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  1. [Differences in clinical characteristics and outcomes of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in Jewish and Bedouin patients].

    Rabaev, Elena; Sagy, Iftach; Zaid, Eed Abu; Nevzorov, Roman; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Zeller, Lior; Barski, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare clinical characteristics and outcomes of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in the Jewish and Bedouin populations. A retrospective analysis was conducted of hospital admissions for diabetic ketoacidosis in adult patients between 2003 and 2010. The clinical and biochemical characteristics and outcomes of diabetic ketoacidosis patients of Jewish origin were compared with those of Bedouin origin. The primary outcome was in-hospital all-cause mortality. The study cohort included 220 consecutive patients for whom the admission diagnosis was diabetic ketoacidosis. The cohort was categorized according to Jewish and Bedouin origin as follows: 177 (80.5%) Jewish and 43 (19.5%) Bedouin patients. The Jewish patients were significantly older than the Bedouin patients (45.8 +/- 18.9 vs. 32.9 +/- 15.3, p ventilation and bed-ridden state were independent predictors of 30-day mortality in both ethnic groups.

  2. Single Centre Experience – Clinical Presentation and Frequency of Paediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) At Diagnosis over a 5-Year Period

    McKenna, A

    2018-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) symptoms are subtle and easily overlooked. Delayed diagnosis can result in Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a life threatening complication with lasting consequences. We sought to define the presenting features of T1D and DKA frequency, in children <15 years diagnosed in a single national tertiary centre, and identify predictive factors for DKA. A review of T1D incident cases was undertaken from 2008-2012 using the National Diabetes Register (ICDNR) and clinical case notes. Data were compared with a 1997\\/8 national study. We found DKA at presentation in 28.7 % of children and 15.5% had moderate\\/severe DKA. Commonest symptoms were polydipsia, polyuria, weight loss, and lethargy. Median symptom duration was 17 days. Clinical presentation was similar and frequency of DKA at T1D diagnosis remains high. The proportion with moderate\\/severe DKA is lower than the 25% previously reported (p=0.038). National monitoring and targeted action to reduce DKA at diagnosis is required.

  3. Positive predictive value of automated database records for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA in children and youth exposed to antipsychotic drugs or control medications: a tennessee medicaid study

    Bobo William V

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA is a potentially life-threatening complication of treatment with some atypical antipsychotic drugs in children and youth. Because drug-associated DKA is rare, large automated health outcomes databases may be a valuable data source for conducting pharmacoepidemiologic studies of DKA associated with exposure to individual antipsychotic drugs. However, no validated computer case definition of DKA exists. We sought to assess the positive predictive value (PPV of a computer case definition to detect incident cases of DKA, using automated records of Tennessee Medicaid as the data source and medical record confirmation as a "gold standard." Methods The computer case definition of DKA was developed from a retrospective cohort study of antipsychotic-related type 2 diabetes mellitus (1996-2007 in Tennessee Medicaid enrollees, aged 6-24 years. Thirty potential cases with any DKA diagnosis (ICD-9 250.1, ICD-10 E1x.1 were identified from inpatient encounter claims. Medical records were reviewed to determine if they met the clinical definition of DKA. Results Of 30 potential cases, 27 (90% were successfully abstracted and adjudicated. Of these, 24 cases were confirmed by medical record review (PPV 88.9%, 95% CI 71.9 to 96.1%. Three non-confirmed cases presented acutely with severe hyperglycemia, but had no evidence of acidosis. Conclusions Diabetic ketoacidosis in children and youth can be identified in a computerized Medicaid database using our case definition, which could be useful for automated database studies in which drug-associated DKA is the outcome of interest.

  4. Diabetic ketoacidosis

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000320.htm Diabetic ketoacidosis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening problem that ...

  5. Incidence and prevalence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) among adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D): a systematic literature review.

    Fazeli Farsani, Soulmaz; Brodovicz, Kimberly; Soleymanlou, Nima; Marquard, Jan; Wissinger, Erika; Maiese, Brett A

    2017-08-01

    To summarise incidence and prevalence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) for the overall patient population and different subgroups (age, sex, geographical region, ethnicity and type of insulin administration). Systematic literature review (SLR). Medline (via PubMed) and Embase (1 January 2000 to 23 June 2016). Peer-reviewed observational studies with reported data on the incidence or prevalence of DKA in T1D adults were included. A single reviewer completed the study screening and selection process and a second reviewer performed an additional screening of approximately 20% of the publications; two reviewers independently conducted the quality assessment; the results were narratively synthesised. Out of 1082 articles, 19 met the inclusion and exclusion criteria, with two additional studies identified that did not specify the patient age range and are therefore not included in the SLR. Overall, eight studies reported incidence with a range of 0-56 per 1000 person-years (PYs), with one outlying study reporting an incidence of 263 per 1000 PYs. Eleven studies reported prevalence with a range of 0-128 per 1000 people. Prevalence of DKA decreased with increasing age. Subgroup analyses were performed using data from no more than two studies per subgroup. There was a higher prevalence of DKA reported in women, non-whites and patients treated with insulin injections compared with men, whites and patients using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pumps, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first SLR on the epidemiology of DKA in T1D adults. Despite an increasing prevalence of T1D in recent years, DKA in adults has been poorly characterised. In an era when the benefit-risk profiles of new antidiabetic therapies are being evaluated, including the potential risk of DKA, there is a clear need to better elucidate the expected rate of DKA among T1D adults. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text

  6. Thyroid storm associated with Graves' disease covered by diabetic ketoacidosis: A case report.

    Osada, Erika; Hiroi, Naoki; Sue, Mariko; Masai, Natsumi; Iga, Ryo; Shigemitsu, Rika; Oka, Reiko; Miyagi, Masahiko; Iso, Kaoru; Kuboki, Koji; Yoshino, Gen

    2011-04-14

    Thyroid storm is a condition in which multiple organ dysfunction results from failure of the compensatory mechanisms of the body owing to excessive thyroid hormone activity induced by some factors in patients with thyrotoxicosis. While diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an important trigger for thyroid storm, simultaneous development of DKA and thyroid storm is rare. A 59-year-old woman with no history of either diabetes mellitus or thyroid disease presented to our hospital because of developing nausea, vomiting and diarrhea for 2 days. Physical examination showed mild disturbance of consciousness, fever, and tachycardia. There were no other signs of thyrotoxicosis. Laboratory studies revealed elevation of random blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin, strongly positive of urine acetone, and metabolic acidosis. Since DKA was diagnosed, we initiated the patient on treatment with administration of insulin and adequate fluid replacement. Although the hyperglycemia and acidosis were immediately relieved, the disturbance of consciousness and tachycardia remained persistent. Levels of FT3 and FT4 were extremely high and TSH was below the detectable limit. TRAb was positive. The thyroid storm score of Burch & Wartofsky was 75/140, and the thyroid storm diagnostic criteria of the Japan Thyroid Association were satisfied. Oral administration of thiamazole, potassium iodide and propranolol resulted in immediate relief of the tachycardia. We encountered a case of thyroid storm associated with Graves' disease covered by DKA. Thyroid storm and DKA are both potentially fatal, and the prognosis varies depending on whether or not these conditions are detected and treated sufficiently early. The thyroid storm diagnostic criteria prepared in 2008 by the Japan Thyroid Association are very simple as compared to the Burch & Wartofsky scoring system for thyroid storm. The Japanese criteria may be useful in the diagnosis of this condition since they enable clinicians to identify a broad

  7. Recurrent diabetic ketoacidosis

    Skinner, T. Chas

    2002-01-01

    Longitudinal studies indicate that 20% of paediatric patients account for 80% of all admissions for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). The frequency of DKA peaks during adolescence and, although individuals generally go into remission, they may continue to have bouts of recurrent DKA in adulthood. The ...

  8. Severe diabetic ketoacidosis and acute pericarditis precipitated by concomitant Graves′ thyrotoxicosis in type 1 diabetic patient

    Muneera A Alshareef

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 20-year-old male known case of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM presented to emergency department with vomiting and abdominal pain, and was diagnosed to have diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA. There was no obvious precipitating cause for DKA. Patient was started on DKA protocol and initially responded well to treatment. Later on, patient developed severe metabolic acidosis and chest pain. The cardiac evaluation established the diagnosis of acute pericarditis and ruled out acute coronary syndrome. The cause for his stormy coarse of DKA, and persistent tachycardia were further evaluated, and he was diagnosed to have concomitant thyrotoxicosis (graves′ disease complicating the DKA. He was successfully treated with aggressive management of DKA and started on thyrotoxicosis treatment. Autoimmune diseases are known to manifest in cluster but concomitant thyrotoxicosis precipitating DKA and causing acute pericarditis is rare. Prompt recognition of thyrotoxicosis in patients with persistent tachycardia, and treatment of thyrotoxicosis will improve outcome in DKA patients.

  9. Thyroid storm associated with Graves' disease covered by diabetic ketoacidosis: A case report

    Osada Erika

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thyroid storm is a condition in which multiple organ dysfunction results from failure of the compensatory mechanisms of the body owing to excessive thyroid hormone activity induced by some factors in patients with thyrotoxicosis. While diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA is an important trigger for thyroid storm, simultaneous development of DKA and thyroid storm is rare. Case presentation A 59-year-old woman with no history of either diabetes mellitus or thyroid disease presented to our hospital because of developing nausea, vomiting and diarrhea for 2 days. Physical examination showed mild disturbance of consciousness, fever, and tachycardia. There were no other signs of thyrotoxicosis. Laboratory studies revealed elevation of random blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin, strongly positive of urine acetone, and metabolic acidosis. Since DKA was diagnosed, we initiated the patient on treatment with administration of insulin and adequate fluid replacement. Although the hyperglycemia and acidosis were immediately relieved, the disturbance of consciousness and tachycardia remained persistent. Levels of FT3 and FT4 were extremely high and TSH was below the detectable limit. TRAb was positive. The thyroid storm score of Burch & Wartofsky was 75/140, and the thyroid storm diagnostic criteria of the Japan Thyroid Association were satisfied. Oral administration of thiamazole, potassium iodide and propranolol resulted in immediate relief of the tachycardia. Discussion We encountered a case of thyroid storm associated with Graves' disease covered by DKA. Thyroid storm and DKA are both potentially fatal, and the prognosis varies depending on whether or not these conditions are detected and treated sufficiently early. The thyroid storm diagnostic criteria prepared in 2008 by the Japan Thyroid Association are very simple as compared to the Burch & Wartofsky scoring system for thyroid storm. The Japanese criteria may be useful in the diagnosis

  10. Thyroid Storm Precipitated by Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Influenza A: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Ikeoka, Toshiyuki; Otsuka, Hiroaki; Fujita, Naruhiro; Masuda, Yukiko; Maeda, Shigeto; Horie, Ichiro; Ando, Takao; Abiru, Norio; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    A 46-year-old woman with a history of Graves' disease presented with the chief complaints of appetite loss, weight loss, fatigue, nausea, and sweating. She was diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), thyroid storm, and influenza A. She was treated with an intravenous insulin drip, intravenous fluid therapy, intravenous hydrocortisone, oral potassium iodine, and oral methimazole. As methimazole-induced neutropenia was suspected, the patient underwent thyroidectomy. It is important to maintain awareness that thyroid storm and DKA can coexist. Furthermore, even patients who have relatively preserved insulin secretion can develop DKA if thyroid storm and infection develop simultaneously.

  11. Profiles of Diabetic Ketoacidosis in Multiethnic Diabetic Population ...

    Purpose: To outline first-time patient profiles of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in the absence of reported incidence and mortality rates of DKA in Malaysian diabetic population. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was designed and all medical records of patients with a discharge note of DKA were reviewed.

  12. Diagnostic and therapeutic approach of diabetic ketoacidosis in children and adolescents in the emergency department = Enfoque diagnóstico y terapéutico de la cetoacidosis diabética en niños y adolescentes en el servicio de urgencias

    Ana María Jiménez Fadul

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA is the most frequent complication in children with type 1 diabetes. DKA is due to a partial or complete insulin deficit, associated with an increase of counterregulatory hormones, which leads to the biochemical alterations that define the disease: hyperglycemia, metabolic acidosis and ketonemia. Most DKA related deaths are caused by complications associated with the initial treatment. To prevent complications, an adequate assessment in the emergency service is essential; gradual reposition of fluids, dextrose supplementation during hydration, and insulin therapy are necessary. This paper is a critical review of the physiopathology, clinical manifestations, treatment and main complications of DKA.

  13. Diabetic ketoacidosis: clinical characteristics, precipitating factors and outcomes of care.

    Barski, Leonid; Nevzorov, Roman; Rabaev, Elena; Jotkowitz, Alan; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Zektser, Miri; Zeller, Lior; Shleyfer, Elena; Almog, Yaniv

    2012-05-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a common and serious complication of diabetes mellitus (DM). To evaluate the clinical characteristics, hospital management and outcomes of patients with DKA. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients hospitalized with DKA during the period 1 January 2003 to 1 January 2010. Three groups were compared: patients with mild DKA, with moderate DKA, and with severe DKA. The primary outcome was in-hospital all-cause mortality. The secondary outcomes were 30 days all-cause mortality, length of hospital stay, and complication rate. The study population comprised 220 patients with DKA. In the mild (78 patients) and moderate (116 patients) groups there was a higher proportion of patients with type 1 DM (75.6%, 79.3%) compared with 57.7% in the severe group (26 patients, P = 0.08). HbA1c levels prior to admission were high in all three groups, without significant difference (10.9 +/- 2.2, 10.7 +/- 1.9, and 10.6 +/- 2.4 respectively, P = 0.9). In all groups the most frequent precipitating factors were related to insulin therapy and infections. The patients with severe DKA had more electrolyte abnormalities (hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, hypophosphatemia) compared with the mild and moderate forms of the disease. While 72.7% of the entire cohort was hospitalized in the general medical ward, 80.8% of those with severe DKA were admitted to the intensive care unit. The in-hospital mortality rate for the entire cohort was 4.1%, comparable with previous data from experienced centers. Advanced age, mechanical ventilation and bedridden state were independent predictors associated with 30 day mortality: hazard ratio (HR) 1.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.11; HR 6.8, 95% CI 2.03-23.1; and HR 3.8, 95% CI 1.13-12.7, respectively. Patients with DKA in our study were generally poorly controlled prior to their admission, as reflected by high HbA1c levels. Type 2 DM is frequently associated with DKA including the severe form of the disease. The

  14. Factors Associated with Newly Diagnosed Children with Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Raheleh Mirsadraee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetes mellitus type 1 is one of the most prevalent endocrine diseases in pediatrics. Diabetic ketoacidosis is considered as one of the most threatening clinical pictures of DM1, especially if occurred as the first presentation of DM1 in children. Objectives The current study aimed to identify factors which may play a role in DKA onset in children. Methods This case-control study included all patients under 18 years old who referred to department of pediatrics endocrinology at Mashhad University Hospital (Imam Reza from January 2013 to December 2015 as newly diagnosed patients with DM1. Patients who fulfilled DKA criteria at diagnosis were considered as DKA group and those who referred with other presentations were considered as control group (non-DKA group. Data were analyzed by SPSS software ver. 16. Results During the study period, 97 (39.2% male newly diagnosed patients were included as DKA group. Accordingly 97 gender- and age-matched patients were added as non-DKA group. The most prevalent symptoms in both groups were polyuria (91.88% and polydipsia (88.66%. Fever and cold symptoms were significantly higher in the DKA group (P < 0.001 and P =0.005, respectively. Hemoglobin A1c level was significantly higher in the DKA group (P = 0.001, while body mass index was significantly lower in the DKA group (P = 0.045. Fever and father’s education level were the most important risk and protective factors in the DKA onset in newly diagnosed patients with DM1 (adjusted OR = 10.1, 95% CI = 2.9-35.3; P < 0.001 and adjusted OR = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.3 - 0.9 and P = 0.019, respectively. Conclusions In conclusion, a recent febrile illness was found as the strongest risk factor and father’s education level as the main protective factor in the DKA to diagnose children with DM1. The study findings suggested that DKA is a severe form of DM1 instead of a neglected or misdiagnosed disease.

  15. Management of diabetic ketoacidosis | Jivan | Journal of ...

    Although the mortality of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) has decreased substantially in the developed world, high mortality rates still prevail in South Africa, thus making this an important condition to recognise early and manage well. This review discusses the treatment of DKA, with emphasis on the controversial aspect of ...

  16. Euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy

    Tarif, N.; Al-Badr, W.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) can be a catastrophic event during pregnancy, complicating almost nine percent of diabetics in pregnancy. It includes both maternal and fetal mortality. Ketosis has been implicated in fetal distress and causes adverse neurological outcome. DKA with relatively low blood sugar levels is called euglycemic DKA, which is a rare entity and reported usually in type I diabetic patients. A 37-years-old Saudi female patient known to have type II diabetes developed euglycemic [blood glucose level 4.3 mmol/L (78 mg/dl) DKA while in her fifth pregnancy. She responded to intravenous dextrose and insulin with gradual improvement. Euglycemic DKA should be considered in type II diabetics during pregnancy and treated promptly. (author)

  17. An identification of the risk factors implicated in diabetic ketoacidosis ...

    reviewed (60 type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients and 17 type 2 DM patients). Results. More juveniles ... insulin deficiency aggravated by ensu- ... for a worldwide review of all aspects of. DKA in ..... children with diabetic ketoacidosis. New.

  18. Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome Complicated by Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Graves' Disease in Slowly Progressive Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (SPIDDM): A Case Report and a Review of the Literature.

    Hirai, Hiroyuki; Fukushima, Naotaro; Hasegawa, Koji; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Osamu; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman with a history of diabetes was admitted for nausea and vomiting with body weight loss. A blood examination revealed high plasma glucose and thyroid hormone levels and metabolic acidosis. She was therefore diagnosed with both diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperthyroidism. Nausea and vomiting continued intermittently despite the administration of saline and insulin. The patient was further diagnosed with superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) after abdominal computed tomography revealed that a horizontal portion of the duodenum was sandwiched between the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery. Clinicians should be vigilant for SMAS in patients with both DKA and hyperthyroidism who present body weight loss.

  19. Closing anion gap without insulin in euglycaemic diabetic ketoacidosis

    Resham Raj Poudel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Euglycaemic diabetic ketoacidosis (euDKA occurs in patients with poor carbohydrate intake who continue to take insulin. For these patients are not truly in the insulin-deficient state, intravenous fluid resuscitation alone can correct the ketoacidosis without any risk of hypoglycaemia. Diagnosis of euDKA can be missed in inexperienced settings; therefore, calculating anion gap and measuring ketone levels should be practiced in every sick diabetic patient regardless of glucose levels.

  20. Profiles of Diabetic Ketoacidosis in Multiethnic Diabetic Population ...

    Purpose: To outline first-time patient profiles of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in the absence of reported incidence and ... Type 2 diabetes mellitus (51.1 %) patients were prone to develop DKA. .... with a prevalence rate of 11.6 % for DM [10].

  1. Plasma Exchange for the Treatment of Transient Extreme Hypertriglyceridemia Associated with Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Acute Pancreatitis

    Davide Donelli

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA can quite frequently present in association with acute pancreatitis (AP caused by transient severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG. Here we report the case of a patient presenting with DKA, severe HTG and AP who received urgent plasma exchange for HTG control, and who reached adequate serum triglyceride levels only after appropriate DKA management. The treatment of patients presenting with DKA and coexistent AP associated with severe HTG should focus first on appropriate DKA management. Plasma exchange as a treatment for severe HTG in patients with DKA and AP should be evaluated carefully.

  2. Distinct clinical characteristics and therapeutic modalities for diabetic ketoacidosis in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Kamata, Yuji; Takano, Koji; Kishihara, Eriko; Watanabe, Michiko; Ichikawa, Raishi; Shichiri, Masayoshi

    2017-02-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes often develop diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Reportedly, DKA in type 2 diabetes has higher mortality despite its limited occurrence. The exact clinical characteristics and therapeutic modalities yielding successful outcomes in DKA type 2 diabetes remain unknown. This retrospective study compared the clinical features and detailed treatment of consecutive type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients hospitalized with DKA between January 2001 and December 2014. We report on 127 patients with type 1 and 74 patients with type 2 diabetes whose DKA was successfully treated. The most frequent precipitating cause for DKA was infectious disease for patients with type 1 diabetes and consumption of sugar-containing beverages for those with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes patients showed higher mean plasma glucose levels than those with type 1 diabetes (48.4±21.6, vs. 37.1±16.4mmol/l, P1) and higher serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and hemoglobin levels, which normalized after DKA resolution. Compared with type 1 diabetes patients, those with type 2 diabetes required distinctly higher daily total insulin dosage (35.9±37.0U, vs. 20.2±23.3U, P1), larger replacement fluid volumes (4.17±2.69L, vs. 2.29±1.57L, P1) and greater potassium supplementation (23.9±36.5mEq, vs. 11.2±17.9mEq, P1) to resolve DKA and reduce plasma glucose level to ≤16.7mmol/l. DKA patients with type 2 diabetes required management with a modified treatment protocol to resolve their profound hyperglycemia and dehydration compared with those with type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Anesthetic Management of A Parturient With Diabetic Keto-Acidosis

    Rupasinghe M N; Hemmad A R

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in pregnancy is a life threatening medical emergency. It can compromise both the fetus and the mother profoundly. The incidence of DKA during pregnancy ranges between 2 to 3%, and carries a 10–20% risk of fetal death.1 DKA is characterized by a biochemical triad of ketonemia, hyperglycemia and acidemia. We present a case of a parturient with mismanaged DKA that was brought to the operating room for a STAT cesarean section (C/S) due to fetal distress and discuss the...

  4. 15-year incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis at onset of type 1 diabetes in children from a regional setting (Auckland, New Zealand).

    Jefferies, Craig; Cutfield, Samuel W; Derraik, José G B; Bhagvandas, Jignal; Albert, Benjamin B; Hofman, Paul L; Gunn, Alistair J; Cutfield, Wayne S

    2015-05-19

    We assessed the incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children aged Auckland Region (New Zealand) in 1999-2013, in a retrospective review of a complete regional cohort. DKA and its severity were classified according to ISPAD 2014 guidelines. Of 730 children presenting with new-onset T1DM over the 15-year time period, 195 cases had DKA of any severity (27%). There was no change in the incidence of DKA or the proportion of children with severe DKA at presentation. The incidence of DKA among children aged Auckland Region over time. Thus, it is important to explore ways to reduce DKA risk.

  5. 15-year incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis at onset of type 1 diabetes in children from a regional setting (Auckland, New Zealand)

    Jefferies, Craig; Cutfield, Samuel W.; Derraik, José G. B.; Bhagvandas, Jignal; Albert, Benjamin B.; Hofman, Paul L.; Gunn, Alistair J.; Cutfield, Wayne S.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children aged Auckland Region (New Zealand) in 1999–2013, in a retrospective review of a complete regional cohort. DKA and its severity were classified according to ISPAD 2014 guidelines. Of 730 children presenting with new-onset T1DM over the 15-year time period, 195 cases had DKA of any severity (27%). There was no change in the incidence of DKA or the proportion of children with severe DKA at presentation. The incidence of DKA among children aged Auckland Region over time. Thus, it is important to explore ways to reduce DKA risk. PMID:25989414

  6. Diabetic Ketoacidosis-Associated Stroke in Children and Youth

    Jennifer Ruth Foster

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA is a state of severe insulin deficiency, either absolute or relative, resulting in hyperglycemia and ketonemia. Although possibly underappreciated, up to 10% of cases of intracerebral complications associated with an episode of DKA, and/or its treatment, in children and youth are due to hemorrhage or ischemic brain infarction. Systemic inflammation is present in DKA, with resultant vascular endothelial perturbation that may result in coagulopathy and increased hemorrhagic risk. Thrombotic risk during DKA is elevated by abnormalities in coagulation factors, platelet activation, blood volume and flow, and vascular reactivity. DKA-associated cerebral edema may also predispose to ischemic injury and hemorrhage, though cases of stroke without concomitant cerebral edema have been identified. We review the current literature regarding the pathogenesis of stroke during an episode of DKA in children and youth.

  7. Incidence of diabetic ketosis and ketoacidosis in Caucasian adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a population-based study

    Ivan Kruljac

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims: We aimed to analyze incidence and characteristics of patients with diabetic ketosis (DK and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA in Caucasian adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Methods: Studied population included 261,749 adults. DK criteria included plasma glucose >13.9 mmol/L and ketonuria >2, while in DKA bicarbonate <18 mEq/L or pH<7.30 was also required. Hyperglycemic crises without these criteria were defined as non-ketotic hyperglycemia (NKH. Results: During a 5-year period, we observed 630 episodes of DK and 215 episodes of DKA. Only 8.6% of DK episodes and 34.4% of DKA were attributed to type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. Patients with T1DM were younger, leaner, majority had newly diagnosed disease, and hyperglycemia was the main cause of admission. Standardized incidence ratio for DK was 48.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 44.5-52.1 and 17.0 (95% CI 14.9-19.4 for DKA. Incidence for both DK and DKA was increasing with age. In patients younger than 50, the incidence of DK and DKA was similar. However, dramatic rise in the incidence of DK was observed in both sexes after the age of 50. When compared with patients with NKH, the patients with DK had higher serum pH and bicarbonates. Patients with T2DM had a risk of 0.8% for developing DKA and 2.9% for DK over 5-year period. Conclusions: Our study showed that DK and DKA are not uncommon in Caucasian adults and the majority of episodes were contributed to T2DM. Incidence of DK is far more higher than the incidence of DKA in patients older than 50, who predominantly have T2DM. Moreover, patients with DK have higher serum pH and bicarbonates, both of which imply that DK and DKA are distinct clinical entities in patients with T2DM. Further studies are needed to assess the impact of these clinical entities.

  8. Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Pattern of Precipitating Causes

    Ashraf Uddin Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA is one of the most common acute complications of diabetes mellitus (DM. DKA is a recognised presenting feature of type 1 DM, but it commonly complicates previously diagnosed diabetic patients of all types, specially if they get infection or discontinue treatment. Objective: To describe the precipitating causes of DKA. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was done from September to November, 2010 in Bangladesh Institute of Research & Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM. Diagnosed DKA cases were evaluated clinically and by laboratory investigations for identification of precipitating causes. Results: Out of 50 patients, 28 were female. Mean age was 38.3 years. Forty patients (80% were known diabetics and 10 (20% were detected diabetic first time during this admission. Severe DKA cases were less common. Infection (20, 40% was the commonest precipitating cause followed by noncompliance (14, 28%. In 7 (14% cases no cause could be identified. Other less common causes included acute myocardial infarction, acute pancreatitis, stroke and surgery. Conclusion: Infection and noncompliance were the major precipitants of DKA. So, it is assumed that many DKA cases might be prevented by proper counselling regarding adherence to medication and sick days’ management.

  9. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia in Diabetic Ketoacidosis Accompanied by Acute Pancreatitis: Case Report

    Hahn, Suk Jae; Park, Jung-hyun; Lee, Jong Ho; Lee, Jun Kyu; Kim, Kyoung-Ah

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hypertriglyceridemia (severely elevated to 15,240 mg/dL) complicated by acute pancreatitis, which was treated successfully with insulin therapy and conservative management. A 20-yr-old woman with a history of type 1 diabetes came to the emergency department 7 months after discontinuing insulin therapy. DKA, severe hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis were diagnosed, with DKA suspected of contributing to the development of the other co...

  10. [Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State].

    Schumann, Christina; Faust, Michael

    2018-03-01

     Diabetic ketoacidosis and the hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state are the most serious diabetic emergencies. Before the discovery of insulin in 1921 by Banting and Best the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes was fatal ending in diabetic ketoacidosis equivalent to a torturous death. Today, mortality from diabetic ketoacidosis is low at approximately 2 %. But each death from these two acute metabolic complications of diabetes is potentially avoidable by improved patient and healthcare professional education. Therefore, there is a need to raise awareness of hyperglycemic crisis and its management amongst physicians.  Insulin deficiency or resistence and increased concentrations of counterreulatory hormones (glucagon, catecholamines, cortisol and growth hormone) are responsible for the development of diabetic ketoacidosis and the hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state. Hyperglycemia develops as a result of increased gluconeogenesis and accelerated glyconeogenesis. In DKA, the absolute insulin deficiency additionally leads to increased lipolysis and production of ketone bodies and resulting metabolic acidosis.  Both DKA and HHS require prompt recognition and management. The diagnosis can be suspected by clinical features and confirmed by laboratory findings.  The treatment of DKA and HHS is similar, including correction of fluid and electrolyte abnormalities and the administration of insulin. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Hamman’s syndrome in diabetic ketoacidosis

    Alexandra Rose Pain

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hamman’s syndrome (spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum is a rare complication of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA, with a multifactorial etiology. Awareness of this syndrome is important: it is likely underdiagnosed as the main symptom of shortness of breath is often attributed to Kussmaul’s breathing and the findings on chest radiograph can be subtle and easily missed. It is also important to be aware of and consider Boerhaave’s syndrome as a differential diagnosis, a more serious condition with a 40% mortality rate when diagnosis is delayed. We present a case of pneumomediastinum, pneumopericardium, epidural emphysema and subcutaneous emphysema complicating DKA in an eighteen-year-old patient. We hope that increasing awareness of Hamman’s syndrome, and how to distinguish it from Boerhaave’s syndrome, will lead to better recognition and management of these syndromes in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis.

  12. Severe hypertriglyceridemia in diabetic ketoacidosis accompanied by acute pancreatitis: case report.

    Hahn, Suk Jae; Park, Jung-hyun; Lee, Jong Ho; Lee, Jun Kyu; Kim, Kyoung-Ah

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hypertriglyceridemia (severely elevated to 15,240 mg/dL) complicated by acute pancreatitis, which was treated successfully with insulin therapy and conservative management. A 20-yr-old woman with a history of type 1 diabetes came to the emergency department 7 months after discontinuing insulin therapy. DKA, severe hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis were diagnosed, with DKA suspected of contributing to the development of the other conditions. In Korea, two cases of DKA-induced hypertriglyceridemia and 13 cases of hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis have been previously reported separately.

  13. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis with diabetic ketoacidosis: A rare presentation of type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Prabhat Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA is a frequently encountered complication of diabetes mellitus. DKA is an insulin deficit state and results in moderate to severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG. HTG is the third leading cause of acute pancreatitis (AP and often goes unnoticed. The triad of DKA, HTG, and AP is rarely seen, and literature on the same is sparse. We report a case of AP which was due to DKA-induced secondary HTG in an adult with previously undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. His HbA1c was significantly raised, and C-peptide level was low, confirming chronic hyperglycemia. He was treated successfully with insulin infusion, intravenous crystalloid, and analgesics.

  14. Diabetic ketoacidosis: a challenging diabetes phenotype

    Cliona Small

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe three patients presenting with diabetic ketoacidosis secondary to ketosis prone type 2, rather than type 1 diabetes. All patients were treated according to a standard DKA protocol, but were subsequently able to come off insulin therapy while maintaining good glycaemic control. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes (KPD presenting with DKA has not been described previously in Irish patients. The absence of islet autoimmunity and evidence of endogenous beta cell function after resolution of DKA are well-established markers of KPD, but are not readily available in the acute setting. Although not emphasised in any current guidelines, we have found that a strong family history of type 2 diabetes and the presence of cutaneous markers of insulin resistance are strongly suggestive of KPD. These could be emphasised in future clinical practice guidelines.

  15. Diabetic ketoacidosis in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus – clinical and biochemical differences

    N. Krdžalić

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this retrospective study was to establish differences in clinical picture, biochemical parametres and precipitating factors in patiens with diabetic ketoacidosis in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. A total number of 25 patients was hospitalised in the Intensive Case Unit of the Department for Internal Diseases of the Cantonal Hospital in Zenica in the period of 14 months. Most patients had type 1 diabetes whose ketoacidosis showed symptoms of vomiting, stomachache and it was most often caused by a discontinued application of insulin or an infection. In patients with type 2 diabetes an inadequate regulation of glycemia had been noticed before hospitalisation and diabetic ketoacidosis was manifested by polyuria, polyphagia, polydipsia and weight loss. Precipitating factor in most patients with type 2 diabetes was an infection. In addition, a significant number of patients were newly discovered diabetics whose precipitating factor in most cases could not be found and the symptoms of the disease correspond to insulin dependent patients. The observed biochemical parameters did not show statistically significant differences between the groups of patients suffering from different types of diabetes. This study has shown that diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in type 2 diabetes. DKA can be prevented by education of patients, improvement of health care as well as improved communication between patients and doctors of family medicine.

  16. Frequency of Ketoacidosis in Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetic Children

    Razavi, Zahra

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (TIDM). Many patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes present with DKA. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency and the clinical presentation of diabetic ketoacidosis at the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus in youths in hamadan, Western Province of Iran. Methods The Clinical and laboratory data of a total of 200 patients under 19 years of age with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus between 1995-2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 11. Results 48 (24%)of the children were presented in a state of ketoacidosis. Sever form of DKA (pH≤7.2) was observed in 54.5% of patients. The mean age at diagnosis was 7.3±5.15 years in DKA group and 8.59±3.07 in non-DKA group (p=0.22). 60.4% of patient with DKA were female whereas in the non-DKA group, 53.3% of patients were female, the difference was not significant (p=0.38). The duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 14.84±8.19 days in patients with DKA and 22.39±2.27 in the non-DKA group, (p=0.11). No significant difference was found between the age, sex and duration of the symptoms and occurance of DKA. Polydipsia (85.4) polyuria (83.3%), weakness (68.8%) and abdominal pain (52.1%) were the most frequently notified symptoms among the patients. In two cases, diagnosis of DKA was preceded by as appendicitis and the patient underwent appendectomy. Conclusion Frequency of DKA at onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus was significant in the studied region. However, it was lower than other regions in Asia. Polydipsia, polyuria, fatigue and abdominal pain were the most common symptoms on presentation. PMID:22125712

  17. Frequency of Ketoacidosis in Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetic Children

    Zahra Razavi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTObjectives: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (TIDM. Many patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes present with DKA. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency and the clinical presentation of diabetic ketoacidosis at the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus in youths in hamadan, Western Province of Iran.Methods: The Clinical and laboratory data of a total of 200 patients under 19 years of age with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus between 1995-2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 11.Results: 48 (24%of the children were presented in a state of ketoacidosis. Sever form of DKA (pH≤7.2 was observed in 54.5% of patients. The mean age at diagnosis was 7.3±5.15 years in DKA group and 8.59±3.07 in non-DKA group (p=0.22. 60.4% of patient with DKA were female whereas in the non-DKA group, 53.3% of patients were female, the difference was not significant (p=0.38. The duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 14.84±8.19 days in patients with DKA and 22.39±2.27 in the non-DKA group, (p=0.11. No significant difference was found between the age, sex and duration of the symptoms and occurance of DKA. Polydipsia (85.4 polyuria (83.3%, weakness (68.8% and abdominal pain (52.1% were the most frequently notified symptoms among the patients. In two cases, diagnosis of DKA was preceded by as appendicitis and the patient underwent appendectomy.Conclusion: Frequency of DKA at onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus was significant in the studied region. However, it was lower than other regions in Asia. Polydipsia, polyuria, fatigue and abdominal pain were the most common symptoms on presentation.

  18. Clinical and Diagnostic Aspects of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Z.P. Nizhynska-Аstapenko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Leading criteria for laboratory diagnosis and determination of diabetic ketoacidosis severity are considered to be the levels of glucose, blood pH and blood bicarbonate. Technological capabilities of a family doctor are very limited. Therefore, knowledge of detailed clinical symptoms will help the physician to establish correctly a provisional diagnosis and refer a patient to a specialized institution. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence and special features of certain clinical symptoms and basic laboratory parameters in order to establish the severity level of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA and to reveal certain correlation between clinical symptoms and laboratory changes in the blood in patients with DKA. Materials and methods. The study involved 123 patients with acute critical decompensated diabetes aged from 9 to 65 years old. We studied the clinical symptoms, measured biochemical changes in blood, blood gas and acid-base state. Results. There was not determined the correlation between severity of diabetic ketoacidosis and clinical parameters and acid-base balance in patients. There were determined the peculiarities electrolyte changes and the emergence gas metabolic changes on the cell level under ketosis, which further deepened with the development of ketoacidosis. The results of the study indicate the need for a comparison of clinical symptoms and laboratory parameters of pathogenic treatment, taking into account the cumulative data. These recommendations in the protocols are often attached to a single laboratory value and can not always fully comply with the severity of the condition. Conclusions. Blood gas is the most sensitive criterion of metabolic changes in case of diabetic ketoacidosis. The level of blood potassium can be used as an indicator of DKA severity. The level of blood potassium at admission to hospital does not really reflect its deficiency in the tissues.

  19. Disturbance of inorganic phosphate metabolism in diabetes mellitus: clinical manifestations of phosphorus-depletion syndrome during recovery from diabetic ketoacidosis

    Lervang H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Jørn Ditzel, Hans-Henrik LervangDepartment of Endocrinology, and Center for Prevention of Struma and Metabolic Diseases, Aalborg University Hospital, Aarhus University, DenmarkAbstract: The acute effects of intracellular phosphate depletion and hypophosphatemia on organs and tissues in and during recovery from diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA have been reviewed. When insufficient phosphate and/or oxygen are available for high energy phosphate synthesis, cell homeostasis cannot be maintained and cell integrity may be impaired. The clinical consequences are recognized as occasional cause of morbidity and mortality. Although phosphate repletion has not been routinely recommended in the treatment of DKA, physicians should be aware of these clinical conditions and phosphate repletion in such situations should be considered.Keywords: high energy phosphates, hypoxia, fructose 1,6-diphosphate

  20. Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    ... ketones build up in the blood and eventually "spill over" into the urine. Diabetic ketoacidosis is usually ... your heart, muscles and nerves. Swelling in the brain (cerebral edema). Adjusting your blood sugar level too ...

  1. Hypertension despite dehydration during severe pediatric diabetic ketoacidosis.

    Deeter, Kristina H; Roberts, Joan S; Bradford, Heidi; Richards, Todd; Shaw, Dennis; Marro, Kenneth; Chiu, Harvey; Pihoker, Catherine; Lynn, Anne; Vavilala, Monica S

    2011-06-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) may result in both dehydration and cerebral edema but these processes may have opposing effects on blood pressure. We examined the relationship between dehydration and blood pressure in pediatric DKA. A retrospective review was performed at Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, WA. Participants were hospitalized children less than 18 yr. Intervention(s) or main exposure was to patients with DKA (venous pH 300 mg/dL, HCO(3) Dehydration was calculated as percent body weight lost at admission compared to discharge. Hypertension (systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) percentile > 95%) was defined based on National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI, 2004) nomograms and hypotension was defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) dehydration. Despite dehydration, most children admitted with severe DKA had hypertension. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS IN CHILDREN- CLINICAL PROFILE AND OUTCOME

    Bindu Krishnan Padma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially life-threatening condition, which accounts for the majority of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Early diagnosis and prompt management substantially reduces the mortality. The aim of the study is to assess the clinical characteristics and early outcome in children with diabetic ketoacidosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a descriptive study done in a tertiary care hospital. Fifty two episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis in children of age ≤12 years admitted during the period 2011 to 2016 were included in the study. Clinical details, investigations and complications were recorded in a pro forma and data was analysed using statistical tests. RESULTS Fifty two episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis were included in the study. Thirty three (63.5% children presented with DKA at first diagnosis of diabetes, whereas 19 (36.5% were DKA among children with established diabetes. Mean age at presentation was 9.048 ± 3.24. Female-to-male ratio was (1.36:1. The mean duration of onset of symptom before hospitalisation was 10.10 ± 9.52. Most commonly observed presenting symptoms were polyuria (63.46%, polydipsia (65.38%, tiredness (61.54%, vomiting (36.54% and pain abdomen (32.69%. Mild DKA occurred frequently than moderate and severe forms. Among these children, 40.4% had infection as the predisposing factor. Demographic variables like age, gender, socioeconomic status, family history of diabetes did not have any significant association with the severity of DKA. The clinical parameters like tachypnoea, Kussmaul breathing, shock, altered sensorium at presentation and dehydration had significant association with the severity of DKA. Similarly, hypoglycaemia, hypokalaemia, hyponatraemia, acute kidney injury and cerebral oedema had significant association with the severity of DKA. All the patients recovered with therapy. No mortality was reported. CONCLUSION Diabetic

  3. SGLT2 Inhibitor-associated Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Clinical Review and Recommendations for Prevention and Diagnosis.

    Goldenberg, Ronald M; Berard, Lori D; Cheng, Alice Y Y; Gilbert, Jeremy D; Verma, Subodh; Woo, Vincent C; Yale, Jean-François

    2016-12-01

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are the newest class of antihyperglycemic agents available on the market. Regulator warnings and concerns regarding the risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), however, have dampened enthusiasm for the class despite the combined glycemic, blood pressure, and occasional weight benefits of SGLT2 inhibitors. With the goal of improving patient safety, a cross-Canada expert panel and writing group were convened to review the evidence to-date on reported SGLT2 inhibitor-related DKA incidents and to offer recommendations for preventing and recognizing patients with SGLT2 inhibitor-associated DKA. Reports covering DKA events in subjects taking SGLT2 inhibitors that were published in PubMed, presented at professional conferences, or in the public domain from January 2013 to mid-August 2016 were reviewed by the group independently and collectively. Practical recommendations for diagnosis and prevention were established by the panel. DKA is rarely associated with SGLT2 inhibitor therapy. Patients with SGLT2 inhibitor-associated DKA may be euglycemic (plasma glucose level SGLT2 inhibitor-associated DKA may be prevented by withholding SGLT2 inhibitors when precipitants develop, avoiding insulin omission or inappropriate insulin dose reduction, and by following sick day protocols as recommended. Preventive strategies should help avoid SGLT2 inhibitor-associated DKA. All SGLT2 inhibitor-treated patients presenting with signs or symptoms of DKA should be suspected to have DKA and be investigated for DKA, especially euglycemic patients. If DKA is diagnosed, SGLT2 inhibitor treatment should be stopped, and the DKA should be treated with a traditional treatment protocol. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. DKA with Severe Hypertriglyceridemia and Cerebral Edema in an Adolescent Boy: A Case Study and Review of the Literature

    Tansit Saengkaew

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 13-year-old adolescent boy with type 1 diabetes mellitus (1b presented with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA and cerebral edema. Grossly lipemic serum and lipemia retinals due to extremely high triglyceride (TG level were observed without evidence of xanthoma or xanthelasma. Cerebral edema was treated by appropriate ventilation and mannitol administration. Normal saline was carefully given and regular insulin was titrated according to blood sugar levels. Triglyceride levels were reduced from 9,800 mg/dL to normal range within 9 days after conventional treatment was commenced without antilipid medication. Based on our review of the literature, this is the first reported case of confirmed pediatric DKA with severe hypertriglyceridemia and cerebral edema. In patients with DKA and hypertriglyceridemia, clinicians should be mindful of the possibility of associated acute pancreatitis and cerebral edema.

  5. 23 years of managing diabetic ketoacidosis at Auckland Hospital

    Braatvedt, Geoffrey; Tekiteki, Amelia; Britton, Holly; Wallace, John; Khanolkar, Manish

    2017-02-17

    To examine the length of stay and need for intensive care of people admitted with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) to a single centre between 1988 and 2011. Patients aged ≥15 years admitted for the first time with DKA (plasma glucose ≥ 10mmol/L and a bicarbonate concentration ≤15mmol/L and a pH Auckland City Hospital from 1988-2011 were identified retrospectively. The patients were divided into four cohorts (1988-1996; 1997-2001; 2002-2006; 2007-2011). Over this time period there was no significant change to the insulin infusion protocol. There were 576 admissions with DKA in 388 people over the 23 years. The mean age of the patients and glucose concentration at presentation to hospital fell significantly over time. The admission pH and bicarbonate concentration was higher in more recent cohorts. The length of stay and need for intensive care admission fell significantly over time, but the number of patients subsequently readmitted with DKA remained high. In-hospital mortality remained low. DKA remains an important reason for admission to this hospital, but the severity of DKA at presentation has reduced over time. The need for intensive care admission and length of stay has fallen dramatically.

  6. Diabetic ketoacidosis in adult patients: an audit of factors influencing time to normalisation of metabolic parameters.

    Lee, Melissa H; Calder, Genevieve L; Santamaria, John D; MacIsaac, Richard J

    2018-05-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute life-threatening metabolic complication of diabetes that imposes substantial burden on our healthcare system. There is a paucity of published data in Australia assessing factors influencing time to resolution of DKA and length of stay (LOS). To identify factors that predict a slower time to resolution of DKA in adults with diabetes. Retrospective audit of patients admitted to St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne between 2010 to 2014 coded with a diagnosis of 'Diabetic Ketoacidosis'. The primary outcome was time to resolution of DKA based on normalisation of biochemical markers. Episodes of DKA within the wider Victorian hospital network were also explored. Seventy-one patients met biochemical criteria for DKA; median age 31 years (26-45 years), 59% were male and 23% had newly diagnosed diabetes. Insulin omission was the most common precipitant (42%). Median time to resolution of DKA was 11 h (6.5-16.5 h). Individual factors associated with slower resolution of DKA were lower admission pH (P < 0.001) and higher admission serum potassium level (P = 0.03). Median LOS was 3 days (2-5 days), compared to a Victorian state-wide LOS of 2 days. Higher comorbidity scores were associated with longer LOS (P < 0.001). Lower admission pH levels and higher admission serum potassium levels are independent predictors of slower time to resolution of DKA. This may assist to stratify patients with DKA using markers of severity to determine who may benefit from closer monitoring and to predict LOS. © 2018 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  7. Frequency, clinical characteristics and outcome of diabetic ketoacidosis in children with type-1 diabetes at a tertiary care hospital

    Lone, S.W.; Siddiqui, E.U.; Muhammed, F.; Atta, I.; Ibrahim, M.N.; Raza, J.

    2010-01-01

    To observe the frequency, demographic data and outcome of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children with established type 1 diabetes and newly diagnosed diabetes at a tertiary care hospital. Methods: The case record review was done of children admitted with the diagnosis of DKA at The National Institute of Child Health, Karachi from 1 June, 2008 till 31 May, 2009. All records with the diagnosis of DKA were reviewed and those children with only hyperglycaemia, or who did not fulfill the criteria of DKA were excluded. The demographic data and laboratory investigations which included blood sugar monitoring, arterial blood gases, urine analysis especially for ketones, serum electrolytes, complete blood count and blood culture were reviewed. The previous numbers of admissions in children with established DKA were also noted with reasons. The duration of symptoms and fluids required, time of recovery, complications, and outcome were noted and compared between those with established diabetes and children with newly diagnosed diabetes. Data was entered and analyzed on SPSS version 15. Results: Out of 124 case records, 117 were included which fulfilled the criteria of DKA. A large number, 65 (55.5%) children were in the > 10 years age group with a female predominance. Out of 117 children 50 (42.7%) had established Type 1 diabetes and 67 (57.2 %) children had newly diagnosed diabetes. The commonest presenting complaints in both groups were respiratory distress (87.1%) and vomiting (77.7%). The symptoms of polyuria, polydipsia and nocturia were more among the newly diagnosed children as compared to those with established diabetes with a significant p value <0.001. The comparison of clinical features and laboratory investigations of the two groups showed no difference except that those children with established diabetes improved earlier, required lesser duration of intravenous fluids and their insulin was changed to subcutaneous in less time compared with newly diagnosed

  8. Do obese children with diabetic ketoacidosis have type 1 or type 2 diabetes?

    Low, Joey C; Felner, Eric I; Muir, Andrew B; Brown, Milton; Dorcelet, Margalie; Peng, Limin; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2012-04-01

    Many obese children with unprovoked diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) display clinical features of type 2 diabetes during follow up. We describe the clinical presentation, autoimmune markers and the long-term course of obese and lean children with DKA. We reviewed the medical records on the initial acute hospitalization and outpatient follow-up care of 21 newly diagnosed obese and 20 lean children with unprovoked DKA at Emory University affiliated children's hospitals between 1/2003 and 12/2006. Obese children with DKA were older and predominantly male, had acanthosis nigricans, and had lower prevalence of autoantibodies to islet cells and glutamic acid decarboxylase than lean children. Half of the obese, but none of the lean children with DKA achieve near-normoglycemia remission and discontinued insulin therapy during follow-up. Time to achieve remission was 2.2±2.3 months. There were no differences on clinical presentation between obese children who achieved near-normoglycemia remission versus those who did not. The addition of metformin to insulin therapy shortly after resolution of DKA resulted in lower hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels, higher rates of near-normoglycemia remission, and lower frequency of DKA recurrence. Near-normoglycemia remission, however, was of short duration and the majority of obese patients required reinstitution of insulin treatment within 15 months of follow-up. In contrast to lean children with DKA, many obese children with unprovoked DKA display clinical and immunologic features of type 2 diabetes during follow-up. The addition of metformin to insulin therapy shortly after resolution of DKA improves glycemic control, facilitates achieving near-normoglycemia remission and prevents DKA recurrence in obese children with DKA. Copyright © 2011 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hypothermia and hypokalemia in a patient with diabetic ketoacidosis

    Osamu Saito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 36-year-old man with type-1 diabetes who was hospitalized with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA. On admission, he had hypothermia, hypokalemia and combined metabolic and respiratory alkalosis, in addition to hyperglycemia. Hypothermia, hypokalemia and metabolic alkalosis, with a concurrent respiratory alkalosis, are not commonly seen in DKA. After admission, intravenous infusion of 0.45% saline was administered, which resulted in the development of pure metabolic acidosis. After starting insulin infusion, hypokalemia and hypophosphatemia became evident and finally resulted in massive rhabdomyolysis. Hyperkalemia accompanying oliguric acute kidney injury (AKI warranted initiation of hemodialysis (HD on Day-five. On the 45th hospital day, his urine output started to increase and a total of 22 HD sessions were required. We believe that in this case severe dehydration, hypothermia and hypokalemia might have contributed to the initial symptoms of DKA as well as the prolongation of AKI.

  10. Alpha coma in an adolescent with diabetic ketoacidosis.

    Ostojic, Slavica; Vukovic, Rade; Milenkovic, Tatjana; Mitrovic, Katarina; Djuric, Milena; Nikolic, Ljubica

    2017-01-01

    Ostojic S, Vukovic R, Milenkovic T, Mitrovic K, Djuric M, Nikolic L. Alpha coma in an adolescent with diabetic ketoacidosis. Turk J Pediatr 2017; 59: 318-321. This is the first report of alpha coma (AC) caused by brain edema in a patient with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). A previously healthy 15-year-old girl was admitted to the intensive care unit due to altered state of consciousness during the course of treatment for DKA. Patient was in a coma, intubated and had tachycardia with poor peripheral perfusion. Results of laboratory analyses indicated severe DKA and computed tomography scan indicated diffuse brain edema. The EEG pattern showed uniform alpha activity. Treatment with intravenous fluids, insulin and mannitol was started. Patient`s state of consciousness gradually improved and on the third day she was extubated. On the fifth day, her neurologic status and EEG findings were completely normal with no residual neurological deficits. In conclusion, although AC is associated with a high fatality rate, favorable outcome can be achieved with prompt recognition and treatment of cerebral edema in pediatric patients with DKA.

  11. Root Cause Analysis of Diabetic Ketoacidosis Admissions at a Tertiary Referral Pediatric Emergency Department in North India

    Jayashree, Muralidharan; Sasidharan, Rohit; Singhi, Sunit; Nallasamy, Karthi; Baalaaji, Mullai

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To identify system-based factors contributing to Emergency Department (ED) admissions of children with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and related complications with emphasis on parental and physician awareness and prereferral management. Materials and Methods: A prospective observational root cause analysis study of all consecutive admissions of children with DKA to pediatric ED of a tertiary care referral hospital in northern India over a period of 1 year (July 2010–June 2011). Preh...

  12. The influence of ketoacids on plasma creatinine assays in diabetic ketoacidosis

    Kemperman, F. A.; Weber, J. A.; Gorgels, J.; van Zanten, A. P.; Krediet, R. T.; Arisz, L.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Analysis of the interference of ketoacids on various routine plasma creatinine assays during a clinical episode of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). DESIGN: Observational study. Blood samples were drawn before, during and after standard in-hospital treatment. Plasma creatinine was measured

  13. Review of Evidence for Adult Diabetic Ketoacidosis Management Protocols

    Tara T. T. Tran

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDiabetic ketoacidosis (DKA is an endocrine emergency with associated risk of morbidity and mortality. Despite this, DKA management lacks strong evidence due to the absence of large randomised controlled trials (RCTs.ObjectiveTo review existing studies investigating inpatient DKA management in adults, focusing on intravenous (IV fluids; insulin administration; potassium, bicarbonate, and phosphate replacement; and DKA management protocols and impact of DKA resolution rates on outcomes.MethodsOvid Medline searches were conducted with limits “all adult” and published between “1973 to current” applied. National consensus statements were also reviewed. Eligibility was determined by two reviewers’ assessment of title, abstract, and availability.ResultsA total of 85 eligible articles published between 1973 and 2016 were reviewed. The salient findings were (i Crystalloids are favoured over colloids though evidence is lacking. The preferred crystalloid and hydration rates remain contentious. (ii IV infusion of regular human insulin is preferred over the subcutaneous route or rapid acting insulin analogues. Administering an initial IV insulin bolus before low-dose insulin infusions obviates the need for supplemental insulin. Consensus-statements recommend fixed weight-based over “sliding scale” insulin infusions although evidence is weak. (iii Potassium replacement is imperative although no trials compare replacement rates. (iv Bicarbonate replacement offers no benefit in DKA with pH > 6.9. In severe metabolic acidosis with pH < 6.9, there is lack of both data and consensus regarding bicarbonate administration. (v There is no evidence that phosphate replacement offers outcome benefits. Guidelines consider replacement appropriate in patients with cardiac dysfunction, anaemia, respiratory depression, or phosphate levels <0.32 mmol/L. (vi Upon resolution of DKA, subcutaneous insulin is recommended with IV insulin infusions

  14. Point-of-care test identifies diabetic ketoacidosis at triage.

    Naunheim, Rosanne; Jang, Timothy J; Banet, Gerald; Richmond, Alec; McGill, Janet

    2006-06-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a common, life-threatening complication of diabetes. The diagnosis of DKA relies on signs and symptoms, plus laboratory findings of blood glucose (BG) of > 250 mg/dL, an anion gap (AG) of > or = 15 mmol/L, and carbon dioxide (CO2) of 250 mg/dL underwent testing for beta-OHB with the Precision Xtra meter (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, IL) at triage in a large urban hospital emergency department. The diagnosis of DKA was made by clinicians by using standard clinical criteria without knowledge of the beta-OHB test. A diagnosis of DKA was made in 57 of 160 subjects. The beta-OHB values correlated strongly with AG (r = 0.66, p < 0.001) and with CO2 (r = -0.69, p < 0.001), as well as with glucose (r = 0.31, p < 0.001). Cross-classification of DKA vs. beta-OHB yielded sensitivity of 98% (95% CI = 91% to 100%), specificity of 85% (95% CI = 78% to 91%), with a positive likelihood ratio of 6.7 (95% CI = 4.22 to 10.78), and negative likelihood ratio of 0.021 (95% CI = 0.003 to 0.144) at the manufacturer-suggested beta-OHB level of 1.5. The point-of-care test for beta-OHB was as sensitive as more established indicators of DKA. It is more useful than glucose alone for the diagnosis of DKA and offers immediate diagnosis of patients at triage.

  15. Resolution of ketoacidosis in children with new onset diabetes: Evaluation of various definitions.

    von Oettingen, Julia E; Rhodes, Erinn T; Wolfsdorf, Joseph I

    2018-01-01

    Data are sparse concerning use of serum electrolyte parameters as compared to venous blood gas (VBG) measurements to monitor acid-base status during treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). We explored the utility of various parameters to define DKA resolution by investigating the relationship of venous pH (vpH), anion gap (AG), serum bicarbonate (HCO 3 ), and glucose concentration during management of DKA in children with new onset diabetes mellitus (NODM). We included all patients with NODM presenting with DKA to Boston Children's Hospital from 10/1/07-7/1/13. DKA was defined as serum glucose ≥ 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) and vpHvpH≥7.30 and AG≤18 mmol/L. We used Cox regression to determine time to DKA resolution, and logistic regression to evaluate different serum HCO 3 cut-off values as predictors of DKA resolution. 263 patients (133F, mean age 9.9±4.4 years, 74% White) were included. DKA was mild in 134 (51%), moderate in 75 (28%) and severe in 54 (20%). In mild DKA, AG closed after normalization of vpH; in moderate and severe DKA, AG closed before normalization of vpH. HCO 3 >15mmol/L correlated with vpH≥7.30, and had 76% sensitivity and 85% specificity to predict DKA resolution. Median times to DKA resolution were similar using two different definitions: vpH and AG (8.4h [IQR 6.3-11.9]) vs. HCO 3 >15 mmol/L (7.9 h [IQR 5.0-11.8]), p=.42. During management of pediatric DKA, HCO 3  > 15 mmol/L reliably predicts resolution of DKA. In low-resource settings where VBG is unavailable, electrolyte parameters alone may be used to determine DKA resolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of diabetic ketoacidosis in patients with type-1 and type-2 diabetes mellitus.

    Barski, Leonid; Nevzorov, Roman; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Jotkowitz, Alan; Rabaev, Elena; Zektser, Miri; Zeller, Lior; Shleyfer, Elena; Almog, Yaniv

    2013-04-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurs most often in patients with type 1 diabetes, however patients with type 2 diabetes are also susceptible to DKA under stressful conditions. The aims of our study were to evaluate and compare the clinical and biochemical characteristics and outcomes of type 1 versus type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients with DKA. A retrospective cohort study of adult patients hospitalized with DKA between January 1, 2003, and January 1, 2010. The clinical and biochemical characteristics of DKA patients with type-1 DM were compared with those of patients with type-2 DM. The primary outcome was in-hospital all-cause mortality. The study cohort included 201 consecutive patients for whom the admission diagnosis was DKA: 166 patients (82.6%) with type-1 DM and 35 patients (17.4%) with type-2 DM. The patients with DKA and type-2 DM were significantly older than patients with type-1 DM (64.3 versus 37.3, P ventilation and bed-ridden state were independent predictors of 30-day mortality.

  17. Implementation of a Diabetes Educator Care Model to Reduce Paediatric Admission for Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

    Deeb, Asma; Yousef, Hana; Abdelrahman, Layla; Tomy, Mary; Suliman, Shaker; Attia, Salima; Al Suwaidi, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious complication that can be life-threatening. Management of DKA needs admission in a specialized center and imposes major constraints on hospital resources. Aim. We plan to study the impact of adapting a diabetes-educator care model on reducing the frequency of hospital admission of children and adolescents presenting with DKA. Method. We have proposed a model of care led by diabetes educators for children and adolescents with diabetes. The team consisted of highly trained nurses. The model effectiveness is measured by comparing the rate of hospital admission for DKA over 4-year period to the baseline year prior to implementing the model. Results. There were 158 admissions for DKA over a 5-year period. Number of patients followed up in the outpatient diabetes clinics increased from 37 to 331 patients at the start and the end of the study years. Admission rate showed a downward trend over the five-year period. Percentage of admission for DKA is reduced from 210% to 1.8% (P 0.001). Conclusion. Diabetes educator care model is an effective and a sustainable measure to reduce hospital admission for DKA in children and adolescents.

  18. Treatment Modality-Dependent Risk of Diabetic Ketoacidosis in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    Hoshina, Sari; Andersen, Gregers S; Jørgensen, Marit E

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence rates of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) according to treatment modality in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in Denmark, either multiple daily injections (MDI) or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). MATERIALS AND...... events were lower among CSII users, while the opposite was true for the smaller clinics (P = 0.016). CONCLUSIONS: Delivery of CSII in large diabetes clinics with sufficient support and patient education may ensure that CSII treatment does not lead to an increased risk of DKA....

  19. Diabetic ketoacidosis characteristics and differences in type 1 versus type 2 diabetes patients

    Rashid, M.O.; Sheikh, A.; Salam, A.; Farooq, S.; Kiran, Z.; Islam, N.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is undoubtedly one of the most challenging health problems of the 21st century. It is well known that diabetes once develop can lead to several complications. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is one of the life-threatening complications of diabetes. This study was designed to determine the frequency of DKA in diabetes patients and find out the clinical and biochemical determinants of DKA. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted at Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH) Karachi, Pakistan from January 2010 to February 2016. All known or newly diagnosed diabetic patients of >16 years of age irrespective of gender and type of diabetes were included. Information regarding patient’s demographics, presenting symptoms, precipitating causes of DKA, biochemical profiles and outcome at the time of discharge was collected. Results: Majority (54.7%) had moderate and 12.4% had severe DKA at presentation. Previous history of DKA was found higher in type 1 diabetes patients (T1DM) (14%) as compare to (4%) type 2 diabetes patients (T2DM) (p<0.05). DKA severity was observed more (12%) in newly diagnosed (T1DM) (p<0.05). Comorbidities were found more (81%) in (T2DM) (p<0.05) Mortality was also observed higher in Type 2 diabetes patients (p<0.05). Conclusion: Majority of the diabetics had moderate to severe DKA at presentation. Mortality and morbidity related with DKA was found considerably higher among patients with T2DM while infection, myocardial infarction and stroke found as triggering factors in these patients. (author)

  20. Prenatal Diagnosis of Fetal Encephalomalacia after Maternal Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Rozalyn Love

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction - Encephalomalacia in a developing fetus is a rare and devastating neurological finding on radiologic imaging. Maternal diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA can lead to metabolic and vascular derangements which can cause fetal encephalomalacia. Case - We report the case of a 27-year-old pregnant woman with White's Class C diabetes mellitus who presented in the 25th week of gestation with DKA. Four weeks after her discharge, marked fetal cerebral ventriculomegaly was noted on ultrasound. A subsequent fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated extensive, symmetric cystic encephalomalacia, primarily involving both cerebral hemispheres. The pregnancy was continued with close fetal and maternal surveillance. The patient underwent a repeat cesarean delivery in her 37th week. The infant had a 1 month neonatal intensive care unit stay with care rendered by a multiple disciplinary team of pediatric subspecialists. The postnatal course was complicated by global hypotonia, poor feeding, delayed development and ultimately required anticonvulsants for recurrent seizures. He died at the age of 9 months from aspiration during a seizure. Discussion - Although the maternal mortality from DKA has declined, DKA still confers significant neurological fetal morbidity to its survivors.

  1. Prenatal Diagnosis of Fetal Encephalomalacia after Maternal Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Love, Rozalyn; Lee, Amy; Matiasek, April; Carter, William; Ylagan, Marissa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Encephalomalacia in a developing fetus is a rare and devastating neurological finding on radiologic imaging. Maternal diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) can lead to metabolic and vascular derangements which can cause fetal encephalomalacia. Case We report the case of a 27-year-old pregnant woman with White's Class C diabetes mellitus who presented in the 25th week of gestation with DKA. Four weeks after her discharge, marked fetal cerebral ventriculomegaly was noted on ultrasound. A subsequent fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated extensive, symmetric cystic encephalomalacia, primarily involving both cerebral hemispheres. The pregnancy was continued with close fetal and maternal surveillance. The patient underwent a repeat cesarean delivery in her 37th week. The infant had a 1 month neonatal intensive care unit stay with care rendered by a multiple disciplinary team of pediatric subspecialists. The postnatal course was complicated by global hypotonia, poor feeding, delayed development and ultimately required anticonvulsants for recurrent seizures. He died at the age of 9 months from aspiration during a seizure. Discussion Although the maternal mortality from DKA has declined, DKA still confers significant neurological fetal morbidity to its survivors. PMID:25452892

  2. Prenatal diagnosis of fetal encephalomalacia after maternal diabetic ketoacidosis.

    Love, Rozalyn; Lee, Amy; Matiasek, April; Carter, William; Ylagan, Marissa

    2014-11-01

    Introduction Encephalomalacia in a developing fetus is a rare and devastating neurological finding on radiologic imaging. Maternal diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) can lead to metabolic and vascular derangements which can cause fetal encephalomalacia. Case We report the case of a 27-year-old pregnant woman with White's Class C diabetes mellitus who presented in the 25th week of gestation with DKA. Four weeks after her discharge, marked fetal cerebral ventriculomegaly was noted on ultrasound. A subsequent fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated extensive, symmetric cystic encephalomalacia, primarily involving both cerebral hemispheres. The pregnancy was continued with close fetal and maternal surveillance. The patient underwent a repeat cesarean delivery in her 37th week. The infant had a 1 month neonatal intensive care unit stay with care rendered by a multiple disciplinary team of pediatric subspecialists. The postnatal course was complicated by global hypotonia, poor feeding, delayed development and ultimately required anticonvulsants for recurrent seizures. He died at the age of 9 months from aspiration during a seizure. Discussion Although the maternal mortality from DKA has declined, DKA still confers significant neurological fetal morbidity to its survivors.

  3. Risk factors for cerebral oedema in children and adolescents with diabetic ketoacidosis

    Natasha Y. Yaneva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral oedema (CO is a rare life-threatening complication of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA in children. We analysed the biochemical and therapeutic risk factors for CO in DKA by a retrospective review of 256 children hospitalized for DKA between February 2003 and March 2015. The demographic characteristics, biochemical variables and therapeutic interventions were compared between the patients with and without CO. CO was observed in 22 (8.6% of the 256 subjects included in the study. One of these patients (5% had a fatal outcome and two patients (9% survived with neurological consequences. CO was significantly associated with severe DKA: lower initial venous pH (p < 0.001 and bicarbonate (p < 0.001, higher initial blood glucose (p < 0.01, urea level (p < 0.05 and baseline serum osmolality (р < 0.05. During the treatment of DKA, low serum phosphate level was found to be significantly associated with CO (p < 0.05. We also found significant dependence between the development of CO and the initiation of treatment for DKA in another facility before hospitalization in our hospital (p < 0.05, bicarbonate application (p < 0.001, higher fluid volume infused initially (p < 0.01 and delayed potassium substitution (p < 0.01. Severe ketoacidosis, hyperglycaemia and dehydration at presentation, and low serum phosphate during treatment are significantly related to CO formation in children with DKA. The initial severe acidosis and hyperglycaemia probably cause brain injury which progresses into CO in the course of developing hypophosphatemia and cerebral hypervolemia.

  4. Epidemiological, clinical and laboratory findings of children fewer than 15 years with diabetic ketoacidosis admitted at San Vicente Fundación Hospital in Medellín, Colombia, between January 2001 and December 2010 = Características epidemiológicas y clínicas y hallazgos de laboratorio de los niños menores de 15 años con cetoacidosis diabética atendidos en el Hospital Universitario San Vicente Fundación en Medellín, Colombia, entre enero de 2001 y diciembre de 2010

    Ballesteros Calderón, Alicia Lucía

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA is the most important acute complication in children with diabetes mellitus. There are several publications regarding the characteristics of children with DKA admitted to hospital care in developed countries, however, in our population there is no information concerning the characteristics of these children. Our aim is to determinate these characteristics. Methods: Retrospective study of DKA events in children fewer than 15 years admitted to HUSVF between 2001 and 2010. The information was collected from medical records and characteristics are depicted by descriptive statistics. Results: We included 98 events of DKA in 77 patients, 64.3% were women, uninsured 23.5%. DKA was the debut of the disease in 53.1%, the average age was 8.7 years (DE 4.35. Patients with known diagnosis didn’t have treatment adherence in 57%, 42,8 % of patients had urinary tract, gastrointestinal, respiratory or another febrile illness at admission. The time between the onset of symptoms and admission was 109 hours (1-720 hours. Ketoacidosis was mild in 29.5%, moderate in 28.7% and severe in 41.8%. The pH at admission was 7,12 (SD 0,12. It took 12.6 hours (SD 8,98 to reach pH 7,30. 14.4% showed hypokalemia, hyponatremia 28.6%, 28.6% hypoglycemia, 5% had cerebral edema and mortality was 2%. Conclusions: Clinical and laboratory characteristics of our population are similar to those reported in other studies. Lack of adherence can be an important and preventable cause of decompensation.

  5. Diabetic Ketoacidosis in a Patient with Type 2 Diabetes After Initiation of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitor Treatment

    Storgaard, Heidi; Bagger, Jonatan I; Knop, Filip K

    2016-01-01

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) were recently introduced for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). SGLT2i lower plasma glucose by inhibiting the renal reuptake of glucose leading to glucosuria. Generally, these drugs are considered safe to use. However, recently, SGLT2i have...... been suggested to predispose to ketoacidosis. Here, we present a case of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) developed in an obese, poorly controlled male patient with T2D treated with the SGLT2i dapagliflozin. He was admitted with DKA 5 days after the initiation of treatment with the SGLT2i dapagliflozin...... 72 hr with insulin as the only glucose-lowering therapy. After 1 month, dapagliflozin was reintroduced as add-on to insulin with no recurrent signs of ketoacidosis. During acute illness or other conditions with increased insulin demands in diabetes, SGLT2i may predispose to the formation of ketone...

  6. The relationship between lactate and thiamine levels in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis.

    Moskowitz, Ari; Graver, Amanda; Giberson, Tyler; Berg, Katherine; Liu, Xiaowen; Uber, Amy; Gautam, Shiva; Donnino, Michael W

    2014-02-01

    Thiamine functions as an important cofactor in aerobic metabolism and thiamine deficiency can contribute to lactic acidosis. Although increased rates of thiamine deficiency have been described in diabetic outpatients, this phenomenon has not been studied in relation to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). In the present study, we hypothesize that thiamine deficiency is associated with elevated lactate in patients with DKA. This was a prospective observational study of patients presenting to a tertiary care center with DKA. Patient demographics, laboratory results, and outcomes were recorded. A one-time blood draw was performed and analyzed for plasma thiamine levels. Thirty-two patients were enrolled. Eight patients (25%) were thiamine deficient, with levels lower than 9 nmol/L. A negative correlation between lactic acid and plasma thiamine levels was found (r = -0.56, P = .002). This relationship remained significant after adjustment for APACHE II scores (P = .009). Thiamine levels were directly related to admission serum bicarbonate (r = 0.44, P = .019), and patients with thiamine deficiency maintained lower bicarbonate levels over the first 24 hours (slopes parallel with a difference of 4.083, P = .002). Patients with DKA had a high prevalence of thiamine deficiency. Thiamine levels were inversely related to lactate levels among patients with DKA. A study of thiamine supplementation in DKA is warranted. © 2013.

  7. Diagnostic approach to drug-screening tests for fatal diabetic ketoacidosis: forensic autopsy of a methamphetamine abuser.

    Kashiwagi, Masayuki; Hara, Kenji; Liu, Zhao; Kageura, Mitsuyoshi; Matsusue, Aya; Sugimura, Tomoko; Kubo, Shin-ichi

    2010-07-01

    To diagnose the cause of death in autopsy cases, systematic examinations, such as macroscopic, pathological, biochemical, and toxicological are important. In this case report, drug examinations also gave very useful information to diagnose the cause of death, fatal diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). A female methamphetamine abuser in her forties was found dead lying on a hotel bed. Diagnosing her cause of death was difficult only from the macroscopic findings because there was no fatal and/or serious injury or disease. On toxicological examination, acetone was detected at a high concentration (682 microg/mL in blood, 887 microg/mL in urine) using gas chromatography (GC). Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), methamphetamine was detected in the blood, urine, hair, and visceral organs; however, these concentrations were low. At the same time, GC-MS examination revealed a high glucose peak. From the results of the biochemical examination of urine, acetoacetic acid was 1940 micromol/L, beta-hydroxybutyric acid was 14,720 micromol/L, and glucose was 4620 mg/dL. Histologically, Langerhans' islets in the pancreas were fibrotic and atrophic, and no insulin-immunoreactive cells were observed. The subsequent police investigation also revealed that she had contracted diabetes mellitus type 1; therefore, we concluded that her cause of death was DKA, due to a lack of insulin injection. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prognostic Factors in Patients Hospitalized with Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Avinash Agarwal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDiabetic ketoacidosis (DKA is characterized by a biochemical triad of hyperglycemia, acidosis, and ketonemia. This condition is life-threatening despite improvements in diabetic care. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and biochemical prognostic markers of DKA. We assessed correlations in prognostic markers with DKA-associated morbidity and mortality.MethodsTwo hundred and seventy patients that were hospitalized with DKA over a period of 2 years were evaluated clinically and by laboratory tests. Serial assays of serum electrolytes, glucose, and blood pH were performed, and clinical outcome was noted as either discharged to home or death.ResultsThe analysis indicated that significant predictors included sex, history of type 1 diabetes mellitus or type 2 diabetes mellitus, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, total leukocyte count, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II score, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, serum magnesium, serum phosphate, serum osmolality, serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminases, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminases, serum albumin, which were further regressed and subjected to multivariate logistic regression (MLR analysis. The MLR analysis indicated that males were 7.93 times more likely to have favorable outcome compared with female patients (odds ratio, 7.93; 95% confidence interval, 3.99 to 13.51, while decreases in mean APACHE II score (14.83 and serum phosphate (4.38 at presentation may lead to 2.86- and 2.71-fold better outcomes, respectively, compared with higher levels (APACHE II score, 25.00; serum phosphate, 6.04.ConclusionSex, baseline biochemical parameters such as APACHE II score, and phosphate level were important predictors of the DKA-associated mortality.

  9. Management of diabetic ketosis and ketoacidosis with intramuscular regular insulin in a low-resource family medicine setting

    Sudhakar Basetty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: India is facing an epidemic of diabetes mellitus (DM. Effective management of complications of DM is a challenge in resource-poor areas of India. This study addresses the need to explore low-cost methods to manage diabetic ketosis (DK and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA. Objectives: To demonstrate the use of intramuscular (IM regular insulin as a safe alternative method to control DK and DKA in a family practice setting. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review was done for 34 patients admitted with DK and DKA in a family medicine unit for the urban poor over 5 years. Data on age, sex, precipitating factors, blood pressure, number of days of hospitalization, amount of insulin, and time required to control blood glucose (BG and to correct acidosis were entered into EpiData version 3.1 and analyzed using SPSS software version 17. Results: Administration of IM regular insulin was effective in reducing the BG to < 250 mg/dL in patients with DK and DKA. The mean time required for this in the ketosis group was 3.8 h and in the ketoacidosis group was 3.9 h. The mean amount of insulin required for correction of acidosis in the ketoacidosis group was 72.3 units and the mean time to achieve this was 33 h. Of the 34 patients, only one in the ketoacidosis group had hypoglycemia. There was no fatality or referral of any patient. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that IM regular insulin is a safe alternative method in managing DK and DKA in a family medicine setting.

  10. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY POSITION STATEMENT ON THE ASSOCIATION OF SGLT-2 INHIBITORS AND DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS.

    Handelsman, Yehuda; Henry, Robert R; Bloomgarden, Zachary T; Dagogo-Jack, Sam; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Einhorn, Daniel; Ferrannini, Ele; Fonseca, Vivian A; Garber, Alan J; Grunberger, George; LeRoith, Derek; Umpierrez, Guillermo E; Weir, Matthew R

    2016-06-01

    AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists ACE = American College of Endocrinology DKA = diabetic ketoacidosis EMA = European Medicines Agency FDA = U.S. Food and Drug Administration SGLT-2 = sodium glucosecotransporter 2 T1D = type 1 diabetes T2D = type 2 diabetes.

  11. Create Your Plate

    Full Text Available ... Complications Hypoglycemia Hyperglycemia Skin Complications Eye Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis ...

  12. Thyroid storm presenting as psychosis: masked by diabetic ketoacidosis

    Raafia Memon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While extremely uncommon, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA and thyroid storm (TS are endocrine emergencies that can coexist. We describe a case with a confounding clinical presentation that identifies these two emergencies within the setting of sepsis and influenza. Case: A 69-year-old diabetic female was found by the paramedic staff to be disoriented. She demonstrated tachycardia and had a foul-smelling abdominal wound. Laboratory evaluation revealed DKA, leukocytosis, influenza B, and urinary tract infection. After appropriate management in the intensive care unit, the DKA resolved the following morning. However, the patient developed a fever, and her psychosis became more pronounced. Extensive analysis was performed but did not explain her mental status. The patient was found to have thyroid stimulating hormone of 0.06 mIU/mL, free T4 (thyroxine of 2.38 ng/dL, and total T3 (triiodothyronine of 72 ng/dL. Based on the Burch and Wartofsky criteria (score of 65, TS was diagnosed. Based on more recent diagnostic criteria suggested by Akamizu et al., the patient met criteria for TS grade 1. Within several hours of initiating treatment, the patient's mental state and tachycardia improved, and her psychosis resolved by the third day. Conclusion: This case highlights the importance of recognizing the clinical diagnosis of TS, as the magnitude of thyroid hormone derangements may not correlate with clinical severity. While rare, DKA and TS can simultaneously occur and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality if not promptly recognized and treated.

  13. Dehydration in children with diabetic ketoacidosis: a prospective study.

    Sottosanti, Maria; Morrison, Gavin C; Singh, Ram N; Sharma, Ajay P; Fraser, Douglas D; Alawi, Khalid; Seabrook, Jamie A; Kornecki, Alik

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the association between the degree of patient dehydration on presentation with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and clinical and laboratory parameters obtained on admission. Prospective descriptive study. A tertiary care children's hospital. Thirty-nine paediatric patients (1 month-16 years) presenting with 42 episodes of DKA. Clinical and biochemical variables were collected on admission. Dehydration was calculated by measuring acute changes in body weight during the period of illness. All patients were treated according to a previously established protocol. Magnitude of dehydration, defined as % loss of body weight (LBW), was determined by the difference in body weight obtained at presentation and at discharge. The relationship between the magnitude of dehydration and the clinical assessment and biochemical parameters was examined. The median (25th-75th centiles) magnitude of dehydration at presentation was 5.7% (3.8-8.3%) (mean ± SD 6.8 ± 5%). Neither the initial clinical assessment nor the comprehensive biochemical profile at admission correlated with the magnitude of dehydration. Despite considerable variation in the degree of dehydration and biochemical disequilibrium, all patients recovered from DKA within 24 h with a standardised therapeutic approach. Furthermore, the rapidity of patient recovery did not correlate with the magnitude of dehydration on presentation or the amount of fluid administered (median (25th-75th centiles) 48.8 ml/kg (38.5-60.3)) in the first 12 h. The magnitude of dehydration in DKA is not reflected by either clinical or biochemical parameters. These findings need confirmation in larger studies.

  14. Cerebral infarction and femoral venous thrombosis detected in a patient with diabetic ketoacidosis and heterozygous factor V Leiden G1691A and PAI-1 4G/5G mutations.

    Yaroglu Kazanci, Selcen; Yesilbas, Osman; Ersoy, Melike; Kihtir, Hasan Serdar; Yildirim, Hamdi Murat; Sevketoglu, Esra

    2015-09-01

    Cerebral infarction is one of the serious neurological complications of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Especially in patients who are genetically prone to thrombosis, cerebral infarction may develop due to inflammation, dehydration, and hyperviscocity secondary to DKA. A 6-year-old child with DKA is diagnosed with cerebral infarction after respiratory insufficiency, convulsion, and altered level of consciousness. Femoral and external iliac venous thrombosis also developed in a few hours after central femoral catheter had been inserted. Heterozygous type of factor V Leiden and PAI-14G/5G mutation were detected. In patients with DKA, cerebral infarction may be suspected other than cerebral edema when altered level of consciousness, convulsion, and respiratory insufficiency develop and once cerebral infarction occurs the patients should also be evaluated for factor V Leiden and PAI-14G/5G mutation analysis in addition to the other prothrombotic risk factors.

  15. The performance of a glucose-ketone meter in the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis in patients with type 2 diabetes in the emergency room.

    Voulgari, Christina; Tentolouris, Nicholas

    2010-07-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious metabolic complication. One of its precipitating causes is insulin omission. DKA requires early diagnosis and strict glucose control, which increases the use of glucose meters in the Emergency Room (ER). We aimed to determine the performance of a glucose-ketone meter in the diagnosis of DKA. From 450 type 2 diabetes mellitus insulin-treated patients attending the ER with a capillary glucose level >13.9 mmol/L, 50 patients (26 men and 24 women, mean age 60.2 +/- 8.2 years) had DKA. Capillary glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate (beta-OHB) were measured with the Precision-Xtra device (Abbott Laboratories, Abingdon, UK). Serum glucose and biochemical parameters were measured on an automatic analyzer; serum beta-OHB was determined using an enzymatic end-point spectrophotometric method. Urine ketones were determined using a semiquantitative assay (Ketodiastix, Bayer Diagnostics, Stoke Poges, Slough, UK). Serum and capillary beta-OHB values were highly correlated (r = 0.99, P 3.0 mmol/L) had the highest performance (sensitivity 99.87%, specificity 92.89%, positive predictive value 92.89%) for the diagnosis of DKA compared with serum ketonemia (sensitivity 90.45%, specificity 88.65%, positive predictive value 87.76%) or ketonuria (sensitivity 89.89%, specificity 52.73%, positive predictive value 41.87%). Implementation of measures such as home glucose and ketone monitoring can possibly decrease the number of hospital admissions due to DKA.

  16. Risperidone-induced type 2 diabetes presenting with diabetic ketoacidosis

    Clarissa Ern Hui Fang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A 28-year-old male presented with 2 days of vomiting and abdominal pain, preceded by 2 weeks of thirst, polyuria and polydipsia. He had recently started risperidone for obsessive-compulsive disorder. He reported a high dietary sugar intake and had a strong family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. On admission, he was tachycardic, tachypnoeic and drowsy with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS of 10/15. We noted axillary acanthosis nigricans and obesity (BMI 33.2 kg/m2. Dipstick urinalysis showed ketonuria and glycosuria. Blood results were consistent with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA, with hyperosmolar state. We initiated our DKA protocol, with intravenous insulin, fluids and potassium, and we discontinued risperidone. His obesity, family history of T2DM, acanthosis nigricans and hyperosmolar state prompted consideration of T2DM presenting with ‘ketosis-prone diabetes’ (KPD rather than T1DM. Antibody markers of beta-cell autoimmunity were subsequently negative. Four weeks later, he had modified his diet and lost weight, and his metabolic parameters had normalised. We reduced his total daily insulin dose from 35 to 18 units and introduced metformin. We stopped insulin completely by week 7. At 6 months, his glucometer readings and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c level had normalised.

  17. Newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes complicated by ketoacidosis and peripheral thrombosis leading to transfemoral amputation

    Bisgaard Jørgensen, Line; Skov, Ole; Yderstræde, Knud Bonnet

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral vascular thromboembolism is a rarely described complication of diabetic ketoacidosis. We report a 41-year-old otherwise healthy man admitted with ketoacidosis and ischaemia of the left foot. The patient was unsuccessfully treated with thromboendarterectomy, and the extremity was ultima...... was ultimately amputated. The patient had no family history of cardiovascular disease, and all blood sample analyses for hypercoagulability were negative. We recommend an increased focus on peripheral thromboembolism, when treating patients with severe ketoacidosis....

  18. Simplifying the Evaluation of Children With New Onset Diabetes: Utility of Pancreatic Autoantibodies for Diabetes Type Classification and Use of Serum Bicarbonate to Diagnose and Classify Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

    Von Oettingen, Julia Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess whether routinely measuring pancreatic autoantibodies (PAA) in pediatric new onset diabetes (NODM) is necessary, and to evaluate serum bicarbonate (HCO3) as a substitute for venous pH (vpH) in the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Methods: Retrospective analysis of all patients with NODM admitted to Boston Children's Hospital from 10/1/07-7/1/13. Logistic regression was used to develop a clinical score to classify diabetes type. Linear and logistic regression...

  19. Pathways to reduce diabetic ketoacidosis with new onset type 1 diabetes: Evidence from a regional pediatric diabetes center: Auckland, New Zealand, 2010 to 2014.

    Gunn, Eleanor R; Albert, Benjamin B; Hofman, Paul L; Cutfield, Wayne S; Gunn, Alistair J; Jefferies, Craig A

    2017-11-01

    There has been little change in the incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in children and adolescents in most developed countries. To assess potentially modifiable antecedents of DKA in children Auckland (New Zealand) from 2010 to 2014. DKA and severity were defined according to the ISPAD 2014 guidelines. A total of 263 children presented with new onset T1DM during the 5-year study period at 9.0 years of age (range 1.0-14.7), of whom 61% were NZ-European, 14% Maori, 13% Pacifica, and 11% other. A total of 71 patients (27%) were in DKA, including 31 mild, 20 moderate, and 20 severe DKA. DKA was associated with no family history of T1DM, higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values at presentation, self-presenting to secondary care, health care professional contacts in the 4 weeks before final presentation, and greater deprivation. Although a delay in referral from primary care for laboratory testing was common (81/216), only delay for more than 48 hours was associated with increased risk of DKA (11/22 > 48 h vs 12/59 referred at <48 h, P = .013). These data suggest that in addition to lack of family awareness potentially modifiable risk factors for new onset DKA include prolonged delay for laboratory testing and a low index of medical suspicion for T1DM leading to delayed diagnosis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Intensity of early correction of hyperglycaemia and outcome of critically ill patients with diabetic ketoacidosis.

    Mårtensson, Johan; Bailey, Michael; Venkatesh, Balasubramanian; Pilcher, David; Deane, Adam; Abdelhamid, Yasmine Ali; Crisman, Marco; Verma, Brij; MacIsaac, Christopher; Wigmore, Geoffrey; Shehabi, Yahya; Suzuki, Takafumi; French, Craig; Orford, Neil; Kakho, Nima; Prins, Johannes; Ekinci, Elif I; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2017-09-01

    To determine the impact of the intensity of early correction of hyperglycaemia on outcomes in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) admitted to the intensive care unit. We studied adult patients with DKA admitted to 171 ICUs in Australia and New Zealand from 2000 to 2013. We used their blood glucose levels (BGLs) in the first 24 hours after ICU admission to determine whether intensive early correction of hyperglycemia to ≤ 180 mg/dL was independently associated with hypoglycaemia, hypokalaemia, hypo-osmolarity or mortality, compared with partial early correction to > 180 mg/dL as recommended by DKA-specific guidelines. Among 8553 patients, intensive early correction of BGL was applied to 605 patients (7.1%). A greater proportion of these patients experienced hypoglycaemia (20.2% v 9.1%; P < 0.001) and/or hypo-osmolarity (29.4% v 22.0%; P < 0.001), but not hypokalaemia (16.7% v 15.6%; P = 0.47). Overall, 11 patients (1.8%) in the intensive correction group and 112 patients (1.4%) in the partial correction group died (P = 0.42). However, after adjustment for illness severity, partial early correction of BGL was independently associated with a lower risk of hypoglycaemia (odds ratio [OR], 0.38; 95% CI, 0.30-0.48; P < 0.001), lower risk of hypo-osmolarity (OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.65-0.98; P < 0.03) and lower risk of death (OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.22-0.86; P = 0.02). In a large cohort of patients with DKA, partial early correction of BGL according to DKA-specific guidelines, when compared with intensive early correction of BGL, was independently associated with a lower risk of hypoglycaemia, hypo-osmolarity and death.

  1. Root cause analysis of diabetic ketoacidosis admissions at a tertiary referral pediatric emergency department in North India

    Muralidharan Jayashree

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify system-based factors contributing to Emergency Department (ED admissions of children with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA and related complications with emphasis on parental and physician awareness and prereferral management. Materials and Methods: A prospective observational root cause analysis study of all consecutive admissions of children with DKA to pediatric ED of a tertiary care referral hospital in northern India over a period of 1 year (July 2010–June 2011. Prehospital, health-care system, referral, follow-up, and continuum of care related details were obtained through direct interview of parents and physicians and/or field observations for all enrolled children. Results: Of the 30 children enrolled, 26 (86.6% were referrals; 16 (61.5% from first, 7 (26.9% from second, and 3 (11.5% from third health-care facility. More than half (n [%], 18 [60%] had new onset diabetes and belonged to lower socioeconomic strata. Twenty-two (73.3% were complicated DKA; shock (n [%], 19 [63%], hypokalemia (n [%], 11 [36%], and CE (n [%], 3 [10%] were the most common complications. Most parents were ignorant of diabetes, its symptoms or complicating DKA. Nearly, half of the cases remained undiagnosed (n = 11 at first contact health-care facility; more so for new onset as compared to known diabetes (9/18 vs. 2/8; P = 0.022. The referring hospitals had limited facilities for rapid blood glucose estimation (n [%], 12 [40%], blood gas analysis (n [%], 6 [20%] and insulin infusion. On univariate analysis, patients with missed/delayed diagnosis more often had severe and complicated DKA. Conclusion: Parental ignorance, lower socioeconomic status, lack of clinical experience, and limited primary health-care facilities were root causes for severe and complicated DKA.

  2. Gender-related differences in clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis.

    Barski, Leonid; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Nevzorov, Roman; Rabaev, Elena; Zektser, Miri; Jotkowitz, Alan B; Zeller, Lior; Shleyfer, Elena; Almog, Yaniv

    2011-12-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is 1 of the most common and serious complications of diabetes, and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. There is a paucity of data regarding gender-related differences in clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients hospitalized for DKA. The purpose of this study was to assess whether gender plays a role in clinical characteristics and outcome of DKA. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients hospitalized with DKA between January 1, 2003 and January 1, 2010. The outcomes of male and female patients were compared. The primary outcome was in-hospital all-cause mortality. The secondary outcomes were 30-day all-cause mortality and rate of complications: sepsis, respiratory failure, multiple organ failure, stroke, and myocardial infarction. Eighty-nine men and 131 women with DKA were included in the study. Male patients had higher rates of chronic renal failure compared with women (16.9% vs 3.1%; P = 0.001), whereas more women than men received oral hypoglycemic therapy (19.8% vs 9.0%; P = 0.046); women also had higher glycosated hemoglobin levels before admission (11.9% [1.7%] vs 9.9% [2.2%]; P = 0.025). The in-hospital mortality rate was not significantly different for both genders (4.5% in the male group vs 3.8% in the female group; P = 1.0). We did not find significant differences between the 2 groups in the 30-day mortality rate (4.5% vs 6.1%; P = 0.7) or the rate of complications (5.6% vs 6.9%; P = 0.9). Advanced age, mechanical ventilation, and bedridden state were independent predictors of 30-day mortality. In our study we did not find statistically significant differences in the in-hospital mortality, 30-day all-cause mortality, or rate of complications between men and women hospitalized with DKA. However, women with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus receiving oral hypoglycemic therapy required particular attention and might benefit from earlier introduction and intensification of insulin

  3. DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS IN CHILDREN – AN EXPERIENCE IN A TERTIARY HOSPITAL

    Bedowra Zabeen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study was done in the in-patient department of paediatrics, BIRDEM from January 2002 to November 2006 to determine the clinico-laboratory features, precipitating factors and outcome of diabetic ketoacidosis. Over the five year period, 344 diabetic patients were hospitalized. Among them, 54 (15.6% had diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA. Among those, 50 were Type I, one was Fibrocalculous Pancreatic Diabetes (FCPD and 3 were of other specific types. More than half (51.9% of the patients were newly diagnosed. Amongst the precipitating factors, 28% had missed insulin and 48% had overt infection. Infections, particularly those of the respiratory tract, were the main precipitating cause for the DKA. There was h/o both infection and missed insulin injections in 11.5% patients. The mean age of patients with DKA was 11.2 ± 4.4 years. Those in the age range 10-14 yrs suffered most frequently (p<0.0001 from ketoacidosis (n= 38, 70.4% compared with those aged 0-4 yrs (9% and 5-9 yrs. (20%. There was a significant difference between those newly diagnosed (group I and known diabetics (group II (p<.029. The frequency of DKA was higher in girls than in boys (66.7% vs. 33.3%; p =.0001. The median duration of polyuria and/or polydipsia was variable between newly diagnosed and known diabetics (3.2 - 25d (p<.001. All patients presented with altered levels of consciousness and 35 (67.3% were unconscious of different grades. Mean random blood glucose (RBG and HbA1c were 27.6mmol/L and 13.4%. Complications noted were acute renal failure (n=2, 3.7% and cerebral edema (n = 4, 7.5%. The outcome of treatment in the whole group was good, 46 (86.7% patients recovered without complications, but 7 (13.4% patients died. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2008; 2(1: 17-20

  4. Diabetic ketoacidosis: risk factors, mechanisms and management ...

    Diabetic ketoacidosis: risk factors, mechanisms and management strategies in sub-Saharan Africa: a review. ... ketoacidosis is the most common hyperglycaemic emergency in patients with diabetes mellitus, especially type 1 diabetes.

  5. Diabetic ketoacidosis: risk factors, mechanisms and management strategies in sub-Saharan Africa: a review.

    Otieno, C F; Kayima, J K; Omonge, E O; Oyoo, G O

    2005-12-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis is the most common hyperglycaemic emergency in patients with diabetes mellitus, especially type 1 diabetes. It carries very high mortality in sub-Saharan Africa, both in the treated patients and those who are presenting to hospital with diabetes for the first time. To review the risk factors, mechanisms and management approaches in diabetes ketoacidosis in published literature and to discuss them in the context of why a significant proportion of patients who develop diabetic ketoacidosis in sub-Saharan Africa still have high mortality. Literature review of relevant published literature from both Africa and the rest of the world. The main causes or precipitants of DKA in patients in SSA are newly diagnosed diabetes, missed insulin doses and infections. The major underlying mechanism is insulin deficiency. Treated patients miss insulin doses for various reasons, for example, inaccessibility occasioned by; unavailability and unaffordability of insulin, missed clinics, perceived ill-health and alternative therapies like herbs, prayers and rituals. Infections also occur quite often, but are not overt, like urinary tract, tuberculosis and pneumonia. Due to widespread poverty of individuals and nations alike, the healthcare systems are scarce and the few available centres are unable to adequately maintain a reliable system of insulin supply and exhaustively investigate their hospitalised patients. Consequently, there is little guarantee of successful outcomes. Poor people may also have sub-optimal nutrition, caused or worsened by diabetes, more so, at first presentation to hospital. Intensive insulin therapy in such individuals mimics 're-feeding syndrome', an acute anabolic state whose outcome may be unfavourable during the period of treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Although mortality and morbidity from diabetic ketoacidosis remains high in sub-Saharan Africa, improved healthcare systems and reliable insulin supply can reverse the trend, at least

  6. Diabetic ketoacidosis at the onset of type 1 diabetes is associated with future HbA(1c) levels

    Fredheim, S; Johannesen, J; Johansen, A

    2013-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We investigated the long-term impact of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) at onset on metabolic regulation and residual beta cell function in a Danish population with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: The study is based on data from DanDiabKids, a Danish national diabetes register for children....... The register provides clinical and biochemical data on patients with type 1 diabetes diagnosed in 1996-2009 and then followed-up until 1 January 2012. Repeated-measurement models were used as statistical methods. RESULTS: The study population comprised 2,964 children...

  7. Nivolumab-induced fulminant diabetic ketoacidosis followed by thyroiditis

    Ploutarchos Tzoulis

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Five days following the 3rd cycle of nivolumab, a monoclonal antibody, which acts as immune checkpoint inhibitor against the programmed cell death protein-1, for metastatic lung adenocarcinoma, a 56-year-old woman presented at the hospital critically ill. On admission, she had severe diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA, as evidenced by venous glucose of 47 mmol/L, blood ketones of 7.5 mmol/L, pH of 6.95 and bicarbonate of 6.6 mmol/L. She has had no personal or family history of diabetes mellitus (DM, while random venous glucose, measured 1 week prior to hospitalisation, was 6.1 mmol/L. On admission, her HbA1c was 8.2% and anti-GAD antibodies were 12 kIU/L (0–5 kU/L, while islet cell antibodies and serum C-peptide were undetectable. Nivolumab was recommenced without the development of other immune-mediated phenomena until 6 months later, when she developed hypothyroidism with TSH 18 U/L and low free T4. She remains insulin dependent and has required levothyroxine replacement, while she has maintained good radiological and clinical response to immunotherapy. This case is notable for the rapidity of onset and profound nature of DKA at presentation, which occurred two months following commencement of immunotherapy. Despite the association of nivolumab with immune-mediated endocrinopathies, only a very small number of patients developing type 1 DM has been reported to date. Patients should be closely monitored for hyperglycaemia and thyroid dysfunction prior to and periodically during immunotherapy.

  8. Recreational drug abuse in patients hospitalized for diabetic ketosis or diabetic ketoacidosis.

    Isidro, María L; Jorge, Segundo

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the association between recreational drug use and diabetic ketosis (DK) and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in our area. Retrospective examination of records from a 1,450 bed urban teaching hospital in Spain. All adult admissions for DK or DKA from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2009 in our hospital were included. Demographic, exploratory (blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate), and analytical data (glucose, urea, creatinine, corrected Na(+), K(+), pH, HCO3(-) and HbA1c) at admittance were recorded. In 152 patients, 253 episodes of DK or DKA occurred. Screening for drug use was performed in 40.3% of the events; 20.6% of the episodes (n = 52) were shown to be substance abuse. Cocaine, followed by cannabis and alcohol, was the most frequently involved drug. Poly-substance abuse occurred in 67.3% of them. Comorbidities were present in 11.5 and 39.8% of the cases shown and not shown to be related to drug use (P = 0.00). Seventy percent of the patients who were at least once shown to have consumed drugs, and 15.9% of those who were never shown to have done so, were admitted more than once (P = 0.00). The frequency of recent drug misuse in patients presenting with DK or DKA was high. Substance abuse screening was frequently neglected. Adverse profile, most significantly in readmission to hospital, was found in the patients with positive drug findings. History taking in this context should routinely include questions on substance abuse, and toxicology screening may be worthwhile, particularly in those with the history of frequent readmissions.

  9. Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis with Elevated Acetone in a Patient Taking a Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) Inhibitor.

    Andrews, Tory J; Cox, Robert D; Parker, Christina; Kolb, James

    2017-02-01

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitor medications are a class of antihyperglycemic agents that increase urinary glucose excretion by interfering with the reabsorption of glucose in the proximal renal tubules. In May of 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration released a warning concerning a potential increased risk of ketoacidosis and ketosis in patients taking these medications. We present a case of a 57-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus taking a combination of canagliflozin and metformin who presented with progressive altered mental status over the previous 2 days. Her work-up demonstrated a metabolic acidosis with an anion gap of 38 and a venous serum pH of 7.08. The serum glucose was 168 mg/dL. The urinalysis showed glucose > 500 mg/dL and ketones of 80 mg/dL. Further evaluation demonstrated an elevated serum osmolality of 319 mOsm/kg and an acetone concentration of 93 mg/dL. She was treated with intravenous insulin and fluids, and the metabolic abnormalities and her altered mental status resolved within 36 h. This was the first episode of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) for this patient. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Diabetic patients on SGLT2 inhibitor medications are at risk for ketoacidosis. Due to the renal glucose-wasting properties of these drugs, they may present with ketoacidosis with only mild elevations in serum glucose, potentially complicating the diagnosis. Acetone is one of the three main ketone bodies formed during DKA and it may be present at considerable concentrations, contributing to the serum osmolality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with SGLT2 inhibitors and other antihyperglycemic agents.

    Wang, Yiting; Desai, Mehul; Ryan, Patrick B; DeFalco, Frank J; Schuemie, Martijn J; Stang, Paul E; Berlin, Jesse A; Yuan, Zhong

    2017-06-01

    To estimate and compare incidence of diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) among patients with type 2 diabetes who are newly treated with SGLT2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) versus non-SGLT2i antihyperglycemic agents (AHAs) in actual clinical practice. A new-user cohort study design using a large insurance claims database in the US. DKA incidence was compared between new users of SGLT2i and new users of non-SGLT2i AHAs pair-matched on exposure propensity scores (EPS) using Cox regression models. Overall, crude incidence rates (95% CI) per 1000 patient-years for DKA were 1.69 (1.22-2.30) and 1.83 (1.58-2.10) among new users of SGLT2i (n=34,442) and non-SGLT2i AHAs (n=126,703). These rates more than doubled among patients with prior insulin prescriptions but decreased by more than half in analyses that excluded potential autoimmune diabetes (PAD). The hazard ratio (95% CI) for DKA comparing new users of SGLT2i to new users of non-SGLT2i AHAs was 1.91 (0.94-4.11) (p=0.09) among the 30,196 EPS-matched pairs overall, and 1.13 (0.43-3.00) (p=0.81) among the 27,515 EPS-matched pairs that excluded PAD. This was the first observational study that compared DKA risk between new users of SGLT2i and non-SGLT2i AHAs among patients with type 2 diabetes, and overall no statistically significant difference was detected. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative occurrence of diabetes in canine, feline, and few wild animals and their association with pancreatic diseases and ketoacidosis with therapeutic approach

    Kamal Niaz; Faheem Maqbool; Fazlullah Khan; Fatima Ismail Hassan; Saeideh Momtaz; Mohammad Abdollahi

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disorder in which blood glucose level raises that can result in severe complications. However, the incidence increased mostly by obesity, pregnancy, persistent corpus luteum, and diestrus phase in humans and animals. This review has focused on addressing the possible understanding and pathogenesis of spontaneous DM in canine, feline, and few wild animals. Furthermore, pancreatic associated disorders, diabetic ketoacidosis, hormonal and drug intera...

  12. Two cases of diabetic ketoacidosis in HNF1A-MODY linked to severe dehydration: is it time to change the diagnostic criteria for MODY?

    Pruhova, Stepanka; Dusatkova, Petra; Neumann, David; Hollay, Erik; Cinek, Ondrej; Lebl, Jan; Sumnik, Zdenek

    2013-09-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1A maturity-onset diabetes of the young (HNF1A-MODY) is a monogenic form of diabetes caused by heterozygous mutations in HNF1A. Currently, a history of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an exclusion criterion for genetic testing for MODY. In this article, we describe two unrelated patients aged 17 and 24 years with severe DKA developed several years after the diagnosis of HNF1A-MODY. Both patients were treated with insulin, but their metabolic control was poor (HbA1c 15%, 140 mmol/mol and 13%, 119 mmol/mol, respectively) due to noncompliance and missed insulin injections. In both patients, DKA followed a course of recurrent vomiting with dehydration and prerenal acute kidney injury. Their glycemia, blood pH, and base excess at admission were 97 mmol/L [1,748 mg/dL], 6.80, and -33 mmol/L (patient 1) and 34 mmol/L [613 mg/dL], 7.03, and -14 mmol/L (patient 2). This anecdotal observation supports the notion that a history of DKA does not exclude MODY.

  13. PRECIPITATING FACTORS, CLINICAL PROFILE AND METABOLIC ABNORMALITIES OF DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS IN CHILDREN WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES AND THEIR ROLE IN PREDICTING THE OUTCOME

    Madhava Vijaya Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of the study is to study the clinical profile of diabetic ketoacidosis in children with type 1 diabetes to identify the precipitating factors, to assess the metabolic alterations due to this illness and to correlate these parameters with the outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a prospective observational study and 33 children admitted in PICU during the study period were recruited for the study. RESULTS 24 children were newly-diagnosed cases and 9 children were already established cases of type 1 diabetes. Mean age group was 10.7 years. Major precipitating causes of DKA in established cases were intercurrent respiratory infections and omission of insulin. Nausea, vomiting, thirst and polyuria were the most common symptoms. Mean duration of symptoms before diagnosing DKA were 20 days in newly-diagnosed cases and 4 days in established cases. ¾ of children had dehydration at the time of admission. Severity was more in younger children. Commonest biochemical abnormality was hypokalaemia. Late diagnosis and delay in the initiation of treatment were the commonest predisposing factors for the development of cerebral oedema. CONCLUSION DKA is a life-threatening complication of type 1 diabetes and the red flag signs of bad outcome were young age, late diagnosis, late referral and late initiation of treatment. Hence, a high index of suspicion is necessary to diagnose DKA in first presentation of diabetes as well as in established cases.

  14. Blood glucose measurement in patients with suspected diabetic ketoacidosis: a comparison of Abbott MediSense PCx point-of-care meter values to reference laboratory values.

    Blank, Fidela S J; Miller, Moses; Nichols, James; Smithline, Howard; Crabb, Gillian; Pekow, Penelope

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare blood glucose levels measured by a point of care (POC) device to laboratory measurement using the same sample venous blood from patients with suspected diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). A descriptive correlational design was used for this IRB-approved quality assurance project. The study site was the 50-bed BMC emergency department (ED) which has an annual census of over 100,000 patient visits. The convenience sample consisted of 54 blood samples from suspected DKA patients with orders for hourly blood draws for glucose measurement. Spearman correlations of the glucose POC values, reference lab values, and differences between the two, were evaluated. A chi-square test was used to evaluate the association between the acidosis status and FDA acceptability of POC values. Patient age range was 10-86 years; 63% were females; 46% had a final diagnosis of DKA. POC values underestimated glucose levels 93% of the time. There was a high correlation between the lab value and the magnitude of the difference, (lab minus POC value) indicating that the higher the true glucose value, the greater the difference between the lab and the POC value. A chi-square test showed no overall association between acidosis and FDA-acceptability. The POC values underestimated lab reported glucose levels in 50 of 54 cases even with the use of same venous sample sent to the lab, which make it highly unreliable for use in monitoring suspected DKA patients.

  15. Create Your Plate

    Full Text Available ... Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing ...

  16. Create Your Plate

    Full Text Available ... Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ...

  17. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Full Text Available ... Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ...

  18. Facts about Type 2

    Full Text Available ... Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ...

  19. Olanzapine-Induced Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome with Rhabdomyolysis: A Case Report

    Young Kyoung Sa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Atypical antipsychotics have replaced conventional antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia because they have less of a propensity to cause undesirable neurologic adverse events including extrapyramidal symptoms, tardive dyskinesia, and neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS. However, atypical antipsychotics have been known to result in various metabolic complications such as impaired glucose tolerance, diabetes and even diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA. In addition, a number of NMS cases have been reported in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics, although the absolute incidence of neurologic side effects is currently significantly low. Here, we report a patient who simultaneously developed DKA, acute renal failure and NMS with rhabdomyolysis after olanzapine treatment. Olanzapine-induced metabolic complications and NMS were dramatically improved with cessation of the olanzapine treatment and initiation of supportive management including fluid therapy, hemodialysis, and intensive glycemic control using insulin. At short-term follow-up, insulin secretion was markedly recovered as evidenced by a restoration of serum C-peptide level, and the patient no longer required any hypoglycemic medications. Despite the dramatic increase in the use of atypical antipsychotics treatment, individualized treatments along with careful monitoring may be prudent for high risk or vulnerable patients in order to avoid the development of metabolic side effects.

  20. Pituitary gigantism presenting with depressive mood disorder and diabetic ketoacidosis in an Asian adolescent.

    Kuo, Sheng-Fong; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Ng, Sohching; Chen, Chih-Hung; Chang, Chen-Nen; Chou, Chi-Hsiang; Weng, Wei-Chieh; Yeh, Chih-Hua; Lin, Jen-Der

    2013-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is seldom described in young patients with pituitary gigantism. Here, we describe the case of a 17-year-old Taiwanese boy who developed depressive mood disorder and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) at the presentation of pituitary gigantism. The boy complained of lethargy and dysphoric mood in June 2008. He presented at the emergency department with epigastralgia and dyspnea in January 2009. Results of laboratory tests suggested type 1 diabetes mellitus with DKA. However, serum C-peptide level was normal on follow-up. Although he had no obvious features of acral enlargement, a high level of insulin-like growth factor 1 was detected, and a 75 g oral glucose suppression test showed no suppression of serum growth hormone levels. A pituitary macroadenoma was found on subsequent magnetic resonance imaging. The pituitary adenoma was surgically removed, followed by gamma-knife radiosurgery, and Sandostatin long-acting release treatment. He was then administered metformin, 500 mg twice daily, and to date, his serum glycohemoglobin has been <7%.

  1. Effect of Volume of Fluid Resuscitation on Metabolic Normalization in Children Presenting in Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Bakes, Katherine; Haukoos, Jason S; Deakyne, Sara J; Hopkins, Emily; Easter, Josh; McFann, Kim; Brent, Alison; Rewers, Arleta

    2016-04-01

    The optimal rate of fluid administration in pediatric diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is unknown. Our aim was to determine whether the volume of fluid administration in children with DKA influences the rate of metabolic normalization. We performed a randomized controlled trial conducted in a tertiary pediatric emergency department from December 2007 until June 2010. The primary outcome was time to metabolic normalization; secondary outcomes were time to bicarbonate normalization, pH normalization, overall length of hospital treatment, and adverse outcomes. Children between 0 and 18 years of age were eligible if they had type 1 diabetes mellitus and DKA. Patients were randomized to receive intravenous (IV) fluid at low volume (10 mL/kg bolus + 1.25 × maintenance rate) or high volume (20 mL/kg bolus + 1.5 × maintenance rate) (n = 25 in each). After adjusting for initial differences in bicarbonate levels, time to metabolic normalization was significantly faster in the higher-volume infusion group compared to the low-volume infusion group (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-3.9; p = 0.04). Higher-volume IV fluid infusion appeared to hasten, to a greater extent, normalization of pH (HR = 2.5; 95% CI 1.2-5.0; p = 0.01) than normalization of serum bicarbonate (HR = 1.2; 95% CI 0.6-2.3; p = 0.6). The length of hospital treatment HR (0.8; 95% CI 0.4-1.5; p = 0.5) and time to discharge HR (0.8; 95% CI 0.4-1.5; p = 0.5) did not differ between treatment groups. Higher-volume fluid infusion in the treatment of pediatric DKA patients significantly shortened metabolic normalization time, but did not change overall length of hospital treatment. ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01701557. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Peripheral neuropathy as a complication of diabetic ketoacidosis in a child with newly diagnosed diabetes type 1 - case report.

    Baszyńska-Wilk, Marta; Wysocka-Mincewicz, Marta; Świercz, Anna; Świderska, Jolanta; Marszał, Magdalena; Szalecki, Mieczysław

    2017-12-08

    Neurological complications of diabetic ketoacidosis are considered to be very serious clinical problem. The most common complication is cerebral edema. However this group includes also less common syndromes such as ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis or very rare peripheral neuropathy. We present a case of 9-year old girl with new onset type 1 diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis, cerebral edema, multifocal vasogenic brain lesions and lower limbs peripheral paresis. The patient developed polydipsia and polyuria one week before admission to the hospital. In laboratory tests initial blood glucose level 1136 mg/dl and acidosis (pH 7.1; BE-25.9) were noted. She was admitted to the hospital in a critical condition and required treatment in intensive care unit. Computed tomography scan showed brain edema and hipodense lesion in the left temporal region. Brain MRI revealed more advanced multifocal brain lesions Nerve conduction studies demonstrated damage of the motor neuron in both lower extremities with dysfunction in both peroneal nerves and the right tibial nerve. As a result of diabetological, neurological treatment and physiotherapy patient's health state gradually improved. Acute neuropathy after ketoacidosis is rare complication and its pathomechanism is not clear. Patients with DKA require careful monitoring of neurological functions even after normalization of glycemic parameters.

  3. Pituitary gigantism causing diabetic ketoacidosis.

    Alvi, N S; Kirk, J M

    1999-01-01

    Although growth hormone excess (acromegaly) in association with glucose intolerance and diabetes mellitus is well documented in adult medicine, it is much less common in the paediatric age group. We report the case of a 13 year-old boy who presented with tall stature secondary to a large growth hormone secreting adenoma of the pituitary gland. Random growth hormone was 630 mIU/l and did not suppress during an oral glucose tolerance test. Following debulking of the tumour, he developed diabetic ketoacidosis requiring insulin treatment, but after further surgery glucose handling returned to normal. He has been started on testosterone to arrest further increase in height.

  4. Comparative occurrence of diabetes in canine, feline, and few wild animals and their association with pancreatic diseases and ketoacidosis with therapeutic approach.

    Niaz, Kamal; Maqbool, Faheem; Khan, Fazlullah; Hassan, Fatima Ismail; Momtaz, Saeideh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2018-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disorder in which blood glucose level raises that can result in severe complications. However, the incidence increased mostly by obesity, pregnancy, persistent corpus luteum, and diestrus phase in humans and animals. This review has focused on addressing the possible understanding and pathogenesis of spontaneous DM in canine, feline, and few wild animals. Furthermore, pancreatic associated disorders, diabetic ketoacidosis, hormonal and drug interaction with diabetes, and herbal remedies associated with DM are elucidated. Bibliographic search for the present review was done using PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar for articles on concurrent DM in small and wild animals. Persistent corpus luteal and pseudopregnancy in female dogs generate gestational DM (GDM). GDM can also be caused by extensive use of drugs/hormones such as glucocorticosteroids. Although many similarities are present between diabetic cats and diabetic humans which present islet amyloidosis, there was a progressive loss of β- and α-cells and the normal number of δ-cells. The most prominent similarity is the occurrence of islet amyloidosis in all cases of diabetic cat and over 90% of human non-insulin dependent DM Type-2. Acute pancreatic necrosis (APN) occurs due to predisposing factors such as insulin antagonism, insulin resistance, alteration in glucose tolerance, obesity, hyperadrenocorticism, and persistent usage of glucocorticoids, as these play a vital role in the progression of APN. To manage such conditions, it is important to deal with the etiological agent, risk factors, diagnosis of diabetes, and hormonal and drug interaction along with its termination with suitable therapy (herbal) protocols. It should be noted that the protocols used for the diagnosis and treatment of human DM are not appropriate for animals. Further investigations regarding diabetic conditions of pets and wild animals are required, which will benefit the health status of

  5. Comparative occurrence of diabetes in canine, feline, and few wild animals and their association with pancreatic diseases and ketoacidosis with therapeutic approach

    Kamal Niaz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a chronic metabolic disorder in which blood glucose level raises that can result in severe complications. However, the incidence increased mostly by obesity, pregnancy, persistent corpus luteum, and diestrus phase in humans and animals. This review has focused on addressing the possible understanding and pathogenesis of spontaneous DM in canine, feline, and few wild animals. Furthermore, pancreatic associated disorders, diabetic ketoacidosis, hormonal and drug interaction with diabetes, and herbal remedies associated with DM are elucidated. Bibliographic search for the present review was done using PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar for articles on concurrent DM in small and wild animals. Persistent corpus luteal and pseudopregnancy in female dogs generate gestational DM (GDM. GDM can also be caused by extensive use of drugs/hormones such as glucocorticosteroids. Although many similarities are present between diabetic cats and diabetic humans which present islet amyloidosis, there was a progressive loss of β- and α-cells and the normal number of δ-cells. The most prominent similarity is the occurrence of islet amyloidosis in all cases of diabetic cat and over 90% of human non-insulin dependent DM Type-2. Acute pancreatic necrosis (APN occurs due to predisposing factors such as insulin antagonism, insulin resistance, alteration in glucose tolerance, obesity, hyperadrenocorticism, and persistent usage of glucocorticoids, as these play a vital role in the progression of APN. To manage such conditions, it is important to deal with the etiological agent, risk factors, diagnosis of diabetes, and hormonal and drug interaction along with its termination with suitable therapy (herbal protocols. It should be noted that the protocols used for the diagnosis and treatment of human DM are not appropriate for animals. Further investigations regarding diabetic conditions of pets and wild animals are required, which will benefit the

  6. Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI in a juvenile miniature schnauzer dog with concurrent hypertriglyceridemia, necrotizing pancreatitis, and diabetic ketoacidosis.

    Pérez, Mayrim L; Kridel, Heather A; Gallagher, Alex; Sheppard, Barbara J; Reese, Shona; Kondo, Hirotaka; Alleman, Rick; Giger, Urs

    2015-03-01

    A 7-month-old, neutered male miniature schnauzer dog with a history of cryptorchidism and umbilical hernia was referred for diabetic ketoacidosis. Clinical evaluation revealed stunted growth, skeletal abnormalities, hypertriglyceridemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, and acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Further testing was diagnostic for mucopolysaccharidosis type VI causing the stunted growth and skeletal deformities, but no connection between mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, hypertriglyceridemia, and pancreatic diseases was found.

  7. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, nucleotide phosophate, and organic and inorganic phosphate levels during the early phases of diabetic ketoacidosis.

    Kanter, Y; Gerson, J R; Bessman, A N

    1977-05-01

    The relation between serum and red blood cell (RBC) inorganic phosphate levels, RBC 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) levels, RBC nucleotide phosphate (Pn), and RBC total phosphate (Pt) levels were studied during the early phases of treatment and recovery from diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). A steady drop in serum inorganic phosphate was found during the first 24 hours of insulin treatment and was most profound at 24 hours. No statistically significant changes (P less than 0.05) were found in red cell inorganic phosphate or nucleotide phosphate levels during the 24-hour study period. The levels of total red cell phosphate were lower in this group of patients than in nonacidotic diabetic subjects and decreased slightly after 24 hours of treatment. The red cell 2,3-DPG levels were low at the initiation of therapy and remained low during the 24-hour study period. Glucose, bicarbonate, lactate, and ketone levels fell in linear patterns with treatment. In view of the current evidence for the effects of low 2,3-DPG on oxygen delivery and the relation of low serum phosphate levels to RBC glycolysis and 2,3-DPG formation, this study reemphasizes the need for phosphate replacement during the early phases of treatment of DKA.

  8. Familial Brugada syndrome uncovered by hyperkalaemic diabetic ketoacidosis

    Postema, Pieter G.; Vlaar, Alexander P. J.; DeVries, J. Hans; Tan, Hanno L.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a case of diabetic ketoacidosis with concomitant hyperkalaemia that uncovered a typical Brugada syndrome electrocardiogram (ECG). Further provocation testing in the patient and his son confirmed familial Brugada syndrome. Diabetic ketoacidosis with hyperkalaemia may uncover an

  9. Cetoacidose diabética em crianças: perfil de tratamento em hospital universitário Diabetic ketoacidosis in children: treatment profile at a university hospital

    Lelma Castro

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar as características de crianças com cetoacidose diabética (CAD tratadas no Hospital de Clínicas da UNICAMP. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo e descritivo de variáveis clínicas e laboratoriais de 74 internações por CAD em 49 pacientes no período de janeiro de 1994 a dezembro de 2003. RESULTADOS: Doze pacientes tiveram mais de uma internação, 27 eram do sexo feminino e a idade variou de 0,9 a 14,5 anos. O tempo médio de DM1 foi de 3 ± 3,1 anos, sendo em 20 casos a primeira manifestação do DM1. A CAD foi classificada em grave em 51% e moderada em 30%, 17 apresentaram choque e 13 coma na admissão. O tempo decorrido para a normalização da glicemia, do pH e do bicarbonato apresentou correlação significativa positiva com o valor inicial. Em apenas três internações foi usado o bicarbonato endovenoso. O potássio inicial variou de 3,1 a 5,9 mEq/l, sendo 8% com valores abaixo de 3,5 e 62% acima de 4,5. A hipoglicemia ocorreu em 10 internações e o edema cerebral com óbito em uma. O tempo total de tratamento correlacionou-se significativamente com o tempo de fluidoterapia, o local de internação e o tempo para normalização do pH. CONCLUSÃO: Na amostra estudada houve predomínio de pacientes do sexo feminino, abaixo de 10 anos, com manifestação grave da doença, porém com boa evolução e poucas complicações. As internações corresponderam, em sua maioria, a um pequeno número de pacientes.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the profile of children with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA treated at the UNICAMP "Hospital de Clínicas". METHODS: Retrospective and descriptive study of clinical and laboratory variables of 74 admissions related to 49 patients bearers of DKA, between January 1994 and December 2003. RESULTS: Twelve patients were admitted more than once, 27 were females and ages ranged from 0.9 to 14.5 years. The mean time from DM1 diagnosis to admission was 3 ± 3.1 years and 20 cases presented with DKA at the onset of

  10. Severe hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis in young persons with preschool onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus: An analysis of three nationwide population-based surveys.

    Lindner, Lena M E; Gontscharuk, Veronika; Bächle, Christina; Castillo, Katty; Stahl-Pehe, Anna; Tönnies, Thaddäus; Yossa, Rhuphine; Holl, Reinhard W; Rosenbauer, Joachim

    2018-06-01

    To describe incidence rates and temporal trends of severe hypoglycemia (SH) and of hospitalizations for SH or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in persons with early-onset, long-term type 1 diabetes (T1D) and associations of these short-term complications with potential risk factors. This study includes data of 1,875 persons 11.2 to 21.9 years of age with early-onset (10 years) T1D from 3 cross-sectional nationwide, population-based surveys conducted in 2009/2010, 2012/2013 and 2015/2016 using standardized questionnaires. Negative binomial regression was used to estimate incidence rates per 100 person-years (py), temporal trends and associations between potential risk factors and outcomes. The crude incidence rate of SH showed a decreasing trend over time (P for trend = .004), disappearing after adjustment for confounders (P for trend = .341). In contrast, adjusted rates of SH- and DKA-associated hospitalizations did not change significantly between 2009 and 2016 (P for trend = .306 and .774, respectively). Associations between sex, diabetes duration, insulin treatment regimen, hypoglycemia awareness as well as physical activity and SH were found, while family structure was associated with hospitalizations for SH. Family structure, socioeconomic status (SES), diabetes duration, and hemoglobin A1c values showed associations with DKA-related hospitalizations. After adjustment, rates of SH and SH- or DKA-associated hospitalization showed no significant changes in recent years. Structured education programs focusing on high-risk groups as, for example, persons with T1D living with 1 biological parent and the parents' partner or those with a low SES, should be implemented to reduce incidence rates of hospitalizations. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. LPL gene mutation as the cause of severe hypertriglyceridemia in the course of ketoacidosis in a patient with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Nocoń-Bohusz, Julita; Wikiera, Beata; Basiak, Aleksander; Śmigiel, Robert; Noczyńska, Anna

    2016-02-18

    Severe hypertriglyceridemia is a condition associated with extremely high triglycerides (TG) plasma concentrations exceeding 1000mg/dl. This condition may result in mutations in genes encoding lipoprotein lipase (LPL), apolipoprotein C2 (APOC2) and apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) characterized by an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. A case report of a patient in which clinical picture of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) was accompanied by diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and severe hypertriglyceridemia. A 2.5-year-old boy was admitted to the hospital with ketoacidosis (pH - 7.0, BE - 20mmol/l, HCO3 10mmol/l), glucose level of 850mg%, hyponatremia (Na 100mmol/l) and hyperlipidemia (TG 13493 mg/dl, TC 734 mg/dl). The administered treatment resulted in nearly normal glycemic values and lipid disturbances normalization. This child was diagnosed with a heterozygous mutation of the LPL gene. Currently with an intensive insulin therapy and correct metabolic control of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), this patient maintains a normal lipid profile. In patient with T1DM the diagnosis of severe hypertriglyceridemia in the course of ketoacidosis should be based on careful interpretation of laboratory tests results. Moreover genetic tests of the patient and his/her immediate relatives blood samples should be performed. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  12. Perspectivas atuais do tratamento da cetoacidose diabética em pediatria Current perspectives for treating children with diabetic ketoacidosis

    Jefferson P. Piva

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Revisar os conceitos atuais da fisiopatologia, diagnóstico e tratamento da cetoacidose diabética (CAD na infância, assim como as medidas preventivas para evitar o edema cerebral. FONTES DOS DADOS: Os autores selecionaram artigos na MEDLINE com as palavras-chave diabetes, cetoacidose, hiperglicemia e edema cerebral, priorizando estudos realizados em crianças, que tenham textos completos publicados em inglês, português ou espanhol. Revisaram, ainda, capítulos de livros publicados no Brasil descrevendo o tratamento de CAD em unidade de tratamento intensivo pediátrico. Baseados na literatura revisada e em sua experiência, apresentam as medidas mais eficazes e recomendadas no manejo da CAD. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: Consolida-se cada vez mais a utilização de solução fisiológica (NaCl 0,9% tanto na fase de reposição rápida quanto na fase de hidratação, em substituição às soluções diluídas (hipotônicas, assim como a contra-indicação do uso de bicarbonato de sódio para corrigir acidose metabólica na CAD. A insulina regular deve ser utilizada sob a forma de infusão contínua (0,1 UI/kg/h sem a necessidade de dose de ataque. Para rápidas correções das oscilações da glicemia, é apresentado um esquema prático com duas bolsas de soluções eletrolíticas. Revisam edema cerebral, seu mecanismo fisiopatológico e o tratamento atual. CONCLUSÕES: O uso de infusão contínua de insulina regular associada à reposição hídrica adequada com soluções isotônicas, além de tratamentos efetivos da CAD, preserva a osmolaridade plasmática e previne a ocorrência de edema cerebral.OBJECTIVE:To review current concepts of physiopathology, diagnosis and treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA in childhood, as well as preventive measures to avoid cerebral edema. SOURCES: The authors selected articles from MEDLINE with the keywords diabetes, ketoacidosis, hyperglycemia and cerebral edema, and priority was given to studies

  13. Diabetic ketoacidosis in a patient with acromegaly

    Kopff, B; Mucha, S; Wolffenbuttel, B H; Drzewoski, J

    2001-01-01

    Abnormalities of glucose metabolism are a common feature of acromegaly. Overt diabetes mellitus develops in about 10-15% of patients. We present an unusual complication of acromegaly: a 37-year old man with a 2-year history of acromegaly developed diabetic ketoacidosis 3 weeks after transsphenoidal

  14. SGLT2 Inhibitors May Predispose to Ketoacidosis.

    Taylor, Simeon I; Blau, Jenny E; Rother, Kristina I

    2015-08-01

    Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are antidiabetic drugs that increase urinary excretion of glucose, thereby improving glycemic control and promoting weight loss. Since approval of the first-in-class drug in 2013, data have emerged suggesting that these drugs increase the risk of diabetic ketoacidosis. In May 2015, the Food and Drug Administration issued a warning that SGLT2 inhibitors may lead to ketoacidosis. Using PubMed and Google, we conducted Boolean searches including terms related to ketone bodies or ketoacidosis with terms for SGLT2 inhibitors or phlorizin. Priority was assigned to publications that shed light on molecular mechanisms whereby SGLT2 inhibitors could affect ketone body metabolism. SGLT2 inhibitors trigger multiple mechanisms that could predispose to diabetic ketoacidosis. When SGLT2 inhibitors are combined with insulin, it is often necessary to decrease the insulin dose to avoid hypoglycemia. The lower dose of insulin may be insufficient to suppress lipolysis and ketogenesis. Furthermore, SGLT2 is expressed in pancreatic α-cells, and SGLT2 inhibitors promote glucagon secretion. Finally, phlorizin, a nonselective inhibitor of SGLT family transporters decreases urinary excretion of ketone bodies. A decrease in the renal clearance of ketone bodies could also increase the plasma ketone body levels. Based on the physiology of SGLT2 and the pharmacology of SGLT2 inhibitors, there are several biologically plausible mechanisms whereby this class of drugs has the potential to increase the risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis. Future research should be directed toward identifying which patients are at greatest risk for this side effect and also to optimizing pharmacotherapy to minimize the risk to patients.

  15. An Exceptional Case of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Celine Van de Vyver

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of diabetic ketoacidosis, known as one of the most serious metabolic complications of diabetes. We were confronted with rapid neurological deterioration and unseen glycaemic values, which reached almost 110 mmol/L, subsequently resulting in hyperkalaemia and life-threatening dysrhythmias. This is the first reported live case with such high values of blood glucose and a favourable outcome.

  16. Usefulness of postmortem biochemistry in identification of ketosis: Diagnosis of ketoacidosis at the onset of autoimmune type 1 diabetes in an autopsy case with cold exposure and malnutrition.

    Tani, Naoto; Michiue, Tomomi; Chen, Jian-Hua; Oritani, Shigeki; Ishikawa, Takaki

    2016-09-01

    A severely malnourished, Japanese female in her twenties was found dead in her apartment. On autopsy, most of the findings from the internal examination were suggestive of hypothermia. Postmortem biochemistry, however, showed severely increased levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and blood and urine glucose levels. Levels of acetone, 3-hydroxybutyric acid, and acetoacetate in various body fluids were also highly increased, indicating ketosis. The serum insulin and c-peptide levels were severely low, and subsequent testing was positive for anti-GAD antibodies. Immunohistochemical examination of the pancreatic islet cells revealed few insulin-positive cells but many glucagon-positive cells on staining. Furthermore, slight invasion of CD8-positive lymphocytes in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans was observed. Results of immunostaining of the pancreatic and bronchial epithelial tissues were partly positive for the Influenza A virus. We concluded that severe ketoacidosis associated with rapid-onset hyperglycemia due to autoimmune type 1 diabetes (AT1D) had occurred shortly before death. However, the ketosis was accompanied by hypothermia and malnutrition as well as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Therefore, we retrospectively collected biochemical data on cases of hypothermia and malnutrition and compared them with the present case. Serum glucose, acetone, 3-hydroxybutyric acid, and acetoacetic acid can be used for screening and diagnosis to distinguish DKA from ketosis due to hypothermia and malnutrition. Therefore, in the present case, we diagnosed that the natural cause of death was due to AT1D. In conclusion, screening investigations for relevant biochemical markers can provide essential information for the diagnosis of metabolic disturbances, which fail to demonstrate characteristic autopsy findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Biliary sludge and recurrent ketoacidosis: a case report

    Kalra Sanjay

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A five year old boy, weighing 14 kg with no family history of diabetes, presented in frank diabetic ketoacidosis. He recovered, but continued to have episodes of ketoacidosis. He was diagnosed to have biliary sludge, which recovered with insulin treatment.

  18. Reimbursement for pediatric diabetes intensive case management: a model for chronic diseases?

    Beck, Joni K; Logan, Kathy J; Hamm, Robert M; Sproat, Scott M; Musser, Kathleen M; Everhart, Patricia D; McDermott, Harrold M; Copeland, Kenneth C

    2004-01-01

    Current reimbursement policies serve as potent disincentives for physicians who provide evaluation and management services exclusively. Such policies threaten nationwide availability of care for personnel-intensive services such as pediatric diabetes. This report describes an approach to improving reimbursement for highly specialized, comprehensive pediatric diabetes management through prospective contracting for services. The objective of this study was to determine whether pediatric diabetes intensive case management services are cost-effective to the payer, the patient, and a pediatric diabetes program. A contract with a third-party payer was created to reimburse for 3 key pediatric diabetes intensive case management components: specialty education, 24/7 telephone access to an educator (and board-certified pediatric endocrinologist as needed), and quarterly educator assessments of self-management skills. Data were collected and analyzed for 15 months after signing the contract. Within the first 15 months after the contract was signed, 22 hospital admissions for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurred in 16 different patients. After hospitalizations for DKA, all 16 patients were offered participation in the program. All were followed during the subsequent 1 to 15 months of observation. Ten patients elected to participate, and 6 refused participation. Frequency of rehospitalization, emergency department visits, and costs were compared between the 2 groups. Among the 10 participating patients, there was only 1 subsequent DKA admission, whereas among the 6 who refused participation, 5 were rehospitalized for DKA on at least 1 occasion. The 10 patients who participated in the program had greater telephone contact with the team compared with those who did not (16 crisis-management calls vs 0). Costs (education, hospitalization, and emergency department visits) per participating patient were approximately 1350 dollars less than those for nonparticipating patients

  19. 糖尿病酮症酸中毒并发急性胰腺炎患者精细化目标管理的效果评价%Evaluation of effects of detailed target management on patients with diabetic ketoacidosis complicated with acute pancreatitis

    王洪飞; 廉永刚; 王刚; 冒山林

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical role and value of detailed target management on patients with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) complicated with acute pancreatitis (AP).Methods The clinical data of patients with DKA complicated with AP admitted to the Department of Emergency of Linyi City People's Hospital from January 2013 toDecember 2016 were retrospectively analyzed. The patients managed by detailed target management (from January 2015 to December 2016) were served as the observation group (detailed target management group), and those managed by routine management (from January 2013 to December 2014) were set as the control group (traditional management group). The gender, age, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation Ⅱ (APACHE Ⅱ) score, Ranson score, underlying disease, blood glucose, glycemic excursion [including: standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG) level, the largest amplitude of glycemic excursions (LAGE), mean amplitude of glycemic excursion (MAGE), and absolute means of daily difference (MODD) in blood glucose], remission time of DKA, the incidence of MODS and mortality were compared between two groups.Results There were no significant differences in sex, age, APACHE Ⅱ score, Ranson score, blood glucose and the distribution of underlying disease between the two groups (allP > 0.05). Compared with the traditional management group, the level of blood glucose in the detailed target management group was decreased steadily, blood glucose excursions of within-day and day-to-day were significantly reduced on the 2nd and 3rd day (the 2nd day: SDBG was 3.01±1.38 vs. 4.27±1.89, LAGE was 4.14±1.52 vs. 5.62±2.54, MAGE was 0.61±0.35 vs. 1.01±0.57, the 3rd day: SDBG was 2.94±0.91 vs. 3.83±1.29, LAGE was 3.81±1.05 vs. 5.02±2.13, MAGE was 0.58±0.32 vs. 0.96±0.52), MODD: 0.82±0.81 vs. 1.59±1.12, allP 0.05).Conclusions Detailed target management can help the salvage and treatment of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis complicated with acute

  20. Association between diabetic ketoacidosis and acromegaly

    Paloma Ocampo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus occurs in nearly 10% of patients with acromegaly and is secondary to insulin resistance caused by high levels of growth hormone. Diabetes ketoacidosis has been described as a rare complication of acromegaly, resulting from a relative insulin deficiency caused by growth hormone excess. We described the case of a 38 year-old man who presented to the emergency room with a 6-week history of polydipsia, polyuria, polyphagia and weight loss. He also had nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain from two days before admission. His plasma glucose level was 880 mg/dl, plasma osmolarity 368 mOsm/l, arterial pH 7.06 and serum bicarbonate 8.6 mEq/l. At the clinical examination, he had features of acromegaly. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a pituitary macro adenoma and growth hormone dosages were abnormally high. After tumor removal, plasma glucose levels became normal. This case shows the rare association between diabetic ketoacidosis and acromegaly. Surgery, in this case, was the definite modality of treatment.

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  18. Cerebral oedema with coning in diabetic keto-acidosis

    1991-06-15

    £548. 10. Trachrman H, Babour R, Srurman JA, Finberg L. Taurine and osmoregul;l- tion. Pediarr Res 1988; 23: 35-39. 11. Duck Se, Wyaa DT. Faerors associated with brain herniation in the rrearment of diabetic ketoacidosis.

  19. [Opportunities to improve hospital emergency care of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis].

    Navarro-Díaz, Francisco José; Amillo, Mónica; Rosales, María; Panadero, Ana; Ena, Javier

    2015-02-01

    To identify opportunities to improve the care of adult patients with diabetic ketoacidosis in the emergency room. Retrospective observational study of records for 2010 to 2013. Searching for International Classification of Diseases discharge codes 250.1–250.3 we identified patients who met the following 3 criteria: ketonuria of 100 mg/dL or more, diagnosed diabetes or glucose concentration of 250 mg/dL or more, and venous blood pH below 7.30 (or venous bicarbonate concentration less than 18 mEq/L). We reviewed the cases to extract patient and clinical characteristics and time from triage until diagnosis and start of treatment. The findings were compared with recommendations in clinical practice guidelines. We identified 49 episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis (4 mild, 32 moderate, and 13 severe) in 43 patients. The median delay between triage until the first blood test results were available was 142 minutes (range, 59-597 minutes). In 50% of the cases fluid therapy was delayed beyond the time recommended in clinical practice guidelines. Intravenous insulin was also delayed (in 66%) and insuficient intravenous potassium was given in 65%. Sodium bicarbonate was overused (in 50%). Half the patients developed hypokalemia in the hospital. Diagnosis and initiation of treatment were often delayed for patients with diabetic ketoacidosis in our emergency department.

  20. Metabolic acidosis mimicking diabetic ketoacidosis after use of calorie-free mineral water.

    Dahl, Gry T; Woldseth, Berit; Lindemann, Rolf

    2012-09-01

    A previously healthy boy was admitted with fever, tachycardia, dyspnea, and was vomiting. A blood test showed a severe metabolic acidosis with pH 7.08 and an anion gap of 36 mmol/L. His urine had an odor of acetone. The serum glucose was 5.6 mmol/L, and no glucosuria was found. Diabetic ketoacidosis could therefore be eliminated. Lactate level was normal. Tests for the most common metabolic diseases were negative. Because of herpes stomatitis, the boy had lost appetite and only been drinking Diet Coke and water the last days. Diet Coke or Coca-Cola Light is sweetened with a blend containing cyclamates, aspartame, and acesulfame potassium, all free of calories. The etiology of the metabolic acidosis appeared to be a catabolic situation exaggerated by fasting with no intake of calories. The elevated anion gap was due to a severe starvation ketoacidosis, mimicking a diabetic ketoacidosis. Pediatricians should recommend carbohydrate/calorie-containing fluids for rehydration of children with acute fever, diarrhea, or illness.

  1. Severe Ketoacidosis (pH ≤ 6.9 in Type 2 Diabetes: More Frequent and Less Ominous Than Previously Thought

    René Rodríguez-Gutiérrez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic ketoacidosis is a life-threatening acute metabolic complication of uncontrolled diabetes. Severe cases of DKA (pH ≤ 7.00, bicarbonate level ≤ 10.0, anion gap > 12, positive ketones, and altered mental status are commonly encountered in patients with type 1 diabetes and are thought to carry an ominous prognosis. There is not enough information on the clinical course of severely acidotic type 2 diabetes (pH ≤ 6.9 patients with DKA, possibly because this condition is rarely seen in developed countries. In this series, we present 18 patients with type 2 diabetes, DKA, and a pH ≤ 6.9 that presented to a tertiary university hospital over the past 11 years. The objective was to describe their clinical characteristics, the triggering cause, and emphasis on treatment, evolution, and outcomes. The majority of the patients were female (61%. Mean age was 40.66 years (23–59. The patients had been first diagnosed with type 2 diabetes on average 5.27 ± 3.12 years before admission. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65 antibodies were negative in all patients. The origin of DKA could be attributed to two main causes: treatment omission in 8 (44.4% patients and infections in 7 (38.8% patients. The most common symptoms described were general malaise, dyspnea, altered mental status, and abdominal pain. Mean serum glucose on admission was 613.8 ± 114.5 mg/dL. Mean venous pH was 6.84 ± 0.03 with an anion gap of 30.3 ± 2.9 and a venous HCO3 level of 3.62 ± 1.35 mmol/L. All patients had acute renal failure on admission, with a mean serum creatinine of 1.57 ± 0.35 mg/dL compared to 0.55 ± 0.21 mg/dL at discharge. All patients received regular insulin infusion, aggressive fluid repletion, and 12 patients (66% received bicarbonate infusion. Mean total insulin infusion dose was 181.7 ± 90.4 U (on average 0.14 ± 0.05 U/Kg/h. Mean time on infusion was 24.4 ± 12.6 hours. We recorded no mortality in this case series. Mean in-hospital stay

  2. Diabetic Ketoacidosis in a Patient with Acromegaly

    Yen-Ling Chen

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus develops in about 10% of acromegalic patients, usually secondary to insulin resistance caused by growth hormone excess. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a result of relative insulin deficiency and is a rare feature of acromegaly. Here, we present one case of this disorder. A 57-year-old man came to the emergency room due to 2 weeks of dizziness. He also had polyuria, polydipsia, nausea, diplopia, blurred vision and dysarthria. His plasma glucose level was 32.06 mmol/L, plasma osmolarity was 322 mOsm/L, arterial pH was 7.30, level of bicarbonates was 18 mmol/L, urine ketones was 4+, and HbA1c was 14.1%. No specific cause for the development of this metabolic derangement could be found. He displayed clinical features of acromegaly during admission, which was confirmed by an elevated growth hormone level and pituitary macroadenoma shown on magnetic resonance imaging. The patient underwent total transsphe-noid tumor removal 2 weeks later; plasma glucose levels became normal thereafter.

  3. Diabetic ketoacidosis associated with tacrolimus in solid organ transplant recipients

    Maqsood, M.Q.; Rabbani, M.; Habib, M.; Saleem, T.

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis in patients receiving tacrolimus in the post-transplant setting is rare. We describe two such cases in solid-organ transplant recipients. The first patient, a 17-year-old male, presented with severe diabetic ketoacidosis and was managed with intravenous fluids and insulin infusion. He was a known case of Laurence-Moon-Bardet-Biedl syndrome and had received a renal transplant 2 years ago and was receiving tacrolimus since then. Although diabetic ketoacidosis resolved in 24 hours, large doses of subcutaneous insulin (unto 130 units per day) were needed to keep serum glucose within the normal range. Substitution of tacrolimus with cyclosporine obviated the need for insulin or oral hypoglycaemics. The second patient, a 55-year-old woman, presented with a history of polyuria for 3 days. She had received a hepatic transplant 2 years ago and tacrolimus was being used since then. Mild diabetic ketoacidosis was managed with fluid resuscitation and subcutaneous insulin. Her insulin requirement after an uneventful recovery has been 54 - 70 units per day. Clinicians should be cognizant of the possibility of hyperglycaemic crisis presenting as sudden onset of diabetic ketoacidosis in patients receiving tacrolimus. Use of an alternative calcineurin inhibitor may provide a safer solution to minimize future morbidity in such patients. (author)

  4. Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndrome 3 Onset with Severe Ketoacidosis in a 74-Year-Old Woman

    Stefano Benedini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D, autoimmune thyroid disease, and autoimmune gastritis often occur together forming the so-called autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 3 (APS3. We here report a clinical case of a 74-year-old woman who presented for the first time with severe hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis diagnosed as T1D. Further clinical investigations revealed concomitant severe hypothyroidism with autoimmune thyroid disease and severe cobalamin deficiency due to chronic atrophic gastritis. The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus was confirmed by the detection of autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, islet cell antibodies, and anti-insulin autoantibodies. Anti-thyroperoxidase, anti-thyroglobulin, and anti-gastric parietal cell antibodies were also clearly positive. The case emphasized that new onset diabetic ketoacidosis, hypothyroidism, and cobalamin deficiency may simultaneously occur, and one disease can mask the features of the other, thereby making diagnosis difficult. It is noteworthy that an APS3 acute episode occurred in an asymptomatic elder woman for any autoimmune diseases.

  5. Prognostic factors in patients hospitalised with diabetic ketoacidosis ...

    Objective: To determine the clinico-laboratory predictors of outcomes of patients hospitalised with diabetic ketoacidosis who were undergoing treatment. Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study. Setting: The accident and emergency department and medical wards of the Kenyatta National Hospital. Subjects: Fifty one ...

  6. South Beach Diet associated ketoacidosis: a case report

    Chalasani Swapna

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction It has been previously unclear whether a "mild" degree of low carbohydrate or "starvation" ketonemia and acidosis induced by a low carbohydrate diet is clinically relevant to a patient. Case presentation A 30-year-old Caucasian male on a low carbohydrate diet presented with nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. The patient's bicarbonate level was 12 and he had hyperglycemia and ketonemia. He was felt to be in diabetic ketoacidosis and was started on intravenous insulin and isotonic saline infusions and responded well. Following cessation of insulin therapy, the patient remained normoglycemic for the remainder of his hospital stay. He later admitted to having been on the South Beach Diet, which is a low carbohydrate diet, for the three weeks prior to his presentation and during which time he had lost 16 pounds. On admission his BMI was 27.1. On presentation, the patient was felt to be in diabetic ketoacidosis but, interestingly, he was subsequently euglycemic without therapy. Following discharge, the patient discontinued the diet plan and he has remained asymptomatic and euglycemic over the following two years. Conclusion The hyperglycemic ketoacidosis in this patient may have been caused by increased concentrations of free fatty acids in the absence of carbohydrate-induced inhibition of beta-oxidation of fatty acids and in the presence of an abnormally high ratio of glucagons to insulin. Given the present day popularity of low-carbohydrate diet plans, healthcare providers should be aware of the apparent association between such diets and symptomatic ketoacidosis. In a patient with ketoacidosis suspected to be secondary to a low carbohydrate diet, all other causes of high anion gap acidosis should be ruled out before attributing the acidosis to the low carbohydrate diet.

  7. Mortality in hyperglycemic crisis: a high association with infections and cerebrovascular disease.

    Ekpebegh, C; Longo-Mbenza, B

    2013-06-01

    Aim of the present study was to determine syndrome specific mortality rates and the precipitating factors associated with deaths following admission for hyperglycemic crisis to a high care unit. Retrospective review of medical records for hyperglycemic crisis at Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital, Mthatha, Eastern Cape Province of South Africa from February 1 2010 to January 31 2011. All admissions were initially into the high care unit. The overall mortality rates (per admissions) was 13.9% (N.=15/108) with syndrome specific mortality rates (per admissions) of 11.9% (N.=8/67), 0% (N.=0/8) and 21.2% (N.=7/33) respectively for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) and hyperglycemia with dehydration (HD). The precipitating factors that were mainly associated with mortality were infections and cerebrovascular disease (CVD). The patients with CVD who died were all unconscious. There were no deaths where non-compliance with hypoglycaemic agents (14.8%, N.=16/108) was the precipitating factor. The overall mortality rates (per admissions) following high care unit admissions for hyperglycemic crisis was 13.9% with infections and CVD as the precipitating factors most associated with deaths.

  8. [Severely increased serum lipid levels in diabetic ketoacidosis - case report].

    Stefansson, Hrafnkell; Sigvaldason, Kristinn; Kjartansson, Hilmar; Sigurjonsdottir, Helga Águsta

    2017-01-01

    Severe hypertriglyceridemia is a known, but uncommon complication of diabetic ketoacidosis. We discuss the case of a 23-year-old, previously healthy, woman who initially presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain. Grossly lipemic serum due to extremely high triglyceride (38.6 mmol/L) and cholesterol (23.2 mmol/L) levels were observed with a high blood glucose (23 mmol/L) and a low pH of 7.06 on a venous blood gas. She was treated successfully with fluids and insulin and had no sequale of pancreatitis or cerebral edema. Her triglycerides and cholesterol was normalized in three days and she was discharged home on insulin therapy after five days. Further history revealed a recent change in diet with no meat, fish or poultry consumption in the last 12 months and concomitantly an increase in carbohydrate intake which might have contributed to her extremely high serum lipid levels. This case demonstrates that clinicians should be mindful of the different presentations of diabetic ketoacidosis. Key words: diabetic ketoacidosis, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperlipidemia, vegan diet, carbohydrate diet. Correspondence: Hrafnkell Stefansson, hrafnkell.stefans@gmail.com.

  9. Prognostic factors in hospitalized patients with diabetic ketoacidosis%糖尿病酮症酸中毒住院患者的预后因素分析

    张春林; 刘刚; 童强; 张瑞

    2017-01-01

    目的 回顾性分析糖尿病酮症酸中毒(diabetic ketoacidosis,DKA)患者预后相关因素,以期提高DKA诊治水平及降低病死率.方法 收集本院内分泌科2014年1月至2016年12月收治的DKA住院患者临床资料.根据DKA患者是否存活分为存活组和死亡组,并回顾性分析2组患者基本情况、入院时血常规、肝肾功、电解质、C反应蛋白、格拉斯哥昏迷评分(Glasgow coma scale,GCS)、急性生理与慢性健康评分Ⅱ(acute physiology and chronic health evaluation scoreⅡ,APACHEⅡ)等观察指标及预后情况.结果 共纳入患者70例,其中男性36例,女性34例,年龄(42.63±15.67)岁.经统计分析结果显示,存活组患者GCS评分[(14.41±1.42)vs(11.36 ±3.14)]、血磷[(0.96±0.47) mg/L vs(0.68 ±0.60) mg/L]明显高于死亡组(P<0.05,P<0.01),存活组APACHEⅡ评分[(8.58±4.63)vs(15.73±4.38)]、白细胞总数[(14.82 ±9.55)×109/L vs(22.80 ±7.67)×109/L]、C反应蛋白[(33.67±45.70) mg/L vs(211.39±173.93) mg/L]、肌酐[(87.28±43.89) μmol/L vs(136.47±87.50) μmol/L]、尿素氮[(8.45 ±5.00) mmol/L vs(14.72 ±9.23) mmol/L]明显低于死亡组(P <0.05,P<0.01).DKA患者GCS评分(OR =0.510,P<0.05)越低、APACHEⅡ评分(OR=1.300,P<0.05)及C反应蛋白(OR=1.031,P<0.05)越高,预后则越差.结论 C反应蛋白、GCS评分、APACHEⅡ评分是DKA患者独立的预后因素.%Objective To retrospectively analyze the prognostic factors for diabetic ketoacidsis (DKA) in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment and decreased the mortality for DKA.Methods Clinical data of all DKA patients admitted in our department of endocrinology from January 2014 to December 2016 were collected and retrospectively analyzed.The patients were divided into the survival group and dead group.The baseline data,blood routine results,liver and renal functions,electrolyte levels,C-reactive protein (CRP) level,Scores of Glasgow coma scale (GCS) and acute physiology and chronic health

  10. Diabetic ketoacidosis in acromegaly; a rare complication precipitated by corticosteroid use.

    Weiss, Jeremy; Wood, Anna J; Zajac, Jeffrey D; Grossmann, Mathis; Andrikopoulos, Sofianos; Ekinci, Elif I

    2017-12-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis has been described in the literature as a rare possible initial presentation of acromegaly before a diagnosis of acromegaly is eventually made. Indeed, diabetic ketoacidosis is a recognised complication of acromegaly. There are a number of factors that can predispose patients with acromegaly to diabetes as well as to diabetic ketoacidosis. These include high levels of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 in acromegaly and the effect on glycaemia by medications used in the management of acromegaly. Ketoacidosis has been described in patients with acromegaly even without the presence of an underlying autoimmune diabetes. Patients with acromegaly and ketoacidosis often respond to treatment and may not require long-term insulin. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Facts about Type 2

    Full Text Available ... Information Legal Assistance Success Stories Complications Hypoglycemia Hyperglycemia Skin Complications Eye Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & ...

  12. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Full Text Available ... Information Legal Assistance Success Stories Complications Hypoglycemia Hyperglycemia Skin Complications Eye Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & ...

  13. Create Your Plate

    Full Text Available ... Information Legal Assistance Success Stories Complications Hypoglycemia Hyperglycemia Skin Complications Eye Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & ...

  14. [Euglycemic ketoacidosis : a complication of SGLT2 inhibitors].

    Mizuno, Aki; Lolachi, Sanaz; Pernet, Alain

    2017-05-31

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors constitute a new category of oral antidiabetics recently indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Their mechanism of action (inhibition of renal reabsorption of glucose) and the fact that they do not induce hypoglycemia (as monotherapy) make their clinical use interesting. Various adverse events have however been reported regarding these drugs with the euglycemic ketoacidosis being the most serious. In this article we aim to review the possible mechanism of this side effect and recommendations for use of SGLT2 inhibitors by means of a case report.

  15. Rapid-onset diabetic ketoacidosis secondary to nivolumab therapy

    Senhong Lee

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 67-year-old man with type 2 diabetes presented with diabetic ketoacidosis, two weeks after his first dose of nivolumab therapy for non–small-cell lung carcinoma. He was started on empagliflozin two days prior in the setting of hyperglycaemia after the initiation of nivolumab therapy. Laboratory evaluation revealed an undetectable C-peptide and a positive anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD antibody. He was treated with intravenous fluids and insulin infusion and was subsequently transitioned to subcutaneous insulin and discharged home. He subsequently has developed likely autoimmune thyroiditis and autoimmune encephalitis.

  16. Long-Term Follow-up of a Case with Proprotein Convertase 1/3 Deficiency: Transient Diabetes Mellitus with Intervening Diabetic Ketoacidosis During Growth Hormone Therapy.

    Gönç, E. Nazlı; Özön, Alev; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer; Kandemir, Nurgün

    2017-09-01

    Proprotein convertase 1/3 (PC1/3) deficiency is a very rare disease characterized by severe intractable diarrhea in the first years of life, followed by obesity and several hormonal deficiencies later. Diabetes mellitus requiring insulin treatment and diabetic ketoacidosis have not been reported in this disorder. We herein present a girl with PC1/3 deficiency who has been followed from birth to 17 years of age. She developed deficiencies of all pituitary hormones over time as well as diabetes mellitus while receiving growth hormone (GH) therapy. She was complicated with diabetic ketoacidosis during dietary management of diabetes mellitus, thus insulin treatment was initiated. Insulin requirement to regulate hyperglycemia was short-lived. Repeat oral glucose tolerance test five years later was normal. The findings of this patient show that diabetes mellitus can develop at any time during follow-up of cases with proportein convertase 1/3 deficiency especially under GH therapy.

  17. Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome after renal transplantation in the United States

    Agodoa Lawrence Y

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence and risk factors for diabetic ketoacidosis (diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome, previously called non-ketotic hyperosmolar coma have not been reported in a national population of renal transplant (renal transplantation recipients. Methods We performed a historical cohort study of 39,628 renal transplantation recipients in the United States Renal Data System between 1 July 1994 and 30 June 1998, followed until 31 Dec 1999. Outcomes were hospitalizations for a primary diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis (ICD-9 code 250.1x and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (code 250.2x. Cox Regression analysis was used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios for time to hospitalization for diabetic ketoacidosis or hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome. Results The incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome were 33.2/1000 person years (PY and 2.7/1000 PY respectively for recipients with a prior diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM, and 2.0/1000 PY and 1.1/1000 PY in patients without DM. In Cox Regression analysis, African Americans (AHR, 2.71, 95 %CI, 1.96–3.75, females, recipients of cadaver kidneys, patients age 33–44 (vs. >55, more recent year of transplant, and patients with maintenance TAC (tacrolimus, vs. cyclosporine had significantly higher risk of diabetic ketoacidosis. However, the rate of diabetic ketoacidosis decreased more over time in TAC users than overall. Risk factors for hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome were similar except for the significance of positive recipient hepatitis C serology and non-significance of female gender. Both diabetic ketoacidosis (AHR, 2.44, 95% CI, 2.10–2.85, p Conclusions We conclude that diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome were associated with increased risk of mortality and were not uncommon after renal transplantation. High-risk groups were identified.

  18. [Acidosis without marked hyperglycemia : Euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis associated with SGLT2-Inhibitors].

    Valek, R; Von der Mark, J

    2017-03-01

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are new antidiabetic drugs that regulate blood glucose levels by increasing urinary glucose excretion. In May 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a warning that SGLT2 inhibitors may lead to ketoacidosis. In this report, we describe a case of life-threatening euglycemic ketoacidosis associated with SGLT2 inhibition and evaluate possible mechanisms and triggers.

  19. An audit of the management of diabetic ketoacidosis at St Luke’s Hospital

    Abela, Alexia-Giovanna; Magri, Caroline Jane; Debono, Miguel; Calleja, Neville; Vassallo, Josanne; Azzopardi, Joseph;

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To perform an audit of the protocol used in the management of patients with Diabetic Ketoacidosis, in St Lukes Hospital. Methods: Patients admitted with `Diabetes Ketoacidosis', between 14th August 2004 and 14th August 2005, were identified from the Admission book at the Accident and Emergency Department. Data obtained from patients' medical records were collected according to a preset proforma. The criteria assessed by this audit included parameter monitoring, investigations performed, ...

  20. Alternative management of diabetic ketoacidosis in a Brazilian pediatric emergency department

    Savoldelli, Roberta D; Farhat, Sylvia CL; Manna, Thais D

    2010-01-01

    Abstract DKA is a severe metabolic derangement characterized by dehydration, loss of electrolytes, hyperglycemia, hyperketonemia, acidosis and progressive loss of consciousness that results from severe insulin deficiency combined with the effects of increased levels of counterregulatory hormones (catecholamines, glucagon, cortisol, growth hormone). The biochemical criteria for diagnosis are: blood glucose > 200 mg/dl, venous pH

  1. A STUDY OF THE CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS, BIOCHEMICAL FINDINGS, PRECIPITATING FACTORS AND COMPLICATIONS IN 56 EPISODES OF DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS

    M. Rafii

    1998-01-01

    Fifty six episodes of DKA occurred in 33 patients during the period between 1998 -96. These patients were admitted and treated in Bahrami children hospital, a Tehran University teaching medical center. The most frequent clinical manifestations consisted of polyuria and polydipsia (66%), nausea and vomiting (64%), reduction in consciousness (53%), and Kussmaul respiration (53.5%). 54.6% of DKA episodes showed a pH below 7.1. There was a relationship between the severity of acidosis and the tim...

  2. Measured degree of dehydration in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetic ketoacidosis.

    Ugale, Judith; Mata, Angela; Meert, Kathleen L; Sarnaik, Ashok P

    2012-03-01

    Successful management of diabetic ketoacidosis depends on adequate rehydration while avoiding cerebral edema. Our objectives are to 1) measure the degree of dehydration in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and diabetic ketoacidosis based on change in body weight; and 2) investigate the relationships between measured degree of dehydration and clinically assessed degree of dehydration, severity of diabetic ketoacidosis, and routine serum laboratory values. Prospective observational study. University-affiliated tertiary care children's hospital. Sixty-six patients dehydration was based on the difference between admission and plateau weights. Clinical degree of dehydration was assessed by physical examination and severity of diabetic ketoacidosis was assessed by blood gas values as defined by international guidelines. Laboratory values obtained on admission included serum glucose, urea nitrogen, sodium, and osmolality. Median measured degree of dehydration was 5.2% (interquartile range, 3.1% to 7.8%). Fourteen (21%) patients were clinically assessed as mild dehydration, 49 (74%) as moderate, and three (5%) as severe. Patients clinically assessed as moderately dehydrated had a greater measured degree of dehydration (5.8%; interquartile range, 3.6% to 9.6%) than those assessed as mildly dehydrated (3.7%; interquartile range, 2.3% to 6.4%) or severely dehydrated (2.5%; interquartile range, 2.3% to 2.6%). Nine (14%) patients were assessed as mild diabetic ketoacidosis, 18 (27%) as moderate, and 39 (59%) as severe. Diabetic ketoacidosis severity groups did not differ in measured degree of dehydration. Variables independently associated with measured degree of dehydration included serum urea nitrogen and sodium concentration on admission. Hydration status in children with diabetic ketoacidosis cannot be accurately assessed by physical examination or blood gas values. Fluid therapy based on maintenance plus 6% deficit replacement is reasonable for most patients.

  3. Ketoacidosis With Canagliflozin Prescribed for Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Inhibitor–Induced Hyperglycemia: A Case Report

    Christopher Bowman MD

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Context . Many phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K inhibitors are under trial for cancer treatment. We present a patient taking taselisib who developed ketoacidosis within 1 week of starting canagliflozin. Case Description . A 69-year-old female patient with no previous history of diabetes mellitus was enrolled in a clinical trial for taselisib therapy in stage IV breast cancer. Hyperglycemia treatment with metformin was insufficient and not tolerated. The addition of canagliflozin daily resulted in ketoacidosis and hospitalization within 1 week. Conclusions . This case report brings together 2 poorly understood and relatively understudied disorders of glucose homeostasis: hyperglycemia due to PI3K inhibition and euglycemic ketoacidosis due to dehydration/SGLT2 inhibition. It demonstrates the complexities of glucose management in the setting of PI3K inhibition. PI3K stimulation (via insulin in this setting is counterintuitive; therefore, non–insulin-mediated therapies (eg, metformin, thiazolidinediones might be favored over insulin-mediated therapies.

  4. Diabetic ketoacidosis in a pediatric intensive care unit

    Clarice L.S. Lopes

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To describe the characteristics of children aged 0-14 years diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis and compare the following outcomes between children with prior diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus and children without prior diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus length of hospital stay, severity on admission, insulin dosage, time of continuous insulin use, volume of fluids infused during treatment, and complications. Methods: A retrospective descriptive study with review of medical records of patients admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit of a referral hospital from June 2013 to July 2015. The following data regarding 52 admissions were analyzed: age, sex, weight, body surface area, signs, symptoms and severity on admission, blood gas, blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin, serum osmolarity, and index of mortality. The insulin dosage, time of continuous insulin use, volume administered in the expansion phase and in the first 24 h, length of stay, and complications such as electrolyte disturbances, hypoglycemia, cerebral edema, and death were compared between the two groups. Results: Patients without a previous diagnosis of DM1 were younger at admission, with mean age of 8.4 years (p < 0.01, reported more nausea or vomiting, polydipsia and polyuria, and showed more weight loss (p < 0.01. This study also observed a higher prevalence of hypokalemia (p < 0.01 and longer hospital stay in this group. Conclusions: No differences in severity between groups were observed. The study showed that children without prior diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus were younger at admission, had more hypokalemia during the course of treatment, and had greater length of hospital stay.

  5. Alternative management of diabetic ketoacidosis in a Brazilian pediatric emergency department

    Savoldelli Roberta D

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract DKA is a severe metabolic derangement characterized by dehydration, loss of electrolytes, hyperglycemia, hyperketonemia, acidosis and progressive loss of consciousness that results from severe insulin deficiency combined with the effects of increased levels of counterregulatory hormones (catecholamines, glucagon, cortisol, growth hormone. The biochemical criteria for diagnosis are: blood glucose > 200 mg/dl, venous pH 3 mmol/L and presence of ketonuria. A patient with DKA must be managed in an emergency ward by an experienced staff or in an intensive care unit (ICU, in order to provide an intensive monitoring of the vital and neurological signs, and of the patient's clinical and biochemical response to treatment. DKA treatment guidelines include: restoration of circulating volume and electrolyte replacement; correction of insulin deficiency aiming at the resolution of metabolic acidosis and ketosis; reduction of risk of cerebral edema; avoidance of other complications of therapy (hypoglycemia, hypokalemia, hyperkalemia, hyperchloremic acidosis; identification and treatment of precipitating events. In Brazil, there are few pediatric ICU beds in public hospitals, so an alternative protocol was designed to abbreviate the time on intravenous infusion lines in order to facilitate DKA management in general emergency wards. The main differences between this protocol and the international guidelines are: intravenous fluid will be stopped when oral fluids are well tolerated and total deficit will be replaced orally; if potassium analysis still indicate need for replacement, it will be given orally; subcutaneous rapid-acting insulin analog is administered at 0.15 U/kg dose every 2-3 hours until resolution of metabolic acidosis; approximately 12 hours after treatment initiation, intermediate-acting (NPH insulin is initiated at the dose of 0.6-1 U/kg/day, and it will be lowered to 0.4-0.7 U/kg/day at discharge from hospital.

  6. Create Your Plate

    Full Text Available ... Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing ... Pinterest Youtube Instagram Diabetes Stops Here Blog Online Community Site ... Day Prediabetes My Health Advisor Tools to Know Your Risk Diabetes Basics ...

  7. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Full Text Available ... Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing ... Pinterest Youtube Instagram Diabetes Stops Here Blog Online Community Site ... Day Prediabetes My Health Advisor Tools to Know Your Risk Diabetes Basics ...

  8. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Full Text Available ... Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools ... Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease ... than planned or exercised less than planned. You have stress from an illness, such as a cold or flu. You have ...

  9. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Full Text Available ... Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & ... Non-starchy Vegetables Grains and Starchy ... has too little insulin or when the body can't use insulin properly. What Causes Hyperglycemia? A number of ...

  10. Create Your Plate

    Full Text Available ... Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & ... Non-starchy Vegetables Grains and Starchy ... healthy fats in small amounts. For cooking, use oils. For salads, some healthy additions are nuts, ...

  11. Facts about Type 2

    Full Text Available ... Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & ... Non-starchy Vegetables Grains and Starchy ... form of diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, your body does not use insulin properly. This is called insulin resistance. At ...

  12. Evaluation of New-Onset Diabetes in Patients Presenting Emergency Service with a Diabetic Ketoacidosis Attack

    Yavuz Yiğit

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the rate of new-onset diabetes mellitus (DM in patients presenting to our emergency department with diabetic ketoacidosis. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated hospital records of patients who presented to the Emergency Department at Istanbul Goztepe Research and Training Hospital between 01 April 2009 and 01 April 2011 and were diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis. 57 patients having complete clinical data were included in the study. Results: 45.6%of patients had type 1 DM, 33.3%- type 2 DM, and 21%of them were with new-onset DM. No statistically significant difference was found between type 1 DM, type 2 DM and new-onset DM patients with respect to arterial blood pH and HCO3 levels and serum sodium, potassium and plasma glucose levels at presentation as well as time of presentation (p>0.05, while HbA1c levels showed statistically significant difference in new-onset DM patients. Conclusion: No statistically significant difference was found between types of DM in patients diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis except for precipitating factors, age and HbA1c. Detecting high blood glucose levels in patients presenting to emergency room for reasons other than DM is not a rare condition. Cautious evaluation and recognition of these patients in emergency room for the possibility of undiagnosed DM is important for prevention of future diabetic ketoacidosis episodes. (The Medical Bulletin of Haseki 2013; 51: 168-72

  13. Ketosis and diabetic ketoacidosis in response to SGLT2 inhibitors: Basic mechanisms and therapeutic perspectives.

    Qiu, Hongyu; Novikov, Aleksandra; Vallon, Volker

    2017-07-01

    Inhibitors of the sodium-glucose cotransporter SGLT2 are a new class of antihyperglycemic drugs that have been approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). These drugs inhibit glucose reabsorption in the proximal tubules of the kidney thereby enhancing glucosuria and lowering blood glucose levels. Additional consequences and benefits include a reduction in body weight, uric acid levels, and blood pressure. Moreover, SGLT2 inhibition can have protective effects on the kidney and cardiovascular system in patients with T2DM and high cardiovascular risk. However, a potential side effect that has been reported with SGLT2 inhibitors in patients with T2DM and particularly during off-label use in patients with type 1 diabetes is diabetic ketoacidosis. The US Food and Drug Administration recently warned that SGLT2 inhibitors may result in euglycemic ketoacidosis. Here, we review the basic metabolism of ketone bodies, the triggers of diabetic ketoacidosis, and potential mechanisms by which SGLT2 inhibitors may facilitate the development of ketosis or ketoacidosis. This provides the rationale for measures to lower the risk. We discuss the role of the kidney and potential links to renal gluconeogenesis and uric acid handling. Moreover, we outline potential beneficial effects of modestly elevated ketone body levels on organ function that may have therapeutic relevance for the observed beneficial effects of SGLT2 inhibitors on the kidney and cardiovascular system. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Fatal hypertriglyceridaemia, acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis possibly induced by quetiapine

    Madsen, Kristian Roerbaek

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old man treated with quetiapine for anxiety disorder developed hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis. He was otherwise physically healthy with no family history of hyperlipidaemia. Despite aggressive intensive therapy he died of multiorgan failure wi...... and possibly plasmapheresis in case of extreme hypertriglyceridaemia....

  15. Euglycaemic ketoacidosis in a non-diabetic primigravida following an appendicectomy

    Dinushi Dilanka Dikowita

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy creates significant alterations in energy metabolism which itself is a physiological adaptation to provide continuous flow of energy metabolites to the foetus. The state of insulin resistance created by hormonal changes in pregnancy enables free flow of glucose to the foetus and allows its absorption through facilitated diffusion. As glucose is preferentially available for the foetus, maternal fasting glucose level would be less than that of a non-pregnant state and in contrast plasma ketones and free fatty acids levels are elevated, resulting in a state of accelerated starvation. These metabolic alterations place a pregnant woman at a higher risk of developing euglycaemic ketoacidosis when allowed to fast for prolonged periods due to medical, surgical and psychological reasons. We report a rare case of euglycaemic ketoacidosis causing severe increased anion gap metabolic acidosis in a non-diabetic mother following surgery for appendicitis at a gestation of 27 weeks.

  16. Endocrine and metabolic emergencies in children: hypocalcemia, hypoglycemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis

    Se Young Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is important to fast diagnosis and management of the pediatric patients of the endocrine metabolic emergencies because the signs and symptoms of these disorders are nonspecific. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to serious consequences of the pediatric patients, for example, cerebral dysfunction leading to coma or death of the patients with hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, or diabetic ketoacidosis. The index of suspicion of the endocrine metabolic emergencies should be preceded prior to the starting nonspecific treatment. Importantly, proper diagnosis depends on the collection of blood and urine specimen before nonspecific therapy (intravenous hydration, electrolytes, glucose or calcium injection. At the same time, the taking of precise history and searching for pathognomonic physical findings should be performed. This review was described for fast diagnosis and proper management of hypoglycemic emergencies, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis.

  17. Acute starvation ketoacidosis in pregnancy with severe hypertriglyceridemia: A case report.

    Hui, Li; Shuying, Li

    2018-05-01

    Pregnant women are more prone to ketosis due to the relative insulin resistance, accelerated lipolysis and increased free fatty acids. We report a pregnant woman with hyperlipidemia, who experienced severe metabolic acidosis after a short period of starvation. Based on her clinical symptoms, exclusion diagnosis and therapeutic diagnosis, her condition was diagnosed as starvation ketoacidosis. An emergency caesarean section under general anesthesia was implemented 2 hours after her admission. The metabolic acidosis was treated with fluid resuscitation using compound sodium lactate, bicarbonate, and 5% dextrose together with insulin 6U. Both mother and baby were discharged clinically well. Starvation ketoacidosis may happen in special patient who was in pregnancy and with severe hypertriglyceridemia, after just one day fasting and vomiting.

  18. Acute Pancreatitis and Diabetic Ketoacidosis following L-Asparaginase/Prednisone Therapy in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Dania Lizet Quintanilla-Flores

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis are unusual adverse events following chemotherapy based on L-asparaginase and prednisone as support treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We present the case of a 16-year-old Hispanic male patient, in remission induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia on treatment with mitoxantrone, vincristine, prednisone, and L-asparaginase. He was hospitalized complaining of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Hyperglycemia, acidosis, ketonuria, low bicarbonate levels, hyperamylasemia, and hyperlipasemia were documented, and the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis was made. Because of uncertainty of the additional diagnosis of acute pancreatitis as the cause of abdominal pain, a contrast-enhanced computed tomography was performed resulting in a Balthazar C pancreatitis classification.

  19. A case of hyperthyroidism complicated with diabetic ketoacidosis following 131I therapy

    Itoh, Mitsuyasu; Funauchi, Masanori; Fukuma, Naobumi; Abe, Yohsuke; Hirooka, Yoshibumi; Nihei, Noriyuki

    1982-01-01

    The coexistence of diabetes mellitus and hyperthyroidism has long been known and, in a few cases, diabetic acidosis complicated with thyroid storm has been reported. We describe a case who developed thyroid storm and diabetic ketoacidosis following 131 I therapy for severe hyperthyroidism. A 50-yr-old man was diagnosed as having hyperthyroidism complicated with diabetes mellitus at the age of 47. After he had been unsuccessfully treated with methimazole and oral hypoglycemic agents, radioactive iodine was administered twice. However, no remarkable effect was observed. After a third treatment with 131 I, the patient showed symptoms like thyroid storm and diabetic ketoacidosis. He was hospitalized on October 3, 1980. Administration of insulin and supportive therapy including correction of dehydration alleviated his symptoms after admission. Administration inistration of methimazole normalized his thyroid function. A 75 g GTT and tolbutamide i.v. test revealed impaired secretion of endogenous insulin. The patient had a high level of serum T 3 and T 4 following 131 I therapy, indicating that the released hormone caused a transient condition like thyroid storm, which led to deterioration of glucose metabolism as indicated in high levels of hemoglobin A1c. Diabetic acidosis is the precipitating factor for thyroid storm. Prompt treatment for diabetic ketoacidosis, therefore, might prevent the complications of life-threatening thyroid storm. (author)

  20. Case of hyperthyroidism complicated with diabetic ketoacidosis following /sup 131/I therapy

    Itoh, Mitsuyasu; Funauchi, Masanori; Fukuma, Naobumi; Abe, Yohsuke; Hirooka, Yoshibumi; Nihei, Noriyuki (Hamamatsu Univ. Shizuoka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-10-01

    The coexistence of diabetes mellitus and hyperthyroidism has long been known and, in a few cases, diabetic acidosis complicated with thyroid storm has been reported. We describe a case who developed thyroid storm and diabetic ketoacidosis following /sup 131/I therapy for severe hyperthyroidism. A 50-yr-old man was diagnosed as having hyperthyroidism complicated with diabetes mellitus at the age of 47. After he had been unsuccessfully treated with methimazole and oral hypoglycemic agents, radioactive iodine was administered twice. However, no remarkable effect was observed. After a third treatment with /sup 131/I, the patient showed symptoms like thyroid storm and diabetic ketoacidosis. He was hospitalized on October 3, 1980. Adm of insulin and supportive therapy including correction of dehydration alleviated his symptoms after admission. Administration of methimazole normalized his thyroid function. A 75 g GTT and tolbutamide i.v. test revealed impaired secretion of endogenous insulin. The patient had a high level of serum T/sub 3/ and T/sub 4/ following /sup 131/I therapy, indicating that the released hormone caused a transient condition like thyroid storm, which led to deterioration of glucose metabolism as indicated in high levels of hemoglobin A1c. Diabetic acidosis is the precipitating factor for thyroid storm. Prompt treatment for diabetic ketoacidosis, therefore, might prevent the complications of life-threatening thyroid storm.

  1. Low-dose insulin therapy and nursing of children with diabetic ketoacidosis%小剂量胰岛素治疗儿童糖尿病酮症酸中毒及护理

    王九珍

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨小剂量胰岛素持续滴注治疗儿童糖尿病酮症酸中毒的护理方法.方法 对8例1型糖尿病酮症酸中毒患儿,在积极抢救治疗的基础上,注意严密观察病情变化,给予正确的液体治疗、小剂量胰岛素等治疗及护理.结果 8例患儿均好转,原发病病情稳定,血糖控制满意.结论 小剂量胰岛素法治疗糖尿病酮症酸中毒易于掌握,安全有效.护士熟练掌握儿童糖尿病酮症酸中毒抢救治疗护理的程序,对抢救患儿的生命起着重要的作用,做好监测、液体治疗、胰岛素的正确、精确的应用等都是控制本病的关键.%Objective To explore the nursing measures for the low - dose insulin continuous infusion therapy in children with diabetic ketoacidosis. Methods Being kept a strict watch over to note the slightest change in them, 8 cases of type 1 diabetic ketoacidosis in children were given correct fluid therapy, low - dose insulin treatment and nursing methods on the basis of active emergency treatment. Results The state of illness in all patients was improved, the primary disease in stable condition, the serum glucose controlled satisfactorily. Conclusions It is manageable, safe and effective to take low dose insulin treatment on diabetic ketoacidosis patients. Nurses' mastering of nursing procedure in emergency treatment of children with diabetic ketoacidosis plays an important role in saving patients' lives, and the key to control the disease is careful monitoring, fluid therapy,sophisticated use of insulin.

  2. SGLT2-I in the Hospital Setting: Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Other Benefits and Concerns.

    Levine, Joshua A; Karam, Susan L; Aleppo, Grazia

    2017-07-01

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are the newest class of antihyperglycemic agents. They are increasingly being prescribed in the outpatient diabetic population. In this review, we examine the risks and benefits of continuation and initiation of SGLT2 inhibitors in the inpatient setting. There are currently no published data regarding safety and efficacy of SGLT2 inhibitor use in the hospital. Outpatient data suggests that SGLT2 inhibitors have low hypoglycemic risk. They also decrease systolic blood pressure and can prevent cardiovascular death. The EMPA-REG study also showed a decrease in admissions for acute decompensated heart failure. There have been increasing cases of diabetic ketoacidosis, and specifically the euglycemic manifestation, associated with SGLT2 inhibitors use. We present two cases of inpatient SGLT2 inhibitor use, one of continuation of outpatient therapy and one of new initiation of therapy. We then discuss potential risks and methods to mitigate these as well as benefits of these medications in the inpatient setting. We cautiously suggest the use of SGLT2 inhibitors in the hospital. However, these must be used judiciously and the practitioner must be aware of euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis and its risk factors in this population.

  3. Grapefruit Derived Flavonoid Naringin Improves Ketoacidosis and Lipid Peroxidation in Type 1 Diabetes Rat Model.

    Alfred N Murunga

    Full Text Available Hypoglycemic effects of grapefruit juice are well known but the effects of naringin, its main flavonoid on glucose intolerance and metabolic complications in type 1 diabetes are not known.To investigate the effects of naringin on glucose intolerance, oxidative stress and ketonemia in type 1 diabetic rats.Sprague-Dawley rats divided into 5 groups (n = 7 were orally treated daily with 3.0 ml/kg body weight (BW/day of distilled water (group 1 or 50 mg/kg BW of naringin (groups 2 and 4, respectively. Groups 3, 4 and 5 were given a single intra-peritoneal injection of 60 mg/kg BW of streptozotocin to induce diabetes. Group 3 was further treated with subcutaneous insulin (4.0 IU/kg BW twice daily, respectively.Stretozotocin (STZ only-treated groups exhibited hyperglycemia, polydipsia, polyuria, weight loss, glucose intolerance, low fasting plasma insulin and reduced hepatic glycogen content compared to the control group. Furthermore they had significantly elevated Malondialdehyde (MDA, acetoacetate, β-hydroxybutyrate, anion gap and significantly reduced blood pH and plasma bicarbonate compared to the control group. Naringin treatment significantly improved Fasting Plasma Insulin (FPI, hepatic glycogen content, malondialdehyde, β-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, bicarbonate, blood pH and anion gap but not Fasting Blood Glucose (FBG compared to the STZ only-treated group.Naringin is not hypoglycemic but ameliorates ketoacidosis and oxidative stress. Naringin supplements could therefore mitigate complications of diabetic ketoacidosis.

  4. Starvation Ketoacidosis: A Cause of Severe Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis in Pregnancy

    Nupur Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is a diabetogenic state characterized by relative insulin resistance, enhanced lipolysis, elevated free fatty acids and increased ketogenesis. In this setting, short period of starvation can precipitate ketoacidosis. This sequence of events is recognized as “accelerated starvation.” Metabolic acidosis during pregnancy may have adverse impact on fetal neural development including impaired intelligence and fetal demise. Short periods of starvation during pregnancy may present as severe anion gap metabolic acidosis (AGMA. We present a 41-year-old female in her 32nd week of pregnancy, admitted with severe AGMA with pH 7.16, anion gap 31, and bicarbonate of 5 mg/dL with normal lactate levels. She was intubated and accepted to medical intensive care unit. Urine and serum acetone were positive. Evaluation for all causes of AGMA was negative. The diagnosis of starvation ketoacidosis was established in absence of other causes of AGMA. Intravenous fluids, dextrose, thiamine, and folic acid were administered with resolution of acidosis, early extubation, and subsequent normal delivery of a healthy baby at full term. Rapid reversal of acidosis and favorable outcome are achieved with early administration of dextrose containing fluids.

  5. Alcoholic ketoacidosis

    ... Exams and Tests Tests may include: Arterial blood gases (measures the acid/base balance and oxygen level ... 2018, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM ...

  6. Diabetic ketoacidosis associated with atypical antipsychotic drug, clozapine treatment: Report of a case and review of literature

    Pillai L; Husainy SMK; Ramchandani K

    2006-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs are associated with metabolic disturbances like weight gain, type 2 diabetes hyperglycaemia and dyslipedemia, which can result in serious health risk in patients. Diabetic ketoacidosis resulting in serious metabolic acidosis, occurring in a schizophrenic patient on treatment with clozapine is being reported to draw attention this association. Frequent monitoring of the blood sugar and lipids is advised before and during therapy with atypical antipsychotic drugs.

  7. 78 FR 50428 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    2013-08-19

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIDDK Ancillary R01 Studies on Liver... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Diabetic Ketoacidosis. Date: September...

  8. Critical Illness Polyneuromyopathy Developing After Diabetic Ketoacidosis in an Intensive Care Unit

    Mehmet Salih Sevdi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Critical illness polyneuromyopathy (CIPNM is a primary axonal-degenerative condition that occurs in sensory and motor fibers after the onset of a critical illness. It is thought that it develops due to tissue damage due to hypoxia/ischemia. When 24-year-old female patient was followed in the intensive care unit (ICU due to diabetic ketoacidosis, she was extubated on the second day. She was reintubated on the third day because of respiratory acidosis. Sedation was withdrawn on the fifth day, however the patient could not recover consciousness until the 14th day and tetraplegia was found during her neurological examination. Motor peripheral nerve-transmission response in the upper-and lower-extremity was evaluated to be of low amplitude in the conducted needle electroneuromyography. The patient was weaned from mechanical ventilation on the 23rd day. The neuromuscular symptoms developing as a result of critical illnesses reflect themselves as an increase in the hospitalization duration in the ICU, a difficulty in separation from the mechanical ventilator and an extension of rehabilitation.

  9. In vitro fertilization–induced hypertriglyceridemia with secondary acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis

    Claire Michael Issa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In vitro fertilization is becoming more and more popular lately, as such light is to be shed on any possible related complication. One of these complications is the possible hormonal effect on the lipid profile of the patients. Case presentation: We present a case of a 39-year-old woman with no prior or family history of dyslipidemia, who presented with post in vitro fertilization severe hypertriglyceridemia and secondary acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis. Discussion of the case is followed by a brief review of the literature related to in vitro fertilization–induced hypertriglyceridemia. Conclusion: This is, up to our knowledge, the sixth reported case of in vitro fertilization–induced hypertriglyceridemia with secondary acute pancreatitis. This is a serious and life-threatening complication. As such, it might be wise at least in high-risk patients (such as patients with diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovaries syndrome, obesity, and family and personal history of dyslipidemia to screen for lipid abnormalities before initiating in vitro fertilization and monitor these levels afterward.

  10. Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors and euglycemic ketoacidosis: Wisdom of hindsight

    Awadhesh Kumar Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT-2i are newly approved class of oral anti-diabetic drugs, in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, which reduces blood glucose through glucouresis via the kidney, independent, and irrespective of available pancreatic beta-cells. Studies conducted across their clinical development program found, a modest reduction in glycated hemoglobin ranging from −0.5 to −0.8%, without any significant hypoglycemia. Moreover, head-to-head studies versus active comparators yielded comparable efficacy. Interestingly, weight and blood pressure reduction were additionally observed, which was not only consistent but significantly superior to active comparators, including metformin, sulfonylureas, and dipeptydylpeptide-4 inhibitors. Indeed, these additional properties makes this class a promising oral anti-diabetic drug. Surprisingly, a potentially fatal unwanted side effect of diabetic ketoacidosis has been noted with its widespread use, albeit rarely. Nevertheless, this has created a passé among the clinicians. This review is an attempt to pool those ketosis data emerging with SGLT-2i, and put a perspective on its implicated mechanism.

  11. Nondiabetic ketoacidosis in a pregnant woman due to acute starvation with concomitant influenza A (H1N1) and respiratory failure.

    Skalley, G; Rodríguez-Villar, S

    2018-02-28

    Threatening refractory metabolic acidosis due to short-term starvation nondiabetic ketoacidosis is rarely reported. Severe ketoacidosis due to starvation itself is a rare occurrence, and more so in pregnancy with a concomitant stressful clinical situation. This case report presents a nondiabetic woman admitted in intensive care for respiratory failure type 1 during the third trimester of pregnancy with a severe metabolic acidosis refractory to medical treatment. We diagnosed the patient with acute starvation ketoacidosis based on her history and the absence of other causes of high anion gap metabolic acidosis after doing a rigorous analysis of her acid-base disorder. Crown Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Determination of acetone in saliva by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and the monitoring of diabetes mellitus patients with ketoacidosis.

    Fujii, Shinya; Maeda, Toshio; Noge, Ichiro; Kitagawa, Yutaka; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Inoue, Koichi; Min, Jun Zhe; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2014-03-20

    In diabetes mellitus (DM) patients with ketoacidosis, ketone bodies, i.e., acetone, acetoacetic acid (AA) and β-hydroxybutyric acid (HA), are increased in the blood and urine. Acetone is also excreted by breathing due to the spontaneous decomposition of AA. Thus, the increase in acetone has been considered as one of the biomarkers for the diagnosis of DM. However, the determination of acetone in one's breath is not recommended because of the sample handling difficulty. We measured acetone in saliva by reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC) with fluorescence (FL) detection. The proposed method was applied to the determination of acetone in the saliva of healthy volunteers and DM patients with and without ketoacidosis. 3-Pentanone (I.S.) and DBD-H in acetonitrile were added to freshly collected saliva and reacted at room temperature for 20 min in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid. After the reaction, the solution was centrifuged at 10,000 × g and 4 °C for 5 min. The supernatant was separated by reversed-phase LC and the FL detected at 550 nm (excitation at 460 nm). The concentrations of acetone in the DM patients with ketoacidosis were significantly higher than those of the normal subjects and DM patients without ketoacidosis. Furthermore, the total contents of the ketone bodies in the blood correlated with acetone in the saliva of the DM patients. The concentrations of acetone in the saliva of an emergency patient also correlated with the ketone bodies in the blood at each sampling time. The proposed method using LC-FL seems to be useful for the determination of acetone in the saliva of DM patients with ketoacidosis. The method offers a new option for the diagnosis and monitoring of DM patients with ketoacidosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Possibly Masked Acute Pancreatitis and Led to a Difficult Diagnosis in an Obese Patient with Ketoacidosis-onset Type 2 Diabetes.

    Fujishiro, Midori; Horita, Akiko; Nakagawara, Hiroshi; Mawatari, Takayuki; Kishigami, Yoshifusa; Tominaga, Yoshiteru; Moriyama, Mitsuhiko; Ishihara, Hisamitsu

    2017-10-01

    A young obese man with ketoacidosis-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus, associated with severe hypertriglyceridemia, was admitted to a local hospital complaining of abdominal pain. Although the abdominal pain worsened, his serum amylase level remained normal with persistent severe hypertriglyceridemia until the second day of hospitalization. The next day, computed tomography showed severe acute pancreatitis (AP) with serum amylase elevation, while the patient's triglyceride level decreased to 558 mg/dL. He was transferred to our hospital and recovered after intensive care. AP accompanied by diabetic ketoacidosis is not rare but an early diagnosis can be difficult to make due to normal amylase levels in the presence of severe hypertriglyceridemia.

  14. A Turkish Patient With Succinyl-CoA:3-Oxoacid CoA Transferase Deficiency Mimicking Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Sahin Erdol MD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Succinyl-CoA:3-oxoacid CoA transferase (SCOT deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of ketone body utilization that is clinically characterized with intermittent ketoacidosis crises. We report here the second Turkish case with SCOT deficiency. She experienced 3 ketoacidotic episodes: The first ketoacidotic crisis mimicked diabetic ketoacidosis because of the associated hyperglycemia. Among patients with SCOT deficiency, the blood glucose levels at the first crises were variable, and this case had the highest ever reported blood glucose level. She is a compound heterozygote with 2 novel mutations, c.517A>G (K173E and c.1543A>G (M515V, in exons 5 and 17 of the OXCT1 gene, respectively. In patient’s fibroblasts, SCOT activity was deficient and, by immunoblot analysis, SCOT protein was much reduced. The patient attained normal development and had no permanent ketosis. The accurate diagnosis of SCOT deficiency in this case had a vital impact on the management strategy and outcome.

  15. Short-term starvation with a near-fatal asthma attack induced ketoacidosis in a nondiabetic pregnant woman: A case report.

    Wei, Kuang-Yu; Chang, Shan-Yueh; Wang, Sheng-Huei; Su, Her-Young; Tsai, Chen-Liang

    2016-06-01

    Life-threatening refractory metabolic acidosis due to starvation ketoacidosis is rarely reported, even among nondiabetic pregnant women, and may be overlooked. Furthermore, stressful situations may increase the acidosis severity.In the present case, a nondiabetic multiparous woman was admitted for a near-fatal asthma attack and vomiting during the third trimester of pregnancy. She was intubated and rapidly developed high anion gap metabolic acidosis. We diagnosed the patient with starvation ketoacidosis based on vomiting with concomitant periods of stress during pregnancy and the absence of other causes of high anion gap metabolic acidosis. She responded poorly to standard treatment, although the ketoacidosis and asthma promptly resolved after an emergency caesarean section. The patient and her baby were safely discharged.Short-term starvation, if it occurs during periods of stress and medication, can result in life-threatening ketoacidosis, even among nondiabetic women during the third trimester of pregnancy. Awareness of this condition may facilitate prompt recognition and proactive treatment for dietary and stress control, and emergent interventions may also improve outcomes.

  16. Islet immunity and beta cell reserve of indigenous Black South Africans with ketoacidosis at initial diagnosis of diabetes.

    Ekpebegh, Chukwuma; Longo-Mbenza, Benjamin; Blanco-Blanco, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Islet immunity and beta cell reserve status were utilized to classify persons with ketoacidosis as the initial manifestation of diabetes. The clinical features of the various diabetes classes were also characterized. Prospective cross sectional study. Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital, Mthatha, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Indigenous Black South Africans with ketoacidosis as the initial manifestation of diabetes. Islet immunity and beta cell reserve were respectively assessed using serum anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD) antibody and serum C-peptide after 1 mg of intravenous glucagon. Serum anti-GAD 65 antibody > or = 5 units/L and or = 0.5 ng/mL and < 0.5 ng/mL, respectively. The proportions of patients with A+beta-, A+beta+, A-beta- and A-beta+ and their clinical characteristics were determined. Of the 38 males and 33 females who participated in the study, patients were categorized in various classes: A-beta+, 46.5% (n=33/ 71); A-beta-, 26.8% (n=19/71); A+beta-, 22.5% (n=16/71); and A+beta+, 4.2% (n=3/71). The ages of the various classes were: 41.8 +/- 13.8 years for A-beta+ (n=33); 36.5 +/- 14.6 years for A-beta- (n=19); and 20.6 +/- 7.1 years for the combination of A+beta- with A+beta+ (n=19) (P<.0001, P<.0001 for the combination of A+beta- and A+beta+ vs A-beta+, P=.001 for the combination of A+beta- and A+beta+ vs A-beta-and P=.2 for A-beta- vs A-beta+. The clinical features of type 2 diabetes were most prevalent in A-beta+ class while the A+beta- and A+beta+ groups had the clinical profile of type 1A diabetes. Most of the indigenous Black South African patients with ketoacidosis as the initial manifestation of diabetes had islet immunity, beta cell reserve status and clinical profiles of type 2 diabetes.

  17. Mortality patterns among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Ilorin ...

    2010-01-15

    Jan 15, 2010 ... Keywords: causes of death; longevity; type 2 diabetes; Nigeria. Introduction. The incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) has continued ... accounted for the majority of deaths from diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).

  18. Browse Title Index

    Items 51 - 100 of 1034 ... Vol 49, No 2 (2007), African Index Medicus: Improving access to African ... insulin therapy initiation among patients with type 2 diabetes attending a ... Risk Factors Implicated in Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), Abstract PDF.

  19. Maternal Mortality at Federal Medical Centre Yola, Adamawa State ...

    the management of the Federal Medical centre Yola before the .... response to emergencies may help reduce deaths from obstetric ... HIV, anesthetic deaths and Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) were the indirect causes of maternal mortality.

  20. Create Your Plate

    Full Text Available ... Eye Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & ... someone new is diagnosed. Diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Your gift today will help ...

  1. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Full Text Available ... Eye Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & ... someone new is diagnosed. Diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Your gift today will help ...

  2. Effect of insulin pump and continuous intravenous insulin on ketone body metabolism, blood gas indexes and stress state in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis

    Hui-Jin Shi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of insulin pump and continuous intravenous insulin on ketone body metabolism, blood gas indexes and stress state in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. Methods: Patients with diabetic ketoacidosis who were treated in Meizhou Maternal and Child Heath Hospital between May 2014 and March 2017 were selected as the research subjects and randomly divided into the group A who received subcutaneous insulin infusion by insulin pump and the group B who received intravenous small-dose insulin injection by micropump. The indexes of ketone body, blood gas and stress were measured before and after treatment. Results: 12 h and 24 h after treatment, serum β-hydroxybutyrate, MDA, NE, ACTH and Cor contents of both groups of patients were significantly lower than those before treatment while pH, HCO3 - and base excess levels as well as serum SOD, GSH-Px, CAT and TAC contents were significantly higher than those before treatment, and serum β-hydroxybutyrate, MDA, NE, ACTH and Cor contents of group A were significantly lower than those of group B while pH, HCO3 - and base excess levels as well as serum SOD, GSH-Px, CAT and TAC contents were significantly higher than those of group B. Conclusion: Subcutaneous insulin infusion by insulin pump can improve ketone body metabolism, acidosis status and stress state in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis.

  3. Emergency Nursing Strategies of Patients With Diabetic Ketoacidosis%糖尿病酮症酸中毒患者的急诊护理对策探讨

    乔春苹

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the emergency nursing measures of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis.Methods A retrospective analysis of our hospital in February 2012 to July 2014 of 129 patients with diabetic ketoacidosis admitted into the emergency department of clinical nursing methods.ResultsAl patients blood sugar levels back to normal after treatment for 2 d,ketone overcast,body were recovered.Conclusion In patients with diabetic ketoacidosis adopted effective emergency measures and individualized nursing method,can help to promote patients restored to health as soon as possible.%目的:探究糖尿病酮症酸中毒患者的急诊护理措施。方法回顾性分析我院2012年2月~2014年7月急诊科收治的129例糖尿病酮症酸中毒患者的临床护理方法。结果全部患者治疗2 d后血糖水平恢复正常,酮体转阴,均痊愈出院。结论对糖尿病酮症酸中毒患者采取有效的急诊急救措施和个性化护理方法,有助于促进患者尽快恢复健康。

  4. Update on diagnosis, pathogenesis and management of ketosis-prone Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Smiley, Dawn; Chandra, Prakash; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) has been considered a key clinical feature of Type 1 diabetes mellitus; however, increasing evidence indicates that DKA is also a common feature of Type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Many cases of DKA develop under stressful conditions such as trauma or infection but an increasing number of cases without precipitating cause have been reported in children and adults with T2DM. Such patients present with severe hyperglycemia and ketosis as in Type 1 diabetes mellitus but can di...

  5. Metformin inhibits Branched Chain Amino Acid (BCAA) derived ketoacidosis and promotes metabolic homeostasis in MSUD.

    S Sonnet, Davis; N O'Leary, Monique; A Gutierrez, Mark; M Nguyen, Steven; Mateen, Samiha; Hsu, Yuehmei; P Mitchell, Kylie; J Lopez, Antonio; Vockley, Jerry; K Kennedy, Brian; Ramanathan, Arvind

    2016-07-04

    Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD) is an inherited disorder caused by the dysfunction in the branched chain keto-acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) enzyme. This leads to buildup of branched-chain keto-acids (BCKA) and branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) in body fluids (e.g. keto-isocaproic acid from the BCAA leucine), leading to numerous clinical features including a less understood skeletal muscle dysfunction in patients. KIC is an inhibitor of mitochondrial function at disease relevant concentrations. A murine model of intermediate MSUD (iMSUD) shows significant skeletal muscle dysfunction as by judged decreased muscle fiber diameter. MSUD is an orphan disease with a need for novel drug interventions. Here using a 96-well plate (liquid chromatography- mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based drug-screening platform we show that Metformin, a widely used anti-diabetic drug, reduces levels of KIC in patient-derived fibroblasts by 20-50%. This Metformin-mediated effect was conserved in vivo; Metformin-treatment significantly reduced levels of KIC in the muscle (by 69%) and serum (by 56%) isolated from iMSUD mice, and restored levels of mitochondrial metabolites (e.g. AMP and other TCA). The drug also decreased the expression of mitochondrial branched chain amino transferase (BCAT) which produces KIC in skeletal muscle. This suggests that Metformin can restore skeletal muscle homeostasis in MSUD by decreasing mitochondrial KIC production.

  6. Association of Insulin Pump Therapy vs Insulin Injection Therapy With Severe Hypoglycemia, Ketoacidosis, and Glycemic Control Among Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Karges, Beate; Schwandt, Anke; Heidtmann, Bettina; Kordonouri, Olga; Binder, Elisabeth; Schierloh, Ulrike; Boettcher, Claudia; Kapellen, Thomas; Rosenbauer, Joachim; Holl, Reinhard W

    2017-10-10

    Insulin pump therapy may improve metabolic control in young patients with type 1 diabetes, but the association with short-term diabetes complications is unclear. To determine whether rates of severe hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis are lower with insulin pump therapy compared with insulin injection therapy in children, adolescents, and young adults with type 1 diabetes. Population-based cohort study conducted between January 2011 and December 2015 in 446 diabetes centers participating in the Diabetes Prospective Follow-up Initiative in Germany, Austria, and Luxembourg. Patients with type 1 diabetes younger than 20 years and diabetes duration of more than 1 year were identified. Propensity score matching and inverse probability of treatment weighting analyses with age, sex, diabetes duration, migration background (defined as place of birth outside of Germany or Austria), body mass index, and glycated hemoglobin as covariates were used to account for relevant confounders. Type 1 diabetes treated with insulin pump therapy or with multiple (≥4) daily insulin injections. Primary outcomes were rates of severe hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis during the most recent treatment year. Secondary outcomes included glycated hemoglobin levels, insulin dose, and body mass index. Of 30 579 patients (mean age, 14.1 years [SD, 4.0]; 53% male), 14 119 used pump therapy (median duration, 3.7 years) and 16 460 used insulin injections (median duration, 3.6 years). Patients using pump therapy (n = 9814) were matched with 9814 patients using injection therapy. Pump therapy, compared with injection therapy, was associated with lower rates of severe hypoglycemia (9.55 vs 13.97 per 100 patient-years; difference, -4.42 [95% CI, -6.15 to -2.69]; P young patients with type 1 diabetes, insulin pump therapy, compared with insulin injection therapy, was associated with lower risks of severe hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis and with better glycemic control during the

  7. Hyperglycemia and Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    ... If the urine test is positive, contact your child's diabetes health care team. Tests done by a lab ... and to learn how to help bring your child's diabetes back under control. Reviewed by: Mauri Carakushansky, MD ...

  8. Hyperglycaemic crisis in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa: high mortality and association of hyperosmolar ketoacidosis with a new diagnosis of diabetes.

    Ekpebegh, C O; Longo-Mbenza, B; Akinrinmade, A; Blanco-Blanco, E; Badri, M; Levitt, N S

    2010-12-01

    To describe the frequencies, presenting characteristics (demographic, clinical and biochemical) and outcomes (duration of admission and mortality rates) for various types of hyperglycaemic crisis. Retrospective review of medical records of patients with hyperglycaemic crisis admitted to Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital, Mthatha, E Cape, from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2009. Outcome measures were duration of admission and mortality. Data were available for 269 admissions (response rate 81.0%), 169 females and 100 males. Admissions for hyperglycaemia (HG, N=119), and non-hyperosmolar diabetic ketoacidosis (NHDKA, N=97) were more frequent than those for hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state (HHS, N=29) and hyperosmolar diabetic ketoacidosis (HDKA, N=24). Duration of admission was similar in all groups. Mortality was high in all groups, but was higher in patients with HDKA (37.5%, risk ratio (RR) 3.88, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.41 - 10.67, p=0.009), HHS (31.0%, RR 2.91, 95% CI 1.09 - 7.75, p=0.033) and HG (19.5%, RR 1.56, 95% CI 0.75 - 3.21, p=0.236) than in those with NHDKA (13.4%). HDKA (62.5%) was associated with new-onset diabetes more often than NHDKA (27.8%), HHS (44.8%) or HG (17.6%) (p<0.0001). An altered level of consciousness was more frequent in HDKA than NHDKA admissions (RR 5.71, 95% CI 1.90 - 17.17, p=0.002). Duration of hospital stay was similar across groups. Mortality rates were high in all groups. New-onset diabetes, altered level of consciousness and mortality were more characteristically associated with HDKA than any of the other types of hyperglycaemic crisis. Optimal glycaemic control in known diabetic patients will reduce rates of hyperglycaemic crisis admissions.

  9. Severity of clinical presentation in youth with type 1 diabetes is associated with differences in brain structure.

    Siller, Alejandro F; Lugar, Heather; Rutlin, Jerrel; Koller, Jonathan M; Semenkovich, Katherine; White, Neil H; Arbelaez, Ana Maria; Shimony, Joshua; Hershey, Tamara

    2017-12-01

    Differences in cognition and brain structure have been found in youth with type 1 diabetes compared with controls, even after relatively short disease duration. To determine whether severity of clinical presentation contributes to these differences, we obtained structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in youth ages 7-17 who were either newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (presentation was measured by the presence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and degree of hyperglycemia exposure [hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c)] at diagnosis. MRI were obtained using T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and diffusion-weighted sequences. Within the group with type 1 diabetes, 12 subjects presented in DKA and 34 did not. After controlling for age, sex, and multiple comparisons, the type 1 diabetes group had lower volume in the left temporal-parietal-occipital cortex compared with controls. Within the type 1 diabetes group, DKA at presentation was associated with lower radial, axial, and mean diffusivity (MD) throughout major white matter tracts and higher HbA1c was associated with lower hippocampal, thalamic, and cerebellar white matter volumes, lower right posterior parietal cortical thickness, and greater right occipital cortical thickness. These data suggest that severity of clinical presentation is an important factor in predicting brain structural differences in youth with type 1 diabetes approximately 3 months after diagnosis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Produktová nabídka Honey Hive

    Tomečková, Alena

    2010-01-01

    The topic of this Master's thesis is to define the product offering for start-up called Honey Hive and to describe the process supporting the product portfolio definition. Product portfolio definition is based on the theory of 4P (Marketing mix). The whole process of defining the product offering is based on 4P -- Price, Product, Promotion and Place. Each aspect brings its own view into product offering -- from defining the pricing strategy, through suppliers mix definition to the competition...

  11. Perioperative Management of Diabetes: A Review

    Md Nazmul Kayes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes increases the requirements of surgery as well as perioperative morbidity and mortality. Careful preoperative evaluation and treatment of cardiac and renal diseases, intensive intraoperative and postoperative management are essential to optimize the best outcome. Stress hyperglycemia in response to surgery, osmotic diuresis and hypoinsulinemia can lead to life threatening complications like ketoacidosis or hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome. Wound healing is impaired by hyperglycemia and chance of postoperative wound infection is more in diabetics. Therefore aseptic precautions must be taken. Adequate insulin, glucose, fluid and electrolytes should be provided for good metabolic control. Though some current study reveals that oral hypoglycemic agents can be used for the effective management of perioperative diabetes; the adverse effects of newly introduced agents need more clinical observations. Subcutaneous administration of insulin as in Sliding Scale may be a less preferable method, because of unreliable absorption and unpredictable blood glucose. Intravenous administration of rapid onset soluble (short acting insulin as in Alberti (GIK regimen, is safe and effective method controlling perioperative hyperglycemia. Patient with type 1 diabetes needs frequent monitoring of glucose, electrolytes and acid-base balance as chance of high hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis is more. In case of emergency surgery assessment for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA and meticulous management is essential. Postoperative pain and hyperglycemia should be treated carefully to avoid complications.

  12. Multiple daily injection of insulin regimen for a 10-month-old infant with type 1 diabetes mellitus and diabetic ketoacidosis

    Ji Hyun Park

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of type 1 diabetes is increasing worldwide, and the greatest increase has been observed in very young children under 4 years of age. A case of infantile diabetic ketoacidosis in a 10-month-old male infant was encountered by these authors. The infant's fasting glucose level was 490 mg/dL, his PH was 7.13, his pCO2 was 15 mmHg, and his bicarbonate level was 5.0 mmol/L. The glycosylated hemoglobin level had increased to 9.4%. Ketonuria and glucosuria were detected in the urinalysis. The fasting C-peptide and insulin levels had decreased. The infant was positive for anti-insulin and antiglutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. Immediately after the infant's admission, fluid therapy and intravenous insulin infusion therapy were started. On the second day of the infant's hospitalization and after fluid therapy, he recovered from his lethargic condition, and his general condition improved. Feeding was started on the third day, and he was fed a formula 5 to 7 times a day and ate rice, vegetables, and lean meat. Due to the frequent feeding, the frequency of rapid-acting insulin injection was increased from 3 times before feeding to 5 times, adjusted according to the feeding frequency. The total dose of insulin that was injected was 0.8–1.1 IU/kg/day, and the infant was discharged on the 12th day of his hospitalization. The case is presented herein with a brief review of the relevant literature.

  13. DISEASES

    Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Pallejà, Albert; Tsafou, Kalliopi

    2015-01-01

    Text mining is a flexible technology that can be applied to numerous different tasks in biology and medicine. We present a system for extracting disease-gene associations from biomedical abstracts. The system consists of a highly efficient dictionary-based tagger for named entity recognition...... of human genes and diseases, which we combine with a scoring scheme that takes into account co-occurrences both within and between sentences. We show that this approach is able to extract half of all manually curated associations with a false positive rate of only 0.16%. Nonetheless, text mining should...... not stand alone, but be combined with other types of evidence. For this reason, we have developed the DISEASES resource, which integrates the results from text mining with manually curated disease-gene associations, cancer mutation data, and genome-wide association studies from existing databases...

  14. Management of a Woman With Maple Syrup Urine Disease During Pregnancy, Delivery, and Lactation.

    Wessel, Ann E; Mogensen, Kris M; Rohr, Frances; Erick, Miriam; Neilan, Edward G; Chopra, Sameer; Levy, Harvey L; Gray, Kathryn J; Wilkins-Haug, Louise; Berry, Gerard T

    2015-09-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inherited disorder of metabolism of the branched-chain amino acids leucine, isoleucine, and valine. Complications of acute elevation in plasma leucine include ketoacidosis and risk of cerebral edema, which can be fatal. Individuals with MSUD are at risk of metabolic crisis throughout life, especially at times of physiological stress. We present a case of successful management of a woman with MSUD through pregnancy, delivery, postpartum, and lactation, including nutrition therapy using modified parenteral nutrition. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  15. Hyperglycaemic emergencies are a common problem

    to presence of ketosis, standard bicarbonate level and serum osmolality: (I) mild diabetic keto-acidosis (OKA);. (h) severe DKA; (UI) hyperosmolar state; and. (iv) hyperglycaemia. Results. There were 131 admissions in 122 patients. Sixty-five occurred in non-insulin-dependent diabetics,. 45 in insulin-dependent diabetics ...

  16. Clinical presentation and precipitating factors of diabetic ...

    MoZarD

    among patients admitted to intensive care unit at a tertiary hospital in. Mwanza, Tanzania ... Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), one of the common emergencies in patient with diabetes mellitus is associated with .... Study area and data collection ... None of the patients presented with myocardial infarction, peripheral ...

  17. Poor adherence to ketone testing in patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, still common, and preventable complication of type 1 diabetes (T1D) associated with increased health care costs, morbidity, and mortality. Clinical recommendations advise self-monitoring of ketones in people with T1D during hyperglycemia and illness to allow ...

  18. Use of Serum Bicarbonate to Substitute for Venous pH in New-Onset Diabetes.

    von Oettingen, Julia; Wolfsdorf, Joseph; Feldman, Henry A; Rhodes, Erinn T

    2015-08-01

    To investigate whether serum bicarbonate (HCO3) levels can be used to accurately diagnose diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and classify its severity in children with new-onset diabetes mellitus (NODM). Retrospective study of all patients with NODM presenting to Boston Children's Hospital from October 1, 2007, to July 1, 2013. DKA was defined as blood glucose ≥200 mg/dL, venous pH (vpH) vpH vpH, and logistic regression to evaluate serum HCO3 as a predictor of DKA and severe DKA. Of 690 study cohort subjects (47% girls, age 10.8 ± 4.3 years, 76.7% white), 19.4% presented with DKA. The relationship between serum HCO3 and vpH was log-linear (r = 0.87, 95% CI 0.85-0.89, P vpH (R(2) 0.75, P vpH = 6.81301 + (0.17823*ln[HCO3]) and DKA and severe DKA (c-statistic 0.97 [95% CI 0.96-0.99, P vpH to diagnose DKA and classify severity in children with NODM. It is suggested as an alternative to reliance on vpH, especially in settings in which access to vpH measurement is limited. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Multinational study in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes: association of age, ketoacidosis, HLA status, and autoantibodies on residual beta-cell function and glycemic control 12 months after diagnosis

    Mortensen, H.B.; Swift, P.G.F.; Holl, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    .005), and by stimulated C-peptide (p IA; p = 0.02) and glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA; p = 0.0004) at 1 month. HbA1c at 12 months was predicted by HbA1c at diagnosis (p ... (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Younger age, ketoacidosis at diagnosis, and IA and GADA 1 month after diagnosis were the strongest explanatory factors for residual beta-cell function at 12 months. Glycemic control at 12 months was influenced predominantly by ethnicity, HbA1c at diagnosis, and GADA at 1......Objective: To identify predictors of residual beta-cell function and glycemic control during the first 12 months after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Subjects and Methods: Clinical information and blood samples were collected from 275 children. HbA1c, antibodies, HLA typing and mixed meal...

  20. Bedside ketone determination in diabetic children with hyperglycemia and ketosis in the acute care setting.

    Ham, Melissa R; Okada, Pamela; White, Perrin C

    2004-03-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus marked by characteristic biochemical derangements. Diagnosis and management involve frequent evaluation of these biochemical parameters. Reliable bedside equivalents for these laboratory studies may help reduce the time to treatment and reduce costs. We evaluated the precision and bias of a bedside serum ketone meter in the acute care setting. Serum ketone results using the Precision Xtra glucometer/ketone meter (Abbott Laboratories, MediSense Products Inc., Bedford, MA, USA) correlated strongly with the Children's Medical Center of Dallas' laboratory values within the meter's value range. Meter ketone values steadily decreased during the treatment of DKA as pH and CO(2) levels increased and acidosis resolved. Therefore, the meter may be useful in monitoring therapy for DKA. This meter may also prove useful in identifying patients at risk for DKA in physicians' offices or at home.

  1. Management of type 2 diabetes mellitus associated with pituitary gigantism.

    Ali, Omar; Banerjee, Swati; Kelly, Daniel F; Lee, Phillip D K

    2007-01-01

    Pituitary gigantism, a condition of endogenous growth hormone (GH) hypersecretion prior to epiphyseal closure, is a rare condition. In the adult condition of GH excess, acromegaly, the occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) have been reported, with resolution following normalization of GH levels. We report the case of a 16-year-old male with pituitary gigantism due to a large invasive suprasellar adenoma who presented with T2DM and DKA. Despite surgical de-bulking, radiotherapy and medical treatment with cabergoline and pegvisomant, GH and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels remained elevated. However, the T2DM and recurrent DKA were successfully managed with metformin and low-dose glargine insulin, respectively. We review the pathophysiology of T2DM and DKA in growth hormone excess and available treatment options.

  2. The Impact of Hyperglycemic Emergencies on the Kidney and Liver

    Feng Bai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the alterations of liver and kidney function parameters in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA and diabetic ketosis (DK were limited. Participants with DKA, DK, non-DK, and healthy controls were enrolled in the current study. Parameters of liver and kidney function were measured and evaluated. The patients with DKA had higher levels of plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, uric acid, and creatinine but lower levels of transferases and protein compared with the other three groups ( for all. The patients with DK had higher levels of plasma glucose and HbA1c but lower levels of glutamyl transpeptidase and protein compared with the non-DK and control groups (. Prealbumin levels were significantly reduced in the severe DKA patients compared with the mild/moderate DKA patients. Serum prealbumin levels were correlated with albumin levels (, , HCO3 (, , and arterial pH (, in the DKA patients. A diagnostic analysis showed that lower prealbumin levels significantly reflected the presence of hyperglycemic emergencies (. Liver and kidney function parameters deteriorated, especially in DKA. Prealbumin levels can be of value in detecting the presence of hyperglycemic crisis. This clinical trial is registered with ChiCTR-OCH-12003077.

  3. The relationship between lactate and thiamine levels in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis⋆

    Moskowitz, Ari; Graver, Amanda; Giberson, Tyler; Berg, Katherine; Liu, Xiaowen; Uber, Amy; Gautam, Shiva; Donnino, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Thiamine functions as an important cofactor in aerobic metabolism and thiamine deficiency can contribute to lactic acidosis. Although increased rates of thiamine deficiency have been described in diabetic outpatients, this phenomenon has not been studied in relation to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). In the present study, we hypothesize that thiamine deficiency is associated with elevated lactate in patients with DKA. Materials and Methods This was a prospective observational study of patients presenting to a tertiary care center with DKA. Patient demographics, laboratory results, and outcomes were recorded. A one-time blood draw was performed and analyzed for plasma thiamine levels. Results Thirty-two patients were enrolled. Eight patients (25%) were thiamine deficient, with levels lower than 9 nmol/L. A negative correlation between lactic acid and plasma thiamine levels was found (r = −0.56, P = .002). This relationship remained significant after adjustment for APACHE II scores (P = .009). Thiamine levels were directly related to admission serum bicarbonate (r = 0.44, P = .019), and patients with thiamine deficiency maintained lower bicarbonate levels over the first 24 hours (slopes parallel with a difference of 4.083, P = .002). Conclusions Patients with DKA had a high prevalence of thiamine deficiency. Thiamine levels were inversely related to lactate levels among patients with DKA. A study of thiamine supplementation in DKA is warranted. PMID:23993771

  4. Ketosis-Onset Diabetes and Ketosis-Prone Diabetes: Same or Not?

    Liu, Beiyan; Yu, Changhua; Li, Qiang; Li, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare clinical characteristics, immunological markers, and ? -cell functions of 4 subgroups (?A ? ? classification system) of ketosis-onset diabetes and ketosis prone diabetes patients without known diabetes, presenting with ketosis or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and admitted to our department from March 2011 to December 2011 in China, with 50 healthy persons as control group. Results. ? -cell functional reserve was preserved in 63.52% of patients. In almost each subgroup (exc...

  5. Efficacy of Liposomal Amphotericin B and Posaconazole in Intratracheal Models of Murine Mucormycosis

    Luo, Guanpingsheng; Gebremariam, Teclegiorgis; Lee, Hongkyu; French, Samuel W.; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Patterson, Thomas F.; Filler, Scott G.

    2013-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a life-threatening fungal infection almost uniformly affecting diabetics in ketoacidosis or other forms of acidosis and/or immunocompromised patients. Inhalation of Mucorales spores provides the most common natural route of entry into the host. In this study, we developed an intratracheal instillation model of pulmonary mucormycosis that hematogenously disseminates into other organs using diabetic ketoacidotic (DKA) or cyclophosphamide-cortisone acetate-treated mice. Various degrees of lethality were achieved for the DKA or cyclophosphamide-cortisone acetate-treated mice when infected with different clinical isolates of Mucorales. In both DKA and cyclophosphamide-cortisone acetate models, liposomal amphotericin B (LAmB) or posaconazole (POS) treatments were effective in improving survival, reducing lungs and brain fungal burdens, and histologically resolving the infection compared with placebo. These models can be used to study mechanisms of infection, develop immunotherapeutic strategies, and evaluate drug efficacies against life-threatening Mucorales infections. PMID:23650163

  6. Severe Sepsis and Acute Myocardial Dysfunction in an Adolescent with Chlamydia Trachomatis Pelvic Inflammatory Disease: A Case Report.

    Morgan, Ashley M; Roden, R Claire; Matson, Steven C; Wallace, Grant M; Lange, Hannah L H; Bonny, Andrea E

    2018-04-01

    Although generally asymptomatic, severe Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis) infections have been documented. C. trachomatis has been associated with myocarditis as well as sepsis. A 19-year-old girl with type 1 diabetes mellitus developed sudden-onset mental status change and shock after resolution of diabetic ketoacidosis. Abdominal and pelvic imaging showed uterine and adnexal inflammation, and pelvic examination confirmed a diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease. The patient was intubated, required vasopressor support, and developed severe biventricular myocardial dysfunction. Infectious myocarditis workup was negative. Nucleic acid amplification testing from vaginal discharge was positive for C. trachomatis and Trichomonas vaginalis and negative for Neisseria gonorrhoeae. C. trachomatis should be considered in the workup of septic shock, particularly in populations at high risk for sexually transmitted infections. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Agmag Igbo dka Ngwar n'kwalite Ezi Nchekwa na Nkwsiike haobodo

    Ka Najira nwerechara onwe ya n'af 1960, olileanya tt mamala ya b na ihe ga-adz mma. Mana ka oge na-aga, a chptara na ihe na-akawanye nj. Usoro chch d iche iche daptara. Nd am na nd nkt achala mana nd gara n'ihu na-akawanye nj. O bu ihe doro anya na chch ha b nke nchgbu na fnfju akpa. N'agbanyegh na ...

  8. Nabídka vybrané cestovní kanceláře

    Stefjuk, Julija

    2017-01-01

    The aim of bachelor thesis is to analyze the offer of the travel agency. Specifically, for this purpose the travel agency Neckermann was selected. The thesis is divided into three main chapters. In the first chapter, it is defined the basic theoretical terms such as travel agency, a travel agent, an offer of travel agency and a holiday package. The second chapter is dedicated to a brief offer of a travel agency. The great emphasis is laid on analysis one of the main products dynamic packaging...

  9. Diabetic ketoacidosis with pneumomediastinum: a case report

    Makdsi, Fadi; Kolade, Victor O

    2009-01-01

    An 18-year-old male with type 1 diabetes mellitus presented to the emergency department after one day of lethargy and vomiting. Physical examination revealed a dehydrated male with tachycardia and Kussmaul?s respiration. There was subcutaneous emphysema in both supraclavicular regions. Chest auscultation revealed a positive Hamman?s sign. Laboratory investigation was significant for metabolic acidosis with venous blood pH 7.08. Plasma glucose was 1438 mg/dl; ketones were present in the urine....

  10. Diabetic Ketoacidosis: An Emergency Medicine Simulation Scenario

    Addison, Reuben; Skinner, Tate; Zhou, Felix; Parsons, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Simulation provides a safe environment where learning is enhanced through the deliberate practice of skills and controlled management of a variety of clinical encounters. This is particularly important for core cases and low-frequency, high-stakes procedures and encounters. Competency-based medical education has seen widespread adoption in the field along with ongoing work in the areas of undergraduate and postgraduate training. Similarly, effective professional development activities stand t...

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis

    of death, which can be prevented by early and effective management. All physicians ..... mechanisms and management strategies in sub-Saharan Africa: A review. ... Sacks DB, Burns DE, Goldstein DE, Maclaren NK, McDonald JM, Parrott M.

  12. Ethylene Glycol Poisoning; an Unusual Cause of Hyperglycemia: A Case Report

    Abdul Raoof Kunnummal Madathodi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:Poisoning with ethylene glycol (EG can be fatal even if appropriate treatments are delivered. EG poisoning usually causes central nervous system depression, cardiovascular dysfunction, metabolic acidosis and acute renal failure (ARF. Case Report:A 33-year-old man was referred to the emergency department with reduced consciousness and dyspnea of four-hour duration due to unknown reason. The patient had no history of diabetes, hypertension, cardiac disease or asthma. He was tachycardic, tachypneic and hypertensive. Laboratory investigations revealed hyperglycemia, high serum creatinine, hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, leukocytosis and high anion gap metabolic acidosis (HAGMA. He was initially managed as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA. Alternative diagnoses of toxic alcohols poisoning was considered as there was no improvement. EG ingestion was confirmed when the relatives found an empty bottle of automotive brake oil, a poly glycol-based product, in the patient’s room. Although he was treated with ethanol and hemodialysis, renal failure worsened and finally he succumbed to death due to severe sepsis on the seventh day of EG ingestion. Discussion: This case illustrates the difficulties posed by high toxicity as well as unraveled and delayed diagnosis of EG poisoning. High anion gap and high osmolal gap are characteristics of EG poisoning. Transient pancreatitis caused by EG and insulin resistance due to ARF are the possible explanations for hyperglycemia secondary to EG poisoning. Conclusion:EG poisoning may manifest with hyperglycemia and HAGMA resembling DKA. It is important for the clinician to have high degree of suspicion for EG poisoning in case of HAGMA and ARF refractory to common treatments.

  13. The PTPN22 C1858T gene variant is associated with proinsulin in new-onset type 1 diabetes

    Vanelli Maurizio

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 2 (PTPN22 has been established as a type 1 diabetes susceptibility gene. A recent study found the C1858T variant of this gene to be associated with lower residual fasting C-peptide levels and poorer glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes. We investigated the association of the C1858T variant with residual beta-cell function (as assessed by stimulated C-peptide, proinsulin and insulin dose-adjusted HbA1c, glycemic control, daily insulin requirements, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA and diabetes-related autoantibodies (IA-2A, GADA, ICA, ZnT8Ab in children during the first year after diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Methods The C1858T variant was genotyped in an international cohort of children (n = 257 patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes during 12 months after onset. We investigated the association of this variant with liquid-meal stimulated beta-cell function (proinsulin and C-peptide and antibody status 1, 6 and 12 months after onset. In addition HbA1c and daily insulin requirements were determined 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after diagnosis. DKA was defined at disease onset. Results A repeated measurement model of all time points showed the stimulated proinsulin level is significantly higher (22%, p = 0.03 for the T allele carriers the first year after onset. We also found a significant positive association between proinsulin and IA levels (est.: 1.12, p = 0.002, which did not influence the association between PTPN22 and proinsulin (est.: 1.28, p = 0.03. Conclusions The T allele of the C1858T variant is positively associated with proinsulin levels during the first 12 months in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes children.

  14. The endothelial cell receptor GRP78 is required for mucormycosis pathogenesis in diabetic mice

    Liu, Mingfu; Spellberg, Brad; Phan, Quynh T.; Fu, Yue; Fu, Yong; Lee, Amy S.; Edwards, John E.; Filler, Scott G.; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.

    2010-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a fungal infection of the sinuses, brain, or lungs that causes a mortality rate of at least 50% despite first-line therapy. Because angioinvasion is a hallmark of mucormycosis infections, we sought to define the endothelial cell receptor(s) for fungi of the order Mucorales (the fungi that cause mucormycosis). Furthermore, since patients with elevated available serum iron, including those with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), are uniquely susceptible to mucormycosis, we sought to define the role of iron and glucose in regulating the expression of such a receptor. Here, we have identified glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) as what we believe to be a novel host receptor that mediates invasion and damage of human endothelial cells by Rhizopus oryzae, the most common etiologic species of Mucorales, but not Candida albicans or Aspergillus fumigatus. Elevated concentrations of glucose and iron, consistent with those seen during DKA, enhanced GRP78 expression and the resulting R. oryzae invasion and damage of endothelial cells in a receptor-dependent manner. Mice with DKA, which have enhanced susceptibility to mucormycosis, exhibited increased expression of GRP78 in sinus, lungs, and brain compared with normal mice. Finally, GRP78-specific immune serum protected mice with DKA from mucormycosis. These results suggest a unique susceptibility of patients with DKA to mucormycosis and provide a foundation for the development of new therapeutic interventions for these deadly infections. PMID:20484814

  15. Retinopathy screening in patients with type 1 diabetes diagnosed in young age using a non-mydriatic digital stereoscopic retinal imaging.

    Minuto, N; Emmanuele, V; Vannati, M; Russo, C; Rebora, C; Panarello, S; Pistorio, A; Lorini, R; d'Annunzio, G

    2012-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy seriously impairs patients' quality of life, since it represents the first cause of blindness in industrialized countries. To estimate prevalence of retinopathy in young Type 1 diabetes patients using a non-mydriatic digital stereoscopic retinal imaging (NMDSRI), and to evaluate the impact of socio-demographic, clinical, and metabolic variables. In 247 young patients glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), gender, age, pubertal stage, presence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), HLA-DQ heterodimers of susceptibility for Type 1 diabetes, and β-cell autoimmunity at clinical onset were considered. At retinopathy screening, we evaluated age, disease duration, pubertal stage, body mass index (BMI-SDS), insulin requirement, HbA1c levels, other autoimmune diseases, diabetes-related complications, serum concentrations of cholesterol and triglycerides, systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Retinopathy was found in 26/247 patients: 25 showed background retinopathy, and 1 had a sight-threatening retinopathy. A significant relationship between retinopathy and female gender (p=0.01), duration of disease ≥15 yr (p65 mg/dl (p=0.012) and mean HbA1c ≥7.5% or >9% (p=0.0014) were found at the multivariate logistic analysis. Metabolic control is the most important modifiable factor and promotion of continuous educational process to reach a good metabolic control is a cornerstone to prevent microangiopathic complications. Symptoms appear when the complication is already established; a screening program with an early diagnosis is mandatory to prevent an irreversible damage.

  16. Clinical utility of Abbott Precision Xceed Pro® ketone meter in diabetic patients.

    Yu, Hoi-Ying Elsie; Agus, Michael; Kellogg, Mark D

    2011-11-01

    Diagnosis and management of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) often rely on the measurement of urine ketones along with blood glucose, anion gap, and pH. These values, however, do not reliably reflect the severity of ketoacidosis. The Abbott Precision Xceed Pro® meter is an FDA-approved device that quantitatively measures β-hydroxybutyrate (BOH) in whole blood. This study was undertaken to determine whether the ketone meter meets the analytical criteria to aid DKA diagnosis and management in the hospital. 54 heparinized venous whole blood BOH concentrations from 27 diabetic patients were measured by the Abbott meter, and compared with the plasma BOH concentrations measured with Stanbio reagent (reference method). Measurements were done in the hospital central laboratory. Of the 54 pairs of specimens analyzed, 17 pairs displayed a difference of >15% between the two methods. Nearly all discrepant points occurred when BOH >5 mmol/L (reference method). Linearity evaluation revealed that the meter is not linear from 0.0 to 8.0 mmol/L, contrary to the claim by the manufacturer. Further, we identified acetoacetate, a metabolite commonly present in DKA patients, as a potential interfering substance for the meter BOH measurement. BOH measurements by the Abbott meter up to 3 mmol/L correlate well with the reference method, but become discrepant above that point. While this characteristic may be useful in the diagnosis of DKA, it may not allow clinicians to serially follow the response to therapy in hospitalized DKA patients with BOH values greater than 5 mmol/L (reference method). © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. l-Carnitine and heart disease.

    Wang, Zhong-Yu; Liu, Ying-Yi; Liu, Guo-Hui; Lu, Hai-Bin; Mao, Cui-Ying

    2018-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a key cause of deaths worldwide, comprising 15-17% of healthcare expenditure in developed countries. Current records estimate an annual global average of 30 million cardiac dysfunction cases, with a predicted escalation by two-three folds for the next 20-30years. Although β-blockers and angiotensin-converting-enzymes are commonly prescribed to control CVD risk, hepatotoxicity and hematological changes are frequent adverse events associated with these drugs. Search for alternatives identified endogenous cofactor l-carnitine, which is capable of promoting mitochondrial β-oxidation towards a balanced cardiac energy metabolism. l-Carnitine facilitates transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix, triggering cardioprotective effects through reduced oxidative stress, inflammation and necrosis of cardiac myocytes. Additionally, l-carnitine regulates calcium influx, endothelial integrity, intracellular enzyme release and membrane phospholipid content for sustained cellular homeostasis. Carnitine depletion, characterized by reduced expression of "organic cation transporter-2" gene, is a metabolic and autosomal recessive disorder that also frequently associates with CVD. Hence, exogenous carnitine administration through dietary and intravenous routes serves as a suitable protective strategy against ventricular dysfunction, ischemia-reperfusion injury, cardiac arrhythmia and toxic myocardial injury that prominently mark CVD. Additionally, carnitine reduces hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperglycemia, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, obesity, etc. that enhance cardiovascular pathology. These favorable effects of l-carnitine have been evident in infants, juvenile, young, adult and aged patients of sudden and chronic heart failure as well. This review describes the mechanism of action, metabolism and pharmacokinetics of l-carnitine. It specifically emphasizes upon the beneficial

  18. O manejo da cetoacidose em pacientes com Diabetes Mellitus : subsídios para a prática clínica de enfermagem El manejo de la cetoacidosis en pacientes con Diabetes Mellitus:subsidios para la práctica clínica de enfermería Management of diabetic ketoacidosis in Diabetic patients: clinical practice nursing recommendations

    Sonia Aurora Alves Grossi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A cetoacidose diabética é uma condição aguda e grave que se desenvolve predominantemente em pacientes com Diabetes mellitus do tipo 1 e é induzida pela deficiência relativa ou absoluta de insulina. Ocorre comumente em associação a situações de estresse, que elevam os níveis dos hormônios contra-reguladores e constitui importante emergência clínica, que requer intervenções imediatas e efetivas. Assim, pretende-se, por meio deste artigo, com base na fisiopatologia e nas manifestações clínicas, fornecer subsídios para a prática clínica de enfermagem no manejo da cetoacidose diabética.La cetoacidosis diabética es una condición aguda y grave que se desarrolla predominantemente en los pacientes con Diabetes mellitus del tipo 1 y es inducida por la deficiencia relativa o absoluta de insulina. Ocurre generalmente asociada a situaciones de estrés, que elevan los niveles de las hormonas contra-reguladoras, constituyéndose en una importante emergencia clínica, que requiere intervenciones inmediatas y efectivas. Así, se pretende, por medio de este artículo, con base en la fisiopatología y en las manifestaciones clínicas, ofrecer elementos de juicio para la práctica clínica de enfermería en el manejo de la cetoacidosis diabética.Diabetic ketoacidosis is a severe and acute condition in Type 1 Diabetes mellitus that is prompted by relative or absolute insulin deficiency. It is frequently related to stressful situations, in which stress hormones are elevated. It is considered a clinical emergency that requires immediate and effective intervention. This article, based on the physiopathology and the clinical manifestations, aims at providing clinical practice nursing recommendations for the management of diabetic ketoacidosis.

  19. [Clinical and radiological features of pulmonary tuberculosis manifested as interstitial lung diseases.].

    Shi, Ju-Hong; Feng, Rui-E; Tian, Xin-Lun; Xu, Wen-Bing; Xu, Zuo-Jun; Liu, Hong-Rui; Zhu, Yuan-Jue

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the clinical and radiological features of pulmonary tuberculosis presenting as interstitial lung diseases (ILD). We analyzed the data of cases suspected of diffuse parenchyma lung diseases at this hospital between October 2003 and October 2007. The diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis was based on epithelioid granuloma or positive acid-fast bacilli in lung biopsy and changes on serial radiographs obtained during treatment. The data of a series of 230 consecutive patients with suspected ILD were retrospectively analyzed. The diagnosis was confirmed by lung biopsy. Twelve patients were confirmed to have pulmonary tuberculosis. There were 5 males and 7 females with a mean age of 38 +/- 11 years (range, 17 - 68). The median course of disease in these patients was 3 months (range, 0.5 - 18 months). Patients with pulmonary tuberculosis presented with fever (11/12), cough (9/12), weight loss (7/12), dyspnea (7/12), lymphadenopathy (4/12), and splenohepatomegaly (2/12). On chest CT scan, ground-glass attenuation was identified in 4, bilateral patchy infiltration in 5, tree-in-bud appearance 1, and centrilobular lesions in 2 of the 12 patients. During the follow-up period (median, 9 month, range from 3 to 12 month), 11 patients improved, but 1 died of diabetic ketoacidosis. The diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis should be considered in suspected ILD patients presenting with fever, splenohepatomegaly and lymphadenopathy.

  20. Brain injury with diabetes mellitus: evidence, mechanisms and treatment implications.

    Hamed, Sherifa A

    2017-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a risk for brain injury. Brain injury is associated with acute and chronic hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hypoglycaemic events in diabetic patients. Hyperglycemia is a cause of cognitive deterioration, low intelligent quotient, neurodegeneration, brain aging, brain atrophy and dementia. Areas covered: The current review highlights the experimental, clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathological evidence of brain injury induced by diabetes and its associated metabolic derangements. It also highlights the mechanisms of diabetes-induced brain injury. It seems that the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia-induced brain injury is complex and includes combination of vascular disease, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, reduction of neurotrophic factors, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activation, neurotransmitters' changes, impairment of brain repair processes, impairment of brain glymphatic system, accumulation of amyloid β and tau phosphorylation and neurodegeneration. The potentials for prevention and treatment are also discussed. Expert commentary: We summarize the risks and the possible mechanisms of DM-induced brain injury and recommend strategies for neuroprotection and neurorestoration. Recently, a number of drugs and substances [in addition to insulin and its mimics] have shown promising potentials against diabetes-induced brain injury. These include: antioxidants, neuroinflammation inhibitors, anti-apoptotics, neurotrophic factors, AChE inhibitors, mitochondrial function modifiers and cell based therapies.

  1. Relation of retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus to other diabetic complications

    Shu-Hui Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the correlation between systemic complications and diabetic retinopathy in the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.METHODS: Seven hundred and two hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes were included. All patients were divided into two groups according to with or without retinopathy: NDR group and DR group. DR group was divided into group non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy(NPDRand group proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR. The relation between DR and other complications of diabetes, including diabetic macrovascular complications, diabetic nephropathy(DN, diabetic peripheral neuropathy(DPN, peripheral vascular disease of diabetes mellitus(PVD, diabetic foot(DF, diabetic ketoacidosis(DKA, was analyzed.RESULTS: The development of DR was related to hypertension, hyperlipemia, carotid atherosclerosis and plaque, lower extremity arteriosclerosis and plaque, DN, DPN, DF and PVD. PDR was closely associated with hypertension and DPN. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of DR increased in the diabetic patients with systemic complications, especially, the increase of prevalence of PDR in the patients with hypertension and DPN. Vascular endothelial injury and microcirculatory disturbance are the common pathologic base for DR and other complications. Therefore, it is important to carry out the regular fundus examination in the diabetic patients, especially in those with systemic complication, in order to decrease the rate of blindness.

  2. Farber's Disease

    ... management, and therapy of rare diseases, including the lipid storage diseases. Research on lipid storage diseases within the Network includes ... management, and therapy of rare diseases, including the lipid storage diseases. Research on lipid storage diseases within the Network includes ...

  3. Differing manifestations of hepatitis C and tacrolimus on hospitalized diabetes mellitus occurring after kidney transplantation.

    Abbott, Kevin C; Bernet, Victor J; Agodoa, Lawrence Y; Yuan, Christina M

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies suggest the association of recipient hepatitis C seropositivity (HCV+) and use of tacrolimus (TAC) with post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) may differ by manifestations of type I or type II diabetes, but this has not been assessed in the era of current immunosuppression. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 10,342 Medicare primary renal transplantation recipients without evidence of diabetes at the time of listing in the United States Renal Data System between January 1, 1998 and July 31, 2000, followed until December 31, 2000. Outcomes were hospitalizations for a primary diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS). Cox regression analysis was used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (AHR) for time to DKA or HHS, stratified by diabetes status at the time of transplant. In Cox regression analysis, use of TAC at discharge was independently associated with shorter time to DKA (AHR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.05-3.37, p=0.034) but not HHS. In contrast, recipient HCV+ was independently associated with shorter time to HHS (AHR, 3.90; 1.59-9.60, p=.003), but not DKA. There was no interaction between TAC and HCV+ for either outcome. These results confirm earlier findings that TAC and HCV+ may mediate the risk of PTDM through different mechanisms, even in the modern era.

  4. Real-time support of pediatric diabetes self-care by a transport team.

    Franklin, Brandi E; Crisler, S Crile; Shappley, Rebekah; Armour, Meri M; McCommon, Dana T; Ferry, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The study seeks to improve access for underserved patients via novel integration of Pedi-Flite (a critical care transport team) and to validate whether this safely enhances diabetes care and effectively expands the endocrine workforce. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The study retrospectively analyzed pager service use in a cohort of established diabetic patients (n = 979) after inception of Pedi-Flite support. Outcomes included incidence and severity of recurrent diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and cost savings generated from reduced referrals to the emergency department (ED) and on-call endocrinologist. We generated descriptive statistics to characterize the study population and ED visits for DKA and constructed logistic regression models to examine associations of pager use and likelihood of ED visitation and nonelective inpatient admission from an ED for DKA. RESULTS Pager users comprised 30% of the patient population. They were younger but had more established diabetes than nonusers. While pager users were 2.75 times more likely than nonusers to visit the ED for DKA (P management models supported by allied health personnel.

  5. Real-Time Support of Pediatric Diabetes Self-Care by a Transport Team

    Franklin, Brandi E.; Crisler, S. Crile; Shappley, Rebekah; Armour, Meri M.; McCommon, Dana T.; Ferry, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The study seeks to improve access for underserved patients via novel integration of Pedi-Flite (a critical care transport team) and to validate whether this safely enhances diabetes care and effectively expands the endocrine workforce. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The study retrospectively analyzed pager service use in a cohort of established diabetic patients (n = 979) after inception of Pedi-Flite support. Outcomes included incidence and severity of recurrent diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and cost savings generated from reduced referrals to the emergency department (ED) and on-call endocrinologist. We generated descriptive statistics to characterize the study population and ED visits for DKA and constructed logistic regression models to examine associations of pager use and likelihood of ED visitation and nonelective inpatient admission from an ED for DKA. RESULTS Pager users comprised 30% of the patient population. They were younger but had more established diabetes than nonusers. While pager users were 2.75 times more likely than nonusers to visit the ED for DKA (P management models supported by allied health personnel. PMID:23959568

  6. Breath odor

    ... failure Bowel obstruction Bronchiectasis Chronic kidney failure Esophageal cancer Gastric carcinoma Gastrojejunocolic fistula Hepatic encephalopathy Diabetic ketoacidosis Lung abscess Ozena , or atrophic rhinitis Periodontal disease Pharyngitis Zenker ...

  7. Endocrine Diseases

    ... Syndrome (PCOS) Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease Primary Hyperparathyroidism Prolactinoma Thyroid Tests Turner Syndrome Contact Us The National ... Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información de la ...

  8. SPECTRUM OF DISEASE AND OUTCOME OF PRIMARY AMPUTATION FOR DIABETIC FOOT SEPSIS.

    Cheddie, S; Manneh, C; Zulu, H

    2017-09-01

    Guillotine amputation for diabetic foot sepsis followed by an elective refashioning of the stump is regarded as standard practice. Primary amputation is associated with higher reamputation rates. A prospective cohort study of 85 patients who underwent surgery for diabetic foot sepsis from 2014 to 2016 at Madadeni Provincial Hospital, KwaZulu-Natal was done. Ethical approval was granted. The Wagner classification (Wag) was used to classify disease severity. Outcome measures included length of hospital stay, mortality and re-amputation rates. Of the 85 patients, females (n=45) accounted for 53% of admissions. The mean age was 61 years (range: 29 to 80 years). The majority of patients were African, n=75 (88%). Only 1 patient presented with diabetic ketoacidosis and 18 (21%) presented with renal failure. Most patients presented with advanced disease: [Wag 5, n=66 (78%); Wag 4, n=12 (14%); Wag 3, n=5 (6%); Wag 2, n=2 (2%)]. The levels of vascular occlusion included aortoiliac disease n=2 (2%), femoro-popliteal disease n=18 (21%), tibio-peroneal disease n=65 (76%). Radiographic features included normal findings n=60 (71%); gas gangrene n=11 (13%), osteitis n=8 (9%). The following amputations were done: AKA, n=29 (34%); BKA, n=39 (46%); TMA, n=8 (9%); Toe-ectomy, n=5 (6%) and Debridement, n=4 (5%). The re-amputation rate to above knee amputation was n= 3/39 (8%). All AKA stumps healed well. The overall in-hospital mortality was n=5 (6%) and mean length of hospital stay was 7.8 days ±3.83. The majority of patients presented with advanced disease requiring a major amputation. A definitive one stage primary amputation is a safe and effective procedure for diabetic foot sepsis and is associated with a low re-amputation rate, length of hospital stay and mortality. A guillotine amputation should be reserved for physiologically unstable patients.

  9. Active cocaine use does not increase the likelihood of hyperglycemic crisis.

    Modzelewski, Katherine L; Rybin, Denis V; Weinberg, Janice M; Alexanian, Sara M; McDonnell, Marie E; Steenkamp, Devin W

    2017-09-01

    Hyperglycemic crisis encompasses a group of diabetes emergencies characterized by insulin deficiency with high morbidity and mortality. Cocaine use is increasingly prevalent in the United States and may be associated with increased risk of diabetic ketoacidosis. The objective was to determine if active cocaine use at hospital admission could be considered a risk factor for development of hyperglycemic crisis. A retrospective case-control analysis was performed on 950 inpatients with hyperglycemia at an urban academic hospital. Patients admitted with non-emergent hyperglycemia were compared to patients who met criteria for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS), and hyperosmolar ketoacidosis (HK), based on the absence or presence of cocaine metabolites on urine toxicology screen. Outcomes included frequency of cocaine use in patients with DKA, HHS, HK, and non-emergent hyperglycemia; phenotypic characteristics of cocaine users vs. non-users with hyperglycemia; phenotypic characteristics of patients with hyperglycemic crisis vs. non-emergent hyperglycemia. 950 patients were admitted with hyperglycemia, 133 of which met criteria for hyperglycemic crisis. There was no significant difference in the frequency of cocaine use in individuals with non-emergent hyperglycemia compared to individuals with hyperglycemic crisis (16.9% vs. 17.2%, p = 0.90). 16.9% of patients with DKA, 16.4% of patients with HHS, and 6.4% of patients with HK were cocaine users. We found no association between active cocaine use at the time of hospital admission and development of hyperglycemic crisis, when compared to non-emergent hyperglycemia. The role of routine screening for cocaine use in patients with hyperglycemic crisis is unclear.

  10. An in vitro analysis of the effect of acidosis on coagulation in chronic disease states - a thromboelastograph study.

    White, Hayden; Bird, Robert; Sosnowski, Kellie; Jones, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Thrombosis is a complication of many chronic illnesses. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and diabetes mellitus are common medical conditions frequently associated with a hypercoagulable state. Acidaemia has been shown to reduce coagulation. COPD and diabetes mellitus during acute deterioration can present with a severe acidaemia. The impact of this acidaemia on coagulation is poorly studied. Patients presenting with a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis or type II respiratory failure from COPD and a pH of less than 7.2 were included in our study. A coagulation screen and a thromboelastograph (TEG) were performed on admission and 24 hours later. The mean pH on admission was 7.07 and mean base excess was -16.3. The activated partial thromboplastin time was associated with pH change but remained within the normal range (26-41 s). All other coagulation and TEG parameters failed to show evidence of association (p>0.05). In the two models of non-haemorrhagic acidosis investigated, coagulation was not altered by the changes in pH. More work is needed to understand the complex relationship between factors affecting coagulation in individual disease processes. © 2016 Royal College of Physicians.

  11. Ribbing disease

    Mukkada, Philson J; Franklin, Teenu; Rajeswaran, Rangasami; Joseph, Santhosh

    2010-01-01

    Ribbing disease is a rare sclerosing dysplasia that involves long tubular bones, especially the tibia and femur. It occurs after puberty and is reported to be more common in women. In this article we describe how Ribbing disease can be differentiated from diseases like Engelmann-Camurati disease, van Buchem disease, Erdheim-Chester disease, osteoid osteoma, chronic osteomyelitis, stress fracture, etc

  12. Zvláštnosti výslechu svědka - poškozeného

    Píchová, Petra

    2009-01-01

    79 14. EXPROPRIATION OF OWNERSHIP TITLE TO LAND AND BUILDINGS This work is titled "Expropriation of ownership title to land and buildings". An expropriation is one of the special interference of the state to the property right. It not allows only to the deprivation of the ownership title but also the restriction thereof. In the Czech Republic there are legal bases of expropriation established in the Bill of Fundamental Rights and Freedoms, which is part of constitutional system. Based on the ...

  13. Prostate Diseases

    ... Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Prostate Diseases Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic ... body. Approximately 3 million American men have some type of prostate disease. The most common prostate diseases ...

  14. Infectious Diseases

    ... But some of them can make you sick. Infectious diseases are diseases that are caused by germs. There ... many different ways that you can get an infectious disease: Through direct contact with a person who is ...

  15. Pick disease

    Semantic dementia; Dementia - semantic; Frontotemporal dementia; FTD; Arnold Pick disease; 3R tauopathy ... doctors tell Pick disease apart from Alzheimer disease. (Memory loss is often the main, and earliest, symptom ...

  16. Prion Diseases

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Prion Diseases Prion diseases are a related group of ... deer and elk. Why Is the Study of Prion Diseases a Priority for NIAID? Much about TSE ...

  17. Periodontal Diseases

    ... diseases. The primary research focus was on oral bacteria. Periodontal diseases were thought to begin when chalky white ... tools to target their treatment specifically to the bacteria that trigger periodontal disease. At the same time, because biofilms form ...

  18. Addison's Disease

    ... of potassium and low levels of sodium. What causes Addison’s disease? Addison’s disease is caused by injury to your ... example, a problem with your pituitary gland can cause secondary Addison’s disease. Or, you may develop Addison’s disease if you ...

  19. Graves' Disease

    ... 2011 survey of clinical practice patterns in the management of Graves' disease. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2012 Dec;97( ... 30 a.m. to 5 p.m. eastern time, M-F Follow Us NIH… Turning Discovery Into ... Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  20. Heart Diseases

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  1. Gaucher Disease

    Gaucher disease is a rare, inherited disorder. It is a type of lipid metabolism disorder. If you ... affected. It usually starts in childhood or adolescence. Gaucher disease has no cure. Treatment options for types ...

  2. Lyme Disease

    ... spread to the nervous system, causing facial paralysis ( Bell's palsy ), or meningitis. The last stage of Lyme disease ... My Lyme Disease Risk? Bug Bites and Stings Bell's Palsy Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Meningitis View more About ...

  3. Stargardt Disease

    ... Stargardt disease, lipofuscin accumulates abnormally. The Foundation Fighting Blindness supports research studying lipofuscin build up and ways to prevent it. A decrease in color perception also occurs in Stargardt disease. This is ...

  4. Refsum Disease

    ... night blindness due to degeneration of the retina (retinitis pigmentosa). If the disease progresses, other symptoms may include ... night blindness due to degeneration of the retina (retinitis pigmentosa). If the disease progresses, other symptoms may include ...

  5. Addison Disease

    ... your blood pressure and water and salt balance. Addison disease happens if the adrenal glands don't make ... A problem with your immune system usually causes Addison disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks your own tissues, ...

  6. Alzheimer disease

    ... likely need to plan for their loved one's future care. The final phase of the disease may ... disease and other dementias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  7. Menkes Disease

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Menkes disease is caused by a defective gene named ATPTA ... arteries. Weakened bones (osteoporosis) may result in fractures. × Definition Menkes disease is caused by a defective gene named ATPTA ...

  8. Fabry Disease

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Fabry disease is caused by the lack of or faulty ... severe symptoms similar to males with the disorder. × Definition Fabry disease is caused by the lack of or faulty ...

  9. Liver Diseases

    Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases: Diseases caused by viruses, such as hepatitis ...

  10. Liver disease

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000205.htm Liver disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The term "liver disease" applies to many conditions that stop the ...

  11. Digestive Diseases

    ... Lactose Intolerance Liver Disease Ménétrier’s Disease Microscopic Colitis Ostomy Surgery of the Bowel Pancreatitis Peptic Ulcers (Stomach ... and outreach materials. Clinical Trials Clinical trials offer hope for many people and opportunities to help researchers ...

  12. Kidney Disease

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Kidney Disease KidsHealth / For Teens / Kidney Disease What's in ... Coping With Kidney Conditions Print What Do the Kidneys Do? You might never think much about some ...

  13. Sandhoff Disease

    ... which had been particularly high in people of Eastern European and Ashkenazi Jewish descent, but Sandhoff disease ... which had been particularly high in people of Eastern European and Ashkenazi Jewish descent, but Sandhoff disease ...

  14. Fifth disease

    Parvovirus B19; Erythema infectiosum; Slapped cheek rash ... Fifth disease is caused by human parvovirus B19. It often affects preschoolers or school-age children during the spring. The disease spreads through the fluids in the nose and mouth ...

  15. Brain transmitter precursors and metabolites in diabetic ketoacidosis.

    Curzon, G; Kantamaneni, B D; Callaghan, N; Sullivan, P A

    1982-01-01

    Patients studied during recovery from an episode of ketoacidotic diabetes had raised blood glucose, plasma free fatty acid and plasma free tryptophan concentrations. Plasma total tryptophan was decreased. Well controlled diabetics showed normal values. The ketoacidotic patients had increased lumbar CSF tryptophan and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid concentrations. Plasma tyrosine and CSF tyrosine and homovanillic acid concentrations were normal in both diabetic groups. The results are discussed in...

  16. Diabetic ketoacidosis in a pediatric intensive care unit

    Clarice L.S. Lopes

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: No differences in severity between groups were observed. The study showed that children without prior diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus were younger at admission, had more hypokalemia during the course of treatment, and had greater length of hospital stay.

  17. Cardiovascular diseases

    Kodama, Kazunori

    1992-01-01

    This paper is aimed to discuss the involvement of delayed radiation effects of A-bomb exposure in cardiovascular diseases. First, the relationship between radiation and cardiovascular diseases is reviewed in the literature. Animal experiments have confirmed the relationship between ionizing radiation and vascular lesions. There are many reports which describe ischemic heart disease, cervical and cerebrovascular diseases, and peripheral disease occurring after radiation therapy. The previous A-bomb survivor cohort studies, i.e., the RERF Life Span Study and Adult Health Study, have dealt with the mortality rate from cardiovascular diseases, the prevalence or incidence of cardiovascular diseases, pathological findings, clinical observation of arteriosclerosis, ECG abnormality, blood pressure abnormality, and cardiac function. The following findings have been suggested: (1) A-bomb exposure is likely to be involved in the mortality rate and incidence of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases; (2) similarly, the involvement of A-bomb exposure is considered in the prevalence of the arch of aorta; (3) ECG abnormality corresponding to ischemic heart disease may reflect the involvement of A-bomb exposure. To confirm the above findings, further studies are required on the basis of more accurate information and the appropriate number of cohort samples. Little evidence has been presented for the correlation between A-bomb exposure and both rheumatic heart disease and congenital heart disease. (N.K.) 88 refs

  18. Autoinflammatory Diseases

    Penaranda P, Edgar; Spinel B, Nestor; Restrepo, Jose F; Rondon H, Federico; Millan S, Alberto; Iglesias G Antonio

    2010-01-01

    We present a review article on the autoinflammatory diseases, narrating its historical origin and describing the protein and molecular structure of the Inflammasome, the current classification of the autoinflammatory diseases and a description of the immuno genetics and clinical characteristics more important of every disease.

  19. Lyme Disease.

    Taylor, George C.

    1991-01-01

    This overview of the public health significance of Lyme disease includes the microbiological specifics of the infectious spirochete, the entomology and ecology of the ticks which are the primary disease carrier, the clinical aspects and treatment stages, the known epidemiological patterns, and strategies for disease control and for expanded public…

  20. Gaucher disease

    ... please enable JavaScript. Gaucher disease is a rare genetic disorder in which a person lacks an enzyme called glucocerebrosidase (GBA). Causes Gaucher disease is rare in the general population. People of Eastern and Central European (Ashkenazi) Jewish heritage are more likely to have this disease. It ...

  1. Severe hypertriglyceridemia at new onset type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Fick, Tyler; Jack, Julie; Pyle-Eilola, Amy L; Henry, Rohan K

    2017-08-28

    Severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) as well as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) are complications of type 1 diabetes (T1DM). HTG is an exceedingly rare complication in the pediatric population and herein we report a case of HTG at new-onset T1DM in DKA and discuss management and potential complications. An 11-year-old previously well patient with a history of fatigue and weight loss presented with: glucose >600 mg/dL, venous blood gas: pH 7.26, pCO2 20 mmHg, PO2 101 mmHg and base deficit 13 with triglyceride level 3573 mg/dL. An insulin drip was continued past criteria for discontinuation to facilitate lipoprotein lipase-based triglyceride metabolism. Lipemia secondary to severe HTG, though exceedingly rare, may exist in new onset T1DM with DKA. Complicating the diagnosis is the possibility of an analytical error from lipemia causing incongruence in diagnostic criteria. Clinicians should rely on clinical criteria for management and should consider HTG if laboratory data is inconsistent with the clinical picture.

  2. Spontaneous complete remission of type 1 diabetes mellitus in an adult – review and case report

    Harsha Moole

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is an autoimmune condition that results in low plasma insulin levels by destruction of beta cells of the pancreas. As part of the natural progression of this disease, some patients regain beta cell activity transiently. This period is often referred to as the ‘honeymoon period’ or remission of T1DM. During this period, patients manifest improved glycemic control with reduced or no use of insulin or anti-diabetic medications. The incidence rates of remission and duration of remission is extremely variable. Various factors seem to influence the remission rates and duration. These include but are not limited to C-peptide level, serum bicarbonate level at the time of diagnosis, duration of T1DM symptoms, haemoglobin A1C (HbA1C levels at the time of diagnosis, sex, and age of the patient. Mechanism of remission is not clearly understood. Extensive research is ongoing in regard to the possible prevention and reversal of T1DM. However, most of the studies that showed positive results were small and uncontrolled. We present a 32-year-old newly diagnosed T1DM patient who presented with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA and HbA1C of 12.7%. She was on basal bolus insulin regimen for the first 4 months after diagnosis. Later, she stopped taking insulin and other anti-diabetic medications due to compliance and logistical issues. Eleven months after diagnosis, her HbA1C spontaneously improved to 5.6%. Currently (14 months after T1DM diagnosis, she is still in complete remission, not requiring insulin therapy.

  3. Spontaneous complete remission of type 1 diabetes mellitus in an adult – review and case report

    Moole, Harsha; Moole, Vishnu; Mamidipalli, Adrija; Dharmapuri, Sowmya; Boddireddy, Raghuveer; Taneja, Deepak; Sfeir, Hady; Gajula, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune condition that results in low plasma insulin levels by destruction of beta cells of the pancreas. As part of the natural progression of this disease, some patients regain beta cell activity transiently. This period is often referred to as the ‘honeymoon period’ or remission of T1DM. During this period, patients manifest improved glycemic control with reduced or no use of insulin or anti-diabetic medications. The incidence rates of remission and duration of remission is extremely variable. Various factors seem to influence the remission rates and duration. These include but are not limited to C-peptide level, serum bicarbonate level at the time of diagnosis, duration of T1DM symptoms, haemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) levels at the time of diagnosis, sex, and age of the patient. Mechanism of remission is not clearly understood. Extensive research is ongoing in regard to the possible prevention and reversal of T1DM. However, most of the studies that showed positive results were small and uncontrolled. We present a 32-year-old newly diagnosed T1DM patient who presented with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and HbA1C of 12.7%. She was on basal bolus insulin regimen for the first 4 months after diagnosis. Later, she stopped taking insulin and other anti-diabetic medications due to compliance and logistical issues. Eleven months after diagnosis, her HbA1C spontaneously improved to 5.6%. Currently (14 months after T1DM diagnosis), she is still in complete remission, not requiring insulin therapy. PMID:26486109

  4. Dent disease

    Rina R Rus

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Dent disease is an x-linked disorder of proximal renal tubular dysfunction that occurs almost exclusively in males. It is characterized by significant, mostly low molecular weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, and chronic kidney disease. Signs and symptoms of this condition appear in early childhood and worsen over time. There are two forms of Dent disease, which are distinguished by their genetic cause and pattern of signs and symptoms (type 1 and type 2. Dent disease 2 is characterized by the features described above and also associated with extrarenal abnormalities (they include mild intellectual disability, hypotonia, and cataract. Some researchers consider Dent disease 2 to be a mild variant of a similar disorder called Lowe syndrome.We represent a case of a 3-year old boy with significant proteinuria in the nephrotic range and hypercalciuria. We confirmed Dent disease type 1 by genetic analysis.

  5. Morgellons Disease

    Ohn, Jungyoon; Park, Seon Yong; Moon, Jungyoon; Choe, Yun Seon; Kim, Kyu Han

    2017-01-01

    Morgellons disease is a rare disease with unknown etiology. Herein, we report the first case of Morgellons disease in Korea. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of pruritic erythematous patches and erosions on the arms, hands, and chin. She insisted that she had fiber-like materials under her skin, which she had observed through a magnifying device. We performed skin biopsy, and observed a fiber extruding from the dermal side of the specimen. Histopathological examination sho...

  6. Celiac disease

    Holtmeier Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by intolerance to gluten. It is characterized by immune-mediated enteropathy, associated with maldigestion and malabsorption of most nutrients and vitamins. In predisposed individuals, the ingestion of gluten-containing food such as wheat and rye induces a flat jejunal mucosa with infiltration of lymphocytes. The main symptoms are: stomach pain, gas, and bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, edema, bone or joint pain. Prevalence for clinically overt celiac disease varies from 1:270 in Finland to 1:5000 in North America. Since celiac disease can be asymptomatic, most subjects are not diagnosed or they can present with atypical symptoms. Furthermore, severe inflammation of the small bowel can be present without any gastrointestinal symptoms. The diagnosis should be made early since celiac disease causes growth retardation in untreated children and atypical symptoms like infertility or neurological symptoms. Diagnosis requires endoscopy with jejunal biopsy. In addition, tissue-transglutaminase antibodies are important to confirm the diagnosis since there are other diseases which can mimic celiac disease. The exact cause of celiac disease is unknown but is thought to be primarily immune mediated (tissue-transglutaminase autoantigen; often the disease is inherited. Management consists in life long withdrawal of dietary gluten, which leads to significant clinical and histological improvement. However, complete normalization of histology can take years.

  7. Celiac disease

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a multysystemic autoimmune disease induced by gluten in wheat, barley and rye. It is characterized by polygenic predisposition, high prevalence (1%, widely heterogeneous expression and frequent association with other autoimmune diseases, selective deficit of IgA and Down, Turner and Williams syndrome. The basis of the disease and the key finding in its diagnostics is symptomatic or asymptomatic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa which resolves by gluten-free diet. Therefore, the basis of the treatment involves elimination diet, so that the disorder, if timely recognized and adequately treated, also characterizes excellent prognosis.

  8. Peyronie's Disease.

    Taylor, Frederick L; Levine, Laurence A

    2007-11-01

    Peyronie's disease is a psychologically and physically devastating disorder that is manifest by a fibrous inelastic scar of the tunica albuginea, resulting in palpable penile scar in the flaccid condition and causing penile deformity, including penile curvature, hinging, narrowing, shortening, and painful erections. Peyronie's disease remains a considerable therapeutic dilemma even to today's practicing physicians.

  9. Parasitogenic diseases

    Rozenshtraukh, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    Radiological semiotics of parasitogenic diseases of the intestinal tract is presented. The problem of radiological examination in the case of the diseases consists in the determination of the large intestine state, depth and extension of lesions, and also in solution of treatment efficiency problem

  10. Batten Disease

    ... the country. NIH is the leading supporter of biomedical research in the world. Much of NINDS’ research on Batten disease and the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses focuses on gaining a better understanding of the disease, gene therapy, and developing novel drugs to treat the disorders. ...

  11. Liver Disease

    ... and ridding your body of toxic substances. Liver disease can be inherited (genetic) or caused by a variety of factors that damage the ... that you can't stay still. Causes Liver disease has many ... or semen, contaminated food or water, or close contact with a person who is ...

  12. Leigh's Disease

    ... X-linked form of Leigh’s disease, a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet may be recommended. View Full Treatment Information Definition Leigh's disease is a rare inherited neurometabolic disorder that affects the central nervous system. This progressive disorder begins in infants between the ...

  13. Meniere's Disease

    ... ears and head) special tests that check your balance and how well your ears work. Can Meniere’s disease be prevented or avoided? Because ... find ways to limit the stress in your life or learn how to deal with stress ... Let your family, friends, and co-workers know about the disease. Tell ...

  14. Parasitic diseases

    Rozenshtraukh, L.S.

    1983-01-01

    Foundations of roentgenological semiotics of parasitic diseases of lungs, w hich are of the greatest practical value, are presented. Roentgenological pictu res of the following parasitic diseases: hydatid and alveolar echinococcosis, pa ragonimiasis, toxoplasmosis, ascariasis, amebiasis, bilharziasis (Schistosomias is) of lungs, are considered

  15. Angara disease

    Jane

    2011-10-12

    Oct 12, 2011 ... 1988). Since the disease emerged in this specific geographic area, HHS was initially referred to as “Angara. Disease”. The disease is caused by an avian adenovirus serotype-iv in Pakistan. This virus is responsible for development of intranuclear inclusion bodies in the cells of liver, pancreas and kidneys.

  16. Huntington's Disease

    ... monitor a disease) for HD. A large and related NINDS-supported study aims to identify additional genetic factors in people that influence the course of the disease. Other research hopes to identify variations in the genomes of individuals with HD that may point to new targets ...

  17. Coeliac disease

    2013-03-08

    Mar 8, 2013 ... Two factors are involved in the development of coeliac disease, namely the ... degradation by gastric, pancreatic and intestinal brush ... epithelial layer with chronic inflammatory cells in patients ... Coeliac disease increases the risk of malignancies, such as small bowel adenocarcinoma and enteropathy-.

  18. Celiac Disease

    Manoochehr Karjoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease also known as gluten-sensitive enteropathy is characterized by intestinal mucosal damage and malabsorption from dietary intake of wheat, rye or barley. Symptoms may appear with introduction of cereal in the first 3 years of life. A second peak in symptoms occurs in adults during the third or forth decade and even as late as eight decade of life. The prevalence of this disease is approximately 1 in 250 adults. The disease is more prevalent in Ireland as high as 1 in 120 adults. The disorder occurs in Arab, Hispanics, Israeli Jews, Iranian and European but is rare in Chinese and African American. To have celiac disease the patient should have the celiac disease genetic markers as HLA DQ 2 and HLA DQ 8. Patient with celiac disease may have 95 per cent for DQ 2 and the rest is by DQ 8. Someone may have the genetic marker and never develops the disease. In general 50 percent with markers may develop celiac disease. To develop the disease the gene needs to become activated. This may happen with a viral or bacterial infection, a surgery, delivery, accident, or psychological stress. After activation of gene cause the tight junction to opens with the release of Zonulin This results in passage of gluten through the tight junction and formation of multiple antibodies and autoimmune disease. This also allows entrance of other proteins and development of multiple food allergies. As a result is shortening, flattening of intestinal villi resulting in food, vitamins and minerals malabsorption.

  19. Refractory disease in autoimmune diseases

    Vasconcelos, Carlos; Kallenberg, Cees; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    Refractory disease (RD) definition has different meanings but it is dynamic, according to knowledge and the availability of new drugs. It should be differentiated from severe disease and damage definitions and it must take into account duration of adequate therapy and compliance of the patient. It

  20. Thyroid diseases and cerebrovascular disease

    Squizzato, A.; Gerdes, V. E. A.; Brandjes, D. P. M.; Büller, H. R.; Stam, J.

    2005-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Acute cerebral ischemia has been described in different diseases of the thyroid gland, and not only as a result of thyrotoxic atrial fibrillation and cardioembolic stroke. The purpose of this review is to summarize the studies on the relationship between thyroid diseases and

  1. Morgellons Disease.

    Ohn, Jungyoon; Park, Seon Yong; Moon, Jungyoon; Choe, Yun Seon; Kim, Kyu Han

    2017-04-01

    Morgellons disease is a rare disease with unknown etiology. Herein, we report the first case of Morgellons disease in Korea. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of pruritic erythematous patches and erosions on the arms, hands, and chin. She insisted that she had fiber-like materials under her skin, which she had observed through a magnifying device. We performed skin biopsy, and observed a fiber extruding from the dermal side of the specimen. Histopathological examination showed only mild lymphocytic infiltration, and failed to reveal evidence of any microorganism. The polymerase chain reaction for Borrelia burgdorferi was negative in her serum.

  2. [Infectious diseases].

    Chapuis-Taillard, Caroline; de Vallière, Serge; Bochud, Pierre-Yves

    2009-01-07

    In 2008, several publications have highlighted the role of climate change and globalization on the epidemiology of infectious diseases. Studies have shown the extension towards Europe of diseases such as Crimea-Congo fever (Kosovo, Turkey and Bulgaria), leismaniosis (Cyprus) and chikungunya virus infection (Italy). The article also contains comments on Plasmodium knowlesi, a newly identified cause of severe malaria in humans, as well as an update on human transmission of the H5NI avian influenza virus. It also mentions new data on Bell's palsy as well as two vaccines (varicella-zoster and pneumococcus), and provides a list of recent guidelines for the treatment of common infectious diseases.

  3. Hirschsprung disease.

    Haricharan, Ramanath N; Georgeson, Keith E

    2008-11-01

    Hirschsprung disease is a relatively common condition managed by pediatric surgeons. Significant advances have been made in understanding its etiologies in the last decade, especially with the explosion of molecular genetic techniques and early diagnosis. The surgical management has progressed from a two- or three-stage procedure to a primary operation. More recently, definitive surgery for Hirschsprung disease through minimally invasive techniques has gained popularity. In neonates, the advancement of treatment strategies for Hirschsprung disease continues with reduced patient morbidity and improved outcomes.

  4. Crohn's disease.

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2012-02-03

    Crohn\\'s disease is a disorder mediated by T lymphocytes which arises in genetically susceptible individuals as a result of a breakdown in the regulatory constraints on mucosal immune responses to enteric bacteria. Regulation of immune reactivity to enteric antigens has improved understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of Crohn\\'s disease, and has expanded therapeutic options for patients with this disorder. Disease heterogeneity is probable, with various underlying defects associated with a similar pathophysiological outcome. Although most conventional drug treatments are directed at modification of host response, therapeutic manipulation of the enteric flora is becoming a realistic option.

  5. Norries disease

    Saini J

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A 2-month-old male infant was found to have Norrie′s disease. The clinical presentation and detailed histological features diagnostic of the disease are discussed. This is the first authentic, histologically proven case of Norrie′s disease from India. The absence of hearing loss and mental retardation at the time of presentation at the early stage of infancy and the fact that the case was sporadic do not detract from the diagnosis. However the child at the age of one year developed hearing loss.

  6. Hyperglycemic emergencies in Indian patients with diabetes mellitus on pilgrimage to Amarnathji yatra

    Mohd Ashraf Ganie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS represent two distinct metabolic derangements manifested by insulin deficiency and severe hyperglycemia, with estimated mortality rates of 2.5-9%. In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM controlled by diet or oral agents, DKA does not occur unless there is significant severe stress such as severe sepsis, major surgery, trauma, etc. We observed many such emergencies occurring in pilgrims. Objective: We analyzed the data of 13 patients with DM admitted in our endocrine department with hyperglycemic emergencies during 2 years of the annual pilgrimage (yatra to Amarnathji. Materials and Methods: We reviewed and analyzed the case records of 13 yatris with DM who were referred and admitted in our hospital with hyperglycemic emergencies during the yatra season (July-August of 2006 and 2007. Results: Eleven of 13 had DKA and 1 each had HHS and hypoglycemia. After initial clinical assessment and blood sampling for blood counts, electrolytes, blood gases, urinalysis, chest radiography, and electrocardiography, these cases were managed with standard protocol published by American Diabetes Association (ADA for the management of DKA and HHS. Average blood glucose was 466 mg/dl and nine subjects had moderate to severe ketonuria. All the cases, except one, were in stable condition at the time of discharge. Conclusion: High altitude, strenuous exertion of going uphill, withdrawal of insulin or oral hypoglycemic drugs, starvation, sepsis, and alcohol intake were recorded as predisposing factors. Therefore, there is an immense need for institution of a special health education program to all the yatris before taking the endeavor.

  7. A retrospective study of serum β-hydroxybutyric acid in 215 ill cats: clinical signs, laboratory findings and diagnoses.

    Aroch, Itamar; Shechter-Polak, M; Segev, Gilad

    2012-02-01

    Serum concentrations of β-hydroxybutyric acid (sBHBA) are increased in cats with diabetes mellitus (DM), diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hepatic lipidosis (HL). This study assessed sBHBA as a diagnostic tool in 215 consecutively-enrolled ill cats in the general population in a veterinary hospital. At the time of presentation, sBHBA was within the reference range in 158/215 (73.5%) cats (median 0.27; range 0.00-0.49 mmol/L) and elevated in 57/215 (26.5%) cats (median 0.87; range 0.51-21.45 mmol/L). Compared to cats with normal sBHBA, those with increased sBHBA had higher frequencies of anorexia, weight loss, icterus, polyuria/polydipsia, hyperbilirubinaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, pancreatitis, HL, DM and DKA. They had higher concentrations of bilirubin and triglycerides and lower concentrations of potassium, chloride and total protein. There were positive correlations (P<0.01) between sBHBA and urinary glucose (r=0.42) and ketones (r=0.76), but there were no group differences in dipstick levels of urinary ketones. Cats with DM/DKA and with HL had significantly higher sBHBA compared to other cats. Receiver operator characteristics analysis of sBHBA as a predictor of HL showed that sBHBA was a good predictor of HL. Increased sBHBA occurs frequently in ill cats and provides useful diagnostic information, especially in DM/DKA and HL. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Blount disease

    ... Unlike bowlegs , which tend to straighten as the child develops, Blount disease slowly gets worse. It can cause severe bowing of one or both legs. This condition is more common among African American children. It is also associated with obesity ...

  9. Pneumococcal Disease

    ... pneumococcal disease kills one in every four to five people over the age of 65 who gets it. ... A second PPSV23 vaccine is recommended for these persons five years after the first PPSV23. CDC recommends only ...

  10. Behcet's Disease

    ... this research; and the dissemination of information on research progress in these diseases. Contact Us NIAMS Archive Viewers and Players Social Media Moderation Policy FOIA Privacy Statement Accessibility Disclaimer Digital Strategy ...

  11. Coeliac disease

    Reilly, Norelle R; Husby, Steffen; Sanders, David S

    2018-01-01

    Coeliac disease is increasingly recognized as a global problem in both children and adults. Traditionally, the findings of characteristic changes of villous atrophy and increased intraepithelial lymphocytosis identified in duodenal biopsy samples taken during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy have...... been required for diagnosis. Although biopsies remain advised as necessary for the diagnosis of coeliac disease in adults, European guidelines for children provide a biopsy-sparing diagnostic pathway. This approach has been enabled by the high specificity and sensitivity of serological testing. However......, these guidelines are not universally accepted. In this Perspective, we discuss the pros and cons of a biopsy-avoiding pathway for the diagnosis of coeliac disease, especially in this current era of the call for more biopsies, even from the duodenal bulb, in the diagnosis of coeliac disease. In addition, a contrast...

  12. Addison disease

    Symptoms of Addison disease include: Chronic diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting Darkening of the skin in some places Dehydration Dizziness when standing up Low-grade fever Extreme weakness , fatigue , and slow, sluggish movement Darker ...

  13. Alpers' Disease

    ... underlying liver disease, failure to thrive, infection-associated encephalopathy, spasticity, myoclonus (involuntary jerking of a muscle or group of muscles), seizures, or liver failure. An increased protein level is seen in ...

  14. Heart Disease

    ... it may be caused by diseases, such as connective tissue disorders, excessive iron buildup in your body (hemochromatosis), the buildup of abnormal proteins (amyloidosis) or by some cancer treatments. Causes of heart infection A heart infection, ...

  15. Alexander Disease

    ... Administrator Channels Synapses Circuits Cluster Neurosurgery Research Fellowships Scientific Director, Division of Intramural Research ... Disease Information Page What research is being done? Recent discoveries show that most individuals (approximately 90 percent) with ...

  16. Retinal Diseases

    ... Linked Retinoschisis (XLRS) X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa (XLRP) Usher Syndrome Other Retinal Diseases Glossary News & Research News & Research ... central portion of the retina called the macula. Usher Syndrome Usher syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  17. Sever's Disease

    ... boys 10 years to 12 years of age. Soccer players and gymnasts often get Sever’s disease, but ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ...

  18. Parkinson disease

    ... The disease leads to shaking ( tremors ) and trouble walking and moving . ... include: Difficulty starting movement, such as starting to walk or ... are not moving. This is called resting tremor. Occur when your ...

  19. Behcet's Disease

    ... organs and affect the central nervous system, causing memory loss and impaired speech, balance, and movement. The effects of the disease may include blindness, stroke, swelling of the spinal cord, and intestinal ...

  20. Extrapyramidal disease

    2010-01-01

    2010380 Evaluation non-motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and its influence on ability of daily living. WANG Rongfei(王荣飞),et al. Dept Neurol,1st Hosp,Guangzhou Med Coll,Guangzhou 510000. Chin J Neurol 2010;43(4):273-276. Objective To evaluate the non-motor symptoms (NMS) in Parkinson’s disease (PD),and its influence on ability of daily living (ADL) in PD

  1. Menkes disease

    Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth B

    2010-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is a lethal multisystemic disorder of copper metabolism. Progressive neurodegeneration and connective tissue disturbances, together with the peculiar 'kinky' hair are the main manifestations. MD is inherited as an X-linked recessive trait, and as expected the vast majority...... of surplus copper from cells. Severely affected MD patients die usually before the third year of life. A cure for the disease does not exist, but very early copper-histidine treatment may correct some of the neurological symptoms....

  2. Elm diseases

    John W. Peacock

    1989-01-01

    Dutch elm disease was found in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1930, and is now in most of the contiguous 48 states. The disease is caused by a fungus that has killed millions of wild and planted elms. Losses have been the greatest in the eastern United States. The fungus attacks all elms, but our native species, American, slippery, and rock elm have little or no resistance to the...

  3. Ollier disease

    Jüppner Harald

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enchondromas are common intraosseous, usually benign cartilaginous tumors, that develop in close proximity to growth plate cartilage. When multiple enchondromas are present, the condition is called enchondromatosis also known as Ollier disease (WHO terminology. The estimated prevalence of Ollier disease is 1/100,000. Clinical manifestations often appear in the first decade of life. Ollier disease is characterized by an asymmetric distribution of cartilage lesions and these can be extremely variable (in terms of size, number, location, evolution of enchondromas, age of onset and of diagnosis, requirement for surgery. Clinical problems caused by enchondromas include skeletal deformities, limb-length discrepancy, and the potential risk for malignant change to chondrosarcoma. The condition in which multiple enchondromatosis is associated with soft tissue hemangiomas is known as Maffucci syndrome. Until now both Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome have only occurred in isolated patients and not familial. It remains uncertain whether the disorder is caused by a single gene defect or by combinations of (germ-line and/or somatic mutations. The diagnosis is based on clinical and conventional radiological evaluations. Histological analysis has a limited role and is mainly used if malignancy is suspected. There is no medical treatment for enchondromatosis. Surgery is indicated in case of complications (pathological fractures, growth defect, malignant transformation. The prognosis for Ollier disease is difficult to assess. As is generally the case, forms with an early onset appear more severe. Enchondromas in Ollier disease present a risk of malignant transformation of enchondromas into chondrosarcomas.

  4. Complex Multi-Block Analysis Identifies New Immunologic and Genetic Disease Progression Patterns Associated with the Residual β-Cell Function 1 Year after Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes

    Andersen, Marie Louise Max; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt; Pörksen, Sven; Svensson, Jannet; Vikre-Jørgensen, Jennifer; Thomsen, Jane; Hertel, Niels Thomas; Johannesen, Jesper; Pociot, Flemming; Petersen, Jacob Sten; Hansen, Lars; Mortensen, Henrik Bindesbøl; Nielsen, Lotte Brøndum

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to explore the progression of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in Danish children 12 months after diagnosis using Latent Factor Modelling. We include three data blocks of dynamic paraclinical biomarkers, baseline clinical characteristics and genetic profiles of diabetes related SNPs in the analyses. This method identified a model explaining 21.6% of the total variation in the data set. The model consists of two components: (1) A pattern of declining residual β-cell function positively associated with young age, presence of diabetic ketoacidosis and long duration of disease symptoms (P = 0.0004), and with risk alleles of WFS1, CDKN2A/2B and RNLS (P = 0.006). (2) A second pattern of high ZnT8 autoantibody levels and low postprandial glucagon levels associated with risk alleles of IFIH1, TCF2, TAF5L, IL2RA and PTPN2 and protective alleles of ERBB3 gene (P = 0.0005). These results demonstrate that Latent Factor Modelling can identify associating patterns in clinical prospective data – future functional studies will be needed to clarify the relevance of these patterns. PMID:23755131

  5. Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease

    ... with Rheumatic Disease Pregnancy & Rheumatic Disease Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Diseases with the potential to affect ... control. What are the effects of pregnancy on rheumatic disease? The effects of pregnancy on rheumatic diseases vary ...

  6. Crohn's disease.

    von Roon, Alexander C; Reese, George E; Orchard, Timothy R; Tekkis, Paris P

    2007-11-07

    Crohn's disease is a long-term chronic condition of the gastrointestinal tract. It is characterised by transmural, granulomatous inflammation that occurs in a discontinuous pattern, with a tendency to form fistulae. The cause is unknown but may depend on interactions between genetic predisposition, environmental triggers, and mucosal immunity. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of medical treatments in adults to induce remission in Crohn's disease? What are the effects of lifestyle interventions in adults with Crohn's disease to maintain remission? What are the effects of surgical interventions in adults with small-bowel Crohn's disease to induce remission? What are the effects of surgical interventions in adults with colonic Crohn's disease to induce remission? What are the effects of medical interventions to maintain remission in adults with Crohn's disease; and to maintain remission following surgery? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to March 2006 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 60 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aminosalicylates, antibiotics, azathioprine/mercaptopurine, ciclosporin, corticosteroids (oral), enteral nutrition, fish oil, infliximab, methotrexate, probiotics, resection, segmental colectomy, smoking cessation, and strictureplasty.

  7. Dent's disease

    Thakker Rajesh V

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dent's disease is a renal tubular disorder characterized by manifestations of proximal tubule dysfunction, including low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, and progressive renal failure. These features are generally found in males only, and may be present in early childhood, whereas female carriers may show a milder phenotype. Prevalence is unknown; the disorder has been reported in around 250 families to date. Complications such as rickets or osteomalacia may occur. The disease is caused by mutations in either the CLCN5 (Dent disease 1 or OCRL1 (Dent disease 2 genes that are located on chromosome Xp11.22 and Xq25, respectively. CLCN5 encodes the electrogenic Cl-/H+ exchanger ClC-5, which belongs to the CLC family of Cl- channels/transporters. OCRL1 encodes a phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2 5-phosphatase and mutations are also associated with Lowe Syndrome. The phenotype of Dent's disease is explained by the predominant expression of ClC-5 in the proximal tubule segments of the kidney. No genotype-phenotype correlation has been described thus far, and there is considerable intra-familial variability in disease severity. A few patients with Dent's disease do not harbour mutations in CLCN5 and OCRL1, pointing to the involvement of other genes. Diagnosis is based on the presence of all three of the following criteria: low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria and at least one of the following: nephrocalcinosis, kidney stones, hematuria, hypophosphatemia or renal insufficiency. Molecular genetic testing confirms the diagnosis. The differential diagnosis includes other causes of generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubules (renal Fanconi syndrome, hereditary, acquired, or caused by exogenous substances. Antenatal diagnosis and pre-implantation genetic testing is not advised. The care of patients with Dent's disease is supportive, focusing on the treatment of hypercalciuria and

  8. Parkinson's disease

    Astradsson, Arnar; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The mean age of onset of Parkinson's disease is about 65 years, with a median time of 9 years between diagnosis and death. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of fetal cell or stem cell......-derived therapy in people with Parkinson's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to September 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from...

  9. Role of β-hydroxybutyrate, its polymer poly-β-hydroxybutyrate and inorganic polyphosphate in mammalian health and disease

    Elena N. Dedkova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We provide a comprehensive review of the role of β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB, its linear polymer poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB and inorganic polyphosphate (polyP in mammalian health and disease. β-OHB is a metabolic intermediate that constitutes 70% of ketone bodies produced during ketosis. Although ketosis has been generally considered as an unfavorable pathological state (e.g. diabetic ketoacidosis in type-1 diabetes mellitus, it has been suggested that induction of mild hyperketonemia may have certain therapeutic benefits. β-OHB is synthesized in the liver from acetyl-CoA by β-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase and can be used as alternative energy source. Elevated levels of PHB are associated with pathological states. In humans, short-chain, complexed PHB (cPHB is found in a wide variety of tissues and in atherosclerotic plaques. Plasma cPHB concentrations correlate strongly with atherogenic lipid profiles, and PHB tissue levels are elevated in type-1 diabetic animals. However, little is known about mechanisms of PHB action especially in the heart. In contrast to β-OHB, PHB is a water-insoluble, amphiphilic polymer that has high intrinsic viscosity and salt-solvating properties. cPHB can form non-specific ion channels in planar lipid bilayers and liposomes. PHB can form complexes with polyP and Ca2+ which increases membrane permeability. The biological roles played by polyP, a ubiquitous phosphate polymer with ATP-like bonds, have been most extensively studied in prokaryotes, however polyP has recently been linked to a variety of functions in mammalian cells, including blood coagulation, regulation of enzyme activity in cancer cells, cell proliferation, apoptosis and mitochondrial ion transport and energy metabolism. Recent evidence suggests that polyP is a potent activator of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in cardiomyocytes and may represent a hitherto unrecognized key structural and functional component of the mitochondrial

  10. Hashimoto's Disease

    ... diagnosed with hypothyroidism or had not yet started treatment for hypothyroidism. 4 Problems during pregnancy. The unborn baby's brain ... can last up to a year and requires treatment. Most often, thyroid function returns to normal as the ... from Hashimoto's disease treated during pregnancy? During pregnancy, ...

  11. Prionic diseases

    Abelardo Q-C Araujo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are neurodegenerative illnesses due to the accumulation of small infectious pathogens containing protein but apparently lacking nucleic acid, which have long incubation periods and progress inexorably once clinical symptoms appear. Prions are uniquely resistant to a number of normal decontaminating procedures. The prionopathies [Kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD and its variants, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS syndrome and fatal familial insomnia (FFI] result from accumulation of abnormal isoforms of the prion protein in the brains of normal animals on both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. The accumulation of this protein or fragments of it in neurons leads to apoptosis and cell death. There is a strong link between mutations in the gene encoding the normal prion protein in humans (PRNP - located on the short arm of chromosome 20 – and forms of prion disease with a familial predisposition (familial CJD, GSS, FFI. Clinically a prionopathy should be suspected in any case of a fast progressing dementia with ataxia, myoclonus, or in individuals with pathological insomnia associated with dysautonomia. Magnetic resonance imaging, identification of the 14-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid, tonsil biopsy and genetic studies have been used for in vivo diagnosis circumventing the need of brain biopsy. Histopathology, however, remains the only conclusive method to reach a confident diagnosis. Unfortunately, despite numerous treatment efforts, prionopathies remain short-lasting and fatal diseases.

  12. Parkinson's Disease

    ... a long and relatively healthy life. What Causes Parkinson's Disease? In the very deep parts of the brain, there is a collection of nerve cells that help control movement, known as the basal ganglia (say: BAY-sul GAN-glee-ah). In a ...

  13. Grover's Disease

    ... Information for Authors Information for Reviewers Human & Animal Rights Job Postings Sections of the ... dermatosis) is a condition that appears suddenly as itchy red spots on the trunk, most often in older men. Minor cases of Grover's disease may be rather common. ...

  14. Huntington's disease

    Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Law, Ian; Jønch, Aia

    2011-01-01

    In this open-label pilot study, the authors evaluated the effect of memantine on the distribution of brain glucose metabolism in four Huntington's disease (HD) patients as determined by serial 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose [F(18)]FDG-PET scans over a period of 3-4 months (90-129 days, with one patient...

  15. Canavan disease

    ... affects how the body breaks down and uses aspartic acid . ... scan Head MRI scan Urine chemistry for elevated aspartic acid ... Matalon KM, Matalon RK. Aspartic acid (Canavan disease). In: ... JW III, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. ...

  16. DEVIC'S DISEASE

    had been poor in the right eye and he had found it hard to pass urine. ... right optic:-nerve disease, and was followed in 1880 by mention pupil was large and reacted very sluggishly to light, and the left .... The enzyme theory is that an enzyme-.

  17. Wilson's Disease

    ... yellowing of the skin and the whites of the eye (jaundice) Golden-brown eye discoloration (Kayser-Fleischer rings) Fluid buildup ... is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, which means that to develop the disease you must inherit one copy of the ...

  18. Morgellons disease?

    Accordino, Robert E; Engler, Danielle; Ginsburg, Iona H; Koo, John

    2008-01-01

    Morgellons disease, a pattern of dermatologic symptoms very similar, if not identical, to those of delusions of parasitosis, was first described many centuries ago, but has recently been given much attention on the internet and in the mass media. The present authors present a history of Morgellons disease, in addition to which they discuss the potential benefit of using this diagnostic term as a means of building trust and rapport with patients to maximize treatment benefit. The present authors also suggest "meeting the patient halfway" and creating a therapeutic alliance when providing dermatologic treatment by taking their cutaneous symptoms seriously enough to provide both topical ointments as well as antipsychotic medications, which can be therapeutic in these patients.

  19. Celiac disease

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina

    2015-01-01

    This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins......, which are found in wheat, rye, and barley. The disease prevalence is 0.5-1.0%, but CD remains under-diagnosed. The diagnosis relies on the demonstration of lymphocyte infiltration, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy in duodenal biopsies. Serology, malabsorption, biochemical markers......, and identification of specific HLA haplotypes may contribute to CD diagnosis. Classical CD presents with diarrhoea and weight loss, but non-classical CD with vague or extraintestinal symptoms is common. The treatment for CD is a lifelong gluten-free diet (GFD), which, in the majority of patients, normalises...

  20. disease patient

    Setareh Mamishi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is an inherited disorder of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase complex. This disorder results in recurrent life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections. Aspergillus species are the most common fungal infections in these patients. Case Report: Herein, we present a case of fungal infection in a girl with CGD. We confirmed aspergillosis through the positive microscopic and macroscopic examinations, as well as radiology results. Invasive aspergillosis in this patient with pneumonia, lung abscess, and osteomyelitis of the ribs was not initially treated with amphotericin B (Am B and recombinant interferon-gamma. Conclusion: Among infectious diseases, fungal infections, in particular aspergillosis, remain a serious problem in CGD patients. Considering poor clinical response and deficient immune system, rapid diagnosis of fungal infection and optimizing the treatment of these patients are recommended.

  1. [Addison's disease].

    Quinkler, M

    2012-09-01

    The clinical signs and symptoms of primary adrenal insufficiency are unspecific often causing a delayed diagnosis or even misdiagnosis. In the diagnostic work-up the short synacthen test is regarded as the gold standard. Hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone are the preferred therapy for Addison's disease. The management and surveillance of therapy requires experience and several aspects need to be followed to prevent side effects which might occur due to overtreatment or undertreatment. Very important aspects in therapy are the repeated teaching of the patient and relatives, the issuing of an emergency steroid card and the prescription of a glucocorticoid emergency set. Acute adrenal failure (adrenal crisis), which might be the first manifestation of adrenal insufficiency, is a life-threatening situation requiring immediate glucocorticoid administration and fluid substitution. The most common causes for an adrenal crisis are gastrointestinal infections and fever and discontinuation of glucocorticoid therapy. This article gives an up-to-date overview of diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of Addison's disease.

  2. Joint diseases

    Weissman, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss how x-ray examination is essential in the diagnosis and evaluation of the arthritides. Most arthritides are first suspected by the clinician, and x-ray evaluation of these entities along with laboratory testing is important for confirmation of the clinical diagnosis and in staging of the disease process. Several arthritides are often diagnosed first by the podiatrist on x-ray evaluation, including pseudogout, ankylosing spondylitis, early rheumatoid arthritis, degenerative joint disease, and tuberculosis of bone. The joint responds to insult in only a limited number of ways that become apparent on x-ray. The soft tissues surrounding the joint, the articulating bones, and alignment of the joint space may all be involved by the arthritic process. On roentgenographic examination, the soft tissues must be examined for edema, masses, calcifications, and atrophy. The articulating bones must be examined for demineralization, erosions, osteophytes, periosteal reaction, cysts and sclerosis

  3. Thyroid disease

    Falk, S.

    1990-01-01

    Presenting a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, this volume provides a comprehensive picture of current thyroid medicine and surgery. The book integrates the perspectives of the many disciplines that deal with the clinical manifestations of thyroid disorders. Adding to the clinical usefulness of the book is the state-of-the-art coverage of many recent developments in thyroidology, including the use of highly sensitive two-site TSH immunoradionetric measurements to diagnose thyroid activity; thyroglobulin assays in thyroid cancer and other diseases; new diagnostic applications of MRI and CT; treatment with radionuclides and chemotherapy; new developments in thyroid immunology, pathology, and management of hyperthyroidism; suppressive treatment with thyroid hormone; and management of Graves' ophthalmopathy. The book also covers all aspects of thyroid surgery, including surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism; papillary, follicular, and other carcinomas; thyroidectomy; and prevention and management of complications.

  4. Thyroid disease

    Falk, S.

    1990-01-01

    Presenting a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, this volume provides a comprehensive picture of current thyroid medicine and surgery. The book integrates the perspectives of the many disciplines that deal with the clinical manifestations of thyroid disorders. Adding to the clinical usefulness of the book is the state-of-the-art coverage of many recent developments in thyroidology, including the use of highly sensitive two-site TSH immunoradionetric measurements to diagnose thyroid activity; thyroglobulin assays in thyroid cancer and other diseases; new diagnostic applications of MRI and CT; treatment with radionuclides and chemotherapy; new developments in thyroid immunology, pathology, and management of hyperthyroidism; suppressive treatment with thyroid hormone; and management of Graves' ophthalmopathy. The book also covers all aspects of thyroid surgery, including surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism; papillary, follicular, and other carcinomas; thyroidectomy; and prevention and management of complications

  5. Gaucher's disease

    Hainaux, B.; Christophe, C.; Hanquinet, S.; Perlmutter, N.

    1992-01-01

    We report our observations made by conventional radiography, ultrasound, computerized tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on a 3 1/2-year-old girl with Gaucher's disease. The interest of the case consists in the exceptional lungs involvement, the demonstration by MRI of the bone marrow involvement and the necrosis and fibrosis of the liver, as shown by CT. This liver complication has been previously reported only once. (orig.)

  6. Mitochondrial Disease

    Bulent Kurt; Turgut Topal

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are the major energy source of cells. Mitochondrial disease occurs due to a defect in mitochondrial energy production. A valuable energy production in mitochondria depend a healthy interconnection between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. A mutation in nuclear or mitochondrial DNA may cause abnormalities in ATP production and single or multiple organ dysfunctions, secondarily. In this review, we summarize mitochondrial physiology, mitochondrial genetics, and clinical expression and ...

  7. Cushing disease

    Torres Esteche, V.; Menafra Prieto, M.; Ormaechea Gorricho, R.; Vignolo Scalone, G.; Larre Borges, A.

    1998-01-01

    A review of the Cushings disease in its various aspects. It highlights the importance of early diagnosis to avoid repercussions hypercortisolism secondary to parenchymal. We describe the findings in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), noting that the pituitary adenoma is often of small size and sometimes not visible on MRI. The treatment of choice remains surgical treatment other contingencies exist for particular cases (Author) [es

  8. Diabetic Eye Disease

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetic Eye Disease What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease is a group ... eye diseases that can threaten your sight are Diabetic retinopathy The retina is the inner lining at ...

  9. Heavy Chain Diseases

    ... of heavy chain produced: Alpha Gamma Mu Alpha Heavy Chain Disease Alpha heavy chain disease (IgA heavy ... the disease or lead to a remission. Gamma Heavy Chain Disease Gamma heavy chain disease (IgG heavy ...

  10. WEST AFRICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE

    Administrator

    (CKD) in 2002 was a landmark event.1 This is because CKD is a global ... determination procedure provide us with ... Also, patients with diabetic ketoacidosis .... kidney disease: a position statement ... European Renal Association Section I.

  11. Facts about Type 2

    Full Text Available ... Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication ... Learning at Camp Find a Camp Fundraising Events Step Out Walk to Stop Diabetes Tour de Cure ...

  12. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Full Text Available ... Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication ... Learning at Camp Find a Camp Fundraising Events Step Out Walk to Stop Diabetes Tour de Cure ...

  13. 1 - 5_Bunza

    DR. AMINU

    2014-06-01

    Jun 1, 2014 ... ketoacidosis, or hyperosmolar coma (David, 2001). As the disease progresses ... diabetes develop nephropathy, but in type 2 diabetes a considerably smaller ..... in type 2 diabetic patients: A cross-sectional study of frequency,.

  14. Debut af arvelig metabolisk encefalopati kan ses efter neonatalperioden

    Sørensen, Line Carøe; Rehman, Shazia; Lund, Allan Meldgaard

    2016-01-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder causing accumulation of the branched amino acids valin, isoleucin, leucin and their toxic metabolites resulting in ketoacidosis, progressive neurological deterioration and cerebral oedema. The classical form presents...

  15. Thyroid diseases

    Noma, Koji

    1992-01-01

    This chapter reviews the correlation between thyroid disease, other than cancer, and radiation in the literature. Radiation-induced thyroid disturbance is discussed in the context of external and internal irradiation. External irradiation of 10 to 40 Gy may lower thyroid function several months or years later. Oral administration of I-131 is widely given to patients with Basedow's disease; it may also lower thyroid function with increasing radiation doses. When giving 70 Gy or more of I-131, hypothyroidism has been reported to occur in 20-30% and at least 10%. Thyroiditis induced with internal I-131 irradiation has also been reported, but no data is available concerning external irradiation-induced thyroiditis. The incidence of nodular goiter was found to be several ten times higher with external irradiation than internal irradiation. Thyroid disturbance is correlated with A-bomb survivors. A-bomb radiation can be divided into early radiation within one minute after A-bombing and the subsequent residual radiation. Nodular goiter was significantly more frequent in the exposed group than the non-exposed group; it increased with increasing radiation doses and younger age (20 years or less) at the time of exposure. The incidence of decrease in thyroid function was higher with increasing radiation doses. However, in the case of Nagasaki, the incidence of hypothyroidism was significantly higher in the low-dose exposed group, especially A-bomb survivors aged 10-39 at the time of exposure and women. (N.K.)

  16. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk ...

  17. Virtuální prohlídka staveniště termojaderného reaktoru aneb Tour de ITER

    Řípa, Milan

    Únor (2017) ISSN 2464-7888 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : fusion * ITER * tokamak * virtual * 2D * 3D * dron Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) http://www.3pol.cz/cz/rubriky/jaderna-fyzika-a-energetika/1977-virtualni-prohlidka-staveniste-termojaderneho-reaktoru-aneb-tour-de-iter

  18. Diseases of the skull

    Koval', G.Yu.

    1984-01-01

    Different forms of skull diseases viz. inflammatory diseases, skull tumors, primary and secondary bone tumors, are considered. Roentgenograms in some above-mentioned diseases are presented and analysed

  19. Hirayama disease

    Atul T Tayade

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old male, who gave up his favorite sport cricket and started playing football, presented with one-year history of slowly progressive atrophic weakness of forearms and hands. Neurological examination showed weak and wasted arms, forearms and hand but no evidence of pyramidal tract, spinothalmic tract and posterior column lesions. Plain cervical spine radiographs showed no abnormal findings. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed asymmetric cord atrophy; images obtained with neck flexed showed the anterior shifting of the posterior wall of the lower cervical dural sac resulting in cord compression. These findings suggest Hirayama disease, a kind of cervical myelopathy related to the flexion movements of the neck.

  20. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    ... Find your local chapter Join our online community Parkinson's Disease Dementia Parkinson's disease dementia is an impairment ... disease. About Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Parkinson's disease dementia The brain changes caused by Parkinson's ...

  1. HIV and Cardiovascular Disease

    ... Select a Language: Fact Sheet 652 HIV and Cardiovascular Disease HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE WHY SHOULD PEOPLE WITH HIV CARE ABOUT CVD? ... OF CVD? WHAT ABOUT CHANGING MEDICATIONS? HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE Cardiovascular disease (CVD) includes a group of problems ...

  2. What Is Celiac Disease?

    ... Disease" Articles Celiac Disease Changes Everything / What is Celiac Disease? / Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment / Four Inches and Seven Pounds… / Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease / Living Gluten-Free Spring 2015 Issue: Volume 10 ...

  3. Celiac Disease Changes Everything

    ... Disease" Articles Celiac Disease Changes Everything / What is Celiac Disease? / Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment / Four Inches and Seven Pounds… / Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease / Living Gluten-Free Spring 2015 Issue: Volume 10 ...

  4. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease

    ... Home Conditions Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... by Barbara Goldstein, MD (February 01, 2016) Undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease. This ...

  5. Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    ... gland in the neck, thick and coarse hair. Addison’s Disease Arare disease involving the adrenal gland. The prevalence of celiac disease in people with addison’s disease is significant. Symptoms of Addison’s may include weight ...

  6. Genetics and Rheumatic Disease

    ... Well with Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Studying twins has ... 70%, and for non-identical pairs, even lower. Genetics and ankylosing spondylitis Each rheumatic disease has its ...

  7. Mad Cow Disease

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Mad Cow Disease KidsHealth / For Teens / Mad Cow Disease What's ... are people to get it? What Is Mad Cow Disease? Mad cow disease is an incurable, fatal ...

  8. Niemann-Pick disease

    NPD; Sphingomyelinase deficiency; Lipid storage disorder - Niemann-Pick disease; Lysosomal storage disease - Niemann-Pick ... lipofuscinoses or Batten disease (Wolman disease, cholesteryl ... metabolism of lipids. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, ...

  9. American Lyme Disease Foundation

    ... Infectious Diseases, 35: 451-464, 2002) What is Lyme Disease? Lyme disease (LD) is an infection caused by ... mission with your own tax-deductible contribution. American Lyme Disease Foundation, Inc. PO Box 466 Lyme, CT 06371 ...

  10. Heart disease and women

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007188.htm Heart disease and women To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. People often DO NOT consider heart disease a woman's disease. Yet cardiovascular disease is the ...

  11. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 13,2017 Understand the risks of ... inflammation causes cardiovascular disease, inflammation is common for heart disease and stroke patients and is thought to be ...

  12. Men and Heart Disease

    ... Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Men and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Source: Interactive Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke Heart Disease Facts in Men Heart disease is the leading ...

  13. Heart disease and diet

    Diet - heart disease; CAD - diet; Coronary artery disease - diet; Coronary heart disease - diet ... diet and lifestyle can reduce your risk of: Heart disease, heart attacks, and stroke Conditions that lead ...

  14. Heart disease - risk factors

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  15. Coronary heart disease

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... buildup of plaque in the arteries to your heart. This may also be called hardening of the ...

  16. Osler's disease

    Ahlhelm, F.; Mueller, U.; Lieb, J.; Schneider, G.; Ulmer, S.

    2013-01-01

    Osler's disease, also known as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder leading to abnormal blood vessel formation in the skin, mucous membranes and often in organs, such as the lungs, liver and brain (arteriovenous malformations AVM). Various types are known. Patients may present with epistaxis. Teleangiectasia can be identified by visual inspection during physical examination of the skin or oral cavity or by endoscopy. Diagnosis is made after clinical examination and genetic testing based on the Curacao criteria. Modern imaging modalities, such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have become more important as they can depict the AVMs. Pulmonary AVMs can be depicted in CT imaging even without the use of a contrast agent while other locations including the central nervous system (CNS) usually require administration of contrast agents. Knowledge of possible clinical manifestations in various organs, possible complications and typical radiological presentation is mandatory to enable adequate therapy of these patients. Interventional procedures are becoming increasingly more important in the treatment of HHT patients. (orig.) [de

  17. Renal disease in patients with celiac disease.

    Boonpheng, Boonphiphop; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Wijarnpreecha, Karn

    2018-04-01

    Celiac disease, an inflammatory disease of small bowel caused by sensitivity to dietary gluten and related protein, affects approximately 0.5-1% of the population in the Western world. Extra-intestinal symptoms and associated diseases are increasingly recognized including diabetes mellitus type 1, thyroid disease, dermatitis herpetiformis and ataxia. There have also been a number of reports of various types of renal involvement in patients with celiac disease including diabetes nephropathy, IgA nephropathy, membranous nephropathy, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, nephrotic syndrome related to malabsorption, oxalate nephropathy, and associations of celiac disease with chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease. This review aims to present the current literature on possible pathologic mechanisms underlying renal disease in patients with celiac disease.

  18. Hematopoietic diseases

    Dohi, Hiroo

    1992-01-01

    A-bombing panicked many people with anxiety because they suffered from various symptoms after A-bombing (ie, they generally called them A-bomb disease). In this chapter, major two conditions (ie, leukopenia and anemia), which caused their symptoms, are reviewed based on the early data soon after A-bombing. According to the chronological changes in both white blood cell (WBC) and red blood cell (RBC) counts, both leukopenia and anemia are discussed. The findings can be divided into acute (one week or at least 10 days), subacute (2 weeks to one month), and delayed (thereafter) periods. During an acute period, some exposed even at ≤200 m from the hypocenter showed WBC count of 6,000/mm 3 or more one week after exposure but others exposed at 1,500-2,000 m showed WBC count of less than 3,000/mm 3 , suggesting the influence of shielding on WBC count. WBC count sometimes became the lowest during a subacute period, although it was normal during an acute period. A survey for WBC count during a delayed period (one year later) showed that WBC count of less than 4,000/mm 3 was more frequent in the exposed group (78/523 A-bomb survivors, 14.9%) than the non-exposed group (6/173 persons, 3.5%). In the exposed group, leukopenia was independent of distance and symptoms at the time of exposure. For anemia, there was no data available during an acute period. Anemia frequently occurred during a subacute period. Morphological abnormality of RBC tended to be high in death cases. A delayed survey on anemia 10 years after exposure showed that there was no statistically significant difference in any of the factors, such as hemoglobin, RBC count, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin, between the exposed and non-exposed groups. (N.K.)

  19. Association between periodontal diseases and systemic diseases

    Patrícia Weidlich

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Current evidence suggests that periodontal disease may be associated with systemic diseases. This paper reviewed the published data about the relationship between periodontal disease and cardiovascular diseases, adverse pregnancy outcomes, diabetes and respiratory diseases, focusing on studies conducted in the Brazilian population. Only a few studies were found in the literature focusing on Brazilians (3 concerning cardiovascular disease, 7 about pregnancy outcomes, 9 about diabetes and one regarding pneumonia. Although the majority of them observed an association between periodontitis and systemic conditions, a causal relationship still needs to be demonstrated. Further studies, particularly interventional well-designed investigations, with larger sample sizes, need to be conducted in Brazilian populations.

  20. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  1. Multiple Electrolyte and Metabolic Emergencies in a Single Patient

    Caprice Cadacio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While some electrolyte disturbances are immediately life-threatening and must be emergently treated, others may be delayed without immediate adverse consequences. We discuss a patient with alcoholism and diabetes mellitus type 2 who presented with volume depletion and multiple life-threatening electrolyte and metabolic derangements including severe hyponatremia (serum sodium concentration [SNa] 107 mEq/L, hypophosphatemia (“undetectable,” <1.0 mg/dL, and hypokalemia (2.2 mEq/L, moderate diabetic ketoacidosis ([DKA], pH 7.21, serum anion gap [SAG] 37 and hypocalcemia (ionized calcium 4.0 mg/dL, mild hypomagnesemia (1.6 mg/dL, and electrocardiogram with prolonged QTc. Following two liters of normal saline and associated increase in SNa by 4 mEq/L and serum osmolality by 2.4 mosm/Kg, renal service was consulted. We were challenged with minimizing the correction of SNa (or effective serum osmolality to avoid the osmotic demyelinating syndrome while replacing volume, potassium, phosphorus, calcium, and magnesium and concurrently treating DKA. Our management plan was further complicated by an episode of significant aquaresis. A stepwise approach was strategized to prioritize and correct all disturbances with considerations that the treatment of one condition could affect or directly worsen another. The current case demonstrates that a thorough understanding of electrolyte physiology is required in managing complex electrolyte disturbances to avoid disastrous outcomes.

  2. Diabetes-Specific and General Life Stress and Glycemic Outcomes in Emerging Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: Is Race/Ethnicity a Moderator?

    Butler, Ashley M; Weller, Bridget E; Yi-Frazier, Joyce P; Fegan-Bohm, Kelly; Anderson, Barbara; Pihoker, Catherine; Hilliard, Marisa E

    2017-10-01

    This study examines whether race/ethnicity moderates relationships of (a) diabetes stress and general life stressors with (b) diabetes outcomes of glycemic control and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) among emerging adults (aged 18-25 years) with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Using a T1D Exchange Registry sample of non-Hispanic White, African American, and Hispanic emerging adults (N = 3,440), multiple group analyses were used to determine whether race/ethnicity moderates the relationships between stress and diabetes outcomes. The relationships between the two stress types and glycemic control did not differ between African American and non-Hispanic Whites. However, as compared with non-Hispanic Whites, the association between higher diabetes-specific stress and poorer glycemic control was significantly stronger for Hispanics, and Hispanics had poorer glycemic control when they experienced a relatively fewer number of general life stressors than non-Hispanic Whites. The relationships between the type of stress (diabetes-specific and general stress) and DKA did not differ across racial/ethnic groups. Future research should evaluate possible mechanisms that contribute to the different relationships of stress with glycemic control among Hispanics compared with non-Hispanic Whites. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  3. Ketosis-Onset Diabetes and Ketosis-Prone Diabetes: Same or Not?

    Liu, Beiyan; Yu, Changhua; Li, Qiang; Li, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare clinical characteristics, immunological markers, and β-cell functions of 4 subgroups (“Aβ” classification system) of ketosis-onset diabetes and ketosis prone diabetes patients without known diabetes, presenting with ketosis or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and admitted to our department from March 2011 to December 2011 in China, with 50 healthy persons as control group. Results. β-cell functional reserve was preserved in 63.52% of patients. In almost each subgroup (except A−  β− subgroup of ketosis prone group), male patients were more than female ones. The age of the majority of patients in ketosis prone group was older than that of ketosis-onset group, except A−  β− subgroup of ketosis prone group. The durations from the patient first time ketosis or DKA onset to admitting to the hospital have significant difference, which were much longer for the ketosis prone group except the A+ β+ subgroup. BMI has no significant difference among subgroups. FPG of ketosis prone group was lower than that of A−  β+ subgroup and A+ β+ subgroup in ketosis-onset group. A−  β− subgroup and A+ β+ subgroup of ketosis prone group have lower HbA1c than ketosis-onset group. Conclusions. Ketosis-onset diabetes and ketosis prone diabetes do not absolutely have the same clinical characteristics. Each subgroup shows different specialty. PMID:23710177

  4. Amphetamine-Like Analogues in Diabetes: Speeding towards Ketogenesis

    Natalia M. Branis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is common in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Amphetamine-like analogues comprise the most popular class of weight loss medications. We present a case of a 34-year-old African American female with a history of type 1 diabetes, dyslipidemia, and obesity who developed diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA after starting Diethylpropion for the purpose of weight loss. Shortly after starting Diethylpropion, she developed nausea, vomiting, and periumbilical pain. Blood work revealed glucose of 718 mg/dL, pH 7.32 (7.35–7.45, bicarbonate 16 mmol/L (22–29 mmol/L, and anion gap 19 mmol/L (8–16 mmol/L. Urine analysis demonstrated large amount of ketones. She was hospitalized and successfully treated for DKA. Diethylpropion was discontinued. Amphetamine-like analogues administration leads to norepinephrine release from the lateral hypothalamus which results in the appetite suppression. Peripheral norepinephrine concentration rises as well. Norepinephrine stimulates adipocyte lipolysis and thereby increases nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA availability. It promotes β-oxidation of NEFA to ketone bodies while decreasing metabolic clearance rate of ketones. In the setting of acute insulin deficiency these effects are augmented. Females are more sensitive to norepinephrine effects compared to males. In conclusion, amphetamine-like analogues lead to a release of norepinephrine which can result in a clinically significant ketosis, especially in the setting of insulin deficiency.

  5. Lysosomal storage disease 2 - Pompe's disease

    van der Ploeg, Ans T.; Reuser, Arnold J. J.

    2008-01-01

    Pompe's disease, glycogen-storage disease type II, and acid maltase deficiency are alternative names for the same metabolic disorder. It is a pan-ethnic autosomal recessive trait characterised by acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency leading to lysosomal glycogen storage. Pompe's disease is also

  6. Huntington's disease: a perplexing neurological disease ...

    Huntington's disease is an inherited intricate brain illness. It is a neurodegenerative, insidious disorder; the onset of the disease is very late to diagnose. It is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the Huntingtin gene, which encodes an abnormally long polyglutamine repeat in the Huntingtin protein. Huntington's disease ...

  7. Standardizing Clinically Meaningful Outcome Measures Beyond HbA1c for Type 1 Diabetes: A Consensus Report of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, the American Diabetes Association, the Endocrine Society, JDRF International, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, and the T1D Exchange.

    Agiostratidou, Gina; Anhalt, Henry; Ball, Dana; Blonde, Lawrence; Gourgari, Evgenia; Harriman, Karen N; Kowalski, Aaron J; Madden, Paul; McAuliffe-Fogarty, Alicia H; McElwee-Malloy, Molly; Peters, Anne; Raman, Sripriya; Reifschneider, Kent; Rubin, Karen; Weinzimer, Stuart A

    2017-12-01

    To identify and define clinically meaningful type 1 diabetes outcomes beyond hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) based upon a review of the evidence, consensus from clinical experts, and input from researchers, people with type 1 diabetes, and industry. Priority outcomes include hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, time in range, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), and patient-reported outcomes (PROs). While priority outcomes for type 1 and type 2 diabetes may overlap, type 1 diabetes was the focus of this work. A Steering Committee-comprising representatives from the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, the American Diabetes Association, the Endocrine Society, JDRF International, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, and the T1D Exchange-was the decision-making body for the Type 1 Diabetes Outcomes Program. Their work was informed by input from researchers, industry, and people with diabetes through Advisory Committees representing each stakeholder group. Stakeholder surveys were used to identify priority outcomes. The outcomes prioritized in the surveys were hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, time in range, DKA, and PROs. To develop consensus on the definitions of these outcomes, the Steering Committee relied on published evidence, their clinical expertise, and feedback from the Advisory Committees. The Steering Committee developed definitions for hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, time in range, and DKA in type 1 diabetes. The definitions reflect their assessment of the outcome's short- and long-term clinical impact on people with type 1 diabetes. Knowledge gaps to be addressed by future research were identified. The Steering Committee discussed PROs and concluded that further type 1 diabetes-specific development is needed. The Steering Committee recommends use of the defined clinically meaningful outcomes beyond HbA 1c in the research, development, and evaluation of type 1 diabetes

  8. Prevalence and impact of initial misclassification of pediatric type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Tripathi, Avnish; Rizvi, Ali A; Knight, Lisa M; Jerrell, Jeanette M

    2012-10-01

    To characterize rates of initial misclassification of type 1 diabetes mellitus as type 2/unspecified diabetes mellitus in a cohort of children/adolescents and to examine the impact of misclassification on the risk of diabetes-related complications. An 11-year dataset (1996-2006) was analyzed. Inclusion criteria included age 17 years and younger, enrollees in South Carolina State Medicaid, and diagnosis of type 2/unspecified or type 1 diabetes mellitus for at least two visits, 15 days apart. Survival analysis was used to assess the association of "misclassification" with the incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), and the cumulative incidence of neuropathy, nephropathy, and cardiovascular complications, after controlling for individual risk factors and comorbid conditions. A total of 1130 individuals meeting the inclusion criteria were studied for a median of 7 years. Of the 1130 individuals, 669 (59.2%) maintained a diagnosis of type 2/unspecified diabetes mellitus, 205 (18.1%) were consistently diagnosed as type 1 diabetes mellitus, and the remaining 256 individuals (22.7%) were misclassified. Insulin treatment was used in 100% of the type 1 diabetes mellitus group and 73% of the misclassified group. Compared with the type 2 diabetes mellitus group, being misclassified was associated with earlier development of DKA (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 5.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.09-8.37), neuropathy (aHR 1.94, CI 1.31-2.88), and nephropathy (aHR 1.72, CI 1.19-2.50), whereas being consistently classified with type 1 diabetes mellitus was associated only with earlier development of DKA (aHR 4.96, CI 2.56-9.61). Proper categorization of pediatric diabetes can be challenging, especially with comorbid obesity. Failure to ascertain type 1 diabetes mellitus in a timely manner in a pediatric population may increase the risk of substandard care and diabetes-related complications.

  9. The Expression of Activating Receptor Gene of Natural Killer Cells (KLRC3 in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM

    Dalia Shalaby

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify the possible role of natural killer (NK cells in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM through studying the expression of the KLRC3 gene, which encodes the NK cell activating receptor (NKG2E. Methods: This study was conducted at Alexandria University Children’s Hospital from April to October 2015. The study was conducted with 30 newly diagnosed T1DM patients (15 males and 15 females, aged 7–13 years (10.6±1.8 years and 20 non-diabetic subjects served as age- and sex-matched controls. The patients were further sub-divided into two groups; group I included patients who first presented with classical symptoms of DM (polyuria, polydipsia, and polyphagia without diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA and group II included patients who first presented with DKA. The expression of the KLRC3 gene was measured in each group using the real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: KLRC3 gene expression was significantly downregulated in T1DM cases compared to healthy controls (p = 0.001. Expression was more downregulated in group I patients (p = 0.008. Moreover, there was higher mean value of glycated heamoglobin and lower C-peptide levels in group I than group II. Serum pancreatic amylase showed no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusions: KLRC3 gene expression was downregulated in patients with T1DM compared to healthy controls. Downregulation of expression was greater in DKA patients compared to those who presented with classical symptoms. Expression of KLRC3 in T1DM might play a role in the pathogenesis of T1DM and could be a predictor of its severity.

  10. The Expression of Activating Receptor Gene of Natural Killer Cells (KLRC3) in Patients with 
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM)

    Shalaby, Dalia; Saied, Marwa; Khater, Doaa; Abou Zeid, Abla

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To identify the possible role of natural killer (NK) cells in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) through studying the expression of the KLRC3 gene, which encodes the NK cell activating receptor (NKG2E). Methods This study was conducted at Alexandria University Children’s Hospital from April to October 2015. The study was conducted with 30 newly diagnosed T1DM patients (15 males and 15 females), aged 7–13 years (10.6±1.8 years) and 20 non-diabetic subjects served as age- and sex-matched controls. The patients were further sub-divided into two groups; group I included patients who first presented with classical symptoms of DM (polyuria, polydipsia, and polyphagia) without diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) and group II included patients who first presented with DKA. The expression of the KLRC3 gene was measured in each group using the real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results KLRC3 gene expression was significantly downregulated in T1DM cases compared to healthy controls (p = 0.001). Expression was more downregulated in group I patients (p = 0.008). Moreover, there was higher mean value of glycated heamoglobin and lower C-peptide levels in group I than group II. Serum pancreatic amylase showed no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusions KLRC3 gene expression was downregulated in patients with T1DM compared to healthy controls. Downregulation of expression was greater in DKA patients compared to those who presented with classical symptoms. Expression of KLRC3 in T1DM might play a role in the pathogenesis of T1DM and could be a predictor of its severity. PMID:28804584

  11. EXTERNAL VALIDATION OF THE DIABETES EARLY READMISSION RISK INDICATOR (DERRI™).

    Rubin, Daniel J; Recco, Dominic; Turchin, Alexander; Zhao, Huaqing; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2018-04-06

    The Diabetes Early Readmission Risk Indicator (DERRI ™ ) was previously developed and internally validated as a tool to predict the risk of all-cause readmission within 30 days of discharge (30-d readmission) of hospitalized patients with diabetes. In this study, the predictive performance of the DERRI ™ with and without additional predictors was assessed in an external sample. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of adult patients with diabetes discharged from 2 academic medical centers between 1/1/2000 and 12/31/2014. We applied the previously developed DERRI ™ , which includes admission laboratory results, sociodemographics, a diagnosis of certain comorbidities, and recent discharge information, and evaluated the effect of adding metabolic indicators on predictive performance using multivariable logistic regression. Total cholesterol and A1c were selected based on clinical relevance and univariate association with 30-d readmission. Among 105,974 discharges, 19,032 (18.0%) were followed by 30-d readmission for any cause. The DERRI ™ had a C-statistic of 0.634 for 30-d readmission. Total cholesterol (TC) was the lipid parameter most strongly associated with 30-d readmission. The DERRI ™ predictors, A1c, and TC were significantly associated with 30-d readmission; however, their addition to the DERRI ™ did not significantly change model performance (C-statistic 0.643 [95% CI, 0.638-0.647], p=0.92). Performance of the DERRI ™ in this external cohort was modest but comparable to other readmission prediction models. Addition of A1c and TC to the DERRI ™ did not significantly improve performance. Although the DERRI ™ may be useful to direct resources toward diabetes patients at higher risk, better prediction is needed. DERRI = Diabetes Early Readmission Risk Indicator; TC = Total cholesterol; A1c = hemoglobin A1c; HDL-C = high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; LDL-C = low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; DKA = diabetic ketoacidosis; HHS

  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Full Text Available ... Expert Briefings: Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease NY Nightly News with Chuck ... Briefings: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease 2010 Expert Briefings: Legal Issues: ...

  13. Parkinson disease - discharge

    Your doctor has told you that you have Parkinson disease . This disease affects the brain and leads ... have you take different medicines to treat your Parkinson disease and many of the problems that may ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Full Text Available ... Tips for Care Partners Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Innovations in PD Nurse Education CareMAP: Managing Advanced Parkinson's ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis How Is Parkinson's Disease ...

  15. Understanding cardiovascular disease

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000759.htm Understanding cardiovascular disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... lead to heart attack or stroke. Types of Cardiovascular Disease Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common ...

  16. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    ... a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, ... physician. Established by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) Celiac Disease Eosinophilic ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Conference: Lessons Learned How Does the DBS Device Work? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis CareMAP: ...

  18. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many ... viruses. Sometimes the cause is not known. Degenerative nerve diseases include Alzheimer's disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Friedreich's ...

  19. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease)

    ... Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) is a rare and deadly disease ...

  20. Mixed Connective Tissue Disease

    Mixed connective tissue disease Overview Mixed connective tissue disease has signs and symptoms of a combination of disorders — primarily lupus, scleroderma and polymyositis. For this reason, mixed connective tissue disease ...

  1. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 29,2018 The following ... clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent ...

  2. Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

    ... disease. Who Gets ALS? Although this disease can strike anyone, ALS is extremely rare in kids. According ... home to provide care that the family cannot handle alone. Living With Lou Gehrig's Disease Living with ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Full Text Available ... Does Caregiving Change from Day to Day? Unconditional Love How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? ... Mind Guide to Parkinson's Disease Guide to Deep Brain Stimulation Sleep: A Mind Guide to Parkinson’s Disease ...

  4. Lyme Disease Data

    ... materials Why is CDC concerned about Lyme disease? Data and Statistics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... sixth most common Nationally Notifiable disease . Lyme Disease Data File To facilitate the public health and research ...

  5. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    ... Health Topics Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis is often used to refer to any ... primary immunodeficiency syndrome March 11, 2013 Arthritis and Rheumatic Disease News Research Brief | January 9, 2017 Tofacitinib Shows ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Full Text Available ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Overview of Parkinson's ... Disease? What Are Some Strategies to Improve the Quality of Community Care for PD Patients? CareMAP: Dealing ...

  7. Chronic kidney disease

    disease, together with other related non -communicable diseases. (NCDs), poses not only a threat ... but because if we do not act against NCDs we will also be increasing individual and ... respiratory diseases and cancer. This is in recognition ...

  8. Tay-Sachs Disease

    Tay-Sachs disease is a rare, inherited disease. It is a type of lipid metabolism disorder. It causes too ... cells, causing mental and physical problems. . Infants with Tay-Sachs disease appear to develop normally for the first few ...

  9. Menopause and Heart Disease

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Heart ... can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases . However, certain ...

  10. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis). This group of tests ...

  11. Lyme disease (image)

    Lyme disease is an acute inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, joint inflammation and symptoms similar to the ... that is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi . Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of a deer ...

  12. Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... How many Americans over age 65 may have Alzheimer's disease? as many as 5 million as many ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease: One Voice, Many Listeners Expert Briefings: Medical Therapies: What's in the Parkinson's Pipeline? Expert Briefings: Under-recognized Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ...

  14. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    ... Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Back to Patient Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Millions of people experience irregular or abnormal ... harmless and happen in healthy people free of heart disease. However, some abnormal heart rhythms can be serious ...

  15. Parasitic diseases of lungs

    Rozenshtraukh, L.C.; Rybakova, N.I.; Vinner, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Roentgenologic semiotics of the main parasitic diseases of lungs is described: echinococcosis, paragonimiasis, cysticercosis, toxoplasmosis, ascariasis, amebiosis and some rarely met parasitic diseases

  16. Biomarker for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    2017-07-03

    Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Glycogen Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type I; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV; Glycogen Storage Disease Type V; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VIII

  17. Diabetes and Celiac Disease

    ... some in the family will have celiac disease. • Symptoms of celiac disease vary widely, but are often absent in persons ... Abnormal labs XX Diabetes and Celiac Disease | continued CELIAC DISEASE Classic symptoms... Gas, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, weight loss, anemia. ...

  18. Poorly Responsive Celiac Disease

    ... Close Celiac Disease Understanding Celiac Disease What is Celiac Disease? Symptoms Screening and Diagnosis Treatment and Follow-Up Dermatitis ... Schuppan D, Kelly CP. Etiologies and predictors of diagnosis in nonresponsive celiac disease. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2007; 5 : 445–50. Finding ...

  19. The integrated disease network.

    Sun, Kai; Buchan, Natalie; Larminie, Chris; Pržulj, Nataša

    2014-11-01

    The growing body of transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic and genomic data generated from disease states provides a great opportunity to improve our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving diseases and shared between diseases. The use of both clinical and molecular phenotypes will lead to better disease understanding and classification. In this study, we set out to gain novel insights into diseases and their relationships by utilising knowledge gained from system-level molecular data. We integrated different types of biological data including genome-wide association studies data, disease-chemical associations, biological pathways and Gene Ontology annotations into an Integrated Disease Network (IDN), a heterogeneous network where nodes are bio-entities and edges between nodes represent their associations. We also introduced a novel disease similarity measure to infer disease-disease associations from the IDN. Our predicted associations were systemically evaluated against the Medical Subject Heading classification and a statistical measure of disease co-occurrence in PubMed. The strong correlation between our predictions and co-occurrence associations indicated the ability of our approach to recover known disease associations. Furthermore, we presented a case study of Crohn's disease. We demonstrated that our approach not only identified well-established connections between Crohn's disease and other diseases, but also revealed new, interesting connections consistent with emerging literature. Our approach also enabled ready access to the knowledge supporting these new connections, making this a powerful approach for exploring connections between diseases.

  20. Epigenetics of kidney disease.

    Wanner, Nicola; Bechtel-Walz, Wibke

    2017-07-01

    DNA methylation and histone modifications determine renal programming and the development and progression of renal disease. The identification of the way in which the renal cell epigenome is altered by environmental modifiers driving the onset and progression of renal diseases has extended our understanding of the pathophysiology of kidney disease progression. In this review, we focus on current knowledge concerning the implications of epigenetic modifications during renal disease from early development to chronic kidney disease progression including renal fibrosis, diabetic nephropathy and the translational potential of identifying new biomarkers and treatments for the prevention and therapy of chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease.

  1. [Periodontal disease in pediatric rheumatic diseases].

    Fabri, Gisele M C; Savioli, Cynthia; Siqueira, José T; Campos, Lucia M; Bonfá, Eloisa; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are immunoinflammatory periodontal diseases characterized by chronic localized infections usually associated with insidious inflammation This narrative review discusses periodontal diseases and mechanisms influencing the immune response and autoimmunity in pediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD), particularly juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (C-SLE) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Gingivitis was more frequently observed in these diseases compared to health controls, whereas periodontitis was a rare finding. In JIA patients, gingivitis and periodontitis were related to mechanical factors, chronic arthritis with functional disability, dysregulation of the immunoinflammatory response, diet and drugs, mainly corticosteroids and cyclosporine. In C-SLE, gingivitis was associated with longer disease period, high doses of corticosteroids, B-cell hyperactivation and immunoglobulin G elevation. There are scarce data on periodontal diseases in JDM population, and a unique gingival pattern, characterized by gingival erythema, capillary dilation and bush-loop formation, was observed in active patients. In conclusion, gingivitis was the most common periodontal disease in PRD. The observed association with disease activity reinforces the need for future studies to determine if resolution of this complication will influence disease course or severity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Occupational skin diseases

    Mahler, V; Aalto-Korte, K; Alfonso, J H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Work-related skin diseases (WSD) are caused or worsened by a professional activity. Occupational skin diseases (OSD) need to fulfil additional legal criteria which differ from country to country. OSD range amongst the five most frequently notified occupational diseases (musculoskeletal...... diseases, neurologic diseases, lung diseases, diseases of the sensory organs, skin diseases) in Europe. OBJECTIVE: To retrieve information and compare the current state of national frameworks and pathways to manage patients with occupational skin disease with regard to prevention, diagnosis, treatment...... in Science and Technology (COST) Action TD 1206 (StanDerm) (www.standerm.eu). RESULTS: Besides a national health service or a statutory health insurance, most European member states implemented a second insurance scheme specifically geared at occupational diseases [insurance against occupational risks...

  3. Pregnancy and periodontal disease

    Sağlam, Ebru; Saruhan, Nesrin; Çanakçı, Cenk Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Some maternal immunological changes due to pregnancy increases susceptibility to infections. Periodontal disease, the main cause is plaque, is a common disease which is seen multifactorial and varying severity. There are many clinical criteria for diagnosis of periodontal disease. Correlation between pregnancy and periodontal inflammation is known for many years. Periodontal disease affects pregnant’s systemic condition and also has negative effects on fetus. Periodontal disease increases the...

  4. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease and prion disease

    Eikelenboom, P.; Bate, C.; van Gool, W. A.; Hoozemans, J. J. M.; Rozemuller, J. M.; Veerhuis, R.; Williams, A.

    2002-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and prion disease are characterized neuropathologically by extracellular deposits of Abeta and PrP amyloid fibrils, respectively. In both disorders, these cerebral amyloid deposits are co-localized with a broad variety of inflammation-related proteins (complement factors,

  5. Human Environmental Disease Network

    Taboureau, Olivier; Audouze, Karine

    2017-01-01

    During the past decades, many epidemiological, toxicological and biological studies have been performed to assess the role of environmental chemicals as potential toxicants for diverse human disorders. However, the relationships between diseases based on chemical exposure have been rarely studied...... by computational biology. We developed a human environmental disease network (EDN) to explore and suggest novel disease-disease and chemical-disease relationships. The presented scored EDN model is built upon the integration on systems biology and chemical toxicology using chemical contaminants information...... and their disease relationships from the reported TDDB database. The resulting human EDN takes into consideration the level of evidence of the toxicant-disease relationships allowing including some degrees of significance in the disease-disease associations. Such network can be used to identify uncharacterized...

  6. Menopause and Rheumatic Disease.

    Talsania, Mitali; Scofield, Robert Hal

    2017-05-01

    Menopause occurs naturally in women at about 50 years of age. There is a wealth of data concerning the relationship of menopause to systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis; there are limited data concerning other rheumatic diseases. Age at menopause may affect the risk and course of rheumatic diseases. Osteoporosis, an integral part of inflammatory rheumatic diseases, is made worse by menopause. Hormone replacement therapy has been studied; its effects vary depending on the disease and even different manifestations within the same disease. Cyclophosphamide can induce early menopause, but there is underlying decreased ovarian reserve in rheumatic diseases. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Wilson’s Disease

    Figen Hanağası

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Wilson’s disease is a autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism. Clinical phenotypes include hepatic, haemolytic, neurologic and psychiatric diseases. Wilson’s disease is caused by mutations in the ATP7B gene. ATP7B encodes a hepatic copper-transporting protein, which is important for copper excretion into bile. Neurological symptoms in Wilson’s disease include variable combinations of dysathria, ataxia, parkinsonism, dystonia and tremor. Wilson’s disease is lethal if untreated. This review discusses the epidemiology, genetics, clinical features, etiopathophysiology, diagnostic tests, and treatment of Wilson’s disease

  8. Lysosomal storage diseases

    Ferreira, Carlos R.; Gahl, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are cytoplasmic organelles that contain a variety of different hydrolases. A genetic deficiency in the enzymatic activity of one of these hydrolases will lead to the accumulation of the material meant for lysosomal degradation. Examples include glycogen in the case of Pompe disease, glycosaminoglycans in the case of the mucopolysaccharidoses, glycoproteins in the cases of the oligosaccharidoses, and sphingolipids in the cases of Niemann-Pick disease types A and B, Gaucher disease, Tay-Sachs disease, Krabbe disease, and metachromatic leukodystrophy. Sometimes, the lysosomal storage can be caused not by the enzymatic deficiency of one of the hydrolases, but by the deficiency of an activator protein, as occurs in the AB variant of GM2 gangliosidosis. Still other times, the accumulated lysosomal material results from failed egress of a small molecule as a consequence of a deficient transporter, as in cystinosis or Salla disease. In the last couple of decades, enzyme replacement therapy has become available for a number of lysosomal storage diseases. Examples include imiglucerase, taliglucerase and velaglucerase for Gaucher disease, laronidase for Hurler disease, idursulfase for Hunter disease, elosulfase for Morquio disease, galsulfase for Maroteaux-Lamy disease, alglucosidase alfa for Pompe disease, and agalsidase alfa and beta for Fabry disease. In addition, substrate reduction therapy has been approved for certain disorders, such as eliglustat for Gaucher disease. The advent of treatment options for some of these disorders has led to newborn screening pilot studies, and ultimately to the addition of Pompe disease and Hurler disease to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel (RUSP) in 2015 and 2016, respectively. PMID:29152458

  9. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease - A multisystem disease?

    Mikolasevic, Ivana; Milic, Sandra; Turk Wensveen, Tamara; Grgic, Ivana; Jakopcic, Ivan; Stimac, Davor; Wensveen, Felix; Orlic, Lidija

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common comorbidities associated with overweight and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Importantly, NAFLD is one of its most dangerous complications because it can lead to severe liver pathologies, including fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatic cellular carcinoma. Given the increasing worldwide prevalence of obesity, NAFLD has become the most common cause of chronic liver disease and therefore is a major global health problem. Currently, NAFLD is predominantly regarded as a hepatic manifestation of MetS. However, accumulating evidence indicates that the effects of NAFLD extend beyond the liver and are negatively associated with a range of chronic diseases, most notably cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is becoming increasingly clear that these diseases are the result of the same underlying pathophysiological processes associated with MetS, such as insulin resistance, chronic systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia. As a result, they have been shown to be independent reciprocal risk factors. In addition, recent data have shown that NAFLD actively contributes to aggravation of the pathophysiology of CVD, T2DM, and CKD, as well as several other pathologies. Thus, NAFLD is a direct cause of many chronic diseases associated with MetS, and better detection and treatment of fatty liver disease is therefore urgently needed. As non-invasive screening methods for liver disease become increasingly available, detection and treatment of NAFLD in patients with MetS should therefore be considered by both (sub-) specialists and primary care physicians. PMID:27920470

  10. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Library is an extensive collection of books, fact sheets, videos, podcasts, and more. To get started, use ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  12. Lyme Disease Transmission

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  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  14. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    ... Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At a ... help understand the role of genetic factors in cardiovascular disease . However, the testing is sometimes used in clinical ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Conference: Lessons Learned How Does the DBS Device Work? Why Is It Important to Continue Self-Care ...

  17. Children and Parasitic Diseases

    ... because they disproportionately affect impoverished people. More on: Neglected Tropical Diseases Prevention One of the most important ways to help prevent these parasitic diseases is to teach children the importance of washing hands correctly with soap ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... with Advanced Parkinson's How Does the DBS Device Work? What Are the Strategies for Managing Problems with ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... 2016: Coping Strategy: Yoga & Stretching CareMAP: Medications and General Health Part 1 Expert Briefings: Depression and PD: ...

  20. Celiac Disease: Diagnosis.

    Byrne, Greg; Feighery, Conleth F

    2015-01-01

    Historically the diagnosis of celiac disease has relied upon clinical, serological, and histological evidence. In recent years the use of sensitive serological methods has meant an increase in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The heterogeneous nature of the disorder presents a challenge in the study and diagnosis of the disease with patients varying from subclinical or latent disease to patients with overt symptoms. Furthermore the related gluten-sensitive disease dermatitis herpetiformis, while distinct in some respects, shares clinical and serological features with celiac disease. Here we summarize current best practice for the diagnosis of celiac disease and briefly discuss newer approaches. The advent of next-generation assays for diagnosis and newer clinical protocols may result in more sensitive screening and ultimately the possible replacement of the intestinal biopsy as the gold standard for celiac disease diagnosis.

  1. Celiac Disease Tests

    ... diet When To Get Tested? When you have symptoms suggesting celiac disease, such as chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, anemia , and ... Celiac tests are usually ordered for people with symptoms suggesting celiac disease, including anemia and abdominal pain. Sometimes celiac testing ...

  2. Addison's Disease: Treatment

    Addison's disease Diagnosis Your doctor will talk to you first about your medical history and your signs and ... If your doctor thinks that you may have Addison's disease, you may undergo some of the following tests: ...

  3. Lyme disease antibody

    ... JavaScript. The Lyme disease blood test looks for antibodies in the blood to the bacteria that causes ... needed. A laboratory specialist looks for Lyme disease antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Full Text Available ... There is a lot to know about Parkinson's disease. Learn about symptoms, how it is diagnosed and ... quality of life and live well with Parkinson's disease. Learn More Expert Care Patient Centered Care Centers ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  7. Fatty Liver Disease

    What is fatty liver disease? Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Fatty liver disease is a condition in which fat builds ...

  8. Gum Disease and Men

    ... Club Program Perio Store Education & Careers Careers in Periodontics Perio Exam for Dental Licensure Recommended Competencies Periodontal ... your risk of cardiovascular disease. Both diseases are chronic inflammatory conditions, and researchers believe that inflammation is ...

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Full Text Available ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies ... to Know? Why Is Comprehensive Care or Team Approach Important? 2013 PSA Featuring Katie Couric What Are ...

  10. Progression of Liver Disease

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  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Full Text Available ... Progression of the Disease? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis What Are Some Strategies for Problems with Urination? CareMAP: Changes Around the ...

  13. Valvular heart disease

    Gelson, E; Gatzoulis, M; Johnson, M

    2007-01-01

    Valvular disease may be unmasked in pregnancy when physiological changes increase demands on the heart. Women with valvular heart disease require close follow-up during pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  16. Machado-Joseph Disease

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  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Full Text Available ... and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease Nurse Webinars: Interdisciplinary Education on Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Getting Around: Transportation and Travel with PD Expert Briefings: Sleep and Parkinson's Nurse: ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Excessive Daytime Sleepiness? Is Compulsive Behavior a Side Effect of PD Medications? CareMAP: Putting Things in Place ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  4. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Full Text Available ... PD: What Do We Really Know? Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Improving Caregiver Strain through Science and Model ... Disease Psychosis: Hallucinations, Delusions and Paranoia Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Understanding Fatigue and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease ...

  5. Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease

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  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  7. Glomerular Disease in Women

    Kate Wiles

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gender differences exist in the prevalence of glomerular diseases. Data based on histological diagnosis underestimate the prevalence of preeclampsia, which is almost certainly the commonest glomerular disease in the world, and uniquely gender-specific. Glomerular disease affects fertility via disease activity, the therapeutic use of cyclophosphamide, and underlying chronic kidney disease. Techniques to preserve fertility during chemotherapy and risk minimization of artificial reproductive techniques are considered. The risks, benefits, and effectiveness of different contraceptive methods for women with glomerular disease are outlined. Glomerular disease increases the risk of adverse outcomes in pregnancy, including preeclampsia; yet, diagnosis of preeclampsia is complicated by the presence of hypertension and proteinuria that precede pregnancy. The role of renal biopsy in pregnancy is examined, in addition to the use of emerging angiogenic biomarkers. The safety of drugs prescribed for glomerular disease in relation to reproductive health is detailed. The impact of both gender and pregnancy on long-term prognosis is discussed.

  8. Genetic Disease Foundation

    ... has used its fundraising efforts to help further research programs at Mount Sinai. Spotlight: Gaucher Gaucher Disease is the most common of the lipid storage diseases. Learn about its symptoms, how it ...

  9. Tay-Sachs Disease

    ... better understanding of how neurological deficits arise in lipid storage diseases and on the development of new treatments targeting disease mechanisms. Specific research on the gangliodisoses including expanding the use of ...

  10. Acid Lipase Disease

    ... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke conducts and supports research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency and ... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke conducts and supports research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency and ...

  11. Maple syrup urine disease

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  12. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Full Text Available ... Help with Cognitive Impairment? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis: A Caregiver’s Story What Are Some Strategies for Problems with Urination? CareMAP: Las Actividades en ...

  13. [Emerging noninfectious diseases].

    Consiglio, Ezequiel

    2008-11-01

    In recent years, emerging diseases were defined as being infectious, acquiring high incidence, often suddenly, or being a threat or an unexpected phenomenon. This study discusses the hallmarks of emerging diseases, describing the existence of noninfectious emerging diseases, and elaborating on the advantages of defining noninfectious diseases as emerging ones. From the discussion of various mental health disorders, nutritional deficiencies, external injuries and violence outcomes, work injuries and occupational health, and diseases due to environmental factors, the conclusion is drawn that a wide variety of noninfectious diseases can be defined as emergent. Noninfectious emerging diseases need to be identified in order to improve their control and management. A new definition of "emergent disease" is proposed, one that emphasizes the pathways of emergence and conceptual traits, rather than descriptive features.

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Full Text Available ... Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Gait, Balance and Falls in Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: Coping ... Pensamiento y el Comportamiento, Parte 2 CareMAP: Balancing Life and Caregiving Jose Maria Lobo: Musica en vivo ...

  17. Motor Neuron Diseases

    ... and other neurodegenerative diseases to better understand the function of neurons and other support cells and identify candidate therapeutic ... and other neurodegenerative diseases to better understand the function of neurons and other support cells and identify candidate therapeutic ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Full Text Available ... Delusions and Paranoia Nurse Webinars: Nursing Solutions: Understanding Fatigue and Apathy in Parkinson's Disease Nurse Webinars: Interdisciplinary ... Missing? Communication and the PD Partnership Expert Briefings: Fatigue, Sleep Disorders and Parkinson's Disease Expert Briefings: What's ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Full Text Available ... Learn More Research Research We Fund Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grant Opportunities Science News & Progress Patient Engagement Research ... Help with Cognitive Impairment? OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis: A ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  4. Gallstone disease and mortality

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Mønsted; Sørensen, Lars Tue; Jørgensen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this cohort study was to determine whether subjects with gallstone disease identified by screening of a general population had increased overall mortality when compared to gallstone-free participants and to explore causes of death. METHODS: The study population (N...... built. RESULTS: Gallstone disease was present in 10%. Mortality was 46% during median 24.7 years of follow-up with 1% lost. Overall mortality and death from cardiovascular diseases were significantly associated to gallstone disease. Death from unknown causes was significantly associated to gallstone...... disease and death from cancer and gastrointestinal disease was not associated. No differences in mortality for ultrasound-proven gallstones or cholecystectomy were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Gallstone disease is associated with increased overall mortality and to death from cardiovascular disease. Gallstones...

  5. Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

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  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  8. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  9. Takayasu's disease and pregnancy

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  10. Chronic Kidney Diseases

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  11. Hypertensive heart disease

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000163.htm Hypertensive heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hypertensive heart disease refers to heart problems that occur because of ...

  12. Heart disease and intimacy

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  13. Aspirin and heart disease

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  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  16. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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  19. Congenital heart disease

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  20. Heart Disease Risk Factors

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