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Sample records for disease assessment scale-cognitive

  1. Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-Cog): Normative Data for the Portuguese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Joana; Freitas, Sandra; Duro, Diana; Tábuas-Pereira, Miguel; Guerreiro, Manuela; Almeida, Jorge; Santana, Isabel

    2018-02-28

    The Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale is a brief battery developed to assess cognitive functioning in Alzheimer's disease that encompasses the core characteristics of cognitive decline (e.g. memory, language, praxis, constructive ability and orientation). The early detection, as well as the monitoring of cognitive decline along disease progression, is extremely important in clinical care and interventional research. The main goals of the present study were to analyze the psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale, and to establish normative values for the Portuguese population. The Portuguese version of Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale was administered to 223 cognitively healthy participants according to a standard assessment protocol consisting of the Mini-Mental State Examination, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and the Adults and Older Adults Functional Assessment Inventory. Normal performance on the assessment protocol was the inclusion criteria for the study. The Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale revealed good psychometric properties when used in the Portuguese population. Age was the main predictor of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale total score (R2 = 0.123), whereas the influence of education level was lower (R2 = 0.027). These two variables explained 14.4% of the variance on the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale scores and were used to stratify the normative values for the Portuguese population presented here. On the total sample, the average total score in the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale was 6 points. The normative data were determined according to age and educational level as these were the sociodemographic variables that significantly contributed to the prediction of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale

  2. Validation study of the Alzheimer's disease assessment scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) for the Portuguese patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Joana; Freitas, Sandra; Duro, Diana; Almeida, Jorge; Santana, Isabel

    2018-03-23

    The Alzheimer's disease assessment scale-Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-Cog) is a battery to assess cognitive performance in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and was developed according to the core characteristics of cognitive decline in AD: memory, language, praxis, constructive ability, and orientation. The aim of this study was to explore the diagnostic accuracy and discriminative capacity of the ADAS-Cog for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and AD, using cut-off points for the Portuguese population. The European Portuguese version of the ADAS-Cog was administrated to 650 participants, divided into a control group (n = 210), an MCI group (n = 240), and an AD group (n = 200). The clinical groups fulfilled standard international diagnostic criteria. Controls were healthy cognitive participants actively integrated in the community. The neuropsychological assessment protocol included the ADAS-Cog, the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), and the Adults and Older Adults Functional Assessment Inventory (IAFAI). The ADAS-Cog revealed good psychometric indicators, and the total scores were significantly different between the three groups (p  9 points (AUC = .835; sensitivity = 58% and specificity = 91%) and AD > 12 points (AUC = .996; sensitivity = 94% and specificity = 98%). Our findings confirmed the capacity of the ADAS-Cog total score to identify cognitive impairment in AD patients, with poor sensitivity for MCI, in a Portuguese cohort.

  3. An approach for estimating item sensitivity to within-person change over time: An illustration using the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, N Maritza; Bolt, Daniel M; Deng, Sien

    2016-12-01

    When assessments are primarily used to measure change over time, it is important to evaluate items according to their sensitivity to change, specifically. Items that demonstrate good sensitivity to between-person differences at baseline may not show good sensitivity to change over time, and vice versa. In this study, we applied a longitudinal factor model of change to a widely used cognitive test designed to assess global cognitive status in dementia, and contrasted the relative sensitivity of items to change. Statistically nested models were estimated introducing distinct latent factors related to initial status differences between test-takers and within-person latent change across successive time points of measurement. Models were estimated using all available longitudinal item-level data from the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale, including participants representing the full-spectrum of disease status who were enrolled in the multisite Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Five of the 13 Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive items demonstrated noticeably higher loadings with respect to sensitivity to change. Attending to performance change on only these 5 items yielded a clearer picture of cognitive decline more consistent with theoretical expectations in comparison to the full 13-item scale. Items that show good psychometric properties in cross-sectional studies are not necessarily the best items at measuring change over time, such as cognitive decline. Applications of the methodological approach described and illustrated in this study can advance our understanding regarding the types of items that best detect fine-grained early pathological changes in cognition. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Predictors of placebo group decline in the Alzheimer's disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) in 24 week clinical trials of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizarry, Michael C; Webb, David J; Bains, Chanchal; Barrett, Steven J; Lai, Robert Y; Laroche, Janette P; Hosford, David; Maher-Edwards, Gareth; Weil, John G

    2008-07-01

    One limitation of several recent 24 week Alzheimer's disease (AD) clinical trials was the lack of cognitive decline detected by the AD Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) in the placebo groups, possibly obscuring true medication effects. Data from 733 individuals in the placebo arms of six AD clinical trials performed 1996-1997 were pooled to examine the relationship of clinical, demographic, and genetic characteristics with the 24 week change in ADAS-cog. Baseline cognitive and functional status and the screening-to-baseline change in ADAS-cog were the strongest independent predictors of the 24 week change in ADAS-cog. The ADAS-cog did not detect progression in patients with mild dementia (screening Mini-Mental State Exam, MMSE, >or=20). The change in ADAS-cog from screening to baseline was inversely correlated with the 24 week change score; it was more difficult to detect cognitive decline at 24 weeks if individuals markedly worsened from screening to baseline. The effects of baseline MMSE and screening-to-baseline change in ADAS-cog generalized to the placebo group (N=106) of another AD study performed in 2004-2005. Overcoming lack of placebo decline in AD clinical trials will require scales more sensitive to cognitive decline in mild AD and strategies to reduce within-person variability in outcome measures.

  5. A study of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive (ADAS-Cog) in an Icelandic elderly population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannesdóttir, Kristin; Snaedal, Jón

    2002-01-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS) is designed for screening of cognitive and non-cognitive dysfunctions characteristic of persons with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD). The cognitive part of the scale (ADAS-Cog) is both convenient for screening of probable AD and as a measure of cognitive functioning during drug intervention. The aim of this study was to translate the ADAS-Cognitive sub-test (ADAS-Cog) into Icelandic and to study its application in an elderly Icelandic population. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the ADAS-Cog were administered to 20 AD patients and 20 controls. Each patient was also rated on the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS). The probable AD patients were divided into two groups based on their GDS: 3-4 and 5-6 points. The patients were also divided into two groups based on their MMSE score: very mild to mild (23-30 points) and mild to moderate (15-22 points). Furthermore, the subjects were divided into two age groups: 65-76 and 77-92 years. Results revealed a highly significant difference on MMSE (22.3 +/- 3.4; 26.8 +/- 1.6; P ADAS-Cog (18.4 +/- 7.7; 7.3 +/- 3.5; P ADAS-Cog plays an important role in the diagnostic makeup of AD along with other detailed investigations, such as neuropsychological assessment.

  6. New scoring methodology improves the sensitivity of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Nishant; Beretvas, S Natasha; Pascual, Belen; Masdeu, Joseph C; Markey, Mia K

    2015-11-12

    As currently used, the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) has low sensitivity for measuring Alzheimer's disease progression in clinical trials. A major reason behind the low sensitivity is its sub-optimal scoring methodology, which can be improved to obtain better sensitivity. Using item response theory, we developed a new scoring methodology (ADAS-CogIRT) for the ADAS-Cog, which addresses several major limitations of the current scoring methodology. The sensitivity of the ADAS-CogIRT methodology was evaluated using clinical trial simulations as well as a negative clinical trial, which had shown an evidence of a treatment effect. The ADAS-Cog was found to measure impairment in three cognitive domains of memory, language, and praxis. The ADAS-CogIRT methodology required significantly fewer patients and shorter trial durations as compared to the current scoring methodology when both were evaluated in simulated clinical trials. When validated on data from a real clinical trial, the ADAS-CogIRT methodology had higher sensitivity than the current scoring methodology in detecting the treatment effect. The proposed scoring methodology significantly improves the sensitivity of the ADAS-Cog in measuring progression of cognitive impairment in clinical trials focused in the mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease stage. This provides a boost to the efficiency of clinical trials requiring fewer patients and shorter durations for investigating disease-modifying treatments.

  7. The Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-Cog): Modifications and Responsiveness in Pre-Dementia Populations. A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueper, Jacqueline K; Speechley, Mark; Montero-Odasso, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-Cog) was developed in the 1980s to assess the level of cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease. Advancements in the research field have shifted focus toward pre-dementia populations, and use of the ADAS-Cog has extended into these pre-dementia studies despite concerns about its ability to detect important changes at these milder stages of disease progression. If the ADAS-Cog cannot detect important changes, our understanding of pre-dementia disease progression may be compromised and trials may incorrectly conclude that a novel treatment approach is not beneficial. The purpose of this review was to assess the performance of the ADAS-Cog in pre-dementia populations, and to review all modifications that have been made to the ADAS-Cog to improve its measurement performance in dementia or pre-dementia populations. The contents of this review are based on bibliographic searches of electronic databases to locate all studies using the ADAS-Cog in pre-dementia samples or subsamples, and to locate all modified versions. Citations from relevant articles were also consulted. Overall, our results suggest the original ADAS-Cog is not an optimal outcome measure for pre-dementia studies; however, given the prominence of the ADAS-Cog, care must be taken when considering the use of alternative outcome measures. Thirty-one modified versions of the ADAS-Cog were found. Modification approaches that appear most beneficial include altering scoring methodology or adding tests of memory, executive function, and/or daily functioning. Although modifications improve the performance of the ADAS-Cog, this is at the cost of introducing heterogeneity that may limit between-study comparison.

  8. Clinical meaningfulness of Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale change in relation to goal attainment in patients on cholinesterase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwood, Kenneth; Howlett, Susan E; Hoffman, Deborah; Schindler, Rachel; Mitnitski, Arnold

    2017-10-01

    The clinical meaningfulness of Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) subscale change is disputed. We compared 2- to 4-point ADAS-Cog changes with changes in Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) and everyday function across initial ADAS-Cog scores and treatment responses. This exploratory analysis evaluated mild-moderate Alzheimer's disease patients treated with donepezil (12 months) or galantamine (8 months). Clinical meaningfulness was defined as concomitant ADAS-Cog and GAS changes of ±3 points and/or functional improvement. Patients with ≥3-point ADAS-Cog improvement significantly improved on GAS but not on standard tests of everyday function. ADAS-Cog "no change" (≤±3 points) was seen with mean GAS improvement. Initial ADAS-Cog improvement made endpoint improvement (ADAS-Cog 3 points and GAS 1 point) more likely (odds ratio = 6.9; 95% confidence interval = 2.5-19.5). In contrast, initial deterioration made endpoint improvement unlikely (0.33; 0.14-0.64). ADAS-Cog improvement and no change were each associated with GAS improvement. Initial ADAS-Cog worsening was unlikely to result in later improvement. ISRCTN26167328. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Adaptation and validation of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive (ADAS-Cog) in a low-literacy setting in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddick, Stella-Maria; Kisoli, Aloyce; Mkenda, Sarah; Mbowe, Godfrey; Gray, William Keith; Dotchin, Catherine; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Kisima, John; Olakehinde, Olaide; Mushi, Declare; Walker, Richard William

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the feasibility of a low-literacy adaptation of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive (ADAS-Cog) for use in rural sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) for interventional studies in dementia. No such adaptations currently exist. Tanzanian and Nigerian health professionals adapted the ADAS-Cog by consensus. Validation took place in a cross-sectional sample of 34 rural-dwelling older adults with mild/moderate dementia alongside 32 non-demented controls in Tanzania. Participants were oversampled for lower educational level. Inter-rater reliability was conducted by two trained raters in 22 older adults (13 with dementia) from the same population. Assessors were blind to diagnostic group. Median ADAS-Cog scores were 28.75 (interquartile range (IQR), 22.96-35.54) in mild/moderate dementia and 12.75 (IQR 9.08-16.16) in controls. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.973 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.936-1.00) for dementia. Internal consistency was high (Cronbach's α 0.884) and inter-rater reliability was excellent (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.905, 95% CI 0.804-0.964). The low-literacy adaptation of the ADAS-Cog had good psychometric properties in this setting. Further evaluation in similar settings is required.

  10. The Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive-Plus (ADAS-Cog-Plus): an expansion of the ADAS-Cog to improve responsiveness in MCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Jeannine; Carvalho, Janessa O; Potter, Guy G; Thames, April; Zelinski, Elizabeth; Crane, Paul K; Gibbons, Laura E

    2012-12-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) is widely used in AD, but may be less responsive to change when used in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Participants from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative were administered a neuropsychological battery and 1.5 T MRI scans over 2-3 years. Informants were queried regarding functional impairments. Some participants had lumbar punctures to obtain cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We added executive functioning (EF) and functional ability (FA) items to the ADAS-Cog to generate candidate augmented measures. We calibrated these candidates using baseline data (n = 811) and selected the best candidate that added EF items alone and that added EF and FA items. We selected candidates based on their responsiveness over three years in a training sample of participants with MCI (n = 160). We compared traditional ADAS-Cog scores with the two candidates based on their responsiveness in a validation sample of participants with MCI (n = 234), ability to predict conversion to dementia (n = 394), strength of association with baseline MRI (n = 394) and CSF biomarkers (n = 193). The selected EF candidate added category fluency (ADAS Plus EF), and the selected EF and FA candidate added category fluency, Digit Symbol, Trail Making, and five items from the Functional Assessment Questionnaire (ADAS Plus EF&FA). The ADAS Plus EF& FA performed as well as or better than traditional ADAS-Cog scores. Adding EF and FA items to the ADAS-Cog may improve responsiveness among people with MCI without impairing validity.

  11. Detecting Treatment Group Differences in Alzheimer's Disease Clinical Trials: A Comparison of Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-Cog) and the Clinical Dementia Rating - Sum of Boxes (CDR-SB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, A M; Dowsett, S A; Sims, J R

    2018-01-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale's cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) has been widely used as an outcome measure in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) clinical trials. In its original form (ADAS-Cog11), the scale has been used successfully in mild-to-moderate AD dementia populations, but its use is more limited in the study of earlier disease (mild cognitive impairment [MCI] or mild dementia due to AD) owing to lack of appropriate sensitivity of some items. With recent focus on earlier treatment, efforts have focused on the development of more sensitive tools, including the Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (CDR-SB), a global assessment tool to evaluate both cognition and function. The ability of the ADAS-Cog and CDR-SB to detect treatment group differences in the clinical trial environment has not been systematically studied. The aim of this analysis was to compare the utility of these tools in detecting treatment group differences, by reviewing study findings identified through advanced searches of clinicaltrials.gov and Ovid, and press releases and scientific presentations. Findings from placebo-controlled studies of ≥ 6m duration and enrolling >100 participants were included; reporting of both the ADAS-Cog and CDR-SB at endpoint was also a requirement. Of the >300 records identified, 34 studies fulfilled the criteria. There were significant placebo versus active drug group differences based on findings from at least one measure for 14 studies. The ADAS-Cog detected treatment differences more frequently than the CDR-SB. Based on these and previously published findings, the ADAS-Cog appears more useful than the CDR-SB in detecting treatment group differences.

  12. [Validation of the Hungarian version of Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-Cog) in patients with mild cognitive impairment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Edina; Pákáski, Magdolna; Drótos, Gergely; Kálmán, János

    2012-01-01

    Early recognition of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has increasing clinical relevance in the treatment process of dementia, since it is considered as prodromal period. A great variety of instruments have been developed for measuring cognitive performance of the demented patients. The cognitive subscale of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-Cog) is one of the most frequently applied instrument to determine the severity of dementia and the efficiency of pharmacotherapy. The aim of this study is to examine the sensitivity parameters of the Hungarian ADAS-Cog in differentiating healthy elderly from MCI patients, furthermore to compare the sociodemographic data of the two groups. Fourty-five patients with MCI and 47 healthy subjects (HS) participated in the study. Their age variated between 52 and 88 years, the mean age was 68.8 (standard deviation=8.6). The mean of the years of education was 11.8 (standard deviation=3.5). Mental state was determined by ADAS-Cog and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was used to exclude depression. Data analysis was performed with SPSS 17. There were no significant differences between the two groups considering the sociodemographic data. The total score of ADAS-Cog is the most sensitive index (AUC: 0.875, sensitivity: 95.6%) for determining MCI, although the ratio of false positive cases was very high (specificity: 70.2%). The cut-off scores of the ADAS-Cog in the Hungarian sample were higher than the findings in previous researches. Positive correlation between age and ADAS-Cog total score was only significant in the HS group. On the other hand, negative correlation was found between education and ADAS-Cog total score in the MCI group. These results indicate that the currently used Hungarian ADAS-Cog is able to distinguish between MCI patients and HS groups. However, the adaptation of the Hungarian version will be necessary during the further standardization process including the

  13. The validity and reliability of the Turkish version of Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-Cog) in patients with mild and moderate Alzheimer's disease and normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavioglu, H; Gedizlioglu, M; Akyel, S; Aslaner, T; Eser, E

    2006-03-01

    The cognitive subscale of the Alzheimer's Disease Assesment Scale (ADAS-Cog) is the most widely used test in clinical trials dealing with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aim of this study was to investigate the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of ADAS-Cog. Twenty-nine patients with AD, fulfilling NINCDS-ADRDA criteria of probable AD, who were in stage 3-5 according to the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS), and 27 non-demented control subjects with similar age, gender and educational status were recruited for the study. The Turkish version of ADAS-Cog, Standardized Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and Short Orientation-Memory-Concentration Test (SOMCT) were applied to both of the groups. Inter-rater reliability, internal consistency, test-retest reliability; face validity, differential validity and convergent validity were statistically analyzed. Both MMSE and ADAS-Cog have significantly differentiated patients with AD and control subjects (p ADAS-Cog scores in AD group (r: -0.739). ADAS-Cog was also highly significantly correlated with GDS (r: 0.720) and SOMCT (r: 0.738). For the group with AD, control and whole cohort coefficients of internal consistency, Cronbach's alpha: 0.800, 0.515, 0.873 were found respectively. Inter-rater reliability for total ADAS-Cog score was found as ICC: 0.99 and 0.98 and test-retest reliability was found as ICC: 0.91 and 0.95 for demented and nondemented subjects, respectively. The Turkish version of ADAS-Cog has been found to be highly reliable and valid in differentiating patients with mild and moderate AD from nondemented subjects.

  14. Efficacy of a medical food on cognition in Alzheimer's disease: results from secondary analyses of a randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, P.J.G.H.; Verhey, F.R.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.; Twisk, J.W.; Swinkels, S.H.; Scheltens, P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the extent that baseline cognitive impairment and intake adherence affected the 13-item Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) intervention response of a medical food in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients. Desigrt/setting/participants

  15. Efficacy of a medical food on cognition in Alzheimer's disease: results from secondary analyses of a randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, P.J.; Verhey, F.R.J.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Swinkels, S.H.N.; Scheltens, P.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the extent that baseline cognitive impairment and intake adherence affected the 13-item Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) intervention response of a medical food in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients. DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS

  16. Radiological assessement of Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florio, F.; Palladino, M.; Stella, P.; Barbi, E.

    1987-01-01

    Fifty-eight consecutive cases of patients affected by Crohn's disease, with ileum (23/58), colon (10/58) and ileo-colic (25/58) involvement were studied. A good overall sensitivity was reached by the radiological procedures employed (barium meal, barium enema, enterclysis). Enterclysis is proposed as a second-step method for the study of ileum involvement, because it provides a quite precise assessement of disease stage and extent. Some criteria for a rational use of current radiological procedures in follow-up of both surgically and medically treated patients are proposed. Moreover it is suggested that better coordination of anatomo-radiological and clinical aspects could improve the therapeutic approach and prognostic judgement in such cases

  17. Radionuclide assessment of Gaucher's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, T.H.; Holman, B.L.

    1978-01-01

    Gaucher's disease involves multiple organs and may present with variable severity. The scintigraphic appearance of the reticuloendothelial system and bone are described in three patients with Gaucher's disease. Scintigraphic abnormalities reflected the severity of organ involvement and correlated well with the patients' clinical status. Scintigraphy appears useful for the evaluation and followup of patients with Gaucher's disease

  18. Total cardiovascular disease risk assessment: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooney, Marie Therese

    2011-09-01

    The high risk strategy for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) requires an assessment of an individual\\'s total CVD risk so that the most intensive risk factor management can be directed towards those at highest risk. Here we review developments in the assessment and estimation of total CVD risk.

  19. Motor assessment in Parkinson`s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opara, Józef; Małecki, Andrzej; Małecka, Elżbieta; Socha, Teresa

    2017-09-21

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of most disabling disorders of the central nervous system. The motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease: shaking, rigidity, slowness of movement, postural instability and difficulty with walking and gait, are difficult to measure. When disease symptoms become more pronounced, the patient experiences difficulties with hand function and walking, and is prone to falls. Baseline motor impairment and cognitive impairment are probable predictors of more rapid motor decline and disability. An additional difficulty is the variability of the symptoms caused by adverse effects of drugs, especially levodopa. Motor assessment of Parkinson`s Disease can be divided into clinimetrics, assessment of balance and posture, arm and hand function, and gait/walking. These are many clinimetric scales used in Parkinson`s Disease, the most popular being the Hoehn and Yahr stages of progression of the disease and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. Balance and posture can be assessed by clinimetric scales like the Berg BS, Tinetti, Brunel BA, and Timed Up and Go Test, or measured by posturometric platforms. Among skill tests, the best known are: the Purdue Pegboard Test, Nine-Hole Peg Test, Jebsen and Taylor test, Pig- Tail Test, Frenchay Arm Test, Action Research Arm Test, Wolf FMT and Finger-Tapping Test. Among motricity scales, the most popular are: the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment Scale and Södring Motor Evaluation. Gait and walking can also be assessed quantitatively and qualitatively. Recently, the most popular is three-dimensional analysis of movement. This review article presents the current possibilities of motor assessment in Parkinson`s disease.

  20. Assessment of adrenal function in liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kharb

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent times, there are reports of adrenal dysfunction in whole spectrum of liver disease. Adrenal insufficiency (AI has been shown to correlate with progression of liver disease. Hence this study was conducted to assess adrenal function in subjects with acute liver disease (ALD, chronic liver disease (CLD and post liver transplantation (LT. Material and Methods: This study included 25 healthy controls, 25 patients of ALD, 20 subjects of CLD with Child-Pugh stage A (CLD-1 and 30 with Child-Pugh stage B or C (CLD-2, and 10 subjects with LT. All subjects were assessed clinically, biochemically and for adrenal functions. Results: AI was present in 9 (34.6% patients with ALD, 20 (40% patients with CLD and 4 (40% in subjects with LT. AI was more common in CLD-2 (18 patients - 60% than CLD-1 (2 patients - 10%. All patients with chronic liver disease had significantly lower basal cortisol (8.8±4.8, P=0.01, stimulated cortisol (18.2±6.3, P <0.00001 and incremental cortisol (9.4±4.6, P <0.00001 as compared to controls. There was increase in percentage of subjects with adrenal dysfunction with progression of liver disease as assessed by Child-Pugh staging. AI was predicted by lower levels of serum protein, serum albumin, total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol and higher levels of serum bilirubin and INR. Adrenal functions showed recovery following liver transplantation. Conclusions: AI forms important part of spectrum of acute and chronic liver disease. Deterioration of synthetic functions of liver disease predicts presence of AI, and these patients should be evaluated for adrenal dysfunction periodically.

  1. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Force Recommendations Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults ... on Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) and Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) ...

  2. Assessment of Motor Units in Neuromuscular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Robert D; McCombe, Pamela A

    2017-01-01

    The motor unit comprises the anterior horn cell, its axon, and the muscle fibers that it innervates. Although the true number of motor units is unknown, the number of motor units appears to vary greatly between different muscles and between different individuals. Assessment of the number and function of motor units is needed in diseases of the anterior horn cell and other motor nerve disorders. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is the most important disease of anterior horn cells. The need for an effective biomarker for assessing disease progression and for use in clinical trials in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis has stimulated the study of methods to measure the number of motor units. Since 1970 a number of different methods, including the incremental, F-wave, multipoint, and statistical methods, have been developed but none has achieved widespread applicability. Two methods (MUNIX and the multipoint incremental method) are in current use across multiple centres and are discussed in detail in this review, together with other recently published methods. Imaging with magnetic resonance and ultrasound is increasingly being applied to this area. Motor unit number estimates have also been applied to other neuromuscular diseases such as spinal muscular atrophy, compression neuropathies, and prior poliomyelitis. The need for an objective measure for the assessment of motor units remains tantalizingly close but unfulfilled in 2016.

  3. Disease state fingerprint for fall risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Similä, Heidi; Immonen, Milla

    2014-01-01

    Fall prevention is an important and complex multifactorial challenge, since one third of people over 65 years old fall at least once every year. A novel application of Disease State Fingerprint (DSF) algorithm is presented for holistic visualization of fall risk factors and identifying persons with falls history or decreased level of physical functioning based on fall risk assessment data. The algorithm is tested with data from 42 older adults, that went through a comprehensive fall risk assessment. Within the study population the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale score, Berg Balance Scale (BBS) score and the number of drugs in use were the three most relevant variables, that differed between the fallers and non-fallers. This study showed that the DSF visualization is beneficial in inspection of an individual's significant fall risk factors, since people have problems in different areas and one single assessment scale is not enough to expose all the people at risk.

  4. Chagas disease. A new pathophysiological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redruello, M.; Masoli, O.; Hasson, I.; Cragnolino, D.; Traverso, S.; Perez Balino, N.; Sarmiento, R.; Lazzari, J.; Luluaga, E.

    2002-01-01

    Background: There is scarce information on myocardial perfusion abnormalities and on the coronary vasomotor condition in Chagas disease patients. Aims: To assess regional perfusion abnormalities and the coronary vasomotor response of patients in the chronic phase of Chagas disease. Methods: With the use of 99mTc-sestamibi SPECT imaging and cold pressor test and intracoronary acetylcoline (ACH) perfusion, we studied 9 patients aged 42,6±12 years, 4 males, in the chronic stage of Chagas disease (5 with the indeterminate form and 4 with heart lesion) with normal coronary arteries. Vasomotor responses to intracoronary increasing doses of ACH and to a single dose of nitroglycerine (NTG) were assessed with digital quantitative angiography. Regional myocardial perfusion was evaluated at rest and after cold pressor test by a semi quantitative score analysis in an 18-segment model with 99mTc-sestamibi SPECT images. Results were expressed as mean ± 2SD. Differences between continuous variables were measured by two tails Student's t test for paired variables and the significance level was set at 5 %. Results: All patients had regional perfusion defects and abnormal vasomotor response. The diameter of the left anterior descending artery decreased 34% from a basal diameter of 3.66∫0.95 mm down to 2.42±0.74 mm after maximal response to ACH (p<0.002). NTG infusion augmented its diameter to 3.86±0.77 mm (p<0.0002) that is a 60% increase from post ACH diameter. Myocardial perfusion score was 1∫2.66 at rest and 6.22±3.6 after cold pressor test (p<0.0001). Conclusions: This group of patients in the chronic phase of Chagas disease showed an abnormal vasoconstrictive response to intracoronary ACH and cold-induced perfusion defects suggesting that endothelial dysfunction plays a role in the pathophysiology of chronic Chagas heart disease

  5. Technologies Assessing Limb Bradykinesia in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Hasan; Athauda, Dilan S; Foltynie, Thomas; Noyce, Alastair J

    2017-01-01

    The MDS-UPDRS (Movement Disorders Society - Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale) is the most widely used scale for rating impairment in PD. Subscores measuring bradykinesia have low reliability that can be subject to rater variability. Novel technological tools can be used to overcome such issues. To systematically explore and describe the available technologies for measuring limb bradykinesia in PD that were published between 2006 and 2016. A systematic literature search using PubMed (MEDLINE), IEEE Xplore, Web of Science, Scopus and Engineering Village (Compendex and Inspec) databases was performed to identify relevant technologies published until 18 October 2016. 47 technologies assessing bradykinesia in PD were identified, 17 of which offered home and clinic-based assessment whilst 30 provided clinic-based assessment only. Of the eligible studies, 7 were validated in a PD patient population only, whilst 40 were tested in both PD and healthy control groups. 19 of the 47 technologies assessed bradykinesia only, whereas 28 assessed other parkinsonian features as well. 33 technologies have been described in additional PD-related studies, whereas 14 are not known to have been tested beyond the pilot phase. Technology based tools offer advantages including objective motor assessment and home monitoring of symptoms, and can be used to assess response to intervention in clinical trials or routine care. This review provides an up-to-date repository and synthesis of the current literature regarding technology used for assessing limb bradykinesia in PD. The review also discusses the current trends with regards to technology and discusses future directions in development.

  6. Cognitive Assessment of Patients With Alzheimer's Disease by Telemedicine: Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenuto, Anna; Rea, Raffaele; Ricci, Giovanna; Fasanaro, Angiola Maria; Amenta, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    Background Approximately 46.8 million people are living with dementia worldwide and their number will grow in the next years. Any potential treatment should be administered as early as possible because it is important to provide an early cognitive assessment and to regularly monitor the mental function of patients. Information and communication technologies can be helpful to reach and follow patients without displacing them, but there may be doubts about the reliability of cognitive tests performed by telemedicine. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability of the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) tests administered in hospital by videoconference to patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. Methods The tests were administered to 28 Alzheimer's disease outpatients (8 male, mean age 73.88, SD 7.45 years; 20 female mean age 76.00, SD 5.40 years) recruited and followed in the Alzheimer’s Unit of the A Cardarelli National Hospital (Naples, Italy) at baseline and after 6, 12, 18, and 24 months of observation. Patients were evaluated first face-to-face by a psychologist and then, after 2 weeks, by another psychologist via videoconference in hospital. Results This study showed no differences in the MMSE and ADAS-cog scores when the tests were administered face-to-face or by videoconference, except in patients with more pronounced cognitive deficits (MMSE<17), in which the assessment via videoconference overestimated the cognitive impairment (face to face, MMSE mean 13.9, SD 4.9 and ADAS-cog mean 9.0, SD 3.8; videoconference, MMSE mean 42.8, SD 12.5 and ADAS-cog mean 56.9, SD 5.5). Conclusions We found that videoconferencing is a reliable approach to document cognitive stability or decline, and to measure treatment effects in patients with mild to moderate dementia. A more extended study is needed to confirm these results. PMID:29752254

  7. Cognitive, functional and behavioral assessment: Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia L.F. Chaves

    Full Text Available Abstract A review of the evidence on cognitive, functional and behavioral assessment for the diagnosis of dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (AD is presented with revision and broadening of the recommendations on the use of tests and batteries in Brazil for the diagnosis of dementia due to AD. A systematic review of the literature (MEDLINE, LILACS and SCIELO database was carried out by a panel of experts. Studies on the validation and/or adaptation of tests, scales and batteries for the Brazilian population were analyzed and classified according to level of evidence. There were sufficient data to recommend the IQCODE, DAFS-R, DAD, ADL-Q and Bayer scale for the evaluation of instrumental activities of daily living, and the Katz scale for the assessment of basic activities of daily living. For the evaluation of neuropsychiatric symptoms, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI and the CAMDEX were found to be useful, as was the Cornell scale for depression in dementia. The Mini-Mental State Examination has clinical utility as a screening test, as do the multifunctional batteries (CAMCOG-R, ADAS-COG, CERAD and MDRS for brief evaluations of several cognitive domains. There was sufficient evidence to recommend the CDR scale for clinical and severity assessment of dementia. Tests for Brazilian Portuguese are recommended by cognitive domain based on available data.

  8. Sarcoidosis: assessment of disease severity using HRCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drent, Marjolein [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital of Maastricht, P.O. Box 5800, 6202, AZ Maastricht (Netherlands); Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht (NUTRIM), P.O. Box 5800, 6202, AZ Maastricht (Netherlands); Sarcoidosis Management Center, University Hospital of Maastricht, P.O. Box 5800, 6202, AZ Maastricht (Netherlands); Vries, Jolanda De [Department of Clinical Health Psychology, Tilburg University, P.O. Box 90153, 5000, LE Tilburg (Netherlands); Lenters, Merinke; Wouters, Emiel F.M. [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital of Maastricht, P.O. Box 5800, 6202, AZ Maastricht (Netherlands); Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht (NUTRIM), P.O. Box 5800, 6202, AZ Maastricht (Netherlands); Lamers, Rob J.S. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Maastricht, P.O. Box 5800, 6202, AZ Maastricht (Netherlands); Rothkranz-Kos, Snjezana; Dieijen-Visser, Marja P. van [Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht (NUTRIM), P.O. Box 5800, 6202, AZ Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital of Maastricht, P.O. Box 5800, 6202, AZ Maastricht (Netherlands); Verschakelen, Johny A. [Department of Radiology, Catholic University, 3000, Leuven (Belgium)

    2003-11-01

    The value of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in diagnosing and assessing inflammatory activity in sarcoidosis is well established. The aim of the present study was to address the intra- and inter-observer agreements of the HRCT score by Oberstein et al. [8], and to evaluate the relationship between HRCT findings and disease severity expressed in respiratory functional impairment in sarcoidosis. The clinical records of 80 known sarcoidosis patients visiting the outpatient clinic between January 2000 and August 2001, who underwent a HRCT as well as lung function tests (including exercise testing), were reviewed. Two readers scored the first 60 HRCT images twice. Weighted kappa and intra-class correlation coefficient were used to assess the reliability of the HRCT scoring system. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients and multiple regression analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between HRCT findings (first reading, reader A) and respiratory functional impairment. Intra- and inter-reader reliability demonstrated good agreement. All HRCT subscores, except enlargement of lymph nodes, were correlated to the FEV{sub 1}, FVC, DLco, Pao{sub 2}max (all p<0.05) and A-aPo{sub 2}max (p <0.001). Furthermore, HRCT abnormalities, but not the chest radiographic stage, were strongly associated with functional parameters. Abnormal changes of lung parenchyma, established by HRCT features, were associated with respiratory functional impairment in sarcoidosis. Moreover, compared with the radiographic stages, HRCT findings appeared to be much more sensitive in depicting respiratory disability, especially abnormal gas exchange. (orig.)

  9. Sarcoidosis: assessment of disease severity using HRCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drent, Marjolein; Vries, Jolanda De; Lenters, Merinke; Wouters, Emiel F.M.; Lamers, Rob J.S.; Rothkranz-Kos, Snjezana; Dieijen-Visser, Marja P. van; Verschakelen, Johny A.

    2003-01-01

    The value of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in diagnosing and assessing inflammatory activity in sarcoidosis is well established. The aim of the present study was to address the intra- and inter-observer agreements of the HRCT score by Oberstein et al. [8], and to evaluate the relationship between HRCT findings and disease severity expressed in respiratory functional impairment in sarcoidosis. The clinical records of 80 known sarcoidosis patients visiting the outpatient clinic between January 2000 and August 2001, who underwent a HRCT as well as lung function tests (including exercise testing), were reviewed. Two readers scored the first 60 HRCT images twice. Weighted kappa and intra-class correlation coefficient were used to assess the reliability of the HRCT scoring system. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients and multiple regression analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between HRCT findings (first reading, reader A) and respiratory functional impairment. Intra- and inter-reader reliability demonstrated good agreement. All HRCT subscores, except enlargement of lymph nodes, were correlated to the FEV 1 , FVC, DLco, Pao 2 max (all p 2 max (p <0.001). Furthermore, HRCT abnormalities, but not the chest radiographic stage, were strongly associated with functional parameters. Abnormal changes of lung parenchyma, established by HRCT features, were associated with respiratory functional impairment in sarcoidosis. Moreover, compared with the radiographic stages, HRCT findings appeared to be much more sensitive in depicting respiratory disability, especially abnormal gas exchange. (orig.)

  10. Image registration for assessment of Crohn's disease severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that affects millions of people in Europe alone. It is important to accurately assess the disease severity in a safe and non-invasive manner in order to improve the treatment of patients with CD. Furthermore, the ideal assessment

  11. Quality and Toxicity Assessments of Foot and Mouth Disease Virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quality and toxicity assessment of foot and mouth disease virus vaccine was carried out in inoculated guinea pigs. ... could be used for the control and prevention of foot and mouth disease in Nigerian livestock. Keyword: Foot and Mouth Disease ... 2 blended with Incomplete. Seepic Adjuvant (ISA) montanide 206, which.

  12. Vagus nerve stimulation in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrill, Charley A; Jonsson, Michael A G; Minthon, Lennart

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cognitive-enhancing effects of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) have been reported during 6 months of treatment in a pilot study of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Data through 1 year of VNS (collected from June 2000 to September 2003) are now reported. METHOD: All patients (N = 17......) met the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and the Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association (NINCDS-ADRDA) criteria for probable AD. Responder rates for the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) and Mini-Mental State...

  13. Ambulatory motor assessment in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, N.L.W.; Horstink, M.W.I.M.; Gielen, S.C.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    We developed an algorithm that distinguishes between on and off states in patients with Parkinson's disease during daily life activities. Twenty-three patients were monitored continuously in a home-like situation for approximately 3 hours while they carried out normal daily-life activities. Behavior

  14. Assessment and management of refractory breathlessness in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speakman, Lucy; Walthall, Helen

    2017-09-02

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) refers to a cluster of fibroinflammatory conditions. There are limited treatment options and most patients have severe dyspnoea. The prognosis is poor. This study aims to evaluate current literature on the assessment and management of refractory breathlessness in ILD. Few tools are available to assess dyspnoea in advanced respiratory disease. Holistic assessment requires a combination of tools but there are few disease specific tools. The role of opioids is well established in the reduction of breathlessness, but there is insufficient evidence that benzodiazepines are beneficial. Non-pharmcolological breathlessness intervention services can give patients mastery of their disease, reduced distress due to breathlessness and were more cost effective. More research on holistic interventions for use in advanced disease needs to be done. Patient-reported outcome measures could elicit valuable evidence to describe the benefit of breathlessness management services in advanced respiratory disease.

  15. Radiological assessment of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschampa, Henriette J.; Urbach, Horst [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Zerr, Inga [University of Goettingen, National Reference Center for TSE Surveillance at the Department of Neurology, Goettingen (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a rare fatal neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by rapidly progressive dementia and neurological signs. There is a need for early and accurate clinical diagnosis in order to exclude any treatable disorder. Additionally, it is of public interest to differentiate the sporadic form of the disease from the variant CJD type (vCJD), which is probably transmitted from cattle infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). High signal in the striatum on T2-weighted, FLAIR and diffusion weighted (DW) MRI as well as cortical high signal in FLAIR and DW MRI are the classical findings in sCJD. The ''pulvinar sign'', defined as high signal in the pulvinar thalami that is brighter than potential additional high signal in the basal ganglia, is considered pathognomonic for vCJD. (orig.)

  16. Radiological assessment of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschampa, Henriette J.; Urbach, Horst; Zerr, Inga

    2007-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a rare fatal neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by rapidly progressive dementia and neurological signs. There is a need for early and accurate clinical diagnosis in order to exclude any treatable disorder. Additionally, it is of public interest to differentiate the sporadic form of the disease from the variant CJD type (vCJD), which is probably transmitted from cattle infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). High signal in the striatum on T2-weighted, FLAIR and diffusion weighted (DW) MRI as well as cortical high signal in FLAIR and DW MRI are the classical findings in sCJD. The ''pulvinar sign'', defined as high signal in the pulvinar thalami that is brighter than potential additional high signal in the basal ganglia, is considered pathognomonic for vCJD. (orig.)

  17. Principles for assessing disease management outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzner, Karen; Sidorov, Jaan; Fetterolf, Don; Wennberg, David; Eisenberg, Edward; Cousins, Michael; Hoffman, Joel; Haughton, John; Charlton, Warwick; Krause, David; Woolf, Allen; Mcdonough, Kenneth; Todd, Warren; Fox, Kathe; Plocher, David; Juster, Iver; Stiefel, Matt; Villagra, Victor; Duncan, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Disease management (DM) is rapidly becoming an important force in the late 20th and early 21st century as a strategy for managing the chronic illness of large populations. Given the increasing visibility of DM programs, the clinical, economic and financial impact of this support are vital to DM program accountability and its acceptance as a solution to the twin challenges of achieving affordable, quality health care. Measuring and reporting outcomes in DM is difficult. DM programs must adapt to local market conditions and customer desires, which in turn limits generalizability, and still account for the overlapping/interlocking/multifaceted nature of the interventions included in any DM program. The Disease Management Association of America convened a Steering Committee to suggest a preferred approach, not a mandated or standardized approach for DM program evaluation. This paper presents the Steering Committee's "Consensus Statement" and "Guiding Principles" for robust evaluation.

  18. Physician Performance Assessment: Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipner, Rebecca S.; Weng, Weifeng; Caverzagie, Kelly J.; Hess, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    Given the rising burden of healthcare costs, both patients and healthcare purchasers are interested in discerning which physicians deliver quality care. We proposed a methodology to assess physician clinical performance in preventive cardiology care, and determined a benchmark for minimally acceptable performance. We used data on eight…

  19. Quantitative assessment of cerebral hemodynamic parameters by QUASAR arterial spin labeling in Alzheimer's disease and cognitively normal Elderly adults at 3-tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Henry K F; Chan, Queenie; Zhang, Zhipeng; Petersen, Esben T; Qiu, Deqiang; Zhang, Linda; Yau, Kelvin K W; Chu, Leung-Wing; Golay, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    QUASAR arterial spin labeling (ASL) was used to investigate the role of vascular impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We hypothesized that the hemodynamic parameters monitoring cerebrovascular integrity, i.e., cerebral blood flow (CBF), arterial blood volume (aBV), and arterial transit time (aTT), would be affected. 13 AD patients and 15 healthy control (HC) subjects underwent 3T MRI scanning. Two separate blood flow acquisitions were obtained with 1 slice overlap for whole brain coverage. CBF, aBV, and aTT maps were calculated using in-house software. Preprocessing and statistical analyses were performed on SPM5. Region-of-interest (ROI) studies of ten selected cerebral regions were also conducted. There were significant differences in mini mental status exam (MMSE) (AD: 16.3 ± 4.55, HC: 28.5 ± 2.00) and Alzheimer's disease assessment scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) scores (AD: 25.25 ± 9.64, HC: 5.51 ± 2.62) between the 2 groups (p QUASAR ASL, we found patterns of regional hemodynamic impairment typical of moderate AD, suggesting underlying vascular abnormality. As potential biomarkers, these hemodynamic parameters could differentiate patients from volunteers, and possibly indicate the conversion from healthy aging to mild cognitive impairment to AD.

  20. An assessment of psychiatric disturbances in graves disease in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An assessment of psychiatric disturbances in graves disease in a medical college in eastern India. ... standard error of difference, the chi-square test, and paired Student's T-test. ... The common symptoms were insomnia, irritability, and anxiety.

  1. Assessing neuronal networks: understanding Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bokde, Arun L W

    2012-02-01

    Findings derived from neuroimaging of the structural and functional organization of the human brain have led to the widely supported hypothesis that neuronal networks of temporally coordinated brain activity across different regional brain structures underpin cognitive function. Failure of integration within a network leads to cognitive dysfunction. The current discussion on Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) argues that it presents in part a disconnection syndrome. Studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and electroencephalography demonstrate that synchronicity of brain activity is altered in AD and correlates with cognitive deficits. Moreover, recent advances in diffusion tensor imaging have made it possible to track axonal projections across the brain, revealing substantial regional impairment in fiber-tract integrity in AD. Accumulating evidence points towards a network breakdown reflecting disconnection at both the structural and functional system level. The exact relationship among these multiple mechanistic variables and their contribution to cognitive alterations and ultimately decline is yet unknown. Focused research efforts aimed at the integration of both function and structure hold great promise not only in improving our understanding of cognition but also of its characteristic progressive metamorphosis in complex chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as AD.

  2. Disease assessment and prognosis of liver failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Jing

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Liver failure has a high fatality rate and greatly threatens human health. Liver transplantation can effectively reduce the fatality rate. However, the problems such as donor shortage and allograft rejection limit the wide application of liver transplantation. An accurate early assessment helps to evaluate patients′ condition and optimize therapeutic strategies. At present, commonly used systems for prognostic evaluation include the King′s College Hospital, MELD, integrated MELD, Child-Pugh score, CLIF-SOFA, CLIF-C ACLFS, and D-MELD, and each system has its own advantages and disadvantages. Among these systems, the MELD scoring system is the most commonly used one, and the D-MELD scoring system is the most innovative one, which can be used for patients on the waiting list for liver transplantation. This article elaborates on the characteristics and predictive value of each scoring system in clinical practice.

  3. A Critical Assessment of Research on Neurotransmitters in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this mini-forum, "Neurotransmitters and Alzheimer's Disease", is to critically assess the current status of neurotransmitters in Alzheimer's disease. Neurotransmitters are essential neurochemicals that maintain synaptic and cognitive functions in mammals, including humans, by sending signals across pre- to post-synaptic neurons. Authorities in the fields of synapses and neurotransmitters of Alzheimer's disease summarize the current status of basic biology of synapses and neurotransmitters, and also update the current status of clinical trials of neurotransmitters in Alzheimer's disease. This article discusses the prevalence, economic impact, and stages of Alzheimer's dementia in humans.

  4. Lyme Disease in West Virginia: An Assessment of Distribution and Clinicians' Knowledge of Disease and Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sarah; Parker, David; Mark-Carew, Miguella; White, Robert; Fisher, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease case misclassification, a top public health concern, may be attributed to the current disconnect between clinical diagnosis and surveillance. This study examines Lyme disease distribution in West Virginia (WV) and determines clinicians' knowledge of both disease and surveillance. Lyme disease surveillance data for 2013 were obtained from the WV Bureau for Public Health. A validated survey, distributed to clinicians at an academic medical center, assessed clinicians' knowledge of disease diagnosis and surveillance. There were 297 adult Lyme disease cases of which 83 were confirmed. Clinician survey responses resulted in a correct response rate of 70% for Lyme disease knowledge questions. Fewer than half of all clinicians were aware of the surveillance criteria for confirming Lyme disease cases. Neither medical specialty nor previous treatment of patients with Lyme disease were significantly associated with clinicians' knowledge of the disease. Clinicians in WV are familiar with symptoms and clinical management of Lyme disease. However, they are less knowledgeable about diagnosis and public health surveillance comprising reporting and confirming cases of the disease. Clinicians and public health authorities should collaborate more closely to promote education and awareness as a key step to successfully reducing the burden of Lymne disease.

  5. Early chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: definition, assessment, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennard, Stephen I; Drummond, M Bradley

    2015-05-02

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death worldwide. COPD, however, is a heterogeneous collection of diseases with differing causes, pathogenic mechanisms, and physiological effects. Therefore a comprehensive approach to COPD prevention will need to address the complexity of COPD. Advances in the understanding of the natural history of COPD and the development of strategies to assess COPD in its early stages make prevention a reasonable, if ambitious, goal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Health assessment of environmental pollutants: proliferative and degenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, B.O.

    1988-01-01

    In order to achieve a balanced approach to risk assessment between carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic health effects one must examine the risk of disease or death in the general population exposed to a particular air pollutant that can be related quantitatively to intensity and duration of exposures (National Academy of Sciences, 1983). Such risk assessment should be based upon careful evaluation of scientific findings of dose-response relationships in the chronically exposed population. Quantitative assessment of environmentally produced disease in man has proven to be complex and demanding. A variety of factors play important roles in this task. As an example, there are induction-latency periods for chronic diseases, including cancer, which may range from five to twenty-five years. The diseases themselves, whether proliferative or degenerative, may follow several stages of progression. There is only sparse epidemiological data on serious health effects that may be due to environmental as compared to occupational exposures. Exposures to chemical or radiological air contaminants do not occur singly but to a multiplicity of agents, and disease processes are frequently markedly affected by the interaction of a variety of factors, particularly that of cigarette smoking. There is growing recognition of potentially sensitive subpopulations, including the elderly and the very young, but adequate techniques for assessing the magnitude of increased risks to these groups have not yet been developed

  7. Minimal Residual Disease Assessment in Lymphoma: Methods and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Alex F; Armand, Philippe

    2017-12-01

    Standard methods for disease response assessment in patients with lymphoma, including positron emission tomography and computed tomography scans, are imperfect. In other hematologic malignancies, particularly leukemias, the ability to detect minimal residual disease (MRD) is increasingly influencing treatment paradigms. However, in many subtypes of lymphoma, the application of MRD assessment techniques, like flow cytometry or polymerase chain reaction-based methods, has been challenging because of the absence of readily detected circulating disease or canonic chromosomal translocations. Newer MRD detection methods that use next-generation sequencing have yielded promising results in a number of lymphoma subtypes, fueling the hope that MRD detection may soon be applicable in clinical practice for most patients with lymphoma. MRD assessment can provide real-time information about tumor burden and response to therapy, noninvasive genomic profiling, and monitoring of clonal dynamics, allowing for many possible applications that could significantly affect the care of patients with lymphoma. Further validation of MRD assessment methods, including the incorporation of MRD assessment into clinical trials in patients with lymphoma, will be critical to determine how best to deploy MRD testing in routine practice and whether MRD assessment can ultimately bring us closer to the goal of personalized lymphoma care. In this review article, we describe the methods available for detecting MRD in patients with lymphoma and their relative advantages and disadvantages. We discuss preliminary results supporting the potential applications for MRD testing in the care of patients with lymphoma and strategies for including MRD assessment in lymphoma clinical trials.

  8. [Valvular heart disease: preoperative assessment and postoperative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nägele, Reto; Kaufmann, Beat A

    2013-10-30

    Patients with valvular heart disease or with a prosthetic heart valve replacement are seen with increasing frequency in clinical practice. The medical care and evaluation of patients with valvular heart disease before valve surgery, but also the post-operative treatment is complex and managed by general practitioners, cardiologists and cardiac surgeons. In this mini-review we will first discuss the preoperative assessment of the two most common valvulopathies, aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation. Then we will discuss the post-operative care, which includes the management of anticoagulation, serial follow up and as well as the diagnostic assessment of complications such as thromboembolism, hemolysis, endocarditis and valve dysfunction.

  9. Biomarkers in rheumatic diseases: how can they facilitate diagnosis and assessment of disease activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Chandra; Assassi, Shervin

    2015-11-26

    Serological and proteomic biomarkers can help clinicians diagnose rheumatic diseases earlier and assess disease activity more accurately. These markers have been incorporated into the recently revised classification criteria of several diseases to enable early diagnosis and timely initiation of treatment. Furthermore, they also facilitate more accurate subclassification and more focused monitoring for the detection of certain disease manifestations, such as lung and renal involvement. These biomarkers can also make the assessment of disease activity and treatment response more reliable. Simultaneously, several new serological and proteomic biomarkers have become available in the routine clinical setting--for example, a protein biomarker panel for rheumatoid arthritis and a myositis antibody panel for dermatomyositis and polymyositis. This review will focus on commercially available antibody and proteomic biomarkers in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), dermatomyositis and polymyositis, and axial spondyloarthritis (including ankylosing spondylitis). It will discuss how these markers can facilitate early diagnosis as well as more accurate subclassification and assessment of disease activity in the clinical setting. The ultimate goal of current and future biomarkers in rheumatic diseases is to enable early detection of these diseases and their clinical manifestations, and to provide effective monitoring and treatment regimens that are tailored to each patient's needs and prognosis. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd 2015.

  10. Assessment of airway lesion in obstructive lung diseases by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimi, Akio; Matsumoto, Hisako; Ueda, Tetsuya; Mishima, Michiaki

    2002-01-01

    Airway lesion in obstructive pulmonary diseases, such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), has recently been assessed quantitatively. Especially in asthma, wall thickening of central airways, and its relation to the severity of disease or airflow obstruction has been clarified. Pathophysiologic importance of peripheral airway lesion has also been highlighted by pathologic or physiologic studies. However, direct evaluation of peripheral airway lesion is beyond resolutional limitation of CT. To assess airway trapping, an indirect CT finding of peripheral airway disease, by quantitative and semiquantitative measures and compare them with clinical indices such as pulmonary function, airway responsiveness, or airway inflammation. Patients with stable asthma (n=20) were studied. HRCT at 3 levels of both lungs were scanned. Low attenuation area (LAA)% and mean lung density were quantitatively assessed by an automatic method. Distribution of mosaic pattern was visually scored semiquantitatively. LAA% and mean lung density at full expiratory phase correlated with the degree of airflow obstruction. Mosaic score at full inspiratory phase correlated with the severity of disease and airflow obstruction. Expiratory/inspiratory ratio of mean lung density was also associated with airway responsiveness or residual volume/total lung capacity (RV/TLC). These CT findings may be useful as markers of asthma pathophysiology. (author)

  11. Cochlear Implants and Psychiatric Assessments: a Norrie Disease Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Denis; Dubois, Thomas; Zdanowicz, Nicolas; Gilain, Chantal; Garin, Pierre

    2017-09-01

    It is important to perform psychiatric assessments of adult patients who are candidates for cochlear implants both to screen them for psychiatric disorders and to assess their understanding and compliance with the procedure. Deafness is a factor of difficulty for conducting in-depth psychiatric interviews, but concomitant blindness may make it impossible. After a description of Norrie disease, a rare disease in which blindness and deafness may occur together, we propose a case report of a patient suffering from the disease and who consulted in view of a cochlear implant. Early information on cochlear implants appears to be necessary before total deafness occurs in patients suffering from Norrie disease. An inventory of digital communication tools that can be used by the patient is also highly valuable. Research should be supported for a more systematic use of psychiatric assessments prior to cochlear implants. In the special case of Norrie disease, we recommend early screening for mental retardation and related psychotic disorders and, depending on the patient's level of understanding, preventive information on the benefits and limits of cochlear implants before total deafness occurs.

  12. Assessment of disease activity in large-vessel vasculitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aydin, Sibel Z.; Direskeneli, Haner; Merkel, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To arrive at consensus for candidate outcomes for disease activity assessment in largevessel vasculitis (LVV) in clinical trials. Methods.A Delphi survey including 99 items was circulated among international experts for 3 rounds. Results. Fifty-seven items were accepted for both giant ...

  13. Systematic review: questionnaires for assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolier, E. A.; Kessing, B. F.; Smout, A. J.; Bredenoord, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous questionnaires with a wide variety of characteristics have been developed for the assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Four well-defined dimensions are noticeable in these GERD questionnaires, which are symptoms, response to treatment, diagnosis, and burden on the quality

  14. Assessing arthropod pests and disease occurrence in cassava ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On-station trials were conducted at CSIR-Crops Research Institute's research farms at Kwadaso and Ejura, Ashanti Region, Ghana, during 2010/2011 cropping season, to assess the pests and disease occurrence in cassava-cowpea intercrop farming systems and their effect on yield of produce. Three improved cassava ...

  15. Dealing with uncertainties in environmental burden of disease assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Sluijs Jeroen P

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs combine the number of people affected by disease or mortality in a population and the duration and severity of their condition into one number. The environmental burden of disease is the number of DALYs that can be attributed to environmental factors. Environmental burden of disease estimates enable policy makers to evaluate, compare and prioritize dissimilar environmental health problems or interventions. These estimates often have various uncertainties and assumptions which are not always made explicit. Besides statistical uncertainty in input data and parameters – which is commonly addressed – a variety of other types of uncertainties may substantially influence the results of the assessment. We have reviewed how different types of uncertainties affect environmental burden of disease assessments, and we give suggestions as to how researchers could address these uncertainties. We propose the use of an uncertainty typology to identify and characterize uncertainties. Finally, we argue that uncertainties need to be identified, assessed, reported and interpreted in order for assessment results to adequately support decision making.

  16. Natriuretic peptides and integrated risk assessment for cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willeit, Peter; Kaptoge, S; Welsh, P.

    2016-01-01

    samples and collection of data from studies identified through a systematic search of the literature (PubMed, Scientific Citation Index Expanded, and Embase) for articles published up to Sept 4, 2014, using search terms related to natriuretic peptide family members and the primary outcomes......BACKGROUND: Guidelines for primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases focus on prediction of coronary heart disease and stroke. We assessed whether or not measurement of N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentration could enable a more integrated approach than at present...... by predicting heart failure and enhancing coronary heart disease and stroke risk assessment. METHODS: In this individual-participant-data meta-analysis, we generated and harmonised individual-participant data from relevant prospective studies via both de-novo NT-proBNP concentration measurement of stored...

  17. Systematic review: questionnaires for assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolier, E A; Kessing, B F; Smout, A J; Bredenoord, A J

    2015-01-01

    Numerous questionnaires with a wide variety of characteristics have been developed for the assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Four well-defined dimensions are noticeable in these GERD questionnaires, which are symptoms, response to treatment, diagnosis, and burden on the quality of life of GERD patients. The aim of this review is to develop a complete overview of all available questionnaires, categorized per dimension of the assessment of GERD. A systematic search of the literature up to January 2013 using the Pubmed database and the Embase database, and search of references and conference abstract books were conducted. A total number of 65 questionnaires were extracted and evaluated. Thirty-nine questionnaires were found applicable for the assessment of GERD symptoms, three of which are generic gastrointestinal questionnaires. For the assessment of response to treatment, 14 questionnaires were considered applicable. Seven questionnaires with diagnostic purposes were found. In the assessment of quality of life in GERD patients, 18 questionnaires were found and evaluated. Twenty questionnaires were found to be used for more than one assessment dimension, and eight questionnaires were found for GERD assessment in infants and/or children. A wide variety of GERD questionnaires is available, of which the majority is used for assessment of GERD symptoms. Questionnaires differ in aspects such as design, validation and translations. Also, numerous multidimensional questionnaires are available, of which the Reflux Disease Questionnaire is widely applicable. We provided an overview of GERD questionnaires to aid investigators and clinicians in their search for the most appropriate questionnaire for their specific purposes. © 2013 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  18. An Arabic Version of the Cognitive Subscale of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-Cog): Reliability, Validity, and Normative Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Jemaa, Sonia; Attia Romdhane, Neila; Bahri-Mrabet, Amel; Jendli, Adel; Le Gall, Didier; Bellaj, Tarek

    2017-01-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale's cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) is the most widely used instrument for screening cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease. The aim of the present study was to develop an Arabic version of this scale (A-ADAS-Cog), examine its psychometric properties (reliability and validity), and provide normative data. The A-ADAS-Cog), an Arabic version of the Mini-Mental State Examination (A-MMSE), and a Standardized Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR) were administered to three Tunisian groups: 124 normal controls (NC), 33 patients with non-Alzheimer dementia (N-AD), and 25 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The A-ADAS-Cog scores were significantly affected by age and education. A correction table was constructed to control these effects. The results showed that the A-ADAS-Cog has good internal consistency and reliability (α= 0.82 for AD). The test-retest reliability of the A-ADAS-Cog was stable over time (r = 0.97). An evaluation of the construct validity of the A-ADAS-Cog using principal component analysis led to a solution with three factors (memory, language and praxis), which explained 72% of the variance. The concurrent validity of the A-ADAS-Cog was established using the A-MMSE score (r = -0.86), CDR Sum of Boxes score (CDR-SB; r = 0.87), and global CDR score (CDR-Global; r = 0.74). Finally, the A-ADAS-Cog has an excellent discriminating power in the diagnosis of AD (ROC area = 0.92). A cut-off score of 10 (sensitivity = 84% and specificity = 91%) is indicated for the screening of the AD. Overall, the results indicated that the A-ADAS-Cog is psychometrically reliable and valid and provides promising results for screening of dementia in Arabic speaking patients.

  19. Assessing peridomestic entomological factors as predictors for Lyme disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connally, N.P.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Mather, T.N.

    2006-01-01

    The roles of entomologic risk factors, including density of nymphal blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis), prevalence of nymphal infection with the etiologic agent (Borrelia burgdorferi), and density of infected nymphs, in determining the risk of human Lyme disease were assessed at residences in the endemic community of South Kingstown, RI. Nymphs were sampled between May and July from the wooded edge around 51 and 47 residential properties in 2002 and 2003, respectively. Nymphs were collected from all residences sampled. Tick densities, infection rates, and densities of infected nymphs were all significantly higher around homes reporting Lyme disease histories in 2003, while only infection rates were significantly higher in 2002. However, densities of infected nymphs did not significantly predict the probability of Lyme disease at a residence (by logistic regression) in either year. There were no significant differences in entomologic risk factors between homes with state-confirmed Lyme disease histories and homes with self-reported cases (not reported to the state health department). Therefore, although entomologic risk factors tended to be higher at residences with cases of Lyme disease, entomological indices, in the absence of human behavior measures, were not useful predictors of Lyme disease at the scale of individual residences in a tick-endemic community.

  20. A critical assessment of adverse pregnancy outcome and periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Gernot; Pihlstrom, Bruce L

    2008-09-01

    Pre-term birth is a major cause of infant mortality and morbidity that has considerable societal, medical, and economic costs. The rate of pre-term birth appears to be increasing world-wide and efforts to prevent or reduce its prevalence have been largely unsuccessful. To review the literature for studies investigating periodontal disease as a possible risk factor for pre-term birth and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Variability among studies in definitions of periodontal disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes as well as widespread inadequate control for confounding factors and possible effect modification make it difficult to base meaningful conclusions on published data. However, while there are indications of an association between periodontal disease and increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in some populations, there is no conclusive evidence that treating periodontal disease improves birth outcome. Based on a critical qualitative review, available evidence from clinical trials indicates that, although non-surgical mechanical periodontal treatment in the second trimester of pregnancy is safe and effective in reducing signs of maternal periodontal disease, it does not reduce the rate of pre-term birth. Clinical trials currently underway will further clarify the potential role of periodontal therapy in preventing adverse birth outcomes. Regardless of the outcomes of these trials, it is recommended that large, prospective cohort studies be conducted to assess risk for adverse pregnancy outcome in populations with periodontal disease. It is critical that periodontal exposure and adverse birth outcomes be clearly defined and the many potential confounding factors and possible effect modifiers for adverse pregnancy outcome be controlled in these studies. If periodontal disease is associated with higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in these specific populations, large multicenter randomized-controlled trials will be needed to determine if prevention or

  1. Assessing nutritional status in children with chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachel M; Dhawan, Anil

    2005-12-01

    The metabolic changes compounded by anorexia associated with chronic liver disease adversely affect growth in children. In many cases, this requires the administration of artificial nutritional support. It is important in this group of patients that those who are becoming nutritionally depleted are identified quickly and in those receiving artificial nutritional support, the effectiveness is monitored. The current review is an examination of methods available to assess nutritional status. These include anthropometry, methods available in the laboratory and a selection of less commonly used methods undergoing evaluation at research level. A brief discussion accompanies each technique, outlining the limitations of its use in children with chronic liver disease. The review concludes with an outline of how nutritional status should be assessed in this group of children, and suggests further research.

  2. Assessment of diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dariusz Włodarek; Dominika Głąbska; Jadwiga Rojek-Trębicka

    2014-01-01

    [b]introduction and objective[/b]. Nutrition is important in the therapy of predialysis patients. The aim of the presented single-centre descriptive study was to assess the diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients with no previous dietary intervention, in comparison with recommendations, as well as the analysis of the energy, protein and phosphate intake in correlation with chosen laboratory measurements. [b]materials and methods.[/b] The research was carried out in 31...

  3. [Nutritional Assessment and Management for Patients with Chronic Liver Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Hee

    2018-04-25

    When liver disease is severe, the prognosis can be worse if the patient is malnourished. Adequate nutritional support for patients with liver diseases can improve the patient's condition and prognosis. In the case of liver cirrhosis, malnutrition can occur due to a variety of causes, including poor oral intake, maldigestion, malabsorption, associated renal disease, and metabolic abnormalities. For a nutritional assessment, it is important to check the dietary intake, change in body composition, including anthropometry, and a functional assessment of muscle. Counselling and oral or enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition as in other diseases. If esophageal varices are present, care should be taken when installing a feeding tube, but if there are ascites, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is contraindicated because of the risk of complications. Calories of 30-35 kcal/kg/day and protein from 1.2 to 1.5 g/kg/day are appropriate. Protein restriction is unnecessary unless the hepatic encephalopathy is severe. A late evening snack and branched chain amino acids can be helpful. In the case of cholestasis, the supply of manganese and copper should be restricted. Sarcopenia in patients with liver cirrhosis is also prevalent and associated with the prognosis.

  4. Parthenium dermatitis severity score to assess clinical severity of disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal K Verma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Parthenium dermatitis is the most common type of airborne contact dermatitis in India. It is a chronic disease of a remitting and relapsing course with significant morbidity and distress, but there is no scoring system to assess its severity. Aim: To design a scoring system for the assessment of clinical severity of disease in Parthenium dermatitis and to use this scoring system in various studies to determine its sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility. Methods and Results: In our first few studies on Parthenium dermatitis, we designed and used a basic clinical severity scoring system based on itching, morphology of the lesions, and areas involved. However, in subsequent studies, we modified it to the present scoring system as Parthenium dermatitis severity score (PDSS. Our studies showed the high sensitivity of PDSS in characterization of the disease severity at the given point of time, as well as to determine the efficacy of a prescribed treatment modality which was reliable and reproducible. Conclusion: Thus, PDSS may be used by clinicians for appropriate scoring of the clinical severity of Parthenium dermatitis and in monitoring the disease response to therapy.

  5. Utility analysis and calibration of QOL assessment in disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mo

    2018-05-02

    In clinical trials, the assessment of health-related quality of life (QOL) (or patient-reported outcome [PRO] measure) has become very popular especially for clinical studies conducted for evaluating clinical benefits of patients with chronic, severe, and/or life threatening diseases. Health-related QOL information and PRO measures are useful for disease management for achieving best clinical practice. In this article, we will focus on health-related QOL assessment. The concept, design, and analysis of health-related QOL in clinical trials are reviewed. Validation of the use of health-related QOL instrument in terms of some key performance characteristics such as accuracy, reliability, sensitivity, and responsibility for assuring quality, integrity, and validity of collected QOL data are discussed. The concept of utility analysis and calibration (e.g., with respect to life events) for achieving the optimization of disease management are proposed. The change of the QOL could be translated into different life events for effective disease management. These translations could evaluate the treatment effect by more directly displaying the change of the QOL.

  6. Preconception risk assessment for thalassaemia, sickle cell disease, cystic fibrosis and Tay-Sachs disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Norita; Weng, Stephen F; Kai, Joe; Kleijnen, Jos; Qureshi, Nadeem

    2018-03-14

    Globally, about five per cent of children are born with congenital or genetic disorders. The most common autosomal recessive conditions are thalassaemia, sickle cell disease, cystic fibrosis and Tay-Sachs disease, with higher carrier rates in specific patient populations. Identifying and counselling couples at genetic risk of the conditions before pregnancy enables them to make fully informed reproductive decisions, with some of these choices not being available if genetic counselling is only offered in an antenatal setting. This is an update of a previously published review. To assess the effectiveness of systematic preconception genetic risk assessment to improve reproductive outcomes in women and their partners who are identified as carriers of thalassaemia, sickle cell disease, cystic fibrosis and Tay-Sachs disease in healthcare settings when compared to usual care. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Trials Registers. In addition, we searched for all relevant trials from 1970 (or the date at which the database was first available if after 1970) to date using electronic databases (MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO), clinical trial databases (National Institutes of Health, Clinical Trials Search portal of the World Health Organization, metaRegister of controlled clinical trials), and hand searching of key journals and conference abstract books from 1998 to date (European Journal of Human Genetics, Genetics in Medicine, Journal of Community Genetics). We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles, reviews and guidelines and also contacted subject experts in the field to request any unpublished or other published trials.Date of latest search of the registers: 20 June 2017.Date of latest search of all other sources: 16 November 2017. Any randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials (published or unpublished) comparing reproductive outcomes of systematic preconception genetic risk assessment for thalassaemia, sickle

  7. ASSESSMENT OF LENS THICKNESS IN ANGLE CLOSURE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishat Sultana Khayoom

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Anterior chamber depth and lens thickness have been considered as important biometric determinants in primary angle-closure glaucoma. Patients with primary narrow angle may be classified as a primary angle closure suspect (PACS, or as having primary angle closure (PAC or primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG. 23.9% of patients with primary angle closure disease are in India, which highlights the importance of understanding the disease, its natural history, and its underlying pathophysiology, so that we may try to establish effective methods of treatment and preventative measures to delay, or even arrest, disease progression, thereby reducing visual morbidity. AIM To determine the lens thickness using A-scan biometry and its significance in various stages of angle closure disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients attending outpatient department at Minto Ophthalmic Hospital between October 2013 to May 2015 were screened for angle closure disease and subsequently evaluated at glaucoma department. In our study, lens thickness showed a direct correlation with shallowing of the anterior chamber by determining the LT/ ACD ratio. A decrease in anterior chamber depth is proportional to the narrowing of the angle which contributes to the progression of the angle closure disease from just apposition to occlusion enhancing the risk for optic nerve damage and visual field loss. Hence, if the lens thickness values are assessed earlier in the disease process, appropriate intervention can be planned. CONCLUSION Determination of lens changes along with anterior chamber depth and axial length morphometrically can aid in early detection of angle closure. The role of lens extraction for PACG is a subject of increased interest. Lens extraction promotes the benefits of anatomical opening of the angle, IOP reduction and improved vision. This potential intervention may be one among the armamentarium of approaches for PACG. Among the current treatment modalities

  8. Electromagnetic fields: risk assessment and occupational diseases in Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filosa, L.; Frusteri, L. [Risk Assessment and Prevention, Technical Advisory Dept., Italian Workers Compensation Authority, Rome (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Every year about 8000 occupational diseases are accepted in Italy by I.N.A.I.L., the Italian Workers' Compensation Authority. The occupational diseases are caused by different agents (chemical, biological, physical) but only a very little percentage resulted to be caused by non ionizing radiations. In this paper the Authors report an analysis of occupational diseases caused by non ionising radiations denounced to I.N.A.I.L. and compensated. It is discussed the Italian situation in light of the controversial studies related to the link between exposure and health effects. Because of the uncertainty about an E.M.F. - health link, the main effort is to determine the probability and seriousness of E.M.F. hazard and to realize an accurate risk assessment at workplace, which is one of the main objectives pursued by I.N.A.I.L. Technical Advisory Department for Risk Assessment and Prevention. Moreover, in this paper it is also reported the state of advancement of Italian legislation on health protection against non ionizing radiations at workplace in view of the new European Directive (2004/40/C.E.). (authors)

  9. Electromagnetic fields: risk assessment and occupational diseases in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filosa, L.; Frusteri, L.

    2006-01-01

    Every year about 8000 occupational diseases are accepted in Italy by I.N.A.I.L., the Italian Workers' Compensation Authority. The occupational diseases are caused by different agents (chemical, biological, physical) but only a very little percentage resulted to be caused by non ionizing radiations. In this paper the Authors report an analysis of occupational diseases caused by non ionising radiations denounced to I.N.A.I.L. and compensated. It is discussed the Italian situation in light of the controversial studies related to the link between exposure and health effects. Because of the uncertainty about an E.M.F. - health link, the main effort is to determine the probability and seriousness of E.M.F. hazard and to realize an accurate risk assessment at workplace, which is one of the main objectives pursued by I.N.A.I.L. Technical Advisory Department for Risk Assessment and Prevention. Moreover, in this paper it is also reported the state of advancement of Italian legislation on health protection against non ionizing radiations at workplace in view of the new European Directive (2004/40/C.E.). (authors)

  10. An ethical assessment model for digital disease detection technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecke, Kerstin

    2017-09-20

    Digital epidemiology, also referred to as digital disease detection (DDD), successfully provided methods and strategies for using information technology to support infectious disease monitoring and surveillance or understand attitudes and concerns about infectious diseases. However, Internet-based research and social media usage in epidemiology and healthcare pose new technical, functional and formal challenges. The focus of this paper is on the ethical issues to be considered when integrating digital epidemiology with existing practices. Taking existing ethical guidelines and the results from the EU project M-Eco and SORMAS as starting point, we develop an ethical assessment model aiming at providing support in identifying relevant ethical concerns in future DDD projects. The assessment model has four dimensions: user, application area, data source and methodology. The model supports in becoming aware, identifying and describing the ethical dimensions of DDD technology or use case and in identifying the ethical issues on the technology use from different perspectives. It can be applied in an interdisciplinary meeting to collect different viewpoints on a DDD system even before the implementation starts and aims at triggering discussions and finding solutions for risks that might not be acceptable even in the development phase. From the answers, ethical issues concerning confidence, privacy, data and patient security or justice may be judged and weighted.

  11. Technologies Assessing Limb Bradykinesia in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Hasan; Athauda, Dilan S.; Foltynie, Thomas; Noyce, Alastair J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The MDS-UPDRS (Movement Disorders Society – Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale) is the most widely used scale for rating impairment in PD. Subscores measuring bradykinesia have low reliability that can be subject to rater variability. Novel technological tools can be used to overcome such issues. Objective: To systematically explore and describe the available technologies for measuring limb bradykinesia in PD that were published between 2006 and 2016. Methods: A systematic literature search using PubMed (MEDLINE), IEEE Xplore, Web of Science, Scopus and Engineering Village (Compendex and Inspec) databases was performed to identify relevant technologies published until 18 October 2016. Results: 47 technologies assessing bradykinesia in PD were identified, 17 of which offered home and clinic-based assessment whilst 30 provided clinic-based assessment only. Of the eligible studies, 7 were validated in a PD patient population only, whilst 40 were tested in both PD and healthy control groups. 19 of the 47 technologies assessed bradykinesia only, whereas 28 assessed other parkinsonian features as well. 33 technologies have been described in additional PD-related studies, whereas 14 are not known to have been tested beyond the pilot phase. Conclusion: Technology based tools offer advantages including objective motor assessment and home monitoring of symptoms, and can be used to assess response to intervention in clinical trials or routine care. This review provides an up-to-date repository and synthesis of the current literature regarding technology used for assessing limb bradykinesia in PD. The review also discusses the current trends with regards to technology and discusses future directions in development. PMID:28222539

  12. Assessing the influence of consanguinity on congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan H Bittles

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous articles have been published linking consanguineous marriage to an elevated prevalence of congenital heart disease, with ventricular septal defects and atrial septal defects the most commonly cited disorders. While initially persuasive, on closer examination many of these studies have fundamental shortcomings in their design and in the recruitment of study subjects and controls. Improved matching of cases and controls, to include recognition of the long-established community boundaries within which most marriages are contracted, and the assessment of consanguinity within specific levels and types of marital union would improve and help to focus the study outcomes. At the same time, major discrepancies between studies in their reported prevalence and types of congenital heart disease suggest an urgent need for greater standardization in the classification and reporting of these disorders.

  13. Digital subtraction angiography in the assessment of cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, D.P.; Boxt, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is a new radiographic method for evaluating the cardiovascular system. It represents another in a continuing series of computer-assisted diagnostic imaging modalities. The advantages of this technique are its relatively noninvasive nature combined with diagnostically acceptable angiographic images of a variety of cardiovascular structures. Major clinical applications of DSA include its use in imaging of localized regions of peripheral arterial disease and as a screening procedure in evaluating extracranial carotid and vertebral artery disease and renovascular hypertension. Cardiac applications of DSA include assessment of ventricular function, recognition and quantification of intracardiac shunts, visualization of coronary artery bypass grafts, and the study of complex congenital cardiac malformations. Digital subtraction angiography may also be used to evaluate intracranial aneurysms and vascular tumors

  14. Assessing the influence of consanguinity on congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittles, Alan H.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous articles have been published linking consanguineous marriage to an elevated prevalence of congenital heart disease, with ventricular septal defects and atrial septal defects the most commonly cited disorders. While initially persuasive, on closer examination many of these studies have fundamental shortcomings in their design and in the recruitment of study subjects and controls. Improved matching of cases and controls, to include recognition of the long-established community boundaries within which most marriages are contracted, and the assessment of consanguinity within specific levels and types of marital union would improve and help to focus the study outcomes. At the same time, major discrepancies between studies in their reported prevalence and types of congenital heart disease suggest an urgent need for greater standardization in the classification and reporting of these disorders

  15. Bladder symptoms assessed with overactive bladder questionnaire in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovelli, Elisa; Gilio, Francesca; Meco, Giuseppe; Fattapposta, Francesco; Vanacore, Nicola; Brusa, Livia; Giacomelli, Elena; Gabriele, Maria; Rubino, Alfonso; Locuratolo, Nicoletta; Iani, Cesare; Pichiorri, Floriana; Colosimo, Carlo; Carbone, Antonio; Palleschi, Giovanni; Inghilleri, Maurizio

    2010-07-15

    In Parkinson's disease (PD) the urinary dysfunction manifests primarily with symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB). The OAB questionnaire (OAB-q) is a measure designed to assess the impact of OAB symptoms on health-related quality of life. In this study, we quantified the urinary symptoms in a large cohort of PD patients by using the OAB-q short form. Possible correlations between the OAB-q and clinical features were tested. Three hundred and two PD patients were enrolled in the study. Correlations between the OAB-q and sex, age, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III (UPDRS-III), Hoehn-Yahr (H-Y) staging, disease duration, and treatment were analyzed. Data were compared with a large cohort of 303 age-matched healthy subjects. The OAB-q yielded significantly higher scores in PD patients than in healthy subjects. In the group of PD patients, all the variables tested were similar between men and women. Pearson's coefficient showed a significant correlation between mean age, disease duration, mean OAB-q scores, UPDRS-III scores, and H-Y staging. A multiple linear regression analysis showed that OAB-q values were significantly influenced by age and UPDRS-III. No statistical correlations were found between OAB-q scores and drug therapy or the equivalent levodopa dose, whilst the items relating to the nocturia symptoms were significantly associated with the equivalent levodopa dose. Our findings suggest that bladder dysfunction assessed by OAB-q mainly correlates with UPDRS-III scores for severity of motor impairment, possibly reflecting the known role of the decline in nigrostriatal dopaminergic function in bladder dysfunction associated with PD and patients' age. Our study also suggests that the OAB-q is a simple, easily administered test that can objectively evaluate bladder function in patients with PD.

  16. A longitudinal assessment of periodontal disease in 52 Miniature Schnauzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Mark D; Wallis, Corrin V; Milella, Lisa; Colyer, Alison; Tweedie, Andrew D; Harris, Stephen

    2014-09-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is the most widespread oral disease in dogs and has been associated with serious systemic diseases. The disease is more prevalent in small breeds compared to large breeds and incidence increases with advancing age. In prevalence studies 84% of Beagles over the age of 3 and 100% of Poodles over the age of 4 were diagnosed with PD. Current knowledge of the rate of progression of PD is limited. The objective of this study was to determine the rate of PD progression in Miniature Schnauzers, an at risk small breed of dog. Dogs (n = 52, age 1.3-6.9 years) who had received a regular oral care regime prior to this study were assessed for levels of gingivitis and periodontitis around the whole gingival margin in every tooth under general anaesthetic. Assessments were conducted approximately every six weeks for up to 60 weeks following the cessation of the oral care regime. All of the 2155 teeth assessed entered the study with some level of gingivitis. 23 teeth entered the study with periodontitis, observed across 12 dogs aged between 1.3 and 6.9 years. 35 dogs had at least 12 teeth progress to periodontitis within 60 weeks. Of the teeth that progressed to periodontitis, 54% were incisors. The lingual aspect of the incisors was significantly more likely to be affected (p periodontitis-affected teeth was variable with 24% of the aspects affected having very mild gingivitis, 36% mild gingivitis and 40% moderate gingivitis. Periodontitis progression rate was significantly faster in older dogs. Only one dog (age 3.5) did not have any teeth progress to periodontitis after 60 weeks. This is the first study to have assessed the progression rate of periodontitis in Miniature Schnauzers and highlights that with no oral care regime, the early stages of periodontitis develop rapidly in this breed. An oral care regime and twice yearly veterinary dental health checks should be provided from an early age for this breed and other breeds with similar

  17. Rates of cognitive change in Alzheimer disease: Observations across a decade of placebo-controlled clinical trials with donepezil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Roy W; Schwam, Elias; Wilkinson, David

    2009-01-01

    Treatment success in Alzheimer disease (AD) trials is generally based on benefits over placebo-treated controls. Consequently, variation in rates of decline among placebo-treated patients could impact outcomes from AD trials. In the present analyses, individual patient data [baseline Mini......-Mental State Examination (MMSE): 10 to 26] were pooled from randomized, placebo-controlled studies of donepezil for AD conducted during the 1990s, and grouped by initiation year-group 1: 1990 to 1994; group 2: 1996 to 1999. Changes in MMSE and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS...

  18. Technical and clinical view on ambulatory assessment in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobert, M A; Maetzler, W; Aminian, K; Chiari, L

    2014-09-01

    With the progress of technologies of recent years, methods have become available that use wearable sensors and ambulatory systems to measure aspects of--particular axial--motor function. As Parkinson's disease (PD) can be considered a model disorder for motor impairment, a significant number of studies have already been performed with these patients using such techniques. In general, motion sensors such as accelerometers and gyroscopes are used, in combination with lightweight electronics that do not interfere with normal human motion. A fundamental advantage in comparison with usual clinical assessment is that these sensors allow a more quantitative, objective, and reliable evaluation of symptoms; they have also significant advantages compared to in-lab technologies (e.g., optoelectronic motion capture) as they allow long-term monitoring under real-life conditions. In addition, based on recent findings particularly from studies using functional imaging, we learned that non-motor symptoms, specifically cognitive aspects, may be at least indirectly assessable. It is hypothesized that ambulatory quantitative assessment strategies will allow users, clinicians, and scientists in the future to gain more quantitative, unobtrusive, and everyday relevant data out of their clinical evaluation and can also be designed as pervasive (everywhere) and intensive (anytime) tools for ambulatory assessment and even rehabilitation of motor and (partly) non-motor symptoms in PD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Assessement of rheumatic diseases with computational radiology: current status and future potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peloschek, Philipp; Boesen, Mikael; Donner, Rene

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, several computational image analysis methods to assess disease progression in rheumatic diseases were presented. This review article explains the basics of these methods as well as their potential application in rheumatic disease monitoring, it covers radiography, sonography...

  20. Sensing across large-scale cognitive radio networks: Data processing, algorithms, and testbed for wireless tomography and moving target tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonior, Jason David

    As the use of wireless devices has become more widespread so has the potential for utilizing wireless networks for remote sensing applications. Regular wireless communication devices are not typically designed for remote sensing. Remote sensing techniques must be carefully tailored to the capabilities of these networks before they can be applied. Experimental verification of these techniques and algorithms requires robust yet flexible testbeds. In this dissertation, two experimental testbeds for the advancement of research into sensing across large-scale cognitive radio networks are presented. System architectures, implementations, capabilities, experimental verification, and performance are discussed. One testbed is designed for the collection of scattering data to be used in RF and wireless tomography research. This system is used to collect full complex scattering data using a vector network analyzer (VNA) and amplitude-only data using non-synchronous software-defined radios (SDRs). Collected data is used to experimentally validate a technique for phase reconstruction using semidefinite relaxation and demonstrate the feasibility of wireless tomography. The second testbed is a SDR network for the collection of experimental data. The development of tools for network maintenance and data collection is presented and discussed. A novel recursive weighted centroid algorithm for device-free target localization using the variance of received signal strength for wireless links is proposed. The signal variance resulting from a moving target is modeled as having contours related to Cassini ovals. This model is used to formulate recursive weights which reduce the influence of wireless links that are farther from the target location estimate. The algorithm and its implementation on this testbed are presented and experimental results discussed.

  1. Role of ultrasound in the assessment of nodular thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastin, S.; Bolland, M. J.; Croxson, M. S.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The role for ultrasound (US) in the assessment of nodular thyroid disease has increased in recent years. This expanded role has been highlighted in recent consensus guidelines on the management of nodular thyroid disease. In this review, we address the potential roles for US in assessing thyroid nodules and review these recent guidelines. In particular, we review the evidence that US characteristics of thyroid nodules can predict the risk of malignancy. A predominantly solid nodule, hypoechogenicity, microcalcification, macrocalcification, ill-defined margins, intranodular vascularity, and taller-than-wide shape have all been associated with increased risk of malignancy, but no single US characteristic is sufficiently sensitive or specific to exclude or diagnose malignancy by itself. However, the use of combinations of US characteristics to stratify nodules into high and low risk for malignancy appears a promising strategy. Unselected nodules without any suspicious US features have a low risk of malignancy (<2%), whereas malignancy rates are much higher in nodules with at least two suspicious features. Recent guidelines endorse this approach of using combinations of US features to guide nodule selection for fine needle aspiration.

  2. Assessment of postural instability in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszczyk, J W; Orawiec, R; Duda-Kłodowska, D; Opala, G

    2007-10-01

    Postural instability is one of the most disabling features of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we focused on postural instability as the main factor predisposing parkinsonians to falls. For this purpose, changes in sway characteristics during quiet stance due to visual feedback exclusion were studied. We searched for postural sway measures that could be potential discriminators for an increased fall risk. A group of 110 subjects: 55 parkinsonians (Hoehn and Yahr: 1-3), and 55 age-matched healthy volunteers participated in the experiment. Their spontaneous sway characteristics while standing quiet with eyes open and eyes closed were analyzed. We found that an increased mediolateral sway and sway area while standing with eyes closed are characteristic of parkinsonian postural instability and may serve to quantify well a tendency to fall. These sway indices significantly correlated with disease severity rated both by the Hoehn and Yahr scale as well as by the Motor Section of the UPDRS. A forward shift of a mean COP position in parkinsonians which reflects their flexed posture was also significantly greater to compare with the elderly subjects and exhibited a high sensitivity to visual conditions. Both groups of postural sway abnormalities identified here may be used as accessible and reliable measures which allow for quantitative assessment of postural instability in Parkinson's disease.

  3. Power analysis to detect treatment effects in longitudinal clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiyue; Muniz-Terrera, Graciela; Tom, Brian D M

    2017-09-01

    Assessing cognitive and functional changes at the early stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and detecting treatment effects in clinical trials for early AD are challenging. Under the assumption that transformed versions of the Mini-Mental State Examination, the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale-Sum of Boxes, and the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale tests'/components' scores are from a multivariate linear mixed-effects model, we calculated the sample sizes required to detect treatment effects on the annual rates of change in these three components in clinical trials for participants with mild cognitive impairment. Our results suggest that a large number of participants would be required to detect a clinically meaningful treatment effect in a population with preclinical or prodromal Alzheimer's disease. We found that the transformed Mini-Mental State Examination is more sensitive for detecting treatment effects in early AD than the transformed Clinical Dementia Rating Scale-Sum of Boxes and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale. The use of optimal weights to construct powerful test statistics or sensitive composite scores/endpoints can reduce the required sample sizes needed for clinical trials. Consideration of the multivariate/joint distribution of components' scores rather than the distribution of a single composite score when designing clinical trials can lead to an increase in power and reduced sample sizes for detecting treatment effects in clinical trials for early AD.

  4. Efficacy of a medical food in mild Alzheimer's disease: A randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheltens, Philip; Kamphuis, Patrick J G H; Verhey, Frans R J; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M; Wurtman, Richard J; Wilkinson, David; Twisk, Jos W R; Kurz, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect of a medical food on cognitive function in people with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). A total of 225 drug-naïve AD patients participated in this randomized, double-blind controlled trial. Patients were randomized to active product, Souvenaid, or a control drink, taken once-daily for 12 weeks. Primary outcome measures were the delayed verbal recall task of the Wechsler Memory Scale-revised, and the 13-item modified Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale at week 12. At 12 weeks, significant improvement in the delayed verbal recall task was noted in the active group compared with control (P = .021). Modified Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale and other outcome scores (e.g., Clinician Interview Based Impression of Change plus Caregiver Input, 12-item Neuropsychiatric Inventory, Alzheimer's disease Co-operative Study-Activities of Daily Living, Quality of Life in Alzheimer's Disease) were unchanged. The control group neither deteriorated nor improved. Compliance was excellent (95%) and the product was well tolerated. Supplementation with a medical food including phosphatide precursors and cofactors for 12 weeks improved memory (delayed verbal recall) in mild AD patients. This proof-of-concept study justifies further clinical trials. 2010 The Alzheimer's Association. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The number and the size of joints matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntson, Lillemor; Wernroth, Lisa; Fasth, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Variables for assessment of disease activity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) were studied, in order to develop a disease activity score for children with JIA.......Variables for assessment of disease activity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) were studied, in order to develop a disease activity score for children with JIA....

  6. Assessment of Cardiovascular Disease Risk in South Asian Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Monira Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although South Asian populations have high cardiovascular disease (CVD burden in the world, their patterns of individual CVD risk factors have not been fully studied. None of the available algorithms/scores to assess CVD risk have originated from these populations. To explore the relevance of CVD risk scores for these populations, literature search and qualitative synthesis of available evidence were performed. South Asians usually have higher levels of both “classical” and nontraditional CVD risk factors and experience these at a younger age. There are marked variations in risk profiles between South Asian populations. More than 100 risk algorithms are currently available, with varying risk factors. However, no available algorithm has included all important risk factors that underlie CVD in these populations. The future challenge is either to appropriately calibrate current risk algorithms or ideally to develop new risk algorithms that include variables that provide an accurate estimate of CVD risk.

  7. Assessment of diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włodarek, Dariusz; Głąbska, Dominika; Rojek-Trębicka, Jadwiga

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition is important in the therapy of predialysis patients. The aim of the presented single-centre descriptive study was to assess the diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients with no previous dietary intervention, in comparison with recommendations, as well as the analysis of the energy, protein and phosphate intake in correlation with chosen laboratory measurements. The research was carried out in 31 female predialysis patients with CKD of different etiology, aged 29-79 years (GFR: 19.4±9.7 ml/min/1.73 m2). Main outcome measures were self-reported data from three-day dietary recall. Nutrients content and energy value of diet were compared with guidelines for chronic kidney disease patients or, in case of nutrients when they are not settled, with the recommendations for healthy women. All patients had a lower energy intake than the recommended level. At the same time, 35.8% of patients were characterised by improper protein intake--too low or too high. The majority of patients had low intake of most of vitamins and minerals. The total, animal and plant protein were positively correlated with the energy value of diet and with amount of most of the nutrients. Values of GFR were positively correlated with animal protein intake, while phosphate and creatinine in blood were negatively correlated with total and animal protein intake. The study highlights that diet of CKD predialysis patients with no previous dietary intervention is not properly balanced.

  8. Machine learning for the assessment of Alzheimer's disease through DTI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lella, Eufemia; Amoroso, Nicola; Bellotti, Roberto; Diacono, Domenico; La Rocca, Marianna; Maggipinto, Tommaso; Monaco, Alfonso; Tangaro, Sabina

    2017-09-01

    Digital imaging techniques have found several medical applications in the development of computer aided detection systems, especially in neuroimaging. Recent advances in Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) aim to discover biological markers for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), one of the most widespread neurodegenerative disorders. We explore here how different supervised classification models provide a robust support to the diagnosis of AD patients. We use DTI measures, assessing the structural integrity of white matter (WM) fiber tracts, to reveal patterns of disrupted brain connectivity. In particular, we provide a voxel-wise measure of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD), thus identifying the regions of the brain mostly affected by neurodegeneration, and then computing intensity features to feed supervised classification algorithms. In particular, we evaluate the accuracy of discrimination of AD patients from healthy controls (HC) with a dataset of 80 subjects (40 HC, 40 AD), from the Alzheimer's Disease Neurodegenerative Initiative (ADNI). In this study, we compare three state-of-the-art classification models: Random Forests, Naive Bayes and Support Vector Machines (SVMs). We use a repeated five-fold cross validation framework with nested feature selection to perform a fair comparison between these algorithms and evaluate the information content they provide. Results show that AD patterns are well localized within the brain, thus DTI features can support the AD diagnosis.

  9. Assessment of Type I Interferon Signaling in Pediatric Inflammatory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian I; Melki, Isabelle; Frémond, Marie-Louise; Briggs, Tracy A; Rodero, Mathieu P; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Oojageer, Anthony; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Belot, Alexandre; Bodemer, Christine; Quartier, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J

    2017-02-01

    patients; median IS 1.07, IQR 0.491-3.74). An assessment of six ISGs can be used to define a spectrum of inflammatory diseases related to enhanced type I interferon signaling. If future studies demonstrate that the IS is a reactive biomarker, this measure may prove useful both in the diagnosis and the assessment of treatment efficacy.

  10. rCBF and cognitive impairment changes assessed by SPECT and ADAS-cog in late-onset Alzheimer's disease after 18 months of treatment with the cholinesterase inhibitors donepezil or galantamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirayama, Yukihiko; Takahashi, Michio; Oda, Yasunori; Yoshino, Kouhei; Sato, Koichi; Okubo, Toshiyuki; Iyo, Masaomi

    2017-12-15

    Late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) differs substantially from early-onset AD. In this cross sectional study we investigated brain perfusion changes after 18 months of treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) donepezil or galantamine. Twenty-five drug-naïve late-onset AD patients were recruited from outpatient clinics. We examined brain perfusion using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and used three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection (3D-SSP) and the stereotactic extraction estimation method (SEE) level 3 to analyze classified gyrus level segments. We assessed cognitive function using the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) grouped into three subgroup domains, language, memory, and praxis. In the follow-up data, some regions were further hypoperfused, reflecting worsening of the disease, while other regions showed alleviated hypoperfusion, potentially related to the ChEIs treatment. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) decreased in the parietal cortex and increased in the frontal and the limbic cortices. Increased hypoperfusion significantly correlated with ADAS-cog scores changes were seen in the superior parietal lobule, inferior parietal lobule, angular gyrus, and supramarginal gyrus of the parietal cortex. Alleviated hypoperfusion significantly related to recovery of ADAS-cog scores were seen in the rectal and paracentral lobule of the frontal cortex, and the anterior cingulate of the limbic cortex. These regions showed significant relationships with total ADAS-cog and language, memory and praxis subscales scores. The current longitudinal study indicates prominent rCBF changes and their relationships with changes in ADAS-cog scores in late-onset AD patients.

  11. Assessment of diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Włodarek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]introduction and objective[/b]. Nutrition is important in the therapy of predialysis patients. The aim of the presented single-centre descriptive study was to assess the diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients with no previous dietary intervention, in comparison with recommendations, as well as the analysis of the energy, protein and phosphate intake in correlation with chosen laboratory measurements. [b]materials and methods.[/b] The research was carried out in 31 female predialysis patients with CKD of different etiology, aged 29–79 years (GFR: 19.4±9.7ml/min/1.73m [sup]2[/sup] . Main outcome measures were self-reported data from three-day dietary recall. Nutrients content and energy value of diet were compared with guidelines for chronic kidney disease patients or, in case of nutrients when they are not settled, with the recommendations for healthy women. [b]results[/b]. All patients had a lower energy intake than the recommended level. At the same time, 35.8% of patients were characterised by improper protein intake – too low or too high. The majority of patients had low intake of most of vitamins and minerals. The total, animal and plant protein were positively correlated with the energy value of diet and with amount of most of the nutrients. Values of GFR were positively correlated with animal protein intake, while phosphate and creatinine in blood were negatively correlated with total and animal protein intake. [b]conclusions[/b]. The study highlights that diet of CKD predialysis patients with no previous dietary intervention is not properly balanced.

  12. Assessment of gene expression profiles in peripheral occlusive arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenek, Serban; Nastase, Anca; Niculescu, Ana Maria; Baila, Sorin; Herlea, Vlad; Lazar, Vadimir; Paslaru, Liliana; Botezatu, Anca; Tomescu, Dana; Popescu, Irinel; Dima, Simona

    2012-01-01

    Molecular events responsible for the onset and progression of peripheral occlusive arterial disease (POAD) are incompletely understood. Gene expression profiling may point out relevant features of the disease. Tissue samples were collected as operatory waste from a total of 36 patients with (n = 18) and without (n = 18) POAD. The tissues were histologically evaluated, and the patients with POAD were classified according to Leriche-Fontaine (LF) classification: 11% with stage IIB, 22% with stage III, and 67% with stage IV. Total RNA was isolated from all samples and hybridized onto Agilent 4×44K Oligo microarray slides. The bioinformatic analysis identified genes differentially expressed between control and pathologic tissues. Ten genes with a fold change ≥ 2 (1 with a fold change ≥ 1.8) were selected for quantitative polymerase chain reaction validation (GPC3, CFD, GDF10, ITLN1, TSPAN8, MMP28, NNMT, SERPINA5, LUM, and FDXR). C-reactive protein (CRP) was assessed with a specific assay, while nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT) was evaluated in the patient serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A multiple regression analysis showed that the level of CRP in the serum is correlated with the POAD LF stages (r(2) = 0.22, P = 0.046) and that serum NNMT is higher in IV LF POAD patients (P = 0.005). The mRNA gene expression of LUM is correlated with the LF stage (r(2) = 0.45, P = 0.009), and the mRNA level of ITLN1 is correlated with the ankle-brachial index (r(2) = 0.42, P = 0.008). Our analysis shows that NNMT, ITLN1, LUM, CFD, and TSPAN8 in combination with other known markers, such as CRP, could be evaluated as a panel of biomarkers of POAD. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Multiparametric Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging in Assessment of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Perlman, Alan; Kalache, Safa; Berman, Nathaniel; Seshan, Surya; Salvatore, Steven; Smith, Lindsey; Wehrli, Natasha; Waldron, Levi; Kodali, Hanish; Chevalier, James

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the value of multiparametric quantitative ultrasound imaging in assessing chronic kidney disease (CKD) using kidney biopsy pathologic findings as reference standards. We prospectively measured multiparametric quantitative ultrasound markers with grayscale, spectral Doppler, and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in 25 patients with CKD before kidney biopsy and 10 healthy volunteers. Based on all pathologic (glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy, arteriosclerosis, and edema) scores, the patients with CKD were classified into mild (no grade 3 and quantitative ultrasound parameters included kidney length, cortical thickness, pixel intensity, parenchymal shear wave velocity, intrarenal artery peak systolic velocity (PSV), end-diastolic velocity (EDV), and resistive index. We tested the difference in quantitative ultrasound parameters among mild CKD, moderate to severe CKD, and healthy controls using analysis of variance, analyzed correlations of quantitative ultrasound parameters with pathologic scores and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using Pearson correlation coefficients, and examined the diagnostic performance of quantitative ultrasound parameters in determining moderate CKD and an estimated GFR of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. There were significant differences in cortical thickness, pixel intensity, PSV, and EDV among the 3 groups (all P quantitative ultrasound parameters, the top areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for PSV and EDV were 0.88 and 0.97, respectively, for determining pathologic moderate to severe CKD, and 0.76 and 0.86 for estimated GFR of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . Moderate to good correlations were found for PSV, EDV, and pixel intensity with pathologic scores and estimated GFR. The PSV, EDV, and pixel intensity are valuable in determining moderate to severe CKD. The value of shear wave velocity in

  14. The Effect of Vascular Risk Factors on the Efficacy of Rivastigmine Patch and Capsule Treatment in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Farlow

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vascular risk factors (VRF may influence response to rivastigmine in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Methods: AD patients who participated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of rivastigmine patch and capsule treatment were stratified by baseline VRF status. Treatment response was evaluated using the AD Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog, AD Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change (ADCS-CGIC and the AD Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living (ADCS-ADL scale. Results: ADAS-cog scores significantly improved in all rivastigmine-treated patients (p Conclusion: VRF may influence AD progression and response to rivastigmine.

  15. Assessment of Mycotoxin Exposure in Breastfeeding Mothers with Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Valitutti

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the risk of mycotoxin exposure (aflatoxin M1, ochratoxin A, and zearalenone in celiac disease (CD breastfeeding mothers and healthy control mothers, as well as in their offspring, by quantifying these contaminants in breast milk. Study design: Thirty-five breastfeeding women with CD on a gluten-free diet and 30 healthy breastfeeding controls were recruited. Milk sampling was performed three times per day for three consecutive days. Mycotoxin content was investigated by an analytical method using immunoaffinity column clean-up and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC with fluorometric detection. Results: Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1 was detected in 37% of CD group samples (mean ± SD = 0.012 ± 0.011 ng/mL; range = 0.003–0.340 ng/mL. The control group showed lower mean AFM1 concentration levels in 24% of the analyzed samples (0.009 ± 0.007 ng/mL; range = 0.003–0.067 ng/mL, ANOVA on ranks, p-value < 0.01. Ochratoxin A and zearalenone did not differ in both groups. Conclusion: Breast milk AFM1 contamination for both groups is lower than the European safety threshold. However, the estimated exposures of infants from CD mothers and control mothers was much higher (≃15 times and ≃11 times, respectively than the threshold set by the joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA. Since incongruities exist between JECFA and the European Union standard, a novel regulatory review of the available data on this topic is desirable. Protecting babies from a neglected risk of high AFM1 exposure requires prompt regulatory and food-control policies.

  16. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Hawaii Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 17 sites at...

  17. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Saipan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 8 sites at...

  18. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Kure Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Kure...

  19. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 6 sites at...

  20. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Asuncion Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 3 sites at...

  1. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Maug Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Maug...

  2. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Molokai Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 3 sites at...

  3. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Midway Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at...

  4. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Rose Island, American Samoa in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at...

  5. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Rota Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 6 sites at Rota...

  6. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Oahu, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 2 sites at Oahu...

  7. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Uracas Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 3 sites at...

  8. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at...

  9. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Wake Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at...

  10. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Sarigan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 3 sites at...

  11. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Tinian Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 5 sites at...

  12. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 11 sites at...

  13. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Guguan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 3 sites at...

  14. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Ofu-Olosega Island, American Samoa in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 10 sites at...

  15. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Swains Atoll, American Samoa in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 8 sites at...

  16. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Ta'u Island, American Samoa in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Ta'u...

  17. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Lehua Rock, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 3 sites at...

  18. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Maui Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 11 sites at...

  19. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Guam, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 10 sites at...

  20. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Necker Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 2 sites at...

  1. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Pagan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at...

  2. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Lisianski Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at...

  3. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Aguijan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 1 sites at...

  4. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Alamagan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 3 sites at...

  5. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Agrihan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 3 sites at...

  6. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Laysan Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 3 sites at...

  7. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Kaula Rock, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 2 sites at...

  8. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Tutuila Island, American Samoa in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 23 sites at...

  9. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Niihau Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 6 sites at...

  10. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at French Frigate Shoals, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 10 sites at...

  11. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Lanai Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 6 sites at...

  12. Assessment of dyslipidemia in renal disease patients | Digban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dyslipidemia is elevation of plasma cholesterol, triglycerides (TGs), or both, or a low high density lipoprotein level that contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Lipid pattern of renal disease patients were determined. One hundred volunteers were recruited for this study which comprised of sixty renal disease ...

  13. An assessment of the physical fitness and coronary heart disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health and fitness clubs play an important role in addressing the causes of hypokinetic diseases and coronary heart disease (CHD). In order to be well prepared, service providers should be aware of the health and fitness profiles of their clients when they join their clubs. In the current study 243 white female subjects ...

  14. New concepts in assessing sickle cell disease severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnog, JJB; Lard, LR; Rojer, RA; Van der Dijs, FPL; Muskiet, FAJ; Duits, AJ

    Vasoocclusion leads to pain, chronic organ damage, and a decreased life expectancy in patients with sickle cell disease. Therapeutic options for sickle cell disease have usually been evaluated according to their capacity for reducing the frequency of vasoocclusive crises requiring clinical

  15. SSR Markers Assessed for Peanut Smut Disease Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peanut smut disease, caused by Thecaphora frezii (Carranza & Lindquist), can result in yield losses higher than 50%. Several strategies have been developed for disease management but they are still insufficient. The smut genetic resistance found in wild species and Bolivian landraces is currently th...

  16. Comparing Clinical Profiles in Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin R. Farlow

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Greater understanding of differences in baseline impairment and disease progression in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD may improve the interpretation of drug effects and the design of future studies. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of three randomized, double-blind rivastigmine databases (one in PDD, two in AD. Impairment on the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog, Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living (ADCS-ADL scale, 10-item Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI-10 and the ADCS-Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGIC was compared [standardized difference (Cohen's d, similar if Results: Patients with AD or PDD had similar levels of impairment on the ADAS-cog and NPI-10. Scores on the ADCS-ADL scale (standardized difference = 0.47 and the ADAS-cog memory domain (total, 0.33; items, 0.10-0.58 were higher in AD; PDD patients were more impaired in the language (0.23 and praxis (0.34 domains. AD patients receiving placebo showed greater deterioration on the ADAS-cog (0.14 and improvement on the NPI-10 (0.11 compared with patients with PDD. Conclusion: Differing patterns of impairment occur in AD and PDD.

  17. Comparing clinical profiles in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farlow, Martin R; Schmitt, Frederick; Aarsland, Dag; Grossberg, George T; Somogyi, Monique; Meng, Xiangyi

    2013-01-01

    Greater understanding of differences in baseline impairment and disease progression in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) may improve the interpretation of drug effects and the design of future studies. This was a retrospective analysis of three randomized, double-blind rivastigmine databases (one in PDD, two in AD). Impairment on the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog), Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living (ADCS-ADL) scale, 10-item Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI-10) and the ADCS-Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGIC) was compared [standardized difference (Cohen's d), similar if <0.1]. Patients with AD or PDD had similar levels of impairment on the ADAS-cog and NPI-10. Scores on the ADCS-ADL scale (standardized difference = 0.47) and the ADAS-cog memory domain (total, 0.33; items, 0.10-0.58) were higher in AD; PDD patients were more impaired in the language (0.23) and praxis (0.34) domains. AD patients receiving placebo showed greater deterioration on the ADAS-cog (0.14) and improvement on the NPI-10 (0.11) compared with patients with PDD. Differing patterns of impairment occur in AD and PDD.

  18. Determining transition readiness in congenital heart disease: Assessing the utility of the Transition Readiness Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Transition Readiness Assessment Questionnaire (TRAQ) is a tool commonly used to assess transition readiness in adolescents with chronic diseases. It was previously validated in youth with special health care needs (YSHCN), but no patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) were included in the ...

  19. Imaging popliteal artery disease in young adults with claudication: self-assessment module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Felix S; Bui-Mansfield, Liem T

    2007-09-01

    The educational objectives of this self-assessment module on imaging popliteal artery disease in young adults with intermittent claudication are for the participant to exercise, self-assess, and improve his or her knowledge of the imaging and clinical features of popliteal artery entrapment syndrome, cystic adventitial disease,and masses associated with popliteal artery obstruction.

  20. Assessement of rheumatic diseases with computational radiology: Current status and future potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peloschek, Philipp; Boesen, Mikael; Donner, Rene; Kubassova, Olga; Birngruber, Erich; Patsch, Janina; Mayerhoefer, Marius; Langs, Georg

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, several computational image analysis methods to assess disease progression in rheumatic diseases were presented. This review article explains the basics of these methods as well as their potential application in rheumatic disease monitoring, it covers radiography, sonography as well as magnetic resonance imaging in quantitative analysis frameworks.

  1. The internal consistency and validity of the Self-assessment Parkinson's Disease Disability Scale.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemans, M.A.J.E.; Dekker, J.; Woude, L.H.V. van der

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the consistency and validity of the Self-assessment Parkinson's Disease Disability Scale in patients with Parkinson's disease living at home. DESIGN: Patients with Parkinson's disease responded to a set of questionnaires. In addition, an observation of the performance of daily

  2. Internal consistency and validity of the self-assessment Parkinson's Disease disability scale. Abstract.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, J.; Biemans, M.A.J.E.; Woude, L.H.V. van der

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the consistency and validity of the Self-assessment Parkinson's Disease Disability Scale in patients with Parkinson's disease living at home. DESIGN: Patients with Parkinson's disease responded to a set of questionnaires. In addition, an observation of the performance of daily

  3. [Assessment of invalidity as a result of infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čeledová, L; Čevela, R; Bosák, M

    2016-01-01

    The article features the new medical assessment paradigm for invalidity as a result of infectious disease which is applied as of 1 January 2010. The invalidity assessment criteria are regulated specifically by Regulation No. 359/2009. Chapter I of the Annexe to the invalidity assessment regulation addresses the area of infectious diseases with respect to functional impairment and its impact on the quality of life. Since 2010, the invalidity has also been newly categorized into three groups. The new assessment approach makes it possible to evaluate a persons functional capacity, type of disability, and eligibility for compensation for reduced capacity for work. In 2010, a total of 170 375 invalidity cases were assessed, and in 2014, 147 121 invalidity assessments were made. Invalidity as a result of infectious disease was assessed in 177 persons in 2010, and 128 invalidity assessments were made in 2014. The most common causes of invalidity as a result of infectious disease are chronic viral hepatitis, other spirochetal infections, tuberculosis of the respiratory tract, tick-borne viral encephalitis, and HIV/AIDS. The number of assessments of invalidity as a result of infectious disease showed a declining trend between 2010 and 2014, similarly to the total of invalidity assessments. In spite of this fact, the cases of invalidity as a result of infectious disease account for approximately half percent of all invalidity assessments made in the above-mentioned period of time.

  4. The assessment of changes in cardiovascular diseases trend in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceyda Şahan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: The aims of this study are to determine the community-based studies on coronary heart disease (CHD and cerebrovascular disease (CVD prevalence in Turkey, critical appraisal of methodological appropriateness of these studies, and analyze the yearly trends using the research findings which have comparable data. Methods: The studies in this systematic review were selected by searching MEDLINE, ULAKBIM, Higher Education Thesis databases. The inclusion criteria were; to be 1 conducted in Turkey and 2 community-based, and cross-sectional, 3 providing at least one morbidity (prevalence or incidence rate of either coronary heart disease or cerebrovascular disease, 4 not to be conducted in hospital or nursing setting. A total of 23 studies were selected for critical evaluation, two researchers evaluated the studies using checklists. Results: According to the regression equations created by using five study data that had the same definition for the diseases, and provided CHD and CVD prevalence by age and sex, the estimated prevalence of CHD in 2008, for above the age of 35 was 10.7% in men, 12.7% in women while in 2012 it was 6.6% in men, 7.0% in women. In 2008, the estimated prevalence of CVD in men over the age 35 was 1.6%, 2.0% in women, while it was 1.3 in men and women in 2012, respectively. Conclusions: Most of the studies examining cardiovascular disease epidemiology in Turkey are either regional or do not provide comparable data as an appropriate method has not been used. Further studies should be nationwide, represent all regions, provide comparable data, and be conducted using valid diagnostic methods.Key Words: Prevalence, frequency, trend, coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease.

  5. Pulmonary MR imaging with ultra-short TEs: Utility for disease severity assessment of connective tissue disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Nishio, Mizuho; Koyama, Hisanobu; Takenaka, Daisuke; Takahashi, Masaya; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Obara, Makoto; Cauteren, Marc van; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of pulmonary magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with ultra-short echo times (UTEs) at a 3.0 T MR system for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessments of connective tissue disease (CTD) patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained from 18 CTD patients (eight men and ten women) and eight normal subjects with suspected chest disease (three men and five women). All subjects underwent thin-section MDCT, pulmonary MR imaging with UTEs, pulmonary function test and serum KL-6. Regional T2* maps were generated from each MR data set, and mean T2* values were determined from ROI measurements. From each thin-section MDCT data set, CT-based disease severity was evaluated with a visual scoring system. Mean T2* values for normal and CTD subjects were statistically compared by using Student's t-test. To assess capability for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessments, mean T2* values were statistically correlated with pulmonary functional parameters, serum KL-6 and CT-based disease severity. Results: Mean T2* values for normal and CTD subjects were significantly different (p = 0.0019) and showed significant correlations with %VC, %DL CO , serum KL-6 and CT-based disease severity of CTD patients (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Pulmonary MR imaging with UTEs is useful for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessments of CTD patients with ILD

  6. Pulmonary MR imaging with ultra-short TEs: Utility for disease severity assessment of connective tissue disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yosirad@kobe-u.ac.jp [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Nishio, Mizuho [Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Takenaka, Daisuke [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Department of Radiology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi, Hyogo (Japan); Takahashi, Masaya [Advanced Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Houston, TX (United States); Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Obara, Makoto; Cauteren, Marc van [Philips Electronics Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of pulmonary magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with ultra-short echo times (UTEs) at a 3.0 T MR system for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessments of connective tissue disease (CTD) patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained from 18 CTD patients (eight men and ten women) and eight normal subjects with suspected chest disease (three men and five women). All subjects underwent thin-section MDCT, pulmonary MR imaging with UTEs, pulmonary function test and serum KL-6. Regional T2* maps were generated from each MR data set, and mean T2* values were determined from ROI measurements. From each thin-section MDCT data set, CT-based disease severity was evaluated with a visual scoring system. Mean T2* values for normal and CTD subjects were statistically compared by using Student's t-test. To assess capability for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessments, mean T2* values were statistically correlated with pulmonary functional parameters, serum KL-6 and CT-based disease severity. Results: Mean T2* values for normal and CTD subjects were significantly different (p = 0.0019) and showed significant correlations with %VC, %DL{sub CO}, serum KL-6 and CT-based disease severity of CTD patients (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Pulmonary MR imaging with UTEs is useful for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessments of CTD patients with ILD.

  7. Correlation of Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire to impedance-pH measurements in children

    OpenAIRE

    Prachuapthunyachart, Sittichoke; Jarasvaraparn, Chaowapong; Gremse, David A

    2017-01-01

    Background: Esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring has become one of the preferred tests to correlate observed reflux-like behaviors with esophageal reflux events. The Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire is a validated tool used to distinguish infants with gastroesophageal reflux disease from healthy children. The aim of this study was to determine whether the Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire composite symptom ...

  8. Shrimp viral diseases, import risk assessment and international trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunasagar, Iddya; Ababouch, Lahsen

    2012-09-01

    Shrimp is an important commodity in international trade accounting for 15 % in terms of value of internationally traded seafood products which reached $102.00 billion in 2008. Aquaculture contributes to over 50 % of global shrimp production. One of the major constraints faced by shrimp aquaculture is the loss due to viral diseases like white spot syndrome, yellow head disease, and Taura syndrome. There are several examples of global spread of shrimp diseases due to importation of live shrimp for aquaculture. Though millions of tonnes of frozen or processed shrimp have been traded internationally during the last two decades despite prevalence of viral diseases in shrimp producing areas in Asia and the Americas, there is no evidence of diseases having been transmitted through shrimp imported for human consumption. The guidelines developed by the World Animal Health Organisation for movement of live animals for aquaculture, frozen crustaceans for human consumption, and the regulations implemented by some shrimp importing regions in the world are reviewed.

  9. Assessment of Patients with Chronic Liver Diseases using Plasma Adrenomedullin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasheid, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is among the important health problems in Egypt which lead to chronic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis.Liver cirrhosis is associated with circulatory disturbances which are attributed to arterial vasodilatation that results from overproduction or reduced degradation of vasodilator substances. Adrenomedullin (AM) is responsible for the arteriolar vasodilatation and hyper dynamic circulation in liver cirrhosis. The aim of work was to the assessment patients with chronic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis with or without renal impairment by determining the level of AM and comparing them with healthy controls. 44 patients with chronic liver diseases (14 patients with chronic hepatitis and 30 patients with liver cirrhosis, 16 in Child-Pugh's class A, 8 in Child-Pugh's class B, and 6 in Child-Pugh's class C) were examined clinically, laboratory, ultrasonography and endoscopically. Plasma concentration of adrenomedullin was measured in all patients and 15 normal controls.The mean levels of AM were higher in patients with chronic hepatitis and patients with liver cirrhosis compared to controls (0.52 ± 0.19 ng/ml , 0.67 ± 0.16 ng/ml and 0.35 ± 0.12 ng/ml, respectively; p<0.001). The mean levels of plasma aldosterone concentration were higher in patients with chronic hepatitis and patients with liver cirrhosis compared to controls (256 ± 197 ng/dl 358 ± 264 ng/dl and 179 ± 142 ng/dl, respectively; p<0.001). The mean levels of creatinine clearance were lower in patients with chronic hepatitis and patients with liver cirrhosis compared to controls (0.31±0.19 ml/min 0.25±0.21 ml/min and 0.45±0.37 ml/min, respectively; p<0.001). The mean levels of AM were higher in patients with liver cirrhosis with renal impairment than without. Also there was significant difference in AM levels between patients with and without esophageal varices (0.71 ± 0.22 ng/ml and 0.52 ± 0.17 ng/ml respectively, p<0.05). AM levels between patients with and without ascites

  10. Increased fracture risk assessed by fracture risk assessment tool in Greek patients with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzoudis, Sotirios; Zavos, Christos; Damilakis, John; Neratzoulakis, John; Dimitriadi, Daphne Anna; Roussomoustakaki, Maria; Kouroumalis, Elias A; Koutroubakis, Ioannis E

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization has recently developed the fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) based on clinical risk factors and bone mineral density (BMD) for evaluation of the 10-year probability of a hip or a major osteoporotic fracture. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of the FRAX tool in Greek patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). FRAX scores were applied to 134 IBD patients [68 Crohn's disease (CD); 66 ulcerative colitis (UC)] who underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans at the femoral neck and lumbar spine during the period 2007-2012. Calculation of the FRAX scores, with or without BMD, was made through a web-based probability model used to compute individual fracture probabilities according to specific clinical risk factors. The median 10-year probability of a major osteoporotic fracture for IBD patients based on clinical data was 7.1%, and including the BMD was 6.2%. A significant overestimation with the first method was found (P = 0.01). Both scores with and without BMD were significantly higher in CD patients compared with UC patients (P = 0.02 and P = 0.005, respectively). The median 10-year probability of hip fracture based on clinical data was 0.8%, and including the BMD was 0.9%. The score with use of BMD was significantly higher in CD compared with UC patients (P = 0.04). CD patients have significantly higher FRAX scores and possibly fracture risk compared with UC patients. The clinical FRAX score alone seems to overestimate the risk of osteoporotic fracture in Greek IBD patients.

  11. Assessment of fibrotic liver disease with multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fake; Zheng, Wei; Tai, Dean C. S.; Lin, Jian; Yu, Hanry; Huang, Zhiwei

    2010-02-01

    Liver fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins such as collagens, which may result in cirrhosis, liver failure, and portal hypertension. In this study, we apply a multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy platform developed to investigate the fibrotic liver diseases in rat models established by performing bile duct ligation (BDL) surgery. The three nonlinear microscopy imaging modalities are implemented on the same sectioned tissues of diseased model sequentially: i.e., second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging quantifies the contents of the collagens, the two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) imaging reveals the morphology of hepatic cells, while coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging maps the distributions of fats or lipids quantitatively across the tissue. Our imaging results show that during the development of liver fibrosis (collagens) in BDL model, fatty liver disease also occurs. The aggregated concentrations of collagen and fat constituents in liver fibrosis model show a certain correlationship between each other.

  12. Risk assessment for heart disease and workplace ETS exposure among nonsmokers.

    OpenAIRE

    Steenland, K

    1999-01-01

    In 1994 the U.S. Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) published a study of risk assessment for heart disease and lung cancer resulting from workplace exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) among nonsmokers. This assessment is currently being revised. The present article considers different possible approaches to a risk assessment for heart disease among nonsmokers resulting from workplace ETS exposure, reviews the approach taken by OSHA in 1994, and suggests some modifi...

  13. Automatic Heart Sound Analysis for Cardiovascular Disease Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Ciências e Tecnologias da Informação, apresentada ao Departamento de Engenharia Informática da Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade de Coimbra Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the most deadly diseases worldwide leaving behind diabetes and cancer. Being connected to ageing population above 65 years is prone to CVDs; hence a new trend of healthcare is emerging focusing on preventive health care in order to reduce the number of hospital visits and to en...

  14. Assessment of the pattern of childhood malignant diseases seen at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: In a bid to accurately document Cancers at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, a cancer registry was established in the unit as all cases are usually managed in the unit. All cases of childhood admissions for malignant diseases were documented in the cancer registry. This data was recalled and a reviewed ...

  15. Quality control assessment of two lentogenic newcastle disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Control of Newcastle Disease is principally by vaccination. Both imported and locally produced vaccines are in use in Nigeria. Comparison was made between two lentogenic vaccines imported from France, India and the Vom-produced Lasota in terms of physical outlook, sterility viral viability, immunogenicity and safety.

  16. The Global Burden of Disease assessments--WHO is responsible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Stein

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Global Burden of Disease (GBD concept has been used by the World Health Organization (WHO for its reporting on health information for nearly 10 years. The GBD approach results in a single summary measure of morbidity, disability, and mortality, the so-called disability-adjusted life year (DALY. To ensure transparency and objectivity in the derivation of health information, WHO has been urged to use reference groups of external experts to estimate burden of disease. Under the leadership and coordination of WHO, expert groups have been appraising and abstracting burden of disease information. Examples include the Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group (CHERG, the Malaria Monitoring and Evaluation Reference Group (MERG, and the recently established Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference Group (FERG. The structure and functioning of and lessons learnt by these groups are described in this paper. External WHO expert groups have provided independent scientific health information while operating under considerable differences in structure and functioning. Although it is not appropriate to devise a single "best practice" model, the common thread described by all groups is the necessity of WHO's leadership and coordination to ensure the provision and dissemination of health information that is to be globally accepted and valued.

  17. [Neuromuscular disease: respiratory clinical assessment and follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Villa Asensi, J R; Luna Paredes, M C; Osona Rodríguez de Torres, F B; Peña Zarza, J A; Larramona Carrera, H; Costa Colomer, J

    2014-10-01

    Patients with neuromuscular disease are an important group at risk of frequently suffering acute or chronic respiratory failure, which is their main cause of death. They require follow-up by a pediatric respiratory medicine specialist from birth or diagnosis in order to confirm the diagnosis and treat any respiratory complications within a multidisciplinary context. The ventilatory support and the cough assistance have improved the quality of life and long-term survival for many of these patients. In this paper, the authors review the pathophysiology, respiratory function evaluation, sleep disorders, and the most frequent respiratory complications in neuromuscular diseases. The various treatments used, from a respiratory medicine point of view, will be analyzed in a next paper. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Parkinson's disease Assessment using Fuzzy Expert System and Nonlinear Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GEMAN, O.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new screening system for quantitative evaluation and analysis, designed for the early stage detection of Parkinson disease. This has been carried out in the view of improving the diagnosis currently established upon a basis of subjective scores. Parkinson?s disease (PD appears as a result of dopamine loss, a chemical mediator that is responsible for the body?s ability to control movements. The symptoms reflect the loss of nerve cells, due to an unknown. The input parameters of the system are represented by amplitude, frequency, the spectral characteristic and trembling localization. The main symptoms include trembling of hand, arms, movement difficulties, postural instability, disturbance of coordination and equilibrium, sleep disturbance, difficulties in speaking, reducing of voice volume. The medical knowledge in PD field is characterized by imprecision, uncertainty and vagueness. The proposed system (fuzzy expert systems is non-invasive and, easy to use by both physicians and patients at home.

  19. Gait Disorders in Parkinson's Disease: Assessment and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hao Chen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gait disorder, a major cause of morbidity in the elderly population, is one of the cardinal features of Parkinson's disease. Owing to the characteristics of these gaits varying widely from festination to freezing of gait, analysis can be hardly identified in the clinical setting. Instrumented gait analysis has been widely used in a traditional gait laboratory. Recently, wireless monitoring systems have become highly informative by allowing long-term data collection in a variety of environments outside the labs. The quantitative analysis of gait patterns is probably the first step to a successful management of an individual patient. The presence of abnormal gait usually indicates advanced stages of disease and is often associated with cognitive impairment, falls, and injuries. Besides pharmacological and surgical treatments, parkinsonian gait can benefit from a variety of interventions. Assistive devices prevent patients from falls, and cueing strategies help them decrease episodes of freezing. Therefore, a multidisciplinary team approach to the optimal management is essential for an elderly patient with Parkinson's disease.

  20. Development, validation and clinical assessment of a short questionnaire to assess disease-related knowledge in inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keegan, Denise

    2013-02-01

    Only two inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) knowledge scales are available, both primarily aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of clinical education programs. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a short knowledge questionnaire for clinical and academic research purposes.

  1. Risk factors and assessment for cardiovascular disease among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: this was a cross-sectional study of HIV-positive patients attending the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Anthropometric and blood pressure measurements were performed; fasting lipid profile, plasma glucose, homocysteine and hsCRP were determined, as well as prevalences and risk assessments.

  2. Assessment of the impact of latrine utilization on diarrhoeal diseases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    improve health through the regular use of well-maintained sanitation facilities. Objective: Assessing the .... A stratified cluster sampling was applied to select the ... Descriptive statistics was performed ... Bivaraiate and multivariate analyses using odds ratio with 95% CI .... were significantly associated at the bivariate analysis.

  3. Human Environmental Disease Network: A computational model to assess toxicology of contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Audouze, Karine

    2017-01-01

    During the past decades, many epidemiological, toxicological and biological studies have been performed to assess the role of environmental chemicals as potential toxicants associated with diverse human disorders. However, the relationships between diseases based on chemical exposure rarely have been studied by computational biology. We developed a human environmental disease network (EDN) to explore and suggest novel disease-disease and chemical-disease relationships. The presented scored EDN model is built upon the integration of systems biology and chemical toxicology using information on chemical contaminants and their disease relationships reported in the TDDB database. The resulting human EDN takes into consideration the level of evidence of the toxicant-disease relationships, allowing inclusion of some degrees of significance in the disease-disease associations. Such a network can be used to identify uncharacterized connections between diseases. Examples are discussed for type 2 diabetes (T2D). Additionally, this computational model allows confirmation of already known links between chemicals and diseases (e.g., between bisphenol A and behavioral disorders) and also reveals unexpected associations between chemicals and diseases (e.g., between chlordane and olfactory alteration), thus predicting which chemicals may be risk factors to human health. The proposed human EDN model allows exploration of common biological mechanisms of diseases associated with chemical exposure, helping us to gain insight into disease etiology and comorbidity. This computational approach is an alternative to animal testing supporting the 3R concept.

  4. Assessment of disease-specific knowledge in Australian children with inflammatory bowel disease and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Andrew S; Mylvaganam, Gaithri; Shalloo, Nollaig; Clarkson, Cathy; Leach, Steven T; Lemberg, Daniel A

    2017-08-01

    Disease-specific knowledge may influence disease outcome and quality of life in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This prospective study aimed to define IBD-related knowledge in a group of Australian children with IBD and their parents using a validated measure of disease-specific knowledge, the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Knowledge Inventory Device (IBD-KID). Children (less than 18 years) diagnosed with IBD who were members of the Australian patient support organisation were identified. Each family was sent copies of the IBD-KID. Children aged 10-18 years and all parents were asked to complete the IBD-KID and to also provide demographic details and disease characteristics. Replies were received from 196 families: 262 parents and 128 children completed questionnaires. Most children had a diagnosis of Crohn disease (65%) and 51% were male. Children diagnosed in the preceding 6 years scored higher than those with longer time since diagnosis. Parents had better scores in the IBD-KID than the children (P parents and children had poor understanding of key management issues for IBD (such as side effects of steroids), important outcomes (e.g. growth) and the use of complementary therapies. Consistent patterns of IBD-related knowledge were noted in this large group of Australian children with IBD and their parents. Measurement of disease-related knowledge with the IBD-KID can identify gaps in understanding, thereby permitting focused educational activities. Although these knowledge gaps may impact upon outcomes, further prospective studies are now required to elucidate the relationships between enhanced knowledge and specific outcomes. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  5. Endoscopic assessment of inflammatory bowel disease: colonoscopy/esophagogastroduodenoscopy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Grace

    2012-06-01

    Endoscopy plays an important role in the initial diagnosis of IBD, including the evaluation of disease severity, activity, and extent. The implications of complete mucosal healing further confirm the function of endoscopy in the follow-up of IBD patients. The use of therapeutic endoscopy, for example stricture dilatation, can avoid the need for bowel resection. Modalities such as capsule endoscopy, EUS, NBI, CE, and other emerging techniques are likely to have an increasing role in the management of IBD, particularly in the area of dysplasia surveillance and treatment.

  6. Evaluating rivastigmine in mild-to-moderate Parkinson's disease dementia using ADAS-cog items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Frederick A; Aarsland, Dag; Brønnick, Kolbjørn S; Meng, Xiangyi; Tekin, Sibel; Olin, Jason T

    2010-08-01

    Rivastigmine has been shown to improve cognition in patients with Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD). To further explore the impact of anticholinesterase therapy on PDD, Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) items were assessed in a retrospective analysis of a 24-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of rivastigmine. Mean changes from baseline at week 24 were calculated for ADAS-cog item scores and for 3 cognitive domain scores. A total of 362 patients were randomized to 3 to 12 mg/d rivastigmine capsules and 179 to placebo. Patients with PDD receiving rivastigmine improved versus placebo on items: word recall, following commands, ideational praxis, remembering test instructions, and comprehension of spoken language (P ADAS-cog is sensitive to broad cognitive changes in PDD. Overall, rivastigmine was associated with improvements on individual cognitive items and general cognitive domains.

  7. Clinical epidemiology of Alzheimer's disease: assessing sex and gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Michelle M; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Rocca, Walter A

    2014-01-01

    With the aging of the population, the burden of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is rapidly expanding. More than 5 million people in the US alone are affected with AD and this number is expected to triple by 2050. While men may have a higher risk of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), an intermediate stage between normal aging and dementia, women are disproportionally affected with AD. One explanation is that men may die of competing causes of death earlier in life, so that only the most resilient men may survive to older ages. However, many other factors should also be considered to explain the sex differences. In this review, we discuss the differences observed in men versus women in the incidence and prevalence of MCI and AD, in the structure and function of the brain, and in the sex-specific and gender-specific risk and protective factors for AD. In medical research, sex refers to biological differences such as chromosomal differences (eg, XX versus XY chromosomes), gonadal differences, or hormonal differences. In contrast, gender refers to psychosocial and cultural differences between men and women (eg, access to education and occupation). Both factors play an important role in the development and progression of diseases, including AD. Understanding both sex- and gender-specific risk and protective factors for AD is critical for developing individualized interventions for the prevention and treatment of AD.

  8. Whole-Body MRI versus PET in assessment of multiple myeloma disease activity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shortt, Conor P

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare FDG PET; whole-body MRI; and the reference standard, bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, to determine the best imaging technique for assessment of disease activity in multiple myeloma.

  9. A Triple Aim Framework For the Performance Assessment of Disease Management Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, N.A.; M.G. Franken (Margreet); M.A. Koopmanschap (Marc); M.P.M.H. Rutten-van Mölken (Maureen)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractObjectives: A structured and comprehensive assessment of disease management implementations is not straightforward due to the broadness of the interventions and the various evaluation possibilities. The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive framework for outcome

  10. Standardized Handwriting to Assess Bradykinesia, Micrographia and Tremor in Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Esther J.; Tolonen, Antti J.; Cluitmans, Luc; van Gils, Mark; Conway, Bernard A.; Zietsma, Rutger C.; Leenders, Klaus L.; Maurits, Natasha M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether standardized handwriting can provide quantitative measures to distinguish patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease from age- and gender-matched healthy control participants. Design: Exploratory study. Pen tip trajectories were recorded during circle, spiral and line

  11. Validity of Montreal Cognitive Assessment in non-english speaking patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Syam; Justus, Sunitha; Meluveettil, Radhamani; Menon, Ramshekhar N; Sarma, Sankara P; Kishore, Asha

    2015-01-01

    The Montreal Cognitive Assessment is a brief and easy screening tool for accurately testing cognitive dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. We tested its validity for use in non-English (Malayalam) speaking patients with Parkinson's disease. We developed a Malayalam (a south-Indian language) version of Montreal Cognitive Assessment and applied to 70 patients with Parkinson's disease and 60 age- and education-matched healthy controls. Metric properties were assessed, and the scores were compared with the performance in validated Malayalam versions of Mini Mental Status Examination and Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment-Malayalam showed good internal consistency and test-retest reliability and its scores correlated with Mini Mental Status Examination (patients: R = 0.70; P speaking Parkinson's disease patients for early screening and potential future interventions for cognitive dysfunction.

  12. Definition and Reliability Assessment of Elementary Ultrasonographic Findings in Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippou, Georgios; Scirè, Carlo A; Damjanov, Nemanja

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To define the ultrasonographic characteristics of calcium pyrophosphate crystal (CPP) deposits in joints and periarticular tissues and to evaluate the intra- and interobserver reliability of expert ultrasonographers in the assessment of CPP deposition disease (CPPD) according to the ne...

  13. Risk assessment of UVB effects on resistance to infectious diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garssen, J.; Goettsch, W.; Slob, W.; Loveren, H. van; de Gruijl, F.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a quantitative risk assessment of lowered resistance to infections in humans due to (solar) ultraviolet B (UVB) exposure. We followed the steps for risk assessment as defined by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences: (1) hazard identification, (2) dose-response assessment, (3) exposure assessment, and (4) risk characterization. For step 1, the suppressory effects of UVB radiation on the immune system has been reviewed, supplemented with new data, and analyzed. Experiments on UV-induced immunosuppression cannot be performed with humans for ethical reasons, but herpes simplex virus infection appears to be the human paradigm. Thus, UVB radiation appears to be a potential hazard to immunologic functions. Step 2 is crucial, but dose-response relationships for infections have never been measured in humans. We used our earlier dose-response rat data for suppression of lymphocyte stimulation and computed that the UVB dose resulting in a 50% reduction of lymphocyte stimulation by Listeria monocytogenes is 6.800 J/m 2 . Using mixed skin lymphocyte response assays we found that humans are 3.8 times less sensitive than rats (interspecies variation [IEV]). To account for the 2.5 percentile of most susceptible individuals in a population, an additional factor (intraspecies variation [IAV]) was introduced (0.5 for humans). Using these data, we computed that 13.100 J/m 2 of UVB radiation emitted by FS40 lamps would suppress 50% of the proliferative response of lymphocytes to L. monocytogenes in most sensitive skin type 2 humans. In step 3, we assumed the action spectrum for the responses analyzed by us as identical to an action spectrum for suppression of contact hypersensitivity that is available in the literature. In step 4, we calculated that approximately 100 min of solar exposure at around noon in Italy or Spain would suppress the resistance to infections by L. monocytogenes in the most sensitive humans. (author)

  14. Risk assessment of UVB effects on resistance to infectious diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garssen, J.; Goettsch, W.; Slob, W.; Loveren, H. van [National Institute of Public Health and Environment, Bilthoven (Netherlands); de Gruijl, F. [Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a quantitative risk assessment of lowered resistance to infections in humans due to (solar) ultraviolet B (UVB) exposure. We followed the steps for risk assessment as defined by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences: (1) hazard identification, (2) dose-response assessment, (3) exposure assessment, and (4) risk characterization. For step 1, the suppressory effects of UVB radiation on the immune system has been reviewed, supplemented with new data, and analyzed. Experiments on UV-induced immunosuppression cannot be performed with humans for ethical reasons, but herpes simplex virus infection appears to be the human paradigm. Thus, UVB radiation appears to be a potential hazard to immunologic functions. Step 2 is crucial, but dose-response relationships for infections have never been measured in humans. We used our earlier dose-response rat data for suppression of lymphocyte stimulation and computed that the UVB dose resulting in a 50% reduction of lymphocyte stimulation by Listeria monocytogenes is 6.800 J/m{sup 2}. Using mixed skin lymphocyte response assays we found that humans are 3.8 times less sensitive than rats (interspecies variation [IEV]). To account for the 2.5 percentile of most susceptible individuals in a population, an additional factor (intraspecies variation [IAV]) was introduced (0.5 for humans). Using these data, we computed that 13.100 J/m{sup 2} of UVB radiation emitted by FS40 lamps would suppress 50% of the proliferative response of lymphocytes to L. monocytogenes in most sensitive skin type 2 humans. In step 3, we assumed the action spectrum for the responses analyzed by us as identical to an action spectrum for suppression of contact hypersensitivity that is available in the literature. In step 4, we calculated that approximately 100 min of solar exposure at around noon in Italy or Spain would suppress the resistance to infections by L. monocytogenes in the most sensitive humans. (author).

  15. Assessment of listing and categorisation of animal diseases within the framework of the Animal Health Law (Regulation (EU) No 2016/429): Borna disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    EFSA Panel on Animal Health and Welfare; More, Simon J.; Bøtner, Anette

    2017-01-01

    Borna disease has been assessed according to the criteria of the Animal Health Law (AHL), in particular criteria of Article 7 on disease profile and impacts, Article 5 on the eligibility of Borna disease to be listed, Article 9 for the categorisation of Borna disease according to disease prevention...... at collective level. The output is composed of the categorical answer, and for the questions where no consensus was reached, the different supporting views are reported. Details on the methodology used for this assessment are explained in a separate opinion. According to the assessment performed, Borna disease...

  16. APACHE II SCORING SYSTEM AND ITS MODIFICATION FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF DISEASE SEVERITY IN CHILDREN WHO UNDERWENT POLYCHEMOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. V. Sotnikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Short-term disease prognosis should be considered for the appropriate treatment policy based on the assessment of disease severity in patients with acute disease. The adequate assessment of disease severity and prognosis allows the indications for transferring patients to the resuscitation and intensive care department to be defined more precisely. Disease severity of patients who underwent polychemotherapy was assessed using APACHE II scoring system.

  17. Assessing Old and New Diagnostic Tests for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezi, Michael F; Sifrim, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    A detailed critique of objective measurements of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) would improve management of patients suspecting of having reflux, leading to rational selection of treatment and better outcomes. Many diagnostic tests for GERD have been developed over the past decades. We analyze their development, positive- and negative-predictive values, and ability to predict response to treatment. These features are important for development of medical, surgical, and endoscopic therapies for GERD. We discuss the value of available diagnostic tests and review their role in management of patients with persistent reflux symptoms despite adequate medical or surgical treatment. This is becoming a significant health economic problem, due to the widespread use of proton pump inhibitors. GERD is believed to cause nonesophageal symptoms, such as those provoked by ear, nose, throat, or respiratory disorders. We analyze the value of GERD diagnostic tests in evaluation of these troublesome, nonesophageal symptoms. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Intelligent platforms for disease assessment: novel approaches in functional echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Partho P

    2013-11-01

    Accelerating trends in the dynamic digital era (from 2004 onward) has resulted in the emergence of novel parametric imaging tools that allow easy and accurate extraction of quantitative information from cardiac images. This review principally attempts to heighten the awareness of newer emerging paradigms that may advance acquisition, visualization and interpretation of the large functional data sets obtained during cardiac ultrasound imaging. Incorporation of innovative cognitive software that allow advanced pattern recognition and disease forecasting will likely transform the human-machine interface and interpretation process to achieve a more efficient and effective work environment. Novel technologies for automation and big data analytics that are already active in other fields need to be rapidly adapted to the health care environment with new academic-industry collaborations to enrich and accelerate the delivery of newer decision making tools for enhancing patient care. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Quantitative muscle MRI as an assessment tool for monitoring disease progression in LGMD2I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willis, Tracey A; Hollingsworth, Kieren G; Coombs, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Outcome measures for clinical trials in neuromuscular diseases are typically based on physical assessments which are dependent on patient effort, combine the effort of different muscle groups, and may not be sensitive to progression over short trial periods in slow-progressing diseases. We hypoth...

  20. Benign breast diseases. Radiology, pathology, risk assessment. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinyama, Catherine N.

    2014-01-01

    Radiological and pathological correlation of the full range of benign breast lesions, with emphasis on screen-detected lesions. Detailed discussion of risk assessment. Revised and updated edition, with a new chapter on gynaecomastia. Ideal aid to the management of patients with benign or indeterminate breast lesions in a multidisciplinary setting. The second edition of this book has been extensively revised and updated. There have been numerous scientific advances in the radiology, pathology and risk assessment of benign breast lesions since the publication of the first edition. The first edition concentrated on screen-detected lesions, which has since been rectified; new symptomatic and screen-detected lesions are discussed in the second edition and include: mastitis and breast abscesses, idiopathic granulomatous mastitis, diabetic mastopathy, phyllodes tumours, gynaecomastia and pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia. The chapters on columnar cell lesions and mucocele-like lesions have been extensively updated. Where applicable, genetic analysis of the benign lesions, which is becoming part of personalised medicine in the field of breast cancer, has been included. The book also presents detailed analyses of the main models, such as the Gail Model, used to assess the subsequent risk of breast cancer in individuals. The current trend in the management of all cancers is preventative. Screening mammography detects early curable cancers as well as indeterminate lesions, the latter of which are invariably pathologically benign. The author has collated important benign lesions and, based on peer-reviewed publications, has documented the relative risk of subsequent cancer to allow the patient and the clinician to implement preventative measures where possible. This book will therefore serve as an essential component of multidisciplinary management of patients with symptomatic and screen-detected benign breast lesions.

  1. Benign breast diseases. Radiology, pathology, risk assessment. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinyama, Catherine N. [Princess Elizabeth Hospital, Le Vauquiedor, St. Martin' s Guernsey, Channel Islands (United Kingdom); Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    Radiological and pathological correlation of the full range of benign breast lesions, with emphasis on screen-detected lesions. Detailed discussion of risk assessment. Revised and updated edition, with a new chapter on gynaecomastia. Ideal aid to the management of patients with benign or indeterminate breast lesions in a multidisciplinary setting. The second edition of this book has been extensively revised and updated. There have been numerous scientific advances in the radiology, pathology and risk assessment of benign breast lesions since the publication of the first edition. The first edition concentrated on screen-detected lesions, which has since been rectified; new symptomatic and screen-detected lesions are discussed in the second edition and include: mastitis and breast abscesses, idiopathic granulomatous mastitis, diabetic mastopathy, phyllodes tumours, gynaecomastia and pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia. The chapters on columnar cell lesions and mucocele-like lesions have been extensively updated. Where applicable, genetic analysis of the benign lesions, which is becoming part of personalised medicine in the field of breast cancer, has been included. The book also presents detailed analyses of the main models, such as the Gail Model, used to assess the subsequent risk of breast cancer in individuals. The current trend in the management of all cancers is preventative. Screening mammography detects early curable cancers as well as indeterminate lesions, the latter of which are invariably pathologically benign. The author has collated important benign lesions and, based on peer-reviewed publications, has documented the relative risk of subsequent cancer to allow the patient and the clinician to implement preventative measures where possible. This book will therefore serve as an essential component of multidisciplinary management of patients with symptomatic and screen-detected benign breast lesions.

  2. An integrated risk assessment tool for team-based periodontal disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyvalikakath, Thankam P; Padman, Rema; Gupta, Sugandh

    2013-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests a potential association of periodontal disease with systemic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer and stroke. The objective of this study is to develop an integrated risk assessment tool that displays a patients' risk for periodontal disease in the context of their systemic disease, social habits and oral health. Such a tool will be used by not just dental professionals but also by care providers who participate in the team-based care for chronic disease management. Displaying relationships between risk factors and its influence on the patient's general health could be a powerful educational and disease management tool for patients and clinicians. It may also improve the coordination of care provided by the provider-members of a chronic care team.

  3. Quantitative assessment of finger tapping characteristics in mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roalf, David R; Rupert, Petra; Mechanic-Hamilton, Dawn; Brennan, Laura; Duda, John E; Weintraub, Daniel; Trojanowski, John Q; Wolk, David; Moberg, Paul J

    2018-06-01

    Fine motor impairments are common in neurodegenerative disorders, yet standardized, quantitative measurements of motor abilities are uncommonly used in neurological practice. Thus, understanding and comparing fine motor abilities across disorders have been limited. The current study compared differences in finger tapping, inter-tap interval, and variability in Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and healthy older adults (HOA). Finger tapping was measured using a highly sensitive light-diode finger tapper. Total number of finger taps, inter-tap interval, and intra-individual variability (IIV) of finger tapping was measured and compared in AD (n = 131), PD (n = 63), MCI (n = 46), and HOA (n = 62), controlling for age and sex. All patient groups had fine motor impairments relative to HOA. AD and MCI groups produced fewer taps with longer inter-tap interval and higher IIV compared to HOA. The PD group, however, produced more taps with shorter inter-tap interval and higher IIV compared to HOA. Disease-specific changes in fine motor function occur in the most common neurodegenerative diseases. The findings suggest that alterations in finger tapping patterns are common in AD, MCI, and PD. In addition, the present results underscore the importance of motor dysfunction even in neurodegenerative disorders without primary motor symptoms.

  4. [Suspected Alzheimer's disease. Selection of outpatients for neuropsychological assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, S A; Henry, M; Deike, R; Ebert, A D; Wallesch, C-W

    2008-04-01

    Incipient Alzheimer's disease (AD) is frequently suspected by neurologists and psychiatrists, but diagnosis is difficult to establish. The aim of this report was to analyse to what extent suspicion is confirmed by a comprehensive neuropsychological examination intended to distinguish different types of dementia. Descriptive data analysis was used for investigating the differential diagnoses of 47 outpatients with suspected AD referred to a department of neuropsychology by physicians in private practice. Data analysis was based upon the NINCDS-ADRDA diagnostic criteria of AD. Only 38% of the outpatients examined with suspected AD met the NINCDS-ADRDA diagnostic criteria for AD or mixed dementia from a neuropsychological point of view, whereas 22% met criteria for other types of dementia. The remaining patients met criteria for distinct differential diagnoses (23%) or lacked pathological findings in neuropsychological functions (17%). Neuropsychology is an essential part in the differential diagnosis of mild to moderate dementias. It can aid in differential therapeutic considerations concerning the treatment of dementia, for example in selecting appropriate treatments or avoiding expensive but inappropriate ones.

  5. Framework for assessing causality in disease management programs: principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas; MacDowell, Martin

    2003-01-01

    To credibly state that a disease management (DM) program "caused" a specific outcome it is required that metrics observed in the DM population be compared with metrics that would have been expected in the absence of a DM intervention. That requirement can be very difficult to achieve, and epidemiologists and others have developed guiding principles of causality by which credible estimates of DM impact can be made. This paper introduces those key principles. First, DM program metrics must be compared with metrics from a "reference population." This population should be "equivalent" to the DM intervention population on all factors that could independently impact the outcome. In addition, the metrics used in both groups should use the same defining criteria (ie, they must be "comparable" to each other). The degree to which these populations fulfill the "equivalent" assumption and metrics fulfill the "comparability" assumption should be stated. Second, when "equivalence" or "comparability" is not achieved, the DM managers should acknowledge this fact and, where possible, "control" for those factors that may impact the outcome(s). Finally, it is highly unlikely that one study will provide definitive proof of any specific DM program value for all time; thus, we strongly recommend that studies be ongoing, at multiple points in time, and at multiple sites, and, when observational study designs are employed, that more than one type of study design be utilized. Methodologically sophisticated studies that follow these "principles of causality" will greatly enhance the reputation of the important and growing efforts in DM.

  6. A rivastigmine patch for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Winblad, Bengt

    2007-11-01

    Rivastigmine patch is the first transdermal treatment to be approved for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease dementia in the USA and for AD in Europe. It provides smooth, continuous drug delivery, and has the potential to maintain rivastigmine concentrations within an optimal therapeutic window while avoiding the peaks and troughs associated with oral drug delivery. The target dose, rivastigmine 9.5 mg/24 h patch (a 10 cm(2) patch), is given once daily and requires a simple one-step dose titration to the therapeutic dose. In a 24-week study in 1195 AD patients, the rivastigmine 9.5 mg/24 h patch provided similar efficacy to the highest dose range of capsules, with approximately three-times fewer reports of nausea and vomiting. Patients in the 9.5 mg/24 h patch and 12 mg/day capsule groups evidenced significant improvements versus placebo on both primary outcome measures: the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale; and Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change; in addition to the following secondary outcome measures: Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living scale; Mini-Mental State Examination; and Trail Making Test Part A for assessment of attention, visual tracking and motor processing speed. Treatment differences on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory and Ten Point Clock-drawing Test did not reach statistical significance in this study. The patch may be the optimal way to treat dementia patients with rivastigmine.

  7. Acoustics based assessment of respiratory diseases using GMM classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, P; Druzgalski, C; Morelos, R L; Gonzalez, O H; Vidales, J

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to present a method utilizing lung sounds for a quantitative assessment of patient health as it relates to respiratory disorders. In order to accomplish this, applicable traditional techniques within the speech processing domain were utilized to evaluate lung sounds obtained with a digital stethoscope. Traditional methods utilized in the evaluation of asthma involve auscultation and spirometry, but utilization of more sensitive electronic stethoscopes, which are currently available, and application of quantitative signal analysis methods offer opportunities of improved diagnosis. In particular we propose an acoustic evaluation methodology based on the Gaussian Mixed Models (GMM) which should assist in broader analysis, identification, and diagnosis of asthma based on the frequency domain analysis of wheezing and crackles.

  8. The Music Therapy assessment tool for Advanced Huntington's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Kelly, Julian; Bodak, R.

    2013-01-01

    is limited, is a challenging process. With awareness often masked by perceptual or motor impairments, misdiagnosis rates remain high. Music therapy assessment holds the potential to elicit responses despite damage to verbal or visual processing faculties, although robust empirical studies are lacking...... music conditions (live salient music & improvised music entrained to respiration), recordings of disliked music, white noise and silence. Neurophysiological and behavioral measures were recorded using a 32 channel XLTEK© video EEG system, with a piezoelectric respiratory belt, and analysed using MATLAB......, EEGLAB and BrainVision Analyzer 2 software. One way repeated measures ANOVA analysis of respiration, and power spectra analysis of EEG data indicated a range of significant responses (p≤0.05) across controls corresponding to arousal and attention in response to live music, including concurrent increases...

  9. Population assessment of future trajectories in coronary heart disease mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Björk Thorolfsdottir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coronary heart disease (CHD mortality rates have been decreasing in Iceland since the 1980s, largely reflecting improvements in cardiovascular risk factors. The purpose of this study was to predict future CHD mortality in Iceland based on potential risk factor trends. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The previously validated IMPACT model was used to predict changes in CHD mortality between 2010 and 2040 among the projected population of Iceland aged 25-74. Calculations were based on combining: i data on population numbers and projections (Statistics Iceland, ii population risk factor levels and projections (Refine Reykjavik study, and iii effectiveness of specific risk factor reductions (published meta-analyses. Projections for three contrasting scenarios were compared: (1 If the historical risk factor trends of past 30 years were to continue, the declining death rates of past decades would level off, reflecting population ageing. (2 If recent trends in risk factors (past 5 years continue, this would result in a death rate increasing from 49 to 70 per 100,000. This would reflect a recent plateau in previously falling cholesterol levels and recent rapid increases in obesity and diabetes prevalence. 3 Assuming that in 2040 the entire population enjoys optimal risk factor levels observed in low risk cohorts, this would prevent almost all premature CHD deaths before 2040. CONCLUSIONS: The potential increase in CHD deaths with recent trends in risk factor levels is alarming both for Iceland and probably for comparable Western populations. However, our results show considerable room for reducing CHD mortality. Achieving the best case scenario could eradicate premature CHD deaths by 2040. Public health policy interventions based on these predictions may provide a cost effective means of reducing CHD mortality in the future.

  10. Measurement instruments to assess posture, gait, and balance in Parkinson's disease: Critique and recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloem, B.R.; Marinus, J.; Almeida, Q.; Dibble, L.; Nieuwboer, A.; Post, B.; Ruzicka, E.; Goetz, C.; Stebbins, G.; Martinez-Martin, P.; Schrag, A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Disorders of posture, gait, and balance in Parkinson's disease (PD) are common and debilitating. This MDS-commissioned task force assessed clinimetric properties of existing rating scales, questionnaires, and timed tests that assess these features in PD. METHODS: A literature review was

  11. 111In autologous leucocytes in the diagnosis and assessment of inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saverymuttu, S.H.; Peters, A.M.; Reavy, H.J.; Danpure, H.J.; Osman, S.; Chadwick, V.S.; Hodgson, H.J.; Lavender, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    111 In-labelled leucocytes were used to obtain gamma camera images of inflamed of bowel in a wide variety of inflammatory bowel disease. No false positive scans were observed in the irritable bowel syndrome and in bowel malignancy. All patients with moderate or severely active disease had positive scans. Faecal excretion of 111 Indium increased with disease severity. 111 In-tropolone labelling appeared to offer the advantage over 111 In-acac labelling in localising inflamed bowel earlier. In many cases the bowel was imaged within 40 min of re-injection of the leucocytes. 111 In-leucocyte scanning provides a novel approach to the problem of diagnosis and assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. It is non-invasive, requires no bowel preparation and thus is safe in the acutely sick patient where conventional radiological imaging methods may be hazardous. 111 Indium faecal excretion provides an objective assessment of disease activity which should prove useful in evaluating treatment regimes

  12. Can the CERAD neuropsychological battery be used to assess cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique Ferreira Camargo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD neuropsychological battery was created to assess cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD but it is widely-used for various dementias. The aim of this study was to analyze the efficacy of using the CERAD battery in the assessment of patients with Parkinson's disease. Forty-nine patients with Parkinson's disease were divided into two groups (one with dementia and one without using the Movement Disorder Society criteria for Parkinson's disease dementia. Cognitive deficits were assessed with the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale as the gold standard, and the CERAD. The ROC curve for the CERAD battery had an area under the curve = 0.989 (95% CI = 0.967 – 1, p<0.0001. Among the CERAD subtests, verbal fluency had the worst accuracy, and word list learning had the best accuracy. Despite the limits of this study, the CERAD battery can be efficient for assessment of cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease patients.

  13. Health related quality of life assessment in metastatic disease of the spine: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, John; Berven, Sigurd; Fisher, Charles; Ryken, Timothy

    2009-10-15

    Systematic literature review. To examine the available literature on health related quality of life (HRQOL) assessment in metastatic disease of the spine and identify the optimal functional outcome scales to be used in developing a disease-specific tool. There is a lack of consensus in the use of HRQOL measures in patients with metastatic spine disease. A systematic review was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Science Citation Index (ISI), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, the PsycINFO, the Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED), Cochrane Reviews and Global Health databases for clinical studies addressing metastatic spine disease from 1966 through 2008. The validity of outcome tools was established by linkage analysis with the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF). One hundred forty-one clinical studies met inclusion criteria including 10,347 patients. Only 5 moderate grade and 1 high grade study were identified. Thirty- four studies used a patient self-assessment instrument to assess health status. None of the instruments were validated for metastatic spine patients. The most commonly used Pi-by-no tools were SF-36, SIP 5, and the ADL. None of the studies defined health related quality of life (HRQOL) or justified the choice of instrument. The most commonly used cancer-specific tools were ECOG, EORTC QCQ-C30, and EUROQOL 5D. Based on frequency of citation and on correlation with the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health, the ECOG and SF36 were judged as most valid and reliable. A systematic review of the available evidence suggests that valid and reliable health related quality of life measures exist for the assessment of oncology patients; however, a disease-specific tool for metastatic spine disease awaits development. Until such time as a disease-specific tool is available, we recommend that the ECOG and SF-36 be considered for use in studies addressing the outcome

  14. Oxygen-enhanced MRI for patients with connective tissue diseases: Comparison with thin-section CT of capability for pulmonary functional and disease severity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yosirad@kobe-u.ac.jp [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Nishio, Mizuho [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Seki, Shinichiro [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Tsubakimoto, Maho [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nakagami-Gun, Okinawa (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To prospectively and directly compare oxygen-enhanced (O{sub 2}-enhanced) MRI with thin-section CT for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessment in connective tissue disease (CTD) patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Materials and methods: Thin-section CT, O{sub 2}-enhanced MRI, pulmonary function test and serum KL-6 were administered to 36 CTD patients with ILD (23 men, 13 women; mean age: 63.9 years) and nine CTD patients without ILD (six men, and three women; mean age: 62.0 years). A relative-enhancement ratio (RER) map was generated from O{sub 2}-enhanced MRI and mean relative enhancement ratio (MRER) for each subject was calculated from all ROI measurements. CT-assessed disease severity was evaluated with a visual scoring system from each of the thin-section CT data. MRER and CT-assessed disease severities of CTD patients with and without ILD were then statistically compared. To assess capability for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessment in CTD patients, correlations of MRER and CT-assessed disease severity with pulmonary functional parameters and serum KL-6 in all subjects were statistically determined. Results: MRER and CT-assessed disease severity showed significant differences between CTD patients with (MRER: 0.15 ± 0.08, CT-assessed disease severity: 13.0 ± 7.4%) and without ILD (MRER: 0.25 ± 0.06, p = 0.0011; CT-assessed disease severity: 1.6 ± 1.6%, p < 0.0001). MRER and CT-assessed disease severity correlated significantly with pulmonary functional parameters and serum KL-6 in all subjects (0.61 ≤ r ≤ 0.79, p < 0.05). Conclusion: O{sub 2}-enhanced MRI was found to be as useful as thin-section CT for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessment of CTD patients with ILD.

  15. Oxygen-enhanced MRI for patients with connective tissue diseases: Comparison with thin-section CT of capability for pulmonary functional and disease severity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Nishio, Mizuho; Koyama, Hisanobu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Seki, Shinichiro; Tsubakimoto, Maho; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively and directly compare oxygen-enhanced (O 2 -enhanced) MRI with thin-section CT for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessment in connective tissue disease (CTD) patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Materials and methods: Thin-section CT, O 2 -enhanced MRI, pulmonary function test and serum KL-6 were administered to 36 CTD patients with ILD (23 men, 13 women; mean age: 63.9 years) and nine CTD patients without ILD (six men, and three women; mean age: 62.0 years). A relative-enhancement ratio (RER) map was generated from O 2 -enhanced MRI and mean relative enhancement ratio (MRER) for each subject was calculated from all ROI measurements. CT-assessed disease severity was evaluated with a visual scoring system from each of the thin-section CT data. MRER and CT-assessed disease severities of CTD patients with and without ILD were then statistically compared. To assess capability for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessment in CTD patients, correlations of MRER and CT-assessed disease severity with pulmonary functional parameters and serum KL-6 in all subjects were statistically determined. Results: MRER and CT-assessed disease severity showed significant differences between CTD patients with (MRER: 0.15 ± 0.08, CT-assessed disease severity: 13.0 ± 7.4%) and without ILD (MRER: 0.25 ± 0.06, p = 0.0011; CT-assessed disease severity: 1.6 ± 1.6%, p < 0.0001). MRER and CT-assessed disease severity correlated significantly with pulmonary functional parameters and serum KL-6 in all subjects (0.61 ≤ r ≤ 0.79, p < 0.05). Conclusion: O 2 -enhanced MRI was found to be as useful as thin-section CT for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessment of CTD patients with ILD

  16. Patient satisfaction with a chronic kidney disease risk assessment service in community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheewala, Pankti A; Peterson, Gregory M; Zaidi, Syed Tabish R; Jose, Matthew D; Castelino, Ronald L

    2018-04-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important determinant of the feasibility and sustainability of community pharmacy screening services. However, few studies have evaluated this, with no such study performed for a chronic kidney disease risk assessment service. The aim was to determine patient satisfaction with a chronic kidney disease risk assessment service performed in community pharmacies. Community pharmacies in the state of Tasmania, Australia. An anonymous nine-item satisfaction survey, with Likert-type scales, was developed following a literature review of existing surveys. Reliability of the nine-item scale was determined using Cronbach's alpha. Patients were asked an additional question on willingness to pay, with choices of amount from $5 to $25. The satisfaction survey was mailed to 389 patients who participated in the chronic kidney disease risk assessment study. Patient level of satisfaction with and willingness to pay for the chronic kidney disease service. Responses from 143 participants were included in the final analysis. Cronbach's alpha for the nine-item satisfaction scale was 0.87. The majority of participants agreed that the time required to undergo the risk assessment process was justified (90.2%); overall, they were satisfied with the chronic kidney disease risk assessment service (90.0%) and they felt comfortable with the pharmacist referring their results to their doctor (88.9%). Of 136 participants who answered the question on willingness to pay, 62.9% indicated that they would pay for the chronic kidney disease service. Of these, 29.2, 25.8 and 19.1% were willing to pay $20, $10 and $5, respectively. Patient satisfaction with the community pharmacy-based chronic kidney disease risk assessment was high. These findings provide support for the implementation of the service within community pharmacy practice.

  17. Neuropsychological assessment of driving safety risk in older adults with and without neurologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Steven W; Aksan, Nazan; Dawson, Jeffrey D; Uc, Ergun Y; Johnson, Amy M; Rizzo, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Decline in cognitive abilities can be an important contributor to the driving problems encountered by older adults, and neuropsychological assessment may provide a practical approach to evaluating this aspect of driving safety risk. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate several commonly used neuropsychological tests in the assessment of driving safety risk in older adults with and without neurological disease. A further goal of this study was to identify brief combinations of neuropsychological tests that sample performances in key functional domains and thus could be used to efficiently assess driving safety risk. A total of 345 legally licensed and active drivers over the age of 50, with no neurologic disease (N = 185), probable Alzheimer's disease (N = 40), Parkinson's disease (N = 91), or stroke (N = 29), completed vision testing, a battery of 10 neuropsychological tests, and an 18-mile drive on urban and rural roads in an instrumented vehicle. Performances on all neuropsychological tests were significantly correlated with driving safety errors. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to identify 3 key cognitive domains assessed by the tests (speed of processing, visuospatial abilities, and memory), and several brief batteries consisting of one test from each domain showed moderate corrected correlations with driving performance. These findings are consistent with the notion that driving places demands on multiple cognitive abilities that can be affected by aging and age-related neurological disease, and that neuropsychological assessment may provide a practical off-road window into the functional status of these cognitive systems.

  18. One-year treatment of Alzheimer's disease with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors: improvement on ADAS-cog and TMT A, no change or worsening on other tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowska, Alina; Ziolkowska-Kochan, Marzena; Rybakowski, Janusz K

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess cognitive functioning measured by selected psychometric and neuropsychological tools in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) after 1-year treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Seventy-six patients (22 male and 54 female) with a mild to moderate stage of AD, aged 56-86 (mean 68) years, were treated. Forty-seven received donepezil (mean dose 9.3 mg/d) and 29 rivastigmine (mean dose 8.5 mg/d). Cognitive measurements included: the mini mental state examination (MMSE), the Alzheimer disease assessment scale-cognitive (ADAS- cog), the trail making test (TMT) and the Stroop color word interference test. The assessments were made before and after 3, 6 and 12 months of treatment. A significant improvement in ADAS-cog (p ADAS-cog) and psychomotor speed (TMT A), however, such treatment is unable to prevent the deterioration of working memory and executive functions. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Diffusion-weighed MR of the thyroid gland in Graves' disease: assessment of disease activity and prediction of outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek; Sadek, Ahmed Galal; Gaballa, Gada

    2010-06-01

    To assess the activity and clinical course of Graves' disease with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Fifty-one patients with Graves' disease and 25 volunteers underwent diffusion MR imaging of the thyroid gland using a single shot echo-planar imaging with b-factor of 0, 300 and 600 second/mm(2). The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the thyroid gland were calculated. Patients with active Graves' disease included untreated patients at initial diagnosis (n = 12), patients under antithyroid drugs (n = 11), and patients in relapse after withdrawal of therapy (n = 13). Patients with inactive disease had a remission of hyperthyroidism (n = 15). The mean ADC values of thyroid gland with active Graves' disease was 0.65 +/- 0.03 x 10(-3) mm(2)/second in patients at initial diagnosis, 0.81 +/- 0.02 x 10(-3) mm(2)/second in patients undergoing antithyroid drug and 0.72 +/- 0.07 x 10(-3) mm(2)/second in patients with relapse of hyperthyroidism. The mean ADC of patients with remission was 0.94 +/- 0.03 x 10(-3) mm(2)/second and for normal volunteer was 1.06 +/- 0.08 x 10(-3) mm(2)/second. There was significant difference in the ADC value of patients with active disease and remission (P = .001). The cutoff ADC value used for differentiating patients with active disease from patients with remission was 0.82 x 10(-3) mm(2)/second. The mean ADC value of thyroid gland had positive correlation with thyroid-stimulating hormone (r = 0.87, P = .001) and negative correlation with serum T4 (r = -0.82, P = .001) and serum T3 (r = -0.71, P = .001). The ADC value of the thyroid gland is a promising non invasive parameter for diagnosis of different clinical stages of Graves' disease. Hence it can be used to assess the activity and predict the outcome of patients during and after medical treatment. Crown Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Validation of the "German Inflammatory Bowel Disease Activity Index (GIBDI)": An Instrument for Patient-Based Disease Activity Assessment in Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüppe, Angelika; Langbrandtner, Jana; Häuser, Winfried; Raspe, Heiner; Bokemeyer, Bernd

    2018-05-09

    Assessment of disease activity in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) is usually based on the physician's evaluation of clinical symptoms, endoscopic findings, and biomarker analysis. The German Inflammatory Bowel Disease Activity Index for CD (GIBDI CD ) and UC (GIBDI UC ) uses data from patient-reported questionnaires. It is unclear to what extent the GIBDI agrees with the physicians' documented activity indices.  Data from 2 studies were reanalyzed. In both, gastroenterologists had documented disease activity in UC with the partial Mayo Score (pMS) and in CD with the Harvey Bradshaw Index (HBI). Patient-completed GIBDI questionnaires had also been assessed. The analysis sample consisted of 151 UC and 150 CD patients. Kappa coefficients were determined as agreement measurements.  Rank correlations were 0.56 (pMS, GIBDI UC ) and 0.57 (HBI, GIBDI CD ), with p < 0.001. The absolute agreement for 2 categories of disease activity (remission yes/no) was 74.2 % (UC) and 76.6 % (CD), and for 4 categories (none/mild/moderate/severe) 60.3 % (UC) and 61.9 % (CD). The kappa values ranged between 0.47 for UC (2 categories) and 0.58 for CD (4 categories).  There is satisfactory agreement of GIBDI with the physician-documented disease activity indices. GIBDI can be used in health care research without access to assessments of medical practitioners. In clinical practice, the index offers a supplementary source of information. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Quality of life in patients with coronary heart disease-I: Assessment tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Cheuk-Man

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Health-related quality of life (HRQL assessment is an important measure of the impact of the disease, effect of treatment and other variables affecting people's lives. The review focused on the assessment of HRQL in patient with coronary heart disease (CHD by appropriate tools. Although no consensus exists about the precise definition of HRQL, a plethora of instruments have been developed to assess it. Two broad types – generic and disease-specific – have been developed but there is some debate about their relative merits. There is a wide selection of instruments available but choice should be based on a careful consideration of an instrument's psychometric properties, the breadth and depth with which it addresses relevant health domains and the specific clinical or research purpose for which it is intended.

  2. A review of methods for assessment of coronary microvascular disease in both clinical and experimental settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries, A.R.; Habazettl, H.; Ambrosio, G.

    2008-01-01

    -will certainly result in more rational diagnostic and therapeutic interventions for patients with ischaemic heart disease. Specifically targeted research based on improved assessment modalities is needed to improve the diagnosis of CMD and to translate current molecular, cellular, and physiological knowledge......Obstructive disease of the large coronary arteries is the prominent cause for angina pectoris. However, angina may also occur in the absence of significant coronary atherosclerosis or coronary artery spasm, especially in women. Myocardial ischaemia in these patients is often associated...

  3. INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT OF STATIN-ASSOCIATED MUSCLE DAMAGE PREDICTORS IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    V. I. Petrov; O. N. Smuseva; Yu. V. Solovkina

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To assess the risk factors of statin-associated muscle damage in patient with ischemic heart disease.Material and methods. 258 patients with ischemic heart disease treated with statin were included into the study. Total plasma creatine kinase levels were measured and SLCO1B1*5 genotyping was performed. Relationship between statin therapy and adverse events was evaluated by Naranjo algorithm.Results. Patients with muscle symptoms received statins significantly longer (48.8 vs 11.9 months,...

  4. Beyond Income: A Social Justice Approach to Assessing Poverty among Older Adults with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Mary A; Washington, Tiffany R; Swanner, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    How social workers define and assess poverty is a matter of economic and social justice. Recent conceptual and measurement advances point to a multidimensional definition of poverty which captures material, social, and political deprivations. Using data from a survey, this article describes how nephrology social workers assess poverty among older adults living with a chronic kidney disease (N = 52). Results suggest respondents already conceive of poverty as a multidimensional experience, support awareness-raising about poverty, and primarily assess poverty by employment status, income, access to transportation, and education. Opportunities to expand poverty assessment in future work are promising.

  5. Assessment of CF lung disease using motion corrected PROPELLER MRI: a comparison with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciet, Pierluigi [General Hospital Ca' Foncello, Radiology Department, Treviso (Italy); Sophia Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Pulmonology Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Serra, Goffredo; Catalano, Carlo [University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Radiology, Rome (Italy); Bertolo, Silvia; Morana, Giovanni [General Hospital Ca' Foncello, Radiology Department, Treviso (Italy); Spronk, Sandra [Erasmus MC, Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Epidemiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Ros, Mirco [Ca' Foncello Hospital, Pediatrics, Treviso (Italy); Fraioli, Francesco [University College London (UCL), Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Quattrucci, Serena [University of Rome Sapienza, Pediatrics, Rome (Italy); Assael, M.B. [Azienda Ospedaliera di Verona, Verona CF Center, Verona (Italy); Pomerri, Fabio [University of Padova, Department of Medicine-DIMED, Padova (Italy); Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Sophia Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Pulmonology Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    To date, PROPELLER MRI, a breathing-motion-insensitive technique, has not been assessed for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. We compared this technique to CT for assessing CF lung disease in children and adults. Thirty-eight stable CF patients (median 21 years, range 6-51 years, 22 female) underwent MRI and CT on the same day. Study protocol included respiratory-triggered PROPELLER MRI and volumetric CT end-inspiratory and -expiratory acquisitions. Two observers scored the images using the CF-MRI and CF-CT systems. Scores were compared with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI versus CT were calculated. MRI sensitivity for detecting severe CF bronchiectasis was 0.33 (CI 0.09-0.57), while specificity was 100 % (CI 0.88-1). ICCs for bronchiectasis and trapped air were as follows: MRI-bronchiectasis (0.79); CT-bronchiectasis (0.85); MRI-trapped air (0.51); CT-trapped air (0.87). Bland-Altman plots showed an MRI tendency to overestimate the severity of bronchiectasis in mild CF disease and underestimate bronchiectasis in severe disease. Motion correction in PROPELLER MRI does not improve assessment of CF lung disease compared to CT. However, the good inter- and intra-observer agreement and the high specificity suggest that MRI might play a role in the short-term follow-up of CF lung disease (i.e. pulmonary exacerbations). (orig.)

  6. Assessment of CF lung disease using motion corrected PROPELLER MRI: a comparison with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciet, Pierluigi; Serra, Goffredo; Catalano, Carlo; Bertolo, Silvia; Morana, Giovanni; Spronk, Sandra; Ros, Mirco; Fraioli, Francesco; Quattrucci, Serena; Assael, M.B.; Pomerri, Fabio; Tiddens, Harm A.W.M.

    2016-01-01

    To date, PROPELLER MRI, a breathing-motion-insensitive technique, has not been assessed for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. We compared this technique to CT for assessing CF lung disease in children and adults. Thirty-eight stable CF patients (median 21 years, range 6-51 years, 22 female) underwent MRI and CT on the same day. Study protocol included respiratory-triggered PROPELLER MRI and volumetric CT end-inspiratory and -expiratory acquisitions. Two observers scored the images using the CF-MRI and CF-CT systems. Scores were compared with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI versus CT were calculated. MRI sensitivity for detecting severe CF bronchiectasis was 0.33 (CI 0.09-0.57), while specificity was 100 % (CI 0.88-1). ICCs for bronchiectasis and trapped air were as follows: MRI-bronchiectasis (0.79); CT-bronchiectasis (0.85); MRI-trapped air (0.51); CT-trapped air (0.87). Bland-Altman plots showed an MRI tendency to overestimate the severity of bronchiectasis in mild CF disease and underestimate bronchiectasis in severe disease. Motion correction in PROPELLER MRI does not improve assessment of CF lung disease compared to CT. However, the good inter- and intra-observer agreement and the high specificity suggest that MRI might play a role in the short-term follow-up of CF lung disease (i.e. pulmonary exacerbations). (orig.)

  7. Strengthening Chronic Disease Prevention Programming: the Toward Evidence-Informed Practice (TEIP) Program Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dayna; Fortin, Rebecca; Lessio, Anne; Herrera, Christine; Hanning, Rhona; Rush, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Best practices identified solely on the strength of research evidence may not be entirely relevant or practical for use in community-based public health and the practice of chronic disease prevention. Aiming to bridge the gap between best practices literature and local knowledge and expertise, the Ontario Public Health Association, through the Toward Evidence-Informed Practice initiative, developed a set of resources to strengthen evidence-informed decision making in chronic disease prevention programs. A Program Assessment Tool, described in this article, emphasizes better processes by incorporating review criteria into the program planning and implementation process. In a companion paper, “Strengthening Chronic Disease Prevention Programming: The Toward Evidence-Informed Practice (TEIP) Program Evidence Tool,” we describe another tool, which emphasizes better evidence by providing guidelines and worksheets to identify, synthesize, and incorporate evidence from a range of sources (eg, peer-reviewed literature, gray literature, local expertise) to strengthen local programs. The Program Assessment Tool uses 19 criteria derived from literature on best and promising practices to assess and strengthen program planning and implementation. We describe the benefits, strengths, and challenges in implementing the tool in 22 community-based chronic disease prevention projects in Ontario, Canada. The Program Assessment Tool helps put best processes into operation to complement adoption and adaptation of evidence-informed practices for chronic disease prevention. PMID:23721789

  8. 76 FR 63308 - Data and Data Needs To Advance Risk Assessment for Emerging Infectious Diseases Relevant to Blood...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ...] Data and Data Needs To Advance Risk Assessment for Emerging Infectious Diseases Relevant to Blood and... Needs to Advance Risk Assessment for Emerging Infectious Diseases Relevant to Blood and Blood Products... an important tool for evaluating the risks associated with new emerging infectious diseases (EIDs...

  9. Assessment of the quality of life of patients with peripheral vascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohlgemuth, W.A.; Bayreuth Univ.; Niechzial, M.; Nagel, E.; Bohndorf, K.

    2003-01-01

    The Medical Outcome Short Form 36 is commonly used as a generic quality of life measure in the assessment of vascular disease. The Claudication Scale CLAU-S, the PAVK-86 Fragebogen, and the Walking Impairment Questionnaire WIQ are validated disease-specific questionnaires for intermittent claudication. A disease specific tool for critical ischaemia is lacking. Quality of life of patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease is not only impaired in the physical functioning domains (mobility, self care, activities of daily living), but moreover in their social and emotional wellbeing. This situation worsens under conservative treatment. Angioplasty and operation procedure similar improvements in all dimensions of hrQOL. As radiological interventional procedures just aim to improve hrQOL and do not bring a definite cure for the underlying disease, patients perception of their quality of life should be taken into account both in the indication for angioplasty and for the scientific evaluation of new treatment modalities. (orig.) [de

  10. Assessment of Climate Change and Vector-borne Diseases in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, A. J.; Beard, C. B.; Eisen, R. J.; Barker, C. M.; Garofalo, J.; Hahn, M.; Hayden, M.; Ogden, N.; Schramm, P.

    2016-12-01

    Vector-borne diseases are illnesses that are transmitted by vectors, which include mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas. The seasonality, distribution, and prevalence of vector-borne diseases are influenced significantly by climate factors, primarily high and low temperature extremes and precipitation patterns. In this presentation we summarize key findings from Chapter 5 ("Vector-borne Diseases") of the recently published USGCRP Scientific Assessment of the Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States. Climate change is expected to alter geographic and seasonal distributions of vectors and vector-borne diseases, leading to earlier activity and northward range expansion of ticks capable of carrying the bacteria that cause Lyme disease and other pathogens, and influencing the distribution, abundance and prevalence of infection in mosquitoes that transmit West Nile virus and other pathogens. The emergence or reemergence of vector-borne pathogens is also likely.

  11. A Critical Assessment of Research on Neurotransmitters in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P. Hemachandra

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this mini-forum, “Neurotransmitters and Alzheimer’s Disease”, is to critically assess the current status of neurotransmitters in Alzheimer’s disease. Neurotransmitters are essential neurochemicals that maintain synaptic and cognitive functions in mammals, including humans, by sending signals across pre- to post-synaptic neurons. Authorities in the fields of synapses and neurotransmitters of Alzheimer’s disease summarize the current status of basic biology of synapses and neurotransmitters, and also update the current status of clinical trials of neurotransmitters in Alzheimer’s disease. This article discusses the prevalence, economic impact, and stages of Alzheimer’s dementia in humans. PMID:28409748

  12. Assessment of inflammatory activity in Crohn's disease by means of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupillo, V A; Di Cesare, E; Frieri, G; Limbucci, N; Tanga, M; Masciocchi, C

    2007-09-01

    Our aim was to perform a dynamic study of contrast enhancement of the intestinal wall in patients with Crohn's disease to quantitatively assess local inflammatory activity. We studied a population of 50 patients with histologically proven Crohn's disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed using a 1.5-T magnet with a phased-array coil and acquisition of T2-weighted single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) half Fourier sequences before intravenous administration of gadolinium, and T1-weighted fast spoiled gradient (FSPGR) fat-saturated sequences before and after contrast administration. Before the examination, patents received oral polyethylene glycol (PEG) (1,000 ml for adults; 10 ml/Kg of body weight for children). Regions of interest (ROI) were placed on the normal and diseased intestinal wall to assess signal intensity and rate of increase in contrast enhancement over time. Data were compared with the Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI). The diseased bowel wall showed early and intense uptake of contrast that increases over time until a plateau is reached. In patients in the remission phase after treatment, signal intensity was only slightly higher in diseased bowel loops than in healthy loops. There was a significant correlation between the peak of contrast uptake and CDAI. Dynamic MRI is a good technique for quantifying local inflammatory activity of bowel wall in patients with Crohn's disease.

  13. Plant Disease Severity Assessment-How Rater Bias, Assessment Method, and Experimental Design Affect Hypothesis Testing and Resource Use Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kuo-Szu; Bock, Clive H; Lee, I-Hsuan; El Jarroudi, Moussa; Delfosse, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    The effect of rater bias and assessment method on hypothesis testing was studied for representative experimental designs for plant disease assessment using balanced and unbalanced data sets. Data sets with the same number of replicate estimates for each of two treatments are termed "balanced" and those with unequal numbers of replicate estimates are termed "unbalanced". The three assessment methods considered were nearest percent estimates (NPEs), an amended 10% incremental scale, and the Horsfall-Barratt (H-B) scale. Estimates of severity of Septoria leaf blotch on leaves of winter wheat were used to develop distributions for a simulation model. The experimental designs are presented here in the context of simulation experiments which consider the optimal design for the number of specimens (individual units sampled) and the number of replicate estimates per specimen for a fixed total number of observations (total sample size for the treatments being compared). The criterion used to gauge each method was the power of the hypothesis test. As expected, at a given fixed number of observations, the balanced experimental designs invariably resulted in a higher power compared with the unbalanced designs at different disease severity means, mean differences, and variances. Based on these results, with unbiased estimates using NPE, the recommended number of replicate estimates taken per specimen is 2 (from a sample of specimens of at least 30), because this conserves resources. Furthermore, for biased estimates, an apparent difference in the power of the hypothesis test was observed between assessment methods and between experimental designs. Results indicated that, regardless of experimental design or rater bias, an amended 10% incremental scale has slightly less power compared with NPEs, and that the H-B scale is more likely than the others to cause a type II error. These results suggest that choice of assessment method, optimizing sample number and number of replicate

  14. Readability and suitability assessment of patient education materials in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Rennie L; Von Feldt, Joan M; Schumacher, H Ralph; Merkel, Peter A

    2013-10-01

    Web-based patient education materials and printed pamphlets are frequently used by providers to inform patients about their rheumatic disease. Little attention has been given to the readability and appropriateness of patient materials. The objective of this study was to examine the readability and suitability of commonly used patient education materials for osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and vasculitis. Five or 6 popular patient resources for each disease were chosen for evaluation. Readability was measured using the Flesch-Kincaid reading grade level and suitability was determined by the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM), a score that considers characteristics such as content, graphics, layout/topography, and cultural appropriateness. Three different reviewers rated the SAM score and means were used in the analysis. Twenty-three resources written on the 4 diseases were evaluated. The education material for all 4 diseases studied had readability above the eighth-grade level and readability did not differ among the diseases. Only 5 of the 23 resources received superior suitability scores, and 3 of these 5 resources were written for OA. All 4 diseases received adequate suitability scores, with OA having the highest mean suitability score. Most patient education materials for rheumatic diseases are written at readability levels above the recommended sixth-grade reading level and have only adequate suitability. Developing more appropriate educational resources for patients with rheumatic diseases may improve patient comprehension. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Assessing threats from coral and crustose coralline algae disease on the reefs of New Caledonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeby, Greta S.; Tribollet, Aline; Lasne, Gregory; Work, Thierry M.

    2015-01-01

    The present study reports the results of the first quantitative survey of lesions on coral and crustose coralline algae (CCA) on reefs in the lagoon of New Caledonia. Surveys on inshore and offshore reefs were conducted at 13 sites in 2010, with 12 sites resurveyed in 2013. Thirty coral diseases affecting 15 coral genera were found, with low overall disease prevalence (<1%). This study extends the known distribution of growth anomalies to the coral genera Platygyraand Hydnophora, endolithic hypermycosis to Platygyra, Leptoria and Goniastrea and extends the geographic range of three CCA diseases. We found the first trematode infection in Porites outside of Hawaii. Disease prevalence differed among coral genera, with Porites having more lesions, and Acropora and Montipora fewer lesions, than expected on the basis of field abundance. Inshore reefs had a lower coral-colony density, species diversity and reduced CCA cover than did the offshore reefs. Disease prevalence was significantly higher on inshore reefs in 2013 than in 2010, but did not change on offshore reefs. The potential ecological impact of individual coral diseases was assessed using an integrative-scoring and relative-ranking scheme based on average frequency of occurrence, prevalence and estimated degree of virulence. The top-five ranked diseases were all tissue-loss diseases.

  16. Assessment of the myocardial perfusion pattern in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Hakki, A.H.; Segal, B.L.; Kane, S.A.; Amenta, A.

    1983-01-01

    A total of 42 symptomatic patients with coronary artery disease involving two or three vessels were studied using exercise thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy. Qualitative analysis of the images predicted multivessel disease in 75% of the patients with two-vessel disease and in 82% of the patients with three-vessel disease. Quantitative analysis of the size of the perfusion defect indicated that approximately 40% of the left ventricular perimeter showed abnormal perfusion pattern during stress in these patients, and there was no significant difference in the size of the defect in patients with two-vessel disease or three-vessel disease (41 +/- 17% vs 42 +/- 14%, respectively, mean +/- SD). The exercise heart rate, exercise ECG response, and severity of narrowing did not correlate with the size of the perfusion defect. Patients with anterior infarction had larger defects in the distribution of the left anterior descending artery than those without infarction. Collaterals offered partial protection during exercise only when they were not jeopardized. This study confirms the value of qualitative analysis of exercise thallium-201 imaging in predicting multivessel disease, and describes a simple method of assessing the extent of perfusion abnormalities during stress in patients with multivessel disease. The results may be important in patient management and prognosis

  17. Semantic Memory in the Clinical Progression of Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchakoute, Christophe T; Sainani, Kristin L; Henderson, Victor W

    2017-09-01

    Semantic memory measures may be useful in tracking and predicting progression of Alzheimer disease. We investigated relationships among semantic memory tasks and their 1-year predictive value in women with Alzheimer disease. We conducted secondary analyses of a randomized clinical trial of raloxifene in 42 women with late-onset mild-to-moderate Alzheimer disease. We assessed semantic memory with tests of oral confrontation naming, category fluency, semantic recognition and semantic naming, and semantic density in written narrative discourse. We measured global cognition (Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale, cognitive subscale), dementia severity (Clinical Dementia Rating sum of boxes), and daily function (Activities of Daily Living Inventory) at baseline and 1 year. At baseline and 1 year, most semantic memory scores correlated highly or moderately with each other and with global cognition, dementia severity, and daily function. Semantic memory task performance at 1 year had worsened one-third to one-half standard deviation. Factor analysis of baseline test scores distinguished processes in semantic and lexical retrieval (semantic recognition, semantic naming, confrontation naming) from processes in lexical search (semantic density, category fluency). The semantic-lexical retrieval factor predicted global cognition at 1 year. Considered separately, baseline confrontation naming and category fluency predicted dementia severity, while semantic recognition and a composite of semantic recognition and semantic naming predicted global cognition. No individual semantic memory test predicted daily function. Semantic-lexical retrieval and lexical search may represent distinct aspects of semantic memory. Semantic memory processes are sensitive to cognitive decline and dementia severity in Alzheimer disease.

  18. Disease severity estimates - effects of rater accuracy and assessments methods for comparing treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assessment of disease is fundamental to the discipline of plant pathology, and estimates of severity are often made visually. However, it is established that visual estimates can be inaccurate and unreliable. In this study estimates of Septoria leaf blotch on leaves of winter wheat from non-treated ...

  19. Systematic review of foodborne burden of disease studies: Quality assessment of data and methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Haagsma (Juanita); S. Polinder (Suzanne); C. Stein (Claudia); A.H. Havelaar (Arie)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBurden of disease (BoD) studies aim to identify the public health impact of different health problems and risk factors. To assess BoD, detailed knowledge is needed on epidemiology, disability and mortality in the population under study. This is particularly challenging for foodborne

  20. Automatic and objective assessment of alternating tapping performance in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memedi, Mevludin; Khan, Taha; Grenholm, Peter; Nyholm, Dag; Westin, Jerker

    2013-12-09

    This paper presents the development and evaluation of a method for enabling quantitative and automatic scoring of alternating tapping performance of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Ten healthy elderly subjects and 95 patients in different clinical stages of PD have utilized a touch-pad handheld computer to perform alternate tapping tests in their home environments. First, a neurologist used a web-based system to visually assess impairments in four tapping dimensions ('speed', 'accuracy', 'fatigue' and 'arrhythmia') and a global tapping severity (GTS). Second, tapping signals were processed with time series analysis and statistical methods to derive 24 quantitative parameters. Third, principal component analysis was used to reduce the dimensions of these parameters and to obtain scores for the four dimensions. Finally, a logistic regression classifier was trained using a 10-fold stratified cross-validation to map the reduced parameters to the corresponding visually assessed GTS scores. Results showed that the computed scores correlated well to visually assessed scores and were significantly different across Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores of upper limb motor performance. In addition, they had good internal consistency, had good ability to discriminate between healthy elderly and patients in different disease stages, had good sensitivity to treatment interventions and could reflect the natural disease progression over time. In conclusion, the automatic method can be useful to objectively assess the tapping performance of PD patients and can be included in telemedicine tools for remote monitoring of tapping.

  1. A Haptic Serious Augmented Reality Game for Motor Assessment of Parkinson's Disease Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Meulen, E.; Cidota, M.A.; Lukosch, S.G.; Bank, PJM; van der Helm, A.J.C.

    2016-01-01

    n the clinical community there is a need for assessment tools that allow for objective, quantitative and valid measures of motor dysfunction. In this paper, we report on the design and evaluation of a serious game that engages patients with Parkinson's disease in upper extremity (hand/arm)

  2. Relationships between Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder and Neurodegenerative Diseases: Clinical Assessments, Biomarkers, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Li

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: More longitudinal studies should be conducted to evaluate the predictive value of biomarkers of RBD. Moreover, because the glucose and dopamine metabolisms are not specific for assessing cognitive cognition, the molecular metabolism directly related to cognition should be investigated. There is a need for more treatment trials to determine the effectiveness of interventions of RBD on preventing the conversion to neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Explanatory Value of the Ability Index as Assessed by Cardiologists and Patients with Congenital Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrader, Anne-Marie Voss; Lisby, Karen H; King, Catriona

    2012-01-01

    Introduction.  The Ability Index was developed to classify patients with congenital heart disease into four functional classes. Functional class is typically determined by the cardiologist, based on data from a clinical interview. The validity of the Ability Index as assessed by the patient has...

  4. Validity of a Questionnaire to Assess the Physical Activity Level in Coronary Artery Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraud, Thibaut; Granger, Richard; Bousquet, Marc; Gremeaux, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to compare, in coronary artery disease patients, physical activity (PA) assessed with the Dijon Physical Activity Questionnaire (DPAQ) and the true PA objectively measured using an accelerometer. Seventy patients wore an accelerometer (MyWellness Key actimeter) throughout 1 week after a cardiac rehabilitation program that…

  5. Assess PET/MR in diagnosis of disease in comparison with PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Jianhua; Lim, Jason Chu-Chern; Loi, Hoi Yin; Totoman, John; Sinha, Arvind Kumar; Quek, Swee Titan; Townsend, David

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the performance of 18F-FDG whole body PET/MRI in comparison with PET/CT based on SUV. Anatomical location of lesion with Dixon MRI and additional value of advanced MRI technology such as diffusion weighted MR imaging in diagnosis of malignant disease will also be investigated.

  6. Assessing Disordered Speech and Voice in Parkinson's Disease: A Telerehabilitation Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Gabriella; Theodoros, Deborah; Russell, Trevor; Ward, Elizabeth; Wilson, Stephen; Wootton, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Background: Patients with Parkinson's disease face numerous access barriers to speech pathology services for appropriate assessment and treatment. Telerehabilitation is a possible solution to this problem, whereby rehabilitation services may be delivered to the patient at a distance, via telecommunication and information technologies. A number of…

  7. European monitoring systems and data for assessing environmental and climate impacts on human infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Gordon L; Andersson, Yvonne; Lindgren, Elisabet; Devaux, Isabelle; Semenza, Jan C

    2014-04-09

    Surveillance is critical to understanding the epidemiology and control of infectious diseases. The growing concern over climate and other drivers that may increase infectious disease threats to future generations has stimulated a review of the surveillance systems and environmental data sources that might be used to assess future health impacts from climate change in Europe. We present an overview of organizations, agencies and institutions that are responsible for infectious disease surveillance in Europe. We describe the surveillance systems, tracking tools, communication channels, information exchange and outputs in light of environmental and climatic drivers of infectious diseases. We discuss environmental and climatic data sets that lend themselves to epidemiological analysis. Many of the environmental data sets have a relatively uniform quality across EU Member States because they are based on satellite measurements or EU funded FP6 or FP7 projects with full EU coverage. Case-reporting systems for surveillance of infectious diseases should include clear and consistent case definitions and reporting formats that are geo-located at an appropriate resolution. This will allow linkage to environmental, social and climatic sources that will enable risk assessments, future threat evaluations, outbreak management and interventions to reduce disease burden.

  8. Alzheimer's Disease Assessment: A Review and Illustrations Focusing on Item Response Theory Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsis, Steve; Choudhury, Tabina K; Geraci, Lisa; Benge, Jared F; Patrick, Christopher J

    2018-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) affects neurological, cognitive, and behavioral processes. Thus, to accurately assess this disease, researchers and clinicians need to combine and incorporate data across these domains. This presents not only distinct methodological and statistical challenges but also unique opportunities for the development and advancement of psychometric techniques. In this article, we describe relatively recent research using item response theory (IRT) that has been used to make progress in assessing the disease across its various symptomatic and pathological manifestations. We focus on applications of IRT to improve scoring, test development (including cross-validation and adaptation), and linking and calibration. We conclude by describing potential future multidimensional applications of IRT techniques that may improve the precision with which AD is measured.

  9. Quality assessment of diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of infectious diseases in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saust, Laura Trolle; Monrad, Rikke Nygaard; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup

    2016-01-01

    QIs, especially disease-specific QIs concerning the diagnostic process, is needed. KEY POINTS In order to improve the use of antibiotics in primary care, measurable instruments, such as quality indicators, are needed to assess the quality of care being provided. A total of 11 studies were found......OBJECTIVE: To identify existing quality indicators (QIs) for diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of patients with infectious diseases in primary care. DESIGN: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed and EMBASE. We included studies with a description of the development of QIs...... for diagnosis and antibiotic use in patients with infectious diseases in primary care. We extracted information about (1) type of infection; (2) target for quality assessment; (3) methodology used for developing the QIs; and (4) whether the QIs were developed for a national or international application. The QIs...

  10. Clinical assessment, staging, and epidemiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    Patients presenting with an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are initially assessed to ensure that a proper diagnosis has been made and that relevant differential diagnoses are excluded. Although guidelines provide indicators for use, very little systematic research has...... been done in initial assessment of COPD exacerbations. Next, the assessment should aim at stratifying patients for risk of poor outcome. For this, predictors of poor prognosis as well as knowledge of favorable treatments can be used. However, no formal and validated staging system exists today. Given...... the frequency and impact of COPD exacerbations, there seems to be a need for systematic research in this area....

  11. Episodic memory impairment in Addison's disease: results from a telephonic cognitive assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Michelle; Thomas, Kevin G F; Ross, Ian L

    2014-06-01

    Patients with Addison's disease frequently self-report memory and attention difficulties, even when on standard replacement therapy. However, few published studies examine, using objective measures and assessing across multiple domains, the cognitive functioning of Addison's disease patients relative to healthy controls. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether the previously reported subjective cognitive deficits in Addison's disease are confirmed by objective measures. Conducting comprehensive neuropsychological assessments of patients with relatively rare clinical disorders, such as Addison's disease, is challenging because access to those patients is often limited, and because their medical condition might prevent extended testing sessions. Brief telephonic cognitive assessments are a useful tool in such circumstances. Hence, we administered the Brief Test of Adult Cognition by Telephone to 27 Addison's disease patients and 27 matched healthy controls. The instrument provides objective assessment of episodic memory, working memory, executive functioning, reasoning, and speed of processing. Statistical analyses confirmed that, as expected, patients performed significantly more poorly than controls on the episodic memory subtest. There were, however, no significant between-group differences on the attention, executive functioning, reasoning, and speed of processing subtests. Furthermore, patients with a longer duration of illness performed more poorly across all domains of cognition. We conclude that, for Addison's disease patients, previously reported subjective cognitive deficits are matched by objective impairment, but only in the domain of episodic memory. Future research might investigate (a) whether these memory deficits are material-specific (i.e., whether non-verbal memory is also affected), and (b) the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these deficits.

  12. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlides, Michael; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Tunnicliffe, Elizabeth M; Kelly, Catherine; Collier, Jane; Wang, Lai Mun; Fleming, Kenneth A; Cobbold, Jeremy F; Robson, Matthew D; Neubauer, Stefan; Barnes, Eleanor

    2017-07-01

    The diagnosis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and fibrosis staging are central to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease assessment. We evaluated multiparametric magnetic resonance in the assessment of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and fibrosis using histology as standard in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Seventy-one patients with suspected non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were recruited within 1 month of liver biopsy. Magnetic resonance data were used to define the liver inflammation and fibrosis score (LIF 0-4). Biopsies were assessed for steatosis, lobular inflammation, ballooning and fibrosis and classified as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or simple steatosis, and mild or significant (Activity ≥2 and/or Fibrosis ≥2 as defined by the Fatty Liver Inhibition of Progression consortium) non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Transient elastography was also performed. Magnetic resonance success rate was 95% vs 59% for transient elastography (Pliver inflammation and fibrosis (r s =.51, Pliver inflammation and fibrosis for the diagnosis of cirrhosis was 0.85. Liver inflammation and fibrosis score for ballooning grades 0, 1 and 2 was 1.2, 2.7 and 3.5 respectively (Pliver inflammation and fibrosis (1.3) compared to patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (3.0) (PLiver inflammation and fibrosis scores for patients with mild and significant non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were 1.2 and 2.9 respectively (Pliver inflammation and fibrosis for the diagnosis of significant non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was 0.89. Multiparametric magnetic resonance is a promising technique with good diagnostic accuracy for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease histological parameters, and can potentially identify patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. © 2017 The Authors Liver International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The COPD Assessment Test as a Prognostic Marker in Interstitial Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujiko Someya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD Assessment Test (CAT, which was developed to measure the health status of patients with COPD, was applied to patients with interstitial lung disease, aiming to examine the CAT as a predictor of outcome. Over a follow-up period of more than one year, 101 consecutive patients with interstitial lung disease were evaluated by the CAT. The CAT scores of 40 in total were categorized into four subsets according to the severity. Patients with higher (more severe scores exhibited lower forced vital capacity and lung diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide. The survival rate was significantly lower in patients with higher scores (log-rank test, P = 0.0002, and the hazard ratios for death of the higher scores and lower lung diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide were independently significant. These findings suggest that CAT can indicate the risk of mortality in patients with interstitial lung disease.

  14. Serum Immunoglobulin Free Light Chain Assessment in IgG4-Related Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Grados

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin free light chains are produced in excess during normal antibody synthesis. Their evaluation is commonly used in case of a monoclonal gammopathy. In polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia related to the Sjögren syndrome or systemic lupus, erythematosus serum free light chain levels are increased and could correlate with disease activity. We show here that the κ ( and λ ( free light chains and the κ : λ ratio ( are increased in sixteen patients with IgG4-related disease when compared to healthy controls. The increase of κ and λ free light chains probably reflects the marked polyclonal B cell activation of the disease. We could not assess in this small cohort of patients a significative correlation of serum free light chain levels and disease activity or extension.

  15. l-arginine and l-NMMA for assessing cerebral endothelial dysfunction in ischaemic cerebrovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, William K; Sørensen, Caspar G; Kruuse, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction (ED), in particular cerebral ED, may be an essential biomarker for ischaemic cerebrovascular disease. However, there is no consensus on methods to best estimate cerebral ED. In this systematic review, we evaluate the use of l-arginine and NG -monomethyl-l-arginine (l......-NMMA) for assessment of cerebral ED. A systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library was done. We included studies investigating cerebrovascular response to l-arginine or l-NMMA in human subjects with vascular risk factors or ischaemic cerebrovascular disease. Seven studies (315 subjects) were eligible...... cerebrovascular disease. Inconsistencies in results were most likely due to variations in methods and included subject populations. In order to use cerebral ED as a prognostic marker, further studies are required to evaluate the association to cerebrovascular disease....

  16. Correlation of Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire to impedance-pH measurements in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prachuapthunyachart, Sittichoke; Jarasvaraparn, Chaowapong; Gremse, David A

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring has become one of the preferred tests to correlate observed reflux-like behaviors with esophageal reflux events. The Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire is a validated tool used to distinguish infants with gastroesophageal reflux disease from healthy children. The aim of this study was to determine whether the Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire composite symptom scores and individual symptom scores correlate with outcomes in esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring. A total of 26 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease-associated symptoms, aged 0-2 years, for whom both esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring and Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire survey results were available were included in the study. Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire score data were collected from a 7-day recall of parent's responses about the frequency and severity of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms, which determined the individual symptom scores. The composite symptom scores is the sum of all individual symptom scores. Multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH study results were compared to Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire data using Pearson correlation. Among 26 patients, a total number of 2817 (1700 acid and 1117 non-acid) reflux episodes and 845 clinical reflux behaviors were recorded. There were significant correlations between the reflux index and the individual symptom scores for coughing/gagging/choking (r 2 = 0.2842, p = 0.005), the impedance score and individual symptom scores for coughing/gagging/choking (r 2 = 0.2482, p = 0.009), the reflux symptom index for acid reflux-related coughing/gagging/choking and the individual symptom scores for coughing/gagging/choking (r 2 = 0.1900, p = 0.026), the impedance score and

  17. Sleep quality assessment in 35 Parkinson's disease patients in the Fann Teaching Hospital, Dakar, Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiga, B; Diop, M S; Sangare, M; Dembele, K; Cisse, L; Kone, O; Seck, L B; Landoure, G; Guinto, C O; Ndiaye, M; Ndiaye, M M

    2016-03-01

    Sleep disorders are diverse in Parkinson's disease. We aimed to assess the quality of sleep in patients with Parkinson's disease in an African population. In a transversal and prospective study from April to June 2014, all parkinsonian patients followed at the Fann Teaching Hospital Neurology Clinic (Dakar, Senegal) were assessed using the Hoehn and Yahr's scale and filled out the following questionnaires: Parkinson's disease sleep scale (PDSS), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). A PDSS score5 indicated poor quality or impaired sleep. An ESS score>10 indicated excessive daytime sleepiness. We used the Pearson coefficient to search for correlation between age, disease stage, disease duration, and the importance of sleep impairment. Hoehn and Yahr staging was 2.42±0.90 in the 35 patients (60% male, mean age 65.7±7.4years, disease duration 32.4±23.4months). The mean total PDSS score was 99.5±24.1 and 74.3% of the patients had an abnormally high PSQI score, indicating high frequency and intensity of sleep disorders. Most frequent disorders were pain or cramps interrupting sleep, night waking to urinate and fatigue or sleepiness on waking. Patients exhibited excessive diurnal sleepiness in 22.9% of the cases; they often had an abnormal PSQI score. Both the total PDSS score and the difficulty to sleep increased with disease stage, but not with age or disease duration. We found evidence of major alteration of sleep quality in Senegalese Parkinson patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Physiological assessment of sensitivity of noninvasive testing for coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonetti, I.; Rezai, K.; Rossen, J.D.; Winniford, M.D.; Talman, C.L.; Hollenberg, M.; Kirchner, P.T.; Marcus, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    The sensitivity of three noninvasive tests for coronary artery disease was assessed by means of quantitative indexes of disease severity in three different groups of patients. The overall population consisted of 110 subjects with limited coronary artery disease and no myocardial infarction. Planar dipyridamole- 201 Tl scintigraphy was evaluated in 31 patients, computer-assisted exercise treadmill in 28, and high-dose dipyridamole echocardiography testing in 51. Sensitivity was assessed by rigorous gold standards to define disease severity, such as measurement of minimum cross-sectional area and percent area of stenosis, by quantitative computerized coronary angiography (Brown/Dodge method). On the basis of the results of previous studies, the presence of physiologically significant coronary artery disease was indicated by a stenotic minimum cross-sectional area (MCSA) of less than 2.0 mm 2 or a greater than 75% area of stenosis. With MCSA as the gold standard, dipyridamole- 201 Tl scintigraphy, computerized exercise treadmill, and dipyridamole echocardiography testing showed sensitivities of 52%, 54%, and 61%, respectively, in the three different patient cohorts enrolled. With percent area of stenosis as the gold standard, the sensitivity figures obtained for dipyridamole- 201 Tl, computerized exercise treadmill, and dipyridamole echocardiography testing were 64%, 54%, and 69%, respectively. For each of the three tests, sensitivity increased with increasing lesion severity. Sensitivity was also better in patients with left anterior descending coronary (LAD) disease when compared with patients with left circumflex or right coronary artery disease. Results of these studies demonstrate that in patients with limited coronary artery disease none of the tests evaluated is definitely superior in sensitivity

  19. Clinical and fiberoptic endoscopic assessment of swallowing in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macri, Marina Rodrigues Bueno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is characterized by progressive and partially reversible obstruction of pulmonary airflow. Aim: To characterize swallowing in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and correlate the findings with the degree chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart and respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, and smoking. Method: We conducted a prospective cohort study of 19 patients (12 men and 7 women; age range, 50–85 years with confirmed medical diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This study was performed in 2 stages (clinical evaluation and functional assessment using nasolaryngofibroscopy on the same day. During both stages, vital signs were checked by medical personnel. Results: Clinical evaluation of swallowing in all patients showed the clinical signs of cough. The findings of nasolaryngofibroscopy highlighted subsequent intraoral escape in 5 patients (26.5%. No patient had tracheal aspiration. There was no association of subsequent intraoral escape with degree of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart and respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, or smoking. Conclusion: In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, there was a prevalence of oral dysphagia upon swallowing and nasolaryngofibroscopy highlighted the finding of subsequent intraoral escape. There was no correlation between intraoral escape and the degree of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart and respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, or smoking.

  20. Assessment of jeopardized myocardium in patients with one-vessel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Lichtenberg, R.; Segal, B.L.; Mintz, G.S.; Mundth, E.D.; Hakki, A.-H.; Kimbiris, D.; Bemis, C.E.; Croll, M.N.; Kane, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    The size of the perfusion defect was assessed from a quantitative analysis of exercise thallium-201 images. Quantitative analysis was determined by measuring the area and the perimeter of the perfusion defect and expressing it as a percentage of the total left ventricular area or perimeter in three projections. Using this technique, we studied 50 patients with one-vessel disease of 50% or greater diameter narrowing. The planimetric and the perimetric methods correlated well (p<0.001, r=0.97). Of the 11 patients with less than 70% diameter narrowing, only one patient had abnormal exercise thallium-201 images. Of the remaining 39 patients with 70% or greater diameter narrowing, 35 had abnormal exercise images. The defects were larger in patients with left anterior descending coronary artery disease (33 +/- 10%; mean +/- SD by perimetry) than in patients with left circumflex coronary artery disease (19 +/- 14%, p<0.01) or right coronary artery disease (17 +/- 11%, p<0.01). There was also significant variation in the sizes of the defects in the three projections in patients with left circumflex and right coronary artery disease, but not in patients with left anterior descending coronary artery disease. Patients with left anterior descending coronary artery disease with collaterals had smaller defects than their counterparts without collaterals

  1. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Howland Island, Phoenix Islands, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 5 sites around...

  2. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Baker Island, Phoenix Islands, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 4 sites around...

  3. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at at Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 14 sites at...

  4. CRED REA Coral Health and Disease Assessment at Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral health and disease assessments were conducted along 2 consecutively placed 25-m transects, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 13 sites at...

  5. /sup 111/In autologous leucocytes in the diagnosis and assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. [Tropolone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saverymuttu, S.H.; Peters, A.M.; Chadwick, V.S.; Hodgson, H.J.; Lavender, J.P. (Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK))

    1982-01-01

    Indium-111 autologous leukocyte scanning is now established as an effective method of localising sepsis (Ascher and others, 1980). In view of the extensive leucocyte infiltration of the intestinal wall in inflammatory bowel disease, the authors have prospectively studied the use of indium-111 labelled white cells in a variety of inflammatory bowel disorders. Leukocytes were labelled in 68 patients using /sup 111/In acetylacetonate and in 18 patients /sup 111/In tropolone. Crude mixed leukocytes preparations were used in 74 patients and pure neutrophil preparation used in 12 patients. Gamma scans over the abdomen were performed from 40 min later after re-injection of the labelled cells and assessed. /sup 111/In-tropolone labelling appeared to offer the advantage over /sup 111/In-acac labelling in localising inflamed bowel earlier. The technique of /sup 111/In-leukocyte scanning offers several advantages over the alternative technique of imaging diseased bowel using gallium-67 citrate. Indium-111 leukocyte scanning provides a novel approach to the problem of diagnosis and assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. It is non-invasive, requires no bowel preparation and this is safe in the acutely sick patient where conventional radiological imaging methods may be hazardous. /sup 111/In faecal excretion provides an objective assessment of disease activity which should prove useful in evaluating treatment regimes.

  6. Nutritional status of Iranian women with rheumatoid arthritis: an assessment of dietary intake and disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazi, Jalal; Mohtadinia, Javad; Kolahi, Soasan; Bakhtiyari, Mahmood; Delpisheh, Ali

    2011-09-01

    Long-standing chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis are known to be associated with impairment of nutritional status to some degree. The present study aimed to assess nutritional status of women with rheumatoid arthritis and compare their ingestion of certain micronutrients with dietary reference intakes. In this cross-sectional study, 90 eligible women were recruited. After examination, all patients were evaluated on the basis of disease activity score, calculated using the number of tender and swollen joints, patient global assessment of pain and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP). A three-day 24 h recall was completed and a 10 ml fasting blood sample was obtained to assess the plasma levels of malondialdehyde, total antioxidant and CRP. Despite normal BMI, intake of energy and micronutrients including calcium, folic acid, zinc, magnesium and vitamin B6 were considerably lower compared with the dietary reference intakes. There was no significant relationship between intake of different nutrients or food groups and disease activity score and the biochemical markers including malondialdehyde, CRP and total antioxidant. Intake of energy and some micronutrients were significantly lower than the recommended values. However, no relationship was found between intake of different food groups or nutrients with disease activity or serum antioxidant capacity.

  7. Scale-Dependent Assessment of Relative Disease Resistance to Plant Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Skelsey

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Phenotyping trials may not take into account sufficient spatial context to infer quantitative disease resistance of recommended varieties in commercial production settings. Recent ecological theory—the dispersal scaling hypothesis—provides evidence that host heterogeneity and scale of host heterogeneity interact in a predictable and straightforward manner to produce a unimodal (“humpbacked” distribution of epidemic outcomes. This suggests that the intrinsic artificiality (scale and design of experimental set-ups may lead to spurious conclusions regarding the resistance of selected elite cultivars, due to the failure of experimental efforts to accurately represent disease pressure in real agricultural situations. In this model-based study we investigate the interaction of host heterogeneity and scale as a confounding factor in the inference from ex-situ assessment of quantitative disease resistance to commercial production settings. We use standard modelling approaches in plant disease epidemiology and a number of different agronomic scenarios. Model results revealed that the interaction of heterogeneity and scale is a determinant of relative varietal performance under epidemic conditions. This is a previously unreported phenomenon that could provide a new basis for informing the design of future phenotyping platforms, and optimising the scale at which quantitative disease resistance is assessed.

  8. Evaluating Recall and Recognition Memory Using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment: Applicability for Alzheimer's and Huntington's Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Liew, Charles; Santoro, Maya S; Goldstein, Jody; Gluhm, Shea; Gilbert, Paul E; Corey-Bloom, Jody

    2016-12-01

    We sought to investigate whether the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) could provide a brief assessment of recall and recognition using Huntington disease (HD) and Alzheimer disease (AD) as disorders characterized by different memory deficits. This study included 80 participants with HD, 64 participants with AD, and 183 community-dwelling control participants. Random-effects hierarchical logistic regressions were performed to assess the relative performance of the normal control (NC), participants with HD, and participants with AD on verbal free recall, cued recall, and multiple-choice recognition on the MoCA. The NC participants performed significantly better than participants with AD at all the 3 levels of assessment. No difference existed between participants with HD and NC for cued recall, but NC participants performed significantly better than participants with HD on free recall and recognition. The participants with HD performed significantly better than participants with AD at all the 3 levels of assessment. The MoCA appears to be a valuable, brief cognitive assessment capable of identifying specific memory deficits consistent with known differences in memory profiles. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Advances in Remote Respiratory Assessments for People with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroi, Sidney; McNamara, Renae J; McKenzie, David K; Gandevia, Simon; Brodie, Matthew A

    2018-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of mortality. Advances in remote technologies and telemedicine provide new ways to monitor respiratory function and improve chronic disease management. However, telemedicine does not always include remote respiratory assessments, and the current state of knowledge for people with COPD has not been evaluated. Systematically review the use of remote respiratory assessments in people with COPD, including the following questions: What devices have been used? Can acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) be predicted by using remote devices? Do remote respiratory assessments improve health-related outcomes? The review protocol was registered (PROSPERO 2016:CRD42016049333). MEDLINE, EMBASE, and COMPENDEX databases were searched for studies that included remote respiratory assessments in people with COPD. A narrative synthesis was then conducted by two reviewers according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Fifteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Forced expiratory volume assessed daily by using a spirometer was the most common modality. Other measurements included resting respiratory rate, respiratory sounds, and end-tidal carbon dioxide level. Remote assessments had high user satisfaction. Benefits included early detection of AECOPD, improved health-related outcomes, and the ability to replace hospital care with a virtual ward. Remote respiratory assessments are feasible and when combined with sufficient organizational backup can improve health-related outcomes in some but not all cohorts. Future research should focus on the early detection, intervention, and rehabilitation for AECOPD in high-risk people who have limited access to best care and investigate continuous as well as intermittent monitoring.

  10. Long-term assessment of fatigue in patients with culture-confirmed Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormser, Gary P; Weitzner, Erica; McKenna, Donna; Nadelman, Robert B; Scavarda, Carol; Nowakowski, John

    2015-02-01

    Fatigue is a common symptom with numerous causes. Severe fatigue is thought to be an important manifestation of post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome. The frequency with which severe fatigue occurs as a long-term sequela in prospectively followed patients with Lyme disease is unknown. Patients with culture-confirmed Lyme disease who originally presented with erythema migrans have been evaluated annually in a prospective study to determine their long-term outcome. In 2011-2013, subjects were evaluated for fatigue using an 11-item Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS-11) that has been used in studies of post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome. An FSS-11 score of ≥4.0 is indicative of severe fatigue. A total of 100 subjects were assessed, 52% of whom were male; the mean age was 64.9 years (range, 42-86 years). The mean duration of follow-up was 15.4 years (range, 11-20 years). Nine subjects had severe fatigue but in none as a consequence of Lyme disease. Only 3 subjects were thought to possibly have persistent fatigue from Lyme disease. The FSS-11 value for these 3 individuals was less than 4, averaging 2.27, and none had functional impairment. Severe fatigue was found in 9 patients (9%) with culture-confirmed early Lyme disease at 11 to 20 years after presentation, but was due to causes other than Lyme disease. Fatigue of lesser severity was possibly due to Lyme disease, but was found in only 3% of 100 patients, and therefore is rarely a long-term complication of this infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of the grading and disorder assessment of congenital heart disease with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Zhongru; Qin Yongwen

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is one of the most common and serious complications in congenital heart disease. Identification of whether the pulmonary, arterial hypertension is dynamic or resistance remains as the great importance for deciding to transfer for surgery, intervention or conservative therapy and directly concerning with the prognosis and choice of treatment. This review mainly deals with the problems such as grading, staging, pathophysiology and the correlative mechanism with clinical assessment of pulmonary. arterial hypertension in congenital heart disease and furthermore providing comprehensive informations for clinical diagnosis and treatment. (authors)

  12. Clinical course of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: an assessment of severity, progression, and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeone JC

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Jason C Simeone,1 Jay P Bae,2 Byron J Hoogwerf,3 Qian Li,1 Axel Haupt,3 Ayad K Ali,4 Marilyn K Boardman,3 Beth L Nordstrom1 1Real-world Evidence, Evidera, Waltham, MA, USA; 2Global Patient Outcomes and Real World Evidence, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 3Lily Diabetes, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 4Global Patient Safety, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA Purpose: To identify the characteristics and initial disease severity of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and assess incidence and risk factors for disease progression in a retrospective study.Methods: Patients ≥18 years of age without alcoholism or other liver diseases (eg, hepatitis B/C were selected from Geisinger Health System electronic medical record data from 2004 to 2015. Initial disease stage was stratified into uncomplicated NAFLD, advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, and liver transplant using clinical biomarkers, diagnosis, and procedure codes. Disease progression was defined as stage progression or death and analyzed via Kaplan–Meier plots and multistate models.Results: In the NAFLD cohort (N=18,754, 61.5% were women, 39.0% had type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, and the mean body mass index was 38.2±10.2 kg/m2. At index, 69.9% had uncomplicated NAFLD, 11.7% had advanced fibrosis, and 17.8% had cirrhosis. Of 18,718 patients assessed for progression, 17.3% progressed (11.0% had stage progression, 6.3% died without evidence of stage progression during follow-up (median=842 days. Among subgroups, 12.3% of those without diabetes mellitus progressed vs 24.7% of those with T2DM. One-year mortality increased from 0.5% in uncomplicated NAFLD to 22.7% in HCC. After liver transplant, mortality decreased to 5.6% per year.Conclusions: In 2.3 years of follow-up, approximately 17% of patients progressed or died without evidence of stage progression. T2DM was associated with approximately twice the risk of

  13. Disease Risk Assessments Involving Companion Animals: an Overview for 15 Selected Pathogens Taking a European Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijks, J M; Cito, F; Cunningham, A A; Rantsios, A T; Giovannini, A

    2016-07-01

    Prioritization of companion animal transmissible diseases was performed by the Companion Animals multisectoriaL interprofessionaL Interdisciplinary Strategic Think tank On zoonoses (CALLISTO) project. The project considered diseases occurring in domesticated species commonly kept as pets, such as dogs and cats, but also included diseases occurring in captive wild animals and production animal species. The prioritization process led to the selection of 15 diseases of prime public health relevance, agricultural economic importance, or both. An analysis was made of the current knowledge on the risk of occurrence and transmission of these diseases among companion animals, and from companion animals to man (zoonoses) or to livestock. The literature was scanned for risk assessments for these diseases. Studies were classified as import risk assessments (IRAs) or risk factor analyses (RFAs) in endemic areas. For those pathogens that are absent from Europe, only IRAs were considered; for pathogens present throughout Europe, only RFAs were considered. IRAs were identified for seven of the eight diseases totally or partially absent from Europe. IRAs for classical rabies and alveolar echinococcosis found an increased risk for introduction of the pathogen into officially disease-free areas as a consequence of abandoning national rules and adopting the harmonized EU rules for pet travel. IRAs for leishmaniosis focused on risk associated with the presence of persistently infected dogs in new geographical areas, taking into consideration the risk of disease establishment should a competent vector arise. IRAs for Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and West Nile fever indicated that the likelihood of introduction via companion animals was low. IRAs for bluetongue paid no attention to the risk of introduction via companion animals, which was also the case for IRAs for foot-and-mouth disease, the only disease considered to be absent from Europe. RFAs dealing with the risk factors for

  14. The assessment of cognitive function in older adult patients with chronic kidney disease: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Mary; Steffen, Alana; Quinn, Lauretta; Collins, Eileen G; Phillips, Shane A; Bronas, Ulf G

    2018-05-25

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common chronic condition in older adults that is associated with cognitive decline. However, the exact prevalence of cognitive impairment in older adults with CKD is unclear likely due to the variety of methods utilized to assess cognitive function. The purpose of this integrative review is to determine how cognitive function is most frequently assessed in older adult patients with CKD. Five electronic databases were searched to explore relevant literature related to cognitive function assessment in older adult patients with CKD. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were created to focus the search to the assessment of cognitive function with standardized cognitive tests in older adults with CKD, not on renal replacement therapy. Through the search methods, 36 articles were found that fulfilled the purpose of the review. There were 36 different types of cognitive tests utilized in the included articles, with each study utilizing between one and 12 tests. The most commonly utilized cognitive test was the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE), followed by tests of digit symbol substitution and verbal fluency. The most commonly assessed aspect of cognitive function was global cognition. The assessment of cognitive function in older adults with CKD with standardized tests is completed in various ways. Unfortunately, the common methods of assessment of cognitive function may not be fully examining the domains of impairment commonly found in older adults with CKD. Further research is needed to identify the ideal cognitive test to best assess older adults with CKD for cognitive impairment.

  15. Periodontal disease, tooth loss and coronary heart disease assessed by coronary angiography: a cross-sectional observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, S M; Pereira, S S; Barbisan, J N; Vieira, L; Saba-Chujfi, E; Haas, A N; Rösing, C K

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the association between periodontal disease, tooth loss and coronary heart disease (CHD). There is still controversy about the relationship between periodontal disease and tooth loss with vessel obstruction assessed using coronary angiography. This cross-sectional study included 195 patients that underwent coronary angiography and presented with at least six teeth. Patients were classified into three categories of coronary obstruction severity: absence; one or more vessels with ≤ 50% obstruction; and one or more vessels with ≥ 50% obstruction. The extent of coronary obstruction was dichotomized into 0 and ≥ 1 affected vessels. A periodontist blinded to patient CHD status conducted a full mouth examination to determine mean clinical attachment loss, mean periodontal probing depth and tooth loss. Multiple logistic regression models were applied adjusting for age, gender, hypertension, smoking, body mass index, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and C-reactive protein. Most patients were males (62.1%) older than 60 years (50.8%), and 61% of them had CHD. Mean periodontal probing depth, clinical attachment loss and tooth loss were 2.64 ± 0.72 mm, 4.40 ± 1.31 mm and 12.50 ± 6.98 teeth respectively. In the multivariable models, tooth loss was significantly associated with a higher chance of having at least one obstructed vessel (odds ratio = 1.04; 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.09) and with vessel obstruction ≥ 50% (odds ratio = 1.06; 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.11). No significant associations were found between periodontal variables and vessel obstruction. Tooth loss was found to be a risk indicator for CHD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Assessment of Ebola virus disease preparedness in the WHO South-East Asia Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vong, Sirenda; Samuel, Reuben; Gould, Philip; El Sakka, Hammam; Rana, Bardan J; Pinyowiwat, Vason; Bezbaruah, Supriya; Ofrin, Roderico

    2016-12-01

    To conduct assessments of Ebola virus disease preparedness in countries of the World Health Organization (WHO) South-East Asia Region. Nine of 11 countries in the region agreed to be assessed. During February to November 2015 a joint team from WHO and ministries of health conducted 4-5 day missions to Bangladesh, Bhutan, Indonesia, Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Timor-Leste. We collected information through guided discussions with senior technical leaders and visits to hospitals, laboratories and airports. We assessed each country's Ebola virus disease preparedness on 41 tasks under nine key components adapted from the WHO Ebola preparedness checklist of January 2015. Political commitment to Ebola preparedness was high in all countries. Planning was most advanced for components that had been previously planned or tested for influenza pandemics: multilevel and multisectoral coordination; multidisciplinary rapid response teams; public communication and social mobilization; drills in international airports; and training on personal protective equipment. Major vulnerabilities included inadequate risk assessment and risk communication; gaps in data management and analysis for event surveillance; and limited capacity in molecular diagnostic techniques. Many countries had limited planning for a surge of Ebola cases. Other tasks needing improvement included: advice to inbound travellers; adequate isolation rooms; appropriate infection control practices; triage systems in hospitals; laboratory diagnostic capacity; contact tracing; and danger pay to staff to ensure continuity of care. Joint assessment and feedback about the functionality of Ebola virus preparedness systems help countries strengthen their core capacities to meet the International Health Regulations.

  17. Assessment of socioemotional processes facilitates the distinction between frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narme, Pauline; Mouras, Harold; Roussel, Martine; Devendeville, Agnès; Godefroy, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    We explored the value of a battery of socioemotional tasks for differentiating between frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Patients with FTLD (n = 13) or AD (n = 13) and healthy controls (n = 26) underwent a neuropsychological assessment and the socioemotional battery (an empathy questionnaire, an emotion recognition task, and theory of mind tasks). Socioemotional processes were markedly impaired in FTLD but relatively unaffected in mild AD. The computed Socioemotional Index discriminated more accurately between FTLD from AD than behavioral and executive assessments did. Furthermore, impairments in socioemotional processes were correlated with indifference to others.

  18. Joint assessment in von Willebrand disease : Validation of the Haemophilia Joint Health score and Haemophilia Activities List

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Galen, Karin P. M.; Timmer, Merel A.; de Kleijn, Piet; Fischer, Kathelijn; Foppen, Wouter; Schutgens, Roger E. G.; Eikenboom, Jeroen; Meijer, Karina; Cnossen, Marjon H.; Fijnvandraat, Karin; van der Bom, Johanna G.; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta A. P.; Leebeek, Frank W. G.; Mauser-Bunschoten, Eveline P.

    Assessment of clinical outcome after joint bleeding is essential to identify joint damage and optimise treatment, to prevent disability. However, disease-specific tools to assess the musculoskeletal status in patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD) are lacking. We aimed to determine validity and

  19. Combining Body Mass Index With Measures of Central Obesity in the Assessment of Mortality in Subjects With Coronary Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, Thais; Goel, Kashish; Corrêa de Sá, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to assess the mortality risk of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) based ona combination of body mass index (BMI) with measures of central obesity.......This study sought to assess the mortality risk of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) based ona combination of body mass index (BMI) with measures of central obesity....

  20. Physiologic assessment of coronary artery disease: Focus on fractional flow reserve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Do Yeon; Koo, Bon Kwon [Dept. of Radiology, Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joo Myung [Dept. of Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Center, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The presence of myocardial ischemia is the most important prognostic factor in patients with ischemic heart disease. Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a gold standard invasive method used to detect the stenosis-specific myocardial ischemia. FFR-guided revascularization strategy is superior to angiography-guided strategy. The recently developed hyperemia-free index, instantaneous wave free ratio is being actively investigated. A non-invasive FFR derived from coronary CT angiography is now used in clinical practice. Due to rapid expansion of invasive and non-invasive physiologic assessment, comprehensive understanding of the role and potential pitfalls of each modality are required for its application. In this review, we focus on the basic and clinical aspects of physiologic assessment in ischemic heart disease.

  1. Clinical Applications of Natriuretic Peptides in Assessment of Valvular Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers such as natriuretic peptides (NPs have evolving clinical utility beyond the scope of heart failure. The role of NPs in the management of valvular heart disease is a growing area of investigation. NPs have much potential in the assessment of asymptomatic patients with hemodynamically significant valvular lesions who have traditionally been excluded from consideration of surgical intervention. NPs also have a role in the risk stratification of these patients as well as in routine surveillance and monitoring. Together with echocardiographic data and functional status, NPs are being incorporated into the management of valvular heart disease. In this review we examine the evidence for the role of natriuretic peptides in assessment of VHD.

  2. Clinical Applications of Natriuretic Peptides in Assessment of Valvular Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Vaseem; Garg, Aakash; Aggarwal, Chirag

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers such as natriuretic peptides (NPs) have evolving clinical utility beyond the scope of heart failure. The role of NPs in the management of valvular heart disease is a growing area of investigation. NPs have much potential in the assessment of asymptomatic patients with hemodynamically significant valvular lesions who have traditionally been excluded from consideration of surgical intervention. NPs also have a role in the risk stratification of these patients as well as in routine surveillance and monitoring. Together with echocardiographic data and functional status, NPs are being incorporated into the management of valvular heart disease. In this review we examine the evidence for the role of natriuretic peptides in assessment of VHD. PMID:26265794

  3. Physiologic assessment of coronary artery disease: Focus on fractional flow reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Do Yeon; Koo, Bon Kwon; Lee, Joo Myung

    2016-01-01

    The presence of myocardial ischemia is the most important prognostic factor in patients with ischemic heart disease. Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a gold standard invasive method used to detect the stenosis-specific myocardial ischemia. FFR-guided revascularization strategy is superior to angiography-guided strategy. The recently developed hyperemia-free index, instantaneous wave free ratio is being actively investigated. A non-invasive FFR derived from coronary CT angiography is now used in clinical practice. Due to rapid expansion of invasive and non-invasive physiologic assessment, comprehensive understanding of the role and potential pitfalls of each modality are required for its application. In this review, we focus on the basic and clinical aspects of physiologic assessment in ischemic heart disease

  4. Leap motion evaluation for assessment of upper limb motor skills in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, A H; Rovini, E; Dolciotti, C; Bongioanni, P; De Petris, G; Cavallo, F

    2017-07-01

    The main goal of this study is to investigate the potential of the Leap Motion Controller (LMC) for the objective assessment of motor dysfunctioning in patients with Parkinson's disease (PwPD). The most relevant clinical signs in Parkinson's Disease (PD), such as slowness of movements, frequency variation, amplitude variation, and speed, were extracted from the recorded LMC data. Data were clinically quantified using the LMC software development kit (SDK). In this study, 16 PwPD subjects and 12 control healthy subjects were involved. A neurologist assessed the subjects during the task execution, assigning them a score according to the MDS/UPDRS-Section III items. Features of motor performance from both subject groups (patients and healthy controls) were extracted with dedicated algorithms. Furthermore, to find out the significance of such features from the clinical point of view, machine learning based methods were used. Overall, our findings showed the moderate potential of LMC to extract the motor performance of PwPD.

  5. Parent knowledge of disease management in cystic fibrosis: Assessing behavioral treatment management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolais, Christina J; Bernstein, Ruth; Riekert, Kristin A; Quittner, Alexandra L

    2018-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening, burdensome disease requiring complex knowledge to manage the disease. Significant gaps in knowledge have been documented for parents, which may lead to unintentionally poor adherence and insufficient transfer of treatment responsibility from parents to adolescents. There are no current, validated measures of parent knowledge for this population and there are no measures that assess the knowledge required for day-to-day behavioral management of CF. We assessed the psychometric properties of the parent version of the Knowledge of Disease Management-Cystic Fibrosis measure (KDM-CF-P) using data from iCARE (I Change Adherence and Raise Expectations), a randomized control adherence intervention trial. A total of 196 parents in the iCARE standard care/control arm completed 35 items assessing their knowledge of disease management at their 12-month study visit, prior to beginning the intervention. Items were eliminated from the measure if they met the threshold for ceiling effects, were deemed clinically irrelevant, or did not correlate well with their intended scale. Item-to-total correlations, confirmatory factor analysis, discriminant function, reliability, and convergent validity were calculated. The KDM-CF-P (19 items) demonstrated internal consistency of KR20 = 0.60 on each scale and a two-scale structure. Convergent validity for knowledge scores was found with maternal education, family income, and type of medical insurance. Parents correctly answered approximately 85% of items on the KDM-CF-P. The KDM-CF-P psychometrics support a two-scale measure with clinical utility. It is useful for assessing gaps in knowledge that can be remediated through individualized, tailored interventions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Automatic and Objective Assessment of Alternating Tapping Performance in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mevludin Memedi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and evaluation of a method for enabling quantitative and automatic scoring of alternating tapping performance of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD. Ten healthy elderly subjects and 95 patients in different clinical stages of PD have utilized a touch-pad handheld computer to perform alternate tapping tests in their home environments. First, a neurologist used a web-based system to visually assess impairments in four tapping dimensions (‘speed’, ‘accuracy’, ‘fatigue’ and ‘arrhythmia’ and a global tapping severity (GTS. Second, tapping signals were processed with time series analysis and statistical methods to derive 24 quantitative parameters. Third, principal component analysis was used to reduce the dimensions of these parameters and to obtain scores for the four dimensions. Finally, a logistic regression classifier was trained using a 10-fold stratified cross-validation to map the reduced parameters to the corresponding visually assessed GTS scores. Results showed that the computed scores correlated well to visually assessed scores and were significantly different across Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale scores of upper limb motor performance. In addition, they had good internal consistency, had good ability to discriminate between healthy elderly and patients in different disease stages, had good sensitivity to treatment interventions and could reflect the natural disease progression over time. In conclusion, the automatic method can be useful to objectively assess the tapping performance of PD patients and can be included in telemedicine tools for remote monitoring of tapping.

  7. Chromium 51-ethylenediaminetetraacetate test: a useful test in the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Morain, C.A.; Abelow, A.C.; Chervu, L.R.; Fleischner, G.M.; Das, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of urinary excretion values in assessing mucosal damage in inflammatory bowel disease after administration of chromium 51-labeled EDTA either orally or rectally. In the oral study, 19 controls, 18 patients with Crohn's disease, and 13 patients with ulcerative colitis were given 100 microCi 51 Cr-EDTA by mouth. The amount of 51 Cr-EDTA in a 24-hour urine collection was expressed as a percentage of the ingested dose. The patients with Crohn's disease of the small bowel excreted 6.3% +/- 4.3%, which was significantly (P less than 0.001) higher than the percentage in patients with ulcerative colitis (1.7% +/- 1.1%) and controls (1.4% +/- 0.6%). In the enema study, 19 patients with ulcerative colitis, two with Crohn's disease, two with radiation colitis, and four controls (spastic colitis, lactose intolerance) were given 100 microCi 51 Cr-EDTA by retention enema. The patients with active colonic inflammation excreted 8.4% +/- 3.9% of the dose given by enema, which was significantly (P less than 0.01) higher than in other controls (1.9% +/- 0.91%) or patients with inactive colitis (2.2% +/- 1.9%). The 51 Cr-EDTA excretion test is a safe, inexpensive test useful in evaluating patients with inflammatory bowel disease. It can be given orally to screen patients with abdominal complaints who are suspected of having Crohn's disease involving the small intestine, and when given by enema it provides additional objective assessment of idiopathic ulcerative colitis or proctitis

  8. Assessment of subclinical atherosclerosis in ankylosing spondylitis: correlations with disease activity indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.M. Perrotta

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate atherosclerosis in ankylosing spondylitis (AS through the assessment of morphological and functional measures of subclinical atherosclerosis. Twenty patients [M/F=12/8, age (median/range 43.5/28-69 years; disease duration (median/range 9.7/1-36 years] with AS classified according to modified New York criteria and twenty age and sex related healthy controls with negative past medical history for cardiovascular events were enrolled in the study. In all patients and controls, the intima-media thickness (IMT of common carotid artery, carotid bulb and internal carotid artery, and the flow-mediated dilatation (FMD of non-dominant arm brachial artery were determined, using a sonographic probe Esaote GPX (Genoa, Italy. Furthermore, we assess the main disease activity and disability indices [bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index, ankylosing spondylitis disease activity score-eritrosedimentation rate (ASDAS-ESR, ASDAS-C-reactive protein (CRP, bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index, bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index and acute phase reactants. Plasmatic values of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, triglyceride and homocysteine were carried out in all twenty patients. IMT at carotid bulb was significant higher in patients than in controls (0.67 mm vs 0.54 mm; P=0.03. FMD did not statistically differ between patients and controls (12.5% vs 15%; P>0.05. We found a correlation between IMT at carotid bulb and ESR (rho 0.43; P=0.04. No correlation was found between FMD and disease activity and disability indices. This study showed that in AS patients, without risk factors for cardiovascular disease, carotid bulb IMT, morphological index of subclinical atherosclerosis, is higher than in controls.

  9. Chromium 51-ethylenediaminetetraacetate test: a useful test in the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Morain, C.A.; Abelow, A.C.; Chervu, L.R.; Fleischner, G.M.; Das, K.M.

    1986-11-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of urinary excretion values in assessing mucosal damage in inflammatory bowel disease after administration of chromium 51-labeled EDTA either orally or rectally. In the oral study, 19 controls, 18 patients with Crohn's disease, and 13 patients with ulcerative colitis were given 100 microCi /sup 51/Cr-EDTA by mouth. The amount of /sup 51/Cr-EDTA in a 24-hour urine collection was expressed as a percentage of the ingested dose. The patients with Crohn's disease of the small bowel excreted 6.3% +/- 4.3%, which was significantly (P less than 0.001) higher than the percentage in patients with ulcerative colitis (1.7% +/- 1.1%) and controls (1.4% +/- 0.6%). In the enema study, 19 patients with ulcerative colitis, two with Crohn's disease, two with radiation colitis, and four controls (spastic colitis, lactose intolerance) were given 100 microCi /sup 51/Cr-EDTA by retention enema. The patients with active colonic inflammation excreted 8.4% +/- 3.9% of the dose given by enema, which was significantly (P less than 0.01) higher than in other controls (1.9% +/- 0.91%) or patients with inactive colitis (2.2% +/- 1.9%). The /sup 51/Cr-EDTA excretion test is a safe, inexpensive test useful in evaluating patients with inflammatory bowel disease. It can be given orally to screen patients with abdominal complaints who are suspected of having Crohn's disease involving the small intestine, and when given by enema it provides additional objective assessment of idiopathic ulcerative colitis or proctitis.

  10. Effects of enteral nutritional support on malnourished patients with inflammatory bowel disease by subjective global assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sökülmez, Pınar; Demirbağ, Ali Eba; Arslan, Perihan; Dişibeyaz, Selçuk

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the prevalence of malnutrition in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by subjective global assessment (SGA) and the effects of oral nutritional support on the clinical parameters, consumption of energy, macronutrients and fiber intake in the Study and Control groups, prospectively. A total of 38 (28 Male; 10 Female) hospitalized patients with moderate or severe IBD (13 with Crohn's disease (CD); 25 with Ulcerative colitis (UC)) were included. At stage 1, the disease severity, clinical symptoms and, signs, food consumption and nutritional status by using subjective global assessment (SGA) were recorded. At stage 2, the patients were blindly randomized into a Study Group and Controls. In the Study Group, a standard enteral product was added into the regulated hospital diets, but for the Controls, deficits were regulated by only hospital diets for 3 weeks. the independent variables were the group, the disease and its activity, age, Body body mass index (BMI), weight loss history, the hospitalization period; the dependent variables were SGA, bowel movements, change in nutritional status, disease severity, clinical findings, and also consumption of macronutrients. Prevalance of malnutrition (SGA-B or SGA-C) for all the patients was 92.1% at the beginning and 71.1% at the end of study. Improvements in disease activity score for the patients with UC were statistically significant in both the Study Group and the Controls (p=0.006 for the Study Group and p=0.001 for the Controls, respectively). Macronutrients, total and water soluble fiber consumption levels improved, with statistically significant differences for all the groups. The prevalence of malnutrition is a major problem in patients with IBD. Not only the regulation of hospital food, but also enteral nutritional support, improved their levels of malnutrition, as well as their energy, macronutrients, and fiber consumption, and SGA is an easy method for nutritional monitoring.

  11. Recommendations for ICT use in Alzheimer's disease assessment: Monaco CTAD Expert Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, P H; Konig, A; Andrieu, S; Bremond, F; Chemin, I; Chung, P C; Dartigues, J F; Dubois, B; Feutren, G; Guillemaud, R; Kenisberg, P A; Nave, S; Vellas, B; Verhey, F; Yesavage, J; Mallea, P

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) and other related dementia represent a major challenge for health care systems within the aging population. It is therefore important to develop better instruments for assessing disease severity and disease progression to optimize patient's care and support to care providers, and also provide better tools for clinical research. In this area, Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) are of particular interest. Such techniques enable accurate and standardized assessments of patients' performance and actions in real time and real life situations. The aim of this article is to provide basic recommendation concerning the development and the use of ICT for Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. During he ICT and Mental Health workshop (CTAD meeting held in Monaco on the 30th October 2012) an expert panel was set up to prepare the first recommendations for the use of ICT in dementia research. The expert panel included geriatrician, epidemiologist, neurologist, psychiatrist, psychologist, ICT engineers, representatives from the industry and patient association. The recommendations are divided into three sections corresponding to 1/ the clinical targets of interest for the use of ICT, 2/ the conditions, the type of sensors and the outputs (scores) that could be used and obtained, 3/ finally the last section concerns specifically the use of ICT within clinical trials.

  12. Disease-related social situation in family of children with chronic kidney disease--parents` assessment. A multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliś-Pstrusińska, Katarzyna; Medyńska, Anna; Adamczyk, Piotr; Bałasz-Chmielewska, Irena; Grenda, Ryszard; Kluska-Jóźwiak, Agnieszka; Leszczyńska, Beata; Olszak-Szot, Ilona; Miklaszewska, Monika; Szczepańska, Maria; Tkaczyk, Marcin; Wasilewska, Anna; Zachwieja, Katarzyna; Zajączkowska, Maria; Ziółkowska, Helena; Zagożdżon, Ilona; Zwolińska, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children burdens life of patients and their families. Little is known about parents` assessment of families' social situation. However, the knowledge of the details of a patient's and his family's life standards might influence modification and optimization of applied therapy. Therefore, the main goal of the present study was to explore the selected elements of life situation of patients suffering with CKD as well as their parents, depending on the CKD stage and appropriate treatment. Cross-sectional national study was conducted. A total of 203 children with CKD and 388 their parent-proxies (196 women and 192 men) were enrolled into this study. Patient data and questionnaires filled by both parents, concerning social-demographic parameters and assessment of changes in families after CKD diagnosis in the child, were analysed. CKD children are being brought up in proper families whose financial situation is not good. Children need help in process of education. Perception of current situation differed between both parents in the change of the income source, taking care of CKD child, change in social relations and evaluating relations with medical staff. Parents do not obtain proper support from social workers. Families of CKD children require support in area of financial and educational help for school children. The discrepancies in evaluation of family situation between mothers and fathers of ill children might be the source of conflicts possibly resulting in worsening the outcome for CKD children.

  13. Non-invasive assessment determine the swallowing and respiration dysfunction in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chin-Man; Shieh, Wann-Yun; Weng, Yi-Hsin; Hsu, Yi-Hsuan; Wu, Yih-Ru

    2017-09-01

    Dysphagia is common among patients with Parkinson's disease. Swallowing and its coordination with respiration is extremely important to achieve safety swallowing. Different tools have been used to assess this coordination, however the results have been inconsistent. We aimed to investigate this coordination in patients with Parkinson's disease using a non-invasive method. Signals of submental muscle activity, thyroid cartilage excursion, and nasal airflow during swallowing were recorded simultaneously. Five different water boluses were swallowed three times, and the data were recorded and analyzed. Thirty-seven controls and 42 patients with early-stage Parkinson's disease were included. The rates of non-expiratory/expiratory pre- and post-swallowing respiratory phase patterns were higher in the patients than in the controls (P Parkinson's disease, and safety compensation mechanisms were used more than efficiency during swallowing. The results of this study may serve as a baseline for further research into new treatment regimens and to improve the management of swallowing in patients with Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Cystic fibrosis lung disease: genetic influences, microbial interactions, and radiological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Gibson, Ronald L.; Effmann, Eric L.

    2005-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multiorgan disease caused by mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Obstructive lung disease is the predominant cause of morbidity and mortality; thus, most efforts to improve outcomes are directed toward slowing or halting lung-disease progression. Current therapies, such as mucolytics, airway clearance techniques, bronchodilators, and antibiotics, aim to suppress airway inflammation and the processes that stimulate it, namely, retention and infection of mucus plaques at the airway surface. New approaches to therapy that aim to ameliorate specific CFTR mutations or mutational classes by restoring normal expression or function are being investigated. Because of its sensitivity in detecting changes associated with early airway obstruction and regional lung disease, high-resolution CT (HRCT) complements pulmonary function testing in defining disease natural history and measuring response to both conventional and experimental therapies. In this review, perspectives on the genetics and microbiology of CF provide a context for understanding the increasing importance of HRCT and other imaging techniques in assessing CF therapies. (orig.)

  15. A computational method for computing an Alzheimer’s Disease Progression Score; experiments and validation with the ADNI dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedynak, Bruno M.; Liu, Bo; Lang, Andrew; Gel, Yulia; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the time-dependent changes of biomarkers related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a key to assessing disease progression and to measuring the outcomes of disease-modifying therapies. In this paper, we validate an Alzheimer’s disease progression score model which uses multiple biomarkers to quantify the AD progression of subjects following three assumptions: (1) there is a unique disease progression for all subjects, (2) each subject has a different age of onset and rate of progression, and (3) each biomarker is sigmoidal as a function of disease progression. Fitting the parameters of this model is a challenging problem which we approach using an alternating least squares optimization algorithm. In order to validate this optimization scheme under realistic conditions, we use the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort. With the help of Monte Carlo simulations, we show that most of the global parameters of the model are tightly estimated, thus enabling an ordering of the biomarkers that fit the model well, ordered as: the Rey auditory verbal learning test with 30 minutes delay, the sum of the two lateral hippocampal volumes divided by the intra-cranial volume, followed by (the clinical dementia rating sum of boxes score and the mini mental state examination score) in no particular order and lastly the Alzheimer’s disease assessment scale-cognitive subscale. PMID:25444605

  16. Assessment of a strategy for the control of respiratory diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Julio Cesar Rodrigues

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A programme for the control of respiratory diseases in children was conceived for the State of S. Paulo, Brazil, in 1986. Its progress thereafter and the epidemiology of the diseases concerned are examined. Apart from an inquiry into the 64 existing State local health authorities, a sample of 18,255 cases of children assisted by the programme at different levels, including both in-patient and outpatient care, is analysed. Each case record included information about identification (child, doctor and health facility, reasons for calling, diagnoses made and outcome of treatment. Further data were also sought from hospitals and from State mortality records. The programme was found to be poorly implemented in the State but, where implemented, it showed itself capable of resolving problems (only 0.5% of the cases could not be handled as also of changing ongoing trends (more than 50% reduction in hospital admission rates. Individual assessment of each item of the programme indicated its bottlenecks. Regarding the epidemiology of respiratory diseases, it is observed that the major burden to health services comes from children aged less than five, and that the most important diseases are wheezing illnesses and pneumonia. Morevoer, they were found to be significantly associated (p = 0.000 so that a child in the community presenting wheezing diseases is 5 times more likely to develop pneumonia than a child with any other respiratory diagnosis. Similarly, among the under five deaths it was found that the risk for pneumonia is 3 times greater for children who died presenting wheezing diseases than it is for children with any other sort of diagnosis. In conclusion, the programme is deemed to be efficient and effective but its efficacy is marred by administrative flaws. The successful control of respiratory problems in childhood is related to a proper appreciation of the importance of wheezing diseases.

  17. Using Self-reports or Claims to Assess Disease Prevalence: It's Complicated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Clair, Patricia; Gaudette, Étienne; Zhao, Henu; Tysinger, Bryan; Seyedin, Roxanna; Goldman, Dana P

    2017-08-01

    Two common ways of measuring disease prevalence include: (1) using self-reported disease diagnosis from survey responses; and (2) using disease-specific diagnosis codes found in administrative data. Because they do not suffer from self-report biases, claims are often assumed to be more objective. However, it is not clear that claims always produce better prevalence estimates. Conduct an assessment of discrepancies between self-report and claims-based measures for 2 diseases in the US elderly to investigate definition, selection, and measurement error issues which may help explain divergence between claims and self-report estimates of prevalence. Self-reported data from 3 sources are included: the Health and Retirement Study, the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey, and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Claims-based disease measurements are provided from Medicare claims linked to Health and Retirement Study and Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey participants, comprehensive claims data from a 20% random sample of Medicare enrollees, and private health insurance claims from Humana Inc. Prevalence of diagnosed disease in the US elderly are computed and compared across sources. Two medical conditions are considered: diabetes and heart attack. Comparisons of diagnosed diabetes and heart attack prevalence show similar trends by source, but claims differ from self-reports with regard to levels. Selection into insurance plans, disease definitions, and the reference period used by algorithms are identified as sources contributing to differences. Claims and self-reports both have strengths and weaknesses, which researchers need to consider when interpreting estimates of prevalence from these 2 sources.

  18. Prognostic factors in pulmonary arterial hypertension: assessing the course of the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Howard

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The practical management of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH requires an accurate assessment of disease severity and prognosis. A number of prognostic indicators are known to be associated with patient outcome, and recent treatment guidelines advocate using such parameters to guide management decisions. Although PAH is characterised by the presence of pulmonary vasculopathy, it is the response of the right ventricle to an increased afterload that is the greatest determinant of a patient's symptoms and survival; thus, measurements that capture right ventricular function provide the best potential to assess PAH severity. One challenge is to understand how the tests we use in everyday clinical practice relate to right heart function in PAH patients, and how current measures can be improved and developed to optimise assessment of disease status and progress. Future research in the field of PAH should focus on how best to assess right heart function, and which measures or combination of measures provide the most relevant information for the individual patient.

  19. Magnetization transfer ratio for the assessment of perianal fistula activity in Crohn's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinson, C.; Dolores, M.; Cruypeninck, Y.; Koning, E.; Dacher, J.N.; Savoye-Collet, C. [Rouen University Hospital-Charles Nicolle, Department of Radiology, Rouen cedex (France); Savoye, G. [Rouen University Hospital-Charles Nicolle, Department of Gastroenterology, Rouen cedex (France)

    2017-01-15

    Assessment of perianal fistulas is important to guide management of Crohn's disease (CD). Our objectives were to analyze the feasibility of magnetization transfer (MT) imaging to assess fistulas and to evaluate its contribution in assessing disease activity. During 15 months, all patients referred for perianal fistulas in CD underwent 3T-MRI including diffusion, T2/T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced sequences and MT sequences (one with an off-resonance saturation pulse of 800 and one with 1200 Hz). We collected Van Assche score, fistula activity signs by analyzing T2, diffusion and contrast enhancement. We calculated MT ratio (MTR) with a ROI in the largest fistula. Twenty-nine patients (mean 34.9 years, range 17-53) were included. Van Assche score was 11.7, range 4-21. In 22 patients, the fistula presented with a bright T2 and diffusion signal with contrast enhancement, and was characterized as active. Mean MTR was respectively 47.2 (range 12-68) and 34.3 (range 11-57) at 800 and 1200 Hz. MTR at 800 Hz was significantly lower in non-active (34, range 12-55) than in active fistulas (51, range 24-68) (p < 0.02). MTR is feasible for the assessment of fistulas in CD and in the future could be used to help identify active and non-active fistulas. (orig.)

  20. Remotely Assessing Symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease Using Videoconferencing: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Stillerova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility of assessing a person’s symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD in their home using the videoconferencing technology they already possess, without a home visit. Method. Eleven participants with PD completed the Movement Disorder Society Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS face-to-face and then via videoconferencing within a two-week period. Participants used free software and the computers and webcams available at their home to complete the videoconference assessment with a clinical rater scoring remotely. Clinical raters and participants provided feedback on the experience. Results. Excluding rigidity and postural stability, between zero and seven items could not be completed in the assessment of each participant (median 2.0, IQR 1.0–4.0. Between face-to-face and videoconference assessments, the median difference in scores was 3.0 (IQR 1.5–9.0. Content analysis of feedback identified the clinical raters’ reasons why some scoring could not be completed and the participants’ hope for future clinical application. Conclusions. In using free everyday technology available in participants’ homes, MDS-UPDRS ratings could be obtained without an initial home visit; however some items were unable to be scored for some participants. Use of a protocol or technological advances are likely to reduce missing items.

  1. Efficacy of language assessment in Alzheimer's disease: comparing in-person examination and telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestal, Lindsey; Smith-Olinde, Laura; Hicks, Gretchen; Hutton, Terri; Hart, John

    2006-01-01

    With the large number of aging individuals requiring screening of cognitive functions for dementing illnesses, there is a necessity for innovative evaluation approaches. One domain that should allow for online, at a distance, examination is speech and language dysfunction, if the auditory and visual transmission is of sufficient quality to allow adequate patient participation and reliable, valid interpretation of signs and symptoms (Duffy et al 1997). Examine the effectiveness of language assessment in mild Alzheimer's patients using telemedicine (TM) compared with traditional in-person (IP) assessment. Ten patients with mild Alzheimer's disease, enrolled at a Geriatric Memory Clinic received a battery of standard language tests under two conditions: face-to-face and via satellite TM. Comparison of TM and IP testing conditions were assessed within each for scores on each test in the two conditions. On each of the five language tasks, the Wilcoxon signed ranks test indicated no significant difference on performance between the TM and IP conditions for each participant. Overall acceptance of the TM evaluation in an elderly population was rated at a high level except for one individual. Telemedicine can improve access to speech and language evaluation services which is relevant to both dementia and other neurological diseases of the elderly. In particular, this specific assessment tool can be used to provide evaluations in under-served rural areas.

  2. Risk assessment for infectious disease and its impact on voluntary vaccination behavior in social networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Eriko; Kokubo, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Jun; Wang, Zhen; Hagishima, Aya; Ikegaya, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We model a vaccination game from the standpoint of network reciprocity on 2 × 2 game. • We investigate the impacts of public information for infectious disease. • Effect of risk assessment based on public information depends on network structure. • Use of public information yields positive effect if vaccination cost is small. - Abstract: Achievement of the herd immunity is essential for preventing the periodic spreading of an infectious disease such as the flu. If vaccination is voluntary, as vaccination coverage approaches the critical level required for herd immunity, there is less incentive for individuals to be vaccinated; this results in an increase in the number of so-called “free-riders” who craftily avoid infection via the herd immunity and avoid paying any cost. We use a framework originating in evolutionary game theory to investigate this type of social dilemma with respect to epidemiology and the decision of whether to be vaccinated. For each individual in a population, the decision on vaccination is associated with how one assesses the risk of infection. In this study, we propose a new risk-assessment model in a vaccination game when an individual updates her strategy, she compares her own payoff to a net payoff obtained by averaging a collective payoff over individuals who adopt the same strategy as that of a randomly selected neighbor. In previous studies of vaccination games, when an individual updates her strategy, she typically compares her payoff to the payoff of a randomly selected neighbor, indicating that the risk for changing her strategy is largely based on the behavior of one other individual, i.e., this is an individual-based risk assessment. However, in our proposed model, risk assessment by any individual is based on the collective success of a strategy and not on the behavior of any one other individual. For strategy adaptation, each individual always takes a survey of the degree of success of a certain

  3. Diagnostic Assessment and Management of Dysphagia in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccardi, Virginia; Ruggiero, Carmelinda; Patriti, Alberto; Marano, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    A growing concern in patients affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) is dysphagia, or swallowing impairment, which leads to malnutrition, dehydration, weight loss, functional decline and fear of eating and drinking, as well as a decrease in the quality of life. Thus the diagnostic assessment of dysphagia in patients with AD is imperative to ensure that they receive effective management, avoiding complications, and reducing comorbidity and mortality in such a growing population. Dysphagia management requires a multidisciplinary approach considering that no single strategy is appropriate for all patients. However, evidence for clinical diagnostic assessment, interventions, and medical management of dysphagia in these patients are still limited: few studies are reporting the evaluation and the management among this group of patients. Here we analyzed the most recent findings in diagnostic assessment and management of swallowing impairment in patients affected by AD.

  4. Assessment of prevalence and risk factors of peripheral arterial disease in diabetic foot ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulasikumar G

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot ulcer(DFU is very common yet challenging complication of diabetes worldwide. These ulcers are biologically compromised majorly by ischemia and neuropathy. Ischemia has gained recognition as a significant cause of DFU. The association of peripheral arterial disease(PAD largely impacts the treatment outcomes of DFU in terms of ulcer healing, lower limb amputations and mortality. The burden of PAD in DFU in South Indian population has not been assessed adequately in the recent years. A multidisciplinary approach to DFU and prompt diagnosis of ischemia will decrease the loss of limb and life. The objective of the study was to assess the peripheral arterial disease and associated risk factors in patients with diabetic foot ulcer. A total of 100 patients were evaluated in this study. The patients were subjected to detailed history and clinical examination which included distal pulse assessment, ankle-brachial index(ABI and duplex scan to evaluate PAD. The data was subjected to statistical analysis to find out association between parameters of interest. The prevalence of PAD in DFU was found to be 36%. It was more prevalent in males and in age>40 years and higher with increasing age. PAD was associated almost equally with plantar and dorsal ulcers, more often whole of foot was involved. There is significant association of PAD with longer diabetic duration(p<0.0001 with mean disease duration of 10 years. Previous studies aimed to study prevalence of PAD in diabetes irrespective of foot ulcer. The present study analyzed various factors coexisting with DFU and PAD. The results conclude that peripheral arterial disease is a potential risk factor for major limb amputations.

  5. PoCos: Population Covering Locus Sets for Risk Assessment in Complex Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Ayati

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility loci identified by GWAS generally account for a limited fraction of heritability. Predictive models based on identified loci also have modest success in risk assessment and therefore are of limited practical use. Many methods have been developed to overcome these limitations by incorporating prior biological knowledge. However, most of the information utilized by these methods is at the level of genes, limiting analyses to variants that are in or proximate to coding regions. We propose a new method that integrates protein protein interaction (PPI as well as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL data to identify sets of functionally related loci that are collectively associated with a trait of interest. We call such sets of loci "population covering locus sets" (PoCos. The contributions of the proposed approach are three-fold: 1 We consider all possible genotype models for each locus, thereby enabling identification of combinatorial relationships between multiple loci. 2 We develop a framework for the integration of PPI and eQTL into a heterogenous network model, enabling efficient identification of functionally related variants that are associated with the disease. 3 We develop a novel method to integrate the genotypes of multiple loci in a PoCo into a representative genotype to be used in risk assessment. We test the proposed framework in the context of risk assessment for seven complex diseases, type 1 diabetes (T1D, type 2 diabetes (T2D, psoriasis (PS, bipolar disorder (BD, coronary artery disease (CAD, hypertension (HT, and multiple sclerosis (MS. Our results show that the proposed method significantly outperforms individual variant based risk assessment models as well as the state-of-the-art polygenic score. We also show that incorporation of eQTL data improves the performance of identified POCOs in risk assessment. We also assess the biological relevance of PoCos for three diseases that have similar biological mechanisms

  6. Assessment of the Sustainability Capacity of a Coordinated Approach to Chronic Disease Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Combs, Todd; Polk, LaShaun; Dexter, Sarah

    2017-12-07

    This article outlines some factors that influenced the sustainability capacity of a coordinated approach to chronic disease prevention in state and territory health departments. This study involved a cross-sectional design and mixed-methods approach. Quantitative data were collected using the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool (PSAT), a 40-item multiple-choice instrument that assesses 8 domains of sustainability capacity (environmental support, funding stability, partnerships, organizational capacity, program evaluation, program adaptation, communications, and strategic planning). Qualitative data were collected via phone interviews. The PSAT was administered to staff and stakeholders from public health departments in 50 US states, District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, who were involved in the implementation of coordinated chronic disease programs. Phone interviews were conducted with program coordinators in each state. Sustainability score patterns and state-level categorical results, as well as strengths and opportunities for improvement across the 8 program sustainability domains, were explored. On average, programs reported the strongest sustainability capacity in the domains of program adaptation, environmental support, and organizational capacity, while funding stability, strategic planning, and communications yielded lowest scores, indicating weakest capacity. Scores varied the most by state in environmental support and strategic planning. The PSAT results highlight the process through which states approached the sustainability of coordinated chronic disease initiatives. This process included an initial focus on program evaluation and partnerships with transfer of priority to long-term strategic planning, communications, and funding stability to further establish coordinated chronic disease efforts. Qualitative interviews provided further context to PSAT results, indicating that leadership, communications, partnerships, funding stability, and policy

  7. Salivary cortisol day curves in assessing glucocorticoid replacement therapy in Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smans, Lisanne; Lentjes, Eef; Hermus, Ad; Zelissen, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Patients with Addison's disease require lifelong treatment with glucocorticoids. At present, no glucocorticoid replacement therapy (GRT) can exactly mimic normal physiology. As a consequence, under- and especially overtreatment can occur. Suboptimal GRT may lead to various side effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of salivary cortisol day curves (SCDC) in the individual adjustment of GRT in order to approach normal cortisol levels as closely as possible, reduce over- and underreplacement and study the short-term effects on quality of life (QoL). Twenty patients with Addison's disease were included in this prospective study. A SCDC was obtained and compared to normal controls; general and disease specific QoL-questionnaires were completed. Based on SCDC assessment of over- and undertreatment (calculated as duration (h) × magnitude (nmol/L) at different time points, glucocorticoid dose and regime were adjusted. After 4 weeks SCDC and QoL assessment were repeated and the effect of adjusting GRT was analysed. At baseline, underreplacement was present in 3 and overreplacement in 18 patients; total calculated overreplacement was 32.8 h.nmol/L. Overreplacement decreased significantly to 13.3 h. nmol/L (p =0.005) after adjustment of GRT. Overreplacement was found particularly in the afternoon and evening. After reducing overreplacement in the evening, complaints about sleep disturbances significantly decreased. Individual adjustment of GRT based on SCDC to approach normal cortisol concentrations during the day can reduce overreplacement, especially in the evening. This can lead to a reduction of sleep disturbances and fatigue in patients with Addison's disease. A SCDC is a simple and patient-friendly tool for adjusting GRT and can be useful in the follow-up of patients with Addison's disease.

  8. Blogging in Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology: Assessment of 'Blogosphere' Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgand, Gabriel; Troughton, Rachael; Moore, Luke S P; Charani, Esmita; Rawson, Timothy M; Castro-Sánchez, Enrique; Holmes, Alison H

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze influential infectious diseases, antimicrobial stewardship, infection control, or medical microbiology blogs and bloggers SETTING World wide web DESIGN We conducted a systematic search for blogs in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines in September 2015. METHODS A snowball sampling approach was applied to identify blogs using various search engines. Blogs were eligible if they (1) focused on infectious diseases, antimicrobial stewardship, infection control, or medical microbiology; (2) were intended for health professionals; and (3) were written in English and (4) were updated regularly. We mapped blog and blogger characteristics and used an innovative tool to assess the architecture and content of the included blogs. The motivations and perceptions of bloggers and readers were also assessed. RESULTS A total of 88 blogs were identified. Moreover, 28 blogs (32%) focused on infectious diseases, 46 (52%) focused on medical microbiology, and 14 (16%) focused on infection control or antimicrobial stewardship. Bloggers were mainly male with medical doctorates and/or PhDs; 32 bloggers (36%) posted at least weekly; and 51 (58%) had a research purpose. The aims were considered clear for 23 blogs (26%), and the field covered was considered broad for 25 blogs (28%). Presentation was considered good for 22 blogs (25%), 51 blogs (58%) were easy to read, and 46 blogs (52%) included expert interpretation. Among the top 10 blogs, 3 focused on infectious diseases, 6 focused on medical microbiology, and 2 focused on infection control (2 were equally ranked). The bloggers we questioned were motivated to share their independent expertise and opinions. Readers appreciated the concise messages on scientific topics and practical updates. CONCLUSIONS This study describes high-level blogs in the fields of infectious diseases, infection control, and medical microbiology. Our findings suggest ways in which bloggers should build/orientate blogs for readers, and we have

  9. Radiographic assessment of disease progression in rheumatoid arthritis patients undergoing early disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wick, M.C.

    2002-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic disease predominantly involving the joints. Since the pathogenesis, etiology and pathophysiological mechanisms of RA have only been partially elucidated, a definitive therapy has not been established. Precise diagnosis and follow-up therapy requires objective quantification, and radiological analyses are considered to be the most appropriate method. The aim of this study was to retrospectively determine the time-dependent progression of joint damage in patients with pharmacologically-treated RA, and to determine which therapeutic agents demonstrate the highest efficacy. Outpatient records, laboratory values, therapy schemes and radiographs from hands and feet of 150 RA patients were collected, analyzed and statistically evaluated. Radiographs were quantified using the Larsen score and supportively using the 'RheumaCoach-Rheumatology' computer software. Our observations reveal that radiologically-detectable damage is most pronounced during the first year of disease, while mitigated and generally progressing linearly thereafter. Overall Larsen scores linearly increased from year 0 to 10 (r=0.853), during which the mean Larsen score increased 7.93 ± 0.76 per year. During the first year, RA progression was similar regardless of the medication administered (gold-compounds, AU; chloroquine, CQ; methotrexate, MTX; sulfasalazine SSZ). While MTX and CQ treatment showed no difference when examined as mean 5-year increment of Larsen score, AU and SSZ showed up to 3 fold higher RA progression compared with MTX. The Larsen score in year 1 did not correlate with that of years 2 to 5. In contrast, Larsen scores in year 2 were linearly related to each of the subsequent 3 years. Despite similar ESR values in various medication groups, cumulative ESR correlated with RA progression, and its reduction with therapeutic efficacy. In conclusion, this study found that, (i) early DMARD-treated RA progressed more rapidly during the first than

  10. The Assessment of Health-Related Quality of Life in Scleroderma-Interstitial Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad M Lari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pulmonary involvement is the most common cause of mortality and disability in patients with systemic sclerosis and it significantly affects the quality of life in these patients. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary involvement seems necessary in patients with SSc. In this study, we aimed to assess the health-related quality of life (HRQoL in patients with Scleroderma-Interstitial Lung Disease (SSc-ILD and its relationship with pulmonary function parameters. Materials and Methods: Considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 25 patients with SSc-ILD were enrolled in this cross-sectional study from April 2012 to June 2013. Full tests of lung function, including body plethysmography and diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DLCO, 6-minute walk distance (6MWD, and pulse oximetry were performed. The HRQoL was assessed using St. George’s and CAT questionnaires; also, dyspnea was evaluated for all the patients, using modified medical research council (MMRC scale. Afterwards, the relationship between the total scores of HRQoL questionnaires and the severity of lung disease was analyzed, based on the recorded variables. Results: The mean age of the patients was 40.36±9.50 years and the mean duration of the disease was 7.16±4.50 years. A statistically significant inverse correlation was observed between 6MWD (r=-0.50, P=0.01, DLCO (r=-0.67, P

  11. Development and psychometric evaluation of a cardiovascular risk and disease management knowledge assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosneck, James S; Hughes, Joel; Gunstad, John; Josephson, Richard; Noe, Donald A; Waechter, Donna

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the systematic construction and psychometric analysis of a knowledge assessment instrument for phase II cardiac rehabilitation (CR) patients measuring risk modification disease management knowledge and behavioral outcomes derived from national standards relevant to secondary prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. First, using adult curriculum based on disease-specific learning outcomes and competencies, a systematic test item development process was completed by clinical staff. Second, a panel of educational and clinical experts used an iterative process to identify test content domain and arrive at consensus in selecting items meeting criteria. Third, the resulting 31-question instrument, the Cardiac Knowledge Assessment Tool (CKAT), was piloted in CR patients to ensure use of application. Validity and reliability analyses were performed on 3638 adults before test administrations with additional focused analyses on 1999 individuals completing both pretreatment and posttreatment administrations within 6 months. Evidence of CKAT content validity was substantiated, with 85% agreement among content experts. Evidence of construct validity was demonstrated via factor analysis identifying key underlying factors. Estimates of internal consistency, for example, Cronbach's α = .852 and Spearman-Brown split-half reliability = 0.817 on pretesting, support test reliability. Item analysis, using point biserial correlation, measured relationships between performance on single items and total score (P knowledge instrument specifically designed for an adult CR population was systematically developed and tested in a large representative patient population, satisfying psychometric parameters, including validity and reliability.

  12. Psychological Assessment of Patients With Biotin-Thiamine-Responsive Basal Ganglia Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfadhel, Majid; Al-Bluwi, Amal

    2017-01-01

    Biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease is a devastating autosomal recessive inherited neurological disorder. We conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients with biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease who underwent a formal psychological assessment. Six females and 3 males were included. Five patients (56%) had an average IQ, two patients (22%) had mild delay, and two (22%) had severe delay. A normal outcome was directly related to the time of diagnosis and initiation of treatment. Early diagnosis and immediate commencement of treatment were associated with a favorable outcome and vice versa. The most affected domain was visual motor integration, while understanding and mathematical problem-solving were the least affected. In summary, this is the first study discussing the psychological assessment of patients with biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease. The results of this study alert clinicians to consider prompt initiation of biotin and thiamine in any patient presenting with neuroregression and a basal ganglia lesion on a brain magnetic resonance imaging.

  13. Discordance Between Physician Assessment and Patient-Reported Depressive Symptoms in Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachner, Christian; Armstrong, Melissa J; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L; Rezvani, Zahra; Reich, Stephen G; Fishman, Paul S; Salazar, Richard; Shulman, Lisa M

    2017-07-01

    To assess concordance between physician assessment and patient-reported symptoms when screening for depression in Parkinson disease (dPD). Depression in Parkinson disease is highly prevalent (∼40%) and has a significant impact on quality of life and disability, yet physician recognition and treatment remain inadequate. One thousand seventy-six patients with PD completed the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18), a screening questionnaire for psychiatric symptoms, which was compared to item #3 (depression) on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). The mean BSI-18 depression score was 51.4 (9.7). Of the 170 (16%) patients screening positive for dPD on the BSI-18, 104 (61%) were not recognized as depressed by neurologists on the UPDRS. Factors associated with lower neurologist recognition included male gender, better mental health quality of life, and lack of antidepressant use. More than 60% of patients screening positive for depression on self-report were not recognized by neurologists on the UPDRS. A patient-reported screening tool for depression may improve recognition and management of dPD.

  14. U.K. Foot and Mouth Disease: A Systemic Risk Assessment of Existing Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, João; Pollard, Simon; Pearn, Kerry; Snary, Emma L; Black, Edgar; Prpich, George; Longhurst, Phil

    2017-09-01

    This article details a systemic analysis of the controls in place and possible interventions available to further reduce the risk of a foot and mouth disease (FMD) outbreak in the United Kingdom. Using a research-based network analysis tool, we identify vulnerabilities within the multibarrier control system and their corresponding critical control points (CCPs). CCPs represent opportunities for active intervention that produce the greatest improvement to United Kingdom's resilience to future FMD outbreaks. Using an adapted 'features, events, and processes' (FEPs) methodology and network analysis, our results suggest that movements of animals and goods associated with legal activities significantly influence the system's behavior due to their higher frequency and ability to combine and create scenarios of exposure similar in origin to the U.K. FMD outbreaks of 1967/8 and 2001. The systemic risk assessment highlights areas outside of disease control that are relevant to disease spread. Further, it proves to be a powerful tool for demonstrating the need for implementing disease controls that have not previously been part of the system. © 2016 The Authors Risk Analysis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Risk Analysis.

  15. Diagnosis and prognosis of elderly patients with coronary artery disease. Assessment with dipyridamole thallium imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Fumiyasu; Takata, Jun; Seo, Hiromi; Chikamori, Taishiro; Yamada, Mitsutoshi; Yabe, Toshikazu; Doi, Yoshinori

    1995-01-01

    The diagnostic and prognostic value of dipyridamole perfusion scintigraphy was assessed in 147 patients with coronary artery disease aged 65 years and older. All patients underwent coronary angiography. Dipyridamole perfusion scintigraphy was performed safely in all patients. Multiple regression analysis showed that fixed defect and reversible defect were powerful detectors of coronary lesions, all patients with fixed disease and 94% of patients with only reversible defects had significant coronary lesion. Diffuse slow washout and ST depression were statistically significant for detection multivessel coronary lesions in patients with fixed disease, the sensitivity and specificity of diffuse slow washout and/or ST depression for detecting multivessel coronary lesions were 85% and 74%, respectively. Cox survival analysis identified diffuse slow washout as the best predictor of future cardiac events among the scintigraphic variables. Univariate analysis showed the best predictors were age (≥70), diffuse slow washout, and severe coronary lesions. Multivariate analysis showed diffuse slow washout and severe coronary lesions were the best predictors. Dividing the patients by age (≥70) showed that age and diffuse slow washout were good predictors. Scintigraphic and angiographic parameters found diffuse slow washout was the only good predictor. Dipyridamole perfusion scintigraphy is useful for the noninvasive detection of significant coronary artery disease in the elderly, and for predicting future cardiac events with similar predictability to angiographic findings. (S.Y.)

  16. Coronary artery disease risk assessment from unstructured electronic health records using text mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Ray, Pradeep; Kumar, Manish; Chang, Nai-Wen; Dai, Hong-Jie

    2015-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) often leads to myocardial infarction, which may be fatal. Risk factors can be used to predict CAD, which may subsequently lead to prevention or early intervention. Patient data such as co-morbidities, medication history, social history and family history are required to determine the risk factors for a disease. However, risk factor data are usually embedded in unstructured clinical narratives if the data is not collected specifically for risk assessment purposes. Clinical text mining can be used to extract data related to risk factors from unstructured clinical notes. This study presents methods to extract Framingham risk factors from unstructured electronic health records using clinical text mining and to calculate 10-year coronary artery disease risk scores in a cohort of diabetic patients. We developed a rule-based system to extract risk factors: age, gender, total cholesterol, HDL-C, blood pressure, diabetes history and smoking history. The results showed that the output from the text mining system was reliable, but there was a significant amount of missing data to calculate the Framingham risk score. A systematic approach for understanding missing data was followed by implementation of imputation strategies. An analysis of the 10-year Framingham risk scores for coronary artery disease in this cohort has shown that the majority of the diabetic patients are at moderate risk of CAD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evolution of diagnostic criteria and assessments for Parkinson's disease mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Jennifer G; Holden, Samantha K; Litvan, Irene; McKeith, Ian; Stebbins, Glenn T; Taylor, John-Paul

    2018-04-01

    Mild cognitive impairment has gained recognition as a construct and a potential prodromal stage to dementia in both Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease (PD). Although mild cognitive impairment has been recognized in the Alzheimer's disease field, it is a relatively more recent topic of interest in PD. Recent advances include the development of diagnostic criteria for PD mild cognitive impairment to provide more uniform definitions for clinical and research use. Studies reveal that mild cognitive impairment in PD is frequent, but also heterogeneous, with variable clinical presentations, differences in its progression to dementia, and likely differences in underlying pathophysiology. Application of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PD Mild Cognitive Impairment Task Force diagnostic criteria has provided insights regarding cognitive measures, functional assessments, and other key topics that may require additional refinement. Furthermore, it is important to consider definitions of PD mild cognitive impairment in the landscape of other related Lewy body disorders, such as dementia with Lewy bodies, and in the context of prodromal and early-stage PD. This article examines the evolution of mild cognitive impairment in concept and definition, particularly in PD, but also in related disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies; the development and application of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PD Mild Cognitive Impairment diagnostic criteria; and insights and future directions for the field of PD mild cognitive impairment. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  18. MDS-UPDRS to assess non-motor symptoms after STN DBS for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Nickey; Pahwa, Rajesh; Nazzaro, Jules M; Arnold, Paul M; Lyons, Kelly E

    2016-01-01

    To determine if the non-motor sections of the Movement Disorder Society's (MDS) version of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) could supplement the original UPDRS as a patient completed assessment of changes in non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients after bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS). Thirty PD patients who underwent bilateral STN DBS were assessed using the total UPDRS and the non-motor sections of the MDS-UPDRS prior to surgery and one year following surgery. This study focuses on non-motor symptoms as assessed by Part I of the UPDRS and Part 1A and 1B of the MDS-UPDRS. One year following surgery, no individual non-motor symptoms or the total mentation score of the UPDRS were significantly changed. In comparison, the MDS-UPDRS showed significant improvements in sleep and urinary problems and a trend towards improvement in anxiety, constipation, daytime sleepiness, fatigue and pain. This study provides evidence that the MDS-UPDRS non-motor sections, when completed by the patients, can supplement the original version of the UPDRS as an effective method of measuring changes in non-motor symptoms after DBS. It also reinforces the benefits of bilateral STN DBS on non-motor symptoms of PD.

  19. Readability assessment of concussion and traumatic brain injury publications by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Preetinder S; Gill, Tejkaran S; Kamath, Ashwini; Whisnant, Billy

    2012-01-01

    Health literacy is associated with a person’s capacity to find, access, contextualize, and understand information needed for health care-related decisions. The level of health literacy thus has an influence on an individual’s health status. It can be argued that low health literacy is associated with poor health status. Health care literature (eg, pamphlets, brochures, postcards, posters, forms) are published by public and private organizations worldwide to provide information to the general public. The ability to read, use, and understand is critical to the successful application of knowledge disseminated by this literature. This study assessed the readability, suitability, and usability of health care literature associated with concussion and traumatic brain injury published by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Flesch–Kincaid Grade Level, Flesch Reading Ease, Gunning Fog, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook, and Suitability Assessment of Materials indices were used to assess 40 documents obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. The documents analyzed were targeted towards the general public. It was found that in order to be read properly, on average, these documents needed more than an eleventh grade/high school level education. This was consistent with the findings of other similar studies. However, the qualitative Suitability Assessment of Materials index showed that, on average, usability and suitability of these documents was superior. Hence, it was concluded that formatting, illustrations, layout, and graphics play a pivotal role in improving health care-related literature and, in turn, promoting health literacy. Based on the comprehensive literature review and assessment of the 40 documents associated with concussion and traumatic brain injury, recommendations have been made for improving the readability, suitability, and usability of health care-related documents. The recommendations are

  20. Perceived Preparedness of Health Care Students for Providing Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Zolezzi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Early assessment and management of risk factors is known to have significant impact in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD and its associated burden. Cardiovascular disease risk assessment and management (CVDRAM is best approached by teamwork across health care professionals. This study aimed at assessing health care students’ (HCSs knowledge about the parameters needed for estimating CVD risk, their self-assessed preparedness/confidence and perceived barriers for the provision of CVDRAM services through a survey administered to third and fourth year pharmacy, medical, and nursing students in Qatar. Although all student cohorst achieved similar knowledge scores, less than half (n = 38, 47% were able to identify all of the six main risk factors necessary to estimate absolute CVD risk, and a third (32% were unable to identify total cholesterol as an independent risk factor necessary to estimate CVD risk. Training on the use of CVD risk assessment tools differed among the three student cohorts. All student cohorts also perceived similar levels of preparedness in CVDRAM. However, pharmacy students reported the highest preparedness/confidence with the use of the latest CVDRAM guidelines. The majority of statements listed under the barriers scale were perceived by the students as being moderate (median score = 3. Poor public acceptance or unawareness of importance of estimating CVD risk was the only barrier perceived as major by nursing students. Future integration of interprofessional educational (IPE activities in the CVDRAM curricula of HCSs may be a suitable strategy to minimize barriers and foster collaborative practice for the provision of CVDRAM services in Qatar.

  1. Perceived Preparedness of Health Care Students for Providing Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolezzi, Monica; Abdallah, Oraib; Aden, Suad; Major, Stella; White, Diana; El-Awaisi, Alla

    2017-02-21

    Early assessment and management of risk factors is known to have significant impact in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its associated burden. Cardiovascular disease risk assessment and management (CVDRAM) is best approached by teamwork across health care professionals. This study aimed at assessing health care students' (HCSs) knowledge about the parameters needed for estimating CVD risk, their self-assessed preparedness/confidence and perceived barriers for the provision of CVDRAM services through a survey administered to third and fourth year pharmacy, medical, and nursing students in Qatar. Although all student cohorts achieved similar knowledge scores, less than half ( n = 38, 47%) were able to identify all of the six main risk factors necessary to estimate absolute CVD risk, and a third (32%) were unable to identify total cholesterol as an independent risk factor necessary to estimate CVD risk. Training on the use of CVD risk assessment tools differed among the three student cohorts. All student cohorts also perceived similar levels of preparedness in CVDRAM. However, pharmacy students reported the highest preparedness/confidence with the use of the latest CVDRAM guidelines. The majority of statements listed under the barriers scale were perceived by the students as being moderate (median score = 3). Poor public acceptance or unawareness of importance of estimating CVD risk was the only barrier perceived as a major by nursing students. Future integration of interprofessional educational (IPE) activities in the CVDRAM curricula of HCSs may be a suitable strategy to minimize barriers and foster collaborative practice for the provision of CVDRAM services in Qatar.

  2. Assessment of right ventricular afterload in mitral valve diseases with radionuclide angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Mitsuharu; Nakagawa, Tomio; Kohno, Yoshihiro; Kuroda, Masahiro; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Hiraki, Yoshio; Nagaya, Isao; Senoh, Yoshimasa; Teramoto, Shigeru

    1991-01-01

    Right ventricular function at rest and during exercise was studied in 33 patients with mitral valve disease by equilibrium gated radionuclide angiography using 99m Tc in vivo labeled red blood cells. Radionuclide measurements of right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) were correlated with mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP). RVEF decreased significantly with exercise. There was no significant correlation between RVEF at rest and mPAP. However, mPAP showed significant negative correlation with RVEF during exercise and with the changes of RVEF from rest to exercise. It is concluded that RVEF during exercise in mitral valve disease is affected by right ventricular afterload, and the measurements of RVEF at rest and during exercise by equilibrium gated radionuclide angiography is useful to assess right ventricular afterload. (author)

  3. Noninvasive imaging in the assessment and prevention of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llerena Rojas, Luis Roberto; Peix Gonzalez, Amalia; Valiente Mustelier, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Echocardiography, multidetector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear cardiology can all help prevent coronary heart disease. Echocardiography can identify asymptomatic individuals who are at risk of coronary disease and who should receive aggressive preventative therapy by providing data on the carotid intima-media thickness, arterial stiffness and flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery. The calcium score is an independent predictor of cardiac events that influences clinical risk scores such as the Framingham risk score. By using multidetector computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging for coronary angiography, it is possible to visualize both the lumen and vessel walls of coronary arteries and to discriminate between calcified and noncalcified atherosclerotic plaque before invasive coronary angiography is performed. With nuclear cardiology, the functional effects of atherosclerotic lesions can be evaluated by assessing perfusion and ventricular function simultaneously

  4. Handwritten dynamics assessment through convolutional neural networks: An application to Parkinson's disease identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Clayton R; Pereira, Danilo R; Rosa, Gustavo H; Albuquerque, Victor H C; Weber, Silke A T; Hook, Christian; Papa, João P

    2018-04-16

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is considered a degenerative disorder that affects the motor system, which may cause tremors, micrography, and the freezing of gait. Although PD is related to the lack of dopamine, the triggering process of its development is not fully understood yet. In this work, we introduce convolutional neural networks to learn features from images produced by handwritten dynamics, which capture different information during the individual's assessment. Additionally, we make available a dataset composed of images and signal-based data to foster the research related to computer-aided PD diagnosis. The proposed approach was compared against raw data and texture-based descriptors, showing suitable results, mainly in the context of early stage detection, with results nearly to 95%. The analysis of handwritten dynamics using deep learning techniques showed to be useful for automatic Parkinson's disease identification, as well as it can outperform handcrafted features. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Non-obstructive coronary artery disease assessed by coronary computed tomography angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, L.; Bøtker, H. E.; Sorensen, H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Coronary CT angiography (CTA) detects non-obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) that may not be recognized by functional testing, but the prognostic impact is not well understood. This study aimed to compare the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and all-cause mortality...... in patients without or with non-obstructive and obstructive CAD assessed by coronary CTA. Methods: Consecutive patients without known coronary artery disease (CAD) and with chest pain who underwent coronary CTA (>64-detector row) between January 2007 and December 2012 in the 10 centers participating...... in the Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry were included. The endpoints were 3-year MI or all-cause mortality. The coronary CTA result was defined as normal (0% luminal stenosis), non-obstructive CAD (1%-49% luminal stenosis) or obstructive CAD (>50% luminal stenosis; 1-vessel, 2-vessel, or 3...

  6. Prognostic assessment of stable coronary artery disease as determined by coronary computed tomography angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüche Nielsen, Lene; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Sørensen, Henrik T.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: To examine the 3.5 year prognosis of stable coronary artery disease (CAD) as assessed by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in real-world clinical practice, overall and within subgroups of patients according to age, sex, and comorbidity. Methods and results: This cohort study......, and comorbidity. Conclusion: Coronary artery disease determined by CCTA in real-world practice predicts the 3.5 year composite risk of late revascularization, myocardial infarction, and all-cause death across different groups of age, sex, or comorbidity burden....... included 16,949 patients (median age 57 years; 57% women) with new-onset symptoms suggestive of CAD, who underwent CCTA between January 2008 and December 2012. The endpoint was a composite of late coronary revascularization procedure >90 days after CCTA, myocardial infarction, and all-cause death...

  7. Assessment of axonal degeneration in Alzheimer's disease with diffusion tensor MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, R.; Dietrich, O.; Reiser, M.F.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Teipel, S.; Hampel, H.

    2003-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) causes cortical degeneration with subsequent degenerative changes of the white matter. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent of white matter tissue damage of patients with Alzheimer's disease in comparison with healthy subjects using diffusion tensor MRI (DTI). The value of integrated parallel imaging techniques (iPAT) for reduction of image distortion was assessed. We studied 9 patients with mild AD and 10 age and gender matched healthy controls. DTI brain scans were obtained on a 1.5 tesla system (Siemens Magnetom Sonata) using parallel imaging (iPAT) and an EPI diffusion sequence with TE/TR 71 ms/6000 ms. We used an 8-element head coil and a GRAPPA reconstruction algorithm with an acceleration factor of 2. From the tensor, the mean diffusivity (D), the fractional anisotropy (FA), and the relative anisotropy (RA) of several white matter regions were determined. FA was significantly lower (p [de

  8. Combined assessment of DYRK1A, BDNF and homocysteine levels as diagnostic marker for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janel, N; Alexopoulos, P; Badel, A; Lamari, F; Camproux, A C; Lagarde, J; Simon, S; Feraudet-Tarisse, C; Lamourette, P; Arbones, M; Paul, J L; Dubois, B; Potier, M C; Sarazin, M; Delabar, J M

    2017-06-20

    Early identification of Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk factors would aid development of interventions to delay the onset of dementia, but current biomarkers are invasive and/or costly to assess. Validated plasma biomarkers would circumvent these challenges. We previously identified the kinase DYRK1A in plasma. To validate DYRK1A as a biomarker for AD diagnosis, we assessed the levels of DYRK1A and the related markers brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and homocysteine in two unrelated AD patient cohorts with age-matched controls. Receiver-operating characteristic curves and logistic regression analyses showed that combined assessment of DYRK1A, BDNF and homocysteine has a sensitivity of 0.952, a specificity of 0.889 and an accuracy of 0.933 in testing for AD. The blood levels of these markers provide a diagnosis assessment profile. Combined assessment of these three markers outperforms most of the previous markers and could become a useful substitute to the current panel of AD biomarkers. These results associate a decreased level of DYRK1A with AD and challenge the use of DYRK1A inhibitors in peripheral tissues as treatment. These measures will be useful for diagnosis purposes.

  9. Economic assessment of an emerging disease: the case of Schmallenberg virus in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waret-Szkuta, A; Alarcon, P; Hasler, B; Rushton, J; Corbière, F; Raboisson, D

    2017-04-01

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV) was first detected in 2011 in Germany and then in France in 2012. This study simulates the production of different ruminant systems in France and estimates, through partial budget analyses, the economic cost of SBV at the farm level, under two disease scenarios (a high-impact and low-impact scenario). A partial budget is used to evaluate the financial effect of incremental changes, and includes only resources or production that will be changed. In the high-impact scenario, the estimated impact of SBV ranged from €23 to €43 per cow per year and €19 to €37 per ewe per year. In the low-impact scenario, it was approximately half (for cows) or one-third (for ewes) of this amount. These financial impacts represent 0.6% to 63% of the gross margin, depending on the chosen scenario and the livestock system being considered. The impacts of SBV come mainly from: the extra costs from purchasing and raising replacement heifers and losses in milk production (dairy cows); the losses in calf or lamb production (beef systems and meat sheep); and the losses in milk production and from unsold replacement lambs (dairy sheep). The use of integrated production and economic models enabled the authors to estimate the cost of SBV and to tackle the problem of scarce data, which is a difficulty for most emerging diseases, by their very nature. It also allowed the authors to develop an accurate disease impact assessment for several production systems, over a short time span. Extrapolating from this economic assessment to predict the scenario in coming years depends on the immunity period of the disease and the length of the production cycles.

  10. Customized Internal Reference Controls for Improved Assessment of Circulating MicroRNAs in Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenny Schlosser

    Full Text Available Altered levels of circulating extracellular miRNA in plasma and serum have shown promise as non-invasive biomarkers of disease. However, unlike the assessment of cellular miRNA levels for which there are accepted housekeeping genes, analogous reference controls for normalization of circulating miRNA are lacking. Here, we provide an approach to identify and validate circulating miRNA reference controls on a de novo basis, and demonstrate the advantages of these customized internal controls in different disease settings. Importantly, these internal controls overcome key limitations of external spike-in controls.Using a global RT-qPCR screen of 1066 miRNAs in plasma from pulmonary hypertension patients (PAH and healthy subjects as a case example, we identified a large pool of initial candidate miRNAs that were systematically ranked according to their plasma level stability using a predefined algorithm. The performance of the top candidates was validated against multiple comparators, and in a second independent cohort of PAH and control subjects. The broader utility of this approach was demonstrated in a completely different disease setting with 372 miRNAs screened in plasma from septic shock patients and healthy controls.Normalization of data with specific internal reference controls significantly reduced the overall variation in circulating miRNA levels between subjects (relative to raw data, provided a more balanced distribution of up- and down-regulated miRNAs, replicated the results obtained by the benchmark geometric averaging of all detected miRNAs, and outperformed the commonly used external spike-in strategy.We demonstrate the feasibility of identifying circulating reference controls that can reduce extraneous technical variations, and improve the assessment of disease-related changes in plasma miRNA levels. This study provides a novel conceptual framework that addresses a critical and previously unmet need if circulating miRNAs are to

  11. A service development study of the assessment and management of fracture risk in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shribman, Samuel; Torsney, Kelli M; Noyce, Alastair J; Giovannoni, Gavin; Fearnley, Julian; Dobson, Ruth

    2014-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with an increased risk of fragility fracture. FRAX and Qfracture are risk calculators that estimate the 10-year risk of hip and major fractures and guide definitive investigation for osteoporosis using dual X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) imaging. It is unclear which PD patients should be considered for fracture risk assessment and whether FRAX or Qfracture should be used. Seventy-seven patients with PD were recruited in the movement disorders clinic. Data were collected on PD-related characteristics and fracture risk scores were calculated. Patients with previous osteoporotic fractures had a higher incidence of falls (p = 0.0026) and use of bilateral walking aids (p = 0.0187) in addition to longer disease duration (p = 0.0037). Selecting patients with falls in combination with either disease duration >5 years, bilateral walking aids, or previous osteoporotic fracture distinguished patients with and without previous osteoporotic fracture with specificity 67.7 % (95 % CI 55.0-78.8) and sensitivity 100.0 % (95 % CI 73.5-100.0). Qfracture calculated significantly higher fracture risk scores than FRAX for hip (p < 0.0001) and major (p = 0.0008) fracture in PD patients. Receiver operating characteristic curves demonstrated that FRAX outperformed Qfracture with an area under the curve of 0.84 (95 % CI 0.70-0.97, p = 0.0004) for FRAX and 0.68 (95 % CI 52-86, p = 0.0476) for Qfracture major fracture risk calculators. We suggest that falls in combination with either a disease duration longer than 5 years or bilateral walking aids or previous osteoporotic fracture should be used as red flags in PD patients to prompt clinicians to perform a FRAX fracture risk assessment in the neurology clinic.

  12. ASSESSMENT OF AWARENESS LEVEL OF OWN DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH STABLE ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. Andreeva

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Arterial hypertension (AH is the most frequent risk factor of cardiovascular diseases and related mortality in all developed countries. Altough therapy with antihypertensive drugs significantly reduces this risk, patients with stable mild hypertension have poor compliance with the treatment. The reasons and levels of inadequacy of antihypertensive therapy in this group of patients are well-known.Aim. To evaluate the awareness level of own disease, adequacy of therapy only in those patients with stable mild arterial hypertension, who are complied with recommendations of physicians concerning AH treatment and changing of mode of life. It was also planned to reveal possible grounds for inadequate secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.Materials and methods. 76 patiens with stable mild arterial hypertension were included into study. They didn’t have any serious concomitant diseases and were complied with the recommendations of physicians concerning secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Questionnaire of State Research Center for Preventive Medicine “Assessment of awareness level of own disease in patients with stable arterial hypertension” was used in the study.Results. It was revealed, that the majority of patients, invoved in the study, were nonsmokers and regularly took antihypertensive drugs. 70% of questioned patients reached the target arterial blood pressure levels, while patients with arterial hypertension in general Russia population received regular and efficient treatment in less than 30-20%. Drugs treatment of questioned patients almost didn’t differ from that, which received patients in out-patient clinics of Moscow: in both cases ACE inhibitors were preferred. Only 29% of questioned patients knew their lipid levels in blood and none of the patients took drugs, reducing levels of lipids in blood. Half of the patients, that took part in our study, had increased level of body mass index.Conclusions. Inadequate

  13. Comparative assessment of the prevalence of periodontal disease in subjects with and without systemic autoimmune diseases: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh Kumar, S G; Aswath Narayanan, M B; Jayanthi, D

    2016-01-01

    Immune mechanism shares a common pathway both for systemic autoimmune diseases and periodontal diseases. Scientific exploration of literature revealed limited studies on the association between systemic autoimmune diseases and periodontal diseases in India. The aim of the study is to find whether the presence of systemic autoimmune diseases in an individual is a risk factor for the development of periodontal disease. This was a hospital-based case-control study. A sample of 253 patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, attending the Rheumatology Department of Government General Hospital, Chennai-3, and 262 patients without systemic autoimmune diseases, attending the outpatient department of the Tamil Nadu Government Dental College and Hospital, Chennai-3, constituted the case and control groups, respectively. Age, gender, and oral hygiene status matching was done. Oral hygiene status was assessed using oral hygiene index (OHI) and periodontal status was assessed using community periodontal index (CPI) and loss of attachment (LOA) index. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 15 (SPSS Inc, 2006, Chicago). Results showed 99.2% and 73.9% prevalence of gingivitis and periodontitis, respectively, in the case group as compared to 85.5% and 14.9%, respectively, in the control group. There is no linear relationship between OHI scores and prevalence of periodontitis (CPI and LOA scores) in the case group. Patients suffering from systemic autoimmune diseases showed more prevalence of periodontal diseases irrespective of oral hygiene scores. It is postulated that the presence of systemic autoimmune diseases may pose a risk for the development of periodontal diseases.

  14. Rabbit haemorrhagic disease: advantages of cELISA in assessing immunity in wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tao; Parkes, John P

    2011-12-15

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) is an acute fatal disease of domestic and wild European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) caused by RHD virus (RHDV). Accurate assessment of immunity is of great importance for the conservation and control of wild rabbits. We evaluated a competitive ELISA (cELISA) against isotype ELISAs for assessing the protective immunity against the disease by challenging 50 wild-caught rabbits with a lethal dose of RHDV. Death or survival to the challenge was used as a criterion to determine the performance characteristics of the assay for the assessment of immunity in rabbits. At 1:10 dilution, a serum exhibiting ≥ 25% inhibition (1:10(25)) was regarded as the presence of RHDV-specific antibodies. Eleven of 16 (68.8%) rabbits with antibodies at 1:10(25) (<1:40) died of RHD. When the cut-off was moved from 25% to 50% inhibition (1:10(50)) at 1:10 serum dilution, the assay sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for the protective immunity were improved from 84%, 54.2% and 69.4% to 84%, 100% and 91.8%, respectively. We also demonstrated at the epitope amino acid sequence level why the presence of the RHDV-cross reactive benign rabbit calicivirus, which interfered with isotype ELISAs, had little impact on the specificity of the cELISA for the diagnosis of RHDV infection. The presence of RHDV-specific antibody at 1:10(50) by the cELISA is a reliable indicator for the protective immunity. In contrast to isotype ELISAs, the cELISA is a valuable specific tool for monitoring the herd immunity to RHD for the conservation and management of wild rabbits in the field. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Primary and Secondary Yield Losses Caused by Pests and Diseases: Assessment and Modeling in Coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerda, Rolando; Avelino, Jacques; Gary, Christian; Tixier, Philippe; Lechevallier, Esther; Allinne, Clémentine

    2017-01-01

    The assessment of crop yield losses is needed for the improvement of production systems that contribute to the incomes of rural families and food security worldwide. However, efforts to quantify yield losses and identify their causes are still limited, especially for perennial crops. Our objectives were to quantify primary yield losses (incurred in the current year of production) and secondary yield losses (resulting from negative impacts of the previous year) of coffee due to pests and diseases, and to identify the most important predictors of coffee yields and yield losses. We established an experimental coffee parcel with full-sun exposure that consisted of six treatments, which were defined as different sequences of pesticide applications. The trial lasted three years (2013-2015) and yield components, dead productive branches, and foliar pests and diseases were assessed as predictors of yield. First, we calculated yield losses by comparing actual yields of specific treatments with the estimated attainable yield obtained in plots which always had chemical protection. Second, we used structural equation modeling to identify the most important predictors. Results showed that pests and diseases led to high primary yield losses (26%) and even higher secondary yield losses (38%). We identified the fruiting nodes and the dead productive branches as the most important and useful predictors of yields and yield losses. These predictors could be added in existing mechanistic models of coffee, or can be used to develop new linear mixed models to estimate yield losses. Estimated yield losses can then be related to production factors to identify corrective actions that farmers can implement to reduce losses. The experimental and modeling approaches of this study could also be applied in other perennial crops to assess yield losses.

  16. Quantitative Assessment of Dance Therapy Infulence on the Parkinson’s Disease Patients’ Lower Limb Biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatas Lukšys

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease – progressive neurologic disorder that damages a variety of motor function and reduces the quality of life. Patients with PD are subject to various physical therapy exercises, but recently is applied more often the dance – music therapy. This study aims assessing the therapeutic effect of the modified Lindy Hop dance therapy on lower extremity biomechanics. The experimental study was performed using inertial sensors that registered lower extremity biomechanical parameters during gait. Several spatio-temporal parameters of lower limb were calculated and were found statistically significant between groups, which allows quantifying the influence of dance therapy.

  17. The utility of cardiac CT beyond the assessment of suspected coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakouros, N. [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Giles, J.; Crundwell, N.B. [Conquest Hospital, St Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex (United Kingdom); McWilliams, E.T.M., E-mail: eric.mcwilliams@esht.nhs.uk [Conquest Hospital, St Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Extensive work has been done over recent years to improve the spatial and temporal resolution of electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated cardiac computed tomography (CT). Advances in both hardware and software analysis have enabled the development of non-invasive coronary angiography. However, these high-quality examinations lend themselves to multiple additional applications beyond coronary angiography. In this review, we illustrate and discuss some established and some emerging applications of ECG-gated cardiac CT beyond the assessment of suspected coronary disease, particularly in light of recent recommendations on the appropriate use of this technology.

  18. The utility of cardiac CT beyond the assessment of suspected coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakouros, N.; Giles, J.; Crundwell, N.B.; McWilliams, E.T.M.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive work has been done over recent years to improve the spatial and temporal resolution of electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated cardiac computed tomography (CT). Advances in both hardware and software analysis have enabled the development of non-invasive coronary angiography. However, these high-quality examinations lend themselves to multiple additional applications beyond coronary angiography. In this review, we illustrate and discuss some established and some emerging applications of ECG-gated cardiac CT beyond the assessment of suspected coronary disease, particularly in light of recent recommendations on the appropriate use of this technology.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging assessed inflammation in the wrist is associated with patient-reported physical impairment, global assessment of disease activity and pain in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glinatsi, Daniel; Baker, Joshua F; Hetland, Merete L

    2017-01-01

    metacarpophalangeal joints in the analyses did not strengthen the associations between MRI pathology and PROs. CONCLUSIONS: MRI-assessed inflammation, but not damage, in early RA wrists is associated with patient-reported physical impairment, global assessment of disease activity and pain and influences the physical...

  20. Assessment of smoking patients awareness on the effects of smoking on the incidence of civilization diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Białkowska

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Smoking is known to affect the body adversely and to contribute significantly to the development of many diseases. It is necessary to carry out education programs, to develop healthy attitudes and to motivate smokers to start the fight against addiction. The aim is to show the patients’ point of view on the effects of tobacco smoking on health. It was also an attempt to assess patients’ knowledge about the effects of smoking and the incidence of civilization diseases. The authors analyze the health behaviours and habits of nicotine-dependent patients from data from patients hospitalized in the rehabilitation and internal diseases wards. Material and methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted in patients hospitalized at the University Hospital in Olsztyn and Healthcare Complex in Nidzica. The study included 50 smokers aged 21 to 80 years. The data was used to develop statistical methods: analysis of rho-Spearman correlation to examine relationships between variables, non-parametric test of Mann-Whitney U to detectsignificant differences between the compared groups and one-way analysis of variance to test differences between groups. Results: Prevalence of symptoms of the disease in patients is associated with an increased awareness of the dangers of smoking tobacco. Knowledge of these risks among the respondents is independent of age and education. Educational activities conducted by therapists are indeed important for the patients’ health-related behaviors. Conclusions: Awareness of the dangers of cigarette smoking is fixed and is not determined by the age of the smoker, education or the fact of suffering from a particular disease. Therapists who have frequent contact with the patients are able to affect their health behaviors. In connection with the manifestation of tolerance to the phenomenon of heavy smokers’ nicotine addiction, people from a particular physical neighborhood are more likely to adopt the habit. There are

  1. A Delphic consensus assessment: imaging and biomarkers in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumor disease management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell Oberg

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the clinical management of neuroendocrine neoplasia (NEN is exacerbated by limitations in imaging modalities and a paucity of clinically useful biomarkers. Limitations in currently available imaging modalities reflect difficulties in measuring an intrinsically indolent disease, resolution inadequacies and inter-/intra-facility device variability and that RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria are not optimal for NEN. Limitations of currently used biomarkers are that they are secretory biomarkers (chromogranin A, serotonin, neuron-specific enolase and pancreastatin; monoanalyte measurements; and lack sensitivity, specificity and predictive capacity. None of them meet the NIH metrics for clinical usage. A multinational, multidisciplinary Delphi consensus meeting of NEN experts (n = 33 assessed current imaging strategies and biomarkers in NEN management. Consensus (>75% was achieved for 78% of the 142 questions. The panel concluded that morphological imaging has a diagnostic value. However, both imaging and current single-analyte biomarkers exhibit substantial limitations in measuring the disease status and predicting the therapeutic efficacy. RECIST remains suboptimal as a metric. A critical unmet need is the development of a clinico-biological tool to provide enhanced information regarding precise disease status and treatment response. The group considered that circulating RNA was better than current general NEN biomarkers and preliminary clinical data were considered promising. It was resolved that circulating multianalyte mRNA (NETest had clinical utility in both diagnosis and monitoring disease status and therapeutic efficacy. Overall, it was concluded that a combination of tumor spatial and functional imaging with circulating transcripts (mRNA would represent the future strategy for real-time monitoring of disease progress and therapeutic efficacy.

  2. Prospective study on cost-effectiveness of home-based motor assessment in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubo, E; Mariscal, N; Solano, B; Becerra, V; Armesto, D; Calvo, S; Arribas, J; Seco, J; Martinez, A; Zorrilla, L; Heldman, D

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Treatment adjustments in Parkinson's disease (PD) are in part dependent on motor assessments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of home-based motor monitoring plus standard in-office visits versus in-office visits alone in patients with advanced PD. Methods The procedures consisted of a prospective, one-year follow-up, randomized, case-control study. A total of 40 patients with advanced PD were randomized into two groups: 20 patients underwent home-based motor monitoring by using wireless motion sensor technology, while the other 20 patients had in-office visits. Motor and non-motor symptom severities, quality of life, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and comorbidities were assessed every four months. Direct costs were assessed using a standardized questionnaire. Cost-effectiveness was assessed using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Results Both groups of PD patients were largely comparable in their clinical and demographic variables at baseline; however, there were more participants using levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel in the home-based motor monitoring group. There was a trend for lower Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale functional status (UPDRS II) scores in the patients monitored at home compared to the standard clinical follow-up ( p = 0.06). However, UPDRS parts I, III, IV and quality-adjusted life-years scores were similar between both groups. Home-based motor monitoring was cost-effective in terms of improvement of functional status, motor severity, and motor complications (UPDRS II, III; IV subscales), with an ICER/UPDRS ranging from €126.72 to €701.31, respectively. Discussion Home-based motor monitoring is a tool which collects cost-effective clinical information and helps augment health care for patients with advanced PD.

  3. Assessment of inflammatory bowel disease activity by technetium 99m phagocyte scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pullman, W.E.; Sullivan, P.J.; Barratt, P.J.; Lising, J.; Booth, J.A.; Doe, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    Autologous technetium 99m-labeled phagocyte scanning has been used to assess disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease in 51 consecutive patients. Strong correlations were found between the 24-h fecal excretion of isotope and the histologic score of mucosal biopsy specimens (rS = 0.84, p less than 0.001, where rS is Spearman's rank correlation coefficient), and between the 24-h fecal excretion of isotope and a clinical inflammatory bowel disease activity index based on the Crohn's disease activity index (rS = 0.87, p less than 0.001). To develop a clinically useful and objective measure of inflammatory bowel disease activity that did not require a 24-h stool collection, the intensity of bowel uptake on scanning was graded visually from 0 to 4, a ratio of count rates for the region of interest to the iliac crest reference region was calculated, and the rapidity of labeled phagocyte uptake into inflamed bowel was measured as the peak uptake time. Visual grading of disease activity on the scans was validated by comparing it with the ratio of count rates from inflamed bowel regions of interest and those from the iliac crest reference region. The ratio of count rates showed a significant correlation with the clinical disease activity index (r = 0.75, p less than 0.001). The visual scan grade also correlated well with the clinical activity index (r = 0.87, p less than 0.001). Count rates from hourly scans were also used to calculate the time of peak uptake of counts for a given region of interest. There was a strong negative correlation between this peak uptake time and the fecal excretion of isotope (rS = -0.81, p less than 0.001), a clinical activity index (r = -0.60, p less than 0.001), and the histologic score of the mucosal biopsy specimens (r = -0.84, p less than 0.001)

  4. Risk assessment of environmentally influenced airway diseases based on time-series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbarth, O

    1995-09-01

    Threshold values are of prime importance in providing a sound basis for public health decisions. A key issue is determining threshold or maximum exposure values for pollutants and assessing their potential health risks. Environmental epidemiology could be instrumental in assessing these levels, especially since the assessment of ambient exposures involves relatively low concentrations of pollutants. This paper presents a statistical method that allows the determination of threshold values as well as the assessment of the associated risk using a retrospective, longitudinal study design with a prospective follow-up. Morbidity data were analyzed using the Fourier method, a time-series analysis that is based on the assumption of a high temporal resolution of the data. This method eliminates time-dependent responses like temporal inhomogeneity and pseudocorrelation. The frequency of calls for respiratory distress conditions to the regional Mobile Medical Emergency Service (MMES) in the city of Leipzig were investigated. The entire population of Leipzig served as a pool for data collection. In addition to the collection of morbidity data, air pollution measurements were taken every 30 min for the entire study period using sulfur dioxide as the regional indicator variable. This approach allowed the calculation of a dose-response curve for respiratory diseases and air pollution indices in children and adults. Significantly higher morbidities were observed above a 24-hr mean value of 0.6 mg SO2/m3 air for children and 0.8 mg SO2/m3 for adults.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess myocardial fibrosis in valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesnikar, Tomaz; Delgado, Victoria; Bax, Jeroen J

    2018-01-01

    The left ventricular (LV) remodeling process associated with significant valvular heart disease (VHD) is characterized by an increase of myocardial interstitial space with deposition of collagen and loss of myofibers. These changes occur before LV systolic function deteriorates or the patient develops symptoms. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) permits assessment of reactive fibrosis, with the use of T1 mapping techniques, and replacement fibrosis, with the use of late gadolinium contrast enhancement. In addition, functional consequences of these structural changes can be evaluated with myocardial tagging and feature tracking CMR, which assess the active deformation (strain) of the LV myocardium. Several studies have demonstrated that CMR techniques may be more sensitive than the conventional measures (LV ejection fraction or LV dimensions) to detect these structural and functional changes in patients with severe left-sided VHD and have shown that myocardial fibrosis may not be reversible after valve surgery. More important, the presence of myocardial fibrosis has been associated with lesser improvement in clinical symptoms and recovery of LV systolic function. Whether assessment of myocardial fibrosis may better select the patients with severe left-sided VHD who may benefit from surgery in terms of LV function and clinical symptoms improvement needs to be demonstrated in prospective studies. The present review article summarizes the current status of CMR techniques to assess myocardial fibrosis and appraises the current evidence on the use of these techniques for risk stratification of patients with severe aortic stenosis or regurgitation and mitral regurgitation.

  6. A quantitative assessment of alkaptonuria: testing the reliability of two disease severity scoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Trevor F; Ranganath, Lakshminarayan

    2011-12-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is due to excessive homogentisic acid accumulation in body fluids due to lack of enzyme homogentisate dioxygenase leading in turn to varied clinical manifestations mainly by a process of conversion of HGA to a polymeric melanin-like pigment known as ochronosis. A potential treatment, a drug called nitisinone, to decrease formation of HGA is available. However, successful demonstration of its efficacy in modifying the natural history of AKU requires an effective quantitative assessment tool. We have described two potential tools that could be used to quantitate disease burden in AKU. One tool describes scoring the clinical features that includes clinical assessments, investigations and questionnaires in 15 patients with AKU. The second tool describes a scoring system that only includes items obtained from questionnaires used in 44 people with AKU. Statistical analyses were carried out on the two patient datasets to assess the AKU tools; these included the calculation of Chronbach's alpha, multidimensional scaling and simple linear regression analysis. The conclusion was that there was good evidence that the tools could be adopted as AKU assessment tools, but perhaps with further refinement before being used in the practical setting of a clinical trial.

  7. Effectiveness of a national cardiovascular disease risk assessment program (NHS Health Check): results after one year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artac, Macide; Dalton, Andrew R H; Majeed, Azeem; Car, Josip; Millett, Christopher

    2013-08-01

    We aimed to assess whether the National Health Service (NHS) Health Check, a systematic cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk assessment and management program, was associated with reduction in CVD risk in attendees after one year. We extracted data from patients aged 40-74 years, with high estimated CVD risk, who were registered with general practices in a deprived, culturally diverse setting in England. We included 4748 patients at baseline (July 2008-November 2009), with 3712 at follow-up (December 2009-March 2011). We used a pre-post study design to assess changes in global CVD risk, individual CVD risk factors and statin prescription in patients with a complete and partial Health Check. There were significant reductions in mean CVD risk score (28.2%; 95% confidence interval (CI)=27.3-29.1 to 26.2%; 95% CI, 25.4-27.1), diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol levels and lipid ratios after one year in patients with a complete Health Check. Statin prescription increased from 14.0% (95% CI=11.9-16.0) to 60.6% (95% CI=57.7-63.5). The introduction of NHS Health Check was associated with significant but modest reductions in CVD risk among screened high-risk individuals. Further cost-effectiveness analysis and work accounting for uptake is required to assess whether the program can make significant changes to population health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of neuropsychological assessment in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Maria Lima Pimentel

    Full Text Available Abstract The prevalence of dementia increases significantly from the age of 65 years, doubling every five years thereafter. Alzheimer's disease (AD and vascular dementia (VaD constitute the two main dementia types. Differentiating them encompasses anamnesis, neurological examination, laboratory and neuroimaging exams and neuropsychological assessment. Neuropsychological assessment produces different findings for each dementia type, and reveals those areas most impaired as well as those most preserved. The aim of the present article was to describe the role of neuropsychology in diagnosing dementia and achieving a differential diagnosis between AD and VaD. A general overview follows of the most widely known instruments used to assess cognitive function in dementia, and the cognitive changes seen in AD and VaD. The conclusion drawn was that there is significant overlap in cognitive changes between both these dementia types, while each type has its own specific characteristics which are identifiable and quantifiable on neuropsychological assessments and provide the basis for reaching a differential diagnosis.

  9. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease history assessment in Spain: a multidimensional chronic obstructive pulmonary disease evaluation. Study methods and organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Campos, José Luis; Peces-Barba, Germán; Soler-Cataluña, Juan José; Soriano, Joan B; de Lucas Ramos, Pilar; de-Torres, Juan P; Marín, José M; Casanova, Ciro

    2012-12-01

    This present paper describes the method and the organization of the study known as the COPD History Assessment In SpaiN (CHAIN), whose main objective is to evaluate the long-term natural history of a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patient cohort from a multidimensional standpoint and to identify clinical phenotypes, in comparison with another non-COPD control cohort. CHAIN is a multicenter, observational study of prospective cohorts carried out at 36 Spanish hospitals. Both cohorts will be followed-up during a 5-year study period with complete office visits every 12 months and telephone interviews every 6 months in order to evaluate exacerbations and the vital state of the subjects. The recruitment period for cases was between 15 January 2010 and 31 March 2012. At each annual visit, information will be collected on: (i) clinical aspects (socio-economic situation, anthropometric data, comorbidities, smoking, respiratory symptoms, exacerbations, quality of life, anxiety-depression scale, daily life activities, treatments); (ii) respiratory function (spirometry, blood gases, hyperinflation, diffusion, respiratory pressures); (iii) BODE index (main study variable); (iv) peripheral muscle function, and (v) blood work-up (including IgE and cardiovascular risk factors). In addition, a serum bank will be created for the future determination of biomarkers. The data of the patients are anonymized in a database with a hierarchical access control in order to guarantee secure information access. The CHAIN study will provide information about the progression of COPD and it will establish a network of researchers for future projects related with COPD. Copyright © 2012 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of Nonverbal and Verbal Apraxia in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monia Presotto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the presence of nonverbal and verbal apraxia in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD and analyze the correlation between these conditions and patient age, education, duration of disease, and PD stage, as well as evaluate the correlation between the two types of apraxia and the frequency and types of verbal apraxic errors made by patients in the sample. Method. This was an observational prevalence study. The sample comprised 45 patients with PD seen at the Movement Disorders Clinic of the Clinical Hospital of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Patients were evaluated using the Speech Apraxia Assessment Protocol and PD stages were classified according to the Hoehn and Yahr scale. Results. The rate of nonverbal apraxia and verbal apraxia in the present sample was 24.4%. Verbal apraxia was significantly correlated with education (p≤0.05. The most frequent types of verbal apraxic errors were omissions (70.8%. The analysis of manner and place of articulation showed that most errors occurred during the production of trill (57.7% and dentoalveolar (92% phonemes, consecutively. Conclusion. Patients with PD presented nonverbal and verbal apraxia and made several verbal apraxic errors. Verbal apraxia was correlated with education levels.

  11. Invasive assessment of renal artery atherosclerotic disease and resistant hypertension before renal sympathetic denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribichini, Flavio; Pighi, Michele; Zivelonghi, Carlo; Gambaro, Alessia; Valvo, Enrico; Lupo, Antonio; Vassanelli, Corrado

    2013-01-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) is emerging as a new therapeutic option for patients with severe hypertension refractory to medical therapy. The presence of a renal artery stenosis may be both a cause of secondary hypertension and a contraindication to RSD if a renal artery stent is implanted; therefore, the definition of the functional importance of a renal artery stenosis in a patient with refractory hypertension is crucial. We describe the imaging and functional intravascular assessment of an angiographically severe stenosis of the renal artery in a patient with severe refractory hypertension, by means of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), and measurement of the translesional pressure gradient with a pressure wire. Pressure wire examination excluded any severity of the stenosis, and IVUS showed the presence of a dissected plaque that resolved spontaneously after 3 months of intensive medical therapy and high-dose statin. Subsequently the patient was treated with RSD, achieving a significant effect on blood pressure control. Intravascular imaging and functional assessment of renal artery anatomy in patients with atherosclerotic disease may prove particularly suited to patients with refractory hypertension and multilevel vascular disease who are considered for endovascular therapies, either renal artery stenting or RSD.

  12. Bihemispheric cerebral FDG PET correlates of cognitive dysfunction as assessed by the CERAD in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönknecht, Oskar Dieter Peter; Hunt, Aoife; Toro, Pablo; Guenther, Thomas; Henze, Marcus; Haberkorn, Uwe; Schröder, Johannes

    2011-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a variety of cognitive deficits which can be reliably assessed by the neuropsychological test battery of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD), but the cerebral changes underlying the respective cognitive deficits are only partly understood. Measures of severity of dementia in AD as well as delayed episodic memory performance in mild cognitive impairment significantly correlated with bihemispheric cerebral glucose hypometabolism. We therefore hypothesized that the CERAD cognitive battery may represent cerebral dysfunction of both hemispheres in patients with AD. In 32 patients with AD, cerebral glucose metabolism was investigated using positron-emission-tomography with 18Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG PET) and associated with the test scores of the CERAD cognitive battery by statistical parametric mapping. Episodic memory scores significantly correlated with temporopari etal glucose metabolism of both hemispheres while delayed episodic memory significantly was correlated with the right frontotemporal cortices. Verbal fluency and naming scores significantly correlated with glucose metabolism in left temporoparietal and right frontal cortices, whereas constructional praxis predominantly correlated significantly with the bilateral precuneus. In conclusion, the results of our study demonstrate that not only memory function but also functions of language and constructional praxis in AD are associated with glucose metabolism as revealed by FDG PET in subsets of uni- and bilateral brain areas. The findings of our study for the first time demonstrate that in AD neuropsychological deficits as assessed by the CERAD refer to different cerebral sites of both hemispheres.

  13. Translational Assays for Assessment of Cognition in Rodent Models of Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, A; Tyebji, S; Hannan, A J; Burrows, E L

    2016-11-01

    Cognitive dysfunction appears as a core feature of dementia, which includes its most prevalent form, Alzheimer's disease (AD), as well as vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia, and other brain disorders. AD alone affects more than 45 million people worldwide, with growing prevalence in aging populations. There is no cure, and therapeutic options remain limited. Gene-edited and transgenic animal models, expressing disease-specific gene mutations, illuminate pathogenic mechanisms leading to cognitive decline in AD and other forms of dementia. To date, cognitive tests in AD mouse models have not been directly relevant to the clinical presentation of AD, providing challenges for translation of findings to the clinic. Touchscreen testing in mice has enabled the assessment of specific cognitive domains in mice that are directly relevant to impairments described in human AD patients. In this review, we provide context for how cognitive decline is measured in the clinic, describe traditional methods for assessing cognition in mice, and outline novel approaches, including the use of the touchscreen platform for cognitive testing. We highlight the limitations of traditional memory-testing paradigms in mice, particularly their capacity for direct translation into cognitive testing of patients. While it is not possible to expect direct translation in testing methodologies, we can aim to develop tests that engage similar neural substrates in both humans and mice. Ultimately, that would enable us to better predict efficacy across species and therefore improve the chances that a treatment that works in mice will also work in the clinic.

  14. The assessment of online heath videos for surgery in Crohn's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J H; Baker, D M; Lee, M J; Jones, G L; Lobo, A J; Brown, S R

    2018-02-10

    YouTube ™ is an open-access, non-peer reviewed video-hosting site and is used as a source of publicly available healthcare information. This study aimed to assess the thematic content of the most viewed videos relating to surgery and Crohn's Disease and to explore the viewer interactions to these videos. A search of YouTube ™ was carried out using one search string. The 50 most viewed videos were identified and categorised by source, content themes and assessed for viewer interactions. Video comments were used to describe the usefulness of the video content to viewers. The majority of videos were uploaded by patients (n=21).The remainder were uploaded by individual health care professionals (n=9), hospital/speciality associations (n=18) and industry (n=2). The median number of likes for patient videos was significantly higher than hospital/speciality association videos (p=content(n=27), and more comments asking for further information (n=14). The median number of likes for 'experience of surgery' (p=content of patient sourced videos focused on surgical and disease experience, suggesting these themes are important to patients.Current patient developed videos provide limited information, as reflected by viewers requesting further information. Storytelling patient-centred videos combined with clinical evidence may be a good model for future videos. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Ultrasound -a useful complementary tool to mammography in assessment of symptomatic breast diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatima, S.T.; Zahur, Z.; Jeilani, A.; Hussain, S.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common female malignancy worldwide. Pakistan has the highest incidence rate of breast cancer than any other Asian population. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the worth of sono-mammography in diagnosis of symptomatic breast diseases by comparing it with mammogram. Methods: In this cross-sectional validation study, 45 subjects with mean age of 45+-12.07 were included. Majority of the patients presented with complaint of breast lump. After complete history and clinical examination, all the patients had high resolution ultrasound of bilateral breasts and axilla followed by bilateral mammography. Histopathology was taken as gold standard in this study. The exclusion criteria were pregnancy and patients having direct clinical signs of breast malignancy. Results: Based on histopathology, out of 45 patients with breast symptoms, 12 patients had benign lesions, whereas 32 patients were diagnosed as the cases of breast cancers. Finally one patient did not have biopsy proven final diagnosis. Sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound were calculated to be 100% and 67% as compared to sensitivity and specificity of 90.6% and 91.7% for that of mammography. Conclusions: Ultrasound is a useful complementary tool to mammography in assessment of symptomatic breast diseases since it helps in characterization and localization of breast lesions seen on mammogram and it is not limited by dense breasts. Also it should be the considered as initial imaging technique for assessment of palpable breast lumps. (author)

  16. Ultrasound assessment of thyroid gland volume in diabetic patients without overt thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nduka, Christopher C; Adeyekun, Ademola A

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus and thyroid disease are known to mutually influence each other. Thyroid disease can worsen glycaemic control in diabetes, and patients with diabetes mellitus have increased incidence of thyroid disorders such as increase in size, compared to the normal population. The aim of the study was to sonographically assess thyroid gland volume in Nigerian adult diabetic patients and compare with apparently healthy adults (controls). The study setting was the Department of Radiology, University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH) Nigeria. The thyroid gland in 120 diabetic subjects and equal number of apparently healthy controls was scanned with a 5-12 MHz linear transducer of a SONOACE X4 Machine. Thyroid gland volume was assessed. Statistical analysis was done with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 17 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL, USA). Diabetics had significantly increased thyroid volume compared to age matched male and female control subjects (11.5 ± 5.2 cm3 vs 7.4 ± 1.9 cm3; Pthyroid volume among diabetics. Diabetics have higher thyroid gland dimensions, compared to apparently healthy subjects. Gland proliferation from circulating insulin may play a role. This is not influenced by gender.

  17. Implementing Cargo Movement into Climate Based Risk Assessment of Vector-Borne Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Margarete Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades the disease vector Aedes albopictus (Asian tiger mosquito has rapidly spread around the globe. Global shipment of goods contributes to its permanent introduction. Invaded regions are facing novel and serious public health concerns, especially regarding the transmission of formerly non-endemic arboviruses such as dengue and chikungunya. The further development and potential spread to other regions depends largely on their climatic suitability. Here, we have developed a tool for identifying and prioritizing European areas at risk for the establishment of Aedes albopictus by taking into account, for the first time, the freight imports from this mosquito’s endemic countries and the climate suitability at harbors and their surrounding regions. In a second step we consider the further transport of containers by train and inland waterways because these types of transport can be well controlled. We identify European regions at risk, where a huge amount of transported goods meet climatically suitable conditions for the disease vector. The current and future suitability of the climate for Aedes albopictus was modeled by a correlative niche model approach and the Regional Climate Model COSMO-CLM. This risk assessment combines impacts of globalization and global warming to improve effective and proactive interventions in disease vector surveillance and control actions.

  18. The Role of MR Enterography in Assessing Crohn’s Disease Activity and Treatment Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Moy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MR enterography (MRE has become the primary imaging modality in the assessment of Crohn’s disease (CD in both children and adults at many institutions in the United States and worldwide, primarily due to its noninvasiveness, superior soft tissue contrast, and lack of ionizing radiation. MRE technique includes distention of the small bowel with oral contrast media with the acquisition of T2-weighted, balanced steady-state free precession, and multiphase T1-weighted fat suppressed gadolinium contrast-enhanced sequences. With the introduction of molecule-targeted biologic agents into the clinical setting for CD and their potential to reverse the inflammatory process, MRE is increasingly utilized to evaluate disease activity and response to therapy as an imaging complement to clinical indices or optical endoscopy. New and emerging MRE techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI, magnetization transfer, ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide- (USPIO- enhanced MRI, and PET-MR, offer the potential for an expanded role of MRI in detecting occult disease activity, evaluating early treatment response/resistance, and differentiating inflammatory from fibrotic strictures. Familiarity with MR enterography is essential for radiologists and gastroenterologists as the technique evolves and is further incorporated into the clinical management of CD.

  19. Nonketotic hyperglycinemia: Functional assessment of missense variants in GLDC to understand phenotypes of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Alonso, Irene; Navarrete, Rosa; Arribas-Carreira, Laura; Perona, Almudena; Abia, David; Couce, María Luz; García-Cazorla, Angels; Morais, Ana; Domingo, Rosario; Ramos, María Antonia; Swanson, Michael A; Van Hove, Johan L K; Ugarte, Magdalena; Pérez, Belén; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Rodríguez-Pombo, Pilar

    2017-06-01

    The rapid analysis of genomic data is providing effective mutational confirmation in patients with clinical and biochemical hallmarks of a specific disease. This is the case for nonketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH), a Mendelian disorder causing seizures in neonates and early-infants, primarily due to mutations in the GLDC gene. However, understanding the impact of missense variants identified in this gene is a major challenge for the application of genomics into clinical practice. Herein, a comprehensive functional and structural analysis of 19 GLDC missense variants identified in a cohort of 26 NKH patients was performed. Mutant cDNA constructs were expressed in COS7 cells followed by enzymatic assays and Western blot analysis of the GCS P-protein to assess the residual activity and mutant protein stability. Structural analysis, based on molecular modeling of the 3D structure of GCS P-protein, was also performed. We identify hypomorphic variants that produce attenuated phenotypes with improved prognosis of the disease. Structural analysis allows us to interpret the effects of mutations on protein stability and catalytic activity, providing molecular evidence for clinical outcome and disease severity. Moreover, we identify an important number of mutants whose loss-of-functionality is associated with instability and, thus, are potential targets for rescue using folding therapeutic approaches. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Assessment of coronary artery disease by post-mortem cardiac MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruder, Thomas D.; Bauer-Kreutz, Regula; Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Rosskopf, Andrea B.; Pilgrim, Thomas M.; Weber, Oliver M.; Thali, Michael J.; Hatch, Gary M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Minimally invasive or virtual autopsies are being advocated as alternative to traditional autopsy, but have limited abilities to detect coronary artery disease. It was the objective of this study to assess if the occurrence of chemical shift artifacts (CSA) along the coronary arteries on non-contrast, post-mortem cardiac MR may be used to investigate coronary artery disease. Methods: We retrospectively compared autopsy and CT findings of 30 cases with significant (≥75%), insignificant (<75%), or absent coronary artery stenosis to post-mortem cardiac MR findings. The chi-square test was used to investigate if the occurrence of CSA depends on the presence or absence of stenosis. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values were calculated for each finding. Results: CSA indicates the absence of (significant) stenosis (p < 0.001). The occurrence of paired dark bands in lieu of CSA on post-mortem cardiac MR suggests (significant) coronary arteries stenosis (p < 0.001). Both findings have a high specificity but low sensitivity. Conclusions: CSA is a marker of vessel patency. The presence of paired dark bands indicates stenosis. These criteria improve the ability of minimally invasive or virtual autopsy to detect coronary artery disease related deaths

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of urologic disease: an all-in-one approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verswijvel, G.A.; Oyen, R.H.; Vaninbrouckx, J.; Bosmans, H.; Marchal, G. [University Hospital, Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology; Van Poppel, H.P.; Goethuys, H. [Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Urology; Maes, B. [Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Nephrology

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an ''all-in-one'' MR procedure to examine the kidneys, the renal vascular supply and renal perfusion, and the urinary tract. In 64 patients (58 with urologic disease and 6 healthy volunteers), MR was performed including: (a) T1- and T2-weighted imaging; (b) 3D contrast-enhanced MR angiography (MRA), including the renal arteries, renal veins, as well as renal perfusion; and (c) 3D contrast-enhanced MR urography (MRU) in the coronal and sagittal plane. For the latter, low- and high-resolution images were compared. Prior to gadolinium injection, 0.1 mg/kg body weight of furosemide was administered intravenously. The results were compared with correlative imaging modalities (ultrasonography, intravenous urography, CT), ureterorenoscopy and/or surgical-pathologic findings. Visualization of the renal parenchyma, the vascular supply, and the collecting system was adequate in all cases, both in nondilated and in dilated systems and irrespective of the renal function. One infiltrating urothelial cancer was missed; there was one false-positive urothelial malignancy. Different MR techniques can be combined to establish an all-in-one imaging modality in the assessment of diseases which affect the kidneys and urinary tracts. Continuous refinement of the applied MR techniques and further improvements in spatial resolution is needed to expand the actual imaging possibilities and to create new tracts and challenges in the MR evaluation of urologic disease. (orig.)

  2. Rethinking Iron Regulation and Assessment in Iron Deficiency, Anemia of Chronic Disease, and Obesity: Introducing Hepcidin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tussing-Humphreys, Lisa; Pustacioglu, Cenk; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Braunschweig, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Adequate iron availability is essential to human development and overall health. Iron is a key component of oxygen-carrying proteins, has a pivotal role in cellular metabolism, and is essential to cell growth and differentiation. Inadequate dietary iron intake, chronic and acute inflammatory conditions, and obesity are each associated with alterations in iron homeostasis. Tight regulation of iron is necessary because iron is highly toxic and human beings can only excrete small amounts through sweat, skin and enterocyte sloughing, and fecal and menstrual blood loss. Hepcidin, a small peptide hormone produced mainly by the liver, acts as the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. Hepcidin controls movement of iron into plasma by regulating the activity of the sole known iron exporter ferroportin-1. Downregulation of the ferroportin-1 exporter results in sequestration of iron within intestinal enterocytes, hepatocytes, and iron-storing macrophages reducing iron bioavailability. Hepcidin expression is increased by higher body iron levels and inflammation and decreased by anemia and hypoxia. Importantly, existing data illustrate that hepcidin may play a significant role in the development of several iron-related disorders, including the anemia of chronic disease and the iron dysregulation observed in obesity. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to discuss iron regulation, with specific emphasis on systemic regulation by hepcidin, and examine the role of hepcidin within several disease states, including iron deficiency, anemia of chronic disease, and obesity. The relationship between obesity and iron depletion and the clinical assessment of iron status will also be reviewed. PMID:22717199

  3. Reproducibility and validity of patient-rated assessment of speech, swallowing, and saliva control in Parkinson’s Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machiel Zwarts; Johanna Kalf; Bastiaan Bloem; George Borm; Marten Munneke; Bert de Swart

    2012-01-01

    To report on the development and psychometric evaluation of the Radboud Oral Motor Inventory for Parkinson's Disease (ROMP), a newly developed patient-rated assessment of speech, swallowing, and saliva control in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). To evaluate reproducibility, 60 patients

  4. 75 FR 54589 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Foot-and-Mouth Disease Vaccine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ...] Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Foot-and-Mouth Disease Vaccine, Live Adenovirus... unlicensed foot-and-mouth disease vaccine, live adenovirus vector. The EA, which is based on a risk analysis... testing following the close of the comment period for this notice unless new substantial issues bearing on...

  5. Prevalence and Knowledge Assessment of HIV and Non-Communicable Disease Risk Factors among Formal Sector Employees in Namibia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guariguata, Leonor; de Beer, Ingrid; Hough, Rina; Mulongeni, Pancho; Feeley, Frank G.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is growing in sub-Saharan Africa combined with an already high prevalence of infectious disease, like HIV. Engaging the formal employment sector may present a viable strategy for addressing both HIV and NCDs in people of working age. This study assesses

  6. Prospective assessment of disease-specific quality of life in adults with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, E; Taft, T; Zalewski, A; Gonsalves, N; Hirano, I

    2017-10-27

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an important cause of upper gastrointestinal dysfunction in children and adults. The EoE-quality of life (QOL)-A was validated as a disease-specific measure of quality of life in EoE. This study characterized the extent of QOL concerns in a cohort of adult EoE patients and delineated the relationships between QOL and other disease activity measures. One hundred sixty-seven patients enrolled in this prospective cohort study. Patients with established and suspected EoE undergoing endoscopy at a single university-based medical center were recruited. EoE was diagnosed on the basis of the clinical criteria and histologic demonstration of ≥15 eos/hpf while on proton pump inhibition therapy. Sixty five patients undergoing repeat endoscopy during the enrollment period participated twice. Patients provided demographic information and completed symptom assessments and the EoE-QOL-A. Analyses included comparisons with overall QOL as well as QOL subscales. Outcome measures included endoscopic activity using a validated instrument, the EoE Endoscopic Reference Score, and histology. Overall QOL was significantly correlated with dysphagia frequency, intensity, and severity (P food impaction in the last 30 days had significantly worse overall QOL (P = 0.009). There was no correlation between overall QOL and years since diagnosis, symptom duration, endoscopic features, or histologic findings. Patient symptoms correlated with endoscopic features of edema, rings, and stricture severity. Histologic activity was highly correlated with severity of endoscopic features. Patients who underwent repeat endoscopy with histologic response demonstrated improved eating and social QOL; however, overall QOL was unchanged. In adults with EoE, patient reported QOL is associated with symptom severity but not endoscopic or histologic features. Disease-specific QOL may complement parameters of biologic activity in the assessment of overall disease burden in EoE.

  7. Ultrasonographic assessment of the thyroid gland structure in inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Katarzyna; Woźniak-Stolarska, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), encompassing Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), is still not fully elucidated and seems to be multifactorial. It has been suggested that genetic, immunological and environmental factors participate in IBD development. IBD extraintestinal manifestations include rheumatic, metabolic, dermatologic, ophthalmologic, hepatobiliary, pancreatic, urologic, pulmonary, neurological, hematological and thromboembolic complications. Thyroid gland diseases have not been confirmed as extraintestinal manifestations of IBD. However, it is known that some thyroid diseases share an immunological background with IBD, and that dysfunction of the thyroid gland may induce gastrointestinal symptoms. Ultrasound examination is the gold standard for evaluation of thyroid gland morphology. This study was designed to assess the prevalence of abnormalities in the structure of the thyroid gland in IBD patients and to compare it to the control group. The study group consisted of 199 consecutive IBD patients (80 CD patients and 119 UC patients) hospitalized at the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology of Wroclaw Medical University (Poland). The control group consisted of 42 healthy volunteers and patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders. The most common finding in the ultrasound examination in IBD patients were tumors. Tumors, which were smaller than or equal to 10 mm were present in 11.5% of IBD patients; and tumors larger than 10 mm were present in 13.1%. These results show that small tumors (less than 10 mm in diameter) of the thyroid gland are more frequent among patients with CD and UC compared to the control group (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.001, respectively). Additionally, enlargement of the thyroid gland occurs more often in UC patients compared to the control group (p = 0.003). There was no difference in the frequency of thyroid abnormalities between UC and CD patients. In patients with inflammatory

  8. Comparative assessment of the diets of healthy individuals, subjects with preclinical coronary heart disease and patients with severe heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronov, D.M.; Eganyan, R.A.; Kovaleva, O.F.; Zhidko, N.I.; Danielov, G.Eh.; Rozhnov, A.V.; Shcherbakova, I.A.

    1991-01-01

    92 males aged 26 to 55 (28 healthy individuals, 45 persons with preclinical coronary heart disease and 19 patients with functional class 1-2 coronary heart disease) were examined to study the peculiarities and dietary patterns of persons with a high physical working capacity and having no typical clinical signs of the disease. All persons were subjected to a complex examination which included questionnarire, myocardial scintigraphy with 201 Tl at a maximum physical loading, echocardiography, coronaroangiography. Certain dietary peculiarities are established in persons with preclinical coronary heart disease

  9. Standardized handwriting to assess bradykinesia, micrographia and tremor in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther J Smits

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess whether standardized handwriting can provide quantitative measures to distinguish patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease from age- and gender-matched healthy control participants. DESIGN: Exploratory study. Pen tip trajectories were recorded during circle, spiral and line drawing and repeated character 'elelelel' and sentence writing, performed by Parkinson patients and healthy control participants. Parkinson patients were tested after overnight withdrawal of anti-Parkinsonian medication. SETTING: University Medical Center Groningen, tertiary care, the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 10; mean age 69.0 years; 6 male and healthy controls (n = 10; mean age 68.1 years; 6 male. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Movement time and velocity to detect bradykinesia and the size of writing to detect micrographia. A rest recording to investigate the presence of a rest-tremor, by frequency analysis. RESULTS: Mean disease duration in the Parkinson group was 4.4 years and the patients were in modified Hoehn-Yahr stages 1-2.5. In general, Parkinson patients were slower than healthy control participants. Median time per repetition, median velocity and median acceleration of the sentence task and median velocity of the elel task differed significantly between Parkinson patients and healthy control participants (all p<0.0014. Parkinson patients also wrote smaller than healthy control participants and the width of the 'e' in the elel task was significantly smaller in Parkinson patients compared to healthy control participants (p<0.0014. A rest-tremor was detected in the three patients who were clinically assessed as having rest-tremor. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that standardized handwriting can provide objective measures for bradykinesia, tremor and micrographia to distinguish Parkinson patients from healthy control participants.

  10. North American Pediatric Gastroenterology Fellowship Needs Assessment in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Trainee and Program Director Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Jennifer L; Falaiye, Tolulope; Bricker, Josh B; Strople, Jennifer; Rosh, Joel

    2016-07-01

    Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) care is complex and rapidly evolving. The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America and North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition cosponsored a needs assessment survey of pediatric gastroenterology trainees and program directors (PDs) to inform on educational programming. A Web-based, self-completed survey was provided to North American trainees and PDs during the 2013-2014 academic year. Standard descriptive statistics summarized demographics and responses. One hundred sixty-six of 326 (51%) trainees (62% female) and 37 of 74 (50%) PDs responded. Median trainees per program = 5 and median total faculty = 10 (3 IBD experts); 15% of programs did not have a self-identified "IBD expert" faculty member. Sixty-nine percent of trainees were confident/somewhat confident in their IBD inpatient training, whereas 54% were confident/somewhat confident in their outpatient training. Trainees identified activities that would most improve their education, including didactics (55%), interaction with national experts (50%), trainee-centered IBD Web resources (42%), and increased patient exposure (42%). Trainees were most confident in managing inpatient active Crohn's disease/ulcerative colitis, phenotype classification, managing biological therapies, and using clinical disease activity indices. They were least confident in managing J-pouch complications, performing pouchoscopy, managing extraintestinal manifestations, and ostomy-related complications. Eighty-five percent would like an IBD-focused training elective. Most directors (86%) would allow trainees to do electives at other institutions. This IBD needs assessment survey of pediatric gastroenterology trainees and PDs demonstrated a strong resource commitment to IBD training and clinical care. Areas for educational enrichment emerged, including pouch and ostomy complications.

  11. Assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity during major depression and after remission of disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vakilian Alireza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are a growing number of studies suggesting that depression may increase the risk of stroke. Impaired autoregulation of vascular tone may contribute to a higher risk of developing cerebrovascular diseases. Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR reflects the compensatory dilatory capacity of cerebral arterioles to a dilatory stimulus and is an important mechanism that ensures constant cerebral blood flow. There is a hypothesis that CVR is reduced in major depression, which would explain the association between depression and stroke. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of depression on CVR in cerebral vessels by comparing CVR during the depression phase with that during remission. Material and Methods: Using the apnea test, we assessed CVR in 16 patients with unipolar depression during disease and after remission of disease by calculating the increase in cerebral blood flow velocity after breath-holding (the apnea test. Blood flow velocities were measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD. Results: CVR was significantly reduced in the depression phase in comparison to that in the remission phase. However, this change was not seen in all the patients. Conclusion: CVR was reduced in most of the depressed patients. The decreased CVR, as indicated by the changes in peak systolic velocity (PSV and mean flow velocity (MFV of the middle cerebral artery, in depressed patients was more marked on the right side, which could point to a vascular basis for some kinds of depression. We recommend that other studies, with larger samples, be done; future studies should assess whether the changes in the CVR varies with the severity and type of depression.

  12. Assessment of the right ventricular function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yan; Du Xiangying; Qin Wen; Li Kuncheng

    2011-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often associated with changes of the structure and the function of the right ventricle (RV). Therefore, the assessment of right ventricular function and myocardial mass (MM) is clinically important for the evaluation of the severity of COPD, which may provide an objective basis for therapeutic strategy. Purpose: To assess the right ventricular function and RV MM in patients with mild to severe COPD using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods: We prospectively studied 49 COPD patients determined by the pulmonary function test (PFT). Using the Global Initiative for COPD classification, the COPD patients were divided into three groups according to the severity of the disease: group I = mild (n = 18); group II = moderate (n = 16); and group III = severe (n = 15). The patient groups were compared to a control group consisting of 30 age-matched, healthy, non-smoking subjects. The RV function and RV MM were obtained by 1.5T cardiac MRI in all of the four groups. The results were compared among the four groups using the ANOVA. Pearson's correlation was used to evaluate the relationship between the right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) and MM with the PFT results in COPD patients. Results: The RVEF was significantly lower in group III than in the other groups (P < 0.01). The RV MM differed significantly among all groups (P < 0.01) and gradually increased with the severity of COPD (P < 0.01). The correlation was significant between the MRI results and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (r = 0.860 for RVEF, r = -0.838 for RV MM) in COPD patients. Conclusion: The RVEF and RV MM measured by MRI correlate significantly with the severity of disease as determined by PFT in patients with COPD

  13. Assessment of the right ventricular function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Yan; Du Xiangying; Qin Wen; Li Kuncheng (Dept. of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China)), email: kuncheng.li@gmail.com

    2011-09-15

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often associated with changes of the structure and the function of the right ventricle (RV). Therefore, the assessment of right ventricular function and myocardial mass (MM) is clinically important for the evaluation of the severity of COPD, which may provide an objective basis for therapeutic strategy. Purpose: To assess the right ventricular function and RV MM in patients with mild to severe COPD using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods: We prospectively studied 49 COPD patients determined by the pulmonary function test (PFT). Using the Global Initiative for COPD classification, the COPD patients were divided into three groups according to the severity of the disease: group I = mild (n = 18); group II = moderate (n = 16); and group III = severe (n = 15). The patient groups were compared to a control group consisting of 30 age-matched, healthy, non-smoking subjects. The RV function and RV MM were obtained by 1.5T cardiac MRI in all of the four groups. The results were compared among the four groups using the ANOVA. Pearson's correlation was used to evaluate the relationship between the right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) and MM with the PFT results in COPD patients. Results: The RVEF was significantly lower in group III than in the other groups (P < 0.01). The RV MM differed significantly among all groups (P < 0.01) and gradually increased with the severity of COPD (P < 0.01). The correlation was significant between the MRI results and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (r = 0.860 for RVEF, r = -0.838 for RV MM) in COPD patients. Conclusion: The RVEF and RV MM measured by MRI correlate significantly with the severity of disease as determined by PFT in patients with COPD

  14. Evidence assessments and guideline recommendations in Lyme disease: the clinical management of known tick bites, erythema migrans rashes and persistent disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Daniel J; Johnson, Lorraine B; Maloney, Elizabeth L

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with Lyme disease were developed by the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS). The guidelines address three clinical questions – the usefulness of antibiotic prophylaxis for known tick bites, the effectiveness of erythema migrans treatment and the role of antibiotic retreatment in patients with persistent manifestations of Lyme disease. Healthcare providers who evaluate and manage patients with Lyme disease are the intended users of the new ILADS guidelines, which replace those issued in 2004 (Exp Rev Anti-infect Ther 2004;2:S1–13). These clinical practice guidelines are intended to assist clinicians by presenting evidence-based treatment recommendations, which follow the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. ILADS guidelines are not intended to be the sole source of guidance in managing Lyme disease and they should not be viewed as a substitute for clinical judgment nor used to establish treatment protocols. PMID:25077519

  15. Evidence assessments and guideline recommendations in Lyme disease: the clinical management of known tick bites, erythema migrans rashes and persistent disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Daniel J; Johnson, Lorraine B; Maloney, Elizabeth L

    2014-09-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with Lyme disease were developed by the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS). The guidelines address three clinical questions - the usefulness of antibiotic prophylaxis for known tick bites, the effectiveness of erythema migrans treatment and the role of antibiotic retreatment in patients with persistent manifestations of Lyme disease. Healthcare providers who evaluate and manage patients with Lyme disease are the intended users of the new ILADS guidelines, which replace those issued in 2004 (Exp Rev Anti-infect Ther 2004;2:S1-13). These clinical practice guidelines are intended to assist clinicians by presenting evidence-based treatment recommendations, which follow the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. ILADS guidelines are not intended to be the sole source of guidance in managing Lyme disease and they should not be viewed as a substitute for clinical judgment nor used to establish treatment protocols.

  16. Assessment of disease named entity recognition on a corpus of annotated sentences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimeno, Antonio; Jimenez-Ruiz, Ernesto; Lee, Vivian; Gaudan, Sylvain; Berlanga, Rafael; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich

    2008-04-11

    In recent years, the recognition of semantic types from the biomedical scientific literature has been focused on named entities like protein and gene names (PGNs) and gene ontology terms (GO terms). Other semantic types like diseases have not received the same level of attention. Different solutions have been proposed to identify disease named entities in the scientific literature. While matching the terminology with language patterns suffers from low recall (e.g., Whatizit) other solutions make use of morpho-syntactic features to better cover the full scope of terminological variability (e.g., MetaMap). Currently, MetaMap that is provided from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) is the state of the art solution for the annotation of concepts from UMLS (Unified Medical Language System) in the literature. Nonetheless, its performance has not yet been assessed on an annotated corpus. In addition, little effort has been invested so far to generate an annotated dataset that links disease entities in text to disease entries in a database, thesaurus or ontology and that could serve as a gold standard to benchmark text mining solutions. As part of our research work, we have taken a corpus that has been delivered in the past for the identification of associations of genes to diseases based on the UMLS Metathesaurus and we have reprocessed and re-annotated the corpus. We have gathered annotations for disease entities from two curators, analyzed their disagreement (0.51 in the kappa-statistic) and composed a single annotated corpus for public use. Thereafter, three solutions for disease named entity recognition including MetaMap have been applied to the corpus to automatically annotate it with UMLS Metathesaurus concepts. The resulting annotations have been benchmarked to compare their performance. The annotated corpus is publicly available at ftp://ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/software/textmining/corpora/diseases and can serve as a benchmark to other systems. In addition, we found

  17. The application of phase analysis of gated myocardial perfusion imaging to assess left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony in cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jianfeng; Wang Yuetao

    2013-01-01

    Left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony is closely related to the severity of cardiovascular disease, it is essential to assess left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony accurately for early prediction of adverse cardiac events and prognosis assessment of the cardiac resynchronization therapy. As a new technology to assess left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony, the phase analysis of gated myocardial perfusion imaging (GMPI) can get both quantitative indicators of regional myocardial perfusion, evaluation of regional myocardial viability and scar tissue, as well as quantitative analysis of left ventricular function and left ventricular mechanical synchrony, it has broad application prospects in cardiovascular disease to assess left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony and prognosis assessment. This review mainly described the applications of GMPI phase analysis in the cardiovascular disease. (authors)

  18. Assessing the burden of medical impoverishment by cause: a systematic breakdown by disease in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verguet, Stéphane; Memirie, Solomon Tessema; Norheim, Ole Frithjof

    2016-10-21

    Out-of-pocket (OOP) medical expenses often lead to catastrophic expenditure and impoverishment in low- and middle-income countries. Yet, there has been no systematic examination of which specific diseases and conditions (e.g., tuberculosis, cardiovascular disease) drive medical impoverishment, defined as OOP direct medical costs pushing households into poverty. We used a cost and epidemiological model to propose an assessment of the burden of medical impoverishment in Ethiopia, i.e., the number of households crossing a poverty line due to excessive OOP direct medical expenses. We utilized disease-specific mortality estimates from the Global Burden of Disease study, epidemiological and cost inputs from surveys, and secondary data from the literature to produce a count of poverty cases due to OOP direct medical costs per specific condition. In Ethiopia, in 2013, and among 20 leading causes of mortality, we estimated the burden of impoverishment due to OOP direct medical costs to be of about 350,000 poverty cases. The top three causes of medical impoverishment were diarrhea, lower respiratory infections, and road injury, accounting for 75 % of all poverty cases. We present a preliminary attempt for the estimation of the burden of medical impoverishment by cause for high mortality conditions. In Ethiopia, medical impoverishment was notably associated with illness occurrence and health services utilization. Although currently used estimates are sensitive to health services utilization, a systematic breakdown of impoverishment due to OOP direct medical costs by cause can provide important information for the promotion of financial risk protection and equity, and subsequent design of health policies toward universal health coverage, reduction of direct OOP payments, and poverty alleviation.

  19. Quality Assessment of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Respiratory Diseases in China: A Systematic Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mei; Liao, Li-Yue; Liu, Xiao-Qing; He, Wei-Qun; Guan, Wei-Jie; Chen, Hao; Li, Yi-Min

    2015-09-01

    There has been a significant increase in the publication of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for respiratory diseases in China. However, little is known about the quality and potential impacts of these CPGs. Our objective was to critically evaluate the quality of Chinese CPGs for respiratory diseases that were published in peer-reviewed medical journals. A systematic search of scientific literature published between 1979 and 2013 was undertaken to identify and select CPGs that were related to respiratory diseases. Four Chinese databases (the Chinese Biomedical Literature database [CBM], the China National Knowledge Infrastructure [CNKI], the VIP database, and the WANFANG database) were used. The quality of eligible guidelines was assessed independently by four reviewers using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument. The overall agreement among reviewers was evaluated using an intraclass correlation coefficient. A total of 109 guidelines published in 27 medical journals from 1979 to 2013 were evaluated. The overall agreement among reviewers was considered good (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.838; 95% CI, 0.812-0.862). The scores of the six AGREE domains were low: 57.3% for scope and purpose (range, 4.2%-80.5%), 23.8% for stakeholder involvement (range, 2.8%-54.2%), 7.7% for rigor of development (range, 0%-27.1%), 59.8% for clarity and presentation (range, 22.2%-80.6%), 10.9% for applicability (range, 0%-22.9%), and 0.6% for editorial independence (range, 0%-16.7%). Scores for all guidelines were below 60%, and only three guidelines (2.8%) were recommended for clinical practice with modifications. The quality of the guidelines was low, and stakeholder involvement, rigor of development, applicability, and editorial independence should be considered in the future development of CPGs for respiratory diseases in China.

  20. Assessing Health Status in Inflammatory Bowel Disease using a Novel Single-Item Numeric Rating Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surti, Bijal; Spiegel, Brennan; Ippoliti, Andrew; Vasiliauskas, Eric; Simpson, Peter; Shih, David; Targan, Stephan; McGovern, Dermot; Melmed, Gil Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background Current instruments used to measure disease activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are often cumbersome, time-consuming, and expensive; although used in clinical trials, they are not convenient for clinical practice. A numeric rating scale (NRS) is a quick, inexpensive, and convenient patient-reported outcome (PRO) that can capture the patient’s overall perception of health. Aims To assess the validity, reliability, and responsiveness of an NRS and evaluate its use in clinical practice in patients with CD and UC. Methods We prospectively evaluated patient-reported NRS scores and measured correlations between NRS and a range of severity measures, including physician-reported NRS, Crohn’s disease activity index (CDAI), Harvey-Bradshaw index (HBI), inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire (IBDQ), and C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with CD. Subsequently, we evaluated the correlation between the NRS and standard measures of health status (HBI or simple colitis clinical activity index [SCCAI]) and laboratory tests (sedimentation rate [ESR], CRP, and fecal calprotectin) in patients with CD and UC. Results The patient-reported NRS showed excellent correlation with CDAI (R2=0.59, p<0.0001), IBDQ (R2=0.66, p<0.0001), and HBI (R2=0.32, p<0.0001) in patients with CD. The NRS showed poor, but statistically significant correlation with SCCAI (R2=0.25, p<0.0001) in patients with UC. The NRS did not correlate with CRP, ESR, or calprotectin. The NRS was reliable and responsive to change. Conclusions The NRS is a valid, reliable, and responsive measure that may be useful to evaluate patients with CD and possibly UC. PMID:23250673

  1. Relationships between Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder and Neurodegenerative Diseases: Clinical Assessments, Biomarkers, and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wang, Li; Liu, Jiang-Hong; Zhan, Shu-Qin

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by dream enactment and loss of muscle atonia during rapid eye movement sleep. RBD is closely related to α-synucleinopathies including Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy. Many studies have investigated the markers of imaging and neurophysiological, genetic, cognitive, autonomic function of RBD and their predictive value for neurodegenerative diseases. This report reviewed the progress of these studies and discussed their limitations and future research directions. Data Sources: Using the combined keywords: “RBD”, “neurodegenerative disease”, “Parkinson disease”, and “magnetic resonance imaging”, the PubMed/MEDLINE literature search was conducted up to January 1, 2018. Study Selection: A total of 150 published articles were initially identified citations. Of the 150 articles, 92 articles were selected after further detailed review. This study referred to all the important English literature in full. Results: Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in SCARB2 (rs6812193) and MAPT (rs12185268) were significantly associated with RBD. The olfactory loss, autonomic dysfunction, marked electroencephalogram slowing during both wakefulness and rapid eye movement sleep, and cognitive impairments were potential predictive markers for RBD conversion to neurodegenerative diseases. Traditional structural imaging studies reported relatively inconsistent results, whereas reduced functional connectivity between the left putamen and substantia nigra and dopamine transporter uptake demonstrated by functional imaging techniques were relatively consistent findings. Conclusions: More longitudinal studies should be conducted to evaluate the predictive value of biomarkers of RBD. Moreover, because the glucose and dopamine metabolisms are not specific for assessing cognitive cognition, the molecular metabolism directly related to cognition should be investigated

  2. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease heterogeneity: challenges for health risk assessment, stratification and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Josep; Vargas, Claudia; Cano, Isaac; Selivanov, Vitaly; Barreiro, Esther; Maier, Dieter; Falciani, Francesco; Wagner, Peter; Cascante, Marta; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Kalko, Susana; De Mas, Igor; Tegnér, Jesper; Escarrabill, Joan; Agustí, Alvar; Gomez-Cabrero, David

    2014-11-28

    Heterogeneity in clinical manifestations and disease progression in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) lead to consequences for patient health risk assessment, stratification and management. Implicit with the classical "spill over" hypothesis is that COPD heterogeneity is driven by the pulmonary events of the disease. Alternatively, we hypothesized that COPD heterogeneities result from the interplay of mechanisms governing three conceptually different phenomena: 1) pulmonary disease, 2) systemic effects of COPD and 3) co-morbidity clustering, each of them with their own dynamics. To explore the potential of a systems analysis of COPD heterogeneity focused on skeletal muscle dysfunction and on co-morbidity clustering aiming at generating predictive modeling with impact on patient management. To this end, strategies combining deterministic modeling and network medicine analyses of the Biobridge dataset were used to investigate the mechanisms of skeletal muscle dysfunction. An independent data driven analysis of co-morbidity clustering examining associated genes and pathways was performed using a large dataset (ICD9-CM data from Medicare, 13 million people). Finally, a targeted network analysis using the outcomes of the two approaches (skeletal muscle dysfunction and co-morbidity clustering) explored shared pathways between these phenomena. (1) Evidence of abnormal regulation of skeletal muscle bioenergetics and skeletal muscle remodeling showing a significant association with nitroso-redox disequilibrium was observed in COPD; (2) COPD patients presented higher risk for co-morbidity clustering than non-COPD patients increasing with ageing; and, (3) the on-going targeted network analyses suggests shared pathways between skeletal muscle dysfunction and co-morbidity clustering. The results indicate the high potential of a systems approach to address COPD heterogeneity. Significant knowledge gaps were identified that are relevant to shape strategies aiming at

  3. Comparison of Disease Activity Score in 28 joints with ESR (DAS28, Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI, Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI & Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data with 3 measures (RAPID3 for assessing disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis at initial presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Siddhartha Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: In adult patients with RA, in the setting where illiteracy is high, CDAI emerged as the preferred choice for rapid assessment of severity of disease at the time of initial presentation.

  4. Assessment of a primary and tertiary care integrated management model for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiro Meritxell

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnosis and treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in Spain continues to present challenges, and problems are exacerbated when there is a lack of coordinated follow-up between levels of care. This paper sets out the protocol for assessing the impact of an integrated management model for the care of patients with COPD. The new model will be evaluated in terms of 1 improvement in the rational utilization of health-care services and 2 benefits reflected in improved health status and quality of life for patients. Methods/Design A quasi-experimental study of the effectiveness of a COPD management model called COPD PROCESS. The patients in the study cohorts will be residents of neighborhoods served by two referral hospitals in Barcelona, Spain. One area comprises the intervention group (n = 32,248 patients and the other the control group (n = 32,114 patients. The study will include pre- and post-intervention assessment 18 months after the program goes into effect. Analyses will be on two datasets: clinical and administrative data available for all patients, and clinical assessment information for a cohort of 440 patients sampled randomly from the intervention and control areas. The main endpoints will be the hospitalization rates in the two health-care areas and quality-of-life measures in the two cohorts. Discussion The COPD PROCESS model foresees the integrated multidisciplinary management of interventions at different levels of the health-care system through coordinated routine clinical practice. It will put into practice diagnostic and treatment procedures that are based on current evidence, multidisciplinary consensus, and efficient use of available resources. Care pathways in this model are defined in terms of patient characteristics, level of disease severity and the presence or absence of exacerbation. The protocol covers the full range of care from primary prevention to treatment of

  5. Bimodal fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (BFAHP) for coronary heart disease risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabahi, Farnaz

    2018-04-04

    Rooted deeply in medical multiple criteria decision-making (MCDM), risk assessment is very important especially when applied to the risk of being affected by deadly diseases such as coronary heart disease (CHD). CHD risk assessment is a stochastic, uncertain, and highly dynamic process influenced by various known and unknown variables. In recent years, there has been a great interest in fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (FAHP), a popular methodology for dealing with uncertainty in MCDM. This paper proposes a new FAHP, bimodal fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (BFAHP) that augments two aspects of knowledge, probability and validity, to fuzzy numbers to better deal with uncertainty. In BFAHP, fuzzy validity is computed by aggregating the validities of relevant risk factors based on expert knowledge and collective intelligence. By considering both soft and statistical data, we compute the fuzzy probability of risk factors using the Bayesian formulation. In BFAHP approach, these fuzzy validities and fuzzy probabilities are used to construct a reciprocal comparison matrix. We then aggregate fuzzy probabilities and fuzzy validities in a pairwise manner for each risk factor and each alternative. BFAHP decides about being affected and not being affected by ranking of high and low risks. For evaluation, the proposed approach is applied to the risk of being affected by CHD using a real dataset of 152 patients of Iranian hospitals. Simulation results confirm that adding validity in a fuzzy manner can accrue more confidence of results and clinically useful especially in the face of incomplete information when compared with actual results. Applying the proposed BFAHP on CHD risk assessment of the dataset, it yields high accuracy rate above 85% for correct prediction. In addition, this paper recognizes that the risk factors of diastolic blood pressure in men and high-density lipoprotein in women are more important in CHD than other risk factors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All

  6. Improved flow cytometric assessment reveals distinct microvesicle (cell-derived microparticle signatures in joint diseases.

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    Bence György

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Microvesicles (MVs, earlier referred to as microparticles, represent a major type of extracellular vesicles currently considered as novel biomarkers in various clinical settings such as autoimmune disorders. However, the analysis of MVs in body fluids has not been fully standardized yet, and there are numerous pitfalls that hinder the correct assessment of these structures. METHODS: In this study, we analyzed synovial fluid (SF samples of patients with osteoarthritis (OA, rheumatoid arthritis (RA and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. To assess factors that may confound MV detection in joint diseases, we used electron microscopy (EM, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA and mass spectrometry (MS. For flow cytometry, a method commonly used for phenotyping and enumeration of MVs, we combined recent advances in the field, and used a novel approach of differential detergent lysis for the exclusion of MV-mimicking non-vesicular signals. RESULTS: EM and NTA showed that substantial amounts of particles other than MVs were present in SF samples. Beyond known MV-associated proteins, MS analysis also revealed abundant plasma- and immune complex-related proteins in MV preparations. Applying improved flow cytometric analysis, we demonstrate for the first time that CD3(+ and CD8(+ T-cell derived SF MVs are highly elevated in patients with RA compared to OA patients (p=0.027 and p=0.009, respectively, after Bonferroni corrections. In JIA, we identified reduced numbers of B cell-derived MVs (p=0.009, after Bonferroni correction. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that improved flow cytometric assessment of MVs facilitates the detection of previously unrecognized disease-associated vesicular signatures.

  7. Basic life support skills: assessment and education of spouse and first degree relatives of patients with coronary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Javaid Arif; Shafquat, Azam; Kundi, Asadullah

    2010-05-01

    To assess the knowledge of basic cardiac life support (BCLS) before and after the institution of training among first degree relatives and spouses of patients with coronary disease. Quasi-experimental study. National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Karachi, from April 2007 to May 2008. A total of 300 relatives of patients with coronary heart disease undertook a one day CPR course. Questionnaire assessing knowledge of CPR was administered before and after the course. Patients were studied in groups of 10-20 at a time. Proportion of correct knowledge was compared using chi-square test with significance at p educational levels (p educational groups showed equal learning abilities.

  8. Readability assessment of concussion and traumatic brain injury publications by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill PS

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Preetinder S Gill,1 Tejkaran S Gill,2 Ashwini Kamath,3 Billy Whisnant41College of Technology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI; 2College of Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; 3School of Information, University of Texas, Austin, TX; 4College of Technology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI, USAAbstract: Health literacy is associated with a person’s capacity to find, access, contextualize, and understand information needed for health care-related decisions. The level of health literacy thus has an influence on an individual’s health status. It can be argued that low health literacy is associated with poor health status. Health care literature (eg, pamphlets, brochures, postcards, posters, forms are published by public and private organizations worldwide to provide information to the general public. The ability to read, use, and understand is critical to the successful application of knowledge disseminated by this literature. This study assessed the readability, suitability, and usability of health care literature associated with concussion and traumatic brain injury published by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Flesch–Kincaid Grade Level, Flesch Reading Ease, Gunning Fog, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook, and Suitability Assessment of Materials indices were used to assess 40 documents obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. The documents analyzed were targeted towards the general public. It was found that in order to be read properly, on average, these documents needed more than an eleventh grade/high school level education. This was consistent with the findings of other similar studies. However, the qualitative Suitability Assessment of Materials index showed that, on average, usability and suitability of these documents was superior. Hence, it was concluded that formatting, illustrations, layout, and graphics play a pivotal role in improving

  9. Diagnostic value of combined assessment of olfaction and sustantia nigra hyperechogenicity for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Hernández, N; García Escrivá, A; Shalabi Benavent, M

    2015-10-01

    Hyposmia and substantia nigra hyperechogenicity (SN+) are characteristic markers of Parkinson's disease (PD), although their diagnostic value in isolation may be limited. We evaluated the combined prevalence of both disorders in patients diagnosed with PD and assessed their diagnostic yield compared to a sample with essential tremor (ET) and another group of healthy subjects. Patients diagnosed with PD and ET and treated in our outpatient clinic were enrolled. Olfaction was assessed using the "Sniffin' Sticks" odour identification test (SS-12) and hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra (SN+) was assessed by transcranial duplex ultrasound. A total of 98 subjects were analysed, comprising 30 with PD, 21 with ET, and 47 controls. The respective prevalence rates of hyposmia (SS-12 .24cm(2)) were 70% and 83.3% in PD, 33.3% and 9.5% in ET, and 17% and 10.6% in controls. Both markers were present in 63% of patients with PD, none of the patients with ET, and only 2 of the controls. Combined use of substantia nigra sonography and olfactory testing with SS-12, two rapid, safe, and accessible tests, was more specific than each isolated marker for distinguishing patients with PD from patients with ET and control subjects. Since both markers have been described in very early phases of PD, combined use may be helpful in providing early diagnosis of PD. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of congenital heart disease (CHD): Is there a role for fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)?

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    Manganaro, L. [Department of Radiological Sciences, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Savelli, S. [Department of Radiological Sciences, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: sarasavelli@hotmail.it; Di Maurizio, M.; Perrone, A.; Francioso, A.; La Barbera, L.; Totaro, P.; Fierro, F.; Tomei, A.; Coratella, F. [Department of Radiological Sciences, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Giancotti, A. [Department of Gynaecological Sciences, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Ballesio, L. [Department of Radiological Sciences, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Ventriglia, F. [Department of Pediatric Cardiology, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: To review our experience with fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate congenital heart disease (CHD). Methods: We performed fetal MRI in 32 fetuses with an echocardiographically assessed CHD. Both direct and indirect signs of CHD were investigated. Direct signs considered were: morpho-volumetric abnormalities of the heart; malrotations; ventricular and atrial septal defects; anomalies of the origin, size and course of the great arteries. Indirect signs considered were: difficulty to recognize a 'normal' anatomical structures in the reference projections; increase of the vascular size before a stenosis; hypertrophy of the papillary muscles; cardiomegaly and pericardial effusion. All MRI findings were compared with postnatal or autoptic findings. Results: MRI allowed the CHD to be visualised by direct signs in 17 fetuses, indirect signs in 5 and both direct and indirect signs in 9 fetuses, excluding the prenatal echocardiographic suspect of hypoplastic left heart syndrome in 1 fetus. Postnatal echocardiograms or autoptic findings confirmed a normal heart in 1 fetus and CHD in 31 fetuses including a single cardiac anomaly or syndrome in 19 fetuses, 2 associated cardiac abnormalities in 11 and 3 cardiac anomalies in 1 fetus. However, in 2 fetuses MRI detected a ventricular septal defect successively disclosed by gold standard. Conclusions: MRI is a promising method for further assessment of the cardiovascular pathologies diagnosed by echocardiography, and may be a valuable tool in assessing associated extracardiac anomalies.

  11. The importance of assessing medication exposure to the definition of refractory disease in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Laurent; Zahr, Noël; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Amoura, Zahir

    2011-09-01

    Treatment of patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) who have active disease refractory to current therapeutic strategies continues to be a real challenge. Here, we propose that the classic definition of refractory SLE patients - failure to achieve adequate response to the standard of care - should be further refined to incorporate the dimension of adequate drug exposure. Inter-individual pharmacokinetic variability may induce insufficient exposure to many drugs used in SLE, leading to both apparent inefficacy of treatments and inappropriate therapeutic escalation. Among others, we have shown that individual assessment of exposure to mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) could be used to determine whether a given patient received adequate doses of MMF. We have also shown that measuring blood concentrations of hydroxychloroquine could be used as an efficient way to assess observance, which is a critical issue since a significant proportion of refractory SLE patients is likely to have poor observance as the primary source of treatment failure. Finally, we have underlined the importance of assessing drug interactions as SLE patients often require, in addition to immunosuppressants, several other drugs to prevent or treat associated conditions, which may result in decreased exposure to immunosuppressants. Considering these data, we believe that refractory SLE patients should not only be defined as the failure to achieve adequate therapeutic response to the standard of care, but should also incorporate the dimension of inadequate pharmacokinetic exposure and include drug blood level, interaction and observance monitoring. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Agreement in the assessment of metastatic spine disease using scoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Estanislao; Kovacs, Francisco M; Royuela, Ana; Asenjo, Beatriz; Pérez-Ramírez, Ursula; Zamora, Javier

    2015-04-01

    To assess variability in the use of Tomita and modified Bauer scores in spine metastases. Clinical data and imaging from 90 patients with biopsy-proven spinal metastases, were provided to 83 specialists from 44 hospitals. Spinal levels involved and the Tomita and modified Bauer scores for each case were determined twice by each clinician, with a minimum of 6-week interval. Clinicians were blinded to every evaluation. Kappa statistic was used to assess intra and inter-observer agreement. Subgroup analyses were performed according to clinicians' specialty (medical oncology, neurosurgery, radiology, orthopedic surgery and radiation oncology), years of experience (⩽7, 8-13, ⩾14), and type of hospital (four levels). For metastases identification, intra-observer agreement was "substantial" (0.600.80) at the other levels. Inter-observer agreement was "almost perfect" at lumbar spine, and "substantial" at the other levels. Intra-observer agreement for the Tomita and Bauer scores was almost perfect. Inter-observer agreement was almost perfect for the Tomita score and substantial for the Bauer one. Results were similar across specialties, years of experience and type of hospital. Agreement in the assessment of metastatic spine disease is high. These scoring systems can improve communication among clinicians involved in oncology care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Agreement in the assessment of metastatic spine disease using scoring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arana, Estanislao; Kovacs, Francisco M.; Royuela, Ana; Asenjo, Beatriz; Pérez-Ramírez, Ursula; Zamora, Javier; Abraira, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess variability in the use of Tomita and modified Bauer scores in spine metastases. Materials and methods: Clinical data and imaging from 90 patients with biopsy-proven spinal metastases, were provided to 83 specialists from 44 hospitals. Spinal levels involved and the Tomita and modified Bauer scores for each case were determined twice by each clinician, with a minimum of 6-week interval. Clinicians were blinded to every evaluation. Kappa statistic was used to assess intra and inter-observer agreement. Subgroup analyses were performed according to clinicians’ specialty (medical oncology, neurosurgery, radiology, orthopedic surgery and radiation oncology), years of experience (⩽7, 8–13, ⩾14), and type of hospital (four levels). Results: For metastases identification, intra-observer agreement was “substantial” (0.60 < k < 0.80) at sacrum, and “almost perfect” (k > 0.80) at the other levels. Inter-observer agreement was “almost perfect” at lumbar spine, and “substantial” at the other levels. Intra-observer agreement for the Tomita and Bauer scores was almost perfect. Inter-observer agreement was almost perfect for the Tomita score and substantial for the Bauer one. Results were similar across specialties, years of experience and type of hospital. Conclusion: Agreement in the assessment of metastatic spine disease is high. These scoring systems can improve communication among clinicians involved in oncology care

  14. Reliability of the Alzheimer's disease assessment scale (ADAS-Cog) in longitudinal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Anzalee; Yavorsky, Christian; DiClemente, Guillermo; Opler, Mark; Liechti, Stacy; Rothman, Brian; Jovic, Sofija

    2013-11-01

    Considering the scarcity of longitudinal assessments of reliability, there is need for a more precise understanding of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The primary goal was to assess longitudinal changes in inter-rater reliability, test retest reliability and internal consistency of scores of the ADAS-Cog. 2,618 AD subjects were enrolled in seven randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter-trials from 1986 to 2009. Reliability, internal-consistency and cross-sectional analysis of ADAS-Cog and MMSE across seven visits were examined. Intra-class correlation (ICC) for ADAS-Cog was moderate to high supporting their reliability. Absolute Agreement ICCs 0.392 (Visit-7) to 0.806 (Visit-2) showed a progressive decrease in correlations across time. Item analysis revealed a decrease in item correlations, with the lowest correlations for Visit 7 for Commands (ICC=0.148), Comprehension (ICC=0.092), Spoken Language (ICC=0.044). Suitable assessment of AD treatments is maintained through accurate measurement of clinically significant outcomes. Targeted rater education ADAS-Cog items over-time can improve ability to administer and score the scale.

  15. Assessment of tumor vascularization with functional computed tomography perfusion imaging in patients with cirrhotic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Ping; Zhao, De-Li; Jiang, Hui-Jie; Huang, Ya-Hua; Li, Da-Qing; Wan, Yong; Liu, Xin-Ding; Wang, Jin-E

    2011-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignant tumor in China, and early diagnosis is critical for patient outcome. In patients with HCC, it is mostly based on liver cirrhosis, developing from benign regenerative nodules and dysplastic nodules to HCC lesions, and a better understanding of its vascular supply and the hemodynamic changes may lead to early tumor detection. Angiogenesis is essential for the growth of primary and metastatic tumors due to changes in vascular perfusion, blood volume and permeability. These hemodynamic and physiological properties can be measured serially using functional computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging and can be used to assess the growth of HCC. This study aimed to clarify the physiological characteristics of tumor angiogenesis in cirrhotic liver disease by this fast imaging method. CTP was performed in 30 volunteers without liver disease (control subjects) and 49 patients with liver disease (experimental subjects: 27 with HCC and 22 with cirrhosis). All subjects were also evaluated by physical examination, laboratory screening and Doppler ultrasonography of the liver. The diagnosis of HCC was made according to the EASL criteria. All patients underwent contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, pre- and post-contrast triple-phase CT and CTP study. A mathematical deconvolution model was applied to provide hepatic blood flow (HBF), hepatic blood volume (HBV), mean transit time (MTT), permeability of capillary vessel surface (PS), hepatic arterial index (HAI), hepatic arterial perfusion (HAP) and hepatic portal perfusion (HPP) data. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine differences in perfusion parameters between the background cirrhotic liver parenchyma and HCC and between the cirrhotic liver parenchyma with HCC and that without HCC. In normal liver, the HAP/HVP ratio was about 1/4. HCC had significantly higher HAP and HAI and lower HPP than background liver parenchyma adjacent to the HCC. The value of HBF at the tumor

  16. A comparison of the mini mental state exam to the Montreal cognitive assessment in identifying cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadikoff, Cindy; Fox, Susan H.; Tang-Wai, David F.; Thomsen, Teri; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Wadia, Pettarusup; Miyasaki, Janis; Duff-Canning, Sarah; Lang, Anthony E.; Marras, Connie

    2008-01-01

    Dementia is an important and increasingly recognized problem in Parkinson's disease (PD). The mini-mental state examination (MMSE) often fails to detect early cognitive decline. The Montreal cognitive assessment (MoCA) is a brief tool developed to detect mild cognitive impairment that assesses a

  17. Expansion of the prognostic assessment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease : the updated BODE index and the ADO index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puhan, Milo A.; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Frey, Martin; ter Riet, Gerben; Anto, Josep M.; Agusti, Alvar G.; Gomez, Federico P.; Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto; Moons, Karel G. M.; Kessels, Alphons G.; Held, Ulrike

    2009-01-01

    Background The BODE index (including body-mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnoea, and exercise capacity) was an important contribution to the prognostic assessment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, no study has assessed whether the risk of mortality predicted

  18. In vitro data combined with human disease data to improve toxicological hazard assessment: the ASAT Knowledge Base

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venhorst, J; Aarts, Jac; Boorsma, Andre; Caiment, Florian; Soeteman-Hernandez, Lya G.; van der Veen, J; Tsamou, Maria; Russel, Frans G. M.; Groothuis, Genoveva; Stierum, Rob

    2014-01-01

    In line with the Assuring Safety Without Animal Testing (ASAT) principle, risk assessment may ultimately become feasible without the use of animals (Fentem et al., 2004). ASAT assumes that activation of human disease mechanisms in in vitro models can be used for toxicological assessment. Therefore,

  19. Assessing the socio-cultural impacts of emerging molecular technologies for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boenink, M.; Cuijpers, Y.M.; Laan, A.L. van der; Lente, H. van; Moors, E.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Novel technologies for early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) will impact the way society views and deals with AD and ageing. However, such “sociocultural” impacts are hardly acknowledged in standard approaches of technology assessment. In this paper, we outline three steps to assess such

  20. Diagnostic approach to assessment of valvular heart disease using MRI—Part I: a practical approach for valvular regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaothawee, Lertlak

    2012-01-01

    Valvular heart diseases from any cause are divided into two categories: stenosis and regurgitation. Acquired knowledge of the pathological aetiology and disease severity are the important clues for optimal treatment, which may be medication or combination with surgery. The non-invasive techniques have been established for valvular heart disease evaluation for many years especially in demonstrating valvular structure and assessing severity. Transthoracic echocardiography still plays the major role. However, not every case can be clearly evaluated by transthoracic echocardiography because of rib space window limitation. In the present-day practice, MRI has been extensively used for the evaluation of heart diseases in both unique and complementary categories. However, valvular heart disease assessment using cardiac MRI still remains an important challenge. PMID:27326026

  1. A risk assessment of climate change and the impact of forest diseases on forest ecosystems in the Western United States and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    John T. Kliejunas

    2011-01-01

    This risk assessment projects the effects of eight forest diseases under two climate-change scenarios (warmer and drier, warmer and wetter). Examples are used to describe how various types of forest diseases may respond to environmental changes. Forest diseases discussed in this report include foliar diseases, Phytophthora diseases, stem rusts,...

  2. Assessment of listing and categorisation of animal diseases within the framework of the Animal Health Law (Regulation (EU) No 2016/429)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    EFSA Panel on Animal Health and Welfare; More, Simon; Bøtner, Anette

    2017-01-01

    Border disease has been assessed according to the criteria of the Animal Health Law (AHL), in particular criteria of Article 7 on disease profile and impacts, Article 5 on the eligibility of Border disease to be listed, Article 9 for the categorisation of Border disease according to disease...

  3. Assessment of listing and categorisation of animal diseases within the framework of the Animal Health Law (Regulation (EU) No 2016/429)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    EFSA Panel on Animal Health and Welfare; More, Simon J.; Bøtner, Anette

    2017-01-01

    Borna disease has been assessed according to the criteria of the Animal Health Law (AHL), in particular criteria of Article 7 on disease profile and impacts, Article 5 on the eligibility of Borna disease to be listed, Article 9 for the categorisation of Borna disease according to disease prevention...

  4. Microstructure assessment of the thalamus in Wilson's disease using diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, G.; Zhou, X.; Xu, P.; Pan, X.; Chen, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To assess diffusion changes of the thalamus in Wilson's disease using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Materials and methods: Fifteen patients with Wilson's disease and an abnormal signal in the thalamus (designated as group 1) and 18 patients with Wilson's disease with a normal-appearing thalamus (designated as group 2) at conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were recruited. Fifteen age-matched and sex-matched healthy volunteers were also enrolled as the control group (designated as group 3). The fractional anisotropy (FA), primary eigenvalue (λ1), second eigenvalue (λ2), and third eigenvalue (λ3) of the thalamus were measured and the differences were compared. Results: The FA values of the thalamus were different in the three groups (group 1: 0.36 ± 0.02; group 2: 0.38 ± 0.02; group 3: 0.43 ± 0.02; F = 54.51, p 2 /s, 1.11 ± 0.06 mm 2 /s, and 1.10 ± 0.04 mm 2 /s of λ1 in group 1, group 2, and group 3, respectively; 0.82 ± 0.08 mm 2 /s, 0.78 ± 0.05 mm 2 /s, and 0.72 ± 0.02 mm 2 /s of λ2 in group 1, group 2, and group 3, respectively; 0.52 ± 0.05 mm 2 /s, 0.49 ± 0.06 mm 2 /s, and 0.42 ± 0.06 mm 2 /s of λ3 in group 1, group 2, and group 3, respectively; F = 1.65, p = 0.203 of λ1; F = 10.55, p < 0.001 of λ2; F = 4.21, p = 0.021 of λ3; respectively). A statistically significant difference in the λ2 value was observed between group 1 and group 3 (p < 0.001) and group 2 and group 3 (p = 0.005). A statistically significant difference in the λ3 value was also observed between group 1 and group 3 (p = 0.007). No significant difference in the λ1 value was noted between each of the two groups. Conclusions: Damage of the thalamus in Wilson's disease patients can be detected using DTI. DTI may provide information regarding thalamus damage in patients with Wilson's disease before abnormal signals on conventional MRI

  5. RISK FACTOR ASSESSMENT AND CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF BREAST DISEASES IN A TERTIARY CENTER- A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Jina

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Breast is modified sebaceous gland. It is an organ of female beauty and pride. From puberty to death, the breast is subjected to constant physical and physiological alterations that are related to menses, pregnancy and menopause. The breast problem could be as simple as breast abscess to as ominous as cancer. Both benign and malignant diseases occur in men and women of all ages but benign lesion tend to occur more commonly at younger age than cancer. Benign breast diseases (BBD are common with estimate of over half of the female population at some times in life seeking medical advice for breast problem. This prospective study was done on patients attending OPD for breast complaints in 1 year period, to do the risk factors assessment & clinical analysis of patients presented with breast complaints. MATERIALS AND METHODS Total 200 patients who have attended OPD with breast related complaints and given consent for study, were studied in a period of 1 year duration from at Nehru Hospital, B.R.D Medical College, Gorakhpur. RESULTS Benign breast diseases are more common in the population than malignant one, Fibroadenoma, Breast abscesses and Fibrocystic disease and ANDI are the most common cause of mass seen in middle ages. Malignant lesion of the breast is major concern and the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in our region as seen in study. Incidence is high in western industrialized countries and relatively low in developing countries in Asia and other parts of the world, predisposing factors for BBD are age, sex, race, inverted nipple, retracted nipple, cracked nipple, improper feeding due to lack of knowledge about breast-feeding and endogenous hormonal factors. CONCLUSION BBD is the most frequent type of lesion found in the present study in surgery OPD in BRD medical college, Gorakhpur. Among BBD, fibroadenoma was the commonest, followed by breast abscess, ANDI and gynecomastia. In this study, breast abscess was second most

  6. Emotion recognition in frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease: A new film-based assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodkind, Madeleine S; Sturm, Virginia E; Ascher, Elizabeth A; Shdo, Suzanne M; Miller, Bruce L; Rankin, Katherine P; Levenson, Robert W

    2015-08-01

    Deficits in recognizing others' emotions are reported in many psychiatric and neurological disorders, including autism, schizophrenia, behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Most previous emotion recognition studies have required participants to identify emotional expressions in photographs. This type of assessment differs from real-world emotion recognition in important ways: Images are static rather than dynamic, include only 1 modality of emotional information (i.e., visual information), and are presented absent a social context. Additionally, existing emotion recognition batteries typically include multiple negative emotions, but only 1 positive emotion (i.e., happiness) and no self-conscious emotions (e.g., embarrassment). We present initial results using a new task for assessing emotion recognition that was developed to address these limitations. In this task, respondents view a series of short film clips and are asked to identify the main characters' emotions. The task assesses multiple negative, positive, and self-conscious emotions based on information that is multimodal, dynamic, and socially embedded. We evaluate this approach in a sample of patients with bvFTD, AD, and normal controls. Results indicate that patients with bvFTD have emotion recognition deficits in all 3 categories of emotion compared to the other groups. These deficits were especially pronounced for negative and self-conscious emotions. Emotion recognition in this sample of patients with AD was indistinguishable from controls. These findings underscore the utility of this approach to assessing emotion recognition and suggest that previous findings that recognition of positive emotion was preserved in dementia patients may have resulted from the limited sampling of positive emotion in traditional tests. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Are cardiovascular disease risk assessment and management programmes cost effective? A systematic review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John Tayu; Lawson, Kenny D; Wan, Yizhou; Majeed, Azeem; Morris, Stephen; Soljak, Michael; Millett, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    The World Health Organization recommends that countries implement population-wide cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk assessment and management programmes. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review to evaluate whether this recommendation is supported by cost-effectiveness evidence. Published economic evaluations were identified via electronic medical and social science databases (including Medline, Web of Science, and the NHS Economic Evaluation Database) from inception to March 2016. Study quality was evaluated using a modified version of the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards. Fourteen economic evaluations were included: five studies based on randomised controlled trials, seven studies based on observational studies and two studies using hypothetical modelling synthesizing secondary data. Trial based studies measured CVD risk factor changes over 1 to 3years, with modelled projections of longer term events. Programmes were either not, or only, cost-effective under non-verified assumptions such as sustained risk factor changes. Most observational and hypothetical studies suggested programmes were likely to be cost-effective; however, study deigns are subject to bias and subsequent empirical evidence has contradicted key assumptions. No studies assessed impacts on inequalities. In conclusion, recommendations for population-wide risk assessment and management programmes lack a robust, real world, evidence basis. Given implementation is resource intensive there is a need for robust economic evaluation, ideally conducted alongside trials, to assess cost effectiveness. Further, the efficiency and equity impact of different delivery models should be investigated, and also the combination of targeted screening with whole population interventions recognising that there multiple approaches to prevention. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Assessment of fall-related self-efficacy and activity avoidance in people with Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drake Anna-Maria

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fear of falling (FOF is common in Parkinson's disease (PD, and it is considered a vital aspect of comprehensive balance assessment in PD. FOF can be conceptualized differently. The Falls-Efficacy Scale (FES assesses fall-related self-efficacy, whereas the Survey of Activities and Fear of Falling in the Elderly (SAFFE assesses activity avoidance due to the risk of falling. This study aimed at investigating the validity and reliability of FES and SAFFE in people with PD. Methods Seventy-nine people with PD (mean age; 64 years, SD 7.2 completed the Swedish version of FES(S, SAFFE and the physical functioning (PF scale of the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36. FES(S and SAFFE were administered twice, with an 8.8 (SD 2.3 days interval. Assumptions for summing item scores into total scores were examined and score reliability (Cronbach's alpha and test-retest reliability were calculated. Construct validity was assessed by examining the pattern of Spearman correlations (rs between the FES(S/SAFFE and other variables, and by examining differences in FES(S/SAFFE scores between fallers and non-fallers, genders, and between those reporting FOF and unsteadiness while turning. Results For both scales, item mean scores (and standard deviations were roughly similar and corrected item-total correlations exceeded 0.4. Reliabilities were ≥0.87. FES(S-scores correlated strongest (rs, -0.74, p s, -0.76, p s ≤ 0.08. Experiencing falls, unsteadiness while turning, and FOF was associated with lower fall-related self-efficacy and higher activity avoidance. Conclusions This study provides initial support for the score reliability and validity of the FES(S and SAFFE in people with PD.

  9. Emotion Recognition in Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease: A New Film-Based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodkind, Madeleine S.; Sturm, Virginia E.; Ascher, Elizabeth A.; Shdo, Suzanne M.; Miller, Bruce L.; Rankin, Katherine P.; Levenson, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Deficits in recognizing others' emotions are reported in many psychiatric and neurological disorders, including autism, schizophrenia, behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Most previous emotion recognition studies have required participants to identify emotional expressions in photographs. This type of assessment differs from real-world emotion recognition in important ways: Images are static rather than dynamic, include only 1 modality of emotional information (i.e., visual information), and are presented absent a social context. Additionally, existing emotion recognition batteries typically include multiple negative emotions, but only 1 positive emotion (i.e., happiness) and no self-conscious emotions (e.g., embarrassment). We present initial results using a new task for assessing emotion recognition that was developed to address these limitations. In this task, respondents view a series of short film clips and are asked to identify the main characters' emotions. The task assesses multiple negative, positive, and self-conscious emotions based on information that is multimodal, dynamic, and socially embedded. We evaluate this approach in a sample of patients with bvFTD, AD, and normal controls. Results indicate that patients with bvFTD have emotion recognition deficits in all 3 categories of emotion compared to the other groups. These deficits were especially pronounced for negative and self-conscious emotions. Emotion recognition in this sample of patients with AD was indistinguishable from controls. These findings underscore the utility of this approach to assessing emotion recognition and suggest that previous findings that recognition of positive emotion was preserved in dementia patients may have resulted from the limited sampling of positive emotion in traditional tests. PMID:26010574

  10. Assessing the Economic Impact of Vaccine Availability When Controlling Foot and Mouth Disease Outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaud Porphyre

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Predictive models have been used extensively to assess the likely effectiveness of vaccination policies as part of control measures in the event of a foot and mouth disease (FMD outbreak. However, the availability of vaccine stocks and the impact of vaccine availability on disease control strategies represent a key uncertainty when assessing potential control strategies. Using an epidemiological, spatially explicit, simulation model in combination with a direct cost calculator, we assessed how vaccine availability constraints may affect the economic benefit of a “vaccination-to-live” strategy during a FMD outbreak in Scotland, when implemented alongside culling of infected premises and dangerous contacts. We investigated the impact of vaccine stock size and restocking delays on epidemiological and economic outcomes. We also assessed delays in the initial decision to vaccinate, maximum daily vaccination capacity, and vaccine efficacy. For scenarios with conditions conducive to large outbreaks, all vaccination strategies perform better than the strategy where only culling is implemented. A stock of 200,000 doses, enough to vaccinate 12% of the Scottish cattle population, would be sufficient to maximize the relative benefits of vaccination, both epidemiologically and economically. However, this generates a wider variation in economic cost than if vaccination is not implemented, making outcomes harder to predict. The probability of direct costs exceeding £500 million is reduced when vaccination is used and is steadily reduced further as the size of initial vaccine stock increases. If only a suboptimal quantity of vaccine doses is initially available (100,000 doses, restocking delays of more than 2 weeks rapidly increase the cost of controlling outbreaks. Impacts of low vaccine availability or restocking delays are particularly aggravated by delays in the initial decision to vaccinate, or low vaccine efficacy. Our findings confirm that

  11. Huntington's disease predictive testing: the case for an assessment approach to requests from adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binedell, J; Soldan, J R; Scourfield, J; Harper, P S

    1996-01-01

    Adolescents who are actively requesting Huntington's predictive testing of their own accord pose a dilemma to those providing testing. In the absence of empirical evidence as regards the impact of genetic testing on minors, current policy and guidelines, based on the ethical principles of non-maleficence and respect for individual autonomy and confidentiality, generally exclude the testing of minors. It is argued that adherence to an age based exclusion criterion in Huntington's disease predictive testing protocols is out of step with trends in UK case law concerning minors' consent to medical treatment. Furthermore, contributions from developmental psychology and research into adolescents' decision making competence suggest that adolescents can make informed choices about their health and personal lives. Criteria for developing an assessment approach to such requests are put forward and the implications of a case by case evaluation of competence to consent in terms of clinicians' tolerance for uncertainty are discussed. PMID:8950670

  12. Enteroclysis in adult celiac disease: assessment of jejuno-ileal diameter and of number of folds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Seta, F.; Bucellato, A.; Cabibbo, L.; Cottone, M.; Salerno, G.; Dardanoni, G.

    1991-01-01

    The authors retrospectively reviewed the radiographic findings (obtained with double-contrast small bowel enema) of 27 patients with adult celiac disease and of 27 healthy control subjects. Two parameters were measurated in two different locations; lumen diameter and number of folds both in proximal jejunum and in the distal ileum. Statistical differences in mean values between cases and controls were calculated, and correlations between the four variables were assessed. Sensitivity, specificity and their 95% confidence limits were calculated for all the variables. The best parameter in discriminating cases from controls seems to be the caliber of distal ileum (>3 cm), with 93% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The value of the obtained results is discussed

  13. Ecological assessment of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease using the Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolló-Gasol, S; Piñol-Ripoll, G; Cejudo-Bolivar, J C; Llorente-Vizcaino, A; Peraita-Adrados, H

    2014-01-01

    The Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test (RBMT) is a short, ecologically-valid memory test battery that can provide data about a subject's memory function in daily life. We used RBMT to examine daily memory function in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer disease (AD), and in healthy controls. We also evaluated differences between the memory profiles of subjects whose MCI remained stable after 1 year and those with conversion to AD. Sample of 91 subjects older than 60 years: 30 controls, 27 MCI subjects and 34 AD patients. Subjects were assessed using MMSE and RBMT. The 40 men and 51 women in the sample had a mean age of 74.29±6.71 and 5.87±2.93 years of education. For the total profile and screening RBMT scores (Pde Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional Performance and Associations between Performance Tests and Neurological Assessment Differ in Men and Women with Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Medijainen, Kadri; Pääsuke, Mati; Lukmann, Aet; Taba, Pille

    2015-01-01

    Background. Neurological assessment of a patient with Parkinson's disease (PD) is expected to reflect upon functional performance. As women are known to report more limitations even for same observed functional performance level, present study was designed to examine whether associations between neurological assessments and functional performance differ across genders. Methods. 14 men and 14 women with PD participated. Functional performance was assessed by measuring walking speeds on 10-mete...

  15. Assessment of renal fibrosis in chronic kidney disease using diffusion-weighted MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, J.; Wang, Z.J.; Liu, M.; Zhu, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, T.; Li, S.; Li, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To assess the performance of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of renal fibrosis in chronic kidney disease (CKD), with histopathology as a reference standard. Materials and methods: Forty patients with CKD and 30 healthy volunteers were recruited for the study. All participants underwent diffusion-weighted MRI. Renal biopsy was performed in 25 patients with CKD. Mean renal medullary and cortical apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were compared between CKD patients and the healthy volunteers. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated to investigate the relationship between ADC values, serum creatinine (SCr), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 24 h urinary protein (24h-UPRO), and renal histopathological scores. Results: Cortical and medullary ADC values in the CKD group were significantly lower compared to those in the healthy controls. In the CKD group, a significant negative correlation was found between cortical ADC values and SCr/24h-UPRO, and significant positive correlation was found between cortical ADC and eGFR. There was also a significant negative correlation between medullary ADC values and SCr. Both cortical and medullary ADC values were significantly correlated with histopathological fibrosis score. Conclusion: Renal ADC values strongly correlate with histological measures of fibrosis, and have the potential to enhance the non-invasive monitoring of chronic kidney disease. - Highlights: • Renal ADC values in the CKD patients were lower than those in controls. • Renal ADC values were strongly correlated with histological fibrosis score. • Renal ADC values have the potential to enhance the noninvasive monitoring of CKD

  16. Assessment of left ventricular function using dobutamine stress echocardiography and myocardial scintigraphy in valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Nobuchika; Sugimoto, Takaki; Okada, Masayoshi

    1999-01-01

    To assess the left ventricular (LV) function in valvular heart disease, we employed the preoperative dobutamine stress echocardiography and the myocardial scintigraphy. During the past 13 years, 37 of 324 the patients showed LV dysfunction with the % fractional shortening (%FS) of 25% or less in the preoperative echocardiogram. These patients were retrospectively divided into two groups; Group A (n=21): %FS has improved late after operation; Group B (n=16): %FS has deteriorated or LV failure occurred. The mean follow-up period was 84±54 months after valve surgery. No significant differences were observed in the preoperative characteristics and operative variables between these two groups. The dobutamine stress test had been performed in 8 patients in Group A and 9 patients in Group B preoperatively, and the maximum increase ratio of %FS (Δ%FS) was used for assessment. Seven patients in Group A had showed Δ%FS of more than 9%, while all patients in Group B had showed Δ%FS of less than 9%. Myocardial scintigraphy was performed in 11 patients of them, and another 22 patients with %FS of above 25% acted as the control group. The Defect Score, which was defined as the sum of defect scales in 25 LV segments, showed a significant difference between 11 patients with LV dysfunction and control group. The distribution of the Defect Score in each myocardial segment, showed significantly higher in the posterior and inferior LV segments. In addition, the perfusion defect on myocardial imaging was initiated in the junction between the septal and LV free wall, and extended from the posterior to the lateral wall along with deterioration of LV function. In conclusion, preoperative dobutamine stress echocardiography proved to be very useful for prediction of the postoperative LV function, and myocardial scintigraphy might be indicative of LV function even in valvular heart disease. (author)

  17. Assessment of left ventricular function using dobutamine stress echocardiography and myocardial scintigraphy in valvular heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, Nobuchika; Sugimoto, Takaki; Okada, Masayoshi [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-02-01

    To assess the left ventricular (LV) function in valvular heart disease, we employed the preoperative dobutamine stress echocardiography and the myocardial scintigraphy. During the past 13 years, 37 of 324 the patients showed LV dysfunction with the % fractional shortening (%FS) of 25% or less in the preoperative echocardiogram. These patients were retrospectively divided into two groups; Group A (n=21): %FS has improved late after operation; Group B (n=16): %FS has deteriorated or LV failure occurred. The mean follow-up period was 84{+-}54 months after valve surgery. No significant differences were observed in the preoperative characteristics and operative variables between these two groups. The dobutamine stress test had been performed in 8 patients in Group A and 9 patients in Group B preoperatively, and the maximum increase ratio of %FS ({delta}%FS) was used for assessment. Seven patients in Group A had showed {delta}%FS of more than 9%, while all patients in Group B had showed {delta}%FS of less than 9%. Myocardial scintigraphy was performed in 11 patients of them, and another 22 patients with %FS of above 25% acted as the control group. The Defect Score, which was defined as the sum of defect scales in 25 LV segments, showed a significant difference between 11 patients with LV dysfunction and control group. The distribution of the Defect Score in each myocardial segment, showed significantly higher in the posterior and inferior LV segments. In addition, the perfusion defect on myocardial imaging was initiated in the junction between the septal and LV free wall, and extended from the posterior to the lateral wall along with deterioration of LV function. In conclusion, preoperative dobutamine stress echocardiography proved to be very useful for prediction of the postoperative LV function, and myocardial scintigraphy might be indicative of LV function even in valvular heart disease. (author)

  18. Assessment of cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease: prevalence and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Q

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Qiumei Wang,1 Zhenxin Zhang,2 Ling Li,2 Hongbo Wen,2 Qun Xu3,4 1Department of Geriatrics, 2Department of Neurology, 3School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, 4Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China Background: Although Parkinson's disease (PD is clinically characterized by motor symptoms, cognitive impairment is one of the most disabling non-motor symptoms. Despite it attracting increasing attention worldwide, less is known about its prevalence in the Chinese population. The objective of this study was to assess cognitive impairment and related risk factors in Chinese PD patients. Methods: We collected the demographic, diagnostic, and treatment information of 901 PD patients from 42 centers throughout the People's Republic of China, then administered a battery of neuropsychological tests, to assess motor, cognitive, and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Results: Overall, 193 of 901 (21.4% PD patients met the criteria for dementia (PD-D, and 206 (22.8% met the criteria for mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI. Visuospatial dysfunction and attention/executive impairment predominated. Increased severity of cognitive impairment was associated with greater motor impairment. Patients with psychiatric symptoms, such as depression and hallucinations, were more likely to have dementia. Potentially, the younger-aged and more educated are shown less cognitive impairment, but age at onset, and levodopa equivalent dose, were not associated with the presence of cognitive dysfunction. Conclusion: The prevalence and profile of cognitive impairment in Chinese PD patients, as well as the risk factors, are similar as those reported for other races, but the frequency of nonamnestic cognitive domains differs. Keywords: cognitive impairment, risk factor, prevalence, Parkinson's disease

  19. An Ultrasound Surface Wave Technique for Assessing Skin and Lung Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Boran; Kalra, Sanjay; Bartholmai, Brian; Greenleaf, James; Osborn, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multi-organ connective tissue disease characterized by immune dysregulation and organ fibrosis. Severe organ involvement, especially of the skin and lung, is the cause of morbidity and mortality in SSc. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) includes multiple lung disorders in which the lung tissue is fibrotic and stiffened. The purpose of this study was to translate ultrasound surface wave elastography (USWE) for assessing patients with SSc and/or ILD via measuring surface wave speeds of both skin and superficial lung tissue. Forty-one patients with both SSc and ILD and 30 healthy patients were enrolled in this study. An external harmonic vibration was used to generate the wave propagation on the skin or lung. Three excitation frequencies of 100, 150 and 200 Hz were used. An ultrasound probe was used to measure the wave propagation in the tissue non-invasively. Surface wave speeds were measured on the forearm and upper arm of both left and right arm, as well as the upper and lower lungs, through six intercostal spaces of patients and healthy patients. Viscoelasticity of the skin was calculated by the wave speed dispersion with frequency using the Voigt model. The magnitudes of surface wave speed and viscoelasticity of patients' skin were significantly higher than those of healthy patients (p wave speeds of patients' lung were significantly higher than those of healthy patients (p ionizing technique for measuring both skin and lung surface wave speed and may be useful for quantitative assessment of SSc and/or ILD. Copyright © 2018 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a quantitative assessment method of pigmentary skin disease using ultraviolet optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Onseok; Park, Sunup; Kim, Jaeyoung; Oh, Chilhwan

    2017-11-01

    The visual scoring method has been used as a subjective evaluation of pigmentary skin disorders. Severity of pigmentary skin disease, especially melasma, is evaluated using a visual scoring method, the MASI (melasma area severity index). This study differentiates between epidermal and dermal pigmented disease. The study was undertaken to determine methods to quantitatively measure the severity of pigmentary skin disorders under ultraviolet illumination. The optical imaging system consists of illumination (white LED, UV-A lamp) and image acquisition (DSLR camera, air cooling CMOS CCD camera). Each camera is equipped with a polarizing filter to remove glare. To analyze images of visible and UV light, images are divided into frontal, cheek, and chin regions of melasma patients. Each image must undergo image processing. To reduce the curvature error in facial contours, a gradient mask is used. The new method of segmentation of front and lateral facial images is more objective for face-area-measurement than the MASI score. Image analysis of darkness and homogeneity is adequate to quantify the conventional MASI score. Under visible light, active lesion margins appear in both epidermal and dermal melanin, whereas melanin is found in the epidermis under UV light. This study objectively analyzes severity of melasma and attempts to develop new methods of image analysis with ultraviolet optical imaging equipment. Based on the results of this study, our optical imaging system could be used as a valuable tool to assess the severity of pigmentary skin disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A simple bedside test to assess the swallowing dysfunction in Parkinson′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Vinoth Kanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Swallowing changes are common in Parkinson′s disease (PD. Early identification is essential to avoid complications of aspiration. Objectives: To evaluate the swallowing ability of the PD patients and to correlate it with the indicators of disease progression. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 PD patients (70 males and 30 females aged between 50 years and 70 years with varying stage, duration, and severity were enrolled in a cross-sectional study carried out between January and May 2012. A simple bedside water swallowing test was performed using standard 150 ml of water. Swallowing process was assessed under three categories-swallowing speeds (ml/s, swallowing volume (ml/swallow and swallowing duration (s/swallow. Equal number of age and sex matched controls were also evaluated. Results: All of them completed the task of swallowing. A mean swallowing speed (27.48 ml/s, swallowing volume (28.5 ml/s, and swallowing duration (1.05 s/swallow was established by the control group. The PD patients showed decreased swallowing speed (7.15 ml/s in males and 6.61 ml/s in females, decreased swallowing volume (14.59 ml/swallow and 14 ml/swallow in females, and increased swallowing duration (2.37 s/swallow and 2.42 s/swallow which are statistically significant. There was a significant positive correlation between the severity, duration, and staging of the disease with the swallowing performance and a poor correlation between the subjective reports of dysphagia and the objective performance on water swallow test. Conclusion: The water swallowing test is a simple bedside test to identify the swallowing changes early in PD. It is recommended to do the test in all PD Patients to detect dysphagia early and to intervene appropriately.

  2. Effectiveness of diffusion tensor imaging in assessing disease severity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponrartana, Skorn; Hu, Houchun Harry; Ramos-Platt, Leigh; Wren, Tishya Anne Leong; Gilsanz, Vicente; Perkins, Thomas Gardner; Chia, Jonathan Mawlin

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a lack of suitable objective endpoints to measure disease progression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Emerging research suggests that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has potential as an outcome measure for the evaluation of skeletal muscle injury. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of DTI as quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) markers of disease severity in DMD. Thirteen consecutive boys (8.9 years ± 3.0 years) with DMD were evaluated using DTI. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were compared with clinical outcome measures of manual muscle testing and MRI determinations of muscle fat fraction (MFF) in the right lower extremity. Both MRI measures of FA and ADC strongly correlated with age and muscle strength. Values for FA positively correlated with age and negatively correlated with muscle strength (r = 0.78 and -0.96; both P ≤ 0.002) while measures of ADC negatively correlated age, but positively correlated with muscle strength (r = -0.87 and 0.83; both P ≤ 0.0004). Additionally, ADC and FA strongly correlated with MFF (r = -0.891 and 0.894, respectively; both P ≤ 0.0001). Mean MMF was negatively correlated with muscle strength (r = -0.89, P = 0.0001). DTI measures of muscle structure strongly correlated with muscle strength and adiposity in boys with DMD in this pilot study, although these markers may be more reflective of fat replacement rather than muscle damage in later stages of the disease. Further studies in presymptomatic younger children are needed to assess the ability of DTI to detect early changes in DMD. (orig.)

  3. Effectiveness of diffusion tensor imaging in assessing disease severity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponrartana, Skorn; Hu, Houchun Harry [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ramos-Platt, Leigh [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, Department of Neurology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Wren, Tishya Anne Leong; Gilsanz, Vicente [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Perkins, Thomas Gardner; Chia, Jonathan Mawlin [Philips Healthcare North America, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-04-01

    There is currently a lack of suitable objective endpoints to measure disease progression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Emerging research suggests that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has potential as an outcome measure for the evaluation of skeletal muscle injury. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of DTI as quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) markers of disease severity in DMD. Thirteen consecutive boys (8.9 years ± 3.0 years) with DMD were evaluated using DTI. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were compared with clinical outcome measures of manual muscle testing and MRI determinations of muscle fat fraction (MFF) in the right lower extremity. Both MRI measures of FA and ADC strongly correlated with age and muscle strength. Values for FA positively correlated with age and negatively correlated with muscle strength (r = 0.78 and -0.96; both P ≤ 0.002) while measures of ADC negatively correlated age, but positively correlated with muscle strength (r = -0.87 and 0.83; both P ≤ 0.0004). Additionally, ADC and FA strongly correlated with MFF (r = -0.891 and 0.894, respectively; both P ≤ 0.0001). Mean MMF was negatively correlated with muscle strength (r = -0.89, P = 0.0001). DTI measures of muscle structure strongly correlated with muscle strength and adiposity in boys with DMD in this pilot study, although these markers may be more reflective of fat replacement rather than muscle damage in later stages of the disease. Further studies in presymptomatic younger children are needed to assess the ability of DTI to detect early changes in DMD. (orig.)

  4. The assessment of adverse events of radioactive iodine therapy in patients with Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nechaeva, Olga; Dreval, Alexander; Chikh, Irina

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Aim: The aim of the study is to assess the adverse events of RAI in patients with Graves disease. Study design: have analyzed the data of 42 patients (33 women, 9 men, median age 46,6 years) with Graves disease without thyroid ophthalmopathy, who were treated with RAI to control thyrotoxicosis. Radioiodine dose was determent individually and was taken into consideration of goiter volume and turnover of 13 21I. Patients received one dose of 131 I - median 10,2 (from 2,0 to 34,1 m #N-tilde# i). We asked the patients to fill questionnaire of sings and symptoms about their complaints after treatment. Results: The most frequent adverse events after radioiodine treatment were: fallout hair - in 31%, headache - in 28,5%, muscle pain - in 24,0%, edema of upper and lower eyelids - in 20,0%, pain in joints - in 19,0%, pain in thyroid gland - in 14,0%. Other adverse events were determent rarer: pain in eyeballs - 12,0%, sensation of the pressure in eyeballs - in 12,0%, tension in the field of thyroid gland - in 9,5%, muscle compactions - in 9,5%, diplopia - in 7,1%, deterioration of concomitant chronic diseases - in 7,1%, pain in hypochondrium- in 7,1%, heartburn - in 7,1%, weakness in legs- in 4,8%, dryness skin cover -in 2,4%, sleeplessness - in 2,4%. All adverse events were not serious, were nor demand of administration of special treatment and ended in 5 days after using of radioactive iodine. Conclusion: Radioactive iodine treatment does not entail of significant deterioration of condition of the patients. (author)

  5. [Blood transfusion assessment to 112 homozygous sickle-cell disease patients in university hospital of Brazzaville].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokekias, A Elira; Ossini, L Ngolet; Tsiba, F O Atipo; Malanda, F; Koko, I; De Montalembert, M

    2009-01-01

    Homozygous, sickle-cell disease (SCD) is responsible for acute complication, especially anaemic crisis and special situation such as acute chest syndrome, stroke and acute priapism. Pregnancy sickle-cell disease presents high risk for the mother and the fetus. In these indications, blood transfusion is the main therapy aiming to reduce anaemia in order to restore hemoglobin's rate or to increase normal Hb proportion. This study aims to assess the short-term efficiency of the red cell transfusion in SCD homozygous form. One hundred and twelve homozygous sickle-cell patients were enrolled in this prospective study: 59 females and 53 males, median age is 21,8 years (extremes: 2 and 45 years). These patients are mostly with very low income. Two groups of patients are included in this study. In the first group, patients present acute anemia crisis caused by infections disease (malaria, bacterial infections). In the second group (20 cases), SCD patients have particularly situations: pregnancy (10 cases); stroke (six cases); cardiac failure (two cases) and priapism (two cases). Transfusion treatment in first group is simple regimen. Transfusion of EC increased median Hb level at 2,9 g/dl (extremes: 1,1 and 4,7). In the second group of patients, 16 cases were transfused by manual partial exchange (1-3) and four patients received simple regimen of transfusion. Median Hb level was 3,1g/dl (extremes: 2,4-4,9 g/dl). HbS percentage reduction was after PTE between -30 and -66,8% (median: -52,6%). According to our diagnostic possibilities (blood serologic test), we have not found any contamination by HIV, HBV and HCV (virus).

  6. Neuropsychological assessment, neuroimaging, and neuropsychiatric evaluation in pediatric and adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Edwards

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Christopher L Edwards1, Renee Dunn Raynor1, Miriam Feliu1, Camela McDougald1, Stephanie Johnson2, Donald Schmechel3, Mary Wood1, Gary G Bennett4, Patrick Saurona5, Melanie Bonner1, Chante’ Wellington1, Laura M DeCastro6, Elaine Whitworth6, Mary Abrams6, Patrick Logue1, Lekisha Edwards1, Salutario Martinez7, Keith E Whitfield81Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2American Psychological Association, Science Directorate, Washington, DC, USA; 3Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 4Department of Society, Human Development, and Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; 5Taub Institute For Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and The Aging Brain, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA; 6Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 7Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 8Duke University, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: Traditionally, neuropsychological deficits due to Sickle Cell Disease (SCD have been understudied in adults. We have begun to suspect, however, that symptomatic and asymptomatic Cerebrovascular Events (CVE may account for an alarming number of deficits in this population. In the current brief review, we critically evaluated the pediatric and adult literatures on the neurocognitive effects of SCD. We highlighted the studies that have been published on this topic and posit that early detection of CVE via neurocognitive testing, neuropsychiatric evaluations, and neuroimaging may significantly reduce adult cognitive and functional morbidities.Keywords: cerebral vascular event, neuropsychological assessment, sickle cell disease, neuroimaging

  7. Cardiac involvement in genotype-positive Fabry disease patients assessed by cardiovascular MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozor, Rebecca; Grieve, Stuart M; Tchan, Michel C; Callaghan, Fraser; Hamilton-Craig, Christian; Denaro, Charles; Moon, James C; Figtree, Gemma A

    2016-02-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has the potential to provide early detection of cardiac involvement in Fabry disease. We aimed to gain further insight into this by assessing a cohort of Fabry patients using CMR. Fifty genotype-positive Fabry subjects (age 45±2 years; 50% male) referred for CMR and 39 matched controls (age 40±2 years; 59% male) were recruited. Patients had a mean Mainz severity score index of 15±2 (range 0-46), reflecting an overall mild degree of disease severity. Compared with controls, Fabry subjects had a 34% greater left ventricular mass (LVM) index (82±5 vs 61±2 g/m(2), p=0.001) and had a significantly greater papillary muscle contribution to total LVM (13±1 vs 6±0.5%, pgadolinium enhancement (LGE) was present in 15 Fabry subjects (9/21 males and 6/23 females). The most common site for LGE was the basal inferolateral wall (93%, 14/15). There was a positive association between LVM index and LGE. Despite this, there were two males and three females with no LVH that displayed LGE. Of Fabry subjects who were not on enzyme replacement therapy at enrolment (n=28), six were reclassified as having cardiac involvement (four LVH-negative/LGE-positive, one LVH-positive/LGE-positive and one LVH-positive/LGE-negative). CMR was able to detect cardiac involvement in 48% of this Fabry cohort, despite the overall mild disease phenotype of the cohort. Of those not on ERT, 21% were reclassified as having cardiac involvement allowing improved risk stratification and targeting of therapy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Difficulty in Assessing Quality of Life Outcomes in a Fluctuating Disease: A Hypothesis Based on Gastroparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vic Velanovich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An underlying assumption of quality of life outcome research is that after some intervention a “steady-state” of quality of life is reached which can be identified as an endpoint, and, hence, the “outcome.” However, in some disease processes, no so such steady-state is reached. The hypothesis presented is that a disease process with a waxing and waning course will make it difficult to determine a quality of life endpoint. After clinical observation, a pilot study of patients with either diabetic or idiopathic gastroparesis with gastric neurostimulation their records were reviewed to identify the number of clinic visits, the number of clinic visits in which the patients were asymptomatic, much improved, improved, no change, worse, or much worse. These changes were defined as “transitions.” A “transition ratio” was calculated by dividing the number of transitions by the number of clinic visits. Preliminary results showed that of 32 patients, the median number of clinic encounters was 8 (1–35, and the median number of transitions 4 (0–22. The average transition ration was 0.56±0.31. In the case of gastroparesis, over half of all clinical encounters were associated with a transition. The implication of the hypothesis and preliminary finding suggests a difficulty to identify when the symptomatic endpoint was reached. Other methods to assess the effects of treatment in such a disease process are required to fully understand the effects of treatment on quality of life.

  9. What is the impact of disease prevalence upon health technology assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotily, Michel; Roze, Stéphane

    2013-12-01

    As national budgets for health care will remain under stress for the foreseeable future, health technology assessment (HTA) aimed at offering guidance to policy-making will have an increasing role to play in optimizing resources. The emergence of new treatment paradigms and health technologies, and the prevalence studies which determine when a disease is a current or future burden for patients and the community are in the roots of the HTA process. Analysing studies on screening test strategies and health care policy, this paper revisits two key concepts in epidemiology, prevalence and incidence, in order to show their major impact upon HTA. Utilization of the predictive values of screening tests that include prevalence in their calculations, and analysing all options for screening strategies are necessary in HTA. Cost-effectiveness analyses and statistical models should include potential externalities, especially the impact of prevention and treatment on infectious disease prevalence. Beyond estimates of cost-effectiveness ratios, decision makers also need to know by how much their annual health care budget is likely to increase or decrease in the years following the emergence of new technologies: hence the importance of incidence- or prevalence-based economic evaluations. As new paradigms are occurring, especially in the field of oncology, with treatments targeted to 'small' groups of patients identified through genetic testing, prevalence data are strongly needed. Precise estimates of disease prevalence, in general populations as well as in risk or targeted groups, will therefore be necessary to improve HTA process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. STUDY OF CORRELATION AND SIGNIFICANCE OF BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS IN THE ASSESSMENT OF ACTIVE PHASE OF THYROID EYE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar P

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM Role of Interleukin-6 and HS-CRP Levels in the assessment of active thyroid eye disease. MATERIALS & METHODS A prospective observational study of 30 patients from the age group of 20-60 years with thyroid eye disease done at Regional Institute of Ophthalmology. All patients were subjected to detailed history, ocular examination, systemic examination, biochemical analysis and Imaging. Patients are categorised as mild, moderate and severe active disease based on clinical activity score. For the period of two years, patients are followed at regular periodic intervals according to the severity of disease and results were analysed. RESULTS Out of 30 patients studied, majority of the patients were females (60%, and 70% of the patients had bilateral disease. Among 30 patients, 83.33% in hyperthyroid state, 3.33% in Hypothyroid state, 13.33% in Euthyroid state (Table 3. Smoking being important risk factor in 30% among males. 50% of patients presented with mild disease, 30% with moderate disease, 0% with severe disease. IL-6, HS-CRP levels are increased only in patients with severe active disease (Table 6. Remission attained in all patients when treated earlier with steroids. CONCLUSION Identifying disease activity early and aggressive treatment with systemic steroids in active phase of moderate and severe disease has reduced the morbidity associated with disease. Correlation of IL-6, HS-CRP, TFT levels are significantly increased only in patients with active phase of severe thyroid eye disease but not significantly elevated in active phase of moderate disease. Another pitfall is IL-6 is an expensive ELISA based diagnosis. Thus, IL-6 & HS-CRP cannot be routinely used to screen patients with Thyroid eye disease.

  11. Assessment of printed patient-educational materials for chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuot, Delphine S; Davis, Elizabeth; Velasquez, Alexandra; Banerjee, Tanushree; Powe, Neil R

    2013-01-01

    Awareness of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is suboptimal among patients with CKD, perhaps due to poor readability of patient education materials (PEMs). We reviewed the suitability and readability of common PEMs that focused on 5 content areas: basics of CKD, risk factors for CKD development, risk factors for CKD progression, complications of CKD and self-management strategies to improve kidney health. Three reviewers (nephrologist, primary care physician, patient) used the Suitability Assessment of Materials to rate PEMs on message content/stimulation of learning, typography, visuals and layout and determined literacy level. Mean ratings were calculated for each PEM by content area and overall (superior = 70-100; adequate = 40-69; inadequate = 6th grade) was associated with an 11.7 point higher mean rating. Most PEMs for kidney disease were adequate. Outstanding PEMs shared characteristics of patient centeredness, a low literacy level, and patient interaction. Providers should be aware of strengths and limitations of PEMs when educating their patients about CKD. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. In Vivo Assessment of Neurodegeneration in Type C Niemann-Pick Disease by IDEAL-IQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ruo-Mi; Li, Qing-Ling; Luo, Zhong-Xing; Tang, Wen; Jiao, Ju; Wang, Jin; Kang, Zhuang; Chen, Shao-Qiong; Zhang, Yong

    2018-01-01

    To noninvasively assess the neurodegenerative changes in the brain of patients with Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease by measuring the lesion tissue with the iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least square estimation-iron quantification (IDEAL-IQ). Routine brain MRI, IDEAL-IQ and 1 H-proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS, served as control) were performed on 12 patients with type C Niemann-Pick disease (4 males and 8 females; age range, 15-61 years; mean age, 36 years) and 20 healthy subjects (10 males and 10 females; age range, 20-65 years; mean age, 38 years). The regions with lesion and the normal appearing regions (NARs) of patients were measured and analyzed based on the fat/water signal intensity on IDEAL-IQ and the lipid peak on 1 H-MRS. Niemann-Pick type C patients showed a higher fat/water signal intensity ratio with IDEAL-IQ on T2 hyperintensity lesions and NARs (3.7-4.9%, p IQ instead of 1 H-MRS. The findings of this study suggested that IDEAL-IQ may be useful as a noninvasive and objective method in the evaluation of patients with NPC; additionally, IDEAL-IQ can be used to quantitatively measure the brain parenchymal adipose content and monitor patient follow-up after treatment of NPC.

  13. Willingness to pay in dermatology: assessment of the burden of skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, Anne M; Bayoumi, Ahmed M; Goldstein, Mary K; Cruz, Ponciano D; Chen, Suephy C

    2012-07-01

    Willingness to pay (WTP) is a monetary, preference-based, burden-of-disease measure with a potential role in dermatology, where many conditions are temporary and/or mild, and many treatments are inexpensive and one might be able to imagine paying out of pocket. We assessed construct validity by interviewing 254 consecutive dermatology patients at Stanford Medical Center, Grady Hospital, and Parkland Hospital. Instruments asked about an individual's own health status and elicited WTP, time-trade-off (TTO) utilities, and health status quality of life (QOL). We measured WTP cure (short treatment course to eliminate disease) and WTP control (lifelong medication). Our data indicate greater construct validity in non-Medicaid (n=163) than Medicaid (n=91) patients. Non-Medicaid subjects had greater WTP as percent of income for cure (median: 2%) than control (median: 1.6%), PWTP amounts for control and cure did not differ. Non-Medicaid subjects with verrucae had little QOL impact, no measurable burden by TTO, and a correspondingly low WTP. Medicaid subjects with basal cell carcinoma had a strong, negative QOL impact and high burden by TTO, but had relatively moderate WTP. WTP appears promising in certain income categories. More studies are needed for conclusions about specific diagnoses.

  14. US Assessment of Hip Joint Synovitis in Rheumatic Diseases A comparison with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soini, I.; Kotaniemi, A.; Kautiainen, H.; Kauppi, M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the significance of ultrasonography (US) in detecting hip joint synovitis in patients with rheumatic diseases. Material and Methods: Forty patients with rheumatic disease and suspected hip joint synovitis underwent MRI and US of the hip joint. In addition to the throughout MRI evaluation, the anterior collum-capsule distance (CCD) was determined by both MRI and US. Thirteen healthy volunteers were examined with MRI to establish the criteria for normal findings in MRI when classifying hip joints to those with synovitis and those without. MRI was used as a gold standard. Results: Synovitis was found using MRI in 31 hips of 22 patients (9 patients had bilateral synovitis). The intraclass correlation was 0.61 between MRI and US in measuring CCD. In classifying hip joint synovitis with US, the sensitivity of the method was 87% and specificity 42%, when the CCD criterion for synovitis was determined to be 7 mm. If the cut-off point was raised to 9 mm, the sensitivity decreased to 61% while specificity increased to 94%. A difference in CCD of 1 mm between the hips as an additional criterion for synovitis increased the number of false-positive findings. Conclusion: Measurement of CCD with US proved to be a rather inaccurate method to point out synovitis in rheumatic patients when using MRI as a reference. The main reason for this result was the thickened capsule, which US could not differentiate from a thickened synovium

  15. Assessment of chronic kidney disease using skin texture as a key parameter: for South Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udhayarasu, Madhanlal; Ramakrishnan, Kalpana; Periasamy, Soundararajan

    2017-12-01

    Periodical monitoring of renal function, specifically for subjects with history of diabetic or hypertension would prevent them from entering into chronic kidney disease (CKD) condition. The recent increase in numbers may be due to food habits or lack of physical exercise, necessitates a rapid kidney function monitoring system. Presently, it is determined by evaluating glomerular filtration rate (GFR) that is mainly dependent on serum creatinine value and demographic parameters and ethnic value. Attempted here is to develop ethnic parameter based on skin texture for every individual. This value when used in GFR computation, the results are much agreeable with GFR obtained through standard modification of diet in renal disease and CKD epidemiology collaboration equations. Once correlation between CKD and skin texture is established, classification tool using artificial neural network is built to categorise CKD level based on demographic values and parameter obtained through skin texture (without using creatinine). This network when tested gives almost at par results with the network that is trained with demographic and creatinine values. The results of this Letter demonstrate the possibility of non-invasively determining kidney function and hence for making a device that would readily assess the kidney function even at home.

  16. Diagnosis, assessment and management of delusional jealousy in Parkinson's disease with and without dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugi, Giulio; Poletti, Michele; Logi, Chiara; Berti, Caterina; Romano, Anna; Del Dotto, Paolo; Lucetti, Claudio; Ceravolo, Roberto; Dell'Osso, Liliana; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo

    2013-09-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may present delusional jealousy (DJ). In a previous cross-sectional prevalence study we identified 15 cognitively preserved and five demented PD patients with DJ. The current study aimed at evaluating their clinical (motor and non-motor) characteristics and the pharmacological treatments associated with DJ, and its subsequent pharmacological management. Patients were assessed by neurologists and psychiatrists using the Hoehn and Yahr scale, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Efficacy of DJ management was evaluated in follow-up visits. All patients were in therapy with dopamine agonists. A subgroup of five cognitively preserved patients developed DJ after a short period of treatment of therapy with dopamine agonists, while other patients developed DJ after a longer period of dopaminergic treatment. Psychiatric comorbidities were common in cognitively preserved and in demented patients. The pharmacological management included the interruption of dopamine agonists in two patients and the reduction of dopamine agonist dose plus the use of antipsychotics in other patients. These clinical data suggest that the management of medicated PD patients should include investigation for the presence of DJ and the evaluation of clinical characteristics potentially relevant to the prevention or the early recognition of delusions.

  17. Assessing Motor Fluctuations in Parkinson's Disease Patients Based on a Single Inertial Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-López, Carlos; Samà, Albert; Rodríguez-Martín, Daniel; Català, Andreu; Cabestany, Joan; Moreno-Arostegui, Juan Manuel; de Mingo, Eva; Rodríguez-Molinero, Alejandro

    2016-12-15

    Altered movement control is typically the first noticeable symptom manifested by Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Once under treatment, the effect of the medication is very patent and patients often recover correct movement control over several hours. Nonetheless, as the disease advances, patients present motor complications. Obtaining precise information on the long-term evolution of these motor complications and their short-term fluctuations is crucial to provide optimal therapy to PD patients and to properly measure the outcome of clinical trials. This paper presents an algorithm based on the accelerometer signals provided by a waist sensor that has been validated in the automatic assessment of patient's motor fluctuations (ON and OFF motor states) during their activities of daily living. A total of 15 patients have participated in the experiments in ambulatory conditions during 1 to 3 days. The state recognised by the algorithm and the motor state annotated by patients in standard diaries are contrasted. Results show that the average specificity and sensitivity are higher than 90%, while their values are higher than 80% of all patients, thereby showing that PD motor status is able to be monitored through a single sensor during daily life of patients in a precise and objective way.

  18. Non-invasive brain stimulation to assess and modulate neuroplasticity in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggio, Paulo Sérgio; Valasek, Claudia Aparecida; Campanhã, Camila; Giglio, Ana Carolina Alem; Baptista, Nathalia Ishikawa; Lapenta, Olivia Morgan; Fregni, Felipe

    2011-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative and progressive disease related to a gradual decline in cognitive functions such as memory, attention, perceptual-spatial abilities, language, and executive functions. Recent evidence has suggested that interventions promoting neural plasticity can induce significant cognitive gains especially in subjects at risk of or with mild AD. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are non-invasive techniques that can induce significant and long-lasting changes in focal and non-focal neuroplasticity. In this review, we present initial preliminary evidence that TMS and tDCS can enhance performance in cognitive functions typically impaired in AD. Also, we reviewed the initial six studies on AD that presented early findings showing cognitive gains such as in recognition memory and language associated with TMS and tDCS treatment. In addition, we showed that TMS has also been used to assess neuroplasticity changes in AD supporting the notion that cortical excitability is changed in AD due to the neurodegenerative process. Due to the safe profile, cost of these tools, and initial clinical trials results, further studies are warranted in order to replicate and extend the initial findings of rTMS and tDCS as cognitive enhancers in AD. Further trials should explore different targets of stimulation along with different paradigms of stimulation including combination with behavioural interventions.

  19. INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT OF STATIN-ASSOCIATED MUSCLE DAMAGE PREDICTORS IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Petrov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the risk factors of statin-associated muscle damage in patient with ischemic heart disease.Material and methods. 258 patients with ischemic heart disease treated with statin were included into the study. Total plasma creatine kinase levels were measured and SLCO1B1*5 genotyping was performed. Relationship between statin therapy and adverse events was evaluated by Naranjo algorithm.Results. Patients with muscle symptoms received statins significantly longer (48.8 vs 11.9 months, р<0.0001 and in higher doses, than patients without muscle pain/weakness. There were not significant differences in creatine kinase levels between patients with and without muscle symptoms. Patients with SLCO1B1*5 genotype were revealed in both groups, but more often (58% among patients with muscle symptoms. Patients with abnormal C allele having muscle symptoms received statins significantly longer, than these without muscle signs (54.7 vs 13.9 months, р=0.0028.Conclusion. Association between occurrence of muscle symptoms and SLCO1B1*5 allele carriership, statin dose and therapy duration was revealed. Creatine kinase examination was not valuable for finding of statin-induced muscle damage.

  20. INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT OF STATIN-ASSOCIATED MUSCLE DAMAGE PREDICTORS IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Petrov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the risk factors of statin-associated muscle damage in patient with ischemic heart disease.Material and methods. 258 patients with ischemic heart disease treated with statin were included into the study. Total plasma creatine kinase levels were measured and SLCO1B1*5 genotyping was performed. Relationship between statin therapy and adverse events was evaluated by Naranjo algorithm.Results. Patients with muscle symptoms received statins significantly longer (48.8 vs 11.9 months, р<0.0001 and in higher doses, than patients without muscle pain/weakness. There were not significant differences in creatine kinase levels between patients with and without muscle symptoms. Patients with SLCO1B1*5 genotype were revealed in both groups, but more often (58% among patients with muscle symptoms. Patients with abnormal C allele having muscle symptoms received statins significantly longer, than these without muscle signs (54.7 vs 13.9 months, р=0.0028.Conclusion. Association between occurrence of muscle symptoms and SLCO1B1*5 allele carriership, statin dose and therapy duration was revealed. Creatine kinase examination was not valuable for finding of statin-induced muscle damage.

  1. Myocardial adrenergic nerve activity in valvular diseases assessed by iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Yoshihiro; Fukuyama, Takaya

    1997-01-01

    Iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging was used to assess myocardial adrenergic nerve activity in patients with heart failure. MIBG planar images were obtained in 94 patients. The uptake of MIBG, calculated as the heart-to-mediastinum activity ratio in the immediate image (15 min), showed a significant decrease only in patients with severe heart failure due to cardiomyopathy, but was not changed in those with valvular diseases. Storage and release of MIBG, calculated as the percentage myocardial MIBG washout from 15 min to 4 hours after isotope injection, was substantially accelerated in both patients with cardiomyopathy and valvular diseases in proportion to the severity of heart failure. These data suggest that, in severe heart failure associated with cardiomyopathy, norepinephrine uptake is reduced. Also, myocardial adrenergic nerve activity is accelerated in proportion to the severity of heart failure independent of the underlying cause. MIBG images were analyzed in 20 patients with mitral stenosis with the same methods to clarify whether myocardial adrenergic nerve activity is different in patients with heart failure without left ventricular volume or pressure overload. Myocardial uptake of MIBG did not show any significant difference. The percentage myocardial MIBG washout was increased in patients with severe heart failure. The closest correlation was between myocardial washout and cardiac output. In heart failure due to mitral stenosis, myocardial adrenergic nerve activity is intensified. Decrease in cardiac output associated with mitral stenosis acts as a potent stimulus for this intensification. (author)

  2. Development of the Korean version of Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-K).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, J C; Lee, D Y; Kim, K W; Lee, J H; Jhoo, J H; Lee, K U; Ha, J; Woo, J I

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this study was the development of the Korean Version of Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-K). ADAS-K was administrated to 84 AD patients as well as 105 non-demented control subjects. Three aspects of reliability were tested. To evaluate the validity of ADAS-K, discriminant validity and concurrent validity were tested. To evaluate the sensitivity of ADAS-K to disease severity, all subjects, AD patients and control subjects, were grouped by CDR scale and their mean scores on ADAS-K were compared. ADAS-K demonstrated high levels of reliability. Mean ADAS-K scores for AD patients were significantly different from the control group (p ADAS-K exhibited significant correlations with other tests and scales (range 0.45-0.85, p ADAS-K displayed high diagnostic efficacy and the optimal cut-off point was selected between 18/19. ADAS-K was able to discriminate the degree of AD severity according to CDR classification. Our results suggested that ADAS-K-cog was sensitive to very mild AD. We demonstrated that ADAS-K is a reliable and valid instrument not only for AD diagnosis but also for evaluation of its severity. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Role of serum thyroglobulin levels in the assessment of thyroid disease (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, H.G.; Khan, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg), a glycoprotein, is the principal iodoprotein of the thyroid gland and is the major component of the thyroid mass. As Tg is specific to thyroid gland and thyroid related-cells, its measurement in the circulation is potentially useful to study the pathogenesis, establish the diagnosis and follow the course of thyroid disorders. Serum Tg is a suitable marker for the differentiated thyroid carcinoma after total thyroid ablation by surgery and /sup 131/I treatment. Radioimmunoassay (RIA) and immunoradiometric (IRMA) methodologies are important to measure hormones for diagnosis of various diseases. In addition to /sup 131/I uptake, /sup 131/I whole body scintigraphy and estimation of T3, T4 and TSH levels, serum Tg levels in euthyroids (n=42), hyper thyroids (n=55) and treated cases (thyroidectomy and /sup 131/I ablation) of carcinoma (CA) thyroid were 9.7 - +9.96, 109.9 - +160.3 and 2.2 - + 4.2 respectively. Serum Tg levels were significantly higher (P < 0.005) in hyper thyroids and significantly lower (P < 0.025) in treated CA thyroids when compared with those of euthyroids. In treated patients (surgery and /sup 131/I ablation) serum Tg assay is an excellent method to assess the treatment and recurrence of disease. (author)

  4. Personality traits in patients with Parkinson's disease: assessment and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Michele; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo

    2012-06-01

    This study reviews empirical evidence on the association between personality traits and Parkinson's disease (PD), with a twofold aim. First, to better identify non-motor symptoms, such as affective symptoms and personality changes, that could help to define the pre-motor phase of PD; second, to better understand the neurobiological bases of personality traits, a goal that is not fully accomplished by a purely anatomical approach. A literature review was performed on studies of personality traits in PD patients, in electronic databases ISI Web of Knowledge, Medline and PsychInfo, conducted in July 2011. We found evidence that the existence of a characteristic premorbid personality profile of PD patients is not actually sustained by robust empirical evidence, mainly due to the methodological bias of the retrospective assessment of personality; PD patients present a personality profile of low novelty seeking and high harm avoidance. We concluded that the definition of a pre-motor phase of PD, based on non-motor symptoms, should search for the presence of concomitant affective disorders and for a positive psychiatric history for affective disorders rather than for a typical personality profile or personality changes. The low novelty seeking profile is probably related to the dopaminergic deficit, while the high harm avoidance profile is probably associated with the presence of affective disorders. Clinical implications of these findings, in regard to personality assessment and pharmacological treatments in PD, are also discussed.

  5. Opportunities for Prevention: Assessing Where Low-Income Patients Seek Care for Preventable Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaiman, Tamar A; Valdmanis, Vivian G; Bernet, Patrick; Moises, James

    2015-10-01

    The Affordable Care Act has many aspects that are aimed at improving health care for all Americans, including mandated insurance coverage for individuals, as well as required community health needs assessments (CHNAs), and reporting of investments in community benefit by nonprofit hospitals in order to maintain tax exemptions. Although millions of Americans have gained access to health insurance, many--often the most vulnerable--remain uninsured, and will continue to depend on hospital community benefits for care. Understanding where patients go for care can assist hospitals and communities to develop their CHNA and implementation plans in order to focus resources where the need for prevention is greatest. This study evaluated patient care-seeking behavior among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) in Florida in 2008--analyzed in 2013--to assess whether low-income patients accessed specific safety net hospitals for treatment or received care from hospitals that were geographically closer to their residence. This study found evidence that low-income patients went to hospitals that treated more low-income patients, regardless of where they lived. The findings demonstrate that hospitals-especially public safety net hospitals with a tradition of treating low-income patients suffering from CAD-should focus prevention activities where low-income patients reside.

  6. A user's guide to the disease management literature: recommendations for reporting and assessing program outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Ariel; Roberts, Nancy

    2005-02-01

    Recently there has been tremendous growth in the number of lay-press articles and peer-reviewed journal articles reporting extraordinary improvements in health status and financial outcomes due to disease management (DM) interventions. However, closer scrutiny of these reports reveals serious flaws in research design and/or analysis, leaving many to question the veracity of the claims. In recent years, there have been numerous contributions to the literature on how to assess the quality of medical research papers. However, these guidelines focus primarily on randomized controlled trials, with little attention given to the observational study designs typically used in DM outcome studies. As such, general guides to evaluating the medical literature are inadequate in their utility to assist authors and readers of DM outcomes research. The purpose of this paper is to provide authors with a clear and comprehensive guide to the reporting of DM outcomes, as well as to educate readers of the DM literature (both lay and peer reviewed) in how to assess the quality of the findings presented.

  7. Assessments of plasma ghrelin levels in the early stages of parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ning; Wang, Weiwei; Jia, Fengjv; Du, Xixun; Xie, Anmu; He, Qing; Shen, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jing; Rogers, Jack T; Xie, Junxia; Jiang, Hong

    2017-10-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms are early events in Parkinson's disease (PD). The gastrointestinal hormone ghrelin was neuroprotective in the nigrostriatal dopamine system. The objective of this study was to assess ghrelin levels in the early stages of PD. Plasma was collected in the fasting state in 291 PD patients in stages 1-3 and 303 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Additional samples were taken in the glucose response test to assess nutrition-related ghrelin levels in 20 PD patients and 20 healthy controls. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure total and active plasma ghrelin levels. We reported that total and active plasma ghrelin levels were decreased in PD, although there was no difference across progressive PD stages. Postprandial ghrelin suppression and preprandial peak responses were both attenuated in PD. Plasma ghrelin levels were decreased in PD; however, this event might be irrelevant to PD progression. Ghrelin responses to meals were also impaired in PD. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  8. Swallowing disorders in muscular diseases: functional assessment and indications of cricopharyngeal myotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Guily, J L; Périé, S; Willig, T N; Chaussade, S; Eymard, B; Angelard, B

    1994-01-01

    Thirty-four patients with an identified muscular disease were referred to our department for assessment and treatment of swallowing difficulties. Their ages ranged from 16 to 91 years (mean 59). The diagnoses were oculopharyngeal dystrophy in 17 patients, Steinert myotonic dystrophy in 6, mitochondrial myopathies in 4, polymyositis in 3, and other types in 4 patients. The main consequences of the dysphagia were weight loss (12 patients), pulmonary infections (15 patients), modified food consistency (18 patients) and non-oral feeding (3 patients). Several techniques were used to assess the different stages of deglutition: physical examination during swallowing, videofluoroscopy, pharyngoesophageal manometry, videofibroscopy of the pharynx during swallowing. Major pathological features found in the pharynx were decreased pharynx peristaltis and impaired UES relaxation. Cricopharyngeal myotomy was performed in 11 myopathic patients (median follow-up 24.9 months), while it was unnecessary, refused or contraindicated in the other patients. The procedure was successful in 8 patients whose dysphagia was dramatically improved, and failed in 3 patients. Pharyngeal perstaltis was severely impaired only in the 3 failures and was partly preserved in the improved cases. We conclude that pharyngeal function is the major prognostic factor. Cricopharyngeal myotomy is an effective treatment in those cases where cricopharyngeal dysfunction is a predominant problem or where pharyngeal peristaltis is partly impaired, since the procedure removes one obstacle. It is contraindicated when pharynx propulsion is severely impaired.

  9. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: MR imaging of liver proton density fat fraction to assess hepatic steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, An; Tan, Justin; Sun, Mark; Hamilton, Gavin; Bydder, Mark; Wolfson, Tanya; Gamst, Anthony C; Middleton, Michael; Brunt, Elizabeth M; Loomba, Rohit; Lavine, Joel E; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B; Sirlin, Claude B

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-estimated proton density fat fraction (PDFF) for assessing hepatic steatosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by using centrally scored histopathologic validation as the reference standard. This prospectively designed, cross-sectional, internal review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant study was conducted in 77 patients who had NAFLD and liver biopsy. MR imaging-PDFF was estimated from magnitude-based low flip angle multiecho gradient-recalled echo images after T2* correction and multifrequency fat modeling. Histopathologic scoring was obtained by consensus of the Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) Clinical Research Network Pathology Committee. Spearman correlation, additivity and variance stabilization for regression for exploring the effect of a number of potential confounders, and receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed. Liver MR imaging-PDFF was systematically higher, with higher histologic steatosis grade (P steatosis grade (ρ = 0.69, P steatosis grade 0 (n = 5) from those with grade 1 or higher (n = 72), 0.825 (95% confidence interval: 0.734, 0.915) to distinguish those with grade 1 or lower (n = 31) from those with grade 2 or higher (n = 46), and 0.893 (95% confidence interval: 0.809, 0.977) to distinguish those with grade 2 or lower (n = 58) from those with grade 3 (n = 19). MR imaging-PDFF showed promise for assessment of hepatic steatosis grade in patients with NAFLD. For validation, further studies with larger sample sizes are needed. © RSNA, 2013.

  10. A Novel Scoring System Approach to Assess Patients with Lyme Disease (Nutech Functional Score).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Geeta; Hopf-Seidel, Petra

    2018-01-01

    A bacterial infection by Borrelia burgdorferi referred to as Lyme disease (LD) or borreliosis is transmitted mostly by a bite of the tick Ixodes scapularis in the USA and Ixodes ricinus in Europe. Various tests are used for the diagnosis of LD, but their results are often unreliable. We compiled a list of clinically visible and patient-reported symptoms that are associated with LD. Based on this list, we developed a novel scoring system. Nutech functional Score (NFS), which is a 43 point positional (every symptom is subgraded and each alternative gets some points according to its position) and directional (moves in direction bad to good) scoring system that assesses the patient's condition. The grades of the scoring system have been converted into numeric values for conducting probability based studies. Each symptom is graded from 1 to 5 that runs in direction BAD → GOOD. NFS is a unique tool that can be used universally to assess the condition of patients with LD.

  11. Recent machine learning advancements in sensor-based mobility analysis: Deep learning for Parkinson's disease assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskofier, Bjoern M; Lee, Sunghoon I; Daneault, Jean-Francois; Golabchi, Fatemeh N; Ferreira-Carvalho, Gabriela; Vergara-Diaz, Gloria; Sapienza, Stefano; Costante, Gianluca; Klucken, Jochen; Kautz, Thomas; Bonato, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    The development of wearable sensors has opened the door for long-term assessment of movement disorders. However, there is still a need for developing methods suitable to monitor motor symptoms in and outside the clinic. The purpose of this paper was to investigate deep learning as a method for this monitoring. Deep learning recently broke records in speech and image classification, but it has not been fully investigated as a potential approach to analyze wearable sensor data. We collected data from ten patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease using inertial measurement units. Several motor tasks were expert-labeled and used for classification. We specifically focused on the detection of bradykinesia. For this, we compared standard machine learning pipelines with deep learning based on convolutional neural networks. Our results showed that deep learning outperformed other state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms by at least 4.6 % in terms of classification rate. We contribute a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of deep learning for sensor-based movement assessment and conclude that deep learning is a promising method for this field.

  12. A Novel Scoring System Approach to Assess Patients with Lyme Disease (Nutech Functional Score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geeta Shroff

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A bacterial infection by Borrelia burgdorferi referred to as Lyme disease (LD or borreliosis is transmitted mostly by a bite of the tick Ixodes scapularis in the USA and Ixodes ricinus in Europe. Various tests are used for the diagnosis of LD, but their results are often unreliable. We compiled a list of clinically visible and patient-reported symptoms that are associated with LD. Based on this list, we developed a novel scoring system. Methodology: Nutech functional Score (NFS, which is a 43 point positional (every symptom is subgraded and each alternative gets some points according to its position and directional (moves in direction bad to good scoring system that assesses the patient's condition. Results: The grades of the scoring system have been converted into numeric values for conducting probability based studies. Each symptom is graded from 1 to 5 that runs in direction BAD → GOOD. Conclusion: NFS is a unique tool that can be used universally to assess the condition of patients with LD.

  13. A multicenter family practitioners' research on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease screening using the COPD Assessment Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Hakan; Eniste, Koncuy; Basaran, Ebru Onuker; Ocakoglu, Gokhan; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Tuna, Sumeyye

    2017-11-01

    Spirometry is known to be a gold standard for the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD Assessment Test (CAT) is an eight-item questionnaire currently in use to evaluate patients with COPD. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate if CAT is an adequate tool for screening COPD. In total, 600 persons aging ⩾40 years old were randomly selected from three different family practice units located in the city center. CAT was asked to the participants and a spirometry was used to assess pulmonary obstruction. Pulmonary obstruction was defined as forced expiratory volume in first second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC)COPD diagnosis was confirmed with the reversibility test. The relationship between CAT results and pulmonary function test values was evaluated. In this sampling, the prevalence of COPD was 4.2%. Reliability of the CAT in the study group was acceptable (Cronbach's α: 0.84). The CAT scores was significantly higher in patients with COPD (PCOPD. CAT is a reliable questionnaire and there is an apparent relationship between the total CAT scores and COPD. However, CAT's ability to screen COPD is limited since it may miss the symptom-free cases.

  14. Comparison of Test Your Memory and Montreal Cognitive Assessment Measures in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J. Henderson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. MoCA is widely used in Parkinson’s disease (PD to assess cognition. The Test Your Memory (TYM test is a cognitive screening tool that is self-administered. Objectives. We sought to determine (a the optimal value of TYM to discriminate between PD patients with and without cognitive deficits on MoCA testing, (b equivalent MoCA and TYM scores, and (c interrater reliability in TYM testing. Methods. We assessed the discriminant ability of TYM and the equivalence between TYM and MoCA scores and measured the interrater reliability between three raters. Results. Of the 135 subjects that completed both tests, 55% had cognitive impairment according to MoCA. A MoCA score of 25 was equivalent to a TYM score of 43-44. The area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC curve for TYM to differentiate between PD-normal and PD-cognitive impairment was 0.82 (95% CI 0.75 to 0.89. The optimal cutoff to distinguish PD-cognitive impairment from PD-normal was ≤45 (sensitivity 90.5%, specificity 59% thereby correctly classifying 76.3% of patients with PD-cognitive impairment. Interrater agreement was high (0.97 and TYM was completed in under 7 minutes (interquartile range 5.33 to 8.52 minutes. Conclusions. The TYM test is a useful and less resource intensive screening test for cognitive deficits in PD.

  15. Assessment of Abilities of Gastroenterology Fellows to Provide Information to Patients With Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Noami; Lucero, Catherine; Villanueva, Gerald; Poles, Michael; Gillespie, Colleen; Zabar, Sondra; Weinshel, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    Patient education is critical in ensuring patient compliance and good health outcomes. Fellows must be able to effectively communicate with their patients, delivering enough information for the patient to understand their medical problem and maximize patient compliance. We created an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) with 4 liver disease cases to assess fellows' knowledge and ability to inform standardized patients (SPs) about their clinical condition. We developed 4 cases highlighting different aspects of liver disease and created a 4-station OSCE: hepatitis B, acute hepatitis C, new diagnosis of cirrhosis, and an end-stage cirrhotic nontransplant candidate. The SP with hepatitis B was minimizing the fact that she could not read English. The acute hepatitis C SP was a nursing student who is afraid that having hepatitis C might jeopardize her career. The SP with the new diagnosis of alcoholic cirrhosis needed to stop drinking, and the end-stage liver disease patient had to grapple with his advanced directives. Twelve fellows from 4 GI training programs participated. Our focus was to assess the fellows' knowledge about liver diseases and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies of health literacy, shared decision making, advanced directives, and goals of care. The goal for the fellows was to communicate effectively with the SPs, and acknowledge that each patient had an emotionally charged issue to overcome. The SPs used a checklist to rate fellows' performance. Faculty and the SPs observed the cases and provided feedback. The fellows were surveyed on their performance regarding the case. The majority of fellows were able to successfully summarize findings and discuss a plan with the patient in the new diagnosis of cirrhosis (76.92%) and hepatitis C case (100%), but were less successful in the hepatitis B case (30.77%) and the end-of-life case (41.67%). Overall, a small percentage of fellows reflected that they did a good

  16. Tl-201 per rectum scintigraphy in chronic liver disease: assessment of Tl-201 uptake indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Won Jin; Choi, Yun Young; Cho, Suk Shin; Lee, Min Ho

    1999-01-01

    Heart to liver ratio on Tl-201 per rectal scintigraphy (shunt index) is known to be useful in the assessment of portal systemic shunt. We assessed Tl-201 uptake pattern and early liver/heart uptake rate of Tl-201 and correlated with shunt index in patients with chronic active hepatitis (CAH) and liver cirrhosis (LC). Fifty eight patients with biopsy-proven chronic liver disease (35 with CAH, 23 with LC) underwent Tl-201 per rectum scintigraphy after instillation of 18.5 MBq of Tl-201 into the upper rectum. We evaluated hepatic uptake (type 1: homogeneous, 2: inhomogeneous segmental, 3: inhomogeneous nonsegmental) and extrahepatic uptake of spleen, heart and kidney (grade 0: no uptake, 1: less than liver, 2: equal to liver, 3: greater than liver). We measured the early liver/heart uptake rate (the slope of the liver to heart uptake ratio for 10 mim) and shunt index (heart to liver uptake ratio). Tl-201 uptake pattern and early liver/heart uptake rate of Tl-201 was correlated with the pathologic diagnosis and shunt index. Hepatic uptake patterns of type 1 and 2 were dominant in CAH (CAH: 27/35, LC: 8/23), and type 3 in LC (CAH: 8/35, LC: 15/23)(p<0.005). The grades of extrahepatic uptake were higher in LC than in CAH (spleen: p<0.001, other soft tissue: p<0.005). The early liver/heart uptake rate of CAH (0.110±0.111) was significantly higher than that of LC (0.014±0.090)(p<0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of the early liver/heart uptake rate were 77.7% and 67.7% in differentiating LC from CAH. There was negative correlation between early liver/heart uptake rate and shunt index (r=-0.3347, p<0.01). Hepatic and extrahepatic uptake pattern and early liver/heart uptake rate on Tl-201 per rectum scintigraphy are useful in the assessment of portal systemic shunt in patients with chronic liver disease

  17. Development of the Music Therapy Assessment Tool for Advanced Huntington's Disease: A Pilot Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelly, Julian; Bodak, Rebeka

    2016-01-01

    Case studies of people with Huntington's disease (HD) report that music therapy provides a range of benefits that may improve quality of life; however, no robust music therapy assessment tools exist for this population. Develop and conduct preliminary psychometric testing of a music therapy assessment tool for patients with advanced HD. First, we established content and face validity of the Music Therapy Assessment Tool for Advanced HD (MATA-HD) through focus groups and field testing. Second, we examined psychometric properties of the resulting MATA-HD in terms of its construct validity, internal consistency, and inter-rater and intra-rater reliability over 10 group music therapy sessions with 19 patients. The resulting MATA-HD included a total of 15 items across six subscales (Arousal/Attention, Physical Presentation, Communication, Musical, Cognition, and Psychological/Behavioral). We found good construct validity (r ≥ 0.7) for Mood, Communication Level, Communication Effectiveness, Choice, Social Behavior, Arousal, and Attention items. Cronbach's α of 0.825 indicated good internal consistency across 11 items with a common focus of engagement in therapy. The inter-rater reliability (IRR) Intra-Class Coefficient (ICC) scores averaged 0.65, and a mean intra-rater ICC reliability of 0.68 was obtained. Further training and retesting provided a mean of IRR ICC of 0.7. Preliminary data indicate that the MATA-HD is a promising tool for measuring patient responses to music therapy interventions across psychological, physical, social, and communication domains of functioning in patients with advanced HD. © the American Music Therapy Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. DISEASES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Pallejà, Albert; Tsafou, Kalliopi

    2015-01-01

    Text mining is a flexible technology that can be applied to numerous different tasks in biology and medicine. We present a system for extracting disease-gene associations from biomedical abstracts. The system consists of a highly efficient dictionary-based tagger for named entity recognition...... of human genes and diseases, which we combine with a scoring scheme that takes into account co-occurrences both within and between sentences. We show that this approach is able to extract half of all manually curated associations with a false positive rate of only 0.16%. Nonetheless, text mining should...... not stand alone, but be combined with other types of evidence. For this reason, we have developed the DISEASES resource, which integrates the results from text mining with manually curated disease-gene associations, cancer mutation data, and genome-wide association studies from existing databases...

  19. Delayed-Start Analyses in the Phase 3 Solanezumab EXPEDITION3 Study in Mild Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu-Seifert, H; Case, M G; Andersen, S W; Holdridge, K C; Aisen, P S; Kollack-Walker, S; Siemers, E

    2018-01-01

    A delayed-start design has been proposed to assess a potential disease-modifying effect in investigational drugs for Alzheimer's disease that target the underlying disease process. We extended this methodology to recently obtained data from the EXPEDITION3. EXPEDITION3 was a Phase 3, double-blind study with participants randomized to solanezumab (400 mg) or placebo every 4 weeks for 80 weeks, with an optional extension of active treatment. The delayed-start analysis was designed to determine if a statistically significant treatment difference established during the placebo-controlled period is maintained (at predefined level) during the delayed-start period, which would suggest the active drug has a disease-modifying effect. The delayed-start analysis was assessed across multiple efficacy measures, and includes data from baseline in the placebo-controlled period and up to 9 months in the delayed-start period. No significant difference was observed between the placebo and solanezumab treatment groups at the end of the placebo-controlled period for the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive 14-item subscale. A significant treatment difference was observed at the end of the placebo-controlled period for the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living instrumental items, an effect also seen at 6 months in the delayed-start period, and the noninferiority criterion was met. No other efficacy measures met these criteria. Delayed-start statistical methodology was used to understand the longitudinal outcomes in EXPEDITION3 and its extension. The small treatment differences observed at the end of the placebo-controlled phase prevented adequate assessment of any putative disease modifying effect.

  20. Hazard analysis of critical control points assessment as a tool to respond to emerging infectious disease outbreaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L Edmunds

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAI strain H5N1 has had direct and indirect economic impacts arising from direct mortality and control programmes in over 50 countries reporting poultry outbreaks. HPAI H5N1 is now reported as the most widespread and expensive zoonotic disease recorded and continues to pose a global health threat. The aim of this research was to assess the potential of utilising Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points (HACCP assessments in providing a framework for a rapid response to emerging infectious disease outbreaks. This novel approach applies a scientific process, widely used in food production systems, to assess risks related to a specific emerging health threat within a known zoonotic disease hotspot. We conducted a HACCP assessment for HPAI viruses within Vietnam's domestic poultry trade and relate our findings to the existing literature. Our HACCP assessment identified poultry flock isolation, transportation, slaughter, preparation and consumption as critical control points for Vietnam's domestic poultry trade. Introduction of the preventative measures highlighted through this HACCP evaluation would reduce the risks posed by HPAI viruses and pressure on the national economy. We conclude that this HACCP assessment provides compelling evidence for the future potential that HACCP analyses could play in initiating a rapid response to emerging infectious diseases.

  1. Generic versus Disease-Specific Instruments in Quality-of-life Assessment of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malý, Marek; Vondra, V.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 2 (2006), s. 211-215 ISSN 0026-1270 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : health-related quality of life * questionnaires * chronic obstructive pulmonary disease * reproducibility * responsiveness Subject RIV: FC - Pulmology Impact factor: 1.684, year: 2006

  2. A qualitative assessment of personal and social responsibility for kidney disease: the Increasing Kidney Disease Awareness Network Transplant Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigner, Clarence; Lyles, Courtney Rees; Galvin, Georgia; Sabin, Janice; Davis, Connie; Dick, Andre; Young, Bessie A

    2011-01-01

    Limited qualitative research has explored opinions of kidney disease health care providers regarding racial and ethnic disparities in access to and receipt of kidney transplantation. Key informant interviews were conducted among transplant nephrologists, nephrologists, transplant social workers, and transplant coordinators to determine barriers to transplantation among African Americans compared to whites with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Thirty-eight interviews were audio recorded and transcribed to hardcopy for content analysis. Grounded theory was used to determine dominant themes within the interviews. Reliability and validity were ensured by several coinvestigators independently sorting verbatim responses used for generating themes and subsequent explanations. Several major categories arose from analysis of the transcripts. Under the category of personal and social responsibility for kidney transplantation, interviews revealed 4 major themes: negative personal behaviors, acquisition of and lack of self-treatment of comorbid conditions, lack of individual responsibility, and the need for more social responsibility. Many providers perceived patients as being largely responsible for the development of ESRD, while some providers expressed the idea that more social responsibility was needed to improve poor health status and disparities in kidney transplantation rates. Kidney disease health providers seemed torn between notions of patients' accountability and social responsibility for racial disparities in chronic kidney disease and ESRD. Further research is needed to clarify which aspects contribute most to disparities in access to transplantation.

  3. Combining Public Health Education and Disease Ecology Research: Using Citizen Science to Assess Chagas Disease Entomological Risk in Texas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Curtis-Robles

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a zoonotic parasitic disease well-documented throughout the Americas and transmitted primarily by triatomine 'kissing bug' vectors. In acknowledgment of the successful history of vector control programs based on community participation across Latin America, we used a citizen science approach to gain novel insight into the geographic distribution, seasonal activity, and Trypanosoma cruzi infection prevalence of kissing bugs in Texas while empowering the public with information about Chagas disease.We accepted submissions of kissing bugs encountered by the public in Texas and other states from 2013-2014 while providing educational literature about Chagas disease. In the laboratory, kissing bugs were identified to species, dissected, and tested for T. cruzi infection. A total of 1,980 triatomines were submitted to the program comprised of at least seven species, of which T. gerstaeckeri and T. sanguisuga were the most abundant (85.7% of submissions. Triatomines were most commonly collected from dog kennels and outdoor patios; Overall, 10.5% of triatomines were collected from inside the home. Triatomines were submitted from across Texas, including many counties which were not previously known to harbor kissing bugs. Kissing bugs were captured primarily throughout April-October, and peak activity occurred in June-July. Emails to our dedicated account regarding kissing bugs were more frequent in the summer months (June-August than the rest of the year. We detected T. cruzi in 63.3% of tested bugs.Citizen science is an efficient approach for generating data on the distribution, phenology, and infection prevalence of kissing bugs-vectors of the Chagas disease parasite-while educating the public and medical community.

  4. Comparison of Disease Activity Score in 28 joints with ESR (DAS28), Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI), Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) & Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data with 3 measures (RAPID3) for assessing disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis at initial presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B Siddhartha; Suneetha, P; Mohan, Alladi; Kumar, D Prabath; Sarma, K V S

    2017-11-01

    In patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), disease severity assessment is done using Disease Activity Score in 28 joints with ESR (DAS28). Computing DAS28 is time-consuming, requires laboratory testing and an online calculator. There is a need to validate rapid methods of disease severity assessment for routine daily use. This study was conducted to compare DAS28, Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI), Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) and Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data with 3 measures (RAPID3) to assess the disease activity in patients with RA. We prospectively studied the utility of CDAI, HAQ-DI and RAPID3 scoring in 100 consecutive newly diagnosed, disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) naïve adult patients with RA seen during January 2013 and June 2014 at a tertiary care teaching hospital in south India. The mean age of the patients was 42.1±11.6 yr, there were 82 females. The median [interquartile range (IQR)] symptom duration was 6 (range 4-12) months. The median (IQR) DAS28, CDAI, HAQ-DI and RAPID3 scores at presentation were 7 (6-7), 36 (28-43), 2 (1-2) and 17 (13-19), respectively. A significant positive correlation was observed between DAS28 and CDAI (r=0.568; Pfair' agreement was observed in between DAS28 and CDAI (kappa-statistic=0.296). The agreement between DAS28 and HAQ-DI (kappa-statistic=0.007) and RAPID3 (kappa-statistic=0.072) was less robust. In adult patients with RA, in the setting where illiteracy is high, CDAI emerged as the preferred choice for rapid assessment of severity of disease at the time of initial presentation.

  5. From disease association to risk assessment: an optimistic view from genome-wide association studies on type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Wei

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have been fruitful in identifying disease susceptibility loci for common and complex diseases. A remaining question is whether we can quantify individual disease risk based on genotype data, in order to facilitate personalized prevention and treatment for complex diseases. Previous studies have typically failed to achieve satisfactory performance, primarily due to the use of only a limited number of confirmed susceptibility loci. Here we propose that sophisticated machine-learning approaches with a large ensemble of markers may improve the performance of disease risk assessment. We applied a Support Vector Machine (SVM algorithm on a GWAS dataset generated on the Affymetrix genotyping platform for type 1 diabetes (T1D and optimized a risk assessment model with hundreds of markers. We subsequently tested this model on an independent Illumina-genotyped dataset with imputed genotypes (1,008 cases and 1,000 controls, as well as a separate Affymetrix-genotyped dataset (1,529 cases and 1,458 controls, resulting in area under ROC curve (AUC of approximately 0.84 in both datasets. In contrast, poor performance was achieved when limited to dozens of known susceptibility loci in the SVM model or logistic regression model. Our study suggests that improved disease risk assessment can be achieved by using algorithms that take into account interactions between a large ensemble of markers. We are optimistic that genotype-based disease risk assessment may be feasible for diseases where a notable proportion of the risk has already been captured by SNP arrays.

  6. Validation of 24-hour ambulatory gait assessment in Parkinson's disease with simultaneous video observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilda Valentina

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder resulting in motor disturbances that can impact normal gait. Although PD initially responds well to pharmacological treatment, as the disease progresses efficacy often fluctuates over the course of the day, and clinical management would benefit from long-term objective measures of gait. We have previously described a small device worn on the shank that uses acceleration and angular velocity sensors to calculate stride length and identify freezing of gait in PD patients. In this study we extend validation of the gait monitor to 24-h using simultaneous video observation of PD patients. Methods A sleep laboratory was adapted to perform 24-hr video monitoring of patients while wearing the device. Continuous video monitoring of a sleep lab, hallway, kitchen and conference room was performed using a 4-camera security system and recorded to hard disk. Subjects (3 wore the gait monitor on the left shank (just above the ankle for a 24-h period beginning around 5 pm in the evening. Accuracy of stride length measures were assessed at the beginning and end of the 24-h epoch. Two independent observers rated the video logs to identify when subjects were walking or lying down. Results The mean error in stride length at the start of recording was 0.05 m (SD 0 and at the conclusion of the 24 h epoch was 0.06 m (SD 0.026. There was full agreement between observer coding of the video logs and the output from the gait monitor software; that is, for every video observation of the subject walking there was a corresponding pulse in the monitor data that indicated gait. Conclusions The accuracy of ambulatory stride length measurement was maintained over the 24-h period, and there was 100% agreement between the autonomous detection of locomotion by the gait monitor and video observation.

  7. Factors associated with coronary artery disease progression assessed by serial coronary computed tomography angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, Gabriel Cordeiro; Gottlieb, Ilan; Rothstein, Tamara; Derenne, Maria Eduarda; Sabioni, Leticia; Lima, Ronaldo de Souza Leão; Lima, João A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) allows for noninvasive coronary artery disease (CAD) phenotyping. Factors related to CAD progression are epidemiologically valuable. Objective: To identify factors associated with CAD progression in patients undergoing sequential CCTA testing. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 384 consecutive patients who had at least two CCTA studies between December 2005 and March 2013. Due to limitations in the quantification of CAD progression, we excluded patients who had undergone surgical revascularization previously or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) between studies. CAD progression was defined as any increase in the adapted segment stenosis score (calculated using the number of diseased segments and stenosis severity) in all coronary segments without stent (in-stent restenosis was excluded from the analysis). Stepwise logistic regression was used to assess variables associated with CAD progression. Results: From a final population of 234 patients, a total of 117 (50%) had CAD progression. In a model accounting for major CAD risk factors and other baseline characteristics, only age (odds ratio [OR] 1.04, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 1.01–1.07), interstudy interval (OR 1.03, 95%CI 1.01–1.04), and past PCI (OR 3.66, 95%CI 1.77–7.55) showed an independent relationship with CAD progression. Conclusions: A history of PCI with stent placement was independently associated with a 3.7-fold increase in the odds of CAD progression, excluding in-stent restenosis. Age and interstudy interval were also independent predictors of progression. (author)

  8. Assessment of automated disease detection in diabetic retinopathy screening using two-field photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goatman, Keith; Charnley, Amanda; Webster, Laura; Nussey, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    To assess the performance of automated disease detection in diabetic retinopathy screening using two field mydriatic photography. Images from 8,271 sequential patient screening episodes from a South London diabetic retinopathy screening service were processed by the Medalytix iGrading™ automated grading system. For each screening episode macular-centred and disc-centred images of both eyes were acquired and independently graded according to the English national grading scheme. Where discrepancies were found between the automated result and original manual grade, internal and external arbitration was used to determine the final study grades. Two versions of the software were used: one that detected microaneurysms alone, and one that detected blot haemorrhages and exudates in addition to microaneurysms. Results for each version were calculated once using both fields and once using the macula-centred field alone. Of the 8,271 episodes, 346 (4.2%) were considered unassessable. Referable disease was detected in 587 episodes (7.1%). The sensitivity of the automated system for detecting unassessable images ranged from 97.4% to 99.1% depending on configuration. The sensitivity of the automated system for referable episodes ranged from 98.3% to 99.3%. All the episodes that included proliferative or pre-proliferative retinopathy were detected by the automated system regardless of configuration (192/192, 95% confidence interval 98.0% to 100%). If implemented as the first step in grading, the automated system would have reduced the manual grading effort by between 2,183 and 3,147 patient episodes (26.4% to 38.1%). Automated grading can safely reduce the workload of manual grading using two field, mydriatic photography in a routine screening service.

  9. Factors associated with coronary artery disease progression assessed by serial coronary computed tomography angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, Gabriel Cordeiro; Gottlieb, Ilan, E-mail: ilangottlieb@gmail.com [Casa de Saúde São José, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rothstein, Tamara; Derenne, Maria Eduarda; Sabioni, Leticia; Lima, Ronaldo de Souza Leão [Centro de Diagnóstico por Imagem CDPI, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lima, João A. C. [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Background: Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) allows for noninvasive coronary artery disease (CAD) phenotyping. Factors related to CAD progression are epidemiologically valuable. Objective: To identify factors associated with CAD progression in patients undergoing sequential CCTA testing. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 384 consecutive patients who had at least two CCTA studies between December 2005 and March 2013. Due to limitations in the quantification of CAD progression, we excluded patients who had undergone surgical revascularization previously or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) between studies. CAD progression was defined as any increase in the adapted segment stenosis score (calculated using the number of diseased segments and stenosis severity) in all coronary segments without stent (in-stent restenosis was excluded from the analysis). Stepwise logistic regression was used to assess variables associated with CAD progression. Results: From a final population of 234 patients, a total of 117 (50%) had CAD progression. In a model accounting for major CAD risk factors and other baseline characteristics, only age (odds ratio [OR] 1.04, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 1.01–1.07), interstudy interval (OR 1.03, 95%CI 1.01–1.04), and past PCI (OR 3.66, 95%CI 1.77–7.55) showed an independent relationship with CAD progression. Conclusions: A history of PCI with stent placement was independently associated with a 3.7-fold increase in the odds of CAD progression, excluding in-stent restenosis. Age and interstudy interval were also independent predictors of progression. (author)

  10. A mobile cloud-based Parkinson's disease assessment system for home-based monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Di; Dhall, Rohit; Lieberman, Abraham; Petitti, Diana B

    2015-03-26

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most prevalent movement disorder of the central nervous system, and affects more than 6.3 million people in the world. The characteristic motor features include tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and impaired postural stability. Current therapy based on augmentation or replacement of dopamine is designed to improve patients' motor performance but often leads to levodopa-induced adverse effects, such as dyskinesia and motor fluctuation. Clinicians must regularly monitor patients in order to identify these effects and other declines in motor function as soon as possible. Current clinical assessment for Parkinson's is subjective and mostly conducted by brief observations made during patient visits. Changes in patients' motor function between visits are hard to track and clinicians are not able to make the most informed decisions about the course of therapy without frequent visits. Frequent clinic visits increase the physical and economic burden on patients and their families. In this project, we sought to design, develop, and evaluate a prototype mobile cloud-based mHealth app, "PD Dr", which collects quantitative and objective information about PD and would enable home-based assessment and monitoring of major PD symptoms. We designed and developed a mobile app on the Android platform to collect PD-related motion data using the smartphone 3D accelerometer and to send the data to a cloud service for storage, data processing, and PD symptoms severity estimation. To evaluate this system, data from the system were collected from 40 patients with PD and compared with experts' rating on standardized rating scales. The evaluation showed that PD Dr could effectively capture important motion features that differentiate PD severity and identify critical symptoms. For hand resting tremor detection, the sensitivity was .77 and accuracy was .82. For gait difficulty detection, the sensitivity was .89 and accuracy was .81. In PD severity estimation, the

  11. Functional Performance and Associations between Performance Tests and Neurological Assessment Differ in Men and Women with Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medijainen, Kadri; Pääsuke, Mati; Lukmann, Aet; Taba, Pille

    2015-01-01

    Neurological assessment of a patient with Parkinson's disease (PD) is expected to reflect upon functional performance. As women are known to report more limitations even for same observed functional performance level, present study was designed to examine whether associations between neurological assessments and functional performance differ across genders. 14 men and 14 women with PD participated. Functional performance was assessed by measuring walking speeds on 10-meter walk test (10MWT) and by performing timed-up-and-go-test (TUG). Neurological assessment included Hoehn and Yahr Scale (HY), Movement Disorders Society Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS), Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living Scale (S-E), and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). In women with PD, Kendall's tau-b correlation analyses revealed significant correlations between functional performance tests and neurological assessment measures, with the exception in MMSE. No corresponding associations were found for men, although they demonstrated better functional performance, as expected. Men in similar clinical stage of the PD perform better on functional tests than women. Disease severity reflects upon functional performance differently in men and women with PD. Results indicate that when interpreting the assessment results of both functional performance and neurological assessment tests, the gender of the patient should be taken into consideration.

  12. Functional Performance and Associations between Performance Tests and Neurological Assessment Differ in Men and Women with Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadri Medijainen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neurological assessment of a patient with Parkinson’s disease (PD is expected to reflect upon functional performance. As women are known to report more limitations even for same observed functional performance level, present study was designed to examine whether associations between neurological assessments and functional performance differ across genders. Methods. 14 men and 14 women with PD participated. Functional performance was assessed by measuring walking speeds on 10-meter walk test (10MWT and by performing timed-up-and-go-test (TUG. Neurological assessment included Hoehn and Yahr Scale (HY, Movement Disorders Society Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS, Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living Scale (S-E, and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE. Results. In women with PD, Kendall’s tau-b correlation analyses revealed significant correlations between functional performance tests and neurological assessment measures, with the exception in MMSE. No corresponding associations were found for men, although they demonstrated better functional performance, as expected. Conclusion. Men in similar clinical stage of the PD perform better on functional tests than women. Disease severity reflects upon functional performance differently in men and women with PD. Results indicate that when interpreting the assessment results of both functional performance and neurological assessment tests, the gender of the patient should be taken into consideration.

  13. Health impacts related to urban and transport planning: A burden of disease assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Natalie; Rojas-Rueda, David; Basagaña, Xavier; Cirach, Marta; Cole-Hunter, Tom; Dadvand, Payam; Donaire-Gonzalez, David; Foraster, Maria; Gascon, Mireia; Martinez, David; Tonne, Cathryn; Triguero-Mas, Margarita; Valentín, Antònia; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark

    2017-10-01

    Until now, estimates of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) have mainly been produced on national or regional levels. These general estimates, however, are less useful for city governments who have to take decisions on local scales. To address this gap, we focused on the city-level burden of disease (BD) due to exposures affected by urban and transport planning. We conducted a BD assessment using the Urban and Transport Planning Health Impact Assessment (UTOPHIA) tool to estimate annual preventable morbidity and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) under compliance with international exposure recommendations for physical activity (PA), exposure to air pollution, noise, heat, and access to green spaces in Barcelona, Spain. Exposure estimates and morbidity data were available for 1,357,361 Barcelona residents ≥20years (2012). We compared recommended with current exposure levels to estimate the associated BD. We quantified associations between exposures and morbidities and calculated population attributable fractions to estimate the number of attributable cases. We calculated DALYs using GBD Study 2015 background DALY estimates for Spain, which were scaled to Barcelona considering differences in population size, age and sex structures. We also estimated annual health costs that could be avoided under compliance with exposure recommendations. Not complying with recommended levels for PA, air pollution, noise, heat and access to green spaces was estimated to generate a large morbidity burden and resulted in 52,001 DALYs (95% CI: 42,866-61,136) in Barcelona each year (13% of all annual DALYs). From this BD 36% (i.e. 18,951 DALYs) was due to traffic noise with sleep disturbance and annoyance contributing largely (i.e. 10,548 DALYs). Non-compliance was estimated to result in direct health costs of 20.10 million € (95% CI: 15.36-24.83) annually. Non-compliance of international exposure recommendations was estimated to result in a considerable BD and in substantial

  14. Evaluation of the Johne's disease risk assessment and management plan on dairy farms in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Laura; Sorge, Ulrike S; DeVries, Trevor J; Godkin, Ann; Lissemore, Kerry; Kelton, David F

    2015-10-01

    Johne's disease (JD) is a production-limiting gastrointestinal disease in cattle. To minimize the effects of JD, the Ontario dairy industry launched the Ontario Johne's Education and Management Assistance Program in 2010. As part of the program, trained veterinarians conducted a risk assessment and management plan (RAMP), an on-farm questionnaire where high RAMP scores are associated with high risk of JD transmission. Subsequently, veterinarians recommended farm-specific management practices for JD prevention. Milk or serum ELISA results from the milking herd were used to determine the herd ELISA status (HES) and within-herd prevalence. After 3.5 yr of implementation of the program, the aim of this study was to evaluate the associations among RAMP scores, HES, and recommendations. Data from 2,103 herds were available for the analyses. A zero-inflated negative binomial model for the prediction of the number of ELISA-positive animals per farm was built. The model included individual RAMP questions about purchasing animals in the logistic portion, indicating risks for between-herd transmission, and purchasing bulls, birth of calves outside the designated calving area, colostrum and milk feeding management, and adult cow environmental hygiene in the negative binomial portion, indicating risk factors for within-herd transmission. However, farms which fed low-risk milk compared with milk replacer had fewer seropositive animals. The model additionally included the JD herd history in the negative binomial and the logistic portion, indicating that herds with a JD herd history were more likely to have at least 1 positive animal and to have a higher number of positive animals. Generally, a positive association was noted between RAMP scores and the odds of receiving a recommendation for the respective risk area; however, the relationship was not always linear. For general JD risk and calving area risk, seropositive herds had higher odds of receiving recommendations compared

  15. Gaucher disease type I: assessment of basal metabolic rate in patients from southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doneda, Divair; Lopes, André L; Oliveira, Alvaro R; Netto, Cristina B; Moulin, Cileide C; Schwartz, Ida V D

    2011-01-15

    Gaucher disease (GD) is characterized by clinical heterogeneity and is associated with metabolic abnormalities such as increased resting energy expenditure. To assess the basal metabolic rate (BMR) of patients with GD type I followed at the Gaucher Disease Reference Center of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Fourteen patients (male=6) and 14 healthy controls matched by gender, age and body mass index (BMI) were included in the study. The nutritional status of patients was assessed by BMI. The BMR was measured by indirect calorimetry. In two patients, it was possible to perform BMR in the pre- and the post-treatment periods. Mean age and BMI of patients and controls were, respectively, 32.8 ± 17.6 and 32.1 ± 16.6 years and 23.3 ± 3.1 and 22.4 ± 3.1 kg/m(2). Twelve patients were receiving enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with imiglucerase (mean duration of treatment=5.2 ± 4.3 years; mean dosage of imiglucerase=24.2 ± 7.3 UI/kg/inf). Five patients (36%) were overweight, and nine (64%) were normal weight. Mean BMR of patients on ERT was 27.1% higher than that of controls (p=0.007). There was no difference between the BMR of patients on ERT and not on ERT (n=4) (p=0.92). Comparing the BMR of patients on ERT and their controls with the BMR estimated by the Harris-Benedict equation, the BMR of patients was 6.3% higher than the estimated (p = 0.1), while the BMR of their controls was 17.0% lower than the estimated (p = 0.001). Most treated GD type I patients were normal weight. The patients including those on ERT showed higher BMR when compared to controls. Imiglucerase is probably unable to normalize the hypermetabolism presented by GD type I patients. Additional studies should be performed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A study of measurement properties of the Life-Space Assessment questionnaire in older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Isabel Fialho Fontenele; Tiuganji, Carina Tiemi; Simões, Maria do Socorro Morais Pereira; Lunardi, Adriana Claudia

    2018-06-01

    To test the measurement properties (reliability, interpretability, and validity) of the Life-Space Assessment questionnaire for older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Clinimetric study. Pneumology service, ambulatory care, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. Consecutive sample of older adults ( n = 62; 38 (61%) men, 24 (39%) women) with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Not applicable. Life-Space Assessment questionnaire assesses five space levels visited by the older adult in four weeks prior to the assessment. We tested the following measurement properties of this questionnaire: reliability (reproducibility assessed by a type-2,1 intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC 2,1 ); internal consistency assessed by the Cronbach's alpha; measurement error by determining the standard error of measurement (SEM)), interpretability (minimum detectable change with 90% confidence (MDC 90 ); ceiling and floor effects by calculating the proportion of participants who achieved the minimum and maximum scores), and validity by Pearson's correlation test between the Life-Space Assessment questionnaire scores and number of daily steps assessed by accelerometry. Reproducibility (ICC 2,1 ) was 0.90 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.84-0.94), and internal consistency (Cronbach's α) was 0.80 (range = 0.76-0.80 for each item deleted). SEM was 3.65 points (3%), the MDC 90 was 0.20 points, and we observed no ceiling (2%) or floor (6%) effects. We observed an association between the score of the Life-Space Assessment questionnaire and daily steps ( r = 0.43; P = 0.01). Life-Space Assessment questionnaire shows adequate measurement properties for the assessment of life-space mobility in older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  17. Exploratory assessment of left ventricular strain–volume loops in severe aortic valve diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Hugo G.; van Dijk, Arie P.; George, Keith P.; Hopman, Maria T. E.; Thijssen, Dick H. J.

    2017-01-01

    Key points Severe aortic valve diseases are common cardiac abnormalities that are associated with poor long‐term survival.Before any reduction in left ventricular (LV) function, the left ventricle undergoes structural remodelling under the influence of changing haemodynamic conditions.In this study, we combined temporal changes in LV structure (volume) with alterations in LV functional characteristics (strain, ԑ) into a ԑ–volume loop, in order to provide novel insight into the haemodynamic cardiac consequences of aortic valve diseases in those with preserved LV ejection fraction.We showed that our novel ԑ–volume loop and the specific loop characteristics provide additional insight into the functional and mechanical haemodynamic consequences of severe aortic valve diseases (with preserved LV ejection fraction).Finally, we showed that the ԑ–volume loop characteristics provide discriminative capacity compared with conventional measures of LV function. Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine left ventricular (LV) strain (ԑ)–volume loops to provide novel insight into the haemodynamic cardiac consequences of aortic valve stenosis (AS) and aortic valve regurgitation (AR). Twenty‐seven participants were retrospectively recruited: AR (n = 7), AS (n = 10) and control subjects (n = 10). Standard transthoracic echocardiography was used to obtain apical four‐chamber images to construct ԑ–volume relationships, which were assessed using the following parameters: early systolic ԑ (ԑ_ES); slope of ԑ–volume relationship during systole (Sslope); end‐systolic peak ԑ (peak ԑ); and diastolic uncoupling (systolic ԑ–diastolic ԑ at same volume) during early diastole (UNCOUP_ED) and late diastole (UNCOUP_LD). Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine the ability to detect impaired LV function. Although LV ejection fraction was comparable between groups, longitudinal peak ԑ was reduced compared with control subjects

  18. Exploratory assessment of left ventricular strain-volume loops in severe aortic valve diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Hugo G; van Dijk, Arie P; George, Keith P; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J; Oxborough, David L

    2017-06-15

    Severe aortic valve diseases are common cardiac abnormalities that are associated with poor long-term survival. Before any reduction in left ventricular (LV) function, the left ventricle undergoes structural remodelling under the influence of changing haemodynamic conditions. In this study, we combined temporal changes in LV structure (volume) with alterations in LV functional characteristics (strain, ԑ) into a ԑ-volume loop, in order to provide novel insight into the haemodynamic cardiac consequences of aortic valve diseases in those with preserved LV ejection fraction. We showed that our novel ԑ-volume loop and the specific loop characteristics provide additional insight into the functional and mechanical haemodynamic consequences of severe aortic valve diseases (with preserved LV ejection fraction). Finally, we showed that the ԑ-volume loop characteristics provide discriminative capacity compared with conventional measures of LV function. The purpose of this study was to examine left ventricular (LV) strain (ԑ)-volume loops to provide novel insight into the haemodynamic cardiac consequences of aortic valve stenosis (AS) and aortic valve regurgitation (AR). Twenty-seven participants were retrospectively recruited: AR (n = 7), AS (n = 10) and control subjects (n = 10). Standard transthoracic echocardiography was used to obtain apical four-chamber images to construct ԑ-volume relationships, which were assessed using the following parameters: early systolic ԑ (ԑ_ES); slope of ԑ-volume relationship during systole (Sslope); end-systolic peak ԑ (peak ԑ); and diastolic uncoupling (systolic ԑ-diastolic ԑ at same volume) during early diastole (UNCOUP_ED) and late diastole (UNCOUP_LD). Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine the ability to detect impaired LV function. Although LV ejection fraction was comparable between groups, longitudinal peak ԑ was reduced compared with control subjects. In contrast, ԑ_ES and Sslope were

  19. An ontology-based approach to patient follow-up assessment for continuous and personalized chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Gou, Ling; Zhou, Tian-Shu; Lin, De-Nan; Zheng, Jing; Li, Ye; Li, Jing-Song

    2017-08-01

    Chronic diseases are complex and persistent clinical conditions that require close collaboration among patients and health care providers in the implementation of long-term and integrated care programs. However, current solutions focus partially on intensive interventions at hospitals rather than on continuous and personalized chronic disease management. This study aims to fill this gap by providing computerized clinical decision support during follow-up assessments of chronically ill patients at home. We proposed an ontology-based framework to integrate patient data, medical domain knowledge, and patient assessment criteria for chronic disease patient follow-up assessments. A clinical decision support system was developed to implement this framework for automatic selection and adaptation of standard assessment protocols to suit patient personal conditions. We evaluated our method in the case study of type 2 diabetic patient follow-up assessments. The proposed framework was instantiated using real data from 115,477 follow-up assessment records of 36,162 type 2 diabetic patients. Standard evaluation criteria were automatically selected and adapted to the particularities of each patient. Assessment results were generated as a general typing of patient overall condition and detailed scoring for each criterion, providing important indicators to the case manager about possible inappropriate judgments, in addition to raising patient awareness of their disease control outcomes. Using historical data as the gold standard, our system achieved a rate of accuracy of 99.93% and completeness of 95.00%. This study contributes to improving the accessibility, efficiency and quality of current patient follow-up services. It also provides a generic approach to knowledge sharing and reuse for patient-centered chronic disease management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Reduced striatal volumes in Parkinson’s disease: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitcher Toni L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence and extent of structural changes in the brain as a consequence of Parkinson’s disease (PD is still poorly understood. Methods High-resolution 3-tesla T1-weighted structural magnetic resonance images in sixty-five PD and 27 age-matched healthy control participants were examined. Putamen, caudate, and intracranial volumes were manually traced in the axial plane of 3D reconstructed images. Striatal nuclei volumes were normalized to intracranial volume for statistical comparison. Disease status was assessed using the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale and Hoehn and Yahr scale. Cognitive status was assessed using global status tests and detailed neuropsychological testing. Results Both caudate and putamen volumes were smaller in PD brains compared to controls after adjusting for age and gender. Caudate volumes were reduced by 11% (p = 0.001 and putamen volumes by 8.1% (p = 0.025. PD striatal volumes were not found to be significantly correlated with cognitive or motor decline. Conclusion Small, but significant reductions in the volume of both the caudate and putamen occur in PD brains. These reductions are independent of the effects of age and gender, however the relation of these reductions to the functional loss of dopamine, which is characteristic of PD, remains unclear.

  1. Alzheimer Disease Biomarkers as Outcome Measures for Clinical Trials in MCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroli, Anna; Prestia, Annapaola; Wade, Sara; Chen, Kewei; Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Landau, Susan M; Madison, Cindee M; Haense, Cathleen; Herholz, Karl; Reiman, Eric M; Jagust, William J; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the performance and power of the best-established diagnostic biological markers as outcome measures for clinical trials in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Magnetic resonance imaging, F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography markers, and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale were compared in terms of effect size and statistical power over different follow-up periods in 2 MCI groups, selected from Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative data set based on cerebrospinal fluid (abnormal cerebrospinal fluid Aβ1-42 concentration-ABETA+) or magnetic resonance imaging evidence of Alzheimer disease (positivity to hippocampal atrophy-HIPPO+). Biomarkers progression was modeled through mixed effect models. Scaled slope was chosen as measure of effect size. Biomarkers power was estimated using simulation algorithms. Seventy-four ABETA+ and 51 HIPPO+ MCI patients were included in the study. Imaging biomarkers of neurodegeneration, especially MR measurements, showed highest performance. For all biomarkers and both MCI groups, power increased with increasing follow-up time, irrespective of biomarker assessment frequency. These findings provide information about biomarker enrichment and outcome measurements that could be employed to reduce MCI patient samples and treatment duration in future clinical trials.

  2. Three-Dimensional Photography for Quantitative Assessment of Penile Volume-Loss Deformities in Peyronie's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolin, Ezra J; Mlynarczyk, Carrie M; Mulhall, John P; Stember, Doron S; Stahl, Peter J

    2017-06-01

    Non-curvature penile deformities are prevalent and bothersome manifestations of Peyronie's disease (PD), but the quantitative metrics that are currently used to describe these deformities are inadequate and non-standardized, presenting a barrier to clinical research and patient care. To introduce erect penile volume (EPV) and percentage of erect penile volume loss (percent EPVL) as novel metrics that provide detailed quantitative information about non-curvature penile deformities and to study the feasibility and reliability of three-dimensional (3D) photography for measurement of quantitative penile parameters. We constructed seven penis models simulating deformities found in PD. The 3D photographs of each model were captured in triplicate by four observers using a 3D camera. Computer software was used to generate automated measurements of EPV, percent EPVL, penile length, minimum circumference, maximum circumference, and angle of curvature. The automated measurements were statistically compared with measurements obtained using water-displacement experiments, a tape measure, and a goniometer. Accuracy of 3D photography for average measurements of all parameters compared with manual measurements; inter-test, intra-observer, and inter-observer reliabilities of EPV and percent EPVL measurements as assessed by the intraclass correlation coefficient. The 3D images were captured in a median of 52 seconds (interquartile range = 45-61). On average, 3D photography was accurate to within 0.3% for measurement of penile length. It overestimated maximum and minimum circumferences by averages of 4.2% and 1.6%, respectively; overestimated EPV by an average of 7.1%; and underestimated percent EPVL by an average of 1.9%. All inter-test, inter-observer, and intra-observer intraclass correlation coefficients for EPV and percent EPVL measurements were greater than 0.75, reflective of excellent methodologic reliability. By providing highly descriptive and reliable measurements of

  3. Occupational disease risk and some medical assessment criteria in occupational dermatoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirasek, L.; Kalensky, J.

    1989-01-01

    Proposals are put forward for the amendment of the List of Occupational Diseases (Supplement to Decree No. 149/1988 of the Czechoslovak Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs for the enforcement of Act No. 100/1988 on social welfare) in the field of skin diseases. This also concerns the item ''Diseases Caused by Ionizing Radiation and by Radiation with Similar Biological Effects''. Problems associated with diagnosing the skin disease, criteria of occupational diseases and disease hazards, and measures to be taken are discussed. (P.A.)

  4. Diffusion-weighted imaging in assessing renal pathology of chronic kidney disease: A preliminary clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qinghai; Li, Jinning; Zhang, Lan; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Minming [Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China); Yan, Fuhua, E-mail: zemylife@163.com [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2014-05-15

    Objective: To investigate the clinical potential of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in assessing renal pathology of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: Seventy-one CKD patients and twelve healthy volunteers were examined using DWI with prospective acquisition correction. Renal biopsy specimens from the CKD patients were scored based on the severity of renal pathology and to confirm pathology type. CKD patients were divided into three groups according to pathology scores: mild, moderate, or severe. The association between renal apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and pathology scores was investigated using Pearson's correlation and single factor analysis of variance. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to explore associations between renal ADC values and pathology score, glomerular filtration rate, serum creatinine, and age. The Kruskal–Wallis H test was conducted to compare ADC values and pathology type. Results: Renal ADC values correlated negatively with pathology scores (r = −0.633, P < 0.001). The ADC values among the four groups (mild, moderate, severe impairment, and controls) were significantly different (F = 19.512, P < 0.001). However, when patients were stratified by pathology type, no significant differences were found in ADC values among these groups (χ{sup 2} = 9.929, P = 0.270). Further multiple linear regression analysis showed that only the pathology score and ADC values were related (t = −4.586, P = 0.000). Conclusions: DWI has clinical potential in assessing the severity of renal pathology in CKD and shows promise as a non-invasive and effective technique to guide therapy and follow-up.

  5. Characterization and Peripheral Blood Biomarker Assessment of Jo-1 Antibody-Positive Interstitial Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Thomas J.; Eggebeen, Aaron; Gibson, Kevin; Yousem, Samuel; Fuhrman, Carl; Gochuico, Bernadette R.; Fertig, Noreen; Oddis, Chester V.; Kaminski, Naftali; Rosas, Ivan O.; Ascherman, Dana P.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Combining clinical, radiographic, functional, and serum protein biomarker assessment, this study defines the prevalence and clinical characteristics of ILD in a large cohort of patients possessing anti-Jo-1 antibodies. Methods Clinical records, pulmonary function testing, and imaging studies determined the existence of ILD in anti-Jo-1 antibody positive (anti-Jo-1 Ab+) individuals accumulated in the University of Pittsburgh Myositis Database from 1982–2007. Multiplex ELISA of serum inflammatory markers, cytokines, chemokines, and matrix metalloproteinases in different patient subgroups then permitted assessment of serum proteins associated with anti-Jo-1 Ab+ ILD. Results Among 90 anti-Jo-1 Ab+ individuals with sufficient clinical, radiographic, and/or pulmonary function data, 77 (86%) met criteria for ILD. While computerized tomography scans revealed a variety of patterns suggestive of underlying UIP or NSIP, review of histopathologic abnormalities in a subset (n=22) of individuals undergoing open lung biopsy demonstrated a preponderance of UIP and DAD. Multiplex ELISA yielded statistically significant associations between Jo-1 Ab+ ILD and elevated serum levels of CRP, CXCL9, and CXCL10 that distinguished this subgroup from IPF and anti-SRP Ab+ myositis. Recursive partitioning further demonstrated that combinations of these and other serum protein biomarkers can distinguish these subgroups with high sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion In this large cohort of anti-Jo-1 Ab+ individuals, the incidence of ILD approaches 90%. Multiplex ELISA demonstrates disease-specific associations between Jo-1 Ab+ ILD and serum levels of CRP as well as the IFN-γ-inducible chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10, highlighting the potential of this approach to define biologically active molecules contributing to the pathogenesis of myositis-associated ILD. PMID:19565490

  6. Diffusion-weighted imaging in assessing renal pathology of chronic kidney disease: A preliminary clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Qinghai; Li, Jinning; Zhang, Lan; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Minming; Yan, Fuhua

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical potential of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in assessing renal pathology of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: Seventy-one CKD patients and twelve healthy volunteers were examined using DWI with prospective acquisition correction. Renal biopsy specimens from the CKD patients were scored based on the severity of renal pathology and to confirm pathology type. CKD patients were divided into three groups according to pathology scores: mild, moderate, or severe. The association between renal apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and pathology scores was investigated using Pearson's correlation and single factor analysis of variance. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to explore associations between renal ADC values and pathology score, glomerular filtration rate, serum creatinine, and age. The Kruskal–Wallis H test was conducted to compare ADC values and pathology type. Results: Renal ADC values correlated negatively with pathology scores (r = −0.633, P < 0.001). The ADC values among the four groups (mild, moderate, severe impairment, and controls) were significantly different (F = 19.512, P < 0.001). However, when patients were stratified by pathology type, no significant differences were found in ADC values among these groups (χ 2 = 9.929, P = 0.270). Further multiple linear regression analysis showed that only the pathology score and ADC values were related (t = −4.586, P = 0.000). Conclusions: DWI has clinical potential in assessing the severity of renal pathology in CKD and shows promise as a non-invasive and effective technique to guide therapy and follow-up

  7. Valvular heart disease: assessment of valve morphology and quantification using MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwitter, J.

    2000-01-01

    For clinical evaluation and decision-making in patients with valvular heart disease, the diagnostic armamentarium expands steadily. This evolution makes it difficult to choose the most appropriate approach for a specific valvular lesion. It may also reflect our uncertainty of what are the findings that best predict clinical outcome of patients, e. g. after surgery. Accordingly, for each type of valvular lesion, some pathophysiological considerations are stated in order to derive the most important measures that would allow optimal guidance of patients. Based on these considerations the value of an MR study is discussed for each valvular lesion. Newest advances in MR technology allow for highly accurate measurements of regurgitant volumes and hence, MR may be the method of choice for a quantitative evaluation of regurgitant valves. For assessment of stenosis severity, measurement of transvalvular pressure gradient is an appropriate measure and MR may not confer benefits over echocardiography, provided the ultrasound window is adequate (and stroke volume is in the normal range). With respect to surgical treatment, valvular morphology is of pivotal importance, particularly for the mitral valve, and echocardiography still appears to be the first line method. Little data relate lesion severity and/or morphology to clinical outcome. Conversely, the extent of cardiac adaptation to pressure- and/or volume-overload, i. e. ventricular remodeling, is a strong predictor of outcome, and is therefore most important for final judgement of the patient. For assessment of left and right ventricular remodeling, echocardiography typically provides all the necessary information. However, in special cases with discrepant findings, with inadequate ultrasound window, or in the preoperative work-up, MR may provide important information regarding cardiac adaptation to valvular lesion. (orig.) [de

  8. Clinical global assessment of nutritional status as predictor of mortality in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lu; Mukai, Hideyuki; Lindholm, Bengt; Heimbürger, Olof; Barany, Peter; Stenvinkel, Peter; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid

    2017-01-01

    The value of subjective global assessment (SGA) as nutritional assessor of protein-energy wasting (PEWSGA) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients depends on its mortality predictive capacity. We investigated associations of PEWSGA with markers of nutritional status and all-cause mortality in CKD patients. In 1031 (732 CKD1-5 non-dialysis and 299 dialysis) patients, SGA and body (BMI), lean (LBMI) and fat (FBMI) body mass indices, % handgrip strength (% HGS), serum albumin, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were examined at baseline. The five-year all-cause mortality predictive strength of baseline PEWSGA and during follow-up were investigated. PEWSGA was present in 2% of CKD1-2, 16% of CKD3-4, 31% of CKD5 non-dialysis and 44% of dialysis patients. Patients with PEWSGA (n = 320; 31%) had higher hsCRP and lower BMI, LBMI, FBMI, %HGS and serum albumin. But, using receiver operating characteristics-derived cutoffs, these markers could not classify (by kappa statistic) or explain variations of (by multinomial logistic regression analysis) presence of PEWSGA. In generalized linear models, SGA independently predicted mortality after adjustments of multiple confounders (RR: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.11-1.23). Among 323 CKD5 patients who were re-assessed after median 12.6 months, 222 (69%) remained well-nourished, 37 (11%) developed PEWSGA de novo, 40 (12%) improved while 24 (8%) remained with PEWSGA. The latter independently predicted mortality (RR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.13-1.46). SGA, a valid assessor of nutritional status, is an independent predictor of all-cause mortality both in CKD non-dialysis and dialysis patients that outperforms non-composite nutritional markers as prognosticator.

  9. Nintendo Wii assessment of Hoehn and Yahr score with Parkinson's disease tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçer, Abdulkadir; Oktay, Ayse Betul

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of Parkinson's Disease (PD) by analyzing the resting tremor were much studied by using different accelerometer based methods, however the quantitative assessment of Hoehn and Yahr Scale (HYS) score with a machine learning based system has not been previously addressed. In this study, we aimed to propose a system to automatically assess the HYS score of patients with PD. The system was evaluated and tested on a dataset containing 55 subjects where 35 of them were patients and 20 of them were healthy controls. The resting tremor data were gathered with the 3 axis accelerometer of the Nintendo Wii (Wiimote). The clinical disability of the PD was graded from 1 to 5 by the HYS and tremor was recorded twice from the more affected side in each patient and from the dominant extremity in each control for a 60 seconds period. The HYS scores were learned with Support Vector Machines (SVM) from the features of the tremor data. Thirty-two of the subjects with PD were classified correctly and 18 of the normal subjects were also classified correctly by our system. The system had average 0.89 accuracy rate (Range: 81-100% changing according to grading by HYS). We compared quantitative measurements of hand tremor in PD patients, with staging of PD based on accelerometer data gathered using the Wii sensor. Our results showed that the machine learning based system with simple features could be helpful for diagnosis of PD and estimate HYS score. We believed that this portable and easy-to-use Wii sensor measure might also be applicable in the continuous monitoring of the resting tremor with small modifications in routine clinical use.

  10. Assessment of listing and categorisation of animal diseases within the framework of the Animal Health Law (Regulation (EU) No 2016/429)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    More, Simon; Bøtner, Anette; Butterworth, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Aujeszky's disease has been assessed according to the criteria of the Animal Health Law (AHL), in particular criteria of Article 7 on disease profile and impacts, Article 5 on the eligibility of Aujeszky's disease to be listed, Article 9 for the categorisation of Aujeszky's disease according...

  11. Assessment of listing and categorisation of animal diseases within the framework of the Animal Health Law (Regulation (EU) No 2016/429)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    More, Simon J.; Bøtner, Anette; Butterworth, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Koi herpes virus (KHV) disease has been assessed according to the criteria of the Animal Health Law (AHL), in particular criteria of Article 7 on disease profile and impacts, Article 5 on the eligibility of KHV disease to be listed, Article 9 for the categorisation of KHV disease according...

  12. Developing a Performance Assessment Framework and Indicators for Communicable Disease Management in Natural Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaie, Javad; Ardalan, Ali; Vatandoost, Hasan; Goya, Mohammad Mehdi; Akbarisari, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Communicable disease management (CDM) is an important component of disaster public health response operations. However, there is a lack of any performance assessment (PA) framework and related indicators for the PA. This study aimed to develop a PA framework and indicators in CDM in disasters. In this study, a series of methods were used. First, a systematic literature review (SLR) was performed in order to extract the existing PA frameworks and indicators. Then, using a qualitative approach, some interviews with purposively selected experts were conducted and used in developing the PA framework and indicators. Finally, the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was used for weighting of the developed indicators. The input, process, products, and outcomes (IPPO) framework was found to be an appropriate framework for CDM PA. Seven main functions were revealed to CDM during disasters. Forty PA indicators were developed for the four categories. There is a lack of any existing PA framework in CDM in disasters. Thus, in this study, a PA framework (IPPO framework) was developed for the PA of CDM in disasters through a series of methods. It can be an appropriate framework and its indicators could measure the performance of CDM in disasters.

  13. Genetic diversity and apple leaf spot disease resistance characterization assessed by SSR markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo H.F. Klabunde

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the cultivation problems of apple production in Brazil, Apple Leaf Spot (ALS disease represents one of the main breeding challenges. This study aims at analyzing the genetic diversity among 152 apple scion accessions available at the Apple Gene Bank of EPAGRI, located in Caçador, Santa Catarina/ Brazil. Eleven genomic SSR loci were analyzed to assess genetic diversity of ALS resistant and susceptible accessions. Results revealed high genetic diversity of the studied accessions, being 120 exclusive alleles (67 unique from scion accessions resistant to ALS, and a mean PIC of 0.823. The locus Probability of Identity (I ranged from 0.017 to 0.089. The combined I was 4.11 x 10-16, and the Power of Exclusion was 99.99999259%. In addition, the DNA fingerprint patterns will contribute as additional descriptors to select parental for crosses and early identification of apple accessions for breeding purposes, and also for cultivar protection.

  14. Assessment of the pathogenicity of cell-culture-adapted Newcastle disease virus strain Komarov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visnuvinayagam, Sivam; Thangavel, K; Lalitha, N; Malmarugan, S; Sukumar, Kuppannan

    2015-01-01

    Newcastle disease vaccines hitherto in vogue are produced from embryonated chicken eggs. Egg-adapted mesogenic vaccines possess several drawbacks such as paralysis and mortality in 2-week-old chicks and reduced egg production in the egg-laying flock. Owing to these possible drawbacks, we attempted to reduce the vaccine virulence for safe vaccination by adapting the virus in a chicken embryo fibroblast cell culture (CEFCC) system. Eighteen passages were carried out by CEFCC, and the pathogenicity was assessed on the basis of the mean death time, intracerebral pathogenicity index, and intravenous pathogenicity index, at equal passage intervals. Although the reduction in virulence demonstrated with increasing passage levels in CEFCC was encouraging, 20% of the 2-week-old birds showed paralytic symptoms with the virus vaccine from the 18(th)(final) passage. Thus, a tissue-culture-adapted vaccine would demand a few more passages by CEFCC in order to achieve a complete reduction in virulence for use as a safe and effective vaccine, especially among younger chicks. Moreover, it can be safely administered even to unprimed 8-week-old birds.

  15. Noninvasive Assessment of Advanced Fibrosis Based on Hepatic Volume in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tatsuya; Saitoh, Satoshi; Fukuzawa, Kei; Tsuji, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Junji; Kawamura, Yusuke; Akuta, Norio; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Ikeda, Kenji; Fujii, Takeshi; Miyati, Tosiaki; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2017-09-15

    Noninvasive liver fibrosis evaluation was performed in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We used a quantitative method based on the hepatic volume acquired from gadoxetate disodium-enhanced (Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosing advanced fibrosis in patients with NAFLD. A total of 130 patients who were diagnosed with NAFLD and underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI were retrospectively included. Histological data were available for 118 patients. Hepatic volumetric parameters, including the left hepatic lobe to right hepatic lobe volume ratio (L/R ratio), were measured. The usefulness of the L/R ratio for diagnosing fibrosis ≥F3-4 and F4 was assessed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify variables (age, body mass index, serum fibrosis markers, and histological features) that were associated with the L/R ratio. The L/R ratio demonstrated good performance in differentiating advanced fibrosis (AUROC, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.72 to 0.88) from cirrhosis (AUROC, 0.87; 95% confidence interval, 0.75 to 0.99). Multiple regression analysis showed that only fibrosis was significantly associated with the L/R ratio (coefficient, 0.121; p<0.0001). The L/R ratio, which is not influenced by pathological parameters other than fibrosis, is useful for diagnosing cirrhosis in patients with NAFLD.

  16. Genetic Stratification in Myeloid Diseases: From Risk Assessment to Clinical Decision Support Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yishai Ofran

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic aberrations have become a dominant factor in the stratification of myeloid malignancies. Cytogenetic and a few mutation studies are the backbone of risk assessment models of myeloid malignancies which are a major consideration in clinical decisions, especially patient assignment for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Progress in our understanding of the genetic basis of the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies and the growing capabilities of mass sequencing may add new roles for the clinical usage of genetic data. A few recently identified mutations recognized to be associated with specific diseases or clinical scenarios may soon become part of the diagnostic criteria of such conditions. Mutational studies may also advance our capabilities for a more efficient patient selection process, assigning the most effective therapy at the best timing for each patient. The clinical utility of genetic data is anticipated to advance further with the adoption of deep sequencing and next-generation sequencing techniques. We herein suggest some future potential applications of sequential genetic data to identify pending deteriorations at time points which are the best for aggressive interventions such as allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Genetics is moving from being mostly a prognostic factor to becoming a multitasking decision support tool for hematologists. Physicians must pay attention to advances in molecular hematology as it will soon be accessible and influential for most of our patients.

  17. Assessment of the (/sup 14/C) aminopyrine breath test in liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galizzi, J; Long, R G; Billing, B H; Sherlock, S [Royal Free Hospital, London (UK)

    1978-01-01

    Different methods of performing the (/sup 14/C) aminopyrine breath test have been assessed. A tracer dose of 2 ..mu..Ci without a loading dose and with a single breath collection at two hours was the method selected, since it gave the best discrimination between patients with hepatocellular diseases and normal subjects (5.2 +- 0.2%, mean - SEM). Reduced values occurred in patients with chronic active hepatitis (with and without cirrhosis) (1.5 +- 0.2%), alcoholic cirrhosis (1.7 +- 0.4%) and hepatitis (2.5 +- 0.3%), and late primary biliary cirrhosis suggesting defective microsomal function with respect to demethylation. Normal results were common in early primary biliary cirrhosis. Two weeks of prednisolone therapy caused some improvement in the breath test in nine of ten patients with chronic active hepatitis. It is concluded that the (/sup 14/C) aminopyrine breath test is a simple test for detecting hepatocellular dysfunction, but has no obvious diagnostic advantage over the determination of serum aspartate transaminase and two hour post-prandial bile-acids.

  18. MRI for the assessment of organ perfusion in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odudu, Aghogho; Francis, Susan T; McIntyre, Christopher W

    2012-11-01

    Recent data have highlighted the importance of quantitative measures of organ perfusion and functional reserve. Magnetic resonance imaging allows the assessment of markers of perfusion without the use of contrast media. Techniques such as arterial spin labelling (ASL) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) imaging have been available for some time, but advances in the technology and concerns over the safety of contrast media in renal disease have spurred renewed interest and development. ASL measures perfusion, whereas BOLD imaging provides a marker of blood oxygenation, arising from the compound effect of a number of measures including perfusion, blood volume and oxygen consumption; thus, the techniques are complementary rather than analogous. They were initially confined to brain imaging as inherently low signal, susceptibility effects and motion limited their use in thoracic and abdominal organs. Advances in technology have led to robust sequences that can quantify clinically relevant changes and correlate well with reference standards. Novel approaches are likely to accelerate translation into clinical practice. The noninvasive and repeatable nature of ASL and BOLD imaging makes it likely that they will be increasingly used in clinical research. Using a developmental framework, we suggest that the application of these techniques to thoracic and abdominal organs requires validation before they are suitable for generalized clinical use. The demand for these techniques is likely to be driven by the incentive to avoid the use of contrast media.

  19. Assessment of Fecal Microbiota and Fecal Metabolome in Symptomatic Uncomplicated Diverticular Disease of the Colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tursi, Antonio; Mastromarino, Paola; Capobianco, Daniela; Elisei, Walter; Miccheli, Alfredo; Capuani, Giorgio; Tomassini, Alberta; Campagna, Giuseppe; Picchio, Marcello; Giorgetti, GianMarco; Fabiocchi, Federica; Brandimarte, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess fecal microbiota and metabolome in a population with symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease (SUDD). Whether intestinal microbiota and metabolic profiling may be altered in patients with SUDD is unknown. Stool samples from 44 consecutive women [15 patients with SUDD, 13 with asymptomatic diverticulosis (AD), and 16 healthy controls (HCs)] were analyzed. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify targeted microorganisms. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy associated with multivariate analysis with partial least-square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was applied on the metabolite data set. The overall bacterial quantity did not differ among the 3 groups (P=0.449), with no difference in Bacteroides/Prevotella, Clostridium coccoides, Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, and Escherichia coli subgroups. The amount of Akkermansia muciniphila species was significantly different between HC, AD, and SUDD subjects (P=0.017). PLS-DA analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance -based metabolomics associated with microbiological data showed significant discrimination between HCs and AD patients (R=0.733; Q=0.383; Pcolonic bacterial overgrowth, but a significant difference in the levels of fecal A. muciniphila was observed. Moreover, increasing expression of some metabolites as expression of different AD and SUDD metabolic activity was found.

  20. Assessing cardiorespiratory capacity in older adults with major depression and Alzheimer disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Felipe Zanco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To assess cardiorespiratory capacity through subjective and objective tests in older adults diagnosed with major depression (MDD, Alzheimer disease (AD and healthy older adults. Methods Fifty seven subjects (72 ± 7.9 years were divided into three groups: MDD (n = 20, AD (n = 17 and Healthy (n = 20. The subjects answered Hamilton Scale (HAM-D, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, Veterans Specific Activity Questionnaire (VSAQ and 2-minute Step test. Results MDD and AD showed lower scores than healthy group for Nomogram VSAQ (p < 0.001 and 2-minute Step (p = 0.009; p = 0.008, respectively. Adjusted for age and educational level, no differences among groups were observed for Step (MDD, p = 0.097; AD, p = 0.102. AD group did not present differences to healthy group for Step, when adjusting for MMSE (p = 0.261. Conclusions Despite the lower cardiorespiratory fitness of elderly patients with DM and DA have been found in both evaluations, the results should be viewed with caution, since the tests showed low correlation and different risk classifications of functional loss. In addition, age, level educational and cognitive performance are variables that can influence the performance objective evaluation.

  1. From Risk Assessment to Knowledge Mapping: Science, Precaution, and Participation in Disease Ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy C. Stirling

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Governance of infectious disease risks requires understanding of often indeterminate interactions between diverse, complex, open, and dynamic human and natural systems. In the face of these challenges, worldwide policy making affords disproportionate status to " science-based" risk-assessment methods. These reduce multiple, complex dimensions to simple quantitative parameters of "outcomes" and "probabilities," and then re-aggregate across diverse metrics, contexts, and perspectives to yield a single ostensibly definitive picture of risk. In contrast, more precautionary or participatory approaches are routinely portrayed as less rigorous, complete, or robust. Yet, although conventional reductive-aggregative techniques provide powerful responses to a narrow state of risk, they are not applicable to less tractable conditions of uncertainty, ambiguity, and ignorance. Strong sensitivities to divergent framings can render results highly variable. Reductive aggregation can marginalize important perspectives and compound exposure to surprise. The value of more broad-based precautionary and participatory approaches may be appreciated. These offer ways to be more rigorous and complete in the mapping of different framings. They may also be more robust than reductive-aggregative appraisal methods, in "opening up" greater accountability for intrinsically normative judgements in decision making on threats like pandemic avian influenza.

  2. Sonographic assessment of spleen size in Saudi patients with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Salem, Ahmed H.; Al-Aithan, S.; Al-Jama, A.; Al-Dabbous, I.; Bhamidipati, P.

    1998-01-01

    In patients with SCD, the spleen commonly enlarges during the first two decades of life but then undergoes autosplenectomy due to repeated attacks of vaso-occlusion and infarction. This, however, is not the case in Saudi patients with SCD (340 SCD and 23-sickle beta-thalassemia). A total of 363 patients were evaluated. There ages ranged from 1-60 years (mean 60 years). Only 24 (6.6%) of our patients had autosplenectomy. The splenic index increased with age until about 40 years of age and then gradually decreased indicating persistence of splenomegaly in our patients into an older age group. Forty-three patients (11.8%) had marked-massive splenomegaly (splenic index >120cm) and these had higher HbF levels (mean HbF=22.2%) when compared with those who had autosplenectomy (mean HbF=14.6). This is significant (P-value=0.0169) and confirms the effect of HbF on persistence of splenomegaly in SCD patients. Ultrasonography is a simple, safe and accurate method of assessing splenic size in patients with sickle cell disease. Patients with persistent splenomegaly should be followed closely for development of complications which may necessitate splenectomy. (author)

  3. MRI assessed pancreatic morphology and exocrine function are associated with disease burden in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzak, Adnan; Olesen, Søren Schou; Lykke Poulsen, Jakob; Bolvig Mark, Esben; Mohr Drewes,