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Sample records for discover galactic dark

  1. Evidence for Compact Dark Matter in Galactic Halos

    CERN Document Server

    Abbas, S; Mohanty, S; Abbas, Samar; Abbas, Afsar; Mohanty, Shukadev

    2000-01-01

    Clumped dark matter arises naturally within the framwork of generic cosmological dark matter models. Invoking the existence of dark matter clumps can also solve many unexplained mysteries in astrophysics and geology or geophysics, eg. the galactic gamma-ray halo and the periodic terrestrial flood basalt volcanic episodes. Clumped dark matter is dynamically stable to friction and will not heat the disk. Such clumps may have already been discovered in the form of dwarf spheroidals, and further searches are encouraged by the results of this paper.

  2. Directional detection of galactic Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Mayet, F; Bernard, G; Bosson, G; Bourrion, O; Grignon, C; Guillaudin, O; Koumeir, C; Richer, J P; Santos, D; Colas, P; Ferer, E; Giomataris, I; Allaoua, A; Lebreton, L

    2010-01-01

    Directional detection of galactic Dark Matter is a promising search strategy for discriminating geniune WIMP events from background ones. We present technical progress on gaseous detectors as well as recent phenomenological studies, allowing the design and construction of competitive experiments.

  3. Relativistic Dark Matter at the Galactic Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Mustafa A.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Wizansky, Tommer; /SLAC

    2007-11-16

    In a large region of the supersymmetry parameter space, the annihilation cross section for neutralino dark matter is strongly dependent on the relative velocity of the incoming particles. We explore the consequences of this velocity dependence in the context of indirect detection of dark matter from the galactic center. We find that the increase in the annihilation cross section at high velocities leads to a flattening of the halo density profile near the galactic center and an enhancement of the annihilation signal.

  4. Directional detection of galactic dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Mayet, F; Santos, D

    2012-01-01

    Directional detection is a promising Dark Matter search strategy. Taking advantage on the rotation of the Solar system around the galactic center through the Dark Matter halo, it allows to show a direction dependence of WIMP events that may be a powerful tool to identify genuine WIMP events as such. Directional detection strategy requires the simultaneous measurement of the energy and the 3D track of low energy recoils, which is a common challenge for all current projects of directional detectors.

  5. Galactic Collapse of Scalar Field Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Alcubierre, M; Matos, T; Núñez, D; Urena-Lopez, L A; Wiederhold, P; Alcubierre, Miguel; Matos, Tonatiuh; Nunez, Dario; Wiederhold, Petra

    2002-01-01

    We present a scenario for galaxy formation based on the hypothesis of scalar field dark matter. We interpret galaxy formation through the collapse of a scalar field fluctuation. We find that a cosh potential for the self-interaction of the scalar field provides a reasonable scenario for galactic formation, which is in agreement with cosmological observations and phenomenological studies in galaxies.

  6. Galactic Collapse of Scalar Field Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    We present a scenario for galaxy formation based on the hypothesis of scalar field dark matter. We interpret galaxy formation through the collapse of a scalar field fluctuation. We find that a cosh potential for the self-interaction of the scalar field provides a reasonable scenario for galactic formation, which is in agreement with cosmological observations and phenomenological studies in galaxies.

  7. Updated galactic radio constraints on Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cirelli, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the synchrotron signals produced by Dark Matter annihilations and decays. We consider different set-ups for the propagation of electrons and positrons, the galactic magnetic field and Dark Matter properties. We then confront these signals with radio and microwave maps, including Planck measurements, from a frequency of 22 MHz up to 70 GHz. We derive two sets of constraints: conservative and progressive, the latter based on a modeling of the astrophysical emission. Radio and microwave constraints are complementary to those obtained with other indirect detection methods, especially for dark matter annihilating into leptonic channels.

  8. Updated galactic radio constraints on Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirelli, Marco [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Hautes Energies (LPTHE),UMR 7589 CNRS & UPMC, 4 Place Jussieu, Paris, F-75252 (France); Taoso, Marco [Instituto de Física Teórica (IFT) UAM/CSIC,calle Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, Cantoblanco, Madrid, 28049 (Spain)

    2016-07-25

    We perform a detailed analysis of the synchrotron signals produced by dark matter annihilations and decays. We consider different set-ups for the propagation of electrons and positrons, the galactic magnetic field and dark matter properties. We then confront these signals with radio and microwave maps, including PLANCK measurements, from a frequency of 22 MHz up to 70 GHz. We derive two sets of constraints: conservative and progressive, the latter based on a modeling of the astrophysical emission. Radio and microwave constraints are complementary to those obtained with other indirect detection methods, especially for dark matter annihilating into leptonic channels.

  9. Dark Matter Annihilation at the Galactic Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linden, Timothy Ryan [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Observations by the WMAP and PLANCK satellites have provided extraordinarily accurate observations on the densities of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy in the universe. These observations indicate that our universe is composed of approximately ve times as much dark matter as baryonic matter. However, e orts to detect a particle responsible for the energy density of dark matter have been unsuccessful. Theoretical models have indicated that a leading candidate for the dark matter is the lightest supersymmetric particle, which may be stable due to a conserved R-parity. This dark matter particle would still be capable of interacting with baryons via weak-force interactions in the early universe, a process which was found to naturally explain the observed relic abundance of dark matter today. These residual annihilations can persist, albeit at a much lower rate, in the present universe, providing a detectable signal from dark matter annihilation events which occur throughout the universe. Simulations calculating the distribution of dark matter in our galaxy almost universally predict the galactic center of the Milky Way Galaxy (GC) to provide the brightest signal from dark matter annihilation due to its relative proximity and large simulated dark matter density. Recent advances in telescope technology have allowed for the rst multiwavelength analysis of the GC, with suitable e ective exposure, angular resolution, and energy resolution in order to detect dark matter particles with properties similar to those predicted by the WIMP miracle. In this work, I describe ongoing e orts which have successfully detected an excess in -ray emission from the region immediately surrounding the GC, which is di cult to describe in terms of standard di use emission predicted in the GC region. While the jury is still out on any dark matter interpretation of this excess, I describe several related observations which may indicate a dark matter origin. Finally, I discuss the

  10. New Galactic supernova remnants discovered with IPHAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sabin, L; Contreras, M E; Olguín, L; Frew, D J; Stupar, M; Vázquez, R; Wright, N J; Corradi, R L M; Morris, R A H

    2013-01-01

    As part of a systematic search programme of a 10-degree wide strip of the Northern Galactic plane we present preliminary evidence for the discovery of four (and possibly five) new supernova remnants (SNRs). The pilot search area covered the 19-20 hour right ascension zone sampling from +20 to +55 degrees in declination using binned mosaic images from the INT Photometric H-alpha Survey (IPHAS). The optical identification of the candidate SNRs was based mainly on their filamentary and arc-like emission morphologies, their apparently coherent, even if fractured structure and clear disconnection from any diffuse neighbouring HII region type nebulosity. Follow-up optical spectroscopy was undertaken, sampling carefully across prominent features of these faint sources. The resulting spectra revealed typical emission line ratios for shock excited nebulae which are characteristic of SNRs, which, along with the latest diagnostic diagrams, strongly support the likely SNR nature of these sources: G038.7-1.3 (IPHASX J1906...

  11. Galactic collapse of scalar field dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcubierre, Miguel [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Guzman, F Siddhartha [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Matos, Tonatiuh [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, AP 14-740, 07000 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Nunez, Dario [Centre for Gravitational Physics and Geometry, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Urena-Lopez, L Arturo [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, AP 14-740, 07000 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Wiederhold, Petra [Departamento de Control Automatico, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, AP 14-740, 07000 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2002-10-07

    We present a scenario for core galaxy formation based on the hypothesis of scalar field dark matter. We interpret galaxy formation through the collapse of a scalar field fluctuation. We find that a cosh potential for the self-interaction of the scalar field provides a reasonable scenario for the formation of a galactic core plus a remnant halo, which is in agreement with cosmological observations and phenomenological studies in galaxies.

  12. Dark Matter Superfluidity and Galactic Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Berezhiani, Lasha

    2015-01-01

    We propose a unified framework that reconciles the stunning success of MOND on galactic scales with the triumph of the LambdaCDM model on cosmological scales. This is achieved through the physics of superfluidity. Dark matter consists of self-interacting axion-like particles that thermalize and condense to form a superfluid in galaxies, with ~mK critical temperature. The superfluid phonons mediate a MOND acceleration on baryonic matter. Our framework naturally distinguishes between galaxies (where MOND is successful) and galaxy clusters (where MOND is not): dark matter has a higher temperature in clusters, and hence is in a mixture of superfluid and normal phase. The rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity leads to a number of striking observational signatures.

  13. Detection of Galactic Dark Matter by GLAST

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseev, A; Arrighi, H; Bloom, Elliott D; Chaput, C; Digel, S W; Engovatov, D; Norris, J; Silvis, J

    1999-01-01

    The mysterious dark matter has been a subject of special interest to high energy physicists, astrophysicists and cosmologists for many years. According to theoretical models, it can make up a significant fraction of the mass of the Universe. One possible form of galactic dark matter, Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), could be detected by their annihilation into monoenergetic gamma-ray line(s). This paper will demonstrate that the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled for launch in 2005 by NASA, will be capable of searching for these gamma-ray lines in the energy range from 20 GeV to ~500 GeV and will be sufficiently sensitive to test a number of models. The required instrument performance and its capability to reject backgrounds to the required levels are explicitly discussed.

  14. Dark matter superfluidity and galactic dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasha Berezhiani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We propose a unified framework that reconciles the stunning success of MOND on galactic scales with the triumph of the ΛCDM model on cosmological scales. This is achieved through the physics of superfluidity. Dark matter consists of self-interacting axion-like particles that thermalize and condense to form a superfluid in galaxies, with ∼mK critical temperature. The superfluid phonons mediate a MOND acceleration on baryonic matter. Our framework naturally distinguishes between galaxies (where MOND is successful and galaxy clusters (where MOND is not: dark matter has a higher temperature in clusters, and hence is in a mixture of superfluid and normal phase. The rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity leads to a number of striking observational signatures.

  15. Spheroidal galactic halos and mirror dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, R

    2004-01-01

    Mirror matter has been proposed as a dark matter candidate. It has several very attractive features, including automatic stability and darkness, the ability to mimic the broad features of cold dark matter while in the linear density perturbation regime, and consistency with all direct dark matter search experiments, both negative (e.g. CDMS II) and positive (DAMA). In this paper we consider an important unsolved problem: Are there plausible reasons to explain why most of the mirror matter in spiral galaxies exists in the form of gaseous {\\it spheroidal} galactic halos around ordinary matter {\\it disks}? We compute an order-of-magnitude estimate that the mirror photon luminosity of a typical spiral galaxy today is around $10^{44}$ erg/s. Interestingly, this rate of energy loss is similar to the power supplied by ordinary supernova explosions. We discuss circumstances under which supernova power can be used to heat the gaseous part of the mirror matter halo and hence prevent its collapse to a disk. The {\\it mac...

  16. Hydrodynamical description of Galactic dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cabral, L G; Sussman, R A; Matos, T

    2003-01-01

    We consider simple hydrodynamical models of galactic dark matter in which the galactic halo is a self-gravitating and self-interacting gas that dominates the dynamics of the galaxy. Modeling this halo as a sphericaly symmetric and static perfect fluid satisfying the field equations of General Relativity, visible barionic matter can be treated as 'test particles' in the geometry of this field. We show that the assumption of an empirical 'universal rotation curve' that fits a wide variety of galaxies is compatible, under suitable approximations, with state variables characteristic of a non-relativistic Maxwell-Boltzmann gas that becomes an isothermal sphere in the Newtonian limit. Consistency criteria lead to a minimal bound for particle masses in the range 30 eV < m < 60 eV and to a constraint between the central temperature and the particles mass. The allowed mass range includes popular supersymmetric particle candidates, such as the neutslino, axino and gravitino, as well as lighter particles (m - keV)...

  17. Cold Dark Matter Substructure and Galactic Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Bullock, James S

    2008-01-01

    We perform a set of high-resolution, dissipationless N-body simulations to investigate the influence of cold dark matter (CDM) substructure on the dynamical evolution of thin galactic disks. Our method combines cosmological simulations of galaxy-sized CDM halos to derive the properties of substructure populations and controlled numerical experiments of consecutive subhalo impacts onto initially-thin, fully-formed disk galaxies. We demonstrate that close encounters between massive subhalos and galactic disks since z~1 should be common occurrences in LCDM models. In contrast, extremely few satellites in present-day CDM halos are likely to have a significant impact on the disk structure. One typical host halo merger history is used to seed controlled N-body experiments of subhalo-disk encounters. As a result of these accretion events, the disk thickens considerably at all radii with the disk scale height increasing in excess of a factor of 2 in the solar neighborhood. We show that interactions with the subhalo p...

  18. Dark matter and generation of galactic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Berezhiani, Zurab; Tkachev, I I

    2013-01-01

    A mechanism for creation of galactic and intergalactic magnetic fields at a recent cosmological epoch is proposed. We show that in rotating protogalaxies circular electric currents are generated by the interactions of free electrons with dark matter particles while the impact of such interactions on galactic protons is considerably weaker. Light dark matter particles can be efficient for generation of such currents if these particles have some long range interactions. In particular, millicharged warm dark matter particles or light mirror particles with the photon kinetic mixing to the usual matter are considered. The induced currents may be strong enough to create the observed magnetic fields on the galaxy scales without need for a strong dynamo amplification. On the other hand, the angular momentum transfer from the rotating gas to dark matter component could change the dark matter profile and formation of cusps at galactic centers would be inhibited. We also discuss how the global motion of the ionized gas ...

  19. Active Galactic Nuclei Discovered in the Kepler Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Shaya, Edward J; Mushotzky, Richard

    2015-01-01

    We report on candidate active galactic nuclei (AGN) discovered during the monitoring of $\\sim$500 bright (r < 18 mag) galaxies over several years with the Kepler Mission. Most of the targets were sampled every 30 minutes nearly continuously for a year or more. Variations of 0.001 mag and often less could be detected reliably. About 4.0% (19) of our random sample continuously fluctuated with amplitudes increasing with longer timescales, but the majority are close to the limits of detectability with Kepler. We discuss our techniques to mitigate the long term instrumental trends in Kepler light curves and our resulting structure function curves. The amplitudes of variability over four month periods, as seen in the structure functions and PSDs, can dramatically change for many of these AGN candidates. Four of the candidates have features in their Structure Functions that may indicate quasi-periodic behavior, although other possibilities are discussed.

  20. Detecting dark matter with imploding pulsars in the galactic center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramante, Joseph; Linden, Tim

    2014-11-07

    The paucity of old millisecond pulsars observed at the galactic center of the Milky Way could be the result of dark matter accumulating in and destroying neutron stars. In regions of high dark matter density, dark matter clumped in a pulsar can exceed the Schwarzschild limit and collapse into a natal black hole which destroys the pulsar. We examine what dark matter models are consistent with this hypothesis and find regions of parameter space where dark matter accumulation can significantly degrade the neutron star population within the galactic center while remaining consistent with observations of old millisecond pulsars in globular clusters and near the solar position. We identify what dark matter couplings and masses might cause a young pulsar at the galactic center to unexpectedly extinguish. Finally, we find that pulsar collapse age scales inversely with the dark matter density and linearly with the dark matter velocity dispersion. This implies that maximum pulsar age is spatially dependent on position within the dark matter halo of the Milky Way. In turn, this pulsar age spatial dependence will be dark matter model dependent.

  1. Galactic structure explained with dissipative mirror dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, R

    2013-01-01

    Dissipative dark matter, such as mirror dark matter and related hidden sector dark matter candidates, requires an energy source to stabilize dark matter halos in spiral galaxies. It has been proposed previously that supernovae might be the source of this energy. Recently, it has been argued that this mechanism might explain two galactic scaling relations inferred from observations of spiral galaxies. One of which is that $\\rho_0 r_0$ is roughly constant, and another relates the galactic luminosity to $r_0$. [$\\rho_0$ is the dark matter central density and $r_0$ is the core radius.] Here we derive equations for the heating of the halo via supernova energy, and the cooling of the halo via thermal bremsstrahlung. These equations are numerically solved to obtain constraints on the $\\rho_0, \\ r_0$ parameters appropriate for spiral galaxies. These constraints are in remarkable agreement with the aforementioned scaling relations. We examine also constraints on the dark matter halo parameters of dwarf spheroidal gala...

  2. Galactic Dynamics Using 1/r Force Without Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Lo, Martin Wen-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Dark matter, a conjectured substance not directly observable but which has tremendous mass, was proposed to explain why galaxies hold together and rotate faster at their edges than predicted by Newton's Inverse Square (1/r2) Law of Gravity. Here we propose an alternative, an Inverse Law (1/r), which explains galactic morphology and rotation without dark matter. By varying initial conditions, the Inverse Law can systematically and easily generate realistic galactic formations including spirals, cartwheels (extremely difficult under Newtonian gravity), bars, rings, and spokes. This model can also produce filaments and void structures reminiscent of the large-scale structure of the universe. Newtonian gravity cannot do all this without dark matter. Occam's Razor suggests that at galactic scales, gravity should be 1/r and dark matter is unnecessary. This simple model with its self-organizing emergent properties, combined with dynamical systems theory, has broader implications. It may help us understand more compl...

  3. Galilean Equivalence for Galactic Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kesden, M; Kesden, Michael; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Satellite galaxies of the Milky Way experience a tidal disruption as they orbit in the Milky Way's dark halo. While the bound core of the satellite remains dominated by dark matter, the tidally disrupted stars behave like purely baryonic tracers of the Milky Way's potential well. If dark matter experiences a stronger self attraction than visible matter, stars will preferentially gain rather than lose energy during tidal disruption. This leads to a relative enhancement in the trailing as compared to the leading tidal stream. We show that the absence of a strong asymmetry in the surface brightness of the leading and trailing tidal streams already constrains the equivalence of acceleration of dark matter and baryons in a gravitational field to less than ten percent--thus ruling out a recently proposed mechanism to clear dwarf galaxies from voids. Future observations should be sensitive at the percent level to departures from the equivalence of dark matter and baryons.

  4. Condensation of galactic cold dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visinelli, Luca

    2016-07-01

    We consider the steady-state regime describing the density profile of a dark matter halo, if dark matter is treated as a Bose-Einstein condensate. We first solve the fluid equation for ``canonical'' cold dark matter, obtaining a class of density profiles which includes the Navarro-Frenk-White profile, and which diverge at the halo core. We then solve numerically the equation obtained when an additional ``quantum pressure'' term is included in the computation of the density profile. The solution to this latter case is finite at the halo core, possibly avoiding the ``cuspy halo problem'' present in some cold dark matter theories. Within the model proposed, we predict the mass of the cold dark matter particle to be of the order of Mχ c2 ≈ 10-24 eV, which is of the same order of magnitude as that predicted in ultra-light scalar cold dark matter models. Finally, we derive the differential equation describing perturbations in the density and the pressure of the dark matter fluid.

  5. Alternative approach to the galactic dark matter problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nucamendi, Ulises; Salgado, Marcelo; Sudarsky, Daniel

    2001-06-15

    We discuss scenarios in which the galactic dark matter in spiral galaxies is described by a long range coherent field which settles in a stationary configuration that might account for the features of the galactic rotation curves. The simplest possibility is to consider scalar fields, so we discuss, in particular, two mechanisms that would account for the settlement of the scalar field in a nontrivial configuration in the absence of a direct coupling of the field with ordinary matter: topological defects and spontaneous scalarization.

  6. An alternative approach to the galactic dark matter problem

    CERN Document Server

    Nucamendi, U; Sudarsky, D; Nucamendi, Ulises; Salgado, Marcelo; Sudarsky, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    We discuss scenarios in which the galactic dark matter in spiral galaxies is described by a long range coherent field which settles in a stationary configuration that might account for the features of the galactic rotation curves. The simplest possibility is to consider scalar fields, so we discuss in particular, two mechanisms that would account for the settlement of the scalar field in a non-trivial configuration in the absence of a direct coupling of the field with ordinary matter: topological defects, and spontaneous scalarization.

  7. Dark Matter Substructure and Dwarf Galactic Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Kravtsov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A decade ago cosmological simulations of increasingly higher resolution were used to demonstrate that virialized regions of Cold Dark Matter (CDM halos are filled with a multitude of dense, gravitationally bound clumps. These dark matter subhalos are central regions of halos that survived strong gravitational tidal forces and dynamical friction during the hierarchical sequence of merging and accretion via which the CDM halos form. Comparisons with observations revealed that there is a glaring discrepancy between abundance of subhalos and luminous satellites of the Milky Way and Andromeda as a function of their circular velocity or bound mass within a fixed aperture. This large discrepancy, which became known as the “substructure” or the “missing satellites” problem, begs for an explanation. In this paper, the author reviews the progress made during the last several years both in quantifying the problem and in exploring possible scenarios in which it could be accommodated and explained in the context of galaxy formation in the framework of the CDM paradigm of structure formation. In particular, he shows that the observed luminosity function, radial distribution, and the remarkable similarity of the inner density profiles of luminous satellites can be understood within hierarchical CDM framework using a simple model in which efficiency of star formation monotonically decreases with decreasing virial mass satellites had before their accretion without any actual sharp galaxy formation threshold.

  8. Dark matter concentrations in galactic nuclei according to polytropic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton, Curtis J.; Younsi, Ziri; Wu, Kinwah

    2016-10-01

    We calculate the radial profiles of galaxies where the nuclear region is self-gravitating, consisting of self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) with F degrees of freedom. For sufficiently high density this dark matter becomes collisional, regardless of its behaviour on galaxy scales. Our calculations show a spike in the central density profile, with properties determined by the dark matter microphysics, and the densities can reach the `mean density' of a black hole (from dividing the black hole mass by the volume enclosed by the Schwarzschild radius). For a galaxy halo of given compactness (χ ≡ 2GM/Rc2), certain values for the dark matter entropy yield a dense central object lacking an event horizon. For some soft equations of state of the SIDM (e.g. F ≳ 6), there are multiple horizonless solutions at given compactness. Although light propagates around and through a sphere composed of dark matter, it is gravitationally lensed and redshifted. While some calculations give non-singular solutions, others yield solutions with a central singularity. In all cases, the density transitions smoothly from the central body to the dark matter envelope around it, and to the galaxy's dark matter halo. We propose that pulsar timing observations will be able to distinguish between systems with a centrally dense dark matter sphere (for different equations of state) and conventional galactic nuclei that harbour a supermassive black hole.

  9. Dark matter, shared asymmetries, and galactic gamma ray signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Nayara; Necib, Lina; Thaler, Jesse

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a novel dark matter scenario where the visible sector and the dark sector share a common asymmetry. The two sectors are connected through an unstable mediator with baryon number one, allowing the standard model baryon asymmetry to be shared with dark matter via semi-annihilation. The present-day abundance of dark matter is then set by thermal freeze-out of this semi-annihilation process, yielding an asymmetric version of the WIMP miracle as well as promising signals for indirect detection experiments. As a proof of concept, we find a viable region of parameter space consistent with the observed Fermi excess of GeV gamma rays from the galactic center.

  10. Galactic Center Excess by Higgs Portal Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arindam; Okada, Nobuchika; Seto, Osamu

    2016-07-01

    A Z2 parity odd real scalar is a good candidate for dark matter in the present Universe. We consider models contain two Higgs doublet fields and one real scalar dark matter particle with mass in the range of 31 - 40 GeV and annihilating into a bb¯ pair, or with about 10 GeV mass and annihilating into tau lepton pair. Those annihilation modes suitably explain the observed excess of the gamma-ray flux from the Galactic Center. We identify the parameter region of the model that can fit the gamma-ray excess and satisfy phenomenological constraints, such as the observed dark matter relic density and the null results of direct dark matter search experiments. Most of the parameter region is found to be within the search reach of various future experiments.

  11. Density of dark matter in the Galactic disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, C.; Fuchs, B.

    1994-10-01

    We determine abundances, luminosities and space motions for a sample of nearby K giants. We analyse their kinematics and argue that we have isolated the local counterpart of the K giants found in a cone at the South Galactic Pole by Bahcall, Flynn & Gould (BFG). For a given description of the vertical potential of the local disc, constructed from the known matter and possible dark matter components, the velocity distribution and space density of these nearby K giants can be calculated as a function of height z above the Galactic plane. Comparison with the BFG observations then allows us to solve for the best-fitting potential. The major result is that the observations can be quite well fitted by the potential due to known matter only. The fit can be improved by invoking dark matter in the disc, but only a small amount is required: if such dark matter is distributed proportionately to the known matter (following Bahcall) our best-fitting model has a disc surface density of o = 52 t 13 M0 , compared to = 49 t 9 M0 for the known disc matter. This determination is in good accord with the Kuijken & Gilmore analysis of disc dark matter from K dwarfs. Key words: celestial mechanics, stellar dynamics - stars: fundamental parameters - stars: giant - Galaxy: kinematics and dynamics - Galaxy: structure - dark matter.

  12. Could wormholes form in dark matter galactic halos?

    CERN Document Server

    Rahaman, Farook; Sen, Banashree; Ray, Saibal

    2016-01-01

    We estimate expression for velocity as a function of the radial coordinate $r$ by using polynomial interpolation based on the experimental data of rotational velocities at distant outer regions of galaxies. The interpolation technique has been used to estimate fifth degree polynomial followed by cubic spline interpolation. This rotational velocity is used to find the geometry of galactic halo regions within the framework of Einstein's general relativity. In this letter we have analyzed features of galactic halo regions based on two possible choices for the dark matter density profile, viz. Navarro, Frenk \\& White (NFW) type~\\citep{Navarro1996} and Universal Rotation Curve (URC) ~\\citep{Castignani2012}. It is argued that spacetime of the galactic halo possesses some of the characteristics needed to support traversable wormholes.

  13. Could wormholes form in dark matter galactic halos?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Farook; Shit, G. C.; Sen, Banashree; Ray, Saibal

    2016-01-01

    We estimate expression for velocity as a function of the radial coordinate r by using polynomial interpolation based on the experimental data of rotational velocities at distant outer regions of galaxies. The interpolation technique has been used to estimate fifth degree polynomial followed by cubic spline interpolation. This rotational velocity is used to find the geometry of galactic halo regions within the framework of Einstein's general relativity. In this paper we have analyzed features of galactic halo regions based on two possible choices for the dark matter density profile, viz. Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) type (Navarro et al. in Astrophys. J. 462:563, 1996) and Universal Rotation Curve (URC) (Castignani et al. in Nat. Sci. 4:265, 2012). It is argued that spacetime of the galactic halo possesses some of the characteristics needed to support traversable wormholes.

  14. Positrons from dark matter annihilation in the galactic halo: uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Fornengo, N; Lineros, R; Donato, F; Salati, P

    2007-01-01

    Indirect detection signals from dark matter annihilation are studied in the positron channel. We discuss in detail the positron propagation inside the galactic medium: we present novel solutions of the diffusion and propagation equations and we focus on the determination of the astrophysical uncertainties which affect the positron dark matter signal. We show that, especially in the low energy tail of the positron spectra at Earth, the uncertainty is sizeable and we quantify the effect. Comparison of our predictions with current available and foreseen experimental data are derived.

  15. Is it possible to discover a dark matter particle with an accelerator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednyakov, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    The paper contains description of the main properties of the galactic dark matter (DM) particles, available approaches for detection of DM, main features of direct DM detection, ways to estimate prospects for the DM detection, the first collider search for a DM candidate within an Effective Field Theory, complete review of ATLAS results of the DM candidate search with LHC RUN I, and less complete review of "exotic" dark particle searches with other accelerators and not only. From these considerations it follows that one is unable to prove, especially model-independently, a discovery of a DM particle with an accelerator, or collider. One can only obtain evidence on existence of a weakly interacting neutral particle, which could be, or could not be the DM candidate. The current LHC DM search program uses only the missing transverse energy signature. Non-observation of any excess above Standard Model expectations forces the LHC experiments to enter into the same fighting for the best exclusion curve, in which (almost) all direct and indirect DM search experiments permanently take place. But this fighting has very little (almost nothing) to do with a real possibility of discovering a DM particle. The true DM particles possess an exclusive galactic signature—annual modulation of a signal, which is accessible today only for direct DM detection experiments. There is no way for it with a collider, or accelerator. Therefore to prove the DM nature of a collider-discovered candidate one must find the candidate in a direct DM experiment and demonstrate the galactic signature for the candidate. Furthermore, being observed, the DM particle must be implemented into a modern theoretical framework. The best candidate is the supersymmetry, which looks today inevitable for coherent interpretation of all available DM data.

  16. Perspective of Galactic dark matter subhalo detection on Fermi from the EGRET observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Qiang; BI Xiao-Jun; ZHANG Juan

    2009-01-01

    The perspective of the detectability of Galactic dark matter subhaioes on the Fermi satellite is investigated in this work.Under the assumptions that dark matter annihilation accounts for the "GeV excess" of the Galactic diffuse γ-rays discovered by EGRET and the γ-ray flux is dominated by the contribution from subhaloes of dark matter, we calculate the expected number of dark matter subhaloes that Fermi may detect.We show that Fermi may detect a few tens to several hundred subhaloes in a 1-year all-sky survey.Since EGRET observation is taken as a normalization, this prediction is independent of the particle physics property of dark matter.The uncertainties of the prediction are discussed in detail.We find that the major uncertainty comes from the mass function of subhaloes, i.e., whether the subhaloes are "point like" (high-mass rich) or "diffuse like" (low-mass rich).Other uncertainties like the background estimation and the observational errors will contribute a factor of 2-3.

  17. Particle Dark Matter constraints: the effect of Galactic uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Maria; Bernal, Nicolás; Bozorgnia, Nassim; Calore, Francesca; Iocco, Fabio

    2017-02-01

    Collider, space, and Earth based experiments are now able to probe several extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics which provide viable dark matter candidates. Direct and indirect dark matter searches rely on inputs of astrophysical nature, such as the local dark matter density or the shape of the dark matter density profile in the target in object. The determination of these quantities is highly affected by astrophysical uncertainties. The latter, especially those for our own Galaxy, are ill-known, and often not fully accounted for when analyzing the phenomenology of particle physics models. In this paper we present a systematic, quantitative estimate of how astrophysical uncertainties on Galactic quantities (such as the local galactocentric distance, circular velocity, or the morphology of the stellar disk and bulge) propagate to the determination of the phenomenology of particle physics models, thus eventually affecting the determination of new physics parameters. We present results in the context of two specific extensions of the Standard Model (the Singlet Scalar and the Inert Doublet) that we adopt as case studies for their simplicity in illustrating the magnitude and impact of such uncertainties on the parameter space of the particle physics model itself. Our findings point toward very relevant effects of current Galactic uncertainties on the determination of particle physics parameters, and urge a systematic estimate of such uncertainties in more complex scenarios, in order to achieve constraints on the determination of new physics that realistically include all known uncertainties.

  18. Is dark matter visible by galactic gamma rays?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W De Boer

    2006-10-01

    The EGRET excess in the diffuse galactic gamma ray data above 1 GeV shows all features expected from dark matter WIMP annihilation: (a) It is present and has the same spectrum in all sky directions, not just in the galactic plane. (b) The intensity of the excess shows the 1/2 profile expected for a flat rotation curve outside the galactic disc with an additionally interesting substructure in the disc in the form of a doughnut-shaped ring at 14 kpc from the centre of the galaxy. At this radius a ring of stars indicates the probable infall of a dwarf galaxy, which can explain the increase in DM density. From the spectral shape of the excess the WIMP mass is estimated to be between 50 and 100 GeV, while from the intensity the halo profile is reconstructed. Given the mass and intensity of the WIMPs the mass of the ring can be calculated, which is shown to explain the peculiar change of slope in the rotation curve at about 11 kpc. These results are model-independent in the sense that only the known shapes of signal and background were fitted with free normalization factors, thus being independent of model-dependent flux calculations. The statistical significance is more than 10 in comparison with a fit of the conventional galactic model to the EGRET data. These signals of dark matter annihilation are compatible with supersymmetry including all electroweak constraints. The statistical significance combined with all features mentioned above provide an intriguing hint that the EGRET excess is indeed a signal from dark matter annihilation.

  19. Supermassive dark-matter Q-balls in galactic centers?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troitsky, Sergey [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences,60th October Anniversary Prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology,Institutskii per. 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-11

    Though widely accepted, it is not proven that supermassive compact objects (SMCOs) residing in galactic centers are black holes. In particular, the Milky Way’s SMCO can be a giant nontopological soliton, Q-ball, made of a scalar field: this fits perfectly all observational data. Similar but tiny Q-balls produced in the early Universe may constitute, partly or fully, the dark matter. This picture explains in a natural way, why our SMCO has very low accretion rate and why the observed angular size of the corresponding radio source is much smaller than expected. Interactions between dark-matter Q-balls may explain how SMCOs were seeded in galaxies and resolve well-known problems of standard (non-interacting) dark matter.

  20. Annihilating dark matter and the galactic positron excess

    CERN Document Server

    Maor, I

    2006-01-01

    The possibility that the Galactic dark matter is composed of neutralinos that are just above half the $Z^o$ mass is examined, in the context of the Galactic positron excess. In particular, we check if the anomalous bump in the cosmic ray positron to electron ratio at $10~GeV$ can be explained with the ``decay'' of virtual $Z^o$ bosons produced when the neutralinos annihilate. We find that the low energy behaviour of our prediction fits well the existing data. Assuming the neutralinos annihilate primarily in the distant density concentration in the Galaxy and allowing combination of older, diffused positrons with young free-streaming ones, produces a fit which is not satisfactory on its own but is significantly better than the one obtained with homogeneous injection.

  1. Testing MONDian dark matter with galactic rotation curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, Doug [Department of Physics, Emory and Henry College, Emory, VA 24327 (United States); Farrah, Duncan; Minic, Djordje; Takeuchi, Tatsu [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Ho, Chiu Man [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Ng, Y. Jack, E-mail: dedmonds@ehc.edu, E-mail: farrah@vt.edu, E-mail: dminic@vt.edu, E-mail: takeuchi@vt.edu, E-mail: chiuman.ho@vanderbilt.edu, E-mail: yjng@physics.unc.edu [Institute of Field Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    MONDian dark matter (MDM) is a new form of dark matter quantum that naturally accounts for Milgrom's scaling, usually associated with modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND), and theoretically behaves like cold dark matter (CDM) at cluster and cosmic scales. In this paper, we provide the first observational test of MDM by fitting rotation curves to a sample of 30 local spiral galaxies (z ≈ 0.003). For comparison, we also fit the galactic rotation curves using MOND and CDM. We find that all three models fit the data well. The rotation curves predicted by MDM and MOND are virtually indistinguishable over the range of observed radii (∼1 to 30 kpc). The best-fit MDM and CDM density profiles are compared. We also compare with MDM the dark matter density profiles arising from MOND if Milgrom's formula is interpreted as Newtonian gravity with an extra source term instead of as a modification of inertia. We find that discrepancies between MDM and MOND will occur near the center of a typical spiral galaxy. In these regions, instead of continuing to rise sharply, the MDM mass density turns over and drops as we approach the center of the galaxy. Our results show that MDM, which restricts the nature of the dark matter quantum by accounting for Milgrom's scaling, accurately reproduces observed rotation curves.

  2. Galactic cluster winds in presence of a dark energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Merafina, M.

    2013-10-01

    We obtain a solution for the hydrodynamic outflow of the polytropic gas from the gravitating centre, in the presence of the uniform dark energy (DE). The antigravity of DE is enlightening the outflow and makes the outflow possible at smaller initial temperature, at the same density. The main property of the wind in the presence of DE is its unlimited acceleration after passing the critical point. In application of this solution to the winds from galaxy clusters, we suggest that collision of the strongly accelerated wind with another galaxy cluster, or with another galactic cluster wind, could lead to the formation of a highest energy cosmic rays.

  3. Galactic cluster winds in presence of a dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G S

    2013-01-01

    We obtain a solution for the hydrodynamic outflow of the polytropic gas from the gravitating center, in presence of the uniform Dark Energy (DE). The antigravity of DE is enlightening the outflow and make the outflow possible at smaller initial temperature, at the same density. The main property of the wind in presence of DE is its unlimited acceleration after passing the critical point. In application of this solution to the winds from galaxy clusters we suggest that collision of the strongly accelerated wind with another galaxy cluster, or with another galactic cluster wind could lead to the formation of a highest energy cosmic rays.

  4. Dark Matter in $\\gamma$ lines: Galactic Center vs dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lefranc, Valentin; Panci, Paolo; Sala, Filippo; Silk, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We provide CTA sensitivities to Dark Matter (DM) annihilation in $\\gamma$-ray lines, from the observation of the Galactic Center (GC) as well as, for the first time, of dwarf Spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). We compare the GC reach with that of dSphs as a function of a putative core radius of the DM distribution, which is itself poorly known. We find that the currently best dSph candidates constitute a more promising target than the GC, for core radii of one to a few kpc. We use the most recent instrument response functions and background estimations by CTA, on top of which we add the diffuse photon component. Our analysis is of particular interest for TeV-scale electroweak multiplets as DM candidates, such as the supersymmetric Wino and the Minimal Dark Matter fiveplet, whose predictions we compare with our projected sensitivities.

  5. Neutrino propagation in the Galactic dark matter halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Salas, P. F.; Lineros, R. A.; Tórtola, M.

    2016-12-01

    Neutrino oscillations are a widely observed and well-established phenomenon. It is also well known that deviations with respect to flavor conversion probabilities in vacuum arise due to neutrino interactions with matter. In this work, we analyze the impact of new interactions between neutrinos and the dark matter present in the Milky Way on the neutrino oscillation pattern. The dark matter-neutrino interaction is modeled by using an effective coupling proportional to the Fermi constant GF with no further restrictions on its flavor structure. For the galactic dark matter profile we consider a homogeneous distribution as well as several density profiles, estimating in all cases the size of the interaction required to get an observable effect at different neutrino energies. Our discussion is mainly focused in the PeV neutrino energy range, to be explored in observatories like IceCube and KM3NeT. The obtained results may be interpreted in terms of a light O (sub -eV - keV ) or weakly interacting massive particlelike dark matter particle or as a new interaction with a mediator of O (sub -eV - keV ) mass.

  6. CALET's sensitivity to Dark Matter annihilation in the galactic halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motz, H.; Asaoka, Y.; Torii, S.; Bhattacharyya, S.

    2015-12-01

    CALET (Calorimetric Electron Telescope), installed on the ISS in August 2015, directly measures the electron+positron cosmic rays flux up to 20 TeV. With its proton rejection capability of 1 : 105 and an aperture of 1200 cm2· sr, it will provide good statistics even well above one TeV, while also featuring an energy resolution of 2%, which allows it to detect fine structures in the spectrum. Such structures may originate from Dark Matter annihilation or decay, making indirect Dark Matter search one of CALET's main science objectives among others such as identification of signatures from nearby supernova remnants, study of the heavy nuclei spectra and gamma astronomy. The latest results from AMS-02 on positron fraction and total electron+positron flux can be fitted with a parametrization including a single pulsar as an extra power law source with exponential cut-off, which emits an equal amount of electrons and positrons. This single pulsar scenario for the positron excess is extrapolated into the TeV region and the expected CALET data for this case are simulated. Based on this prediction for CALET data, the sensitivity of CALET to Dark Matter annihilation in the galactic halo has been calculated. It is shown that CALET could significantly improve the limits compared to current data, especially for those Dark Matter candidates that feature a large fraction of annihilation directly into e+ + e-, such as the LKP (Lightest Kaluza-Klein particle).

  7. Dark Matter and Synchrotron Emission from Galactic Center Radio Filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linden, Tim [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Hooper, Dan [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2011-11-10

    The inner degrees of the Galactic center contain a large population of filamentary structures observed at radio frequencies. These so-called non-thermal radio filaments (NRFs) trace magnetic field lines and have attracted significant interest due to their hard (S_v ~ -0.1 +/- 0.4) synchrotron emission spectra. The origin of these filaments remains poorly understood. We show that the electrons and positrons created through the annihilations of a relatively light (~5-10 GeV) dark matter particle with the cross section predicted for a simple thermal relic can provide a compelling match to the intensity, spectral shape, and flux variation of the NRFs. Furthermore, the characteristics of the dark matter particle necessary to explain the synchrotron emission from the NRFs is consistent with those required to explain the excess gamma-ray emission observed from the Galactic center by the Fermi-LAT, as well as the direct detection signals observed by CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA.

  8. DAMA RESULTS: DARK MATTER IN THE GALACTIC HALO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bernabei

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental efforts and theoretical developmens support that most of the Universe is Dark and a large fraction of it should be made of relic particles; many possibilities are open on their nature and interaction types. In particular, the DAMA/LIBRA experiment at Gran Sasso Laboratory (sensitive mass: ~250 kg is mainly devoted to the investigation of Dark Matter (DM particles in the Galactic halo by exploiting the model independent DM annual modulation signature with higly radiopure Na I(Tl targets. DAMA/LIBRA is the succesor of the first generation DAMA/NaI (sensitive mass: ~100 kg; cumulatively the two experiments have released so far the results obtained by analyzing an exposure of 1.17 t yr, collected over 13 annual cycles. The data show a model independent evidence of the presence of DM particles in the galactic halo at 8.9σ confidence level (C.L.. Some of the already achieved results are shortly reminded, the last upgrade occurred at fall 2010 is mentioned and future perspectives are sumarized.

  9. The Futile Search for Galactic Disk Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Pestaña, José Luis G

    2010-01-01

    Several approaches have been used to search for dark matter in our galactic disk, but with mixed results: {\\em maybe yes and maybe no}. The prevailing approach, integrating the Poisson-Boltzmann equation for tracer stars, has led to more definitive results: {\\em yes and no}. The touchstone {\\em yes} analysis of Bahcall et al. (1992) has subsequently been confirmed or refuted by various other investigators. This has been our motivation for approaching the search from a different direction: applying the Virial Theorem to extant data. We conclude that the vertical density profile of the disk is not in a state of equilbrium and, therefore, that the Poisson-Boltzmann approach is inappropriate and it thereby leads to indefensible conclusions.

  10. Anisotropic Models for Globular Clusters, Galactic Bulges and Dark Halos

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, P H

    2013-01-01

    Spherical systems with a polytropic equation of state are of great interest in astrophysics. They are widely used to describe neutron stars, red giants, white dwarfs, brown dwarfs, main sequence stars, galactic halos and globular clusters of diverse sizes. In this paper we construct analytically a family of self-gravitating spherical models in the post-Newtonian approximation of general relativity. These models present interesting cusps in their density profiles which are appropriate for the modeling of galaxies and dark matter halos. The systems described here are anisotropic in the sense that their equiprobability surfaces in velocity space are non-spherical, leading to an overabundance of radial or circular orbits, depending on the parameters of the model in consideration. Among the family, we find the post-Newtonian generalization of the Plummer and Hernquist models. A close inspection of their equation of state reveals that these solutions interpolate smoothly between a polytropic sphere in the asymptoti...

  11. G306.3-0.9: A Newly Discovered Young Galactic Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Mark T.; Loi, Syheh T.; Murphy, Tara; Miller, Jon M.; Maitra, Dipankar; Gueltekin, Kayhan; Gehrels, Neil; Kennea, Jamie A.; Siegel, Michael H.; Gelbord, Jonathan; Kuin, Paul; Moss, Vanessa; Reeves, Sarah; Robbins, William J.; Gaensler, B. M.; Reis, Rubens C.; Petre, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We present X-ray and radio observations of the new Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G306.3-0.9, recently discovered by Swift. Chandra imaging reveals a complex morphology, dominated by a bright shock. The X-ray spectrum is broadly consistent with a young SNR in the Sedov phase, implying an age of 2500 yr for a distance of 8 kpc, plausibly identifying this as one of the 20 youngest Galactic SNRs. Australia Telescope Compact Array imaging reveals a prominent ridge of radio emission that correlates with the X-ray emission. We find a flux density of 160 mJy at 1 GHz, which is the lowest radio flux recorded for a Galactic SNR to date. The remnant is also detected at 24µm, indicating the presence of irradiated warm dust. The data reveal no compelling evidence for the presence of a compact stellar remnant.

  12. G306.3-0.9: A NEWLY DISCOVERED YOUNG GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, Mark T.; Miller, Jon M.; Maitra, Dipankar; Gueltekin, Kayhan; Reis, Rubens C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Loi, Shyeh T.; Murphy, Tara; Moss, Vanessa; Reeves, Sarah; Robbins, William J.; Gaensler, B. M. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Gehrels, Neil; Petre, Robert [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kennea, Jamie A.; Siegel, Michael H.; Gelbord, Jonathan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kuin, Paul, E-mail: markrey@umich.edu [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-01

    We present X-ray and radio observations of the new Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G306.3-0.9, recently discovered by Swift. Chandra imaging reveals a complex morphology, dominated by a bright shock. The X-ray spectrum is broadly consistent with a young SNR in the Sedov phase, implying an age of 2500 yr for a distance of 8 kpc, plausibly identifying this as one of the 20 youngest Galactic SNRs. Australia Telescope Compact Array imaging reveals a prominent ridge of radio emission that correlates with the X-ray emission. We find a flux density of {approx}160 mJy at 1 GHz, which is the lowest radio flux recorded for a Galactic SNR to date. The remnant is also detected at 24 {mu}m, indicating the presence of irradiated warm dust. The data reveal no compelling evidence for the presence of a compact stellar remnant.

  13. G306.3-0.9: A newly discovered young galactic supernova remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, Mark; Murphy, Tara; Miller, Jon; Maitra, Dipankar; Gultekin, Kayhan; Gehrels, Neil; Kennea, Jamie; Siegel, Michael; Gelbord, Jonathan; Kuin, Paul; Moss, Vanessa; Reeves, Sarah; Robbins, William; Gaensler, Bryan; Reis, Rubens; Petre, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We present X-ray and radio observations of the new Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G306.3-0.9, recently discovered by Swift. Chandra imaging reveals a complex morphology, dominated by a bright shock. The X-ray spectrum is broadly consistent with a young SNR in the Sedov phase, implying an age of 2500 yr for a distance of 8 kpc, plausibly identifying this as one of the 20 youngest Galactic SNRs. Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) imaging reveals a prominent ridge of radio emission that correlates with the X-ray emission. We find a flux density of ~ 160 mJy at 1 GHz, which is the lowest radio flux recorded for a Galactic SNR to date. The remnant is also detected at 24microns, indicating the presence of irradiated warm dust. The data reveal no compelling evidence for the presence of a compact stellar remnant.

  14. 3FGL Demographics Outside the Galactic Plane using Supervised Machine Learning: Pulsar and Dark Matter Subhalo Interpretations

    CERN Document Server

    Mirabal, N; Ferrara, E C; Gonthier, P L; Harding, A K; Sánchez-Conde, M A; Thompson, D J

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 1/3 of the sources listed in the Third Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) catalog (3FGL) remain unassociated. It is possible that predicted and even unanticipated gamma-ray source classes are present in these data waiting to be discovered. Taking advantage of the excellent spectral capabilities achieved by the Fermi LAT, we use machine learning classifiers (Random Forest and XGBoost) to pinpoint potentially novel source classes in the unassociated 3FGL sample outside the Galactic plane. Here we report a total of 34 high-confidence Galactic candidates at |b| > 5 degrees. The currently favored standard astrophysical interpretations for these objects are pulsars or low-luminosity globular clusters hosting millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Yet, these objects could also be interpreted as dark matter annihilation taking place in ultra-faint dwarf galaxies or dark matter subhalos. Unfortunately, Fermi LAT spectra are not sufficient to break degeneracies between the different scenarios. Careful visual inspection of ar...

  15. Another Path for the Emergence of Modified Galactic Dynamics from Dark Matter Superfluidity

    CERN Document Server

    Khoury, Justin

    2016-01-01

    In recent work we proposed a novel theory of dark matter (DM) superfluidity that matches the successes of the LambdaCDM model on cosmological scales while simultaneously reproducing MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) phenomenology on galactic scales. The agents responsible for mediating the MONDian force law are superfluid phonons that couple to ordinary (baryonic) matter. In this paper we propose an alternative way for the MOND phenomenon to emerge from DM superfluidity. The central idea is to use higher-gradient corrections in the superfluid effective theory. These next-to-leading order terms involve gradients of the gravitational potential, and therefore effectively modify the gravitational force law. In the process we discover a novel mechanism for generating the non-relativistic MOND action, starting from a theory that is fully analytic in all field variables. The idea, inspired by the symmetron mechanism, uses the spontaneous breaking of a discrete symmetry. For large acceleration, the symmetry is unbro...

  16. Dark matter substructure modelling and sensitivity of the Cherenkov Telescope Array to Galactic dark halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hütten, M.; Combet, C.; Maier, G.; Maurin, D.

    2016-09-01

    Hierarchical structure formation leads to a clumpy distribution of dark matter in the Milky Way. These clumps are possible targets to search for dark matter annihilation with present and future γ-ray instruments. Many uncertainties exist on the clump distribution, leading to disputed conclusions about the expected number of detectable clumps and the ensuing limits that can be obtained from non-detection. In this paper, we use the CLUMPY code to simulate thousands of skymaps for several clump distributions. This allows us to statistically assess the typical properties (mass, distance, angular size, luminosity) of the detectable clumps. Varying parameters of the clump distributions allows us to identify the key quantities to which the number of detectable clumps is the most sensitive. Focusing our analysis on two extreme clump configurations, yet consistent with results from numerical simulations, we revisit and compare various calculations made for the Fermi-LAT instrument, in terms of number of dark clumps expected and the angular power spectrum for the Galactic signal. We then focus on the prospects of detecting dark clumps with the future CTA instrument, for which we make a detailed sensitivity analysis using open-source CTA software. Based on a realistic scenario for the foreseen CTA extragalactic survey, and accounting for a post-trial sensitivity in the survey, we show that we obtain competitive and complementary limits to those based on long observation of a single bright dwarf spheroidal galaxy.

  17. Dark matter substructure modelling and sensitivity of the Cherenkov Telescope Array to Galactic dark halos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huetten, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Humboldt Univ. Berlin (Germany); Combet, C.; Maurin, D. [Grenoble-Alpes Univ., CNRS/IN2P3, Grenoble (France). LPSC; Maier, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    Hierarchical structure formation leads to a clumpy distribution of dark matter in the Milky Way. These clumps are possible targets to search for dark matter annihilation with present and future γ-ray instruments. Many uncertainties exist on the clump distribution, leading to disputed conclusions about the expected number of detectable clumps and the ensuing limits that can be obtained from non-detection. In this paper, we use the CLUMPY code to simulate thousands of skymaps for several clump distributions. This allows us to statistically assess the typical properties (mass, distance, angular size, luminosity) of the detectable clumps. Varying parameters of the clump distributions allows us to identify the key quantities to which the number of detectable clumps is the most sensitive. Focusing our analysis on two extreme clump configurations, yet consistent with results from numerical simulations, we revisit and compare various calculations made for the Fermi-LAT instrument, in terms of number of dark clumps expected and the angular power spectrum for the Galactic signal. We then focus on the prospects of detecting dark clumps with the future CTA instrument, for which we make a detailed sensitivity analysis using open-source CTA software. Based on a realistic scenario for the foreseen CTA extragalactic survey, and accounting for a post-trial sensitivity in the survey, we show that we obtain competitive and complementary limits to those based on long observation of a single bright dwarf spheroidal galaxy.

  18. Joint constraints on the Galactic dark matter halo and Galactic Centre from hypervelocity stars

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Elena M; Cacciato, M; Kuiack, M; Sari, R

    2016-01-01

    The mass assembly history of the Milky Way is an outstanding issue that can inform both theory of galaxy formation and the underlying cosmological model. For this reason, observational constraints on the properties of both its baryonic and dark matter contents are sought. Here we show that hypervelocity stars (HVSs) can in principle provide such constraints. We model the observed velocity distribution of HVSs, produced by tidal break-up of stellar binaries caused by Sgr A*. Considering a Galactic Centre (GC) binary population consistent with that observed in more accessible star forming regions, a marginally acceptable fit to current HVS data can be obtained only if the escape velocity from the GC to 50 kpc is $V_{\\rm G} \\lower.5ex\\hbox{$\\; \\buildrel 800$ km/s. Models in this region, however, would not reproduce circular velocity data, would require a binary population in the GC increasingly different from those observed elsewhere and dark matter haloes increasingly inconsistent with predictions in the $\\Lam...

  19. Inelastic frontier: Discovering dark matter at high recoil energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramante, Joseph; Fox, Patrick J.; Kribs, Graham D.; Martin, Adam

    2016-12-01

    There exist well-motivated models of particle dark matter which predominantly scatter inelastically off nuclei in direct detection experiments. This inelastic transition causes the dark matter to upscatter in terrestrial experiments into an excited state up to 550 keV heavier than the dark matter itself. An inelastic transition of this size is highly suppressed by both kinematics and nuclear form factors. In this paper, we extend previous studies of inelastic dark matter to determine the present bounds on the scattering cross section and the prospects for improvements in sensitivity. Three scenarios provide illustrative examples: nearly pure Higgsino supersymmetric dark matter, magnetic inelastic dark matter, and inelastic models with dark photon exchange. We determine the elastic scattering rate (through loop diagrams involving the heavy state) as well as verify that exothermic transitions are negligible (in the parameter space we consider). Presently, the strongest bounds on the cross section are from xenon at LUX-PandaX (when the mass splitting δ ≲160 keV ), iodine at PICO (when 160 ≲δ ≲300 keV ), and tungsten at CRESST (when δ ≳300 keV ). Amusingly, once δ ≳200 keV , weak scale (and larger) dark matter-nucleon scattering cross sections are allowed. The relative competitiveness of these diverse experiments is governed by the upper bound on the recoil energies employed by each experiment, as well as strong sensitivity to the mass of the heaviest element in the detector. Several implications, including sizable recoil energy-dependent annual modulation and improvements for future experiments, are discussed. We show that the xenon experiments can improve on the PICO results, if they were to analyze their existing data over a larger range of recoil energies, i.e., 20-500 keV Intriguingly, CRESST has reported several events in the recoil energy range 45-100 keV that, if interpreted as dark matter scattering, is compatible with δ ˜200 keV and an

  20. Cosmic Rays from Heavy Dark Matter from the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Cembranos, Jose A R; Maroto, Antonio L

    2013-01-01

    The gamma-ray fluxes observed by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) from the J1745-290 Galactic Center source is well fitted by the secondary photons coming from Dark Matter (DM) annihilation in particle-antiparticle standard model pairs over a diffuse power-law background. The spectral features of the signal are consistent with different channels: light quarks, electro-weak gauge bosons and top-antitop production. The amount of photons and morphology of the signal localized within a region of few parsecs, require compressed DM profiles as those resulting from baryonic contraction, which offer large enhancements in the signal over DM alone simulations. The fits return a heavy WIMP, with a mass above 10 TeV, but well below the unitarity limit for thermal relic annihilation. The fitted background spectral index is compatible with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) data from the same region. This possibility can be potentially tested with the observations of other high energy cosmic rays.

  1. Erasing Dark Matter Cusps in Cosmological Galactic Halos with Baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Romano-Diaz, Emilio; Hoffman, Yehuda; Heller, Clayton

    2008-01-01

    We study the central dark matter (DM) cusp evolution in cosmological galactic halos. Models with and without baryons (baryons+DM, hereafter BDM model, and pure DM, PDM model, respectively) are advanced from identical initial conditions. The DM cusp properties are contrasted by a direct comparison of pure DM and baryonic models. We find a divergent evolution between the PDM and BDM models within the inner ~10 kpc region. The PDM model forms a R^{-1} cusp as expected, while the DM in the BDM model forms a larger isothermal cusp R^{-2} instead. The isothermal cusp is stable until z~1 when it gradually levels off. This leveling proceeds from inside out and the final density slope is shallower than -1 within the central 3 kpc (i.e., expected size of the R^{-1} cusp), tending to a flat core within ~2 kpc. This effect cannot be explained by a finite resolution of our code which produces only a 5% difference between the gravitationally softened force and the exact Newtonian force of point masses at 1 kpc from the cen...

  2. Positron Anomaly in Galactic Cosmic Rays: Constraining Dark Matter Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagdeev, Roald; Malkov, Mikhail; Diamond, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    An explanation of the unexpected rise in the positron fraction of the cosmic ray (CR) leptonic energy spectrum, is proposed. It is argued that the e+/- spectra are different because they are accelerated by a charge-sign selective mechanism. This premise was hinted at by a recent result from the AMS-02 spectrometer that revealed a difference between e+ and antiproton spectra, which both are secondary CRs but of the opposite charges. The new mechanism extends the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) to make it charge-sign selective. The DSA, operating in Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) shocks, is held responsible for the production of the bulk of the CRs. The new mechanism was found to account for the positron data with an excellent agreement, except in a limited energy range between 100-300 GeV. In this range, the data exceed the theoretical prediction systematically, thus opening a window for a contribution from dark matter decay or annihilation as well as nearby pulsars. The charge-sign selectivity of the DSA arises from an electric field induced by the CR protons illuminating the neutral gas clumps in the SNR surroundings. The electric field expels positrons from the clump but traps electrons and secondary antiprotons, thus suppressing their acceleration in such SNRs. Work supported by NASA ATP-program under Grant NNX14AH36G, and by the US Department of Energy under Award No. DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  3. The Inelastic Frontier: Discovering Dark Matter at High Recoil Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Bramante, Joseph; Kribs, Graham D; Martin, Adam

    2016-01-01

    There exist well motivated models of particle dark matter which predominantly scatter inelastically off nuclei in direct detection experiments. This inelastic transition causes the DM to up-scatter in terrestrial experiments into an excited state up to 550 keV heavier than the DM itself. An inelastic transition of this size is highly suppressed by both kinematics and nuclear form factors. We extend previous studies of inelastic DM to determine the present bounds on the scattering cross section, and the prospects for improvements in sensitivity. Three scenarios provide illustrative examples: nearly pure Higgsino DM; magnetic inelastic DM; and inelastic models with dark photon exchange. We determine the elastic scattering rate as well as verify that exothermic transitions are negligible. Presently, the strongest bounds on the cross section are from xenon at LUX-PandaX (\\delta 300 keV). Amusingly, once \\delta > 200 keV, weak scale (and larger) DM - nucleon scattering cross sections are allowed. The relative com...

  4. Cold Dark Matter Substructure and Galactic Disks I: Morphological Signatures of Hierarchical SatelliteAccretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Bullock, James S.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2007-12-03

    We conduct a series of high-resolution, fully self-consistent dissipation less N-body simulations to investigate the cumulative effect of substructure mergers onto thin disk galaxies in the context of the {Lambda}CDM paradigm of structure formation. Our simulation campaign is based on a hybrid approach combining cosmological simulations and controlled numerical experiments. Substructure mass functions, orbital distributions, internal structures, and accretion times are culled directly from cosmological simulations of galaxy-sized cold dark matter (CDM) halos. We demonstrate that accretions of massive subhalos onto the central regions of host halos, where the galactic disk resides, since z {approx} 1 should be common occurrences. In contrast, extremely few satellites in present-day CDM halos are likely to have a significant impact on the disk structure. This is due to the fact that massive subhalos with small orbital pericenters that are most capable of strongly perturbing the disk become either tidally disrupted or suffer substantial mass loss prior to z = 0. One host halo merger history is subsequently used to seed controlled N-body experiments of repeated satellite impacts on an initially-thin Milky Way-type disk galaxy. These simulations track the effects of six dark matter substructures, with initial masses in the range {approx} (0.7-2) x 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} ({approx} 20-60% of the disk mass), crossing the disk in the past {approx} 8 Gyr. We show that these accretion events produce several distinctive observational signatures in the stellar disk including: a long-lived, low-surface brightness, ring-like feature in the outskirts; a significant flare; a central bar; and faint filamentary structures that (spuriously) resemble tidal streams in configuration space. The final distribution of disk stars exhibits a complex vertical structure that is well-described by a standard 'thin-thick' disk decomposition, where the 'thick' disk

  5. Cold Dark Matter Substructure and Galactic Disks I: Morphological Signatures of Hierarchical SatelliteAccretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Bullock, James S.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2007-12-03

    We conduct a series of high-resolution, fully self-consistent dissipation less N-body simulations to investigate the cumulative effect of substructure mergers onto thin disk galaxies in the context of the {Lambda}CDM paradigm of structure formation. Our simulation campaign is based on a hybrid approach combining cosmological simulations and controlled numerical experiments. Substructure mass functions, orbital distributions, internal structures, and accretion times are culled directly from cosmological simulations of galaxy-sized cold dark matter (CDM) halos. We demonstrate that accretions of massive subhalos onto the central regions of host halos, where the galactic disk resides, since z {approx} 1 should be common occurrences. In contrast, extremely few satellites in present-day CDM halos are likely to have a significant impact on the disk structure. This is due to the fact that massive subhalos with small orbital pericenters that are most capable of strongly perturbing the disk become either tidally disrupted or suffer substantial mass loss prior to z = 0. One host halo merger history is subsequently used to seed controlled N-body experiments of repeated satellite impacts on an initially-thin Milky Way-type disk galaxy. These simulations track the effects of six dark matter substructures, with initial masses in the range {approx} (0.7-2) x 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} ({approx} 20-60% of the disk mass), crossing the disk in the past {approx} 8 Gyr. We show that these accretion events produce several distinctive observational signatures in the stellar disk including: a long-lived, low-surface brightness, ring-like feature in the outskirts; a significant flare; a central bar; and faint filamentary structures that (spuriously) resemble tidal streams in configuration space. The final distribution of disk stars exhibits a complex vertical structure that is well-described by a standard 'thin-thick' disk decomposition, where the 'thick' disk

  6. 3FGL Demographics Outside the Galactic Plane using Supervised Machine Learning: Pulsar and Dark Matter Subhalo Interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabal, N.; Charles, E.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gonthier, P. L.; Harding, A. K.; Sánchez-Conde, M. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    2016-07-01

    Nearly one-third of the sources listed in the Third Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) catalog (3FGL) remain unassociated. It is possible that predicted and even unanticipated gamma-ray source classes are present in these data waiting to be discovered. Taking advantage of the excellent spectral capabilities achieved by the Fermi LAT, we use machine-learning classifiers (Random Forest and XGBoost) to pinpoint potentially novel source classes in the unassociated 3FGL sample outside the Galactic plane. Here we report a total of 34 high-confidence Galactic candidates at | b| ≥slant 5^\\circ . The currently favored standard astrophysical interpretations for these objects are pulsars or low-luminosity globular clusters hosting millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Yet these objects could also be interpreted as dark matter annihilation taking place in ultra-faint dwarf galaxies or dark matter subhalos. Unfortunately, Fermi LAT spectra are not sufficient to break degeneracies between the different scenarios. Careful visual inspection of archival optical images reveals no obvious evidence for low-luminosity globular clusters or ultra-faint dwarf galaxies inside the 95% error ellipses. If these are pulsars, this would bring the total number of MSPs at | b| ≥slant 5^\\circ to 106, down to an energy flux ≈4.0 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 between 100 MeV and 100 GeV. We find this number to be in excellent agreement with predictions from a new population synthesis of MSPs that predicts 100-126 high-latitude 3FGL MSPs depending on the choice of high-energy emission model. If, however, these are dark matter substructures, we can place upper limits on the number of Galactic subhalos surviving today and on dark matter annihilation cross sections. These limits are beginning to approach the canonical thermal relic cross section for dark matter particle masses below ˜100 GeV in the bottom quark (b\\bar{b}) annihilation channel.

  7. The Galactic Halo in Mixed Dark Matter Cosmologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderhalden, D.; Diemand, J.; Bertone, G.; Macciò, A.V.; Schneider, A.

    2012-01-01

    A possible solution to the small scale problems of the cold dark matter (CDM) scenario is that the dark matter consists of two components, a cold and a warm one. We perform a set of high resolution simulations of the Milky Way halo varying the mass of the WDM particle (mWDM) and the cosmic dark

  8. The prolate shape of the galactic dark-matter halo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmi, A; Spooner, NJC; Kudryavtsev,

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of the distribution of dark-matter in our Galaxy plays a crucial role in the interpretation of dark-matter detection experiments. I will argue here that probably the best way of constraining the properties of the dark-matter halo is through astrophysical observations. These provide

  9. The prolate shape of the galactic dark-matter halo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmi, A; Spooner, NJC; Kudryavtsev,

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of the distribution of dark-matter in our Galaxy plays a crucial role in the interpretation of dark-matter detection experiments. I will argue here that probably the best way of constraining the properties of the dark-matter halo is through astrophysical observations. These provide constra

  10. Signatures of Dark Star Remnants in the Galactic Halo

    CERN Document Server

    Sandick, Pearl; Freese, Katherine; Spolyar, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    The very first stars likely formed from metal-free, molecular hydrogen-cooled gas at the centers of dark matter minihalos. Prior to nuclear fusion, these stars may have been supported by dark matter heating from annihilations in the star, in which case they could have grown to be quite massive before collapsing to black holes. Many remnant black holes and their surrounding dark matter density spikes may be part of our Milky Way halo today. Here we explore the gamma-ray signatures of dark matter annihilations in the dark matter spikes surrounding these black holes for a range of star formation scenarios, black hole masses, and dark matter annihilation modes. Data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope are used to constrain models of dark matter annihilation and the formation of the first stars.

  11. COLLISIONS BETWEEN DARK MATTER CONFINED HIGH VELOCITY CLOUDS AND MAGNETIZED GALACTIC DISKS: THE SMITH CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galyardt, Jason; Shelton, Robin L., E-mail: jeg@uga.edu, E-mail: rls@physast.uga.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Galaxy’s population of High Velocity Clouds (HVCs) may include a subpopulation that is confined by dark matter minihalos and falling toward the Galactic disk. We present the first magnetohydrodynamic simulational study of dark-matter-dominated HVCs colliding with a weakly magnetized galactic disk. Our HVCs have baryonic masses of 5 × 10{sup 6}M{sub ⊙} and dark matter minihalo masses of 0, 3 × 10{sup 8}, or 1 × 10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙}. They are modeled on the Smith Cloud, which is said to have collided with the disk 70 Myr ago. We find that, in all cases, the cloud’s collision with the galactic disk creates a hole in the disk, completely disperses the cloud, and forms a bubble-shaped structure on the far side of the disk. In contrast, when present, the dark matter minihalo continues unimpeded along its trajectory. Later, as the minihalo passes through the bubble structure and galactic halo, it accretes up to 6.0 × 10{sup 5} M{sub ⊙} in baryonic material, depending on the strengths of the magnetic field and minihalo gravity. These simulations suggest that if the Smith Cloud is associated with a dark matter minihalo and collided with the Galactic disk, the minihalo has accreted the observed gas. However, if the Smith Cloud is dark-matter-free, it is on its first approach toward the disk. These simulations also suggest that the dark matter is most concentrated either at the head of the cloud or near the cloud, depending upon the strength of the magnetic field, a point that could inform indirect dark matter searches.

  12. Prospects for detecting supersymmetric dark matter in the Galactic halo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Springel, V.; White, S. D. M.; Frenk, C. S.; Navarro, J. F.; Jenkins, A.; Vogelsberger, M.; Wang, J.; Ludlow, A.; Helmi, A.

    2008-01-01

    Dark matter is the dominant form of matter in the Universe, but its nature is unknown. It is plausibly an elementary particle, perhaps the lightest supersymmetric partner of known particle species(1). In this case, annihilation of dark matter in the halo of the Milky Way should produce gamma-rays at

  13. Prospects for detecting supersymmetric dark matter in the Galactic halo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Springel, V.; White, S. D. M.; Frenk, C. S.; Navarro, J. F.; Jenkins, A.; Vogelsberger, M.; Wang, J.; Ludlow, A.; Helmi, A.

    2008-01-01

    Dark matter is the dominant form of matter in the Universe, but its nature is unknown. It is plausibly an elementary particle, perhaps the lightest supersymmetric partner of known particle species(1). In this case, annihilation of dark matter in the halo of the Milky Way should produce gamma-rays at

  14. Final Technical Report: Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saurabh W. Jha

    2012-10-03

    The final technical report from the project "Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae" led at Rutgers the State University of New Jersey by Prof. Saurabh W. Jha is presented, including all publications resulting from this award.

  15. New variable stars discovered in the fields of three Galactic open clusters using the VVV survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, T.; Minniti, D.; Dékány, I.; Clariá, J. J.; Alonso-García, J.; Gramajo, L. V.; Ramírez Alegría, S.; Bonatto, C.

    2016-11-01

    This project is a massive near-infrared (NIR) search for variable stars in highly reddened and obscured open cluster (OC) fields projected on regions of the Galactic bulge and disk. The search is performed using photometric NIR data in the J-, H- and Ks- bands obtained from the Vista Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) Survey. We performed in each cluster field a variability search using Stetson's variability statistics to select the variable candidates. Later, those candidates were subjected to a frequency analysis using the Generalized Lomb-Scargle and the Phase Dispersion Minimization algorithms. The number of independent observations range between 63 and 73. The newly discovered variables in this study, 157 in total in three different known OCs, are classified based on their light curve shapes, periods, amplitudes and their location in the corresponding color-magnitude (J -Ks ,Ks) and color-color (H -Ks , J - H) diagrams. We found 5 possible Cepheid stars which, based on the period-luminosity relation, are very likely type II Cepheids located behind the bulge. Among the newly discovered variables, there are eclipsing binaries, δ Scuti, as well as background RR Lyrae stars. Using the new version of the Wilson & Devinney code as well as the "Physics Of Eclipsing Binaries" (PHOEBE) code, we analyzed some of the best eclipsing binaries we discovered. Our results show that these studied systems turn out to be ranging from detached to double-contact binaries, with low eccentricities and high inclinations of approximately 80°. Their surface temperatures range between 3500 K and 8000 K.

  16. Dark Antimatter as a Galactic Heater: X-rays from the Core of our Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, M M N; Forbes, Michael McNeil; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2006-01-01

    Several independent observations of the Galactic core suggest hitherto unexplained sources of energy. We show that dark matter in the form of dense antimatter droplets provides a natural site for electron and proton annihilation, providing 511 keV photons, gamma-rays, and energy that sustains thermal X-ray radiation. Such a picture not only identifies the dark matter in our universe, but allows X-ray observations to directly probe the matter distribution in our Galaxy.

  17. Prospects for detecting supersymmetric dark matter in the Galactic halo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springel, V; White, S D M; Frenk, C S; Navarro, J F; Jenkins, A; Vogelsberger, M; Wang, J; Ludlow, A; Helmi, A

    2008-11-06

    Dark matter is the dominant form of matter in the Universe, but its nature is unknown. It is plausibly an elementary particle, perhaps the lightest supersymmetric partner of known particle species. In this case, annihilation of dark matter in the halo of the Milky Way should produce gamma-rays at a level that may soon be observable. Previous work has argued that the annihilation signal will be dominated by emission from very small clumps (perhaps smaller even than the Earth), which would be most easily detected where they cluster together in the dark matter haloes of dwarf satellite galaxies. Here we report that such small-scale structure will, in fact, have a negligible impact on dark matter detectability. Rather, the dominant and probably most easily detectable signal will be produced by diffuse dark matter in the main halo of the Milky Way. If the main halo is strongly detected, then small dark matter clumps should also be visible, but may well contain no stars, thereby confirming a key prediction of the cold dark matter model.

  18. Dark Matter Massive Fermions and Einasto Profiles in Galactic Haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Siutsou, I; Ruffini, R

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of a fermionic dark matter model we fit rotation curves of The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey THINGS sample and compare our 3-parametric model to other models widely used in the literature: 2-parametric Navarro--Frenk--White, pseudoisothermal sphere, Burkhert models, and 3-parametric Einasto model, suggested as the new "standard dark matter profile" model in the paper by Chemin et. al., AJ 142 (2011) 109. The results from the fitting procedure provides evidence for an underlying fermionic nature of the dark matter candidate, with rest mass above the keV regime.

  19. Dark matter massive fermions and Einasto profiles in galactic haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siutsou, I.; Argüelles, C. R.; Ruffini, R.

    2015-07-01

    On the basis of a fermionic dark matter model we fit rotation curves of The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS) sample and compare our 3-parametric model to other models widely used in the literature: 2-parametric Navarro-Frenk-White, pseudoisothermal sphere, Burkhert models, and 3-parametric Einasto model, suggested as the new "standard dark matter profile" model in the paper by Chemin et al., Astron. J. 142 (2011) 109. The results from the fitting procedure provides evidence for an underlying fermionic nature of the dark matter candidate, with rest mass above the keV regime.

  20. An X-Ray-selected Active Galactic Nucleus at z=4.6 Discovered by the CYDER Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treister, E.; Castander, F.J.; Maccarone, T.J.; Herrera, D.; Gawiser, E.; Maza, J.; Coppi, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    We present the discovery of a high-redshift, X-ray-selected active galactic nucleus (AGN) by the Calan-Yale Deep Extragalactic Research (CYDER) survey: CXOCY J033716.7-050153, located at z=4.61, the second high-redshift AGN discovered by this survey. Here we present its optical, near-IR, and X-ray

  1. Search for dark matter from the Galactic halo with the IceCube Neutrino Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J.A.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S.W.; Bay, R.; Alba, J.L.B.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J.J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J.K.; Becker, K.H.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; BenZvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D.Z.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D.J.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Boser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brown, A.M.; Buitink, S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D.F.; D'Agostino, M.V.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J.C.; Clercq, C. De; Demirors, L.; Denger, T.; Depaepe, O.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; Vries-Uiterweerd, G. de; DeYoung, T.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J.P.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R.W.; Engdegard, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P.A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A.R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Foerster, M.M.; Fox, B.D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T.K.; Gallagher, J.; Geisler, M.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glusenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J.A.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Gross, A.; Grullon, S.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Herquet, P.; Lafebre, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Self-annihilating or decaying dark matter in the Galactic halo might produce high energy neutrinos detectable with neutrino telescopes. We have conducted a search for such a signal using 276 days of data from the IceCube 22-string configuration detector acquired during 2007 and 2008. The effect of h

  2. Dark matter concentrations in galactic nuclei according to polytropic models

    CERN Document Server

    Saxton, Curtis J; Wu, Kinwah

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the radial profiles of galaxies where the nuclear region is self-gravitating, consisting of self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) with $F$ degrees of freedom. For sufficiently high density this dark matter becomes collisional, regardless of its behaviour on galaxy scales. Our calculations show a spike in the central density profile, with properties determined by the dark matter microphysics, and the densities can reach the `mean density' of a black hole (from dividing the black-hole mass by the volume enclosed by the Schwarzschild radius). For a galaxy halo of given compactness ($\\chi=2GM/Rc^2$), certain values for the dark matter entropy yield a dense central object lacking an event horizon. For some soft equations of state of the SIDM (e.g. $F\\ge6$), there are multiple horizonless solutions at given compactness. Although light propagates around and through a sphere composed of dark matter, it is gravitationally lensed and redshifted. While some calculations give non-singular solutions, others yie...

  3. Galactic Dark Matter and Bertrand Space-times

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Dipanjan; Sarkar, Tapobrata

    2013-01-01

    Bertrand space-times (BSTs) are static, spherically symmetric solutions of Einstein's equations, that admit stable, closed orbits. Starting from the fact that to a good approximation, stars in the disc or halo regions of typical galaxies move in such orbits, we propose that, under certain physical assumptions, the dark matter distribution of some low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies can seed a particular class of BSTs. In the Newtonian limit, it is shown that for flat rotation curves, our proposal leads to an analytic prediction of the NFW dark matter profile. We further show that the dark matter distribution that seeds the BST, is described by a two-fluid anisotropic model, and present its analytic solution. A new solution of the Einstein's equations, with an internal BST and an external Schwarzschild metric, is also constructed.

  4. Tully-Fisher relation, galactic rotation curves and dissipative mirror dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, R

    2013-01-01

    If dark matter is dissipative then the distribution of dark matter within galactic halos can be governed by dissipation, heating and hydrostatic equilibrium. Previous work has shown that a specific model, in the framework of mirror dark matter, can explain several empirical galactic scaling relations. It is shown here that this dynamical halo model implies a quasi-isothermal dark matter density, $\\rho (r) = \\rho_0 r_0^2/(r^2 + r_0^2)$, where the core radius, $r_0$, scales with disk scale length, $r_D$, via $r_0/{\\rm kpc} = 1.4\\left(r_D/{\\rm kpc}\\right)$. Additionally, the product $\\rho_0 r_0$ is roughly $constant$, i.e. independent of galaxy size (the $constant$ is set by the parameters of the model). The derived dark matter density profile implies that the galactic rotation velocity satisfies the Tully-Fisher relation, $L_B \\propto v^{3}_{max}$, where $v_{max}$ is the maximal rotational velocity. Examples of rotation curves resulting from this dynamics are given.

  5. Search for dark matter annihilation in the Galactic Center with IceCube-79

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Hill, G.C.; Robertson, S.; Whelan, B.J. [University of Adelaide, School of Chemistry and Physics, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Abraham, K.; Bernhard, A.; Coenders, S.; Gross, A.; Holzapfel, K.; Huber, M.; Jurkovic, M.; Krings, K.; Resconi, E.; Veenkamp, J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Ackermann, M.; Berghaus, P.; Bernardini, E.; Bretz, H.P.; Cruz Silva, A.H.; Gluesenkamp, T.; Gora, D.; Jacobi, E.; Kaminsky, B.; Karg, T.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Nahnhauer, R.; Schoenwald, A.; Shanidze, R.; Spiering, C.; Stasik, A.; Stoessl, A.; Strotjohann, N.L.; Terliuk, A.; Usner, M.; Yanez, J.P. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J.; Brown, A.M. [University of Canterbury, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Aguilar, J.A.; Heereman, D.; Meagher, K.; Meures, T.; O' Murchadha, A.; Pinat, E. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, Brussels (Belgium); Ahlers, M.; Arguelles, C.; Beiser, E.; BenZvi, S.; Braun, J.; Chirkin, D.; Day, M.; Desiati, P.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Fadiran, O.; Fahey, S.; Feintzeig, J.; Ghorbani, K.; Gladstone, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hoshina, K.; Jero, K.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J.L.; Kheirandish, A.; McNally, F.; Merino, G.; Middlemas, E.; Morse, R.; Richter, S.; Sabbatini, L.; Tobin, M.N.; Tosi, D.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Santen, J.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, C.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wille, L. [Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Ahrens, M.; Bohm, C.; Dumm, J.P.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Hulth, P.O.; Hultqvist, K.; Walck, C.; Wolf, M.; Zoll, M. [Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Altmann, D.; Classen, L.; Kappes, A.; Tselengidou, M. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Anderson, T.; Arlen, T.C.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Groh, J.C.; Huang, F.; Keivani, A.; Lanfranchi, J.L.; Quinnan, M.; Smith, M.W.E.; Stanisha, N.A.; Tesic, G. [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Physics, University Park, PA (United States); Archinger, M.; Baum, V.; Boeser, S.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Koepke, L.; Kroll, G.; Luenemann, J.; Sander, H.G.; Schatto, K.; Wiebe, K. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics, Mainz (Germany); Auffenberg, J.; Bissok, M.; Blumenthal, J.; Glagla, M.; Gier, D.; Gretskov, P.; Haack, C.; Hansmann, B.; Hellwig, D.; Kemp, J.; Konietz, R.; Koob, A.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Paul, L.; Puetz, J.; Raedel, L.; Reimann, R.; Rongen, M.; Schimp, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schukraft, A.; Stahlberg, M.; Vehring, M.; Wallraff, M.; Wichary, C.; Wiebusch, C.H. [RWTH Aachen University, III. Physikalisches Institut, Aachen (Germany); Bai, X. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Physics Department, Rapid City, SD (United States); Barwick, S.W.; Yodh, G. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Irvine, CA (United States); Bay, R.; Filimonov, K.; Price, P.B.; Woschnagg, K. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Beatty, J.J. [Ohio State University, Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Columbus, OH (United States); Ohio State University, Department of Astronomy, Columbus, OH (United States); Becker Tjus, J.; Bos, F.; Eichmann, B.; Fedynitch, A.; Kroll, M.; Saba, S.M.; Schoeneberg, S. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Bochum (Germany); Becker, K.H.; Bindig, D.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Helbing, K.; Hickford, S.; Hoffmann, R.; Klaes, J.; Kopper, S.; Naumann, U.; Obertacke, A.; Omairat, A.; Posselt, J.; Soldin, D. [University of Wuppertal, Department of Physics, Wuppertal (Germany); Berley, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Cheung, E.; Christy, B.; Felde, J.; Hellauer, R.; Hoffman, K.D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Maunu, R.; Olivas, A.; Redl, P.; Schmidt, T.; Sullivan, G.W.; Wissing, H. [University of Maryland, Department of Physics, College Park, MD (United States); Besson, D.Z. [University of Kansas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lawrence, KS (United States); Binder, G.; Gerhardt, L.; Ha, C.; Klein, S.R.; Miarecki, S. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Boersma, D.J.; Botner, O.; Euler, S.; Hallgren, A.; Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

    2015-10-15

    The Milky Way is expected to be embedded in a halo of dark matter particles, with the highest density in the central region, and decreasing density with the halo-centric radius. Dark matter might be indirectly detectable at Earth through a flux of stable particles generated in dark matter annihilations and peaked in the direction of the Galactic Center. We present a search for an excess flux of muon (anti-) neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the Galactic Center using the cubic-kilometer-sized IceCube neutrino detector at the South Pole. There, the Galactic Center is always seen above the horizon. Thus, new and dedicated veto techniques against atmospheric muons are required to make the southern hemisphere accessible for IceCube. We used 319.7 live-days of data from IceCube operating in its 79-string configuration during 2010 and 2011. No neutrino excess was found and the final result is compatible with the background. We present upper limits on the self-annihilation cross-section, left angle σ{sub A} right angle, for WIMP masses ranging from 30 GeV up to 10 TeV, assuming cuspy (NFW) and flat-cored (Burkert) dark matter halo profiles, reaching down to ≅ 4 . 10{sup -24} cm{sup 3}s{sup -1}, and ≅ 2.6 . 10{sup -23} cm{sup 3}s{sup -1} for the νanti ν channel, respectively. (orig.)

  6. Search for dark matter annihilation in the Galactic Center with IceCube-79

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Beiser, E.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brown, A. M.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Fuchs, T.; Glagla, M.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Gretskov, P.; Groh, J. C.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansmann, B.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hellwig, D.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jurkovic, M.; Kaminsky, B.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Koob, A.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Middlemas, E.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Pütz, J.; Quinnan, M.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Richter, S.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Sabbatini, L.; Sander, H.-G.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shanidze, R.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stanisha, N. A.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Santen, J.; Vanheule, S.; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wichary, C.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zoll, M.

    2015-10-01

    The Milky Way is expected to be embedded in a halo of dark matter particles, with the highest density in the central region, and decreasing density with the halo-centric radius. Dark matter might be indirectly detectable at Earth through a flux of stable particles generated in dark matter annihilations and peaked in the direction of the Galactic Center. We present a search for an excess flux of muon (anti-) neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the Galactic Center using the cubic-kilometer-sized IceCube neutrino detector at the South Pole. There, the Galactic Center is always seen above the horizon. Thus, new and dedicated veto techniques against atmospheric muons are required to make the southern hemisphere accessible for IceCube. We used 319.7 live-days of data from IceCube operating in its 79-string configuration during 2010 and 2011. No neutrino excess was found and the final result is compatible with the background. We present upper limits on the self-annihilation cross-section, , for WIMP masses ranging from 30 GeV up to 10 TeV, assuming cuspy (NFW) and flat-cored (Burkert) dark matter halo profiles, reaching down to ˜eq 4 \\cdot 10^{-24} cm^3 s^{-1}, and ˜eq 2.6 \\cdot 10^{-23} cm^3 s^{-1} for the ν overline{ν } channel, respectively.

  7. On the detectability of Galactic dark matter annihilation into monochromatic gamma-rays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Zhi-Cheng; YUAN Qiang; BI Xiao-Jun; CHEN Guo-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Monochromatic γ-rays are thought to be the smoking gun signal for identifying dark matter annihilation. However, the flux of monochromatic γ-rays is usually suppressed by virtual quantum effects since dark matter should be neutral and does not couple with γ-rays directly. In this work, we study the detection strategy of the monochromatic γ-rays in a future space-based detector. The flux of monochromatic γ-rays between 50 GeV and several TeV is calculated by assuming the supersymmetric neutralino as a typical dark matter candidate. The detection both by focusing on the Galactic center and in a scan mode that detects γ-rays from the whole Galactic halo are compared. The detector performance for the purpose of monochromatic γ-ray detection, with different energy and angular resolution, field of view, and background rejection efficiencies, is carefully studied with both analytical and fast Monte-Carlo methods.

  8. On the Detectability of Galactic Dark Matter Annihilation into Monochromatic Gamma-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Zhi-Cheng; Bi, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Guo-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Monochromatic gamma-rays are thought to be the smoking gun signal for identifying the dark matter annihilation. However, the flux of monochromatic gamma-rays is usually suppressed by the virtual quantum effects since dark matter should be neutral and does not couple with gamma-rays directly. In the work we study the detection strategy of the monochromatic gamma-rays in a future space-based detector. The monochromatic gamma-ray flux is calculated by assuming supersymmetric neutralino as a typical dark matter candidate. We discuss both the detection focusing on the Galactic center and in a scan mode which detects gamma-rays from the whole Galactic halo are compared. The detector performance for the purpose of monochromatic gamma-rays detection, with different energy and angular resolution, field of view, background rejection efficiencies, is carefully studied with both analytical and fast Monte-Carlo method.

  9. New variable stars discovered in the fields of three Galactic open clusters using the VVV Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Palma, Tali; Dékány, Istvan; Clariá, Juan J; Alonso-García, Javier; Gramajo, Luciana V; Alegría, Sebastian Ramírez; Bonatto, Charles

    2016-01-01

    This project is a massive near-infrared (NIR) search for variable stars in highly reddened and obscured open cluster (OC) fields projected on regions of the Galactic bulge and disk. The search is performed using photometric NIR data in the $J$-, $H$- and $K_s$- bands obtained from the Vista Variables in the V\\'ia L\\'actea (VVV) Survey. We performed in each cluster field a variability search using Stetson's variability statistics to select the variable candidates. Later, those candidates were subjected to a frequency analysis using the Generalized Lomb-Scargle and the Phase Dispersion Minimization algorithms. The number of independent observations range between 63 and 73. The newly discovered variables in this study, 157 in total in three different known OCs, are classified based on their light curve shapes, periods, amplitudes and their location in the corresponding color-magnitude $(J-K_s,K_s)$ and color-color $(H-K_s,J-H)$ diagrams. We found 5 possible Cepheid stars which, based on the period-luminosity rel...

  10. On the shape of the Galactic dark matter halo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmi, A

    2004-01-01

    The confined nature of the debris from the Sagittarius dwarf to a narrow trail on the sky has recently prompted the suggestion that the dark matter halo of our Galaxy should be nearly spherical (Ibata et al. 2001; Majewski et al. 2003). This would seem to be in strong contrast with predictions from

  11. The Morphology of the Galactic Dark Matter Synchrotron Emission with Self-Consistent Cosmic Ray Diffusion Models

    CERN Document Server

    Linden, Tim; Anderson, Brandon

    2010-01-01

    A generic prediction in the paradigm of weakly interacting dark matter is the production of relativistic particles from dark matter pair-annihilation in regions of high dark matter density. Ultra-relativistic electrons and positrons produced in the center of the Galaxy by dark matter annihilation should produce a diffuse synchrotron emission. While the spectral shape of the synchrotron dark matter haze depends on the particle model (and secondarily on the galactic magnetic fields), the morphology of the haze depends primarily on (1) the dark matter density distribution, (2) the galactic magnetic field morphology, and (3) the diffusion model for high-energy cosmic-ray leptons. Interestingly, an unidentified excess of microwave radiation with characteristics similar to those predicted by dark matter models has been claimed to exist near the galactic center region in the data reported by the WMAP satellite, and dubbed the "WMAP haze". In this study, we carry out a self-consistent treatment of the variables enume...

  12. Annihilation physics of exotic galactic dark matter particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1990-01-01

    Various theoretical arguments make exotic heavy neutral weakly interacting fermions, particularly those predicted by supersymmetry theory, attractive candidates for making up the large amount of unseen gravitating mass in galactic halos. Such particles can annihilate with each other, producing secondary particles of cosmic-ray energies, among which are antiprotons, positrons, neutrinos, and gamma-rays. Spectra and fluxes of these annihilation products can be calculated, partly by making use of positron electron collider data and quantum chromodynamic models of particle production derived therefrom. These spectra may provide detectable signatures of exotic particle remnants of the big bang.

  13. Self-gravitating fluid systems and galactic dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Banik, Uddipan; Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Sarkar, Tapobrata

    2016-01-01

    In this work we model galaxy-like structures as self-gravitating fluids, and analyse their properties in the Newtonian framework. For isotropic fluids, we show that this leads to a generalised Hernquist profile that admits flat rotation curves at large radial distances. For two-fluid component models, we show analytically that physicality of the solutions demand that one of the fluids is necessarily exotic, i.e has negative pressure, excepting for the case where the density profile is that of the isothermal sphere. We reconcile this result with a corresponding relativistic analysis. Our work can be applied to cases where the gravitating fluids are interpreted as dark fluids, whose microscopic constituents are dark matter particles, which may accompany or cause gravitational collapse giving birth to galaxy like structures. We elaborate on such collapse processes, which might lead to naked singularities.

  14. Latest results on searches for dark matter signatures in galactic and extragalactic selected targets by the MAGIC Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammaria, P.; Aleksić, J.; Lombardi, S.; Maggio, C.; Palacio, J.; Rico, J.; Vanzo, G.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; MAGIC Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Discovering the nature of Dark Matter (DM) is one of the fundamental challenges of the modern physics. Indirect searches of DM are devoted to look for non-gravitational signals of its presence in the highly DM dominated cosmic regions. Within the weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) scenario, we expect very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emissions resulting from annihilation and/or decay of DM particles. Since the beginning of operations, the Major Atmospheric Gamma Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescopes are carrying out deep observations of several promising DM targets, with the aim of detecting such signals or alternatively setting stringent constrains to DM particle models in the TeV mass region. In this contribution we present the latest indirect DM search results achieved by MAGIC on several targets, such as dwarf satellites - where MAGIC reached the strongest constraints on DM annihilation searches above few hundreds of GeV -, galaxy clusters, and the Galactic Center.

  15. Subhaloes in Self-Interacting Galactic Dark Matter Haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Vogelsberger, Mark; Loeb, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    We present N-body simulations of a new class of self-interacting dark matter models, which do not violate any astrophysical constraints due to a non-power-law velocity dependence of the transfer cross section which is motivated by a Yukawa-like new gauge boson interaction. Specifically, we focus on the formation of a Milky Way-like dark matter halo taken from the Aquarius project and re-simulate it for a couple of representative cases in the allowed parameter space of this new model. We find that for these cases, the main halo only develops a small core (~1 kpc) followed by a density profile identical to that of the standard cold dark matter scenario outside of that radius. Neither the subhalo mass function nor the radial number density of subhaloes are altered in these models but there is a significant change in the inner density structure of subhaloes resulting in the formation of a large density core. As a consequence, the inner circular velocity profiles of the most massive subhaloes differ significantly ...

  16. Search for Dark Matter Annihilation in the Galactic Center with IceCube-79

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Archinger, M; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Beiser, E; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Börner, M; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Brown, A M; Buzinsky, N; Casey, J; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; Dembinski, H; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de Wasseige, G; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Ehrhardt, T; Eichmann, B; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fahey, S; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Fuchs, T; Glagla, M; Gaisser, T K; Gaior, R; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Ghorbani, K; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Góra, D; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hansmann, B; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hellwig, D; Hickford, S; Hignight, J; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Holzapfe, K; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huber, M; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; In, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jurkovic, M; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kemp, J; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Kohnen, G; Koirala, R; Kolanoski, H; Konietz, R; Koob, A; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lanfranchi, J L; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leuner, J; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Mahn, K B M; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meli, A; Menne, T; Merino, G; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Middlemas, E; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Pandya, H; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Pütz, J; Quinnan, M; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Reimann, R; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Richter, S; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Sabbatini, L; Sander, H -G; Sandrock, A; Sandroos, J; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schimp, M; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Seckel, D; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stahlberg, M; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Sutherland, M; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; van Santen, J; Vanheule, S; Veenkamp, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallraff, M; Wandkowsky, N; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Whitehorn, N; Wichary, C; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Wille, L; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Xu, Y; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Zoll, M

    2015-01-01

    The Milky Way is expected to be embedded in a halo of dark matter particles, with the highest density in the central region, and decreasing density with the halo-centric radius. Dark matter might be indirectly detectable at Earth through a flux of stable particles generated in dark matter annihilations and peaked in the direction of the Galactic Center. We present a search for an excess flux of muon (anti-) neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the Galactic Center using the cubic-kilometer-sized IceCube neutrino detector at the South Pole. There, the Galactic Center is always seen above the horizon. Thus, new and dedicated veto techniques against atmospheric muons are required to make the southern hemisphere accessible for IceCube. We used 319.7 live-days of data from IceCube operating in its 79-string configuration during 2010 and 2011. No neutrino excess was found and the final result is compatible with the background. We present upper limits on the self-annihilation cross-section, $\\left$, for WIMP ma...

  17. Gamma-ray and neutrino fluxes form Heavy Dark Matter in the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Gammaldi, V; de la Cruz-Dombriz, A; Lineros, R A; Maroto, A L

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the Galactic Center region as a possible source of both secondary gamma-ray and neutrino fluxes from annihilating dark matter. We have studied the gamma-ray flux observed by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) from the J1745-290 Galactic Center source. The data are well fitted as annihilating dark matter in combination with an astrophysical background. The analysis was performed by means of simulated gamma spectra produced by Monte Carlo event generators packages. We analyze the differences in the spectra obtained by the various Monte Carlo codes developed so far in particle physics. We show that, within some uncertainty, the HESS data can be fitted as a signal from a heavy dark matter density distribution peaked at the Galactic Center, with a power-law for the background with a spectral index which is compatible with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) data from the same region. If this kind of dark matter distribution generates the gamma-ray flux observed by HESS, we also expec...

  18. Sensitivity of CTA to dark matter signals from the Galactic Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierre, Mathias [Département Physique, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, 61 Avenue du Président Wilson, Cachan, 94230 France (France); Siegal-Gaskins, Jennifer M. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA, 91125 (United States); Scott, Pat, E-mail: mathias.pierre@ens-cachan.fr, E-mail: jsg@tapir.caltech.edu, E-mail: patscott@physics.mcgill.ca [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montréal, Québec, H3A 2T8 Canada (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    The Galactic Center is one of the most promising targets for indirect detection of dark matter with gamma rays. We investigate the sensitivity of the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) to dark matter annihilation and decay in the Galactic Center. As the inner density profile of the Milky Way's dark matter halo is uncertain, we study the impact of the slope of the Galactic density profile, inwards of the Sun, on the prospects for detecting a dark matter signal with CTA. Adopting the Ring Method to define the signal and background regions in an ON-OFF analysis approach, we find that the sensitivity achieved by CTA to annihilation signals is strongly dependent on the inner profile slope, whereas the dependence is more mild in the case of dark matter decay. Surprisingly, we find that the optimal choice of signal and background regions is virtually independent of the assumed density profile. For the fiducial case of a Navarro-Frenk-White profile, we find that CTA will be able to probe annihilation cross-sections well below the canonical thermal relic value for dark matter masses from a few tens of GeV up to ∼ 5 TeV for annihilation to τ{sup +}τ{sup −}, and will achieve only a slightly weaker sensitivity for annihilation to b b-bar or μ{sup +}μ{sup −}. CTA will improve significantly on current sensitivity to annihilation signals for dark matter masses above ∼ 100 GeV, covering parameter space that is complementary to that probed by searches with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The interpretation of apparent excesses in the measured cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra as signals of dark matter decay will also be testable with CTA observations of the Galactic Center. We demonstrate that both for annihilation and for decay, including spectral information for hard channels (such as μ{sup +}μ{sup −} and τ{sup +}τ{sup −}) leads to enhanced sensitivity for dark matter masses above m{sub DM} ∼ 200 GeV.

  19. Simplified Dark Matter Models for the Galactic Center Gamma-Ray Excess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlin, Asher; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel D.

    2014-06-01

    Motivated by the gamma-ray excess observed from the region surrounding the Galactic Center, we explore particle dark matter models that could potentially account for the spectrum and normalization of this signal. Taking a model-independent approach, we consider an exhaustive list of tree-level diagrams for dark matter annihilation, and determine which could account for the observed gamma-ray emission while simultaneously predicting a thermal relic abundance equal to the measured cosmological dark matter density. We identify a wide variety of models that can meet these criteria without conflicting with existing constraints from direct detection experiments or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The prospects for detection in near future dark matter experiments and/or the upcoming 14 TeV LHC appear quite promising.

  20. The cold dark matter content of Galactic dwarf spheroidals: no cores, no failures, no problem

    CERN Document Server

    Fattahi, Azadeh; Sawala, Till; Frenk, Carlos S; Sales, Laura V; Oman, Kyle; Schaller, Matthieu; Wang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    We examine the dark matter content of satellite galaxies in Lambda-CDM cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of the Local Group from the APOSTLE project. We find excellent agreement between simulation results and estimates for the 9 brightest Galactic dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) derived from their stellar velocity dispersions and half-light radii. Tidal stripping plays an important role by gradually removing dark matter from the outside in, affecting in particular fainter satellites and systems of larger-than-average size for their luminosity. Our models suggest that tides have significantly reduced the dark matter content of Can Ven I, Sextans, Carina, and Fornax, a prediction that may be tested by comparing them with field galaxies of matching luminosity and size. Uncertainties in observational estimates of the dark matter content of individual dwarfs have been underestimated in the past, at times substantially. We use our improved estimates to revisit the `too-big-to-fail' problem highlighted in earlier N-...

  1. No evidence for a dark matter disk within 4 kpc from the Galactic plane

    CERN Document Server

    Bidin, C Moni; Mendez, R A; van Altena, W F

    2010-01-01

    We estimated the dynamical surface mass density (Sigma) at the solar Galactocentric distance between 2 and 4 kpc from the Galactic plane, as inferred from the observed kinematics of the thick disk. We find Sigma(z=2 kpc)=57.6+-5.8 Mo pc^-2, and it shows only a tiny increase in the z-range considered by our investigation. We compared our results with the expectations for the visible mass, adopting the most recent estimates in the literature for contributions of the Galactic stellar disk and interstellar medium, and proposed models of the dark matter distribution. Our results match the expectation for the visible mass alone, never differing from it by more than 0.8 $Mo pc^-2 at any z, and thus we find little evidence for any dark component. We assume that the dark halo could be undetectable with our method, but the dark disk, recently proposed as a natural expectation of the LambdaCDM models, should be detected. Given the good agreement with the visible mass alone, models including a dark disk are less likely, ...

  2. Transonic solutions of isothermal galactic winds in a cold dark matter halo

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuchiya, Masami; Nitta, Shin-ya

    2013-01-01

    We study fundamental properties of steady, spherically symmetric, isothermal galactic outflow in appropriate gravitational potential models. We aim at constructing a universal scale free theory not only for galactic winds, but also for winds from clusters/groups of galaxies. In particular, we consider effects of mass-density distribution on the formation of transonic galactic outflows under several models of the density distribution profile predicted by cosmological simulations of structure formation based on the cold dark matter (CDM) scenario. In this study, we have clarified that there exists two types of transonic solutions: outflows from the central region and from distant region with a finite radius, depending upon the density distribution of the system. The system with sufficiently steep density gradient at the center is allowed to have the transonic outflows from the center. The resultant criterion intriguingly indicates that the density gradient at the center must be steeper than that of the predicti...

  3. Search for dark matter from the Galactic halo with the IceCube Neutrino Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Benzvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brown, A. M.; Buitink, S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D. F.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; de Clercq, C.; Demirörs, L.; Denger, T.; Depaepe, O.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; Deyoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegård, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Foerster, M. M.; Fox, B. D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Geisler, M.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Groß, A.; Grullon, S.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Herquet, P.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hülß, J.-P.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Joseph, J. M.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kenny, P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Krings, T.; Kroll, G.; Kuehn, K.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lafebre, S.; Laihem, K.; Landsman, H.; Larson, M. J.; Lauer, R.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Majumdar, P.; Marotta, A.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Mészáros, P.; Meures, T.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Naumann, U.; Nießen, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; O'Murchadha, A.; Ono, M.; Panknin, S.; Paul, L.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Petrovic, J.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Porrata, R.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Prikockis, M.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Roth, P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Rutledge, D.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schmidt, T.; Schoenwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schultes, A.; Schulz, O.; Schunck, M.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Slipak, A.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stephens, G.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stoyanov, S.; Strahler, E. A.; Straszheim, T.; Stür, M.; Sullivan, G. W.; Swillens, Q.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tarasova, O.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Turčan, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Voigt, B.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Walter, M.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, C.; Xu, X. W.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.

    2011-07-01

    Self-annihilating or decaying dark matter in the Galactic halo might produce high energy neutrinos detectable with neutrino telescopes. We have conducted a search for such a signal using 276 days of data from the IceCube 22-string configuration detector acquired during 2007 and 2008. The effect of halo model choice in the extracted limit is reduced by performing a search that considers the outer halo region and not the Galactic Center. We constrain any large-scale neutrino anisotropy and are able to set a limit on the dark matter self-annihilation cross section of ⟨σAv⟩≃10-22cm3s-1 for weakly interacting massive particle masses above 1 TeV, assuming a monochromatic neutrino line spectrum.

  4. Jeans instability of a galactic disk embedded in a live dark halo

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, O

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the Jeans instability of a galactic disk embedded in a dynamically responsive dark halo. It is shown that the disk-halo system becomes nominally Jeans unstable. On small scales the instability is suppressed, if the Toomre stability index Q_T is higher than a certain threshold, but on large scales the Jeans instability sets invariably in. However, using a simple self-consistent disk-halo model it is demonstrated that this occurs on scales which are much larger than the system so that this is indeed only a nominal effect. From a practical point of view the Jeans instability of galactic disks is not affected by a live dark halo.

  5. Search for Dark Matter from the Galactic Halo with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Abu-Zayyad, T; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Alba, J L Bazo; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K -H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Brown, A M; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Demirörs, L; Denger, T; Depaepe, O; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Diaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdeg\\aard, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Foerster, M M; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Geisler, M; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Gro\\ss, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Herquet, P; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Huelsnitz, W; Hül\\ss, J -P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K -H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kenny, P; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Krings, T; Kroll, G; Kuehn, K; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lafebre, S; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Majumdar, P; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Nie\\ssen, P; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Ono, M; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Heros, C Pérez de los; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Porrata, R; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Prikockis, M; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Rodrigues, J P; Roth, P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schmidt, T; Schoenwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Slipak, A; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stephens, G; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Stür, M; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tarasova, O; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Tur\\vcan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Voigt, B; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P

    2011-01-01

    Self-annihilating or decaying dark matter in the Galactic halo might produce high energy neutrinos detectable with neutrino telescopes. We have conducted a search for such a signal using 276 days of data from the IceCube 22-string configuration detector acquired during 2007 and 2008. The effect of halo model choice in the extracted limit is reduced by performing a search that considers the outer halo region and not the Galactic Center. We constrain any large scale neutrino anisotropy and are able to set a limit on the dark matter self-annihilation cross section of \\simeq 10^{-22} cm^3/s for WIMP masses above 1 TeV, assuming a monochromatic neutrino line spectrum.

  6. Dark Matter Annihilation in The Galactic Center As Seen by the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Goodenough, Lisa; /New York U.

    2010-10-01

    We analyze the first two years of data from the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope from the direction of the inner 10{sup o} around the Galactic Center with the intention of constraining, or finding evidence of, annihilating dark matter. We find that the morphology and spectrum of the emission between 1.25{sup o} and 10{sup o} from the Galactic Center is well described by a the processes of decaying pions produced in cosmic ray collisions with gas, and the inverse Compton scattering of cosmic ray electrons in both the disk and bulge of the Inner Galaxy, along with gamma rays from known points sources in the region. The observed spectrum and morphology of the emission within approximately 1.25{sup o} ({approx}175 parsecs) of the Galactic Center, in contrast, cannot be accounted for by these processes or known sources. We find that an additional component of gamma ray emission is clearly present which is highly concentrated around the Galactic Center, but is not point-like in nature. The observed morphology of this component is consistent with that predicted from annihilating dark matter with a cusped (and possibly adiabatically contracted) halo distribution ({rho} {proportional_to} r{sup -1.34{+-}0.04}). The observed spectrum of this component, which peaks at energies between 2-4 GeV (in E{sup 2} units), is well fit by that predicted for a 7.3-9.2 GeV dark matter particle annihilating primarily to tau leptons with a cross section in the range of <{sigma}{nu}> = 3.3 x 10{sup -27} to 1.5 x 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3}/s, depending on how the dark matter distribution is normalized. We discuss other possible sources for this component, but argue that they are unlikely to account for the observed emission.

  7. Observing molecular hydrogen clouds and dark massive objects in galactic halos

    OpenAIRE

    F. De Paolis(University of Lecce and INFN, Lecce, Italy); Ingrosso, G.; Jetzer, Ph.; Quadir, A.; Roncadelli, M.

    1995-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen clouds can contribute substantially to the galactic halo< dark matter and may lead to the birth of massive halo objects (MHOs) observed indirectly by microlensing. We present a method to detect these molecular clouds in the halo of M31 using the Doppler shift effect. We also consider the possibility to directly observe MHOs in the halo of M31 via their infrared emission.

  8. Dark matter annihilation and decay from non-spherical dark halos in galactic dwarf satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kohei; Ichikawa, Koji; Matsumoto, Shigeki; Ibe, Masahiro; Ishigaki, Miho N.; Sugai, Hajime

    2016-09-01

    The dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) in the Milky Way are the primary targets in the indirect searches for particle dark matter. To set robust constraints on candidate dark matter particles, understanding the dark halo structure of these systems is of substantial importance. In this paper, we first evaluate the astrophysical factors for dark matter annihilation and decay for 24 dSphs, taking into account a non-spherical dark halo, using generalized axisymmetric mass models based on axisymmetric Jeans equations. First, from a fitting analysis of the most recent kinematic data available, our axisymmetric mass models are a much better fit than previous spherical ones, thus, our work should be the most realistic and reliable estimator for astrophysical factors. Secondly, we find that among analysed dSphs, the ultra-faint dwarf galaxies Triangulum II and Ursa Major II are the most promising but large uncertain targets for dark matter annihilation while the classical dSph Draco is the most robust and detectable target for dark matter decay. It is also found that the non-sphericity of luminous and dark components influences the estimate of astrophysical factors, even though these factors largely depend on the sample size, the prior range of parameters and the spatial extent of the dark halo. Moreover, owing to these effects, the constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross-section are more conservative than those of previous spherical works. These results are important for optimizing and designing dark matter searches in current and future multi-messenger observations by space and ground-based telescopes.

  9. Searching for Dark Matter Annihilation in Recently Discovered Milky Way Satellites with Fermi-LAT

    CERN Document Server

    Fermi-LAT, The; Anderson, B; Bechtol, K; Drlica-Wagner, A; Meyer, M; Sanchez-Conde, M; Strigari, L; Wood, M; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Benoit-Levy, A; Bernstein, G M; Bernstein, R A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Burke, D L; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Crocce, M; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Eifler, T F; Evrard, A E; Neto, A Fausti; Finley, D A; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gerdes, D W; Goldstein, D A; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kent, S; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Li, T S; Maia, M A G; March, M; Marshall, J L; Martini, P; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Neilsen, E; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Reil, K; Romer, A K; Rykoff, E S; Sanchez, E; Santiago, B; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Vikram, V; Walker, A R; Wechsler, R H

    2016-01-01

    We search for excess gamma-ray emission coincident with the positions of confirmed and candidate Milky Way satellite galaxies using 6 years of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Our sample of 45 stellar systems includes 28 kinematically confirmed dark-matter-dominated dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) and 17 recently discovered systems that have photometric characteristics consistent with the population of known dSphs. For each of these targets, the relative predicted gamma-ray flux due to dark matter annihilation is taken from kinematic analysis if available, and estimated from a distance-based scaling relation otherwise, assuming that the stellar systems are dark-matter-dominated dSphs. LAT data coincident with four of the newly discovered targets show a slight preference (each ~$2 \\sigma$ local) for gamma-ray emission in excess of the background. However, the ensemble of derived gamma-ray flux upper limits for individual targets is consistent with the expectation from analyzing random blank-sk...

  10. Hidden Sector Dark Matter Models for the Galactic Center Gamma-Ray Excess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlin, Asher [Chicago U.; Gratia, Pierre [Chicago U.; Hooper, Dan [Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; McDermott, Samuel D. [Michigan U., MCTP

    2014-07-24

    The gamma-ray excess observed from the Galactic Center can be interpreted as dark matter particles annihilating into Standard Model fermions with a cross section near that expected for a thermal relic. Although many particle physics models have been shown to be able to account for this signal, the fact that this particle has not yet been observed in direct detection experiments somewhat restricts the nature of its interactions. One way to suppress the dark matter's elastic scattering cross section with nuclei is to consider models in which the dark matter is part of a hidden sector. In such models, the dark matter can annihilate into other hidden sector particles, which then decay into Standard Model fermions through a small degree of mixing with the photon, Z, or Higgs bosons. After discussing the gamma-ray signal from hidden sector dark matter in general terms, we consider two concrete realizations: a hidden photon model in which the dark matter annihilates into a pair of vector gauge bosons that decay through kinetic mixing with the photon, and a scenario within the generalized NMSSM in which the dark matter is a singlino-like neutralino that annihilates into a pair of singlet Higgs bosons, which decay through their mixing with the Higgs bosons of the MSSM.

  11. Effect of dark matter halo on global spiral modes in a collisionless galactic disc

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Soumavo; Jog, Chanda J

    2016-01-01

    Low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are dominated by dark matter halo from the innermost radii; hence they are ideal candidates to investigate the influence of dark matter on different dynamical aspects of spiral galaxies. Here, we study the effect of dark matter halo on grand-design, m = 2, spiral modes in a galactic disc, treated as a collisionless system, by carrying out a global modal analysis within the WKB approximation. First, we study a superthin, LSB galaxy UGC 7321 and show that it does not support discrete global spiral modes when modelled as a disc-alone system or as a disc plus dark matter system. Even a moderate increase in the stellar central surface density does not yield any global spiral modes. This naturally explains the observed lack of large-scale spiral structure in LSBs. An earlier work (Ghosh, Saini, & Jog 2016) where the galactic disc was treated as a fluid system for simplicity had shown that the dominant halo could not arrest global modes. This difference arises due to the dif...

  12. Vector Fermion-Portal Dark Matter: Direct Detection and Galactic Center Gamma-Ray Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Jiang-Hao

    2014-01-01

    We investigate a neutral gauge boson X originated from a hidden U(1) extension of the standard model as the particle dark matter candidate. The vector dark matter interacts with the standard model fermions through heavy fermion mediators. The interactions give rise to t-channel annihilation cross section in the XX to ff process, which dominates the thermal relic abundance during thermal freeze-out and produces measurable gamma-ray flux in the galactic halo. For a light vector dark matter, if it predominantly couples to the third generation fermions, this model could explain the excess of gamma rays from the galactic center. We show that the vector dark matter with a mass of 20 ~ 40 GeV and that annihilate into the bb and tautau final states provides an excellent description of the observed gamma-ray excess. The parameter space aimed at explaining the gamma-ray excess, could also provide the correct thermal relic density and is compatible with the constraints from electroweak precision data, Higgs invisible de...

  13. On the mass of ultra-light bosonic dark matter from galactic dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lora, V; Bernal, Argelia; Sanchez-Salcedo, F J; Grebel, E K

    2011-01-01

    We consider the hypothesis that galactic dark matter is composed of ultralight scalar particles. We use Ursa Minor and Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxies to establish a preferred range for the mass m of these bosonic particles. It is demonstrated that for masses in the range 0.3 \\times 10-22 eV < m < 1 \\times 10-22 eV, scalar field dark halos without self-interaction would have cores large enough to explain the longevity of the cold clump in Ursa Minor and the wide distribution of globular clusters in Fornax, but small enough to make the mass of the dark halos compatible with dynamical limits. It is encouraging to see that this interval of m is consistent with that needed to suppress the overproduction of substructure in galactic halos and is compatible with the acoustic peaks of cosmic microwave radiation. On the other hand, for self-interacting scalar fields with coupling constant l, values of m^4/l <= 0.95\\times10^3 eV^4 are required to account for the properties of the dark halos of these dSph gala...

  14. Dark matter annihilation and decay from non-spherical dark halos in the Galactic dwarf satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, Kohei; Matsumoto, Shigeki; Ibe, Masahiro; Ishigaki, Miho N; Sugai, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    The dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies in the Milky Way are the primary targets for the indirect searches for particle dark matter. In order to set robust constraints on candidates of dark matter particle, understanding of the dark halo structure of these systems is of substantial importance. In this paper, we first evaluate the astrophysical factor for dark matter annihilation and decay in 24 dSphs with taking into account non-spherical dark halo, using generalized axisymmetric mass models based on axisymmetric Jeans equations. First, from fitting analysis of the most recent kinematic data available, our axisymmetric mass models are so much better fit than previous spherical ones, thus our work should be the most realistic and reliable estimator for astrophysical factors. Second, we find that among analyzed dSphs, Triangulum 2 and Ursa Major II ultra faint dwarf galaxies are the most promising but large uncertain targets for dark matter annihilation while Draco classical dSph is the most robust and detectable ...

  15. Sub MeV Bosonic Dark Matter, Misalignment Mechanism and Galactic Dark Matter Halo Luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Qiaoli

    2016-01-01

    We explore a scenario that the dark matter is a boson condensate created by the misalignment mechanism in which a spin zero boson (an axion like particle) and a spin one boson (the dark photon) are considered respectively. We find that although the sub MeV dark matter boson is extremely stable, the huge dark matter particle number in a galaxy halo makes the decaying signal detectable. A galaxy halo is a large structure bounded by gravity with a typical $\\sim10^{12}$ solar mass and its majority components are made of dark matter. For the axion like particle case, it decays via $\\phi\\to \\gamma\\gamma$ therefore the photon spectrum is monochromatic and for the dark photon case, it is a three body decay $A'\\to\\gamma\\gamma\\gamma$, however we find numerically that the photon spectrum is heavily peaked at $M/2$ thus could be a facility to observations. We also suggest a physical explanation for the three body decay spectrum by comparing the physics in the decay of orthopositronium. In addition, for both cases the dec...

  16. Galactic Center gamma-ray excess and Higgs-portal Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, Tanmoy

    2015-01-01

    From astronomical observations, we know that dark matter exists and makes up $\\sim$25\\% of our Universe. Recently the study of anomalous gamma-ray emission in the regions surrounding the galactic center has drawn a lot of attention. It has been pointed out that the excess of 1-3 GeV gamma-ray in the low latitude is consistent with the emission expected from annihilating dark matter. I will discuss the Higgs-portal dark matter models which can explain these phenomena because of the presence of scalar resonance. In addition, the parameter space of these models also satisfy constraints from the LHC Higgs searches, relic abundance and direct detection experiments. The gauged $U(1)_{B-L}$ model is very well suited with the FERMI-LAT observation along with other constraints.

  17. The surface brightness of dark matter unique signatures of neutralino annihilation in the Galactic halo

    CERN Document Server

    Calcaneo-Roldan, C; Calcaneo-Roldan, Carlos; Moore, Ben

    2000-01-01

    We use high resolution numerical simulations of the formation of cold dark matter halos to simulate the background of decay products from neutralino annihilation, such as gamma-rays or neutrinos. Halos are non-spherical, have steep singular density profiles and contain many thousands of surviving dark matter substructure clumps. This leads to several unique signatures in the gamma-ray background that may be confirmed or rejected by the next generation of gamma-ray experiments. Most importantly, the diffuse background is enhanced by over two orders of magnitude due to annihilation within substructure halos. The largest dark substructures are easily visibly above the background and may account for the unidentified EGRET sources. A deep strip survey of the gamma-ray background would allow the shape of the Galactic halo to be quantified.

  18. A Chain of Dark Clouds in Projection Against the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Nagayama, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Shogo; Murai, Yuka; Nagata, Tetsuya; Hatano, Hirofumi; Kurita, Mikio; Tamura, Motohide; Nakajima, Yasushi; Sugitani, Koji; Oka, Tomoharu; Sofue, Yoshiaki

    2008-01-01

    In the J, H, and Ks bands survey of the the Galactic Center region over an area of 2deg x 5deg, we have found many dark clouds, among which a distinguished chain of dark clouds can be identified with a quiescent CO cloud. The distances of the clouds is estimated to be 3.2-4.2 kpc, corresponding to the Norma arm by our new method to determine distance to dark clouds using the cumulative number of stars against J-Ks colors. Adopting these estimated distances, the size is about 70 pc in length and the total mass of the cloud is 6x10^4 M_solar. Three compact HII regions harbor in the cloud, indicating that star forming activities are going on at the cores of the quiescent CO cloud on the spiral arm.

  19. Gamma Ray and Neutrino Flux from Annihilation of Neutralino Dark Matter at Galactic Halo Region in mAMSB Model

    CERN Document Server

    Modak, Kamakshya Prasad

    2013-01-01

    We consider the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP), neutralino in minimal anomaly mediated supersymmetry breaking model (mAMSB) to be a possible candidate for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP) or cold dark matter and investigate its direct and indirect detections. The supersymmetric parametric space for such a model is constrained by the WMAP results for relic densities. The spin independent and spin dependent scattering cross sections for dark matter off nucleon are thus constrained from the WMAP results. They are found to be within the allowed regions of different ongoing direct detection experiments. The annihilation of such dark matter candidates at the galactic centre produce different standard model particles such as gamma rays, neutrinos etc. In this work, we investigate the possible fluxes of such particles from galactic centre. The neutrino flux from the galactic centre and at different locations away from the galactic centre produced by WIMP annihilation in this model are also obtained...

  20. Stellar Gas Flows Into A Dark Cluster Potential At The Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Melia, F; Melia, Fulvio; Coker, Robert

    1999-01-01

    The evidence for the presence of a concentration of dark matter at the Galactic center is now very compelling. There is no question that the stellar and gas kinematics within 0.01 pc is dominated by under-luminous matter in the form of either a massive black hole, a highly condensed distribution of stellar remnants, or a more exotic source of gravity. The unique, compact radio source Sgr A* appears to be coincident with the center of this region, but its size (less than 3x10^14 cm at lambda=1.35cm) is still significantly smaller than the current limiting volume enclosing this mass. Sgr A* may be the black hole, if the dark matter distribution is point-like. If not, we are left with a puzzle regarding its nature, and a question of why this source should be so unique and lie only at the Galactic center. Here, we examine an alternative to the black hole paradigm---that the gravitating matter is a condensed cluster of stellar remnants---and study the properties of the Galactic center wind flowing through this reg...

  1. Boosted dark matter in IceCube and at the galactic center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia; Wang, Xiao-Ping [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence and Mainz Institute for Theoretical Physics,Johannes Gutenberg University,Staudingerweg 7, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-04-20

    We show that the event excess observed by the IceCube collaboration at TeV–PeV energies, usually interpreted as evidence for astrophysical neutrinos, can be explained alternatively by the scattering of highly boosted dark matter particles. Specifically, we consider a scenario where a ∼4 PeV scalar dark matter particle ϕ can decay to a much lighter dark fermion χ, which in turn scatters off nuclei in the IceCube detector. Besides these events, which are exclusively shower-like, the model also predicts a secondary population of events at O(100 TeV) originating from the 3-body decay ϕ→χχ̄a, where a is a pseudoscalar which mediates dark matter-Standard Model interactions and whose decay products include neutrinos. This secondary population also includes track-like events, and both populations together provide an excellent fit to the IceCube data. We then argue that a relic abundance of light Dark Matter particles χ, which may constitute a subdominant component of the Dark Matter in the Universe, can have exactly the right properties to explain the observed excess in GeV gamma rays from the galactic center region. Our boosted Dark Matter scenario also predicts fluxes of O(10) TeV positrons and O(100 TeV) photons from 3-body cascade decays of the heavy Dark Matter particle ϕ, and we show how these can be used to constrain parts of the viable parameter space of the model. Direct detection limits are weak due to the pseudoscalar couplings of χ. Accelerator constraints on the pseudoscalar mediator a lead to the conclusion that the preferred mass of a is ≳10 GeV and that large coupling to b quarks but suppressed or vanishing coupling to leptons are preferred.

  2. Galactic center excess in γ rays from annihilation of self-interacting dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplinghat, Manoj; Linden, Tim; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2015-05-29

    Observations by the Fermi Large-Area Telescope have uncovered a significant γ-ray excess directed toward the Milky Way Galactic Center. There has been no detection of a similar signal in the stacked population of Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Additionally, astronomical observations indicate that dwarf galaxies and other faint galaxies are less dense than predicted by the simplest cold dark matter models. We show that a self-interacting dark matter model with a particle mass of roughly 50 GeV annihilating to the mediator responsible for the strong self-interaction can simultaneously explain all three observations. The mediator is necessarily unstable, and its mass must be below about 100 MeV in order to decrease the dark matter density of faint galaxies. If the mediator decays to electron-positron pairs with a cross section on the order of the thermal relic value, then we find that these pairs can up-scatter the interstellar radiation field in the Galactic center and produce the observed γ-ray excess.

  3. Secluded WIMPs, Dark QED with Massive Photons, and the Galactic Center Gamma-Ray Excess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, E. C. F. S.; Pleitez, V.; Stecker, F. W.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a particular secluded WIMP dark matter model consisting of neutral fermions as the dark matter candidate and a Proca-Wentzel (PW) field as a mediator. In the model that we consider here, dark matter WIMPs interact with standard model (SM) particles only through the PW field of approximately MeV-multi-GeV mass particles. The interactions occur via a U(1)' mediator, V'(sub mu), which couples to the SM by kinetic mixing with U(1) hypercharge bosons, B'(sub mu). One important difference between our model and other such models in the literature is the absence of an extra singlet scalar, so that the parameter with dimension of mass M(sup 2, sub V) is not related to a spontaneous symmetry breaking. This QED based model is also renormalizable. The mass scale of the mediator and the absence of the singlet scalar can lead to interesting astrophysical signatures. The dominant annihilation channels are different from those usually considered in previous work. We show that the GeV energy gamma-ray excess in the galactic center region, as derived from Fermi-LAT Gamma-ray Space Telescope data, can be attributed to such secluded dark matter WIMPs, given parameters of the model that are consistent with both the cosmological dark matter density and the upper limits on WIMP spin-independent elastic scattering. Secluded WIMP models are also consistent with suggested upper limits on a DM contribution to the cosmic-ray antiproton flux.

  4. Dark matter substructure modelling and sensitivity of the Cherenkov Telescope Array to Galactic dark halos

    CERN Document Server

    Hütten, Moritz; Maier, Gernot; Maurin, David

    2016-01-01

    Hierarchical structure formation leads to a clumpy distribution of dark matter in the Milky Way. These clumps are possible targets to search for dark matter annihilation with present and future $\\gamma$-ray instruments. Many uncertainties exist on the clump distribution, leading to disputed conclusions about the expected number of detectable clumps and the ensuing limits that can be obtained from non-detection. In this paper, we use the $\\tt{CLUMPY}$ code to simulate thousands of skymaps for several clump distributions. This allows us to statistically assess the typical properties (mass, distance, angular size, luminosity) of the detectable clumps. Varying parameters of the clump distributions allows us to identify the key quantities to which the number of detectable clumps is the most sensitive. Focusing our analysis on two extreme clump configurations, yet consistent with results from numerical simulations, we revisit and compare various calculations made for the $\\textit{Fermi}$-LAT instrument, in terms of...

  5. Dark matter origin of the gamma ray emission from the galactic center observed by HESS

    CERN Document Server

    Cembranos, J A R; Maroto, A L

    2012-01-01

    We show that the gamma ray spectrum observed with the HESS array of Cherenkov telescopes coming from the Galactic Center (GC) region and identified with the source HESS J1745-290, is well fitted by the secondary photons coming from dark matter (DM) annihilation over a diffuse power-law background. The amount of photons and morphology of the signal localized within a region of few parsecs, require compressed DM profiles as those resulting from baryonic contraction, which offer $\\sim 10^3$ enhancements in the signal over DM alone simulations. The fitted background from HESS data is consistent with recent Fermi-LAT observations of the same region.

  6. Finding new signature effects on galactic dynamics to constrain Bose-Einstein-condensed cold dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Rindler-Daller, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    If cosmological cold dark matter (CDM) consists of light enough bosonic particles that their phase-space density exceeds unity, they will comprise a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). The nature of this BEC-CDM as a quantum fluid may then distinguish it dynamically from the standard form of CDM involving a collisionless gas of non-relativistic particles that interact purely gravitationally. We summarize some of the dynamical properties of BEC-CDM that may lead to observable signatures in galactic halos and present some of the bounds on particle mass and self-interaction coupling strength that result from a comparison with observed galaxies.

  7. Dark matter with pseudoscalar-mediated interactions explains the DAMA signal and the galactic center excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arina, Chiara; Del Nobile, Eugenio; Panci, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    We study a Dirac dark matter particle interacting with ordinary matter via the exchange of a light pseudoscalar, and analyze its impact on both direct and indirect detection experiments. We show that this candidate can accommodate the long-standing DAMA modulated signal and yet be compatible with all exclusion limits at 99(S)% C.L. This result holds for natural choices of the pseudoscalar-quark couplings (e.g., flavor universal), which give rise to a significant enhancement of the dark matter-proton coupling with respect to the coupling to neutrons. We also find that this candidate can accommodate the observed 1-3 GeV gamma-ray excess at the Galactic center and at the same time have the correct relic density today. The model could be tested with measurements of rare meson decays, flavor changing processes, and searches for axionlike particles with mass in the MeV range.

  8. FOUR HIGHLY DISPERSED MILLISECOND PULSARS DISCOVERED IN THE ARECIBO PALFA GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Stovall, K. [Center for Gravitational Wave Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States); Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Nice, D. J. [Department of Physics, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042 (United States); Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Lazarus, P. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Hessels, J. W. T. [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990-AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Freire, P. C. C.; Champion, D. J.; Desvignes, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Allen, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Bhat, N. D. R.; Camilo, F. [Center for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Bogdanov, S. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cognard, I. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l' Environnement et de l' Espace, LPC2E, CNRS et Universite d' Orleans, and Station de radioastronomie de Nancay, Observatoire de Paris, F-18330 Nancay (France); Deneva, J. S., E-mail: fcrawfor@fandm.edu [Arecibo Observatory, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612 (United States); and others

    2012-09-20

    We present the discovery and phase-coherent timing of four highly dispersed millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from the Arecibo PALFA Galactic plane survey: PSRs J1844+0115, J1850+0124, J1900+0308, and J1944+2236. Three of the four pulsars are in binary systems with low-mass companions, which are most likely white dwarfs, and which have orbital periods on the order of days. The fourth pulsar is isolated. All four pulsars have large dispersion measures (DM >100 pc cm{sup -3}), are distant ({approx}> 3.4 kpc), faint at 1.4 GHz ({approx}< 0.2 mJy), and are fully recycled (with spin periods P between 3.5 and 4.9 ms). The three binaries also have very small orbital eccentricities, as expected for tidally circularized, fully recycled systems with low-mass companions. These four pulsars have DM/P ratios that are among the highest values for field MSPs in the Galaxy. These discoveries bring the total number of confirmed MSPs from the PALFA survey to 15. The discovery of these MSPs illustrates the power of PALFA for finding weak, distant MSPs at low-Galactic latitudes. This is important for accurate estimates of the Galactic MSP population and for the number of MSPs that the Square Kilometer Array can be expected to detect.

  9. Searching for Dark Matter Annihilation in Recently Discovered Milky Way Satellites with Fermi-Lat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, A.; Anderson, B.; Bechtol, K.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Meyer, M.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Strigari, L.; Wood, M.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration; DES Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We search for excess γ-ray emission coincident with the positions of confirmed and candidate Milky Way satellite galaxies using six years of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Our sample of 45 stellar systems includes 28 kinematically confirmed dark-matter-dominated dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) and 17 recently discovered systems that have photometric characteristics consistent with the population of known dSphs. For each of these targets, the relative predicted γ-ray flux due to dark matter annihilation is taken from kinematic analysis if available, and estimated from a distance-based scaling relation otherwise, assuming that the stellar systems are DM-dominated dSphs. LAT data coincident with four of the newly discovered targets show a slight preference (each ∼ 2σ local) for γ-ray emission in excess of the background. However, the ensemble of derived γ-ray flux upper limits for individual targets is consistent with the expectation from analyzing random blank-sky regions, and a combined analysis of the population of stellar systems yields no globally significant excess (global significance < 1σ ). Our analysis has increased sensitivity compared to the analysis of 15 confirmed dSphs by Ackermann et al. The observed constraints on the DM annihilation cross section are statistically consistent with the background expectation, improving by a factor of ∼2 for large DM masses ({m}{DM,b\\bar{b}}≳ 1 {TeV} and {m}{DM,{τ }+{τ }-}≳ 70 {GeV}) and weakening by a factor of ∼1.5 at lower masses relative to previously observed limits.

  10. Dark matter search in the inner galactic center halo with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Lefranc, V

    2016-01-01

    The presence of dark matter in the universe is nowadays supported by a substantial set of astronomical and cosmological observations. A large amount of dark matter is expected in the Galactic Center (GC) region. Thanks also to its proximity, it is one of the best targets to look for dark matter particle self-annihilation into very high energy gamma-rays. We perform a search for annihilating dark matter in the central 300 parsecs around the GC with the H.E.S.S. array of ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. Using the full H.E.S.S.- I dataset (2004-2014) of GC observations, new constraints are derived on the velocity-weighted annihilation cross section $\\langle \\sigma v \\rangle$ with a 2D likelihood method using spectral and spatial morphologies of the DM signal compared to background. These constraints are the strongest obtained so far in the TeV mass range and improve the previous constraints by a factor of 5. Considering an Einasto profile, the constraints reach $\\langle \\sigma v \\rangle$ values of $6\\times 10^...

  11. Heating of galactic gas by dark matter annihilation in ultracompact minihalos

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Hamish A; Elahi, Pascal J; Lewis, Geraint F; Scott, Pat

    2016-01-01

    The existence of substructure in halos of annihilating dark matter would be expected to substantially boost the rate at which annihilation occurs. Ultracompact minihalos of dark matter (UCMHs) are one of the more extreme examples of this. The boosted annihilation can inject significant amounts of energy into the gas of a galaxy over its lifetime. Here we determine the impact of the boost factor from UCMH substructure on the heating of galactic gas in a Milky Way-type galaxy, by means of N-body simulation. If $1\\%$ of the dark matter exists as UCMHs, the corresponding boost factor can be of order $10^5$. For reasonable values of the relevant parameters (annihilation cross section $3\\times10^{-26} ~\\textrm{cm}^3~ \\textrm{s}^{-1}$, dark matter mass 100 GeV, 10% heating efficiency), we show that the presence of UCMHs at the 0.1% level would inject enough energy to eject significant amounts of gas from the halo, potentially preventing star formation within $\\sim$1 kpc of the halo centre.

  12. Dark Atoms and the Positron-Annihilation-Line Excess in the Galactic Bulge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-R. Cudell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It was recently proposed that stable particles of charge −2, O--, can exist and constitute dark matter after they bind with primordial helium in O-helium (OHe atoms. We study here in detail the possibility that this model provides an explanation for the excess of gamma radiation in the positron-annihilation line from the galactic bulge observed by INTEGRAL. This explanation assumes that OHe, excited to a 2s state through collisions in the central part of the Galaxy, deexcites to its ground state via an E0 transition, emitting an electron-positron pair. The cross-section for OHe collisions with excitation to 2s level is calculated and it is shown that the rate of such excitations in the galactic bulge strongly depends not only on the mass of O-helium, which is determined by the mass of O--, but also on the density and velocity distribution of dark matter. Given the astrophysical uncertainties on these distributions, this mechanism constrains the O-- mass to lie in two possible regions. One of these is reachable in the experimental searches for stable multicharged particles at the LHC.

  13. Planet from another galaxy discovered - Galactic cannibalism brings an exoplanet of extragalactic origin within astronomers' reach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    An exoplanet orbiting a star that entered our Milky Way from another galaxy has been detected by a European team of astronomers using the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile. The Jupiter-like planet is particularly unusual, as it is orbiting a star nearing the end of its life and could be about to be engulfed by it, giving tantalising clues about the fate of our own planetary system in the distant future. Over the last 15 years, astronomers have detected nearly 500 planets orbiting stars in our cosmic neighbourhood, but none outside our Milky Way has been confirmed [1]. Now, however, a planet with a minimum mass 1.25 times that of Jupiter [2] has been discovered orbiting a star of extragalactic origin, even though the star now finds itself within our own galaxy. It is part of the so-called Helmi stream [3] - a group of stars that originally belonged to a dwarf galaxy that was devoured by our galaxy, the Milky Way, in an act of galactic cannibalism about six to nine billion years ago. The results are published today in Science Express. "This discovery is very exciting," says Rainer Klement of the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA), who was responsible for the selection of the target stars for this study. "For the first time, astronomers have detected a planetary system in a stellar stream of extragalactic origin. Because of the great distances involved, there are no confirmed detections of planets in other galaxies. But this cosmic merger has brought an extragalactic planet within our reach." The star is known as HIP 13044, and it lies about 2000 light-years from Earth in the southern constellation of Fornax (the Furnace). The astronomers detected the planet, called HIP 13044 b, by looking for the tiny telltale wobbles of the star caused by the gravitational tug of an orbiting companion. For these precise observations, the team used the high-resolution spectrograph FEROS [4] attached to the 2.2-metre MPG/ESO telescope [5] at

  14. Kathryns Wheel: A spectacular galaxy collision discovered in the Galactic neighbourhood

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Quentin A; Stupar, Milorad; Cluver, Michelle; Frew, David J; Bendo, George; Bojicic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of the closest collisional ring galaxy to the Milky Way. Such rare systems occur due to "bulls-eye" encounters between two reasonably matched galaxies. The recessional velocity of about 840 km/s is low enough that it was detected in the AAO/UKST Survey for Galactic H$\\alpha$ emission. The distance is only 10.0 Mpc and the main galaxy shows a full ring of star forming knots, 6.1 kpc in diameter surrounding a quiescent disk. The smaller assumed "bullet" galaxy also shows vigorous star formation. The spectacular nature of the object had been overlooked because of its location in the Galactic plane and proximity to a bright star and even though it is the 60$^{\\rm th}$ brightest galaxy in the HI Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS) HI survey. The overall system has a physical size of $\\sim$15 kpc, a total mass of $M_\\ast = 6.6\\times 10^9$ M$_\\odot$ (stars + HI), a metallicity of [O/H]$\\sim-0.4$, and a star formation rate of 0.2-0.5 M$_\\odot$\\,yr$^{-1}$, making it a Magellanic-type system. Collisi...

  15. A newly-discovered young massive star cluster at the end of the Galactic Bar

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, Ben; Najarro, Francisco; Hinton, Jim A; Trombley, Christine; Figer, Donald F; Puga, Elena

    2011-01-01

    We present a near-infrared study of the candidate star cluster Mercer 81, located at the centre of the G338.4+0.1 HII region, and close to the TeV gamma-ray source HESS 1640-465. Using HST/NICMOS imaging and VLT/ISAAC spectroscopy we have detected a compact and highly extincted cluster of stars, though the bright stars in the centre of the field are in fact foreground objects. The cluster contains nine stars with strong Paschen-alpha emission, one of which we identify as a Wolf-Rayet (WR) star, as well as an A-type supergiant. The line-of-sight extinction is very large, $A_{V}\\sim 45$, illustrating the challenges of locating young star clusters in the Galactic Plane. From a quantitative analysis of the WR star we argue for a cluster age of 3.7$^{+0.4}_{-0.5}$\\,Myr, and, assuming that all emission-line stars are WRs, a cluster mass of $\\ga 10^4$\\msun. A kinematic analysis of the cluster's surrounding HII-region shows that the cluster is located in the Galactic disk at a distance of 11$\\pm$2\\,kpc. This places t...

  16. Searching for dwarf spheroidal galaxies and other galactic dark matter substructures with the Fermi large area telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drlica-Wagner, Alex [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2013-08-01

    Over the past century, it has become clear that about a quarter of the known universe is composed of an invisible, massive component termed ''dark matter''. Some of the most popular theories of physics beyond the Standard Model suggest that dark matter may be a new fundamental particle that could self-annihilate to produce γ rays. Nearby over-densities in the dark matter halo of our Milky Way present some of the most promising targets for detecting the annihilation of dark matter. We used the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope to search for γ rays produced by dark matter annihilation in Galactic dark matter substructures. We searched for γ-ray emission coincident with Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies, which trace the most massive Galactic dark matter substructures. We also sought to identify nearby dark matter substructures that lack all astrophysical tracers and would be detectable only through γ-ray emission from dark matter annihilation. We found no conclusive evidence for γ-ray emission from dark matter annihilation, and we set stringent and robust constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section. While γ-ray searches for dark matter substructure are currently the most sensitive and robust probes of dark matter annihilation, they are just beginning to intersect the theoretically preferred region of dark matter parameter space. Thus, we consider future prospects for increasing the sensitivity of γ-ray searches through improvements to the LAT instrument performance and through upcoming wide- field optical surveys.

  17. Joint constraints on the Galactic dark matter halo and GC from hypervelocity stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Elena M.; Marchetti, T.; Cacciato, M.; Kuiack, M.; Sari, R.

    2017-01-01

    The mass assembly history of the Milky Way can inform both theory of galaxy formation and the underlying cosmological model. Thus, observational constraints on the properties of both its baryonic and dark matter contents are sought. Here we show that hypervelocity stars (HVSs) can in principle provide such constraints. We model the observed velocity distribution of HVSs, produced by tidal break-up of stellar binaries caused by Sgr A*. Considering a Galactic Centre (GC) binary population consistent with that inferred in more observationally accessible regions, a fit to current HVS data with significance level >5% can only be obtained if the escape velocity from the GC to 50 kpc is V_G ≲ 850 km s-1, regardless of the enclosed mass distribution. When a NFW matter density profile for the dark matter halo is assumed, haloes with V_G ≲ 850 km s-1are in agreement with predictions in the ΛCDM model and that a subset of models around M200 ˜ 0.5 - 1.5 × 1012M⊙ and r_s ≲ 35 kpc can also reproduce Galactic circular velocity data. HVS data alone cannot currently exclude potentials with VG > 850 km s-1. Finally, specific constraints on the halo mass from HVS data are highly dependent on the assumed baryonic mass potentials. This first attempt to simultaneously constrain GC and dark halo properties is primarily hampered by the paucity and quality of data. It nevertheless demonstrates the potential of our method, that may be fully realised with the ESA Gaia mission.

  18. Chandra Discovers the X-ray Signature of a Powerful Wind from a Galactic Microquasar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has detected, for the first time in X rays, a stellar fingerprint known as a P Cygni profile--the distinctive spectral signature of a powerful wind produced by an object in space. The discovery reveals a 4.5-million-mile-per-hour wind coming from a highly compact pair of stars in our galaxy, report researchers from Penn State and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in a paper they will present on 8 November 2000 during a meeting of the High-Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society in Honolulu, Hawaii. The paper also has been accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal Letters. "To our knowledge, these are the first P Cygni profiles reported in X rays," say researchers Niel Brandt, assistant professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Penn State, and Norbert S. Schulz, research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The team made the discovery during their first observation of a binary-star system with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which was launched into space in July 1999. The system, known as Circinus X-1, is located about 20,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Circinus near the Southern Cross. It contains a super-dense neutron star in orbit around a normal fusion-burning star like our Sun. Although Circinus X-1 was discovered in 1971, many properties of this system remain mysterious because Circinus X-1 lies in the galactic plane where obscuring dust and gas have blocked its effective study in many wavelengths. The P Cygni spectral profile, previously detected primarily at ultraviolet and optical wavelengths but never before in X rays, is the textbook tool astronomers rely on for probing stellar winds. The profile looks like the outline of a roller coaster, with one really big hill and valley in the middle, on a data plot with velocity on one axis and the flow rate of photons per second on the other. It is named after the famous star P Cygni, in which such

  19. Interplay between Dark Matter and Galactic Structure in Disk and Oblate Elliptical Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Euaggelos E. Zotos; Nicolaos D. Caranicolas

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the regular or chaotic nature of orbits in galaxies is undoubtedly an issue of great importance. We determine the character of orbits of stars moving in the meridional plane (, ) of an axially symmetric time-independent galactic model with a spherical central nucleus, and a flat biaxial oblate dark matter halo component. In particular, we try to reveal the influence of the fractional portion of dark matter on the structure and also on the different families of orbits of the galaxy, by monitoring how the percentage of chaotic orbits, as well as the percentages of orbits of the main regular resonant families evolve when the ratio of dark matter to luminous mass varies. The smaller alignment index (SALI) was computed by numerically integrating the equations of motion as well as the variational equations to extensive samples of orbits in order to distinguish between ordered and chaotic motion. In addition, a method based on the concept of spectral dynamics that utilizes the Fourier transform of the time series of each coordinate is used to identify the various families of regular orbits and also to recognize the secondary resonances that bifurcate from them. The investigation is carried out both in the physical (, ) and the phase (, $\\dot{R}$) space for a better understanding of the orbital properties of the system. The numerical computations reveal that in both cases, the fractional portion of dark matter influences more or less, the overall orbital structure of the system. It was observed however, that the evolution of the percentages of all types of orbits as a function of the fractional portion of dark matter strongly depends on the particular type of space (physical or phase) in which the initial conditions of orbits are launched. The results are compared with the similar earlier work.

  20. First Science with SAMI: A Serendipitously Discovered Galactic Wind in ESO 185-G031

    CERN Document Server

    Fogarty, Lisa M R; Croom, Scott M; Green, Andrew W; Bryant, Julia J; Lawrence, Jon S; Richards, Samuel; Allen, James T; Bauer, Amanda E; Birchall, Michael N; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Ellis, Simon C; Farrell, Tony; Goodwin, Michael; Heald, Ron; Hopkins, Andrew M; Horton, Anthony; Jones, D Heath; Lee, Steve; Lewis, Geraint; López-Sánchez, Ángel R; Miziarski, Stan; Trowland, Holly; Leon-Saval, Sergio G; Min, Seong-Sik; Trinh, Christopher; Cecil, Gerald; Veilleux, Sylvain; Kreimeyer, Kory

    2012-01-01

    We present the first scientific results from the Sydney-AAO Multi-Object IFS (SAMI) at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. This unique instrument deploys 13 fused fibre bundles (hexabundles) across a one-degree field of view allowing simultaneous spatially-resolved spectroscopy of 13 galaxies. During the first SAMI commissioning run, targeting a single galaxy field, one object (ESO 185-G031) was found to have extended minor axis emission with ionisation and kinematic properties consistent with a large-scale galactic wind. The importance of this result is two-fold: (i) fibre bundle spectrographs are able to identify low-surface brightness emission arising from extranuclear activity; (ii) such activity may be more common than presently assumed because conventional multi-object spectrographs use single-aperture fibres and spectra from these are nearly always dominated by nuclear emission. These early results demonstrate the extraordinary potential of multi-object hexabundle spectroscopy in future galaxy surveys.

  1. The Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope discovers the Pulsar in the Young Galactic Supernova-Remnant CTA 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M.G.; Bastieri, Denis; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bogaert, G.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.

    2009-05-15

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves (supernova remnants, SNRs) are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 ms, a period derivative of 3.614 x 10{sup -13} s s{sup -1}. Its characteristic age of 10{sup 4} years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. It is conjectured that most unidentified Galactic gamma ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  2. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope discovers the pulsar in the young galactic supernova remnant CTA 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bogaert, G; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Carlson, P; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto E Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Farnier, C; Focke, W B; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Hartman, R C; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Kanai, Y; Kanbach, G; Katagiri, H; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Kishishita, T; Kiziltan, B; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kuehn, F; Kuss, M; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Lonjou, V; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mineo, T; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nolan, P L; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piano, G; Pieri, L; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Schalk, T L; Sellerholm, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Wang, P; Watters, K; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yasuda, H; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2008-11-21

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves [supernova remnants (SNRs)] are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 milliseconds and a period derivative of 3.614 x 10(-13) seconds per second. Its characteristic age of 10(4) years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. We speculate that most unidentified Galactic gamma-ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  3. The Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope discovers the Pulsar in the Young Galactic Supernova-Remnant CTA 1

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bogaert, G; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Carlson, P; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; De Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Farnier, C; Focke, W B; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Hartman, R C; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Kanai, Y; Kanbach, G; Katagiri, H; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Kishishita, T; Kiziltan, B; Kndlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Komin*, N; Kühn, F; Kuss, M; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Lonjou, V; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mineo, T; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nolan, P L; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepé, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piano, G; Pieri, L; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rain, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F W; Sánchez, D; Sander, A; Saz-Parkinson, P M; Schalk, T L; Sellerholm, A; Sgr, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J L; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Wang, P; Watters, K; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yasuda, H; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2008-01-01

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves (supernova remnants, SNRs) are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 ms, a period derivative of 3.614 x 10-13 s s-1 . Its characteristic age of 104 years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. It is conjectured that most unidentified Galactic gamma ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  4. A Bright Gamma-ray Galactic Center Excess and Dark Dwarfs: Strong Tension for Dark Matter Annihilation Despite Milky Way Halo Profile and Diffuse Emission Uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Abazajian, Kevork N

    2015-01-01

    We incorporate Milky Way dark matter halo profile uncertainties, as well as an accounting of diffuse gamma-ray emission uncertainties in dark matter annihilation models for the Galactic Center Extended gamma-ray excess (GCE) detected by the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope. The range of particle annihilation rate and masses expand when including these unknowns. However, empirical determinations of the Milky Way halo's local density and density profile leave the signal region to be in considerable tension with dark matter annihilation searches from combined dwarf galaxy analyses. Extreme changes to the Milky Way halo, which may be possible in cases of extreme adiabatic contraction, must be adopted to escape these constraints in a dark matter annihilation model for the GCE. Dark matter annihilation models that produce the gamma-ray excess via differential mechanisms in the GCE and dwarfs may circumvent this tension.

  5. Four Highly Dispersed Millisecond Pulsars Discovered in the Arecibo PALFA Galactic Plane Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, F; Lyne, A G; Stappers, B W; Nice, D J; Stairs, I H; Lazarus, P; Hessels, J W T; Freire, P C C; Allen, B; Bhat, N D R; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Champion, D J; Chatterjee, S; Cognard, I; Cordes, J M; Deneva, J S; Desvignes, G; Jenet, F A; Kaspi, V M; Knispel, B; Kramer, M; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Lynch, R; McLaughlin, M A; Ransom, S M; Scholz, P; Siemens, X; Venkataraman, A

    2012-01-01

    We present the discovery and phase-coherent timing of four highly dispersed millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from the Arecibo PALFA Galactic plane survey: PSRs J1844+0115, J1850+0124, J1900+0308, and J1944+2236. Three of the four pulsars are in binary systems with low-mass companions, which are most likely white dwarfs, and which have orbital periods on the order of days. The fourth pulsar is isolated. All four pulsars have large dispersion measures (DM > 100 pc cm-3), are distant (> 3.4 kpc), faint at 1.4 GHz (< 0.2 mJy), and are fully recycled (with spin periods P between 3.5 and 4.9 ms). The three binaries also have very small orbital eccentricities, as expected for tidally circularized, fully recycled systems with low-mass companions. These four pulsars have DM/P ratios that are among the highest values for field MSPs in the Galaxy. These discoveries bring the total number of confirmed MSPs from the PALFA survey to fifteen. The discovery of these MSPs illustrates the power of PALFA for finding weak, distant ...

  6. Review of the fermionic dark matter model applied to galactic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krut, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, I–00185 Rome (Italy); Argüelles, C. R. [ICRANet, P.zza della Repubblica 10, I-65122 Pescara (Italy); Rueda, J.; Ruffini, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, I–00185 Rome (Italy); ICRANet, P.zza della Repubblica 10, I-65122 Pescara (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    Baryonic components (e.g. bulge and disk) of galactic structures are assumed to be embedded in an isothermal dark matter halo of fermionic nature. Besides the Pauli principle only gravitational interaction is considered. Using the underlying Fermi-Dirac phase space distribution, typical of collisionless relaxation processes, it yields an one-parameter family of scaled solutions which reproduces the observed flat rotation curves in galaxies, and additionally predicts a degenerate core through their centers. In order to provide the right DM halo properties of galaxies a set of four parameters (particle mass, degeneracy parameter at the galactic center, central density and the velocity dispersion) is necessary. The more general density profile shows three regimes depending on radius: an almost uniform very dense quantum core followed by a steep fall, a plateau in the diluted regime and a Boltzmannian tail representing the halo. In contrast to purely Boltzmannian configurations the fermionic DM model containing a quantum core allows to determine the particle mass. We show that the quantum core can be well approximated by a polytrope of index n = 3/2, while the halo can be perfectly described by an isothermal sphere with a halo scale length radius equal to approximately 3/4 of the King-radius.

  7. Can galactic dark matter substructure contribute to the cosmic gamma-ray anisotropy?

    CERN Document Server

    Lange, J U

    2014-01-01

    The annihilation of dark matter (DM) particles in the Milky Way can contribute to the diffuse gamma-ray background (DGRB). Due to the presence of substructures, this emission will appear anisotropic in a predictable way. We generate full-sky maps of the gamma-ray emission in galactic substructures from results of the high-resolution Via Lactea II N-body simulation of the Milky Way DM halo. We calculate the anisotropy pattern, taking into account different radial profiles of the DM distribution in substructures, cosmic variance, and the detection threshold, and compare it to the anisotropy in the DGRB observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). By comparing the upper limits on the DM self-annihilation cross-section, , implied by the anisotropy to the intensity of the DGRB and detected sources in the LAT 2-yr Point Source Catalog, we find that galactic substructure cannot contribute to the anisotropies in the DGRB without strongly violating these observations. Our results challenge the perception that sma...

  8. Dynamical Modelling of the Galactic Bulge and Bar: Pattern Speed, Stellar, and Dark Matter Mass Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Portail, Matthieu; Wegg, Christopher; Ness, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    We construct a large set of dynamical models of the galactic bulge, bar and inner disk using the Made-to-Measure method. Our models are constrained to match the red clump giant density from a combination of the VVV, UKIDSS and 2MASS infrared surveys together with stellar kinematics in the bulge from the BRAVA and OGLE surveys, and in the entire bar region from the ARGOS survey. We are able to recover the bar pattern speed and the stellar and dark matter mass distributions in the bar region, thus recovering the entire galactic effective potential. We find a bar pattern speed of $39.0 \\pm 3.5 \\,\\rm{km\\,s^{-1}\\,kpc^{-1}}$, placing the bar corotation radius at $6.1 \\pm 0.5 \\, \\rm{kpc}$ and making the Milky Way bar a typical fast rotator. We evaluate the stellar mass of the long bar and bulge structure to be $M_{\\rm{bar/bulge}} = 1.88 \\pm 0.12 \\times 10^{10} \\, \\rm{M}_{\\odot}$, larger than the mass of disk in the bar region, $M_{\\rm{inner\\ disk}} = 1.29\\pm0.12 \\times 10^{10} \\, \\rm{M}_{\\odot}$. The total dynamical...

  9. Merger-driven Fueling of Active Galactic Nuclei: Six Dual and Offset Active Galactic Nuclei Discovered with Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Comerford, Julia M; Barrows, R Scott; Greene, Jenny E; Zakamska, Nadia L; Madejski, Greg M; Cooper, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Dual active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and offset AGNs are kpc-scale separation supermassive black holes pairs created during galaxy mergers, where both or one of the black holes are AGNs, respectively. These dual and offset AGNs are valuable probes of the link between mergers and AGNs but are challenging to identify. Here we present Chandra/ACIS observations of 12 optically-selected dual AGN candidates at z < 0.34, where we use the X-rays to identify AGNs. We also present HST/WFC3 observations of 10 of these candidates, which reveal any stellar bulges accompanying the AGNs. We discover a dual AGN system with separation of 2.2 kpc, where the two stellar bulges have coincident [O III] and X-ray sources. This system is an extremely minor merger (460:1) that may include a dwarf galaxy hosting an intermediate mass black hole. We also find six single AGNs, and five systems that are either dual or offset AGNs with separations < 10 kpc. Four of the six dual AGNs and dual/offset AGNs are in ongoing major mergers, a...

  10. Fitting the gamma-ray spectrum from dark matter with DMFIT: GLAST and the galactic center region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeltema, Tesla E [UCO/Lick Observatories, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Profumo, Stefano, E-mail: tesla@ucolick.org, E-mail: profumo@scipp.ucsc.edu [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    We study the potential of GLAST for unveiling particle dark matter properties with gamma-ray observations of the galactic center region. We present full GLAST simulations including all gamma-ray sources known to date in a region of 4 Degree-Sign around the galactic center, in addition to the diffuse gamma-ray background and to the dark matter signal. We introduce DMFIT, a tool that allows one to fit gamma-ray emission from pair annihilation of generic particle dark matter models and to extract information on the mass, normalization and annihilation branching ratios into Standard Model final states. We assess the impact and systematic bias induced by background modeling and theoretical priors on the reconstruction of dark matter particle properties. Our detailed simulations demonstrate that for some well motivated supersymmetric dark matter setups with one year of GLAST data it will be possible not only to significantly detect a dark matter signal over background, but also to estimate the dark matter mass and its dominant pair annihilation mode.

  11. Fitting the Gamma-Ray Spectrum from Dark Matter with DMFIT: GLAST and the Galactic Center Region

    CERN Document Server

    Jeltema, Tesla E

    2008-01-01

    We study the potential of GLAST to unveil particle dark matter properties with gamma-ray observations of the Galactic center region. We present full GLAST simulations including all gamma-ray sources known to date in a region of 4 degrees around the Galactic center, in addition to the diffuse gamma-ray background and to the dark matter signal. We introduce DMFIT, a tool that allows one to fit gamma-ray emission from pair-annihilation of generic particle dark matter models and to extract information on the mass, normalization and annihilation branching ratios into Standard Model final states. We assess the impact and systematic effects of background modeling and theoretical priors on the reconstruction of dark matter particle properties. Our detailed simulations demonstrate that for some well motivated supersymmetric dark matter setups with one year of GLAST data it will be possible not only to significantly detect a dark matter signal over background, but also to estimate the dark matter mass and its dominant ...

  12. Synchrotron emission from dark matter in galactic subhalos. A look into the Smith cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, N.; Reuben, R.; Sigl, G.; Tytgat, M. H. G.; Vollmann, M.

    2016-11-01

    One of the key predictions of the ``WIMP" paradigm for Dark Matter (DM) is that DM particles can annihilate into charged particles. These annihilations will proceed in e.g. Galactic subhalos such as dwarf Galaxies or, as recently pointed out, high velocity clouds such as the ``Smith Cloud''. In this note, we focus on the radio emission associated with DM annihilations into electrons and positrons occurring in the Smith Cloud. The phenomenology of this emission is discussed in quite some detail. We argue that the uncertainties in the propagation can be captured by the typical diffusion-loss length parameter (Syrovatskii variable) but that the angle-integrated radio fluxes are independent of the propagation. We conclude that if the Smith Cloud is indeed dominated by DM, radio signals from DM annihilation stand out amongst other messengers. Furthermore, low frequencies such as the ones observed by e.g. the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) and the next-generation Square Kilometre Array (SKA) are optimal for searches for DM in the Smith Cloud. As a practical application, we set conservative constraints on dark matter annihilation cross section using data of continuum radio emission from the Galaxy at 22 MHz and at 1.4 GHz. Stronger constraints could be reached by background subtraction, exploiting the profile and frequency dependence of the putative DM signal. We set stronger but tentative limits using the median noise in brightness temperature from the Green Bank Telescope and the LOFAR sensitivities.

  13. Galactic Gamma Ray Excess and Dark Matter Phenomenology in a $U(1)_{B-L}$ Model

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Anirban; Khan, Sarif

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we have considered a gauged $U(1)_{\\rm B-L}$ extension of the Standard Model (SM) with three right handed neutrinos for anomaly cancellation and two additional SM singlet complex scalars with non-trivial B-L charges. One of these is used to spontaneously break the $U(1)_{\\rm B-L}$ gauge symmetry, leading to Majorana masses for the neutrinos through the standard Type I seesaw mechanism, while the other becomes the dark matter (DM) candidate in the model. We test the viability of the model to simultaneously explain the DM relic density observed in the CMB data as well as the Galactic Centre (GC) $\\gamma$-ray excess seen by Fermi-LAT. We show that for DM masses in the range 40-55 GeV and for a wide range of $U(1)_{\\rm B-L}$ gauge boson masses, one can satisfy both these constraints if the additional neutral Higgs scalar has a mass around the resonance region. In studying the dark matter phenomenology and GC excess, we have taken into account theoretical as well as experimental constraints coming fr...

  14. Galactic gamma ray excess and dark matter phenomenology in a U(1) B- L model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Anirban; Choubey, Sandhya; Khan, Sarif

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we have considered a gauged U(1)B-L extension of the Standard Model (SM) with three right handed neutrinos for anomaly cancellation and two additional SM singlet complex scalars with nontrivial B-L charges. One of these is used to spontaneously break the U(1)B-L gauge symmetry, leading to Majorana masses for the neutrinos through the standard Type I seesaw mechanism, while the other becomes the dark matter (DM) candidate in the model. We test the viability of the model to simultaneously explain the DM relic density observed in the CMB data as well as the Galactic Centre (GC) γ-ray excess seen by Fermi-LAT. We show that for DM masses in the range 40-55 GeV and for a wide range of U(1)B-L gauge boson masses, one can satisfy both these constraints if the additional neutral Higgs scalar has a mass around the resonance region. In studying the dark matter phenomenology and GC excess, we have taken into account theoretical as well as experimental constraints coming from vacuum stability condition, Planck bound on DM relic density, LHC and LUX and present allowed areas in the model parameter space consistent with all relevant data, calculate the predicted gamma ray flux from the GC and discuss the related phenomenology.

  15. P-wave Annihilating Dark Matter from a Decaying Predecessor and the Galactic Center Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Choquette, Jeremie; Cornell, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter (DM) annihilations have been widely studied as a possible explanation of excess gamma rays from the galactic center seen by Fermi/LAT. However most such models are in conflict with constraints from dwarf spheroidals. Motivated by this tension, we show that p-wave annihilating dark matter can easily accommodate both sets of observations due to the lower DM velocity dispersion in dwarf galaxies. Explaining the DM relic abundance is then challenging. We outline a scenario in which the usual thermal abundance is obtained through s-wave annihilations of a metastable particle, that eventually decays into the p-wave annihilating DM of the present epoch. The couplings and lifetime of the decaying particle are constrained by big bang nucleosynthesis, the cosmic microwave background and direct detection, but significant regions of parameter space are viable. A sufficiently large p-wave cross section can be found by annihilation into light mediators, that also give rise to Sommerfeld enhancement. A predictio...

  16. Making sense of the local Galactic escape speed estimates in direct dark matter searches

    CERN Document Server

    Lavalle, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Direct detection (DD) of dark matter (DM) candidates in the $\\lesssim$10 GeV mass range is very sensitive to the tail of their velocity distribution. The important quantity is the maximum WIMP speed in the observer's rest frame, i.e. in average the sum of the local Galactic escape speed $v_{\\rm esc}$ and of the circular velocity of the Sun $v_c$. While the latter has been receiving continuous attention, the former is more difficult to constrain. The RAVE Collaboration has just released a new estimate of $v_{\\rm esc}$ (Piffl {\\em et al.}, 2014 --- P14) that supersedes the previous one (Smith {\\em et al.}, 2007), which is of interest in the perspective of reducing the astrophysical uncertainties in DD. Nevertheless, these new estimates cannot be used blindly as they rely on assumptions in the dark halo modeling which induce tight correlations between the escape speed and other local astrophysical parameters. We make a self-consistent study of the implications of the RAVE results on DD assuming isotropic DM velo...

  17. The Paleoclimatic evidence for Strongly Interacting Dark Matter Present in the Galactic Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Shaviv, Nir J

    2016-01-01

    Using a recent geochemical reconstruction of the Phanerozoic climate which exhibits a 32 Ma oscillation with a phase and the secondary modulation expected from the vertical the motion of the solar system perpendicular to the galactic plane (shaviv et al. 2014), we show that a kinematically cold strongly interacting disk dark matter (dDM) component is necessarily present in the disk. It has a local density $\\rho_\\mathrm{dDM} = 0.11 \\pm 0.03$ M$_{\\odot}/$pc$^3$. It is also consistent with the observed constraints on the total gravitating mass and the baryonic components, and it is the natural value borne from the Toomre stability criterion. It also has surface density $\\Sigma_\\mathrm{dDM} = 15 \\pm 5$ M$_{\\odot}/$pc$^2$ and a vertical velocity dispersion of $\\sigma_{W} = 8.0 \\pm 4.5$ km/s. A dense ("dinosaur killing") thin disk is ruled out. The "normal" halo dark matter (hDM) component should then have a local density $\\rho_\\mathrm{hDM} \\lesssim 0.01$ M$_{\\odot}/$pc$^3$. If the dDM component follows the baryons...

  18. Hidden Sector Dark Matter and the Galactic Center Gamma-Ray Excess: A Closer Look

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escudero, Miguel; Witte, Samuel J.; Hooper, Dan

    2017-09-20

    Stringent constraints from direct detection experiments and the Large Hadron Collider motivate us to consider models in which the dark matter does not directly couple to the Standard Model, but that instead annihilates into hidden sector particles which ultimately decay through small couplings to the Standard Model. We calculate the gamma-ray emission generated within the context of several such hidden sector models, including those in which the hidden sector couples to the Standard Model through the vector portal (kinetic mixing with Standard Model hypercharge), through the Higgs portal (mixing with the Standard Model Higgs boson), or both. In each case, we identify broad regions of parameter space in which the observed spectrum and intensity of the Galactic Center gamma-ray excess can easily be accommodated, while providing an acceptable thermal relic abundance and remaining consistent with all current constraints. We also point out that cosmic-ray antiproton measurements could potentially discriminate some hidden sector models from more conventional dark matter scenarios.

  19. Boxes, Boosts, and Energy Duality: Understanding the Galactic-Center Gamma-Ray Excess through Dynamical Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Boddy, Kimberly K.

    2017-01-01

    Many models currently exist which attempt to interpret the excess of gamma rays emanating from the Galactic Center in terms of annihilating or decaying dark matter. These models typically exhibit a variety of complicated cascade mechanisms for photon production, leading to a non-trivial kinematics which obscures the physics of the underlying dark sector. In this paper, by contrast, we observe that the spectrum of the gamma-ray excess may actually exhibit an intriguing "energy-duality" invariance under $E_\\gamma \\rightarrow E_\\ast^2/E_\\gamma$ for some $E_\\ast$. As we shall discuss, such an energy duality points back to a remarkably simple alternative kinematics which in turn is realized naturally within the Dynamical Dark Matter framework. Observation of this energy duality could therefore provide considerable information about the properties of the dark sector from which the Galactic-Center gamma-ray excess might arise, and highlights the importance of acquiring more complete data for the Galactic-Center exce...

  20. Galactic center gamma-ray excess from dark matter annihilation: is there a black hole spike?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Brian D; Shapiro, Stuart L; Shelton, Jessie

    2014-10-10

    If the supermassive black hole Sgr A* at the center of the Milky Way grew adiabatically from an initial seed embedded in a Navarro-Frenk-White dark matter (DM) halo, then the DM profile near the hole has steepened into a spike. We calculate the dramatic enhancement to the gamma-ray flux from the Galactic center (GC) from such a spike if the 1-3 GeV excess observed in Fermi data is due to DM annihilations. We find that for the parameter values favored in recent fits, the point-source-like flux from the spike is 35 times greater than the flux from the inner 1° of the halo, far exceeding all Fermi point source detections near the GC. We consider the dependence of the spike signal on astrophysical and particle parameters and conclude that if the GC excess is due to DM, then a canonical adiabatic spike is disfavored by the data. We discuss alternative Galactic histories that predict different spike signals, including (i) the nonadiabatic growth of the black hole, possibly associated with halo and/or black hole mergers, (ii) gravitational interaction of DM with baryons in the dense core, such as heating by stars, or (iii) DM self-interactions. We emphasize that the spike signal is sensitive to a different combination of particle parameters than the halo signal and that the inclusion of a spike component to any DM signal in future analyses would provide novel information about both the history of the GC and the particle physics of DM annihilations.

  1. New galactic star clusters discovered in the VVV survey. Candidates projected on the inner disk and bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Borissova, J; Alegría, S Ramírez; Sharma, Saurabh; Clarke, J R A; Kurtev, R; Negueruela, I; Marco, A; Amigo, P; Minniti, D; Bica, E; Bonatto, C; Catelan, M; Fierro, C; Geisler, D; Gromadzki, M; Hempel, M; Hanson, M M; Ivanov, V D; Lucas, P; Majaess, D; Bidin, C Moni; Popescu, B; Saito, R K

    2014-01-01

    VISTA Variables in the V\\'ia L\\'actea (VVV) is one of six ESO Public Surveys using the 4 meter Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA). The VVV survey covers the Milky Way bulge and an adjacent section of the disk, and one of the principal objectives is to search for new star clusters within previously unreachable obscured parts of the Galaxy. The primary motivation behind this work is to discover and analyze obscured star clusters in the direction of the inner Galactic disk and bulge. Regions of the inner disk and bulge covered by the VVV survey were visually inspected using composite JHKs color images to select new cluster candidates on the basis of apparent overdensities. DR1, DR2, CASU, and PSF photometry of 10x10 arcmin fields centered on each candidate cluster were used to construct color-magnitude and color-color diagrams. Follow-up spectroscopy of the brightest members of several cluster candidates was obtained in order to clarify their nature. We report the discovery of 58 new inf...

  2. HIP 38939B: A NEW BENCHMARK T DWARF IN THE GALACTIC PLANE DISCOVERED WITH Pan-STARRS1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deacon, Niall R.; Liu, Michael C.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Kaiser, N.; Morgan, J. S.; Sweeney, W. E.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Redstone, Joshua [Facebook, 1601 S. California Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Goldman, Bertrand [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Price, P. A., E-mail: deacon@mpia.de [Princeton University Observatory, 4 Ivy Lane, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    We report the discovery of a wide brown dwarf companion to the mildly metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -0.24), low Galactic latitude (b = 1.{sup 0}88) K4V star HIP 38939. The companion was discovered by its common proper motion with the primary and its red optical (Pan-STARRS1) and blue infrared (Two Micron All Sky Survey) colors. It has a projected separation of 1630 AU and a near-infrared spectral type of T4.5. As such it is one of only three known companions to a main-sequence star which have early/mid T spectral types of (the others being HN Peg B and {epsilon} Indi B). Using chromospheric activity we estimate an age for the primary of 900{+-}{sup 1900}{sub 600} Myr. This value is also in agreement with the age derived from the star's weak ROSAT detection. Comparison with evolutionary models for this age range indicates that HIP 38939B falls in the mass range 38 {+-} 20 M{sub Jup} with an effective temperature range of 1090 {+-} 60 K. Fitting our spectrum with atmospheric models gives a best-fitting temperature of 1100 K. We include our object in an analysis of the population of benchmark T dwarfs and find that while older atmospheric models appeared to overpredict the temperature of the coolest objects compared to evolutionary models, more recent atmospheric models provide better agreement.

  3. Updated collider and direct detection constraints on Dark Matter models for the Galactic Center gamma-ray excess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Miguel; Hooper, Dan; Witte, Samuel J.

    2017-02-01

    Utilizing an exhaustive set of simplified models, we revisit dark matter scenarios potentially capable of generating the observed Galactic Center gamma-ray excess, updating constraints from the LUX and PandaX-II experiments, as well as from the LHC and other colliders. We identify a variety of pseudoscalar mediated models that remain consistent with all constraints. In contrast, dark matter candidates which annihilate through a spin-1 mediator are ruled out by direct detection constraints unless the mass of the mediator is near an annihilation resonance, or the mediator has a purely vector coupling to the dark matter and a purely axial coupling to Standard Model fermions. All scenarios in which the dark matter annihilates through t-channel processes are now ruled out by a combination of the constraints from LUX/PandaX-II and the LHC.

  4. Updated Collider and Direct Detection Constraints on Dark Matter Models for the Galactic Center Gamma-Ray Excess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escudero, Miguel [Valencia U., IFIC; Hooper, Dan [Fermilab; Witte, Samuel J. [UCLA

    2017-02-20

    Utilizing an exhaustive set of simplified models, we revisit dark matter scenarios potentially capable of generating the observed Galactic Center gamma-ray excess, updating constraints from the LUX and PandaX-II experiments, as well as from the LHC and other colliders. We identify a variety of pseudoscalar mediated models that remain consistent with all constraints. In contrast, dark matter candidates which annihilate through a spin-1 mediator are ruled out by direct detection constraints unless the mass of the mediator is near an annihilation resonance, or the mediator has a purely vector coupling to the dark matter and a purely axial coupling to Standard Model fermions. All scenarios in which the dark matter annihilates through $t$-channel processes are now ruled out by a combination of the constraints from LUX/PandaX-II and the LHC.

  5. Can Tonne-Scale Direct Detection Experiments Discover Nuclear Dark Matter?

    CERN Document Server

    Butcher, A; Monroe, J; West, S M

    2016-01-01

    Models of nuclear dark matter propose that the dark sector contains large composite states consisting of dark nucleons in analogy to Standard Model nuclei. We examine the direct detection phenomenology of a particular class of nuclear dark matter model at the current generation of tonne-scale liquid noble experiments, in particular DEAP-3600 and XENON1T. In our chosen nuclear dark matter scenario distinctive features arise in the recoil energy spectra due to the non-point-like nature of the composite dark matter state. We calculate the number of events required to distinguish these spectra from those of a standard point-like WIMP state with a decaying exponential recoil spectrum. In the most favourable regions of nuclear dark matter parameter space, we find that a few tens of events are needed to distinguish nuclear dark matter from WIMPs at the $3\\,\\sigma$ level in a single experiment. Given the total exposure time of DEAP-3600 and XENON1T we find that at best a $2\\,\\sigma$ distinction is possible by these e...

  6. Beyond the bump-hunt: A game plan for discovering dynamical dark matter at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienes, Keith R.; Su, Shufang; Thomas, Brooks

    2016-06-01

    Dynamical Dark Matter (DDM) is an alternative framework for dark-matter physics in which an ensemble of individual constituent fields with a spectrum of masses, lifetimes, and cosmological abundances collectively constitute the dark-matter candidate, and in which the traditional notion of dark-matter stability is replaced by a balancing between lifetimes and abundances across the ensemble. In this talk, we discuss the prospects for distinguishing between DDM ensembles and traditional dark-matter candidates at hadron colliders - and in particular, at the upgraded LHC - via the analysis of event-shape distributions of kine-matic variables. We also examine the correlations between these kinematic variables and other relevant collider variables in order to assess how imposing cuts on these additional variables may distort - for better or worse - their event-shape distributions.

  7. Transonic galactic outflows in a dark matter halo with a central black hole and its application to the Sombrero galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Igarashi, Asuka; Nitta, Shin-ya

    2014-01-01

    We have classified possible transonic solutions of galactic outflows in the gravitational potential of the dark matter halo (DMH) and super massive black hole (SMBH) under the assumptions of isothermal, spherically symmetric and steady state. It is clarified that the gravity of SMBH adds a new branch of transonic solutions with the transonic point in very close proximity to the centre in addition to the outer transonic point generated by the gravity of DMH. Because these two transonic solutions have substantially different mass fluxes and starting points, these solutions may have different influences on the evolution of galaxies and the release of metals into intergalactic space. We have applied our model to the Sombrero galaxy and obtained a new type of galactic outflow: a slowly accelerated transonic outflow through the transonic point at very distant region ($\\simeq 126$\\ kpc). In this galaxy, previous works reported a discrepancy that although the trace of the galactic outflow is observed by X-ray, the ga...

  8. Synchrotron Emission from Dark Matter in Galactic Subhalos. A Look into the Smith Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Leite, Natacha; Sigl, Guenter; Tytgat, Michel H G; Vollmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    One of the key predictions of the WIMP paradigm for Dark Matter (DM) is that DM particles can annihilate into charged particles. These annihilations will proceed in e. g. Galactic subhalos such as dwarf Galaxies or, as recently pointed out, high velocity clouds such as the Smith Cloud. In this note, we focus on the radio emission associated with DM annihilations into electrons and positrons occurring in the Smith Cloud. The phenomenology of this emission is discussed in quite some detail. We argue that the uncertainties in the propagation can be captured by the typical diffusion-loss length parameter (Syrovatskii variable) but that the angle-integrated radio fluxes are independent of the propagation. We conclude that if the Smith Cloud is indeed dominated by DM, radio signals from DM annihilation stand out amongst other messengers provided that the magnetic fields inside the cloud are strong. Furthermore, low frequencies such as the ones observed by e. g. the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) and the next-generatio...

  9. Comparing Galactic Center MSSM dark matter solutions to the Reticulum II gamma-ray data

    CERN Document Server

    Achterbeg, Abraham; Beenakker, Wim; Caron, Sascha; Hendriks, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) indicate a possible small photon signal originating from the dwarf galaxy Reticulum II that exceeds the expected background between 2 GeV and 10 GeV. We have investigated two specific scenarios for annihilating WIMP dark matter within the phenomenological Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (pMSSM) framework as a possible source for these photons. We find that the same parameter ranges in pMSSM as reported by an earlier paper to be consistent with the Galactic center excess, is also consistent with the excess observed in Reticulum II, resulting in a J-factor of $\\log_{10}(J(\\alpha_{int}=0.5 deg)) \\simeq (20.3-20.5)^{+0.2}_{-0.3}$. This J-factor is consistent with $\\log_{10}(J(\\alpha_{int}=0.5 deg)) = 19.5^{+1.0}_{-0.6}$ GeV$^2$cm$^{-5}$, which is derived using an optimized spherical Jeans analysis of kinematic data obtained from the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS).

  10. The Evolution of Active Galactic Nuclei in Clusters of Galaxies from the Dark Energy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Bufanda, E; Jeltema, T E; Rykoff, E S; Rozo, E; Martini, P; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Banerji, M; Benoit-Levy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Cunha, C E; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Evrard, A E; Neto, A Fausti; Flaugher, B; Frieman, J; Gerdes, D W; Goldstein, D A; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lima, M; Maia, M A G; Marshall, J L; Melchior, P; Miquel, R; Mohr, J J; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Rooney, P; Sanchez, E; Santiago, B; Scarpine, V; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Tucker, D L; Walker, A R

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between active galactic nuclei (AGN) and environment provides important clues to AGN fueling and the relationship of black hole growth to galaxy evolution. In this paper, we analyze the fraction of galaxies in clusters hosting AGN as a function of redshift and cluster richness for X-ray detected AGN associated with clusters of galaxies in Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data. The present sample includes 33 AGN with L_X > 10^43 ergs s^-1 in non-central, host galaxies with luminosity greater than 0.5 L* from a total sample of 432 clusters in the redshift range of 0.10.7. This result is in good agreement with previous work and parallels the increase in star formation in cluster galaxies over the same redshift range. However, the AGN fraction in clusters is observed to have no significant correlation with cluster mass. Future analyses with DES Year 1 and 2 data will be able to clarify whether AGN activity is correlated to cluster mass and will tightly constrain the relationship betwe...

  11. The evolution of active galactic nuclei in clusters of galaxies from the Dark Energy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufanda, E.; Hollowood, D.; Jeltema, T. E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Rozo, E.; Martini, P.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Banerji, M.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Melchior, P.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Rooney, P.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D. L.; Walker, A. R.; DES Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    The correlation between active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and environment provides important clues to AGN fuelling and the relationship of black hole growth to galaxy evolution. In this paper, we analyse the fraction of galaxies in clusters hosting AGN as a function of redshift and cluster richness for X-ray-detected AGN associated with clusters of galaxies in Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data. The present sample includes 33 AGNs with LX > 1043 erg s-1 in non-central, host galaxies with luminosity greater than 0.5L* from a total sample of 432 clusters in the redshift range of 0.1 0.7. This result is in good agreement with previous work and parallels the increase in star formation in cluster galaxies over the same redshift range. However, the AGN fraction in clusters is observed to have no significant correlation with cluster mass. Future analyses with DES Year 1 through Year 3 data will be able to clarify whether AGN activity is correlated to cluster mass and will tightly constrain the relationship between cluster AGN populations and redshift.

  12. Comparing Galactic Center MSSM dark matter solutions to the Reticulum II gamma-ray data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achterberg, Abraham; Beekveld, Melissa van [Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics,Faculty of Science, Mailbox 79, Radboud University Nijmegen,P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Beenakker, Wim [Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics,Faculty of Science, Mailbox 79, Radboud University Nijmegen,P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Institute of Physics, University of Amsterdam,Science Park 904, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Caron, Sascha [Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics,Faculty of Science, Mailbox 79, Radboud University Nijmegen,P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nikhef, Science Park,Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hendriks, Luc [Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics,Faculty of Science, Mailbox 79, Radboud University Nijmegen,P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2015-12-04

    Observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) indicate a possible small photon signal originating from the dwarf galaxy Reticulum II that exceeds the expected background between 2 GeV and 10 GeV. We have investigated two specific scenarios for annihilating WIMP dark matter within the phenomenological Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (pMSSM) framework as a possible source for these photons. We find that the same parameter ranges in pMSSM as reported by an earlier paper to be consistent with the Galactic Center excess, are also consistent with the excess observed in Reticulum II, resulting in a J-factor of log{sub 10} (J(α{sub int}=0.5{sup ∘}))≃(20.3−20.5){sub −0.3}{sup +0.2} GeV{sup 2}cm{sup −5}. This J-factor is consistent with log{sub 10} (J(α{sub int}=0.5{sup ∘}))=19.6{sub −0.7}{sup +1.0} GeV{sup 2}cm{sup −5}, which was derived using an optimized spherical Jeans analysis of kinematic data obtained from the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS)

  13. H.E.S.S. observations of the Galactic Center region and their possible dark matter interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F A; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Breitling, F; Brown, A M; Buhler, R; Büsching, I; Carrigan, S; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ata, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Ferrero, E; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Funk, Seb; Funk, S; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; De Jager, O C; Khelifi, B; Komin, N; Konopelko, A; Kosack, K; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lohse, T; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; McComb, T J L; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nedbal, D; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schwanke, U; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Spanier, F; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Superina, G; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Theoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; Van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; al, et

    2006-01-01

    The detection of gamma-rays from the source HESS J1745-290 in the Galactic Center (GC) region with the H.E.S.S. array of Cherenkov telescopes in 2004 is presented. After subtraction of the diffuse gamma-ray emission from the GC ridge, the source is compatible with a point-source with spatial extent less than 1.2'(stat.) (95% CL). The measured energy spectrum above 160 GeV is compatible with a power-law with photon index of 2.25 +/- 0.04(stat.) +/- 0.10 (syst.) and no significant flux variation is detected. These measurements are discussed in the framework of dark matter annihilation. It is found that the bulk of the VHE emission must have non-dark-matter origin. Loose constraints on the velocity-weighted annihilation cross section are derived assuming the presence of an astrophysical non-dark-matter gamma-ray contribution.

  14. The evolution of active galactic nuclei in clusters of galaxies from the Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bufanda, E.; Hollowood, D.; Jeltema, T. E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Rozo, E.; Martini, P.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Banerji, M.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Melchior, P.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Rooney, P.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D. L.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-12-13

    The correlation between active galactic nuclei (AGN) and environment provides important clues to AGN fueling and the relationship of black hole growth to galaxy evolution. In this paper, we analyze the fraction of galaxies in clusters hosting AGN as a function of redshift and cluster richness for X-ray detected AGN associated with clusters of galaxies in Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data. The present sample includes 33 AGN with L_X > 1043 ergs s-1 in non-central, host galaxies with luminosity greater than 0.5 L* from a total sample of 432 clusters in the redshift range of 0.10.7. This result is in good agreement with previous work and parallels the increase in star formation in cluster galaxies over the same redshift range. However, the AGN fraction in clusters is observed to have no significant correlation with cluster mass. Future analyses with DES Year 1 through Year 3 data will be able to clarify whether AGN activity is correlated to cluster mass and will tightly constrain the relationship between cluster AGN populations and redshift.

  15. Polytropic transonic galactic outflows in a dark matter halo with a central black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Asuka; Mori, Masao; Nitta, Shin-ya

    2017-09-01

    Polytropic transonic solutions of spherically symmetric and steady galactic winds in the gravitational potential of a dark matter halo (DMH) with a supermassive black hole (SMBH) are studied. The solutions are classified in terms of their topological features, and the gravitational potential of the SMBH adds a new branch to the transonic solutions generated by the gravity of the DMH. The topological types of the transonic solutions depend on the mass distribution, the amount of supplied energy, the polytropic index γ and the slope α of the DMH mass distribution. When α becomes larger than a critical value αc, the transonic solution types change dramatically. Further, our model predicts that it is possible for a slowly accelerating outflow to exist, even in quiescent galaxies with small γ. This slowly accelerating outflow differs from those considered in many of the previous studies focusing on supersonic outflows in active star-forming galaxies. In addition, our model indicates that outflows in active star-forming galaxies have only one transonic point in the inner region (∼0.01 kpc). The locus of this transonic point does not strongly depend on γ. We apply the polytropic model incorporating mass flux supplied by stellar components to the Sombrero galaxy, and conclude that it can reproduce the observed gas density and the temperature distribution well. This result differs significantly from the isothermal model, which requires an unrealistically large mass flux. Thus, we conclude that the polytropic model is more realistic than the isothermal model, and that the Sombrero galaxy can have a slowly accelerating outflow.

  16. Observing two dark accelerators around the Galactic Centre with Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Hui, C Y; Ng, C W; Lin, L C C; Tam, P H T; Cheng, K S; Kong, A K H; Chernyshov, D O; Dogiel, V A

    2016-01-01

    We report the results from a detailed $\\gamma-$ray investigation in the field of two "dark accelerators", HESS J1745-303 and HESS J1741-302, with $6.9$ years of data obtained by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. For HESS J1745-303, we found that its MeV-GeV emission is mainly originated from the "Region A" of the TeV feature. Its $\\gamma-$ray spectrum can be modeled with a single power-law with a photon index of $\\Gamma\\sim2.5$ from few hundreds MeV to TeV. Moreover, an elongated feature, which extends from "Region A" toward northwest for $\\sim1.3^{\\circ}$, is discovered for the first time. The orientation of this feature is similar to that of a large scale atomic/molecular gas distribution. For HESS J1741-302, our analysis does not yield any MeV-GeV counterpart for this unidentified TeV source. On the other hand, we have detected a new point source, Fermi J1740.1-3013, serendipitously. Its spectrum is apparently curved which resembles that of a $\\gamma-$ray pulsar. This makes it possibly associated with PSR B1...

  17. Multipole analysis of IceCube data to search for dark matter accumulated in the Galactic halo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Hill, G.C.; Robertson, S.; Whelan, B.J. [University of Adelaide, School of Chemistry and Physics, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Ackermann, M.; Berghaus, P.; Bernardini, E.; Bretz, H.P.; Cruz Silva, A.H.; Gluesenkamp, T.; Gora, D.; Jacobi, E.; Kaminsky, B.; Karg, T.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Nahnhauer, R.; Schoenwald, A.; Shanidze, R.; Spiering, C.; Stoessl, A.; Terliuk, A.; Yanez, J.P. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J.; Brown, A.M.; Hickford, S.; Macias, O. [University of Canterbury, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Christchurch (New Zealand); Aguilar, J.A.; Altmann, D.; Christov, A.; Montaruli, T.; Rameez, M.; Vallecorsa, S. [Universite de Geneve, Departement de physique nucleaire et corpusculaire, Geneva (Switzerland); Ahlers, M.; Arguelles, C.; BenZvi, S.; Chirkin, D.; Day, M.; Desiati, P.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Eisch, J.; Fadiran, O.; Feintzeig, J.; Gladstone, L.; Halzen, F.; Hoshina, K.; Jacobsen, J.; Jero, K.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J.L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kopper, C.; Kurahashi, N.; Larsen, D.T.; Maruyama, R.; McNally, F.; Middlemas, E.; Morse, R.; Rees, I.; Riedel, B.; Rodrigues, J.P.; Santander, M.; Tobin, M.N.; Tosi, D.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Santen, J.; Weaver, C.; Wellons, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, Madison, WI (United States); Ahrens, M.; Bohm, C.; Danninger, M.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Hulth, P.O.; Hultqvist, K.; Walck, C.; Wolf, M.; Zoll, M. [Stockholm University, Department of Physics, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm (Sweden); Anderson, T.; Arlen, T.C.; De Andre, J.P.A.M.; DeYoung, T.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Groh, J.C.; Huang, F.; Quinnan, M.; Smith, M.W.E.; Stanisha, N.A.; Tesic, G. [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Physics, University Park, PA (United States); Auffenberg, J.; Bissok, M.; Blumenthal, J.; Gier, D.; Gretskov, P.; Haack, C.; Hallen, P.; Heinen, D.; Hellwig, D.; Jagielski, K.; Koob, A.; Kriesten, A.; Krings, K.; Leuermann, M.; Paul, L.; Penek, Oe.; Puetz, J.; Raedel, L.; Reimann, R.; Rongen, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schukraft, A.; Vehring, M.; Wallraff, M.; Wichary, C.; Wiebusch, C.H.; Zierke, S. [RWTH Aachen University, III. Physikalisches Institut, Aachen (Germany); Bai, X. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Physics Department, Rapid City, SD (United States); Barwick, S.W.; Yodh, G. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Irvine, CA (United States); Baum, V.; Eberhardt, B.; Koepke, L.; Kroll, G.; Luenemann, J.; Sander, H.G.; Schatto, K.; Wiebe, K. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics, Mainz (Germany); Beatty, J.J. [Ohio State University, Department of Physics, Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Columbus, OH (United States); Ohio State University, Department of Astronomy, Columbus, OH (United States); Becker Tjus, J.; Bos, F.; Eichmann, B.; Fedynitch, A.; Kroll, M.; Saba, S.M.; Schoeneberg, S.; Unger, E. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Bochum (Germany); Becker, K.H.; Bindig, D.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Helbing, K.; Hoffmann, R.; Klaes, J.; Kopper, S.; Naumann, U.; Obertacke, A.; Omairat, A.; Posselt, J.; Soldin, D.; Tepe, A. [University of Wuppertal, Department of Physics, Wuppertal (Germany); Berley, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Christy, B.; Felde, J.; Goodman, J.A.; Hellauer, R.; Hoffman, K.D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Meagher, K.; Olivas, A.; Redl, P.; Richman, M.; Schmidt, T.; Sullivan, G.W.; Wissing, H. [University of Maryland, Department of Physics, College Park, MD (United States); Bernhard, A.; Coenders, S.; Gross, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Leute, J.; Resconi, E.; Schulz, O.; Sestayo, Y. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Besson, D.Z. [University of Kansas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lawrence, KS (United States); Binder, G.; Gerhardt, L.; Ha, C.; Klein, S.R.; Miarecki, S. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Boersma, D.J.; Botner, O.; Euler, S.; Hallgren, A.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Stroem, R.; Taavola, H. [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala (Sweden); Bose, D.; Rott, C. [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Physics, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter which is bound in the Galactic halo might self-annihilate and produce a flux of stable final state particles, e.g. high energy neutrinos. These neutrinos can be detected with IceCube, a cubic-kilometer sized Cherenkov detector. Given IceCube's large field of view, a characteristic anisotropy of the additional neutrino flux is expected. In this paper we describe a multipole method to search for such a large-scale anisotropy in IceCube data. This method uses the expansion coefficients of a multipole expansion of neutrino arrival directions and incorporates signal-specific weights for each expansion coefficient. We apply the technique to a high-purity muon neutrino sample from the Northern Hemisphere. The final result is compatible with the nullhypothesis. As no signal was observed, we present limits on the self-annihilation cross-section averaged over the relative velocity distribution left angle σ{sub A}υ right angle down to 1.9 x 10{sup -23} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} for a dark matter particle mass of 700-1,000 GeV and direct annihilation into ν anti ν. The resulting exclusion limits come close to exclusion limits from γ-ray experiments, that focus on the outer Galactic halo, for high dark matter masses of a few TeV and hard annihilation channels. (orig.)

  18. Maser Emission toward the Infrared Dark Cloud G359.94+0.17 Seen in Silhouette against the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Deguchi, S; Shino, N

    2011-01-01

    The infrared dark cloud G359.94+0.17 is a conspicuous, opaque cloud, which is seen in silhouette against the Galactic center. We found unexpectedly strong (~50 Jy) maser emission of CH3OH at 44 GHz with additional weak 22 GHz H2O maser and 43 GHz SiO thermal emissions toward this cloud. Detections of these molecular lines indicate that strong star forming activities are proceeding in this cloud, which were not reported previously despite of numerous works toward the Galactic center.The line profiles of the NH3 inversion lines at 23 GHz indicate that G359.94+0.17 is composed of three clouds with V(lsr)= 0, 15 and ~80 km/s overlapped on the line of sight. The maser emission is associated with the 15 km/s cloud, suggesting that it is located at the Norma spiral arm.

  19. Galactic Dark Matter Halos and Globular Cluster Populations. III. Extension to Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, William E.; Blakeslee, John P.; Harris, Gretchen L. H.

    2017-02-01

    The total mass {M}{GCS} in the globular cluster (GC) system of a galaxy is empirically a near-constant fraction of the total mass {M}h\\equiv {M}{bary}+{M}{dark} of the galaxy across a range of 105 in galaxy mass. This trend is radically unlike the strongly nonlinear behavior of total stellar mass M ⋆ versus M h . We discuss extensions of this trend to two more extreme situations: (a) entire clusters of galaxies and (b) the ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) recently discovered in Coma and elsewhere. Our calibration of the ratio {η }M={M}{GCS}/{M}h from normal galaxies, accounting for new revisions in the adopted mass-to-light ratio for GCs, now gives {η }M=2.9× {10}-5 as the mean absolute mass fraction. We find that the same ratio appears valid for galaxy clusters and UDGs. Estimates of {η }M in the four clusters we examine tend to be slightly higher than for individual galaxies, but more data and better constraints on the mean GC mass in such systems are needed to determine if this difference is significant. We use the constancy of {η }M to estimate total masses for several individual cases; for example, the total mass of the Milky Way is calculated to be {M}h=1.1× {10}12 {M}ȯ . Physical explanations for the uniformity of {η }M are still descriptive, but point to a picture in which massive dense star clusters in their formation stages were relatively immune to the feedback that more strongly influenced lower-density regions where most stars form.

  20. Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae -- Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippenko, Alexei Vladimir [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia; exploding white-dwarf stars) were the key to the Nobel-worthy 1998 discovery and subsequent verification that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, driven by the effects of dark energy. Understanding the nature of this mysterious, yet dominant, component of the Universe is at the forefront of research in cosmology and fundamental physics. SNe Ia will continue to play a leading role in this enterprise, providing precise cosmological distances that improve constraints on the nature of dark energy. However, for this effort to succeed, we need to more thoroughly understand relatively nearby SNe Ia, because our conclusions come only from comparisons between them and distant (high-redshift) SNe Ia. Thus, detailed studies of relatively nearby SNe Ia are the focus of this research program. Many interesting results were obtained during the course of this project; these were published in 32 refereed research papers that acknowledged the grant. A major accomplishment was the publication of supernova (SN) rates derived from about a decade of operation of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) with the 0.76-meter Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT). We have determined the most accurate rates for SNe of different types in large, nearby galaxies in the present-day Universe, and these can be compared with SN rates far away (and hence long ago in the past) to set constraints on the types of stars that explode. Another major accomplishment was the publication of the light curves (brightness vs. time) of 165 SNe Ia, along with optical spectroscopy of many of these SNe as well as other SNe Ia, providing an extensive, homogeneous database for detailed studies. We have conducted intensive investigations of a number of individual SNe Ia, including quite unusual examples that allow us to probe the entire range of SN explosions and provide unique insights into these objects and the stars before they explode. My team's studies have also

  1. Eight New Milky Way Companions Discovered in First-Year Dark Energy Survey Data

    CERN Document Server

    Bechtol, K; Balbinot, E; Pieres, A; Simon, J D; Yanny, B; Santiago, B; Wechsler, R H; Frieman, J; Walker, A R; Williams, P; Rozo, E; Rykoff, E S; Queiroz, A; Luque, E; Benoit-Levy, A; Bernstein, R A; Tucker, D; Sevilla, I; Gruendl, R A; da Costa, L N; Neto, A Fausti; Maia, M A G; Abbott, T; Allam, S; Armstrong, R; Bauer, A H; Bernstein, G M; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Rosell, A Carnero; Castander, F J; D'Andrea, C B; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Eifler, T F; Estrada, J; Evrard, A E; Fernandez, E; Finley, D A; Flaugher, B; Gaztanaga, E; Gerdes, D; Girardi, L; Gladders, M; Gruen, D; Gutierrez, G; Hao, J; Honscheid, K; Jain, B; James, D; Kent, S; Kron, R; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Li, T S; Lin, H; Makler, M; March, M; Marshall, J; Martini, P; Merritt, K W; Miller, C; Miquel, R; Mohr, J; Neilsen, E; Nichol, R; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Peoples, J; Petravick, D; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Thomas, D; Wester, W; Zuntz, J

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of eight new Milky Way companions in ~1,800 deg^2 of optical imaging data collected during the first year of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Each system is identified as a statistically significant over-density of individual stars consistent with the expected isochrone and luminosity function of an old and metal-poor stellar population. The objects span a wide range of absolute magnitudes (M_V from -2.2 mag to -7.4 mag), physical sizes (10 pc to 170 pc), and heliocentric distances (30 kpc to 330 kpc). Based on the low surface brightnesses, large physical sizes, and/or large Galactocentric distances of these objects, several are likely to be new ultra-faint satellite galaxies of the Milky Way and/or Magellanic Clouds. We introduce a likelihood-based algorithm to search for and characterize stellar over-densities, as well as identify stars with high satellite membership probabilities. We also present completeness estimates for detecting ultra-faint galaxies of varying luminosities, sizes, ...

  2. Eight Ultra-faint Galaxy Candidates Discovered in Year Two of the Dark Energy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Drlica-Wagner, A; Rykoff, E S; Luque, E; Queiroz, A; Mao, Y -Y; Wechsler, R H; Simon, J D; Santiago, B; Yanny, B; Balbinot, E; Dodelson, S; Neto, A Fausti; James, D J; Li, T S; Maia, M A G; Marshall, J L; Pieres, A; Stringer, K; Walker, A R; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Benoit-Levy, A; Bernstein, G M; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Crocce, M; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Eifler, T F; Evrard, A E; Finley, D A; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Gerdes, D W; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Martini, P; Miquel, R; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Reil, K; Roodman, A; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Tucker, D; Vikram, V; Wester, W; Zhang, Y; Zuntz, J

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of eight new ultra-faint dwarf galaxy candidates in the second year of optical imaging data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Six of these candidates are detected at high confidence, while two additional lower-confidence candidates are identified in regions of incomplete or non-uniform survey coverage. The new stellar systems are found using three independent automated search techniques, and are identified as statistically significant overdensities of individually resolved stars consistent with the isochrone and luminosity function of an old and metal-poor simple stellar population. The new systems are faint (Mv > -4.7 mag) and span a broad range of physical sizes (17 pc 27.5 mag arcsec$^2$) consistent with known ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. Roughly half of the DES candidates are more distant, less luminous, and/or have lower surface brightnesses than previously known Milky Way satellite galaxies, and would have had a low probability of detection if observed by the Sloan Digital Sky S...

  3. Discussion on the energy content of the galactic dark matter Bose-Einstein condensate halo in the Thomas-Fermi approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Souza, J.C.C.; Pires, M.O.C., E-mail: jose.souza@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: marcelo.pires@ufabc.edu.br [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Rua Santa Adélia 166, Santo André, SP, 09210-170 (Brazil)

    2014-03-01

    We show that the galactic dark matter halo, considered composed of an axionlike particles Bose-Einstein condensate [6] trapped by a self-graviting potential [5], may be stable in the Thomas-Fermi approximation since appropriate choices for the dark matter particle mass and scattering length are made. The demonstration is performed by means of the calculation of the potential, kinetic and self-interaction energy terms of a galactic halo described by a Boehmer-Harko density profile. We discuss the validity of the Thomas-Fermi approximation for the halo system, and show that the kinetic energy contribution is indeed negligible.

  4. Dust-to-gas ratio, XCO factor and CO-dark gas in the Galactic anticentre: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B.-Q.; Liu, X.-W.; Yuan, H.-B.; Huang, Y.; Xiang, M.-S.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the correlation between extinction and H I and CO emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes (|b| > 10°) within the footprint of the Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey of the Galactic anticentre (XSTPS-GAC) on small and large scales. In Paper I, we present a three-dimensional (3D) dust extinction map within the footprint of XSTPS-GAC, covering a sky area of over 6000 deg2 at a spatial angular resolution of 6 arcmin. In the current work, the map is combined with data from gas tracers, including H I data from the Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array H I survey and CO data from the Planck mission, to constrain the values of dust-to-gas ratio DGR = AV/N(H) and CO-to-H2 conversion factor XCO = N(H2)/WCO for the entire GAC footprint excluding the Galactic plane, as well as for selected star-forming regions (such as the Orion, Taurus and Perseus clouds) and a region of diffuse gas in the northern Galactic hemisphere. For the whole GAC footprint, we find DGR = (4.15 ± 0.01) × 10-22 mag cm2 and XCO = (1.72 ± 0.03) × 1020 cm- 2 (K km s- 1)- 1. We have also investigated the distribution of `CO-dark' gas (DG) within the footprint of GAC and found a linear correlation between the DG column density and the V-band extinction: N(DG) ˜eq 2.2 × 10^{21} (A_V - AcV) cm^{-2}. The mass fraction of DG is found to be fDG ˜ 0.55 towards the Galactic anticentre, which is respectively about 23 and 124 per cent of the atomic and CO-traced molecular gas in the same region. This result is consistent with the theoretical work of Papadopoulos et al. but much larger than that expected in the H2 cloud models by Wolfire et al.

  5. Dynamical modelling of the galactic bulge and bar: the Milky Way's pattern speed, stellar and dark matter mass distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portail, Matthieu; Gerhard, Ortwin; Wegg, Christopher; Ness, Melissa

    2017-02-01

    We construct a large set of dynamical models of the galactic bulge, bar and inner disc using the made-to-measure method. Our models are constrained to match the red clump giant density from a combination of the VVV, UKIDSS and 2MASS infrared surveys together with stellar kinematics in the bulge from the BRAVA and OGLE surveys, and in the entire bar region from the ARGOS Survey. We are able to recover the bar pattern speed and the stellar and dark matter mass distributions in the bar region, thus recovering the entire galactic effective potential. We find a bar pattern speed of 39.0 ± 3.5 km s- 1 kpc- 1, placing the bar corotation radius at 6.1 ± 0.5 kpc and making the Milky Way bar a typical fast rotator. We evaluate the stellar mass of the long bar and bulge structure to be Mbar/bulge = 1.88 ± 0.12 × 1010 M⊙, larger than the mass of disc in the bar region, Minner disc = 1.29 ± 0.12 × 1010 M⊙. The total dynamical mass in the bulge volume is 1.85 ± 0.05 × 1010 M⊙. Thanks to more extended kinematic data sets and recent measurement of the bulge initial mass function, our models have a low dark matter fraction in the bulge of 17 ± 2 per cent. We find a dark matter density profile which flattens to a shallow cusp or core in the bulge region. Finally, we find dynamical evidence for an extra central mass of ∼ 0.2 × 1010 M⊙, probably in a nuclear disc or discy pseudo-bulge.

  6. A blueprint for detecting supersymmetric dark matter in the Galactic halo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Springel, V.; White, S.D.M.; Frenk, C.S.; Navarro, J.F.; Jenkins, A.; Vogelsberger, M.; Wang, J.; Ludlow, A.; Helmi, A.

    2008-01-01

    Dark matter is the dominant form of matter in the universe, but its nature is unknown. It is plausibly an elementary particle, perhaps the lightest supersymmetric partner of known particle species. In this case, annihilation of dark matter in the halo of the Milky Way should produce g -rays at a lev

  7. On the detectability of Galactic dark matter annihilation into monochromatic gamma-rays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐志成; 袁强; 毕效军; 陈国明

    2011-01-01

    Monochromatic y-rays are thought to be the smoking gun signal for identifying dark matter annihilation. However, the flux of monochromatic y-rays is usually suppressed by virtual quantum effects since dark matter should be neutral and does not couple with

  8. DETECTING TRIAXIALITY IN THE GALACTIC DARK MATTER HALO THROUGH STELLAR KINEMATICS. II. DEPENDENCE ON NATURE DARK MATTER AND GRAVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas-Niño, Armando; Pichardo, Barbara; Valenzuela, Octavio [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-264, 04510, México, D.F., Universitaria, D.F., México (Mexico); Martínez-Medina, Luis A., E-mail: barbara@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: octavio@astro.unam.mx [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, A.P. 14-740, 07000 México D.F., México (Mexico)

    2015-05-20

    Recent studies have presented evidence that the Milky Way global potential may be non-spherical. In this case, the assembling process of the Galaxy may have left long-lasting stellar halo kinematic fossils due to the shape of the dark matter halo, potentially originated by orbital resonances. We further investigate such a possibility, now considering potential models further away from ΛCDM halos, like scalar field dark matter halos and Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND), and including several other factors that may mimic the emergence and permanence of kinematic groups, such as a spherical and triaxial halo with an embedded disk potential. We find that regardless of the density profile (DM nature), kinematic groups only appear in the presence of a triaxial halo potential. For the case of a MOND-like gravity theory no kinematic structure is present. We conclude that the detection of these kinematic stellar groups could confirm the predicted triaxiality of dark halos in cosmological galaxy formation scenarios.

  9. Ammonia from cold high-mass clumps discovered in the inner Galactic disk by the ATLASGAL survey

    CERN Document Server

    Wienen, M; Schuller, F; Menten, K M; Walmsley, C M; Bronfman, L; Motte, F

    2012-01-01

    The APEX Telescope Large Area Survey: The Galaxy (ATLASGAL) is an unbiased continuum survey of the inner Galactic disk at 870 \\mu m. It covers +/- 60 deg in Galactic longitude and aims to find all massive clumps at various stages of high-mass star formation in the inner Galaxy, particularly the earliest evolutionary phases. We aim to determine properties such as the gas kinetic temperature and dynamics of new massive cold clumps found by ATLASGAL. Most importantly, we derived their kinematical distances from the measured line velocities. We observed the ammonia (J,K) = (1,1) to (3,3) inversion transitions toward 862 clumps of a flux-limited sample of submm clumps detected by ATLASGAL and extracted 13CO (1-0) spectra from the Galactic Ring Survey (GRS). We determined distances for a subsample located at the tangential points (71 sources) and for 277 clumps whose near/far distance ambiguity is resolved. Most ATLASGAL clumps are cold with rotational temperatures from 10-30 K. They have a wide range of NH3 linewi...

  10. Search of Dark Matter Annihilation in the Galactic Centre using the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Adrián-Martínez, S; André, M; Anton, G; Ardid, M; Aubert, J -J; Baret, B; Barrios-Martí, J; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bogazzi, C; Bormuth, R; Bou-Cabo, M; Bouwhuis, M C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Carr, J; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Coniglione, R; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Dekeyser, I; Deschamps, A; DeBonis, G; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Drouhin, D; Dumas, A; Eberl, T; Elsässer, D; Enzenhöfer, A; Fehn, K; Felis, I; Fermani, P; Folger, F; Fusco, L A; Galatà, S; Gay, P; Geißelsöder, S; Geyer, K; Giordano, V; Gleixner, A; Gracia-Ruiz, R; Graf, K; vanHaren, H; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herrero, A; Hößl, J; Hofestädt, J; Hugon, C; WJames, C; deJong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Katz, U; Kießling, D; Kooijman, P; Kouchner, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lambard, G; Lattuada, D; Lefèvre, D; Leonora, E; Loucatos, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Martini, S; Mathieu, A; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Moussa, A; Mueller, C; Neff, M; Nezri, E; Păvălaş, G E; Pellegrino, C; Perrina, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Racca, C; Riccobene, G; Richter, R; Roensch, K; Rostovtsev, A; Saldaña, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sanguineti, M; Sapienza, P; Schmid, J; Schnabel, J; Schulte, S; Schüssler, F; Seitz, T; Sieger, C; Spurio, M; Steijger, J J M; Stolarczyk, Th; Sánchez-Losa, A; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Tönnis, C; Vallage, B; Vallée, C; VanElewyck, V; Visser, E; Vivolo, D; Wagner, S; Wilms, J; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J

    2015-01-01

    A search for high-energy neutrinos coming from the direction of the Galactic Centre is performed using the data recorded by the ANTARES neutrino telescope from 2007 to 2012. The event selection criteria are chosen to maximise the sensitivity to possible signals produced by the self-annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles accumulated around the centre of the Milky Way with respect to the atmospheric background. After data unblinding, the number of neutrinos observed in the line of sight of the Galactic Centre is found to be compatible with background expectations. The 90% C.L. upper limits in terms of the neutrino+anti-neutrino flux, $\\rm \\Phi_{\

  11. Class of Higgs-portal dark matter models in the light of gamma-ray excess from galactic center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmoy Mondal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently the study of anomalous gamma-ray emission in the regions surrounding the galactic center has drawn a lot of attention as it points out that the excess of ∼1–3 GeV gamma-ray in the low latitude is consistent with the emission expected from annihilating dark matter. The best-fit to the gamma-ray spectrum corresponds to dark matter (DM candidate having mass in the range ∼31–40 GeV annihilating into bb¯-pair with cross-section 〈σv〉=(1.4–2.0×10−26 cm3s−1. We have shown that the Higgs-portal dark matter models in presence of scalar resonance (in the annihilation channel are well-suited for explaining these phenomena. In addition, the parameter space of these models also satisfies constraints from the LHC Higgs searches, relic abundance and direct detection experiments. We also comment on real singlet scalar Higgs-portal DM model which is found to be incompatible with the recent analysis.

  12. Binary pulsars as probes of a Galactic dark matter disk arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Caputo, Andrea; Blas, Diego

    As a binary pulsar moves through a wind of dark matter particles, the resulting dynamical friction modifies the binary's orbit. We study this effect for the double disk dark matter (DDDM) scenario, where a fraction of the dark matter is dissipative and settles into a thin disk. For binaries within the dark disk, this effect is enhanced due to the higher dark matter density and lower velocity dispersion of the dark disk, and due to its co-rotation with the baryonic disk.We estimate the effect and compare it with observations for two different limits in the Knudsen number ($Kn$). First, in the case where DDDM is effectively collisionless within the characteristic scale of the binary ($Kn\\gg1$) and ignoring the possible interaction between the pair of dark matter wakes. Second, in the fully collisional case ($Kn\\ll1$), where a fluid description can be adopted and the interaction of the pair of wakes is taken into account. We find that the change in the orbital period is of the same order of magnitude in both lim...

  13. Search of dark matter annihilation in the galactic centre using the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; et al., [Unknown; Bruijn, R.; Kooijman, P.

    2015-01-01

    A search for high-energy neutrinos coming from the direction of the Galactic Centre is performed using the data recorded by the ANTARES neutrino telescope from 2007 to 2012. The event selection criteria are chosen to maximise the sensitivity to possible signals produced by the self-annihilation of w

  14. Search for Dark Matter Annihilation in the Galactic Halo using IceCube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medici, Morten Ankersen

    , and with the right properties of this hypothesized particle, it is possible to look for a signal from dark matter annihilation. In this work, the dark matter particle candidate of weakly interacting massive particles shall be presented, and the possibilities of observing it’s self-annihilation to neutrinos shall...... detector for atmospheric muons it is possible to search for a neutrino signals form the center of the Milky Way located on the souther hemisphere. In this thesis, a complete analysis is carried out on data from 1004 days of IceCube data, looking for an excess of neutrinos consistent with the dark matter...

  15. Flavored Dark Matter and the Galactic Center Gamma-Ray Excess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, Prateek; Batell, Brian; Hooper, Dan; Lin, Tongyan

    2014-09-01

    Thermal relic dark matter particles with a mass of 31-40 GeV and that dominantly annihilate to bottom quarks have been shown to provide an excellent description of the excess gamma rays observed from the center of the Milky Way. Flavored dark matter provides a well-motivated framework in which the dark matter can dominantly couple to bottom quarks in a flavor-safe manner. We propose a phenomenologically viable model of bottom flavored dark matter that can account for the spectral shape and normalization of the gamma-ray excess while naturally suppressing the elastic scattering cross sections probed by direct detection experiments. This model will be definitively tested with increased exposure at LUX and with data from the upcoming high-energy run of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  16. The density of dark matter in the Galactic bulge and implications for indirect detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Dan

    2017-03-01

    A recent study by Portail et al., which made use of the number of horizontal branch stars observed in infrared photometric surveys and kinematic measurements of M-giant stars from the BRAVA survey combined with N-body simulations of stellar populations, has presented a new determination of the dark matter mass within the bulge-bar region of the Milky Way. That study constrains the total mass within the ± 2 . 2 × ± 1 . 4 × ± 1 . 2 kpc volume of the bulge-bar region to be (1 . 84 ± 0 . 07) × 1010M⊙, of which 9%-30% is made up of dark matter. Here, we use this result to constrain the Milky Way's dark matter density profile, and discuss the implications for indirect dark matter searches. Although uncertainties remain significant, these results are consistent with and generally favor dark matter distributions with a cusped density profile. For example, for a scale radius of 20 kpc and a local dark matter density of 0.4 GeV/cm3, density profiles with an inner slope of 0.69 to 1.40 are favored, approximately centered around the standard NFW value. In contrast, profiles with large (multi-kiloparsec) flat-density cores are disfavored by this information.

  17. Constraints on the Galactic Halo Dark Matter from Fermi-LAT Diffuse Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, Theresa J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cuoco, A.; Guiriec, Sylvain Germain; McEnery, Julie E.; Scargle. J. D.; Troja, Eleonora

    2012-01-01

    We have performed an analysis of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) in the Milky Way halo region, searching for a signal from dark matter annihilation or decay. In the absence of a robust dark matter signal, constraints are presented. We consider both gamma rays produced directly in the dark matter annihilation/decay and produced by inverse Compton scattering of the e+/e- produced in the annihilation/decay. Conservative limits are derived requiring that the dark matter signal does not exceed the observed diffuse gamma-ray emission. A second set of more stringent limits is derived based on modeling the foreground astrophysical diffuse emission using the GALPROP code. Uncertainties in the height of the diffusive cosmic-ray halo, the distribution of the cosmic-ray sources in the Galaxy, the index of the injection cosmic-ray electron spectrum, and the column density of the interstellar gas are taken into account using a profile likelihood formalism, while the parameters governing the cosmic-ray propagation have been derived from fits to local cosmic-ray data. The resulting limits impact the range of particle masses over which dark matter thermal production in the early universe is possible, and challenge the interpretation of the PAMELA/Fermi-LAT cosmic ray anomalies as the annihilation of dark matter.

  18. Digging deeper into the Southern skies: a compact Milky Way companion discovered in first-year Dark Energy Survey data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, E.; Queiroz, A.; Santiago, B.; Pieres, A.; Balbinot, E.; Bechtol, K.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Neto, A. Fausti; da Costa, L. N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Yanny, B.; Abbott, T.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Eifler, T. F.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tucker, D.; Walker, A. R.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-05-01

    We use the first-year Dark Energy Survey (DES) data down to previously unprobed photometric depths to search for stellar systems in the Galactic halo, therefore complementing the previous analysis of the same data carried out by our group earlier this year. Our search is based on a matched filter algorithm that produces stellar density maps consistent with stellar population models of various ages, metallicities, and distances over the survey area. The most conspicuous density peaks in these maps have been identified automatically and ranked according to their significance and recurrence for different input models. We report the discovery of one additional stellar system besides those previously found by several authors using the same first-year DES data. The object is compact, and consistent with being dominated by an old and metal-poor population. DES 1 is found at high significance and appears in the DES images as a compact concentration of faint blue point sources. Assuming different spatial profile parameterizations, the best-fitting heliocentric distance and total absolute magnitude in the range of 77.6-87.1 kpc and -3.00 ≲ MV ≲ -2.21, respectively. The half-light radius of this object, rh ˜ 10 pc and total luminosity are consistent with it being a low-mass halo cluster. It is also found to have a very elongated shape (ɛ ˜ 0.57). In addition, our deeper probe of DES first-year data confirms the recently reported satellite galaxy candidate Horologium II as a significant stellar overdensity. We also infer its structural properties and compare them to those reported in the literature.

  19. On-Shell Mediators and Top-Charm Dark Matter Models for the Fermi-LAT Galactic Center Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Rajaraman, Arvind; Tanedo, Philip

    2015-01-01

    An excess in gamma-rays from the galactic center observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope has been proposed as a possible signal of dark matter annihilation. Recently, the Fermi collaboration showed that systematic errors broaden the range of spectral shapes for this excess. We demonstrate fits to this range for (1) flavor-violating annihilations to top-charm pairs and (2) annihilations to on-shell bosonic mediators which decay to Standard Model quarks in a boosted frame. Annihilation of 40 - 100 GeV DM to pairs of spin-1 mediators provide a good fit to the Fermi-LAT spectrum with a normalization consistent with a thermal relic. Top-charm modes and annihilation to three pseudoscalar mediators can fit the spectral shape but typically require non-thermal annihilation cross sections.

  20. Neutrino fluxes from Dark Matter in the HESS J1745-290 source at the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Cembranos, J A R; Maroto, A L

    2014-01-01

    The spectral study of the HESS J1745-290 high energy gamma-ray cut-off from the galactic center is compatible with a signal of Dark Matter (DM) annihilation or decay. If this is the case, a neutrino flux from that source is also expected. We analyze the neutrino flux predicted by DM particles able to originate the HESS J1745-290 gamma-rays observations. We focus on the electroweak and hadronic channels, which are favoured by present measurements. In particular, we study DM annihilating into W+W- and u-ubar with DM masses of 48.8 and 27.9 TeV respectively. We estimate the resolution angle and exposition time necessary to test the DM hypothesis as the origin of the commented gamma signal.

  1. Search for Neutrinos from Annihilating Dark Matter in the Direction of the Galactic Center with the 40-String IceCube Neutrino Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; Uiterweerd, G de Vries; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Hülß, J -P; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jlelati, O; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rädel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönherr, L; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2012-01-01

    A search for muon neutrinos from dark matter annihilations in the Galactic Center region has been performed with the 40-string configuration of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory using data collected in 367 days of live-time starting in April 2008. The observed fluxes were consistent with the atmospheric background expectations. Upper limits on the self-annihilation cross-section are obtained for dark matter particle masses ranging from 100 GeV to 10 TeV. In the case of decaying dark matter, lower limits on the lifetime have been determined for masses between 200 GeV and 20 TeV.

  2. Boosted Dark Matter in IceCube and at the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Kopp, Joachim; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2015-01-01

    We show that the event excess observed by the IceCube collaboration at TeV--PeV energies, usually interpreted as evidence for astrophysical neutrinos, can be explained alternatively by the scattering of highly boosted dark matter particles. Specifically, we consider a scenario where a $\\sim 4$ PeV scalar dark matter particle $\\phi$ can decay to a much lighter dark fermion $\\chi$, which in turn scatters off nuclei in the IceCube detector. Besides these events, which are exclusively shower-like, the model also predicts a secondary population of events at $\\mathcal{O}(100\\ \\text{TeV})$ originating from the 3-body decay $\\phi \\to \\chi \\bar\\chi a$, where $a$ is a pseudoscalar which mediates dark matter--Standard Model interactions and whose decay products include neutrinos. This secondary population also includes track-like events, and both populations together provide an excellent fit to the IceCube data. We then argue that a relic abundance of light Dark Matter particles $\\chi$, which may constitute a subdominan...

  3. Multipole analysis of IceCube data to search for dark matter accumulated in the Galactic halo

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Brown, A M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eichmann, B; Eisch, J; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grandmont, D T; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hellwig, D; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Jagielski, K; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Jurkovic, M; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Kelley, J L; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Koob, A; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kriesten, A; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Larsen, D T; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leute, J; Lünemann, J; Macías, O; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meli, A; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Middlemas, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Paul, L; Penek, Ö; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Pütz, J; Quinnan, M; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Rees, I; Reimann, R; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rodrigues, J P; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Sander, H -G; Sandroos, J; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallraff, M; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Whitehorn, N; Wichary, C; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zoll, M

    2014-01-01

    Dark matter which is bound in the Galactic halo might self-annihilate and produce a flux of stable final state particles, e.g. high energy neutrinos. These neutrinos can be detected with IceCube, a cubic-kilometer sized Cherenkov detector. Given IceCube's large field of view, a characteristic anisotropy of the additional neutrino flux is expected. In this paper we describe a multipole method to search for such a large-scale anisotropy in IceCube data. This method uses the expansion coefficients of a multipole expansion of neutrino arrival directions and incorporates signal-specific weights for each expansion coefficient. We apply the technique to a high-purity muon neutrino sample from the Northern Hemisphere. The final result is compatible with the null-hypothesis. As no signal was observed, we present limits on the self-annihilation cross-section averaged over the relative velocity distribution $\\langle\\sigma v\\rangle$ down to $1.9\\cdot 10^{-23}\\,\\mathrm{cm}^3\\mathrm{s}^{-1}$ for a dark matter particle mass...

  4. Constraints on the Galactic Halo Dark Matter from Fermi-LAT Diffuse Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Ajello, M; Baldini, L; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cuoco, A; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Silva, E do Couto e; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Falletti, L; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Focke, W B; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hadasch, D; Hayashida, M; Horan, D; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Jogler, T; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lionetto, A M; Garde, M Llena; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Naumann-Godo, M; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; H.,; Poon,; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Romoli, C; Sbarra, C; Scargle, J D; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stawarz, Łukasz; Strong, A W; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wallace, E; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yang, Z; Zaharijas, G; Zimmer, S

    2012-01-01

    We have performed an analysis of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with the Fermi Large Area Telescope in the Milky Way Halo region searching for a signal from dark matter annihilation or decay. In the absence of a robust dark matter signal, constraints are presented. We consider both gamma rays produced directly in the dark matter annihilation/decay and produced by inverse Compton scattering of the e+e- produced in the annihilation/decay. Conservative limits are derived requiring that the dark matter signal does not exceed the observed diffuse gamma-ray emission. A second set of more stringent limits is derived based on modeling the foreground astrophysical diffuse emission using the GALPROP code. Uncertainties in the height of the diffusive cosmic-ray halo, the distribution of the cosmic-ray sources in the Galaxy, the index of the injection cosmic-ray electron spectrum and the column density of the interstellar gas are taken into account using a profile likelihood formalism, while the parameters governing the ...

  5. Comparing Galactic Center MSSM dark matter solutions to the Reticulum II gamma-ray data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, A.; van Beekveld, M.; Beenakker, W.; Caron, S.; Hendriks, L.

    2015-01-01

    Observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) indicate a possible small photon signal originating from the dwarf galaxy Reticulum II that exceeds the expected background between 2 GeV and 10 GeV . We have investigated two specific scenarios for annihilating WIMP dark matter within the pheno

  6. How the Self-Interacting Dark Matter Model Explains the Diverse Galactic Rotation Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Kamada, Ayuki; Pace, Andrew B; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The rotation curves of spiral galaxies exhibit a diversity that has been difficult to understand in the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm. We show that the self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) model provides excellent fits to the rotation curves of a sample of galaxies with asymptotic velocities in the 25 to 300 km/s range that exemplify the full range of diversity. We only assume the halo concentration-mass relation predicted by the CDM model and a fixed value of the self-interaction cross section.In dark matter dominated galaxies, thermalization due to self-interactions creates large cores and reduces dark matter densities. In contrast, thermalization leads to denser and smaller cores in more luminous galaxies, and naturally explains the flat rotation curves of the highly luminous galaxies. Our results demonstrate that the impact of the baryons on the SIDM halo profile and the scatter from the assembly history of halos as encoded in the concentration-mass relation can explain the diverse rotation curves of spi...

  7. Glow in the dark matter: observing galactic halos with scattered light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jonathan H; Silk, Joseph

    2015-02-06

    We consider the observation of diffuse halos of light around the discs of spiral galaxies, as a probe of the interaction cross section between dark matter (DM) and photons. Using the galaxy M101 as an example, we show that for a scattering cross section at the level of 10(-23)(m/GeV)  cm(2) or greater dark matter in the halo will scatter light out from the more luminous center of the disc to larger radii, contributing to an effective increased surface brightness at the edges of the observed area on the sky. This allows us to set an upper limit on the DM-photon cross section using data from the Dragonfly instrument. We then show how to improve this constraint, and the potential for discovery, by combining the radial profile of DM-photon scattering with measurements at multiple wavelengths. Observation of diffuse light presents a new and potentially powerful way to probe the interactions of dark matter with photons, a way that is complementary to existing searches.

  8. Glow in the Dark Matter: Observing galactic halos with scattered light

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Jonathan H

    2014-01-01

    We consider the observation of diffuse halos of light around the discs of spiral galaxies, as a probe of the interaction cross section between Dark Matter and photons. Using the galaxy M101 as an example, we show that for a scattering cross section at the level of 10^(-23) x (m/GeV) cm^2 or greater Dark Matter in the halo will scatter light out from the more luminous centre of the disc to larger radii, contributing to an effective increased surface brightness at the edges of the observed area on the sky. This allows us to set an upper limit on the DM-photon cross section using data from the Dragonfly instrument. We then show how to improve this constraint, and the potential for discovery, by combining the radial profile of DM-photon scattering with measurements at multiple wavelengths. Observation of diffuse light presents a new and potentially powerful way to probe the interactions of Dark Matter with photons, which is complimentary to existing searches.

  9. Surface density of dark matter haloes on galactic and cluster scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Popolo, A.; Cardone, V. F.; Belvedere, G.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we analysed the correlation between the central surface density and the halo core radius of galaxies, and cluster of galaxies dark matter (DM) haloes, in the framework of the secondary infall model. We used Del Popolo secondary infall model taking into account ordered and random angular momentum, dynamical friction and DM adiabatic contraction to calculate the density profile of haloes, and then these profiles are used to determine the surface density of DM haloes. The main result is that r* (the halo characteristic radius) is not a universal quantity as claimed by Donato et al. and Gentile et al. On the contrary, we find a correlation with the halo mass M200 in agreement with Cardone & Tortora, Boyarsky et al. and Napolitano, Romanowsky & Tortora, but with a significantly smaller scatter, namely 0.16 ± 0.05. We also consider the baryon column density finding this latter being indeed a constant for low-mass systems, such as dwarfs, but correlating with mass with a slope of α = 0.18 ± 0.05. In the case of the surface density of DM for a system composed only of DM, as in dissipationless simulations, we get α = 0.20 ± 0.05. These results leave little room for the recently claimed universality of (dark and stellar) column density.

  10. Surface Density of dark matter haloes on galactic and cluster scales

    CERN Document Server

    Del Popolo, A; Belvedere, G

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, in the framework of the secondary infall model, the correlation between the central surface density and the halo core radius of galaxy, and cluster of galaxies, dark matter haloes was analyzed, this having recently been studied on a wide range of scales. We used Del Popolo (2009) secondary infall model taking into account ordered and random angular momentum, dynamical friction, and dark matter (DM) adiabatic contraction to calculate the density profile of haloes, and then these profiles are used to determine the surface density of DM haloes. The main result is that $r_\\ast$ (the halo characteristic radius) is not an universal quantity as claimed by Donato et al. (2009) and Gentile et al. (2009). On the contrary, we find a correlation with the halo mass $M_{200}$ in agreement with Cardone & Tortora (2010), Boyarsky at al. (2009) and Napolitano et al. (2010), but with a significantly smaller scatter, namely $0.16 \\pm 0.05$. We also consider the baryon column density finding this latter being ...

  11. Lambda-Cold Dark Matter, Stellar Feedback, and the Galactic Halo Abundance Pattern

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, B; Font, A S; Johnston, K V; Hernquist, L; Robertson, Brant; Bullock, James S.; Font, Andreea S.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Hernquist, Lars

    2005-01-01

    (Abridged) The hierarchical formation scenario for the stellar halo requires the accretion and disruption of dwarf galaxies, yet low-metallicity halo stars are enriched in alpha-elements compared to similar, low-metallicity stars in dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. We address this primary challenge for the hierarchical formation scenario for the stellar halo by combining chemical evolution modelling with cosmologically-motivated mass accretion histories for the Milky Way dark halo and its satellites. We demonstrate that stellar halo and dwarf galaxy abundance patterns can be explained naturally within the LCDM framework. Our solution relies fundamentally on the LCDM model prediction that the majority of the stars in the stellar halo were formed within a few relatively massive, ~5 x 10^10 Msun, dwarf irregular (dIrr)-size dark matter halos, which were accreted and destroyed ~10 Gyr in the past. These systems necessarily have short-lived, rapid star formation histories, are enriched primarily by Type II supern...

  12. Inverse Compton gamma-rays from Galactic dark matter annihilation: Anisotropy signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Le; Sigl, Guenter

    2010-01-01

    High energy electrons and positrons from annihilating dark matter can imprint unique angular anisotropies on the diffuse gamma-ray flux by inverse Compton scattering off the interstellar radiation field. We develop a numerical tool to compute gamma-ray emission from such electrons and positrons diffusing in the smooth host halo and in substructure halos with masses down to 10^(-6) M_sun. We show that, unlike the total gamma-ray angular power spectrum observed by Fermi-LAT, the angular power spectrum from inverse Compton scattering is exponentially suppressed below an angular scale determined by the diffusion length of electrons and positrons. For TeV scale dark matter with a canonical thermal freeze-out cross section 3 x 10^(-26) cm^3/s, this feature may be detectable by Fermi-LAT in the energy range 100-300 GeV after more sophisticated foreground subtraction. We also find that the total flux and the shape of the angular power spectrum depends sensitively on the spatial distribution of subhalos in the Milky W...

  13. Inverse Compton gamma-rays from galactic dark matter annihilation. Anisotropy signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Le; Sigl, Guenter [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Miniati, Francesco [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland). Physics Dept.

    2010-08-15

    High energy electrons and positrons from annihilating dark matter can imprint unique angular anisotropies on the diffuse gamma-ray flux by inverse Compton scattering off the interstellar radiation field. We develop a numerical tool to compute gamma-ray emission from such electrons and positrons diffusing in the smooth host halo and in substructure halos with masses down to 10{sup -6}M{sub s}un. We show that, unlike the total gamma-ray angular power spectrum observed by Fermi-LAT, the angular power spectrum from inverse Compton scattering is exponentially suppressed below an angular scale determined by the diffusion length of electrons and positrons. For TeV scale dark matter with a canonical thermal freeze-out cross section 3 x 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3}/s, this feature may be detectable by Fermi-LAT in the energy range 100-300 GeV after more sophisticated foreground subtraction. We also find that the total flux and the shape of the angular power spectrum depends sensitively on the spatial distribution of subhalos in the Milky Way. Finally, the contribution from the smooth host halo component to the gamma-ray mean intensity is negligibly small compared to subhalos. (orig.)

  14. Structure Formation Inside Triaxial Dark Matter Halos: Galactic Disks, Bulges and Bars

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, Clayton; Athanassoula, Lia

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the formation and co-evolution of galactic disks immersed in assembling live DM halos. Disk/halo components were evolved from the cosmological initial conditions and represent the collapse of an isolated density perturbation. The baryons include (mutually convertible) stars and gas, and the feedback from the stellar energy release onto the ISM has been implemented. We find that (1) The growing triaxial halo figure tumbling is insignificant and the angular momentum (J) is channeled into the internal circulation; (2) Response of the disk is out of phase with the DM, thus diluting the inner halo flatness and washing out its prolateness; (3) The total J is neathly conserved, even in models accounting for feedback; (4) The specific J for the DM is nearly constant, while that for baryons is decreasing; (5) Early stage of disk formation resembles the cat's cradle -- a small amorphous disk fueled via radial string patterns; (6) The initially puffed up gas component in the disk narrows when the star for...

  15. Search for Dark Matter Annihilation in the Galactic Halo using IceCube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medici, Morten Ankersen

    detector for atmospheric muons it is possible to search for a neutrino signals form the center of the Milky Way located on the souther hemisphere. In this thesis, a complete analysis is carried out on data from 1004 days of IceCube data, looking for an excess of neutrinos consistent with the dark matter...... halo of the Milky Way over a uniform atmospheric background. No signi cant excess is ob- served, and constraints are  presented for the thermally averaged product of the self-annihilation cross-section and the relative speed ⟨휎푣⟩, which for the annihilation of a 100 GeV WIMP through 푊+푊−, result...

  16. Antiproton signatures from astrophysical and dark matter sources at the galactic center

    CERN Document Server

    Cembranos, J A R; Maroto, A L

    2015-01-01

    The center of our Galaxy is a complex region characterized by extreme phenomena. The presence of the supermassive Sagittarius A* black hole, a high Dark Matter density and an even higher baryonic density are able to produce very energetic processes. Indeed, high energetic gamma rays have been observed by different telescopes, although its origin is not clear. In this work, we constrain the possible antiproton flux component associated to this signal. The expected secondary astrophysical antiproton background already saturates the observed data. It implies that any other important astrophysical source leads to an inconsistent excess, since the theoretical uncertainties corresponding to the mentioned background are small. The constraints depend on the diffusion model and the spectral features of the source. In particular, we consider antiproton spectra described by a power-law, a monochromatic signal and a Standard Model particle-antiparticle channel production.

  17. A two-component dark matter model with real singlet scalars confronting GeV -ray excess from galactic centre and Fermi bubble

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debasish Majumdar; Kamakshya Prasad Modak; Subhendu Rakshit

    2016-02-01

    We propose a two-component dark matter (DM) model, each component of which is a real singlet scalar, to explain results from both direct and indirect detection experiments. We put the constraints on the model parameters from theoretical bounds, PLANCK relic density results and direct DM experiments. The -ray flux is computed from DM annihilation in this framework and is then compared with the Fermi-LAT observations from galactic centre region and Fermi bubble.

  18. Search for a Dark Matter Annihilation Signal from the Galactic Center Halo with H.E.S.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Barnacka, A.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Bazer-Bachi, A. R.; Becherini, Y.; Becker, J.; Behera, B.; Bernlöhr, K.; Bochow, A.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Borrel, V.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Büsching, I.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Charbonnier, A.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chounet, L.-M.; Clapson, A. C.; Coignet, G.; Conrad, J.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O.'C.; Dubois, F.; Dubus, G.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Fallon, L.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gast, H.; Gérard, L.; Gerbig, D.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glück, B.; Goret, P.; Göring, D.; Hague, J. D.; Hampf, D.; Hauser, M.; Heinz, S.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hoffmann, A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; de Jager, O. C.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Keogh, D.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Masbou, J.; Maurin, D.; Maxted, N.; McComb, T. J. L.; Medina, M. C.; Méhault, J.; Moderski, R.; Moulin, E.; Naumann, C. L.; Naumann-Godo, M.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nekrassov, D.; Nguyen, N.; Nicholas, B.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Ohm, S.; Olive, J.-F.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Panter, M.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pedaletti, G.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Pita, S.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raue, M.; Rayner, S. M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de Los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Ruppel, J.; Ryde, F.; Sahakian, V.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schöck, F. M.; Schönwald, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Shalchi, A.; Sikora, M.; Skilton, J. L.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Tibolla, O.; Tluczykont, M.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vivier, M.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorobiov, S.; Vorster, M.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.; Wierzcholska, A.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2011-04-01

    A search for a very-high-energy (VHE; ≥100GeV) γ-ray signal from self-annihilating particle dark matter (DM) is performed towards a region of projected distance r˜45-150pc from the Galactic center. The background-subtracted γ-ray spectrum measured with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) γ-ray instrument in the energy range between 300 GeV and 30 TeV shows no hint of a residual γ-ray flux. Assuming conventional Navarro-Frenk-White and Einasto density profiles, limits are derived on the velocity-weighted annihilation cross section ⟨σv⟩ as a function of the DM particle mass. These are among the best reported so far for this energy range and in particular differ only little between the chosen density profile parametrizations. In particular, for the DM particle mass of ˜1TeV, values for ⟨σv⟩ above 3×10-25cm3s-1 are excluded for the Einasto density profile.

  19. Search for a Dark Matter annihilation signal from the Galactic Center halo with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Barnacka, A; de Almeida, U Barres; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Becherini, Y; Becker, J; Behera, B; Bernlöhr, K; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Borrel, V; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chounet, L -M; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Conrad, J; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubois, F; Dubus, G; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gallant, Y A; Gast, H; Gérard, L; Gerbig, D; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Göring, D; Hague, J D; Hampf, D; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; de Jager, O C; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzynski, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Keogh, D; Kerschhaggl, M; Khangulyan, D; Khélifi, B; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, D; Maxted, N; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Moderski, R; Moulin, E; Naumann, C L; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nguyen, N; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Olive, J-F; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Panter, M; Arribas, M Paz; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P -O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Ruppel, J; Ryde, F; Sahakian, V; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schöck, F M; Schönwald, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sikora, M; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tibolla, O; Tluczykont, M; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vialle, J P; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Vivier, M; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; Wierzcholska, A; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2011-01-01

    A search for a very-high-energy (VHE; >= 100 GeV) gamma-ray signal from self-annihilating particle Dark Matter (DM) is performed towards a region of projected distance r ~ 45-150 pc from the Galactic Center. The background-subtracted gamma-ray spectrum measured with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) gamma-ray instrument in the energy range between 300 GeV and 30 TeV shows no hint of a residual gamma-ray flux. Assuming conventional Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) and Einasto density profiles, limits are derived on the velocity-weighted annihilation cross section as a function of the DM particle mass. These are among the best reported so far for this energy range. In particular, for the DM particle mass of ~1 TeV, values for above 3 * 10^(-25) cm^3 s^(-1) are excluded for the Einasto density profile. The limits derived here differ much less for the chosen density profile parametrizations, as opposed to limits from gamma-ray observations of dwarf galaxies or the very center of the Milky Way, where the d...

  20. Theoretical evidence of 50 keV fermionic dark matter from galactic observables

    CERN Document Server

    Argüelles, C R; Ruffini, R

    2016-01-01

    We have recently introduced a new model for the distribution of dark matter (DM) in galaxies, the Ruffini-Arg\\"uelles-Rueda (RAR) model, based on a self-gravitating system of massive fermions at finite temperatures. The RAR model, for fermion masses above keV, successfully describes the DM halos in galaxies, and predicts the existence of a denser quantum core towards the center of each configuration. We demonstrate here, for the first time, that the introduction of a cutoff in the fermion phase-space distribution, necessary to account for the finite Galaxy size, defines a new solution with a compact quantum core which represents an alternative to the central black hole (BH) scenario for SgrA*. For a fermion mass in the range $48$~keV$/c^2\\lesssim m \\lesssim 345$~keV$/c^2$, the DM halo distribution fulfills the most recent data of the Milky Way rotation curves, while harbors a dense quantum core of $4\\times10^6 M_\\odot$ within the S2 star pericenter. In particular, for a fermion mass of $m\\sim 50$~keV$/c^2$ th...

  1. White Dwarfs:. Contributors and Tracers of the Galactic Dark-Matter Halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmans, L. V. E.; Blandford, R. D.

    2002-03-01

    We examine the claim by Oppenheimer et al. (2001) that the local halo density of white dwarfs is an order of magnitude higher than previously thought. As it stands, the observational data support the presence of a kinematically distinct population of halo white dwarfs at the >99% confidence level. A maximum-likelihood analysis gives a radial velocity dispersionREFID="9789812778017_0024FN001"> of σ hU = 150+80-40\\ km s-1 and an asymmetric drift of ν ha = 176+102-80\\ km s-1, for a Schwarzschild velocity distribution function with σU:σV:σW = 1:2/3:1/2. Halo white dwarfs have a local number density of 1.1+2.1-0.7 × 10-4\\ pc-3, which amounts to 0.8+1.6-0.5 per cent of the nominal local dark-matter halo density and is 5.0+9.5-3.2 times (90% C.L.) higher and thus only marginally in agreement with previous estimates. We discuss several direct consequences of this white-dwarf population (e.g. microlensing) and postulate a potential mechanism to eject young white dwarfs from the disc to the halo, through the orbital instabilities in triple or multiple stellar systems.

  2. Dancing in the dark: galactic properties trace spin swings along the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Dubois, Yohan; Welker, Charlotte; Borgne, Damien Le; Devriendt, Julien; Laigle, Clotilde; Codis, Sandrine; Pogosyan, Dmitry; Arnouts, Stéphane; Benabed, Karim; Bertin, Emmanuel; Blaizot, Jeremy; Bouchet, François; Cardoso, Jean-François; Colombi, Stéphane; de Lapparent, Valérie; Desjacques, Vincent; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Kassin, Susan; Kimm, Taysun; McCracken, Henry; Milliard, Bruno; Peirani, Sébastien; Prunet, Simon; Rouberol, Stéphane; Silk, Joseph; Slyz, Adrianne; Sousbie, Thierry; Teyssier, Romain; Tresse, Laurence; Treyer, Marie; Vibert, Didier; Volonteri, Marta

    2014-01-01

    A large-scale hydrodynamical cosmological simulation, Horizon-AGN, is used to investigate the alignment between the spin of galaxies and the large-scale cosmic filaments above redshift one. The analysis of more than 150 000 galaxies with morphological diversity in a 100 Mpc/h comoving box size shows that the spin of low-mass, rotation-dominated, blue, star-forming galaxies is preferentially aligned with their neighbouring filaments. High-mass, dispersion-dominated, red, quiescent galaxies tend to have a spin perpendicular to nearby filaments. The reorientation of the spin of massive galaxies is provided by galaxy mergers which are significant in the mass build up of high-mass galaxies. We find that the stellar mass transition from alignment to misalignment happens around 3.10^10 M_sun. This is consistent with earlier findings of a dark matter mass transition for the orientation of the spin of halos (5.10^11 M_sun at the same redshift from Codis et al., 2012). With these numerical evidence, we advocate a scena...

  3. The dark connection between the EGRET excess of diffuse Galactic gamma rays, the Canis Major dwarf, the Monoceros ring, the INTEGRAL 511 keV annihilation line, the gas flaring and the Galactic rotation curve

    CERN Document Server

    de Boer, Wim

    2007-01-01

    The EGRET excess of diffuse Galactic gamma rays shows all the key features of dark matter annihilation (DMA) for a WIMP mass in the range 50-100 GeV, especially the distribution of the excess is compatible with a standard halo profile with some additional ringlike substructures at 4 and 13 kpc from the Galactic centre. These substructures coincide with the gravitational potential well expected from the ring of dust at 4 kpc and the tidal stream of dark matter from the Canis Major satellite galaxy at 13 kpc, as deduced from N-body simulations fitting to the Monoceros ring of stars. Strong independent support for this substructure is given by the gas flaring in our Galaxy. The gamma rays from DMA are originating predominantly from the hadronization of mono-energetic quarks, which should produce also a small, but known fraction of protons and antiprotons. Bergstrom et al. an antiproton flux far above the observed antiproton flux and they conclude that the DMA interpretation of the EGRET excess can therefore be e...

  4. The \\textit{Fermi}-LAT gamma-ray excess at the Galactic Center in the singlet-doublet fermion dark matter model

    CERN Document Server

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Restrepo, Diego; Rivera, Andres; Silverwood, Hamish; Zapata, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    The singlet-doublet fermion dark matter model (SDFDM) provides a good DM candidate as well as the possibility of generating neutrino masses radiatively. The search and identification of DM requires the combined effort of both indirect and direct DM detection experiments in addition to the LHC. Remarkably, an excess of GeV gamma rays from the Galactic Center (GCE) has been measured with the \\textit{Fermi} Large Area Telescope (LAT) which appears to be robust with respect to changes in the diffuse galactic background modeling. Although several astrophysical explanations have been proposed, DM remains a simple and well motivated alternative. In this work, we examine the sensitivities of dark matter searches in the SDFDM scenario using \\textit{Fermi}-LAT, CTA, IceCube/DeepCore, LUX, PICO and LHC with an emphasis on exploring the regions of the parameter space that can account for the GCE. We find that DM particles present in this model with masses close to $\\sim 99$ GeV and $\\sim (173-190)$ GeV annihilating predo...

  5. Digging deeper into the Southern skies: a compact Milky-Way companion discovered in first-year Dark Energy Survey data

    CERN Document Server

    Luque, E; Santiago, B; Pieres, A; Balbinot, E; Bechtol, K; Drlica-Wagner, A; Neto, A Fausti; da Costa, L N; Maia, M A G; Yanny, B; Abbott, T; Allam, S; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Cunha, C E; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Eifler, T F; Finley, D A; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gerdes, D W; Gruen, D; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Li, T S; March, M; Marshall, J L; Martini, P; Miquel, R; Neilsen, E; Nichol, R C; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Tucker, D; Walker, A R; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a 5000 sq. degree survey in the southern hemisphere, which is rapidly reducing the existing north-south asymmetry in the census of MW satellites and other stellar substructure. We use the first-year DES data down to previously unprobed photometric depths to search for stellar systems in the Galactic halo, therefore complementing the previous analysis of the same data carried out by our group earlier this year. Our search is based on a matched filter algorithm that produces stellar density maps consistent with stellar population models of various ages, metallicities, and distances over the survey area. The most conspicuous density peaks in these maps have been identified automatically and ranked according to their significance and recurrence for different input models. We report the discovery of one additional stellar system besides those previously found by several authors using the same first-year DES data. The object is compact, and consistent with being dominated by an old a...

  6. Indirect dark matter search with diffuse gamma rays from the Galactic Center with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacholkowska, A.; Lamanna, G.; Nuss, E.; Bolmont, J.; Adloff, C.; Alcaraz, J.; Battiston, R.; Brun, P.; Burger, W. J.; Choutko, V.; Coignet, G.; Falvard, A.; Fiandrini, E.; Girard, L.; Goy, C.; Jedamzik, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Moultaka, G.; Natale, S.; Pochon, J.; Pohl, M.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Sapinski, M.; Sevilla Noarbe, I.; Vialle, J. P.

    2006-07-01

    The detection of nonbaryonic dark matter through its gamma-ray annihilation in the center of our galaxy has been studied. The gamma fluxes according to different models have been simulated and compared to those expected to be observed with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), during a long-term mission on board of the international space station. Under the assumption that the dark matter is composed of the lightest, stable supersymmetric particle, the neutralino, the results of the simulations in the framework of minimal supergravity models, show that with a cuspy dark matter halo profile or a clumpy halo, the annihilation gamma-ray signal would be detected by AMS. More optimistic perspectives are obtained with the anomaly mediated supersymmetry breaking (AMSB) model. The latter leads also to a cosmologically important Li2 abundance. Finally, the discovery potential for the massive Kaluza-Klein dark matter candidates has been evaluated and their detection looks feasible.

  7. An indirect dark matter search with diffuse gamma rays from the Galactic Centre: prospects for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Jacholkowska, A; Nuss, E; Adloff, C; Alcaraz, J; Battiston, R; Bolmont, J; Brun, P; Burger, W J; Choutko, V; Coignet, G; Falvard, A; Flandrini, E; Girard, L; Goy, C; Jedamzik, K; Kossakowski, R; Moultaka, G; Natale, S; Pochon, J; Pohl, M; Rosier-Lees, S; Sapinski, M; Noarbe, I S; Vialle, J P; Vialle, JP.

    2005-01-01

    The detection of non-baryonic dark matter through its gamma-ray annihilation in the centre of our galaxy has been studied. The gamma fluxes according to different models have been simulated and compared to those expected to be observed with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), during a long-term mission on board of the International Space Station. Under the assumption that the dark matter halo is composed of the lightest, stable supersymmetric particle, the neutralino, the results of the simulations in the framework of mSUGRA models, show that with a cuspy dark matter halo or a clumpy halo, the annihilation gamma-ray signal would be detected by AMS. More optimistic perspectives are obtained with the Anomaly Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking (AMSB) model. The latter leads also to a cosmologically important 6Li abundance. Finally, the discovery potential for the massive Kaluza-Klein dark matter candidates has been evaluated and their detection looks feasible.

  8. New H.E.S.S. diffuse emission from the Galactic center: a combination of heavy dark matter and millisecond pulsars?

    CERN Document Server

    Lacroix, Thomas; Moulin, Emmanuel; Boehm, Celine

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, we show that the newly detected H.E.S.S. gamma-ray diffuse emission from the Galactic center below 0.45 deg can be accounted for by inverse Compton emission from millisecond pulsars and heavy (~ 100 TeV) dark matter annihilating to electrons or muons with a thermal or sub-thermal cross-section, provided that the dark matter density profile features a supermassive black hole-induced spike on sub-pc scales. We discuss the impact of the interstellar radiation field, magnetic field and diffusion set-up on the spectral and spatial morphology of the resulting emission. For well-motivated parameters, we show that the DM-induced emission reproduces the spatial morphology of the H.E.S.S. signal above ~ 10 TeV, while we obtain a more extended component from pulsars at lower energies, which could be used as a prediction for future H.E.S.S. observations.

  9. Conformal Gravity: Dark Matter and Dark Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Nesbet

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This short review examines recent progress in understanding dark matter, dark energy, and galactic halos using theory that departs minimally from standard particle physics and cosmology. Strict conformal symmetry (local Weyl scaling covariance, postulated for all elementary massless fields, retains standard fermion and gauge boson theory but modifies Einstein–Hilbert general relativity and the Higgs scalar field model, with no new physical fields. Subgalactic phenomenology is retained. Without invoking dark matter, conformal gravity and a conformal Higgs model fit empirical data on galactic rotational velocities, galactic halos, and Hubble expansion including dark energy.

  10. A description of the Galactic Center excess in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model and the Dark Matter signatures for the LHC and direct and indire ct detection experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Caron, Sascha; Hendriks, Luc; de Austri, Roberto Ruiz; Weniger, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) indicate an excess in gamma rays originating from the center of our Galaxy. A possible explanation for this excess is the annihilation of Dark Matter particles. We have investigated the annihilation of neutralinos as Dark Matter candidates within the phenomenological Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (pMSSM). An iterative particle filter approach was used to search for solutions within the pMSSM. We found solutions that are consistent with astroparticle physics and collider experiments, and provide a reasonable fit to the energy spectrum of the excess. The neutralino is a Bino/Higgsino mixture and a mass in the range $84-92$~GeV yielding a Dark Matter relic density $0.06 < \\Omega h^2 <0.13$. These pMSSM solutions make clear forecasts for LHC, direct and indirect DM detection experiments. If the pMSSM explanation of the excess seen by Fermi-LAT is correct, a DM signal might be discovered soon.

  11. SOAR optical and near-infrared spectroscopic survey of newly discovered massive stars in the periphery of Galactic Massive star clusters I - NGC3603

    CERN Document Server

    Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Sanmartim, David

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present a spectroscopic study of very massive stars found outside the center of the massive stellar cluster NGC3603. From the analysis of SOAR spectroscopic data and related optical-NIR photometry, we confirm the existence of several very massive stars in the periphery of NGC 3603. The first group of objects (MTT58, WR42e and RFS7) is compound by three new Galactic exemplars of the OIf*/WN type, all of them with probable initial masses well above 100 Msun and estimated ages of about 1 Myr. Based on Goodman blue-optical spectrum of MTT68, we can confirm the previous finding in the NIR of the only other Galactic exemplar (besides HD93129A) of the O2If* type known to date. Based on its position relative to a set of theoretical isochrons in a Hertzprung-Russel diagram, we concluded that the new O2If* star could be one of the most massive (150 Msun) and luminous (Mv=-7.3) O-star in the Galaxy. Also, another remarkable result is the discovery of a new O2V star (MTT31) that is the first exemplar of ...

  12. The Sequential Growth of Star Formation Seeds in the Galactic Snake : Infrared Dark Cloud G11.11-0.12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Ke; Zhang, Qizhou; Testi, Leonardo; Wu, Yuefang; Zhang, Huawei; van der Tak, Floris; Pillai, Thushara; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Carey, Sean; Ragan, Sarah; Henning, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) 1.3 and 0.88 mm broad band observations, and Very Large Array (VLA) observations in NH3 (J,K) = (1,1) up to (5,5), as well as H2O and CH3OH maser lines toward the two most massive molecular clumps in Infrared Dark Cloud (IRDC) G11.11-0.12, also known as the Snake

  13. Hierarchical fragmentation and differential star formation in the Galactic `Snake': infrared dark cloud G11.11-0.12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Ke; Zhang, Qizhou; Testi, Leonardo; van der Tak, Floris; Wu, Yuefang; Zhang, Huawei; Pillai, Thushara; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Carey, Sean; Ragan, Sarah E.; Henning, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) λ = 0.88 and 1.3 mm broad-band observations, and Very Large Array (VLA) observations in NH3 (J, K) = (1,1) up to (5,5), H2O and CH3OH maser lines towards the two most massive molecular clumps in infrared dark cloud (IRDC) G11.11-0.12. Sensitive high-resolution im

  14. The Sequential Growth of Star Formation Seeds in the Galactic Snake: Infrared Dark Cloud G11.11-0.12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Ke; Zhang, Qizhou; Testi, Leonardo; Wu, Yuefang; Zhang, Huawei; van der Tak, Floris; Pillai, Thushara; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Carey, Sean; Ragan, Sarah; Henning, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) 1.3 and 0.88 mm broad band observations, and Very Large Array (VLA) observations in NH3 (J,K) = (1,1) up to (5,5), as well as H2O and CH3OH maser lines toward the two most massive molecular clumps in Infrared Dark Cloud (IRDC) G11.11-0.12, also known as the Snake

  15. LABOCA 870 micron dust continuum mapping of selected infrared-dark cloud regions in the Galactic plane

    CERN Document Server

    Miettinen, Oskari

    2012-01-01

    We have mapped four selected about 0.5 deg x 0.5 deg-sized fields containing Spitzer 8-micron dark regions with APEX/LABOCA at 870 micron. Selected positions in the fields were observed in C17O(2-1) to obtain kinematic information. The obtained LABOCA maps are used in conjunction with the Spitzer IR images. The total number of clumps identified in this survey is 91, out of which 40 (44%) appear dark at 8 and 24 micron. The remaining clumps are associated with mid-IR emission. Many of the identified clumps are massive enough to allow high-mass star formation, and some of them already show clear signposts of that. Seven clumps associated with extended-like 4.5 micron emission are candidate extended green objects (EGOs). Filamentary dust "ridges" were found towards the Spitzer bubbles N10/11 in one of our fields, which conforms to the triggered high-mass star formation in the system. The relative number of IR-dark and IR-bright clumps suggest that the duration of the former stage is about 1.6x10^5 yr. The mass d...

  16. SOAR Optical and Near-infrared Spectroscopic Survey of Newly Discovered Massive Stars in the Periphery of Galactic Massive Star Clusters I-NGC 3603

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Lopes, A.; Franco, G. A. P.; Sanmartim, D.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present the results of a spectroscopic study of very massive stars (VMSs) found outside the center of the massive stellar cluster NGC 3603. From the analysis of the associated Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope spectroscopic data and related optical-near-IR (NIR) photometry, we confirm the existence of several VMSs in the periphery of NGC 3603. The first group of objects (MTT58, WR42e, and RF7) is composed of three new Galactic exemplars of the OIf*/WN type, all of them with probable initial masses well above 100 {M}⊙ and estimated ages of about 1 Myr. Based on our Goodman blue-optical spectrum of another source in our sample (MTT68), we can confirm the previous finding in the NIR of the only other Galactic exemplar (besides HD 93129A) of the O2If* type known to date. Based on its position relative to a set of theoretical isochrones in a Hertzprung-Russel (H-R) diagram, we concluded that the new O2If* star could be one of the most massive (150 {M}⊙ ) and luminous (M V = -7.3) O-stars in the Galaxy. Also, another remarkable result is the discovery of a new O2v star (MTT31), which is the first exemplar of that class so far identified in the Milk Way. From its position in the H-R diagram it is found that this new star probably had an initial mass of 80 {M}⊙ , as well as an absolute magnitude of M V = -6.0, corresponding to a luminosity similar to other known O2v stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Finally, we also communicate the discovery of a new Galactic O3.5If* star (RFS8) that is quite an intriguing case. Indeed, it is located far to the south of the NGC 3603 center, in apparent isolation at a large radial projected linear distance of ˜62 pc. Its derived luminosity is similar to that of the other O3.5If* (Sh18) found in NGC 3603's innermost region, and the fact that a such high mass star is observed so isolated in the field led us to speculate that perhaps it could have been expelled from the innermost parts of the complex

  17. A new X-ray transient, IGR J17451-3022, discovered by INTEGRAL/JEM-X near the Galactic Centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Vandbaek Kroer, L.; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl;

    2014-01-01

    The JEM-X twin X-ray monitors on board the INTEGRAL satellite has detected a new X-ray transient during recent observations of the Galactic Centre and Bulge regions. The new source named IGR J17451-3022 has the following coordinates: R.A. = 266.27 Dec. = -30.38 with a 2arcmin 90% confidence radius...... instrument, only 26 arcsec from the JEM-X position, at the enhanced position : R.A. = 266.27824 Dec. = -30.37876 with a 90% error confidence of 2.1 arcsec. Further analysis of the Swift data is on-going. We thank the Swift team for having performed this observation of the new transient source. Multi...

  18. Black Holes Make Stars, which explains the Mystery of the Newly Discovered Phoenix Galaxy (while Dark Matter is described in the explanation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimorelli, Salvatore A.; Samuels, Chares

    2013-07-01

    A prevailing theory is stars change their energy field and are reduced to Black Holes (BH). Consider there are as many types of BH as there are of stars, and a greatly expanded modified Black Hole (from the original 'Big Bang'), can become a Star. We theorize that something is not made of nothing; and the universe was created by a massive Black Hole in c-1 space, which had enough mass to produce what is contained in our universe, today. We categorized BH, by their mass. Our concept could explain 'the Mystery of the Newly Discovered 'PHOENIX GALAXY' and presents a new theory of what forms of dark matter could exist. We define and categorize BH and the space they inhabit. These are linked to the formation of galaxies, stars, planets and planetary processes. Space itself is categorized as to its purpose and properties as it relates to the various categories of BH and processes ongoing within their space(s). We propose a category-1 (c-1) BH formed the universe, by generating billions of catagory-2 (c-2) BH in c-2 space inside the universe, 10% of which formed galaxies and 90% remain as dark matter in the form of c-2 and c-3 BH which are still evolving. C-2 BH can burst and form a galaxy, containing c-3 space, filled with c-3 and c-4 BH. C-3 BH are significantly more modified and expanded than c-2 BH and are formed from burst c-2 BH on their own or by colliding with another c-2 BH and bursting to form gas and dust clouds inside the galaxy, peppered with c-3 and c-4 BH which eventually are seen as new stars forming in the dust clouds (described later). We envision three mechanisms (a,b,&c) for stellar origin, formation and evolution . The first type "a" is well known (accepted); whereas, the other two "b&c" are new and will be presented. This explains how some super-cluster complexes can occur in 13.4 billion years rather than over 40 billion years.

  19. Estimating Galactic gas content using different tracers: Compatibility of results, dark gas, and unidentified TeV sources

    CERN Document Server

    Pedaletti, Giovanna; Torres, Diego F; Natale, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    A large fraction of Galactic very-high energy (VHE; E$\\gtrsim$100 GeV) $\\gamma$-ray sources is cataloged as unidentified. In this work we explore the possibility that these unidentified sources are located in ambients particularly rich in material content unaccounted by traditional tracers. In a scenario where the VHE emission is due to the interaction of the accelerated particles with a target mass, a large mass of untraced material could be substantially contributing to the VHE emission from these regions. Here, we use three tracers for the commonly explored components: intensity of the $^\\textrm{12}$CO(1$\\rightarrow$0) line to trace the molecular material, HI hyperfine transition at 21cm to trace atomic hydrogen, and dust emission to trace the total hydrogen content. We show that the estimates of material content from these three tracers are compatible if the uncertainty on the respective conversion factors is taken into account. No additional gas component is found in these regions. However, a simple mass...

  20. Evidence for Distinct Components of the Galactic Stellar Halo from 838 RR Lyrae Stars Discovered in the LONEOS-I Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miceli, A; Rest, A; Stubbs, C W; Hawley, S L; Cook, K H; Magnier, E A; Krisciunas, K; Bowell, E; Koehn, B

    2007-02-23

    We present 838 ab-type RR Lyrae stars from the Lowell Observatory Near Earth Objects Survey Phase I (LONEOS-I). These objects cover 1430 deg{sup 2} and span distances ranging from 3-30kpc from the Galactic Center. Object selection is based on phased, photometric data with 28-50 epochs. We use this large sample to explore the bulk properties of the stellar halo, including the spatial distribution. The period-amplitude distribution of this sample shows that the majority of these RR Lyrae stars resemble Oosterhoff type I, but there is a significant fraction (26%) which have longer periods and appear to be Oosterhoff type II. We find that the radial distributions of these two populations have significantly different profiles ({rho}{sub OoI} {approx} R{sup -2.26{+-}0.07} and {rho}{sub OoII} {approx} R{sup -2.88{+-}0.11}). This suggests that the stellar halo was formed by at least two distinct accretion processes and supports dual-halo models.

  1. The dark connection between the Canis Major dwarf, the Monoceros ring, the gas flaring, the rotation curve and the EGRET excess of diffuse Galactic Gamma Rays

    CERN Document Server

    de Boer, Wim; Weber, M; Sander, C; Zhukov, V; Kazakov, D

    2007-01-01

    The excess of diffuse galactic gamma rays above 1 GeV, as observed by the EGRET telescope on the NASA Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, shows all the key features from Dark Matter (DM) annihilation: (i) the energy spectrum of the excess is the same in all sky directions and is consistent with the gamma rays expected for the annihilation of WIMPs with a mass between 50-100 GeV; (ii) the intensity distribution of the excess in the sky is used to determine the halo profile, which was found to correspond to the usual profile from N-body simulations with additional substructure in the form of two doughnut-shaped structures at radii of 4 and 13 kpc; (iii) recent N-body simulations of the tidal disruption of the Canis Major dwarf galaxy show that it is a perfect progenitor of the ringlike Monoceros tidal stream of stars at 13 kpc with ring parameters in agreement with the EGRET data; (iiii) the mass of the outer ring is so large, that its gravitational effects influence both the gas flaring and the rotation curve of th...

  2. Search for dark matter annihilations towards the inner Galactic halo from 10 years of observations with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E; Arrieta, M; Aubert, P; Backes, M; Balzer, A; Barnard, M; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Berge, D; Bernhard, S; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Blackwell, R; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Bregeon, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bryan, M; Bulik, T; Capasso, M; Carr, J; Casanova, S; Chadwick, P M; Chakraborty, N; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Chen, A; Chevalier, J; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Condon, B; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Donath, A; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Ernenwein, J -P; Eschbach, S; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Fernandes, M V; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Funk, S; Füßling, M; Gabici, S; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Gottschall, D; Goyal, A; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Hadasch, D; Hahn, J; Hawkes, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hoischen, C; Holler, M; Horns, D; Ivascenko, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, D; Jankowsky, F; Jingo, M; Jogler, T; Jouvin, L; Jung-Richardt, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kerszberg, D; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; King, J; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Kraus, M; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lau, J; Lees, J -P; Lefaucheur, J; Lefranc, V; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Leser, E; Lohse, T; Lorentz, M; Liu, R; Lypova, I; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Mariaud, C; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; Meintjes, P J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Mitchell, A M W; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Morå, K; Moulin, E; Murach, T; de Naurois, M; Niederwanger, F; Niemiec, J; Oakes, L; Odaka, H; Ohm, S; Öttl, S; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Padovani, M; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Prokhorov, D; Prokoph, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Salek, D; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Sasaki, M; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwemmer, S; Seyffert, A S; Shafi, N; Shilon, I; Simoni, R; Sol, H; Spanier, F; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Tuffs, R; van der Walt, J; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Veh, J; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Vink, J; Voisin, F; Völk, H J; Vuillaume, T; Wadiasingh, Z; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Wagner, R M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Yang, R; Zabalza, V; Zaborov, D; Zacharias, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zefi, F; Ziegler, A; Zywucka, N

    2016-01-01

    The inner region of the Milky Way halo harbors a large amount of dark matter (DM). Given its proximity, it is one of the most promising targets to look for DM. We report on a search for the annihilations of DM particles using $\\gamma$-ray observations towards the inner 300 parsecs of the Milky Way, with the H.E.S.S. array of ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. The analysis is based on a 2D maximum likelihood method using Galactic center (GC) data accumulated by H.E.S.S. over the last 10 years (2004-2014), and does not show any significant $\\gamma$-ray signal above background. Assuming Einasto and Navarro-Frenk-White DM density profiles at the GC, we derive upper limits on the annihilation cross section $\\langle \\sigma v\\rangle$. These constraints are the strongest obtained so far in the TeV DM mass range and improve upon previous limits by a factor 5. For the Einasto profile, the constraints reach $\\langle \\sigma v\\rangle$ values of $\\rm 6\\times10^{-26} cm^3s^{-1}$ in the $W^+W^-$ channel for a DM particle mas...

  3. Hierarchical fragmentation and differential star formation in the Galactic "Snake": infrared dark cloud G11.11-0.12

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ke; Testi, Leonardo; van der Tak, Floris; Wu, Yuefang; Zhang, Huawei; Pillai, Thushara; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Carey, Sean; Ragan, Sarah E; Henning, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) $\\lambda =$ 0.88 and 1.3 mm broad band observations, and the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations in $\\rm{NH_3}$ $(J,K) = (1,1)$ up to $(5,5)$, $\\rm{H_2O}$ and $\\rm{CH_3OH}$ maser lines toward the two most massive molecular clumps in infrared dark cloud (IRDC) G11.11-0.12. Sensitive high-resolution images reveal hierarchical fragmentation in dense molecular gas from the $\\sim 1$ pc clump scale down to $\\sim 0.01$ pc condensation scale. At each scale, the mass of the fragments is orders of magnitude larger than the Jeans mass. This is common to all four IRDC clumps we studied, suggesting that turbulence plays an important role in the early stages of clustered star formation. Masers, shock heated $\\rm{NH_3}$ gas, and outflows indicate intense ongoing star formation in some cores while no such signatures are found in others. Furthermore, chemical differentiation may reflect the difference in evolutionary stages among these star formation seeds. We find $\\rm{NH_3}$ ortho...

  4. On R-W1 as A Diagnostic to Discover Obscured Active Galactic Nuclei in Wide-area X-Ray Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Civano, Francesca; Brusa, Marcella; Stern, Daniel; Glikman, Eilat; Gallagher, Sarah; Urry, C. Meg; Cales, Sabrina; Cappelluti, Nico; Cardamone, Carolin; Comastri, Andrea; Farrah, Duncan; Greene, Jenny E.; Komossa, S.; Merloni, Andrea; Mroczkowski, Tony; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Richards, Gordon; Salvato, Mara; Schawinski, Kevin; Treister, Ezequiel

    2016-02-01

    Capitalizing on the all-sky coverage of WISE and the 35% and 50% sky coverage from Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Pan-STARRS, respectively, we explore the efficacy of mR (optical) - {m}3.4μ {{m}} (mid-infrared), hereafter R-W1, as a color diagnostic to identify obscured supermassive black hole accretion in wide-area X-ray surveys. We use the ˜16.5 deg2 Stripe 82 X-ray survey data as a test bed to compare R-W1 with R - K, an oft-used obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) selection criterion, and examine where different classes of objects lie in this parameter space. Most stars follow a well-defined path in R - K versus R-W1 space. We demonstrate that optically normal galaxies hosting X-ray AGNs at redshifts 0.5\\lt z\\lt 1 can be recovered with an R-W1\\gt 4 color cut, while they typically are not selected as AGNs based on their W1-W2 colors. Additionally, different observed X-ray luminosity bins favor different regions in R-W1 parameter space: moderate-luminosity AGNs (1043 erg {{{s}}}-1\\lt {L}0.5-10{keV}\\lt {10}44 erg s-1) tend to have red colors, while the highest-luminosity AGNs ({L}0.5-10{keV}\\gt {10}45 erg s-1) have bluer colors; higher spectroscopic completeness of the Stripe 82X sample is needed to determine whether this is a selection effect or an intrinsic property. Finally, we parameterize X-ray obscuration of Stripe 82X AGNs by calculating their hardness ratios (HRs) and find no clear trends between HR and optical reddening. Our results will help inform best-effort practices in following up obscured AGN candidates in current and future wide-area, shallow X-ray surveys, including the all-sky eROSITA mission.

  5. Search for Dark Matter Annihilations towards the Inner Galactic Halo from 10 Years of Observations with H.E.S.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, H; Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Ait Benkhali, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E; Arrieta, M; Aubert, P; Backes, M; Balzer, A; Barnard, M; Becherini, Y; Becker Tjus, J; Berge, D; Bernhard, S; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Blackwell, R; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Bregeon, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bryan, M; Bulik, T; Capasso, M; Carr, J; Casanova, S; Chakraborty, N; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Chen, A; Chevalier, J; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Condon, B; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Donath, A; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Ernenwein, J-P; Eschbach, S; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Fernandes, M V; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Funk, S; Füßling, M; Gabici, S; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Gottschall, D; Goyal, A; Grondin, M-H; Grudzińska, M; Hadasch, D; Hahn, J; Hawkes, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hoischen, C; Holler, M; Horns, D; Ivascenko, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, D; Jankowsky, F; Jingo, M; Jogler, T; Jouvin, L; Jung-Richardt, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kerszberg, D; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; King, J; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Kraus, M; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lau, J; Lees, J-P; Lefaucheur, J; Lefranc, V; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J-P; Leser, E; Lohse, T; Lorentz, M; Lui, R; Lypova, I; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Mariaud, C; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; Meintjes, P J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Mitchell, A M W; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Morå, K; Moulin, E; Murach, T; de Naurois, M; Niederwanger, F; Niemiec, J; Oakes, L; Odaka, H; Ohm, S; Öttl, S; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Padovani, M; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Paz Arribas, M; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P-O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Prokhorov, D; Prokoph, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; de Los Reyes, R; Rieger, F; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Salek, D; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Sasaki, M; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwemmer, S; Seyffert, A S; Shafi, N; Simoni, R; Sol, H; Spanier, F; Spengler, G; Spieß, F; Stawarz, L; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Tavernet, J-P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Tuffs, R; van der Walt, J; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Veh, J; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Vink, J; Voisin, F; Völk, H J; Vuillaume, T; Wadiasingh, Z; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Wagner, R M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Yang, R; Zabalza, V; Zaborov, D; Zacharias, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zefi, F; Ziegler, A; Żywucka, N

    2016-09-09

    The inner region of the Milky Way halo harbors a large amount of dark matter (DM). Given its proximity, it is one of the most promising targets to look for DM. We report on a search for the annihilations of DM particles using γ-ray observations towards the inner 300 pc of the Milky Way, with the H.E.S.S. array of ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. The analysis is based on a 2D maximum likelihood method using Galactic Center (GC) data accumulated by H.E.S.S. over the last 10 years (2004-2014), and does not show any significant γ-ray signal above background. Assuming Einasto and Navarro-Frenk-White DM density profiles at the GC, we derive upper limits on the annihilation cross section ⟨σv⟩. These constraints are the strongest obtained so far in the TeV DM mass range and improve upon previous limits by a factor 5. For the Einasto profile, the constraints reach ⟨σv⟩ values of 6×10^{-26}  cm^{3} s^{-1} in the W^{+}W^{-} channel for a DM particle mass of 1.5 TeV, and 2×10^{-26}  cm^{3} s^{-1} in the τ^{+}τ^{-} channel for a 1 TeV mass. For the first time, ground-based γ-ray observations have reached sufficient sensitivity to probe ⟨σv⟩ values expected from the thermal relic density for TeV DM particles.

  6. Search for Dark Matter Annihilations towards the Inner Galactic Halo from 10 Years of Observations with H.E.S.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Arrieta, M.; Aubert, P.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, J.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jogler, T.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Lui, R.; Lypova, I.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Morâ, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Öttl, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokhorov, D.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spieß, F.; Stawarz, L.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tuffs, R.; van der Walt, J.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Żywucka, N.; H. E. S. S. Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The inner region of the Milky Way halo harbors a large amount of dark matter (DM). Given its proximity, it is one of the most promising targets to look for DM. We report on a search for the annihilations of DM particles using γ -ray observations towards the inner 300 pc of the Milky Way, with the H.E.S.S. array of ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. The analysis is based on a 2D maximum likelihood method using Galactic Center (GC) data accumulated by H.E.S.S. over the last 10 years (2004-2014), and does not show any significant γ -ray signal above background. Assuming Einasto and Navarro-Frenk-White DM density profiles at the GC, we derive upper limits on the annihilation cross section ⟨σ v ⟩. These constraints are the strongest obtained so far in the TeV DM mass range and improve upon previous limits by a factor 5. For the Einasto profile, the constraints reach ⟨σ v ⟩ values of 6 ×10-26 cm3 s-1 in the W+W- channel for a DM particle mass of 1.5 TeV, and 2 ×10-26 cm3 s-1 in the τ+τ- channel for a 1 TeV mass. For the first time, ground-based γ -ray observations have reached sufficient sensitivity to probe ⟨σ v ⟩ values expected from the thermal relic density for TeV DM particles.

  7. Black Holes Make Stars which explains the Mystery of the Newly Discovered PHOENIX GALAXY, while Dark Matter is described in the explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimorelli, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    A prevailing theory is some Stars change their energy field and are reduced to Black Holes (BHs). Consider an expanded modified Black Hole from the original Big Bang which might have been a massive Black Hole can become a Galaxy and or a Star. We theorize something is not made of nothing; and the universe was created by a massive Black Hole which had enough mass to produce what is contained in our universe today. We categorized BH by their mass. Our concept could explain the Mystery of the Newly Discovered PHOENIX GALAXY. We define and categorize black holes and the space they inhabit. We describe mechanisms for their formation and mechanisms of black hole collisions and bursts, inside of the universe. These are linked to the formation of galaxies, stars, planets and planetary processes. Insight is gained regarding the formation and evolution of galaxies and the matter contained therein. Space itself is categorized as to its purpose and properties as it relates to the categories of black holes and processes ongoing within the space in which the processes occur. We suggest a category-1 (c-1) black hole burst by collision or on it's own and formed the universe by generating great numbers of c-2 BHs inside the universe, in c-2 space, which become galaxies and which is the start of the universe, 10% of which formed galaxies and 90% remain as dark matter as c-2 and c-3 BHs which are still evolving. C-2 BHs can burst to form a galaxy, containing c-3 space, filled with c-3 and c-4 BHs. C-3 BHs are significantly more modified and expanded than c-2 BHs and are formed from burst c-2 BHs to form gas and dust clouds peppered with the c-3 BHs Remnants from the burst c-2 BH include sizes from minute particles which contribute to the formation of massive gas and dust clouds; to 10 to 20 solar masses that form large stars; and others, tiny stars which eventually become planets and moons. These gas and dust clouds are peppered with c-4 BHs which eventually are seen as new stars

  8. Probing the Dark Sector with Dark Matter Bound States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Haipeng; Echenard, Bertrand; Pospelov, Maxim; Zhang, Yue

    2016-04-15

    A model of the dark sector where O(few  GeV) mass dark matter particles χ couple to a lighter dark force mediator V, m_{V}≪m_{χ}, is motivated by the recently discovered mismatch between simulated and observed shapes of galactic halos. Such models, in general, provide a challenge for direct detection efforts and collider searches. We show that for a large range of coupling constants and masses, the production and decay of the bound states of χ, such as 0^{-+} and 1^{--} states, η_{D} and ϒ_{D}, is an important search channel. We show that e^{+}e^{-}→η_{D}+V or ϒ_{D}+γ production at B factories for α_{D}>0.1 is sufficiently strong to result in multiple pairs of charged leptons and pions via η_{D}→2V→2(l^{+}l^{-}) and ϒ_{D}→3V→3(l^{+}l^{-}) (l=e,μ,π). The absence of such final states in the existing searches performed at BABAR and Belle sets new constraints on the parameter space of the model. We also show that a search for multiple bremsstrahlung of dark force mediators, e^{+}e^{-}→χχ[over ¯]+nV, resulting in missing energy and multiple leptons, will further improve the sensitivity to self-interacting dark matter.

  9. Dark Matter and Dark Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerman, Lotty; Carroll, Sean M; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2008-01-01

    We explore the feasibility and astrophysical consequences of a new long-range U(1) gauge field ("dark electromagnetism") that couples only to dark matter, not to the Standard Model. The dark matter consists of an equal number of positive and negative charges under the new force, but annihilations are suppressed if the dark matter mass is sufficiently high and the dark fine-structure constant $\\hat\\alpha$ is sufficiently small. The correct relic abundance can be obtained if the dark matter also couples to the conventional weak interactions, and we verify that this is consistent with particle-physics constraints. The primary limit on $\\hat\\alpha$ comes from the demand that the dark matter be effectively collisionless in galactic dynamics, which implies $\\hat\\alpha \\lesssim 10^{-4}$ for TeV-scale dark matter. These values are easily compatible with constraints from structure formation and primordial nucleosynthesis. We raise the prospect of interesting new plasma effects in dark matter dynamics, which remain to ...

  10. H.E.S.S. Limits on Linelike Dark Matter Signatures in the 100 GeV to 2 TeV Energy Range Close to the Galactic Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, H; Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Ait Benkhali, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Andersson, T; Angüner, E O; Arrieta, M; Aubert, P; Backes, M; Balzer, A; Barnard, M; Becherini, Y; Becker Tjus, J; Berge, D; Bernhard, S; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Blackwell, R; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Bregeon, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bryan, M; Bulik, T; Capasso, M; Carr, J; Casanova, S; Chakraborty, N; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Chen, A; Chevalier, J; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Condon, B; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Devin, J; deWilt, P; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Donath, A; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Ernenwein, J-P; Eschbach, S; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Fernandes, M V; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Funk, S; Füßling, M; Gabici, S; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Gottschall, D; Goyal, A; Grondin, M-H; Grudzińska, M; Hadasch, D; Hahn, J; Hawkes, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hoischen, C; Holler, M; Horns, D; Ivascenko, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, D; Jankowsky, F; Jingo, M; Jogler, T; Jouvin, L; Jung-Richardt, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kerszberg, D; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; King, J; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Kraus, M; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lau, J; Lees, J-P; Lefaucheur, J; Lefranc, V; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J-P; Leser, E; Liu, R; Lohse, T; Lorentz, M; Lypova, I; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Mariaud, C; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; Meintjes, P J; Meyer, M; Mitchell, A M W; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Morå, K; Moulin, E; Murach, T; de Naurois, M; Niederwanger, F; Niemiec, J; Oakes, L; O'Brien, P; Odaka, H; Ohm, S; Ostrowski, M; Öttl, S; Oya, I; Padovani, M; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Paz Arribas, M; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perennes, C; Petrucci, P-O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Prokhorov, D; Prokoph, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; de Los Reyes, R; Rieger, F; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Salek, D; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Sasaki, M; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwemmer, S; Settimo, M; Seyffert, A S; Shafi, N; Shilon, I; Simoni, R; Sol, H; Spanier, F; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Tavernet, J-P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tibaldo, L; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Tuffs, R; van der Walt, J; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Veh, J; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Vink, J; Voisin, F; Völk, H J; Vuillaume, T; Wadiasingh, Z; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Wagner, R M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Yang, R; Zabalza, V; Zaborov, D; Zacharias, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zefi, F; Ziegler, A; Żywucka, N

    2016-10-07

    A search for dark matter linelike signals iss performed in the vicinity of the Galactic Center by the H.E.S.S. experiment on observational data taken in 2014. An unbinned likelihood analysis iss developed to improve the sensitivity to linelike signals. The upgraded analysis along with newer data extend the energy coverage of the previous measurement down to 100 GeV. The 18 h of data collected with the H.E.S.S. array allow one to rule out at 95% C.L. the presence of a 130 GeV line (at l=-1.5°, b=0° and for a dark matter profile centered at this location) previously reported in Fermi-LAT data. This new analysis overlaps significantly in energy with previous Fermi-LAT and H.E.S.S.

  11. Antideuterons from supersymmetric dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Donato, F; Maurin, D

    2007-01-01

    We calculate the antideuteron flux expected from dark matter annihilation in the galactic halo. The propagation is treated in a full 2-D propagation model consistent with the results obtained from the propagation of B/C and other galactic species. We discuss the potentials of this indirect dark matter detection means, with special emphasis on the possible sources of uncertainties affecting future measurements

  12. Boosted Dark Matter at Neutrino Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Necib, Lina; Wongjirad, Taritree; Conrad, Janet M

    2016-01-01

    Current and future neutrino experiments can be used to discover dark matter, not only in searches for dark matter annihilating to neutrinos, but also in scenarios where dark matter itself scatters off Standard Model particles in the detector. In this work, we study the sensitivity of different neutrino detectors to a class of models called boosted dark matter, in which a subdominant component of a dark sector acquires a large Lorentz boost today through annihilation of a dominant component in a dark matter-dense region, such as the galactic center or dwarf spheroidal galaxies. This analysis focuses on the sensitivity of different neutrino detectors, specifically the Cherenkov-based Super-K and the future argon-based DUNE to boosted dark matter that scatters off electrons. We study the dependence of the expected limits on the experimental features, such as energy threshold, volume and exposure in the limit of constant scattering amplitude. We highlight experiment-specific features that enable current and futur...

  13. H.E.S.S. Limits on Linelike Dark Matter Signatures in the 100 GeV to 2 TeV Energy Range Close to the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Andersson, T.; Angüner, E. O.; Arrieta, M.; Aubert, P.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, J.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jogler, T.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Liu, R.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Lypova, I.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Morâ, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Öttl, S.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokhorov, D.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Settimo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tuffs, R.; van der Walt, J.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Żywucka, N.; H. E. S. S. Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    A search for dark matter linelike signals iss performed in the vicinity of the Galactic Center by the H.E.S.S. experiment on observational data taken in 2014. An unbinned likelihood analysis iss developed to improve the sensitivity to linelike signals. The upgraded analysis along with newer data extend the energy coverage of the previous measurement down to 100 GeV. The 18 h of data collected with the H.E.S.S. array allow one to rule out at 95% C.L. the presence of a 130 GeV line (at l =-1.5 ° , b =0 ° and for a dark matter profile centered at this location) previously reported in Fermi-LAT data. This new analysis overlaps significantly in energy with previous Fermi-LAT and H.E.S.S. results. No significant excess associated with dark matter annihilations was found in the energy range of 100 GeV to 2 TeV and upper limits on the gamma-ray flux and the velocity weighted annihilation cross section are derived adopting an Einasto dark matter halo profile. Expected limits for present and future large statistics H.E.S.S. observations are also given.

  14. H.E.S.S. limits on line-like dark matter signatures in the 100 GeV to 2 TeV energy range close to the Galactic Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Abdalla, H; Aharonian, F; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Andersson, T; Angüner, E O; Arrieta, M; Aubert, P; Backes, M; Balzer, A; Barnard, M; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Berge, D; Bernhard, S; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Blackwell, R; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Bregeon, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bryan, M; Bulik, T; Capasso, M; Carr, J; Casanova, S; Chakraborty, N; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Chen, A; Chevalier, J; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Condon, B; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Devin, J; deWilt, P; Djannati-Ata\\", A; Domainko, W; Donath, A; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Ernenwein, J -P; Eschbach, S; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Fernandes, M V; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Funk, S; Füßling, M; Gabici, S; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Gottschall, D; Goyal, 18 A; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Hadasch, D; Hahn, J; Hawkes, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hoischen, C; Holler, M; Horns, D; Ivascenko, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, D; Jankowsky, F; Jingo, M; Jogler, T; Jouvin, L; Jung-Richardt, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kerszberg, D; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; King, J; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Kraus, M; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lau, J; Lees, J -P; Lefaucheur, J; Lefranc, V; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Leser, E; Liu, R; Lohse, T; Lorentz, M; Lypova, I; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Mariaud, C; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; Meintjes, P J; Meyer, M; Mitchell, A M W; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Morå, K; Moulin, E; Murach, T; de Naurois, M; Niederwanger, F; Niemiec, J; Oakes, L; O'Brien, P; Odaka, H; Ohm, S; Ostrowski, M; Öttl, S; Oya, I; Padovani, M; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perennes, C; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Prokhorov, D; Prokoph, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Salek, D; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Sasaki, M; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwemmer, S; Settimo, M; Seyffert, A S; Shafi, N; Shilon, I; Simoni, R; Sol, H; Spanier, F; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, L; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tibaldo, L; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Tuffs, R; van der Walt, J; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Veh, J; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Vink, J; Voisin, F; Vuillaume, H J Völk T; Wadiasingh, Z; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Wagner, R M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Yang, R; Zabalza, V; Zaborov, D; Zacharias, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zefi, F; Ziegler, A; Żywucka, N

    2016-01-01

    A search for dark matter line-like signals was performed in the vicinity of the Galactic Centre by the H.E.S.S. experiment on observational data taken in 2014. An unbinned likelihood analysis was developed to improve the sensitivity to line-like signals. The upgraded analysis along with newer data extend the energy coverage of the previous measurement down to 100 GeV. The 18 h of data collected with the H.E.S.S. array allow one to rule out at 95% CL the presence of a 130 GeV line (at $l = -1.5^{\\circ}, b = 0^{\\circ}$ and for a dark matter profile centred at this location) previously reported in Fermi-LAT data. This new analysis overlaps signi?cantly in energy with previous Fermi-LAT and H.E.S.S. results. No significant excess associated with dark matter annihilations was found in the energy range 100 GeV to 2 TeV and upper limits on the gamma-ray flux and the velocity weighted annihilation cross-section are derived adopting an Einasto dark matter halo profile. Expected limits for present and future large stat...

  15. Dust-to-gas ratio, $X_{\\rm CO}$ factor and CO-dark gas in the Galactic anticentre: an observational study

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, B -Q; Yuan, H -B; Huang, Y; Xiang, M -S

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the correlation between extinction and H~{\\sc i} and CO emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes ($|b|>10\\degr$) within the footprint of the Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey of the Galactic anticentre (XSTPS-GAC) on small and large scales. In Paper I (Chen et al. 2014), we present a three-dimensional dust extinction map within the footprint of XSTPS-GAC, covering a sky area of over 6,000\\,deg$^2$ at a spatial angular resolution of 6\\,arcmin. In the current work, the map is combined with data from gas tracers, including H~{\\sc i} data from the Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array H~{\\sc i} survey and CO data from the Planck mission, to constrain the values of dust-to-gas ratio $DGR=A_V/N({\\rm H})$ and CO-to-$\\rm H_2$ conversion factor $X_{\\rm CO}=N({\\rm H_2})/W_{\\rm CO}$ for the entire GAC footprint excluding the Galactic plane, as well as for selected star-forming regions (such as the Orion, Taurus and Perseus clouds) and a region of diffuse gas in the northern Galactic hemis...

  16. Clumps and streams in the local dark matter distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemand, J; Kuhlen, M; Madau, P; Zemp, M; Moore, B; Potter, D; Stadel, J

    2008-08-01

    In cold dark matter cosmological models, structures form and grow through the merging of smaller units. Numerical simulations have shown that such merging is incomplete; the inner cores of haloes survive and orbit as 'subhaloes' within their hosts. Here we report a simulation that resolves such substructure even in the very inner regions of the Galactic halo. We find hundreds of very concentrated dark matter clumps surviving near the solar circle, as well as numerous cold streams. The simulation also reveals the fractal nature of dark matter clustering: isolated haloes and subhaloes contain the same relative amount of substructure and both have cusped inner density profiles. The inner mass and phase-space densities of subhaloes match those of recently discovered faint, dark-matter-dominated dwarf satellite galaxies, and the overall amount of substructure can explain the anomalous flux ratios seen in strong gravitational lenses. Subhaloes boost gamma-ray production from dark matter annihilation by factors of 4 to 15 relative to smooth galactic models. Local cosmic ray production is also enhanced, typically by a factor of 1.4 but by a factor of more than 10 in one per cent of locations lying sufficiently close to a large subhalo. (These estimates assume that the gravitational effects of baryons on dark matter substructure are small.).

  17. Ratcheting Up The Search for Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, Samuel Dylan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The last several years have included remarkable advances in two of the primary areas of fundamental particle physics: the search for dark matter and the discovery of the Higgs boson. This dissertation will highlight some contributions made on the forefront of these exciting fields. Although the circumstantial evidence supporting the dark matter hypothesis is now almost undeniably significant, indisputable direct proof is still lacking. As the direct searches for dark matter continue, we can maximize our prospects of discovery by using theoretical techniques complementary to the observational searches to rule out additional, otherwise accessible parameter space. In this dissertation, I report bounds on a wide range of dark matter theories. The models considered here cover the spectrum from the canonical case of self-conjugate dark matter with weak-scale interactions, to electrically charged dark matter, to non-annihilating, non-fermionic dark matter. These bounds are obtained from considerations of astrophysical and cosmological data, including, respectively: diffuse gamma ray photon observations; structure formation considerations, along with an explication of the novel local dark matter structure due to galactic astrophysics; and the existence of old pulsars in dark-matter-rich environments. I also consider the prospects for a model of neutrino dark matter which has been motivated by a wide set of seemingly contradictory experimental results. In addition, I include a study that provides the tools to begin solving the speculative ``inverse'' problem of extracting dark matter properties solely from hypothetical nuclear energy spectra, which we may face if dark matter is discovered with multiple direct detection experiments. In contrast to the null searches for dark matter, we have the example of the recent discovery of the Higgs boson. The Higgs boson is the first fundamental scalar particle ever observed, and precision measurements of the production and

  18. 3D extinction maps, Dust-to-gas ratio, XCO factor and CO-dark gas in the Galactic anti centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingqiu; Liu, Xiaowei

    2015-08-01

    We present a three dimensional extinction map in r band. The map has a spatial angular resolution, depending on latitude, between 3 - 9 arcmin and covers the entire XSTPS-GAC survey area of over 6,000 deg2 for Galactic longitude 140 b Survey of the Galactic Anticentre (XSTPS-GAC) with those of 2MASS and WISE, we have built a multi-band photometric stellar sample of about 30 million stars and applied spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting to the sample. This has allowed us to derive the best-fit extinction and distance information of more than 13 million stars, which are used to construct the three dimensional extinction map. The extinction map is combined with data from gas tracers, including HI data from the GALFA-HI survey and CO data from the Planck mission, to constrain the values of dust-to-gas ratio DGR=AV/N(H) and CO-to-H2 conversion factor XCO = N(H2)/WCO for the entire GAC footprint excluding the Galactic plane, as well as for selected star-forming regions (such as the Orion, Taurus and Perseus clouds) and a region of diffuse gas in the northern Galactic hemisphere. For the whole GAC footprint, we find DGR= 4.15 x 1022 magcm2 and XCO=1.72 x 1020 cm2 (Kkms-1). We have also investigated the distribution of “CO-dark” gas (DG) within the footprint of GAC. The mass fraction of DG is found to be fDG = 0.55 toward the Galactic anticentre, which is respectively about 23 and 124 per cent of the atomic and CO-traced molecular gas in the same region. This result is consistent with the theoretical work of Papadopoulos et al. but much larger than that expected in the H2 cloud models by Wolfire et al.

  19. Dark matter in the Galaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Bilic, Neven; Tupper, Gary B.; Viollier, Raoul D.

    2002-01-01

    After a brief introduction to standard cosmology and the dark matter problem in the the Universe, we consider a self-gravitating noninteracting fermion gas at nonzero temperature as a model for the dark matter halo of the Galaxy. This fermion gas model is then shown to imply the existence of a supermassive compact dark object at the Galactic center.

  20. Structure formation in a mixed dark matter model with decaying sterile neutrino: the 3.5 keV X-ray line and the Galactic substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Harada, Akira; Yoshida, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    We perform a set of cosmological simulations of structure formation in a mixed dark matter (MDM) model. Our model is motivated by the recently identified $3.5\\,{\\rm keV}$ X-ray line that can be explained by the decay of non-resonantly produced sterile neutrinos, if they account for $10$-$60\\%$ of the dark matter in the Universe. The non-resonantly produced sterile neutrino has sizable free-streaming length and hence behaves effectively as warm dark matter (WDM). Assuming the rest of dark matter is composed of some stable and cold particles, i.e. cold dark matter (CDM), we follow the coevolution of the CDM and WDM density perturbations. Specifically, we consider the models with the warm component fraction of $r_{\\rm warm}=0.25$ and $0.5$. Our MDM model predicts that the comoving Jeans length at the matter-radiation equality is close to that of the thermally produced warm dark matter model with particle mass $m_{\\rm WDM}=2.4\\,{\\rm keV}$ but that the suppression in the fluctuation power spectrum is weaker. We pe...

  1. Dipolar Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Blanchet, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Massive gravity theories have been developed as viable IR modifications of gravity motivated by dark energy and the problem of the cosmological constant. On the other hand, modified gravity and modified dark matter theories were developed with the aim of solving the problems of standard cold dark matter at galactic scales. Here we propose to adapt the framework of ghost-free massive bigravity theories to reformulate the problem of dark matter at galactic scales. We investigate a promising alternative to dark matter called dipolar dark matter (DDM) in which two different species of dark matter are separately coupled to the two metrics of bigravity and are linked together by an internal vector field. We show that this model successfully reproduces the phenomenology of dark matter at galactic scales (i.e. MOND) as a result of a mechanism of gravitational polarisation. The model is safe in the gravitational sector, but because the two types of dark matter interact through the vector field, a ghostly degree of fre...

  2. Baryons as dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, B.J. [Queen Mary and Westfield Coll., London (United Kingdom). Astronomy Unit]|[Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States). NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center

    1997-03-01

    Dark matter may reside in galactic disks, galactic halos, clusters of galaxies and the background Universe. Cosmological nucleosynthesis arguments suggest that only some fraction of the baryons in the Universe are in visible form, so at least some of the dark matter problems could be baryonic. The dark matter in galactic disks (if real) is almost certainly baryonic and, in this case, it is either in white dwarfs or brown dwarfs. The dark matter in galactic halos could be at least partly baryonic and, in this case, it is likely to be contained in the remnants of a first generation of pregalactic or protogalatic stars. The various constrains on the nature of such remnants suggest that brown dwarfs are the most plausible candidates, although (rather perplexingly) microlensing searches currently favor white dwarfs. The dark matter in clusters or intergalactic space could be baryonic only if one gives up the standard cosmological nucleosynthesis scenario or assumes that the dark objects are primordial black holes which formed before nucleosynthesis. If it is non-baryonic and in the form of cold WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles), then such particles should also provide some of the halo dark matter. 89 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Quark-flavored scalar dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Bhubanjyoti; Datta, Alakabha; Dupuis, Grace; London, David

    2015-01-01

    It is an intriguing possibility that dark matter (DM) could have flavor quantum numbers like the quarks. We propose and investigate a class of UV-complete models of this kind, in which the dark matter is in a scalar triplet of an SU(3) flavor symmetry, and interacts with quarks via a colored flavor-singlet fermionic mediator. Such mediators could be discovered at the LHC if their masses are $\\sim 1$ TeV. We constrain the DM-mediator couplings using relic abundance, direct detection, and flavor-changing neutral-current considerations. We find that, for reasonable values of its couplings, scalar flavored DM can contribute significantly to the real and imaginary parts of the $B_s$-$\\bar B_s$ mixing amplitude. We further assess the potential for such models to explain the galactic center GeV gamma-ray excess.

  4. MOA-II Galactic microlensing constraints: the inner Milky Way has a low dark matter fraction and a near maximal disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegg, Christopher; Gerhard, Ortwin; Portail, Matthieu

    2016-11-01

    Microlensing provides a unique tool to break the stellar to dark matter degeneracy in the inner Milky Way. We combine N-body dynamical models fitted to the Milky Way's Boxy/Peanut bulge with exponential disc models outside this, and compute the microlensing properties. Considering the range of models consistent with the revised MOA-II data, we find low dark matter fractions in the inner Galaxy: at the peak of their stellar rotation curve a fraction fv = (0.88 ± 0.07) of the circular velocity is baryonic (at 1σ, fv > 0.72 at 2σ). These results are in agreement with constraints from the EROS-II microlensing survey of brighter resolved stars, where we find fv = (0.9 ± 0.1) at 1σ. Our fiducial model of a disc with scale length 2.6 kpc, and a bulge with a low dark matter fraction of 12 per cent, agrees with both the revised MOA-II and EROS-II microlensing data. The required baryonic fractions, and the resultant low contribution from dark matter, are consistent with the NFW profiles produced by dissipationless cosmological simulations in Milky Way mass galaxies. They are also consistent with recent prescriptions for the mild adiabatic contraction of Milky Way mass haloes without the need for strong feedback, but there is some tension with recent measurements of the local dark matter density. Microlensing optical depths from the larger OGLE-III sample could improve these constraints further when available.

  5. We present 'Black Holes Make Stars which Explains the Mystery of the Newly Discovered Phoenix Galaxy while Dark Matter in the Universe is described in our Explanation.'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimorelli, Salvatore; Samuels, Charles

    2014-07-01

    We present an entirely new concept for 'How the universe and its contents might have formed.' We contend the Big Bang (BB) resulted from one (or two) Black Hole(s) (BH) bursting (or colliding), producing an almost infinite number of particles of varying sizes, from the smallest elementary particle to particles large enough to contain the mass of a galaxy. The accepted prevailing theory for stellar evolution is 'sufficiently massive stars are reduced to BH upon their ultimate demise.' We consider larger types of BH originating from the original BB, which are subsequently expanded and modified enough to start significant radiation and burst, which resulting particle eventually result into a Galaxy; and smaller BH which become stars and planets. We theorize the universe was made by a massive BH which had enough mass to produce the contents of our universe. We define and categorize BH by their mass and the spaces which they inhabit. We describe mechanisms for their formation and mechanisms of BH collisions and bursts, inside the universe, linked to formations of galaxies, stars, planets and moons. Our concept could explain the mystery of the newly discovered Phoenix Galaxy, which produces 740 Stars per year, an order of magnitude above expected. We propose that a category-1 (c-1) BH formed the universe, by generating c-2 BH which form galaxies, c-3 BH which form stars, and c-4 BH which form planets and moons. Each sequential category of BH is less dense, and is more expanded and modified; and links the formation of the universe to present day activities and processes observed on earth, especially leading to the formation of the elements on earth. We offer three mechanisms (a, b, & c) for stellar origin, formation and evolution. 'a' is the accepted 'accretion and gravitation process.' 'b' is 'as a star originates as an expanded, modified BH with none or little help from accretion, begins to radiate; and continues to grow into a star. 'c' is a mechanism in which a star

  6. MOA-II Galactic Microlensing Constraints: The Inner Milky Way has a Low Dark Matter Fraction and a Near Maximal Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Wegg, Christopher; Portail, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Microlensing provides a unique tool to break the stellar to dark matter degeneracy in the inner Milky Way. We combine N-body dynamical models fitted to the Milky Way's Boxy/Peanut bulge with exponential disk models outside this, and compute the microlensing properties. Considering the range of models consistent with the revised MOA-II data, we find low dark matter fractions in the inner Galaxy: at the peak of their stellar rotation curve a fraction $f_v=(0.88\\pm0.07)$ of the circular velocity is baryonic (at $1\\sigma$, $f_v > 0.72$ at $2\\sigma$). These results are in agreement with constraints from the EROS-II microlensing survey of brighter resolved stars, where we find $f_v=(0.9\\pm0.1)$ at $1\\sigma$. Our fiducial model of a disk with scale length 2.6kpc, and a bulge with a low dark matter fraction of 12%, agrees with both the revised MOA-II and EROS-II microlensing data. The required baryonic fractions, and the resultant low contribution from dark matter, are consistent with the NFW profiles produced by dis...

  7. Discovering Wavelets

    CERN Document Server

    Aboufadel, Edward

    1999-01-01

    An accessible and practical introduction to wavelets. With applications in image processing, audio restoration, seismology, and elsewhere, wavelets have been the subject of growing excitement and interest over the past several years. Unfortunately, most books on wavelets are accessible primarily to research mathematicians. Discovering Wavelets presents basic and advanced concepts of wavelets in a way that is accessible to anyone with only a fundamental knowledge of linear algebra. The basic concepts of wavelet theory are introduced in the context of an explanation of how the FBI uses wavelets

  8. Active galaxies can make axionic dark energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Cormack, Sam

    2016-12-01

    AGN jets carry helical magnetic fields, which can affect dark matter if the latter is axionic. This preliminary study shows that, in the presence of strong helical magnetic fields, the nature of the axionic condensate may change and become dark energy. Such dark energy may affect galaxy formation and galactic dynamics, so this possibility should not be ignored when considering axionic dark matter.

  9. Cold Dark Clouds: The Initial Conditions for Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Bergin, Edwin A

    2007-01-01

    Cold dark clouds are nearby members of the densest and coldest phase in the galactic interstellar medium, and represent the most accessible sites where stars like our Sun are currently being born. In this review we discuss recent progress in their study, including the newly discovered infrared dark clouds that are likely precursors to stellar clusters. At large scales, dark clouds present filamentary mass distributions with motions dominated by supersonic turbulence. At small, sub-parsec scales, a population of subsonic starless cores provides a unique glimpse of the conditions prior to stellar birth. Recent studies of starless cores reveal a combination of simple physical properties together with a complex chemical structure dominated by the freeze-out of molecules onto cold dust grains. Elucidating this combined structure is both an observational and theoretical challenge whose solution will bring us closer to understanding how molecular gas condenses to form stars.

  10. A Speeding Binary in the Galactic Halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    The recent discovery of a hyper-velocity binary star system in the halo of the Milky Way poses a mystery: how was this system accelerated to its high speed?Accelerating StarsUnlike the uniform motion in the Galactic disk, stars in the Milky Ways halo exhibit a huge diversity of orbits that are usually tilted relative to the disk and have a variety of speeds. One type of halo star, so-called hyper-velocity stars, travel with speeds that can approach the escape velocity of the Galaxy.How do these hyper-velocity stars come about? Assuming they form in the Galactic disk, there are multiple proposed scenarios through which they could be accelerated and injected into the halo, such as:Ejection after a close encounter with the supermassive black hole at the Galactic centerEjection due to a nearby supernova explosionEjection as the result of a dynamical interaction in a dense stellar population.Further observations of hyper-velocity stars are necessary to identify the mechanism responsible for their acceleration.J1211s SurpriseModels of J1211s orbit show it did not originate from the Galactic center (black dot). The solar symbol shows the position of the Sun and the star shows the current position of J1211. The bottom two panels show two depictions(x-y plane and r-z plane) of estimated orbits of J1211 over the past 10 Gyr. [Nmeth et al. 2016]To this end, a team of scientists led by Pter Nmeth (Friedrich Alexander University, Erlangen-Nrnberg) recently studied the candidate halo hyper-velocity star SDSS J121150.27+143716.2. The scientists obtained spectroscopy of J1211 using spectrographs at the Keck Telescope in Hawaii and ESOs Very Large Telescope in Chile. To their surprise, they discovered the signature of a companion in the spectra: J1211 is actually a binary!Nmeth and collaborators found that J1211, located roughly 18,000 light-years away, is moving at a rapid ~570 km/s relative to the galactic rest frame. The binary system consists of a hot (30,600 K) subdwarf and a

  11. A Supersymmetric Dark Disk Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Fischler, Willy; Tangarife, Walter

    2014-01-01

    We present a model of partially interacting dark matter (PIDM) within the framework of supersymmetry with gauge mediated symmetry breaking. Dark sector atoms are produced through Affleck-Dine baryogenesis in the dark sector while avoiding the production of Q-ball relics. We discuss the astrophysical constraints relevant for this model and the possibility of dark galactic disk formation. In addition, jet emission from rotating black holes is discussed in the context of this class of models.

  12. Impeded Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kopp, Joachim; Slatyer, Tracy R; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Xue, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We consider a new class of thermal dark matter models, dubbed "Impeded Dark Matter", in which the mass splitting between the dark matter particles and their annihilation products is tiny. Compared to the previously proposed Forbidden Dark Matter scenario, the mass splittings we consider are much smaller, and are allowed to be either positive or negative. We demonstrate that either case can be easily realized without requiring tuning of model parameters. For negative mass splitting, we demonstrate that the annihilation cross-section for Impeded Dark Matter depends linearly on the dark matter velocity or may even be kinematically forbidden, making this scenario almost insensitive to constraints from the cosmic microwave background and from observations of dwarf galaxies. Accordingly, it may be possible for Impeded Dark Matter to yield observable signals in clusters or the Galactic center, with no corresponding signal in dwarfs. For positive mass splitting, we show that the annihilation cross-section is suppress...

  13. Galactic dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Binney, James

    2008-01-01

    Since it was first published in 1987, Galactic Dynamics has become the most widely used advanced textbook on the structure and dynamics of galaxies and one of the most cited references in astrophysics. Now, in this extensively revised and updated edition, James Binney and Scott Tremaine describe the dramatic recent advances in this subject, making Galactic Dynamics the most authoritative introduction to galactic astrophysics available to advanced undergraduate students, graduate students, and researchers. Every part of the book has been thoroughly overhauled, and many section

  14. Scalar Field Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Matos, T; Urena-Lopez, L A; Núñez, D

    2001-01-01

    This work is a review of the last results of research on the Scalar Field Dark Matter model of the Universe at cosmological and at galactic level. We present the complete solution to the scalar field cosmological scenario in which the dark matter is modeled by a scalar field $\\Phi$ with the scalar potential $V(\\Phi)=V_{0}(cosh {(\\lambda \\sqrt{\\kappa_{0}}\\Phi)}-1)$ and the dark energy is modeled by a scalar field $\\Psi$, endowed with the scalar potential $\\tilde{V}(\\Psi)= \\tilde{V_{0}}(\\sinh{(\\alpha \\sqrt{\\kappa_{0}}\\Psi)})^{\\beta}$, which together compose the 95% of the total matter energy in the Universe. The model presents successfully deals with the up to date cosmological observations, and is a good candidate to treat the dark matter problem at the galactic level.

  15. How Zwicky already ruled out modified gravity theories without dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Theodorus Maria [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); International Institute of Physics, UFRG, Natal (Brazil)

    2017-06-15

    Various theories, such as MOND, MOG, Emergent Gravity and f(R) theories avoid dark matter by assuming a change in General Relativity and/or in Newton's law. Galactic rotation curves are typically described well. Here the application to galaxy clusters is considered, focussed on the good lensing and X-ray data for A1689. As a start, the no-dark-matter case is confirmed to work badly: the need for dark matter starts near the cluster centre, where Newton's law is still supposed to be valid. This leads to the conundrum discovered by Zwicky, which is likely only solvable in his way, namely by assuming additional (dark) matter. Neutrinos with eV masses serve well without altering the successes in (dwarf) galaxies. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. How Zwicky already ruled out modified gravity theories without dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Nieuwenhuizen, Theodorus Maria

    2016-01-01

    Various theories, such as MOND, MOG, Emergent Gravity and $f(R)$ theories avoid dark matter by assuming a change in General Relativity and/or in Newton's law. Galactic rotation curves are typically described well. Here the application to galaxy clusters is considered, focussed on the good lensing and X-ray data for A1689. As a start, the no-dark-matter case is confirmed to work badly: the need for dark matter starts near the cluster centre, where Newton's law is still supposed to be valid. This leads to the conundrum discovered by Zwicky, which is likely only solvable if the theories assume additional (dark) matter. Neutrinos with eV masses serve well without altering the successes in (dwarf) galaxies.

  17. Unified Dark Matter Scalar Field Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Bertacca

    2010-01-01

    of a single scalar field accounts for a unified description of the Dark Matter and Dark Energy sectors, dubbed Unified Dark Matter (UDM models. In this framework, we consider the general Lagrangian of -essence, which allows to find solutions around which the scalar field describes the desired mixture of Dark Matter and Dark Energy. We also discuss static and spherically symmetric solutions of Einstein's equations for a scalar field with noncanonical kinetic term, in connection with galactic halo rotation curves.

  18. Asymptotically Safe Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new paradigm for dark matter (DM) interactions in which the interaction strength is asymptotically safe. In models of this type, the coupling strength is small at low energies but increases at higher energies, and asymptotically approaches a finite constant value. The resulting...... searches are the primary ways to constrain or discover asymptotically safe dark matter....

  19. Asymptotically Safe Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new paradigm for dark matter (DM) interactions in which the interaction strength is asymptotically safe. In models of this type, the coupling strength is small at low energies but increases at higher energies, and asymptotically approaches a finite constant value. The resulting...... searches are the primary ways to constrain or discover asymptotically safe dark matter....

  20. Low-mass right-handed sneutrino dark matter: SuperCDMS and LUX constraints and the Galactic Centre gamma-ray excess

    CERN Document Server

    Cerdeno, D G; Robles, S

    2014-01-01

    Recent results from direct and indirect searches for dark matter (DM) have motivated the study of particle physics models that can provide weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in the mass range 1-50 GeV. Viable candidates for light WIMP DM must fulfil stringent constraints. On the one hand, the observation at the LHC of a Higgs boson with Standard Model properties set an upper bound on the coupling of light DM particles to the Higgs, thereby making it difficult to reproduce the correct relic abundance. On the other hand, the recent results from direct searches in the CDMSlite, SuperCDMS and LUX experiments have set upper constraints on the DM scattering cross section. In this paper, we investigate the viability of light right-handed sneutrino DM in the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Model (NMSSM) in the light of these constraints. To this aim, we have carried out a scan in the NMSSM parameter space, imposing experimental bounds on the Higgs sector and low-energy observables, such as the muon anomalous...

  1. First results from the LUX Dark Matter Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Discovery of the nature of dark matter is internationally recognized as one of the greatest contemporary challenges in science, fundamental to our understanding of the Universe. The most compelling candidates for dark matter are Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) that arise naturally in several models of physics beyond the Standard Model. The discovery of galactic WIMPs would therefore enlighten two of the outstanding problems of modern physics - the matter composition of the Universe and the extrapolation of the Standard Model of particle physics to GUT scales. Although no definitive signal has yet been discovered, the worldwide race towards direct detection has been dramatically accelerated by the remarkable progress and evolution of liquid xenon (LXe) time projection chambers (TPCs). They have shifted the scale of target mass by orders of magnitude whilst simultaneously reducing backgrounds to unprecedented low levels, becoming the leaders of the field and offering the most promising prospects fo...

  2. The Dark Energy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, T; Annis, J; Barlow, M; Bebek, C; Bigelow, B; Beldica, C; Bernstein, R; Bridle, S; Brunner, R; Carlstrom, J; Campbell, M; Castander, F; Cunha, C; Diehl, H T; Dodelson, S; Doel, P; Efstathiou, G P; Estrada, J; Evrard, A; Fernndez, E; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J A; Gaztaaga, E; Gerdes, D; Gladders, M; Hu, W; Huterer, D; Jain, B; Karliner, I; Kent, S; Lahav, O; Levi, M; Lima, M; Lin, H; Limon, P; Martínez, M; McKay, T; McMahon, R; Merritt, W K; Miller, C; Miralda-Escudé, J; Mohr, J; Nichol, R; Oyaizu, H; Peacock, J; Peoples, John; Perlmutter, S; Plante, R; Ricker, P; Roe, N; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Selen, M; Sheldon, E S; Smith, C; Stebbins, A; Stoughton, C; Suntzeff, N; Sutherland, W; Takada, M; Tarle, G; Tecchio, M; Thaler, J; Tucker, D; Viti, S; Walker, A; Wechsler, R; Weller, J; Wester, W

    2006-01-01

    We describe the Dark Energy Survey (DES), a proposed optical-near infrared survey of 5000 sq. deg of the South Galactic Cap to ~24th magnitude in SDSS griz, that would use a new 3 sq. deg CCD camera to be mounted on the Blanco 4-m telescope at Cerro Telolo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). The survey data will allow us to measure the dark energy and dark matter densities and the dark energy equation of state through four independent methods: galaxy clusters, weak gravitational lensing tomography, galaxy angular clustering, and supernova distances. These methods are doubly complementary: they constrain different combinations of cosmological model parameters and are subject to different systematic errors. By deriving the four sets of measurements from the same data set with a common analysis framework, we will obtain important cross checks of the systematic errors and thereby make a substantial and robust advance in the precision of dark energy measurements.

  3. Conformal theory of galactic halos

    CERN Document Server

    Nesbet, R K

    2011-01-01

    Current cosmological theory describes an isolated galaxy as an observable central galaxy, surrounded by a large spherical halo attributed to dark matter. Galaxy formation by condensation of mass-energy out of a primordial uniform background is shown here to leave a scar, observed as a centripetal gravitational field halo in anomalous galactic rotation and in gravitational lensing. Conformal theory accounts for the otherwise counterintuitive centripetal effect.

  4. Discovering Extrasolar Planets with Microlensing Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambsganss, J.

    2016-06-01

    An astronomical survey is commonly understood as a mapping of a large region of the sky, either photometrically (possibly in various filters/wavelength ranges) or spectroscopically. Often, catalogs of objects are produced/provided as the main product or a by-product. However, with the advent of large CCD cameras and dedicated telescopes with wide-field imaging capabilities, it became possible in the early 1990s, to map the same region of the sky over and over again. In principle, such data sets could be combined to get very deep stacked images of the regions of interest. However, I will report on a completely different use of such repeated maps: Exploring the time domain for particular kinds of stellar variability, namely microlens-induced magnifications in search of exoplanets. Such a time-domain microlensing survey was originally proposed by Bohdan Paczynski in 1986 in order to search for dark matter objects in the Galactic halo. Only a few years later three teams started this endeavour. I will report on the history and current state of gravitational microlensing surveys. By now, routinely 100 million stars in the Galactic Bulge are monitored a few times per week by so-called survey teams. All stars with constant apparent brightness and those following known variability patterns are filtered out in order to detect the roughly 2000 microlensing events per year which are produced by stellar lenses. These microlensing events are identified "online" while still in their early phases and then monitored with much higher cadence by so-called follow-up teams. The most interesting of such events are those produced by a star-plus-planet lens. By now of order 30 exoplanets have been discovered by these combined microlensing surveys. Microlensing searches for extrasolar planets are complementary to other exoplanet search techniques. There are two particular advantages: The microlensing method is sensitive down to Earth-mass planets even with ground-based telecopes, and it

  5. Welcome to the dark side

    CERN Multimedia

    Hogan, Jenny

    2007-01-01

    "Physicists says that 96% of the Universe is unseen, and appeal tot he ideas of "dark matter" and "dark energy" to make up the difference. In the first of two articles, jeanny hogan reports that attempts to identify the mysterious dark matter are on the verge of success. In the second, Geoff Brumfiel asks why dark energy, hailed as a breakthrough when discovered a decade ago, is proving more frustrating than ever tot he scientists who study it." (4,5 pages)

  6. Scalar-field theory of dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Kerson; Zhao, Xiaofei

    2013-01-01

    We develop a theory of dark matter based on a previously proposed picture, in which a complex vacuum scalar field makes the universe a superfluid, with the energy density of the superfluid giving rise to dark energy, and variations from vacuum density giving rise to dark matter. We formulate a nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation to describe the superfluid, treating galaxies as external sources. We study the response of the superfluid to the galaxies, in particular, the emergence of the dark-matter galactic halo, contortions during galaxy collisions, and the creation of vortices due to galactic rotation.

  7. Strong gravitational lensing versus dynamic galactic mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Antonio C.C.; Sodre Junior, Laerte [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas. Dept. de Astronomia

    2006-07-01

    The mass associated to a galaxy is a fundamental property necessary for its description and for the understating of its structure, formation and evolution. In the cosmological context, the mass and density profile of galaxies and galaxy clusters is relevant for the understanding of dark matter properties and the formation dynamics of structures in the Universe. We find the masses of 15 galaxies from the SLACS Survey through two methods: using the stellar velocity dispersion (dynamic method) and using strong gravitational lensing. We discover a discrepancy between the masses obtained through these two methods and develop several models to explain it. We test the models suggested by calculating {chi}{sup 2} statistics and the Bayesian information criteria. Statistical fluctuation and a constant systematic error are strongly discarded as explanations for the mass discrepancy. Our results show evidence of projection effects on the line of sight that add a contamination mass in the strong lensing galactic mass determination. This effect was already observed in greater detail in weak and strong gravitational lensing measures of cluster of galaxies, but was little explored before in the case of strong lensing by galaxies. (author)

  8. New knowledge of the Galactic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Han, J L

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic fields of our Milky Way galaxy are the main agent for cosmic rays to transport. In the last decade, much new knowledge has been gained from measurements of the Galactic magnetic fields. In the Galactic disk, from the RMs of a large number of newly discovered pulsars, the large-scale magnetic fields along the spiral arms have been delineated in a much larger region than ever before, with alternating directions in the arm and interarm regions. The toroidal fields in the Galactic halo were revealed to have opposite directions below and above the Galactic plane, which is an indication of an A0 mode dynamo operating in the halo. The strength of large-scale fields obtained from pulsar RM data has been found to increase exponentially towards the Galactic center. Compared to the steep Kolmogorov spectrum of magnetic energy at small scales, the large-scale magnetic fields show a shallow broken spatial magnetic energy spectrum.

  9. Some properties of dark matter field in the complex octonion space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Zi-Hua

    2015-12-01

    The paper aims to consider the electromagnetic adjoint-field in the complex octonion space as the dark matter field, describing some properties of the dark matter, especially the origin, particle category, existence region, force and so forth. Since Maxwell applied the algebra of quaternions to depict the electromagnetic theory, some scholars adopt the complex quaternion and octonion to study the physics property of electromagnetic and gravitational fields. In the paper, by means of the octonion operator, it is found that the gravitational field accompanies with one adjoint-field, whose property is partly similar to that of electromagnetic field. The electromagnetic field accompanies with another adjoint-field, whose feature is partly similar to that of gravitational field. As a result, the electromagnetic adjoint-field can be chosen as one candidate of the dark matter field. According to the electromagnetic adjoint-field, it is able to predict a few properties of the dark matter, for instance, the particle category, interaction intensity, interaction distance, existence region and so forth. The study reveals that the dark matter particle and the gravitational resource will be influenced by the gravitational strength and force. The dark matter field is capable of making a contribution to physics quantities of gravitational field, including the angular momentum, torque, energy, force and so on. Further, there may be comparatively more chances to discover the dark matter in some regions with the ultrastrong field strength, surrounding the neutral star, white dwarf, galactic nucleus, black hole, astrophysical jet and so on.

  10. End of a Dark Age?

    CERN Document Server

    Stuckey, W M; Sten, A K; Silberstein, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We argue that dark matter and dark energy phenomena associated with galactic rotation curves, X-ray cluster mass profiles, and type Ia supernova data can be accounted for via small corrections to idealized general relativistic spacetime geometries due to disordered locality. Accordingly, we fit THINGS rotation curve data rivaling modified Newtonian dynamics, ROSAT/ASCA X-ray cluster mass profile data rivaling metric-skew-tensor gravity, and SCP Union2.1 SN Ia data rivaling $\\Lambda$CDM without non-baryonic dark matter or a cosmological constant. In the case of dark matter, we geometrically modify proper mass interior to the Schwarzschild solution. In the case of dark energy, we modify proper distance in Einstein-deSitter cosmology. Therefore, the phenomena of dark matter and dark energy may be chimeras created by an errant belief that spacetime is a differentiable manifold rather than a disordered graph.

  11. Dark Forces and Light Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Weiner, Neal [New York Univ., NY (United States); Xue, Wei [Rue University (Canada)

    2012-09-01

    We consider a simple class of models in which the dark matter, X, is coupled to a new gauge boson, phi, with a relatively low mass (m_phi \\sim 100 MeV-3 GeV). Neither the dark matter nor the new gauge boson have tree-level couplings to the Standard Model. The dark matter in this model annihilates to phi pairs, and for a coupling of g_X \\sim 0.06 (m_X/10 GeV)^1/2 yields a thermal relic abundance consistent with the cosmological density of dark matter. The phi's produced in such annihilations decay through a small degree of kinetic mixing with the photon to combinations of Standard Model leptons and mesons. For dark matter with a mass of \\sim10 GeV, the shape of the resulting gamma-ray spectrum provides a good fit to that observed from the Galactic Center, and can also provide the very hard electron spectrum required to account for the observed synchrotron emission from the Milky Way's radio filaments. For kinetic mixing near the level naively expected from loop-suppressed operators (epsilon \\sim 10^{-4}), the dark matter is predicted to scatter elastically with protons with a cross section consistent with that required to accommodate the signals reported by DAMA/LIBRA, CoGeNT and CRESST-II.

  12. Chiral Dark Sector

    CERN Document Server

    Co, Raymond T; Nomura, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple and natural dark sector model in which dark matter particles arise as composite states of hidden strong dynamics and their stability is ensured by accidental symmetries. The model has only a few free parameters. In particular, the gauge symmetry of the model forbids the masses of dark quarks, and the confinement scale of the dynamics provides the unique mass scale of the model. The gauge group contains an Abelian symmetry $U(1)_D$, which couples the dark and standard model sectors through kinetic mixing. This model, despite its simple structure, has rich and distinctive phenomenology. In the case where the dark pion becomes massive due to $U(1)_D$ quantum corrections, direct and indirect detection experiments can probe thermal relic dark matter which is generically a mixture of the dark pion and the dark baryon, and the Large Hadron Collider can discover the $U(1)_D$ gauge boson. Alternatively, if the dark pion stays light due to a specific $U(1)_D$ charge assignment of the dark quarks, th...

  13. Alternatives to Dark Matter (?)

    OpenAIRE

    Aguirre, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    It has long been known that Newtonian dynamics applied to the visible matter in galaxies and clusters does not correctly describe the dynamics of those systems. While this is generally taken as evidence for dark matter it is in principle possible that instead Newtonian dynamics (and with it General Relativity) breaks down in these systems. Indeed there have been a number of proposals as to how standard gravitational dynamics might be modified so as to correctly explain galactic dynamics witho...

  14. Galactic stellar haloes in the CDM model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooper, A. P.; Cole, S.; Frenk, C. S.; White, S. D. M.; Helly, J.; Benson, A. J.; De Lucia, G.; Helmi, A.; Jenkins, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Springel, V.; Wang, J.

    2010-01-01

    We present six simulations of galactic stellar haloes formed by the tidal disruption of accreted dwarf galaxies in a fully cosmological setting. Our model is based on the Aquarius project, a suite of high-resolution N-body simulations of individual dark matter haloes. We tag subsets of particles in

  15. The existence and detection of optically dark galaxies by 21-cm surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J. I.; Disney, M. J.; Minchin, R. F.; Auld, R.; Smith, R.

    2006-05-01

    One explanation for the disparity between cold dark matter (CDM) predictions of galaxy numbers and observations could be that there are numerous dark galaxies in the Universe. These galaxies may still contain baryons, but no stars, and may be detectable in the 21-cm line of atomic hydrogen. The results of surveys for such objects, and simulations that do/do not predict their existence, are controversial. In this paper, we use an analytical model of galaxy formation, consistent with CDM, to first show that dark galaxies are certainly a prediction of the model. Secondly, we show that objects like VIRGOHI21, a dark galaxy candidate recently discovered by us, while rare are predicted by the model. Thirdly, we show that previous `blind' HI surveys have placed few constraints on the existence of dark galaxies. This is because they have either lacked the sensitivity and/or velocity resolution or have not had the required detailed optical follow up. We look forward to new 21-cm blind surveys [Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey and Arecibo Galactic Environments Survey (AGES)] using the Arecibo multibeam instrument which should find large numbers of dark galaxies if they exist.

  16. Dark matter dynamics and indirect detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertone, Gianfranco; /Fermilab; Merritt, David; /Rochester Inst. Tech.

    2005-04-01

    Non-baryonic, or ''dark'', matter is believed to be a major component of the total mass budget of the universe. We review the candidates for particle dark matter and discuss the prospects for direct detection (via interaction of dark matter particles with laboratory detectors) and indirect detection (via observations of the products of dark matter self-annihilations), focusing in particular on the Galactic center, which is among the most promising targets for indirect detection studies. The gravitational potential at the Galactic center is dominated by stars and by the supermassive black hole, and the dark matter distribution is expected to evolve on sub-parsec scales due to interaction with these components. We discuss the dominant interaction mechanisms and show how they can be used to rule out certain extreme models for the dark matter distribution, thus increasing the information that can be gleaned from indirect detection searches.

  17. Galactic bulges

    CERN Document Server

    Peletier, Reynier; Gadotti, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    This book consists of invited reviews on Galactic Bulges written by experts in the field. A central point of the book is that, while in the standard picture of galaxy formation a significant amount of the baryonic mass is expected to reside in classical bulges, the question what is the fraction of galaxies with no classical bulges in the local Universe has remained open. The most spectacular example of a galaxy with no significant classical bulge is the Milky Way. The reviews of this book attempt to clarify the role of the various types of bulges during the mass build-up of galaxies, based on morphology, kinematics, and stellar populations, and connecting their properties at low and high redshifts. The observed properties are compared with the predictions of the theoretical models, accounting for the many physical processes leading to the central mass concentration and their destruction in galaxies. This book serves as an entry point for PhD students and non-specialists and as a reference work for researchers...

  18. Cosmology and galactic rotation curves

    CERN Document Server

    Mannheim, P D

    1995-01-01

    We explore the possibility that the entire departure of galactic rotational velocities from their luminous Newtonian expectation be cosmological in origin, and show that within the framework of conformal gravity (but not Einstein gravity apparently) every static observer sees the overall Hubble flow as a local universal linear potential which is able to account for available data without any need for dark matter. We find that the Universe is necessarily an open one with 3-space scalar curvature given by k = -3.5\\times 10^{-60}cm^{-2}.

  19. A Self-Absorption Census of Cold HI Clouds in the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, S J; Higgs, L A; Brunt, C M; Dewdney, P E; Gibson, Steven J.; Higgs, Lloyd A.; Brunt, Christopher M.; Dewdney, Peter E.

    2005-01-01

    We present a 21cm line HI self-absorption (HISA) survey of cold atomic gas within Galactic longitudes 75 to 146 degrees and latitudes -3 to +5 degrees. We identify HISA as spatially and spectrally confined dark HI features and extract it from the surrounding HI emission in the arcminute-resolution Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (CGPS). We compile a catalog of the most significant features in our survey and compare our detections against those in the literature. Within the parameters of our search, we find nearly all previously detected features and identify many new ones. The CGPS shows HISA in much greater detail than any prior survey and allows both new and previously-discovered features to be placed into the larger context of Galactic structure. In space and radial velocity, faint HISA is detected virtually everywhere that the HI emission background is sufficiently bright. This ambient HISA population may arise from small turbulent fluctuations of temperature and velocity in the neutral interstellar medium...

  20. New Galactic Star Clusters Discovered in the VVV Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Borissova, Jura; Kurtev, Radostin; Clarke, James R A; Peñaloza, Francisco; Sale, Stuart E; Minniti, Dante; Alonso-García, Javier; Artigau, Étienne; Barbá, Rodolfo; Bica, Eduardo; Baume, Gustavo Luis; Catelan, Márcio; Chené, André-Nicolas; Dias, Bruno; Folkes, Stuart L; Froebrich, Dirk; Geisler, Doug; de Grijs, Richard; Hanson, Margaret M; Hempel, Maren; Ivanov, Valentin D; Kumar, M S Nanda; Lucas, Philip; Mauro, Francesco; Bidin, Christian Moni; Rejkuba, Marina; Saito, Roberto K; Tamura, Motohide; Toledo, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    VISTA Variables in the V\\'{\\i}a L\\'actea (VVV) is one of the six ESO Public Surveys operating on the new 4-meter Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA). VVV is scanning the Milky Way bulge and an adjacent section of the disk, where star formation activity is high. One of the principal goals of the VVV Survey is to find new star clusters of different ages. In order to trace the early epochs of star cluster formation we concentrated our search in the directions to those of known star formation regions, masers, radio, and infrared sources. The disk area covered by VVV was visually inspected using the pipeline processed and calibrated $K_{\\rm S}$-band tile images for stellar overdensities. Subsequently, we examined the composite $JHK_{\\rm S}$ and $ZJK_{\\rm S}$ color images of each candidate. PSF photometry of $15\\times15$ arcmin fields centered on the candidates was then performed on the Cambridge Astronomy Survey Unit reduced images. After statistical field-star decontamination, color-magnit...

  1. Neutrino signals from dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkoca, Arif Emre

    Large-scale neutrino telescopes will be powerful tools to observe multitude of mysterious phenomena happening in the Universe. The dark matter puzzle is listed as one of them. In this study, indirect detection of dark matter via neutrino signals is presented. The upward muon, the contained muon and the hadronic shower fluxes are calculated, assuming annihilation/decay of the dark matter in the core of the astrophysical objects and in the Galactic center. Direct neutrino production and secondary neutrino production from the decay of Standard Model particles produced in the annihilation/decay of dark matter are studied. The results are contrasted to the ones previously obtained in the literature, illustrating the importance of properly treating muon propagation and energy loss for the upward muon flux. The dependence of the dark matter signals on the density profile, the dark matter mass and the detector threshold are discussed. Different dark matter models (gravitino, Kaluza-Klein and leptophilic) which can account for recent observations of some indirect searches are analyzed regarding their detection in the kilometer size neutrino detectors in the near future. Muon and shower rates and the minimum observation times in order to reach 2sigma detection significance are evaluated, with the result suggesting that the optimum cone half angles chosen about the Galactic center are about 10° (50°) for the muon (shower) events. A detailed analysis shows that for the annihilating dark matter models such as the leptophilic and Kaluza-Klein models, upward and contained muon as well as showers yield promising signals for dark matter detection in just a few years of observation, whereas for decaying dark matter models, the same observation times can only be reached with showers. The analytical results for the final fluxes are also obtained as well as parametric forms for the muon and shower fluxes for the dark matter models considered in this study.

  2. Galactic Building Blocks Seen Swarming Around Andromeda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    University of Virginia. The Milky Way and Andromeda were formed many billions of years ago in a cosmic neighborhood brimming with galactic raw materials -- among which hydrogen, helium, and cold dark matter were primary constituents. By now, most of this raw material has probably been gobbled up by the two galaxies, but astronomers suspect that some primitive clouds are still floating free. Previous studies have revealed a number of clouds of neutral atomic hydrogen that are near the Milky Way but not part of its disk. These were initially referred to as high-velocity clouds (HVCs) when they were first discovered because they appeared to move at velocities difficult to reconcile with Galactic rotation. Scientists were uncertain if HVCs comprised building blocks of the Milky Way that had so far escaped capture, or if they traced gas accelerated to unexpected velocities by energetic processes (multiple supernovae) within the Milky Way. The discovery of similar clouds bound to the Andromeda Galaxy strengthens the case that at least some of these HVCs are indeed galactic building blocks. Astronomers are able to use radio telescopes to detect the characteristic 21-centimeter radiation emitted naturally by neutral atomic hydrogen. The great difficulty in analyzing these low-mass galactic building blocks has been that their natural radio emission is extremely faint. Even those nearest to us, clouds orbiting our Galaxy, are hard to study because of serious distance uncertainties. "We know the Milky Way HVCs are relatively nearby, but precisely how close is maddeningly tough to determine," said Thilker. Past attempts to find missing satellites around external galaxies at well-known distances have been unsuccessful because of the need for a very sensitive instrument capable of producing high-fidelity images, even in the vicinity of a bright source such as the Andromeda Galaxy. One might consider this task similar to visually distinguishing a candle placed adjacent to a spotlight. The

  3. Dipolar dark matter with massive bigravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchet, Luc [GRECO Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris - UMR 7095 du CNRS,Université Pierre & Marie Curie,98" b" i" s boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Heisenberg, Lavinia [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Physics & The Oskar Klein Centre, AlbaNova University Centre,Roslagstullsbacken 21, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-12-14

    Massive gravity theories have been developed as viable IR modifications of gravity motivated by dark energy and the problem of the cosmological constant. On the other hand, modified gravity and modified dark matter theories were developed with the aim of solving the problems of standard cold dark matter at galactic scales. Here we propose to adapt the framework of ghost-free massive bigravity theories to reformulate the problem of dark matter at galactic scales. We investigate a promising alternative to dark matter called dipolar dark matter (DDM) in which two different species of dark matter are separately coupled to the two metrics of bigravity and are linked together by an internal vector field. We show that this model successfully reproduces the phenomenology of dark matter at galactic scales (i.e. MOND) as a result of a mechanism of gravitational polarisation. The model is safe in the gravitational sector, but because of the particular couplings of the matter fields and vector field to the metrics, a ghost in the decoupling limit is present in the dark matter sector. However, it might be possible to push the mass of the ghost beyond the strong coupling scale by an appropriate choice of the parameters of the model. Crucial questions to address in future work are the exact mass of the ghost, and the cosmological implications of the model.

  4. Dipolar dark matter with massive bigravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Luc; Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2015-12-01

    Massive gravity theories have been developed as viable IR modifications of gravity motivated by dark energy and the problem of the cosmological constant. On the other hand, modified gravity and modified dark matter theories were developed with the aim of solving the problems of standard cold dark matter at galactic scales. Here we propose to adapt the framework of ghost-free massive bigravity theories to reformulate the problem of dark matter at galactic scales. We investigate a promising alternative to dark matter called dipolar dark matter (DDM) in which two different species of dark matter are separately coupled to the two metrics of bigravity and are linked together by an internal vector field. We show that this model successfully reproduces the phenomenology of dark matter at galactic scales (i.e. MOND) as a result of a mechanism of gravitational polarisation. The model is safe in the gravitational sector, but because of the particular couplings of the matter fields and vector field to the metrics, a ghost in the decoupling limit is present in the dark matter sector. However, it might be possible to push the mass of the ghost beyond the strong coupling scale by an appropriate choice of the parameters of the model. Crucial questions to address in future work are the exact mass of the ghost, and the cosmological implications of the model.

  5. Galactic Dynamos and Galactic Winds

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Spiral galaxies host dynamically important magnetic fields which can affect gas flows in the disks and halos. Total magnetic fields in spiral galaxies are strongest (up to 30 \\muG) in the spiral arms where they are mostly turbulent or tangled. Polarized synchrotron emission shows that the resolved regular fields are generally strongest in the interarm regions (up to 15 \\muG). Faraday rotation measures of radio polarization vectors in the disks of several spiral galaxies reveal large-scale patterns which are signatures of coherent fields generated by a mean-field dynamo. -- Magnetic fields are also observed in radio halos around edge-on galaxies at heights of a few kpc above the disk. Cosmic-ray driven galactic winds transport gas and magnetic fields from the disk into the halo. The magnetic energy density is larger than the thermal energy density, but smaller than the kinetic energy density of the outflow. The orientation of field lines allows to estimate the wind speed and direction. There is no observation ...

  6. Dark matter via massive bigravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Luc; Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2015-05-01

    In this work we investigate the existence of relativistic models for dark matter in the context of bimetric gravity, used here to reproduce the modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) at galactic scales. For this purpose we consider two different species of dark matter particles that separately couple to the two metrics of bigravity. These two sectors are linked together via an internal U (1 ) vector field, and some effective composite metric built out of the two metrics. Among possible models only certain classes of kinetic and interaction terms are allowed without invoking ghost degrees of freedom. Along these lines we explore the number of allowed kinetic terms in the theory and point out the presence of ghosts in a previous model. Finally, we propose a promising class of ghost-free candidate theories that could provide the MOND phenomenology at galactic scales while reproducing the standard cold dark matter model at cosmological scales.

  7. Chandra Discovers Cosmic Cannonball

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    One of the fastest moving stars ever seen has been discovered with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This cosmic cannonball is challenging theories to explain its blistering speed. Astronomers used Chandra to observe a neutron star, known as RX J0822-4300, over a period of about five years. During that span, three Chandra observations clearly show the neutron star moving away from the center of the Puppis A supernova remnant. This remnant is the stellar debris field created during the same explosion in which the neutron star was created about 3700 years ago. Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A By combining how far it has moved across the sky with its distance from Earth, astronomers determined the neutron star is moving at over 3 million miles per hour. At this rate, RX J0822-4300 is destined to escape from the Milky Way after millions of years, even though it has only traveled about 20 light years so far. "This star is moving at 3 million miles an hour, but it's so far away that the apparent motion we see in five years is less than the height of the numerals in the date on a penny, seen from the length of a football field," said Frank Winkler of Middlebury College in Vermont. "It's remarkable, and a real testament to the power of Chandra, that such a tiny motion can be measured." Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A "Just after it was born, this neutron star got a one-way ticket out of the Galaxy," said co-author Robert Petre of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "Astronomers have seen other stars being flung out of the Milky Way, but few as fast as this." So-called hypervelocity stars have been previously discovered shooting out of the Milky Way with speeds around one million miles per hour. One key difference between RX J0822-4300 and these other reported galactic escapees is the source of their speed. The hypervelocity stars are

  8. An X-ray Galaxy Cluster Survey for Investigations of Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Haiman, Z; Bahcall, Neta A; Bautz, M; Böhringer, H; Borgani, S; Bryan, G; Cabrera, B; Canizares, C; Citterio, O; Evrard, A; Finoguenov, A; Griffiths, R; Hasinger, G; Henry, P; Jahoda, K; Jernigan, G; Kahn, S; Lamb, D; Majumdar, S; Mohr, J; Molendi, S; Mushotzky, R; Pareschi, G; Peterson, J; Petre, R; Predehl, P; Rasmussen, A; Ricker, G; Ricker, P; Rosati, P; Sanderson, A; Stanford, A; Voit, Mark; Wang, S; White, N; White, S

    2005-01-01

    The amount and nature of dark energy (DE) can be tightly constrained by measuring the spatial correlation features and evolution of a sample of ~ 100,000 galaxy clusters over the redshift range 0discover all collapsed structures with mass above 3.5e14 solar masss at redshifts z<2 (i.e. the full range where such objects are expected) in the high Galactic latitude sky. Above this mass threshold the tight correlations between X-ray observables and mass allow direct interpretation of the data. We describe the constraints on Dark Energy that can be inferred from such a survey, using powerful self-calibration techniques to relate the X-ray observables (luminosity and temperature) to the underlying mass.

  9. The Dark Knight Falters

    CERN Document Server

    Mirabal, N

    2012-01-01

    Potential line emission at 111 and 129 GeV from 16 unassociated Fermi-LAT point sources has been reported recently by Su & Finkbeiner (2012c). Together with similar features seen by Fermi in a region near the Galactic Centre, the evidence has been interpreted as the spectral signature of dark matter annihilation or internal bremsstrahlung. Through a combination of supervised machine-learning algorithms and archival multiwavelength observations we find that 14 out of the 16 unassociated sources showing the line emission in the Su & Finkbeiner sample are most likely active galactic nuclei (AGN). Based on this new evidence, one must widen the range of possible solutions for the 100-140 GeV excess to include a very distinct astrophysical explanation. While we cannot rule out a dark matter origin for the line emission in the Galactic Centre, we posit that if the detection in the Su & Finkbeiner sample is indeed real it might be related to accretion, bubble, or jet activity in nearby (z < 0.2) AGN. A...

  10. Bimetric gravity and dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Laura; Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2015-01-01

    We review some recent proposals for relativistic models of dark matter in the context of bimetric gravity. The aim is to solve the problems of cold dark matter (CDM) at galactic scales, and to reproduce the phenomenology of the modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND), while still being in agreement with the standard cosmological model $\\Lambda$-CDM at large scales. In this context a promising alternative is dipolar dark matter (DDM) in which two different species of dark matter particles are separately coupled to the two metrics of bigravity and are linked together by an internal vector field. The phenomenology of MOND then results from a mechanism of gravitational polarization. Probably the best formulation of the model is within the framework of recently developed massive bigravity theories. Then the gravitational sector of the model is safe by construction, but a ghostly degree of freedom in the decoupling limit is still present in the dark matter sector. Future work should analyse the cosmological solutions of...

  11. Dark matter and cosmological nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, D. N.

    1986-01-01

    Existing dark matter problems, i.e., dynamics, galaxy formation and inflation, are considered, along with a model which proposes dark baryons as the bulk of missing matter in a fractal universe. It is shown that no combination of dark, nonbaryonic matter can either provide a cosmological density parameter value near unity or, as in the case of high energy neutrinos, allow formation of condensed matter at epochs when quasars already existed. The possibility that correlations among galactic clusters are scale-free is discussed. Such a distribution of matter would yield a fractal of 1.2, close to a one-dimensional universe. Biasing, cosmic superstrings, and percolated explosions and hot dark matter are theoretical approaches that would satisfy the D = 1.2 fractal model of the large-scale structure of the universe and which would also allow sufficient dark matter in halos to close the universe.

  12. Dark matter and dark energy

    CERN Multimedia

    Caldwell, Robert

    2009-01-01

    "Observations continue to indicate that the Universe is dominated by invisible components - dark matter and dark energy. Shedding light on this cosmic darkness is a priority for astronomers and physicists" (3 pages)

  13. Discovery in the Galactic Bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    In our efforts to map our galaxys structure, one region has remained very difficult to probe: the galactic center. A new survey, however, uses infrared light to peer through the gas and dust in the galactic plane, searching for variable stars in the bulge of the galaxy. This study has discovered a population of very young stars in a thin disk in the galactic center, providing clues to the star formation history of the Milky Way over the last 100 million years.Obscured CenterThe center of the Milky Way is dominated by a region known as the galactic bulge. Efforts to better understand this region in particular, its star formation history have been hindered by the stars, gas, and dust of the galactic disk, which prevent us from viewing the galactic bulge at low latitudes in visible light.The positions of the 35 classical Cepheids discovered in VVV data, projected onto an image of the galactic plane. Click for a better look! The survey area is bounded by the blue lines, and the galactic bar is marked with a red curve. The bottom panel shows the position of the Cepheids overlaid on the VVV bulge extinction map. [Dkny et al. 2015]Infrared light, however, can be used to probe deeper through the dust than visible-light searches. A new survey called VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) uses the VISTA telescope in Chile to search, in infrared, for variable stars in the inner part of the galaxy. The VVV survey area spans the Milky Way bulge and an adjacent section of the mid-plane where star formation activity is high.Led by Istvn Dkny, a researcher at the Millennium Institute of Astrophysics and the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, a team has now used VVV data to specifically identify classical Cepheid variable stars in the bulge. Why? Cepheids are pulsating stars with a very useful relation between their periods and luminosities that allows them to be used as distance indicators. Moreover, classical Cepheids are indicators of young stellar populations which can

  14. Signals from dark atom formation in halos

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, Lauren; Kusenko, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We consider indirect detection signals of atomic dark matter, with a massive dark photon which mixes kinetically with hypercharge. In significant regions of parameter space, dark matter remains at least partially ionized today, and dark atom formation can occur efficiently in dense regions, such as the centers of galactic halos. The formation of dark atoms is accompanied by emission of a dark photon, which can subsequently decay into Standard Model particles. We discuss the expected signal strength and compare it to that of annihilating dark matter. As a case study, we explore the possibility that dark atom formation can account for the observed 511 keV line and outline the relevant parameter space.

  15. Constraints on MACHO Dark Matter from the Star Cluster in the Dwarf Galaxy Eridanus II

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    I show that a recently discovered star cluster near the center of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Eridanus II provides strong constraints on massive compact halo objects (MACHOs) of >~5 M_sun as the main component of dark matter. MACHO dark matter will dynamically heat the cluster, driving it to larger sizes and higher velocity dispersions until it dissolves into its host galaxy. The star cluster has a luminosity of just ~2000 L_sun and is relatively puffy, with a half-light radius of 13 pc, making it much more fragile than other known clusters in dwarf galaxies. For a wide range of plausible dark matter halo properties, Eri II's star cluster combines with existing constraints from microlensing, wide binaries, and disk kinematics to rule out dark matter composed entirely of MACHOs from ~10$^{-7}$ M_sun up to arbitrarily high masses. The cluster in Eri II closes the ~20--100 M_sun window of allowed MACHO dark matter and provides much stronger constraints than wide Galactic binaries for MACHOs of up to thousands o...

  16. Levitating dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    A sizable fraction of the total energy density of the universe may be in heavy particles with a net dark U(1)' charge comparable to its mass. When the charges have the same sign the cancellation between their gravitational and gauge forces may lead to a mismatch between different measures of masses in the universe. Measuring galactic masses by orbits of normal matter, such as galaxy rotation curves or lensing, will give the total mass, while the flows of dark matter agglomerates may yield smaller values if the gauge repulsion is not accounted for. If distant galaxies which house light beacons like SNe Ia contain such dark particles, the observations of their cosmic recession may mistake the weaker forces for an extra `antigravity', and infer an effective dark energy equation of state smaller than the real one. In some cases, including that of a cosmological constant, these effects can mimic w < -1. They can also lead to a local variation of galaxy-galaxy forces, yielding a larger `Hubble Flow' in those regions of space that could be taken for a dynamical dark energy, or superhorizon effects.

  17. Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Einasto, Jaan

    2013-01-01

    I give a review of the development of the concept of dark matter. The dark matter story passed through several stages from a minor observational puzzle to a major challenge for theory of elementary particles. Modern data suggest that dark matter is the dominant matter component in the Universe, and that it consists of some unknown non-baryonic particles. Dark matter is the dominant matter component in the Universe, thus properties of dark matter particles determine the structure of the cosmic...

  18. Galactic planetary science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Giovanna

    2014-04-28

    Planetary science beyond the boundaries of our Solar System is today in its infancy. Until a couple of decades ago, the detailed investigation of the planetary properties was restricted to objects orbiting inside the Kuiper Belt. Today, we cannot ignore that the number of known planets has increased by two orders of magnitude nor that these planets resemble anything but the objects present in our own Solar System. Whether this fact is the result of a selection bias induced by the kind of techniques used to discover new planets--mainly radial velocity and transit--or simply the proof that the Solar System is a rarity in the Milky Way, we do not know yet. What is clear, though, is that the Solar System has failed to be the paradigm not only in our Galaxy but even 'just' in the solar neighbourhood. This finding, although unsettling, forces us to reconsider our knowledge of planets under a different light and perhaps question a few of the theoretical pillars on which we base our current 'understanding'. The next decade will be critical to advance in what we should perhaps call Galactic planetary science. In this paper, I review highlights and pitfalls of our current knowledge of this topic and elaborate on how this knowledge might arguably evolve in the next decade. More critically, I identify what should be the mandatory scientific and technical steps to be taken in this fascinating journey of remote exploration of planets in our Galaxy.

  19. The Galactic Magnetic Field and UHECR Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Farrar, Glennys R; Khurana, Deepak; Sutherland, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A good model of the Galactic magnetic field is crucial for estimating the Galactic contribution in dark matter and CMB-cosmology studies, determining the sources of UHECRs, and also modeling the transport of Galactic CRs since the halo field provides an important escape route for by diffusion along its field lines. We briefly review the observational foundations of the Jansson-Farrar 2012 model for the large scale structure of the GMF, underscoring the robust evidence for a N-to-S directed, spiraling halo field. New results on the lensing effect of the GMF on UHECRs are presented, displaying multiple images and dramatic magnification and demagnification that varies with source direction and CR rigidity.

  20. The Galactic Center Region Imaged by VERITAS

    CERN Document Server

    Beilicke, M

    2011-01-01

    The Galactic Center has long been a region of interest for high-energy and very-high-energy observations. Many potential sources of GeV/TeV gamma-ray emission have been suggested, e.g., the accretion of matter onto the black hole, cosmic rays from a nearby supernova remnant, or the annihilation of dark matter particles. The Galactic Center has been detected at MeV/GeV energies by EGRET and recently by Fermi/LAT. At GeV/TeV energies, the Galactic Center was detected by different ground-based Cherenkov telescopes such as CANGAROO, Whipple 10m, H.E.S.S., and MAGIC. We present the results from 15 hrs of VERITAS observations conducted at large zenith angles, resulting in a >10 standard deviation detection and confirmation of the high-energy spectrum observed by H.E.S.S. The combined Fermi/VERITAS results are compared to astrophysical models.

  1. The infrared Galactic disk: What have we learned?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Churchwell E.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A brief overview is given of some of the new insights we have achieved from the Spitzer/GLIMPSE/MIPSGAL surveys of the Galactic plane. Particular emphasis is given to infrared bubbles, rapidly accreting protostars, infrared dark clouds, and diffuse PAH emission. Large scale galactic structure based on the distribution of red clump giants will be discussed by Robert Benjamin in this volume.

  2. Galactic entropy in extended Kaluza-Klein cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanar, Hilmi; Salti, Mustafa; Aydogdu, Oktay; Acikgoz, Irfan; Yasar, Erol

    2016-02-01

    We use a Kaluza-Klein model with variable cosmological and gravitational terms to discuss the nature of galactic entropy function. For this purpose, we assume a universe filled with dark fluid and consider five-dimensional (5D) field equations using the Gamma law equation. We mainly discuss the validity of the first and generalized second laws of galactic thermodynamics for viable Kaluza-Klein models.

  3. Galactic radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Sofue, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    This book is a concise primer on galactic radio astronomy for undergraduate and graduate students, and provides wide coverage of galactic astronomy and astrophysics such as the physics of interstellar matter and the dynamics and structure of the Milky Way Galaxy and galaxies. Radio astronomy and its technological development have led to significant progress in galactic astronomy and contributed to understanding interstellar matter and galactic structures. The book begins with the fundamental physics of radio-wave radiation, i.e., black body radiation, thermal emission, synchrotron radiation, and HI and molecular line emissions. The author then gives overviews of ingredients of galactic physics, including interstellar matter such as the neutral (HI), molecular hydrogen, and ionized gases, as well as magnetic fields in galaxies. In addition, more advanced topics relevant to the Galaxy and galaxies are also contained here: star formation, supernova remnants, the Galactic Center and black holes, galactic dynamics...

  4. Detecting Dark Matter in High Velocity Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, G F; Putman, M E; Lewis, Geraint F; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Putman, Mary E; Gibson, Brad C

    2000-01-01

    Many high velocity HI clouds (HVCs) are now believed to be scattered throughout the Galactic halo on scales of tens of kiloparsecs. Some of these clouds appear to contain substantial HI masses (>10^6 Msun). It has been suggested that these structures may be associated with dark matter `mini halos' accreting onto the Galactic halo. For a compact HVC along the sight line to a more distant galaxy, we demonstrate that `pixel gravitational lensing' provides a crucial test for the presence of a dark halo in the form of massive compact objects. The detection of pixel lensing will provide an independent means to map the mass distribution within HVCs.

  5. Expectation for the X-ray Galactic Halo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    We present an estimate of the strength and spectrum of the X-ray background from the warm gas associated with the Galactic halo. This investigation is motivated primarily by the recent detection of a spatially variable soft X-ray component towards the north Galactic polar cap by Kuntz et al. (2001), suggesting that the warm gas heated by gravitational shocks of the Galactic halo may produce a significant contribution to the soft X-ray sky. Another purpose of the study is to refine the recent theoretical prediction of the X-ray spectrum from the Galactic alo by Xue (2001) who adopted an ideal and simple isothermal model for the gas and dark matter distributions of the Galactic halo. We use the universal density profile for the dark matter distributions of the Galactic halo to evaluate the Xray properties of the warm gas either in hydrostatic equilibrium with, or tracing the underlying gravitational potential of the Galaxy. It has been shown that our prediction is consistent with the measured soft X-ray component towards the north Galactic polar cap if the gas fraction is taken to be ~ 0.005.

  6. Galactic TeV-PeV Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlers, Markus; Barger, Vernon; Lu, Ran

    2016-01-01

    We study the contribution of Galactic sources to the flux of astrophysical neutrinos recently observed by the IceCube Collaboration. We show that the Galactic diffuse neutrino emission consistent with $\\gamma$-ray (Fermi-LAT) and cosmic ray data (KASCADE, KASCADE-Grande and CREAM) is expected to account for only 4%$-$8% of the IceCube flux above 60 TeV. Direct neutrino emission from cosmic ray-gas ($pp$) interactions in the sources would require an unusually large average opacity above 0.01. On the other hand, we find that the IceCube events already probe Galactic neutrino scenarios via the distribution of event arrival directions. We show that most Galactic scenarios can only have a limited contribution to the astrophysical signal: diffuse Galactic emission ($\\lesssim50$%), quasi-diffuse emission of neutrino sources ($\\lesssim65$%), extended diffuse emission from the Fermi Bubbles ($\\lesssim25$%) or unidentified TeV $\\gamma$-ray sources ($\\lesssim25$%). Presently, dark matter decay remains unconstrained.

  7. A Dark Matter Superfluid

    CERN Document Server

    Khoury, Justin

    2015-01-01

    In this talk we present a novel framework that unifies the stunning success of MOND on galactic scales with the triumph of the LambdaCDM model on cosmological scales. This is achieved through the rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity. The dark matter and MOND components have a common origin, representing different phases of a single underlying substance. In galaxies, dark matter thermalizes and condenses to form a superfluid phase. The superfluid phonons couple to baryonic matter particles and mediate a MOND-like force. Our framework naturally distinguishes between galaxies (where MOND is successful) and galaxy clusters (where MOND is not): dark matter has a higher temperature in clusters, and hence is in a mixture of superfluid and normal phase. The rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity leads to a number of striking observational signatures, which we briefly discuss. Remarkably the critical temperature and equation of state of the dark matter superfluid are similar to those of known cold at...

  8. Dark Matter Superfluidity

    CERN Document Server

    Khoury, Justin

    2016-01-01

    In this talk I summarize a novel framework that unifies the stunning success of MOND on galactic scales with the triumph of the $\\Lambda$CDM model on cosmological scales. This is achieved through the rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity. The dark matter and MOND components have a common origin, representing different phases of a single underlying substance. In galaxies, dark matter thermalizes and condenses to form a superfluid phase. The superfluid phonons couple to baryonic matter particles and mediate a MOND-like force. This framework naturally distinguishes between galaxies (where MOND is successful) and galaxy clusters (where MOND is not): dark matter has a higher temperature in clusters, and hence is in a mixture of superfluid and normal phase. The rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity leads to a number of striking observational signatures, which we briefly discuss. Remarkably the critical temperature and equation of state of the dark matter superfluid are similar to those of known co...

  9. Levitating Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kaloper, Nemanja

    2009-01-01

    A sizable fraction of the total energy density of the universe may be in heavy particles with a net dark $U(1)'$ charge equal to its mass, such as the BPS states in string theory. When the charges have the same sign the cancellation between their gravitational and gauge forces may lead to a mismatch between different measures of masses in the universe. Measuring galactic masses by orbits of normal matter, such as galaxy rotation curves or lensing, will give the total mass, while the flows of dark matter agglomerates may yield smaller values if the gauge repulsion is not accounted for. If distant galaxies which house light beacons like SNe Ia contain such dark particles, the observations of their cosmic recession may mistake the weaker forces for an extra `antigravity', and infer an effective dark energy equation of state smaller than the real one. In some cases, including that of a cosmological constant, these effects can mimic $w<-1$. They can also lead to a {\\it local} variation of galaxy-galaxy forces, ...

  10. Dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Einasto, J.

    2011-01-01

    I give a review of the development of the concept of dark matter. The dark matter story passed through several stages from a minor observational puzzle to a major challenge for theory of elementary particles. Modern data suggest that dark matter is the dominant matter component in the Universe, and that it consists of some unknown non-baryonic particles. Properties of dark matter particles determine the structure of the cosmic web.

  11. Identification of ten new Galactic HII regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We discovered ten large HII regions in the Sino-German λ6 cm polarization survey of the Galactic plane. They have been identified according to their flat spectral indexes and the high ratio between the 60 μm infrared emission and the λ6 cm emission. The integrated flux densities as well as the sizes of these sources are given at 4800 MHz. Cross-identifications are made with other major radio catalogs.

  12. Tachyonic models of dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Nikitin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    We consider a spherically symmetric stationary problem in General Relativity, including a black hole, inflow of normal and tachyonic matter and outflow of tachyonic matter. Computations in a weak field limit show that the resulting concentration of matter around the black hole leads to gravitational effects equivalent to those associated with dark matter halo. In particular, the model reproduces asymptotically constant galactic rotation curves, if the tachyonic flows of the central supermassive black hole in the galaxy are considered as a main contribution.

  13. Shocking Signals of Dark Matter Annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Jonathan H; Boehm, Celine; Kotera, Kumiko; Norman, Colin

    2015-01-01

    We examine whether charged particles injected by self-annihilating Dark Matter into regions undergoing Diffuse Shock Acceleration (DSA) can be accelerated to high energies. We consider three astrophysical sites where shock acceleration is supposed to occur, namely the Galactic Centre, galaxy clusters and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). For the Milky Way, we find that the acceleration of cosmic rays injected by dark matter could lead to a bump in the cosmic ray spectrum provided that the product of the efficiency of the acceleration mechanism and the concentration of DM particles is high enough. Among the various acceleration sources that we consider (namely supernova remnants (SNRs), Fermi bubbles and AGN jets), we find that the Fermi bubbles are a potentially more efficient accelerator than SNRs. However both could in principle accelerate electrons and protons injected by dark matter to very high energies. At the extragalactic level, the acceleration of dark matter annihilation products could be responsible fo...

  14. Galactic cannibalism and CDM density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nipoti, C; Ciotti, L; Stiavelli, M

    2004-01-01

    Using N-body simulations we show that the process of formation of the brightest cluster galaxy through dissipationless galactic cannibalism can affect the inner cluster dark matter density profile. In particular, we use as realistic test case the dynamical evolution of the galaxy cluster C0337-2522 at redshift z=0.59, hosting in its centre a group of five elliptical galaxies which are likely to be the progenitor of a central giant elliptical. After the formation of the brightest cluster galaxy, the inner cluster dark matter density profile is significantly flatter (logarithmic slope 0.48dark matter. We conclude that galactic cannibalism could be a viable physical mechanism to reconcile - at least at the cluster scale - the flat dark matter haloes inferred observationally in some galaxy clusters with the steep haloes predicted by cosmological simulations.

  15. The role of self-interacting right-handed neutrinos in galactic structure

    CERN Document Server

    Argüelles, C.R.; Rueda, J.A.; Ruffini, R.

    2015-01-01

    We show that warm dark matter keV fermions (`inos') can be responsible for both core and halo galactic structure, in agreement with current astrophysical/cosmological constraints. We identify the inos with sterile right-handed neutrinos. The possible mass range of up to a few tens of keV, obtained independently from the galactic structure and dark matter astroparticle physics, points towards an important role of the right-handed neutrinos in the cosmic structure.

  16. Dark Sunshine: Detecting Dark Matter through Dark Photons from the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Jonathan L; Tanedo, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter may interact with the Standard Model through the kinetic mixing of dark photons, $A'$, with Standard Model photons. Such dark matter will accumulate in the Sun and annihilate into dark photons. The dark photons may then leave the Sun and decay into pairs of charged Standard Model particles that can be detected by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer. The directionality of this "dark sunshine" is distinct from all astrophysical backgrounds, providing an opportunity for unambiguous dark matter discovery by AMS. We perform a complete analysis of this scenario including Sommerfeld enhancements of dark matter annihilation and the effect of the Sun's magnetic field on the signal, and we define a set of cuts to optimize the signal probability. With the three years of data already collected, AMS may discover dark matter with mass 1 TeV $\\lesssim m_X \\lesssim$ 10 TeV, dark photon masses $m_{A'} \\sim \\mathcal O(100)$ MeV, and kinetic mixing parameters $10^{-11} \\lesssim \\varepsilon \\lesssim 10^{-8}$. The propose...

  17. Galactic rotation curves and brane world models

    CERN Document Server

    Rahaman, F; De Benedictis, A; Usmani, A A; Ray, Saibal

    2008-01-01

    In the present investigation flat rotational curves of the galaxies are considered under the framework of brane-world models where the 4d effective Einstein equation has extra terms which arise from the embedding of the 3-brane in the $5d$ bulk. It has been shown here that these long range bulk gravitational degrees of freedom can act as a mechanism to yield the observed galactic rotation curves without the need for dark matter. The present model has the advantage that the observed rotation curves result solely from well-established non-local effects of gravitation, such as dark radiation and dark pressure under a direct use of the condition of flat rotation curves and does not invoke any exotic matter field.

  18. Discover your dream

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨红

    2010-01-01

    《盗梦空间》(Inception)票房大热,几乎在全球掀起了一股探梦狂潮,现在就让我们跟随Inception主角Cobb的叙述,来discover your dream(探索你的梦境)吧。

  19. The Local Dark Matter Density

    CERN Document Server

    Read, J I

    2014-01-01

    I review current efforts to measure the mean density of dark matter near the Sun. This encodes valuable dynamical information about our Galaxy and is also of great importance for 'direct detection' dark matter experiments. I discuss theoretical expectations in our current cosmology; the theory behind mass modelling of the Galaxy; and I show how combining local and global measures probes the shape of the Milky Way dark matter halo and the possible presence of a 'dark disc'. I stress the strengths and weaknesses of different methodologies and highlight the continuing need for detailed tests on mock data - particularly in the light of recently discovered evidence for disequilibria in the Milky Way disc. I highlight several recent measurements in order of increasing data complexity and prior, and, correspondingly, decreasing formal error bars. Comparing these measurements with spherical extrapolations from the Milky Way's rotation curve, I show that the Milky Way is consistent with having a spherical dark matter ...

  20. Dark matter, dark radiation and Higgs phenomenology in the hidden sector DM models

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, P

    2015-01-01

    I present a class of hidden sector dark matter (DM) models with local dark gauge symmetries, where DM is stable due to unbroken local dark gauge symmetry, or due topology, or it is long-lived because of some accidental symme- tries, and the particle contents and their dynamics are completely fixed by local gauge symmetries. In these models, one have two types of natural force mediators, dark gauge bosons and dark Higgs boson, which would affect DM and Higgs phenomenology in important ways. I discuss various phenomenological issues including the GeV scale gamma-ray excess from the galactic center (GC), (in)direct detection signatures, dark radiation, Higgs phenomenology and Higgs inflation assisted by dark Higgs.

  1. Gamma-Ray Excess and the Minimal Dark Matter Model

    CERN Document Server

    Duerr, Michael; Smirnov, Juri

    2015-01-01

    We point out that the gamma-ray excesses in the galactic center and in the dwarf galaxy Reticulum II can both be well explained within the simplest dark matter model. We find that the corresponding region of parameter space will be tested by direct and indirect dark matter searches in the near future.

  2. Dark matter assimilation into the baryon asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Eramo, Francesco; Fei, Lin; Thaler, Jesse, E-mail: fderamo@mit.edu, E-mail: lfei@mit.edu, E-mail: jthaler@mit.edu [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Pure singlets are typically disfavored as dark matter candidates, since they generically have a thermal relic abundance larger than the observed value. In this paper, we propose a new dark matter mechanism called {sup a}ssimilation{sup ,} which takes advantage of the baryon asymmetry of the universe to generate the correct relic abundance of singlet dark matter. Through assimilation, dark matter itself is efficiently destroyed, but dark matter number is stored in new quasi-stable heavy states which carry the baryon asymmetry. The subsequent annihilation and late-time decay of these heavy states yields (symmetric) dark matter as well as (asymmetric) standard model baryons. We study in detail the case of pure bino dark matter by augmenting the minimal supersymmetric standard model with vector-like chiral multiplets. In the parameter range where this mechanism is effective, the LHC can discover long-lived charged particles which were responsible for assimilating dark matter.

  3. Dark GPC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banas, Andrew Rafael; Villangca, Mark Jayson; Palima, Darwin;

    2016-01-01

    in a 3x intensified user defined input mask shape against a dark background. In this work, we emphasize GPC’s capability of optimal destructive interference, normally used to create the dark background surrounding the shaped light. We also study input parameters wherein the locations of light...... and darkness are interchanged with respect to typical GPC output, thus resulting to a well-defined structured darkness. The conditions that give destructive interference for the output are then applied to near-arbitrary shapes. Preliminary experimental results are presented using dynamic spatial light...... modulator to form scaled arbitrary darkness shapes. Supporting demonstrations that reverse the light and dark regions of amplitude-modulated input are also presented as a related case of structuring destructive interference. Our analysis and experimental demonstrations show a simplified approach...

  4. Stellar and Galactic Astrophysics with SIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, A.

    2001-05-01

    SIM will revolutionize stellar and Galactic astrophysics by tackling new questions that could never previously be addressed and making order of magnitude improvements in key parameters. SIM will measure R0 and Theta0 to measurements of the Milky Way mass and rotation curve. It will probe the Galactic 3-D mass distribution by 2 independent methods. By calibrating the RR Lyrae MV-[Fe/H] relation as well as obtaining direct distances to clusters and halo field objects, SIM will precisely date halo and globular-cluster formation as a function of metallicity. SIM will obtain 1 measurements for 200 stars of all types ranging from brown dwarfs (BD) to O stars from a broad range of metallicities, including both binaries and single stars, and it will yield precision measurements of white dwarf (WD) and black hole (BH) remnants as well. SIM microlensing will take an unbiased census of all objects in the Galactic bulge, both dark (BD WD NS BH) and luminous, and will resolve the nature of the dark-halo (MACHO) candidates currently being detected toward the LMC.

  5. Milky Way mass constraints from the Galactic satellite gap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cautun, Marius; Frenk, Carlos S.; van de Weygaert, Rien; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2014-01-01

    We use the distribution of maximum circular velocities, Vmax, of satellites in the Milky Way (MW) to constrain the virial mass, M200, of the Galactic halo under an assumed prior of a Λ cold dark matter universe. This is done by analysing the subhalo populations of a large sample of haloes found in t

  6. Did LIGO detect dark matter?

    CERN Document Server

    Bird, Simeon; Muñoz, Julian B; Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Kamionkowski, Marc; Kovetz, Ely D; Raccanelli, Alvise; Riess, Adam G

    2016-01-01

    We consider the possibility that the black-hole (BH) binary detected by LIGO may be a signature of dark matter. Interestingly enough, there remains a window for masses $10\\,M_\\odot \\lesssim M_{\\rm bh} \\lesssim 100\\, M_\\odot$ where primordial black holes (PBHs) may constitute the dark matter. If two BHs in a galactic halo pass sufficiently close, they can radiate enough energy in gravitational waves to become gravitationally bound. The bound BHs will then rapidly spiral inward due to emission of gravitational radiation and ultimately merge. Uncertainties in the rate for such events arise from our imprecise knowledge of the phase-space structure of galactic halos on the smallest scales. Still, reasonable estimates span a range that overlaps the $2-53$ Gpc$^{-3}$ yr$^{-1}$ rate estimated from GW150914, thus raising the possibility that LIGO has detected PBH dark matter. PBH mergers are likely to be distributed spatially more like dark matter than luminous matter and have no optical nor neutrino counterparts. The...

  7. Did LIGO Detect Dark Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Simeon; Cholis, Ilias; Muñoz, Julian B; Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Kamionkowski, Marc; Kovetz, Ely D; Raccanelli, Alvise; Riess, Adam G

    2016-05-20

    We consider the possibility that the black-hole (BH) binary detected by LIGO may be a signature of dark matter. Interestingly enough, there remains a window for masses 20M_{⊙}≲M_{bh}≲100M_{⊙} where primordial black holes (PBHs) may constitute the dark matter. If two BHs in a galactic halo pass sufficiently close, they radiate enough energy in gravitational waves to become gravitationally bound. The bound BHs will rapidly spiral inward due to the emission of gravitational radiation and ultimately will merge. Uncertainties in the rate for such events arise from our imprecise knowledge of the phase-space structure of galactic halos on the smallest scales. Still, reasonable estimates span a range that overlaps the 2-53  Gpc^{-3} yr^{-1} rate estimated from GW150914, thus raising the possibility that LIGO has detected PBH dark matter. PBH mergers are likely to be distributed spatially more like dark matter than luminous matter and have neither optical nor neutrino counterparts. They may be distinguished from mergers of BHs from more traditional astrophysical sources through the observed mass spectrum, their high ellipticities, or their stochastic gravitational wave background. Next-generation experiments will be invaluable in performing these tests.

  8. AN ABSENCE OF FAST RADIO BURSTS AT INTERMEDIATE GALACTIC LATITUDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroff, E.; Van Straten, W.; Bailes, M.; Barr, E. D.; Coster, P.; Flynn, C.; Keane, E. F. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Johnston, S. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Bates, S. D.; Keith, M. J.; Kramer, M.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bhat, N. D. R. [ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), 44 Rosehill Street, Redfern, NSW 2016 (Australia); Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; Tiburzi, C. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Via della Scienza, I-09047 Selargius (Italy); Burke-Spolaor, S. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91104 (United States); Champion, D.; Ng, C. [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Levin, L., E-mail: epetroff@astro.swin.edu.au [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); and others

    2014-07-10

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are an emerging class of bright, highly dispersed radio pulses. Recent work by Thornton et al. has revealed a population of FRBs in the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey at high Galactic latitudes. A variety of progenitors have been proposed, including cataclysmic events at cosmological distances, Galactic flare stars, and terrestrial radio frequency interference. Here we report on a search for FRBs at intermediate Galactic latitudes (–15° discovered in this region. Several effects such as dispersion, scattering, sky temperature, and scintillation decrease the sensitivity by more than 3σ in ∼20% of survey pointings. Including all of these effects, we exclude the hypothesis that FRBs are uniformly distributed on the sky with 99% confidence. This low probability implies that additional factors—not accounted for by standard Galactic models—must be included to ease the discrepancy between the detection rates at high and low Galactic latitudes. A revised rate estimate or another strong and heretofore unknown selection effect in Galactic latitude would provide closer agreement between the surveys' detection rates. The dearth of detections at low Galactic latitude disfavors a Galactic origin for these bursts.

  9. Discovering the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barrie W.

    1999-04-01

    Discovering the Solar System Barrie W. Jones The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK Discovering the Solar System is a comprehensive, up-to-date account of the Solar System and of the ways in which the various bodies have been investigated and modelled. The approach is thematic, with sequences of chapters on the interiors of planetary bodies, on their surfaces, and on their atmospheres. Within each sequence there is a chapter on general principles and processes followed by one or two chapters on specific bodies. There is also an introductory chapter, a chapter on the origin of the Solar System, and a chapter on asteroids, comets and meteorites. Liberally illustrated with diagrams, black and white photographs and colour plates, Discovering the Solar System also features: * tables of essential data * question and answers within the text * end of section review questions with answers and comments Discovering the Solar System is essential reading for all undergraduate students for whom astronomy or planetary science are components of their degrees, and for those at a more advanced level approaching the subject for the first time. It will also be of great interest to non-specialists with a keen interest in astronomy. A small amount of scientific knowledge is assumed plus familiarity with basic algebra and graphs. There is no calculus. Praise for this book includes: ".certainly qualifies as an authoritative text. The author clearly has an encyclopedic knowledge of the subject." Meteorics and Planetary Science ".liberally doused with relevant graphs, tables, and black and white figures of good quality." EOS, Transactions of the American Geophysical Union ".one of the best books on the Solar System I have seen. The general accuracy and quality of the content is excellent." Journal of the British Astronomical Association

  10. Discovering Phonemes of Bidayuh

    OpenAIRE

    Jecky Misieng

    2012-01-01

    There are generally three views of the notion of a phoneme. The structuralist view of the phoneme focuses on this language phenomenon as a phonetic reality. In discovering phonemes of a language, phonologists who hold this view will look for minimal contrasting pairs as a way to determine contrasting sounds of that language. They will also look for allophones or two sounds of the same phoneme which may appear in complementary distribution. This paper will discuss the possible application of t...

  11. Tiny galaxies help unravel dark matter mystery

    CERN Multimedia

    O'Hanlon, Larry

    2007-01-01

    "The 70-year effort to unravel the mysteries of dark matter just got a big boost from some very puny galaxies. In the pas few years, a score of dwarf galaxies have been discovered hanging about the fringes of the Milky way. Now new measurements of the few stars int hese dwarfs reveal them to be dark mater distilleries, with upwards of 1'000 times more dark than normal matter." (3 pages)

  12. TASI 2008 Lectures on Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.

    2009-01-01

    Based on lectures given at the 2008 Theoretical Advanced Study Institute (TASI), I review here some aspects of the phenomenology of particle dark matter, including the process of thermal freeze-out in the early universe, and the direct and indirect detection of WIMPs. I also describe some of the most popular particle candidates for dark matter and summarize the current status of the quest to discover dark matter's particle identity.

  13. Active Galactic Nuclei Feedback and Galactic Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ai-Lei

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is thought to regulate the growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and galaxies. The most direct evidence of AGN feedback is probably galactic outflows. This thesis addresses the link between SMBHs and their host galaxies from four different observational perspectives. First, I study the local correlation between black hole mass and the galactic halo potential (the MBH - Vc relation) based on Very Large Array (VLA) HI observations of galaxy rotation curves. Although there is a correlation, it is no tighter than the well-studied MBH - sigma* relation between the black hole mass and the potential of the galactic bulge, indicating that physical processes, such as feedback, could link the evolution of the black hole to the baryons in the bulge. In what follows, I thus search for galactic outflows as direct evidence of AGN feedback. Second, I use the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to observe a luminous obscured AGN that hosts an ionized galactic outflow and find a compact but massive molecular outflow that can potentially quench the star formation in 10. 6 years.The third study extends the sample of known ionized outflows with new Magellan long-slit observations of 12 luminous obscured AGN. I find that most luminous obscured AGN (Lbol > 1046 ergs s-1) host ionized outflows on 10 kpc scales, and the size of the outflow correlates strongly with the luminosity of the AGN. Lastly, to capitalize on the power of modern photometric surveys, I experiment with a new broadband imaging technique to study the morphology of AGN emission line regions and outflows. With images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), this method successfully constructs images of the [OIII]lambda5007 emission line and reveals hundreds of extended emission-line systems. When applied to current and future surveys, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), this technique could open a new parameter space for the study of AGN outflows. In

  14. Mass Extinctions and a Dark Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Eric David

    2016-01-01

    We consider whether the observed periodicity of mass extinctions and of comet impacts on Earth is consistent with Solar oscillation about the Galactic midplane and spiral arm crossings. It is of further interest to determine whether a hypothetical thin dark disk is necessary to give the right periodicity, and whether such a dark disk is allowed given kinematic and other observational constaints on the Galaxy's gravitational potential. We show that a dark disk consistent with recent bounds, combined with data for spiral arm crossing, can lead to the required periodicity. Moreover, we find that the best fit values correctly predict the date of the Chicxulub crater dated to 66 My ago.

  15. Can Neutron stars constrain Dark Matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kouvaris, Christoforos; Tinyakov, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We argue that observations of old neutron stars can impose constraints on dark matter candidates even with very small elastic or inelastic cross section, and self-annihilation cross section. We find that old neutron stars close to the galactic center or in globular clusters can maintain a surface...... temperature that could in principle be detected. Due to their compactness, neutron stars can acrete WIMPs efficiently even if the WIMP-to-nucleon cross section obeys the current limits from direct dark matter searches, and therefore they could constrain a wide range of dark matter candidates....

  16. Investigating Neutralino Annihilations Using DarkSUSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamel, S.; eSilva, E.

    2002-01-01

    Physicists do not fully understand the nature of dark matter although we infer its existence from experimental observation. This project is part of the dark matter detection searches with the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). We are investigating one of the Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMP) candidates called the neutralino, a particle predicted by the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. In particular, we ran a computer simulation called DarkSUSY that predicts the signature that we expect to see in the data from GLAST that pertains to the detection of the neutralino in the galactic halo.

  17. Observational evidences of the Yukawa Potential Interacting Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Man Ho

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations in galaxies and clusters indicate dark matter density profiles exhibit core-like structures which contradict to the numerical simulation results of collisionless cold dark matter. On the other hand, it has been shown that cold dark matter particles interacting through a Yukawa potential could naturally explain the cores in dwarf galaxies. In this article, I use the Yukawa Potential interacting dark matter model to derive two simple scaling relations on the galactic and cluster scales respectively, which give excellent agreements with observations. Also, in our model, the masses of the force carrier and dark matter particle can be constrained by the observational data.

  18. Students Discover Unique Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Three undergraduate students, from Leiden University in the Netherlands, have discovered an extrasolar planet. The extraordinary find, which turned up during their research project, is about five times as massive as Jupiter. This is also the first planet discovered orbiting a fast-rotating hot star. Omega Centauri ESO PR Photo 45a/08 A planet around a hot star The students were testing a method of investigating the light fluctuations of thousands of stars in the OGLE database in an automated way. The brightness of one of the stars was found to decrease for two hours every 2.5 days by about one percent. Follow-up observations, taken with ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile, confirmed that this phenomenon is caused by a planet passing in front of the star, blocking part of the starlight at regular intervals. According to Ignas Snellen, supervisor of the research project, the discovery was a complete surprise. "The project was actually meant to teach the students how to develop search algorithms. But they did so well that there was time to test their algorithm on a so far unexplored database. At some point they came into my office and showed me this light curve. I was completely taken aback!" The students, Meta de Hoon, Remco van der Burg, and Francis Vuijsje, are very enthusiastic. "It is exciting not just to find a planet, but to find one as unusual as this one; it turns out to be the first planet discovered around a fast rotating star, and it's also the hottest star found with a planet," says Meta. "The computer needed more than a thousand hours to do all the calculations," continues Remco. The planet is given the prosaic name OGLE2-TR-L9b. "But amongst ourselves we call it ReMeFra-1, after Remco, Meta, and myself," says Francis. The planet was discovered by looking at the brightness variations of about 15 700 stars, which had been observed by the OGLE survey once or twice per night for about four years between 1997 and 2000. Because the data had been made public

  19. Astronomical Constraints on Quantum Cold Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Shane; Musielak, Z.; Fry, J.

    2012-01-01

    A model of quantum (`fuzzy') cold dark matter that accounts for both the halo core problem and the missing dwarf galaxies problem, which plague the usual cold dark matter paradigm, is developed. The model requires that a cold dark matter particle has a mass so small that its only allowed physical description is a quantum wave function. Each such particle in a galactic halo is bound to a gravitational potential that is created by luminous matter and by the halo itself, and the resulting wave function is described by a Schrödinger equation. To solve this equation on a galactic scale, we impose astronomical constraints that involve several density profiles used to fit data from simulations of dark matter galactic halos. The solutions to the Schrödinger equation are quantum waves which resemble the density profiles acquired from simulations, and they are used to determine the mass of the cold dark matter particle. The effects of adding certain types of baryonic matter to the halo, such as a dwarf elliptical galaxy or a supermassive black hole, are also discussed.

  20. Discovering system requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahill, A.T.; Bentz, B. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Systems and Industrial Engineering; Dean, F.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirements process. This report provides a high-level overview of the system requirements process, explaining types, sources, and characteristics of good requirements. System requirements, however, are seldom stated by the customer. Therefore, this report shows ways to help you work with your customer to discover the system requirements. It also explains terminology commonly used in the requirements development field, such as verification, validation, technical performance measures, and the various design reviews.

  1. Dark Matter via Massive (bi-)Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Blanchet, Luc

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigate the existence of relativistic models for dark matter in the context of bimetric gravity, used here to reproduce the modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) at galactic scales. For this purpose we consider two different species of dark matter particles that separately couple to the two metrics of bigravity. These two sectors are linked together \\textit{via} an internal $U(1)$ vector field, and some effective composite metric built out of the two metrics. Among possible models only certain class of kinetic and interaction terms are allowed without invoking ghost degrees of freedom. Along these lines we explore the number of allowed kinetic terms in the theory and point out the presence of ghosts in a previous model. Finally, we propose a promising class of ghost-free candidate theories that could provide the MOND phenomenology at galactic scales while reproducing the standard cold dark matter (CDM) model at cosmological scales.

  2. Virgin Galactic explores CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Virgin Galactic visited CERN with a group of future astronauts and Sir Richard Branson. During their visit the group was shown around various experiments, including the Globe, SM18, AMS and the CERN Control Centre.

  3. Galactic dust properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, D.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have shown evidence for variations in the dust emissivity law with temperature and wavelength. A recent dust emission model, called TLS model (for two-level systems), based on the description of the disordered internal structure of the amorphous dust grains has been developped to interpret observations in the far-infrared/submillimeter (FIR/submm) domain. A recent work focusing on the comparison between data of the diffuse interstellar medium seen by FIRAS-WMAP, as well as Archeops compact sources, with the TLS model allowed us to constrain the model parameters characterizing the general Galactic dust properties. Using the newly available Herschel/Hi-GAL data of the inner Galactic plane, we report a 500 μm emissivity excess in the peripheral parts of the Galactic plane, that can reach up to 20% of the emissivity. Results of the TLS modeling indicate significant changes in the dust properties from the central to peripheral parts of the Galactic plane.

  4. Measuring Dark Molecular Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Di; Heiles, Carl E.

    2017-01-01

    It is now well known that a substantial fraction of Galactic molecular gas cannot be traced by CO emission. The thus dubbed CO dark molecular gas (DMG) occupy a large volume of ISM with intermediate extinction, where CO is either not self-shielded and/or subthermally excited. We explore the utilities of simple hydrides, such OH, CH, etc., in tracing DMG. We mapped and modeled the transition zone cross a cloud boundary and derived emperical OH abundance and DMG distribution formulae. We also obtained absorption measurements of various species using Arecibo, VLA, ATCA, and ALMA. The absorption technique has the potential to provide systematic quantification of DMG in the next few years.

  5. Studies of relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei with SKA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agudo, I.; Bottcher, M.; Falcke, H.; Georganopoulos, M.; Ghisellini, G.; Giovannini, G.; Giroletti, M.; Gomez, J.L.; Gurvits, L.; Laing, R.; Lister, M.; Marti, J.M.; Meyer, E.T.; Mizuno, Y.; O'Sullivan, S.; Padovani, P.; Paragi, Z.; Perucho, M.; Schleicher, D.; Stawarz, L.; Vlahakis, N.; Wardle, J.

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei (AGN) are among the most powerful astrophysical objects discovered to date. Indeed, jetted AGN studies have been considered a prominent science case for SKA, and were included in several different chapters of the previous SKA Science Book (Carilli & Rawlin

  6. Supernova Remnants as the Sources of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of cosmic rays holds still manymysteries hundred years after they were first discovered. Supernova remnants have for long been the most likely sources of Galactic cosmic rays. I discuss here some recent evidence that suggests that supernova remnants can indeed efficiently accelerate cosmi

  7. Supernova Remnants as the Sources of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Vink

    2012-01-01

    The origin of cosmic rays holds still manymysteries hundred years after they were first discovered. Supernova remnants have for long been the most likely sources of Galactic cosmic rays. I discuss here some recent evidence that suggests that supernova remnants can indeed efficiently accelerate cosmi

  8. An absence of fast radio bursts at intermediate galactic latitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Petroff, E; Johnston, S; Bailes, M; Barr, E D; Bates, S D; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D; Coster, P; Flynn, C; Keane, E F; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Levin, L; Ng, C; Possenti, A; Stappers, B W; Tiburzi, C; Thornton, D

    2014-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are an emerging class of bright, highly dispersed radio pulses. Recent work by Thornton et al. (2013) has revealed a population of FRBs in the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey at high Galactic latitudes. A variety of progenitors have been proposed including cataclysmic events at cosmological distances, Galactic flare stars, and terrestrial radio frequency interference. Here we report on a search for FRBs at intermediate Galactic latitudes ($-15^{\\circ}$ $< b <$ 15$^{\\circ}$) in data taken as part of the HTRU survey. No FRBs were discovered in this region. Several effects such as dispersion, scattering, sky temperature and scintillation decrease the sensitivity by more than 3$\\sigma$ in $\\sim$20\\% of survey pointings. Including all of these effects, we exclude the hypothesis that FRBs are uniformly distributed on the sky with 99\\% confidence. This low probability implies that additional factors -- not accounted for by standard Galactic models -- must be included to eas...

  9. Galactic Wind in NGC 4460: New Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Oparin, D V

    2015-01-01

    NGC4460 is an isolated lenticular galaxy, in which galactic wind has been earlier discovered as a gas outflow associated with circumnuclear regions of star formation. Using the results of observations in the Halpha line with the scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer on the SAO RAS 6-m telescope, we studied the kinematics of the ionized gas in this galaxy. The parameters of gas outflow from the plane of the galactic disk were refined within a simple geometric model. We show that it is impossible to characterize the wind by a fixed velocity value. Characteristic outflow velocities are within 30..80 km/s , and they are insufficient to make the swept-out matter ultimately leave the galaxy.

  10. Asymmetric capture of Dirac dark matter by the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Blennow, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    Current problems with the solar model may be alleviated if a significant amount of dark matter from the galactic halo is captured in the Sun. We discuss the capture process in the case where the dark matter is a Dirac fermion and the background halo consists of equal amounts of dark matter and anti-dark matter. By considering the case where dark matter and anti-dark matter have different cross sections on solar nuclei as well as the case where the capture process is considered to be a Poisson process, we find that a significant asymmetry between the captured dark particles and anti-particles is possible. Such an asymmetry puts a lower bound on the total amount of captured dark matter and could be a possible solution to the solar composition problem.

  11. Search for Dark Matter at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Conventi, Francesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Dark Matter composes almost 25% of our Universe, but its identity is still unknown which makes it a large challenge for current fundamental physics. A lot of approaches are used to discover the identity of Dark Matter and one of them, collider searches, are discussed in this talk. The latest results on Dark Matter search at ATLAS using 2015 and 2016 data are presented. Results from searches for new physics in the events with final states containing large missing transverse energy + X (photons, jets, boson) are shown. Higgs to invisible and dijet searches are used in sense of complementarity to constrain properties of Dark Matter.

  12. Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-01-01

    It's a dark, dark universe out there, and I don't mean because the night sky is black. After all, once you leave the shadow of the Earth and get out into space, you're surrounded by countless lights glittering everywhere you look. But for all of Sagan's billions and billions of stars and galaxies, it's a jaw-dropping fact that the ordinary kind of…

  13. Dark GPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañas, Andrew R.; Villangca, Mark J.; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) is an efficient method for efficiently shaping light into speckle-free contiguous optical distributions useful in diverse applications such as static beam shaping, optical manipulation and recently, for excitation in two-photon optogenetics. GPC typically results in a 3x intensified user defined input mask shape against a dark background. In this work, we emphasize GPC's capability of optimal destructive interference, normally used to create the dark background surrounding the shaped light. We also study input parameters wherein the locations of light and darkness are interchanged with respect to typical GPC output, thus resulting to a well-defined structured darkness. The conditions that give destructive interference for the output are then applied to near-arbitrary shapes. Preliminary experimental results are presented using dynamic spatial light modulator to form scaled arbitrary darkness shapes. Supporting demonstrations that reverse the light and dark regions of amplitude-modulated input are also presented as a related case of structuring destructive interference. Our analysis and experimental demonstrations show a simplified approach in the generation of extended regions of destructive interference within coherent beams.

  14. Recently discovered pulsars and unidentified EGRET sources

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, D F; Camilo, F M; Torres, Diego F.; Butt, Yousaf M.; Camilo, Fernando

    2001-01-01

    We present a correlative study between all unidentified EGRET sources at low Galactic latitudes and the newly discovered pulsars in the released portion of the Parkes multibeam radio survey. We note 14 positional coincidences: eight of these are ``Vela-like'' pulsars, with relatively small periods, small characteristic ages, and high spin-down luminosities. Three of these coincidences have been investigated by D'Amico et al. (2001) and Camilo et al. (2001). Among the others, we argue that PSR J1015-5719 may plausibly generate part of the high energy radiation observed from 3EG J1014-5705. Three additional interesting cases are: 3EG J1410-6147 and either of PSRs J1412-6145 or J1413-6141, if the pulsars are at the estimated distance of the coincident SNR G312.4-0.4; and 3EG J1639-4702/PSR J1637-4642. The remaining positional coincidences between the EGRET sources and the newly discovered pulsars are almost certainly spurious.

  15. Exact Expressions for the Pericenter Precession Caused by Some Dark Matter Distributions and Constraints on Them from Orbital Motions in the Solar System, in the Double Pulsar and in the Galactic Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We analytically calculate the secular precession of the pericenter of a test particle orbiting a central body surrounded by a continuous distribution of Dark Matter (DM by using some commonly adopted spherically symmetric density profiles for it. We obtain exact expressions without resorting to a-priori simplifying assumptions on the orbital geometry of the test particle. Our formulas allow us to put constraints on the parameters of the DM distributions considered in several local astronomical and astrophysical scenarios, such as the Sun's planetary system, the double pulsar, and the stellar system around the supermassive black hole in Sgr A∗, all characterized by a wide variety of orbital configuratio ns. As far as our Solar System is concerned, latest determinations of the supplementary perihelion precessions ̟˙ with the EPM2011 ephemerides and the common power-law DM density profile ρDM(r = ρ0r−γ λγ yield 5 × 103 GeV cm−3 (γ = 0 ≤ ρ0 ≤ 8 × 103 GeV cm−3 (γ = 4, corresponding to 8.9 × 10−21 g cm−3 ≤ ρ0 ≤ 1.4 × 10−20 g cm−3, at the Saturn's distance. From the periastron of the pulsar PSR J0737-3039A and the same power-low DM density, one has 1.7 × 1016 GeV cm−3 (γ = 0 ≤ ρ0 ≤ 2 × 1016 (γ = 4 GeV cm−3, corresponding to 3.0 × 10−8 g cm−3 ≤ ρ0 ≤ 3.6 × 10−8 g cm−3. The perinigricon of the S0-2 star in Sgr A∗ and the power-law DM model give 1.2 × 1013 GeV cm−3 (γ = 0 ≤ ρ0 ≤ 1 × 1016 (γ = 4, λ = rmin GeV cm−3, corresponding to 2.1 × 10−11 g cm−3 ≤ ρ0 ≤ 1.8 × 10−8 g cm−3.

  16. Dark matter vs. Pulsars: Catching the impostor

    CERN Document Server

    Mirabal, N

    2013-01-01

    Evidence of excess GeV emission nearly coinciding with the Galactic Centre has been interpreted as a possible signature of annihilating dark matter. In this paper, we argue that it seems too early to discard pulsars as a viable explanation for the observed excess. On the heels of the recently released Second Fermi LAT Pulsar Catalogue (2FPC), it is still possible that a population of hard (Gamma < 1) millisecond pulsars (MSPs) either endemic to the innermost region or part of a larger nascent collection of hard MSPs that appears to be emerging in the 2FPC could explain the GeV excess near the Galactic Centre.

  17. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanavichit, Apichart [Kasetsart University, Kamphaengsaen, Nakorn Pathom (Thailand)

    2002-02-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  18. Revised Geometric Estimates of the North Galactic Pole and the Sun's Height Above the Galactic Midplane

    CERN Document Server

    Karim, Md Tanveer

    2016-01-01

    Astronomers are entering an era of {\\mu}as-level astrometry utilizing the 5-decade-old IAU Galactic coordinate system that was only originally defined to $\\sim$0{\\deg}.1 accuracy, and where the dynamical centre of the Galaxy (Sgr A*) is located $\\sim$0{\\deg}.07 from the origin. We calculate new independent estimates of the North Galactic Pole (NGP) using recent catalogues of Galactic disc tracer objects such as embedded and open clusters, infrared bubbles, dark clouds, and young massive stars. Using these catalogues, we provide two new estimates of the NGP. Solution 1 is an "unconstrained" NGP determined by the galactic tracer sources, which does not take into account the location of Sgr A*, and which lies 90{\\deg}.120$\\,\\pm\\,$0{\\deg}.029 from Sgr A*, and Solution 2 is a "constrained" NGP which lies exactly 90{\\deg} from Sgr A*. The "unconstrained" NGP has ICRS position: $\\alpha_{NGP}$ = 192{\\deg}.729 $\\,\\pm\\,$ 0{\\deg}.035, $\\delta_{NGP}$ = 27{\\deg}.084 $\\,\\pm\\,$ 0{\\deg}.023 and $\\theta\\,$ = 122{\\deg}.928 $\\,...

  19. VERITAS Galactic Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Gareth

    2013-06-15

    We report on recent Galactic results and discoveries made by the VERITAS collaboration. The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) is a ground-based gamma-ray observatory, located in southern Arizona, able to detect gamma rays of energies from 100 GeV up to 30 TeV. VERITAS has been fully operational since 2007 and its current sensitivity enables the detection of a 1% Crab Nebula flux at 5 sigma in under 30 hours. The observatory is well placed to view large parts of the galactic plane including its center, resulting in a strong galactic program. Objects routinely observed include Pulsars, Pulsar Wind Nebula, X-ray binaries and sources with unidentified counterparts in other wavelengths.

  20. Quark nugget dark matter: Comparison with radio observations of nearby galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, K., E-mail: klawson@phas.ubc.ca; Zhitnitsky, A.R.

    2016-06-10

    It has been recently claimed that radio observations of nearby spiral galaxies essentially rule out a dark matter source for the galactic haze [1]. Here we consider the low energy thermal emission from a quark nugget dark matter model in the context of microwave emission from the galactic centre and radio observations of nearby Milky Way like galaxies. We demonstrate that observed emission levels do not strongly constrain this specific dark matter candidate across a broad range of the allowed parameter space in drastic contrast with conventional dark matter models based on the WIMP paradigm.

  1. Quark Nugget Dark Matter: Comparison with radio observations of nearby galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lawson, K

    2015-01-01

    It has been recently claimed that radio observations of nearby spiral galaxies essentially rule out a dark matter source for the galactic haze. Here we consider the low energy thermal emission from a quark nugget dark matter model in the context of microwave emission from the galactic centre and radio observations of nearby Milky Way like galaxies. We demonstrate that observed emission levels do not strongly constrain this specific dark matter candidate across a broad range of the allowed parameter space in drastic contrast with conventional dark matter models based on the WIMP paradigm.

  2. On the physical origin of galactic conformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearin, Andrew P.; Behroozi, Peter S.; van den Bosch, Frank C.

    2016-09-01

    Correlations between the star formation rates (SFRs) of nearby galaxies (so-called galactic conformity) have been observed for projected separations up to 4 Mpc, an effect not predicted by current semi-analytic models. We investigate correlations between the mass accretion rates (dMvir/dt) of nearby haloes as a potential physical origin for this effect. We find that pairs of host haloes `know about' each others' assembly histories even when their present-day separation is greater than thirty times the virial radius of either halo. These distances are far too large for direct interaction between the haloes to explain the correlation in their dMvir/dt. Instead, halo pairs at these distances reside in the same large-scale tidal environment, which regulates dMvir/dt for both haloes. Larger haloes are less affected by external forces, which naturally gives rise to a mass dependence of the halo conformity signal. SDSS measurements of galactic conformity exhibit a qualitatively similar dependence on stellar mass, including how the signal varies with distance. Based on the expectation that halo accretion and galaxy SFR are correlated, we predict the scale-, mass- and redshift-dependence of large-scale galactic conformity, finding that the signal should drop to undetectable levels by z ≳ 1. These predictions are testable with current surveys to z ˜ 1; confirmation would establish a strong correlation between dark matter halo accretion rate and central galaxy SFR.

  3. Galactic rotation curves in brane world models

    CERN Document Server

    Gergely, L Á; Dwornik, M; Kupi, G; Keresztes, Z

    2011-01-01

    In the braneworld scenario the four dimensional effective Einstein equation has extra source terms, which arise from the embedding of the 3-brane in the bulk. These non-local effects, generated by the free gravitational field of the bulk, may provide an explanation for the dynamics of the neutral hydrogen clouds at large distances from the galactic center, which is usually explained by postulating the existence of the dark matter. In the present paper we consider the asymptotic behavior of the galactic rotation curves in the brane world models, and we compare the theoretical results with observations of both High Surface Brightness and Low Surface Brightness galaxies. For the chosen sample of galaxies we determine first the baryonic parameters by fitting the photometric data to the adopted galaxy model; then we test the hypothesis of the Weyl fluid acting as dark matter on the chosen sample of spiral galaxies by fitting the tangential velocity equation of the combined baryonic-Weyl model to the rotation curve...

  4. Novel Approach to the Dark Matter Problem: Primordial Intermediate-Mass Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Frampton, Paul H

    2016-01-01

    A discussion at a Scientific American level of the idea that the constituents of the dark mater in galactic halos are primordial intermediate-mass black holes with masses between ten and one hundred thousand times the solar mass.

  5. Formation of dark halos in a universe dominated by cold dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenk, C.S.; White, S.D.M.; Davis, M.; Efstathiou, G.

    1988-04-01

    The formation of galactic halos in a flat universe dominated by cold dark matter is investigated. Halos of galactic scale form in abundance only after z of about 3. Most present-day halos had at least two progenitors of similar size at z not less than 1. The typical rotation speed of halos at the present day is only about 10 percent of their rms velocity dispersion. Dark halos are generically triaxial with, perhaps, a slight preference for near-prolate configurations. It is concluded that, if it is correct, the standard idea that galaxies form by condensation of gas with dark halos may actually require a high-density universe in order to be compatible with observation. 44 references.

  6. Cosmological Implications of Trace-Charged Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, Jason P

    2016-01-01

    Trace charge imbalances can explain puzzling cosmological observations such as the large `missing' fraction of electrons in cosmic rays and their contrast to the charge-neutral solar wind, the extreme energy sources that sustain quasars, galactic jets, and active galactic nuclei, the origin and nature of `dark matter' galaxy haloes, and the apparent acceleration of the expansion of the Universe, obviating $\\Lambda$CDM. When there are $\\sim \

  7. The Formation of Galactic Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Mo, H J; White, S D M; Mao, Shude; White, Simon D.M.

    1997-01-01

    We study the population of galactic disks expected in current hierarchical clustering models for structure formation. A rotationally supported disk with exponential surface density profile is assumed to form with a mass and angular momentum which are fixed fractions of those of its surrounding dark halo. We assume that haloes respond adiabatically to disk formation, and that only stable disks can correspond to real systems. With these assumptions the predicted population can match both present-day disks and the damped Lyman alpha absorbers in QSO spectra. Good agreement is found provided: (i) the masses of disks are a few percent of those of their haloes; (ii) the specific angular momenta of disks are similar to those of their haloes; (iii) present-day disks were assembled recently (at z3kpc/h and about 10% at r>10kpc/h. The cross-section for absorption is strongly weighted towards disks with large angular momentum and so large size for their mass. The galaxy population associated with damped absorbers should...

  8. Towards graphene-based detectors for dark matter directional detection

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shang-Yung

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter detectors with directional sensitivity have the capability to distinguish dark matter induced nuclear recoils from isotropic backgrounds, thus providing a smoking gun signature for dark matter in the Galactic halo. Here we propose a conceptually novel class of high directional sensitivity dark matter detectors utilizing graphene-based van der Waals heterostructures. The advantages over conventional low pressure gas time projection chamber-based directional detectors are discussed in detail. A practical implementation using graphene/hexagonal boron nitride and graphene/molybdenum disulfide heterostructures is presented together with an overwhelming amount of experimental evidence in strong support of its feasibility.

  9. The Rethermalizing Bose-Einstein Condensate of Dark Matter Axions

    CERN Document Server

    Banik, Nilanjan; Sikivie, Pierre; Todarello, Elisa Maria

    2015-01-01

    The axions produced during the QCD phase transition by vacuum realignment, string decay and domain wall decay thermalize as a result of their gravitational self-interactions when the photon temperature is approximately 500 eV. They then form a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). Because the axion BEC rethermalizes on time scales shorter than the age of the universe, it has properties that distinguish it from other forms of cold dark matter. The observational evidence for caustic rings of dark matter in galactic halos is explained if the dark matter is axions, at least in part, but not if the dark matter is entirely WIMPs or sterile neutrinos.

  10. A Dark Matter Disc in the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, J. I.; Bruch, T.; Baudis, L.; Debattista, V. P.; Agertz, O.; Mayer, L.; Brooks, A. M.; Governato, F.; Peter, A. H. G.; Lake, G.

    2010-06-01

    Dark matter direct detection experiments need to know the local phase space density of dark matter fdm(r,v,t) in order to derive dark matter particle properties. To date, calculations for fdm(r,v,t) have been based on simulations that model the dark matter alone. Here we include the influence of the baryonic matter. We find that a star/gas disc at high redshift (z~1) causes merging satellites to be preferentially dragged towards the disc plane. This results in an accreted dark matter disc that contributes ~0.25-1 times the non-rotating halo density at the Solar position. We discuss the impact of the dark disc on dark matter direct detection experiments, and how we might be able to detect it in future Galactic surveys.

  11. The Spatial Distribution of Galactic Satellites in the LCDM Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jie; Cooper, Andrew P

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the spatial distribution of galactic satellites in high resolution simulations of structure formation in the LCDM model: the Aquarius dark matter simulations of individual halos and the Millennium II simulation of a large cosmological volume. To relate the simulations to observations of the Milky Way we use two alternative models to populate dark halos with "visible" galaxies: a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation and an abundance matching technique. We find that the radial density profile of massive satellites roughly follows that of the dark matter halo (unlike the distribution of dark matter subhalos). Furthermore, our two galaxy formation models give results consistent with the observed profile of the 11 classical satellites of the Milky Way. Our simulations predict that larger, fainter samples of satellites should still retain this profile at least up to samples of 100 satellites. The angular distribution of the classical satellites of the Milky Way is known to be highly anisotropic. D...

  12. Semidegenerate Self-Gravitating System of Fermion as Dark Matter on Galaxies i: Universality Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Bernardo M. O.; Argüelles, Carlos; Ruffini, Remo; Siutsou, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified model for galactic Dark Matter (DM) halos as well as galactic DM central cores (alternatively to the central Supermassive Black Hole scenario), based on systems of self-gravitating fermions at finite temperatures. This work will deal mainly with the halo part, leaving the core description to another part of this proceedings...

  13. Lightest exoplanet yet discovered

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Well-known exoplanet researcher Michel Mayor today announced the discovery of the lightest exoplanet found so far. The planet, "e", in the famous system Gliese 581, is only about twice the mass of our Earth. The team also refined the orbit of the planet Gliese 581 d, first discovered in 2007, placing it well within the habitable zone, where liquid water oceans could exist. These amazing discoveries are the outcome of more than four years of observations using the most successful low-mass-exoplanet hunter in the world, the HARPS spectrograph attached to the 3.6-metre ESO telescope at La Silla, Chile. ESO PR Photo 15a/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 e ESO PR Photo 15b/09 A planet in the habitable zone ESO PR Video 15a/09 ESOcast 6 ESO PR Video 15b/09 VNR A-roll ESO PR Video 15c/09 Zoom-in on Gliese 581 e ESO PR Video 15d/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 e ESO PR Video 15e/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 d ESO PR Video 15f/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 system ESO PR Video 15g/09 The radial velocity method ESO PR Video 15h/09 Statement in English ESO PR Video 15i/09 Statement in French ESO PR Video 15j/09 La Silla Observatory "The holy grail of current exoplanet research is the detection of a rocky, Earth-like planet in the ‘habitable zone' -- a region around the host star with the right conditions for water to be liquid on a planet's surface", says Michel Mayor from the Geneva Observatory, who led the European team to this stunning breakthrough. Planet Gliese 581 e orbits its host star - located only 20.5 light-years away in the constellation Libra ("the Scales") -- in just 3.15 days. "With only 1.9 Earth-masses, it is the least massive exoplanet ever detected and is, very likely, a rocky planet", says co-author Xavier Bonfils from Grenoble Observatory. Being so close to its host star, the planet is not in the habitable zone. But another planet in this system appears to be. From previous observations -- also obtained with the HARPS spectrograph

  14. How Cold is Cold Dark Matter?

    CERN Document Server

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    If cold dark matter consists of particles, these must be non-interacting and non-relativistic by definition. In most cold dark matter models, however, dark matter particles inherit a non-vanishing velocity dispersion from interactions in the early universe, a velocity that redshifts with cosmic expansion but certainly remains non-zero. In this article, we place model-independent constraints on the dark matter temperature to mass ratio, whose square root determines the dark matter velocity dispersion. We only assume that dark matter particles decoupled kinetically while non-relativistic, when galactic scales had not entered the horizon yet, and that their momentum distribution has been Maxwellian since that time. Under these assumptions, using cosmic microwave background and matter power spectrum observations, we place upper limits on the temperature to mass ratio of cold dark matter. The latter imply that its velocity dispersion extrapolated to the present has to be smaller than 56 m/s. Cold dark matter has t...

  15. Fundamental plane: dark matter and dissipation contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, Andre L B

    2010-01-01

    Stellar and galactic systems are objects in dynamical equilibrium that are composed of ordinary baryonic matter hypothetically embedded in extended dominant dark matter halos. Our aim is to investigate the scaling relations and dissipational features of these objects over a wide range of their properties, taking the dynamical influence of the dark matter component into account. We study the physical properties of these self-gravitating systems using the two-component virial theorem in conjunction with data that embrace a wide range of astrophysical systems. We find that the scaling relations defined by the properties of these objects admit a dark-to-luminous density ratio parameter as a natural requirement in this framework. We also probe dissipational effects on the fundamental surface defined by the two-component virial theorem and discuss their relations with respect to the region devoid of objects in the data distribution. Our results indicate complementary contributions of dissipation and dark matter to ...

  16. Dark matter annihilation near a naked singularity

    CERN Document Server

    Patil, Mandar

    2011-01-01

    We investigate here the dark matter annihilation near a Kerr naked singularity. We show that when dark matter particles collide and annihilate in vicinity of the singularity, the escape fraction to infinity of particles produced is much larger, at least 10^2 - 10^3 times the corresponding black hole values. As high energy collisions are generically possible near a naked singularity, this provides an excellent environment for efficient conversion of dark matter into ordinary standard model particles. If the center of galaxy harbored such a naked singularity, it follows that the observed emergent flux of particles with energy comparable to mass of the dark matter particles is much larger compared to the blackhole case, thus providing an intriguing observational test on the nature of the galactic center

  17. Elusive active galactic nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maiolino, R; Comastri, A; Gilli, R; Nagar, NM; Bianchi, S; Boker, T; Colbert, E; Krabbe, A; Marconi, A; Matt, G; Salvati, M

    2003-01-01

    A fraction of active galactic nuclei do not show the classical Seyfert-type signatures in their optical spectra, i.e. they are optically 'elusive'. X-ray observations are an optimal tool to identify this class of objects. We combine new Chandra observations with archival X-ray data in order to obtai

  18. Galactic Archaeology: Current Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Wyse, Rosemary F G

    2016-01-01

    I present an overview of the science goals and achievements of ongoing spectroscopic surveys of individual stars in the nearby Universe. I include a brief discussion of the development of the field of Galactic Archaeology - using the fossil record in old stars nearby to infer how our Galaxy evolved and place the Milky Way in cosmological context.

  19. Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Kesavan, Aruna

    2009-01-01

    Dark energy is one of the mysteries of modern science. It is unlike any known form of matter or energy and has been detected so far only by its gravitational effect of repulsion. Owing to its effects being discernible only at very very large distance scales, dark energy was only detected at the turn of the last century when technology had advanced enough to observe a greater part of the universe in finer detail. The aim of the report is to gain a better understanding of the mysterious dark energy. To this end, both theoretical methods and observational evidence are studied. Three lines of evidence, namely , the redshift data of type Ia supernovae, estimates of the age of the universe by various methods, and the anisotropies in the cosmic background radiation, build the case for existence of dark energy. The supernova data indicate that the expansion of the universe is accelerating. The ages of the oldest star clusters in the universe indicate that the universe is older than previously thought to be. The aniso...

  20. A WDM model for the evolution of galactic halos

    CERN Document Server

    Acedo, L

    2011-01-01

    It is a well-known fact that the gravitational effect of dark matter in galaxies is only noticeable when the orbital accelerations drop below $a_0 \\simeq 2\\times 10^{-8}$ cm s$^{-1}$ (Milgrom's Law). This peculiarity of the dynamic behaviour of galaxies was initially ascribed to a modification of Newtonian dynamics (MOND theory) and, consequently, it was used as an argument to criticize the dark matter hypothesis. In our model, warm dark matter is composed by collisionless Vlasov particles with a primordial typical velocity $\\simeq 330$ km s$^{-1}$ and, consequently, they evaporated from galactic cores and reorganized in halos with a cusp at a finite distance from the galactic center (in contrast with Cold Dark Matter simulations which predict a cusp at the center of galaxies). This is confirmed by mean-field N-body simulations of the self-gravitating Vlasov dark matter particles in the potential well of the baryonic core. The rest mass of these particles, $\\mu$, is determined from a kinetic theory of the ear...

  1. Mimicking dark matter in Horndeski gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Rinaldi, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Since the rediscovery of Horndeski gravity, a lot of work has been devoted to the exploration of its properties, especially in the context of dark energy. However, one sector of this theory, namely the one containing the coupling of the Einstein tensor to the kinetic term of the scalar field, shows some surprising features in the construction of black holes and neutron stars. Motivated by these new results, I explore the possibility that this sector of Horndeski gravity can mimic cold dark matter at cosmological level and also explain the flattening of galactic rotation curves. I will show that it is possible to achieve both goals with a minimal set of assumptions.

  2. Indirect constraints to branon dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cembranos, J A R; Gammaldi, V; Maroto, A L

    2012-01-01

    If the present dark matter in the Universe annihilates into Standard Model particles, it must contribute to the gamma ray fluxes detected on the Earth. Here we briefly review the present constraints for the detection of gamma ray photons produced in the annihilation of branon dark matter. We show that observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies and the galactic center by EGRET, Fermi-LAT or MAGIC are below the sensitivity limits for branon detection. However,future experiments such as CTA could be able to detect gamma-ray photons from annihilating branons of masses above 150 GeV.

  3. Measuring dark matter by modeling interacting galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Petsch, H P; Theis, Ch

    2009-01-01

    The dark matter content of galaxies is usually determined from galaxies in dynamical equilibrium, mainly from rotationally supported galactic components. Such determinations restrict measurements to special regions in galaxies, e.g. the galactic plane(s), whereas other regions are not probed at all. Interacting galaxies offer an alternative, because extended tidal tails often probe outer or off-plane regions of galaxies. However, these systems are neither in dynamical equilibrium nor simple, because they are composed of two or more galaxies, by this increasing the associated parameter space.We present our genetic algorithm based modeling tool which allows to investigate the extended parameter space of interacting galaxies. From these studies, we derive the dynamical history of (well observed) galaxies. Among other parameters we constrain the dark matter content of the involved galaxies. We demonstrate the applicability of this strategy with examples ranging from stellar streams around theMilkyWay to extended ...

  4. Decaying vs annihilating dark matter in light of a tentative gamma-ray line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmueller, Wilfried; Garny, Mathias

    2012-06-15

    Recently reported tentative evidence for a gamma-ray line in the Fermi-LAT data is of great potential interest for identifying the nature of dark matter. We compare the implications for decaying and annihilating dark matter taking the constraints from continuum gamma-rays, antiproton flux and morphology of the excess into account. We find that higgsino and wino dark matter are excluded, also for nonthermal production. Generically, the continuum gamma-ray ux severely constrains annihilating dark matter. Consistency of decaying dark matter with the spatial distribution of the Fermi-LAT excess would require an enhancement of the dark matter density near the Galactic center.

  5. The quasi-spherical excess of GeV gamma-rays around the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshev, Dmitry

    2016-07-01

    Hypothetical dark matter annihilation signal is expected to be brightest towards the Galactic center (GC). Several groups have reported an excess of gamma-ray emission towards the GC. The excess signal has a peak in spectral energy distribution around a few GeV and it is consistent with a source being approximately spherical in shape. The possibility that this excess is coming from annihilating dark matter particles is very exciting, but one has to be very careful in eliminating other possible explanations of the excess. In the talk, I will describe the current observational status of the GC excess and review possible explanations, including sources of cosmic rays near the Galactic center, a population of millisecond pulsars in the Galactic bulge, and dark matter annihilation. I will also discuss the prospects of disentangling the nature of the excess with future observations.

  6. Gamma Ray Line Constraints on Effective Theories of Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Jessica; Rajaraman, Arvind; Shepherd, William; Tait, Tim M P; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2010-01-01

    A monochromatic gamma ray line results when dark matter particles in the galactic halo annihilate to produce a two body final state which includes a photon. Such a signal is very distinctive from astrophysical backgrounds, and thus represents an incisive probe of theories of dark matter. We compare the recent null results of searches for gamma ray lines in the galactic center and other regions of the sky with the predictions of effective theories describing the interactions of dark matter particles with the Standard Model. We find that the null results of these searches provide constraints on the nature of dark matter interactions with ordinary matter which are complementary to constraints from other observables, and stronger than collider constraints in some cases.

  7. Static structure of chameleon dark matter as an explanation of dwarf spheroidal galaxy cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Prolay Krishna; Das, Subinoy

    2017-04-01

    We propose a novel mechanism that explains the cored dark matter density profile in recently observed dark matter rich dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In our scenario, dark matter particle mass decreases gradually as a function of distance towards the center of a dwarf galaxy due to its interaction with a chameleon scalar. At closer distance towards the Galactic center the strength of attractive scalar fifth force becomes much stronger than gravity and is balanced by the Fermi pressure of the dark matter cloud; thus, an equilibrium static configuration of the dark matter halo is obtained. Like the case of soliton star or fermion Q-star, the stability of the dark matter halo is obtained as the scalar achieves a static profile and reaches an asymptotic value away from the Galactic center. For simple scalar-dark matter interaction and quadratic scalar self-interaction potential, we show that dark matter behaves exactly like cold dark matter (CDM) beyond a few kpc away from the Galactic center but at closer distance it becomes lighter and Fermi pressure cannot be ignored anymore. Using Thomas-Fermi approximation, we numerically solve the radial static profile of the scalar field, fermion mass and dark matter energy density as a function of distance. We find that for fifth force mediated by an ultralight scalar, it is possible to obtain a flattened dark matter density profile towards the Galactic center. In our scenario, the fifth force can be neglected at distance r ≥1 kpc from the Galactic center and dark matter can be simply treated as heavy nonrelativistic particles beyond this distance, thus reproducing the success of CDM at large scales.

  8. Investigation of some galactic and extragalactic gravitational phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we present a short overview of the most important results of our investigations of the following galactic and extragalactic gravitational phenomena: supermassive black holes in centers of galaxies and quasars, supermassive black hole binaries, gravitational lenses and dark matter. For the purpose of these investigations, we developed a model of a relativistic accretion disk around a supermassive black hole, based on the ray-tracing method in the Kerr metric, a model of a bright spot in an accretion disk and three different models of gravitational microlenses. All these models enabled us to study physics, spacetime geometry and effects of strong gravity in the vicinity of supermassive black holes, variability of some active galaxies and quasars, different effects in the lensed quasars with multiple images, as well as the dark matter fraction in the Universe. We also found an observational evidence for the first spectroscopically resolved sub-parsec orbit of a supermassive black hole binary system in the core of active galaxy NGC 4151. Besides, we studied applications of one potential alternative to dark matter in the form of a modified theory of gravity on Galactic scales, to explain the recently observed orbital precession of some S-stars, which are orbiting around a massive black hole at the Galactic center. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176003: Gravitation and the Large Scale Structure of the Universe

  9. Neutrino signature of inert doublet dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreas, Sarah [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik E; Univ. Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium). Service de Physique Theorique; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    In the framework of the Inert Doublet Model and extensions, the signature of neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the Earth, the Sun and at the Galactic centre is presented. The model contains an extra Higgs doublet, a neutral component of which is chosen as dark matter candidate. There are three distinct mass ranges for which consistency both with WMAP abundance and direct searches can be obtained: a low (4-8 GeV), a middle (60-70 GeV) and a high (500-1500 GeV) WIMP mass range. The first case is of interest as we showed that the model can at the same time give the correct WMAP abundance and account for the positive DAMA results without contradicting other direct searches. We present how capture in the Sun can further constrain this scenario using Super-Kamiokande data. Indirect detection through neutrinos is challenging for the middle and high mass ranges. For the former, the presence of the so-called 'iron resonance' gives rise to larger neutrino fluxes for WIMP masses around 60-70 GeV since capture by the Earth is enhanced. The addition of light right-handed Majorana neutrinos to the particle content of the model further increases the signal since it opens a direct annihilation channel into mono-energetic neutrinos. Neutrinos from the Galactic centre might be detected for heavy WIMPs if the dark matter density at the Galactic centre is substantially boosted. (orig.)

  10. PREFACE: Galactic Center Workshop 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schödel, Rainer; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Muno, Michael P.; Nayakshin, Sergei; Ott, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    We are pleased to present the proceedings from the Galactic Center Workshop 2006—From the Center of the Milky Way to Nearby Low-Luminosity Galactic Nuclei. The conference took place in the Physikzentrum, Bad Honnef, Germany, on 18 to 22 April 2006. It is the third workshop of this kind, following the Galactic Center Workshops held 1998 in Tucson, Arizona, and 2002 in Kona, Hawaii. The center of the Milky Way is the only galactic nucleus of a fairly common spiral galaxy that can be observed in great detail. With a distance of roughly 8 kpc, the resolution that can currently be achieved is of the order 40 mpc/8000 AU in the X-ray domain, 2 mpc/400 AU in the near-infrared, and 0.01 mpc/1 AU with VLBI in the millimeter domain. This is two to three orders of magnitude better than for any comparable nearby galaxy, making thus the center of the Milky Way thetemplate object for the general physical interpretation of the phenomena that can be observed in galactic nuclei. We recommend the summary article News from the year 2006 Galactic Centre workshopby Mark Morris and Sergei Nayakshin—who also gave the summary talk of the conference—to the reader in order to obtain a first, concise overview of the results presented at the workshop and some of the currently most exciting—and debated—developments in recent GC research. While the workshops held in 1998 and 2002 were dedicated solely to the center of the Milky Way, the field of view was widened in Bad Honnef to include nearby low-luminosity nuclei. This new feature followed the realization that not only the GC serves as a template for understanding extragalactic nuclei, but that the latter can also provide the context and broader statistical base for understanding the center of our Milky Way. This concerns especially the accretion and emission processes related to the Sagittarius A*, the manifestation of the super massive black hole in the GC, but also the surprising observation of great numbers of massive, young

  11. Axions and the Galactic Angular Momentum Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Banik, N

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the behavior of axion dark matter before it falls into a galactic gravitational potential well. The axions thermalize sufficiently fast by gravitational self-interactions that almost all go to their lowest energy state consistent with the total angular momentum acquired from tidal torquing. That state is a state of rigid rotation on the turnaround sphere. It predicts the occurrence and detailed properties of the caustic rings of dark matter for which observational evidence had been found earlier. We show that the vortices in the axion Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) are attractive, unlike those in superfluid $^4$He and dilute gases. We expect that a large fraction of the vortices in the axion BEC join into a single big vortex along the rotation axis of the galaxy. The resulting enhancement of caustic rings explains the typical size of the rises in the Milky Way rotation curve attributed to caustic rings. We show that baryons and ordinary cold dark matter particles are entrained by the axion BEC and ...

  12. Dark matter properties implied by gamma ray interstellar emission models

    OpenAIRE

    Balázs, Csaba; Li, Tong

    2016-01-01

    We infer dark matter properties from gamma ray residuals extracted using eight different interstellar emission scenarios proposed by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration to explain the Galactic Center gamma ray excess. Adopting the most plausible simplified ansatz, we assume that the dark matter particle is a Majorana fermion interacting with standard fermions via a scalar mediator. Using this theoretical hypothesis and the Fermi residuals we calculate Bayesian evidences, including Fermi-LAT exclusion...

  13. Galactic gamma ray astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, V.

    1982-05-01

    During the last decade the exploration of the sky in the light of gamma rays has begun by means of satellite-and balloon-borne instruments. Like in other ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum the Milky Way clearly stands out against the rest of the sphere. Part of the galactic ..gamma..-ray emission is due to discrete sources, part is diffuse in origin and is produced in interstellar space. Some of the discrete ..gamma..-ray sources are radio pulsars, the nature of the other sources is still unknown. The intensity distribution of the diffuse galactic ..gamma..-ray component is consistent with a decrease of the cosmic-ray intensity towards the outer part of the galaxy. The identification of the cosmic-ray sources will be one of the main objectives of the next generation of ..gamma..-ray telescopes.

  14. Simulations of galactic dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, Axel

    2014-01-01

    We review our current understanding of galactic dynamo theory, paying particular attention to numerical simulations both of the mean-field equations and the original three-dimensional equations relevant to describing the magnetic field evolution for a turbulent flow. We emphasize the theoretical difficulties in explaining non-axisymmetric magnetic fields in galaxies and discuss the observational basis for such results in terms of rotation measure analysis. Next, we discuss nonlinear theory, the role of magnetic helicity conservation and magnetic helicity fluxes. This leads to the possibility that galactic magnetic fields may be bi-helical, with opposite signs of helicity and large and small length scales. We discuss their observational signatures and close by discussing the possibilities of explaining the origin of primordial magnetic fields.

  15. Galactic oscillator symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosensteel, George

    1995-01-01

    Riemann ellipsoids model rotating galaxies when the galactic velocity field is a linear function of the Cartesian coordinates of the galactic masses. In nuclear physics, the kinetic energy in the linear velocity field approximation is known as the collective kinetic energy. But, the linear approximation neglects intrinsic degrees of freedom associated with nonlinear velocity fields. To remove this limitation, the theory of symplectic dynamical symmetry is developed for classical systems. A classical phase space for a self-gravitating symplectic system is a co-adjoint orbit of the noncompact group SP(3,R). The degenerate co-adjoint orbit is the 12 dimensional homogeneous space Sp(3,R)/U(3), where the maximal compact subgroup U(3) is the symmetry group of the harmonic oscillator. The Hamiltonian equations of motion on each orbit form a Lax system X = (X,F), where X and F are elements of the symplectic Lie algebra. The elements of the matrix X are the generators of the symplectic Lie algebra, viz., the one-body collective quadratic functions of the positions and momenta of the galactic masses. The matrix F is composed from the self-gravitating potential energy, the angular velocity, and the hydostatic pressure. Solutions to the hamiltonian dynamical system on Sp(3,R)/U(3) are given by symplectic isospectral deformations. The Casimirs of Sp(3,R), equal to the traces of powers of X, are conserved quantities.

  16. The Logotropic Dark Fluid as a unification of dark matter and dark energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2016-07-01

    We propose a heuristic unification of dark matter and dark energy in terms of a single ;dark fluid; with a logotropic equation of state P = Aln ⁡ (ρ /ρP), where ρ is the rest-mass density, ρP = 5.16 ×1099gm-3 is the Planck density, and A is the logotropic temperature. The energy density ɛ is the sum of a rest-mass energy term ρc2 ∝a-3 mimicking dark matter and an internal energy term u (ρ) = - P (ρ) - A = 3 Aln ⁡ a + C mimicking dark energy (a is the scale factor). The logotropic temperature is approximately given by A ≃ρΛc2 / ln ⁡ (ρP /ρΛ) ≃ρΛc2 / [ 123 ln ⁡ (10) ], where ρΛ = 6.72 ×10-24gm-3 is the cosmological density and 123 is the famous number appearing in the ratio ρP /ρΛ ∼10123 between the Planck density and the cosmological density. More precisely, we obtain A = 2.13 ×10-9gm-1s-2 that we interpret as a fundamental constant. At the cosmological scale, our model fulfills the same observational constraints as the ΛCDM model (they will differ in about 25 Gyrs when the logotropic universe becomes phantom). However, the logotropic dark fluid has a nonzero speed of sound and a nonzero Jeans length which, at the beginning of the matter era, is about λJ = 40.4pc, in agreement with the minimum size of the dark matter halos observed in the universe. The existence of a nonzero Jeans length may solve the missing satellite problem. At the galactic scale, the logotropic pressure balances the gravitational attraction, providing halo cores instead of cusps. This may solve the cusp problem. The logotropic equation of state generates a universal rotation curve that agrees with the empirical Burkert profile of dark matter halos up to the halo radius. In addition, it implies that all the dark matter halos have the same surface density Σ0 =ρ0rh = 141M⊙ /pc2 and that the mass of dwarf galaxies enclosed within a sphere of fixed radius ru = 300pc has the same value M300 = 1.93 ×107M⊙, in remarkable agreement with the observations

  17. The Logotropic Dark Fluid as a unification of dark matter and dark energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Henri Chavanis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a heuristic unification of dark matter and dark energy in terms of a single “dark fluid” with a logotropic equation of state P=Aln⁡(ρ/ρP, where ρ is the rest-mass density, ρP=5.16×1099gm−3 is the Planck density, and A is the logotropic temperature. The energy density ϵ is the sum of a rest-mass energy term ρc2∝a−3 mimicking dark matter and an internal energy term u(ρ=−P(ρ−A=3Aln⁡a+C mimicking dark energy (a is the scale factor. The logotropic temperature is approximately given by A≃ρΛc2/ln⁡(ρP/ρΛ≃ρΛc2/[123ln⁡(10], where ρΛ=6.72×10−24gm−3 is the cosmological density and 123 is the famous number appearing in the ratio ρP/ρΛ∼10123 between the Planck density and the cosmological density. More precisely, we obtain A=2.13×10−9gm−1s−2 that we interpret as a fundamental constant. At the cosmological scale, our model fulfills the same observational constraints as the ΛCDM model (they will differ in about 25 Gyrs when the logotropic universe becomes phantom. However, the logotropic dark fluid has a nonzero speed of sound and a nonzero Jeans length which, at the beginning of the matter era, is about λJ=40.4pc, in agreement with the minimum size of the dark matter halos observed in the universe. The existence of a nonzero Jeans length may solve the missing satellite problem. At the galactic scale, the logotropic pressure balances the gravitational attraction, providing halo cores instead of cusps. This may solve the cusp problem. The logotropic equation of state generates a universal rotation curve that agrees with the empirical Burkert profile of dark matter halos up to the halo radius. In addition, it implies that all the dark matter halos have the same surface density Σ0=ρ0rh=141M⊙/pc2 and that the mass of dwarf galaxies enclosed within a sphere of fixed radius ru=300pc has the same value M300=1.93×107M⊙, in remarkable agreement with the observations [Donato et al. [10

  18. Dark sector spectroscopy at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Jeppe R.; Spannowsky, Michael [Durham University, Department of Physics, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom); Rauch, Michael [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    Recent studies have shown that searches in the mono-photon and missing energy final state can be used to discover dark matter candidates at the ILC. While an excess in this final state over the Standard Model background would indicate the existence of a dark sector, no detailed information about the internal structure of this sector can be inferred. Here, we demonstrate how just a few observables can discriminate between various realisations of dark sectors, including e.g. the spin of mediators. (orig.)

  19. Taming astrophysical bias in direct dark matter searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pato, Miguel [Physik-Department T30d, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße, 85748 Garching (Germany); Strigari, Louis E. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Trotta, Roberto [Astrophysics Group and Imperial Centre for Inference and Cosmology, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Bertone, Gianfranco, E-mail: miguel.pato@tum.de, E-mail: strigari@stanford.edu, E-mail: r.trotta@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: gf.bertone@gmail.com [GRAPPA Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-02-01

    We explore systematic biases in the identification of dark matter in future direct detection experiments and compare the reconstructed dark matter properties when assuming a self-consistent dark matter distribution function and the standard Maxwellian velocity distribution. We find that the systematic bias on the dark matter mass and cross-section determination arising from wrong assumptions for its distribution function is of order ∼ 1σ. A much larger systematic bias can arise if wrong assumptions are made on the underlying Milky Way mass model. However, in both cases the bias is substantially mitigated by marginalizing over galactic model parameters. We additionally show that the velocity distribution can be reconstructed in an unbiased manner for typical dark matter parameters. Our results highlight both the robustness of the dark matter mass and cross-section determination using the standard Maxwellian velocity distribution and the importance of accounting for astrophysical uncertainties in a statistically consistent fashion.

  20. Local dark matter from a carefully selected sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, John N.; Flynn, Chris; Gould, Andrew

    1992-04-01

    The precise data obtained by Flynn and Freeman (1991) on K giants at the south Galactic pole are used to analyze the amount of local dark matter in which the systematic effects can be modeled easily and evaluated accurately. The method of Bahcall (1984) is employed to solve the self-consistent equations for the distribution of dark matter. The K-giant survey is found to provide significant evidence for disk dark matter. Taking into account all recognized sources of error using a statistical test devised by Gould (1989, 1990), a model with no dark matter is inconsistent with the data at the 86-percent confidence level. The best-fit P-model (in which dark matter is distributed proportionally to known matter) has 53 percent more dark matter than visible matter.

  1. Maverick dark matter at colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán, Maria; Hooper, Dan; Kolb, Edward W.; Krusberg, Zosia A. C.; Tait, Tim M. P.

    2010-09-01

    Assuming that dark matter is a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) species X produced in the early Universe as a cold thermal relic, we study the collider signal of pp or pbar{p} rightarrow bar{X}X + jets and its distinguishability from standard-model background processes associated with jets and missing energy. We assume that the WIMP is the sole particle related to dark matter within reach of the LHC — a “maverick” particle — and that it couples to quarks through a higher dimensional contact interaction. We simulate the WIMP final-state signal Xbar{X} + jets and dominant standard-model (SM) background processes and find that the dark-matter production process results in higher energies for the colored final state partons than do the standard-model background processes. As a consequence, the detectable signature of maverick dark matter is an excess over standard-model expectations of events consisting of large missing transverse energy, together with large leading jet transverse momentum and scalar sum of the transverse momenta of the jets. Existing Tevatron data and forthcoming LHC data can constrain (or discover!) maverick dark matter.

  2. Galactic Center gamma-ray "excess" from an active past of the Galactic Centre?

    CERN Document Server

    Petrovic, Jovana; Zaharijas, Gabrijela

    2014-01-01

    Several groups have recently claimed evidence for unaccounted gamma-ray excesses over diffuse backgrounds at few GeV in Fermi-LAT data in a region around the Galactic Center, consistent with a dark matter annihilation origin. We demonstrate that the main spectral and angular features of this "excess" can be reproduced if they are mostly due to inverse Compton emission from high-energy electrons injected in a burst event of ~ 10^{52}-10^{53} erg roughly O(10^6) years ago. We consider this example as a proof of principle that time-dependent phenomena need to be understood and accounted for---together with detailed diffuse foregrounds and unaccounted "steady state" astrophysical sources---before any robust inference can be made about dark matter signals at the Galactic Center. In addition, we point out that the timescale suggested by our study, which controls both the energy cutoff and the angular extension of the signal, intriguingly matches what is inferred by other forensic evidences suggesting a very active ...

  3. The Galactic Center: A Laboratory for Fundamental Astrophysics and Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ghez, A; Lü, J; Weinberg, N; Matthews, K; Alexander, T; Armitage, P; Becklin, E; Brown, W; Campbell, R; Do, T; Eckart, A; Genzel, R; Gould, A; Hansen, B; Ho, L; Lo, F; Loeb, A; Melia, F; Merritt, D; Milosavljevic, M; Perets, H; Rasio, F; Reid, M; Salim, S; Schödel, R; Yelda, S

    2009-01-01

    As the closest example of a galactic nucleus, the Galactic center presents an exquisite laboratory for learning about supermassive black holes (SMBH) and their environs. Detailed studies of stellar dynamics deep in the potential well of a galaxy, with exisiting and future large ground-based telescopes, offer several exciting directions in the coming decade. First, it will be possible to obtain precision measurements of the Galaxy's central potential, providing both a unique test of General Relativity (GR) and a detection of the extended dark matter distribution that is predicted to exist around the SMBH. Tests of gravity have not previously been possible on the mass scale of a SMBH. Similarly, only upper limits on the extended matter distribution on small scales currently exist; detection of dark matter on these scales is an important test of Lambda-CDM and the detection of stellar remnants would reveal a population that may dominate the stellar dynamics on the smallest scales. Second, our detailed view of th...

  4. Exclusion of leptophilic dark matter models using XENON100 electronic recoil data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprile, E.; et al., [Unknown; Alfonsi, M.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Tiseni, A.; Tunnell, C.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory experiments searching for galactic dark matter particles scattering off nuclei have so far not been able to establish a discovery. We use data from the XENON100 experiment to search for dark matter interacting with electrons. With no evidence for a signal above the low background of our

  5. Exclusion of leptophilic dark matter models using XENON100 electronic recoil data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprile, E.; et al., [Unknown; Alfonsi, M.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Tiseni, A.; Tunnell, C.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory experiments searching for galactic dark matter particles scattering off nuclei have so far not been able to establish a discovery. We use data from the XENON100 experiment to search for dark matter interacting with electrons. With no evidence for a signal above the low background of our e

  6. Discover: What Is Public Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Series Undergraduate Network Membership Contact Discover What is Public Health? Public health protects and improves the health of individuals, families, communities, and populations, locally and globally. Public health is personal. Public health professionals focus on preventing ...

  7. Discovering Natural Laws by Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴轶华

    1989-01-01

    A polynomial algorithm.called Reduction,is presented to discover natural laws by analysing a set of experimental data.instead of a heuristic exploration which,when adopted in BACON,can only lead to rediscovering simple laws.A complex law with multiple variables involved can be discovered by reducing it to a search.This search is so efficient that it does not need any backtracking and is able to cover most of possible laws.A reduction-based discovery system,called DISCOVER 2.0,was developed with a flexible knowledge base and an ability of dealing with imperfect data.The system has been verified to be valid computationally,practically,and theoretically,by discovering a great number o complex laws,and can be also viewed as a leaming engine embodied in any intelligent systems to improve their performance by obtaining a general rule from the accumulated data.

  8. Discovering Relationships Involving Baravelle Spirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanko, Jeffrey J.

    2006-01-01

    This article details an exploration of Baravelle spirals as visual representations of infinite geometric series, focusing on a variety of strategies used by preservice teachers in discovering patterns and investigating relationships of variables.

  9. (Mainly) axion dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Howard

    2016-06-01

    The strong CP problem of QCD is at heart a problem of naturalness: why is the FF ˜ term highly suppressed in the QCD Lagrangian when it seems necessary to explain why there are three and not four light pions? The most elegant solution posits a spontaneously broken Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry which requires the existence of the axion field a. The axion field settles to the minimum of its potential thus removing the offensive term but giving rise to the physical axion whose coherent oscillations can make up the cold dark matter. Only now are experiments such as ADMX beginning to explore QCD axion parameter space. Since a bonafide scalar particle- the Higgs boson- has been discovered, one might expect its mass to reside at the axion scale fa ˜ 1011 GeV. The Higgs mass is elegantly stabilized by supersymmetry: in this case the axion is accompanied by its axino and saxion superpartners. Requiring naturalness also in the electroweak sector implies higgsino-like WIMPs so then we expect mixed axion-WIMP dark matter. Ultimately we would expect detection of both an axion and a WIMP while signals for light higgsinos may show up at LHC and must show up at ILC.

  10. Dark Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Bali-Hudáková, Lenka

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is focused on the variability of the demand and the development of new trends in the fields of the tourism industry. Special attention is devoted to a new arising trend of the Dark Tourism. This trend has appeared in the end of the 20th century and it has gained the attraction of media, tourists, tourism specialists and other stakeholders. First part of the thesis is concerned with the variety of the tourism industry and the ethic question of the tourism development. The other par...

  11. Dark Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Bali-Hudáková, Lenka

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is focused on the variability of the demand and the development of new trends in the fields of the tourism industry. Special attention is devoted to a new arising trend of the Dark Tourism. This trend has appeared in the end of the 20th century and it has gained the attraction of media, tourists, tourism specialists and other stakeholders. First part of the thesis is concerned with the variety of the tourism industry and the ethic question of the tourism development. The other par...

  12. Dark Web

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hsinchun

    2012-01-01

    The University of Arizona Artificial Intelligence Lab (AI Lab) Dark Web project is a long-term scientific research program that aims to study and understand the international terrorism (Jihadist) phenomena via a computational, data-centric approach. We aim to collect "ALL" web content generated by international terrorist groups, including web sites, forums, chat rooms, blogs, social networking sites, videos, virtual world, etc. We have developed various multilingual data mining, text mining, and web mining techniques to perform link analysis, content analysis, web metrics (technical

  13. Cosmic Ray-Dark Matter Scattering: a New Signature of (Asymmetric) Dark Matter in the Gamma Ray Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Profumo, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    We consider the process of scattering of Galactic cosmic-ray electrons and protons off of dark matter with the radiation of a final-state photon. This process provides a novel way to search for Galactic dark matter with gamma rays. We argue that for a generic weakly interacting massive particle, barring effects such as co-annihilation or a velocity-dependent cross section, the gamma-ray emission from cosmic-ray scattering off of dark matter is typically smaller than that from dark matter pair-annihilation. However, if dark matter particles cannot pair-annihilate, as is the case for example in asymmetric dark matter scenarios, cosmic-ray scattering with final state photon emission provides a unique window to detect a signal from dark matter with gamma rays. We estimate the expected flux level and its spectral features for a generic supersymmetric setup, and we also discuss dipolar and luminous dark matter. We show that in some cases the gamma-ray emission might be large enough to be detectable with the Fermi L...

  14. Dark matter signals from cascade annihilations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardon, Jeremy; Nomura, Yasunori; Stolarski, Daniel; Thaler, Jesse, E-mail: jmardon@berkeley.edu, E-mail: YNomura@lbl.gov, E-mail: danchus@berkeley.edu, E-mail: jthaler@jthaler.net [Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    A leading interpretation of the electron/positron excesses seen by PAMELA and ATIC is dark matter annihilation in the galactic halo. Depending on the annihilation channel, the electron/positron signal could be accompanied by a galactic gamma ray or neutrino flux, and the non-detection of such fluxes constrains the couplings and halo properties of dark matter. In this paper, we study the interplay of electron data with gamma ray and neutrino constraints in the context of cascade annihilation models, where dark matter annihilates into light degrees of freedom which in turn decay into leptons in one or more steps. Electron and muon cascades give a reasonable fit to the PAMELA and ATIC data. Compared to direct annihilation, cascade annihilations can soften gamma ray constraints from final state radiation by an order of magnitude. However, if dark matter annihilates primarily into muons, the neutrino constraints are robust regardless of the number of cascade decay steps. We also examine the electron data and gamma ray/neutrino constraints on the recently proposed ''axion portal'' scenario.

  15. Gamma rays and the origin of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ona Wilhelmi, Emma

    2015-08-01

    Cosmic rays (CRs) are highly energetic nuclei (plus a small fraction of electrons) which fill the Galaxy and carry on average as much energy per unit volume as the energy density of starlight, the interstellar magnetic fields, or the kinetic energy density of interstellar gas. The CR spectrum extends as a featureless power-law up to ~2 PeV (the 'knee') and it is believed to be the result of acceleration of those CRs in Galactic Sources and later diffusion and convection in galactic magnetic fields. Those energetic CRs can interact with the surrounding medium via proton-proton collision resulting in secondary gamma-ray photons, observed from 100 MeV to a few tens of TeV. The results obtained by the current Cherenkov telescopes and gamma-ray satellites with the support of X-ray observations have discovered and identified more than 50 Galactic gamma-ray sources. Among them, the number of Supernova remnants (SNRs) and very-high-energy hard-spectrum sources (natural candidates to originate CRs) are steadily increasing. We expect to increase by a factor 10 at least this population of source with the future CTA experiment. I will review our current knowledge of Galactic gamma-ray sources and their connection with energetic CRs and the scientific prospects for CTA in this field. Those observations, together with a strong multi-wavelenght support from radio to hard X-rays, will finally allow us to establish the origin of the Galactic CRs.

  16. Resolving astrophysical uncertainties in dark matter direct detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads Toudal; Kahlhoefer, Felix; McCabe, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    We study the impact of the assumed velocity distribution of galactic dark matter particles on the interpretation of results from nuclear recoil detectors. By converting experimental data to variables that make the astrophysical unknowns explicit, different experiments can be compared without impl...

  17. Active Galactic Nuclei Feedback and Clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biman B. Nath

    2011-12-01

    The Intracluster Medium (ICM) is believed to have been affected by feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and/or supernovae-driven winds. These sources are supposed to have injected entropy into the ICM gas. The recently determined universal pressure profile of the ICM gas has been used and after comparing with the entropy profile of the gas from gravitational effects of the dark matter halo, the additional entropy injected by non-gravitational sources, as a function of the total cluster mass is determined. The current observational data of red-shift evolution of cluster scaling relation is shown that allow models in which the entropy injection decreases at high red-shift.

  18. Does the Galactic Bulge Have Fewer Planets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-12-01

    distribution of host distances from a simulated microlensing survey, correcting for dominant selection effects. They then compared the distribution of distances in this model sample to the distribution of distances measured for the actual, observed systems.Histogram and cumulative distribution (black lines) of distance estimates for microlensing planet hosts. Red lines show the distributions predicted by the model if the disk and bulge abundances were the same. [Penny et al. 2016]Intriguingly, the two distributions dont match when you assume that the planet abundances in the disk and the bulge are the same. The relative abundances appear to be higher in the disk than in the bulge, according to the teams results: the observations agree with a model in which the bulge/disk abundance ratio is less than 0.54.Whats to Blame?There are a few ways to interpret this result: 1) distance measurements for the sample of planets discovered by microlensing have errors, 2) the model is too simplified; it needs to also include dependence of planet abundance and detection sensitivity on properties like host mass and metallicity, or 3) the galactic bulge actually has fewer planets than the disk.Penny and collaboratorssuspect some combination of the first two interpretations is most likely, but an actual paucity of planets in the galactic bulge cant be ruled out. Performing similar analysis on a larger sample of microlensing planets expected from upcoming, second-generation microlensing searches and obtaining more accurate distance measurements will help us to address this puzzlemore definitively in the future.CitationMatthew T. Penny et al 2016 ApJ 830 150. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/830/2/150

  19. Dark Matter as a Trigger for Periodic Comet Impacts

    CERN Document Server

    Randall, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Although statistical evidence is not overwhelming, possible support for an approximately 35 million year periodicity in the crater record on Earth could indicate a nonrandom underlying enhancement of meteorite impacts at regular intervals. A proposed explanation in terms of tidal effects on Oort cloud comet perturbations as the Solar System passes through the galactic midplane is hampered by lack of an underlying cause for sufficiently enhanced gravitational effects over a sufficiently short time interval and by the time frame between such possible enhancements. We show that a smooth dark disk in the galactic midplane would address both these issues and create a periodic enhancement of the sort that has potentially been observed. Such a disk is motivated by a novel dark matter component with dissipative cooling that we considered in earlier work. We show how to evaluate the statistical evidence for periodicity by input of appropriate measured priors from the galactic model, justifying or ruling out periodic c...

  20. The Search for RR Lyrae Variables in the Dark Energy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Chandler; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Long, James

    2017-01-01

    RR Lyrae variables are stars with a characteristic relationship between magnitude and phase and whose distances can be easily determined, making them extremely valuable in mapping and analyzing galactic substructure. We present our method of searching for RR Lyrae variable stars using data extracted from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). The DES probes for stars as faint as i = 24.3. Finding such distant RR Lyrae allows for the discovery of objects such as dwarf spheroidal tidal streams and dwarf galaxies; in fact, at least one RR Lyrae has been discovered in each of the probed dwarf spheroidal galaxies orbiting the Milky Way (Baker & Willman 2015). In turn, these discoveries may ultimately resolve the well-known missing satellite problem, in which theoretical simulations predict many more dwarf satellites than are observed in the local Universe. Using the Lomb-Scargle periodogram to determine the period of the star being analyzed, we could display the relationship between magnitude and phase and visually determine if the star being analyzed was an RR Lyrae. We began the search in frequently observed regions of the DES footprint, known as the supernova fields. We then moved our search to known dwarf galaxies found during the second year of the DES. Unfortunately, we did not discover RR Lyrae in the probed dwarf galaxies; this method should be tried again once more observations are taken in the DES.

  1. On local dark matter density

    CERN Document Server

    Bidin, C Moni; Carraro, G; Mendez, R A; Moyano, M

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, we applied a three-dimensional formulation to kinematic measurements of the Galactic thick disk and derived a surprisingly low dark matter density at the solar position. This result was challenged by Bovy & Tremaine (2012, ApJ, 756, 89), who claimed that the observational data are consistent with the expected dark matter density if a one-dimensional approach is adopted. We analyze the assumption at the bases of their formulation and their claim that this returns a lower limit for the local dark matter density, which is accurate within 20%. We find that the validity of their formulation depends on the underlying mass distribution. We therefore analyze the predictions that their hypothesis casts on the radial gradient of the azimuthal velocity dV/dR and compare it with observational data as a testbed for the validity of their formulation. We find that their hypothesis requires too steep a profile of dV(Z)/dR, which is inconsistent with the observational data both in the Milky Way and in external ga...

  2. The distribution of the dark matter in galaxies as the imprint of its Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigerio Martins, Christiane

    2009-03-01

    The standard framework within which cosmological measurements are confronted and interpreted nowadays, called Lambda Cold Dark Matter, presents a Universe dominated by unknown forms of energy and matter. My Thesis is devoted to investigate the distribution of dark matter in galaxies and addresses the fact that the local universe-the small objects that orbit galaxies and the galaxy cores-turns out to be a marvelous laboratory for examining the nature of dark matter and the fundamental physics involved in structure formation and evolution. I develop tests, based on mass modeling of rotation curves, for the validation of dark matter models on galactic scales. These tests have been applied in analyzing the phenomenology of the cusp vs core controversy, and the phenomenon of non-Keplerian rotation curves as modification of the laws of gravity. I further investigate the properties and scaling laws of dark matter halos. My conclusion is that galactic observations provide strong imprints on the nature of dark matter.

  3. The distribution of the dark matter in galaxies as the imprint of its Nature

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, Christiane Frigerio

    2009-01-01

    The standard framework within which cosmological measurements are confronted and interpreted nowadays, called Lambda Cold Dark Matter, presents a Universe dominated by unknown forms of energy and matter. My Thesis is devoted to investigate the distribution of dark matter in galaxies and addresses the fact that the local universe-the small objects that orbit galaxies and the galaxy cores-turns out to be a marvelous laboratory for examining the nature of dark matter and the fundamental physics involved in structure formation and evolution. I develop tests, based on mass modeling of rotation curves, for the validation of dark matter models on galactic scales. These tests have been applied in analyzing the phenomenology of the cusp vs core controversy, and the phenomenon of non-Keplerian rotation curves as modification of the laws of gravity. I further investigate the properties and scaling laws of dark matter halos. My conclusion is that galactic observations provide strong imprints on the nature of dark matter.

  4. Active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Blandford, RD; Woltjer, L

    1990-01-01

    Starting with this volume, the Lecture Notes of the renowned Advanced Courses of the Swiss Society for Astrophysics and Astronomy will be published annually. In each course, three extensive lectures given by leading experts in their respective fields cover different and essential aspects of the subject. The 20th course, held at Les Diablerets in April 1990, dealt with current research on active galactic nuclei; it represents the most up-to-date views on the subject, presented with particular regard for clarity. The previous courses considered a wide variety of subjects, beginning with ""Theory

  5. Supershells and galactic fountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shustov, B. M.

    1989-03-01

    In the gaseous disk of our Galaxy as well as in other galaxies, HI structures (shells, bubbles, holes, etc.) on scales of 0.1-1 kpc are recognized to be common features; see e.g. the comprehensive review by Tenorio-Tagle and Bodenheimer (1988). The larger ones are usually named with the prefix "super". The estimated energies which are required to produee sueh large objeets are high - up to some 1054 erg. These energetic events must exert a significant influenee upon the gaseous galactic disk and eorona.

  6. Cold Positrons from Decaying Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boubekeur, Lotfi [Universitate de Valencia (Spain); Dodelson, Scott [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Vives, Oscar [Universitate de Valencia (Spain)

    2012-11-01

    Many models of dark matter contain more than one new particle beyond those in the Standard Model. Often heavier particles decay into the lightest dark matter particle as the Universe evolves. Here we explore the possibilities that arise if one of the products in a (Heavy Particle) $\\rightarrow$ (Dark Matter) decay is a positron, and the lifetime is shorter than the age of the Universe. The positrons cool down by scattering off the cosmic microwave background and eventually annihilate when they fall into Galactic potential wells. The resulting 511 keV flux not only places constraints on this class of models but might even be consistent with that observed by the INTEGRAL satellite.

  7. Dark matter relic density from observations of supersymmetry at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtinen, Suvi-Leena; List, Jenny; Berggren, Mikael [DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    If supersymmetric particles were discovered at the International Linear Collider (ILC), would we be able to prove that the dark matter candidate discovered is the only dark matter particle? This was investigated using a scenario with a mostly bino lightest supersymmetric particle and a coannihilating stau. In this scenario, the ILC could find the sleptons and lighter gauginos, while the LHC could discover and measure parts of the coloured spectrum. We will demonstrate which measurements and precisions are needed to determine whether the observed dark matter candidate is the sole constituent of the dark matter relic density. The required precisions will be compared to the predicted precisions at the ILC.

  8. The Dark Disk of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Purcell, Chris W; Kaplinghat, Manoj

    2009-01-01

    Massive satellite accretions onto early galactic disks can lead to the deposition of dark matter in disk-like configurations that co-rotate with the galaxy. This phenomenon has potentially dramatic consequences for dark matter detection experiments. We utilize focused, high-resolution simulations of accretion events onto disks designed to be Galaxy analogues, and compare the resultant disks to the morphological and kinematic properties of the Milky Way's thick disk in order to bracket the range of co-rotating accreted dark matter. We find that the Milky Way's merger history must have been unusually quiescent compared to median LCDM expectations and therefore its dark disk must be relatively small: the fraction of accreted dark disk material near the Sun is about 20% of the host halo density or smaller and the co-rotating dark matter fraction near the Sun, defined as particles moving with a rotational velocity lag less than 50 km/s, is enhanced by about 30% or less compared to a standard halo model. Such a dar...

  9. Searching in the dark: the dark mass content of the Milky Way globular clusters NGC288 and NGC6218

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollima, A.; Ferraro, F. R.; Lovisi, L.; Contenta, F.; Vesperini, E.; Origlia, L.; Lapenna, E.; Lanzoni, B.; Mucciarelli, A.; Dalessandro, E.; Pallanca, C.

    2016-10-01

    We present an observational estimate of the fraction and distribution of dark mass in the innermost region of the two Galactic globular clusters NGC 6218 (M12) and NGC 288. Such an assessment has been made by comparing the dynamical and luminous mass profiles derived from an accurate analysis of the most extensive spectroscopic and photometric surveys performed on these stellar systems. We find that non-luminous matter constitutes more than 60 per cent of the total mass in the region probed by our data (R dark component appears to be more concentrated than the most massive stars suggesting that it is likely composed of dark remnants segregated in the cluster core.

  10. Quantum foam, gravitational thermodynamics, and the dark sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Y. Jack

    2017-05-01

    Is it possible that the dark sector (dark energy in the form of an effective dynamical cosmological constant, and dark matter) has its origin in quantum gravity? This talk sketches a positive response. Here specifically quantum gravity refers to the combined effect of quantum foam (or spacetime foam due to quantum fluctuations of spacetime) and gravitational thermodynamics. We use two simple independent gedankan experiments to show that the holographic principle can be understood intuitively as having its origin in the quantum fluctuations of spacetime. Applied to cosmology, this consideration leads to a dynamical cosmological constant of the observed magnitude, a result that can also be obtained for the present and recent cosmic eras by using unimodular gravity and causal set theory. Next we generalize the concept of gravitational thermodynamics to a spacetime with positive cosmological constant (like ours) to reveal the natural emergence, in galactic dynamics, of a critical acceleration parameter related to the cosmological constant. We are then led to construct a phenomenological model of dark matter which we call “modified dark matter” (MDM) in which the dark matter density profile depends on both the cosmological constant and ordinary matter. We provide observational tests of MDM by fitting the rotation curves to a sample of 30 local spiral galaxies with a single free parameter and by showing that the dynamical and observed masses agree in a sample of 93 galactic clusters. We also give a brief discussion of the possibility that quanta of both dark energy and dark matter are non-local, obeying quantum Boltzmann statistics (also called infinite statistics) as described by a curious average of the bosonic and fermionic algebras. If such a scenario is correct, we can expect some novel particle phenomenology involving dark matter interactions. This may explain why so far no dark matter detection experiments have been able to claim convincingly to have detected

  11. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Jonker, P.G.; Bassa, C. G.; Dieball, A.; Greiss, S.; Maccarone, T. J.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M. A. P.; Britt, C. T.; Clem, J. L.; Gossen, L.; Grindlay, J. E.; Groot, P.J.; Kuiper, L.; Kuulkers, E.; Mendez, M.; Mikles, V. J.; Ratti, E. M.; Rea, N.; van Haaften, L.; Wijnands, R.; in't Zand, J. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (CGBS) is a shallow but wide survey of two approximately 6x1 degree strips of the Galactic Bulge about a degree above and below the plane. The survey by design targets regions where extinction and crowding are manageable and optical counterparts are accessible to de

  12. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Jonker, P. G.; Bassa, C. G.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M. A. P.; Maccarone, T. J.; Greiss, S.; Clem, J.; Dieball, A.; Mikles, V. J.; Britt, C. T.; Gossen, L.; Collazzi, A. C.; Wijnands, R.; In't Zand, J. J. M.; Mendez, M.; Rea, N.; Kuulkers, E.; Ratti, E. M.; van Haaften, L. M.; Heinke, C.; Ozel, F.; Groot, P. J.; Verbunt, F.

    2012-01-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a shallow but wide survey of two approximately 6x1 degree strips of the Galactic Bulge about a degree above and below the plane. The survey by design targets regions where extinction and crowding are manageable and optical counterparts are accessible to det

  13. Dark matter as a trigger for periodic comet impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Lisa; Reece, Matthew

    2014-04-25

    Although statistical evidence is not overwhelming, possible support for an approximately 35×106  yr periodicity in the crater record on Earth could indicate a nonrandom underlying enhancement of meteorite impacts at regular intervals. A proposed explanation in terms of tidal effects on Oort cloud comet perturbations as the Solar System passes through the galactic midplane is hampered by lack of an underlying cause for sufficiently enhanced gravitational effects over a sufficiently short time interval and by the time frame between such possible enhancements. We show that a smooth dark disk in the galactic midplane would address both these issues and create a periodic enhancement of the sort that has potentially been observed. Such a disk is motivated by a novel dark matter component with dissipative cooling that we considered in earlier work. We show how to evaluate the statistical evidence for periodicity by input of appropriate measured priors from the galactic model, justifying or ruling out periodic cratering with more confidence than by evaluating the data without an underlying model. We find that, marginalizing over astrophysical uncertainties, the likelihood ratio for such a model relative to one with a constant cratering rate is 3.0, which moderately favors the dark disk model. Our analysis furthermore yields a posterior distribution that, based on current crater data, singles out a dark matter disk surface density of approximately 10M⊙/pc2. The geological record thereby motivates a particular model of dark matter that will be probed in the near future.

  14. Systematic uncertainties from halo asphericity in dark matter searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernal, Nicolás [ICTP South American Institute for Fundamental Research, Instituto de Física Teórica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, São Paulo (Brazil); Forero-Romero, Jaime E. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de los Andes, Cra. 1 No. 18A-10, Edificio Ip, Bogotá (Colombia); Garani, Raghuveer [Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics and Physikalisches Institut, Universität Bonn, Nußallee 12, D-53115 Bonn,Germany (Germany); Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio, E-mail: nicolas@ift.unesp.br, E-mail: je.forero@uniandes.edu.co, E-mail: garani@th.physik.uni-bonn.de, E-mail: sergio.palomares.ruiz@ific.uv.es [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC-Universitat de València, Apartado de Correos 22085, E-46071, València (Spain)

    2014-09-01

    Although commonly assumed to be spherical, dark matter halos are predicted to be non-spherical by N-body simulations and their asphericity has a potential impact on the systematic uncertainties in dark matter searches. The evaluation of these uncertainties is the main aim of this work, where we study the impact of aspherical dark matter density distributions in Milky-Way-like halos on direct and indirect searches. Using data from the large N-body cosmological simulation Bolshoi, we perform a statistical analysis and quantify the systematic uncertainties on the determination of local dark matter density and the so-called J factors for dark matter annihilations and decays from the galactic center. We find that, due to our ignorance about the extent of the non-sphericity of the Milky Way dark matter halo, systematic uncertainties can be as large as 35%, within the 95% most probable region, for a spherically averaged value for the local density of 0.3-0.4 GeV/cm {sup 3}. Similarly, systematic uncertainties on the J factors evaluated around the galactic center can be as large as 10% and 15%, within the 95% most probable region, for dark matter annihilations and decays, respectively.

  15. A Radio Characterization of Galactic compact Bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Ingallinera, Adriano; Umana, Grazia; Leto, Paolo; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Flagey, Nicolas; Paladini, Roberta; Agliozzo, Claudia; Buemi, Carla

    2013-01-01

    We report the radio observations of a sub-sample of the 428 galactic compact bubbles discovered at 24 $\\mu$m with the MIPSGAL survey. Pervasive through the entire Galactic plane, these objects are thought to be different kinds of evolved stars. The very large majority of the bubbles (~ 70%) are however not yet classified. We conducted radio observations with the EVLA at 6 cm and 20 cm in order to obtain the spectral index of 55 bubbles. We found that at least 70 per cent of the 31 bubbles for which we were effectively able to compute the spectral index (or its lower limit) are likely to be thermal emitters. We were also able to resolve some bubbles, obtaining that the size of the radio nebula is usually similar to the IR size, although our low resolution (with respect to IR images) did not allow further morphological studies. Comparisons between radio flux densities and IR archive data from Spitzer and IRAS suggest that at least 3 unclassified bubbles can be treated as planetary nebula candidates.

  16. Testing Lorentz invariance of dark matter with satellite galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettoni, Dario; Nusser, Adi; Blas, Diego; Sibiryakov, Sergey

    2017-05-01

    We develop the framework for testing Lorentz invariance in the dark matter sector using galactic dynamics. We consider a Lorentz violating (LV) vector field acting on the dark matter component of a satellite galaxy orbiting in a host halo. We introduce a numerical model for the dynamics of satellites in a galactic halo and for a galaxy in a rich cluster to explore observational consequences of such an LV field. The orbital motion of a satellite excites a time dependent LV force which greatly affects its internal dynamics. Our analysis points out key observational signatures which serve as probes of LV forces. These include modifications to the line of sight velocity dispersion, mass profiles and shapes of satellites. With future data and a more detailed modeling these signatures can be exploited to constrain a new region of the parameter space describing the LV in the dark matter sector.

  17. Possible resonance effect of axionic dark matter in Josephson junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christian

    2013-12-06

    We provide theoretical arguments that dark-matter axions from the galactic halo that pass through Earth may generate a small observable signal in resonant S/N/S Josephson junctions. The corresponding interaction process is based on the uniqueness of the gauge-invariant axion Josephson phase angle modulo 2π and is predicted to produce a small Shapiro steplike feature without externally applied microwave radiation when the Josephson frequency resonates with the axion mass. A resonance signal of so far unknown origin observed by C. Hoffmann et al. [Phys. Rev. B 70, 180503(R) (2004)] is consistent with our theory and can be interpreted in terms of an axion mass m(a)c2=0.11  meV and a local galactic axionic dark-matter density of 0.05  GeV/cm3. We discuss future experimental checks to confirm the dark-matter nature of the observed signal.

  18. Direct detection of dark matter axions with directional sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Irastorza, Igor G

    2012-01-01

    We study the directional effect of the expected axion dark matter signal in a resonant cavity of an axion haloscope detector, for cavity geometries not satisfying the condition that the axion de Broglie wavelength is much larger than the cavity dimensions. We focus on long thin cavities immersed in dipole magnets and find, for appropriately chosen cavity lengths, an O(1) modulation of the signal with the cavity orientation with respect the momentum distribution of the relic axion background predicted by the isothermal sphere model for the galactic dark matter halo. This effect can be exploited to design directional axion dark matter detectors, providing an unmistakable signature of the extraterrestrial origin of a possible positive detection. Moreover, the precise shape of the modulation may give information of the galactic halo distribution and, for specific halo models, give extra sensitivity for higher axion masses.

  19. Interacting Agegraphic Dark Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Hao; Cai, Rong-Gen

    2007-01-01

    A new dark energy model, named "agegraphic dark energy", has been proposed recently, based on the so-called K\\'{a}rolyh\\'{a}zy uncertainty relation, which arises from quantum mechanics together with general relativity. In this note, we extend the original agegraphic dark energy model by including the interaction between agegraphic dark energy and pressureless (dark) matter. In the interacting agegraphic dark energy model, there are many interesting features different from the original agegrap...

  20. Understanding Limitations in the Determination of the Diffuse Galactic Gamma-ray Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Digel, S.W.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Porter, T.A.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Reimer, O.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC,; Strong, A.W.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2006-10-03

    We discuss uncertainties and possible sources of errors associated with the determination of the diffuse Galactic {gamma}-ray emission using the EGRET data. Most of the issues will be relevant also in the GLAST era. The focus here is on issues that impact evaluation of dark matter annihilation signals against the diffuse {gamma}-ray emission of the Milky Way.

  1. Dark energy without dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Wiltshire, David L

    2007-01-01

    An overview is presented of a recently proposed "radically conservative" solution to the problem of dark energy in cosmology. The proposal yields a model universe which appears to be quantitatively viable, in terms of its fit to supernovae luminosity distances, the angular scale of the sound horizon in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy spectrum, and the baryon acoustic oscillation scale. It may simultaneously resolve key anomalies relating to primordial lithium abundances, CMB ellipticity, the expansion age of the universe and the Hubble bubble feature. The model uses only general relativity, and matter obeying the strong energy condition, but revisits operational issues in interpreting average measurements in our presently inhomogeneous universe, from first principles. The present overview examines both the foundational issues concerning the definition of gravitational energy in a dynamically expanding space, the quantitative predictions of the new model and its best-fit cosmological parameter...

  2. Discovering High Fashion in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MARTHA; KANG; MCGILL

    2006-01-01

    Nothing beats bargaining in a Beijing clothes market. As an American student, it's a completely novel experience, a great way to practice your Chinese, and gives you the feeling of discovering the real Beijing. The atmosphere is so different from shopping experiences in the United States. It seems here that it must be authentic con

  3. Dark Matter Signatures in the Anisotropic Radio Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Le

    2008-01-01

    We calculate intensity and angular power spectrum of the cosmological background of synchrotron emission from cold dark matter annihilations into electron positron pairs. We compare this background with intensity and anisotropy of astrophysical and cosmological radio backgrounds, such as from normal galaxies, radio-galaxies, galaxy cluster accretion shocks, the cosmic microwave background and with Galactic foregrounds. Under modest assumptions for the dark matter clustering we find that around 2 GHz average intensity and fluctuations of the radio background at sub-degree scales allows to probe dark matter masses >100 GeV and annihilation cross sections not far from the natural values ~ 3 x 10^(-26) cm^3/s required to reproduce the correct relic density of thermal dark matter. The angular power spectrum of the signal from dark matter annihilation tends to be flatter than that from astrophysical radio backgrounds. Furthermore, radio source counts have comparable constraining power. Such signatures are interest...

  4. The Galactic Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melia, Fulvio

    Exciting new broadband observations of the galactic nucleus have placed the heart of the Milky Way under intense scrutiny in recent years. This has been due in part to the growing interest from theorists motivated to study the physics of black hole accretion, magnetized gas dynamics, and unusual star formation. The center of our Galaxy is now known to harbor the most compelling supermassive black hole candidate, weighing in at 3-4 million solar masses. Its nearby environment is comprised of a molecular dusty ring, clusters of evolved and young stars, diffuse hot gas, ionized gas streamers, and several supernova remnants. This chapter will focus on the physical makeup of this dynamic region and the feasibility of actually imaging the black hole's shadow in the coming decade with mm interferometry.

  5. Galactic Diffuse Polarized Emission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ettore Carretti

    2011-12-01

    Diffuse polarized emission by synchrotron is a key tool to investigate magnetic fields in the Milky Way, particularly the ordered component of the large scale structure. Key observables are the synchrotron emission itself and the RM is by Faraday rotation. In this paper the main properties of the radio polarized diffuse emission and its use to investigate magnetic fields will be reviewed along with our current understanding of the galactic magnetic field and the data sets available. We will then focus on the future perspective discussing RM-synthesis – the new powerful instrument devised to unlock the information encoded in such an emission – and the surveys currently in progress like S-PASS and GMIMS.

  6. Galactic Teamwork Makes Distant Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    During the period of reionization that followed the dark ages of our universe, hydrogen was transformed from a neutral state, which is opaque to radiation, to an ionized one, which is transparent to radiation. But what generated the initial ionizing radiation? The recent discovery of multiple distant galaxies offers evidence for how this process occurred.Two Distant GalaxiesWe believe reionization occurred somewhere between a redshift of z = 6 and 7, because Ly-emitting galaxies drop out at roughly this redshift. Beyond this distance, were generally unable to see the light from these galaxies, because the universe is no longer transparent to their emission. This is not always the case, however: if a bubble of ionized gas exists around a distant galaxy, the radiation can escape, allowing us to see the galaxy.This is true of two recently-discovered Ly-emitting galaxies, confirmed to be at a redshift of z~7 and located near one another in a region known as the Bremer Deep Field. The fact that were able to see the radiation from these galaxies means that they are in an ionized HII region presumably one of the earlier regions to have become reionized in the universe.But on their own, neither of these galaxies is capable of generating an ionized bubble large enough for their light to escape. So what ionized the region around them, and what does this mean for our understanding of how reionization occurred in the universe?A Little Help From FriendsLocation in different filters of the objects in the Hubble Bremer Deep Field catalog. The z~7 selection region is outlined by the grey box. BDF-521 and BDF-3299 were the two originally discovered galaxies; the remaining red markers indicate the additional six galaxies discovered in the same region. [Castellano et al. 2016]A team of scientists led by Marco Castellano (Rome Observatory, INAF) investigated the possibility that there are other, faint galaxies near these two that have helped to ionize the region. Performing a survey

  7. Researchers Discover Plants Biological Clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王全良

    1996-01-01

    Scientists who created glow-in-the-dark plants by shooting up seedlingswith firefly DNA have identified the first biological clock gene in plants. Discovery of the timepiece gene, which controls such biological rhythmsas daily leaf movements and proe openings, flower-blooming schedules andphotosynthesis cycles, could lead to a host of applications in ornamental horti-culture, agriculture and even human health. Many researchers believe that

  8. THE MOST LUMINOUS GALAXIES DISCOVERED BY WISE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Chao-Wei; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Moustakas, Leonidas A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Wu, Jingwen; Wright, Edward L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Assef, Roberto J. [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad deIngeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército Libertador 441, Santiago (Chile); Blain, Andrew W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, 1 University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Bridge, Carrie R.; Sayers, Jack [Division of Physics, Math, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Benford, Dominic J.; Leisawitz, David T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cutri, Roc M.; Masci, Frank J.; Yan, Lin [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Griffith, Roger L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Jarrett, Thomas H. [Astronomy Department, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Lonsdale, Carol J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Petty, Sara M. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Stanford, S. Adam, E-mail: Chao-Wei.Tsai@jpl.nasa.gov [Department of Physics, University of California Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); and others

    2015-06-01

    We present 20 Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)-selected galaxies with bolometric luminosities L{sub bol} > 10{sup 14} L{sub ☉}, including five with infrared luminosities L{sub IR} ≡ L{sub (rest} {sub 8–1000} {sub μm)} > 10{sup 14} L{sub ☉}. These “extremely luminous infrared galaxies,” or ELIRGs, were discovered using the “W1W2-dropout” selection criteria which requires marginal or non-detections at 3.4 and 4.6 μm (W1 and W2, respectively) but strong detections at 12 and 22 μm in the WISE survey. Their spectral energy distributions are dominated by emission at rest-frame 4–10 μm, suggesting that hot dust with T{sub d} ∼ 450 K is responsible for the high luminosities. These galaxies are likely powered by highly obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and there is no evidence suggesting these systems are beamed or lensed. We compare this WISE-selected sample with 116 optically selected quasars that reach the same L{sub bol} level, corresponding to the most luminous unobscured quasars in the literature. We find that the rest-frame 5.8 and 7.8 μm luminosities of the WISE-selected ELIRGs can be 30%–80% higher than that of the unobscured quasars. The existence of AGNs with L{sub bol} > 10{sup 14} L{sub ☉} at z > 3 suggests that these supermassive black holes are born with large mass, or have very rapid mass assembly. For black hole seed masses ∼10{sup 3} M{sub ☉}, either sustained super-Eddington accretion is needed, or the radiative efficiency must be <15%, implying a black hole with slow spin, possibly due to chaotic accretion.

  9. Disentangling Dark Matter Dynamics with Directional Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2009-12-16

    Inelastic dark matter reconciles the DAMA anomaly with other null direct detection experiments and points to a non-minimal structure in the dark matter sector. In addition to the dominant inelastic interaction, dark matter scattering may have a subdominant elastic component. If these elastic interactions are suppressed at low momentum transfer, they will have similar nuclear recoil spectra to inelastic scattering events. While upcoming direct detection experiments will see strong signals from such models, they may not be able to unambiguously determine the presence of the subdominant elastic scattering from the recoil spectra alone. We show that directional detection experiments can separate elastic and inelastic scattering events and discover the underlying dynamics of dark matter models.

  10. Dark Matter searches with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Suchek, Stanislav; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Dark Matter composes almost 25% of our Universe, but its identity is still unknown which makes it a large challenge for current fundamental physics. A lot of approaches are used to discover the identity of Dark Matter and one of them, collider searches, are discussed in this talk. The latest results on Dark Matter search at ATLAS using 2015 and 2016 data are presented. Results from searches for new physics in the events with final states containing large missing transverse energy and a single photon or Higgs boson are shown. Higgs to invisible and dijet searches are used in sense of complementarity to constrain properties of Dark Matter. Results and perspectives for all these searches are presented.

  11. Dimensionless constants, cosmology and other dark matters

    CERN Document Server

    Tegmark, M; Rees, M; Wilczek, F; Tegmark, Max; Aguirre, Anthony; Rees, Martin; Wilczek, Frank

    2006-01-01

    We identify 31 dimensionless physical constants required by particle physics and cosmology, and emphasize that both microphysical constraints and selection effects might help elucidate their origin. Axion cosmology provides an instructive example, in which these two kinds of arguments must both be taken into account, and work well together. If a Peccei-Quinn phase transition occurred before or during inflation, then the axion dark matter density will vary from place to place with a probability distribution. By calculating the net dark matter halo formation rate as a function of all four relevant cosmological parameters and assessing other constraints, we find that this probability distribution, computed at stable solar systems, is arguably peaked near the observed dark matter density. If cosmologically relevant WIMP dark matter is discovered, then one naturally expects comparable densities of WIMPs and axions, making it important to follow up with precision measurements to determine whether WIMPs account for ...

  12. Dark matter density profiles of the halos embedding early-type galaxies: characterizing halo contraction and dark matter annihilation strength

    CERN Document Server

    Chae, Kyu-Hyun; Frieman, Joshua A; Bernardi, Mariangela

    2012-01-01

    Identifying dark matter and characterizing its distribution in the inner region of halos embedding galaxies are inter-related problems of broad importance. We devise a new procedure of determining dark matter distribution in halos. We first make a self-consistent bivariate statistical match of stellar mass and velocity dispersion with halo mass as demonstrated here for the first time. Then, selecting early-type galaxy-halo systems we perform Jeans dynamical modeling with the aid of observed statistical properties of stellar mass profiles and velocity dispersion profiles. Dark matter density profiles derived specifically using Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies and halos from up-to-date cosmological dissipationless simulations deviate significantly from the dissipationless profle of Navarro-Frenk-White or Einasto in terms of inner density slope and/or concentration. From these dark matter profiles we find that dark matter density is enhanced in the inner region of most early-type galactic halos providing an ind...

  13. Light Dark Matter and Dark Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Heo, Jae Ho

    2015-01-01

    The light dark matter particles freeze out after neutrino decoupling. If the dark matter particle couples to neutrino or electromagnetic plasma, the late time entropy production by dark matter annihilations can change the neutrino-to-photon temperature ratio, and equally effective number of neutrinos. We study the effect of dark matter annihilations in the thermal equilibrium approximation and non-equilibrium method (freeze-out mechanism), and constrain both results with Planck observations. We demonstrate that the bound of dark matter mass and the possibility of the existence of extra radiation particles are more tightly constrained in the non-equilibrium method.

  14. Imminent science what remains to be discovered

    CERN Document Server

    Bignami, Giovanni F

    2014-01-01

    This is not science fiction. It’s a voyage on the arrow of time to the coming fifty years. The legendary palindromic character Mr. Qfwfq from Italo Calvino’s collection of short stories, The Cosmicomics, will go with us – he who knows all the answers but will give out no hints. He will help us to discover the innovations that will have changed our lives by 2062, when, riding astride Halley’s Comet, our omniscient extraterrestrial will return to visit us.In this book, we shall learn how astronomers will devote themselves to the study of the mysterious force of dark energy, which makes up some three-quarters of the Universe. We shall also delve deeply into the study of our Earth, to exploit the immense thermal energy that lies beneath our feet. We shall solve another enigma in today’s science: the origin of life. We shall come to understand how to develop direct contacts between our brains and the rest of the world. We shall learn about the future of genetics, the reason for the longevity of Methusela...

  15. Search of the Earth Limb Fermi Data and Non-Galactic Center Region Fermi Data for Signs of Narrow Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Bloom, E; Izaguirre, E; Snyder, A; Albert, A; Winer, B; Yang, Z; Essig, R

    2013-01-01

    Since the spring of 2012 there have been many papers published using Fermi LAT public data that claim evidence for narrow spectral lines coming from the region of the Galactic center. This study uses non-Galactic center Fermi-LAT data from survey mode observations, and Earth limb Fermi data to test the dark matter interpretation of this feature and better understand its origins.

  16. Binary pulsars as dark-matter probes

    CERN Document Server

    Pani, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    During the motion of a binary pulsar around the galactic center, the pulsar and its companion experience a wind of dark-matter particles that can affect the orbital motion through dynamical friction. We show that this effect produces a characteristic seasonal modulation of the orbit and causes a secular change of the orbital period whose magnitude can be well within the astonishing precision of various binary-pulsar observations. Our analysis is valid for binary systems with orbital period longer than a day. By comparing this effect with pulsar-timing measurements, it is possible to derive model-independent upper bounds on the dark-matter density at different distances $D$ from the galactic center. For example, the precision timing of J1713+0747 imposes $\\rho_{\\rm DM}\\lesssim 10^5\\,{\\rm GeV/cm}^3$ at $D\\approx7\\,{\\rm kpc}$. The detection of a binary pulsar at $D\\lesssim 10\\,{\\rm pc}$ could provide stringent constraints on dark-matter halo profiles and on growth models of the central black hole. The Square Kil...

  17. Black Holes in Gamma Ray Bursts and Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffini, Remo; Argüelles, C. R.; Fraga, B. M. O.; Geralico, A.; Quevedo, H.; Rueda, J. A.; Siutsou, I.

    2013-09-01

    Current research marks a clear success in identifying the moment of formation of a Black Hole of 10M⊙, with the emission of a Gamma Ray Burst. This explains in terms of the 'Blackholic Energy' the source of the energy of these astrophysical systems. Their energetics up to 1054 erg, make them detectable all over our Universe. Concurrently a new problematic has been arising related to: (a) The evidence of Dark Matter in galactic halos; (b) The origin of the Super Massive Black Holes in active galactic nuclei and Quasars and (c) The purported existence of a Black Hole in the Center of our Galaxy. These three aspects of this new problematic have been traditionally approached independently. We propose an unified approach to all three of them based on a system of massive self-gravitating neutrinos in General Relativity. Perspectives of future research are presented.

  18. Chemical trends in the Galactic Halo with APOGEE data

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Alvar, E; Prieto, C Allende; Hayden, M R; Beers, T C; Fernández-Trincado, J G; Meza, A; Schultheis, M; Santiago, B X; Queiroz, A B; Anders, F; da Costa, L N; Chiappini, C

    2016-01-01

    The galaxy formation process in the $\\Lambda$-Cold Dark Matter scenario can be constrained from the analysis of stars in the Milky Way's halo system. We examine the variation of chemical abundances in distant halo stars observed by the Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), as a function of distance from the Galactic center ($r$) and iron abundance ([M/H]), in the range 5 $\\lesssim r \\lesssim$ 30 kpc and $-2.5 15$ kpc and [M/H] $> -1.1$ (larger in the case of O, Mg and S) with respect to the nearest halo stars. This result confirms previous claims for low-$\\alpha$ stars found at larger distances. Chemical differences in elements with other nucleosynthetic origins (Ni, K, Na, and Al) are also detected. C and N do not provide reliable information about the interstellar medium from which stars formed because our sample comprises RGB and AGB stars and can experience mixing of material to their surfaces.

  19. Galactic mapping with general relativity and the observed rotation curves

    CERN Document Server

    Magalhaes, Nadja S

    2015-01-01

    Typically, stars in galaxies have higher velocities than predicted by Newtonian gravity in conjunction with observable galactic matter. To account for the phenomenon, some researchers modified Newtonian gravitation; others introduced dark matter in the context of Newtonian gravity. We employed general relativity successfully to describe the galactic velocity profiles of four galaxies: NGC 2403, NGC 2903, NGC 5055 and the Milky Way. Here we map the density contours of the galaxies, achieving good concordance with observational data. In our Solar neighbourhood, we found a mass density and density fall-off fitting observational data satisfactorily. From our GR results, using the threshold density related to the observed optical zone of a galaxy, we had found that the Milky Way was indicated to be considerably larger than had been believed to be the case. To our knowledge, this was the only such existing theoretical prediction ever presented. Very recent observational results by Xu et al. have confirmed our predi...

  20. Galactic Halo Wormhole Solutions in f(T Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sharif

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The proposal of galactic halo region is based on the idea that dark halos contain some characteristics needed to support traversable wormhole solutions. We explore wormhole solutions in this region in the framework of generalized teleparallel gravity. We consider static spherically symmetric wormhole spacetime with flat galactic rotational curves and obtain expressions of matter components for nondiagonal tetrad. The effective energy-momentum tensor leads to the violation of energy conditions which may impose condition on the normal matter to satisfy these conditions. We take two well-known f(T models in exponential and logarithmic forms to discuss wormhole solutions as well as the equilibrium condition. It is concluded that wormhole solutions violating weak energy condition are obtained for both models with stable configuration.

  1. Vertical distribution of stars and gas in a galactic disk

    CERN Document Server

    Jog, C J

    2005-01-01

    We study the vertical density distribution of stars and gas (HI and H_2) in a galactic disk which is embedded in a dark matter halo. The new feature of this work is the inclusion of gas, and the gravitational coupling between stars and gas, which has led to a more realistic treatment of a multi-component galactic disk. The gas gravity is shown to be crucially important despite the low gas mass fraction. This approach physically explains the observed scaleheight distribution of all the three disk components, including the long-standing puzzle (Oort 1962) of a constant HI scaleheight observed in the inner Galaxy. The above model is applied to two external galaxies: NGC 891 and NGC 4565, and the stellar disk is shown to be not strictly flat as was long believed but rather it shows a moderate flaring of a factor of about 2 within the optical radius.

  2. Galactic space-times in modified theories of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Dipanjan; Sarkar, Tapobrata

    2014-01-01

    We study Bertrand space-times (BSTs), which have been proposed as viable models of space-times seeded by galactic dark matter, in modified theories of gravity. We first critically examine the issue of galactic rotation curves in General Relativity, and establish the usefulness of BSTs to fit experimental data in this context. We then study BSTs in metric $f(R)$ gravity and in Brans-Dicke theories. For the former, the nature of the Newtonian potential is established, and we also compute the effective equation of state and show that it can provide good fits to some recent experimental results. For the latter, we calculate the Brans-Dicke scalar analytically in some limits and numerically in general, and find interesting constraints on the parameters of the theory. Our results provide evidence for the physical nature of Bertrand space-times in modified theories of gravity.

  3. Orientation of Galactic Bulge Planetary Nebulae toward the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Danehkar, A

    2014-01-01

    We have used the Wide Field Spectrograph on the Australian National University 2.3-m telescope to perform the integral field spectroscopy for a sample of the Galactic planetary nebulae. The spatially resolved velocity distributions of the H$\\alpha$ emission line were used to determine the kinematic features and nebular orientations. Our findings show that some bulge planetary nebulae toward the Galactic center have a particular orientation.

  4. The end of the Galactic spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    De Donato, C

    2007-01-01

    We use a diffusion galactic model to analyze the end of the Galactic cosmic ray spectrum and its mixing with the extragalactic cosmic ray flux. We analyze the transition between Galactic and extragalactic components using two different extragalactic models. We compare the sum of the diffusive galactic spectrum and extragalactic spectrum with the available experimental data.

  5. Discovering Network Structure Beyond Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Adilson E Motter

    2011-01-01

    To understand the formation, evolution, and function of complex systems, it is crucial to understand the internal organization of their interaction networks. Partly due to the impossibility of visualizing large complex networks, resolving network structure remains a challenging problem. Here we overcome this difficulty by combining the visual pattern recognition ability of humans with the high processing speed of computers to develop an exploratory method for discovering groups of nodes chara...

  6. Laser Interferometers as Dark Matter Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Evan D; Müller, Holger; Pospelov, Maxim; Adhikari, Rana X

    2016-01-01

    While global cosmological and local galactic abundance of dark matter is well established, its identity, physical size and composition remain a mystery. In this paper, we analyze an important question of dark matter detectability through its gravitational interaction, using current and next generation gravitational-wave observatories to look for macroscopic (kilogram-scale or larger) objects. Keeping the size of the dark matter objects to be smaller than the physical dimensions of the detectors, and keeping their mass as free parameters, we derive the expected event rates. For favorable choice of mass, we find that dark matter interactions could be detected in space-based detectors such as LISA at a rate of one per ten years. We then assume the existence of an additional Yukawa force between dark matter and regular matter. By choosing the range of the force to be comparable to the size of the detectors, we derive the levels of sensitivity to such a new force, which exceeds the sensitivity of other probes in a...

  7. Searches for Particle Dark Matter: An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, Pat

    2011-01-01

    The identity of dark matter is one of the key outstanding problems in both particle and astrophysics. In this thesis, I describe a number of complementary searches for particle dark matter. I discuss how the impact of dark matter on stars can constrain its interaction with nuclei, focussing on main sequence stars close to the Galactic Centre, and on the first stars as seen through the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. The mass and annihilation cross-section of dark matter particles can be probed with searches for gamma rays produced in astronomical targets. Dwarf galaxies and ultracompact, primordially-produced dark matter minihalos turn out to be especially promising in this respect. I illustrate how the results of these searches can be combined with constraints from accelerators and cosmology to produce a single global fit to all available data. Global fits in supersymmetry turn out to be quite technically demanding, even with the simplest predictive models and the addition of complementary data from a b...

  8. The Green Bank Telescope Galactic H II Region Discovery Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Bania, T M; Balser, Dana S; Rood, R T

    2010-01-01

    We discovered a large population of previously unknown Galactic H II regions by using the Green Bank Telescope to detect their hydrogen radio recombination line emission. Since recombination lines are optically thin at 3 cm wavelength, we can detect H II regions across the entire Galactic disk. Our targets were selected based on spatially coincident 24 micron and 21 cm continuum emission. For the Galactic zone -16 deg < L_gal < 67 deg and abs(B_gal) < 1 deg, we detected 602 discrete recombination line components from 448 lines of sight, 95% of the sample targets, which more than doubles the number of known H II regions in this part of the Milky Way. We found 25 new first quadrant nebulae with negative LSR velocities, placing them beyond the Solar orbit. Because we can detect all nebulae inside the Solar orbit that are ionized by O-stars, the Discovery Survey targets, when combined with existing H II region catalogs, give a more accurate census of Galactic H II regions and their properties. The distri...

  9. The HAWC Sensitivity to Dark Matter Annihilation and Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapici, Tolga; HAWC Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is an extensive air shower array in the state of Puebla, Mexico at an altitude of 4100m. The HAWC observatory will perform an indirect search for dark matter via GeV-TeV photons resulting from dark matter annihilation and decay, including annihilation from extended dark matter sources. We consider the HAWC sensitivity to a subset of the sources, including the M31 galaxy, the Virgo cluster, and the Galactic center. We simulate the HAWC response to gamma rays from the sources in well-motivated dark matter annihilation channels. We show the limits HAWC can place on the dark matter cross-section or lifetime from these sources if gamma-ray excess is not observed. In particular, for dark matter annihilating into gauge bosons, HAWC will be able to measure a narrow range of dark matter masses to cross-sections below that expected for a thermal relic. HAWC should also be sensitive to cross-sections higher than thermal for masses up to nearly 1000 TeV. HAWC will be sensitive to decaying dark matter for these masses as well. HAWC can explore higher dark matter masses than are currently constrained.

  10. Neutral hydrogen in galactic fountains

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, C M

    2007-01-01

    Simulations of an isolated Milky Way-like galaxy, in which supernovae power a galactic fountain, reproduce the observed velocity and 21cm brightness statistics of galactic neutral hydrogen (HI). The simulated galaxy consists of a thin HI disk, similar in extent and brightness to that observed in the Milky Way, and extra-planar neutral gas at a range of velocities due to the galactic fountain. Mock observations of the neutral gas resemble the HI flux measurements from the Leiden-Argentine-Bonn (LAB) HI, survey, including a high-velocity tail which matches well with observations of high-velocity clouds. The simulated high-velocity clouds are typically found close to the galactic disk, with a typical line-of-sight distance of 13kpc from observers on the solar circle. The fountain efficiently cycles matter from the centre of the galaxy to its outskirts at a rate of around 0.5 M_sun/yr

  11. Model-independent approach for dark matter phenomenology: Signatures in linear colliders and cosmic positron experiments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shigeki Matsumoto; Nobuchika Okada

    2007-11-01

    We have studied the phenomenology of dark matter at the ILC and cosmic positron experiments based on model-independent approach. We have found a strong correlation between dark matter signatures at the ILC and those in the indirect detection experiments of dark matter. Once the dark matter is discovered in the positron experiments such as the PAMELA, its nature will be investigated in detail at the ILC.

  12. Dark Energy and the Hubble Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernin, A. D.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.

    The Big Bang predicted by Friedmann could not be empirically discovered in the 1920th, since global cosmological distances (more than 300-1000 Mpc) were not available for observations at that time. Lemaitre and Hubble studied receding motions of galaxies at local distances of less than 20-30 Mpc and found that the motions followed the (nearly) linear velocity-distance relation, known now as Hubble's law. For decades, the real nature of this phenomenon has remained a mystery, in Sandage's words. After the discovery of dark energy, it was suggested that the dynamics of local expansion flows is dominated by omnipresent dark energy, and it is the dark energy antigravity that is able to introduce the linear velocity-distance relation to the flows. It implies that Hubble's law observed at local distances was in fact the first observational manifestation of dark energy. If this is the case, the commonly accepted criteria of scientific discovery lead to the conclusion: In 1927, Lemaitre discovered dark energy and Hubble confirmed this in 1929.

  13. Galactic turbulence and paleoclimate variability

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2010-01-01

    The wavelet regression detrended fluctuations of the reconstructed temperature for the past three ice ages: approximately 340000 years (Antarctic ice cores isotopic data), exhibit clear evidences of the galactic turbulence modulation up to 2500 years time-scales. The observed strictly Kolmogorov turbulence features indicates the Kolmogorov nature of galactic turbulence, and provide explanation to random-like fluctuations of the global temperature on the millennial time scales.

  14. X-ray observations of the Sagittarius D HII region toward the Galactic center with Suzaku

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sawada, M.; Tsujimoto, M.; Koyama, K.; Law, C.J.; Tsuru, T.G.; Hyodo, Y.

    2009-01-01

    We present a Suzaku X-ray study of the Sagittarius D (Sgr D) HII region in the Galactic center region. Two 18' × 18' images by the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) encompass the entire Sgr D complex. Thanks to the low background, XIS discovered two diffuse sources with low surface brightness and obt

  15. Ionized Absorbers as Evidence for Supernova-driven Cooling of the Lower Galactic Corona

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraternali, Filippo; Marasco, Antonino; Marinacci, Federico; Binney, James

    2013-01-01

    We show that the ultraviolet absorption features, newly discovered in Hubble Space Telescope spectra, are consistent with being formed in a layer that extends a few kpc above the disk of the Milky Way. In this interface between the disk and the Galactic corona, high-metallicity gas ejected from the

  16. Dark Matter Halos as Bose-Einstein Condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Mielke, E W; Schunck, F E; Mielke, Eckehard W.; Fuchs, Burkhard; Schunck, Franz E.

    2006-01-01

    Galactic dark matter is modelled by a scalar field in order to effectively modify Kepler's law without changing standard Newtonian gravity. In particular, a solvable toy model with a self-interaction U(Phi) borrowed from non-topological solitons produces already qualitatively correct rotation curves and scaling relations. Although relativistic effects in the halo are very small, we indicate corrections arising from the general relativistic formulation. Thereby, we can also probe the weak gravitational lensing of our soliton type halo. For cold scalar fields, it corresponds to a gravitationally confined Boson-Einstein condensate, but of galactic dimensions.

  17. Elusive Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Maiolino, R; Gilli, R; Nagar, N M; Bianchi, S; Böker, T; Colbert, E; Krabbe, A; Marconi, A; Matt, G; Salvati, M

    2003-01-01

    A fraction of active galactic nuclei do not show the classical Seyfert-type signatures in their optical spectra, i.e. they are optically "elusive". X-ray observations are an optimal tool to identify this class of objects. We combine new Chandra observations with archival X-ray data in order to obtain a first estimate of the fraction of elusive AGN in local galaxies and to constrain their nature. Our results suggest that elusive AGN have a local density comparable to or even higher than optically classified Seyfert nuclei. Most elusive AGN are heavily absorbed in the X-rays, with gas column densities exceeding 10^24 cm^-2, suggesting that their peculiar nature is associated with obscuration. It is likely that in elusive AGN, the nuclear UV source is completely embedded and the ionizing photons cannot escape, which prevents the formation of a classical Narrow Line Region. Elusive AGN may contribute significantly to the 30 keV bump of the X-ray background.

  18. Galactic Superwinds Circa 2001

    CERN Document Server

    Heckman, T M

    2001-01-01

    In this contribution I summarize our current knowledge of the nature and significance of starburst-driven galactic winds (``superwinds''). Superwinds are complex multiphase outflows of cool, warm, and hot gas, dust, and magnetized relativistic plasma. The observational manifestations of superwinds result from the hydrodynamical interaction between the primary energy-carrying wind fluid and the ambient interstellar medium. Superwinds are ubiquitous in galaxies in which the global star-formation rate per unit area exceeds roughly 10$^{-1}$ M$_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-2}$. This criterion is met by local starbursts and the high-z Lyman Break galaxies. Several independent datasets and techniques imply that the total mass and energy outflow rates in a superwind are comparable to the starburst's star-formation-rate and mechanical energy injection rate, respectively. Outflow speeds in interstellar matter entrained in the wind range from $\\sim 10^2$ to $10^3$ km/s, but the primary wind fluid itself may reach velociti...

  19. The Galactic Pevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Neronov, A; Tchernin, C

    2013-01-01

    We present a self-consistent interpretation of the excess of very-high-energy neutrino emission in the direction of the inner Galaxy reported by IceCube. We demonstrate that an estimate of the neutrino flux in the E>100 TeV energy range lies at the high-energy power-law extrapolation of the spectrum of diffuse gamma-ray emission from the Galaxy, measured by Fermi telescope. This proves that IceCube neutrino and Fermi/LAT gamma-ray fluxes are both produced in interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar medium. Cosmic rays responsible for the gamma-ray and neutrino flux are characterized by hard spectrum with the slope harder than -2.4 and cut-off energy higher than 10 PeV. Morphology of the IceCube excess is consistent with a possibility that multi-PeV cosmic ray source is located at the edge of Norma arm / tip of the Galactic Bar.

  20. HI Clouds Near the Galactic Center: Possible Tracers of the Nuclear Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockman, Felix J.; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi; DiTeodoro, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    We have used the Green Bank Telescope to discover more than one hundred neutral hydrogen clouds that appear to be embedded in the Fermi Bubble -- the Milky Way’s nuclear wind. With the other members of this population that were previously found with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we now have a sample of about 200 such clouds. They are identified by their peculiar velocities. The cloud kinematics show no trace of Galactic rotation or association with the Galactic bar. Near longitude zero the clouds can have values of VLSR = +-200 km/s. No clouds have been detected with |VLSR| > 350 km/s. The clouds are concentrated toward the Galactic plane, but some are still found to |b|=10 degrees, or z > 1 kpc at the Galactic Center, where the current surveys end. These clouds are important tracers of conditions in the nuclear wind of the Milky Way.