WorldWideScience

Sample records for directional velocity estimation

  1. Spectral Velocity Estimation in the Transverse Direction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2013-01-01

    A method for estimating the velocity spectrum for a fully transverse flow at a beam-to-flow angle of 90is described. The approach is based on the transverse oscillation (TO) method, where an oscillation across the ultrasound beam is made during receive processing. A fourth-order estimator based...... on the correlation of the received signal is derived. A Fourier transform of the correlation signal yields the velocity spectrum. Performing the estimation for short data segments gives the velocity spectrum as a function of time as for ordinary spectrograms, and it also works for a beam-to-flow angle of 90...... estimation scheme can reliably find the spectrum at 90, where a traditional estimator yields zero velocity. Measurements have been conducted with the SARUS experimental scanner and a BK 8820e convex array transducer (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark). A CompuFlow 1000 (Shelley Automation, Inc, Toronto, Canada...

  2. Improved Vector Velocity Estimation using Directional Transverse Oscillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2015-01-01

    A method for estimating vector velocities using transverse oscillation (TO) combined with directional beamforming is presented. Directional Transverse Oscillation (DTO) is selfcalibrating, which increase the estimation accuracy and finds the lateral oscillation period automatically. A normal...... focused field is emitted and the received signals are beamformed in the lateral direction transverse to the ultrasound beam. A lateral oscillation is obtained by having a receive apodization waveform with two separate peaks. The IQ data are obtained by making a Hilbert transform of the directional signal...... transducer with a focal point at 105.6 mm (F#=5) for Vector Flow Imaging (VFI). A 6 mm radius tube in a circulating flow rig was scanned and the parabolic volume flow of 112.7 l/h (peak velocity 0.55 m/s) measured by a Danfoss Magnetic flow meter for reference. Velocity estimates for DTO are found for 32...

  3. Directional velocity estimation using focusing along the flow direction - I: Theory and simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2003-01-01

    A new method for directional velocity estimation is presented. The method uses beamformation along the flow direction to generate data in which the correct velocity magnitude can be directly estimated from the shift in position of the received consecutive signals. The shift is found by cross-corr...

  4. Estimating Radar Velocity using Direction of Arrival Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Horndt, Volker [General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Bickel, Douglas Lloyd [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Naething, Richard M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Direction of Arrival (DOA) measurements, as with a monopulse antenna, can be compared against Doppler measurements in a Synthetic Aperture Radar ( SAR ) image to determine an aircraft's forward velocity as well as its crab angle, to assist the aircraft's navigation as well as improving high - performance SAR image formation and spatial calibration.

  5. Estimation of velocity vector angles using the directional cross-correlation method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2006-01-01

    and then select the angle with the highest normalized correlation between directional signals. The approach is investigated using Field II simulations and data from the experimental ultrasound scanner RASMUS and a circulating flow rig with a parabolic flow having a peak velocity of 0.3 m/s. A 7 MHz linear array......A method for determining both velocity magnitude and angle in any direction is suggested. The method uses focusing along the velocity direction and cross-correlation for finding the correct velocity magnitude. The angle is found from beamforming directional signals in a number of directions...... transducer is used with a normal transmission of a focused ultrasound field. In the simulations the relative standard deviation of the velocity magnitude is between 0.7% and 7.7% for flow angles between 45 deg and 90 deg. The study showed that angle estimation by directional beamforming can be estimated...

  6. Vector velocity estimation using directional beam forming and cross-correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The two-dimensional velocity vector using a pulsed ultrasound field can be determined with the invention. The method uses a focused ultrasound field along the velocity direction for probing the moving medium under investigation. Several pulses are emitted and the focused received fields along...

  7. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  8. Online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righettini, Paolo; Strada, Roberto; KhademOlama, Ehsan; Valilou, Shirin

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a new online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator (WCE) over position and acceleration data gathered from an electro hydraulic servo shaking table. This is a batch estimator type that is based on the wavelet filter banks which extract the high and low resolution of data. The proposed complementary estimator combines these two resolutions of velocities which acquired from numerical differentiation and integration of the position and acceleration sensors by considering a fixed moving horizon window as input to wavelet filter. Because of using wavelet filters, it can be implemented in a parallel procedure. By this method the numerical velocity is estimated without having high noise of differentiators, integration drifting bias and with less delay which is suitable for active vibration control in high precision Mechatronics systems by Direct Velocity Feedback (DVF) methods. This method allows us to make velocity sensors with less mechanically moving parts which makes it suitable for fast miniature structures. We have compared this method with Kalman and Butterworth filters over stability, delay and benchmarked them by their long time velocity integration for getting back the initial position data. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Frequency Diverse Array Radar Cramér-Rao Lower Bounds for Estimating Direction, Range, and Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbing Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Different from phased-array radar, frequency diverse array (FDA radar offers range-dependent beampattern and thus provides new application potentials. But there is a fundamental question: what estimation performance can achieve for an FDA radar? In this paper, we derive FDA radar Cramér-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs for estimating direction, range (time delay, and velocity (Doppler shift. Two different data models including pre- and postmatched filtering are investigated separately. As the FDA radar has range-angle coupling, we use a simple transmit subaperturing strategy which divides the whole array into two subarrays, each uses a distinct frequency increment. Assuming temporally white Gaussian noise and linear frequency modulated transmit signal, extensive simulation examples are performed. When compared to conventional phased-array radar, FDA can yield better CRLBs for estimating the direction, range, and velocity. Moreover, the impacts of the element number and frequency increment are also analyzed. Simulation results show that the CRLBs decrease with the increase of the elements number and frequency increment.

  10. Vector blood velocity estimation in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gran, Fredrik; Udesen, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    Two methods for making vector velocity estimation in medical ultrasound are presented. All of the techniques can find both the axial and transverse velocity in the image and can be used for displaying both the correct velocity magnitude and direction. The first method uses a transverse oscillation...... in the ultrasound field to find the transverse velocity. In-vivo examples from the carotid artery are shown, where complex turbulent flow is found in certain parts of the cardiac cycle. The second approach uses directional beam forming along the flow direction to estimate the velocity magnitude. Using a correlation...... search can also yield the direction, and the full velocity vector is thereby found. An examples from a flow rig is shown....

  11. Algorithms for estimating blood velocities using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    Ultrasound has been used intensively for the last 15 years for studying the hemodynamics of the human body. Systems for determining both the velocity distribution at one point of interest (spectral systems) and for displaying a map of velocity in real time have been constructed. A number of schemes...... have been developed for performing the estimation, and the various approaches are described. The current systems only display the velocity along the ultrasound beam direction and a velocity transverse to the beam is not detected. This is a major problem in these systems, since most blood vessels...... are parallel to the skin surface. Angling the transducer will often disturb the flow, and new techniques for finding transverse velocities are needed. The various approaches for determining transverse velocities will be explained. This includes techniques using two-dimensional correlation (speckle tracking...

  12. Material Property Estimation for Direct Detection of DNAPL using Integrated Ground-Penetrating Radar Velocity, Imaging and Attribute Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Bradford; Stephen Holbrook; Scott B. Smithson

    2004-12-09

    The focus of this project is direct detection of DNAPL's specifically chlorinated solvents, via material property estimation from multi-fold surface ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. We combine state-of-the-art GPR processing methodology with quantitative attribute analysis and material property estimation to determine the location and extent of residual and/or pooled DNAPL in both the vadose and saturated zones. An important byproduct of our research is state-of-the-art imaging which allows us to pinpoint attribute anomalies, characterize stratigraphy, identify fracture zones, and locate buried objects.

  13. Velocity Estimate Following Air Data System Failure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McLaren, Scott A

    2008-01-01

    .... A velocity estimator (VEST) algorithm was developed to combine the inertial and wind velocities to provide an estimate of the aircraft's current true velocity to be used for command path gain scheduling and for display in the cockpit...

  14. Validation of Transverse Oscillation Vector Velocity Estimation In-Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Udesen, Jesper; Thomsen, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    Conventional Doppler methods for blood velocity estimation only estimate the velocity component along the ultrasound (US) beam direction. This implies that a Doppler angle under examination close to 90deg results in unreliable information about the true blood direction and blood velocity. The novel...... the presented angle independent 2-D vector velocity method. The results give reason to believe that the TO method can be a useful alternative to conventional Doppler systems bringing forth new information to the US examination of blood flow....

  15. An improved estimation and focusing scheme for vector velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Munk, Peter

    1999-01-01

    to reduce spatial velocity dispersion. Examples of different velocity vector conditions are shown using the Field II simulation program. A relative accuracy of 10.1 % is obtained for the lateral velocity estimates for a parabolic velocity profile for a flow perpendicular to the ultrasound beam and a signal...

  16. A new estimator for vector velocity estimation [medical ultrasonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    A new estimator for determining the two-dimensional velocity vector using a pulsed ultrasound field is derived. The estimator uses a transversely modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation...... be introduced, and the velocity estimation is done at a fixed depth in tissue to reduce the influence of a spatial velocity spread. Examples for different velocity vectors and field conditions are shown using both simple and more complex field simulations. A relative accuracy of 10.1% is obtained...

  17. Wave Velocity Estimation in Heterogeneous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Asiri, Sharefa M.; Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, modulating functions-based method is proposed for estimating space-time dependent unknown velocity in the wave equation. The proposed method simplifies the identification problem into a system of linear algebraic equations. Numerical

  18. Velocity Estimation in Medical Ultrasound [Life Sciences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Holbek, Simon

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the application of signal processing in medical ultrasound velocity estimation. Special emphasis is on the relation among acquisition methods, signal processing, and estimators employed. The description spans from current clinical systems for one-and two-dimensional (1-D an...

  19. Performance of a vector velocity estimator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1998-01-01

    tracking can be found in the literature, but no method with a satisfactory performance has been found that can be used in a commercial implementation. A method for estimation of the velocity vector is presented. Here an oscillation transverse to the ultrasound beam is generated, so that a transverse motion...... in an autocorrelation approach that yields both the axial and the lateral velocity, and thus the velocity vector. The method has the advantage that a standard array transducer and a modified digital beamformer, like those used in modern ultrasound scanners, is sufficient to obtain the information needed. The signal...

  20. A New Method for Estimation of Velocity Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Munk, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes a new method for determining the velocity vector of a remotely sensed object using either sound or electromagnetic radiation. The movement of the object is determined from a field with spatial oscillations in both the axial direction of the transducer and in one or two...... directions transverse to the axial direction. By using a number of pulse emissions, the inter-pulse movement can be estimated and the velocity found from the estimated movement and the time between pulses. The method is based on the principle of using transverse spatial modulation for making the received...

  1. Wave Velocity Estimation in Heterogeneous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Asiri, Sharefa M.

    2016-03-21

    In this paper, modulating functions-based method is proposed for estimating space-time dependent unknown velocity in the wave equation. The proposed method simplifies the identification problem into a system of linear algebraic equations. Numerical simulations on noise-free and noisy cases are provided in order to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Directional Transverse Oscillation Vector Flow Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2017-01-01

    A method for estimating vector velocities using transverse oscillation (TO) combined with directional beamforming is presented. In Directional Transverse Oscillation (DTO) a normal focused field is emitted and the received signals are beamformed in the lateral direction transverse to the ultrasound...... beam to increase the amount of data for vector velocity estimation. The approach is self-calibrating as the lateral oscillation period is estimated from the directional signal through a Fourier transform to yield quantitative velocity results over a large range of depths. The approach was extensively...... simulated using Field IIpro and implemented on the experimental SARUS scanner in connection with a BK Medical 8820e convex array transducer. Velocity estimates for DTO are found for beam-to-flow angles of 60, 75, and 90, and vessel depths from 24 to 156 mm. Using 16 emissions the Standard Deviation (SD...

  3. Estimation of sand dune thickness using a vertical velocity profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shuhail, Abdullatif A.

    2004-01-01

    Previous field and mathematical studies have shown that sand dunes may have vertical velocity profiles (i.e. continuous increase of velocity with depth). Therefore, computing the dunes thickness using conventional seismic refraction methods that assume a vertically homogeneous layer will likely produce some errors. The purpose of this study is to quantify the effect of the vertical velocity profile in a sand dune on the process of thickness estimation using seismic refraction data. First, the time distance (T-X) data of the direct wave in the dune is calculated using a vertical velocity profile, V (z), derived from Hertz-Mindlin contact theory. Then the thickness is estimated from the calculated T-X data, intercept time and velocity of the refractor at the dune's base assuming a constant velocity in the dune. The error in the estimated thickness due to the constant-velocity assumption increases with increasing thickness and decreasing porosity of the dune. For sand dunes with porosities greater than 0.2 and thickness less than 200 meter, the error is less than 15%. (author)

  4. Estimating directional epistasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rouzic, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Epistasis, i.e., the fact that gene effects depend on the genetic background, is a direct consequence of the complexity of genetic architectures. Despite this, most of the models used in evolutionary and quantitative genetics pay scant attention to genetic interactions. For instance, the traditional decomposition of genetic effects models epistasis as noise around the evolutionarily-relevant additive effects. Such an approach is only valid if it is assumed that there is no general pattern among interactions—a highly speculative scenario. Systematic interactions generate directional epistasis, which has major evolutionary consequences. In spite of its importance, directional epistasis is rarely measured or reported by quantitative geneticists, not only because its relevance is generally ignored, but also due to the lack of simple, operational, and accessible methods for its estimation. This paper describes conceptual and statistical tools that can be used to estimate directional epistasis from various kinds of data, including QTL mapping results, phenotype measurements in mutants, and artificial selection responses. As an illustration, I measured directional epistasis from a real-life example. I then discuss the interpretation of the estimates, showing how they can be used to draw meaningful biological inferences. PMID:25071828

  5. Estimation of pore pressure from seismic velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Zayra; Ojeda, German Y; Mateus, Darwin

    2009-01-01

    On pore pressure calculations it is common to obtain a profile in a well bore, which is then extrapolated toward offset wells. This practice might generate mistakes on pore pressure measurements, since geological conditions may change from a well bore to another, even into the same basin. Therefore, it is important to use other tools which allow engineers not only to detect and estimate in an indirect way overpressure zones, but also to keep a lateral tracking of possible changes that may affect those values in the different formations. Taking into account this situation, we applied a methodology that estimates formation pressure from 3D seismic velocities by using the Eaton method. First, we estimated formation pore pressure; then, we identified possible overpressure zones. Finally, those results obtained from seismic information were analyzed involving well logs and pore pressure tests, in order to compare real data with prediction based on seismic information from the Colombian foothill.

  6. In Vivo Validation of a Blood Vector Velocity Estimator with MR Angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Udesen, Jesper; Thomsen, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Conventional Doppler methods for blood velocity estimation only estimate the velocity component along the ultrasound beam direction. This implies that a Doppler angle under examination close to 90° results in unreliable information about the true blood direction and blood velocity. The novel method...... indicate that reliable vector velocity estimates can be obtained in vivo using the presented angle-independent 2-D vector velocity method. The TO method can be a useful alternative to conventional Doppler systems by avoiding the angle artifact, thus giving quantitative velocity information....

  7. In-vivo studies of new vector velocity and adaptive spectral estimators in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    2010-01-01

    New ultrasound techniques for blood flow estimation have been investigated in-vivo. These are vector velocity estimators (Transverse Oscillation, Synthetic Transmit Aperture, Directional Beamforming and Plane Wave Excitation) and adaptive spectral estimators (Blood spectral Power Capon and Blood...

  8. 3-D Velocity Estimation for Two Planes in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Ewertsen, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    3-D velocity vectors can provide additional flow information applicable for diagnosing cardiovascular diseases e.g. by estimating the out-of-plane velocity component. A 3-D version of the Transverse Oscillation (TO) method has previously been used to obtain this information in a carotid flow...... and stored on the experimental scanner SARUS. The full 3-D velocity profile can be created and examined at peak-systole and end-diastole without ECG gating in two planes. Maximum out-of-plane velocities for the three peak-systoles and end-diastoles were 68.5 5.1 cm/s and 26.3 3.3 cm/s, respectively....... In the longitudinal plane, average maximum peak velocity in flow direction was 65.2 14.0 cm/s at peak-systole and 33.6 4.3 cm/s at end-diastole. A commercial BK Medical ProFocus UltraView scanner using a spectral estimator gave 79.3 cm/s and 14.6 cm/s for the same volunteer. This demonstrates that real-time 3-D...

  9. Velocity estimation of an airplane through a single satellite image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuxin Zhao; Gongjian Wen; Bingwei Hui; Deren Li

    2012-01-01

    The motion information of a moving target can be recorded in a single image by a push-broom satellite. A push-broom satellite image is composed of many image lines sensed at different time instants. A method to estimate the velocity of a flying airplane from a single image based on the imagery model of the linear push-broom sensor is proposed. Some key points on the high-resolution image of the plane are chosen to determine the velocity (speed and direction). The performance of the method is tested and verified by experiments using a WorldView-1 image.%The motion information of a moving target can be recorded in a single image by a push-broom satellite.A push-broom satellite image is composed of many image lines sensed at different time instants.A method to estimate the velocity of a flying airplane from a single image based on the imagery model of the linear push-broom sensor is proposed.Some key points on the high-resolution image of the plane are chosen to determine the velocity (speed and direction).The performance of the method is tested and verified by experiments using a WorldView-1 image.

  10. Maximum Likelihood Blood Velocity Estimator Incorporating Properties of Flow Physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlaikjer, Malene; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2004-01-01

    )-data under investigation. The flow physic properties are exploited in the second term, as the range of velocity values investigated in the cross-correlation analysis are compared to the velocity estimates in the temporal and spatial neighborhood of the signal segment under investigation. The new estimator...... has been compared to the cross-correlation (CC) estimator and the previously developed maximum likelihood estimator (MLE). The results show that the CMLE can handle a larger velocity search range and is capable of estimating even low velocity levels from tissue motion. The CC and the MLE produce...... for the CC and the MLE. When the velocity search range is set to twice the limit of the CC and the MLE, the number of incorrect velocity estimates are 0, 19.1, and 7.2% for the CMLE, CC, and MLE, respectively. The ability to handle a larger search range and estimating low velocity levels was confirmed...

  11. Examples of in-vivo blood vector velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Nielsen, Kristian R.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper examples of in-vivo blood vector velocity images of the carotid artery are presented. The transverse oscillation (TO) method for blood vector velocity estimation has been used to estimate the vector velocities and the method is first evaluated in a circulating flowrig where...

  12. Estimation of blood velocities using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    imaging, and, finally, some of the more recent experimental techniques. The authors shows that the Doppler shift, usually considered the way velocity is detected, actually, plays a minor role in pulsed systems. Rather, it is the shift of position of signals between pulses that is used in velocity...

  13. Data adaptive estimation of transversal blood flow velocities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirnia, E.; Jakobsson, A.; Gudmundson, E.

    2014-01-01

    the transversal blood flow. In this paper, we propose a novel data-adaptive blood flow estimator exploiting this modulation scheme. Using realistic Field II simulations, the proposed estimator is shown to achieve a notable performance improvement as compared to current state-of-the-art techniques.......The examination of blood flow inside the body may yield important information about vascular anomalies, such as possible indications of, for example, stenosis. Current Medical ultrasound systems suffer from only allowing for measuring the blood flow velocity along the direction of irradiation......, posing natural difficulties due to the complex behaviour of blood flow, and due to the natural orientation of most blood vessels. Recently, a transversal modulation scheme was introduced to induce also an oscillation along the transversal direction, thereby allowing for the measurement of also...

  14. Thermal particle image velocity estimation of fire plume flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiangyang Zhou; Lulu Sun; Shankar Mahalingam; David R. Weise

    2003-01-01

    For the purpose of studying wildfire spread in living vegetation such as chaparral in California, a thermal particle image velocity (TPIV) algorithm for nonintrusively measuring flame gas velocities through thermal infrared (IR) imagery was developed. By tracing thermal particles in successive digital IR images, the TPIV algorithm can estimate the velocity field in a...

  15. Ultrasound systems for blood velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1998-01-01

    Medical ultrasound scanners can be used both for displayinggray-scale images of the anatomy and for visualizing theblood flow dynamically in the body.The systems can interrogate the flow at a single position in the bodyand there find the velocity distribution over time. They can also show adynamic...

  16. Variational multi-valued velocity field estimation for transparent sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramírez-Manzanares, Alonso; Rivera, Mariano; Kornprobst, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Motion estimation in sequences with transparencies is an important problem in robotics and medical imaging applications. In this work we propose a variational approach for estimating multi-valued velocity fields in transparent sequences. Starting from existing local motion estimators, we derive...... a variational model for integrating in space and time such a local information in order to obtain a robust estimation of the multi-valued velocity field. With this approach, we can indeed estimate multi-valued velocity fields which are not necessarily piecewise constant on a layer –each layer can evolve...

  17. Estimating 2-D Vector Velocities Using Multidimensional Spectrum Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Niels; Løvstakken, Lasse; Torp, Hans

    2008-01-01

    new velocity estimators for finding both the axial and lateral velocity components. The estimators essentially search for the plane in the 3-D Fourier space, where the integrated power spectrum is largest. The first uses the 3-D Fourier transform to find the power spectrum, while the second uses...

  18. Determination of velocity vector angles using the directional cross-correlation method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2005-01-01

    and then select the angle with the highest normalized correlation between directional signals. The approach is investigated using Field II simulations and data from the experimental ultrasound scanner RASMUS and with a parabolic flow having a peak velocity of 0.3 m/s. A 7 MHz linear array transducer is used......A method for determining both velocity magnitude and angle in any direction is suggested. The method uses focusing along the velocity direction and cross-correlation for finding the correct velocity magnitude. The angle is found from beamforming directional signals in a number of directions......-time ) between signals to correlate, and a proper choice varies with flow angle and flow velocity. One performance example is given with a fixed value of k tprf for all flow angles. The angle estimation on measured data for flow at 60 ◦ to 90 ◦ , yields a probability of valid estimates between 68% and 98...

  19. Phased-array vector velocity estimation using transverse oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Marcher, Jønne; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-01-01

    .79 to 0.92, indicating a correlation between the performance metrics of the TO spectrum and the velocity estimates. Because these performance metrics are much more readily computed, the TO fields can be optimized faster for improved velocity estimation of both simulations and measurements. For simulations......, but with a poorer performance compared with a 128-element transducer. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the TO method is suitable for use in conjunction with a phased-array transducer, and that 2-D vector velocity estimation is possible down to a depth of 15 cm....

  20. Using IR Imaging of Water Surfaces for Estimating Piston Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gålfalk, M.; Bastviken, D.; Arneborg, L.

    2013-12-01

    The transport of gasses dissolved in surface waters across the water-atmosphere interface is controlled by the piston velocity (k). This coefficient has large implications for, e.g., greenhouse gas fluxes but is challenging to quantify in situ. At present, empirical k-wind speed relationships from a small number of studies and systems are often extrapolated without knowledge of model performance. It is therefore of interest to search for new methods for estimating k, and to compare the pros and cons of existing and new methods. Wind speeds in such models are often measured at a height of 10 meters. In smaller bodies of water such as lakes, wind speeds can vary dramatically across the surface through varying degrees of wind shadow from e.g. trees at the shoreline. More local measurements of the water surface, through wave heights or surface motion mapping, could give improved k-estimates over a surface, also taking into account wind fetch. At thermal infrared (IR) wavelengths water has very low reflectivity (depending on viewing angle) than can go below 1%, meaning that more than 99% is heat radiation giving a direct measurement of surface temperature variations. Using an IR camera at about 100 frames/s one could map surface temperature structures at a fraction of a mm depth even with waves present. In this presentation I will focus on IR imaging as a possible tool for estimating piston velocities. Results will be presented from IR field measurements, relating the motions of surface temperature structures to k calculated from other simultaneous measurements (flux chamber and ADV-Based Dissipation Rate), but also attempting to calculate k directly from the IR surface divergence. A relation between wave height and k will also be presented.

  1. Preliminary evaluation of vector flow and spectral velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Haugaard, Per

    Spectral estimation is considered as the golden standard in ultrasound velocity estimation. For spectral velocity estimation the blood flow angle is set by the ultrasound operator. Vector flow provides temporal and spatial estimates of the blood flow angle and velocity. A comparison of vector flow...... line covering the vessel diameter. A commercial ultrasound scanner (ProFocus 2202, BK Medical, Denmark) and a 7.6 MHz linear transducer was used (8670, BK Medical). The mean vector blood flow angle estimations were calculated {52(18);55(23);60(16)}°. For comparison the fixed angles for spectral...... estimation were obtained {52;56;52}°. The mean vector velocity estimates at PS {76(15);95(17);77(16)}cm/s and at end diastole (ED) {17(6);18(6);24(6)}cm/s were calculated. For comparison spectral velocity estimates at PS {77;110;76}cm/s and ED {18;18;20}cm/s were obtained. The mean vector angle estimates...

  2. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  3. A novel velocity estimator using multiple frequency carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhuo; Jakobsson, Andreas; Nikolov, Svetoslav

    2004-01-01

    . In this paper, we propose a nonlinear least squares (NLS) estimator. Typically, NLS estimators are computationally cumbersome, in general requiring the minimization of a multidimensional and often multimodal cost function. Here, by noting that the unknown velocity will result in a common known frequency......Most modern ultrasound scanners use the so-called pulsed-wave Doppler technique to estimate the blood velocities. Among the narrowband-based methods, the autocorrelation estimator and the Fourier-based method are the most commonly used approaches. Due to the low level of the blood echo, the signal......-to-noise ratio is low, and some averaging in depth is applied to improve the estimate. Further, due to velocity gradients in space and time, the spectrum may get smeared. An alternative approach is to use a pulse with multiple frequency carriers, and do some form of averaging in the frequency domain. However...

  4. Velocity Estimation of the Main Portal Vein with Transverse Oscillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Andreas Hjelm; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates if Transverse Oscillation (TO) can provide reliable and accurate peak velocity estimates of blood flow the main portal vein. TO was evaluated against the recommended and most widely used technique for portal flow estimation, Spectral Doppler Ultrasound (SDU). The main portal...

  5. Blood velocity estimation using ultrasound and spectral iterative adaptive approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundson, Erik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    -mode images are interleaved with the Doppler emissions. Furthermore, the techniques are shown, using both simplified and more realistic Field II simulations as well as in vivo data, to outperform current state-of-the-art techniques, allowing for accurate estimation of the blood velocity spectrum using only 30......This paper proposes two novel iterative data-adaptive spectral estimation techniques for blood velocity estimation using medical ultrasound scanners. The techniques make no assumption on the sampling pattern of the emissions or the depth samples, allowing for duplex mode transmissions where B...

  6. Isotropic Optical Mouse Placement for Mobile Robot Velocity Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungbok Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the isotropic placement of multiple optical mice for the velocity estimation of a mobile robot. It is assumed that there can be positional restriction on the installation of optical mice at the bottom of a mobile robot. First, the velocity kinematics of a mobile robot with an array of optical mice is obtained and the resulting Jacobian matrix is analysed symbolically. Second, the isotropic, anisotropic and singular optical mouse placements are identified, along with the corresponding characteristic lengths. Third, the least squares mobile robot velocity estimation from the noisy optical mouse velocity measurements is discussed. Finally, simulation results for several different placements of three optical mice are given.

  7. Radar velocity determination using direction of arrival measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Bickel, Douglas L.; Naething, Richard M.; Horndt, Volker

    2017-12-19

    The various technologies presented herein relate to utilizing direction of arrival (DOA) data to determine various flight parameters for an aircraft A plurality of radar images (e.g., SAR images) can be analyzed to identify a plurality of pixels in the radar images relating to one or more ground targets. In an embodiment, the plurality of pixels can be selected based upon the pixels exceeding a SNR threshold. The DOA data in conjunction with a measurable Doppler frequency for each pixel can be obtained. Multi-aperture technology enables derivation of an independent measure of DOA to each pixel based on interferometric analysis. This independent measure of DOA enables decoupling of the aircraft velocity from the DOA in a range-Doppler map, thereby enabling determination of a radar velocity. The determined aircraft velocity can be utilized to update an onboard INS, and to keep it aligned, without the need for additional velocity-measuring instrumentation.

  8. Iterative reflectivity-constrained velocity estimation for seismic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaya, Shogo; Verschuur, D. J. Eric

    2018-03-01

    This paper proposes a reflectivity constraint for velocity estimation to optimally solve the inverse problem for active seismic imaging. This constraint is based on the velocity model derived from the definition of reflectivity and acoustic impedance. The constraint does not require any prior information of the subsurface and large extra computational costs, like the calculation of so-called Hessian matrices. We incorporate this constraint into the Joint Migration Inversion algorithm, which simultaneously estimates both the reflectivity and velocity model of the subsurface in an iterative process. Using so-called full wavefield modeling, the misfit between forward modeled and measured data is minimized. Numerical and field data examples are given to demonstrate the validity of our proposed algorithm in case accurate initial models and the low frequency components of observed seismic data are absent.

  9. Estimating Velocities of Glaciers Using Sentinel-1 SAR Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gens, R.; Arnoult, K., Jr.; Friedl, P.; Vijay, S.; Braun, M.; Meyer, F. J.; Gracheva, V.; Hogenson, K.

    2017-12-01

    In an international collaborative effort, software has been developed to estimate the velocities of glaciers by using Sentinel-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery. The technique, initially designed by the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (FAU), has been previously used to quantify spatial and temporal variabilities in the velocities of surging glaciers in the Pakistan Karakoram. The software estimates surface velocities by first co-registering image pairs to sub-pixel precision and then by estimating local offsets based on cross-correlation. The Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) has modified the software to make it more robust and also capable of migration into the Amazon Cloud. Additionally, ASF has implemented a prototype that offers the glacier tracking processing flow as a subscription service as part of its Hybrid Pluggable Processing Pipeline (HyP3). Since the software is co-located with ASF's cloud-based Sentinel-1 archive, processing of large data volumes is now more efficient and cost effective. Velocity maps are estimated for Single Look Complex (SLC) SAR image pairs and a digital elevation model (DEM) of the local topography. A time series of these velocity maps then allows the long-term monitoring of these glaciers. Due to the all-weather capabilities and the dense coverage of Sentinel-1 data, the results are complementary to optically generated ones. Together with the products from the Global Land Ice Velocity Extraction project (GoLIVE) derived from Landsat 8 data, glacier speeds can be monitored more comprehensively. Examples from Sentinel-1 SAR-derived results are presented along with optical results for the same glaciers.

  10. An Iterative Adaptive Approach for Blood Velocity Estimation Using Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundson, Erik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel iterative data-adaptive spectral estimation technique for blood velocity estimation using medical ultrasound scanners. The technique makes no assumption on the sampling pattern of the slow-time or the fast-time samples, allowing for duplex mode transmissions where B......-mode images are interleaved with the Doppler emissions. Furthermore, the technique is shown, using both simplified and more realistic Field II simulations, to outperform current state-of-the-art techniques, allowing for accurate estimation of the blood velocity spectrum using only 30% of the transmissions......, thereby allowing for the examination of two separate vessel regions while retaining an adequate updating rate of the B-mode images. In addition, the proposed method also allows for more flexible transmission patterns, as well as exhibits fewer spectral artifacts as compared to earlier techniques....

  11. Spectral velocity estimation using autocorrelation functions for sparse data sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of velocities of blood or tissue is displayed using ultrasound scanners by finding the power spectrum of the received signal. This is currently done by making a Fourier transform of the received signal and then showing spectra in an M-mode display. It is desired to show a B......-mode image for orientation, and data for this has to acquired interleaved with the flow data. The power spectrum can be calculated from the Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function Ry (k), where its span of lags k is given by the number of emission N in the data segment for velocity estimation...

  12. Discharge estimation combining flow routing and occasional measurements of velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Corato

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure is proposed for estimating river discharge hydrographs during flood events, using only water level data at a single gauged site, as well as 1-D shallow water modelling and occasional maximum surface flow velocity measurements. One-dimensional diffusive hydraulic model is used for routing the recorded stage hydrograph in the channel reach considering zero-diffusion downstream boundary condition. Based on synthetic tests concerning a broad prismatic channel, the "suitable" reach length is chosen in order to minimize the effect of the approximated downstream boundary condition on the estimation of the upstream discharge hydrograph. The Manning's roughness coefficient is calibrated by using occasional instantaneous surface velocity measurements during the rising limb of flood that are used to estimate instantaneous discharges by adopting, in the flow area, a two-dimensional velocity distribution model. Several historical events recorded in three gauged sites along the upper Tiber River, wherein reliable rating curves are available, have been used for the validation. The outcomes of the analysis can be summarized as follows: (1 the criterion adopted for selecting the "suitable" channel length based on synthetic test studies has proved to be reliable for field applications to three gauged sites. Indeed, for each event a downstream reach length not more than 500 m is found to be sufficient, for a good performances of the hydraulic model, thereby enabling the drastic reduction of river cross-sections data; (2 the procedure for Manning's roughness coefficient calibration allowed for high performance in discharge estimation just considering the observed water levels and occasional measurements of maximum surface flow velocity during the rising limb of flood. Indeed, errors in the peak discharge magnitude, for the optimal calibration, were found not exceeding 5% for all events observed in the three investigated gauged sections, while the

  13. Optimized velocity distributions for direct dark matter detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibarra, Alejandro; Rappelt, Andreas, E-mail: ibarra@tum.de, E-mail: andreas.rappelt@tum.de [Physik-Department T30d, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2017-08-01

    We present a method to calculate, without making assumptions about the local dark matter velocity distribution, the maximal and minimal number of signal events in a direct detection experiment given a set of constraints from other direct detection experiments and/or neutrino telescopes. The method also allows to determine the velocity distribution that optimizes the signal rates. We illustrate our method with three concrete applications: i) to derive a halo-independent upper limit on the cross section from a set of null results, ii) to confront in a halo-independent way a detection claim to a set of null results and iii) to assess, in a halo-independent manner, the prospects for detection in a future experiment given a set of current null results.

  14. Experimental estimation of fluctuating velocity and scalar gradients in turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hearst, R.J.; Lavoie, P. [University of Toronto, Institute for Aerospace Studies, Toronto, ON (Canada); Buxton, O.R.H. [The University of Texas at Austin, Center for Aeromechanics Research, Austin, TX (United States); Ganapathisubramani, B. [University of Southampton, Aerodynamics and Flight Mechanics Research Group, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15

    The effect of numerical differentiation is investigated in the context of evaluating fluctuating velocity and scalar quantities in turbulent flows. In particular, 2-point forward-difference and 3-, 5-, 7-, and 9-point centred-difference schemes are investigated. The spectral technique introduced by Wyngaard (in J Sci Instr 1(2):1105-1108, 1968) for homogeneous turbulence is used to quantify the effects of the schemes. Numerical differentiation is shown to attenuate gradient spectra over a range of wavenumbers. The spectral attenuation, which varies with the order of the scheme, results in a reduction in the measured mean-squared gradients. High-order schemes (e.g. 7- or 9-point) are shown to significantly decrease the attenuation at all wavenumbers and as a result produce more accurate gradients. Hot-wire measurements and direct numerical simulations of decaying homogeneous, isotropic turbulence are found to be in good agreement with the predictions of the analysis, which suggests that high-order schemes can be used to improve empirical gradient estimates. The shape of the probability density functions is also found to be sensitive to the choice of numerical differentiation scheme. The effect of numerical differentiation is also discussed with respect to particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of a nominally two-dimensional planar mixing layer. It is found that the relatively low signal-to-noise ratio inherent in typical PIV measurements necessitates the use of low-order schemes to prevent excessive noise amplification, which increases with the order of the scheme. The results of the present work demonstrate that high-order numerical differentiation schemes can be employed to more accurately resolve gradients measured at a given resolution provided the measurements have an adequate signal-to-noise ratio. (orig.)

  15. Estimation of spatial uncertainties of tomographic velocity models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, M.; Du, Z.; Querendez, E. [SINTEF Petroleum Research, Trondheim (Norway)

    2012-12-15

    This research project aims to evaluate the possibility of assessing the spatial uncertainties in tomographic velocity model building in a quantitative way. The project is intended to serve as a test of whether accurate and specific uncertainty estimates (e.g., in meters) can be obtained. The project is based on Monte Carlo-type perturbations of the velocity model as obtained from the tomographic inversion guided by diagonal and off-diagonal elements of the resolution and the covariance matrices. The implementation and testing of this method was based on the SINTEF in-house stereotomography code, using small synthetic 2D data sets. To test the method the calculation and output of the covariance and resolution matrices was implemented, and software to perform the error estimation was created. The work included the creation of 2D synthetic data sets, the implementation and testing of the software to conduct the tests (output of the covariance and resolution matrices which are not implicitly provided by stereotomography), application to synthetic data sets, analysis of the test results, and creating the final report. The results show that this method can be used to estimate the spatial errors in tomographic images quantitatively. The results agree with' the known errors for our synthetic models. However, the method can only be applied to structures in the model, where the change of seismic velocity is larger than the predicted error of the velocity parameter amplitudes. In addition, the analysis is dependent on the tomographic method, e.g., regularization and parameterization. The conducted tests were very successful and we believe that this method could be developed further to be applied to third party tomographic images.

  16. Influence of Flow Velocity on Tsunami Loss Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Song

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Inundation depth is commonly used as an intensity measure in tsunami fragility analysis. However, inundation depth cannot be taken as the sole representation of tsunami impact on structures, especially when structural damage is caused by hydrodynamic and debris impact forces that are mainly determined by flow velocity. To reflect the influence of flow velocity in addition to inundation depth in tsunami risk assessment, a tsunami loss estimation method that adopts both inundation depth and flow velocity (i.e., bivariate intensity measures in evaluating tsunami damage is developed. To consider a wide range of possible tsunami inundation scenarios, Monte Carlo-based tsunami simulations are performed using stochastic earthquake slip distributions derived from a spectral synthesis method and probabilistic scaling relationships of earthquake source parameters. By focusing on Sendai (plain coast and Onagawa (ria coast in the Miyagi Prefecture of Japan in a case study, the stochastic tsunami loss is evaluated by total economic loss and its spatial distribution at different scales. The results indicate that tsunami loss prediction is highly sensitive to modelling resolution and inclusion of flow velocity for buildings located less than 1 km from the sea for Sendai and Onagawa of Miyagi Prefecture.

  17. Dark matter direct detection with non-Maxwellian velocity structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhlen, Michael; Weiner, Neal; Diemand, Jürg; Moore, Ben; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim; Madau, Piero; Zemp, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    The velocity distribution function of dark matter particles is expected to show significant departures from a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. This can have profound effects on the predicted dark matter - nucleon scattering rates in direct detection experiments, especially for dark matter models in which the scattering is sensitive to the high velocity tail of the distribution, such as inelastic dark matter (iDM) or light (few GeV) dark matter (LDM), and for experiments that require high energy recoil events, such as many directionally sensitive experiments. Here we determine the velocity distribution functions from two of the highest resolution numerical simulations of Galactic dark matter structure (Via Lactea II and GHALO), and study the effects for these scenarios. For directional detection, we find that the observed departures from Maxwell-Boltzmann increase the contrast of the signal and change the typical direction of incoming DM particles. For iDM, the expected signals at direct detection experiments are changed dramatically: the annual modulation can be enhanced by more than a factor two, and the relative rates of DAMA compared to CDMS can change by an order of magnitude, while those compared to CRESST can change by a factor of two. The spectrum of the signal can also change dramatically, with many features arising due to substructure. For LDM the spectral effects are smaller, but changes do arise that improve the compatibility with existing experiments. We find that the phase of the modulation can depend upon energy, which would help discriminate against background should it be found

  18. Velocity vector estimation in synthetic aperture flow and B-mode imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2004-01-01

    A method for determining both velocity magnitude and angle in a synthetic aperture ultrasound system is described. The approach uses directional beamforming along the flow direction and cross-correlation to determine velocity magnitude. The angle of the flow is determined from the maximum normali...... with a precision of 0.36 % (60°) and 1.2 % (90°), respectively. The 60° angle is estimated with a bias of 0.54° and a standard deviation of 2.1°. For 90° the bias is 0.0003° and standard deviation 1.32°....

  19. Direct measurement technique for shock wave velocity with irradiation drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Feng; Peng Xiaoshi; Liu Shenye; Jiang Xiaohua; Ding Yongkun

    2011-01-01

    According to the ionization mechanism of transparent material under super high pressure, the direct diagnosis method of shock wave has been analyzed. With the Drude free electron model, the reflectivity difference of shock wave front under different pressures was analyzed. The blank effect in the detector was studied, which is caused by the X-ray ionization of transparent material, after analyzing the reflectivity data in space-time scale. The experiment shows that the beginning point and duration of blank effect are consistent with the start point and duration of laser pulse, respectively. And the reflectivity of shock wave front is about 35% when the shock velocity is 32 km/s. The reason and solution for blank effect was presented. The formula to calculate the shock wave velocity in transparent material was also deduced and verified. (authors)

  20. Estimation of directional wave spreading

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mandal, S.; Bhat, S.S.; Anand, N.M.; Nayak, B.U.

    Directional properties of ocean waves are of great economic interest. The knowledge of wave directionality is important for the design of maritime structures and offshore operations. Two main aspects are considered for this study for the data...

  1. Estimation of wave directional spreading

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Deo, M.C.; Gondane, D.S.; SanilKumar, V.

    One of the useful measures of waves directional spreading at a given location is the directional spreading parameter. This paper presents a new approach to arrive at its characteristic value using the computational technique of Artificial Neural...

  2. Slip Ratio Estimation and Regenerative Brake Control for Decelerating Electric Vehicles without Detection of Vehicle Velocity and Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Toru; Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    In slip ratio control systems, it is necessary to detect the vehicle velocity in order to obtain the slip ratio. However, it is very difficult to measure this velocity directly. We have proposed slip ratio estimation and control methods that do not require the vehicle velocity with acceleration. In this paper, the slip ratio estimation and control methods are proposed without detecting the vehicle velocity and acceleration when it is decelerating. We carried out simulations and experiments by using an electric vehicle to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. In-vivo studies of new vector velocity and adaptive spectral estimators in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    In this PhD project new ultrasound techniques for blood flow measurements have been investigated in-vivo. The focus has mainly been on vector velocity techniques and four different approaches have been examined: Transverse Oscillation, Synthetic Transmit Aperture, Directional Beamforming and Plane...... in conventional Doppler ultrasound. That is angle dependency, reduced temporal resolution and low frame rate. Transverse Oscillation, Synthetic Transmit Aperture and Directional Beamforming can estimate the blood velocity angle independently. The three methods were validated in-vivo against magnetic resonance...... phase contrast angiography when measuring stroke volumes in simple vessel geometry on 11 volunteers. Using linear regression and Bland-Altman analyses good agreements were found, indicating that vector velocity methods can be used for quantitative blood flow measurements. Plane Wave Excitation can...

  4. 2-D blood vector velocity estimation using a phase shift estimator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper

    are presented. Here the TO method is tested both in simulations using the Field II program and in flow phantom experiments using the RASMUS scanner. Both simulations and flow phantom experiments indicate that the TO method can estimate the 2-D vector velocity with an acceptable low bias and standard deviation...... velocity estimation is discussed. The TO method is introduced, and the basic theory behind the method is explained. This includes the creation of the acoustic fields, beamforming, echo-canceling and the velocity estimator. In the second part of the thesis the eight papers produced during this PhD project...... when the angle between the blood and the ultrasound beam is above $50^\\circ$. Furthermore, the TO method is tested in-vivo where the scannings are performed by skilled sonographers. The in-vivo scannings resulted in a sequence of 2-D vector CFM images which showed 2-D flow patterns in the bifurcation...

  5. Accounting for multiple climate components when estimating climate change exposure and velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Christopher P.; Fuller, Angela K.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of anthropogenic climate change on organisms will likely be related to climate change exposure and velocity at local and regional scales. However, common methods to estimate climate change exposure and velocity ignore important components of climate that are known to affect the ecology and evolution of organisms.We develop a novel index of climate change (climate overlap) that simultaneously estimates changes in the means, variation and correlation between multiple weather variables. Specifically, we estimate the overlap between multivariate normal probability distributions representing historical and current or projected future climates. We provide methods for estimating the statistical significance of climate overlap values and methods to estimate velocity using climate overlap.We show that climates have changed significantly across 80% of the continental United States in the last 32 years and that much of this change is due to changes in the variation and correlation between weather variables (two statistics that are rarely incorporated into climate change studies). We also show that projected future temperatures are predicted to be locally novel (using climate overlap compared to 1·4 km yr−1 when estimated using traditional methods.Our results suggest that accounting for changes in the means, variation and correlation between multiple weather variables can dramatically affect estimates of climate change exposure and velocity. These climate components are known to affect the ecology and evolution of organisms, but are ignored by most measures of climate change. We conclude with a set of future directions and recommend future work to determine which measures of climate change exposure and velocity are most related to biological responses to climate change.

  6. Multi-dimensional spectrum analysis for 2-D vector velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Niels; Løvstakken, Lasse; Torp, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Fourier space, which is found through the 3-D Fourier transform of the data matrix, and that the plane is tilted according to the axial and lateral velocity components. Two estimators are derived for finding the plane in the 3-D Fourier space, where the integrated power spectrum is largest. The first uses...... the 3-D Fourier transform to find the power spectrum, while the second uses a minimum variance approach. Based on this plane, the axial and lateral velocity components are estimated. A number of phantom How measurements, for flow-to-beam angles of 60, 75, and 90 degrees, were performed to test...... the estimator. The data were collected using our RASMUS experimental ultrasound scanner and a 128 element commercial linear array transducer. The receive apodization function was manipulated, creating an oscillation in the lateral direction, and multiple parallel lines were beamformed simultaneously. The two...

  7. Direct Investigation of Velocity Overshoot in the Femtosecond Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-25

    by block nuinber) The experiental study ofsubpicsecond transport in GaAs and other semionductors is of fundmental inPortanoe for the understanding of...velocities, hence in principle this measurement can yield information about velocity 5 overshoot phenomenon. An electric field will modify photon absorption in...3.1.2 are the best fit of the theory assuming a constant electron velocity. The constant-velocity model cannot account for the data at 14 and 22kV/cm

  8. Velocity Segregation and Systematic Biases In Velocity Dispersion Estimates with the SPT-GMOS Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Matthew. B.; Zengo, Kyle; Ruel, Jonathan; Benson, Bradford A.; Bleem, Lindsey E.; Bocquet, Sebastian; Bulbul, Esra; Brodwin, Mark; Capasso, Raffaella; Chiu, I.-non; McDonald, Michael; Rapetti, David; Saro, Alex; Stalder, Brian; Stark, Antony A.; Strazzullo, Veronica; Stubbs, Christopher W.; Zenteno, Alfredo

    2017-03-01

    The velocity distribution of galaxies in clusters is not universal; rather, galaxies are segregated according to their spectral type and relative luminosity. We examine the velocity distributions of different populations of galaxies within 89 Sunyaev Zel’dovich (SZ) selected galaxy clusters spanning 0.28GMOS spectroscopic survey, supplemented by additional published spectroscopy, resulting in a final spectroscopic sample of 4148 galaxy spectra—2868 cluster members. The velocity dispersion of star-forming cluster galaxies is 17 ± 4% greater than that of passive cluster galaxies, and the velocity dispersion of bright (m< {m}* -0.5) cluster galaxies is 11 ± 4% lower than the velocity dispersion of our total member population. We find good agreement with simulations regarding the shape of the relationship between the measured velocity dispersion and the fraction of passive versus star-forming galaxies used to measure it, but we find a small offset between this relationship as measured in data and simulations, which suggests that our dispersions are systematically low by as much as 3% relative to simulations. We argue that this offset could be interpreted as a measurement of the effective velocity bias that describes the ratio of our observed velocity dispersions and the intrinsic velocity dispersion of dark matter particles in a published simulation result. Measuring velocity bias in this way suggests that large spectroscopic surveys can improve dispersion-based mass-observable scaling relations for cosmology even in the face of velocity biases, by quantifying and ultimately calibrating them out.

  9. Explosive Yield Estimation using Fourier Amplitude Spectra of Velocity Histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steedman, D. W.; Bradley, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is a series of explosive shots of various size detonated at varying depths in a borehole in jointed granite. The testbed includes an extensive array of accelerometers for measuring the shock environment close-in to the explosive source. One goal of SPE is to develop greater understanding of the explosion phenomenology in all regimes: from near-source, non-linear response to the far-field linear elastic region, and connecting the analyses from the respective regimes. For example, near-field analysis typically involves review of kinematic response (i.e., acceleration, velocity and displacement) in the time domain and looks at various indicators (e.g., peaks, pulse duration) to facilitate comparison among events. Review of far-field data more often is based on study of response in the frequency domain to facilitate comparison of event magnitudes. To try to "bridge the gap" between approaches, we have developed a scaling law for Fourier amplitude spectra of near-field velocity histories that successfully collapses data from a wide range of yields (100 kg to 5000 kg) and range to sensors in jointed granite. Moreover, we show that we can apply this scaling law to data from a new event to accurately estimate the explosive yield of that event. This approach presents a new way of working with near-field data that will be more compatible with traditional methods of analysis of seismic data and should serve to facilitate end-to-end event analysis. The goal is that this new approach to data analysis will eventually result in improved methods for discrimination of event type (i.e., nuclear or chemical explosion, or earthquake) and magnitude.

  10. Conditional random slope: A new approach for estimating individual child growth velocity in epidemiological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Michael; Bassani, Diego G; Racine-Poon, Amy; Goldenberg, Anna; Ali, Syed Asad; Kang, Gagandeep; Premkumar, Prasanna S; Roth, Daniel E

    2017-09-10

    Conditioning child growth measures on baseline accounts for regression to the mean (RTM). Here, we present the "conditional random slope" (CRS) model, based on a linear-mixed effects model that incorporates a baseline-time interaction term that can accommodate multiple data points for a child while also directly accounting for RTM. In two birth cohorts, we applied five approaches to estimate child growth velocities from 0 to 12 months to assess the effect of increasing data density (number of measures per child) on the magnitude of RTM of unconditional estimates, and the correlation and concordance between the CRS and four alternative metrics. Further, we demonstrated the differential effect of the choice of velocity metric on the magnitude of the association between infant growth and stunting at 2 years. RTM was minimally attenuated by increasing data density for unconditional growth modeling approaches. CRS and classical conditional models gave nearly identical estimates with two measures per child. Compared to the CRS estimates, unconditional metrics had moderate correlation (r = 0.65-0.91), but poor agreement in the classification of infants with relatively slow growth (kappa = 0.38-0.78). Estimates of the velocity-stunting association were the same for CRS and classical conditional models but differed substantially between conditional versus unconditional metrics. The CRS can leverage the flexibility of linear mixed models while addressing RTM in longitudinal analyses. © 2017 The Authors American Journal of Human Biology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Estimation of 3-D conduction velocity vector fields from cardiac mapping data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnette, A R; Bayly, P V; Zhang, S; Walcott, G P; Ideker, R E; Smith, W M

    2000-08-01

    A method to estimate three-dimensional (3-D) conduction velocity vector fields in cardiac tissue is presented. The speed and direction of propagation are found from polynomial "surfaces" fitted to space-time (x, y, z, t) coordinates of cardiac activity. The technique is applied to sinus rhythm and paced rhythm mapped with plunge needles at 396-466 sites in the canine myocardium. The method was validated on simulated 3-D plane and spherical waves. For simulated data, conduction velocities were estimated with an accuracy of 1%-2%. In experimental data, estimates of conduction speeds during paced rhythm were slower than those found during normal sinus rhythm. Vector directions were also found to differ between different types of beats. The technique was able to distinguish between premature ventricular contractions and sinus beats and between sinus and paced beats. The proposed approach to computing velocity vector fields provides an automated, physiological, and quantitative description of local electrical activity in 3-D tissue. This method may provide insight into abnormal conduction associated with fatal ventricular arrhythmias.

  12. Estimation of Cumulative Absolute Velocity using Empirical Green's Function Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dong Hee; Yun, Kwan Hee; Chang, Chun Joong; Park, Se Moon

    2009-01-01

    In recognition of the needs to develop a new criterion for determining when the OBE (Operating Basis Earthquake) has been exceeded at nuclear power plants, Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV) was introduced by EPRI. The concept of CAV is the area accumulation with the values more than 0.025g occurred during every one second. The equation of the CAV is as follows. CAV = ∫ 0 max |a(t)|dt (1) t max = duration of record, a(t) = acceleration (>0.025g) Currently, the OBE exceedance criteria in Korea is Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA, PGA>0.1g). When Odesan earthquake (M L =4.8, January 20th, 2007) and Gyeongju earthquake (M L =3.4, June 2nd, 1999) were occurred, we have had already experiences of PGA greater than 0.1g that did not even cause any damage to the poorly-designed structures nearby. This moderate earthquake has motivated Korea to begin the use of the CAV for OBE exceedance criteria for NPPs. Because the present OBE level has proved itself to be a poor indicator for small-to-moderate earthquakes, for which the low OBE level can cause an inappropriate shut down the plant. A more serious possibility is that this scenario will become a reality at a very high level. Empirical Green's Function method was a simulation technique which can estimate the CAV value and it is hereby introduced

  13. Significance of relative velocity in drag force or drag power estimation for a tethered float

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; Sastry, J.S.

    There is difference in opinion regarding the use of relative velocity instead of particle velocity alone in the estimation of drag force or power. In the present study, a tethered spherical float which undergoes oscillatory motion in regular waves...

  14. Viscosity estimation utilizing flow velocity field measurements in a rotating magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    2008-01-01

    The importance of viscosity in determining plasma flow structures has been widely recognized. In laboratory plasmas, however, viscosity measurements have been seldom performed so far. In this paper we present and discuss an estimation method of effective plasma kinematic viscosity utilizing flow velocity field measurements. Imposing steady and axisymmetric conditions, we derive the expression for radial flow velocity from the azimuthal component of the ion fluid equation. The expression contains kinematic viscosity, vorticity of azimuthal rotation and its derivative, collision frequency, azimuthal flow velocity and ion cyclotron frequency. Therefore all quantities except the viscosity are given provided that the flow field can be measured. We applied this method to a rotating magnetized argon plasma produced by the Hyper-I device. The flow velocity field measurements were carried out using a directional Langmuir probe installed in a tilting motor drive unit. The inward ion flow in radial direction, which is not driven in collisionless inviscid plasmas, was clearly observed. As a result, we found the anomalous viscosity, the value of which is two orders of magnitude larger than the classical one. (author)

  15. Estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has similar predictive value as measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Sara V; Blicher, Marie K; Kruger, Ruan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) adds significantly to traditional cardiovascular risk prediction, but is not widely available. Therefore, it would be helpful if cfPWV could be replaced by an estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV) using age and mean blood pres...... that these traditional risk scores have underestimated the complicated impact of age and blood pressure on arterial stiffness and cardiovascular risk....

  16. DeepVel: Deep learning for the estimation of horizontal velocities at the solar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio Ramos, A.; Requerey, I. S.; Vitas, N.

    2017-07-01

    Many phenomena taking place in the solar photosphere are controlled by plasma motions. Although the line-of-sight component of the velocity can be estimated using the Doppler effect, we do not have direct spectroscopic access to the components that are perpendicular to the line of sight. These components are typically estimated using methods based on local correlation tracking. We have designed DeepVel, an end-to-end deep neural network that produces an estimation of the velocity at every single pixel, every time step, and at three different heights in the atmosphere from just two consecutive continuum images. We confront DeepVel with local correlation tracking, pointing out that they give very similar results in the time and spatially averaged cases. We use the network to study the evolution in height of the horizontal velocity field in fragmenting granules, supporting the buoyancy-braking mechanism for the formation of integranular lanes in these granules. We also show that DeepVel can capture very small vortices, so that we can potentially expand the scaling cascade of vortices to very small sizes and durations. The movie attached to Fig. 3 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Comparison of thermal, salt and dye tracing to estimate shallow flow velocities: Novel triple-tracer approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrantes, João R. C. B.; Moruzzi, Rodrigo B.; Silveira, Alexandre; de Lima, João L. M. P.

    2018-02-01

    The accurate measurement of shallow flow velocities is crucial to understand and model the dynamics of sediment and pollutant transport by overland flow. In this study, a novel triple-tracer approach was used to re-evaluate and compare the traditional and well established dye and salt tracer techniques with the more recent thermal tracer technique in estimating shallow flow velocities. For this purpose a triple tracer (i.e. dyed-salted-heated water) was used. Optical and infrared video cameras and an electrical conductivity sensor were used to detect the tracers in the flow. Leading edge and centroid velocities of the tracers were measured and the correction factors used to determine the actual mean flow velocities from tracer measured velocities were compared and investigated. Experiments were carried out for different flow discharges (32-1813 ml s-1) on smooth acrylic, sand, stones and synthetic grass bed surfaces with 0.8, 4.4 and 13.2% slopes. The results showed that thermal tracers can be used to estimate shallow flow velocities, since the three techniques yielded very similar results without significant differences between them. The main advantages of the thermal tracer were that the movement of the tracer along the measuring section was more easily visible than it was in the real image videos and that it was possible to measure space-averaged flow velocities instead of only one velocity value, with the salt tracer. The correction factors used to determine the actual mean velocity of overland flow varied directly with Reynolds and Froude numbers, flow velocity and slope and inversely with flow depth and bed roughness. In shallow flows, velocity estimation using tracers entails considerable uncertainty and caution must be taken with these measurements, especially in field studies where these variables vary appreciably in space and time.

  18. Transverse Oscillation Vector Velocity Estimation using a Phased Array Transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcher, Jønne; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Seerup, Gert

    2012-01-01

    greater than 100 mm. Tests at depths of 72 mm and 82 mm with a peak velocity of 0.5 m/s, showed a relative mean bias ~Bvx that varied from 0 % and to 21 % and a relative mean standard deviation ~vx that varied from 18 % and to 51 %. The investigation showed an increasing bias with respect to depth, which...

  19. Flocculation and Settling Velocity Estimates for Reservoir Sedimentation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    viscosity ). Stokes’ law is commonly used to describe settling velocity of a single particle and is applicable when the particle Reynolds number (Rep...fluid viscosity , and ν is kinematic viscosity . Several researchers recognize that large, fast-settling particles disobey the laminar boundary...interparticle attraction caused by electrostatic and physiochemical forces. These properties give clays their stickiness and control essential

  20. Estimating front-wave velocity of infectious diseases: a simple, efficient method applied to bluetongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioz, Maryline; Guis, Hélène; Calavas, Didier; Durand, Benoît; Abrial, David; Ducrot, Christian

    2011-04-20

    Understanding the spatial dynamics of an infectious disease is critical when attempting to predict where and how fast the disease will spread. We illustrate an approach using a trend-surface analysis (TSA) model combined with a spatial error simultaneous autoregressive model (SAR(err) model) to estimate the speed of diffusion of bluetongue (BT), an infectious disease of ruminants caused by bluetongue virus (BTV) and transmitted by Culicoides. In a first step to gain further insight into the spatial transmission characteristics of BTV serotype 8, we used 2007-2008 clinical case reports in France and TSA modelling to identify the major directions and speed of disease diffusion. We accounted for spatial autocorrelation by combining TSA with a SAR(err) model, which led to a trend SAR(err) model. Overall, BT spread from north-eastern to south-western France. The average trend SAR(err)-estimated velocity across the country was 5.6 km/day. However, velocities differed between areas and time periods, varying between 2.1 and 9.3 km/day. For more than 83% of the contaminated municipalities, the trend SAR(err)-estimated velocity was less than 7 km/day. Our study was a first step in describing the diffusion process for BT in France. To our knowledge, it is the first to show that BT spread in France was primarily local and consistent with the active flight of Culicoides and local movements of farm animals. Models such as the trend SAR(err) models are powerful tools to provide information on direction and speed of disease diffusion when the only data available are date and location of cases.

  1. Spectral velocity estimation in ultrasound using sparse data sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2006-01-01

    Velocity distributions in blood vessels can be displayed using ultrasound scanners by making a Fourier transform of the received signal and then showing spectra in an M-mode display. It is desired to show a B-mode image for orientation, and data for this have to be acquired interleaved with the f......Velocity distributions in blood vessels can be displayed using ultrasound scanners by making a Fourier transform of the received signal and then showing spectra in an M-mode display. It is desired to show a B-mode image for orientation, and data for this have to be acquired interleaved...... with the flow data. This either halves the effective pulse repetition frequency fprf or gaps appear in the spectrum from B-mode emissions. This paper presents a techniques for maintaining the highest possible fprf and at the same time show a B-mode image. The power spectrum can be calculated from the Fourier...

  2. A Transverse Oscillation Approach for Estimation of Three-Dimensional Velocity Vectors, Part I: Concept and Simulation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    A method for 3-D velocity vector estimation us - ing transverse oscillations is presented. The method employs a 2-D transducer and decouples the velocity estimation into three orthogonal components, which are estimated simultane - ously and from the same data. The validity of the method is invest......A method for 3-D velocity vector estimation us - ing transverse oscillations is presented. The method employs a 2-D transducer and decouples the velocity estimation into three orthogonal components, which are estimated simultane - ously and from the same data. The validity of the method...... is investigated by conducting simulations emulating a 32 × 32 matrix transducer. The results are evaluated using two per - formance metrics related to precision and accuracy. The study includes several parameters including 49 flow directions, the SNR, steering angle, and apodization types. The 49 flow direc...... - tions cover the positive octant of the unit sphere. In terms of accuracy, the median bias is −2%. The precision of v x and v y depends on the flow angle β and ranges from 5% to 31% rela - tive to the peak velocity magnitude of 1 m/s. For comparison, the range is 0.4 to 2% for v z . The parameter study...

  3. Tissue motion in blood velocity estimation and its simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlaikjer, Malene; Torp-Pedersen, Søren; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1998-01-01

    to the improvement of color flow imaging. Optimization based on in-vivo data is difficult since the blood and tissue signals cannot be accurately distinguished and the correct extend of the vessel under investigation is often unknown. This study introduces a model for the simulation of blood velocity data in which...... tissue motion is included. Tissue motion from breathing, heart beat, and vessel pulsation were determined based on in-vivo RF-data obtained from 10 healthy volunteers. The measurements were taken at the carotid artery at one condition and in the liver at three conditions. Each measurement was repeated 10....... The motion due to the heart, when the volunteer was asked to hold his breath, gave a peak velocity of 4.2±1.7 mm/s. The movement of the carotid artery wall due to changing blood pressure had a peak velocity of 8.9±3.7 mm/s over the cardiac cycle. The variations are due to differences in heart rhythm...

  4. Evolution of semilocal string networks. II. Velocity estimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Eiguren, A.; Urrestilla, J.; Achúcarro, A.; Avgoustidis, A.; Martins, C. J. A. P.

    2017-07-01

    We continue a comprehensive numerical study of semilocal string networks and their cosmological evolution. These can be thought of as hybrid networks comprised of (nontopological) string segments, whose core structure is similar to that of Abelian Higgs vortices, and whose ends have long-range interactions and behavior similar to that of global monopoles. Our study provides further evidence of a linear scaling regime, already reported in previous studies, for the typical length scale and velocity of the network. We introduce a new algorithm to identify the position of the segment cores. This allows us to determine the length and velocity of each individual segment and follow their evolution in time. We study the statistical distribution of segment lengths and velocities for radiation- and matter-dominated evolution in the regime where the strings are stable. Our segment detection algorithm gives higher length values than previous studies based on indirect detection methods. The statistical distribution shows no evidence of (anti)correlation between the speed and the length of the segments.

  5. A new maximum likelihood blood velocity estimator incorporating spatial and temporal correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlaikjer, Malene; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    and space. This paper presents a new estimator (STC-MLE), which incorporates the correlation property. It is an expansion of the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) developed by Ferrara et al. With the MLE a cross-correlation analysis between consecutive RF-lines on complex form is carried out for a range...... of possible velocities. In the new estimator an additional similarity investigation for each evaluated velocity and the available velocity estimates in a temporal (between frames) and spatial (within frames) neighborhood is performed. An a priori probability density term in the distribution...... of the observations gives a probability measure of the correlation between the velocities. Both the MLE and the STC-MLE have been evaluated on simulated and in-vivo RF-data obtained from the carotid artery. Using the MLE 4.1% of the estimates deviate significantly from the true velocities, when the performance...

  6. Estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has similar predictive value as measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael; Greve, Sara; Blicher, Marie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) adds significantly to traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk prediction, but is not widely available. Therefore, it would be helpful if cfPWV could be replaced by an estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV) using age and mean blood...... pressure and previously published equations. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ePWV could predict CV events independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and/or cfPWV. DESIGN AND METHOD: cfPWV was measured and ePWV calculated in 2366 apparently healthy subjects from four age...

  7. The relationship of seismic velocity structure and surface fracture characteristics of basalt outcrops to rippability estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, S.E.; Dougherty, M.E.; Pelton, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    Seismic velocity has been shown in previous engineering studies to be related to the fracture characteristics and rippability of rock outcrops. However, common methods of measuring seismic velocity in outcrops do not take into account the many possible travel paths for wave propagation and the fact that velocity zones may exist within an outcrop. Presented here are the results of using raytracing inversion of first-arrival travel-time data to map P-velocity structure in basalt outcrops, and also the investigation of the relationship of the mapped velocities to observed surface fractures and hand-sample P-velocities. It is shown that basalt outcrops commonly consist of an irregular near-surface low-velocity zone underlain by higher velocity material; that velocity gradients can exist in outcrops; that hand-sample velocity measurements are typically higher than outcrop-scale measurements; and that the characteristics of surface fractures are empirically related to near-surface P-velocity. All of these findings are relevant to the estimated rippability of rock in geotechnical engineering. The data for this study are derived from eleven sites on basalt outcrops of the Troodos Ophiolite in Cyprus. The basalt types include pillow basalts, massive flows, and a pillow breccia. A commonly available raytracing inversion program (RAYINVR) was used to produce a velocity profile of each outcrop. Different velocity zones were detailed by inverting observed travel times to produce a model of outcrop velocity structure which produces rippability profiles for each outcrop. 16 refs., 9 figs

  8. CAN THE CURRICULUM BE USED TO ESTIMATE CRITICAL VELOCITY IN YOUNG COMPETITIVE SWIMMERS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Marinho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the present study were to assess critical velocity using the swimmer curriculum in front crawl events and to compare critical velocity to the velocity corresponding to a 4 mmol·l-1 of blood lactate concentration and to the velocity of a 30 min test. The sample included 24 high level male swimmers ranged between 14 and 16 years old. For each subject the critical velocity, the velocity corresponding to a 4 mmol·l-1 of blood lactate concentration and the mean velocity of a 30 min test were determined. The critical velocity was also estimated by considering the best performance of a swimmer over several distances based on the swimmer curriculum. Critical velocity including 100, 200 and 400 m events was not different from the velocity of 4 mmol·l-1 of blood lactate concentration. Critical velocity including all the swimmer events was not different from the velocity of a 30 min test. The assessment of critical velocity based upon the swimmer curriculum would therefore seem to be a good approach to determine the aerobic ability of a swimmer. The selection of the events to be included in critical velocity assessment must be a main concern in the evaluation of the swimmer

  9. Maximum Likelihood-Based Methods for Target Velocity Estimation with Distributed MIMO Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxin Cao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The estimation problem for target velocity is addressed in this in the scenario with a distributed multi-input multi-out (MIMO radar system. A maximum likelihood (ML-based estimation method is derived with the knowledge of target position. Then, in the scenario without the knowledge of target position, an iterative method is proposed to estimate the target velocity by updating the position information iteratively. Moreover, the Carmér-Rao Lower Bounds (CRLBs for both scenarios are derived, and the performance degradation of velocity estimation without the position information is also expressed. Simulation results show that the proposed estimation methods can approach the CRLBs, and the velocity estimation performance can be further improved by increasing either the number of radar antennas or the information accuracy of the target position. Furthermore, compared with the existing methods, a better estimation performance can be achieved.

  10. Velocity estimation using synthetic aperture imaging [blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    Presented an approach for synthetic aperture blood flow ultrasound imaging. Estimates with a low bias and standard deviation can be obtained with as few as eight emissions. The performance of the new estimator is verified using both simulations and measurements. The results demonstrate that a fully...

  11. Detection probabilities for time-domain velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1991-01-01

    programs, it is demonstrated that the probability of correct estimation depends on the signal-to-noise ratio, transducer bandwidth, number of A-lines and number of samples used in the correlation estimate. The influence of applying a stationary echo-canceler is explained. The echo canceling can be modeled...

  12. Method of measuring directed electron velocities in flowing plasma using the incoherent regions of laser scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacoby, B.A.; York, T.M.

    1979-02-01

    With the presumption that a shifted Maxwellian velocity distribution adequately describes the electrons in a flowing plasma, the details of a method to measure their directed velocity are described. The system consists of a ruby laser source and two detectors set 180 0 from each other and both set at 90 0 with respect to the incident laser beam. The lowest velocity that can be determined by this method depends on the electron thermal velocity. The application of this diagnostic to the measurement of flow velocities in plasma being lost from the ends of theta-pinch devices is described

  13. New Methods for Estimating Water Current Velocity Fields from Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, J. C.; Medagoda, L.

    2016-02-01

    Water current velocities are a crucial component of understanding oceanographic processes and underwater robots, such as autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), provide a mobile platform for obtaining these observations. Estimating water current velocities requires both measurements of the water velocity, often obtained with an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP), as well as estimates of the vehicle velocity. Presently, vehicle velocities are supplied on the sea surface with velocity from GPS, or near the seafloor where Doppler Velocity Log (DVL) in bottom-lock is available; however, this capability is unavailable in the mid-water column where DVL bottom-lock and GPS are unavailable. Here we present a method which calculates vehicle velocities using consecutive ADCP measurements in the mid-water using an extended Kalman filter (EKF). The correlation of the spatially changing water current states, along with mass transport and shear constraints on the water current field, is formulated using least square constraints. Results from the Sentry AUV from a mid-water surveying mission at Deepwater Horizon and a small-scale hydrothermal vent flux estimation mission suggest the method is suitable for real-time use. DVL data is denied to simulate mid-water missions and the results compared to ground truth water velocity measurements estimated using DVL velocities. Results show quantifiable uncertainties in the water current velocities, along with similar performance, for the DVL and no-DVL case in the mid-water. This method has the potential to provide geo-referenced water velocity measurements from mobile ocean robots in the absence of GPS and DVL as well as estimate the uncertainty associated with the measurements.

  14. Method for Estimating Evaporative Potential (IM/CLO) from ASTM Standard Single Wind Velocity Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-10

    IM/CLO) FROM ASTM STANDARD SINGLE WIND VELOCITY MEASURES DISCLAIMER The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the...USARIEM TECHNICAL REPORT T16-14 METHOD FOR ESTIMATING EVAPORATIVE POTENTIAL (IM/CLO) FROM ASTM STANDARD SINGLE WIND VELOCITY... ASTM STANDARD SINGLE WIND VELOCITY MEASURES Adam W. Potter Biophysics and Biomedical Modeling Division U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental

  15. Power spectral density of velocity fluctuations estimated from phase Doppler data

    OpenAIRE

    Jicha Miroslav; Lizal Frantisek; Jedelsky Jan

    2012-01-01

    Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) and its modifications such as PhaseDoppler Particle Anemometry (P/DPA) is point-wise method for optical nonintrusive measurement of particle velocity with high data rate. Conversion of the LDA velocity data from temporal to frequency domain – calculation of power spectral density (PSD) of velocity fluctuations, is a non trivial task due to nonequidistant data sampling in time. We briefly discuss possibilities for the PSD estimation and specify limitations caused...

  16. Pre- and post-processing filters for improvement of blood velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlaikjer, Malene; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    with different signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). The exact extent of the vessel and the true velocities are thereby known. Velocity estimates were obtained by employing Kasai's autocorrelator on the data. The post-processing filter was used on the computed 2D velocity map. An improvement of the RMS error...... velocity in the vessels. Post-processing is beneficial to obtain an image that minimizes the variation, and present the important information to the clinicians. Applying the theory of fluid mechanics introduces restrictions on the variations possible in a flow field. Neighboring estimates in time and space...... should be highly correlated, since transitions should occur smoothly. This idea is the basis of the algorithm developed in this study. From Bayesian image processing theory an a posteriori probability distribution for the velocity field is computed based on constraints on smoothness. An estimate...

  17. Estimation of S-wave Velocity Structures by Using Microtremor Array Measurements for Subsurface Modeling in Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Ridwan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jakarta is located on a thick sedimentary layer that potentially has a very high seismic wave amplification. However, the available information concerning the subsurface model and bedrock depth is insufficient for a seismic hazard analysis. In this study, a microtremor array method was applied to estimate the geometry and S-wave velocity of the sedimentary layer. The spatial autocorrelation (SPAC method was applied to estimate the dispersion curve, while the S-wave velocity was estimated using a genetic algorithm approach. The analysis of the 1D and 2D S-wave velocity profiles shows that along a north-south line, the sedimentary layer is thicker towards the north. It has a positive correlation with a geological cross section derived from a borehole down to a depth of about 300 m. The SPT data from the BMKG site were used to verify the 1D S-wave velocity profile. They show a good agreement. The microtremor analysis reached the engineering bedrock in a range from 359 to 608 m as depicted by a cross section in the north-south direction. The site class was also estimated at each site, based on the average S-wave velocity until 30 m depth. The sites UI to ISTN belong to class D (medium soil, while BMKG and ANCL belong to class E (soft soil.

  18. Multivariate regression methods for estimating velocity of ictal discharges from human microelectrode recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Jyun-you; Smith, Elliot H.; Bateman, Lisa M.; McKhann, Guy M., II; Goodman, Robert R.; Greger, Bradley; Davis, Tyler S.; Kellis, Spencer S.; House, Paul A.; Schevon, Catherine A.

    2017-08-01

    Objective. Epileptiform discharges, an electrophysiological hallmark of seizures, can propagate across cortical tissue in a manner similar to traveling waves. Recent work has focused attention on the origination and propagation patterns of these discharges, yielding important clues to their source location and mechanism of travel. However, systematic studies of methods for measuring propagation are lacking. Approach. We analyzed epileptiform discharges in microelectrode array recordings of human seizures. The array records multiunit activity and local field potentials at 400 micron spatial resolution, from a small cortical site free of obstructions. We evaluated several computationally efficient statistical methods for calculating traveling wave velocity, benchmarking them to analyses of associated neuronal burst firing. Main results. Over 90% of discharges met statistical criteria for propagation across the sampled cortical territory. Detection rate, direction and speed estimates derived from a multiunit estimator were compared to four field potential-based estimators: negative peak, maximum descent, high gamma power, and cross-correlation. Interestingly, the methods that were computationally simplest and most efficient (negative peak and maximal descent) offer non-inferior results in predicting neuronal traveling wave velocities compared to the other two, more complex methods. Moreover, the negative peak and maximal descent methods proved to be more robust against reduced spatial sampling challenges. Using least absolute deviation in place of least squares error minimized the impact of outliers, and reduced the discrepancies between local field potential-based and multiunit estimators. Significance. Our findings suggest that ictal epileptiform discharges typically take the form of exceptionally strong, rapidly traveling waves, with propagation detectable across millimeter distances. The sequential activation of neurons in space can be inferred from clinically

  19. A new approach for estimation of the axial velocity using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    for the data segment. The benefit of this method is an estimate of the mean axial velocity which is independent of the center frequency of the propagating ultrasound pulse. The estimate will only depend on fs and fprf. Results of the estimation method is presented based on both simple generated RF harmonic...

  20. Preliminary comparison between real-time in-vivo spectral and transverse oscillation velocity estimates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Haugaard, Per

    2011-01-01

    Spectral velocity estimation is considered the gold standard in medical ultrasound. Peak systole (PS), end diastole (ED), and resistive index (RI) are used clinically. Angle correction is performed using a flow angle set manually. With Transverse Oscillation (TO) velocity estimates the flow angle......, peak systole (PSTO), end diastole (EDTO), and resistive index (RITO) are estimated. This study investigates if these clinical parameters are estimated equally good using spectral and TO data. The right common carotid arteries of three healthy volunteers were scanned longitudinally. Average TO flow...

  1. Wind direction/velocity and current direction/velocity data from current meter casts in a world wide distribution from 1970-12-06 to 1991-10-01 (NODC Accession 9700218)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wind direction/velocity and current direction/velocity data were collected using current meter casts in a world wide distribution from December 6, 1970 to October 1,...

  2. Methodology for the determination of underground water velocity, direction and flow, by using radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    A basic route determining velocity and direction of ground water flow by using radioactive tracers is presented. Emphasis has been given to hydrology and nuclear energy concepts, to the construction of some specific equipment, to the calibration of radiation detectors and to the practical applications in borehole. 82 Br and 51 Cr have been chosen as tracers for the Darcy's velocity and direction determinations, respectively. From the obtained value of Darcy's velocity, the laminar flow was confirmed according to the admitted hypothesis. Comparisons of the Darcy's velocity values and flow direction have been made with values obtained using pumping tests and survey of the equipotential curves, where it can be concluded that they are of the same largeness and then, from a practical view, approximate. (Author) [pt

  3. Front-Crawl Instantaneous Velocity Estimation Using a Wearable Inertial Measurement Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamiar Aminian

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring the performance is a crucial task for elite sports during both training and competition. Velocity is the key parameter of performance in swimming, but swimming performance evaluation remains immature due to the complexities of measurements in water. The purpose of this study is to use a single inertial measurement unit (IMU to estimate front crawl velocity. Thirty swimmers, equipped with an IMU on the sacrum, each performed four different velocity trials of 25 m in ascending order. A tethered speedometer was used as the velocity measurement reference. Deployment of biomechanical constraints of front crawl locomotion and change detection framework on acceleration signal paved the way for a drift-free integration of forward acceleration using IMU to estimate the swimmers velocity. A difference of 0.6 ± 5.4 cm·s−1 on mean cycle velocity and an RMS difference of 11.3 cm·s−1 in instantaneous velocity estimation were observed between IMU and the reference. The most important contribution of the study is a new practical tool for objective evaluation of swimming performance. A single body-worn IMU provides timely feedback for coaches and sport scientists without any complicated setup or restraining the swimmer’s natural technique.

  4. Stationary echo canceling in velocity estimation by time-domain cross-correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1993-01-01

    The application of stationary echo canceling to ultrasonic estimation of blood velocities using time-domain cross-correlation is investigated. Expressions are derived that show the influence from the echo canceler on the signals that enter the cross-correlation estimator. It is demonstrated...

  5. Experimental 3-D Vector Velocity Estimation with Row-Column Addressed Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-01-01

    Experimental 3-D vector flow estimates obtained with a 62+62 2-D row-column (RC) array with integrated apodization are presented. A transverse oscillation (TO) velocity estimator is implemented on a 3.0 MHz RC array, to yield realtime 3-D vector flow in a cross-sectional scan plane at 750 frames...... per second. The method is validated in a straight-vessel phantom (Ø = 8 mm) connected to a flow pump capable of generating timevarying carotid waveforms. The out-of-plane velocity component perpendicular to the cross section of the vessel and the crosssectional area is used to estimate volumetric flow...

  6. High-frame-rate Imaging of a Carotid Bifurcation using a Low-complexity Velocity Estimation Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Ianni, Tommaso; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Ewertsen, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a 2-D vector flow imaging (VFI) method developed by combining synthetic aperture sequential beamforming and directional transverse oscillation is used to image a carotid bifurcation. Ninety-six beamformed lines are sent from the probe to the host system for each VFI frame, enabling...... the possibility of wireless transmission. The velocity is estimated using a relatively inexpensive 2-D phase-shift approach, and real-time performance can be achieved in mobile devices. However, high-frame-rate velocities can be obtained by sending the data to a cluster of computers. The objective of this study...... is to demonstrate the scalability of the method’s performance according to the needs of the user and the processing capabilities of the host system. In vivo measurements of a carotid bifurcation of a 54-year-old volunteer were conducted using a linear array transducer connected to the SARUS scanner. The velocities...

  7. Tyre effective radius and vehicle velocity estimation: a variable structure observer solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Tannoury, C.; Plestan, F.; Moussaoui, S.; ROMANi, N. RENAULT

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an application of a variable structure observer for wheel effective radius and velocity of automotive vehicles. This observer is based on high order sliding approach allowing robustness and finite time convergence. Its originality consists in assuming a nonlinear relation between the slip ratio and the friction coefficient and providing an estimation of both variables, wheel radius and vehicle velocity, from measurement of wheel angular velocity and torque. These signals being available on major modern vehicle CAN (Controller Area Network) buses, this system does not require additional sensors. A simulation example is given to illustrate the relevance of this approach.

  8. 3D Vector Velocity Estimation using a 2D Phased Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    of using the TO method for estimation 3D velocity vectors, and the proposed decoupling is demonstrated. A 64x64 and a 32x32 elements transducer are emulated using Field II. Plug flow with a speed of 1 m/s in a small region is rotated in the XY -plane. A binary flow example with [vx,vy]=[1,0] and [0,1] m......A method to estimate the three dimensional (3D) velocity vector is presented is this paper. 3D velocity vector techniques are needed to measure the full velocity and characterize the complicated flow patterns in the human body. The Transverse Oscillation (TO) method introduces oscillations...... matrix transducer. For the 32x32 transducer, the mean and standard deviation for the speed are 0.94 0.11 m/s and for the angle bias -0.487.7. The simulation study clearly demonstrates, that the new method can be used to estimate the 3D velocity vector using a 2D phased matrix array, and that the velocity...

  9. Thermal Cracking in Westerly Granite Monitored Using Direct Wave Velocity, Coda Wave Interferometry, and Acoustic Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, L.; Lengliné, O.; Heap, M. J.; Baud, P.; Schmittbuhl, J.

    2018-03-01

    To monitor both the permanent (thermal microcracking) and the nonpermanent (thermo-elastic) effects of temperature on Westerly Granite, we combine acoustic emission monitoring and ultrasonic velocity measurements at ambient pressure during three heating and cooling cycles to a maximum temperature of 450°C. For the velocity measurements we use both P wave direct traveltime and coda wave interferometry techniques, the latter being more sensitive to changes in S wave velocity. During the first cycle, we observe a high acoustic emission rate and large—and mostly permanent—apparent reductions in velocity with temperature (P wave velocity is reduced by 50% of the initial value at 450°C, and 40% upon cooling). Our measurements are indicative of extensive thermal microcracking during the first cycle, predominantly during the heating phase. During the second cycle we observe further—but reduced—microcracking, and less still during the third cycle, where the apparent decrease in velocity with temperature is near reversible (at 450°C, the P wave velocity is decreased by roughly 10% of the initial velocity). Our results, relevant for thermally dynamic environments such as geothermal reservoirs, highlight the value of performing measurements of rock properties under in situ temperature conditions.

  10. LNOx Estimates Directly from LIS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, W. J.; Vant-hull, B.; McCaul, E.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) are known to indirectly influence climate since they affect the concentration of both atmospheric ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radicals (OH). In addition, lightning NOx (LNOx) is the most important source of NOx in the upper troposphere (particularly in the tropics). It is difficult to estimate LNOx because it is not easy to make measurements near the lightning channel, and the various NOx-producing mechanisms within a lightning flash are not fully understood. A variety of methods have been used to estimate LNOx production [e.g., in-situ observations, combined ground-based VHF lightning mapping and VLF/LF lightning locating observations, indirect retrievals using satellite Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) observations, theoretical considerations, laboratory spark measurements, and rocket triggered lightning measurements]. The present study introduces a new approach for estimating LNOx that employs Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) data. LIS optical measurements are used to directly estimate the total energy of a flash; the total flash energy is then converted to LNOx production (in moles) by multiplying by a thermo-chemical yield. Hence, LNOx estimates on a flash-by-flash basis are obtained. A Lightning NOx Indicator (LNI) is computed by summing up the LIS-derived LNOx contributions from a region over a particular analysis period. Larger flash optical areas are consistent with longer channel length and/or more energetic channels, and hence more NOx production. Brighter flashes are consistent with more energetic channels, and hence more NOx production. The location of the flash within the thundercloud and the optical scattering characteristics of the thundercloud are complicating factors. LIS data for the years 2003-2013 were analyzed, and geographical plots of the time-evolution of the LNI over the southern tier states (i.e. upto 38o N) of CONUS were determined. Overall, the LNI trends downward over the 11 yr analysis period. The LNI has

  11. Satellite Angular Velocity Estimation Based on Star Images and Optical Flow Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarmine Fasano

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An optical flow-based technique is proposed to estimate spacecraft angular velocity based on sequences of star-field images. It does not require star identification and can be thus used to also deliver angular rate information when attitude determination is not possible, as during platform de tumbling or slewing. Region-based optical flow calculation is carried out on successive star images preprocessed to remove background. Sensor calibration parameters, Poisson equation, and a least-squares method are then used to estimate the angular velocity vector components in the sensor rotating frame. A theoretical error budget is developed to estimate the expected angular rate accuracy as a function of camera parameters and star distribution in the field of view. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is tested by using star field scenes generated by a hardware-in-the-loop testing facility and acquired by a commercial-off-the shelf camera sensor. Simulated cases comprise rotations at different rates. Experimental results are presented which are consistent with theoretical estimates. In particular, very accurate angular velocity estimates are generated at lower slew rates, while in all cases the achievable accuracy in the estimation of the angular velocity component along boresight is about one order of magnitude worse than the other two components.

  12. Magnetic Reconnection Processes Involving Modes Propagating in the Ion Diamagnetic Velocity Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, P.; Coppi, B.; Pucella, G.; Zhou, T.

    2013-10-01

    Experiments in weakly collisional plasma regimes, (e.g. neutral beam heated plasmas in the H-regime), measuring the Doppler shift associated with the plasma local rotation, have shown that the toroidal mode phase velocity vph in the frame with Er = 0 is in the direction of the ion diamagnetic velocity. For ohmically heated plasmas, with higher collisionalities, vph in the laboratory frame is in the direction of the electron diamagnetic velocity, but plasma rotation is reversed as well, and vph, in the Er = 0 frame, is in the ion diamagnetic velocity direction. Theoretically, two classes of reconnecting modes should emerge: drift-tearing modes and ``inductive modes'' that depend on the effects of a finite plasma inductivity. The former modes, with vph in the direction of the electron diamagnetic velocity, require the pre-excitation of a different kind of mode in order to become unstable in weakly collisional regimes. The second kind of modes has a growth rate associated with the relevant finite ion viscosity. A comprehensive theory is presented. Sponsored in part by the US DOE.

  13. Determination of filtration velocity and direction of groundwater flow using tracer technique, Port Dickson, Negeri Sembilan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Md Shahid Ayub; Roslan Mohd Ali; Kamarudin Samuding

    1996-01-01

    The filtration velocity of the groundwater was determine by introducing I mCi Br-82 into a borehole. Br-82 was in the form of potassium bromide. The result showed that the filtration velocity varies from 2.3 to 4.5 cm/day depending on the soil matrix with the clayey layer posting more resistance to flow. Au-198 in the form of aurium chloride was introduce into two other boreholes to determine the direction of flow. The general trend of flow was in the direction between N140E and N160E

  14. Application of Depth-Averaged Velocity Profile for Estimation of Longitudinal Dispersion in Rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Givehchi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available River bed profiles and depth-averaged velocities are used as basic data in empirical and analytical equations for estimating the longitudinal dispersion coefficient which has always been a topic of great interest for researchers. The simple model proposed by Maghrebi is capable of predicting the normalized isovel contours in the cross section of rivers and channels as well as the depth-averaged velocity profiles. The required data in Maghrebi’s model are bed profile, shear stress, and roughness distributions. Comparison of depth-averaged velocities and longitudinal dispersion coefficients observed in the field data and those predicted by Maghrebi’s model revealed that Maghrebi’s model had an acceptable accuracy in predicting depth-averaged velocity.

  15. Preliminary Estimates of Specific Discharge and Transport Velocities near Borehole NC-EWDP-24PB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freifeld, Barry; Doughty, Christine; Finsterle, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes fluid electrical conductivity (FEC) and thermal logging data collected in Borehole NC-EWDP-24PB, located approximately 15 km south of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. Preliminary analyses of a small fraction of the FEC and temperature data indicate that relatively large, localized fluid fluxes are likely to exist at this location. The implication that considerable flow is induced by small gradients, and that flow is highly localized, is significant for the estimation of groundwater transport velocities and radionuclide travel times. The sensitivity of the data to potential perturbations during testing (i.e., internal wellbore flow in the case of FEC data, and buoyancy effects in the case of thermal logging data) make it difficult to conclusively derive fluid fluxes and transport velocities without a detailed analysis of all data and processes involved. Such a comprehensive analysis has not yet been performed. However, the preliminary results suggest that the ambient component of the estimated flow rates is significant and on the order of liters per minute, yielding groundwater transport velocities in the range of kilometers per year. One particular zone in the Bullfrog tuff exhibits estimated velocities on the order of 10 km/yr. Given that the preliminary estimates of ambient flow rates and transport velocities are relatively high, and considering the potential impact of high rates and velocities on saturated-zone flow and transport behavior, we recommend that a comprehensive analysis of all the available data be performed. Moreover, additional data sets at other locations should be collected to examine whether the current data set is representative of the regional flow system near Yucca Mountain

  16. Calibrated Tully-Fisher relations for improved estimates of disc rotation velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyes, R.; Mandelbaum, R.; Gunn, J. E.; Pizagno II, Jim; Lackner, C. N.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we derive scaling relations between photometric observable quantities and disc galaxy rotation velocity V-rot or Tully-Fisher relations (TFRs). Our methodology is dictated by our purpose of obtaining purely photometric, minimal-scatter estimators of V-rot applicable to large galaxy

  17. Estimation of seismic velocity in the subducting crust of the Pacific slab beneath Hokkaido, northern Japan by using guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, T.; Nakajima, J.; Toyokuni, G.; Kita, S.; Matsuzawa, T.

    2014-12-01

    A subducting crust contains a large amount of water as a form of hydrous minerals (e.g., Hacker et al., 2003), and the crust plays important roles for water transportation and seismogenesis in subduction zones at intermediate depths (e.g., Kirby et al., 1996; Iwamori, 2007). Therefore, the investigation of seismic structure in the crust is important to understand ongoing physical processes with subduction of oceanic lithosphere. A guided wave which propagates in the subducting crust is recorded in seismograms at Hokkaido, northern Japan (Shiina et al., 2014). Here, we estimated P- and S-wave velocity in the crust with guided waves, and obtained P-wave velocity of 6.6-7.3 km/s and S-wave velocity of 3.6-4.2 km/s at depths of 50-90 km. Moreover, Vp/Vs ratio in the crust is calculated to be 1.80-1.85 in that depth range. The obtained P-wave velocity about 6.6km/s at depths of 50-70 km is consistent with those estimated in Tohoku, northeast Japan (Shiina et al., 2013), and this the P-wave velocity is lower than those expected from models of subducting crustal compositions, such as metamorphosed MORB model (Hacker et al., 2003). In contrast, at greater depths (>80 km), the P-wave velocity marks higher velocity than the case of NE Japan and the velocity is roughly comparable to those of the MORB model. The obtained S-wave velocity distribution also shows characteristics similar to P waves. This regional variation may be caused by a small variation in thermal regime of the Pacific slab beneath the two regions as a result of the normal subduction in Tohoku and oblique subduction in Hokkaido. In addition, the effect of seismic anisotropy in the subducting crust would not be ruled out because rays used in the analysis in Hokkaido propagate mostly in the trench-parallel direction, while those in Tohoku are sufficiently criss-crossed.

  18. Method of LSD profile asymmetry for estimating the center of mass velocities of pulsating stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britavskiy, N.; Pancino, E.; Tsymbal, V.; Romano, D.; Cacciari, C.; Clementini, C.

    2016-05-01

    We present radial velocity analysis for 20 solar neighborhood RR Lyrae and 3 Population II Cepheids. High-resolution spectra were observed with either TNG/SARG or VLT/UVES over varying phases. To estimate the center of mass (barycentric) velocities of the program stars, we utilized two independent methods. First, the 'classic' method was employed, which is based on RR Lyrae radial velocity curve templates. Second, we provide the new method that used absorption line profile asymmetry to determine both the pulsation and the barycentric velocities even with a low number of high-resolution spectra and in cases where the phase of the observations is uncertain. This new method is based on a least squares deconvolution (LSD) of the line profiles in order to an- alyze line asymmetry that occurs in the spectra of pulsating stars. By applying this method to our sample stars we attain accurate measurements (+- 2 kms^-1) of the pulsation component of the radial velocity. This results in determination of the barycentric velocity to within 5 kms^-1 even with a low number of high- resolution spectra. A detailed investigation of LSD profile asymmetry shows the variable nature of the project factor at different pulsation phases, which should be taken into account in the detailed spectroscopic analysis of pulsating stars.

  19. Softverski model estimatora radijalne brzine ciljeva / Software model of a radial velocity estimator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan S. Ivković

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available U radu je softverski modelovan novi blok u delu za obradu signala softverskog radarskog prijemnika, koji je nazvan estimator radijalne brzine. Detaljno je opisan način procene Doplerove frekvencije na osnovu MUSIC algoritma i ukratko prikazan način rada pri merenju. Svi parametri pri merenju klatera i detekcije simuliranih i realnih ciljeva dati su tabelarno, a rezultati grafički. Na osnovu analize prikazanih rezultata može se zaključiti da se pomoću projektovanog estimatora radijalne brzine može precizno proceniti Doplerov pomak u reflektovanom signalu od pokretnog cilja, a samim tim može se precizno odrediti njegova brzina. / In all analyses the MUSIC method has given better results than the FFT method. The MUSIC method proved to be better at estimation precision as well as at resolving two adjacent Doppler frequencies. On the basis of the obtained results, the designed estimator of radial velocity can be said to estimate Doppler frequency in the reflected signal from a moving target precisely, and, consequently, the target velocity. It is thus possible to improve the performances of the current radar as far as a precise estimation of velocity of detected moving targets is concerned.

  20. How Angular Velocity Features and Different Gyroscope Noise Types Interact and Determine Orientation Estimation Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasciuto, Ilaria; Ligorio, Gabriele; Bergamini, Elena; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Sabatini, Angelo Maria; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    In human movement analysis, 3D body segment orientation can be obtained through the numerical integration of gyroscope signals. These signals, however, are affected by errors that, for the case of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are mainly due to: constant bias, scale factor, white noise, and bias instability. The aim of this study is to assess how the orientation estimation accuracy is affected by each of these disturbances, and whether it is influenced by the angular velocity magnitude and 3D distribution across the gyroscope axes. Reference angular velocity signals, either constant or representative of human walking, were corrupted with each of the four noise types within a simulation framework. The magnitude of the angular velocity affected the error in the orientation estimation due to each noise type, except for the white noise. Additionally, the error caused by the constant bias was also influenced by the angular velocity 3D distribution. As the orientation error depends not only on the noise itself but also on the signal it is applied to, different sensor placements could enhance or mitigate the error due to each disturbance, and special attention must be paid in providing and interpreting measures of accuracy for orientation estimation algorithms. PMID:26393606

  1. Estimating random transverse velocities in the fast solar wind from EISCAT Interplanetary Scintillation measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Canals

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Interplanetary scintillation measurements can yield estimates of a large number of solar wind parameters, including bulk flow speed, variation in bulk velocity along the observing path through the solar wind and random variation in transverse velocity. This last parameter is of particular interest, as it can indicate the flux of low-frequency Alfvén waves, and the dissipation of these waves has been proposed as an acceleration mechanism for the fast solar wind. Analysis of IPS data is, however, a significantly unresolved problem and a variety of a priori assumptions must be made in interpreting the data. Furthermore, the results may be affected by the physical structure of the radio source and by variations in the solar wind along the scintillation ray path. We have used observations of simple point-like radio sources made with EISCAT between 1994 and 1998 to obtain estimates of random transverse velocity in the fast solar wind. The results obtained with various a priori assumptions made in the analysis are compared, and we hope thereby to be able to provide some indication of the reliability of our estimates of random transverse velocity and the variation of this parameter with distance from the Sun.Key words. Interplanetary physics (MHD waves and turbulence; solar wind plasma; instruments and techniques

  2. Estimating random transverse velocities in the fast solar wind from EISCAT Interplanetary Scintillation measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Canals

    Full Text Available Interplanetary scintillation measurements can yield estimates of a large number of solar wind parameters, including bulk flow speed, variation in bulk velocity along the observing path through the solar wind and random variation in transverse velocity. This last parameter is of particular interest, as it can indicate the flux of low-frequency Alfvén waves, and the dissipation of these waves has been proposed as an acceleration mechanism for the fast solar wind. Analysis of IPS data is, however, a significantly unresolved problem and a variety of a priori assumptions must be made in interpreting the data. Furthermore, the results may be affected by the physical structure of the radio source and by variations in the solar wind along the scintillation ray path. We have used observations of simple point-like radio sources made with EISCAT between 1994 and 1998 to obtain estimates of random transverse velocity in the fast solar wind. The results obtained with various a priori assumptions made in the analysis are compared, and we hope thereby to be able to provide some indication of the reliability of our estimates of random transverse velocity and the variation of this parameter with distance from the Sun.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (MHD waves and turbulence; solar wind plasma; instruments and techniques

  3. How Angular Velocity Features and Different Gyroscope Noise Types Interact and Determine Orientation Estimation Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasciuto, Ilaria; Ligorio, Gabriele; Bergamini, Elena; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Sabatini, Angelo Maria; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2015-09-18

    In human movement analysis, 3D body segment orientation can be obtained through the numerical integration of gyroscope signals. These signals, however, are affected by errors that, for the case of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are mainly due to: constant bias, scale factor, white noise, and bias instability. The aim of this study is to assess how the orientation estimation accuracy is affected by each of these disturbances, and whether it is influenced by the angular velocity magnitude and 3D distribution across the gyroscope axes. Reference angular velocity signals, either constant or representative of human walking, were corrupted with each of the four noise types within a simulation framework. The magnitude of the angular velocity affected the error in the orientation estimation due to each noise type, except for the white noise. Additionally, the error caused by the constant bias was also influenced by the angular velocity 3D distribution. As the orientation error depends not only on the noise itself but also on the signal it is applied to, different sensor placements could enhance or mitigate the error due to each disturbance, and special attention must be paid in providing and interpreting measures of accuracy for orientation estimation algorithms.

  4. How Angular Velocity Features and Different Gyroscope Noise Types Interact and Determine Orientation Estimation Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Pasciuto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In human movement analysis, 3D body segment orientation can be obtained through the numerical integration of gyroscope signals. These signals, however, are affected by errors that, for the case of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are mainly due to: constant bias, scale factor, white noise, and bias instability. The aim of this study is to assess how the orientation estimation accuracy is affected by each of these disturbances, and whether it is influenced by the angular velocity magnitude and 3D distribution across the gyroscope axes. Reference angular velocity signals, either constant or representative of human walking, were corrupted with each of the four noise types within a simulation framework. The magnitude of the angular velocity affected the error in the orientation estimation due to each noise type, except for the white noise. Additionally, the error caused by the constant bias was also influenced by the angular velocity 3D distribution. As the orientation error depends not only on the noise itself but also on the signal it is applied to, different sensor placements could enhance or mitigate the error due to each disturbance, and special attention must be paid in providing and interpreting measures of accuracy for orientation estimation algorithms.

  5. Artificial neural network approach to spatial estimation of wind velocity data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oztopal, Ahmet

    2006-01-01

    In any regional wind energy assessment, equal wind velocity or energy lines provide a common basis for meaningful interpretations that furnish essential information for proper design purposes. In order to achieve regional variation descriptions, there are methods of optimum interpolation with classical weighting functions or variogram methods in Kriging methodology. Generally, the weighting functions are logically and geometrically deduced in a deterministic manner, and hence, they are imaginary first approximations for regional variability assessments, such as wind velocity. Geometrical weighting functions are necessary for regional estimation of the regional variable at a location with no measurement, which is referred to as the pivot station from the measurements of a set of surrounding stations. In this paper, weighting factors of surrounding stations necessary for the prediction of a pivot station are presented by an artificial neural network (ANN) technique. The wind speed prediction results are compared with measured values at a pivot station. Daily wind velocity measurements in the Marmara region from 1993 to 1997 are considered for application of the ANN methodology. The model is more appropriate for winter period daily wind velocities, which are significant for energy generation in the study area. Trigonometric point cumulative semivariogram (TPCSV) approach results are compared with the ANN estimations for the same set of data by considering the correlation coefficient (R). Under and over estimation problems in objective analysis can be avoided by the ANN approach

  6. Characterization of a signal recording system for accurate velocity estimation using a VISAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rav, Amit; Joshi, K. D.; Singh, Kulbhushan; Kaushik, T. C.

    2018-02-01

    The linearity of a signal recording system (SRS) in time as well as in amplitude are important for the accurate estimation of the free surface velocity history of a moving target during shock loading and unloading when measured using optical interferometers such as a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). Signal recording being the first step in a long sequence of signal processes, the incorporation of errors due to nonlinearity, and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) affects the overall accuracy and precision of the estimation of velocity history. In shock experiments the small duration (a few µs) of loading/unloading, the reflectivity of moving target surface, and the properties of optical components, control the amount of input of light to the SRS of a VISAR and this in turn affects the linearity and SNR of the overall measurement. These factors make it essential to develop in situ procedures for (i) minimizing the effect of signal induced noise and (ii) determine the linear region of operation for the SRS. Here we report on a procedure for the optimization of SRS parameters such as photodetector gain, optical power, aperture etc, so as to achieve a linear region of operation with a high SNR. The linear region of operation so determined has been utilized successfully to estimate the temporal history of the free surface velocity of the moving target in shock experiments.

  7. Blood velocity estimation using spatio-temporal encoding based on frequency division approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a feasibility study of using a spatial encoding technique based on frequency division for blood flow estimation is presented. The spatial encoding is carried out by dividing the available bandwidth of the transducer into a number of narrow frequency bands with approximately disjoint...... spectral support. By assigning one band to one virtual source, all virtual sources can be excited simultaneously. The received echoes are beamformed using Synthetic Transmit Aperture beamforming. The velocity of the moving blood is estimated using a cross- correlation estimator. The simulation tool Field...

  8. A new virtual instrument for estimating punch velocity in combat sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbinati, K S; Scheeren, E; Nohama, P

    2013-01-01

    For improving the performance in combat sport, especially percussion, it is necessary achieving high velocity in punches and kicks. The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of 3D accelerometry in a Virtual Instrumentation System (VIS) designed for estimating punch velocity in combat sports. It was conducted in two phases: (1) integration of the 3D accelerometer with the communication interface and software for processing and visualization, and (2) applicability of the system. Fifteen karate athletes performed five gyaku zuki type punches (with reverse leg) using the accelerometer on the 3rd metacarpal on the back of the hand. It was performed nonparametric Mann-Whitney U-test to determine differences in the mean linear velocity among three punches performed sequentially (p sport.

  9. Direct measurements of the velocity and thickness of ''explosively'' propagating buried molten layers in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowndes, D.H.; Jellison, G.E. Jr.; Pennycook, S.J.; Withrow, S.P.; Mashburn, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Simultaneous infrared (1152 nm) and visible (633 nm) reflectivity measurements with nanosecond resolution were used to study the initial formation and subsequent motion of pulsed KrF laser-induced ''explosively'' propagating buried molten layers in ion implantation-amorphized silicon. The buried layer velocity decreases with depth below the surface, but increases with KrF laser energy density; a maximum velocity of about 14 m/s was observed, implying an undercooling-velocity relationship of approx. 14 K/(m/s). Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to form a direct chemical image of implanted Cu ions transported by the buried layer and showed that the final buried layer thickness was <15 nm

  10. Combined estimation of kappa and shear-wave velocity profile of the Japanese rock reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggi, Valerio; Edwards, Benjamin; Fäh, Donat

    2013-04-01

    The definition of a common soil or rock reference is a key issue in probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA), microzonation studies, local site-response analysis and, more generally, when predicted or observed ground motion is compared for sites of different characteristics. A scaling procedure, which accounts for a common reference, is then necessary to avoid bias induced by the differences in the local geology. Nowadays methods requiring the definition of a reference condition generally prescribe the characteristic of a rock reference, calibrated using indirect estimation methods based on geology or on surface proxies. In most cases, a unique average shear-wave velocity value is prescribed (e.g. Vs30 = 800m/s as for class A of the EUROCODE8). Some attempts at defining the whole shape of a reference rock velocity profile have been described, often without a clear physical justification of how such a selection was performed. Moreover, in spite of its relevance in affecting the high-frequency part of the spectrum, the definition of the associated reference attenuation is in most cases missing or, when present, still remains quite uncertain. In this study we propose an approach that is based on the comparison between empirical anelastic amplification functions from spectral modeling of earthquakes and average S-wave velocities computed using the quarter-wavelength approach. The method is an extension of the approach originally proposed by Poggi et al. (2011) for Switzerland, and is here applied to Japan. For the analysis we make use of a selection of 36 stiff-soil and rock sites from the Japanese KiK-net network, for which a measured velocity profile is available. With respect to the previous study, however, we now analyze separately the elastic and anelastic contributions of the estimated empirical amplification. In a first step - which is consistent with the original work - only the elastic part of the amplification spectrum is considered. This procedure allows

  11. Uncertainty estimation of the velocity model for stations of the TrigNet GPS network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, M.; Malservisi, R.; Hugentobler, U.

    2010-12-01

    Satellite based geodetic techniques - above all GPS - provide an outstanding tool to measure crustal motions. They are widely used to derive geodetic velocity models that are applied in geodynamics to determine rotations of tectonic blocks, to localize active geological features, and to estimate rheological properties of the crust and the underlying asthenosphere. However, it is not a trivial task to derive GPS velocities and their uncertainties from positioning time series. In general time series are assumed to be represented by linear models (sometimes offsets, annual, and semi-annual signals are included) and noise. It has been shown that error models accounting only for white noise tend to underestimate the uncertainties of rates derived from long time series and that different colored noise components (flicker noise, random walk, etc.) need to be considered. However, a thorough error analysis including power spectra analyses and maximum likelihood estimates is computationally expensive and is usually not carried out for every site, but the uncertainties are scaled by latitude dependent factors. Analyses of the South Africa continuous GPS network TrigNet indicate that the scaled uncertainties overestimate the velocity errors. So we applied a method similar to the Allan Variance that is commonly used in the estimation of clock uncertainties and is able to account for time dependent probability density functions (colored noise) to the TrigNet time series. Comparisons with synthetic data show that the noise can be represented quite well by a power law model in combination with a seasonal signal in agreement with previous studies, which allows for a reliable estimation of the velocity error. Finally, we compared these estimates to the results obtained by spectral analyses using CATS. Small differences may originate from non-normal distribution of the noise.

  12. Estimating the Wet-Rock P-Wave Velocity from the Dry-Rock P-Wave Velocity for Pyroclastic Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Sair; Fener, Mustafa; Kilic, Cumhur Ozcan

    2017-07-01

    Seismic methods are widely used for the geotechnical investigations in volcanic areas or for the determination of the engineering properties of pyroclastic rocks in laboratory. Therefore, developing a relation between the wet- and dry-rock P-wave velocities will be helpful for engineers when evaluating the formation characteristics of pyroclastic rocks. To investigate the predictability of the wet-rock P-wave velocity from the dry-rock P-wave velocity for pyroclastic rocks P-wave velocity measurements were conducted on 27 different pyroclastic rocks. In addition, dry-rock S-wave velocity measurements were conducted. The test results were modeled using Gassmann's and Wood's theories and it was seen that estimates for saturated P-wave velocity from the theories fit well measured data. For samples having values of less and greater than 20%, practical equations were derived for reliably estimating wet-rock P-wave velocity as function of dry-rock P-wave velocity.

  13. Estimation of settling velocity of sediment particles in estuarine and coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiha, Hussain J.; Shanmugam, Palanisamy

    2018-04-01

    A model for estimating the settling velocity of sediment particles (spherical and non-spherical) in estuarine and coastal waters is developed and validated using experimental data. The model combines the physical, optical and hydrodynamic properties of the particles and medium to estimate the sediment settling velocity. The well-known Stokes law is broadened to account for the influencing factors of settling velocity such as particle size, shape and density. To derive the model parameters, laboratory experiments were conducted using natural flaky seashells, spherical beach sands and ball-milled seashell powders. Spectral light backscattering measurements of settling particles in a water tank were made showing a distinct optical feature with a peak shifting from 470-490 nm to 500-520 nm for particle populations from spherical to flaky grains. This significant optical feature was used as a proxy to make a shape determination in the present model. Other parameters experimentally determined included specific gravity (ΔSG) , Corey shape factor (CSF) , median grain diameter (D50) , drag coefficient (Cd) and Reynolds number (Re) . The CSF values considered ranged from 0.2 for flaky to 1.0 for perfectly spherical grains and Reynolds numbers from 2.0 to 105 for the laminar to turbulent flow regimes. The specific gravity of submerged particles was optically derived and used along with these parameters to estimate the sediment settling velocity. Comparison with the experiment data showed that the present model estimated settling velocities of spherical and non-spherical particles that were closely consistent with the measured values. Findings revealed that for a given D50, the flaky particles caused a greater decrease in settling velocity than the spherical particles which suggests that the particle shape factor has a profound role in influencing the sediment settling velocity and drag coefficients, especially in transitional and turbulent flow regimes. The present model can

  14. Feasibility of using acoustic velocity meters for estimating highly organic suspended-solids concentrations in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Eduardo

    1996-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted at the Levee 4 canal site below control structure G-88 in the Everglades agricultural area in northwestern Broward County, Florida, to study the relation of acoustic attenuation to suspended-solids concentrations. Acoustic velocity meter and temperature data were obtained with concurrent water samples analyzed for suspended-solids concentrations. Two separate acoustic velocity meter frequencies were used, 200 and 500 kilohertz, to determine the sensitivity of acoustic attenuation to frequency for the measured suspended-solids concentration range. Suspended-solids concentrations for water samples collected at the Levee 4 canal site from July 1993 to September 1994 ranged from 22 to 1,058 milligrams per liter, and organic content ranged from about 30 to 93 percent. Regression analyses showed that attenuation data from the acoustic velocity meter (automatic gain control) and temperature data alone do not provide enough information to adequately describe the concentrations of suspended solids. However, if velocity is also included as one of the independent variables in the regression model, a satisfactory correlation can be obtained. Thus, it is feasible to use acoustic velocity meter instrumentation to estimate suspended-solids concentrations in streams, even when suspended solids are primarily composed of organic material. Using the most comprehensive data set available for the study (500 kiloherz data), the best fit regression model produces a standard error of 69.7 milligrams per liter, with actual errors ranging from 2 to 128 milligrams per liter. Both acoustic velocity meter transmission frequencies of 200 and 500 hilohertz produced similar results, suggesting that transducers of either frequency could be used to collect attenuation data at the study site. Results indicate that calibration will be required for each acoustic velocity meter system to the unique suspended-solids regime existing at each site. More robust solutions may

  15. Modification of Turbulent Pipe Flow Equations to Estimate the Vertical Velocity Profiles Under Woody Debris Jams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervania, A.; Knack, I. M. W.

    2017-12-01

    The presence of woody debris (WD) jams in rivers and streams increases the risk of backwater flooding and reduces the navigability of a channel, but adds fish and macroinvertebrate habitat to the stream. When designing river engineering projects engineers use hydraulic models to predict flow behavior around these obstructions. However, the complexities of flow through and beneath WD jams are still poorly understood. By increasing the ability to predict flow behavior around WD jams, landowners and engineers are empowered to develop sustainable practices regarding the removal or placement of WD in rivers and flood plains to balance the desirable and undesirable effects to society and the environment. The objective of this study is to address some of this knowledge gap by developing a method to estimate the vertical velocity profile of flow under WD jams. When flow passes under WD jams, it becomes affected by roughness elements on all sides, similar to turbulent flows in pipe systems. Therefore, the method was developed using equations that define the velocity profiles of turbulent pipe flows: the law of the wall, the logarithmic law, and the velocity defect law. Flume simulations of WD jams were conducted and the vertical velocity profiles were measured along the centerline. A calculated velocity profile was fit to the measured profile through the calibration of eight parameters. An optimal value or range of values have been determined for several of these parameters using cross-validation techniques. The results indicate there may be some promise to using this method in hydraulic models.

  16. Direct Importance Estimation with Gaussian Mixture Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Makoto; Sugiyama, Masashi

    The ratio of two probability densities is called the importance and its estimation has gathered a great deal of attention these days since the importance can be used for various data processing purposes. In this paper, we propose a new importance estimation method using Gaussian mixture models (GMMs). Our method is an extention of the Kullback-Leibler importance estimation procedure (KLIEP), an importance estimation method using linear or kernel models. An advantage of GMMs is that covariance matrices can also be learned through an expectation-maximization procedure, so the proposed method — which we call the Gaussian mixture KLIEP (GM-KLIEP) — is expected to work well when the true importance function has high correlation. Through experiments, we show the validity of the proposed approach.

  17. Power spectral density of velocity fluctuations estimated from phase Doppler data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedelsky, Jan; Lizal, Frantisek; Jicha, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) and its modifications such as PhaseDoppler Particle Anemometry (P/DPA) is point-wise method for optical nonintrusive measurement of particle velocity with high data rate. Conversion of the LDA velocity data from temporal to frequency domain - calculation of power spectral density (PSD) of velocity fluctuations, is a non trivial task due to nonequidistant data sampling in time. We briefly discuss possibilities for the PSD estimation and specify limitations caused by seeding density and other factors of the flow and LDA setup. Arbitrary results of LDA measurements are compared with corresponding Hot Wire Anemometry (HWA) data in the frequency domain. Slot correlation (SC) method implemented in software program Kern by Nobach (2006) is used for the PSD estimation. Influence of several input parameters on resulting PSDs is described. Optimum setup of the software for our data of particle-laden air flow in realistic human airway model is documented. Typical character of the flow is described using PSD plots of velocity fluctuations with comments on specific properties of the flow. Some recommendations for improvements of future experiments to acquire better PSD results are given.

  18. Power spectral density of velocity fluctuations estimated from phase Doppler data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA and its modifications such as PhaseDoppler Particle Anemometry (P/DPA is point-wise method for optical nonintrusive measurement of particle velocity with high data rate. Conversion of the LDA velocity data from temporal to frequency domain – calculation of power spectral density (PSD of velocity fluctuations, is a non trivial task due to nonequidistant data sampling in time. We briefly discuss possibilities for the PSD estimation and specify limitations caused by seeding density and other factors of the flow and LDA setup. Arbitrary results of LDA measurements are compared with corresponding Hot Wire Anemometry (HWA data in the frequency domain. Slot correlation (SC method implemented in software program Kern by Nobach (2006 is used for the PSD estimation. Influence of several input parameters on resulting PSDs is described. Optimum setup of the software for our data of particle-laden air flow in realistic human airway model is documented. Typical character of the flow is described using PSD plots of velocity fluctuations with comments on specific properties of the flow. Some recommendations for improvements of future experiments to acquire better PSD results are given.

  19. Calibrated Tully-fisher Relations For Improved Photometric Estimates Of Disk Rotation Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Reinabelle; Mandelbaum, R.; Gunn, J. E.; Pizagno, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present calibrated scaling relations (also referred to as Tully-Fisher relations or TFRs) between rotation velocity and photometric quantities-- absolute magnitude, stellar mass, and synthetic magnitude (a linear combination of absolute magnitude and color)-- of disk galaxies at z 0.1. First, we selected a parent disk sample of 170,000 galaxies from SDSS DR7, with redshifts between 0.02 and 0.10 and r band absolute magnitudes between -18.0 and -22.5. Then, we constructed a child disk sample of 189 galaxies that span the parameter space-- in absolute magnitude, color, and disk size-- covered by the parent sample, and for which we have obtained kinematic data. Long-slit spectroscopy were obtained from the Dual Imaging Spectrograph (DIS) at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m for 99 galaxies, and from Pizagno et al. (2007) for 95 galaxies (five have repeat observations). We find the best photometric estimator of disk rotation velocity to be a synthetic magnitude with a color correction that is consistent with the Bell et al. (2003) color-based stellar mass ratio. The improved rotation velocity estimates have a wide range of scientific applications, and in particular, in combination with weak lensing measurements, they enable us to constrain the ratio of optical-to-virial velocity in disk galaxies.

  20. Hillslope response to sprinkling and natural rainfall using velocity and celerity estimates in a slate-bedrock catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaini, Anna; Hissler, Christophe; Fenicia, Fabrizio; Juilleret, Jérôme; Iffly, Jean François; Pfister, Laurent; Beven, Keith

    2018-03-01

    Subsurface flow is often recognized as a dominant runoff generation process. However, observing subsurface properties, and understanding how they control flow pathways, remains challenging. This paper investigates how surface slope and bedrock cleavage control subsurface flow pathways in a slate bedrock headwater catchment in Luxembourg, characterised by a double-peak streamflow response. We use a range of experimental techniques, including field observations of soil and bedrock characteristics, and a sprinkling experiment at a site located 40 m upslope from the stream channel. The sprinkling experiment uses Br- as a tracer, which is measured at a well downslope from the plot and at various locations along the stream, together with well and stream hydrometric responses. The sprinkling experiment is used to estimate velocities and celerities, which in turn are used to infer flow pathways. Our results indicate that the single or first peak of double-peak events is rainfall-driven (controlled by rainfall) while the second peak is storage-driven (controlled by storage). The comparison between velocity and celerity estimates suggests a fast flowpath component connecting the hillslope to the stream, but velocity information was too scarce to fully support such a hypothesis. In addition, different estimates of celerities suggest a seasonal influence of both rainfall intensity rate and residual water storage on the celerity responses at the hillslope scale. At the catchment outlet, the estimated of the total mass of Br- recovered in the stream was about 2.5% of the application. Further downstream, the estimate mass of Br- was about 4.0% of the application. This demonstrates that flowpaths do not appear to align with the slope gradient. In contrast, they appear to follow the strike of the bedrock cleavage. Our results have expanded our understanding of the importance of the subsurface, in particular the underlying bedrock systems, and the importance of cleavage orientation

  1. MIDAS robust trend estimator for accurate GPS station velocities without step detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewitt, Geoffrey; Kreemer, Corné; Hammond, William C.; Gazeaux, Julien

    2016-03-01

    Automatic estimation of velocities from GPS coordinate time series is becoming required to cope with the exponentially increasing flood of available data, but problems detectable to the human eye are often overlooked. This motivates us to find an automatic and accurate estimator of trend that is resistant to common problems such as step discontinuities, outliers, seasonality, skewness, and heteroscedasticity. Developed here, Median Interannual Difference Adjusted for Skewness (MIDAS) is a variant of the Theil-Sen median trend estimator, for which the ordinary version is the median of slopes vij = (xj-xi)/(tj-ti) computed between all data pairs i > j. For normally distributed data, Theil-Sen and least squares trend estimates are statistically identical, but unlike least squares, Theil-Sen is resistant to undetected data problems. To mitigate both seasonality and step discontinuities, MIDAS selects data pairs separated by 1 year. This condition is relaxed for time series with gaps so that all data are used. Slopes from data pairs spanning a step function produce one-sided outliers that can bias the median. To reduce bias, MIDAS removes outliers and recomputes the median. MIDAS also computes a robust and realistic estimate of trend uncertainty. Statistical tests using GPS data in the rigid North American plate interior show ±0.23 mm/yr root-mean-square (RMS) accuracy in horizontal velocity. In blind tests using synthetic data, MIDAS velocities have an RMS accuracy of ±0.33 mm/yr horizontal, ±1.1 mm/yr up, with a 5th percentile range smaller than all 20 automatic estimators tested. Considering its general nature, MIDAS has the potential for broader application in the geosciences.

  2. Methodology to estimate the relative pressure field from noisy experimental velocity data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolin, C D; Raguin, L G

    2008-01-01

    The determination of intravascular pressure fields is important to the characterization of cardiovascular pathology. We present a two-stage method that solves the inverse problem of estimating the relative pressure field from noisy velocity fields measured by phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) on an irregular domain with limited spatial resolution, and includes a filter for the experimental noise. For the pressure calculation, the Poisson pressure equation is solved by embedding the irregular flow domain into a regular domain. To lessen the propagation of the noise inherent to the velocity measurements, three filters - a median filter and two physics-based filters - are evaluated using a 2-D Couette flow. The two physics-based filters outperform the median filter for the estimation of the relative pressure field for realistic signal-to-noise ratios (SNR = 5 to 30). The most accurate pressure field results from a filter that applies in a least-squares sense three constraints simultaneously: consistency between measured and filtered velocity fields, divergence-free and additional smoothness conditions. This filter leads to a 5-fold gain in accuracy for the estimated relative pressure field compared to without noise filtering, in conditions consistent with PC-MRI of the carotid artery: SNR = 5, 20 x 20 discretized flow domain (25 X 25 computational domain).

  3. Upper mantle velocity structure beneath Italy from direct and secondary P-wave teleseismic tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. De Gori

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available High-quality teleseismic data digitally recorded by the National Seismic Network during 1988-1995 have been analysed to tomographically reconstruct the aspherical velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath the Italian region. To improve the quality and the reliability of the tomographic images, both direct (P, PKPdf and secondary (pP,sP,PcP,PP,PKPbc,PKPab travel-time data were used in the inversion. Over 7000 relative residuals were computed with respect to the IASP91 Earth velocity model and inverted using a modified version of the ACH technique. Incorporation of data of secondary phases resulted in a significant improvement of the sampling of the target volume and of the spatial resolution of the heterogeneous zones. The tomographic images show that most of the lateral variations in the velocity field are confined in the first ~250 km of depth. Strong low velocity anomalies are found beneath the Po plain, Tuscany and Eastern Sicily in the depth range between 35 and 85 km. High velocity anomalies dominate the upper mantle beneath the Central-Western Alps, Northern-Central Apennines and Southern Tyrrhenian sea at lithospheric depths between 85 and 150 km. At greater depth, positive anomalies are still observed below the northernmost part of the Apenninic chain and Southern Tyrrhenian sea. Deeper anomalies present in the 3D velocity model computed by inverting only the first arrivals dataset, generally appear less pronounced in the new tomographic reconstructions. We interpret this as the result of the ray sampling improvement on the reduction of the vertical smearing effects.

  4. Electromechanical wave imaging and electromechanical wave velocity estimation in a large animal model of myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costet, Alexandre; Melki, Lea; Sayseng, Vincent; Hamid, Nadira; Nakanishi, Koki; Wan, Elaine; Hahn, Rebecca; Homma, Shunichi; Konofagou, Elisa

    2017-12-01

    Echocardiography is often used in the clinic for detection and characterization of myocardial infarction. Electromechanical wave imaging (EWI) is a non-invasive ultrasound-based imaging technique based on time-domain incremental motion and strain estimation that can evaluate changes in contractility in the heart. In this study, electromechanical activation is assessed in infarcted heart to determine whether EWI is capable of detecting and monitoring infarct formation. Additionally, methods for estimating electromechanical wave (EW) velocity are presented, and changes in the EW propagation velocity after infarct formation are studied. Five (n  =  5) adult mongrels were used in this study. Successful infarct formation was achieved in three animals by ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery. Dogs were survived for a few days after LAD ligation and monitored daily with EWI. At the end of the survival period, dogs were sacrificed and TTC (tetrazolium chloride) staining confirmed the formation and location of the infarct. In all three dogs, as soon as day 1 EWI was capable of detecting late-activated and non-activated regions, which grew over the next few days. On final day images, the extent of these regions corresponded to the location of infarct as confirmed by staining. EW velocities in border zones of infarct were significantly lower post-infarct formation when compared to baseline, whereas velocities in healthy tissues were not. These results indicate that EWI and EW velocity might help with the detection of infarcts and their border zones, which may be useful for characterizing arrhythmogenic substrate.

  5. Velocity-Aided Attitude Estimation for Helicopter Aircraft Using Microelectromechanical System Inertial-Measurement Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Cheol Lee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an algorithm for velocity-aided attitude estimation for helicopter aircraft using a microelectromechanical system inertial-measurement unit. In general, high- performance gyroscopes are used for estimating the attitude of a helicopter, but this type of sensor is very expensive. When designing a cost-effective attitude system, attitude can be estimated by fusing a low cost accelerometer and a gyro, but the disadvantage of this method is its relatively low accuracy. The accelerometer output includes a component that occurs primarily as the aircraft turns, as well as the gravitational acceleration. When estimating attitude, the accelerometer measurement terms other than gravitational ones can be considered as disturbances. Therefore, errors increase in accordance with the flight dynamics. The proposed algorithm is designed for using velocity as an aid for high accuracy at low cost. It effectively eliminates the disturbances of accelerometer measurements using the airspeed. The algorithm was verified using helicopter experimental data. The algorithm performance was confirmed through a comparison with an attitude estimate obtained from an attitude heading reference system based on a high accuracy optic gyro, which was employed as core attitude equipment in the helicopter.

  6. Velocity-Aided Attitude Estimation for Helicopter Aircraft Using Microelectromechanical System Inertial-Measurement Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Cheol; Hong, Sung Kyung

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for velocity-aided attitude estimation for helicopter aircraft using a microelectromechanical system inertial-measurement unit. In general, high- performance gyroscopes are used for estimating the attitude of a helicopter, but this type of sensor is very expensive. When designing a cost-effective attitude system, attitude can be estimated by fusing a low cost accelerometer and a gyro, but the disadvantage of this method is its relatively low accuracy. The accelerometer output includes a component that occurs primarily as the aircraft turns, as well as the gravitational acceleration. When estimating attitude, the accelerometer measurement terms other than gravitational ones can be considered as disturbances. Therefore, errors increase in accordance with the flight dynamics. The proposed algorithm is designed for using velocity as an aid for high accuracy at low cost. It effectively eliminates the disturbances of accelerometer measurements using the airspeed. The algorithm was verified using helicopter experimental data. The algorithm performance was confirmed through a comparison with an attitude estimate obtained from an attitude heading reference system based on a high accuracy optic gyro, which was employed as core attitude equipment in the helicopter. PMID:27973429

  7. Photometric estimation of defect size in radiation direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuev, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    Factors, affecting accuracy of photometric estimation of defect size in radiation transmission direction, are analyzed. Experimentally obtained dependences of contrast of defect image on its size in radiation transmission direction are presented. Practical recommendations on improving accuracy of photometric estimation of defect size in radiation transmission direction, are developed

  8. Estimation of unsteady lift on a pitching airfoil from wake velocity surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Panda, J.; Rumsey, C. L.

    1993-01-01

    The results of a joint experimental and computational study on the flowfield over a periodically pitched NACA0012 airfoil, and the resultant lift variation, are reported in this paper. The lift variation over a cycle of oscillation, and hence the lift hysteresis loop, is estimated from the velocity distribution in the wake measured or computed for successive phases of the cycle. Experimentally, the estimated lift hysteresis loops are compared with available data from the literature as well as with limited force balance measurements. Computationally, the estimated lift variations are compared with the corresponding variation obtained from the surface pressure distribution. Four analytical formulations for the lift estimation from wake surveys are considered and relative successes of the four are discussed.

  9. Estimation of a melting probe's penetration velocity range to reach icy moons' subsurface ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhina, Olga; Chumachenko, Eugene

    2014-05-01

    In modern space science one of the actual branches is icy satellites explorations. The main interest is concentrated around Jovian's moons Europa and Ganymede, Saturn's moons Titan and Enceladus that are covered by thick icy layer according to "Voyager1", "Voyager2", "Galileo" and "Cassini" missions. There is a big possibility that under icy shell could be a deep ocean. Also conditions on these satellites allow speculating about possible habitability, and considering these moons from an astrobiological point of view. One of the possible tasks of planned missions is a subsurface study. For this goal it is necessary to design special equipment that could be suitable for planetary application. One of the possible means is to use a melting probe which operates by melting and moves by gravitational force. Such a probe should be relatively small, should not weight too much and should require not too much energy. In terrestrial case such kind of probe has been successfully used for glaciers study. And it is possible to extrapolate the usage of such probe to extraterrestrial application. One of the tasks is to estimate melting probe's penetration velocity. Although there are other unsolved problems such as analyzing how the probe will move in low gravity and low atmospheric pressure; knowing whether hole will be closed or not when probe penetrate thick enough; and considering what order could be a penetration velocity. This study explores two techniques of melting probe's movement. One of them based on elasto-plastic theory and so-called "solid water" theory, and other one takes phase changing into account. These two techniques allow estimating melting probe's velocity range and study whole process. Based on these technique several cases of melting probe movement were considered, melting probe's velocity range estimated, influence of different factors studied and discussed and an easy way to optimize parameters of the melting probe proposed.

  10. Estimation of groundwater velocities from Yucca Flat to the Amargosa Desert using geochemistry and environmental isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershey, R.L.; Acheampong, S.Y.

    1997-06-01

    Geochemical and isotopic data from groundwater sampling locations can be used to estimate groundwater flow velocities for independent comparison to velocities calculated by other methods. The objective of this study was to calculate groundwater flow velocities using geochemistry and environmental isotopes from the southern end of Yucca Flat to the Amargosa Desert, considering mixing of different groundwater inputs from sources each and southeast of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The approach used to accomplish the objective of this study consisted of five steps: (1) reviewing and selecting locations where carbon isotopic groundwater analyses, reliable ionic analysis, and well completion information are available; (2) calculating chemical speciation with the computer code WATEQ4F (Ball and Nordstrom, 1991) to determine the saturation state of mineral phases for each ground water location; (3) grouping wells into reasonable flowpaths and mixing scenarios from different groundwater sources; (4) using the computer code NETPATH (Plummer et al., 1991) to simulate mixing and the possible chemical reactions along the flowpath, and to calculate the changes in carbon-13/carbon-12 isotopic ratios (δ 13 C) as a result of these reactions; and (5) using carbon-14 ( 14 C) data to calculate velocity

  11. High temperature high velocity direct power extraction using an open-cycle oxy-combustion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, Norman [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2017-09-29

    The implementation of oxy-fuel technology in fossil-fuel power plants may contribute to increased system efficiencies and a reduction of pollutant emissions. One technology that has potential to utilize the temperature of undiluted oxy-combustion flames is open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generators. These systems can be configured as a topping cycle and provide high enthalpy, electrically conductive flows for direct conversion of electricity. This report presents the design and modeling strategies of a MHD combustor operating at temperatures exceeding 3000 K. Throughout the study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were extensively used as a design and optimization tool. A lab-scale 60 kWth model was designed, manufactured and tested as part of this project. A fully-coupled numerical method was developed in ANSYS FLUENT to characterize the heat transfer in the system. This study revealed that nozzle heat transfer may be predicted through a 40% reduction of the semi-empirical Bartz correlation. Experimental results showed good agreement with the numerical evaluation, with the combustor exhibiting a favorable performance when tested during extended time periods. A transient numerical method was employed to analyze fuel injector geometries for the 60-kW combustor. The ANSYS FLUENT study revealed that counter-swirl inlets achieve a uniform pressure and velocity ratio when the ports of the injector length to diameter ratio (L/D) is 4. An angle of 115 degrees was found to increase distribution efficiency. The findings show that this oxy-combustion concept is capable of providing a high-enthalpy environment for seeding, in order to render the flow to be conductive. Based on previous findings, temperatures in the range of 2800-3000 K may enable magnetohydrodynamic power extraction. The heat loss fraction in this oxy-combustion system, based on CFD and analytical calculations, at optimal operating conditions, was estimated to be less than 10 percent

  12. Examples of Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter M.; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    To measure blood flow velocity in vessels with conventional ultrasound, the velocity is estimated along the direction of the emitted ultrasound wave. It is therefore impossible to obtain accurate information on blood flow velocity and direction, when the angle between blood flow and ultrasound wa...

  13. Spacecraft angular velocity estimation algorithm for star tracker based on optical flow techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yujie; Li, Jian; Wang, Gangyi

    2018-02-01

    An integrated navigation system often uses the traditional gyro and star tracker for high precision navigation with the shortcomings of large volume, heavy weight and high-cost. With the development of autonomous navigation for deep space and small spacecraft, star tracker has been gradually used for attitude calculation and angular velocity measurement directly. At the same time, with the dynamic imaging requirements of remote sensing satellites and other imaging satellites, how to measure the angular velocity in the dynamic situation to improve the accuracy of the star tracker is the hotspot of future research. We propose the approach to measure angular rate with a nongyro and improve the dynamic performance of the star tracker. First, the star extraction algorithm based on morphology is used to extract the star region, and the stars in the two images are matched according to the method of angular distance voting. The calculation of the displacement of the star image is measured by the improved optical flow method. Finally, the triaxial angular velocity of the star tracker is calculated by the star vector using the least squares method. The method has the advantages of fast matching speed, strong antinoise ability, and good dynamic performance. The triaxial angular velocity of star tracker can be obtained accurately with these methods. So, the star tracker can achieve better tracking performance and dynamic attitude positioning accuracy to lay a good foundation for the wide application of various satellites and complex space missions.

  14. Uncertainty estimation of the velocity model for the TrigNet GPS network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, Matthias; Malservisi, Rocco; Hugentobler, Urs; Wonnacott, Richard

    2010-05-01

    Satellite based geodetic techniques - above all GPS - provide an outstanding tool to measure crustal motions. They are widely used to derive geodetic velocity models that are applied in geodynamics to determine rotations of tectonic blocks, to localize active geological features, and to estimate rheological properties of the crust and the underlying asthenosphere. However, it is not a trivial task to derive GPS velocities and their uncertainties from positioning time series. In general time series are assumed to be represented by linear models (sometimes offsets, annual, and semi-annual signals are included) and noise. It has been shown that models accounting only for white noise tend to underestimate the uncertainties of rates derived from long time series and that different colored noise components (flicker noise, random walk, etc.) need to be considered. However, a thorough error analysis including power spectra analyses and maximum likelihood estimates is quite demanding and are usually not carried out for every site, but the uncertainties are scaled by latitude dependent factors. Analyses of the South Africa continuous GPS network TrigNet indicate that the scaled uncertainties overestimate the velocity errors. So we applied a method similar to the Allan Variance that is commonly used in the estimation of clock uncertainties and is able to account for time dependent probability density functions (colored noise) to the TrigNet time series. Finally, we compared these estimates to the results obtained by spectral analyses using CATS. Comparisons with synthetic data show that the noise can be represented quite well by a power law model in combination with a seasonal signal in agreement with previous studies.

  15. Artificial Intelligence Estimation of Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity using Carotid Waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavallali, Peyman; Razavi, Marianne; Pahlevan, Niema M

    2018-01-17

    In this article, we offer an artificial intelligence method to estimate the carotid-femoral Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) non-invasively from one uncalibrated carotid waveform measured by tonometry and few routine clinical variables. Since the signal processing inputs to this machine learning algorithm are sensor agnostic, the presented method can accompany any medical instrument that provides a calibrated or uncalibrated carotid pressure waveform. Our results show that, for an unseen hold back test set population in the age range of 20 to 69, our model can estimate PWV with a Root-Mean-Square Error (RMSE) of 1.12 m/sec compared to the reference method. The results convey the fact that this model is a reliable surrogate of PWV. Our study also showed that estimated PWV was significantly associated with an increased risk of CVDs.

  16. The Event Detection and the Apparent Velocity Estimation Based on Computer Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojo, M.

    2012-08-01

    The high spatial and time resolution data obtained by the telescopes aboard Hinode revealed the new interesting dynamics in solar atmosphere. In order to detect such events and estimate the velocity of dynamics automatically, we examined the estimation methods of the optical flow based on the OpenCV that is the computer vision library. We applied the methods to the prominence eruption observed by NoRH, and the polar X-ray jet observed by XRT. As a result, it is clear that the methods work well for solar images if the images are optimized for the methods. It indicates that the optical flow estimation methods in the OpenCV library are very useful to analyze the solar phenomena.

  17. Fast Spectral Velocity Estimation Using Adaptive Techniques: In-Vivo Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Udesen, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    Adaptive spectral estimation techniques are known to provide good spectral resolution and contrast even when the observation window(OW) is very sbort. In this paper two adaptive techniques are tested and compared to the averaged perlodogram (Welch) for blood velocity estimation. The Blood Power...... the blood process over slow-time and averaging over depth to find the power spectral density estimate. In this paper, the two adaptive methods are explained, and performance Is assessed in controlled steady How experiments and in-vivo measurements. The three methods were tested on a circulating How rig...... with a blood mimicking fluid flowing in the tube. The scanning section is submerged in water to allow ultrasound data acquisition. Data was recorded using a BK8804 linear array transducer and the RASMUS ultrasound scanner. The controlled experiments showed that the OW could be significantly reduced when...

  18. In-vivo validation of fast spectral velocity estimation techniques – preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Gran, Fredrik; Pedersen, Mads Møller

    2008-01-01

    Spectral Doppler is a common way to estimate blood velocities in medical ultrasound (US). The standard way of estimating spectrograms is by using Welch's method (WM). WM is dependent on a long observation window (OW) (about 100 transmissions) to produce spectrograms with sufficient spectral...... resolution and contrast. Two adaptive filterbank methods have been suggested to circumvent this problem: the Blood spectral Power Capon method (BPC) and the Blood Amplitude and Phase Estimation method (BAPES). Previously, simulations and flow rig experiments have indicated that the two adaptive methods can...... was scanned using the experimental ultrasound scanner RASMUS and a B-K Medical 5 MHz linear array transducer with an angle of insonation not exceeding 60deg. All 280 spectrograms were then randomised and presented to a radiologist blinded for method and OW for visual evaluation: useful or not useful. WMbw...

  19. Crustal composition in the Hidaka Metamorphic Belt estimated from seismic velocity by laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Sato, H.; Iwasaki, T.; Toyoshima, T.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the dynamics of the lithosphere in subduction systems, the knowledge of rock composition is significant. However, rock composition of the overriding plate is still poorly understood. To estimate rock composition of the lithosphere, it is an effective method to compare the elastic wave velocities measured under the high pressure and temperature condition with the seismic velocities obtained by active source experiment and earthquake observation. Due to an arc-arc collision in central Hokkaido, middle to lower crust is exposed along the Hidaka Metamorphic Belt (HMB), providing exceptional opportunities to study crust composition of an island arc. Across the HMB, P-wave velocity model has been constructed by refraction/wide-angle reflection seismic profiling (Iwasaki et al., 2004). Furthermore, because of the interpretation of the crustal structure (Ito, 2000), we can follow a continuous pass from the surface to the middle-lower crust. We corrected representative rock samples from HMB and measured ultrasonic P-wave (Vp) and S-wave velocities (Vs) under the pressure up to 1.0 GPa in a temperature range from 25 to 400 °C. For example, the Vp values measured at 25 °C and 0.5 GPa are 5.88 km/s for the granite (74.29 wt.% SiO2), 6.02-6.34 km/s for the tonalites (66.31-68.92 wt.% SiO2), 6.34 km/s for the gneiss (64.69 wt.% SiO2), 6.41-7.05 km/s for the amphibolites (50.06-51.13 wt.% SiO2), and 7.42 km/s for the mafic granulite (50.94 wt.% SiO2). And, Vp of tonalites showed a correlation with SiO2 (wt.%). Comparing with the velocity profiles across the HMB (Iwasaki et al., 2004), we estimate that the lower to middle crust consists of amphibolite and tonalite, and the estimated acoustic impedance contrast between them suggests an existence of a clear reflective boundary, which accords well to the obtained seismic reflection profile (Iwasaki et al., 2014). And, we can obtain the same tendency from comparing measured Vp/Vs ratio and Vp/Vs ratio structure model

  20. Estimating discharge using multi-level velocity data from acoustic doppler instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jane Bang; Rasmussen, Keld Rømer; Ovesen, Niels Bering

    In the majority of Danish streams, weed growth affects the effective stream width and bed roughness thus imposes temporal variations on the stage-discharge relationship. Small stream-gradients and firm ecology based restrictions prevent that hydraulic structures are made at the discharge stations...... increases to more than 3 m. The Doppler instruments (Nortek) are placed on a vertical pole about 2 m off the right bank at three fixed elevations above the streambed (0.3, 0.6, and 1.3 m); the beams point horizontally towards the left bank perpendicularly to the average flow direction. At each depth......, the Doppler sensor records 10 minute average stream velocities in the central 10 m section of the stream. During summer periods with low flow, stream velocity has only been recorded at two depths since the water table drops below the uppermost sensor. A pressure transducer is also placed at the pole where...

  1. Determination of the swelling velocity of different wood species and tissues depending on the cutting direction on microtome section level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckenberg, Peter; Wenderdel, Christoph; Zauer, Mario

    2018-06-01

    Swelling velocity in dependence on the anatomical cutting direction of yew [Taxus baccata L.] and boxwood [Buxus sempervirens L.] was determined at temperature of 20 °C and at relative humidity of 10% and 100%. The investigations, conducted on a microtome section level, showed a similar behaviour for specimens of both wood species. It was possible to determine that the swelling velocity for yew and boxwood increases in its anatomical cutting directions. The longitudinal direction showed the lowest value, the tangential direction, by distinction, the highest value. Furthermore, a significant influence of early wood and late wood content on the swelling velocity for yew was detected.

  2. Wake Component Detection in X-Band SAR Images for Ship Heading and Velocity Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Daniela Graziano

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A new algorithm for ship wake detection is developed with the aim of ship heading and velocity estimation. It exploits the Radon transform and utilizes merit indexes in the intensity domain to validate the detected linear features as real components of the ship wake. Finally, ship velocity is estimated by state-of-the-art techniques of azimuth shift and Kelvin arm wavelength. The algorithm is applied to 13 X-band SAR images from the TerraSAR-X and COSMO/SkyMed missions with different polarization and incidence angles. Results show that the vast majority of wake features are correctly detected and validated also in critical situations, i.e., when multiple wake appearances or dark areas not related to wake features are imaged. The ship route estimations are validated with truth-at-sea in seven cases. Finally, it is also verified that the algorithm does not detect wakes in the surroundings of 10 ships without wake appearances.

  3. Distributed Extended Kalman Filter for Position, Velocity, Time, Estimation in Satellite Navigation Receivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Jakubov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Common techniques for position-velocity-time estimation in satellite navigation, iterative least squares and the extended Kalman filter, involve matrix operations. The matrix inversion and inclusion of a matrix library pose requirements on a computational power and operating platform of the navigation processor. In this paper, we introduce a novel distributed algorithm suitable for implementation in simple parallel processing units each for a tracked satellite. Such a unit performs only scalar sum, subtraction, multiplication, and division. The algorithm can be efficiently implemented in hardware logic. Given the fast position-velocity-time estimator, frequent estimates can foster dynamic performance of a vector tracking receiver. The algorithm has been designed from a factor graph representing the extended Kalman filter by splitting vector nodes into scalar ones resulting in a cyclic graph with few iterations needed. Monte Carlo simulations have been conducted to investigate convergence and accuracy. Simulation case studies for a vector tracking architecture and experimental measurements with a real-time software receiver developed at CTU in Prague were conducted. The algorithm offers compromises in stability, accuracy, and complexity depending on the number of iterations. In scenarios with a large number of tracked satellites, it can outperform the traditional methods at low complexity.

  4. The First Result of Relative Positioning and Velocity Estimation Based on CAPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiaojiao; Ge, Jian; Wang, Liang; Wang, Ningbo; Zhou, Kai; Yuan, Hong

    2018-01-01

    The Chinese Area Positioning System (CAPS) is a new positioning system developed by the Chinese Academy of Sciences based on the communication satellites in geosynchronous orbit. The CAPS has been regarded as a pilot system to test the new technology for the design, construction and update of the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS). The system structure of CAPS, including the space, ground control station and user segments, is almost like the traditional Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs), but with the clock on the ground, the navigation signal in C waveband, and different principles of operation. The major difference is that the CAPS navigation signal is first generated at the ground control station, before being transmitted to the satellite in orbit and finally forwarded by the communication satellite transponder to the user. This design moves the clock from the satellite in orbit to the ground. The clock error can therefore be easily controlled and mitigated to improve the positioning accuracy. This paper will present the performance of CAPS-based relative positioning and velocity estimation as assessed in Beijing, China. The numerical results show that, (1) the accuracies of relative positioning, using only code measurements, are 1.25 and 1.8 m in the horizontal and vertical components, respectively; (2) meanwhile, they are about 2.83 and 3.15 cm in static mode and 6.31 and 10.78 cm in kinematic mode, respectively, when using the carrier-phase measurements with ambiguities fixed; and (3) the accuracy of the velocity estimation is about 0.04 and 0.11 m/s in static and kinematic modes, respectively. These results indicate the potential application of CAPS for high-precision positioning and velocity estimation and the availability of a new navigation mode based on communication satellites. PMID:29757204

  5. Direction of arrival estimation based on information geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coutiño Minguez, M.A.; Pribic, R; Leus, G.J.T.; Dong, Min; Zheng, Thomas Fang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new direction of arrival (DOA) estimation approach is devised using concepts from information geometry (IG). The proposed method uses geodesic distances in the statistical manifold of probability distributions parametrized by their covariance matrix to estimate the direction of

  6. Vector velocity volume flow estimation: Sources of error and corrections applied for arteriovenous fistulas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2016-01-01

    radius. The error sources were also studied in vivo under realistic clinical conditions, and the theoretical results were applied for correcting the volume flow errors. Twenty dialysis patients with arteriovenous fistulas were scanned to obtain vector flow maps of fistulas. When fitting an ellipsis......A method for vector velocity volume flow estimation is presented, along with an investigation of its sources of error and correction of actual volume flow measurements. Volume flow errors are quantified theoretically by numerical modeling, through flow phantom measurements, and studied in vivo...

  7. Improved accuracy in the estimation of blood velocity vectors using matched filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gori, P.

    2000-01-01

    the flow and the ultrasound beam (30, 45, 60, and 90 degrees). The parabolic flow has a peak velocity of 0.5 m/s and the pulse repetition frequency is 3.5 kHz. Simulating twenty emissions and calculating the cross-correlation using four pulse-echo lines for each estimate, the parabolic flow profile...... is found with a standard deviation of 0.014 m/s at 45 degrees (corresponding to an accuracy of 2.8%) and 0.022 m/s (corresponding to an accuracy of 4.4%) at 90 degrees, which is transverse to the ultrasound beam....

  8. Uncertainty Estimation of Shear-wave Velocity Structure from Bayesian Inversion of Microtremor Array Dispersion Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosso, S. E.; Molnar, S.; Cassidy, J.

    2010-12-01

    Bayesian inversion of microtremor array dispersion data is applied, with evaluation of data errors and model parameterization, to produce the most-probable shear-wave velocity (VS) profile together with quantitative uncertainty estimates. Generally, the most important property characterizing earthquake site response is the subsurface VS structure. The microtremor array method determines phase velocity dispersion of Rayleigh surface waves from multi-instrument recordings of urban noise. Inversion of dispersion curves for VS structure is a non-unique and nonlinear problem such that meaningful evaluation of confidence intervals is required. Quantitative uncertainty estimation requires not only a nonlinear inversion approach that samples models proportional to their probability, but also rigorous estimation of the data error statistics and an appropriate model parameterization. A Bayesian formulation represents the solution of the inverse problem in terms of the posterior probability density (PPD) of the geophysical model parameters. Markov-chain Monte Carlo methods are used with an efficient implementation of Metropolis-Hastings sampling to provide an unbiased sample from the PPD to compute parameter uncertainties and inter-relationships. Nonparametric estimation of a data error covariance matrix from residual analysis is applied with rigorous a posteriori statistical tests to validate the covariance estimate and the assumption of a Gaussian error distribution. The most appropriate model parameterization is determined using the Bayesian information criterion (BIC), which provides the simplest model consistent with the resolving power of the data. Parameter uncertainties are found to be under-estimated when data error correlations are neglected and when compressional-wave velocity and/or density (nuisance) parameters are fixed in the inversion. Bayesian inversion of microtremor array data is applied at two sites in British Columbia, the area of highest seismic risk in

  9. Ultrasonic 3-D Vector Flow Method for Quantitative In Vivo Peak Velocity and Flow Rate Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon; Ewertsen, Caroline; Bouzari, Hamed

    2017-01-01

    Current clinical ultrasound (US) systems are limited to show blood flow movement in either 1-D or 2-D. In this paper, a method for estimating 3-D vector velocities in a plane using the transverse oscillation method, a 32×32 element matrix array, and the experimental US scanner SARUS is presented...... is validated in two phantom studies, where flow rates are measured in a flow-rig, providing a constant parabolic flow, and in a straight-vessel phantom ( ∅=8 mm) connected to a flow pump capable of generating time varying waveforms. Flow rates are estimated to be 82.1 ± 2.8 L/min in the flow-rig compared...

  10. Flow velocities estimated from chlorine-36 in the South-West Great Artesian Basin, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herczeg, A.L.; Love, A.J.; Sampson, L.; Cresswell, R.G.; Fifield, L.K.

    1999-01-01

    The Great Artesian Basin (GAB) is the largest groundwater basin in the world and is the lifeline for water resources in a large proportion of the arid interior of the Australian continent. Despite its obvious importance, there is a great deal of uncertainty in the estimates of horizontal groundwater flow velocities and recharge rates. We report the first reliable estimates of these sustainability indicators in the south west segment of the GAB. Groundwater was sampled from 23 wells along two transects parallel to the W-E hydraulic gradient for 36 Cl, 14 C, stable isotopes (δ 13 C, δ 18 O, δ 2 H) and major ion chemistry. The groundwater collected was from the undifferentiated Jurassic and Cretaceous (J and K) aquifer. These new data potentially contribute to the resolution of the interpretation of 36 Cl derived ages in a very large slow moving groundwater system and to the overall conceptual understanding of flow systems of the GAB

  11. Estimation of the blood velocity spectrum using a recursive lattice filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Buelund, Claus; Jørgensen, Allan

    1996-01-01

    acquired for showing the blood velocity distribution are inherently non-stationary, due to the pulsatility of the flow. All current signal processing schemes assume that the signal is stationary within the window of analysis, although this is an approximation. In this paper a recursive least......-stationarity are incorporated through an exponential decay factor, that sets the exponential horizon of the filter. A factor close to 1 gives a long horizon with low variance estimates, but can not track a highly non-stationary flow. Setting the factor is therefore a compromise between estimate variance and the filter...... with the actual distributions that always will be smooth. Setting the exponential decay factor to 0.99 gives satisfactory results for in-vivo data from the carotid artery. The filter can easily be implemented using a standard fixed-point signal processing chip for real-time processing...

  12. Quasi-direct numerical simulation of a pebble bed configuration. Part I: Flow (velocity) field analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shams, A.; Roelofs, F.; Komen, E.M.J.; Baglietto, E.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Quasi direct numerical simulations (q-DNS) of a pebble bed configuration has been performed. ► This q-DNS database may serve as a reference for the validation of different turbulence modeling approaches. ► A wide range of qualitative and quantitative data throughout the computational domain has been generated. ► Results for mean, RMS and covariance of velocity field are extensively reported in this paper. -- Abstract: High temperature reactors (HTR) are being considered for deployment around the world because of their excellent safety features. The fuel is embedded in a graphite moderator and can sustain very high temperatures. However, the appearance of hot spots in the pebble bed cores of HTR's may affect the integrity of the pebbles. A good prediction of the flow and heat transport in such a pebble bed core is a challenge for available turbulence models and such models need to be validated. In the present article, quasi direct numerical simulations (q-DNS) of a pebble bed configuration are reported, which may serve as a reference for the validation of different turbulence modeling approaches. Such approaches can be used in order to perform calculations for a randomly arranged pebble bed. Simulations are performed at a Reynolds number of 3088, based on pebble diameter, with a porosity level of 0.42. Detailed flow analyses have shown complex physics flow behavior and make this case challenging for turbulence model validation. Hence, a wide range of qualitative and quantitative data for velocity and temperature field have been extracted for this benchmark. In the present article (part I), results related to the flow field (mean, RMS and covariance of velocity) are documented and discussed in detail. Moreover, the discussion regarding the temperature field will be published in a separate article

  13. Ten years statistics of wind direction and wind velocity measurements performed at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, M.; Dilger, H.

    1979-06-01

    The measurements of wind direction and wind velocity performed at 60 m and 200 m height were evaluated for one year each and frequency distributions of the measured values were established. The velocity was divided into 1 m/s steps and the direction into 10 0 sectors. The frequency distribution of the wind direction reveals three maxima located in the southwest, northeast and north, respectively. The maximum of the frequency distribution of the wind velocity occurs between 4 and 5 m/s at 200 m height and between 3 and 4 m/s at 60 m height. (orig.) [de

  14. Workflow for near-surface velocity automatic estimation: Source-domain full-traveltime inversion followed by waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lu; Fei, Tong; Luo, Yi; Guo, Bowen

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a workflow for near-surface velocity automatic estimation using the early arrivals of seismic data. This workflow comprises two methods, source-domain full traveltime inversion (FTI) and early-arrival waveform inversion. Source

  15. Effects of Adaptation on Discrimination of Whisker Deflection Velocity and Angular Direction in a Model of the Barrel Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainak J. Patel

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Two important stimulus features represented within the rodent barrel cortex are velocity and angular direction of whisker deflection. Each cortical barrel receives information from thalamocortical (TC cells that relay information from a single whisker, and TC input is decoded by barrel regular-spiking (RS cells through a feedforward inhibitory architecture (with inhibition delivered by cortical fast-spiking or FS cells. TC cells encode deflection velocity through population synchrony, while deflection direction is encoded through the distribution of spike counts across the TC population. Barrel RS cells encode both deflection direction and velocity with spike rate, and are divided into functional domains by direction preference. Following repetitive whisker stimulation, system adaptation causes a weakening of synaptic inputs to RS cells and diminishes RS cell spike responses, though evidence suggests that stimulus discrimination may improve following adaptation. In this work, I construct a model of the TC, FS, and RS cells comprising a single barrel system—the model incorporates realistic synaptic connectivity and dynamics and simulates both angular direction (through the spatial pattern of TC activation and velocity (through synchrony of the TC population spikes of a deflection of the primary whisker, and I use the model to examine direction and velocity selectivity of barrel RS cells before and after adaptation. I find that velocity and direction selectivity of individual RS cells (measured over multiple trials sharpens following adaptation, but stimulus discrimination using a simple linear classifier by the RS population response during a single trial (a more biologically meaningful measure than single cell discrimination over multiple trials exhibits strikingly different behavior—velocity discrimination is similar both before and after adaptation, while direction classification improves substantially following adaptation. This is the

  16. Accelerometer-based estimation and modal velocity feedback vibration control of a stress-ribbon bridge with pneumatic muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohan; Schauer, Thomas; Goldack, Arndt; Bleicher, Achim; Schlaich, Mike

    2016-09-01

    Lightweight footbridges are very elegant but also prone to vibration. By employing active vibration control, smart footbridges could accomplish not only the architectural concept but also the required serviceability and comfort. Inertial sensors such as accelerometers allow the estimation of nodal velocities and displacements. A Kalman filter together with a band-limited multiple Fourier linear combiner (BMFLC) is applied to enable a drift-free estimation of these signals for the quasi-periodic motion under pedestrian excitation without extra information from other kinds of auxiliary sensors. The modal velocities of the structure are determined by using a second Kalman filter with the known applied actuator forces as inputs and the estimated nodal displacement and velocities as measurements. The obtained multi-modal velocities are then used for feedback control. An ultra-lightweight stress-ribbon footbridge built in the Peter-Behrens- Halle at the Technische Universitat Berlin served as the research object. Using two inertial sensors in optimal points we can estimate the dominant modal characteristics of this bridge. Real-time implementation and evaluation results of the proposed estimator will be presented in comparison to signals derived from classical displacement encoders. The real-time estimated modal velocities were applied in a multi-modal velocity feedback vibration control scheme with lightweight pneumatic muscle actuators. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of using inertial sensors for active vibration control of lightweight footbridges.

  17. Accelerometer-based estimation and modal velocity feedback vibration control of a stress-ribbon bridge with pneumatic muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiaohan; Goldack, Arndt; Schlaich, Mike; Schauer, Thomas; Bleicher, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Lightweight footbridges are very elegant but also prone to vibration. By employing active vibration control, smart footbridges could accomplish not only the architectural concept but also the required serviceability and comfort. Inertial sensors such as accelerometers allow the estimation of nodal velocities and displacements. A Kalman filter together with a band-limited multiple Fourier linear combiner (BMFLC) is applied to enable a drift-free estimation of these signals for the quasi-periodic motion under pedestrian excitation without extra information from other kinds of auxiliary sensors. The modal velocities of the structure are determined by using a second Kalman filter with the known applied actuator forces as inputs and the estimated nodal displacement and velocities as measurements. The obtained multi-modal velocities are then used for feedback control. An ultra-lightweight stress-ribbon footbridge built in the Peter-Behrens- Halle at the Technische Universitat Berlin served as the research object. Using two inertial sensors in optimal points we can estimate the dominant modal characteristics of this bridge. Real-time implementation and evaluation results of the proposed estimator will be presented in comparison to signals derived from classical displacement encoders. The real-time estimated modal velocities were applied in a multi-modal velocity feedback vibration control scheme with lightweight pneumatic muscle actuators. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of using inertial sensors for active vibration control of lightweight footbridges. (paper)

  18. Estimating of gas transfer velocity using triple isotopes of dissolved oxygen.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Abe, O.; Honda, M.; Saino, T.

    variations in oxygen isotopes are found to be higher than the direct estimations at low wind speed (<5 m s sup(-1)) and lower at high wind speeds (>13 m s sup(-1)) and showed significant spatial variability. The method presented here can be used to derive...

  19. Direct and precise measurement of displacement and velocity of flexible web in roll-to-roll manufacturing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Dongwoo; Lee, Eonseok; Choi, Young-Man; Lee, Taik-Min; Kim, Duk Young; Kim, Dongmin

    2013-01-01

    Interest in the production of printed electronics using a roll-to-roll system has gradually increased due to its low mass-production costs and compatibility with flexible substrate. To improve the accuracy of roll-to-roll manufacturing systems, the movement of the web needs to be measured precisely in advance. In this paper, a novel measurement method is developed to measure the displacement and velocity of the web precisely and directly. The proposed algorithm is based on the traditional single field encoder principle, and the scale grating has been replaced with a printed grating on the web. Because a printed grating cannot be as accurate as a scale grating in a traditional encoder, there will inevitably be variations in pitch and line-width, and the motion of the web should be measured even though there are variations in pitch and line-width in the printed grating patterns. For this reason, the developed algorithm includes a precise method of estimating the variations in pitch. In addtion, a method of correcting the Lissajous curve is presented for precision phase interpolation to improve measurement accuracy by correcting Lissajous circle to unit circle. The performance of the developed method is evaluated by simulation and experiment. In the experiment, the displacement error was less than 2.5 μm and the velocity error of 1σ was about 0.25%, while the grating scale moved 30 mm

  20. Direct and precise measurement of displacement and velocity of flexible web in roll-to-roll manufacturing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Dongwoo; Lee, Eonseok; Choi, Young-Man; Lee, Taik-Min [Advanced Manufacturing Systems Research Division, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 156 Gajeongbuk-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Duk Young [Nano-Opto-Mechatronics Lab., Dept. of Mechanical Eng., KAIST, 335 Gwahangno, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dongmin [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, 267 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Interest in the production of printed electronics using a roll-to-roll system has gradually increased due to its low mass-production costs and compatibility with flexible substrate. To improve the accuracy of roll-to-roll manufacturing systems, the movement of the web needs to be measured precisely in advance. In this paper, a novel measurement method is developed to measure the displacement and velocity of the web precisely and directly. The proposed algorithm is based on the traditional single field encoder principle, and the scale grating has been replaced with a printed grating on the web. Because a printed grating cannot be as accurate as a scale grating in a traditional encoder, there will inevitably be variations in pitch and line-width, and the motion of the web should be measured even though there are variations in pitch and line-width in the printed grating patterns. For this reason, the developed algorithm includes a precise method of estimating the variations in pitch. In addtion, a method of correcting the Lissajous curve is presented for precision phase interpolation to improve measurement accuracy by correcting Lissajous circle to unit circle. The performance of the developed method is evaluated by simulation and experiment. In the experiment, the displacement error was less than 2.5 μm and the velocity error of 1σ was about 0.25%, while the grating scale moved 30 mm.

  1. Interpreting dark matter direct detection independently of the local velocity and density distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, Patrick J.; Kribs, Graham D.; Tait, Tim M. P.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate precisely what particle physics information can be extracted from a single direct detection observation of dark matter while making absolutely no assumptions about the local velocity distribution and local density of dark matter. Our central conclusions follow from a very simple observation: the velocity distribution of dark matter is positive definite, f(v)≥0. We demonstrate the utility of this result in several ways. First, we show a falling deconvoluted recoil spectrum (deconvoluted of the nuclear form factor), such as from ordinary elastic scattering, can be 'mocked up' by any mass of dark matter above a kinematic minimum. As an example, we show that dark matter much heavier than previously considered can explain the CoGeNT excess. Specifically, m χ Ge can be in just as good agreement as light dark matter, while m χ >m Ge depends on understanding the sensitivity of xenon to dark matter at very low recoil energies, E R < or approx. 6 keVnr. Second, we show that any rise in the deconvoluted recoil spectrum represents distinct particle physics information that cannot be faked by an arbitrary f(v). As examples of resulting nontrivial particle physics, we show that inelastic dark matter and dark matter with a form factor can both yield such a rise.

  2. Peaked signals from dark matter velocity structures in direct detection experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Rafael F.; Weiner, Neal

    2010-06-01

    In direct dark matter detection experiments, conventional elastic scattering of WIMPs results in exponentially falling recoil spectra. In contrast, theories of WIMPs with excited states can lead to nuclear recoil spectra that peak at finite recoil energies ER. The peaks of such signals are typically fairly broad, with ΔER/Epeak ~ 1. We show that in the presence of dark matter structures with low velocity dispersion, such as streams or clumps, peaks from up-scattering can become extremely narrow with FWHM of a few keV only. This differs dramatically from the conventionally expected WIMP spectrum and would, once detected, open the possibility to measure the dark matter velocity structure with high accuracy. As an intriguing example, we confront the observed cluster of 3 events near 42 keV from the CRESST commissioning run with this scenario. Inelastic dark matter particles with a wide range of parameters are capable of producing such a narrow peak. We calculate the possible signals at other experiments, and find that such particles could also give rise to the signal at DAMA, although not from the same stream. Over some range of parameters, a signal would be visible at xenon experiments. We show that such dark matter peaks are a very clear signal and can be easily disentangled from potential backgrounds, both terrestrial or due to WIMP down-scattering, by an enhanced annual modulation in both the amplitude of the signal and its spectral shape.

  3. Peaked signals from dark matter velocity structures in direct detection experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, Rafael F.; Weiner, Neal

    2010-01-01

    In direct dark matter detection experiments, conventional elastic scattering of WIMPs results in exponentially falling recoil spectra. In contrast, theories of WIMPs with excited states can lead to nuclear recoil spectra that peak at finite recoil energies E R . The peaks of such signals are typically fairly broad, with ΔE R /E peak ∼ 1. We show that in the presence of dark matter structures with low velocity dispersion, such as streams or clumps, peaks from up-scattering can become extremely narrow with FWHM of a few keV only. This differs dramatically from the conventionally expected WIMP spectrum and would, once detected, open the possibility to measure the dark matter velocity structure with high accuracy. As an intriguing example, we confront the observed cluster of 3 events near 42 keV from the CRESST commissioning run with this scenario. Inelastic dark matter particles with a wide range of parameters are capable of producing such a narrow peak. We calculate the possible signals at other experiments, and find that such particles could also give rise to the signal at DAMA, although not from the same stream. Over some range of parameters, a signal would be visible at xenon experiments. We show that such dark matter peaks are a very clear signal and can be easily disentangled from potential backgrounds, both terrestrial or due to WIMP down-scattering, by an enhanced annual modulation in both the amplitude of the signal and its spectral shape

  4. A single-probe heat pulse method for estimating sap velocity in trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bernal, Álvaro; Testi, Luca; Villalobos, Francisco J

    2017-10-01

    Available sap flow methods are still far from being simple, cheap and reliable enough to be used beyond very specific research purposes. This study presents and tests a new single-probe heat pulse (SPHP) method for monitoring sap velocity in trees using a single-probe sensor, rather than the multi-probe arrangements used up to now. Based on the fundamental conduction-convection principles of heat transport in sapwood, convective velocity (V h ) is estimated from the temperature increase in the heater after the application of a heat pulse (ΔT). The method was validated against measurements performed with the compensation heat pulse (CHP) technique in field trees of six different species. To do so, a dedicated three-probe sensor capable of simultaneously applying both methods was produced and used. Experimental measurements in the six species showed an excellent agreement between SPHP and CHP outputs for moderate to high flow rates, confirming the applicability of the method. In relation to other sap flow methods, SPHP presents several significant advantages: it requires low power inputs, it uses technically simpler and potentially cheaper instrumentation, the physical damage to the tree is minimal and artefacts caused by incorrect probe spacing and alignment are removed. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Yield estimation based on calculated comparisons to particle velocity data recorded at low stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambo, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of optimizing the yield estimation process if some of the material properties are known from geophysical measurements and others are inferred from in-situ dynamic measurements. The material models and 2-D simulations of the event are combined to determine the yield. Other methods of yield determination from peak particle velocity data have mostly been based on comparisons of nearby events in similar media at NTS. These methods are largely empirical and are subject to additional error when a new event has different properties than the population being used for a basis of comparison. The effect of material variations can be examined using LLNL's KDYNA computer code. The data from an NTS event provide the instructive example for simulation

  6. Gradient angle estimation by uniform directional simulation on a cone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    1997-01-01

    approximation to a locally most central limit state point. Moreover, the estimated angle can be used to correct the geometric reliability index.\\bfseries Keywords: Directional simulation, effectivity factor, gradient angle estimation, maximum likelihood, model-correction-factor method, Monte Carlo simulation...

  7. Estimation of wave directional spreading in shallow water

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Deo, M.C.; Anand, N.M.; Chandramohan, P.

    loads on offshore structures, long- term estimation of waves and estimation of sediment transport. According to the principle of superposition of linear waves, the sea state is com- posed of a large number of individual wave components, each having a..., who were involved in the data collection programme. NIO Contribution number 2569. References Benoit, M., 1992. Practical comparative performance survey of methods used for estimating directional wave spectra from heave–pitch–roll data. Proceedings...

  8. Use of radon-222 as tracer to estimate groundwater infiltration velocity in a river bank area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinh Van Giap

    2003-01-01

    Naturally occurring isotope Rn-222 has been used as a natural tracer to determine the residence time of groundwater infiltrated from river into an aquifer in a riverbank area. The applied method is based on the increasing radon concentration in infiltrating water during it passes through the riverbank and reaches an equilibrium value. Solid-state nuclear track detector technique is used to measure directly radon concentration in water of a well. In order to confirm the relationship between radon concentration and it's residence time, a model was constructed in the laboratory. Experiment carried out in Nam Dinh are showed that mean infiltrating velocity of groundwater in the studied area as high as 5.1 m/day. (author)

  9. Validity of a Commercial Linear Encoder to Estimate Bench Press 1 RM from the Force-Velocity Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosquet, Laurent; Porta-Benache, Jeremy; Blais, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the validity and accuracy of a commercial linear encoder (Musclelab, Ergotest, Norway) to estimate Bench press 1 repetition maximum (1RM) from the force - velocity relationship. Twenty seven physical education students and teachers (5 women and 22 men) with a heterogeneous history of strength training participated in this study. They performed a 1 RM test and a force - velocity test using a Bench press lifting task in a random order. Mean 1 RM was 61.8 ± 15.3 kg (range: 34 to 100 kg), while 1 RM estimated by the Musclelab’s software from the force-velocity relationship was 56.4 ± 14.0 kg (range: 33 to 91 kg). Actual and estimated 1 RM were very highly correlated (r = 0.93, p<0.001) but largely different (Bias: 5.4 ± 5.7 kg, p < 0.001, ES = 1.37). The 95% limits of agreement were ±11.2 kg, which represented ±18% of actual 1 RM. It was concluded that 1 RM estimated from the force-velocity relationship was a good measure for monitoring training induced adaptations, but also that it was not accurate enough to prescribe training intensities. Additional studies are required to determine whether accuracy is affected by age, sex or initial level. Key points Some commercial devices allow to estimate 1 RM from the force-velocity relationship. These estimations are valid. However, their accuracy is not high enough to be of practical help for training intensity prescription. Day-to-day reliability of force and velocity measured by the linear encoder has been shown to be very high, but the specific reliability of 1 RM estimated from the force-velocity relationship has to be determined before concluding to the usefulness of this approach in the monitoring of training induced adaptations. PMID:24149641

  10. Field estimates of floc dynamics and settling velocities in a tidal creek with significant along-channel gradients in velocity and SPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, C.; Cox, T.; van Engeland, T.; van Oevelen, D.; van Belzen, J.; van de Koppel, J.; Soetaert, K.; Bouma, T. J.; Meire, P.; Temmerman, S.

    2017-10-01

    A short-term intensive measurement campaign focused on flow, turbulence, suspended particle concentration, floc dynamics and settling velocities were carried out in a brackish intertidal creek draining into the main channel of the Scheldt estuary. We compare in situ estimates of settling velocities between a laser diffraction (LISST) and an acoustic Doppler technique (ADV) at 20 and 40 cm above bottom (cmab). The temporal variation in settling velocity estimated were compared over one tidal cycle, with a maximum flood velocity of 0.46 m s-1, a maximum horizontal ebb velocity of 0.35 m s-1 and a maximum water depth at high water slack of 2.41 m. Results suggest that flocculation processes play an important role in controlling sediment transport processes in the measured intertidal creek. During high-water slack, particles flocculated to sizes up to 190 μm, whereas at maximum flood and maximum ebb tidal stage floc sizes only reached up to 55 μm and 71 μm respectively. These large differences indicate that flocculation processes are mainly governed by turbulence-induced shear rate. In this study, we specifically recognize the importance of along-channel gradients that places constraints on the application of the acoustic Doppler technique due to conflicts with the underlying assumptions. Along-channel gradients were assessed by additional measurements at a second location and scaling arguments which could be used as an indication whether the Reynolds-flux method is applicable. We further show the potential impact of along-channel advection of flocs out of equilibrium with local hydrodynamics influencing overall floc sizes.

  11. Narrowband direction of arrival estimation for antenna arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Foutz, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to narrowband array signal processing, classical and subspace-based direction of arrival (DOA) estimation with an extensive discussion on adaptive direction of arrival algorithms. The book begins with a presentation of the basic theory, equations, and data models of narrowband arrays. It then discusses basic beamforming methods and describes how they relate to DOA estimation. Several of the most common classical and subspace-based direction of arrival methods are discussed. The book concludes with an introduction to subspace tracking and shows how subspace tr

  12. Directional Tuning Curves, Elementary Movement Detectors, and the Estimation of the Direction of Visual Movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateren, J.H. van

    1990-01-01

    Both the insect brain and the vertebrate retina detect visual movement with neurons having broad, cosine-shaped directional tuning curves oriented in either of two perpendicular directions. This article shows that this arrangement can lead to isotropic estimates of the direction of movement: for any

  13. Estimated VO2max and its corresponding velocity predict performance of amateur runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Ribeiro Ramalho Oliveira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been a substantial increase in the number of runners, with a proportional increase in their involvement in amateur street competition. Identification of the determinants of performance in this population appears necessary for optimization of time devoted to training. The objective of this study was to ascertain the association between estimated maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max, critical velocity (CV and VO2max velocity (VVO2max and athletic performance in the 3.6 km (uphill and 10 and 21.1 km (flatland events. Twelve amateur runners (nine male, mean age 36 ± 5 years underwent five tests: 1 and 5 km race on level ground, 3.6 km race with slope (≈8%, and indirect VO2max measurement. CV was determined from the linear relationship between distance and run time on the first two tests. The subjects then took part in two official 10 km and 21.1 km (half marathon races. VVO2max was calculated from the VO2max through a metabolic equation. VO2max showed the best association with running performance in the 10 and 21.1 km events. For the uphill race, VVO2max showed a better association. Overall, the variable with the highest average association was VO2max (0.91±0.07, followed by VVO2max (0.90±0.04 and VC (0.87±0.06. This study showed strong associations between physiological variables established by low-cost, user-friendly indirect methods and running performance in the 10 and 21.1 km (flatland and 3.6 km (uphill running events.

  14. Workflow for near-surface velocity automatic estimation: Source-domain full-traveltime inversion followed by waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lu

    2017-08-17

    This paper presents a workflow for near-surface velocity automatic estimation using the early arrivals of seismic data. This workflow comprises two methods, source-domain full traveltime inversion (FTI) and early-arrival waveform inversion. Source-domain FTI is capable of automatically generating a background velocity that can kinematically match the reconstructed plane-wave sources of early arrivals with true plane-wave sources. This method does not require picking first arrivals for inversion, which is one of the most challenging aspects of ray-based first-arrival tomographic inversion. Moreover, compared with conventional Born-based methods, source-domain FTI can distinguish between slower or faster initial model errors via providing the correct sign of the model gradient. In addition, this method does not need estimation of the source wavelet, which is a requirement for receiver-domain wave-equation velocity inversion. The model derived from source-domain FTI is then used as input to early-arrival waveform inversion to obtain the short-wavelength velocity components. We have tested the workflow on synthetic and field seismic data sets. The results show source-domain FTI can generate reasonable background velocities for early-arrival waveform inversion even when subsurface velocity reversals are present and the workflow can produce a high-resolution near-surface velocity model.

  15. Determination of the effect of wind velocity and direction changes on turbidity removal in rectangular sedimentation tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khezri, Seyed Mostafa; Biati, Aida; Erfani, Zeynab

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a pilot-scale sedimentation tank was used to determine the effect of wind velocity and direction on the removal efficiency of particles. For this purpose, a 1:20 scale pilot simulated according to Frude law. First, the actual efficiency of total suspended solids (TSS) removal was calculated in no wind condition. Then, the wind was blown in the same and the opposite directions of water flow. At each direction TSS removal was calculated at three different velocities from 2.5 to 7 m/s. Results showed that when the wind was in the opposite direction of water flow, TSS removal efficiency initially increased with the increase of wind velocity from 0 to 2.5 m/s, then it decreased with the increase of velocity to 5 m/s. This mainly might happen because the opposite direction of wind can increase particles' retention time in the sedimentation tank. However, higher wind velocities (i.e. 3.5 and 5.5 m/s) could not increase TSS removal efficiency. Thus, if sedimentation tanks are appropriately exposed to the wind, TSS removal efficiency increases by approximately 6%. Therefore, energy consumption will be reduced by a proper site selection for sedimentation tank unit in water and waste water treatment plants.

  16. Motion direction estimation based on active RFID with changing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Wu; Minghua, Zhu; Wei, He

    2018-05-01

    The gate system is used to estimate the direction of RFID tags carriers when they are going through the gate. Normally, it is difficult to achieve and keep a high accuracy in estimating motion direction of RFID tags because the received signal strength of tag changes sharply according to the changing electromagnetic environment. In this paper, a method of motion direction estimation for RFID tags is presented. To improve estimation accuracy, the machine leaning algorithm is used to get the fitting function of the received data by readers which are deployed inside and outside gate respectively. Then the fitted data are sampled to get the standard vector. We compare the stand vector with template vectors to get the motion direction estimation result. Then the corresponding template vector is updated according to the surrounding environment. We conducted the simulation and implement of the proposed method and the result shows that the proposed method in this work can improve and keep a high accuracy under the condition of the constantly changing environment.

  17. Validity of a Commercial Linear Encoder to Estimate Bench Press 1 RM from the Force-Velocity Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosquet, Laurent; Porta-Benache, Jeremy; Blais, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the validity and accuracy of a commercial linear encoder (Musclelab, Ergotest, Norway) to estimate Bench press 1 repetition maximum (1RM) from the force - velocity relationship. Twenty seven physical education students and teachers (5 women and 22 men) with a heterogeneous history of strength training participated in this study. They performed a 1 RM test and a force - velocity test using a Bench press lifting task in a random order. Mean 1 RM was 61.8 ± 15.3 kg (range: 34 to 100 kg), while 1 RM estimated by the Musclelab's software from the force-velocity relationship was 56.4 ± 14.0 kg (range: 33 to 91 kg). Actual and estimated 1 RM were very highly correlated (r = 0.93, pvelocity relationship was a good measure for monitoring training induced adaptations, but also that it was not accurate enough to prescribe training intensities. Additional studies are required to determine whether accuracy is affected by age, sex or initial level. Key pointsSome commercial devices allow to estimate 1 RM from the force-velocity relationship.These estimations are valid. However, their accuracy is not high enough to be of practical help for training intensity prescription.Day-to-day reliability of force and velocity measured by the linear encoder has been shown to be very high, but the specific reliability of 1 RM estimated from the force-velocity relationship has to be determined before concluding to the usefulness of this approach in the monitoring of training induced adaptations.

  18. Determination of velocity and flow direction of ground water by using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Ferreira, L. dos.

    1976-06-01

    The dynamics of water in an aquifer with the purpose of determining the filtration velocity and the direction of groundwater flow with radioactive tracers was studied. Field equipment for the purposes of the study was built in the Laboratory of Tracers in Hydrology in collaboration with the Institute of Nuclear Engineering (IEN/NUCLEBRAS). The equipment was designed to minimize the possible vertical flows, loss and molecular diffusion of the tracer out of the studied region. The performance of the nuclear detectors and the constructional details of the field equipament were examined. The selection of the radioactive tracers was made taking into account its availibility and radiation facilities, cost of the inactive material and their physical and chemical properties. The tracers used were 82 Br and 198 Au. The results are discussed with the help of auxiliary informations such as plots of water levels in time and space, profiles and grain analysis. In order to obtain a physical explanation of the results, a qualitative model of the flow in the aquifer is also presented. (Author) [pt

  19. Estimating heats of detonation and detonation velocities of aromatic energetic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein [Department of Chemistry, Malek-ashtar University of Technology, Shahin-shahr, P. O. Box 83145/115 (Iran)

    2008-12-15

    A new method is introduced to predict reliable estimation of heats of detonation of aromatic energetic compounds. At first step, this procedure assumes that the heat of detonation of an explosive compound of composition C{sub a}H{sub b}N{sub c}O{sub d} can be approximated as the difference between the heat of formation of all H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} arbitrary (H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}) detonation products and that of the explosive, divided by the formula weight of the explosive. Overestimated results based on (H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} arbitrary) can be corrected in the next step. Predicted heats of detonation of pure energetic compounds with the product H{sub 2}O in the liquid state for 31 aromatic energetic compounds have a root mean square (rms) deviation of 2.08 and 0.34 kJ g{sup -1} from experiment for (H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} arbitrary) and new method, respectively. The new method also gives good results as compared to the second sets of decomposition products, which consider H{sub 2},N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O,CO, and CO{sub 2} as major gaseous products. It is shown here how the predicted heats of detonation by the new method can be used to obtain reliable estimation of detonation velocity over a wide range of loading densities. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. Pilot Study: Estimation of Stroke Volume and Cardiac Output from Pulse Wave Velocity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurie Obata

    Full Text Available Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE is increasingly replacing thermodilution pulmonary artery catheters to assess hemodynamics in patients at high risk for cardiovascular morbidity. However, one of the drawbacks of TEE compared to pulmonary artery catheters is the inability to measure real time stroke volume (SV and cardiac output (CO continuously. The aim of the present proof of concept study was to validate a novel method of SV estimation, based on pulse wave velocity (PWV in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.This is a retrospective observational study. We measured pulse transit time by superimposing the radial arterial waveform onto the continuous wave Doppler waveform of the left ventricular outflow tract, and calculated SV (SVPWV using the transformed Bramwell-Hill equation. The SV measured by TEE (SVTEE was used as a reference.A total of 190 paired SV were measured from 28 patients. A strong correlation was observed between SVPWV and SVTEE with the coefficient of determination (R2 of 0.71. A mean difference between the two (bias was 3.70 ml with the limits of agreement ranging from -20.33 to 27.73 ml and a percentage error of 27.4% based on a Bland-Altman analysis. The concordance rate of two methods was 85.0% based on a four-quadrant plot. The angular concordance rate was 85.9% with radial limits of agreement (the radial sector that contained 95% of the data points of ± 41.5 degrees based on a polar plot.PWV based SV estimation yields reasonable agreement with SV measured by TEE. Further studies are required to assess its utility in different clinical situations.

  1. A remark on "Nonlinear output feedback control of underwater vehicle propellers using feedback form estimated axial flow velocity"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouffroy, Jerome; Lottin, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    For original paper see T.I.Fossen and M.Blanke, ibid., vol.25, pp.241-55 (2000). In the work presented by Fossen and Blanke, a nonlinear observer for estimation of propeller axial flow velocity for UUVs was introduced. The proof of the convergence behavior of the observer was carried out with a L......For original paper see T.I.Fossen and M.Blanke, ibid., vol.25, pp.241-55 (2000). In the work presented by Fossen and Blanke, a nonlinear observer for estimation of propeller axial flow velocity for UUVs was introduced. The proof of the convergence behavior of the observer was carried out...

  2. Estimation of Sway Velocity-Dependent Hydrodynamic Derivatives in Surface Ship Manoeuvring Using Ranse Based CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeja Janardhanan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The hydrodynamic derivatives appearing in the manoeuvring equations of motion are the primary parameters in the prediction of the trajectory of a vessel. Determination of these derivatives poses major challenge in ship manoeuvring related problems. This paper deals with one such problem in which an attempt has been made to numerically simulate the conventional straight line test in a towing tank using computational fluid dynamics (CFD. Free-surface effects have been neglected here. The domain size has been fixed as per ITTC guide lines. The grid size has been fixed after a thorough grid independency analysis and an optimum grid size has been chosen in order to ensure the insensitivity of the flow parameters to grid size and also to have reduced computational effort. The model has been oriented to wider range of drift angles to capture the non-linear effects and subsequently the forces and moments acting on the model in each angle have been estimated. The sway velocity dependent derivatives have been obtained through plots and curve-fits. The effect of finite water depth on the derivatives has also been looked into. The results have been compared with the available experimental and empirical values and the method was found to be promising.

  3. Estimation of position and velocity for a low dynamic vehicle in near space using nonresolved photometric and astrometric data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Nan; Li, Chuang; Chong, Yaqin

    2017-01-20

    An estimation method for indirectly observable parameters for a typical low dynamic vehicle (LDV) is presented. The estimation method utilizes apparent magnitude, azimuth angle, and elevation angle to estimate the position and velocity of a typical LDV, such as a high altitude balloon (HAB). In order to validate the accuracy of the estimated parameters gained from an unscented Kalman filter, two sets of experiments are carried out to obtain the nonresolved photometric and astrometric data. In the experiments, a HAB launch is planned; models of the HAB dynamics and kinematics and observation models are built to use as time update and measurement update functions, respectively. When the HAB is launched, a ground-based optoelectronic detector is used to capture the object images, which are processed using aperture photometry technology to obtain the time-varying apparent magnitude of the HAB. Two sets of actual and estimated parameters are given to clearly indicate the parameter differences. Two sets of errors between the actual and estimated parameters are also given to show how the estimated position and velocity differ with respect to the observation time. The similar distribution curve results from the two scenarios, which agree within 3σ, verify that nonresolved photometric and astrometric data can be used to estimate the indirectly observable state parameters (position and velocity) for a typical LDV. This technique can be applied to small and dim space objects in the future.

  4. Speed sensorless direct torque control of IMs with rotor resistance estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barut, Murat; Bogosyan, Seta; Gokasan, Metin

    2005-01-01

    Direct torque control (DTC) of induction motors (IMs) requires an accurate knowledge on the amplitude and angular position of the controlled flux in addition to the information related to angular velocity for velocity control applications. However, unknown load torque and uncertainties related to stator/rotor resistances due to operating conditions constitute major challenges for the performance of such systems. The determination of stator resistance can be performed by measurements, but methods must be developed for estimation and identification of rotor resistance and load torque. In this study, an EKF based solution is sought for determination of the rotor resistance and load torque as well as the above mentioned states required for DTC. The EKF algorithm used in conjunction with the speed sensorless DTC is tested under eleven scenarios comprised of various changes made in the velocity reference beside the load torque and rotor resistance values assigned in the model. With no a priori information in the estimated states and parameters, it has been demonstrated that the EKF estimation and sensorless DTC perform quite well in spite of the uncertainties and variations imposed on the system

  5. Exploration of deep S-wave velocity structure using microtremor array technique to estimate long-period ground motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroaki; Higashi, Sadanori; Sato, Kiyotaka

    2007-01-01

    In this study, microtremor array measurements were conducted at 9 sites in the Niigata plain to explore deep S-wave velocity structures for estimation of long-period earthquake ground motion. The 1D S-wave velocity profiles in the Niigata plain are characterized by 5 layers with S-wave velocities of 0.4, 0.8, 1.5, 2.1 and 3.0 km/s, respectively. The depth to the basement layer is deeper in the Niigata port area located at the Japan sea side of the Niigata plain. In this area, the basement depth is about 4.8 km around the Seirou town and about 4.1 km around the Niigata city, respectively. These features about the basement depth in the Niigata plain are consistent with the previous surveys. In order to verify the profiles derived from microtremor array exploration, we estimate the group velocities of Love wave for four propagation paths of long-period earthquake ground motion during Niigata-ken tyuetsu earthquake by multiple filter technique, which were compared with the theoretical ones calculated from the derived profiles. As a result, it was confirmed that the group velocities from the derived profiles were in good agreement with the ones from long-period earthquake ground motion records during Niigata-ken tyuetsu earthquake. Furthermore, we applied the estimation method of design basis earthquake input for seismically isolated nuclear power facilities by using normal mode solution to estimate long-period earthquake ground motion during Niigata-ken tyuetsu earthquake. As a result, it was demonstrated that the applicability of the above method for the estimation of long-period earthquake ground motion were improved by using the derived 1D S-wave velocity profile. (author)

  6. Review and statistical analysis of the ultrasonic velocity method for estimating the porosity fraction in polycrystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, D.J.; Swickard, S.M.; Stang, D.B.; Deguire, M.R.

    1990-03-01

    A review and statistical analysis of the ultrasonic velocity method for estimating the porosity fraction in polycrystalline materials is presented. Initially, a semi-empirical model is developed showing the origin of the linear relationship between ultrasonic velocity and porosity fraction. Then, from a compilation of data produced by many researchers, scatter plots of velocity versus percent porosity data are shown for Al2O3, MgO, porcelain-based ceramics, PZT, SiC, Si3N4, steel, tungsten, UO2,(U0.30Pu0.70)C, and YBa2Cu3O(7-x). Linear regression analysis produced predicted slope, intercept, correlation coefficient, level of significance, and confidence interval statistics for the data. Velocity values predicted from regression analysis for fully-dense materials are in good agreement with those calculated from elastic properties

  7. Efficient focusing scheme for transverse velocity estimation using cross-correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    simulations with Field II. A 64-elements, 5 MHz linear array was used. A parabolic velocity profile with a peak velocity of 0.5 m/s was considered for different angles between the flow and the ultrasound beam and for different emit foci. At 60 degrees the relative standard deviation was 0.58 % for a transmit...

  8. Evaluation of an ion adsorption method to estimate intragravel flow velocity in salmonid spawning gravels

    Science.gov (United States)

    James L. Clayton; John G. King; Russell F. Thurow

    1996-01-01

    Intragravel water exchange provides oxygenated water, removes metabolic waste, and is an essential factor in salmonid embryo survival. Measurements of intragravel flow velocity have been suggested as an index of gravel quality and also as a useful predictor of fry emergence; however, proposed methods for measuring velocity in gravel are problematic. We evaluate an ion...

  9. The BRAVE Program. I. Improved Bulge Stellar Velocity Dispersion Estimates for a Sample of Active Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batiste, Merida; Bentz, Misty C.; Manne-Nicholas, Emily R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, 25 Park Place, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Onken, Christopher A. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Bershady, Matthew A., E-mail: batiste@astro.gsu.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    We present new bulge stellar velocity dispersion measurements for 10 active galaxies with secure M {sub BH} determinations from reverberation mapping. These new velocity dispersion measurements are based on spatially resolved kinematics from integral-field (IFU) spectroscopy. In all but one case, the field of view of the IFU extends beyond the effective radius of the galaxy, and in the case of Mrk 79 it extends to almost one half the effective radius. This combination of spatial resolution and field of view allows for secure determinations of stellar velocity dispersion within the effective radius for all 10 target galaxies. Spatially resolved maps of the first ( V ) and second ( σ {sub ⋆}) moments of the line of sight velocity distribution indicate the presence of kinematic substructure in most cases. In future projects we plan to explore methods of correcting for the effects of kinematic substructure in the derived bulge stellar velocity dispersion measurements.

  10. Calibrated Tully-Fisher relations for improved estimates of disc rotation velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, R.; Mandelbaum, R.; Gunn, J. E.; Pizagno, J.; Lackner, C. N.

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we derive scaling relations between photometric observable quantities and disc galaxy rotation velocity Vrot or Tully-Fisher relations (TFRs). Our methodology is dictated by our purpose of obtaining purely photometric, minimal-scatter estimators of Vrot applicable to large galaxy samples from imaging surveys. To achieve this goal, we have constructed a sample of 189 disc galaxies at redshifts z < 0.1 with long-slit Hα spectroscopy from Pizagno et al. and new observations. By construction, this sample is a fair subsample of a large, well-defined parent disc sample of ˜170 000 galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7). The optimal photometric estimator of Vrot we find is stellar mass M★ from Bell et al., based on the linear combination of a luminosity and a colour. Assuming a Kroupa initial mass function (IMF), we find: log [V80/(km s-1)] = (2.142 ± 0.004) + (0.278 ± 0.010)[log (M★/M⊙) - 10.10], where V80 is the rotation velocity measured at the radius R80 containing 80 per cent of the i-band galaxy light. This relation has an intrinsic Gaussian scatter ? dex and a measured scatter σmeas= 0.056 dex in log V80. For a fixed IMF, we find that the dynamical-to-stellar mass ratios within R80, (Mdyn/M★)(R80), decrease from approximately 10 to 3, as stellar mass increases from M★≈ 109 to 1011 M⊙. At a fixed stellar mass, (Mdyn/M★)(R80) increases with disc size, so that it correlates more tightly with stellar surface density than with stellar mass or disc size alone. We interpret the observed variation in (Mdyn/M★)(R80) with disc size as a reflection of the fact that disc size dictates the radius at which Mdyn/M★ is measured, and consequently, the fraction of the dark matter 'seen' by the gas at that radius. For the lowest M★ galaxies, we find a positive correlation between TFR residuals and disc sizes, indicating that the total density profile is dominated by dark matter on these scales. For the

  11. Estimation of S-wave velocity structure of deep sedimentary layers using geophysical data and earthquake ground motion records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Haruhiko

    2014-01-01

    The preliminary results with an outline of array observation for micro-tremor and natural earthquakes around the NIIT site were explained. Phase velocity estimated from a horizontal array of strong motion observation agrees with that from the micro-tremor survey. Estimation results are consistent with other literature, such as PS-logging data and gravity maps. Further improvement of the three-dimensional modeling by using micro-tremor surveys and horizontal array observation is planned for the future. (author)

  12. VALIDITY OF A COMMERCIAL LINEAR ENCODER TO ESTIMATE BENCH PRESS 1 RM FROM THE FORCE-VELOCITY RELATIONSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Bosquet

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the validity and accuracy of a commercial linear encoder (Musclelab, Ergotest, Norway to estimate Bench press 1 repetition maximum (1RM from the force - velocity relationship. Twenty seven physical education students and teachers (5 women and 22 men with a heterogeneous history of strength training participated in this study. They performed a 1 RM test and a force - velocity test using a Bench press lifting task in a random order. Mean 1 RM was 61.8 ± 15.3 kg (range: 34 to 100 kg, while 1 RM estimated by the Musclelab's software from the force-velocity relationship was 56.4 ± 14.0 kg (range: 33 to 91 kg. Actual and estimated 1 RM were very highly correlated (r = 0.93, p<0.001 but largely different (Bias: 5.4 ± 5.7 kg, p < 0.001, ES = 1.37. The 95% limits of agreement were ±11.2 kg, which represented ±18% of actual 1 RM. It was concluded that 1 RM estimated from the force-velocity relationship was a good measure for monitoring training induced adaptations, but also that it was not accurate enough to prescribe training intensities. Additional studies are required to determine whether accuracy is affected by age, sex or initial level.

  13. Estimation of urinary flow velocity in models of obstructed and unobstructed urethras by decorrelation of ultrasound radiofrequency signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arif, M.; Idzenga, T.; Mastrigt, R. van; Korte, C.L. de

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of estimating urinary flow velocity from the decorrelation of radiofrequency (RF) signals was investigated in soft tissue-mimicking models of obstructed and unobstructed urethras. The decorrelation was studied in the near field, focal zone and far field of the ultrasound beam.

  14. Direct process estimation from tomographic data using artificial neural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad-Saleh, Junita; Hoyle, Brian S.; Podd, Frank J.; Spink, D. M.

    2001-07-01

    The paper deals with the goal of component fraction estimation in multicomponent flows, a critical measurement in many processes. Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) is a well-researched sensing technique for this task, due to its low-cost, non-intrusion, and fast response. However, typical systems, which include practicable real-time reconstruction algorithms, give inaccurate results, and existing approaches to direct component fraction measurement are flow-regime dependent. In the investigation described, an artificial neural network approach is used to directly estimate the component fractions in gas-oil, gas-water, and gas-oil-water flows from ECT measurements. A 2D finite- element electric field model of a 12-electrode ECT sensor is used to simulate ECT measurements of various flow conditions. The raw measurements are reduced to a mutually independent set using principal components analysis and used with their corresponding component fractions to train multilayer feed-forward neural networks (MLFFNNs). The trained MLFFNNs are tested with patterns consisting of unlearned ECT simulated and plant measurements. Results included in the paper have a mean absolute error of less than 1% for the estimation of various multicomponent fractions of the permittivity distribution. They are also shown to give improved component fraction estimation compared to a well known direct ECT method.

  15. Directional Canopy Emissivity Estimation Based on Spectral Invariants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, M.; Cao, B.; Ren, H.; Yongming, D.; Peng, J.; Fan, W.

    2017-12-01

    Land surface emissivity is a crucial parameter for estimating land surface temperature from remote sensing data and also plays an important role in the physical process of surface energy and water balance from local to global scales. To our knowledge, the emissivity varies with surface type and cover. As for the vegetation, its canopy emissivity is dependent on vegetation types, viewing zenith angle and structure that changes in different growing stages. Lots of previous studies have focused on the emissivity model, but few of them are analytic and suited to different canopy structures. In this paper, a new physical analytic model is proposed to estimate the directional emissivity of homogenous vegetation canopy based on spectral invariants. The initial model counts the directional absorption in six parts: the direct absorption of the canopy and the soil, the absorption of the canopy and soil after a single scattering and after multiple scattering within the canopy-soil system. In order to analytically estimate the emissivity, the pathways of photons absorbed in the canopy-soil system are traced using the re-collision probability in Fig.1. After sensitive analysis on the above six absorptions, the initial complicated model was further simplified as a fixed mathematic expression to estimate the directional emissivity for vegetation canopy. The model was compared with the 4SAIL model, FRA97 model, FRA02 model and DART model in Fig.2, and the results showed that the FRA02 model is significantly underestimated while the FRA97 model is a little underestimated, on basis of the new model. On the contrary, the emissivity difference between the new model with the 4SAIL model and DART model was found to be less than 0.002. In general, since the new model has the advantages of mathematic expression with accurate results and clear physical meaning, the model is promising to be extended to simulate the directional emissivity for the discrete canopy in further study.

  16. Quality-guided orientation unwrapping for fringe direction estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haixia; Kemao, Qian

    2012-02-01

    Fringe patterns produced by various optical interferometric techniques encode information such as shape, deformation, and refractive index. Denoising and demodulation are two important procedures to retrieve information from a single closed fringe pattern. Various existing denoising and demodulation techniques require fringe direction/orientation during the processing. Fringe orientation is often easier to obtain but fringe direction is needed in some demodulation techniques. A quality-guided orientation unwrapping scheme is proposed to estimate direction from orientation. Two techniques, one based on windowed Fourier ridges and the other based on fringe gradient, are proposed for the quality-guided orientation unwrapping scheme. The direction qualities are compared for both simulated and experimental fringe patterns. Their application to demodulation technique is also given.

  17. A comparative study for the estimation of geodetic point velocity by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Geodetic point velocity; artificial neural networks; back propagation; radial basis function; Kriging. J. Earth Syst. Sci. ...... The employment of BPANN is an alternative tool to KRIG for .... Computational Intelligence and Multimedia Applications.

  18. Estimates of vertical velocities and eddy coefficients in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.; Sastry, J.S.

    Vertical velocities and eddy coefficients in the intermediate depths of the Bay of Bengal are calculated from mean hydrographic data for 300 miles-squares. The linear current density (sigma- O) versus log-depth plots show steady balance between...

  19. Study on Rayleigh Wave Inversion for Estimating Shear-wave Velocity Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Sanny

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Rayleigh wave or ground roll is a noise in seismic body waves. However, how to use this noise for soil characterization is very interesting since Rayleigh wave phase velocity is a function of compression-wave velocity, shear-wave velocity, density and layer thickness. In layered-medium Rayleigh wave velocity also depends on wavelength or frequency, and this phenomenon is called dispersion. Inversion procedure to get shear-wave velocity profile needs a priori information about the solution of the problem to limit the unknown parameters. The Lagrange multiplier method was used to solve the constrained optimization problems or well known as a smoothing parameter in inversion problems. The advantage of our inversion procedure is that it can guarantee the convergence of solution even though the field data is incomplete, insufficient, and inconsistent. The addition of smoothing parameter can reduce the time to converge. Beside numerical stability, the statistical stability is also involved in inversion procedure. In field experiment we extracted ground roll data from seismic refraction record. The dispersion curves had been constructed by applying f-k analysis and f-k dip filtering. The dispersion curves show the dependence of Rayleigh wave phase velocities in layered media to frequency. The synthetic models also demonstrate the stability and the speed of inversion procedure.

  20. FrFT-CSWSF: Estimating cross-range velocities of ground moving targets using multistatic synthetic aperture radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chenlei

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Estimating cross-range velocity is a challenging task for space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR, which is important for ground moving target indication (GMTI. Because the velocity of a target is very small compared with that of the satellite, it is difficult to correctly estimate it using a conventional monostatic platform algorithm. To overcome this problem, a novel method employing multistatic SAR is presented in this letter. The proposed hybrid method, which is based on an extended space-time model (ESTIM of the azimuth signal, has two steps: first, a set of finite impulse response (FIR filter banks based on a fractional Fourier transform (FrFT is used to separate multiple targets within a range gate; second, a cross-correlation spectrum weighted subspace fitting (CSWSF algorithm is applied to each of the separated signals in order to estimate their respective parameters. As verified through computer simulation with the constellations of Cartwheel, Pendulum and Helix, this proposed time-frequency-subspace method effectively improves the estimation precision of the cross-range velocities of multiple targets.

  1. Vehicle Velocity and Roll Angle Estimation with Road and Friction Adaptation for Four-Wheel Independent Drive Electric Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhui Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle velocity and roll angle are important information for active safety control systems of four-wheel independent drive electric vehicle. In order to obtain robustness estimation of vehicle velocity and roll angle, a novel method is proposed based on vehicle dynamics and the measurement information provided by the sensors equipped in modern cars. The method is robust with respect to different road and friction conditions. Firstly, the dynamic characteristics of four-wheel independent drive electric vehicle are analyzed, and a four-degree-of-freedom nonlinear dynamic model of vehicle and a tire longitudinal dynamic equation are established. The relationship between the longitudinal and lateral friction forces is derived based on Dugoff tire model. The unknown input reconstruction technique of sliding mode observer is used to achieve longitudinal tire friction force estimation. A simple observer is designed for the estimation of the roll angle of the vehicle. And then using the relationship, the estimated longitudinal friction forces and roll angle, a sliding mode observer for vehicle velocity estimation is provided, which does not need to know the tire-road friction coefficient and road angles. Finally, the proposed method is evaluated experimentally under a variety of maneuvers and road conditions.

  2. On protecting the planet against cosmic attack: Ultrafast real-time estimate of the asteroid's radial velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharchenko, V. D.; Kovalenko, I. G.

    2014-05-01

    A new method for the line-of-sight velocity estimation of a high-speed near-Earth object (asteroid, meteorite) is suggested. The method is based on the use of fractional, one-half order derivative of a Doppler signal. The algorithm suggested is much simpler and more economical than the classical one, and it appears preferable for use in orbital weapon systems of threat response. Application of fractional differentiation to quick evaluation of mean frequency location of the reflected Doppler signal is justified. The method allows an assessment of the mean frequency in the time domain without spectral analysis. An algorithm structure for the real-time estimation is presented. The velocity resolution estimates are made for typical asteroids in the X-band. It is shown that the wait time can be shortened by orders of magnitude compared with similar value in the case of a standard spectral processing.

  3. Validity of a Commercial Linear Encoder to Estimate Bench Press 1 RM from the Force-Velocity Relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Bosquet, Laurent; Porta-Benache, Jeremy; Blais, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the validity and accuracy of a commercial linear encoder (Musclelab, Ergotest, Norway) to estimate Bench press 1 repetition maximum (1RM) from the force - velocity relationship. Twenty seven physical education students and teachers (5 women and 22 men) with a heterogeneous history of strength training participated in this study. They performed a 1 RM test and a force - velocity test using a Bench press lifting task in a random order. Mean 1 RM was 61.8 ± 15...

  4. Site-response Estimation by 1D Heterogeneous Velocity Model using Borehole Log and its Relationship to Damping Factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    In the Niigata area, which suffered from several large earthquakes such as the 2007 Chuetsu-oki earthquake, geographical observation that elucidates the S-wave structure of the underground is advancing. Modeling of S-wave velocity structure in the subsurface is underway to enable simulation of long-period ground motion. The one-dimensional velocity model by inverse analysis of micro-tremors is sufficiently appropriate for long-period site response but not for short-period, which is important for ground motion evaluation at NPP sites. The high-frequency site responses may be controlled by the strength of heterogeneity of underground structure because the heterogeneity of the 1D model plays an important role in estimating high-frequency site responses and is strongly related to the damping factor of the 1D layered velocity model. (author)

  5. Comparing Methods for Estimating Direct Costs of Adverse Drug Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyllensten, Hanna; Jönsson, Anna K; Hakkarainen, Katja M; Svensson, Staffan; Hägg, Staffan; Rehnberg, Clas

    2017-12-01

    To estimate how direct health care costs resulting from adverse drug events (ADEs) and cost distribution are affected by methodological decisions regarding identification of ADEs, assigning relevant resource use to ADEs, and estimating costs for the assigned resources. ADEs were identified from medical records and diagnostic codes for a random sample of 4970 Swedish adults during a 3-month study period in 2008 and were assessed for causality. Results were compared for five cost evaluation methods, including different methods for identifying ADEs, assigning resource use to ADEs, and for estimating costs for the assigned resources (resource use method, proportion of registered cost method, unit cost method, diagnostic code method, and main diagnosis method). Different levels of causality for ADEs and ADEs' contribution to health care resource use were considered. Using the five methods, the maximum estimated overall direct health care costs resulting from ADEs ranged from Sk10,000 (Sk = Swedish krona; ~€1,500 in 2016 values) using the diagnostic code method to more than Sk3,000,000 (~€414,000) using the unit cost method in our study population. The most conservative definitions for ADEs' contribution to health care resource use and the causality of ADEs resulted in average costs per patient ranging from Sk0 using the diagnostic code method to Sk4066 (~€500) using the unit cost method. The estimated costs resulting from ADEs varied considerably depending on the methodological choices. The results indicate that costs for ADEs need to be identified through medical record review and by using detailed unit cost data. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Nonlinear output feedback control of underwater vehicle propellers using feedback form estimated axial flow velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fossen, T. I.; Blanke, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    Accurate propeller shaft speed controllers can be designed by using nonlinear control theory and feedback from the axial water velocity in the propeller disc. In this paper, an output feedback controller is derived, reconstructing the axial flow velocity from vehicle speed measurements, using...... a three-state model of propeller shaft speed, forward (surge) speed of the vehicle, and the axial flow velocity. Lyapunov stability theory is used to prove that a nonlinear observer combined with an output feedback integral controller provide exponential stability. The output feedback controller...... compensates for variations in thrust due to time variations in advance speed. This is a major problem when applying conventional vehicle-propeller control systems, The proposed controller is simulated for an underwater vehicle equipped with a single propeller. The simulations demonstrate that the axial water...

  7. 3-D Vector Velocity Estimation with Row-Column Addressed Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon; Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer

    2015-01-01

    -D velocity vector in a 15◦ rotated vessel with a 75◦ beam-to-flow angle. In the experimental setup with a 90◦ beam-to-flow angle, the relative mean biases were (-2.6%, -1.3% , 1.4%) with a relative standard deviation of (5.0%, 5.2%, 1.0%) for the respective transverse, lateral and axial velocity...... mm) containing a laminar parabolic flow and a peak velocity of 0.54 m/s. Data was sampled and stored on the experimental ultrasound scanner SARUS. Simulations yields relative mean biases at (- 1.1%, -1.5%, -1.0%) with mean standard deviations of σ˜ were (8.5%, 9.0%, 1.4%) % for (vx, vy, vz) from a 3...

  8. Relationship between linear velocity and tangential push force while turning to change the direction of the manual wheelchair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seonhong; Lin, Yen-Sheng; Hogaboom, Nathan S; Wang, Lin-Hwa; Koontz, Alicia M

    2017-08-28

    Wheelchair propulsion is a major cause of upper limb pain and injuries for manual wheelchair users with spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Few studies have investigated wheelchair turning biomechanics on natural ground surfaces. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between tangential push force and linear velocity of the wheelchair during the turning portions of propulsion. Using an instrumented handrim, velocity and push force data were recorded for 25 subjects while they propel their own wheelchairs on a concrete floor along a figure-eight-shaped course at a maximum velocity. The braking force (1.03 N) of the inside wheel while turning was the largest of all other push forces (p<0.05). Larger changes in squared velocity while turning were significantly correlated with higher propulsive and braking forces used at the pre-turning, turning, and post-turning phases (p<0.05). Subjects with less change of velocity while turning needed less braking force to maneuver themselves successfully and safely around the turns. Considering the magnitude and direction of tangential force applied to the wheel, it seems that there are higher risks of injury and instability for upper limb joints when braking the inside wheel to turn. The results provide insight into wheelchair setup and mobility skills training for wheelchair users.

  9. A prototype of radar-drone system for measuring the surface flow velocity at river sites and discharge estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moramarco, Tommaso; Alimenti, Federico; Zucco, Graziano; Barbetta, Silvia; Tarpanelli, Angelica; Brocca, Luca; Mezzanotte, Paolo; Rosselli, Luca; Orecchini, Giulia; Virili, Marco; Valigi, Paolo; Ciarfuglia, Thomas; Pagnottelli, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Discharge estimation at a river site depends on local hydraulic conditions identified by recording water levels. In fact, stage monitoring is straightforward and relatively inexpensive compared with the cost necessary to carry out flow velocity measurements which are, however, limited to low flows and constrained by the accessibility of the site. In this context the mean flow velocity is hard to estimate for high flow, affecting de-facto the reliability of discharge assessment for extreme events. On the other hand, the surface flow velocity can be easily monitored by using radar sensors allowing to achieve a good estimate of discharge by exploiting the entropy theory applied to rivers hydraulic (Chiu,1987). Recently, a growing interest towards the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UVA), henceforth drone, for topographic applications is observed and considering their capability drones may be of a considerable interest for the hydrological monitoring and in particular for streamflow measurements. With this aim, for the first time, a miniaturized Doppler radar sensor, operating at 24 GHz, will be mounted on a drone to measure the surface flow velocity in rivers. The sensor is constituted by a single-board circuit (i.e. is a fully planar circuits - no waveguides) with the antenna on one side and the front-end electronic on the other side (Alimenti et al., 2007). The antenna has a half-power beam width of less than 10 degrees in the elevation plane and a gain of 13 dBi. The radar is equipped with a monolithic oscillator and transmits a power of about 4 mW at 24 GHz. The sensor is mounted with an inclination of 45 degrees with respect to the drone flying plane and such an angle is considered in recovering the surface speed of the water. The drone is a quadricopter that has more than 30 min, flying time before recharging the battery. Furthermore its flying plan can be scheduled with a suitable software and is executed thanks to the on-board sensors (GPS, accelerometers

  10. Calibrated Tully-fisher Relations For Improved Photometric Estimates Of Disk Rotation Velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyes, Reinabelle; Mandelbaum, R.; Gunn, J. E.; Pizagno II, Jim

    We present calibrated scaling relations (also referred to as Tully-Fisher relations or TFRs) between rotation velocity and photometric quantities-- absolute magnitude, stellar mass, and synthetic magnitude (a linear combination of absolute magnitude and color)-- of disk galaxies at z 0.1. First, we

  11. Use of naturally occurring helium to estimate ground-water velocities for studies of geologic storage of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marine, I.W.

    1977-01-01

    In a study of the potential for storing radioactive waste in metamorphic rock at the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina, the rate of water movement was determined to be about 0.06 m/y by analyzing gas dissolved in the water. The gas contained up to 6 percent helium, which originated from the radioactive decay of natural uranium and thorium in the crystalline rock. The residence time of the water in the rock was calculated to be 840,000 years from the quantity of uranium and thorium in the rock, their rates of radioactive decay, and the quantity of helium dissolved in the water. The estimation of ground-water velocities by the helium method is more applicable to the assessment of a geologic site for storage of radioactive waste than are velocities estimated from packer tests, pumping tests, or artificial tracer tests, all of which require extensive time and space extrapolations

  12. NEW COMPLETENESS METHODS FOR ESTIMATING EXOPLANET DISCOVERIES BY DIRECT DETECTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Robert A.; Soummer, Remi

    2010-01-01

    We report on new methods for evaluating realistic observing programs that search stars for planets by direct imaging, where observations are selected from an optimized star list and stars can be observed multiple times. We show how these methods bring critical insight into the design of the mission and its instruments. These methods provide an estimate of the outcome of the observing program: the probability distribution of discoveries (detection and/or characterization) and an estimate of the occurrence rate of planets (η). We show that these parameters can be accurately estimated from a single mission simulation, without the need for a complete Monte Carlo mission simulation, and we prove the accuracy of this new approach. Our methods provide tools to define a mission for a particular science goal; for example, a mission can be defined by the expected number of discoveries and its confidence level. We detail how an optimized star list can be built and how successive observations can be selected. Our approach also provides other critical mission attributes, such as the number of stars expected to be searched and the probability of zero discoveries. Because these attributes depend strongly on the mission scale (telescope diameter, observing capabilities and constraints, mission lifetime, etc.), our methods are directly applicable to the design of such future missions and provide guidance to the mission and instrument design based on scientific performance. We illustrate our new methods with practical calculations and exploratory design reference missions for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) operating with a distant starshade to reduce scattered and diffracted starlight on the focal plane. We estimate that five habitable Earth-mass planets would be discovered and characterized with spectroscopy, with a probability of zero discoveries of 0.004, assuming a small fraction of JWST observing time (7%), η = 0.3, and 70 observing visits, limited by starshade fuel.

  13. Design wave estimation considering directional distribution of waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Deo, M.C

    .elsevier.com/locate/oceaneng Technical Note Design wave estimation considering directional distribution of waves V. Sanil Kumar a,C3 , M.C. Deo b a OceanEngineeringDivision,NationalInstituteofOceanography,Donapaula,Goa-403004,India b Civil... of Physical Oceanography Norway, Report method for the routine 18, 1020–1034. ocean waves. Division of No. UR-80-09, 187 p. analysis of pitch and roll Conference on Coastal Engineering, 1. ASCE, Taiwan, pp. 136–149. Deo, M.C., Burrows, R., 1986. Extreme wave...

  14. Gas-hydrate concentration estimated from P- and S-wave velocities at the Mallik 2L-38 research well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcione, José M.; Gei, Davide

    2004-05-01

    We estimate the concentration of gas hydrate at the Mallik 2L-38 research site using P- and S-wave velocities obtained from well logging and vertical seismic profiles (VSP). The theoretical velocities are obtained from a generalization of Gassmann's modulus to three phases (rock frame, gas hydrate and fluid). The dry-rock moduli are estimated from the log profiles, in sections where the rock is assumed to be fully saturated with water. We obtain hydrate concentrations up to 75%, average values of 37% and 21% from the VSP P- and S-wave velocities, respectively, and 60% and 57% from the sonic-log P- and S-wave velocities, respectively. The above averages are similar to estimations obtained from hydrate dissociation modeling and Archie methods. The estimations based on the P-wave velocities are more reliable than those based on the S-wave velocities.

  15. Estimations of One Repetition Maximum and Isometric Peak Torque in Knee Extension Based on the Relationship Between Force and Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Yoshito; Hatanaka, Yasuhiko; Arai, Tomoaki; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Kanada, Yoshikiyo

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to investigate whether a linear regression formula based on the relationship between joint torque and angular velocity measured using a high-speed video camera and image measurement software is effective for estimating 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and isometric peak torque in knee extension. Subjects comprised 20 healthy men (mean ± SD; age, 27.4 ± 4.9 years; height, 170.3 ± 4.4 cm; and body weight, 66.1 ± 10.9 kg). The exercise load ranged from 40% to 150% 1RM. Peak angular velocity (PAV) and peak torque were used to estimate 1RM and isometric peak torque. To elucidate the relationship between force and velocity in knee extension, the relationship between the relative proportion of 1RM (% 1RM) and PAV was examined using simple regression analysis. The concordance rate between the estimated value and actual measurement of 1RM and isometric peak torque was examined using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Reliability of the regression line of PAV and % 1RM was 0.95. The concordance rate between the actual measurement and estimated value of 1RM resulted in an ICC(2,1) of 0.93 and that of isometric peak torque had an ICC(2,1) of 0.87 and 0.86 for 6 and 3 levels of load, respectively. Our method for estimating 1RM was effective for decreasing the measurement time and reducing patients' burden. Additionally, isometric peak torque can be estimated using 3 levels of load, as we obtained the same results as those reported previously. We plan to expand the range of subjects and examine the generalizability of our results.

  16. Direct simultaneous measurement of intraglottal geometry and velocity fields in excised larynges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Sid; Oren, Liran; Ying, Jun; Gutmark, Ephraim

    2014-04-01

    Current theories regarding the mechanisms of phonation are based on assumptions about the aerodynamics between the vocal folds during the closing phase of vocal fold vibration. However, many of these fundamental assumptions have never been validated in a tissue model. In this study, the main objective was to determine the aerodynamics (velocity fields) and the geometry of the medial surface of the vocal folds during the closing phase of vibration. The main hypothesis is that intraglottal vortices are produced during vocal fold closing when the glottal duct has a divergent shape and that these vortices are associated with negative pressures. Experiments using seven excised canine larynges. The particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) method was used to determine the velocity fields at low, mid-, and high subglottal pressures for each larynx. Modifications were made to previously described PIV methodology to allow the measurement of both the intraglottal velocity fields and the position of the medial aspects of the vocal fold. At relatively low subglottal pressures, little to no intraglottal vortices were seen. At mid- and high subglottal pressures, the flow separation vortices occurred and produced maximum negative pressures, relative to atmospheric, of -2.6 to -14.6 cm H2 O. Possible physiological and surgical implications are discussed. Intraglottal vortices produce significant negative pressures at mid- and high subglottal pressures. These vortices may be important in increasing maximum flow declination rate and acoustic intensity. N/A. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Spectral Velocity Estimation using the Autocorrelation Function and Sparse data Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound scanners can be used for displaying the distribution of velocities in blood vessels by finding the power spectrum of the received signal. It is desired to show a B-mode image for orientation and data for this has to be acquired interleaved with the flow data. Techniques for maintaining...... both the B-mode frame rate, and at the same time have the highest possible $f_{prf}$ only limited by the depth of investigation, are, thus, of great interest. The power spectrum can be calculated from the Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function $R_r(k)$. The lag $k$ corresponds...... of the sequence. The audio signal has also been synthesized from the autocorrelation data by passing white, Gaussian noise through a filter designed from the power spectrum of the autocorrelation function. The results show that both the full velocity range can be maintained at the same time as a B-mode image...

  18. Estimation of blood velocity vectors using transverse ultrasound beam focusing and cross-correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Lacasa, Isabel Rodriguez

    1999-01-01

    program. Simulations are shown for a parabolic velocity profile for flow-to-beam angles of 30, 45, 60, and 90 degrees using a 64 elements linear array with a center frequency of 3 MHz, a pitch of 0.3 mm, and an element height of 5 mm. The peak velocity in the parabolic flow was 0.5 m/s, and the pulse...... repetition frequency was 3.5 kHz. Using four pulse-echo lines, the parabolic flow profile was found with a standard deviation of 0.028 m/s at 60 degrees and 0.092 m/s at 90 degrees (transverse to the ultrasound beam), corresponding to accuracies of 5.6% and 18.4%. Using ten lines gave standard deviations...

  19. Maximum likelihood sequence estimation for optical complex direct modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Di; Yuan, Feng; Shieh, William

    2017-04-17

    Semiconductor lasers are versatile optical transmitters in nature. Through the direct modulation (DM), the intensity modulation is realized by the linear mapping between the injection current and the light power, while various angle modulations are enabled by the frequency chirp. Limited by the direct detection, DM lasers used to be exploited only as 1-D (intensity or angle) transmitters by suppressing or simply ignoring the other modulation. Nevertheless, through the digital coherent detection, simultaneous intensity and angle modulations (namely, 2-D complex DM, CDM) can be realized by a single laser diode. The crucial technique of CDM is the joint demodulation of intensity and differential phase with the maximum likelihood sequence estimation (MLSE), supported by a closed-form discrete signal approximation of frequency chirp to characterize the MLSE transition probability. This paper proposes a statistical method for the transition probability to significantly enhance the accuracy of the chirp model. Using the statistical estimation, we demonstrate the first single-channel 100-Gb/s PAM-4 transmission over 1600-km fiber with only 10G-class DM lasers.

  20. Estimating the angular velocity of a rigid body moving in the plane from tangential and centripetal acceleration measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardou, Philippe; Angeles, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Two methods are available for the estimation of the angular velocity of a rigid body from point-acceleration measurements: (i) the time-integration of the angular acceleration and (ii) the square-rooting of the centripetal acceleration. The inaccuracy of the first method is due mainly to the accumulation of the error on the angular acceleration throughout the time-integration process, which does not prevent that it be used successfully in crash tests with dummies, since these experiments never last more than one second. On the other hand, the error resulting from the second method is stable through time, but becomes inaccurate whenever the rigid body angular velocity approaches zero, which occurs in many applications. In order to take advantage of the complementarity of these two methods, a fusion of their estimates is proposed. To this end, the accelerometer measurements are modeled as exact signals contaminated with bias errors and Gaussian white noise. The relations between the variables at stake are written in the form of a nonlinear state-space system in which the angular velocity and the angular acceleration are state variables. Consequently, a minimum-variance-error estimate of the state vector is obtained by means of extended Kalman filtering. The performance of the proposed estimation method is assessed by means of simulation. Apparently, the resulting estimation method is more robust than the existing accelerometer-only methods and competitive with gyroscope measurements. Moreover, it allows the identification and the compensation of any bias error in the accelerometer measurements, which is a significant advantage over gyroscopes

  1. Using velocity dispersion to estimate halo mass: Is the Local Group in tension with ΛCDM?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Pascal J.; Power, Chris; Lagos, Claudia del P.; Poulton, Rhys; Robotham, Aaron S. G.

    2018-06-01

    Satellite galaxies are commonly used as tracers to measure the line-of-sight (LOS)velocity dispersion (σLOS) of the dark matter halo associated with their central galaxy, and thereby to estimate the halo's mass. Recent observational dispersion estimates of the Local Group, including the Milky Way and M31, suggest σ ˜50 km s-1, which is surprisingly low when compared to the theoretical expectation of σ ˜100 km s-1 for systems of their mass. Does this pose a problem for Lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM)? We explore this tension using the SURFS suite of N-body simulations, containing over 10000 (sub)haloes with well tracked orbits. We test how well a central galaxy's host halo velocity dispersion can be recovered by sampling σLOS of subhaloes and surrounding haloes. Our results demonstrate that σLOS is biased mass proxy. We define an optimal window in vLOS and projected distance (Dp) - 0.5 ≲ Dp/Rvir ≲ 1.0 and vLOS ≲ 0.5Vesc, where Rvir is the virial radius and Vesc is the escape velocity - such that the scatter in LOS to halo dispersion is minimized - σLOS = (0.5 ± 0.1)σv, H. We argue that this window should be used to measure LOS dispersions as a proxy for mass, as it minimises scatter in the σLOS-Mvir relation. This bias also naturally explains the results from McConnachie (2012), who used similar cuts when estimating σLOS, LG, producing a bias of σLG = (0.44 ± 0.14)σv, H. We conclude that the Local Group's velocity dispersion does not pose a problem for ΛCDM and has a mass of log M_{LG, vir}/M_{⊙}=12.0^{+0.8}_{-2.0}.

  2. Non-invasive aortic systolic pressure and pulse wave velocity estimation in a primary care setting: An in silico study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guala, Andrea; Camporeale, Carlo; Ridolfi, Luca; Mesin, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Everyday clinical cardiovascular evaluation is still largely based on brachial systolic and diastolic pressures. However, several clinical studies have demonstrated the higher diagnostic capacities of the aortic pressure, as well as the need to assess the aortic mechanical properties (e.g., by measuring the aortic pulse wave velocity). In order to fill this gap, we propose to exploit a set of easy-to-obtain physical characteristics to estimate the aortic pressure and pulse wave velocity. To this aim, a large population of virtual subjects is created by a validated mathematical model of the cardiovascular system. Quadratic regressive models are then fitted and statistically selected in order to obtain reliable estimations of the aortic pressure and pulse wave velocity starting from the knowledge of the subject age, height, weight, brachial pressure, photoplethysmographic measures and either electrocardiogram or phonocardiogram. The results are very encouraging and foster clinical studies aiming to apply a similar technique to a real population. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. PDV-based estimation of ejecta particles' mass-velocity function from shock-loaded tin experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzkowiak, J.-E.; Prudhomme, G.; Mercier, P.; Lauriot, S.; Dubreuil, E.; Berthe, L.

    2018-03-01

    A metallic tin plate with a given surface finish of wavelength λ ≃ 60 μm and amplitude h ≃ 8 μm is explosively driven by an electro-detonator with a shock-induced breakout pressure PSB = 28 GPa (unsupported). The resulting dynamic fragmentation process, the so-called "micro-jetting," is the creation of high-speed jets of matter moving faster than the bulk metallic surface. Hydrodynamic instabilities result in the fragmentation of these jets into micron-sized metallic particles constituting a self-expanding cloud of droplets, whose areal mass, velocity, and particle size distributions are unknown. Lithium-niobate-piezoelectric sensor measured areal mass and Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) was used to get a time-velocity spectrogram of the cloud. In this article, we present both experimental mass and velocity results and we relate the integrated areal mass of the cloud to the PDV power spectral density with the assumption of a power law particle size distribution. Two models of PDV spectrograms are described. The first one accounts for the speckle statistics of the spectrum and the second one describes an average spectrum for which speckle fluctuations are removed. Finally, the second model is used for a maximum likelihood estimation of the cloud's parameters from PDV data. The estimated integrated areal mass from PDV data is found to agree well with piezoelectric results. We highlight the relevance of analyzing PDV data and correlating different diagnostics to retrieve the physical properties of ejecta particles.

  4. Examples of invasive and non-invasive methods for estimation of shear-wave velocity profile in Bucharest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldea, A.; Albota, E.; Yamanaka, H.; Fukumoto, S.; Poiata, N.

    2007-01-01

    The estimation of subsurface shear-wave velocity is of major importance for understanding and modelling site-response and surface ground motion. The shear-wave velocity profile strongly influence the shear-wave part of the seismic motion that proved to be the most damaging one. The improvement of input seismic ground motion for design is one of the long-term objectives within the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) Project in Romania. Two approaches were used: installation of a digital seismic network and soil investigations (in situ and in laboratory). National Center for Seismic Risk Reduction (NCSRR, Romania), the implementing agency of JICA Project, performed these activities in cooperation with Japanese partner institutions, and an efficient know-how transfer was achieved. Between the soil investigation activities, a special importance was given to the estimation of shear-wave velocity profile. The present paper presents results from PS logging tests at NCSRR seismic station sites, and from single-station and array microtremor measurements. Other results from PS logging tests, surface-wave method and in situ and laboratory geotechnical investigations are presented in other papers in these proceedings. In future, a joint-collaborative effort of Romanian institutions may allow an improved characterisation of the soil profile beneath Bucharest. (authors)

  5. Estimation of shear velocity contrast for dipping or anisotropic medium from transmitted Ps amplitude variation with ray-parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prakash

    2015-12-01

    Amplitude versus offset analysis of P to P reflection is often used in exploration seismology for hydrocarbon exploration. In the present work, the feasibility to estimate crustal velocity structure from transmitted P to S wave amplitude variation with ray-parameter has been investigated separately for dipping layer and anisotropy medium. First, for horizontal and isotropic medium, the approximation of P-to-s conversion is used that is expressed as a linear form in terms of slowness. Next, the intercept of the linear regression has been used to estimate the shear wave velocity contrast (δβ) across an interface. The formulation holds good for isotropic and horizontal layer medium. Application of such formula to anisotropic medium or dipping layer data may lead to erroneous estimation of δβ. In order to overcome this problem, a method has been proposed to compensate the SV-amplitude using shifted version of SH-amplitude, and subsequently transforming SV amplitudes equivalent to that from isotropic or horizontal layer medium as the case may be. Once this transformation has been done, δβ can be estimated using isotropic horizontal layer formula. The shifts required in SH for the compensation are π/2 and π/4 for dipping layer and anisotropic medium, respectively. The effectiveness of the approach has been reported using various synthetic data sets. The methodology is also tested on real data from HI-CLIMB network in Himalaya, where the presence of dipping Moho has already been reported. The result reveals that the average shear wave velocity contrast across the Moho is larger towards the Indian side compared to the higher Himalayan and Tibetan regions.

  6. Pre-stack estimation of time-lapse seismic velocity changes : an example from the Sleipner CO2-sequestration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaderi, A.; Landro, M.; Ghaderi, A.

    2005-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is being injected into a shallow sand formation at around a 1,000 metre depth at the Sleipner Field located in the North Sea. It is expected that the CO 2 injected in the bottom of the formation, will form a plume consisting of CO 2 accumulating in thin lenses during migration up through the reservoir. Several studies have been published using stacked seismic data from 1994, 1999, 2001 and 2002. A thorough analysis of post-stack seismic data from the Sleipner CO2-Sequestration Pilot Project was conducted. Interpretation of seismic data is usually done on post-stack data. For a given subsurface reflection point, seismic data are acquired for various incidence angles, typically 40 angles. These 40 seismic signals are stacked together in order to reduce noise. The term pre-stack refers to seismic data prior to this step. For hydrocarbon-related 4-dimensional seismic studies, travel time shift estimations have been used. This paper compared pre-stack and post-stack estimation of average velocity changes based on measured 4-dimensional travel time shifts. It is more practical to compare estimated velocity changes than the actual travel time changes, since the time shifts vary with offset for pre-stack time-lapse seismic analysis. It was concluded that the pre-stack method gives smaller velocity changes when estimated between two key horizons. Therefore, pre-stack travel time analysis in addition to conventional post-stack analysis is recommended. 6 refs., 12 figs

  7. Orientation Estimation and Signal Reconstruction of a Directional Sound Source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guarato, Francesco

    , one for each call emission, were compared to those calculated through a pre-existing technique based on interpolation of sound-pressure levels at microphone locations. The application of the method to the bat calls could provide knowledge on bat behaviour that may be useful for a bat-inspired sensor......Previous works in the literature about one tone or broadband sound sources mainly deal with algorithms and methods developed in order to localize the source and, occasionally, estimate the source bearing angle (with respect to a global reference frame). The problem setting assumes, in these cases......, omnidirectional receivers collecting the acoustic signal from the source: analysis of arrival times in the recordings together with microphone positions and source directivity cues allows to get information about source position and bearing. Moreover, sound sources have been included into sensor systems together...

  8. Exoplanet Classification and Yield Estimates for Direct Imaging Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Hébrard, Eric; Belikov, Rus; Batalha, Natalie M.; Mulders, Gijs D.; Stark, Chris; Teal, Dillon; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Mandell, Avi

    2018-04-01

    Future NASA concept missions that are currently under study, like the Habitable Exoplanet Imaging Mission (HabEx) and the Large Ultra-violet Optical Infra Red Surveyor, could discover a large diversity of exoplanets. We propose here a classification scheme that distinguishes exoplanets into different categories based on their size and incident stellar flux, for the purpose of providing the expected number of exoplanets observed (yield) with direct imaging missions. The boundaries of this classification can be computed using the known chemical behavior of gases and condensates at different pressures and temperatures in a planetary atmosphere. In this study, we initially focus on condensation curves for sphalerite ZnS, {{{H}}}2{{O}}, {CO}}2, and {CH}}4. The order in which these species condense in a planetary atmosphere define the boundaries between different classes of planets. Broadly, the planets are divided into rocky planets (0.5–1.0 R ⊕), super-Earths (1.0–1.75 R ⊕), sub-Neptunes (1.75–3.5 R ⊕), sub-Jovians (3.5–6.0 R ⊕), and Jovians (6–14.3 R ⊕) based on their planet sizes, and “hot,” “warm,” and “cold” based on the incident stellar flux. We then calculate planet occurrence rates within these boundaries for different kinds of exoplanets, η planet, using the community coordinated results of NASA’s Exoplanet Program Analysis Group’s Science Analysis Group-13 (SAG-13). These occurrence rate estimates are in turn used to estimate the expected exoplanet yields for direct imaging missions of different telescope diameters.

  9. Magnetic field pitch angle and perpendicular velocity measurements from multi-point time-delay estimation of poloidal correlation reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisiazhniuk, D.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Conway, G. D.; Happel, T.; Lebschy, A.; Manz, P.; Nikolaeva, V.; Stroth, U.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-02-01

    In fusion machines, turbulent eddies are expected to be aligned with the direction of the magnetic field lines and to propagate in the perpendicular direction. Time delay measurements of density fluctuations can be used to calculate the magnetic field pitch angle α and perpendicular velocity {{v}\\bot} profiles. The method is applied to poloidal correlation reflectometry installed at ASDEX Upgrade and TEXTOR, which measure density fluctuations from poloidally and toroidally separated antennas. Validation of the method is achieved by comparing the perpendicular velocity (composed of the E× B drift and the phase velocity of turbulence {{v}\\bot}={{v}E× B}+{{v}\\text{ph}} ) with Doppler reflectometry measurements and with neoclassical {{v}E× B} calculations. An important condition for the application of the method is the presence of turbulence with a sufficiently long decorrelation time. It is shown that at the shear layer the decorrelation time is reduced, limiting the application of the method. The magnetic field pitch angle measured by this method shows the expected dependence on the magnetic field, plasma current and radial position. The profile of the pitch angle reproduces the expected shape and values. However, comparison with the equilibrium reconstruction code cliste suggests an additional inclination of turbulent eddies at the pedestal position (2-3°). This additional angle decreases towards the core and at the edge.

  10. Applying Moving Objects Patterns towards Estimating Future Stocks Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galal Dahab

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stock is gaining vast popularity as a strategic investment tool not just by investor bankers, but also by the average worker. Large capitals are being traded within the stock market all around the world, making its impact not only macro economically focused, but also greatly valued taking into consideration its direct social impact. As a result, almost 66% of all American citizens are striving in their respective fields every day, trying to come up with better ways to predict and find patterns in stocks that could enhance their estimation and visualization so as to have the opportunity to take better investment decisions. Given the amount of effort that has been put into enhancing stock prediction techniques, there is still a factor that is almost completely neglected when handling stocks. The factor that has been obsolete for so long is in fact the effect of a correlation existing between stocks of the same index or parent company. This paper proposes a distinct approach for studying the correlation between stocks that belong to the same index by modelling stocks as moving objects to be able to track their movements while considering their relationships. Furthermore, it studies one of the movement techniques applied to moving objects to predict stock movement. The results yielded that both the movement technique and correlation coefficient technique are consistent in directions, with minor variations in values. The variations are attributed to the fact that the movement technique takes into consideration the sibling relationship

  11. Numerical estimation of aircrafts' unsteady lateral-directional stability derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maričić N.L.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A technique for predicting steady and oscillatory aerodynamic loads on general configuration has been developed. The prediction is based on the Doublet-Lattice Method, Slender Body Theory and Method of Images. The chord and span wise loading on lifting surfaces and longitudinal bodies (in horizontal and vertical plane load distributions are determined. The configuration may be composed of an assemblage of lifting surfaces (with control surfaces and bodies (with circular cross sections and a longitudinal variation of radius. Loadings predicted by this method are used to calculate (estimate steady and unsteady (dynamic lateral-directional stability derivatives. The short outline of the used methods is given in [1], [2], [3], [4] and [5]. Applying the described methodology software DERIV is developed. The obtained results from DERIV are compared to NASTRAN examples HA21B and HA21D from [4]. In the first example (HA21B, the jet transport wing (BAH wing is steady rolling and lateral stability derivatives are determined. In the second example (HA21D, lateral-directional stability derivatives are calculated for forward- swept-wing (FSW airplane in antisymmetric quasi-steady maneuvers. Acceptable agreement is achieved comparing the results from [4] and DERIV.

  12. Range of wavelengths possible to estimate phase velocities of surface waves in microtremors; Bido tansaho ni okeru suitei kanona bidochu no hyomenha iso sokudo no hacho han`i

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyakoshi, K; Okada, H; Ling, S [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    To specify the maximum wavelength of the phase velocities that can be estimated by the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method or F-K method in microtremor exploration, investigations were conducted using numerical simulation. In view of feasibility, an equilateral triangle array was employed, the maximum radius of the array having 7 observation points being 0.10km. The dispersion curve of the Rayleigh wave basic mode was calculated from an underground structure model. White noise was used as the incident wave, and, in case the waves came in from multiple directions, a different phase spectrum was assigned to each direction. In searching for the maximum wave length of phase velocities that could be estimated, a limit was imposed upon estimation, and it was prescribed that the wavelength be the limit if the difference between the theoretical value and estimated phase velocity was 5% or higher. As the result, it was found that it is possible to estimate the phase velocity when the wavelength is up to approximately 10 times longer than the array maximum radius in the SPAC method, and up to approximately 5 times longer in case of the F-K method. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Comparisons of Crosswind Velocity Profile Estimates Used in Fast-Time Wake Vortex Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruis, Mathew J.; Delisi, Donald P.; Ahmad, Nashat N.

    2011-01-01

    Five methods for estimating crosswind profiles used in fast-time wake vortex prediction models are compared in this study. Previous investigations have shown that temporal and spatial variations in the crosswind vertical profile have a large impact on the transport and time evolution of the trailing vortex pair. The most important crosswind parameters are the magnitude of the crosswind and the gradient in the crosswind shear. It is known that pulsed and continuous wave lidar measurements can provide good estimates of the wind profile in the vicinity of airports. In this study comparisons are made between estimates of the crosswind profiles from a priori information on the trajectory of the vortex pair as well as crosswind profiles derived from different sensors and a regional numerical weather prediction model.

  14. Rational Rock Physics for Improved Velocity Prediction and Reservoir Properties Estimation for Granite Wash (Tight Sands in Anadarko Basin, Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Z. A. Durrani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the complex nature, deriving elastic properties from seismic data for the prolific Granite Wash reservoir (Pennsylvanian age in the western Anadarko Basin Wheeler County (Texas is quite a challenge. In this paper, we used rock physics tool to describe the diagenesis and accurate estimation of seismic velocities of P and S waves in Granite Wash reservoir. Hertz-Mindlin and Cementation (Dvorkin’s theories are applied to analyze the nature of the reservoir rocks (uncemented and cemented. In the implementation of rock physics diagnostics, three classical rock physics (empirical relations, Kuster-Toksöz, and Berryman models are comparatively analyzed for velocity prediction taking into account the pore shape geometry. An empirical (VP-VS relationship is also generated calibrated with core data for shear wave velocity prediction. Finally, we discussed the advantages of each rock physics model in detail. In addition, cross-plots of unconventional attributes help us in the clear separation of anomalous zone and lithologic properties of sand and shale facies over conventional attributes.

  15. Direct estimation of diffuse gaseous emissions from coal fires: current methods and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Mark A.; Olea, Ricardo A.; O'Keefe, Jennifer M. K.; Hower, James C.; Geboy, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Coal fires occur in nature spontaneously, contribute to increases in greenhouse gases, and emit atmospheric toxicants. Increasing interest in quantifying coal fire emissions has resulted in the adaptation and development of specialized approaches and adoption of numerical modeling techniques. Overview of these methods for direct estimation of diffuse gas emissions from coal fires is presented in this paper. Here we take advantage of stochastic Gaussian simulation to interpolate CO2 fluxes measured using a dynamic closed chamber at the Ruth Mullins coal fire in Perry County, Kentucky. This approach allows for preparing a map of diffuse gas emissions, one of the two primary ways that gases emanate from coal fires, and establishing the reliability of the study both locally and for the entire fire. Future research directions include continuous and automated sampling to improve quantification of gaseous coal fire emissions.

  16. Quantification of mechanical ventricular dyssynchrony. Direct comparison of velocity-encoded and cine magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muellerleile, K.; Baholli, L.; Groth, M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The preoperative assessment of mechanical dyssynchrony can help to improve patient selection in candidates for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The present study compared the performance of velocity-encoded (VENC) MRI to cine-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for quantifying mechanical ventricular dyssynchrony. Materials and Methods: VENC-MRI and cine-MRI were performed in 20 patients with heart failure NYHA class III and reduced ejection fraction (median: 24 %, interquartile range: 18 - 28 %) before CRT device implantation. The interventricular mechanical delay (IVMD) was assessed by VENC-MRI as the temporal difference between the onset of aortic and pulmonary flow. Intraventricular dyssynchrony was quantified by cine-MRI, using the standard deviation of time to maximal wall thickening in sixteen left ventricular segments (SDt-16). The response to CRT was assessed in a six-month follow-up. Results: 14 patients (70 %) clinically responded to CRT. A similar accuracy was found to predict the response to CRT by measurements of the IVMD and SDt-16 (75 vs. 70 %; p = ns). The time needed for data analysis was significantly shorter for the IVMD at 1.69 min (interquartile range: 1.66 - 1.88 min) compared to 9.63 min (interquartile range: 8.92 - 11.63 min) for the SDt-16 (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Measurements of the IVMD by VENC-MRI and the SDt-16 by cine-MRI provide a similar accuracy to identify clinical responders to CRT. However, data analysis of the IVMD is significantly less time-consuming compared to data analysis of the SDt-16. (orig.)

  17. Vertical Rise Velocity of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles Estimated from Equatorial Atmosphere Radar Observations and High-Resolution Bubble Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, T.; Ajith, K. K.; Yamamoto, M.; Niranjan, K.

    2017-12-01

    Equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) is a well-known phenomenon in the equatorial ionospheric F region. As it causes severe scintillation in the amplitude and phase of radio signals, it is important to understand and forecast the occurrence of EPBs from a space weather point of view. The development of EPBs is presently believed as an evolution of the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We have already developed a 3D high-resolution bubble (HIRB) model with a grid spacing of as small as 1 km and presented nonlinear growth of EPBs which shows very turbulent internal structures such as bifurcation and pinching. As EPBs have field-aligned structures, the latitude range that is affected by EPBs depends on the apex altitude of EPBs over the dip equator. However, it was not easy to observe the apex altitude and vertical rise velocity of EPBs. Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) in Indonesia is capable of steering radar beams quickly so that the growth phase of EPBs can be captured clearly. The vertical rise velocities of the EPBs observed around the midnight hours are significantly smaller compared to those observed in postsunset hours. Further, the vertical growth of the EPBs around midnight hours ceases at relatively lower altitudes, whereas the majority of EPBs at postsunset hours found to have grown beyond the maximum detectable altitude of the EAR. The HIRB model with varying background conditions are employed to investigate the possible factors that control the vertical rise velocity and maximum attainable altitudes of EPBs. The estimated rise velocities from EAR observations at both postsunset and midnight hours are, in general, consistent with the nonlinear evolution of EPBs from the HIRB model.

  18. Real-time approaches to the estimation of local wind velocity for a fixed-wing unmanned air vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, W L; Lee, C S; Hsiao, F B

    2011-01-01

    Three real-time approaches to estimating local wind velocity for a fixed-wing unmanned air vehicle are presented in this study. All three methods work around the navigation equations with added wind components. The first approach calculates the local wind speed by substituting the ground speed and ascent rate data given by the Global Positioning System (GPS) into the navigation equations. The second and third approaches utilize the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and the unscented Kalman filter (UKF), respectively. The results show that, despite the nonlinearity of the navigation equations, the EKF performance is proven to be on a par with the UKF. A time-varying noise estimation method based on the Wiener filter is also discussed. Results are compared with the average wind speed measured on the ground. All three approaches are proven to be reliable with stated advantages and disadvantages

  19. Distance and velocity estimation using optical flow from a monocular camera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, H.W.; de Croon, G.C.H.E.; Chu, Q.

    2016-01-01

    Monocular vision is increasingly used in Micro Air Vehicles for navigation. In particular, optical flow, inspired by flying insects, is used to perceive vehicles’ movement with respect to the surroundings or sense changes in the environment. However, optical flow does not directly provide us the

  20. Distance and velocity estimation using optical flow from a monocular camera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, H.W.; de Croon, G.C.H.E.; Chu, Q.

    2017-01-01

    Monocular vision is increasingly used in micro air vehicles for navigation. In particular, optical flow, inspired by flying insects, is used to perceive vehicle movement with respect to the surroundings or sense changes in the environment. However, optical flow does not directly provide us the

  1. Asymmetry of Drosophila ON and OFF motion detectors enhances real-world velocity estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Aljoscha; Ammer, Georg; Meier, Matthias; Serbe, Etienne; Bahl, Armin; Borst, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    The reliable estimation of motion across varied surroundings represents a survival-critical task for sighted animals. How neural circuits have adapted to the particular demands of natural environments, however, is not well understood. We explored this question in the visual system of Drosophila melanogaster. Here, as in many mammalian retinas, motion is computed in parallel streams for brightness increments (ON) and decrements (OFF). When genetically isolated, ON and OFF pathways proved equally capable of accurately matching walking responses to realistic motion. To our surprise, detailed characterization of their functional tuning properties through in vivo calcium imaging and electrophysiology revealed stark differences in temporal tuning between ON and OFF channels. We trained an in silico motion estimation model on natural scenes and discovered that our optimized detector exhibited differences similar to those of the biological system. Thus, functional ON-OFF asymmetries in fly visual circuitry may reflect ON-OFF asymmetries in natural environments.

  2. An improvement of wind velocity estimation from radar Doppler spectra in the upper mesosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Takeda

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new parameter estimation method for Doppler wind spectra in the mesosphere observed with an MST radar such as the MU radar in the DBS (Doppler Beam Swinging mode. Off-line incoherent integration of the Doppler spectra is carried out with a new algorithm excluding contamination by strong meteor echoes. At the same time, initial values on a least square fitting of the Gaussian function are derived using a larger number of integration of the spectra for a longer time and for multiple heights. As a result, a significant improvement has been achieved with the probability of a successful fitting and parameter estimation above 80 km. The top height for the wind estimation has been improved to around 95 km. A comparison between the MU radar and the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI on the UARS satellite is shown and the capability of the new method for a validation of a future satellite mission is suggested.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics – Radio science (remote sensing; signal processing

  3. Estimating the cost of blood: past, present, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shander, Aryeh; Hofmann, Axel; Gombotz, Hans; Theusinger, Oliver M; Spahn, Donat R

    2007-06-01

    Understanding the costs associated with blood products requires sophisticated knowledge about transfusion medicine and is attracting the attention of clinical and administrative healthcare sectors worldwide. To improve outcomes, blood usage must be optimized and expenditures controlled so that resources may be channeled toward other diagnostic, therapeutic, and technological initiatives. Estimating blood costs, however, is a complex undertaking, surpassing simple supply versus demand economics. Shrinking donor availability and application of a precautionary principle to minimize transfusion risks are factors that continue to drive the cost of blood products upward. Recognizing that historical accounting attempts to determine blood costs have varied in scope, perspective, and methodology, new approaches have been initiated to identify all potential cost elements related to blood and blood product administration. Activities are also under way to tie these elements together in a comprehensive and practical model that will be applicable to all single-donor blood products without regard to practice type (e.g., academic, private, multi- or single-center clinic). These initiatives, their rationale, importance, and future directions are described.

  4. Optimization of Transverse Oscillating Fields for Vector Velocity Estimation with Convex Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2013-01-01

    A method for making Vector Flow Images using the transverse oscillation (TO) approach on a convex array is presented. The paper presents optimization schemes for TO fields for convex probes and evaluates their performance using Field II simulations and measurements using the SARUS experimental...... from 90 to 45 degrees in steps of 15 degrees. The optimization routine changes the lateral oscillation period lx to yield the best possible estimates based on the energy ratio between positive and negative spatial frequencies in the ultrasound field. The basic equation for lx gives 1.14 mm at 40 mm...

  5. Estimation of caries experience by multiple imputation and direct standardization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuller, A. A.; Van Buuren, S.

    2014-01-01

    Valid estimates of caries experience are needed to monitor oral population health. Obtaining such estimates in practice is often complicated by nonresponse and missing data. The goal of this study was to estimate caries experiences in a population of children aged 5 and 11 years, in the presence of

  6. Estimation of Caries Experience by Multiple Imputation and Direct Standardization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuller, A. A.; van Buuren, S.

    2014-01-01

    Valid estimates of caries experience are needed to monitor oral population health. Obtaining such estimates in practice is often complicated by nonresponse and missing data. The goal of this study was to estimate caries experiences in a population of children aged 5 and 11 years, in the presence of

  7. Demonstration of a Vector Velocity Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Møller; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    With conventional Doppler ultrasound it is not possible to estimate direction and velocity of blood flow, when the angle of insonation exceeds 60–70°. Transverse oscillation is an angle independent vector velocity technique which is now implemented on a conventional ultrasound scanner. In this pa......With conventional Doppler ultrasound it is not possible to estimate direction and velocity of blood flow, when the angle of insonation exceeds 60–70°. Transverse oscillation is an angle independent vector velocity technique which is now implemented on a conventional ultrasound scanner...

  8. Directly Estimating Earthquake Rupture Area using Second Moments to Reduce the Uncertainty in Stress Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Jeffrey J.; Kaneko, Yoshihiro

    2018-06-01

    The key kinematic earthquake source parameters: rupture velocity, duration and area, shed light on earthquake dynamics, provide direct constraints on stress-drop, and have implications for seismic hazard. However, for moderate and small earthquakes, these parameters are usually poorly constrained due to limitations of the standard analysis methods. Numerical experiments by Kaneko and Shearer [2014,2015] demonstrated that standard spectral fitting techniques can lead to roughly 1 order of magnitude variation in stress-drop estimates that do not reflect the actual rupture properties even for simple crack models. We utilize these models to explore an alternative approach where we estimate the rupture area directly. For the suite of models, the area averaged static stress drop is nearly constant for models with the same underlying friction law, yet corner frequency based stress-drop estimates vary by a factor of 5-10 even for noise free data. Alternatively, we simulated inversions for the rupture area as parameterized by the second moments of the slip distribution. A natural estimate for the rupture area derived from the second moments is A=πLcWc, where Lc and Wc are the characteristic rupture length and width. This definition yields estimates of stress drop that vary by only 10% between the models but are slightly larger than the true area-averaged values. We simulate inversions for the second moments for the various models and find that the area can be estimated well when there are at least 15 available measurements of apparent duration at a variety of take-off angles. The improvement compared to azimuthally-averaged corner-frequency based approaches results from the second moments accounting for directivity and removing the assumption of a circular rupture area, both of which bias the standard approach. We also develop a new method that determines the minimum and maximum values of rupture area that are consistent with a particular dataset at the 95% confidence

  9. Performance of velocity vector estimation using an improved dynamic beamforming setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    control of the acoustic field, based on the Pulsed Plane Wave Decomposition (PPWD), is presented. The PPWD gives an unambigious relation between a given acoustic field and the time functions needed on an array transducer for transmission. Applying this method for the receive beamformation results in a set...... and experimental data. The simulation setup is an attempt to approximate the situation present when performing a scanning of the carotid artery with a linear array. Measurement of the flow perpendicular to the emission direction is possible using the approach of transverse spatial modulation. This is most often...... the case in a scanning of the carotid artery, where the situation is handled by an angled Doppler setup in the present ultrasound scanners. The modulation period of 2 mm is controlled for a range of 20-40 mm which covers the typical range of the carotid artery. A 6 MHz array on a 128-channel system...

  10. Estimating the Direct Economic Damage of the Earthquake in Haiti

    OpenAIRE

    Cavallo, Eduardo; Powell, Andrew; Becerra, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses simple regression techniques to make an initial assessment of the monetary damages caused by the January 12, 2010 earthquake that struck Haiti. Damages are estimated for a disaster with both 200,000 and 250,000 total dead and missing (i.e., the range of mortality that the earthquake is estimated to have caused) using Haiti’s economic and demographic data. The base estimate is US$8.1bn for a death toll of 250,000, but for several reasons this may be a lower- bound estimate. An ...

  11. Comparative study of the temperature and velocity gradients for the interphases obtained during directional solidification of Al-Cu alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ares, Alicia Esther; Gueijman, Sergio Fabian; Schvezov, Carlos E

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies determined that in directionally solidified lead-tin alloys, the position in which the transition occurs from columnar to equiaxial structure depending on the distribution of temperatures in the system, occurs when a minimum and critical thermal gradient value is attained in the liquid before the interphase that separates the (liquid) phase from the (solid + liquid) phase and this critical gradient value is independent from the solute concentration, natural convection, degree of overheating, the mold geometry and the number of columnar and equiaxial grains that form. The study now includes aluminum-copper alloys, for which the temperature gradient test values in the liquid before the (liquid)/(solid + liquid) interphase and the speeds of the (liquid)/(solid+liquid)/(solid) interphases are determined. The values of interphase gradients and velocities contrast with the values predicted by the Hunt model for the same alloy system. The velocities of the interphases are also compared with those calculated with the Lipton equation and used in the Wang and Beckermann model for dendritic equiaxial growth. The results are compared with those obtained previously in the lead-tin system (CW)

  12. Estimation of site specific deposition velocities and mass interception factor using 7Be as a tracer in Kudankulam environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvi, B.S.; Vijayakumar, B.; Ravi, P.M.

    2018-01-01

    Beryllium-7 ( 7 Be) is a cosmogenic radionuclide formed in the atmosphere when cosmic ray produced neutrons and protons disintegrate the atomic nucleus of nitrogen and oxygen in to lighter fragments. ' 7 Be is found naturally in air, rainwater, vegetation, soils and sediments as well as lake and ocean waters. Due to its continuous production in the atmosphere, its relatively short half-life (53.3 days), and its ease of measurement by gamma spectrometry, 7 Be has proven to be a useful tool for tracing and quantifying environmental processes such as atmospheric deposition, atmospheric transport and soil erosion etc. A systematic study is carried out to estimate the site specific deposition velocities and the mass interception factor around the Kudankulam environment

  13. Estimates of ambient groundwater velocity in the alluvium south of Yucca Mountain from single-well tracer tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, P.W.; Umari, M.J.; Roback, R.; Earle, John; Darnell, Jon; Farnham, Irene

    2002-01-01

    The saturated alluvium located south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada is expected to serve as the final barrier to radionuclide transport from the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The alluvium will act as a barrier if radionuclides breach the engineered barriers in the repository, move through the unsaturated zone beneath the repository to the water table, and then migrate through saturated volcanic tuffs to the alluvium. Three single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests were conducted between December 2000 and April 2001 in the saturated alluviuni at NC-EWDP-19D1, a Nye County-Early Warning Drilling Program well located about 18 km south of Yucca Mountain. The tests had the objectives of (1) distinguishing between a single- and a dual-porosity conceptual radionuclide transport model for the alluvium, and (2) obtaining estimates of ambient groundwater velocity in the alluvium.

  14. Prediction of Compressional Wave Velocity Using Regression and Neural Network Modeling and Estimation of Stress Orientation in Bokaro Coalfield, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Suman; Ali, Muhammad; Chatterjee, Rima

    2018-01-01

    Velocity of compressional wave ( V P) of coal and non-coal lithology is predicted from five wells from the Bokaro coalfield (CF), India. Shear sonic travel time logs are not recorded for all wells under the study area. Shear wave velocity ( Vs) is available only for two wells: one from east and other from west Bokaro CF. The major lithologies of this CF are dominated by coal, shaly coal of Barakar formation. This paper focuses on the (a) relationship between Vp and Vs, (b) prediction of Vp using regression and neural network modeling and (c) estimation of maximum horizontal stress from image log. Coal characterizes with low acoustic impedance (AI) as compared to the overlying and underlying strata. The cross-plot between AI and Vp/ Vs is able to identify coal, shaly coal, shale and sandstone from wells in Bokaro CF. The relationship between Vp and Vs is obtained with excellent goodness of fit ( R 2) ranging from 0.90 to 0.93. Linear multiple regression and multi-layered feed-forward neural network (MLFN) models are developed for prediction Vp from two wells using four input log parameters: gamma ray, resistivity, bulk density and neutron porosity. Regression model predicted Vp shows poor fit (from R 2 = 0.28) to good fit ( R 2 = 0.79) with the observed velocity. MLFN model predicted Vp indicates satisfactory to good R2 values varying from 0.62 to 0.92 with the observed velocity. Maximum horizontal stress orientation from a well at west Bokaro CF is studied from Formation Micro-Imager (FMI) log. Breakouts and drilling-induced fractures (DIFs) are identified from the FMI log. Breakout length of 4.5 m is oriented towards N60°W whereas the orientation of DIFs for a cumulative length of 26.5 m is varying from N15°E to N35°E. The mean maximum horizontal stress in this CF is towards N28°E.

  15. System and method to estimate compressional to shear velocity (VP/VS) ratio in a region remote from a borehole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2012-10-16

    In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

  16. A test of the ADV-based Reynolds flux method for in situ estimation of sediment settling velocity in a muddy estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Grace M.; Friedrichs, Carl T.; Smith, S. Jarrell

    2013-12-01

    Under conditions common in muddy coastal and estuarine environments, acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs) can serve to estimate sediment settling velocity ( w s) by assuming a balance between upward turbulent Reynolds flux and downward gravitational settling. Advantages of this method include simple instrument deployment, lack of flow disturbance, and relative insensitivity to biofouling and water column stratification. Although this method is being used with increasing frequency in coastal and estuarine environments, to date it has received little direct ground truthing. This study compared in situ estimates of w s inferred by a 5-MHz ADV to independent in situ observations from a high-definition video settling column over the course of a flood tide in the bottom boundary layer of the York River estuary, Virginia, USA. The ADV-based measurements were found to agree with those of the settling column when the current speed at about 40 cm above the bed was greater than about 20 cm/s. This corresponded to periods when the estimated magnitude of the settling term in the suspended sediment continuity equation was four or more times larger than the time rate of change of concentration. For ADV observations restricted to these conditions, ADV-based estimates of w s (mean 0.48±0.04 mm/s) were highly consistent with those observed by the settling column (mean 0.45±0.02 mm/s). However, the ADV-based method for estimating w s was sensitive to the prescribed concentration of the non-settling washload, C wash. In an objective operational definition, C wash can be set equal to the lowest suspended solids concentration observed around slack water.

  17. Estimating direct and indirect costs of premenstrual syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borenstein, Jeff; Chiou, Chiun-Fang; Dean, Bonnie; Wong, John; Wade, Sally

    2005-01-01

    To quantify the economic impact of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) on the employer. Data were collected from 374 women aged 18-45 with regular menses. Direct costs were quantified using administrative claims of these patients and the Medicare Fee Schedule. Indirect costs were quantified by both self-reported days of work missed and lost productivity at work. Regression analyses were used to develop a model to project PMS-related direct and indirect costs. A total of 29.6% (n = 111) of the participants were diagnosed with PMS. A PMS diagnosis was associated with an average annual increase of $59 in direct costs (P increase in direct medical costs and a large increase in indirect costs.

  18. Estimation of water flow velocity in small plants using cold neutron imaging with D 2O tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, U.; Herppich, W. B.; Kardjilov, N.; Graf, W.; Hilger, A.; Manke, I.

    2009-06-01

    Water flow imaging may help to better understand various problems related to water stress of plants. It may help to fully understand the water relations of plants. The objective of this research was to estimate the velocity of water flow in plant samples. Cut roses ( Rosa hybrida, var. 'Milva') were used as samples. Cold neutron radiography (CNR) was conducted at CONRAD, Helmholtz Center Berlin for Materials and Energy, Berlin, Germany. D 2O and H 2O were interchangeably injected into the water feeding system of the sample. After the uptake of D 2O, the neutron transmission increased due to the smaller attenuation coefficient of D 2O compared to H 2O. Replacement of D 2O in the rose peduncle was clearly observed. Three different optical flow algorithms, Block Matching, Horn-Schunck and Lucas-Kanade, were used to calculate the vector of D 2O tracer flow. The quality of sequential images providing sufficient spatial and temporal resolution allowed to estimate flow vector.

  19. Variance in parametric images: direct estimation from parametric projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguire, R.P.; Leenders, K.L.; Spyrou, N.M.

    2000-01-01

    Recent work has shown that it is possible to apply linear kinetic models to dynamic projection data in PET in order to calculate parameter projections. These can subsequently be back-projected to form parametric images - maps of parameters of physiological interest. Critical to the application of these maps, to test for significant changes between normal and pathophysiology, is an assessment of the statistical uncertainty. In this context, parametric images also include simple integral images from, e.g., [O-15]-water used to calculate statistical parametric maps (SPMs). This paper revisits the concept of parameter projections and presents a more general formulation of the parameter projection derivation as well as a method to estimate parameter variance in projection space, showing which analysis methods (models) can be used. Using simulated pharmacokinetic image data we show that a method based on an analysis in projection space inherently calculates the mathematically rigorous pixel variance. This results in an estimation which is as accurate as either estimating variance in image space during model fitting, or estimation by comparison across sets of parametric images - as might be done between individuals in a group pharmacokinetic PET study. The method based on projections has, however, a higher computational efficiency, and is also shown to be more precise, as reflected in smooth variance distribution images when compared to the other methods. (author)

  20. Comparison of direct and precipitation methods for the estimation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is increase in use of direct assays for analysis of high and low density lipoprotein cholesterol by clinical laboratories despite differences in performance characteristics with conventional precipitation methods. Calculation of low density lipoprotein cholesterol in precipitation methods is based on total ...

  1. ESTIMATIVA DA VELOCIDADE DE INFILTRAÇÃO BÁSICA DO SOLO ESTIMATION OF THE SOIL BASIC INFILTRATION VELOCITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUÍS EDUARDO DE OLIVEIRA SALES

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Objetivando estimar a velocidade de infiltração básica (VIB, avaliou-se a associação desta com outras propriedades físicas das camadas superficial e subsuperficial de um Latossolo Roxo e um Podzólico Vermelho-Amarelo, ambos ocorrentes no campus da Universidade Federal de Lavras. Para tanto, delineou-se um plano amostral consistindo de uma rede cujas malhas apresentaram espaçamentos variáveis. Nos pontos de interseção das malhas determinou-se a VIB e, posteriormente, coletaram-se amostras com estrutura deformada e indeformada nas camadas de 0-20 e 60-80 cm. Com essas amostras determinou-se a textura, densidade do solo e de partículas, porosidade total, macro e microporosidade e condutividade hidráulica do solo saturado. Após análises estatísticas de correlação e regressão, verificou-se que as propriedades físicas da camada de 0-20 cm do Latossolo Roxo e 60-80 cm do Podzólico Vermelho-Amarelo associaram-se melhor com a VIB. Tanto a condutividade hidráulica do solo saturado quanto a densidade do solo se mostraram adequadas para estimar a VIB desses solos.With the objective of estimating the soil basic infiltration velocity (BIV, a study was conducted to evaluate the degree of association between BIV and other physical properties of the superficial and subsuperficial layers of a Dusky-Red Latosol (Oxisol and of a Red-Yellow Podzolic soil (Ultisol, both located at the campus of the Universidade Federal de Lavras, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The sampling was performed with systematic spacing and the points constituted a grid, with variable spacing. At each sampling point, the value of the basic infiltration velocity was determined and thereafter undisturbed and disturbed samples at 0-20 and 60-80 cm of depth were collected. With these samples, the particle-size distribution, bulk density, particle density, total volume of pores, macroporosity, microporosity and hydraulic conductivity of saturated soil were determined. Statistical

  2. SOAP 2.0: a tool to estimate the photometric and radial velocity variations induced by stellar spots and plages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumusque, X.; Boisse, I.; Santos, N. C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents SOAP 2.0, a new version of the Spot Oscillation And Planet (SOAP) code that estimates in a simple way the photometric and radial velocity (RV) variations induced by active regions. The inhibition of the convective blueshift (CB) inside active regions is considered, as well as the limb brightening effect of plages, a quadratic limb darkening law, and a realistic spot and plage contrast ratio. SOAP 2.0 shows that the activity-induced variation of plages is dominated by the inhibition of the CB effect. For spots, this effect becomes significant only for slow rotators. In addition, in the case of a major active region dominating the activity-induced signal, the ratio between the FWHM and the RV peak-to-peak amplitudes of the cross correlation function can be used to infer the type of active region responsible for the signal for stars with v sin i ≤8 km s –1 . A ratio smaller than three implies a spot, while a larger ratio implies a plage. Using the observation of HD 189733, we show that SOAP 2.0 manages to reproduce the activity variation as well as previous simulations when a spot is dominating the activity-induced variation. In addition, SOAP 2.0 also reproduces the activity variation induced by a plage on the slowly rotating star α Cen B, which is not possible using previous simulations. Following these results, SOAP 2.0 can be used to estimate the signal induced by spots and plages, but also to correct for it when a major active region is dominating the RV variation.

  3. SOAP 2.0: A Tool to Estimate the Photometric and Radial Velocity Variations Induced by Stellar Spots and Plages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumusque, X.; Boisse, I.; Santos, N. C.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents SOAP 2.0, a new version of the Spot Oscillation And Planet (SOAP) code that estimates in a simple way the photometric and radial velocity (RV) variations induced by active regions. The inhibition of the convective blueshift (CB) inside active regions is considered, as well as the limb brightening effect of plages, a quadratic limb darkening law, and a realistic spot and plage contrast ratio. SOAP 2.0 shows that the activity-induced variation of plages is dominated by the inhibition of the CB effect. For spots, this effect becomes significant only for slow rotators. In addition, in the case of a major active region dominating the activity-induced signal, the ratio between the FWHM and the RV peak-to-peak amplitudes of the cross correlation function can be used to infer the type of active region responsible for the signal for stars with v sin i SOAP 2.0 manages to reproduce the activity variation as well as previous simulations when a spot is dominating the activity-induced variation. In addition, SOAP 2.0 also reproduces the activity variation induced by a plage on the slowly rotating star α Cen B, which is not possible using previous simulations. Following these results, SOAP 2.0 can be used to estimate the signal induced by spots and plages, but also to correct for it when a major active region is dominating the RV variation. . The work in this paper is based on observations made with the MOST satellite, the HARPS instrument on the ESO 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory (Chile), and the SOPHIE instrument at the Observatoire de Haute Provence (France).

  4. SOAP 2.0: a tool to estimate the photometric and radial velocity variations induced by stellar spots and plages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumusque, X. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Boisse, I. [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille (UMR 6110), Technopole de Château-Gombert, 38 rue Frédéric Joliot-Curie, F-13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Santos, N. C., E-mail: xdumusque@cfa.harvard.edu [Centro de Astrofìsica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal)

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents SOAP 2.0, a new version of the Spot Oscillation And Planet (SOAP) code that estimates in a simple way the photometric and radial velocity (RV) variations induced by active regions. The inhibition of the convective blueshift (CB) inside active regions is considered, as well as the limb brightening effect of plages, a quadratic limb darkening law, and a realistic spot and plage contrast ratio. SOAP 2.0 shows that the activity-induced variation of plages is dominated by the inhibition of the CB effect. For spots, this effect becomes significant only for slow rotators. In addition, in the case of a major active region dominating the activity-induced signal, the ratio between the FWHM and the RV peak-to-peak amplitudes of the cross correlation function can be used to infer the type of active region responsible for the signal for stars with v sin i ≤8 km s{sup –1}. A ratio smaller than three implies a spot, while a larger ratio implies a plage. Using the observation of HD 189733, we show that SOAP 2.0 manages to reproduce the activity variation as well as previous simulations when a spot is dominating the activity-induced variation. In addition, SOAP 2.0 also reproduces the activity variation induced by a plage on the slowly rotating star α Cen B, which is not possible using previous simulations. Following these results, SOAP 2.0 can be used to estimate the signal induced by spots and plages, but also to correct for it when a major active region is dominating the RV variation.

  5. Novel approaches to estimating the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate from low- and moderate-resolution velocity fluctuation time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wacławczyk

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose two approaches to estimating the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE dissipation rate, based on the zero-crossing method by Sreenivasan et al. (1983. The original formulation requires a fine resolution of the measured signal, down to the smallest dissipative scales. However, due to finite sampling frequency, as well as measurement errors, velocity time series obtained from airborne experiments are characterized by the presence of effective spectral cutoffs. In contrast to the original formulation the new approaches are suitable for use with signals originating from airborne experiments. The suitability of the new approaches is tested using measurement data obtained during the Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST airborne research campaign as well as synthetic turbulence data. They appear useful and complementary to existing methods. We show the number-of-crossings-based approaches respond differently to errors due to finite sampling and finite averaging than the classical power spectral method. Hence, their application for the case of short signals and small sampling frequencies is particularly interesting, as it can increase the robustness of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate retrieval.

  6. Estimation of the Ideal Binary Mask using Directional Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldt, Jesper; Kjems, Ulrik; Pedersen, Michael Syskind

    2008-01-01

    The ideal binary mask is often seen as a goal for time-frequency masking algorithms trying to increase speech intelligibility, but the required availability of the unmixed signals makes it difficult to calculate the ideal binary mask in any real-life applications. In this paper we derive the theory...... and the requirements to enable calculations of the ideal binary mask using a directional system without the availability of the unmixed signals. The proposed method has a low complexity and is verified using computer simulation in both ideal and non-ideal setups showing promising results....

  7. Reactive Balance Control in Response to Perturbation in Unilateral Stance: Interaction Effects of Direction, Displacement and Velocity on Compensatory Neuromuscular and Kinematic Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyler, Kathrin; Gollhofer, Albert; Colin, Ralf; Brüderlin, Uli; Ritzmann, Ramona

    2015-01-01

    Unexpected sudden perturbations challenge postural equilibrium and require reactive compensation. This study aimed to assess interaction effects of the direction, displacement and velocity of perturbations on electromyographic (EMG) activity, centre of pressure (COP) displacement and joint kinematics to detect neuromuscular characteristics (phasic and segmental) and kinematic strategies of compensatory reactions in an unilateral balance paradigm. In 20 subjects, COP displacement and velocity, ankle, knee and hip joint excursions and EMG during short (SLR), medium (MLR) and long latency response (LLR) of four shank and five thigh muscles were analysed during random surface translations varying in direction (anterior-posterior (sagittal plane), medial-lateral (frontal plane)), displacement (2 vs. 3cm) and velocity (0.11 vs. 0.18m/s) of perturbation when balancing on one leg on a movable platform. Phases: SLR and MLR were scaled to increased velocity (Pjoints compensated for both increasing displacement and velocity in all directions (Pjoint deflections were particularly sensitive to increasing displacement in the sagittal (Pjoint deflections to increasing velocity in the frontal plane (P<0.05). COP measures increased with increasing perturbation velocity and displacement (P<0.05). Interaction effects indicate that compensatory responses are based on complex processes, including different postural strategies characterised by phasic and segmental specifications, precisely adjusted to the type of balance disturbance. To regain balance after surface translation, muscles of the distal segment govern the quick regain of equilibrium; the muscles of the proximal limb serve as delayed stabilisers after a balance disturbance. Further, a kinematic distinction regarding the compensation for balance disturbance indicated different plane- and segment-specific sensitivities with respect to the determinants displacement and velocity. PMID:26678061

  8. Directable weathering of concave rock using curvature estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael D; Farley, McKay; Butler, Joseph; Beardall, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    We address the problem of directable weathering of exposed concave rock for use in computer-generated animation or games. Previous weathering models that admit concave surfaces are computationally inefficient and difficult to control. In nature, the spheroidal and cavernous weathering rates depend on the surface curvature. Spheroidal weathering is fastest in areas with large positive mean curvature and cavernous weathering is fastest in areas with large negative mean curvature. We simulate both processes using an approximation of mean curvature on a voxel grid. Both weathering rates are also influenced by rock durability. The user controls rock durability by editing a durability graph before and during weathering simulation. Simulations of rockfall and colluvium deposition further improve realism. The profile of the final weathered rock matches the shape of the durability graph up to the effects of weathering and colluvium deposition. We demonstrate the top-down directability and visual plausibility of the resulting model through a series of screenshots and rendered images. The results include the weathering of a cube into a sphere and of a sheltered inside corner into a cavern as predicted by the underlying geomorphological models.

  9. An ML-Based Radial Velocity Estimation Algorithm for Moving Targets in Spaceborne High-Resolution and Wide-Swath SAR Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Jin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Multichannel synthetic aperture radar (SAR is a significant breakthrough to the inherent limitation between high-resolution and wide-swath (HRWS compared with conventional SAR. Moving target indication (MTI is an important application of spaceborne HRWS SAR systems. In contrast to previous studies of SAR MTI, the HRWS SAR mainly faces the problem of under-sampled data of each channel, causing single-channel imaging and processing to be infeasible. In this study, the estimation of velocity is equivalent to the estimation of the cone angle according to their relationship. The maximum likelihood (ML based algorithm is proposed to estimate the radial velocity in the existence of Doppler ambiguities. After that, the signal reconstruction and compensation for the phase offset caused by radial velocity are processed for a moving target. Finally, the traditional imaging algorithm is applied to obtain a focused moving target image. Experiments are conducted to evaluate the accuracy and effectiveness of the estimator under different signal-to-noise ratios (SNR. Furthermore, the performance is analyzed with respect to the motion ship that experiences interference due to different distributions of sea clutter. The results verify that the proposed algorithm is accurate and efficient with low computational complexity. This paper aims at providing a solution to the velocity estimation problem in the future HRWS SAR systems with multiple receive channels.

  10. Estimation of the variations of ventilation rate and indoor radon concentration using the observed wind velocity and indoor-outdoor temperature difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Katsuhiro; Inose, Yuichi; Kojima, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    The indoor radon concentration in the building depends on the ventilation rate. Measurement results of indoor-outdoor pressure difference showed the ventilation rate correlated closely with the indoor-outdoor pressure difference. The observation results showed that one of factor of indoor-outdoor pressure difference was the wind velocity. When the wind velocity is small, the ventilation rate is affected by the indoor-outdoor temperature difference and the effect depends on the wind velocity. The temporal variation of indoor radon concentration was predicted by the time depending indoor radon balance model and the ventilation rate estimated from the wind velocity and the indoor-outdoor temperature difference. The temporal variations of predicted radon concentration gave good agreement with the experimental values. The measurement method, indoor radon concentration and ventilation rate, factors of temporal variation of ventilation rate, and prediction of indoor radon concentration are reported. (S.Y.)

  11. Comparison of groundwater transit velocity estimates from flux theory and water table recession based approaches for solute transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasiah, Velu; Armour, John David

    2013-02-15

    Reliable information in transit time (TT) derived from transit velocity (TV) for rain or irrigation water to mix with groundwater (GW) and the subsequent discharge to surface water bodies (SWB) is essential to address the issues associated with the transport of nutrients, particularly nitrate, from GW to SWB. The objectives of this study are to (i) compare the TV estimates obtained using flux theory-based (FT) approach with the water table rise/recession (WT) rate approach and (ii) explore the impact of the differences on solute transport from GW to SWB. The results from a study conducted during two rainy seasons in the northeast humid tropics of Queensland, Australia, showed the TV varied in space and over time and the variations depended on the estimation procedures. The lateral TV computed using the WT approach ranged from 1.00 × 10(-3) to 2.82 × 10(-1) m/d with a mean of 6.18 × 10(-2) m/d compared with 2.90 × 10(-4) to 5.15 × 10(-2) m/d for FT with a mean of 2.63 × 10(-2) m/d. The vertical TV ranged from 2.00 × 10(-3) to 6.02 × 10(-1) m/d with a mean of 1.28 × 10(-1) m/d for the WT compared with 6.76 × 10(-3)-1.78 m/d for the FT with a mean of 2.73 × 10(-1) m/d. These differences are attributed to the role played by different flow pathways. The bypass flow pathway played a role only in WT but not in FT. Approximately 86-95% of the variability in lateral solute transport was accounted for by the lateral TV and the total recession between two consecutive major rainfall events. A comparison of TT from FT and WT approaches indicated the laterally transported nitrate from the GW to the nearby creek was relatively 'new', implying the opportunity for accumulation and to undergo biochemical reactions in GW was low. The results indicated the WT approach produced more reliable TT estimates than FT in the presence of bypass flow pathways. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Direct magnetic field estimation based on echo planar raw data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testud, Frederik; Splitthoff, Daniel Nicolas; Speck, Oliver; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2010-07-01

    Gradient recalled echo echo planar imaging is widely used in functional magnetic resonance imaging. The fast data acquisition is, however, very sensitive to field inhomogeneities which manifest themselves as artifacts in the images. Typically used correction methods have the common deficit that the data for the correction are acquired only once at the beginning of the experiment, assuming the field inhomogeneity distribution B(0) does not change over the course of the experiment. In this paper, methods to extract the magnetic field distribution from the acquired k-space data or from the reconstructed phase image of a gradient echo planar sequence are compared and extended. A common derivation for the presented approaches provides a solid theoretical basis, enables a fair comparison and demonstrates the equivalence of the k-space and the image phase based approaches. The image phase analysis is extended here to calculate the local gradient in the readout direction and improvements are introduced to the echo shift analysis, referred to here as "k-space filtering analysis." The described methods are compared to experimentally acquired B(0) maps in phantoms and in vivo. The k-space filtering analysis presented in this work demonstrated to be the most sensitive method to detect field inhomogeneities.

  13. Estimation of seismic velocity changes at different depths associated with the 2014 Northern Nagano Prefecture earthquake, Japan ( M W 6.2) by joint interferometric analysis of NIED Hi-net and KiK-net records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawazaki, Kaoru; Saito, Tatsuhiko; Ueno, Tomotake; Shiomi, Katsuhiko

    2016-12-01

    To estimate the seismic velocity changes at different depths associated with a large earthquake, we apply passive image interferometry to two types of seismograms: KiK-net vertical pairs of earthquake records and Hi-net continuous borehole data. We compute the surface/borehole deconvolution waveform (DCW) of seismograms recorded by a KiK-net station and the autocorrelation function (ACF) of ambient noise recorded by a collocated Hi-net station, 26 km from the epicenter of the 2014 Northern Nagano Prefecture earthquake, Japan ( M W 6.2). Because the deeper KiK-net sensor and the Hi-net sensor are collocated at 150 m depth, and another KiK-net sensor is located at the surface directly above the borehole sensors, we can measure shallow (150 m depth) velocity changes separately. The sensitivity of the ACF to the velocity changes in the deeper zone is evaluated by a numerical wave propagation simulation. We detect relative velocity changes of -3.1 and -1.4% in the shallow and deep zones, respectively, within 1 week of the mainshock. The relative velocity changes recover to -1.9 and -1.1%, respectively, during the period between 1 week and 4 months after the mainshock. The observed relative velocity reductions can be attributed to dynamic strain changes due to the strong ground motion, rather than static strain changes due to coseismic deformation by the mainshock. The speed of velocity recovery may be faster in the shallow zone than in the deep zone because the recovery speed is controlled by initial damage in the medium. This recovery feature is analogous to the behavior of slow dynamics observed in rock experiments.

  14. An Estimate of Solar Wind Velocity Profiles in a Coronal Hole and a Coronal Streamer Area (6-40 R(radius symbol)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzold, M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Bird, M. K.

    1995-01-01

    Total electron content data obtained from the Ulysses Solar Corona Experiment (SCE) in 1991 were used to select two data sets, one associated with a coronal hole and the other with coronal streamer crossings. (This is largely equatorial data shortly after solar maximum.) The solar wind velocity profile is estimated for these areas.

  15. Direct estimation of functionals of density operators by local operations and classical communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Carolina Moura; Horodecki, Pawel; Oi, Daniel K. L.; Kwek, L. C.; Ekert, Artur K.

    2003-01-01

    We present a method of direct estimation of important properties of a shared bipartite quantum state, within the ''distant laboratories'' paradigm, using only local operations and classical communication. We apply this procedure to spectrum estimation of shared states, and locally implementable structural physical approximations to incompletely positive maps. This procedure can also be applied to the estimation of channel capacity and measures of entanglement

  16. FAP-overexpressing fibroblasts produce an extracellular matrix that enhances invasive velocity and directionality of pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyung-Ok; Mullins, Stefanie R; Franco-Barraza, Janusz; Valianou, Matthildi; Cukierman, Edna; Cheng, Jonathan D

    2011-01-01

    Alterations towards a permissive stromal microenvironment provide important cues for tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. In this study, Fibroblast activation protein (FAP), a serine protease selectively produced by tumor-associated fibroblasts in over 90% of epithelial tumors, was used as a platform for studying tumor-stromal interactions. We tested the hypothesis that FAP enzymatic activity locally modifies stromal ECM (extracellular matrix) components thus facilitating the formation of a permissive microenvironment promoting tumor invasion in human pancreatic cancer. We generated a tetracycline-inducible FAP overexpressing fibroblastic cell line to synthesize an in vivo-like 3-dimensional (3D) matrix system which was utilized as a stromal landscape for studying matrix-induced cancer cell behaviors. A FAP-dependent topographical and compositional alteration of the ECM was characterized by measuring the relative orientation angles of fibronectin fibers and by Western blot analyses. The role of FAP in the matrix-induced permissive tumor behavior was assessed in Panc-1 cells in assorted matrices by time-lapse acquisition assays. Also, FAP + matrix-induced regulatory molecules in cancer cells were determined by Western blot analyses. We observed that FAP remodels the ECM through modulating protein levels, as well as through increasing levels of fibronectin and collagen fiber organization. FAP-dependent architectural/compositional alterations of the ECM promote tumor invasion along characteristic parallel fiber orientations, as demonstrated by enhanced directionality and velocity of pancreatic cancer cells on FAP + matrices. This phenotype can be reversed by inhibition of FAP enzymatic activity during matrix production resulting in the disorganization of the ECM and impeded tumor invasion. We also report that the FAP + matrix-induced tumor invasion phenotype is β 1 -integrin/FAK mediated. Cancer cell invasiveness can be affected by alterations in the tumor

  17. Bound on the estimation grid size for sparse reconstruction in direction of arrival estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coutiño Minguez, M.A.; Pribic, R; Leus, G.J.T.

    2016-01-01

    A bound for sparse reconstruction involving both the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the estimation grid size is presented. The bound is illustrated for the case of a uniform linear array (ULA). By reducing the number of possible sparse vectors present in the feasible set of a constrained ℓ1-norm

  18. Phase Velocity Estimation of a Microstrip Line in a Stoichiometric Periodically Domain-Inverted LiTaO3 Modulator Using Electro-Optic Sampling Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintaro Hisatake

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We estimate the phase velocity of a modulation microwave in a quasi-velocity-matched (QVM electro-optic (EO phase modulator (QVM-EOM using EO sampling which is accurate and the most reliable technique for measuring voltage waveforms at an electrode. The substrate of the measured QVM-EOM is a stoichiometric periodically domain-inverted LiTaO3 crystal. The electric field of a standing wave in a resonant microstrip line (width: 0.5 mm, height: 0.5 mm is measured by employing a CdTe crystal as an EO sensor. The wavelength of the traveling microwave at 16.0801 GHz is determined as 3.33 mm by fitting the theoretical curve to the measured electric field distribution. The phase velocity is estimated as vm=5.35×107 m/s, though there exists about 5% systematic error due to the perturbation by the EO sensor. Relative dielectric constant of εr=41.5 is led as the maximum likelihood value that derives the estimated phase velocity.

  19. Reactive Balance Control in Response to Perturbation in Unilateral Stance: Interaction Effects of Direction, Displacement and Velocity on Compensatory Neuromuscular and Kinematic Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Freyler

    Full Text Available Unexpected sudden perturbations challenge postural equilibrium and require reactive compensation. This study aimed to assess interaction effects of the direction, displacement and velocity of perturbations on electromyographic (EMG activity, centre of pressure (COP displacement and joint kinematics to detect neuromuscular characteristics (phasic and segmental and kinematic strategies of compensatory reactions in an unilateral balance paradigm. In 20 subjects, COP displacement and velocity, ankle, knee and hip joint excursions and EMG during short (SLR, medium (MLR and long latency response (LLR of four shank and five thigh muscles were analysed during random surface translations varying in direction (anterior-posterior (sagittal plane, medial-lateral (frontal plane, displacement (2 vs. 3 cm and velocity (0.11 vs. 0.18 m/s of perturbation when balancing on one leg on a movable platform. Phases: SLR and MLR were scaled to increased velocity (P<0.05; LLR was scaled to increased displacement (P<0.05. Segments: phasic interrelationships were accompanied by segmental distinctions: distal muscles were used for fast compensation in SLR (P<0.05 and proximal muscles to stabilise in LLR (P<0.05. Kinematics: ankle joints compensated for both increasing displacement and velocity in all directions (P<0.05, whereas knee joint deflections were particularly sensitive to increasing displacement in the sagittal (P<0.05 and hip joint deflections to increasing velocity in the frontal plane (P<0.05. COP measures increased with increasing perturbation velocity and displacement (P<0.05. Interaction effects indicate that compensatory responses are based on complex processes, including different postural strategies characterised by phasic and segmental specifications, precisely adjusted to the type of balance disturbance. To regain balance after surface translation, muscles of the distal segment govern the quick regain of equilibrium; the muscles of the proximal limb

  20. Production, oxygen respiration rates, and sinking velocity of copepod fecal pellets: Direct measurements of ballasting by opal and calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, H.; Iversen, M.H.; Koski, Marja

    2008-01-01

    sp., T. weissflogii, and E. huxleyi, respectively. The average carbon-specific respiration rate was 0.15 d(-1) independent on diet (range: 0.08-0.21 d(-1)). Because of ballasting of opal and calcite, sinking velocities were significantly higher for pellets produced on T. weissflogii (322 +/- 169 m d...

  1. Stress-wave velocity of wood-based panels: effect of moisture, product type, and material direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guangping Han; Qinglin Wu; Xiping Wang

    2006-01-01

    The effect of moisture on longitudinal stress-wave velocity (SWV), bending stiffness. and bending strength of commercial oriented strandboard, plywood. particleboard. and southern pine lumber was evaluated. It was shown that the stress-wave verocity decreased in general with increases in panel moisture content (MC). At a given MC level. SWV varied with panel type and...

  2. Estimation of balance uncertainty using Direct Monte Carlo Simulation (DSMC) on a CPU-GPU architecture

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bidgood, Peter M

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of balance uncertainty using conventional statistical and error propagation methods has been found to be both approximate and laborious to the point of being untenable. Direct Simulation by Monte Carlo (DSMC) has been shown...

  3. On Moderator Detection in Anchoring Research: Implications of Ignoring Estimate Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan N. Cheek

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Anchoring, whereby judgments assimilate to previously considered standards, is one of the most reliable effects in psychology. In the last decade, researchers have become increasingly interested in identifying moderators of anchoring effects. We argue that a drawback of traditional moderator analyses in the standard anchoring paradigm is that they ignore estimate direction—whether participants’ estimates are higher or lower than the anchor value. We suggest that failing to consider estimate direction can sometimes obscure moderation in anchoring tasks, and discuss three potential analytic solutions that take estimate direction into account. Understanding moderators of anchoring effects is essential for a basic understanding of anchoring and for applied research on reducing the influence of anchoring in real-world judgments. Considering estimate direction reduces the risk of failing to detect moderation.

  4. An improved principal component analysis based region matching method for fringe direction estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, A.; Quan, C.

    2018-04-01

    The principal component analysis (PCA) and region matching combined method is effective for fringe direction estimation. However, its mask construction algorithm for region matching fails in some circumstances, and the algorithm for conversion of orientation to direction in mask areas is computationally-heavy and non-optimized. We propose an improved PCA based region matching method for the fringe direction estimation, which includes an improved and robust mask construction scheme, and a fast and optimized orientation-direction conversion algorithm for the mask areas. Along with the estimated fringe direction map, filtered fringe pattern by automatic selective reconstruction modification and enhanced fast empirical mode decomposition (ASRm-EFEMD) is used for Hilbert spiral transform (HST) to demodulate the phase. Subsequently, windowed Fourier ridge (WFR) method is used for the refinement of the phase. The robustness and effectiveness of proposed method are demonstrated by both simulated and experimental fringe patterns.

  5. A fast and automatically paired 2-D direction-of-arrival estimation with and without estimating the mutual coupling coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filik, Tansu; Tuncer, T. Engin

    2010-06-01

    A new technique is proposed for the solution of pairing problem which is observed when fast algorithms are used for two-dimensional (2-D) direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation. Proposed method is integrated with array interpolation for efficient use of antenna elements. Two virtual arrays are generated which are positioned accordingly with respect to the real array. ESPRIT algorithm is used by employing both the real and virtual arrays. The eigenvalues of the rotational transformation matrix have the angle information at both magnitude and phase which allows the estimation of azimuth and elevation angles by using closed-form expressions. This idea is used to obtain the paired interpolated ESPRIT algorithm which can be applied for arbitrary arrays when there is no mutual coupling. When there is mutual coupling, two approaches are proposed in order to obtain 2-D paired DOA estimates. These blind methods can be applied for the array geometries which have mutual coupling matrices with a Toeplitz structure. The first approach finds the 2-D paired DOA angles without estimating the mutual coupling coefficients. The second approach estimates the coupling coefficients and iteratively improves both the coupling coefficients and the DOA estimates. It is shown that the proposed techniques solve the pairing problem for uniform circular arrays and effectively estimate the DOA angles in case of unknown mutual coupling.

  6. Estimating regional pore pressure distribution using 3D seismic velocities in the Dutch Central North Sea Graben

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winthaegen, P.L.A.; Verweij, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The application of the empirical Eaton method to calibrated sonic well information and 3D seismic interval velocity data in the southeastern part of the Central North Sea Graben, using the Japsen (Glob. Planet. Change 24 (2000) 189) normal velocitydepth trend, resulted in the identification of an

  7. A novel five-wire micro anemometer with 3D directionality for low speed air flow detection and acoustic particle velocity detecting capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Chang, Wenhan; Gao, Chengchen; Hao, Yilong

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a novel five-wire micro-fabricated anemometer with 3D directionality based on calorimetric principle is proposed, which is capable of measuring low speed airflow. This structure is realized by vertically bonding two different dies, which can be fabricated on the same wafer resulting in a simple fabrication process. Experiments on speed lower than 200 mm s-1 are conducted, showing good repeatability and directionality. The speed of airflow is controlled by the volumetric flow rate. The measured velocity sensitivity is 9.4 mV · s m-1, with relative direction sensitivity of 37.1 dB. The deviation between the expected and the measured directivity is analyzed by both theories and simulations. A correction procedure is proposed and turns out to be useful to eliminate this deviation. To further explore the potential of our device, we expose it to acoustic plane waves in a standing wave tube, showing consistent planar directivity of figure of eight. The measured velocity sensitivity at 1 kHz and 120 dBC is 4.4 mV · s m-1, with relative direction sensitivity of 27.0 dB. By using the correction method proposed above, the maximum angle error is about  ±2°, showing its good directionality accuracy.

  8. Relating Local to Global Spatial Knowledge: Heuristic Influence of Local Features on Direction Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Daniel W.; Montello, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has examined heuristics--simplified decision-making rules-of-thumb--for geospatial reasoning. This study examined at two locations the influence of beliefs about local coastline orientation on estimated directions to local and distant places; estimates were made immediately or after fifteen seconds. This study goes beyond…

  9. Coordinated path-following and direct yaw-moment control of autonomous electric vehicles with sideslip angle estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinghua; Luo, Yugong; Li, Keqiang; Dai, Yifan

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a novel coordinated path following system (PFS) and direct yaw-moment control (DYC) of autonomous electric vehicles via hierarchical control technique. In the high-level control law design, a new fuzzy factor is introduced based on the magnitude of longitudinal velocity of vehicle, a linear time varying (LTV)-based model predictive controller (MPC) is proposed to acquire the wheel steering angle and external yaw moment. Then, a pseudo inverse (PI) low-level control allocation law is designed to realize the tracking of desired external moment torque and management of the redundant tire actuators. Furthermore, the vehicle sideslip angle is estimated by the data fusion of low-cost GPS and INS, which can be obtained by the integral of modified INS signals with GPS signals as initial value. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed control system is validated by the simulation and experimental tests.

  10. Algorithms to estimate the rose of directions of a spatial fibre system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiderlen, Markus; Pfrang, A.

    2005-01-01

    The directional measure (which is up to normalization the rose of directions) is used to quantify anisotropy of stationary fibre processes in three-dimensional space. There exist a large number of approaches to estimate this measure from the rose of intersections (which is the mean number...

  11. DETECTION OF CA II ABSORPTION BY A HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUD IN THE DIRECTION OF THE QUASAR PKS 0837-120

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROBERTSON, JG; SCHWARZ, UJ; VANWOERDEN, H; MURRAY, JD; MORTON, DC; HULSBOSCH, ANM

    1991-01-01

    We present optical absorption spectroscopy of the Ca II K and H lines along the sight line to the quasar PKS 0837-120, which lies in the direction of a high-velocity cloud (HVC) detected in H I 21-cm emission at V(LSR) = + 105 km s-1. Our data show Ca II absorption due to the HVC as well as a lower

  12. On Training Bi-directional Neural Network Language Model with Noise Contrastive Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    He, Tianxing; Zhang, Yu; Droppo, Jasha; Yu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    We propose to train bi-directional neural network language model(NNLM) with noise contrastive estimation(NCE). Experiments are conducted on a rescore task on the PTB data set. It is shown that NCE-trained bi-directional NNLM outperformed the one trained by conventional maximum likelihood training. But still(regretfully), it did not out-perform the baseline uni-directional NNLM.

  13. Estimations of On-site Directional Wave Spectra from Measured Ship Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2006-01-01

    include an quivalence of energy in the governing equations and, as regards the parametric concept, a frequency dependent spreading of the waves is introduced. The paper includes an extensive analysis of full-scale measurements for which the directional wave spectra are estimated by the two ship response......In general, two main concepts can be applied to estimate the on-site directional wave spectrum on the basis of ship response measurements: 1) a parametric method which assumes the wave spectrum to be composed by parameterised wave spectra, or 2) a non-parametric method where the directional wave...

  14. Measurements of P- and S wave velocities in a rock massif and its use in estimating elastic moduli

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Živor, Roman; Vilhelm, J.; Rudajev, Vladimír; Lokajíček, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2011), s. 157-167 ISSN 1214-9705 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300130906 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : seismic source * seismic waves velocity * elastic constants * geophone * piezo -electric transducer Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2011 http://www.irsm.cas.cz/abstracts/AGG/02_11/6_Zivor.pdf

  15. Dynamic selection of ship responses for estimation of on-site directional wave spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ingrid Marie Vincent; Storhaug, Gaute

    2012-01-01

    -estimate of the wave spectrum is suggested. The selection method needs to be robust for what reason a parameterised uni-directional, two-parameter wave spectrum is treated. The parameters included are the zero up-crossing period, the significant wave height and the main wave direction relative to the ship’s heading...... with the best overall agreement are selected for the actual estimation of the directional wave spectrum. The transfer functions for the ship responses can be determined using different computational methods such as striptheory, 3D panel codes, closed form expressions or model tests. The uncertainty associated......Knowledge of the wave environment in which a ship is operating is crucial for most on-board decision support systems. Previous research has shown that the directional wave spectrum can be estimated by the use of measured global ship responses and a set of transfer functions determined...

  16. Direct and simultaneous estimation of cardiac four chamber volumes by multioutput sparse regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Xiantong; Zhang, Heye; Islam, Ali; Bhaduri, Mousumi; Chan, Ian; Li, Shuo

    2017-02-01

    Cardiac four-chamber volume estimation serves as a fundamental and crucial role in clinical quantitative analysis of whole heart functions. It is a challenging task due to the huge complexity of the four chambers including great appearance variations, huge shape deformation and interference between chambers. Direct estimation has recently emerged as an effective and convenient tool for cardiac ventricular volume estimation. However, existing direct estimation methods were specifically developed for one single ventricle, i.e., left ventricle (LV), or bi-ventricles; they can not be directly used for four chamber volume estimation due to the great combinatorial variability and highly complex anatomical interdependency of the four chambers. In this paper, we propose a new, general framework for direct and simultaneous four chamber volume estimation. We have addressed two key issues, i.e., cardiac image representation and simultaneous four chamber volume estimation, which enables accurate and efficient four-chamber volume estimation. We generate compact and discriminative image representations by supervised descriptor learning (SDL) which can remove irrelevant information and extract discriminative features. We propose direct and simultaneous four-chamber volume estimation by the multioutput sparse latent regression (MSLR), which enables jointly modeling nonlinear input-output relationships and capturing four-chamber interdependence. The proposed method is highly generalized, independent of imaging modalities, which provides a general regression framework that can be extensively used for clinical data prediction to achieve automated diagnosis. Experiments on both MR and CT images show that our method achieves high performance with a correlation coefficient of up to 0.921 with ground truth obtained manually by human experts, which is clinically significant and enables more accurate, convenient and comprehensive assessment of cardiac functions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  17. Angle independent velocity spectrum determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging system (100) includes a transducer array (102) that emits an ultrasound beam and produces at least one transverse pulse-echo field that oscillates in a direction transverse to the emitted ultrasound beam and that receive echoes produced in response thereto and a spectral vel...... velocity estimator (110) that determines a velocity spectrum for flowing structure, which flows at an angle of 90 degrees and flows at angles less than 90 degrees with respect to the emitted ultrasound beam, based on the received echoes....

  18. Salt flow direction and velocity during subsalt normal faulting and syn-kinematic sedimentation—implications from analytical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsitzka, M.; Kukowski, N.; Kley, J.

    2018-04-01

    Salt flow induced by subsalt normal faulting is mainly controlled by tilting of the salt layer, the amount of differential loading due to syn-kinematic deposition, and tectonic shearing at the top or the base of the salt layer. Our study addresses the first two mechanisms and aims to examine salt flow patterns above a continuously moving subsalt normal fault and beneath a syn-kinematic minibasin. In such a setting, salt either tends to flow down towards the basin centre driven by its own weight or is squeezed up towards the footwall side owing to loading differences between the minibasin and the region above the footwall block. Applying isostatic balancing in analytical models, we calculated the steady-state flow velocity in a salt layer. This procedure gives insights into (1) the minimum vertical offset required for upward flow to occur, (2) the magnitude of the flow velocity, and (3) the average density of the supra-salt cover layer at the point at which upward flow starts. In a sensitivity study, we examined how the point of flow reversal and the velocity patterns are influenced by changes of the salt and cover layer thickness, the geometry of the cover flexure, the dip of the subsalt fault, compaction parameters of the supra-salt cover, the salt viscosity and the salt density. Our model results reveal that in most geological scenarios, salt flow above a continuously displacing subsalt normal fault goes through an early phase of downward flow. At sufficiently high fault offset in the range of 700-2600 m, salt is later squeezed upward towards the footwall side. This flow reversal occurs at smaller vertical fault displacement, if the thickness of the pre-kinematic layer is larger, the sedimentation rate of the syn-kinematic cover is higher, the compaction coefficient of cover sediments (i.e. the density increase with depth) is larger or the average density of the salt is lower. Other geometrical parameters such as the width of the cover monocline, the dip of the

  19. Estimation of presampling MTF in CR systems by using direct fluorescence and its problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Kitahei; Inatsu, Hiroshi; Harao, Mototsugu; Itonaga, Haruo; Miyamoto, Hideyuki

    2001-01-01

    We proposed a method for practical estimation of the presampling modulation transfer function (MTF) of a computed radiography (CR) system by using the MTFs of an imaging plate and the sampling aperture. The MTFs of three imaging plates (GP-25, ST-VN, and RP-1S) with different photostimulable phosphors were measured by using direct fluorescence (the light emitted instantaneously by x-ray exposure), and the presampling MTFs were estimated from these imaging plate MTFs and the sampling aperture MTF. Our results indicated that for imaging plate RP-1S the measured presampling MTF was significantly superior to the estimated presampling MTF at any spatial frequency. This was because the estimated presampling MTF was degraded by the diffusion of direct fluorescence in the protective layer of the imaging plate's surface. Therefore, when the presampling MTF of the imaging plate with a thick protective layer is estimated, correction for the thickness of the protective layer should be carried out. However, the estimated presampling MTF of imaging plates with a thin protective layer were almost the same as the measured presampling MTF, except in the high spatial frequency range. Therefore, we consider this estimation method to be useful and practical, because the spatial resolution property of a CR system can be obtained simply from the imaging plate MTF measured with direct fluorescence. (author)

  20. Estimating Steatosis Prevalence in Overweight and Obese Children: Comparison of Bayesian Small Area and Direct Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Khalkhali

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Often, there is no access to sufficient sample size to estimate the prevalence using the method of direct estimator in all areas. The aim of this study was to compare small area’s Bayesian method and direct method in estimating the prevalence of steatosis in obese and overweight children. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, was conducted on 150 overweight and obese children aged 2 to 15 years referred to the Children's digestive clinic of Urmia University of Medical Sciences- Iran, in 2013. After Body mass index (BMI calculation, children with overweight and obese were assessed in terms of primary tests of obesity screening. Then children with steatosis confirmed by abdominal Ultrasonography, were referred to the laboratory for doing further tests. Steatosis prevalence was estimated by direct and Bayesian method and their efficiency were evaluated using mean-square error Jackknife method. The study data was analyzed using the open BUGS3.1.2 and R2.15.2 software. Results: The findings indicated that estimation of steatosis prevalence in children using Bayesian and direct methods were between 0.3098 to 0.493, and 0.355 to 0.560 respectively, in Health Districts; 0.3098 to 0.502, and 0.355 to 0.550 in Education Districts; 0.321 to 0.582, and 0.357 to 0.615 in age groups; 0.313 to 0.429, and 0.383 to 0.536 in sex groups. In general, according to the results, mean-square error of Bayesian estimation was smaller than direct estimation (P

  1. Using linear time-invariant system theory to estimate kinetic parameters directly from projection measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, G.L.; Gullberg, G.T.

    1995-01-01

    It is common practice to estimate kinetic parameters from dynamically acquired tomographic data by first reconstructing a dynamic sequence of three-dimensional reconstructions and then fitting the parameters to time activity curves generated from the time-varying reconstructed images. However, in SPECT, the pharmaceutical distribution can change during the acquisition of a complete tomographic data set, which can bias the estimated kinetic parameters. It is hypothesized that more accurate estimates of the kinetic parameters can be obtained by fitting to the projection measurements instead of the reconstructed time sequence. Estimation from projections requires the knowledge of their relationship between the tissue regions of interest or voxels with particular kinetic parameters and the project measurements, which results in a complicated nonlinear estimation problem with a series of exponential factors with multiplicative coefficients. A technique is presented in this paper where the exponential decay parameters are estimated separately using linear time-invariant system theory. Once the exponential factors are known, the coefficients of the exponentials can be estimated using linear estimation techniques. Computer simulations demonstrate that estimation of the kinetic parameters directly from the projections is more accurate than the estimation from the reconstructed images

  2. Direct Estimation of Power Distribution in Reactors for Nuclear Thermal Space Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldemir, Tunc; Miller, Don W.; Burghelea, Andrei

    2004-02-01

    A recently proposed constant temperature power sensor (CTPS) has the capability to directly measure the local power deposition rate in nuclear reactor cores proposed for space thermal propulsion. Such a capability reduces the uncertainties in the estimated power peaking factors and hence increases the reliability of the nuclear engine. The CTPS operation is sensitive to the changes in the local thermal conditions. A procedure is described for the automatic on-line calibration of the sensor through estimation of changes in thermal .conditions.

  3. Living up to expectations: Estimating direct and indirect rebound effects for UK households

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitnis, Mona; Sorrell, Steve

    2015-01-01

    This study estimates the combined direct and indirect rebound effects from various types of energy efficiency improvement by UK households. In contrast to most studies of this topic, we base our estimates on cross-price elasticities and therefore capture both the income and substitution effects of energy efficiency improvements. Our approach involves estimating a household demand model to obtain price and expenditure elasticities of different goods and services, utilising a multiregional input–output model to estimate the GHG emission intensities of those goods and services, combining the two to estimate direct and indirect rebound effects, and decomposing those effects to reveal the relative contribution of different mechanisms and commodities. We estimate that the total rebound effects are 41% for measures that improve the efficiency of domestic gas use, 48% for electricity use and 78% for vehicle fuel use. The primary source of this rebound is increased consumption of the cheaper energy service (i.e. direct rebound) and this is primarily driven by substitution effects. Our results suggest that the neglect of substitution effects may have led prior research to underestimate the total rebound effect. However, we provide a number of caveats to this conclusion, as well as indicating priorities for future research.

  4. FY 2011 4th Quarter Metric: Estimate of Future Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, D

    2011-09-21

    The global and annual mean aerosol direct and indirect effects, relative to 1850 conditions, estimated from CESM simulations are 0.02 W m-2 and -0.39 W m-2, respectively, for emissions in year 2100 under the IPCC RCP8.5 scenario. The indirect effect is much smaller than that for 2000 emissions because of much smaller SO2 emissions in 2100; the direct effects are small due to compensation between warming by black carbon and cooling by sulfate.

  5. A Scale Elasticity Measure for Directional Distance Function and its Dual: Theory and DEA Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Valentin Zelenyuk

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we focus on scale elasticity measure based on directional distance function for multi-output-multi-input technologies, explore its fundamental properties and show its equivalence with the input oriented and output oriented scale elasticity measures. We also establish duality relationship between the scale elasticity measure based on the directional distance function with scale elasticity measure based on the profit function. Finally, we discuss the estimation issues of the scale...

  6. Adjustable Parameter-Based Distributed Fault Estimation Observer Design for Multiagent Systems With Directed Graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Jiang, Bin; Shi, Peng

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a novel adjustable parameter (AP)-based distributed fault estimation observer (DFEO) is proposed for multiagent systems (MASs) with the directed communication topology. First, a relative output estimation error is defined based on the communication topology of MASs. Then a DFEO with AP is constructed with the purpose of improving the accuracy of fault estimation. Based on H ∞ and H 2 with pole placement, multiconstrained design is given to calculate the gain of DFEO. Finally, simulation results are presented to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed DFEO design with AP.

  7. Convenient method for estimating underground s-wave velocity structure utilizing horizontal and vertical components microtremor spectral ratio; Bido no suiheido/jogedo supekutoru hi wo riyoshita kan`i chika s ha sokudo kozo suiteiho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, H; Yoshioka, M; Saito, T [Iwate University, Iwate (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-05-01

    Studies were conducted about the method of estimating the underground S-wave velocity structure by inversion making use of the horizontal/vertical motion spectral ratio of microtremors. For this purpose, a dynamo-electric velocity type seismograph was used, capable of processing the east-west, north-south, and vertical components integratedly. For the purpose of sampling the Rayleigh wave spectral ratio, one out of all the azimuths was chosen, whose horizontal motion had a high Fourier frequency component coherency with the vertical motions. For the estimation of the underground S-wave velocity structure, parameters (P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density, and layer thickness) were determined from the minimum residual sum of squares involving the observed microtremor spectral ratio and the theoretical value calculated by use of a model structure. The known boring data was utilized for the study of the S-wave velocity in the top layer, and it was determined using an S-wave velocity estimation formula for the Morioka area constructed using the N-value, depth, and geological classification. It was found that the optimum S-wave velocity structure even below the top layer well reflects the S-wave velocity obtained by the estimation formula. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Blind Direction-of-Arrival Estimation with Uniform Circular Array in Presence of Mutual Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A blind direction-of-arrival (DOA estimation algorithm based on the estimation of signal parameters via rotational invariance techniques (ESPRIT is proposed for a uniform circular array (UCA when strong electromagnetic mutual coupling is present. First, an updated UCA model with mutual coupling in a discrete Fourier transform (DFT beam space is deduced, and the new manifold matrix is equal to the product of a centrosymmetric diagonal matrix and a Vandermonde-structure matrix. Then we carry out blind DOA estimation through a modified ESPRIT method, thus avoiding the need for spatial angular searching. In addition, two mutual coupling parameter estimation methods are presented after the DOAs have been estimated. Simulation results show that the new algorithm is reliable and effective especially for closely spaced signals.

  9. Direction of Arrival Estimation Accuracy Enhancement via Using Displacement Invariance Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Fayad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new algorithm for improving Direction of Arrival Estimation (DOAE accuracy has been carried out. Two contributions are introduced. First, Doppler frequency shift that resulted from the target movement is estimated using the displacement invariance technique (DIT. Second, the effect of Doppler frequency is modeled and incorporated into ESPRIT algorithm in order to increase the estimation accuracy. It is worth mentioning that the subspace approach has been employed into ESPRIT and DIT methods to reduce the computational complexity and the model’s nonlinearity effect. The DOAE accuracy has been verified by closed-form Cramér-Rao bound (CRB. The simulation results of the proposed algorithm are better than those of the previous estimation techniques leading to the estimator performance enhancement.

  10. Estimating the probability that the Taser directly causes human ventricular fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, H; Haemmerich, D; Rahko, P S; Webster, J G

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes the first methodology and results for estimating the order of probability for Tasers directly causing human ventricular fibrillation (VF). The probability of an X26 Taser causing human VF was estimated using: (1) current density near the human heart estimated by using 3D finite-element (FE) models; (2) prior data of the maximum dart-to-heart distances that caused VF in pigs; (3) minimum skin-to-heart distances measured in erect humans by echocardiography; and (4) dart landing distribution estimated from police reports. The estimated mean probability of human VF was 0.001 for data from a pig having a chest wall resected to the ribs and 0.000006 for data from a pig with no resection when inserting a blunt probe. The VF probability for a given dart location decreased with the dart-to-heart horizontal distance (radius) on the skin surface.

  11. Novel Diagonal Reloading Based Direction of Arrival Estimation in Unknown Non-Uniform Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nested array can expand the degrees of freedom (DOF from difference coarray perspective, but suffering from the performance degradation of direction of arrival (DOA estimation in unknown non-uniform noise. In this paper, a novel diagonal reloading (DR based DOA estimation algorithm is proposed using a recently developed nested MIMO array. The elements in the main diagonal of the sample covariance matrix are eliminated; next the smallest MN-K eigenvalues of the revised matrix are obtained and averaged to estimate the sum value of the signal power. Further the estimated sum value is filled into the main diagonal of the revised matrix for estimating the signal covariance matrix. In this case, the negative effect of noise is eliminated without losing the useful information of the signal matrix. Besides, the degrees of freedom are expanded obviously, resulting in the performance improvement. Several simulations are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  12. Non-invasive Estimation of Pressure Changes using 2-D Vector Velocity Ultrasound: An Experimental Study with In-Vivo Examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Møller, Niclas Dechau

    2018-01-01

    and at the aortic valve of two healthy volunteers. Ultrasound measurements were performed using the experimental scanner SARUS, in combination with an 8MHz linear array transducer for experimental scans and a carotid scan, whereas a 3.5MHz phased array probe was employed for a scan of an aortic valve. Measured 2-D......A non-invasive method for estimating intravascular pressure changes using 2-D vector velocity is presented. The method was first validated on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data, and with catheter measurements on phantoms. Hereafter, the method was tested in-vivo at the carotid bifurcation...

  13. New technology - demonstration of a vector velocity technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Hansen, Peter; Pedersen, Mads M; Hansen, Kristoffer L

    2011-01-01

    With conventional Doppler ultrasound it is not possible to estimate direction and velocity of blood flow, when the angle of insonation exceeds 60-70°. Transverse oscillation is an angle independent vector velocity technique which is now implemented on a conventional ultrasound scanner. In this pa...

  14. The effects of single bit quantization on direction of arrival estimation of UHF RFID tags

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huiting, J.; Kokkeler, Andre B.J.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2016-01-01

    Phased arrays can be used to estimate the direction-of-arrival (DOA) of UHF RFID tags. To save on energy consumption and hardware costs, in this paper we explore the possibility of using single bit analog-to-digital converters for our phased array setup. This setup consists of an off-the-shelf

  15. Variations in wave direction estimated using first and second order Fourier coefficients

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Anand, N.M.

    to the peak frequency are used in practice. In the present study, comparison is made on wave directions estimated based on first and second order Fourier coefficients using data collected at four locations in the west and east coasts of India. Study shows...

  16. Direct detection of neutral metal atoms in electron-stimulated desorption: Al from CH3O/Al(111) - velocity distribution and absolute yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitten, J.E.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.; Gruen, D.M.; Jones, P.L.

    1994-01-01

    Electron-stimulated desorption of neutral aluminum from the system CH 3 O/Al(111) has been directly monitored via quasiresonant photoionization with 193 nm excimer laser light and confirmed by two-step resonant ionization, utilizing the Al 3d 2 D manifold. Velocity distribution measurements for the neutral Al peak at ∼ 800 m/s for 1 keV incident electron energy. An absolute yield of 3.2 x 10 -6 Al atoms/electron was determined by comparison with sputtering measurements in the same apparatus. This is the first observation of electron-stimulated metal desorption from adsorbate-covered metallic surfaces

  17. Device for the acquisition and visualization in real time of the velocity and direction of wind in a radiological post stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledo P, L.M.; Guibert G, R.; Dominguez L, O.; Alonso A, D.; Ramos V, E.O.

    2006-01-01

    The work shows the development, construction and post stage of a device dedicated to the acquisition and transmission in real time of the information on the behavior of the meteorological variables: velocity and wind direction. It is introduced for the first time in an observation position the automatic monitoring, in real time, using the tools that it offers the digitalisation of the information and the computation. The obtained data are registered in a PC, its are visualized appropriately and can be objects of later analysis. It was developed the application program Autoclima for such purpose. (Author)

  18. An active heat tracer experiment to determine groundwater velocities using fiber optic cables installed with direct push equipment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Caljé, R.; Schaars, F.; Van der Made, K.J.; De Haas, S.

    2015-01-01

    A new approach is developed to insert fiber optic cables vertically into the ground with direct push equipment. Groundwater temperatures may be measured along the cables with high spatial and temporal resolution using a Distributed Temperature Sensing system. The cables may be inserted up to depths

  19. Mathematical modeling for corrosion environment estimation based on concrete resistivity measurement directly above reinforcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Young-Chul; Lee, Han-Seung; Noguchi, Takafumi

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to formulate a resistivity model whereby the concrete resistivity expressing the environment of steel reinforcement can be directly estimated and evaluated based on measurement immediately above reinforcement as a method of evaluating corrosion deterioration in reinforced concrete structures. It also aims to provide a theoretical ground for the feasibility of durability evaluation by electric non-destructive techniques with no need for chipping of cover concrete. This Resistivity Estimation Model (REM), which is a mathematical model using the mirror method, combines conventional four-electrode measurement of resistivity with geometric parameters including cover depth, bar diameter, and electrode intervals. This model was verified by estimation using this model at areas directly above reinforcement and resistivity measurement at areas unaffected by reinforcement in regard to the assessment of the concrete resistivity. Both results strongly correlated, proving the validity of this model. It is expected to be applicable to laboratory study and field diagnosis regarding reinforcement corrosion. (author)

  20. Direction-of-Arrival Estimation for Coprime Array Using Compressive Sensing Based Array Interpolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of direction-of-arrival (DOA estimation using array interpolation is proposed in this paper to increase the number of resolvable sources and improve the DOA estimation performance for coprime array configuration with holes in its virtual array. The virtual symmetric nonuniform linear array (VSNLA of coprime array signal model is introduced, with the conventional MUSIC with spatial smoothing algorithm (SS-MUSIC applied on the continuous lags in the VSNLA; the degrees of freedom (DoFs for DOA estimation are obviously not fully exploited. To effectively utilize the extent of DoFs offered by the coarray configuration, a compressing sensing based array interpolation algorithm is proposed. The compressing sensing technique is used to obtain the coarse initial DOA estimation, and a modified iterative initial DOA estimation based interpolation algorithm (IMCA-AI is then utilized to obtain the final DOA estimation, which maps the sample covariance matrix of the VSNLA to the covariance matrix of a filled virtual symmetric uniform linear array (VSULA with the same aperture size. The proposed DOA estimation method can efficiently improve the DOA estimation performance. The numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Parallel Factor-Based Model for Two-Dimensional Direction Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizar Tayem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional (2D Direction-of-Arrivals (DOA estimation for elevation and azimuth angles assuming noncoherent, mixture of coherent and noncoherent, and coherent sources using extended three parallel uniform linear arrays (ULAs is proposed. Most of the existing schemes have drawbacks in estimating 2D DOA for multiple narrowband incident sources as follows: use of large number of snapshots, estimation failure problem for elevation and azimuth angles in the range of typical mobile communication, and estimation of coherent sources. Moreover, the DOA estimation for multiple sources requires complex pair-matching methods. The algorithm proposed in this paper is based on first-order data matrix to overcome these problems. The main contributions of the proposed method are as follows: (1 it avoids estimation failure problem using a new antenna configuration and estimates elevation and azimuth angles for coherent sources; (2 it reduces the estimation complexity by constructing Toeplitz data matrices, which are based on a single or few snapshots; (3 it derives parallel factor (PARAFAC model to avoid pair-matching problems between multiple sources. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  2. SU-F-P-44: A Direct Estimate of Peak Skin Dose for Interventional Fluoroscopy Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weir, V; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There is an increasing demand for medical physicist to calculate peak skin dose (PSD) for interventional fluoroscopy procedures. The dose information (Dose-Area-Product and Air Kerma) displayed in the console cannot directly be used for this purpose. Our clinical experience shows that the use of the existing methods may overestimate or underestimate PSD. This study attempts to develop a direct estimate of PSD from the displayed dose metrics. Methods: An anthropomorphic torso phantom was used for dose measurements for a common fluoroscopic procedure. Entrance skin doses were measured with a Piranha solid state point detector placed on the table surface below the torso phantom. An initial “reference dose rate” (RE) measurement was conducted by comparing the displayed dose rate (mGy/min) to the dose rate measured. The distance from table top to focal spot was taken as the reference distance (RD at the RE. Table height was then adjusted. The displayed air kerma and DAP were recorded and sent to three physicists to estimate PSD. An inverse square correction was applied to correct displayed air kerma at various table heights. The PSD estimated by physicists and the PSD by the proposed method were then compared with the measurements. The estimated DAPs were compared to displayed DAP readings (mGycm2). Results: The difference between estimated PSD by the proposed method and direct measurements was less than 5%. For the same set of data, the estimated PSD by each of three physicists is different from measurements by ±52%. The DAP calculated by the proposed method and displayed DAP readings in the console is less than 20% at various table heights. Conclusion: PSD may be simply estimated from displayed air kerma or DAP if the distance between table top and tube focal spot or if x-ray beam area on table top is available.

  3. SU-F-P-44: A Direct Estimate of Peak Skin Dose for Interventional Fluoroscopy Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, V [Baylor Scott and White Healthcare System, Dallas, TX (United States); Zhang, J [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: There is an increasing demand for medical physicist to calculate peak skin dose (PSD) for interventional fluoroscopy procedures. The dose information (Dose-Area-Product and Air Kerma) displayed in the console cannot directly be used for this purpose. Our clinical experience shows that the use of the existing methods may overestimate or underestimate PSD. This study attempts to develop a direct estimate of PSD from the displayed dose metrics. Methods: An anthropomorphic torso phantom was used for dose measurements for a common fluoroscopic procedure. Entrance skin doses were measured with a Piranha solid state point detector placed on the table surface below the torso phantom. An initial “reference dose rate” (RE) measurement was conducted by comparing the displayed dose rate (mGy/min) to the dose rate measured. The distance from table top to focal spot was taken as the reference distance (RD at the RE. Table height was then adjusted. The displayed air kerma and DAP were recorded and sent to three physicists to estimate PSD. An inverse square correction was applied to correct displayed air kerma at various table heights. The PSD estimated by physicists and the PSD by the proposed method were then compared with the measurements. The estimated DAPs were compared to displayed DAP readings (mGycm2). Results: The difference between estimated PSD by the proposed method and direct measurements was less than 5%. For the same set of data, the estimated PSD by each of three physicists is different from measurements by ±52%. The DAP calculated by the proposed method and displayed DAP readings in the console is less than 20% at various table heights. Conclusion: PSD may be simply estimated from displayed air kerma or DAP if the distance between table top and tube focal spot or if x-ray beam area on table top is available.

  4. Directional velocity estimation using a spatio-temporal encoding technique based on frequency division for synthetic transmit aperture ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2006-01-01

    be increased. However, to focus the data properly, the signals originating from the different transmitters must be separated. To do so, the pass band of the transducer is divided into a number of subbands with disjoint spectral support. At every transmission, each transmitter is assigned one of the subbands...

  5. Drag and Lift Estimation from 3-D Velocity Field Data Measured by Multi-Plane Stereo PIV

    OpenAIRE

    加藤, 裕之; 松島, 紀佐; 上野, 真; 小池, 俊輔; 渡辺, 重哉; Kato, Hiroyuki; Matsushima, Kisa; Ueno, Makoto; Koike, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Shigeya

    2013-01-01

    For airplane design, it is crucial to have tools that can accurately predict airplane drag and lift. Usually drag and lift prediction methods are force measurement using wind tunnel balance. Unfortunately, balance data do not provide information contribution of airplane to components to drag and lift for more precise and competitive airplane design. To obtain such information, a wake integration method for use drag and lift estimation was developed for use in wake survey data analysis. Wake s...

  6. Estimation of direction of arrival of a moving target using subspace based approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Ripul; Das, Utpal; Akula, Aparna; Kumar, Satish; Sardana, H. K.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, array processing techniques based on subspace decomposition of signal have been evaluated for estimation of direction of arrival of moving targets using acoustic signatures. Three subspace based approaches - Incoherent Wideband Multiple Signal Classification (IWM), Least Square-Estimation of Signal Parameters via Rotation Invariance Techniques (LS-ESPRIT) and Total Least Square- ESPIRIT (TLS-ESPRIT) are considered. Their performance is compared with conventional time delay estimation (TDE) approaches such as Generalized Cross Correlation (GCC) and Average Square Difference Function (ASDF). Performance evaluation has been conducted on experimentally generated data consisting of acoustic signatures of four different types of civilian vehicles moving in defined geometrical trajectories. Mean absolute error and standard deviation of the DOA estimates w.r.t. ground truth are used as performance evaluation metrics. Lower statistical values of mean error confirm the superiority of subspace based approaches over TDE based techniques. Amongst the compared methods, LS-ESPRIT indicated better performance.

  7. ESTIMATION OF TURBULENT DIFFUSIVITY WITH DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF STELLAR CONVECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotta, H.; Iida, Y.; Yokoyama, T., E-mail: hotta.h@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-05-20

    We investigate the value of horizontal turbulent diffusivity {eta} by numerical calculation of thermal convection. In this study, we introduce a new method whereby the turbulent diffusivity is estimated by monitoring the time development of the passive scalar, which is initially distributed in a given Gaussian function with a spatial scale d{sub 0}. Our conclusions are as follows: (1) assuming the relation {eta} = L{sub c} v{sub rms}/3, where v{sub rms} is the root-mean-square (rms) velocity, the characteristic length L{sub c} is restricted by the shortest one among the pressure (density) scale height and the region depth. (2) The value of turbulent diffusivity becomes greater with the larger initial distribution scale d{sub 0}. (3) The approximation of turbulent diffusion holds better when the ratio of the initial distribution scale d{sub 0} to the characteristic length L{sub c} is larger.

  8. Estimating the impact of structural directionality: How reliable are undirected connectomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Kale

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Directionality is a fundamental feature of network connections. Most structural brain networks are intrinsically directed because of the nature of chemical synapses, which comprise most neuronal connections. Because of the limitations of noninvasive imaging techniques, the directionality of connections between structurally connected regions of the human brain cannot be confirmed. Hence, connections are represented as undirected, and it is still unknown how this lack of directionality affects brain network topology. Using six directed brain networks from different species and parcellations (cat, mouse, C. elegans, and three macaque networks, we estimate the inaccuracies in network measures (degree, betweenness, clustering coefficient, path length, global efficiency, participation index, and small-worldness associated with the removal of the directionality of connections. We employ three different methods to render directed brain networks undirected: (a remove unidirectional connections, (b add reciprocal connections, and (c combine equal numbers of removed and added unidirectional connections. We quantify the extent of inaccuracy in network measures introduced through neglecting connection directionality for individual nodes and across the network. We find that the coarse division between core and peripheral nodes remains accurate for undirected networks. However, hub nodes differ considerably when directionality is neglected. Comparing the different methods to generate undirected networks from directed ones, we generally find that the addition of reciprocal connections (false positives causes larger errors in graph-theoretic measures than the removal of the same number of directed connections (false negatives. These findings suggest that directionality plays an essential role in shaping brain networks and highlight some limitations of undirected connectomes. Most brain networks are inherently directed because of the nature of chemical synapses

  9. Detonation velocity in poorly mixed gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorov, E. S.

    2017-10-01

    The technique for computation of the average velocity of plane detonation wave front in poorly mixed mixture of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel and oxygen is proposed. Here it is assumed that along the direction of detonation propagation the chemical composition of the mixture has periodic fluctuations caused, for example, by layered stratification of gas charge. The technique is based on the analysis of functional dependence of ideal (Chapman-Jouget) detonation velocity on mole fraction (with respect to molar concentration) of the fuel. It is shown that the average velocity of detonation can be significantly (by more than 10%) less than the velocity of ideal detonation. The dependence that permits to estimate the degree of mixing of gas mixture basing on the measurements of average detonation velocity is established.

  10. Estimating hourly direct and diffuse solar radiation for the compilation of solar radiation distribution maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueyama, H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for estimating hourly direct and diffuse solar radiation. The essence of the method is the estimation of two important factors related to solar radiation, atmospheric transmittance and a dimensionless parameter, using empirical and physical equations and data from general meteorological observation stations. An equation for atmospheric transmittance of direct solar radiation and a dimensionless parameter representing diffuse solar radiation are developed. The equation is based on multiple regression analysis and uses three parameters as explanatory variates: calculated hourly extraterrestrial solar radiation on a horizontal plane, observed hourly sunshine duration and hourly precipitation as observed at a local meteorological observatory. The dimensionless parameter for estimating a diffuse solar radiation is then determined by linear least squares using observed hourly solar radiation at a local meteorological observatory. The estimated root mean square error (RMSE) of hourly direct and diffuse solar radiation is about 0.0-0.2 MJ¥m(-2)¥h(-1) in each mean period. The RMSE of the ten-day and monthly means of these quantities is about 0.0-0.2 MJ¥m(-2)¥h(-1), based on comparisons with AMeDAS station data, located at a distance of 6 km

  11. Direction-of-Arrival Estimation with Coarray ESPRIT for Coprime Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chengwei; Zhou, Jinfang

    2017-08-03

    A coprime array is capable of achieving more degrees-of-freedom for direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation than a uniform linear array when utilizing the same number of sensors. However, existing algorithms exploiting coprime array usually adopt predefined spatial sampling grids for optimization problem design or include spectrum peak search process for DOA estimation, resulting in the contradiction between estimation performance and computational complexity. To address this problem, we introduce the Estimation of Signal Parameters via Rotational Invariance Techniques (ESPRIT) to the coprime coarray domain, and propose a novel coarray ESPRIT-based DOA estimation algorithm to efficiently retrieve the off-grid DOAs. Specifically, the coprime coarray statistics are derived according to the received signals from a coprime array to ensure the degrees-of-freedom (DOF) superiority, where a pair of shift invariant uniform linear subarrays is extracted. The rotational invariance of the signal subspaces corresponding to the underlying subarrays is then investigated based on the coprime coarray covariance matrix, and the incorporation of ESPRIT in the coarray domain makes it feasible to formulate the closed-form solution for DOA estimation. Theoretical analyses and simulation results verify the efficiency and the effectiveness of the proposed DOA estimation algorithm.

  12. A method for estimating the orientation of a directional sound source from source directivity and multi-microphone recordings: principles and application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guarato, Francesco; Jakobsen, Lasse; Vanderelst, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Taking into account directivity of real sound sources makes it possible to try solving an interesting and biologically relevant problem: estimating the orientation in three-dimensional space of a directional sound source. The source, of known directivity, produces a broadband signal (in the ultra......Taking into account directivity of real sound sources makes it possible to try solving an interesting and biologically relevant problem: estimating the orientation in three-dimensional space of a directional sound source. The source, of known directivity, produces a broadband signal (in...

  13. Development and application of groundwater flow meter in fractured rocks: Measurement of velocity and direction of groundwater flow in single well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawanishi, M.; Miyakawa, K.; Hirata, Y.

    2001-01-01

    For the confirmation of safety for the geological disposal of radioactive wastes, it is very important to demonstrate the groundwater flow by in-situ investigation in the deep underground. We have developed a groundwater flow meter to measure simultaneously the velocity and direction of groundwater flow by means of detecting the electric potential difference between the groundwater to evaluate and the distilled water as a tracer in a single well. In this paper, we describe the outline of the groundwater flow meter system developed by CRIEPI and Taisei-Kiso-Sekkei Co. Ltd. and the evaluation methodology for observed data by using it in fractured rocks. Furthermore, applied results to in-situ tests at the Tounou mine of Japan Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Institute (JNC) and the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) of Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SK) are described. Both sites are different type of fractured rock formations of granite. From these results, it was made clear that this flow meter system can be practically used to measure the groundwater flow direction and velocity as low as order of 1x10 -3 ∼10 -7 cm/sec. (author)

  14. A new way to estimate the direct and indirect rebound effect and other rebound indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire-González, Jaume

    2017-01-01

    Some progress has been done during the last years on the methods and provision of empirical evidence on the direct and indirect rebound effect. However, these methods are complex, and sometimes require some specific economic knowledge. The development of risk and vulnerability rebound indicators for economies can be a useful tool to help the research community, policy-makers and other practitioners to understand and tackle the rebound effect. This research shows a new analytical way to obtain the direct and indirect rebound effect from the direct rebound effect and the use of energy input-output coefficients, and proposes three risk and vulnerability rebound indicators to show the effects of energy efficiency improvements in households on overall energy consumption. An estimation of these indicators has been conducted for the EU-27 countries. - Highlights: • A new method to estimate direct and indirect rebound effect is shown. • Three indicators are developed to assess risk and vulnerability to rebound. • An estimation of rebound indicators has been carried out for the EU-27 economies.

  15. Separating Direct and Indirect Turbofan Engine Combustion Noise While Estimating Post-Combustion (Post-Flame) Residence Time Using the Correlation Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2011-01-01

    A previous investigation on the presence of direct and indirect combustion noise for a full-scale turbofan engine using a far-field microphone at 130 is extended by also examining signals obtained at two additional downstream directions using far-field microphones at 110 deg and 160 deg. A generalized cross-correlation function technique is used to study the change in propagation time to the far field of the combined direct and indirect combustion noise signal as a sequence of low-pass filters are applied. The filtering procedure used produces no phase distortion. As the low-pass filter frequency is decreased, the travel time increases because the relative amount of direct combustion noise is reduced. The indirect combustion noise signal travels more slowly because in the combustor entropy fluctuations move with the flow velocity, which is slow compared to the local speed of sound. The indirect combustion noise signal travels at acoustic velocities after reaching the turbine and being converted into an acoustic signal. The direct combustion noise is always propagating at acoustic velocities. The results show that the estimated indirect combustion noise time delay values (post-combustion residence times) measured at each angle are fairly consistent with one another for a relevant range of operating conditions and demonstrate source separation of a mixture of direct and indirect combustion noise. The results may lead to a better idea about the acoustics in the combustor and may help develop and validate improved reduced-order physics-based methods for predicting turbofan engine core noise.

  16. Improving estimations of greenhouse gas transfer velocities by atmosphere-ocean couplers in Earth-System and regional models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, V. M. N. C. S.; Sahlée, E.; Jurus, P.; Clementi, E.; Pettersson, H.; Mateus, M.

    2015-09-01

    Earth-System and regional models, forecasting climate change and its impacts, simulate atmosphere-ocean gas exchanges using classical yet too simple generalizations relying on wind speed as the sole mediator while neglecting factors as sea-surface agitation, atmospheric stability, current drag with the bottom, rain and surfactants. These were proved fundamental for accurate estimates, particularly in the coastal ocean, where a significant part of the atmosphere-ocean greenhouse gas exchanges occurs. We include several of these factors in a customizable algorithm proposed for the basis of novel couplers of the atmospheric and oceanographic model components. We tested performances with measured and simulated data from the European coastal ocean, having found our algorithm to forecast greenhouse gas exchanges largely different from the forecasted by the generalization currently in use. Our algorithm allows calculus vectorization and parallel processing, improving computational speed roughly 12× in a single cpu core, an essential feature for Earth-System models applications.

  17. Intelligence/Electronic Warfare (IEW) direction-finding and fix estimation analysis report. Volume 2: Trailblazer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Robert; Gillis, James W.; Griesel, Ann; Pardo, Bruce

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the direction finding (DF) and fix estimation algorithms in TRAILBLAZER is presented. The TRAILBLAZER software analyzed is old and not currently used in the field. However, the algorithms analyzed are used in other current IEW systems. The underlying algorithm assumptions (including unmodeled errors) are examined along with their appropriateness for TRAILBLAZER. Coding and documentation problems are then discussed. A detailed error budget is presented.

  18. Direction-of-Arrival Estimation for Coherent Sources via Sparse Bayesian Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang-Meng Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A spatial filtering-based relevance vector machine (RVM is proposed in this paper to separate coherent sources and estimate their directions-of-arrival (DOA, with the filter parameters and DOA estimates initialized and refined via sparse Bayesian learning. The RVM is used to exploit the spatial sparsity of the incident signals and gain improved adaptability to much demanding scenarios, such as low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, limited snapshots, and spatially adjacent sources, and the spatial filters are introduced to enhance global convergence of the original RVM in the case of coherent sources. The proposed method adapts to arbitrary array geometry, and simulation results show that it surpasses the existing methods in DOA estimation performance.

  19. A Robust Real Time Direction-of-Arrival Estimation Method for Sequential Movement Events of Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huawei; Li, Baoqing; Yuan, Xiaobing; Zhou, Qianwei; Huang, Jingchang

    2018-03-27

    Parameters estimation of sequential movement events of vehicles is facing the challenges of noise interferences and the demands of portable implementation. In this paper, we propose a robust direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation method for the sequential movement events of vehicles based on a small Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) microphone array system. Inspired by the incoherent signal-subspace method (ISM), the method that is proposed in this work employs multiple sub-bands, which are selected from the wideband signals with high magnitude-squared coherence to track moving vehicles in the presence of wind noise. The field test results demonstrate that the proposed method has a better performance in emulating the DOA of a moving vehicle even in the case of severe wind interference than the narrowband multiple signal classification (MUSIC) method, the sub-band DOA estimation method, and the classical two-sided correlation transformation (TCT) method.

  20. Direct phase derivative estimation using difference equation modeling in holographic interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, Rishikesh; Rastogi, Pramod

    2014-01-01

    A new method is proposed for the direct phase derivative estimation from a single spatial frequency modulated carrier fringe pattern in holographic interferometry. The fringe intensity in a given row/column is modeled as a difference equation of intensity with spatially varying coefficients. These coefficients carry the information on the phase derivative. Consequently, the accurate estimation of the coefficients is obtained by approximating the coefficients as a linear combination of the predefined linearly independent basis functions. Unlike Fourier transform based fringe analysis, the method does not call for performing the filtering of the Fourier spectrum of fringe intensity. Moreover, the estimation of the carrier frequency is performed by applying the proposed method to a reference interferogram. The performance of the proposed method is insensitive to the fringe amplitude modulation and is validated with the simulation results. (paper)

  1. Biquaternion beamspace with its application to vector-sensor array direction findings and polarization estimations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Xu, Feng; Jiang, Jing Fei; Zhang, Jian Qiu

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, a biquaternion beamspace, constructed by projecting the original data of an electromagnetic vector-sensor array into a subspace of a lower dimension via a quaternion transformation matrix, is first proposed. To estimate the direction and polarization angles of sources, biquaternion beamspace multiple signal classification (BB-MUSIC) estimators are then formulated. The analytical results show that the biquaternion beamspaces offer us some additional degrees of freedom to simultaneously achieve three goals. One is to save the memory spaces for storing the data covariance matrix and reduce the computation efforts of the eigen-decomposition. Another is to decouple the estimations of the sources' polarization parameters from those of their direction angles. The other is to blindly whiten the coherent noise of the six constituent antennas in each vector-sensor. It is also shown that the existing biquaternion multiple signal classification (BQ-MUSIC) estimator is a specific case of our BB-MUSIC ones. The simulation results verify the correctness and effectiveness of the analytical ones.

  2. Considering sampling strategy and cross-section complexity for estimating the uncertainty of discharge measurements using the velocity-area method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despax, Aurélien; Perret, Christian; Garçon, Rémy; Hauet, Alexandre; Belleville, Arnaud; Le Coz, Jérôme; Favre, Anne-Catherine

    2016-02-01

    Streamflow time series provide baseline data for many hydrological investigations. Errors in the data mainly occur through uncertainty in gauging (measurement uncertainty) and uncertainty in the determination of the stage-discharge relationship based on gaugings (rating curve uncertainty). As the velocity-area method is the measurement technique typically used for gaugings, it is fundamental to estimate its level of uncertainty. Different methods are available in the literature (ISO 748, Q + , IVE), all with their own limitations and drawbacks. Among the terms forming the combined relative uncertainty in measured discharge, the uncertainty component relating to the limited number of verticals often includes a large part of the relative uncertainty. It should therefore be estimated carefully. In ISO 748 standard, proposed values of this uncertainty component only depend on the number of verticals without considering their distribution with respect to the depth and velocity cross-sectional profiles. The Q + method is sensitive to a user-defined parameter while it is questionable whether the IVE method is applicable to stream-gaugings performed with a limited number of verticals. To address the limitations of existing methods, this paper presents a new methodology, called FLow Analog UnceRtainty Estimation (FLAURE), to estimate the uncertainty component relating to the limited number of verticals. High-resolution reference gaugings (with 31 and more verticals) are used to assess the uncertainty component through a statistical analysis. Instead of subsampling purely randomly the verticals of these reference stream-gaugings, a subsampling method is developed in a way that mimicks the behavior of a hydrometric technician. A sampling quality index (SQI) is suggested and appears to be a more explanatory variable than the number of verticals. This index takes into account the spacing between verticals and the variation of unit flow between two verticals. To compute the

  3. A portable inspection system to estimate direct glare of various LED modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Li; Liao, Chun-Hsiang; Li, Hung-Chung; Jou, Shyh-Jye; Chen, Han-Ting; Lin, Yu-Hsin; Tang, Yu-Hsiang; Peng, Wei-Jei; Kuo, Hui-Jean; Sun, Pei-Li; Lee, Tsung-Xian

    2015-07-01

    Glare is caused by both direct and indirect light sources and discomfort glare produces visual discomfort, annoyance, or loss in visual performance and visibility. Direct glare is caused by light sources in the field of view whereas reflected glare is caused by bright reflections from polished or glossy surfaces that are reflected toward an individual. To improve visual comfort of our living environment, a portable inspection system to estimate direct glare of various commercial LED modules with the range of color temperature from 3100 K to 5300 K was developed in this study. The system utilized HDR images to obtain the illumination distribution of LED modules and was first calibrated for brightness and chromaticity and corrected with flat field, dark-corner and curvature by the installed algorithm. The index of direct glare was then automatically estimated after image capturing, and the operator can recognize the performance of LED modules and the possible effects on human being once the index was out of expecting range. In the future, we expect that the quick-response smart inspection system can be applied in several new fields and market, such as home energy diagnostics, environmental lighting and UGR monitoring and popularize it in several new fields.

  4. Direct measurements of wind-water momentum coupling in a marsh with emergent vegetation and implications for gas transfer estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, I.; Poindexter, C.; Variano, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Among the numerous ecological benefits of restoring wetlands is carbon sequestration. As emergent vegetation thrive, atmospheric CO2 is removed and converted into biomass that gradually become additional soil. Forecasts and management for these systems rely on accurate knowledge of gas exchange between the atmosphere and the wetland surface waters. Our previous work showed that the rate of gas transfer across the air-water interface is affected by the amount of water column mixing caused by winds penetrating through the plant canopy. Here, we present the first direct measurements of wind-water momentum coupling made within a tule marsh. This work in Twitchell Island in the California Delta shows how momentum is imparted into the water from wind stress and that this wind stress interacts with the surface waters in an interesting way. By correlating three-component velocity signals from a sonic anemometer placed within the plant canopy with data from a novel Volumetric Particle Imager (VoPI) placed in the water, we measure the flux of kinetic energy through the plant canopy and the time-scale of the response. We also use this unique dataset to estimate the air-water drag coefficient using an adjoint method.

  5. Strength Estimation for Hydrate-Bearing Sediments From Direct Shear Tests of Hydrate-Bearing Sand and Silt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhichao; Dai, Sheng; Ning, Fulong; Peng, Li; Wei, Houzhen; Wei, Changfu

    2018-01-01

    Safe and economic methane gas production, as well as the replacement of methane while sequestering carbon in natural hydrate deposits, requires enhanced geomechanical understanding of the strength and volume responses of hydrate-bearing sediments during shear. This study employs a custom-made apparatus to investigate the mechanical and volumetric behaviors of carbon dioxide hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to direct shear. The results show that both peak and residual strengths increase with increased hydrate saturation and vertical stress. Hydrate contributes mainly the cohesion and dilatancy constraint to the peak strength of hydrate-bearing sediments. The postpeak strength reduction is more evident and brittle in specimens with higher hydrate saturation and under lower stress. Significant strength reduction after shear failure is expected in silty sediments with high hydrate saturation Sh ≥ 0.65. Hydrate contribution to the residual strength is mainly by increasing cohesion at low hydrate saturation and friction at high hydrate saturation. Stress state and hydrate saturation are dominating both the stiffness and the strength of hydrate-bearing sediments; thus, a wave velocity-based peak strength prediction model is proposed and validated, which allows for precise estimation of the shear strength of hydrate-bearing sediments through acoustic logging data. This method is advantageous to geomechanical simulators, particularly when the experimental strength data of natural samples are not available.

  6. A Fast Multimodal Ectopic Beat Detection Method Applied for Blood Pressure Estimation Based on Pulse Wave Velocity Measurements in Wearable Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflugradt, Maik; Geissdoerfer, Kai; Goernig, Matthias; Orglmeister, Reinhold

    2017-01-14

    Automatic detection of ectopic beats has become a thoroughly researched topic, with literature providing manifold proposals typically incorporating morphological analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG). Although being well understood, its utilization is often neglected, especially in practical monitoring situations like online evaluation of signals acquired in wearable sensors. Continuous blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity considerations is a prominent example, which depends on careful fiducial point extraction and is therefore seriously affected during periods of increased occurring extrasystoles. In the scope of this work, a novel ectopic beat discriminator with low computational complexity has been developed, which takes advantage of multimodal features derived from ECG and pulse wave relating measurements, thereby providing additional information on the underlying cardiac activity. Moreover, the blood pressure estimations' vulnerability towards ectopic beats is closely examined on records drawn from the Physionet database as well as signals recorded in a small field study conducted in a geriatric facility for the elderly. It turns out that a reliable extrasystole identification is essential to unsupervised blood pressure estimation, having a significant impact on the overall accuracy. The proposed method further convinces by its applicability to battery driven hardware systems with limited processing power and is a favorable choice when access to multimodal signal features is given anyway.

  7. On the direct detection of multi-component dark matter: sensitivity studies and parameter estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Garcia, Juan; Scaffidi, Andre; White, Martin; Williams, Anthony G.

    2017-11-01

    We study the case of multi-component dark matter, in particular how direct detection signals are modified in the presence of several stable weakly-interacting-massive particles. Assuming a positive signal in a future direct detection experiment, stemming from two dark matter components, we study the region in parameter space where it is possible to distinguish a one from a two-component dark matter spectrum. First, we leave as free parameters the two dark matter masses and show that the two hypotheses can be significantly discriminated for a range of dark matter masses with their splitting being the critical factor. We then investigate how including the effects of different interaction strengths, local densities or velocity dispersions for the two components modifies these conclusions. We also consider the case of isospin-violating couplings. In all scenarios, we show results for various types of nuclei both for elastic spin-independent and spin-dependent interactions. Finally, assuming that the two-component hypothesis is confirmed, we quantify the accuracy with which the parameters can be extracted and discuss the different degeneracies that occur. This includes studying the case in which only a single experiment observes a signal, and also the scenario of having two signals from two different experiments, in which case the ratios of the couplings to neutrons and protons may also be extracted.

  8. Experimental Investigation on Low-velocity Impact and Compression After Impact Properties of Three-dimensional Five-directional Braided Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAN Shi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The low-velocity impact and compression after impact (CAI properties of three-dimensional (3D five-directional carbon fiber/epoxy resin braided composites were experimentally investigated. Specimens prepared with different braiding angles were tested at the same impact energy level. Residual post-impact mechanical properties of the different configurations were characterized by compression after impact tests. Results show that the specimens with bigger braiding angle sustain higher peak loads, and smaller impact damage area, mainly attributes to a more compact space construction. The CAI strength and damage mechanism are found to be mainly dependent on the axial support of the braiding fiber tows. With the increase of braiding angle, the CAI strength decreases, and the damage mode of the composites is changed from transverse fracture to shear failure.

  9. Solar Wind Halo Formation by the Scattering of the Strahl via Direct Cluster/PEACE Observations of the 3D Velocity Distribution Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Gurgiolo, Chris A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested by a number of authors that the solar wind electron halo can be formed by the scattering of the strahl. On frequent occasions we have observed in electron angular skymaps (Phi/Theta-plots) of the electron 3D velocity distribution functions) a bursty-filament of particles connecting the strahl to the solar wind core-halo. These are seen over a very limited energy range. When the magnetic field is well off the nominal solar wind flow direction such filaments are inconsistent with any local forces and are probably the result of strong scattering. Furthermore, observations indicates that the strahl component is frequently and significantly anisotropic (Tper/Tpal approx.2). This provides a possible free energy source for the excitation of whistler waves as a possible scattering mechanism. The empirical observational evidence between the halo and the strahl suggests that the strahl population may be, at least in part, the source of the halo component.

  10. Anisotropy of dark matter velocity distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Nagao, Keiko I.

    2018-01-01

    Direct detection of dark matter with directional sensitivity has the potential to discriminate the dark matter velocity distribution. Especially, it will be suitable to discriminate isotropic distribution from anisotropic one. Analyzing data produced with Monte-Carlo simulation, required conditions for the discrimination is estimated. If energy threshold of detector is optimized, $O(10^3-10^4)$ event number is required to discriminate the anisotropy.

  11. Fast computation of statistical uncertainty for spatiotemporal distributions estimated directly from dynamic cone beam SPECT projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reutter, Bryan W.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2001-01-01

    The estimation of time-activity curves and kinetic model parameters directly from projection data is potentially useful for clinical dynamic single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies, particularly in those clinics that have only single-detector systems and thus are not able to perform rapid tomographic acquisitions. Because the radiopharmaceutical distribution changes while the SPECT gantry rotates, projections at different angles come from different tracer distributions. A dynamic image sequence reconstructed from the inconsistent projections acquired by a slowly rotating gantry can contain artifacts that lead to biases in kinetic parameters estimated from time-activity curves generated by overlaying regions of interest on the images. If cone beam collimators are used and the focal point of the collimators always remains in a particular transaxial plane, additional artifacts can arise in other planes reconstructed using insufficient projection samples [1]. If the projection samples truncate the patient's body, this can result in additional image artifacts. To overcome these sources of bias in conventional image based dynamic data analysis, we and others have been investigating the estimation of time-activity curves and kinetic model parameters directly from dynamic SPECT projection data by modeling the spatial and temporal distribution of the radiopharmaceutical throughout the projected field of view [2-8]. In our previous work we developed a computationally efficient method for fully four-dimensional (4-D) direct estimation of spatiotemporal distributions from dynamic SPECT projection data [5], which extended Formiconi's least squares algorithm for reconstructing temporally static distributions [9]. In addition, we studied the biases that result from modeling various orders temporal continuity and using various time samplings [5]. the present work, we address computational issues associated with evaluating the statistical uncertainty of

  12. Effect of parameter calculation in direct estimation of the Lyapunov exponent in short time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. López Jiménez

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature about non-linear dynamics offers a few recommendations, which sometimes are divergent, about the criteria to be used in order to select the optimal calculus parameters in the estimation of Lyapunov exponents by direct methods. These few recommendations are circumscribed to the analysis of chaotic systems. We have found no recommendation for the estimation of λ starting from the time series of classic systems. The reason for this is the interest in distinguishing variability due to a chaotic behavior of determinist dynamic systems of variability caused by white noise or linear stochastic processes, and less in the identification of non-linear terms from the analysis of time series. In this study we have centered in the dependence of the Lyapunov exponent, obtained by means of direct estimation, of the initial distance and the time evolution. We have used generated series of chaotic systems and generated series of classic systems with varying complexity. To generate the series we have used the logistic map.

  13. Mediation analysis to estimate direct and indirect milk losses due to clinical mastitis in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detilleux, J; Kastelic, J P; Barkema, H W

    2015-03-01

    Milk losses associated with mastitis can be attributed to either effects of pathogens per se (i.e., direct losses) or effects of the immune response triggered by intramammary infection (indirect losses). The distinction is important in terms of mastitis prevention and treatment. Regardless, the number of pathogens is often unknown (particularly in field studies), making it difficult to estimate direct losses, whereas indirect losses can be approximated by measuring the association between increased somatic cell count (SCC) and milk production. An alternative is to perform a mediation analysis in which changes in milk yield are allocated into their direct and indirect components. We applied this method on data for clinical mastitis, milk and SCC test-day recordings, results of bacteriological cultures (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and streptococci other than Strep. dysgalactiae and Strep. uberis), and cow characteristics. Following a diagnosis of clinical mastitis, the cow was treated and changes (increase or decrease) in milk production before and after a diagnosis were interpreted counterfactually. On a daily basis, indirect changes, mediated by SCC increase, were significantly different from zero for all bacterial species, with a milk yield decrease (ranging among species from 4 to 33g and mediated by an increase of 1000 SCC/mL/day) before and a daily milk increase (ranging among species from 2 to 12g and mediated by a decrease of 1000 SCC/mL/day) after detection. Direct changes, not mediated by SCC, were only different from zero for coagulase-negative staphylococci before diagnosis (72g per day). We concluded that mixed structural equation models were useful to estimate direct and indirect effects of the presence of clinical mastitis on milk yield. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Sun-Direction Estimation Using a Partially Underdetermined Set of Coarse Sun Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Stephen A.; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2015-09-01

    A comparison of different methods to estimate the sun-direction vector using a partially underdetermined set of cosine-type coarse sun sensors (CSS), while simultaneously controlling the attitude towards a power-positive orientation, is presented. CSS are commonly used in performing power-positive sun-pointing and are attractive due to their relative inexpensiveness, small size, and reduced power consumption. For this study only CSS and rate gyro measurements are available, and the sensor configuration does not provide global triple coverage required for a unique sun-direction calculation. The methods investigated include a vector average method, a combination of least squares and minimum norm criteria, and an extended Kalman filter approach. All cases are formulated such that precise ground calibration of the CSS is not required. Despite significant biases in the state dynamics and measurement models, Monte Carlo simulations show that an extended Kalman filter approach, despite the underdetermined sensor coverage, can provide degree-level accuracy of the sun-direction vector both with and without a control algorithm running simultaneously. If no rate gyro measurements are available, and rates are partially estimated from CSS, the EKF performance degrades as expected, but is still able to achieve better than 10∘ accuracy using only CSS measurements.

  15. Direct Parametric Reconstruction With Joint Motion Estimation/Correction for Dynamic Brain PET Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jieqing; Bousse, Alexandre; Thielemans, Kris; Burgos, Ninon; Weston, Philip S J; Schott, Jonathan M; Atkinson, David; Arridge, Simon R; Hutton, Brian F; Markiewicz, Pawel; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2017-01-01

    Direct reconstruction of parametric images from raw photon counts has been shown to improve the quantitative analysis of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) data. However it suffers from subject motion which is inevitable during the typical acquisition time of 1-2 hours. In this work we propose a framework to jointly estimate subject head motion and reconstruct the motion-corrected parametric images directly from raw PET data, so that the effects of distorted tissue-to-voxel mapping due to subject motion can be reduced in reconstructing the parametric images with motion-compensated attenuation correction and spatially aligned temporal PET data. The proposed approach is formulated within the maximum likelihood framework, and efficient solutions are derived for estimating subject motion and kinetic parameters from raw PET photon count data. Results from evaluations on simulated [ 11 C]raclopride data using the Zubal brain phantom and real clinical [ 18 F]florbetapir data of a patient with Alzheimer's disease show that the proposed joint direct parametric reconstruction motion correction approach can improve the accuracy of quantifying dynamic PET data with large subject motion.

  16. A direct-measurement technique for estimating discharge-chamber lifetime. [for ion thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, J. R.; Garvin, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    The use of short-term measurement techniques for predicting the wearout of ion thrusters resulting from sputter-erosion damage is investigated. The laminar-thin-film technique is found to provide high precision erosion-rate data, although the erosion rates are generally substantially higher than those found during long-term erosion tests, so that the results must be interpreted in a relative sense. A technique for obtaining absolute measurements is developed using a masked-substrate arrangement. This new technique provides a means for estimating the lifetimes of critical discharge-chamber components based on direct measurements of sputter-erosion depths obtained during short-duration (approximately 1 hr) tests. Results obtained using the direct-measurement technique are shown to agree with sputter-erosion depths calculated for the plasma conditions of the test. The direct-measurement approach is found to be applicable to both mercury and argon discharge-plasma environments and will be useful for estimating the lifetimes of inert gas and extended performance mercury ion thrusters currently under development.

  17. Sparse Method for Direction of Arrival Estimation Using Denoised Fourth-Order Cumulants Vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yangyu; Wang, Jianshu; Du, Rui; Lv, Guoyun

    2018-06-04

    Fourth-order cumulants (FOCs) vector-based direction of arrival (DOA) estimation methods of non-Gaussian sources may suffer from poor performance for limited snapshots or difficulty in setting parameters. In this paper, a novel FOCs vector-based sparse DOA estimation method is proposed. Firstly, by utilizing the concept of a fourth-order difference co-array (FODCA), an advanced FOCs vector denoising or dimension reduction procedure is presented for arbitrary array geometries. Then, a novel single measurement vector (SMV) model is established by the denoised FOCs vector, and efficiently solved by an off-grid sparse Bayesian inference (OGSBI) method. The estimation errors of FOCs are integrated in the SMV model, and are approximately estimated in a simple way. A necessary condition regarding the number of identifiable sources of our method is presented that, in order to uniquely identify all sources, the number of sources K must fulfill K ≤ ( M 4 - 2 M 3 + 7 M 2 - 6 M ) / 8 . The proposed method suits any geometry, does not need prior knowledge of the number of sources, is insensitive to associated parameters, and has maximum identifiability O ( M 4 ) , where M is the number of sensors in the array. Numerical simulations illustrate the superior performance of the proposed method.

  18. CALIPSO-Inferred Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects: Bias Estimates Using Ground-Based Raman Lidars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Tyler; Fu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Observational constraints on the change in the radiative energy budget caused by the presence of aerosols, i.e. the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE), have recently been made using observations from the Cloud- Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO). CALIPSO observations have the potential to provide improved global estimates of aerosol DRE compared to passive sensor-derived estimates due to CALIPSO's ability to perform vertically-resolved aerosol retrievals over all surface types and over cloud. In this study we estimate the uncertainties in CALIPSO-inferred aerosol DRE using multiple years of observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Raman lidars (RL) at midlatitude and tropical sites. Examined are assumptions about the ratio of extinction-to-backscatter (i.e. the lidar ratio) made by the CALIPSO retrievals, which are needed to retrieve the aerosol extinction profile. The lidar ratio is shown to introduce minimal error in the mean aerosol DRE at the top-of-atmosphere and surface. It is also shown that CALIPSO is unable to detect all radiatively-significant aerosol, resulting in an underestimate in the magnitude of the aerosol DRE by 30-50%. Therefore, global estimates of the aerosol DRE inferred from CALIPSO observations are likely too weak.

  19. Estimation of line dimensions in 3D direct laser writing lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guney, M G; Fedder, G K

    2016-01-01

    Two photon polymerization (TPP) based 3D direct laser writing (3D-DLW) finds application in a wide range of research areas ranging from photonic and mechanical metamaterials to micro-devices. Most common structures are either single lines or formed by a set of interconnected lines as in the case of crystals. In order to increase the fidelity of these structures and reach the ultimate resolution, the laser power and scan speed used in the writing process should be chosen carefully. However, the optimization of these writing parameters is an iterative and time consuming process in the absence of a model for the estimation of line dimensions. To this end, we report a semi-empirical analytic model through simulations and fitting, and demonstrate that it can be used for estimating the line dimensions mostly within one standard deviation of the average values over a wide range of laser power and scan speed combinations. The model delimits the trend in onset of micro-explosions in the photoresist due to over-exposure and of low degree of conversion due to under-exposure. The model guides setting of high-fidelity and robust writing parameters of a photonic crystal structure without iteration and in close agreement with the estimated line dimensions. The proposed methodology is generalizable by adapting the model coefficients to any 3D-DLW setup and corresponding photoresist as a means to estimate the line dimensions for tuning the writing parameters. (paper)

  20. Direction of Arrival Estimation with a Novel Single-Port Smart Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Sun

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel direction of arrival (DOA estimation technique that uses the conventional multiple-signal classification (MUSIC algorithm with periodic signals is applied to a single-port smart antenna. Results show that the proposed method gives a high-resolution (1 degree DOA estimation in an uncorrelated signal environment. The novelty lies in that the MUSIC algorithm is applied to a simplified antenna configuration. Only 1 analogue-to-digital converter (ADC is used in this antenna, which features low power consumption, low cost, and ease of fabrication. Modifications to the conventional MUSIC algorithm do not bring much additional complexity. The proposed technique is also free from the negative influence by the mutual coupling among antenna elements. Therefore, it offers an economical way to extensively implement smart antennas into the existing wireless mobile communications systems, especially at the power consumption limited mobile terminals such as laptops in wireless networks.

  1. Reduced-Complexity Direction of Arrival Estimation Using Real-Valued Computation with Arbitrary Array Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Gang Yan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A low-complexity algorithm is presented to dramatically reduce the complexity of the multiple signal classification (MUSIC algorithm for direction of arrival (DOA estimation, in which both tasks of eigenvalue decomposition (EVD and spectral search are implemented with efficient real-valued computations, leading to about 75% complexity reduction as compared to the standard MUSIC. Furthermore, the proposed technique has no dependence on array configurations and is hence suitable for arbitrary array geometries, which shows a significant implementation advantage over most state-of-the-art unitary estimators including unitary MUSIC (U-MUSIC. Numerical simulations over a wide range of scenarios are conducted to show the performance of the new technique, which demonstrates that with a significantly reduced computational complexity, the new approach is able to provide a close accuracy to the standard MUSIC.

  2. Spiral-shaped piezoelectric sensors for Lamb waves direction of arrival (DoA) estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, L.; Testoni, N.; Marzani, A.

    2018-04-01

    A novel strategy to design piezoelectric sensors suited for direction of arrival (DoA) estimation of incoming Lamb waves is presented in this work. The designed sensor is composed by two piezoelectric patches (P1, P2) bonded on the structure to be inspected. In particular, by exploiting the Radon transform, the proposed procedure computes the shape of P2 given the shape of P1 so that the difference in time of arrival (DToA) of the Lamb waves at the two patches is linearly related to the DoA while being agnostic of the waveguide dispersion curves. With a dedicated processing procedure, the waveforms acquired from the two electrodes and digitized can be used to retrieve the DoA information. Numerical and experimental results show that DoA estimation performed by means of the proposed shaped transducers is extremely robust.

  3. Experimental Results for Direction of Arrival Estimation with a Single Acoustic Vector Sensor in Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Bereketli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the performances of several computationally efficient and simple techniques for estimating direction of arrival (DOA of an underwater acoustic source using a single acoustic vector sensor (AVS in shallow water. Underwater AVS is a compact device, which consists of one hydrophone and three accelerometers in a packaged form, measuring scalar pressure and three-dimensional acceleration simultaneously at a single position. A very controlled experimental setup is prepared to test how well-known techniques, namely, arctan-based, intensity-based, time domain beamforming, and frequency domain beamforming methods, perform in estimating DOA of a source in different circumstances. Experimental results reveal that for almost all cases beamforming techniques perform best. Moreover, arctan-based method, which is the simplest of all, provides satisfactory results for practical purposes.

  4. Turning lights into flights: Estimating direct and indirect rebound effects for UK households

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitnis, Mona; Sorrell, Steve; Druckman, Angela; Firth, Steven K.; Jackson, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Energy efficiency improvements by households lead to rebound effects that offset the potential energy and emissions savings. Direct rebound effects result from increased demand for cheaper energy services, while indirect rebound effects result from increased demand for other goods and services that also require energy to provide. Research to date has focused upon the former, but both are important for climate change. This study estimates the combined direct and indirect rebound effects from seven measures that improve the energy efficiency of UK dwellings. The methodology is based upon estimates of the income elasticity and greenhouse gas (GHG) intensity of 16 categories of household goods and services, and allows for the embodied emissions of the energy efficiency measures themselves, as well as the capital cost of the measures. Rebound effects are measured in GHG terms and relate to the adoption of these measures by an average UK household. The study finds that the rebound effects from these measures are typically in the range 5–15% and arise mostly from indirect effects. This is largely because expenditure on gas and electricity is more GHG-intensive than expenditure on other goods and services. However, the anticipated shift towards a low carbon electricity system in the UK may lead to much larger rebound effects. - Highlights: ► We estimate the direct and indirect rebound effects from energy efficiency improvements by UK households. ► We allow for the capital cost of the improvement, together with the emissions embodied in the relevant equipment. ► We find rebound effects to be relatively modest, in the range 5–15%. ► The anticipated shift towards a low carbon electricity system will lead to larger rebound effects

  5. Direct estimates of unemployment rate and capacity utilization in macroeconometric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, L R [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Su, V

    1979-10-01

    The problem of measuring resource-capacity utilization as a factor in overall economic efficiency is examined, and a tentative solution is offered. A macro-econometric model is applied to the aggregate production function by linking unemployment rate and capacity utilization rate. Partial- and full-model simulations use Wharton indices as a filter and produce direct estimates of unemployment rates. The simulation paths of durable-goods industries, which are more capital-intensive, are found to be more sensitive to business cycles than the nondurable-goods industries. 11 references.

  6. Estimation of instantaneous heat transfer coefficients for a direct-injection stratified-charge rotary engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. M.; Addy, H. E.; Bond, T. H.; Chun, K. S.; Lu, C. Y.

    1987-01-01

    The main objective of this report was to derive equations to estimate heat transfer coefficients in both the combustion chamber and coolant pasage of a rotary engine. This was accomplished by making detailed temperature and pressure measurements in a direct-injection stratified-charge rotary engine under a range of conditions. For each sppecific measurement point, the local physical properties of the fluids were calculated. Then an empirical correlation of the coefficients was derived by using a multiple regression program. This correlation expresses the Nusselt number as a function of the Prandtl number and Reynolds number.

  7. Estimation of direct effects for survival data by using the Aalen additive hazards model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Torben; Vansteelandt, Stijn; Gerster, Mette

    2011-01-01

    We extend the definition of the controlled direct effect of a point exposure on a survival outcome, other than through some given, time-fixed intermediate variable, to the additive hazard scale. We propose two-stage estimators for this effect when the exposure is dichotomous and randomly assigned...... Aalen's additive regression for the event time, given exposure, intermediate variable and confounders. The second stage involves applying Aalen's additive model, given the exposure alone, to a modified stochastic process (i.e. a modification of the observed counting process based on the first...

  8. Autonomous Sun-Direction Estimation Using Partially Underdetermined Coarse Sun Sensor Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Stephen A.

    In recent years there has been a significant increase in interest in smaller satellites as lower cost alternatives to traditional satellites, particularly with the rise in popularity of the CubeSat. Due to stringent mass, size, and often budget constraints, these small satellites rely on making the most of inexpensive hardware components and sensors, such as coarse sun sensors (CSS) and magnetometers. More expensive high-accuracy sun sensors often combine multiple measurements, and use specialized electronics, to deterministically solve for the direction of the Sun. Alternatively, cosine-type CSS output a voltage relative to the input light and are attractive due to their very low cost, simplicity to manufacture, small size, and minimal power consumption. This research investigates using coarse sun sensors for performing robust attitude estimation in order to point a spacecraft at the Sun after deployment from a launch vehicle, or following a system fault. As an alternative to using a large number of sensors, this thesis explores sun-direction estimation techniques with low computational costs that function well with underdetermined sets of CSS. Single-point estimators are coupled with simultaneous nonlinear control to achieve sun-pointing within a small percentage of a single orbit despite the partially underdetermined nature of the sensor suite. Leveraging an extensive analysis of the sensor models involved, sequential filtering techniques are shown to be capable of estimating the sun-direction to within a few degrees, with no a priori attitude information and using only CSS, despite the significant noise and biases present in the system. Detailed numerical simulations are used to compare and contrast the performance of the five different estimation techniques, with and without rate gyro measurements, their sensitivity to rate gyro accuracy, and their computation time. One of the key concerns with reducing the number of CSS is sensor degradation and failure. In

  9. Amount of gas hydrate estimated from compressional- and shear-wave velocities at the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    The amount of in situ gas hydrate concentrated in the sediment pore space at the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well was estimated by using compressional-wave (P-wave) and shear-wave (S-wave) downhole log measurements. A weighted equation developed for relating the amount of gas hydrate concentrated in the pore space of unconsolidated sediments to the increase of seismic velocities was applied to the acoustic logs with porosities derived from the formation density log. A weight of 1.56 (W=1.56) and the exponent of 1 (n=1) provided consistent estimates of gas hydrate concentration from the S-wave and the P-wave logs. Gas hydrate concentration is as much as 80% in the pore spaces, and the average gas hydrate concentration within the gas-hydrate-bearing section from 897 m to 1110 m (excluding zones where there is no gas hydrate) was calculated at 39.0% when using P-wave data and 37.8% when using S-wave data.

  10. Use of direct and iterative solvers for estimation of SNP effects in genome-wide selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo da Cruz Gouveia Pimentel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare iterative and direct solvers for estimation of marker effects in genomic selection. One iterative and two direct methods were used: Gauss-Seidel with Residual Update, Cholesky Decomposition and Gentleman-Givens rotations. For resembling different scenarios with respect to number of markers and of genotyped animals, a simulated data set divided into 25 subsets was used. Number of markers ranged from 1,200 to 5,925 and number of animals ranged from 1,200 to 5,865. Methods were also applied to real data comprising 3081 individuals genotyped for 45181 SNPs. Results from simulated data showed that the iterative solver was substantially faster than direct methods for larger numbers of markers. Use of a direct solver may allow for computing (covariances of SNP effects. When applied to real data, performance of the iterative method varied substantially, depending on the level of ill-conditioning of the coefficient matrix. From results with real data, Gentleman-Givens rotations would be the method of choice in this particular application as it provided an exact solution within a fairly reasonable time frame (less than two hours. It would indeed be the preferred method whenever computer resources allow its use.

  11. Key Aspects of the Federal Direct Loan Program's Cost Estimates: Department of Education. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calbom, Linda M.; Ashby, Cornelia M.

    Because of concerns about the Department of Education's reliance on estimates to project costs of the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program (FDLP) and a lack of historical information on which to base those estimates, Congress asked the General Accounting Office (GAO) to review how the department develops its cost estimates for the program,…

  12. Angular velocity determination of spinning solar sails using only a sun sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Zhai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The direction of the sun is the easiest and most reliable observation vector for a solar sail running in deep space exploration. This paper presents a new method using only raw measurements of the sun direction vector to estimate angular velocity for a spinning solar sail. In cases with a constant spin angular velocity, the estimation equation is formed based on the kinematic model for the apparent motion of the sun direction vector; the least-squares solution is then easily calculated. A performance criterion is defined and used to analyze estimation accuracy. In cases with a variable spin angular velocity, the estimation equation is developed based on the kinematic model for the apparent motion of the sun direction vector and the attitude dynamics equation. Simulation results show that the proposed method can quickly yield high-precision angular velocity estimates that are insensitive to certain measurement noises and modeling errors.

  13. Direct diffusion tensor estimation using a model-based method with spatial and parametric constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanjie; Peng, Xi; Wu, Yin; Wu, Ed X; Ying, Leslie; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong; Liang, Dong

    2017-02-01

    To develop a new model-based method with spatial and parametric constraints (MB-SPC) aimed at accelerating diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) by directly estimating the diffusion tensor from highly undersampled k-space data. The MB-SPC method effectively incorporates the prior information on the joint sparsity of different diffusion-weighted images using an L1-L2 norm and the smoothness of the diffusion tensor using a total variation seminorm. The undersampled k-space datasets were obtained from fully sampled DTI datasets of a simulated phantom and an ex-vivo experimental rat heart with acceleration factors ranging from 2 to 4. The diffusion tensor was directly reconstructed by solving a minimization problem with a nonlinear conjugate gradient descent algorithm. The reconstruction performance was quantitatively assessed using the normalized root mean square error (nRMSE) of the DTI indices. The MB-SPC method achieves acceptable DTI measures at an acceleration factor up to 4. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can estimate the diffusion tensor more accurately than most existing methods operating at higher net acceleration factors. The proposed method can significantly reduce artifact, particularly at higher acceleration factors or lower SNRs. This method can easily be adapted to MR relaxometry parameter mapping and is thus useful in the characterization of biological tissue such as nerves, muscle, and heart tissue. © 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. Direct radiative feedback due to biogenic secondary organic aerosol estimated from boreal forest site observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lihavainen, Heikki; Asmi, Eija; Aaltonen, Veijo; Makkonen, Ulla; Kerminen, Veli-Matti

    2015-01-01

    We used more than five years of continuous aerosol measurements to estimate the direct radiative feedback parameter associated with the formation of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) at a remote continental site at the edge of the boreal forest zone in Northern Finland. Our upper-limit estimate for this feedback parameter during the summer period (ambient temperatures above 10 °C) was −97 ± 66 mW m −2 K −1 (mean ± STD) when using measurements of the aerosol optical depth (f AOD ) and −63 ± 40 mW m −2 K −1 when using measurements of the ‘dry’ aerosol scattering coefficient at the ground level (f σ ). Here STD represents the variability in f caused by the observed variability in the quantities used to derive the value of f. Compared with our measurement site, the magnitude of the direct radiative feedback associated with BSOA is expected to be larger in warmer continental regions with more abundant biogenic emissions, and even larger in regions where biogenic emissions are mixed with anthropogenic pollution. (letter)

  15. Estimating direction in brain-behavior interactions: Proactive and reactive brain states in driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Javier O; Brooks, Justin; Kerick, Scott; Johnson, Tony; Mullen, Tim R; Vettel, Jean M

    2017-04-15

    Conventional neuroimaging analyses have ascribed function to particular brain regions, exploiting the power of the subtraction technique in fMRI and event-related potential analyses in EEG. Moving beyond this convention, many researchers have begun exploring network-based neurodynamics and coordination between brain regions as a function of behavioral parameters or environmental statistics; however, most approaches average evoked activity across the experimental session to study task-dependent networks. Here, we examined on-going oscillatory activity as measured with EEG and use a methodology to estimate directionality in brain-behavior interactions. After source reconstruction, activity within specific frequency bands (delta: 2-3Hz; theta: 4-7Hz; alpha: 8-12Hz; beta: 13-25Hz) in a priori regions of interest was linked to continuous behavioral measurements, and we used a predictive filtering scheme to estimate the asymmetry between brain-to-behavior and behavior-to-brain prediction using a variant of Granger causality. We applied this approach to a simulated driving task and examined directed relationships between brain activity and continuous driving performance (steering behavior or vehicle heading error). Our results indicated that two neuro-behavioral states may be explored with this methodology: a Proactive brain state that actively plans the response to the sensory information and is characterized by delta-beta activity, and a Reactive brain state that processes incoming information and reacts to environmental statistics primarily within the alpha band. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Direction-of-Arrival Estimation Based on Sparse Recovery with Second-Order Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditional direction-of-arrival (DOA estimation techniques perform Nyquist-rate sampling of the received signals and as a result they require high storage. To reduce sampling ratio, we introduce level-crossing (LC sampling which captures samples whenever the signal crosses predetermined reference levels, and the LC-based analog-to-digital converter (LC ADC has been shown to efficiently sample certain classes of signals. In this paper, we focus on the DOA estimation problem by using second-order statistics based on the LC samplings recording on one sensor, along with the synchronous samplings of the another sensors, a sparse angle space scenario can be found by solving an $ell_1$ minimization problem, giving the number of sources and their DOA's. The experimental results show that our proposed method, when compared with some existing norm-based constrained optimization compressive sensing (CS algorithms, as well as subspace method, improves the DOA estimation performance, while using less samples when compared with Nyquist-rate sampling and reducing sensor activity especially for long time silence signal.

  17. Estimating the direct rebound effect for on-road freight transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winebrake, James J.; Green, Erin H.; Comer, Bryan; Corbett, James J.; Froman, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Energy and environmental concerns have spawned new policies aimed at reducing emissions and fuel consumption of heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) worldwide. While such policies intend to reduce HDV energy consumption and emissions, energy savings that reduce transportation costs may lead to increased demand for HDV transportation services. Increased HDV transportation, in turn, can result in increased energy use and emissions—i.e., a direct “rebound effect.” This paper provides a critical review of the literature related to the HDV rebound effect. Results of this review demonstrate that the lack of focused studies in this area combined with the variability and heterogeneity of the trucking sector limit general understanding of the HDV rebound effect. Currently, the studies that do exist often create biased or erroneous rebound effect estimates by inappropriately relying on freight elasticities or applying metrics that omit important elements of fuel consumption. Research following a more transparent and coherent approach can improve estimates of the rebound effect from policy measures to improve HDV energy efficiency. - Highlights: ► Provides a critical review of HDV rebound effect literature. ► Demonstrates limitations of HDV rebound effect estimates. ► Provides framework for considering more complete HDV rebound effect.

  18. Divergence times in Caenorhabditis and Drosophila inferred from direct estimates of the neutral mutation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter, Asher D

    2008-04-01

    Accurate inference of the dates of common ancestry among species forms a central problem in understanding the evolutionary history of organisms. Molecular estimates of divergence time rely on the molecular evolutionary prediction that neutral mutations and substitutions occur at the same constant rate in genomes of related species. This underlies the notion of a molecular clock. Most implementations of this idea depend on paleontological calibration to infer dates of common ancestry, but taxa with poor fossil records must rely on external, potentially inappropriate, calibration with distantly related species. The classic biological models Caenorhabditis and Drosophila are examples of such problem taxa. Here, I illustrate internal calibration in these groups with direct estimates of the mutation rate from contemporary populations that are corrected for interfering effects of selection on the assumption of neutrality of substitutions. Divergence times are inferred among 6 species each of Caenorhabditis and Drosophila, based on thousands of orthologous groups of genes. I propose that the 2 closest known species of Caenorhabditis shared a common ancestor <24 MYA (Caenorhabditis briggsae and Caenorhabditis sp. 5) and that Caenorhabditis elegans diverged from its closest known relatives <30 MYA, assuming that these species pass through at least 6 generations per year; these estimates are much more recent than reported previously with molecular clock calibrations from non-nematode phyla. Dates inferred for the common ancestor of Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans are roughly concordant with previous studies. These revised dates have important implications for rates of genome evolution and the origin of self-fertilization in Caenorhabditis.

  19. Assessment of ANN and SVM models for estimating normal direct irradiation (H_b)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Cícero Manoel dos; Escobedo, João Francisco; Teramoto, Érico Tadao; Modenese Gorla da Silva, Silvia Helena

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The performance of SVM and ANN in estimating Normal Direct Irradiation (H_b) was evaluated. • 12 models using different input variables are developed (hourly and daily partitions). • The most relevant input variables for DNI are kt, H_s_c and insolation ratio (r′ = n/N). • Support Vector Machine (SVM) provides accurate estimates and outperforms the Artificial Neural Network (ANN). - Abstract: This study evaluates the estimation of hourly and daily normal direct irradiation (H_b) using machine learning techniques (ML): Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM). Time series of different meteorological variables measured over thirteen years in Botucatu were used for training and validating ANN and SVM. Seven different sets of input variables were tested and evaluated, which were chosen based on statistical models reported in the literature. Relative Mean Bias Error (rMBE), Relative Root Mean Square Error (rRMSE), determination coefficient (R"2) and “d” Willmott index were used to evaluate ANN and SVM models. When compared to statistical models which use the same set of input variables (R"2 between 0.22 and 0.78), ANN and SVM show higher values of R"2 (hourly models between 0.52 and 0.88; daily models between 0.42 and 0.91). Considering the input variables, atmospheric transmissivity of global radiation (kt), integrated solar constant (H_s_c) and insolation ratio (n/N, n is sunshine duration and N is photoperiod) were the most relevant in ANN and SVM models. The rMBE and rRMSE values in the two time partitions of SVM models are lower than those obtained with ANN. Hourly ANN and SVM models have higher rRMSE values than daily models. Optimal performance with hourly models was obtained with ANN4"h (rMBE = 12.24%, rRMSE = 23.99% and “d” = 0.96) and SVM4"h (rMBE = 1.75%, rRMSE = 20.10% and “d” = 0.96). Optimal performance with daily models was obtained with ANN2"d (rMBE = −3.09%, rRMSE = 18.95% and “d” = 0

  20. Transfer Entropy Estimation and Directional Coupling Change Detection in Biomedical Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Joon

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The detection of change in magnitude of directional coupling between two non-linear time series is a common subject of interest in the biomedical domain, including studies involving the respiratory chemoreflex system. Although transfer entropy is a useful tool in this avenue, no study to date has investigated how different transfer entropy estimation methods perform in typical biomedical applications featuring small sample size and presence of outliers. Methods With respect to detection of increased coupling strength, we compared three transfer entropy estimation techniques using both simulated time series and respiratory recordings from lambs. The following estimation methods were analyzed: fixed-binning with ranking, kernel density estimation (KDE, and the Darbellay-Vajda (D-V adaptive partitioning algorithm extended to three dimensions. In the simulated experiment, sample size was varied from 50 to 200, while coupling strength was increased. In order to introduce outliers, the heavy-tailed Laplace distribution was utilized. In the lamb experiment, the objective was to detect increased respiratory-related chemosensitivity to O2 and CO2 induced by a drug, domperidone. Specifically, the separate influence of end-tidal PO2 and PCO2 on minute ventilation (V˙E before and after administration of domperidone was analyzed. Results In the simulation, KDE detected increased coupling strength at the lowest SNR among the three methods. In the lamb experiment, D-V partitioning resulted in the statistically strongest increase in transfer entropy post-domperidone for PO2→V˙E. In addition, D-V partitioning was the only method that could detect an increase in transfer entropy for PCO2→V˙E, in agreement with experimental findings. Conclusions Transfer entropy is capable of detecting directional coupling changes in non-linear biomedical time series analysis featuring a small number of observations and presence of outliers. The results

  1. Estimating the direct and indirect effects of secondary organic aerosols using ECHAM5-HAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O'Donnell

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol (SOA has been introduced into the global climate-aerosol model ECHAM5/HAM. The SOA module handles aerosols originating from both biogenic and anthropogenic sources. The model simulates the emission of precursor gases, their chemical conversion into condensable gases, the partitioning of semi-volatile condenable species into the gas and aerosol phases. As ECHAM5/HAM is a size-resolved model, a new method that permits the calculation of partitioning of semi-volatile species between different size classes is introduced. We compare results of modelled organic aerosol concentrations against measurements from extensive measurement networks in Europe and the United States, running the model with and without SOA. We also compare modelled aerosol optical depth against measurements from the AERONET network of grond stations. We find that SOA improves agreement between model and measurements in both organic aerosol mass and aerosol optical depth, but does not fully correct the low bias that is present in the model for both of these quantities. Although many models now include SOA, any overall estimate of the direct and indirect effects of these aerosols is still lacking. This paper makes a first step in that direction. The model is applied to estimate the direct and indirect effects of SOA under simulated year 2000 conditions. The modelled SOA spatial distribution indicates that SOA is likely to be an important source of free and upper tropospheric aerosol. We find a negative shortwave (SW forcing from the direct effect, amounting to −0.31 Wm−2 on the global annual mean. In contrast, the model indicates a positive indirect effect of SOA of +0.23 Wm−2, arising from the enlargement of particles due to condensation of SOA, together with an enhanced coagulation sink of small particles. In the longwave, model results are a direct effect of +0.02 Wm−2 and an indirect effect of −0.03 Wm−2

  2. Broadband implementation of coprime linear microphone arrays for direction of arrival estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Dane; Xiang, Ning

    2015-07-01

    Coprime arrays represent a form of sparse sensing which can achieve narrow beams using relatively few elements, exceeding the spatial Nyquist sampling limit. The purpose of this paper is to expand on and experimentally validate coprime array theory in an acoustic implementation. Two nested sparse uniform linear subarrays with coprime number of elements ( M and N) each produce grating lobes that overlap with one another completely in just one direction. When the subarray outputs are combined it is possible to retain the shared beam while mostly canceling the other superfluous grating lobes. In this way a small number of microphones ( N+M-1) creates a narrow beam at higher frequencies, comparable to a densely populated uniform linear array of MN microphones. In this work beampatterns are simulated for a range of single frequencies, as well as bands of frequencies. Narrowband experimental beampatterns are shown to correspond with simulated results even at frequencies other than the arrays design frequency. Narrowband side lobe locations are shown to correspond to the theoretical values. Side lobes in the directional pattern are mitigated by increasing bandwidth of analyzed signals. Direction of arrival estimation is also implemented for two simultaneous noise sources in a free field condition.

  3. Estimates of future discharges of the river Rhine using two scenario methodologies: direct versus delta approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulations with a hydrological model for the river Rhine for the present (1960–1989 and a projected future (2070–2099 climate are discussed. The hydrological model (RhineFlow is driven by meteorological data from a 90-years (ensemble of three 30-years simulation with the HadRM3H regional climate model for both present-day and future climate (A2 emission scenario. Simulation of present-day discharges is realistic provided that (1 the HadRM3H temperature and precipitation are corrected for biases, and (2 the potential evapotranspiration is derived from temperature only. Different methods are used to simulate discharges for the future climate: one is based on the direct model output of the future climate run (direct approach, while the other is based on perturbation of the present-day HadRM3H time series (delta approach. Both methods predict a similar response in the mean annual discharge, an increase of 30% in winter and a decrease of 40% in summer. However, predictions of extreme flows differ significantly, with increases of 10% in flows with a return period of 100 years in the direct approach and approximately 30% in the delta approach. A bootstrap method is used to estimate the uncertainties related to the sample size (number of years simulated in predicting changes in extreme flows.

  4. Joint Direction-of-Departure and Direction-of-Arrival Estimation in a UWB MIMO Radar Detecting Targets with Fluctuating Radar Cross Sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idnin Pasya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a joint direction-of-departure (DOD and direction-of-arrival (DOA estimation in a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO radar utilizing ultra wideband (UWB signals in detecting targets with fluctuating radar cross sections (RCS. The UWB MIMO radar utilized a combination of two-way MUSIC and majority decision based on angle histograms of estimated DODs and DOAs at each frequency of the UWB signal. The proposed angle estimation scheme was demonstrated to be effective in detecting targets with fluctuating RCS, compared to conventional spectra averaging method used in subband angle estimations. It was found that a wider bandwidth resulted in improved estimation performance. Numerical simulations along with experimental evaluations in a radio anechoic chamber are presented.

  5. Structural Estimation of Family Labor Supply with Taxes: Estimating a Continuous Hours Model Using a Direct Utility Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Bradley T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method for estimating family labor supply in the presence of taxes. This method accounts for continuous hours choices, measurement error, unobserved heterogeneity in tastes for work, the nonlinear form of the tax code, and fixed costs of work in one comprehensive specification. Estimated on data from the 2001 PSID, the…

  6. A direct method for estimating the alpha/beta ratio from quantitative dose-response data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuschke, M.

    1989-01-01

    A one-step optimization method based on a least squares fit of the linear quadratic model to quantitative tissue response data after fractionated irradiation is proposed. Suitable end-points that can be analysed by this method are growth delay, host survival and quantitative biochemical or clinical laboratory data. The functional dependence between the transformed dose and the measured response is approximated by a polynomial. The method allows for the estimation of the alpha/beta ratio and its confidence limits from all observed responses of the different fractionation schedules. Censored data can be included in the analysis. A method to test the appropriateness of the fit is presented. A computer simulation illustrates the method and its accuracy as examplified by the growth delay end point. A comparison with a fit of the linear quadratic model to interpolated isoeffect doses shows the advantages of the direct method. (orig./HP) [de

  7. Novel Direction Of Arrival Estimation Method Based on Coherent Accumulation Matrix Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on coherent accumulation matrix reconstruction, a novel Direction Of Arrival (DOA estimation decorrelation method of coherent signals is proposed using a small sample. First, the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR is improved by performing coherent accumulation operation on an array of observed data. Then, according to the structure characteristics of the accumulated snapshot vector, the equivalent covariance matrix, whose rank is the same as the number of array elements, is constructed. The rank of this matrix is proved to be determined just by the number of incident signals, which realize the decorrelation of coherent signals. Compared with spatial smoothing method, the proposed method performs better by effectively avoiding aperture loss with high-resolution characteristics and low computational complexity. Simulation results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  8. Is Russia successful in attracting foreign direct investment? Evidence based on gravity model estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariev Oleg

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is twofold. First, it is to answer the question of whether Russia is successful in attracting foreign direct investment (FDI. Second, it is to identify partner countries that “overinvest” and “underinvest” in the Russian economy. We do this by calculating potential FDI inflows to Russia and comparing them with actual values. This research is associated with the empirical estimation of factors explaining FDI flows between countries. The methodological foundation used for the research is the gravity model of foreign direct investment. In discussing the pros and cons of different econometric methods of the estimation gravity equation, we conclude that the Poisson pseudo maximum likelihood method with instrumental variables (IV PPML is one of the best options in our case. Using a database covering about 70% of FDI flows for the period of 2001-2011, we discover the following factors that explain the variance of bilateral FDI flows in the world economy: GDP value of investing country, GDP value of recipient country, distance between countries, remoteness of investor country, remoteness of recipient country, level of institutions development in host country, wage level in host country, membership of two countries in a regional economic union, common official language, common border and colonial relationships between countries in the past. The potential values of FDI inflows are calculated using coefficients of regressors from the econometric model. We discover that the Russian economy performs very well in attracting FDI: the actual FDI inflows exceed potential values by 1.72 times. Large developed countries (France, Germany, UK, Italy overinvest in the Russian economy, while smaller and less developed countries (Czech Republic, Belarus, Denmark, Ukraine underinvest in Russia. Countries of Southeast Asia (China, South Korea, Japan also underinvest in the Russian economy.

  9. Introduction to vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Udesen, Jesper; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    Current ultrasound scanners can only estimate the velocity along the ultrasound beam and this gives rise to the cos() factor on all velocity estimates. This is a major limitation as most vessels are close to perpendicular to the beam. Also the angle varies as a function of space and time making ...

  10. Estimating the direct and indirect water use of tourism in the eastern Mediterranean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjikakou, Michalis; Chenoweth, Jonathan; Miller, Graham

    2013-01-15

    The impact of tourism activities on local water resources remains a largely understudied issue in environmental and sustainable tourism management. The aim of the paper is to present a simple methodology that allows an estimate of direct and indirect local water use associated with different holiday packages and to then discuss relevant management implications. This is explored through the creation of five illustrative examples of holidays to semi-arid eastern Mediterranean destinations: Cyprus (2), Turkey, Greece and Syria. Using available data on water use associated with different forms of travel, accommodation and tourist activities, indicative water footprints are calculated for each of the illustrative examples. Food consumption by tourists appears to have by far the most significant impact on the overall water footprint and this aspect of water use is explored in detail in the paper. The paper also suggests a way of employing the water footprint methodology along with import/export balance sheets of main food commodities to distinguish between the global and local pressure of tourism demand on water resources. Water resource use is likely to become an increasingly important issue in tourism management and must be considered alongside more established environmental concerns such as energy use, using methodologies that can capture direct as well as supply chain impacts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Estimating the direct costs of ischemic heart disease: evidence from a teaching hospital in BRAZIL, a retrospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Schlatter, Rosane Paix?o; Hirakata, V?nia Naomi; Polanczyk, Carisi Anne

    2017-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease is the most prevalent cardiovascular disease. In the United States, 7% of adults over 20 years of age are estimated to have coronary artery disease. In Brazil, a prevalence of 5 to 8% has been estimated in adults over 40 years of age, with an increased number of hospitalizations associated with both stable and acute clinical manifestations; and health care costs have quadrupled in the last decade. To estimate the direct costs of managing ischemic heart disea...

  12. Use of high-resolution imagery acquired from an unmanned aircraft system for fluvial mapping and estimating water-surface velocity in rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzel, P. J.; Bauer, M.; Feller, M.; Holmquist-Johnson, C.; Preston, T.

    2013-12-01

    The use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) for environmental monitoring in the United States is anticipated to increase in the coming years as the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) further develops guidelines to permit their integration into the National Airspace System. The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Unmanned Aircraft Systems Project Office routinely obtains Certificates of Authorization from the FAA for utilizing UAS technology for a variety of natural resource applications for the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI). We evaluated the use of a small UAS along two reaches of the Platte River near Overton Nebraska, USA, to determine the accuracy of the system for mapping the extent and elevation of emergent sandbars and to test the ability of a hovering UAS to identify and track tracers to estimate water-surface velocity. The UAS used in our study is the Honeywell Tarantula Hawk RQ16 (T-Hawk), developed for the U.S. Army as a reconnaissance and surveillance platform. The T-Hawk has been recently modified by USGS, and certified for airworthiness by the DOI - Office of Aviation Services, to accommodate a higher-resolution imaging payload than was originally deployed with the system. The T-Hawk is currently outfitted with a Canon PowerShot SX230 HS with a 12.1 megapixel resolution and intervalometer to record images at a user defined time step. To increase the accuracy of photogrammetric products, orthoimagery and DEMs using structure-from-motion (SFM) software, we utilized ground control points in the study reaches and acquired imagery using flight lines at various altitudes (200-400 feet above ground level) and oriented both parallel and perpendicular to the river. Our results show that the mean error in the elevations derived from SFM in the upstream reach was 17 centimeters and horizontal accuracy was 6 centimeters when compared to 4 randomly distributed targets surveyed on emergent sandbars. In addition to the targets, multiple transects were

  13. Field Testing of an In-well Point Velocity Probe for the Rapid Characterization of Groundwater Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorno, T.; Devlin, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    Reliable estimates of groundwater velocity is essential in order to best implement in-situ monitoring and remediation technologies. The In-well Point Velocity Probe (IWPVP) is an inexpensive, reusable tool developed for rapid measurement of groundwater velocity at the centimeter-scale in monitoring wells. IWPVP measurements of groundwater speed are based on a small-scale tracer test conducted as ambient groundwater passes through the well screen and the body of the probe. Horizontal flow direction can be determined from the difference in tracer mass passing detectors placed in four funnel-and-channel pathways through the probe, arranged in a cross pattern. The design viability of the IWPVP was confirmed using a two-dimensional numerical model in Comsol Multiphysics, followed by a series of laboratory tank experiments in which IWPVP measurements were calibrated to quantify seepage velocities in both fine and medium sand. Lab results showed that the IWPVP was capable of measuring the seepage velocity in less than 20 minutes per test, when the seepage velocity was in the range of 0.5 to 4.0 m/d. Further, the IWPVP estimated the groundwater speed with a precision of ± 7%, and an accuracy of ± 14%, on average. The horizontal flow direction was determined with an accuracy of ± 15°, on average. Recently, a pilot field test of the IWPVP was conducted in the Borden aquifer, C.F.B. Borden, Ontario, Canada. A total of approximately 44 IWPVP tests were conducted within two 2-inch groundwater monitoring wells comprising a 5 ft. section of #8 commercial well screen. Again, all tests were completed in under 20 minutes. The velocities estimated from IWPVP data were compared to 21 Point Velocity Probe (PVP) tests, as well as Darcy-based estimates of groundwater velocity. Preliminary data analysis shows strong agreement between the IWPVP and PVP estimates of groundwater velocity. Further, both the IWPVP and PVP estimates of groundwater velocity appear to be reasonable when

  14. Static roll-tilt over 5 minutes locally distorts the internal estimate of direction of gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnutzer, A A; Bockisch, C J; Straumann, D; Marti, S; Bertolini, G

    2014-12-01

    The subjective visual vertical (SVV) indicates perceived direction of gravity. Even in healthy human subjects, roll angle-dependent misestimations, roll overcompensation (A-effect, head-roll > 60° and head-roll tilt, SVV estimates when upright are biased toward the preceding roll position, which indicates that perceived vertical (PV) is shifted by the prior tilt (Tarnutzer AA, Bertolini G, Bockisch CJ, Straumann D, Marti S. PLoS One 8: e78079, 2013). Hypothetically, PV in any roll position could be biased toward the previous roll position. We asked whether such a "global" bias occurs or whether the bias is "local". The SVV of healthy human subjects (N = 9) was measured in nine roll positions (-120° to +120°, steps = 30°) after 5 min of roll-tilt in one of two adaptation positions (±90°) and compared with control trials without adaptation. After adapting, adjustments were shifted significantly (P tilted positions (±30°, ±60°) and upright only. We computationally simulated errors based on the sum of a monotonically increasing function (producing roll undercompensation) and a mixture of Gaussian functions (representing roll overcompensation centered around PV). In combination, the pattern of A- and E-effects could be generated. By shifting the function representing local overcompensation toward the adaptation position, the experimental postadaptation data could be fitted successfully. We conclude that prolonged roll-tilt locally distorts PV rather than globally shifting it. Short-term adaptation of roll overcompensation may explain these shifts and could reflect the brain's strategy to optimize SVV estimates around recent roll positions. Thus postural stability can be improved by visually-mediated compensatory responses at any sustained body-roll orientation. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Parameter estimation method that directly compares gravitational wave observations to numerical relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, J.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Boyle, M.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Campanelli, M.; Chu, T.; Clark, J. A.; Demos, N.; Fong, H.; Healy, J.; Hemberger, D. A.; Hinder, I.; Jani, K.; Khamesra, B.; Kidder, L. E.; Kumar, P.; Laguna, P.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Ossokine, S.; Pfeiffer, H.; Scheel, M. A.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Szilagyi, B.; Teukolsky, S.; Zlochower, Y.

    2017-11-01

    We present and assess a Bayesian method to interpret gravitational wave signals from binary black holes. Our method directly compares gravitational wave data to numerical relativity (NR) simulations. In this study, we present a detailed investigation of the systematic and statistical parameter estimation errors of this method. This procedure bypasses approximations used in semianalytical models for compact binary coalescence. In this work, we use the full posterior parameter distribution for only generic nonprecessing binaries, drawing inferences away from the set of NR simulations used, via interpolation of a single scalar quantity (the marginalized log likelihood, ln L ) evaluated by comparing data to nonprecessing binary black hole simulations. We also compare the data to generic simulations, and discuss the effectiveness of this procedure for generic sources. We specifically assess the impact of higher order modes, repeating our interpretation with both l ≤2 as well as l ≤3 harmonic modes. Using the l ≤3 higher modes, we gain more information from the signal and can better constrain the parameters of the gravitational wave signal. We assess and quantify several sources of systematic error that our procedure could introduce, including simulation resolution and duration; most are negligible. We show through examples that our method can recover the parameters for equal mass, zero spin, GW150914-like, and unequal mass, precessing spin sources. Our study of this new parameter estimation method demonstrates that we can quantify and understand the systematic and statistical error. This method allows us to use higher order modes from numerical relativity simulations to better constrain the black hole binary parameters.

  16. Estimating direct effects of parental occupation on Spaniards’ health by birth cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Pinilla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Social health inequalities in adult population are partly due to socioeconomic circumstances in childhood. A better understanding of how those circumstances affect health during adulthood may improve the opportunities for reducing health disparities. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of parental socioeconomic status, which is proxied by occupation, on adult Spaniards’ health by birth cohort. The analysis will allow checking not only the direct impact of parental occupation on their offspring’s health, but also whether inherited inequality has been reduced over time. Methods We use data from the Bank of Spain’s Survey of Household Finances on Spanish households from 2002 to 2008. Sequential models were used to estimate the influence of the father’s and mother’s occupation on their offspring’s health, trying to disentangle direct from indirect effects. With a sample of 26,832 persons we consider effects for four different cohorts by birth periods ranging from 1916 to 1981. Results The results show that parental occupation has a significant direct impact on individuals’ health (p < 0.01. The effect of father’s occupation exceeds that of mother’s. For those born before 1936, the probability of reporting a good health status ranges from 0.31 (95% confidence interval (CI 0.14–0.48, when fathers were classified as unskilled elementary workers, to 0.98 (95% CI 0.98–0.99 when they were managers or mid-level professionals. For those born during the period 1959–1975, those probabilities are 0.49 (95% CI 0.39–0.59 and 0.97 (95% CI 0.96–0.98, respectively. Therefore, health inequalities linked to parental socioeconomic status have been noticeably reduced, although discrimination against unskilled workers persists over time. Conclusions Great progress has been made in the health area during the twentieth century, so that the impact of parental socioeconomic status on individuals

  17. Estimation of directional sea wave spectra from radar images. A Mediterranean Sea case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corsini, G.; Grasso, R.; Manara, G.; Monorchio, A.

    2001-01-01

    An inversion technique for estimating sea wave directional spectra from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is applied to a set of ERS-1 data relevant to selected Mediterranean areas. The approach followed is based on the analytical definition of the transform which maps the sea wave spectrum onto the corresponding SAR image spectrum. The solution of the inverse problem is determined through a numerical procedure which minimises a proper functional. A suitable iterative scheme is adopted, involving the use of the above transform. Although widely applied to the ocean case, the method has not been yet extensively tested widely applied to the ocean case, the method has not been yet extensively tested in smaller scale basins, as for instance the Mediterranean sea. The results obtained demonstrate the effectiveness of the numerical procedure discussed for retrieving the sea wave spectrum from SAR images. This work provides new experimental data relevant to the Mediterranean Sea, discusses the results obtained by the above inversion technique and compares them with buoy derived sea truth measurements

  18. Direct magnitude estimates of speech intelligibility in dysarthria: effects of a chosen standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weismer, Gary; Laures, Jacqueline S

    2002-06-01

    Direct magnitude estimation (DME) has been used frequently as a perceptual scaling technique in studies of the speech intelligibility of persons with speech disorders. The technique is typically used with a standard, or reference stimulus, chosen as a good exemplar of "midrange" intelligibility. In several published studies, the standard has been chosen subjectively, usually on the basis of the expertise of the investigators. The current experiment demonstrates that a fixed set of sentence-level utterances, obtained from 4 individuals with dysarthria (2 with Parkinson disease, 2 with traumatic brain injury) as well as 3 neurologically normal speakers, is scaled differently depending on the identity of the standard. Four different standards were used in the main experiment, three of which were judged qualitatively in two independent evaluations to be good exemplars of midrange intelligibility. Acoustic analyses did not reveal obvious differences between these four standards but suggested that the standard with the worst-scaled intelligibility had much poorer voice source characteristics compared to the other three standards. Results are discussed in terms of possible standardization of midrange intelligibility exemplars for DME experiments.

  19. Intercomparison of two BRDF models in the estimation of the directional emissivity in MIR channel from MSG1-SEVIRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Geng-Ming; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2008-11-10

    This work intercompared two Bi-directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) models, the modified Minnaert's model and the RossThick-LiSparse-R model, in the estimation of the directional emissivity in Middle Infra-Red (MIR) channel from the data acquired by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infra-Red Imager (SEVIRI) onboard the first Meteosat Second Generation (MSG1). The bi-directional reflectances in SEVIRI channel 4 (3.9 microm) were estimated from the combined MIR and Thermal Infra-Red (TIR) data and then were used to estimate the directional emissivity in this channel with aid of the BRDF models. The results show that: (1) Both models can relatively well describe the non-Lambertian reflective behavior of land surfaces in SEVIRI channel 4; (2) The RossThick-LiSparse-R model is better than the modified Minnaert's model in modeling the bi-directional reflectances, and the directional emissivities modeled by the modified Minnaert's model are always lower than the ones obtained by the RossThick-LiSparse-R model with averaged emissivity differences of approximately 0.01 and approximately 0.04 over the vegetated and bare areas, respectively. The use of the RossThick-LiSparse-R model in the estimation of the directional emissivity in MIR channel is recommended.

  20. Velocity navigator for motion compensated thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Florian; Krafft, Axel J; Yung, Joshua P; Stafford, R Jason; Elliott, Andrew; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Semmler, Wolfhard; Bock, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Proton resonance frequency shift thermometry is sensitive to breathing motion that leads to incorrect phase differences. In this work, a novel velocity-sensitive navigator technique for triggering MR thermometry image acquisition is presented. A segmented echo planar imaging pulse sequence was modified for velocity-triggered temperature mapping. Trigger events were generated when the estimated velocity value was less than 0.2 cm/s during the slowdown phase in parallel to the velocity-encoding direction. To remove remaining high-frequency spikes from pulsation in real time, a Kalman filter was applied to the velocity navigator data. A phantom experiment with heating and an initial volunteer experiment without heating were performed to show the applicability of this technique. Additionally, a breath-hold experiment was conducted for comparison. A temperature rise of ΔT = +37.3°C was seen in the phantom experiment, and a root mean square error (RMSE) outside the heated region of 2.3°C could be obtained for periodic motion. In the volunteer experiment, a RMSE of 2.7°C/2.9°C (triggered vs. breath hold) was measured. A novel velocity navigator with Kalman filter postprocessing in real time significantly improves the temperature accuracy over non-triggered acquisitions and suggests being comparable to a breath-held acquisition. The proposed technique might be clinically applied for monitoring of thermal ablations in abdominal organs.

  1. The species velocity of trees in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, B. D.; Napier, J.; de Lafontaine, G.; Heath, K.; Li, B.; Hu, F.; Greenberg, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Anthropogenic climate change has motivated interest in the paleo record to enhance our knowledge about past vegetation responses to climate change and help understand potential responses in the future. Additionally, polar regions currently experience the most rapid rates of climate change globally, prompting concern over changes in the ecological composition of high latitude ecosystems. Recent analyses have attempted to construct methods to estimate a species' ability to track climate change by computing climate velocity; a measure of the rate of climate displacement across a landscape which may indicate the speed an organism must migrate to keep pace with climate change. However, a challenge to using climate velocity in understanding range shifts is a lack of species-specificity in the velocity calculations: climate velocity does not actually use any species data in its analysis. To solve the shortcomings of climate velocity in estimating species displacement rates, we computed the "species velocity" of white spruce, green and grey alder populations across the state of Alaska from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to today. Species velocity represents the rate and direction a species is required to migrate to keep pace with a changing climate following the LGM. We used a species distribution model to determine past and present white spruce and alder distributions using statistically downscaled climate data at 60m. Species velocity was then derived from the change in species distribution per year by the change in distribution over Alaska (km/yr). High velocities indicate locations where the species environmental envelope is changing drastically and must disperse rapidly to survive climate change. As a result, high velocity regions are more vulnerable to distribution shifts and higher risk of local extinction. Conversely, low species velocities indicate locations where the local climate envelope is shifting relatively slowly, reducing the stress to disperse quickly

  2. Inference of directed climate networks: role of instability of causality estimation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlinka, Jaroslav; Hartman, David; Vejmelka, Martin; Paluš, Milan

    2013-04-01

    Climate data are increasingly analyzed by complex network analysis methods, including graph-theoretical approaches [1]. For such analysis, links between localized nodes of climate network are typically quantified by some statistical measures of dependence (connectivity) between measured variables of interest. To obtain information on the directionality of the interactions in the networks, a wide range of methods exists. These can be broadly divided into linear and nonlinear methods, with some of the latter having the theoretical advantage of being model-free, and principally a generalization of the former [2]. However, as a trade-off, this generality comes together with lower accuracy - in particular if the system was close to linear. In an overall stationary system, this may potentially lead to higher variability in the nonlinear network estimates. Therefore, with the same control of false alarms, this may lead to lower sensitivity for detection of real changes in the network structure. These problems are discussed on the example of daily SAT and SLP data from the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis dataset. We first reduce the dimensionality of data using PCA with VARIMAX rotation to detect several dozens of components that together explain most of the data variability. We further construct directed climate networks applying a selection of most widely used methods - variants of linear Granger causality and conditional mutual information. Finally, we assess the stability of the detected directed climate networks by computing them in sliding time windows. To understand the origin of the observed instabilities and their range, we also apply the same procedure to two types of surrogate data: either with non-stationarity in network structure removed, or imposed in a controlled way. In general, the linear methods show stable results in terms of overall similarity of directed climate networks inferred. For instance, for different decades of SAT data, the Spearman correlation of edge

  3. Estimating Crustal Properties Directly from Satellite Tracking Data by Using a Topography-based Constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, S. J.; Sabaka, T. J.; Genova, A.; Mazarico, E. M.; Nicholas, J. B.; Neumann, G. A.; Lemoine, F. G.

    2017-12-01

    The crust of a terrestrial planet is formed by differentiation processes in its early history, followed by magmatic evolution of the planetary surface. It is further modified through impact processes. Knowledge of the crustal structure can thus place constraints on the planet's formation and evolution. In particular, the average bulk density of the crust is a fundamental parameter in geophysical studies, such as the determination of crustal thickness, studies of the mechanisms of topography support, and the planet's thermo-chemical evolution. Yet even with in-situ samples available, the crustal density is difficult to determine unambiguously, as exemplified by the results for the Gravity and Recovery Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission, which found an average crustal density for the Moon that was lower than generally assumed. The GRAIL results were possible owing to the combination of its high-resolution gravity and high-resolution topography obtained by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), and high correlations between the two datasets. The crustal density can be determined by its contribution to the gravity field of a planet, but at long wavelengths flexure effects can dominate. On the other hand, short-wavelength gravity anomalies are difficult to measure, and either not determined well enough (other than at the Moon), or their power is suppressed by the standard `Kaula' regularization constraint applied during inversion of the gravity field from satellite tracking data. We introduce a new constraint that has infinite variance in one direction, called xa . For constraint damping factors that go to infinity, it can be shown that the solution x becomes equal to a scale factor times xa. This scale factor is completely determined by the data, and we call our constraint rank-minus-1 (RM1). If we choose xa to be topography-induced gravity, then we can estimate the average bulk crustal density directly from the data

  4. Research on the improvement of nuclear safety - Development of a technique for simultaneous measurement of particle size and velocity for direct containment heating accident analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Yong; Song, Si Hong; Koh, Kwang Woong; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kim, Jong Moon; Choi, Chul Jin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-01

    The main objective is to develop a high performance software routine to process the output signals from the phase/Doppler device for simultaneous measurement of drop sizes and two-dimensional velocities of spray drops/particles. The present work has been carried out as an extension work of the first year`s research, where the principles and the limitation of this measuring technique have been thoroughly reviewed. In order to verify the performance and reliability of this software for simultaneous measurement of sizes and velocities of spray drops with two-dimensional motions, the results were compared with those from commercial signal processor DSA by Aerometrics, and concluded to be satisfactory. The routine developed throughout this project is applicable not only to the DCH model experiments but also to the measurements of sizes and velocities of drops/particles in combustors, dryers, humidifiers, and in various two-phase equipments. 20 refs., 5 tabs., 21 figs. (author)

  5. Radiotherapy of tumors under respiratory motion. Estimation of the motional velocity field and dose accumulation based on 4D image data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory motion represents a major challenge in radiation therapy in general, and especially for the therapy of lung tumors. In recent years and due to the introduction of modern techniques to 'acquire temporally resolved computed tomography images (4D CT images), different approaches have been developed to explicitly account for breathing motion during treatment. An integral component of such approaches is the concept of motion field estimation, which aims at a mathematical description and the computation of the motion sequences represented by the patient's images. As part of a 4D dose calculation/dose accumulation, the resulting vector fields are applied for assessing and accounting for breathing-induced effects on the dose distribution to be delivered. The reliability of related 4D treatment planning concepts is therefore directly tailored to the precision of the underlying motion field estimation process. Taking this into account, the thesis aims at developing optimized methods for the estimation of motion fields using 4D CT images and applying the resulting methods for the analysis of breathing induced dosimetric effects in radiation therapy. The thesis is subdivided into three parts that thematically build upon each other. The first part of the thesis is about the implementation, evaluation and optimization of methods for motion field estimation with the goal of precisely assessing respiratory motion of anatomical and pathological structures represented in a patient's 4D er image sequence; this step is the basis of subsequent developments and analysis parts. Especially non-linear registration techniques prove to be well suited to this purpose. After being optimized for the particular problem at hand, it is shown as part of an extensive multi-criteria evaluation study and additionally taking into account publicly accessible evaluation platforms that such methods allow estimating motion fields with subvoxel accuracy - which means that the developed methods

  6. Efficient Narrowband Direction of Arrival Estimation Based on a Combination of Uniform Linear/Shirvani-Akbari Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriar Shirvani Moghaddam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniform linear array (ULA geometry does not perform well for direction of arrival (DOA estimation at directions close to the array endfires. Shirvani and Akbari solved this problem by displacing two elements from both ends of the ULA to the top and/or bottom of the array axis. Shirvani-Akbari array (SAA presents a considerable improvement in the DOA estimation of narrowband sources arriving at endfire directions in terms of DOA estimation accuracy and angular resolution. In this paper, all new proposed SAA configurations are modelled and also examined, numerically. In this paper, two well-known DOA estimation algorithms, multiple signal classification (MUSIC and minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR, are used to evaluate the effectiveness of proposed arrays using total root mean square error (RMSE criterion. In addition, two new scenarios are proposed which divide angular search to two parts, directions close to array endfires as well as middle angles. For middle angles, which belong to (−70∘≤≤70∘, ULA is considered, and for endfire angles, the angles which belong to (−90∘≤≤−70∘ and (70∘≤≤90∘, SAA is considered. Simulation results of new proposed scenarios for DOA estimation of narrowband signals show the better performance with lower computational load.

  7. Annual national direct and indirect cost estimates of the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, Hillegonda Maria Dutilh; Itria, Alexander; Silva, Gulnar Azevedo e; Sartori, Ana Marli Christovam; Rama, Cristina Helena; de Soárez, Patrícia Coelho

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the annual direct and indirect costs of the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer in Brazil. METHODS: This cost description study used a "gross-costing" methodology and adopted the health system and societal perspectives. The estimates were grouped into sets of procedures performed in phases of cervical cancer care: the screening, diagnosis and treatment of precancerous lesions and the treatment of cervical cancer. The costs were estimated for the public and private health systems, using data from national health information systems, population surveys, and literature reviews. The cost estimates are presented in 2006 USD. RESULTS: From the societal perspective, the estimated total costs of the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer amounted to USD $1,321,683,034, which was categorized as follows: procedures (USD $213,199,490), visits (USD $325,509,842), transportation (USD $106,521,537) and productivity losses (USD $676,452,166). Indirect costs represented 51% of the total costs, followed by direct medical costs (visits and procedures) at 41% and direct non-medical costs (transportation) at 8%. The public system represented 46% of the total costs, and the private system represented 54%. CONCLUSION: Our national cost estimates of cervical cancer prevention and treatment, indicating the economic importance of cervical cancer screening and care, will be useful in monitoring the effect of the HPV vaccine introduction and are of interest in research and health care management. PMID:26017797

  8. Employing beam-forming for estimating the direction of arrival in a multi-path propagation environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bresch

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to recent researches on traffic accidents with vulnerable road users (VRUs, several measures revealed a great opportunity of reduction. However, all measures applied so far failed to reduce the number of traffic accidents if there is no line-of-sight. Therefore, a transponder signal is utilized to make the VRU visible. The motor vehicle carries a mobile receiver for VRU detection and location. The receiver employs digital beam-forming for estimating the direction of arrival (DOA with an antenna array for RF ISM band. A sequence of DOA estimations is used for location and motion estimation purposes.

  9. Improved ESPRIT Method for Joint Direction-of-Arrival and Frequency Estimation Using Multiple-Delay Output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xudong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An automatic pairing joint direction-of-arrival (DOA and frequency estimation is presented to overcome the unsatisfactory performances of estimation of signal parameter via rotational invariance techniques- (ESPRIT- like algorithm of Wang (2010, which requires an additional pairing. By using multiple-delay output of a uniform linear antenna arrays (ULA, the proposed algorithm can estimate joint angles and frequencies with an improved ESPRIT. Compared with Wang’s ESPRIT algorithm, the angle estimation performance of the proposed algorithm is greatly improved. The frequency estimation performance of the proposed algorithm is same with that of Wang’s ESPRIT algorithm. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm can obtain automatic pairing DOA and frequency parameters, and it has a comparative computational complexity in contrast to Wang’s ESPRIT algorithm. By the way, this proposed algorithm can also work well for nonuniform linear arrays. The useful behavior of this proposed algorithm is verified by simulations.

  10. Greenhouse gas emissions of an agro-biogas energy system: Estimation under the Renewable Energy Directive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.rana@unifg.it; Ingrao, Carlo; Lombardi, Mariarosaria; Tricase, Caterina

    2016-04-15

    Agro-biogas from energy crops and by-products is a renewable energy carrier that can potentially contribute to climate change mitigation. In this context, application of the methodology defined by the Renewable Energy Directive 2009/28/EC (RED) was performed in order to estimate the 100-year Global Warming Potential (GWP{sub 100}) associated with an agro-biogas supply chain (SC) in Southern Italy. Doing so enabled calculation of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission saving in order to verify if it is at least equal to 35% compared to the fossil fuel reference system, as specified by the RED. For the assessment, an attributional Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach (International Organization for Standardization (ISO), 2006a,b) was integrated with the RED methodology applied following the guidelines reported in COM(2010)11 and updated by SWD(2014)259 and Report EUR 27215 EN (2015). Moreover, primary data were collected with secondary data extrapolated from the Ecoinvent database system. Results showed that the GWP{sub 100} associated with electricity production through the biogas plant investigated was equal to 111.58 g CO{sub 2eq} MJ{sub e}{sup −1} and so a 40.01% GHG-emission saving was recorded compared to the RED reference. The highest contribution comes from biomass production and, in particular, from crop cultivation due to production of ammonium nitrate in the overall amount used for crop cultivation. Based upon the findings of the study, the GHG saving calculated slightly exceeds the related minimum proposed by the RED: therefore, improvements are needed anyway. In particular, the authors documented that through replacement of ammonium nitrate with urea the GHG-emission saving would increase to almost 68%, thus largely satisfying the RED limit. In addition, the study highlighted that conservation practices, such as NT, can significantly enable reduction of the GHG-emissions coming from agricultural activities. Therefore, those practices should be increasingly

  11. Greenhouse gas emissions of an agro-biogas energy system: Estimation under the Renewable Energy Directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Roberto; Ingrao, Carlo; Lombardi, Mariarosaria; Tricase, Caterina

    2016-04-15

    Agro-biogas from energy crops and by-products is a renewable energy carrier that can potentially contribute to climate change mitigation. In this context, application of the methodology defined by the Renewable Energy Directive 2009/28/EC (RED) was performed in order to estimate the 100-year Global Warming Potential (GWP100) associated with an agro-biogas supply chain (SC) in Southern Italy. Doing so enabled calculation of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission saving in order to verify if it is at least equal to 35% compared to the fossil fuel reference system, as specified by the RED. For the assessment, an attributional Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach (International Organization for Standardization (ISO), 2006a,b) was integrated with the RED methodology applied following the guidelines reported in COM(2010)11 and updated by SWD(2014)259 and Report EUR 27215 EN (2015). Moreover, primary data were collected with secondary data extrapolated from the Ecoinvent database system. Results showed that the GWP100 associated with electricity production through the biogas plant investigated was equal to 111.58gCO2eqMJe(-1) and so a 40.01% GHG-emission saving was recorded compared to the RED reference. The highest contribution comes from biomass production and, in particular, from crop cultivation due to production of ammonium nitrate in the overall amount used for crop cultivation. Based upon the findings of the study, the GHG saving calculated slightly exceeds the related minimum proposed by the RED: therefore, improvements are needed anyway. In particular, the authors documented that through replacement of ammonium nitrate with urea the GHG-emission saving would increase to almost 68%, thus largely satisfying the RED limit. In addition, the study highlighted that conservation practices, such as NT, can significantly enable reduction of the GHG-emissions coming from agricultural activities. Therefore, those practices should be increasingly adopted for cultivation of energy

  12. Informed TDoA-based Direction of Arrival Estimation for Hearing Aid Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmani, Mojtaba; Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Tan, Zheng-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Discrete Fourier Transform (IDFT) technique. To study the performance of the proposed algorithms, we run simulations for various DoAs, Signal to Noise Ratios (SNRs), and distances in large crowd noise situations. In these situations, the proposed estimator improves the estimation performance markedly over...

  13. Uncertainty of chromatic dispersion estimation from transmitted waveforms in direct detection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Zbigniew T.

    2017-08-01

    A possibility is shown of a non-disruptive estimation of chromatic dispersion in a fiber of an intensity modulation communication line under work conditions. Uncertainty of the chromatic dispersion estimates is analyzed and quantified with the use of confidence intervals.

  14. The risk function approach to profit maximizing estimation in direct mailing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muus, Lars; Scheer, Hiek van der; Wansbeek, Tom

    1999-01-01

    When the parameters of the model describing consumers' reaction to a mailing are known, addresses for a future mailing can be selected in a profit-maximizing way. Usually, these parameters are unknown and are to be estimated. Standard estimation are based on a quadratic loss function. In the present

  15. In-vivo evaluation of three ultrasound vector velocity techniques with MR angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Udesen, Jesper; Oddershede, Niels

    2008-01-01

    In conventional Doppler ultrasound (US) the blood velocity is only estimated along the US beam direction. The estimate is angle corrected assuming laminar flow parallel to the vessel boundaries. As the now in the vascular system never is purely laminar, the velocities estimated with conventional...... additionally constructed and mean differences for the three comparisons were: DB/MRA = 0.17 ml; STA/MRA = 0.07 ml; TO/MRA = 0.24 ml. The three US vector velocity techniques yield quantitative insight in to flow dynamics and can potentially give the clinician a powerful tool in cardiovascular disease assessment....

  16. Estimation of rainfall inputs and direct recharge to the deep unsaturated zone of southern Niger using the chloride profile method.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bromley, J.; Edmunds, W.M.; Fellman, E.; Brouwer, J.; Gaze, S.R.; Sudlow, J.; Taupin, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    An estimate of direct groundwater recharge below a region of natural woodland (tiger bush) has been made in south-west Niger using the solute profile technique. Data has been collected from a 77 m deep well dug within the study area covered by HAPEX-Sahel (Hydrological and Atmospheric Pilot

  17. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications. 2009 Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Brian D. [Directed Technologies, Arlington, VA (United States); Kalinoski, Jeffrey A. [Directed Technologies, Arlington, VA (United States); Baum, Kevin N. [Directed Technologies, Arlington, VA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This report is the third annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis. It contains estimates for material and manufacturing cost of complete 80 kWnet direct hydrogen proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems suitable for powering light duty automobiles.

  18. Mass Production Cost Estimation For Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systesm for Automotive Applications. 2010 Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Brian D. [Directed Technologies, Arlington, VA (United States); Kalinoski, Jeffrey A. [Directed Technologies, Arlington, VA (United States); Baum, Kevin N. [Directed Technologies, Arlington, VA (United States)

    2010-09-30

    This report is the fourth annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis. It contains estimates for material and manufacturing costs of complete 80 kWnet direct-hydrogen proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems suitable for powering light-duty automobiles.

  19. A 172 $\\mu$W Compressively Sampled Photoplethysmographic (PPG) Readout ASIC With Heart Rate Estimation Directly From Compressively Sampled Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamula, Venkata Rajesh; Valero-Sarmiento, Jose Manuel; Yan, Long; Bozkurt, Alper; Hoof, Chris Van; Helleputte, Nick Van; Yazicioglu, Refet Firat; Verhelst, Marian

    2017-06-01

    A compressive sampling (CS) photoplethysmographic (PPG) readout with embedded feature extraction to estimate heart rate (HR) directly from compressively sampled data is presented. It integrates a low-power analog front end together with a digital back end to perform feature extraction to estimate the average HR over a 4 s interval directly from compressively sampled PPG data. The application-specified integrated circuit (ASIC) supports uniform sampling mode (1x compression) as well as CS modes with compression ratios of 8x, 10x, and 30x. CS is performed through nonuniformly subsampling the PPG signal, while feature extraction is performed using least square spectral fitting through Lomb-Scargle periodogram. The ASIC consumes 172  μ W of power from a 1.2 V supply while reducing the relative LED driver power consumption by up to 30 times without significant loss of relevant information for accurate HR estimation.

  20. The Analysis of Sophisticated Direction of Arrival Estimation Methods in Passive Coherent Locators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ozcetin, Ahmet

    2002-01-01

    ...). The goal is to compare the ACMA to the MUSIC, and CBF algorithms for application to PCL. The results and analysis presented here support the use of constant modulus information, where available, as an important addition to DOA estimation...

  1. Systematic methodology for estimating direct capital costs for blanket tritium processing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology developed for estimating the relative capital costs of blanket processing systems. The capital costs of the nine blanket concepts selected in the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study are presented and compared

  2. Resources for preparing independent government estimates for remedial contracting work assignments. Directive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The memorandum provides information regarding the availability of tools, data bases, and assistance for developing independent government estimates of the cost of work to be performed by contractors for remedial work assignments

  3. Illuminant direction estimation for a single image based on local region complexity analysis and average gray value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jizheng; Mao, Xia; Chen, Lijiang; Xue, Yuli; Compare, Angelo

    2014-01-10

    Illuminant direction estimation is an important research issue in the field of image processing. Due to low cost for getting texture information from a single image, it is worthwhile to estimate illuminant direction by employing scenario texture information. This paper proposes a novel computation method to estimate illuminant direction on both color outdoor images and the extended Yale face database B. In our paper, the luminance component is separated from the resized YCbCr image and its edges are detected with the Canny edge detector. Then, we divide the binary edge image into 16 local regions and calculate the edge level percentage in each of them. Afterward, we use the edge level percentage to analyze the complexity of each local region included in the luminance component. Finally, according to the error function between the measured intensity and the calculated intensity, and the constraint function for an infinite light source model, we calculate the illuminant directions of the luminance component's three local regions, which meet the requirements of lower complexity and larger average gray value, and synthesize them as the final illuminant direction. Unlike previous works, the proposed method requires neither all of the information of the image nor the texture that is included in the training set. Experimental results show that the proposed method works better at the correct rate and execution time than the existing ones.

  4. A direct estimate of evapotranspiration over the Amazon basin and implications for our understanding of carbon and water cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, A. L. S.; Koven, C.; Lombardozzi, D.; Bonan, G. B.

    2017-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a critical term in the surface energy budget as well as the water cycle. There are few direct measurements of ET, and thus the magnitude and variability is poorly constrained at large spatial scales. Estimates of the annual cycle of ET over the Amazon are critical because they influence predictions of the seasonal cycle of carbon fluxes, as well as atmospheric dynamics and circulation. We estimate ET for the Amazon basin using a water budget approach, by differencing rainfall, discharge, and time-varying storage from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment. We find that the climatological annual cycle of ET over the Amazon basin upstream of Óbidos shows suppression of ET during the wet season, and higher ET during the dry season, consistent with flux tower based observations in seasonally dry forests. We also find a statistically significant decrease in ET over the time period 2002-2015 of -1.46 mm/yr. Our direct estimate of the seasonal cycle of ET is largely consistent with previous indirect estimates, including energy budget based approaches, an up-scaled station based estimate, and land surface model estimates, but suggests that suppression of ET during the wet season is underestimated by existing products. We further quantify possible contributors to the phasing of the seasonal cycle and downward time trend using land surface models.

  5. Comparison of direct and indirect methods of estimating health state utilities for resource allocation: review and empirical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, David; Girling, Alan; Stevens, Andrew; Lilford, Richard

    2009-07-22

    Utilities (values representing preferences) for healthcare priority setting are typically obtained indirectly by asking patients to fill in a quality of life questionnaire and then converting the results to a utility using population values. We compared such utilities with those obtained directly from patients or the public. Review of studies providing both a direct and indirect utility estimate. Papers reporting comparisons of utilities obtained directly (standard gamble or time tradeoff) or indirectly (European quality of life 5D [EQ-5D], short form 6D [SF-6D], or health utilities index [HUI]) from the same patient. PubMed and Tufts database of utilities. Sign test for paired comparisons between direct and indirect utilities; least squares regression to describe average relations between the different methods. Mean utility scores (or median if means unavailable) for each method, and differences in mean (median) scores between direct and indirect methods. We found 32 studies yielding 83 instances where direct and indirect methods could be compared for health states experienced by adults. The direct methods used were standard gamble in 57 cases and time trade off in 60(34 used both); the indirect methods were EQ-5D (67 cases), SF-6D (13), HUI-2 (5), and HUI-3 (37). Mean utility values were 0.81 (standard gamble) and 0.77 (time tradeoff) for the direct methods; for the indirect methods: 0.59(EQ-5D), 0.63 (SF-6D), 0.75 (HUI-2) and 0.68 (HUI-3). Direct methods of estimating utilities tend to result in higher health ratings than the more widely used indirect methods, and the difference can be substantial.Use of indirect methods could have important implications for decisions about resource allocation: for example, non-lifesaving treatments are relatively more favoured in comparison with lifesaving interventions than when using direct methods.

  6. Propagation Velocity of Solid Earth Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, S.

    2017-12-01

    One of the significant considerations in most of the geodetic investigations is to take into account the outcome of Solid Earth tides on the location and its consequent impact on the time series of coordinates. In this research work, the propagation velocity resulting from the Solid Earth tides between the Indian stations is computed. Mean daily coordinates for the stations have been computed by applying static precise point positioning technique for a day. The computed coordinates are used as an input for computing the tidal displacements at the stations by Gravity method along three directions at 1-minute interval for 24 hours. Further the baseline distances are computed between four Indian stations. Computation of the propagation velocity for Solid Earth tides can be done by the virtue of study of the concurrent effect of it in-between the stations of identified baseline distance along with the time consumed by the tides for reaching from one station to another. The propagation velocity helps in distinguishing the impact at any station if the consequence at a known station for a specific time-period is known. Thus, with the knowledge of propagation velocity, the spatial and temporal effects of solid earth tides can be estimated with respect to a known station. As theoretically explained, the tides generated are due to the position of celestial bodies rotating about Earth. So the need of study is to observe the correlation of propagation velocity with the rotation speed of the Earth. The propagation velocity of Solid Earth tides comes out to be in the range of 440-470 m/s. This velocity comes out to be in a good agreement with the Earth's rotation speed.

  7. Direct estimation of patient attributes from anatomical MRI based on multi-atlas voting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Ceritoglu, Can; Miller, Michael I; Mori, Susumu

    MRI brain atlases are widely used for automated image segmentation, and in particular, recent developments in multi-atlas techniques have shown highly accurate segmentation results. In this study, we extended the role of the atlas library from mere anatomical reference to a comprehensive knowledge database with various patient attributes, such as demographic, functional, and diagnostic information. In addition to using the selected (heavily-weighted) atlases to achieve high segmentation accuracy, we tested whether the non-anatomical attributes of the selected atlases could be used to estimate patient attributes. This can be considered a context-based image retrieval (CBIR) approach, embedded in the multi-atlas framework. We first developed an image similarity measurement to weigh the atlases on a structure-by-structure basis, and then, the attributes of the multiple atlases were weighted to estimate the patient attributes. We tested this concept first by estimating age in a normal population; we then performed functional and diagnostic estimations in Alzheimer's disease patients. The accuracy of the estimated patient attributes was measured against the actual clinical data, and the performance was compared to conventional volumetric analysis. The proposed CBIR framework by multi-atlas voting would be the first step toward a knowledge-based support system for quantitative radiological image reading and diagnosis.

  8. Direct estimation of patient attributes from anatomical MRI based on multi-atlas voting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MRI brain atlases are widely used for automated image segmentation, and in particular, recent developments in multi-atlas techniques have shown highly accurate segmentation results. In this study, we extended the role of the atlas library from mere anatomical reference to a comprehensive knowledge database with various patient attributes, such as demographic, functional, and diagnostic information. In addition to using the selected (heavily-weighted atlases to achieve high segmentation accuracy, we tested whether the non-anatomical attributes of the selected atlases could be used to estimate patient attributes. This can be considered a context-based image retrieval (CBIR approach, embedded in the multi-atlas framework. We first developed an image similarity measurement to weigh the atlases on a structure-by-structure basis, and then, the attributes of the multiple atlases were weighted to estimate the patient attributes. We tested this concept first by estimating age in a normal population; we then performed functional and diagnostic estimations in Alzheimer's disease patients. The accuracy of the estimated patient attributes was measured against the actual clinical data, and the performance was compared to conventional volumetric analysis. The proposed CBIR framework by multi-atlas voting would be the first step toward a knowledge-based support system for quantitative radiological image reading and diagnosis.

  9. Consistency of direct integral estimator for partially observed systems of ordinary differential equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vujačić, Ivan; Dattner, Itai

    In this paper we use the sieve framework to prove consistency of the ‘direct integral estimator’ of parameters for partially observed systems of ordinary differential equations, which are commonly used for modeling dynamic processes.

  10. Estimating the direction of innovative change based on theory an mixed methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Petrus A.T.M.; Roosendaal, Hans E.

    2001-01-01

    In predicting the direction of innovative changethe question arises of the valid measurement ofyet unknown variables. We developed and applied aresearch method that combines qualitativeand quantitative elements in one interview formatand an analysis tool suitable for these data. Animportant

  11. Use of probabilistic methods for estimating failure probabilities and directing ISI-efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, F; Brickstad, B [University of Uppsala, (Switzerland)

    1988-12-31

    Some general aspects of the role of Non Destructive Testing (NDT) efforts on the resulting probability of core damage is discussed. A simple model for the estimation of the pipe break probability due to IGSCC is discussed. It is partly based on analytical procedures, partly on service experience from the Swedish BWR program. Estimates of the break probabilities indicate that further studies are urgently needed. It is found that the uncertainties about the initial crack configuration are large contributors to the total uncertainty. Some effects of the inservice inspection are studied and it is found that the detection probabilities influence the failure probabilities. (authors).

  12. Estimating the population size and colony boundary of subterranean termites by using the density functions of directionally averaged capture probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Nan-Yao; Lee, Sang-Hee

    2008-04-01

    Marked termites were released in a linear-connected foraging arena, and the spatial heterogeneity of their capture probabilities was averaged for both directions at distance r from release point to obtain a symmetrical distribution, from which the density function of directionally averaged capture probability P(x) was derived. We hypothesized that as marked termites move into the population and given sufficient time, the directionally averaged capture probability may reach an equilibrium P(e) over the distance r and thus satisfy the equal mixing assumption of the mark-recapture protocol. The equilibrium capture probability P(e) was used to estimate the population size N. The hypothesis was tested in a 50-m extended foraging arena to simulate the distance factor of field colonies of subterranean termites. Over the 42-d test period, the density functions of directionally averaged capture probability P(x) exhibited four phases: exponential decline phase, linear decline phase, equilibrium phase, and postequilibrium phase. The equilibrium capture probability P(e), derived as the intercept of the linear regression during the equilibrium phase, correctly projected N estimates that were not significantly different from the known number of workers in the arena. Because the area beneath the probability density function is a constant (50% in this study), preequilibrium regression parameters and P(e) were used to estimate the population boundary distance 1, which is the distance between the release point and the boundary beyond which the population is absent.

  13. Unification of Frequency direction Pilot-symbol Aided Channel Estimation (PACE) for OFDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom, Christian; Manchón, Carles Navarro; Deneire, Luc

    2007-01-01

    their specificities, namely the presence of virtual subcarriers and non-sample-spaced channels. To ease this choice, we propose a unified presentation of estimators encompassing most of the algorithms that can be found in literature, which only differ by the assumptions made on the channel. This unification leads...

  14. Directional maximum likelihood self-estimation of the path-loss exponent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Y.; Leus, G.J.T.; Dong, Min; Zheng, Thomas Fang

    2016-01-01

    The path-loss exponent (PLE) is a key parameter in wireless propagation channels. Therefore, obtaining the knowledge of the PLE is rather significant for assisting wireless communications and networking to achieve a better performance. Most existing methods for estimating the PLE not only require

  15. Direct estimation of human trabecular bone stiffness using cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klintström, Eva; Klintström, Benjamin; Pahr, Dieter; Brismar, Torkel B; Smedby, Örjan; Moreno, Rodrigo

    2018-04-10

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of estimating the biomechanical properties of trabecular bone through finite element simulations by using dental cone beam computed tomography data. Fourteen human radius specimens were scanned in 3 cone beam computed tomography devices: 3-D Accuitomo 80 (J. Morita MFG., Kyoto, Japan), NewTom 5 G (QR Verona, Verona, Italy), and Verity (Planmed, Helsinki, Finland). The imaging data were segmented by using 2 different methods. Stiffness (Young modulus), shear moduli, and the size and shape of the stiffness tensor were studied. Corresponding evaluations by using micro-CT were regarded as the reference standard. The 3-D Accuitomo 80 (J. Morita MFG., Kyoto, Japan) showed good performance in estimating stiffness and shear moduli but was sensitive to the choice of segmentation method. NewTom 5 G (QR Verona, Verona, Italy) and Verity (Planmed, Helsinki, Finland) yielded good correlations, but they were not as strong as Accuitomo 80 (J. Morita MFG., Kyoto, Japan). The cone beam computed tomography devices overestimated both stiffness and shear compared with the micro-CT estimations. Finite element-based calculations of biomechanics from cone beam computed tomography data are feasible, with strong correlations for the Accuitomo 80 scanner (J. Morita MFG., Kyoto, Japan) combined with an appropriate segmentation method. Such measurements might be useful for predicting implant survival by in vivo estimations of bone properties. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Solutions for the diurnally forced advection-diffusion equation to estimate bulk fluid velocity and diffusivity in streambeds from temperature time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Luce; Daniele Tonina; Frank Gariglio; Ralph Applebee

    2013-01-01

    Work over the last decade has documented methods for estimating fluxes between streams and streambeds from time series of temperature at two depths in the streambed. We present substantial extension to the existing theory and practice of using temperature time series to estimate streambed water fluxes and thermal properties, including (1) a new explicit analytical...

  17. A novel directional asymmetric sampling search algorithm for fast block-matching motion estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue-e.; Wang, Qiang

    2011-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel directional asymmetric sampling search (DASS) algorithm for video compression. Making full use of the error information (block distortions) of the search patterns, eight different direction search patterns are designed for various situations. The strategy of local sampling search is employed for the search of big-motion vector. In order to further speed up the search, early termination strategy is adopted in procedure of DASS. Compared to conventional fast algorithms, the proposed method has the most satisfactory PSNR values for all test sequences.

  18. An Approach to Dynamic Line Rating State Estimation at Steady State Using Direct and Indirect Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, David; Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da; Mombello, Enrique E.

    2018-01-01

    Dynamic line rating has emerged as a solution for reducing congestion in overhead lines, allowing the optimization of power systems assets. This technique is based on direct and/or indirect monitoring of conductor temperature. Different devices and methods have been developed to sense conductor...

  19. Direct estimate of cocoa powder content in cakes by colorimetry and photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doka, O.; Bicanic, D.D.; Kulcsar, R.

    2014-01-01

    Cocoa is a very important ingredient in the food industry and largely consumed worldwide. In this investigation, colorimetry and photoacoustic spectroscopy were used to directly assess the content of cocoa powder in cakes; both methods provided satisfactory results. The calibration curve was

  20. Integration of Multi-Tension Permeametry and Photogrammetric Textural Segmentation for Estimating Directional Permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    conditions. Direct push optical methods could easily provide real-time high- resolution images useful for differentiating soil characteristics based on...Kozeny J. 1927. Uber Kapillare Leitung Des Wassers Im Boden. Sitz. Akad. Wissensh, 136:271–306. Lowry, W, N. Mason, And D. Merewether. 1999

  1. Fundamental Frequency and Direction-of-Arrival Estimation for Multichannel Speech Enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karimian-Azari, Sam

    Audio systems receive the speech signals of interest usually in the presence of noise. The noise has profound impacts on the quality and intelligibility of the speech signals, and it is therefore clear that the noisy signals must be cleaned up before being played back, stored, or analyzed. We can...... estimate the speech signal of interest from the noisy signals using a priori knowledge about it. A human speech signal is broadband and consists of both voiced and unvoiced parts. The voiced part is quasi-periodic with a time-varying fundamental frequency (or pitch as it is commonly referred to). We...... their time differences which eventually may further reduce the effects of noise. This thesis introduces a number of principles and methods to estimate periodic signals in noisy environments with application to multichannel speech enhancement. We propose model-based signal enhancement concerning the model...

  2. Cost estimation of a specifically designed direct light processing (DLP) additive manufacturing machine for precision printing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charalambis, Alessandro; Davoudinejad, Ali; Tosello, Guido

    2017-01-01

    creating new opportunities for manufacturers in a variety of industrial sectors. AM is an essentialprototyping technique for product design and development that is used in many different fields. However, the suitability of AMapplications in actual production in an industrial context needs to be determined......Additive Manufacturing (AM) refers to a portfolio of novel manufacturing technologies based on a layer-by-layer fabrication method.The market and industrial application of additive manufacturing technologies as an established manufacturing process have increasedexponentially in the last years....... This study, presents a cost estimation model forprecision printing with a specifically designed Digital Light Processing (DLP) AM machine built and validated at the Technical Universityof Denmark. The model presented in this study can be easily adapted and applied to estimate within a high level...

  3. Estimating air emissions from a remediation of a petroleum sump using direct measurement and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    A technical approach was developed for the remediation of a petroleum sump near a residential neighborhood. The approach evolved around sludge handling/in-situ solidification and on-site disposal. As part of the development of the engineering approach, a field investigation and modeling program was conducted to predict air emissions from the proposed remediation. Field measurements using the EPA recommended surface isolation flux chamber were conducted to represent each major activity or air exposure involving waste at the site. Air emissions from freshly disturbed petroleum waste, along with engineering estimates were used to predict emissions from each phase of the engineering approach. This paper presents the remedial approach and the measurement/modeling technologies used to predict air toxic emissions from the remediation. Emphasis will be placed on the measurement approaches used in obtaining the emission rate data and the assumptions used in the modeling to estimate emissions from engineering scenarios

  4. Visibility of St Lawrence belugas to aerial photography, estimated by direct observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael CS Kingsley

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The depleted population of belugas (Delphinapterus leucas inhabiting the St Lawrence estuary, Canada, was monitored by periodic photographic aerial surveys. In order to correct counts made on aerial survey film and to obtain an estimate of the true size of the population, the diving behaviour and the visibility from the air of these animals was studied. A Secchi-disk turbidity survey in the belugas’ summer range showed that water clarity varied between 1.5 m and 11.6 m. By studying aerial photographs of sheet-plastic models of belugas that had been sunk to different depths below the surface, we found that models of white adults could be seen down to about the same depth as a Secchi disk, but no deeper. Smaller models of dark-grey juveniles could only be seen down to about 50% of Secchi-disk depth. By observing groups of belugas from a hovering helicopter and recording their disappearances and re-appearances, it was found that they were visible for 44.3% of the time, and that an appropriate correction for single photographs would be to multiply the photographic count by about 222% (SE 20%. For surveys in which there was overlap between adjacent frames, the estimated correction would be 209% (SE 16%. This correction factor was slightly conservative and gave an estimate of the true size of the population, based on a single survey, of 1,202 belugas (SE 189 in 1997. An estimate for 1997 based on smoothing 5 surveys 1988–1997 was 1,238 (SE 119.

  5. Direct estimation of elements of quantum states algebra and entanglement detection via linear contractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horodecki, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    Possibility of some nonlinear-like operations in quantum mechanics are studied. Some general formula for real linear maps are derived. With the results we show how to perform physically separability tests based on any linear contraction (on product states) that either is real or Hermitian. We also show how to estimate either product or linear combinations of quantum states without knowledge about the states themselves. This can be viewed as a sort of quantum computing on quantum states algebra

  6. Estimating the Direct Medical Economic Burden of Health Care-Associated Infections in Public Tertiary Hospitals in Hubei Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Liu, Xinliang; Cui, Dan; Wang, Quan; Mao, Zongfu; Fang, Liang; Zhang, Furong; Yang, Ping; Wu, Huiling; Ren, Nili; He, Jianyun; Sun, Jing

    2017-07-01

    This study estimated the attributable direct medical economic burden of health care-associated infections (HAIs) in China. Data were extracted from hospitals' information systems. Inpatient cases with HAIs and non-HAIs were grouped by the propensity score matching (PSM) method. Attributable hospitalization expenditures and length of hospital stay were measured to estimate the direct medical economic burden of HAIs. STATA 12.0 was used to conduct descriptive analysis, bivariate χ 2 test, paired Z test, PSM ( r = 0.25σ, nearest neighbor 1:1 matching), and logistic regress analysis. The statistically significant level was set at .05. The HAIs group had statistically significant higher expenditures and longer hospitalization stay than the non-HAIs group during 2013 to 2015 ( P economic burden of HAIs calls for more effective HAI surveillance and better control with appropriate incentives.

  7. Direct fitness of group living mammals varies with breeding strategy, climate and fitness estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebensperger, Luis A; Rivera, Daniela S; Hayes, Loren D

    2012-09-01

    1. Understanding how variation in fitness relates to variation in group living remains critical to determine whether this major aspect of social behaviour is currently adaptive. 2. Available evidence in social mammals aimed to examine this issue remains controversial. Studies show positive (i.e. potentially adaptive), neutral or even negative fitness effects of group living. 3. Attempts to explain this variation rely on intrinsic and extrinsic factors to social groups. Thus, relatively more positive fitness effects are predicted in singularly breeding as opposed to plural breeding species. Fitness effects of sociality in turn may depend on ecological conditions (i.e. extrinsic factors) that influence associated benefits and costs. 4. We used meta-analytic tools to review how breeding strategy or ecological conditions influence the effect size associated with direct fitness-sociality relationships reported in the mammalian literature. Additionally, we determined how taxonomic affiliation of species studied, different fitness and sociality measures used, and major climatic conditions of study sites explained any variation in direct fitness effect size. 5. We found group living had modest, yet positive effects on direct fitness. This generally adaptive scenario was contingent not only upon breeding strategy and climate of study sites, but also on fitness measures examined. Thus, positive and significant effects characterized singular as opposed to plural breeding strategies. 6. We found more positive fitness effects on studies conducted in tropical as opposed to temperate or arid climates. More positive and significant effects were noted on studies that relied on group fecundity, male fecundity and offspring survival as measures of fitness. 7. To conclude, direct fitness consequences of mammalian group living are driven by interspecific differences in breeding strategy and climate conditions. Other factors not examined in this study, namely individual variation in

  8. Infrasound array criteria for automatic detection and front velocity estimation of snow avalanches: towards a real-time early-warning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, E.; Ripepe, M.; Ulivieri, G.; Kogelnig, A.

    2015-11-01

    Avalanche risk management is strongly related to the ability to identify and timely report the occurrence of snow avalanches. Infrasound has been applied to avalanche research and monitoring for the last 20 years but it never turned into an operational tool to identify clear signals related to avalanches. We present here a method based on the analysis of infrasound signals recorded by a small aperture array in Ischgl (Austria), which provides a significant improvement to overcome this limit. The method is based on array-derived wave parameters, such as back azimuth and apparent velocity. The method defines threshold criteria for automatic avalanche identification by considering avalanches as a moving source of infrasound. We validate the efficiency of the automatic infrasound detection with continuous observations with Doppler radar and we show how the velocity of a snow avalanche in any given path around the array can be efficiently derived. Our results indicate that a proper infrasound array analysis allows a robust, real-time, remote detection of snow avalanches that is able to provide the number and the time of occurrence of snow avalanches occurring all around the array, which represent key information for a proper validation of avalanche forecast models and risk management in a given area.

  9. Continent-Wide Estimates of Antarctic Strain Rates from Landsat 8-Derived Velocity Grids and Their Application to Ice Shelf Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, K. E.; Scambos, T.; Anderson, R. S.; Rajaram, H.; Pope, A.; Haran, T.

    2017-12-01

    Strain rates are fundamental measures of ice flow used in a wide variety of glaciological applications including investigations of bed properties, calculations of basal mass balance on ice shelves, application to Glen's flow law, and many other studies. However, despite their extensive application, strain rates are calculated using widely varying methods and length scales, and the calculation details are often not specified. In this study, we compare the results of nominal and logarithmic strain-rate calculations based on a satellite-derived velocity field of the Antarctic ice sheet generated from Landsat 8 satellite data. Our comparison highlights the differences between the two commonly used approaches in the glaciological literature. We evaluate the errors introduced by each code and their impacts on the results. We also demonstrate the importance of choosing and specifying a length scale over which strain-rate calculations are made, which can have large local impacts on other derived quantities such as basal mass balance on ice shelves. We present strain-rate data products calculated using an approximate viscous length-scale with satellite observations of ice velocity for the Antarctic continent. Finally, we explore the applications of comprehensive strain-rate maps to future ice shelf studies, including investigations of ice fracture, calving patterns, and stability analyses.

  10. Canadian Estimate of Bird Mortality Due to Collisions and Direct Habitat Loss Associated with Wind Turbine Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ryan. Zimmerling

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We estimated impacts on birds from the development and operation of wind turbines in Canada considering both mortality due to collisions and loss of nesting habitat. We estimated collision mortality using data from carcass searches for 43 wind farms, incorporating correction factors for scavenger removal, searcher efficiency, and carcasses that fell beyond the area searched. On average, 8.2 ± 1.4 birds (95% C.I. were killed per turbine per year at these sites, although the numbers at individual wind farms varied from 0 - 26.9 birds per turbine per year. Based on 2955 installed turbines (the number installed in Canada by December 2011, an estimated 23,300 birds (95% C.I. 20,000 - 28,300 would be killed from collisions with turbines each year. We estimated direct habitat loss based on data from 32 wind farms in Canada. On average, total habitat loss per turbine was 1.23 ha, which corresponds to an estimated total habitat loss due to wind farms nationwide of 3635 ha. Based on published estimates of nest density, this could represent habitat for ~5700 nests of all species. Assuming nearby habitats are saturated, and 2 adults displaced per nest site, effects of direct habitat loss are less than that of direct mortality. Installed wind capacity is growing rapidly, and is predicted to increase more than 10-fold over the next 10-15 years, which could lead to direct mortality of approximately 233,000 birds / year, and displacement of 57,000 pairs. Despite concerns about the impacts of biased correction factors on the accuracy of mortality estimates, these values are likely much lower than those from collisions with some other anthropogenic sources such as windows, vehicles, or towers, or habitat loss due to many other forms of development. Species composition data suggest that < 0.2% of the population of any species is currently affected by mortality or displacement from wind turbine development. Therefore, population level impacts are unlikely

  11. Direct estimation of the oxygen requirements of Achromobacter xylosoxidans for aerobic degradation of monoaromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX) in a bioscrubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, David R; McLellan, P James; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2006-08-01

    The O2 requirements for biomass production and supplying maintenance energy demands during the degradation of both benzene and ethylbenzene by Achromobacter xylosoxidans Y234 were measured using a newly proposed technique involving a bioscrubber. Using this approach, relevant microbial parameter estimates were directly and simultaneously obtained via linear regression of pseudo steady-state data. For benzene and ethylbenzene, the biomass yield on O2, Y(X/O2), was estimated on a cell dry weight (CDW) basis as 1.96 +/- 0.25 mg CDW mgO2(-1) and 0.98 +/- 0.17 mg CDW mgO2(-1), while the specific rate of O2 consumption for maintenance, m(O2), was estimated as 0.041 +/- 0.008 mgO(2) mg CDW(-1) h(-1) and 0.053 +/- 0.022 mgO(2) mg CDW(-1) h(-1), respectively.

  12. Variation estimation of the averaged cross sections in the direct and adjoint fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da

    1995-01-01

    There are several applications of the perturbation theory to specifics problems of reactor physics, such as nonuniform fuel burnup, nonuniform poison accumulation and evaluations of Doppler effects on reactivity. The neutron fluxes obtained from the solutions of direct and adjoint diffusion equations, are used in these applications. In the adjoint diffusion equation has been used the group constants averaged in the energy-dependent direct neutron flux, that it is not theoretically consistent. In this paper it is presented a method to calculate the energy-dependent adjoint neutron flux, to obtain the average group-constant that will be used in the adjoint diffusion equation. The method is based on the solution of the adjoint neutron balance equations, that were derived for a two regions cell. (author). 5 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  13. Direct Emissivity Measurements of Painted Metals for Improved Temperature Estimation During Laser Damage Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    policy or position of the United States Air Force, the Department of Defense, or the United States Government . This material is declared a work of the...U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENP-14-M-43 DIRECT EMISSIVITY MEASUREMENTS OF PAINTED METALS FOR...Source The laser probe in use for this test is a Daylight Solutions Unicorn II quantum cascade laser operating at 3.77 µm. According to the laser

  14. Crack propagation direction in a mixed mode geometry estimated via multi-parameter fracture criteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malíková, L.; Veselý, V.; Seitl, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 89, AUG (2016), s. 99-107 ISSN 0142-1123. [International Conference on Characterisation of Crack Tip Fields /3./. Urbino, 20.04.2015-22.04.2015] Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Near-crack-tip fields * Mixed mode * Crack propagation direction * Multi-parameter fracture criteria * Finite element analysis Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.899, year: 2016

  15. Distributions of Mutational Effects and the Estimation of Directional Selection in Divergent Lineages of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Briton; Rutter, Matthew T; Fenster, Charles B; Symonds, V Vaughan; Ungerer, Mark C; Townsend, Jeffrey P

    2017-08-01

    Mutations are crucial to evolution, providing the ultimate source of variation on which natural selection acts. Due to their key role, the distribution of mutational effects on quantitative traits is a key component to any inference regarding historical selection on phenotypic traits. In this paper, we expand on a previously developed test for selection that could be conducted assuming a Gaussian mutation effect distribution by developing approaches to also incorporate any of a family of heavy-tailed Laplace distributions of mutational effects. We apply the test to detect directional natural selection on five traits along the divergence of Columbia and Landsberg lineages of Arabidopsis thaliana , constituting the first test for natural selection in any organism using quantitative trait locus and mutation accumulation data to quantify the intensity of directional selection on a phenotypic trait. We demonstrate that the results of the test for selection can depend on the mutation effect distribution specified. Using the distributions exhibiting the best fit to mutation accumulation data, we infer that natural directional selection caused divergence in the rosette diameter and trichome density traits of the Columbia and Landsberg lineages. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  16. Estimation of 1-D velocity models beneath strong-motion observation sites in the Kathmandu Valley using strong-motion records from moderate-sized earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijukchhen, Subeg M.; Takai, Nobuo; Shigefuji, Michiko; Ichiyanagi, Masayoshi; Sasatani, Tsutomu; Sugimura, Yokito

    2017-07-01

    The Himalayan collision zone experiences many seismic activities with large earthquakes occurring at certain time intervals. The damming of the proto-Bagmati River as a result of rapid mountain-building processes created a lake in the Kathmandu Valley that eventually dried out, leaving thick unconsolidated lacustrine deposits. Previous studies have shown that the sediments are 600 m thick in the center. A location in a seismically active region, and the possible amplification of seismic waves due to thick sediments, have made Kathmandu Valley seismically vulnerable. It has suffered devastation due to earthquakes several times in the past. The development of the Kathmandu Valley into the largest urban agglomerate in Nepal has exposed a large population to seismic hazards. This vulnerability was apparent during the Gorkha Earthquake (Mw7.8) on April 25, 2015, when the main shock and ensuing aftershocks claimed more than 1700 lives and nearly 13% of buildings inside the valley were completely damaged. Preparing safe and up-to-date building codes to reduce seismic risk requires a thorough study of ground motion amplification. Characterizing subsurface velocity structure is a step toward achieving that goal. We used the records from an array of strong-motion accelerometers installed by Hokkaido University and Tribhuvan University to construct 1-D velocity models of station sites by forward modeling of low-frequency S-waves. Filtered records (0.1-0.5 Hz) from one of the accelerometers installed at a rock site during a moderate-sized (mb4.9) earthquake on August 30, 2013, and three moderate-sized (Mw5.1, Mw5.1, and Mw5.5) aftershocks of the 2015 Gorkha Earthquake were used as input motion for modeling of low-frequency S-waves. We consulted available geological maps, cross-sections, and borehole data as the basis for initial models for the sediment sites. This study shows that the basin has an undulating topography and sediment sites have deposits of varying thicknesses

  17. Theory, Design, and Measurement of Novel Uniform Circular Antenna Arrays for Direction of Arrival Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by the Minister of National Defence, 2015 c⃝ Sa Majesté la Reine (en droit du Canada), telle que réprésentée... publication in [1]. Sections 5 and 6 describe the design and fabrication of the three novel UCAs for DOA estimation and provide simulation results. Section...DoA resolution limits in MIMO channel sounding,” in 2004 IEEE International Symposium On Antennas and Propagation and USNC/URSI National Radio

  18. Measuring surface flow velocity with smartphones: potential for citizen observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijs, Steven V.; Chen, Zichong; Brauchli, Tristan; Huwald, Hendrik

    2014-05-01

    Stream flow velocity is an important variable for discharge estimation and research on sediment dynamics. Given the influence of the latter on rating curves (stage-discharge relations), and the relative scarcity of direct streamflow measurements, surface velocity measurements can offer important information for, e.g., flood warning, hydropower, and hydrological science and engineering in general. With the growing amount of sensing and computing power in the hands of more outdoorsy individuals, and the advances in image processing techniques, there is now a tremendous potential to obtain hydrologically relevant data from motivated citizens. This is the main focus of the interdisciplinary "WeSenseIt" project, a citizen observatory of water. In this subproject, we investigate the feasibility of stream flow surface velocity measurements from movie clips taken by (smartphone-) cameras. First results from movie-clip derived velocity information will be shown and compared to reference measurements.

  19. Estimates of oceanic surface wind speed and direction using orthogonal beam scatterometer measurements and comparison of recent sea scattering theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.; Dome, G. J.; Birrer, I. J.

    1978-01-01

    The wind direction properties of radar backscatter from the sea were empirically modelled using a cosine Fourier series through the 4th harmonic in wind direction (referenced to upwind). A comparison with 1975 JONSWAP (Joint North Sea Wave Project) scatterometer data, at incidence angles of 40 and 65, indicates that effects to third and fourth harmonics are negligible. Another important result is that the Fourier coefficients through the second harmonic are related to wind speed by a power law expression. A technique is also proposed to estimate the wind speed and direction over the ocean from two orthogonal scattering measurements. A comparison between two different types of sea scatter theories, one type presented by the work of Wright and the other by that of Chan and Fung, was made with recent scatterometer measurements. It demonstrates that a complete scattering model must include some provisions for the anisotropic characteristics of the sea scatter, and use a sea spectrum which depends upon wind speed.

  20. Detailed site effect estimation in the presence of strong velocity reversals within a small-aperture strong-motion array in Iceland

    KAUST Repository

    Rahpeyma, Sahar

    2016-08-11

    The rock site characterization for earthquake engineering applications in Iceland is common due to the easily exposed older bedrock and more recent volcanic lava rock. The corresponding site amplification is generally assumed to be low but has not been comprehensively quantified, especially for volcanic rock. The earthquake strong-motion of the Mw6.3 Ölfus earthquake on 29 May 2008 and 1705 of its aftershocks recorded on the first small-aperture strong-motion array (ICEARRAY I) in Iceland showed consistent and significant variations in ground motion amplitudes over short distances (<2 km) in an urban area located mostly on lava rock. This study analyses the aftershock recordings to quantify the local site effects using the Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and Standard Spectral Ratio (SSR) methods. Additionally, microseismic data has been collected at array stations and analyzed using the HVSR method. The results between the methods are consistent and show that while the amplification levels remain relatively low, the predominant frequency varies systematically between stations and is found to correlate with the geological units. In particular, for stations on lava rock the underlying geologic structure is characterized by repeated lava-soil stratigraphy characterized by reversals in the shear wave velocity with depth. As a result, standard modeling of HVSR using vertically incident body waves does not apply. Instead, modeling the soil structure as a two-degree-of-freedom dynamic system is found to capture the observed predominant frequencies of site amplification. The results have important implications for earthquake resistant design of structures on rock sites characterized by velocity reversals. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  1. Simple method for direct crown base height estimation of individual conifer trees using airborne LiDAR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Laiping; Zhai, Qiuping; Su, Yanjun; Ma, Qin; Kelly, Maggi; Guo, Qinghua

    2018-05-14

    Crown base height (CBH) is an essential tree biophysical parameter for many applications in forest management, forest fuel treatment, wildfire modeling, ecosystem modeling and global climate change studies. Accurate and automatic estimation of CBH for individual trees is still a challenging task. Airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) provides reliable and promising data for estimating CBH. Various methods have been developed to calculate CBH indirectly using regression-based means from airborne LiDAR data and field measurements. However, little attention has been paid to directly calculate CBH at the individual tree scale in mixed-species forests without field measurements. In this study, we propose a new method for directly estimating individual-tree CBH from airborne LiDAR data. Our method involves two main strategies: 1) removing noise and understory vegetation for each tree; and 2) estimating CBH by generating percentile ranking profile for each tree and using a spline curve to identify its inflection points. These two strategies lend our method the advantages of no requirement of field measurements and being efficient and effective in mixed-species forests. The proposed method was applied to a mixed conifer forest in the Sierra Nevada, California and was validated by field measurements. The results showed that our method can directly estimate CBH at individual tree level with a root-mean-squared error of 1.62 m, a coefficient of determination of 0.88 and a relative bias of 3.36%. Furthermore, we systematically analyzed the accuracies among different height groups and tree species by comparing with field measurements. Our results implied that taller trees had relatively higher uncertainties than shorter trees. Our findings also show that the accuracy for CBH estimation was the highest for black oak trees, with an RMSE of 0.52 m. The conifer species results were also good with uniformly high R 2 ranging from 0.82 to 0.93. In general, our method has

  2. Direct Estimate of Cocoa Powder Content in Cakes by Colorimetry and Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dóka, O.; Bicanic, D.; Kulcsár, R.

    2014-12-01

    Cocoa is a very important ingredient in the food industry and largely consumed worldwide. In this investigation, colorimetry and photoacoustic spectroscopy were used to directly assess the content of cocoa powder in cakes; both methods provided satisfactory results. The calibration curve was constructed using a series of home-made cakes containing varying amount of cocoa powder. Then, at a later stage, the same calibration curve was used to quantify the cocoa content of several commercially available cakes. For self-made cakes, the relationship between the PAS signal and the content of cocoa powder was linear while a quadratic dependence was obtained for the colorimetric index (brightness) and total color difference ().

  3. Approaches for the direct estimation of lambda, and demographic contributions to lambda, using capture-recapture data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, James D.; Hines, James E.

    2002-01-01

    We first consider the estimation of the finite rate of population increase or population growth rate, u i , using capture-recapture data from open populations. We review estimation and modelling of u i under three main approaches to modelling openpopulation data: the classic approach of Jolly (1965) and Seber (1965), the superpopulation approach of Crosbie & Manly (1985) and Schwarz & Arnason (1996), and the temporal symmetry approach of Pradel (1996). Next, we consider the contributions of different demographic components to u i using a probabilistic approach based on the composition of the population at time i + 1 (Nichols et al., 2000b). The parameters of interest are identical to the seniority parameters, n i , of Pradel (1996). We review estimation of n i under the classic, superpopulation, and temporal symmetry approaches. We then compare these direct estimation approaches for u i and n i with analogues computed using projection matrix asymptotics. We also discuss various extensions of the estimation approaches to multistate applications and to joint likelihoods involving multiple data types.

  4. Balance velocities of the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joughin, I.; Fahnestock, M.; Ekholm, Simon

    1997-01-01

    We present a map of balance velocities for the Greenland ice sheet. The resolution of the underlying DEM, which was derived primarily from radar altimetery data, yields far greater detail than earlier balance velocity estimates for Greenland. The velocity contours reveal in striking detail......, the balance map is useful for ice-sheet modelling, mass balance studies, and field planning....

  5. Illumination normalization of face image based on illuminant direction estimation and improved Retinex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jizheng; Mao, Xia; Chen, Lijiang; Xue, Yuli; Rovetta, Alberto; Caleanu, Catalin-Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Illumination normalization of face image for face recognition and facial expression recognition is one of the most frequent and difficult problems in image processing. In order to obtain a face image with normal illumination, our method firstly divides the input face image into sixteen local regions and calculates the edge level percentage in each of them. Secondly, three local regions, which meet the requirements of lower complexity and larger average gray value, are selected to calculate the final illuminant direction according to the error function between the measured intensity and the calculated intensity, and the constraint function for an infinite light source model. After knowing the final illuminant direction of the input face image, the Retinex algorithm is improved from two aspects: (1) we optimize the surround function; (2) we intercept the values in both ends of histogram of face image, determine the range of gray levels, and stretch the range of gray levels into the dynamic range of display device. Finally, we achieve illumination normalization and get the final face image. Unlike previous illumination normalization approaches, the method proposed in this paper does not require any training step or any knowledge of 3D face and reflective surface model. The experimental results using extended Yale face database B and CMU-PIE show that our method achieves better normalization effect comparing with the existing techniques.

  6. Illumination normalization of face image based on illuminant direction estimation and improved Retinex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jizheng Yi

    Full Text Available Illumination normalization of face image for face recognition and facial expression recognition is one of the most frequent and difficult problems in image processing. In order to obtain a face image with normal illumination, our method firstly divides the input face image into sixteen local regions and calculates the edge level percentage in each of them. Secondly, three local regions, which meet the requirements of lower complexity and larger average gray value, are selected to calculate the final illuminant direction according to the error function between the measured intensity and the calculated intensity, and the constraint function for an infinite light source model. After knowing the final illuminant direction of the input face image, the Retinex algorithm is improved from two aspects: (1 we optimize the surround function; (2 we intercept the values in both ends of histogram of face image, determine the range of gray levels, and stretch the range of gray levels into the dynamic range of display device. Finally, we achieve illumination normalization and get the final face image. Unlike previous illumination normalization approaches, the method proposed in this paper does not require any training step or any knowledge of 3D face and reflective surface model. The experimental results using extended Yale face database B and CMU-PIE show that our method achieves better normalization effect comparing with the existing techniques.

  7. The effect of clinical performance on the survival estimates of direct restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyou-Li Kim

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives In most retrospective studies, the clinical performance of restorations had not been considered in survival analysis. This study investigated the effect of including the clinically unacceptable cases according to modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS criteria into the failed data on the survival analysis of direct restorations as to the longevity and prognostic variables. Materials and Methods Nine hundred and sixty-seven direct restorations were evaluated. The data of 204 retreated restorations were collected from the records, and clinical performance of 763 restorations in function was evaluated according to modified USPHS criteria by two observers. The longevity and prognostic variables of the restorations were compared with a factor of involving clinically unacceptable cases into the failures using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard model. Results The median survival times of amalgam, composite resin and glass ionomer were 11.8, 11.0 and 6.8 years, respectively. Glass ionomer showed significantly lower longevity than composite resin and amalgam. When clinically unacceptable restorations were included into the failure, the median survival times of them decreased to 8.9, 9.7 and 6.4 years, respectively. Conclusions After considering the clinical performance, composite resin was the only material that showed a difference in the longevity (p < 0.05 and the significantly higher relative risk of student group than professor group disappeared in operator groups. Even in the design of retrospective study, clinical evaluation needs to be included.

  8. Evaluation of Three Parametric Models for Estimating Directional Thermal Radiation from Simulation, Airborne, and Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyang Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available An appropriate model to correct thermal radiation anisotropy is important for the wide applications of land surface temperature (LST. This paper evaluated the performance of three published directional thermal radiation models—the Roujean–Lagouarde (RL model, the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF model, and the Vinnikov model—at canopy and pixel scale using simulation, airborne, and satellite data. The results at canopy scale showed that (1 the three models could describe directional anisotropy well and the Vinnikov model performed the best, especially for erectophile canopy or low leaf area index (LAI; (2 the three models reached the highest fitting accuracy when the LAI varied from 1 to 2; and (3 the capabilities of the three models were all restricted by the hotspot effect, plant height, plant spacing, and three-dimensional structure. The analysis at pixel scale indicated a consistent result that the three models presented a stable effect both on verification and validation, but the Vinnikov model had the best ability in the erectophile canopy (savannas and grassland and low LAI (barren or sparsely vegetated areas. Therefore, the Vinnikov model was calibrated for different land cover types to instruct the angular correction of LST. Validation with the Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD-measured LST demonstrated that the root mean square (RMSE of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS LST product could be decreased by 0.89 K after angular correction. In addition, the corrected LST showed better spatial uniformity and higher angular correlation.

  9. A rapid reliability estimation method for directed acyclic lifeline networks with statistically dependent components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Won-Hee; Kliese, Alyce

    2014-01-01

    Lifeline networks, such as transportation, water supply, sewers, telecommunications, and electrical and gas networks, are essential elements for the economic and societal functions of urban areas, but their components are highly susceptible to natural or man-made hazards. In this context, it is essential to provide effective pre-disaster hazard mitigation strategies and prompt post-disaster risk management efforts based on rapid system reliability assessment. This paper proposes a rapid reliability estimation method for node-pair connectivity analysis of lifeline networks especially when the network components are statistically correlated. Recursive procedures are proposed to compound all network nodes until they become a single super node representing the connectivity between the origin and destination nodes. The proposed method is applied to numerical network examples and benchmark interconnected power and water networks in Memphis, Shelby County. The connectivity analysis results show the proposed method's reasonable accuracy and remarkable efficiency as compared to the Monte Carlo simulations

  10. A simple, direct method for x-ray scatter estimation and correction in digital radiography and cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siewerdsen, J.H.; Daly, M.J.; Bakhtiar, B.

    2006-01-01

    X-ray scatter poses a significant limitation to image quality in cone-beam CT (CBCT), resulting in contrast reduction, image artifacts, and lack of CT number accuracy. We report the performance of a simple scatter correction method in which scatter fluence is estimated directly in each projection from pixel values near the edge of the detector behind the collimator leaves. The algorithm operates on the simple assumption that signal in the collimator shadow is attributable to x-ray scatter, and the 2D scatter fluence is estimated by interpolating between pixel values measured along the top and bottom edges of the detector behind the collimator leaves. The resulting scatter fluence estimate is subtracted from each projection to yield an estimate of the primary-only images for CBCT reconstruction. Performance was investigated in phantom experiments on an experimental CBCT benchtop, and the effect on image quality was demonstrated in patient images (head, abdomen, and pelvis sites) obtained on a preclinical system for CBCT-guided radiation therapy. The algorithm provides significant reduction in scatter artifacts without compromise in contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). For example, in a head phantom, cupping artifact was essentially eliminated, CT number accuracy was restored to within 3%, and CNR (breast-to-water) was improved by up to 50%. Similarly in a body phantom, cupping artifact was reduced by at least a factor of 2 without loss in CNR. Patient images demonstrate significantly increased uniformity, accuracy, and contrast, with an overall improvement in image quality in all sites investigated. Qualitative evaluation illustrates that soft-tissue structures that are otherwise undetectable are clearly delineated in scatter-corrected reconstructions. Since scatter is estimated directly in each projection, the algorithm is robust with respect to system geometry, patient size and heterogeneity, patient motion, etc. Operating without prior information, analytical modeling

  11. Multidisk neutron velocity selectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammouda, B.

    1992-01-01

    Helical multidisk velocity selectors used for neutron scattering applications have been analyzed and tested experimentally. Design and performance considerations are discussed along with simple explanation of the basic concept. A simple progression is used for the inter-disk spacing in the 'Rosta' design. Ray tracing computer investigations are presented in order to assess the 'coverage' (how many absorbing layers are stacked along the path of 'wrong' wavelength neutrons) and the relative number of neutrons absorbed in each disk (and therefore the relative amount of gamma radiation emitted from each disk). We discuss whether a multidisk velocity selector can be operated in the 'reverse' configuration (i.e. the selector is turned by 180 0 around a vertical axis with the rotor spun in the reverse direction). Experimental tests and calibration of a multidisk selector are reported together with evidence that a multidisk selector can be operated in the 'reverse' configuration. (orig.)

  12. Accurate Recovery of H i Velocity Dispersion from Radio Interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianjamasimanana, R. [Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Blok, W. J. G. de [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Heald, George H., E-mail: roger@mpia.de, E-mail: blok@astron.nl, E-mail: George.Heald@csiro.au [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2017-05-01

    Gas velocity dispersion measures the amount of disordered motion of a rotating disk. Accurate estimates of this parameter are of the utmost importance because the parameter is directly linked to disk stability and star formation. A global measure of the gas velocity dispersion can be inferred from the width of the atomic hydrogen (H i) 21 cm line. We explore how several systematic effects involved in the production of H i cubes affect the estimate of H i velocity dispersion. We do so by comparing the H i velocity dispersion derived from different types of data cubes provided by The H i Nearby Galaxy Survey. We find that residual-scaled cubes best recover the H i velocity dispersion, independent of the weighting scheme used and for a large range of signal-to-noise ratio. For H i observations, where the dirty beam is substantially different from a Gaussian, the velocity dispersion values are overestimated unless the cubes are cleaned close to (e.g., ∼1.5 times) the noise level.

  13. Oxygen transport properties estimation by classical trajectory–direct simulation Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, Domenico, E-mail: domenico.bruno@cnr.it [Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche– Via G. Amendola 122, 70125 Bari (Italy); Frezzotti, Aldo, E-mail: aldo.frezzotti@polimi.it; Ghiroldi, Gian Pietro, E-mail: gpghiro@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Aerospaziali, Politecnico di Milano–Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Coupling direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations with classical trajectory calculations is a powerful tool to improve predictive capabilities of computational dilute gas dynamics. The considerable increase in computational effort outlined in early applications of the method can be compensated by running simulations on massively parallel computers. In particular, Graphics Processing Unit acceleration has been found quite effective in reducing computing time of classical trajectory (CT)-DSMC simulations. The aim of the present work is to study dilute molecular oxygen flows by modeling binary collisions, in the rigid rotor approximation, through an accurate Potential Energy Surface (PES), obtained by molecular beams scattering. The PES accuracy is assessed by calculating molecular oxygen transport properties by different equilibrium and non-equilibrium CT-DSMC based simulations that provide close values of the transport properties. Comparisons with available experimental data are presented and discussed in the temperature range 300–900 K, where vibrational degrees of freedom are expected to play a limited (but not always negligible) role.

  14. ABOUT RISK PROCESS ESTIMATION TECHNIQUES EMPLOYED BY A VIRTUAL ORGANIZATION WHICH IS DIRECTED TOWARDS THE INSURANCE BUSINESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Covrig Mihaela

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In a virtual organization directed on the insurance business, the estimations of the risk process and of the ruin probability are important concerns: for researchers, at the theoretical level, and for the management of the company, as these influence the insurer strategy. We consider the evolution over an extended period of time of the insurer surplus process. In this paper, we present some methods for the estimation of the ruin probability and for the evaluation of a reserve fund. We discuss the ruin probability with respect to: the parameters of the individual claim distribution, the load factor of premiums and the intensity parameter of the number of claims process. We analyze the model in which the premiums are computed according to the mean value principle. Also, we attempt the case when the initial capital is proportional to the expected value of the individual claim. We give numerical illustration.

  15. Experiment for estimating phase velocity and power fraction of Love wave from three component microtremor array observation in Morioka area; Moriokashiiki deno bido no sanseibun array kansoku ni yoru love ha no iso sokudo oyobi power hi suitei no kokoromi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, H; Yakuwa, A; Saito, T [Iwate University, Iwate (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-10-22

    Three component microtremor array observations were carried out in two locations in the city of Morioka for an attempt of estimating phase velocity and power fraction of Love wave by applying the expanded three component spatial self-correlation method. The microtremors were observed by using a seismograph with a natural period of one second. The arrays were so arranged as to form an equilateral triangle consisted of seven points. The maximum radii were 100 m, 50 m, 25 m and 12.5 m for vertical movements, and 100 m and 30 m for horizontal movements at the Iwate University, and 80 m, 40 m, 20 m and 10 m for vertical movements and 90 m for horizontal movements at the Morioka Technical Highschool. The analysis has used three sections, each with relatively steady state of about 40 seconds as selected from records of observations for about 30 minutes. The result of the discussions revealed that it is possible to derive phase velocity of not only Rayleigh waves but also Love waves by applying the expanded spatial self-correlation method to the observation record. Thus, estimation of underground structures with higher accuracy has become possible by using simultaneously the Rayleigh waves and Love waves. 3 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. How to measure propagation velocity in cardiac tissue: a simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre C. Linnenbank

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available To estimate conduction velocities from activation times in myocardial tissue, the average vector method computes all the local activation directions and velocities from local activation times and estimates the fastest and slowest propagation speed from these local values. The single vector method uses areas of apparent uniform elliptical spread of activation and chooses a single vector for the estimated longitudinal velocity and one for the transversal. A simulation study was performed to estimate the influence of grid size, anisotropy, and vector angle bin size. The results indicate that the average vector method can best be used if the grid- or bin-size is large, although systematic errors occur. The single vector method performs better, but requires human intervention for the definition of fiber direction. The average vector method can be automated.

  17. An estimation method of the direct benefit of a waterlogging control project applicable to the changing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengmei, L.; Guanghua, Q.; Zishen, C.

    2015-05-01

    The direct benefit of a waterlogging control project is reflected by the reduction or avoidance of waterlogging loss. Before and after the construction of a waterlogging control project, the disaster-inducing environment in the waterlogging-prone zone is generally different. In addition, the category, quantity and spatial distribution of the disaster-bearing bodies are also changed more or less. Therefore, under the changing environment, the direct benefit of a waterlogging control project should be the reduction of waterlogging losses compared to conditions with no control project. Moreover, the waterlogging losses with or without the project should be the mathematical expectations of the waterlogging losses when rainstorms of all frequencies meet various water levels in the drainage-accepting zone. So an estimation model of the direct benefit of waterlogging control is proposed. Firstly, on the basis of a Copula function, the joint distribution of the rainstorms and the water levels are established, so as to obtain their joint probability density function. Secondly, according to the two-dimensional joint probability density distribution, the dimensional domain of integration is determined, which is then divided into small domains so as to calculate the probability for each of the small domains and the difference between the average waterlogging loss with and without a waterlogging control project, called the regional benefit of waterlogging control project, under the condition that rainstorms in the waterlogging-prone zone meet the water level in the drainage-accepting zone. Finally, it calculates the weighted mean of the project benefit of all small domains, with probability as the weight, and gets the benefit of the waterlogging control project. Taking the estimation of benefit of a waterlogging control project in Yangshan County, Guangdong Province, as an example, the paper briefly explains the procedures in waterlogging control project benefit estimation. The

  18. Estimation of femoral bone density from trabecular direct wave and cortical guided wave ultrasound velocities measured at the proximal femur in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkmann, Reinhard; Dencks, Stefanie; Bremer, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    but not soft tissue SOS. Coefficient of determination, percentage residual error (RMSE) and level of significance (p) were R(2)=0.51, RMSE=12.6%, p2)=0.53, RMSE=12.3%, p... the correlation to R(2)=0.69, RMSE=10.4%, p

  19. Preliminary inter-model comparison of the Agulhas current with direct range doppler velocity estimates from Envisat's Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Backeberg, Bjorn C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available in this study. areas of interest, such as the thermocline and bottom boundary layers. The terrain following coordinates avoid spurious effects associated with discontinuous (step-wise) representation of bathymetry. The ROMS....6 weaker than observed from ASAR. Furthermore, ROMS seems to be superior over HYCOM at representing the topographic stearing effect of the Agulhas Current, especially in the southern region. An assessment of the vertical structure...

  20. Bayesian estimation of direct and correlated responses to selection on linear or ratio expressions of feed efficiency in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirali, Mahmoud; Varley, Patrick Francis; Jensen, Just

    2018-01-01

    meat percentage (LMP) along with the derived traits of RFI and FCR; and (3) deriving Bayesian estimates of direct and correlated responses to selection on RFI, FCR, ADG, ADFI, and LMP. Response to selection was defined as the difference in additive genetic mean of the selected top individuals, expected......, respectively. Selection against RFIG showed a direct response of − 0.16 kg/d and correlated responses of − 0.16 kg/kg for FCR and − 0.15 kg/d for ADFI, with no effect on other production traits. Selection against FCR resulted in a direct response of − 0.17 kg/kg and correlated responses of − 0.14 kg/d for RFIG......, − 0.18 kg/d for ADFI, and 0.98% for LMP. Conclusions: The Bayesian methodology developed here enables prediction of breeding values for FCR and RFI from a single multi-variate model. In addition, we derived posterior distributions of direct and correlated responses to selection. Genetic parameter...