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Sample records for direct cementitious waste

  1. Direct cementitious waste option study report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dafoe, R.E.; Losinski, S.J.

    1998-02-01

    A settlement agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho mandates that all high-level radioactive waste (HLW) now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a target data of 2035. This study investigates the direct grouting of all ICPP calcine (including the HLW dry calcine and those resulting from calcining sodium-bearing liquid waste currently residing in the ICPP storage tanks) as the treatment method to comply with the settlement agreement. This method involves grouting the calcined waste and casting the resulting hydroceramic grout into stainless steel canisters. These canisters will be stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) until they are sent to a national geologic repository. The operating period for grouting treatment will be from 2013 through 2032, and all the HLW will be treated and in interim storage by the end of 2032.

  2. Cementitious waste option scoping study report

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    Lee, A.E.; Taylor, D.D.

    1998-02-01

    A Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho mandates that all high-level radioactive waste (HLW) now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a target date of 2035. This study investigates the nonseparations Cementitious Waste Option (CWO) as a means to achieve this goal. Under this option all liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and existing HLW calcine would be recalcined with sucrose, grouted, canisterized, and interim stored as a mixed-HLW for eventual preparation and shipment off-Site for disposal. The CWO waste would be transported to a Greater Confinement Disposal Facility (GCDF) located in the southwestern desert of the US on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). All transport preparation, shipment, and disposal facility activities are beyond the scope of this study. CWO waste processing, packaging, and interim storage would occur over a 5-year period between 2013 and 2017. Waste transport and disposal would occur during the same time period.

  3. Obtaining cementitious material from municipal solid waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macías, A.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of the present study was to determine the viability of using incinerator ash and slag from municipal solid waste as a secondary source of cementitious materials. The combustion products used were taken from two types of Spanish MSW incinerators, one located at Valdemingómez, in Madrid, and the other in Melilla, with different incineration systems: one with fluidised bed combustion and other with mass burn waterwall. The effect of temperature (from 800 to 1,200 ºC on washed and unwashed incinerator residue was studied, in particular with regard to phase formation in washed products with a high NaCl and KCl content. The solid phases obtained were characterized by X-ray diffraction and BET-N2 specific surface procedures.El principal objetivo del trabajo ha sido determinar la viabilidad del uso de las cenizas y escorias procedentes de la incineración de residuos sólidos urbanos, como materia prima secundaria para la obtención de fases cementantes. Para ello se han empleado los residuos generados en dos tipos de incineradoras españolas de residuos sólidos urbanos: la incineradora de Valdemingómez y la incineradora de Melilla. Se ha estudiado la transformación de los residuos, sin tratamiento previo, en función de la temperatura de calentamiento (desde 800 ºC hasta 1.200 ºC, así como la influencia del lavado de los residuos con alto contenido en NaCl y KCl en la formación de fases obtenidas a las diferentes temperaturas de calcinación. Las fases obtenidas fueron caracterizadas por difracción de rayos X y área superficial por el método BET-N2.

  4. Cementitious Stabilization of Mixed Wastes with High Salt Loadings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, R.D.; Burgess, M.W.; Fedorov, V.V.; Downing, D.J.

    1999-04-01

    Salt loadings approaching 50 wt % were tolerated in cementitious waste forms that still met leach and strength criteria, addressing a Technology Deficiency of low salt loadings previously identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area. A statistical design quantified the effect of different stabilizing ingredients and salt loading on performance at lower loadings, allowing selection of the more effective ingredients for studying the higher salt loadings. In general, the final waste form needed to consist of 25 wt % of the dry stabilizing ingredients to meet the criteria used and 25 wt % water to form a workable paste, leaving 50 wt % for waste solids. The salt loading depends on the salt content of the waste solids but could be as high as 50 wt % if all the waste solids are salt.

  5. Secondary Waste Cementitious Waste Form Data Package for the Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, Kirk J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Serne, R Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Um, Wooyong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cozzi, Alex D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-05-16

    A review of the most up-to-date and relevant data currently available was conducted to develop a set of recommended values for use in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) performance assessment (PA) to model contaminant release from a cementitious waste form for aqueous wastes treated at the Hanford Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). This data package relies primarily upon recent data collected on Cast Stone formulations fabricated with simulants of low-activity waste (LAW) and liquid secondary wastes expected to be produced at Hanford. These data were supplemented, when necessary, with data developed for saltstone (a similar grout waste form used at the Savannah River Site). Work is currently underway to collect data on cementitious waste forms that are similar to Cast Stone and saltstone but are tailored to the characteristics of ETF-treated liquid secondary wastes. Recommended values for key parameters to conduct PA modeling of contaminant release from ETF-treated liquid waste are provided.

  6. Investigations on cementitious composites based on rubber particle waste additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucio Laun Nacif

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The amount of waste rubber has gradually increased over recent years because of over-growing use of rubber products. The disposal of waste rubber has caused serious environmental problems. The incorporation of recycled materials into cementitious composites is a feasible alternative that has gained ground in civil construction. The performance of such materials is much affected not only by the rubber addition, but also the particle size which has been controversially reported in the literature. In order to investigate the single effect of rubber particles into cement based materials, rubber cementitious composites were prepared with no silica particle additions. A full factorial design has been conducted to assess the influence of the rubber particle size (0.84/0.58 mm and 0.28/0.18 mm; mass fraction used (5, 15 and 30%; and water/cement ratio (0.35 and 0.50 on the physic-mechanical properties of the composites. The materials were characterized through apparent density, porosity, compressive strength, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity and microstructural analysis. The interactions of rubber particle size, rubber fraction and water/cement ratio affected significantly the density and compressive strength of the composites. The apparent porosity was influenced mainly by the rubber particle size. The flexural strength was affected by the main factors and the modulus of elasticity was affected by the interaction factors rubber particle size and fraction, and rubber fraction and w/c ratio.

  7. CEMENTITIOUS GROUT FOR CLOSING SRS HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS - #12315

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Burns, H.; Stefanko, D.

    2012-01-10

    In 1997, the first two United States Department of Energy (US DOE) high level waste tanks (Tanks 17-F and 20-F: Type IV, single shell tanks) were taken out of service (permanently closed) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In 2012, the DOE plans to remove from service two additional Savannah River Site (SRS) Type IV high-level waste tanks, Tanks 18-F and 19-F. These tanks were constructed in the late 1950's and received low-heat waste and do not contain cooling coils. Operational closure of Tanks 18-F and 19-F is intended to be consistent with the applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and will be performed in accordance with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The closure will physically stabilize two 4.92E+04 cubic meter (1.3 E+06 gallon) carbon steel tanks and isolate and stabilize any residual contaminants left in the tanks. The closure will also fill, physically stabilize and isolate ancillary equipment abandoned in the tanks. A Performance Assessment (PA) has been developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closure of the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) waste tanks. Next generation flowable, zero-bleed cementitious grouts were designed, tested, and specified for closing Tanks 18-F and 19-F and for filling the abandoned equipment. Fill requirements were developed for both the tank and equipment grouts. All grout formulations were required to be alkaline with a pH of 12.4 and chemically reduction potential (Eh) of -200 to -400 to stabilize selected potential contaminants of concern. This was achieved by including Portland cement and Grade 100 slag in the mixes, respectively. Ingredients and proportions of cementitious reagents were selected and adjusted, respectively, to support the mass placement strategy developed by

  8. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 8, introduction cementitious systems for Low-Level Waste immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J.F.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.; Mason, T.O.; Brough, A.

    1995-07-01

    This report presents details about cementitious systems for low-level waste immobilization. Topics discussed include: composition and properties of portland cement; hydration properties; microstructure of concrete; pozzolans; slags; zeolites; transport properties; and geological aspects of long-term durability of concrete.

  9. The Cementitious Barriers Partnership Experimental Programs and Software Advancing DOE’s Waste Disposal/Tank Closure Efforts – 15436

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Heather [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Flach, Greg [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, Frank [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Langton, Christine [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Brown, Kevin [Vanderbilt Univ./CRESP, Nashville, TN (United States); Kosson, David [Vanderbilt Univ./CRESP, Nashville, TN (United States); Samson, Eric [SIMCO Technologies, Inc. (United States); Mallick, Pramod [US DOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-01-27

    assessments, and Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews of commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) structures which are part of the overall US Energy Security program to extend the service life of NPPs. In addition, the CBP experimental programs have had a significant impact on the DOE complex by providing specific data unique to DOE sodium salt wastes at Hanford and SRS which are not readily available in the literature. Two recent experimental programs on cementitious phase characterization and on technetium (Tc) mobility have provided significant conclusions as follows: recent mineralogy characterization discussed in this paper illustrates that sodium salt waste form matrices are somewhat similar to but not the same as those found in blended cement matrices which to date have been used in long-term thermodynamic modeling and contaminant sequestration as a first approximation. Utilizing the CBP generated data in long-term performance predictions provides for a more defensible technical basis in performance evaluations. In addition, recent experimental studies related to technetium mobility indicate that conventional leaching protocols may not be conservative for direct disposal of Tc-containing waste forms in vadose zone environments. These results have the potential to influence the current Hanford supplemental waste treatment flow sheet and disposal conceptual design.

  10. Reuse of Woody Biomass Ash Waste in Cementitious Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Ukrainczyk, N.; Vrbos, N.; Koenders, E.A.B.

    2016-01-01

    There is an increased interest in the reuse of ash waste from biomass combustion, being a sustainable source of energy. This paper investigates the partial replacement of cement and sand in building materials with fly ash waste generated from combustion of woody biomass waste. The results show that the ash widens the particle size distribution of cement and has minerals complementary to portland cement, thus justifying its application as cement replacement, but with a relatively high amoun...

  11. Heat of Hydration of Low Activity Cementitious Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasol, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-23

    During the curing of secondary waste grout, the hydraulic materials in the dry mix react exothermally with the water in the secondary low-activity waste (LAW). The heat released, called the heat of hydration, can be measured using a TAM Air Isothermal Calorimeter. By holding temperature constant in the instrument, the heat of hydration during the curing process can be determined. This will provide information that can be used in the design of a waste solidification facility. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the heat of hydration and other physical properties are being collected on grout prepared using three simulants of liquid secondary waste generated at the Hanford Site. From this study it was found that both the simulant and dry mix each had an effect on the heat of hydration. It was also concluded that the higher the cement content in the dry materials mix, the greater the heat of hydration during the curing of grout.

  12. The solubility of nickel and its migration through the cementitious backfill of a geological disposal facility for nuclear waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipe-Sotelo, M; Hinchliff, J; Field, L P; Milodowski, A E; Holt, J D; Taylor, S E; Read, D

    2016-08-15

    This work describes the solubility of nickel under the alkaline conditions anticipated in the near field of a cementitious repository for intermediate level nuclear waste. The measured solubility of Ni in 95%-saturated Ca(OH)2 solution is similar to values obtained in water equilibrated with a bespoke cementitious backfill material, on the order of 5×10(-7)M. Solubility in 0.02M NaOH is one order of magnitude lower. For all solutions, the solubility limiting phase is Ni(OH)2; powder X-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy indicate that differences in crystallinity are the likely cause of the lower solubility observed in NaOH. The presence of cellulose degradation products causes an increase in the solubility of Ni by approximately one order of magnitude. The organic compounds significantly increase the rate of Ni transport under advective conditions and show measurable diffusive transport through intact monoliths of the cementitious backfill material.

  13. Utilization of Construction Waste Composite Powder Materials as Cementitious Materials in Small-Scale Prefabricated Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuizhen Xue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction and demolition wastes have increased rapidly due to the prosperity of infrastructure construction. For the sake of effectively reusing construction wastes, this paper studied the potential use of construction waste composite powder material (CWCPM as cementitious materials in small-scale prefabricated concretes. Three types of such concretes, namely, C20, C25, and C30, were selected to investigate the influences of CWCPM on their working performances, mechanical properties, and antipermeability and antifrost performances. Also the effects of CWCPM on the morphology, hydration products, and pore structure characteristics of the cement-based materials were analyzed. The results are encouraging. Although CWCPM slightly decreases the mechanical properties of the C20 concrete and the 7 d compressive strengths of the C25 and C30 concretes, the 28 d compressive strength and the 90 d flexural strength of the C25 and C30 concretes are improved when CWCPM has a dosage less than 30%; CWCPM improves the antipermeability and antifrost performances of the concretes due to its filling and pozzolanic effects; the best improvement is obtained at CWCPM dosage of 30%; CWCPM optimizes cement hydration products, refines concrete pore structure, and gives rise to reasonable pore size distribution, therefore significantly improving the durability of the concretes.

  14. DURABILITY OF GREEN CONCRETE WITH TERNARY CEMENTITIOUS SYSTEM CONTAINING RECYCLED AGGREGATE CONCRETE AND TIRE RUBBER WASTES

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    MAJID MATOUQ ASSAS

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available All over the world billions of tires are being discarded and buried representing a serious ecological threat. Up to now a small part is recycled and millions of tires are just stockpiled, landfilled or buried. This paper presents results about the properties and the durability of green concrete contains recycled concrete as a coarse aggregate with partial replacement of sand by tire rubber wastes for pavement use. Ternary cementious system, Silica fume, Fly ash and Cement Kiln Dust are used as partial replacement of cement by weight. Each one replaced 10% of cement weight to give a total replacement of 30%. The durability performance was assessed by means of water absorption, chloride ion permeability at 28 and 90 days, and resistance to sulphuric acid attack at 1, 7, 14 and 28 days. Also to the compression behaviors for the tested specimens at 7, 14, 28 and 90 days were detected. The results show the existence of ternary cementitious system, silica fly ash and Cement Kiln Dust minimizes the strength loss associated to the use of rubber waste. In this way, up to 10% rubber content and 30% ternary cementious system an adequate strength class value (30 MPa, as required for a wide range of common structural uses, can be reached both through natural aggregate concrete and recycled aggregate concrete. Results also show that, it is possible to use rubber waste up to 15% and still maintain a high resistance to acid attack. The mixes with 10%silica fume, 10% fly ash and 10% Cement Kiln Dust show a higher resistance to sulphuric acid attack than the reference mix independently of the rubber waste content. The mixes with rubber waste and ternary cementious system was a lower resistance to sulphuric acid attack than the reference mix.

  15. Long-term degradation (or improvement?) of cementitious grout/concrete for waste disposal at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepho, M.G. [Daniel B. Stephens & Associates, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    If grout and/or concrete barriers and containments are considered for long-term (500 yrs to 100,000 ) waste disposal, then long-term degradation of grout/cement materials (and others) need to be studied. Long-term degradations of a cementitious grout monolith (15.4mW x 10.4mH x 37.6mL) and its containment concrete shell and asphalt shell (each 1-m thick) were analyzed. The main degradation process of the concrete shell was believed to be fractures due to construction joints, shrinkage, thermal stress, settlement, and seismic events. A scenario with fractures was modeled (flow and transport model) for long-term risk performance (out to a million yrs). Even though the concrete/grout is expected to fracture, the concrete/grout chemistry, which has high Ph value, is very beneficial in causing calcite deposits from calcium in the water precipitating in the fractures. These calcite deposits will tend to plug the fracture and keep water from entering. The effectiveness of such plugging needs to be studied more. It`s possible that the plugged fractures are more impermeable than the original concrete/grout. The long-term performance of concrete/grout barriers will be determined by its chemistry, not its mechanical properties.

  16. INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM: SUMMARY REPORT ON THE PROPERTIES OF CEMENTITIOUS WASTE FORMS

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    Harbour, J

    2007-03-02

    This report provides a summary of the results on the properties of cementitious waste forms obtained as part of the International Program. In particular, this report focuses on the results of Task 4 of the Program that was initially entitled ''Improved Retention of Key Contaminants of Concern in Low Temperature Immobilized Waste Forms''. Task 4 was a joint program between Khlopin Radium Institute and the Savannah River National Laboratory. The task evolved during this period into a study of cementitious waste forms with an expanded scope that included heat of hydration and fate and transport modeling. This report provides the results for Task 4 of the International Program as of the end of FY06 at which time funding for Task 4 was discontinued due to the needs of higher priority tasks within the International Program. Consequently, some of the subtasks were only partially completed, but it was considered important to capture the results up to this point in time. Therefore, this report serves as the closeout report for Task 4. The degree of immobilization of Tc-99 within the Saltstone waste form was measured through monolithic and crushed grout leaching tests. An effective diffusion coefficient of 4.8 x 10{sup -12} (Leach Index of 11.4) was measured using the ANSI/ANS-16.1 protocol which is comparable with values obtained for tank closure grouts using a dilute salt solution. The leaching results show that, in the presence of concentrated salt solutions such as those that will be processed at the Saltstone Production Facility, blast furnace slag can effectively reduce pertechnetate to the immobile +4 oxidation state. Leaching tests were also initiated to determine the degree of immobilization of selenium in the Saltstone waste form. Results were obtained for the upper bound of projected selenium concentration ({approx}5 x 10{sup -3} M) in the salt solution that will be treated at Saltstone. The ANSI/ANS 16.1 leaching tests provided a value for the

  17. Photovoltaic's silica-rich waste sludge as supplementary cementitious material (SCM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quercia, G., E-mail: g.quercia@tue.nl [Materials innovation institute (M2i), Mekelweg 2, P.O. Box 5008, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Putten, J.J.G. van der [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Hüsken, G. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany); Brouwers, H.J.H. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    Waste sludge, a solid recovered from wastewater of photovoltaic-industries, composes of agglomerates of nano-particles like SiO{sub 2} and CaCO{sub 3}. This sludge deflocculates in aqueous solutions into nano-particles smaller than 1 μm. Thus, this sludge constitutes a potentially hazardous waste when it is improperly disposed. Due to its high content of amorphous SiO{sub 2}, this sludge has a potential use as supplementary cementitious material (SCM) in concrete. In this study the main properties of three different samples of photovoltaic's silica-rich waste sludge (nSS) were physically and chemically characterized. The characterization techniques included: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen physical adsorption isotherm (BET method), density by Helium pycnometry, particle size distribution determined by laser light scattering (LLS) and zeta-potential measurements by dynamic light scattering (DLS). In addition, a dispersability study was performed to design stable slurries to be used as liquid additives for the concrete production on site. The effects on the hydration kinetics of cement pastes by the incorporation of nSS in the designed slurries were determined using an isothermal calorimeter. A compressive strength test of standard mortars with 7% of cement replacement was performed to determine the pozzolanic activity of the waste nano-silica sludge. Finally, the hardened system was fully characterized to determine the phase composition. The results demonstrate that the nSS can be utilized as SCM to replace portion of cement in mortars, thereby decreasing the CO{sub 2} footprint and the environmental impact of concrete. -- Highlights: •Three different samples of PV nano-silica sludge (nSS) were fully characterized. •nSS is composed of agglomerates of nano-particles like SiO{sub 2} and CaCO{sub 3}. •Dispersability studies demonstrated that nSS agglomerates are broken to nano

  18. INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM: SUMMARY REPORT ON THE PROPERTIES OF CEMENTITIOUS WASTE FORMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harbour, J

    2007-03-02

    This report provides a summary of the results on the properties of cementitious waste forms obtained as part of the International Program. In particular, this report focuses on the results of Task 4 of the Program that was initially entitled ''Improved Retention of Key Contaminants of Concern in Low Temperature Immobilized Waste Forms''. Task 4 was a joint program between Khlopin Radium Institute and the Savannah River National Laboratory. The task evolved during this period into a study of cementitious waste forms with an expanded scope that included heat of hydration and fate and transport modeling. This report provides the results for Task 4 of the International Program as of the end of FY06 at which time funding for Task 4 was discontinued due to the needs of higher priority tasks within the International Program. Consequently, some of the subtasks were only partially completed, but it was considered important to capture the results up to this point in time. Therefore, this report serves as the closeout report for Task 4. The degree of immobilization of Tc-99 within the Saltstone waste form was measured through monolithic and crushed grout leaching tests. An effective diffusion coefficient of 4.8 x 10{sup -12} (Leach Index of 11.4) was measured using the ANSI/ANS-16.1 protocol which is comparable with values obtained for tank closure grouts using a dilute salt solution. The leaching results show that, in the presence of concentrated salt solutions such as those that will be processed at the Saltstone Production Facility, blast furnace slag can effectively reduce pertechnetate to the immobile +4 oxidation state. Leaching tests were also initiated to determine the degree of immobilization of selenium in the Saltstone waste form. Results were obtained for the upper bound of projected selenium concentration ({approx}5 x 10{sup -3} M) in the salt solution that will be treated at Saltstone. The ANSI/ANS 16.1 leaching tests provided a value for the

  19. Self-healing behavior of strain hardening cementitious composites incorporating local waste materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qian, S.; Zhou, J.; Rooij, M.R. de; Schlangen, E.; Ye, G.; Breugel, K. van

    2009-01-01

    The self-healing behavior of a series of pre-cracked fiber reinforced strain hardening cementitious composites incorporating blast furnace slag (BFS) and limestone powder (LP) with relatively high water/binder ratio is investigated in this paper, focusing on the recovery of its deflection capacity.

  20. Intended long term performances of cementitious engineered barriers for future storage and disposal facilities for radioactive wastes in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sociu F.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Considering the EU statements, Romania is engaged to endorse in the near future the IAEA relevant publications on geological repository (CNCANa, to update the Medium and Long Term National Strategy for Safe Management of Radioactive Waste and to approve the Road Map for Geological Repository Development. Currently, for example, spent fuel is wet stored for 6 years and after this period it is transported to dry storage in MACSTOR-200 (a concrete monolithic module where it is intended to remain at least 50 years. The present situation for radioactive waste management in Romania is reviewed in the present paper. Focus will be done on existent disposal facilities but, also, on future facilities planned for storage / disposal of radioactive wastes. Considering specific data for Romanian radioactive waste inventory, authors are reviewing the advance in the radioactive waste management in Romania considering its particularities. The team tries to highlight the expected limitations and unknown data related with cementitious engineered barriers that has to be faced in the near future incase of interim storage or for the upcoming long periods of disposal.

  1. Intended long term performances of cementitious engineered barriers for future storage and disposal facilities for radioactive wastes in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fako, R.; Barariu, Gh.; Toma, R.; Georgescu, R.; Sociu, F.

    2013-07-01

    Considering the EU statements, Romania is engaged to endorse in the near future the IAEA relevant publications on geological repository (CNCANa), to update the Medium and Long Term National Strategy for Safe Management of Radioactive Waste and to approve the Road Map for Geological Repository Development. Currently, for example, spent fuel is wet stored for 6 years and after this period it is transported to dry storage in MACSTOR-200 (a concrete monolithic module) where it is intended to remain at least 50 years. The present situation for radioactive waste management in Romania is reviewed in the present paper. Focus will be done on existent disposal facilities but, also, on future facilities planned for storage / disposal of radioactive wastes. Considering specific data for Romanian radioactive waste inventory, authors are reviewing the advance in the radioactive waste management in Romania considering its particularities. The team tries to highlight the expected limitations and unknown data related with cementitious engineered barriers that has to be faced in the near future incase of interim storage or for the upcoming long periods of disposal.

  2. DEMONSTRATION OF LEACHXS/ORCHESTRA CAPABILITIES BY SIMULATING CONSTITUENT RELEASE FROM A CEMENTITIOUS WASTE FORM IN A REINFORCED CONCRETE VAULT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Meeussen, J.; Sloot, H.

    2010-03-31

    The objective of the work described in this report is to demonstrate the capabilities of the current version of LeachXS{trademark}/ORCHESTRA for simulating chemical behavior and constituent release processes in a range of applications that are relevant to the CBP. This report illustrates the use of LeachXS{trademark}/ORCHESTRA for the following applications: (1) Comparing model and experimental results for leaching tests for a range of cementitious materials including cement mortars, grout, stabilized waste, and concrete. The leaching test data includes liquid-solid partitioning as a function of pH and release rates based on laboratory column, monolith, and field testing. (2) Modeling chemical speciation of constituents in cementitious materials, including liquid-solid partitioning and release rates. (3) Evaluating uncertainty in model predictions based on uncertainty in underlying composition, thermodynamic, and transport characteristics. (4) Generating predominance diagrams to evaluate predicted chemical changes as a result of material aging using the example of exposure to atmospheric conditions. (5) Modeling coupled geochemical speciation and diffusion in a three layer system consisting of a layer of Saltstone, a concrete barrier, and a layer of soil in contact with air. The simulations show developing concentration fronts over a time period of 1000 years. (6) Modeling sulfate attack and cracking due to ettringite formation. A detailed example for this case is provided in a separate article by the authors (Sarkar et al. 2010). Finally, based on the computed results, the sensitive input parameters for this type of modeling are identified and discussed. The chemical speciation behavior of substances is calculated for a batch system and also in combination with transport and within a three layer system. This includes release from a barrier to the surrounding soil as a function of time. As input for the simulations, the physical and chemical properties of the

  3. Guidelines for assessing the valorization of a waste into cementitious material: dredged sediment for production of self compacting concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozas, F.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents some guidelines in order to analyse the feasibility of including a waste material in the production of a structural cementitious material. First of all, the compatibility of the waste with a cementitious material has to be assured; then, if necessary, a decontamination step will be carried out; after, decision on the type of material has to be taken based on different aspects, with special emphasis on the granulometry. As a last step, mechanical, environmental and durability properties have to be evaluated. Then the procedure is illustrated with a full example, obtaining a self compacting concrete (SCC including dredged sediment taken from a Spanish harbour.Este artículo presenta algunas directrices con el fin de analizar la posibilidad de incluir un material de desecho en la producción de un material base cemento estructural. En primer lugar, debe asegurarse la compatibilidad de los residuos con el material base cemento. Tras ello, si es necesario, se llevará a cabo la etapa de descontaminación del residuo. Después debe tomarse la decisión sobre el tipo de material a utilizar en base a diferentes aspectos, haciendo especial énfasis en la granulometría. Como último paso, deben evaluarse las propiedades mecánicas, ambientales y de durabilidad del producto final. El procedimiento a seguir se ilustra con un ejemplo concreto basado en la obtención de un hormigón autocompactante (SCC incluyendo en su fabricación sedimentos dragados tomados de un puerto español.

  4. The Evaluation of Material Properties of Low-pH Cement Grout for the Application of Cementitious Materials to Deep Radioactive Waste Repository Tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Seop; Kwon, S. K.; Cho, W. J.; Kim, G. W

    2009-12-15

    Considering the current construction technology and research status of deep repository tunnels for radioactive waste disposal, it is inevitable to use cementitious materials in spite of serious concern about their long-term environmental stability. Thus, it is an emerging task to develop low pH cementitious materials. This study reviews the state of the technology on low pH cements developed in Sweden, Switzerland, France, and Japan as well as in Finland which is constructing a real deep repository site for high-level radioactive waste disposal. Considering the physical and chemical stability of bentonite which acts as a buffer material, a low pH cement limits to pH {<=}11 and pozzolan-type admixtures are used to lower the pH of cement. To attain this pH requirement, silica fume, which is one of the most promising admixtures, should occupy at least 40 wt% of total dry materials in cement and the Ca/Si ratio should be maintained below 0.8 in cement. Additionally, selective super-plasticizer needs to be used because a high amount of water is demanded from the use of a large amount of silica fume. In this report, the state of the technology on application of cementitious materials to deep repository tunnels for radioactive waste disposal was analysed. And the material properties of low-pH and high-pH cement grouts were evaluated base on the grout recipes of ONKALO in Finlan.

  5. A new alkali-activated steel slag-based cementitious material for photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutant from waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao Jun; Liu, Li Cai; Xu, Yong; Wang, Ya Chao; Xu, De Long

    2012-03-30

    A new type of Ni,Ca-cementitious material was firstly synthesized via a two-step reaction of alkali-activated steel slag polymerization and ion exchange. The XRF results showed that almost all the Na(+) ions in the matrix of Na,Ca-cementitious material were replaced by Ni(2+) ions at room temperature. The new hydrated products of metahalloysite (Si(2)Al(2)O(5)(OH)(4)) and calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) were formed in the Na,Ca-cementitious material. The diffuse reflectance UV-vis near infrared ray spectrum was blue-shifted due to the strong interaction between Ni(2+) and negative charge of [AlO(4)](5-) tetrahedron in the framework of cementitious material. The Ni,Ca-cementitious material was used as a catalyst for the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue dye and showed a degradation rate of 94.39% under UV irradiation. The high photocatalytic degradation activity was suggested to be the synergistic effect of the cementitious matrix, Ni(2+) ions and the iron oxides of wustite (FeO) and calcium iron oxide (Ca(2)Fe(2)O(5)) from the steel slag. A probable mechanism of photocatalytic oxidative degradation was proposed.

  6. A new alkali-activated steel slag-based cementitious material for photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutant from waste water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yao Jun, E-mail: yaojzhang@yahoo.com.cn [College of Material Science and Engineering, Xi' an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi' an 710055 (China); Liu, Li Cai; Xu, Yong; Wang, Ya Chao; Xu, De Long [College of Material Science and Engineering, Xi' an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi' an 710055 (China)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel Ni,Ca-cementitious material is synthesized by a two-step reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni,Ca-geopolymer is firstly used for the photocatalytic degradation of MB. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absorption bands in the UV and NIR regions are reported for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A reaction mechanism of photocatalytic degradation was proposed. - Abstract: A new type of Ni,Ca-cementitious material was firstly synthesized via a two-step reaction of alkali-activated steel slag polymerization and ion exchange. The XRF results showed that almost all the Na{sup +} ions in the matrix of Na,Ca-cementitious material were replaced by Ni{sup 2+} ions at room temperature. The new hydrated products of metahalloysite (Si{sub 2}Al{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}) and calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) were formed in the Na,Ca-cementitious material. The diffuse reflectance UV-vis near infrared ray spectrum was blue-shifted due to the strong interaction between Ni{sup 2+} and negative charge of [AlO{sub 4}]{sup 5-} tetrahedron in the framework of cementitious material. The Ni,Ca-cementitious material was used as a catalyst for the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue dye and showed a degradation rate of 94.39% under UV irradiation. The high photocatalytic degradation activity was suggested to be the synergistic effect of the cementitious matrix, Ni{sup 2+} ions and the iron oxides of wustite (FeO) and calcium iron oxide (Ca{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 5}) from the steel slag. A probable mechanism of photocatalytic oxidative degradation was proposed.

  7. Cementitious Mixtures for Sealing Evaporite and Clastic Rocks in a Radioactive-Waste Repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    on other materials (Struble, Skalny, and Mindess 1980; Barnes, Diamond, and Dolch 1978). Images of chloride distribution show concentrations of...Waste Management, US Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Struble, L., Skalny, L., and Mindess , S. 1980. Cement and Concrete Research, Vol 10, pp

  8. Review of the potential effects of alkaline plume migration from a cementitious repository for radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, D.

    1997-09-01

    Extensive use of cement and concrete is envisaged in the construction of geological repositories for low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes, both for structural, and encapsulation and backfilling purposes. Saturation of these materials with groundwater may occur in the post-closure period of disposal, producing a hyperalkaline pore fluid with a pH in the range 10-13.5. These pore fluids have the potential to migrate from the repository according to local groundwater flow conditions and react chemically with the host rock. These chemical reactions may affect the rock`s capacity to retard the migration of radionuclides released from the repository after the degradation of the waste packages. The effects of these chemical reactions on the behaviour of the repository rock as a barrier to waste migration need to be investigated for the purposes of assessing the safety of the repository design (so-called `safety assessment` or `performance assessment`). The objectives of the work reported here were to: identify those processes influencing radionuclide mobility in the geosphere which could be affected by plume migration; review literature relevant to alkali-rock reaction; contact organisations carrying out relevant research and summarise their current and future activities; and make recommendations how the effects of plume migration can be incorporated into models of repository performance assessment. (author).

  9. Colloids in the mortar backfill of a cementitious repository for radioactive waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, E; Spieler, P

    2001-01-01

    Colloids are present in groundwater aquifers and water-permeable engineered barrier systems and may facilitate the migration of radionuclides. A highly permeable mortar is foreseen to be used as backfill for the engineered barrier of the Swiss repository for low- and intermediate-level waste. The backfill is considered to be a chemical environment with some potential for colloid generation and, due to its high porosity, for colloid mobility. Colloid concentration measurements were carried out using an in-situ liquid particle counting system. The in-house developed counting system with three commercially available sensors allowed the detection of single particles and colloids at low concentrations in the size range 50-5000 nm. The counting system was tested using suspensions prepared from certified size standards. The concentrations of colloids with size range 50-1000 nm were measured in cement pore water, which was collected from a column filled with a highly permeable backfill mortar. The chemical composition of the pore water corresponded to a Ca(OH)2-controlled cement system. Colloid concentrations in the backfill pore water were found to be typically lower than approximately 0.1 ppm. The specific (geometric) surface areas of the colloid populations were in the range 240 m2 g(-1) to 770 m2 g(-1). The low colloid inventories observed in this study can be explained by the high ionic strength and Ca concentrations of the cement pore water. These conditions are favourable for colloid-colloid and colloid-backfill interactions and unfavourable for colloid-enhanced nuclide transport.

  10. Valorization of an industrial waste (sludge as an artificial pozzolan in cementitious materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanae Lamrani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study fits within the framework of sustainable management of sludge generated from wastewater treatment in industrial network. The studied sludge comes from an industry manufacturing sanitary ceramic products. Physical, chemical and mineralogical characterization was carried out in order to give an identity card to the sludge. We noted the absence of metal pollution. In order to evaluate its pozzolanic character, the industrial sludge has been subjected to thermal activation at various temperatures (from 650°C to 1000°C. The pozzolanic activity was evaluated by physico-chemical and mechanical methods. Pozzolanicity measurement by conductivity, Frattini and Chapelle Test revealed the existence of pozzolanic properties of calcined samples. The best pozzolanic reactivity was obtained for the sample calcined at 800°C. We noticed a decrease in the reactivity of the samples calcined from 850°C. In addition, analysis by means of X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that sludge recrystallization begins at a temperature of 850°C. Pozzolanicity index of the thermally treated samples was determined by measuring the mechanical resistance of mortar specimens previously kept in a saturated lime solution for 28 days. The best pozzolanic activity index was obtained for the sample calcined at 800°C (109.1%. The study of mechanical performances and resistance to chemical attacks of mortars incorporating sludge (calcined at 800°C with different percentages and at various ages showed an improvement of mechanical and chemical resistance compared to the control mortar (100% cement . This work is a contribution to the research for new supplying sources of raw materials and additives in the field of construction. It presents a proposition of a promising solution for the valorization of waste material as an additive instead of being discharged into open air dumps causing a major environmental problem.

  11. Research and Development of a New Silica-Alumina Based Cementitious Material Largely Using Coal Refuse for Mine Backfill, Mine Sealing and Waste Disposal Stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henghu Sun; Yuan Yao

    2012-06-29

    Coal refuse and coal combustion byproducts as industrial solid waste stockpiles have become great threats to the environment. To activate coal refuse is one practical solution to recycle this huge amount of solid waste as substitute for Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). The central goal of this project is to investigate and develop a new silica-alumina based cementitious material largely using coal refuse as a constituent that will be ideal for durable construction, mine backfill, mine sealing and waste disposal stabilization applications. This new material is an environment-friendly alternative to Ordinary Portland Cement. The main constituents of the new material are coal refuse and other coal wastes including coal sludge and coal combustion products (CCPs). Compared with conventional cement production, successful development of this new technology could potentially save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, recycle vast amount of coal wastes, and significantly reduce production cost. A systematic research has been conducted to seek for an optimal solution for enhancing pozzolanic reactivity of the relatively inert solid waste-coal refuse in order to improve the utilization efficiency and economic benefit as a construction and building material.

  12. Evaluation of blends bauxite-calcination-method red mud with other industrial wastes as a cementitious material: Properties and hydration characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Na, E-mail: zhangna06@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Lab of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu Xiaoming [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Sun Henghu [School of Engineering and Computer Science, University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA 95211 (United States); Li Longtu [State Key Lab of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2011-01-15

    Red mud is generated from alumina production, and its disposal is currently a worldwide problem. In China, large quantities of red mud derived from bauxite calcination method are being discharged annually, and its utilization has been an urgent topic. This experimental research was to evaluate the feasibility of blends red mud derived from bauxite calcination method with other industrial wastes for use as a cementitious material. The developed cementitious material containing 30% of the bauxite-calcination-method red mud possessed compressive strength properties at a level similar to normal Portland cement, in the range of 45.3-49.5 MPa. Best compressive strength values were demonstrated by the specimen RSFC2 containing 30% bauxite-calcination-method red mud, 21% blast-furnace slag, 10% fly ash, 30% clinker, 8% gypsum and 1% compound agent. The mechanical and physical properties confirm the usefulness of RSFC2. The hydration characteristics of RSFC2 were characterized by XRD, FTIR, {sup 27}Al MAS-NMR and SEM. As predominant hydration products, ettringite and amorphous C-S-H gel are principally responsible for the strength development of RSFC2. Comparing with the traditional production for ordinary Portland cement, this green technology is easier to be implemented and energy saving. This paper provides a key solution to effectively utilize bauxite-calcination-method red mud.

  13. Evaluation of blends bauxite-calcination-method red mud with other industrial wastes as a cementitious material: properties and hydration characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Liu, Xiaoming; Sun, Henghu; Li, Longtu

    2011-01-15

    Red mud is generated from alumina production, and its disposal is currently a worldwide problem. In China, large quantities of red mud derived from bauxite calcination method are being discharged annually, and its utilization has been an urgent topic. This experimental research was to evaluate the feasibility of blends red mud derived from bauxite calcination method with other industrial wastes for use as a cementitious material. The developed cementitious material containing 30% of the bauxite-calcination-method red mud possessed compressive strength properties at a level similar to normal Portland cement, in the range of 45.3-49.5 MPa. Best compressive strength values were demonstrated by the specimen RSFC2 containing 30% bauxite-calcination-method red mud, 21% blast-furnace slag, 10% fly ash, 30% clinker, 8% gypsum and 1% compound agent. The mechanical and physical properties confirm the usefulness of RSFC2. The hydration characteristics of RSFC2 were characterized by XRD, FTIR, (27)Al MAS-NMR and SEM. As predominant hydration products, ettringite and amorphous C-S-H gel are principally responsible for the strength development of RSFC2. Comparing with the traditional production for ordinary Portland cement, this green technology is easier to be implemented and energy saving. This paper provides a key solution to effectively utilize bauxite-calcination-method red mud.

  14. REVIEW OF MECHANISTIC UNDERSTANDING AND MODELING AND UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS METHODS FOR PREDICTING CEMENTITIOUS BARRIER PERFORMANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Kosson, D.

    2009-11-30

    Cementitious barriers for nuclear applications are one of the primary controls for preventing or limiting radionuclide release into the environment. At the present time, performance and risk assessments do not fully incorporate the effectiveness of engineered barriers because the processes that influence performance are coupled and complicated. Better understanding the behavior of cementitious barriers is necessary to evaluate and improve the design of materials and structures used for radioactive waste containment, life extension of current nuclear facilities, and design of future nuclear facilities, including those needed for nuclear fuel storage and processing, nuclear power production and waste management. The focus of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) literature review is to document the current level of knowledge with respect to: (1) mechanisms and processes that directly influence the performance of cementitious materials (2) methodologies for modeling the performance of these mechanisms and processes and (3) approaches to addressing and quantifying uncertainties associated with performance predictions. This will serve as an important reference document for the professional community responsible for the design and performance assessment of cementitious materials in nuclear applications. This review also provides a multi-disciplinary foundation for identification, research, development and demonstration of improvements in conceptual understanding, measurements and performance modeling that would be lead to significant reductions in the uncertainties and improved confidence in the estimating the long-term performance of cementitious materials in nuclear applications. This report identifies: (1) technology gaps that may be filled by the CBP project and also (2) information and computational methods that are in currently being applied in related fields but have not yet been incorporated into performance assessments of cementitious barriers. The various

  15. Effluent Management Facility Evaporator Bottom-Waste Streams Formulation and Waste Form Qualification Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saslow, Sarah A.; Um, Wooyong; Russell, Renee L.

    2017-08-02

    This report describes the results from grout formulation and cementitious waste form qualification testing performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS). These results are part of a screening test that investigates three grout formulations proposed for wide-range treatment of different waste stream compositions expected for the Hanford Effluent Management Facility (EMF) evaporator bottom waste. This work supports the technical development need for alternative disposition paths for the EMF evaporator bottom wastes and future direct feed low-activity waste (DFLAW) operations at the Hanford Site. High-priority activities included simulant production, grout formulation, and cementitious waste form qualification testing. The work contained within this report relates to waste form development and testing, and does not directly support the 2017 Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) performance assessment (PA). However, this work contains valuable information for use in PA maintenance past FY 2017 and future waste form development efforts. The provided results and data should be used by (1) cementitious waste form scientists to further the understanding of cementitious leach behavior of contaminants of concern (COCs), (2) decision makers interested in off-site waste form disposal, and (3) the U.S. Department of Energy, their Hanford Site contractors and stakeholders as they assess the IDF PA program at the Hanford Site. The results reported help fill existing data gaps, support final selection of a cementitious waste form for the EMF evaporator bottom waste, and improve the technical defensibility of long-term waste form risk estimates.

  16. Properties of Calcium Acetate Manufactured with Etching Waste Solution and Limestone Sludge as a Cementitious High-Early-Strength Admixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deuck-Mo Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is one of the most widely used construction materials. There are several methods available to improve its performance, with one of them being the use of high-early-strength admixtures (HESAs. Typical HESAs include calcium nitrate, calcium chloride, and calcium formate (CF. Industrial by-products, such as acetic acid and lime stone sludge (LSS, can be used together to produce calcium acetate (CA, which can subsequently be used as a cementitious HESA. In this study, calcium carbonate and LSS were mixed with cement in weight ratios of 1 : 1, 1 : 1.5, and 1 : 2, and the properties of the as-produced CA were evaluated. CA and CF were mixed with cement in different weight ratios (0, 1, 2, and 3 wt% to obtain CA- and CF-mortars, respectively. The flow behavior, setting time, pH, and compressive strength of these mortars were evaluated, and their X-ray diffraction patterns were also analyzed. It was found that as the CF content in the CF-mortar increased, the initial strength of the mortar also increased. However, it impaired its long-term strength. On the other hand, when 1% CA was mixed with cement, satisfactory early and long-term strengths were achieved. Thus, CA, which is obtained from industrial by-products, can be an effective HESA.

  17. Impact of cementitious materials decalcification on transfer properties: application to radioactive waste deep repository; Influence de la decalcification de materiaux cimentaires sur les proprietes de transfert: application au stockage profond de dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlot, C

    2005-09-15

    Cementitious materials have been selected to compose the engineering barrier system (EBS) of the French radioactive waste deep repository, because of concrete physico-chemical properties: the hydrates of the cementitious matrix and the pH of the pore solution contribute to radionuclides retention; furthermore the compactness of these materials limits elements transport. The confinement capacity of the system has to be assessed while a period at least equivalent to waste activity (up to 100.000 years). His durability was sustained by the evolution of transfer properties in accordance with cementitious materials decalcification, alteration that expresses structure long-term behavior. Then, two degradation modes were carried out, taking into account the different physical and chemical solicitations imposed by the host formation. The first mode, a static one, was an accelerated decalcification test using nitrate ammonium solution. It replicates the EBS alteration dues to underground water. Degradation kinetic was estimated by the amount of calcium leached and the measurement of the calcium hydroxide dissolution front. To evaluate the decalcification impact, samples were characterized before and after degradation in term of microstructure (porosity, pores size distribution) and of transfer properties (diffusivity, gas and water permeability). The influence of cement nature (ordinary Portland cement, blended cement) and aggregates type (lime or siliceous) was observed: experiments were repeated on different mortars mixes. On this occasion, an essential reflection on this test metrology was led. The second mode, a dynamical degradation, was performed with an environmental permeameter. It recreates the EBS solicitations ensured during the re-saturation period, distinguished by the hydraulic pressure imposed by the geologic layer and the waste exothermicity. This apparatus, based on triaxial cell functioning, allows applying on samples pressure drop between 2 and 10 MPa and

  18. Magnesium alloys and graphite wastes encapsulated in cementitious materials: Reduction of galvanic corrosion using alkali hydroxide activated blast furnace slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, D; Muzeau, B; Stefan, L; Sanchez-Canet, J; Monguillon, C

    2017-03-15

    Magnesium alloys and graphite from spent nuclear fuel have been stored together in La Hague plant. The packaging of these wastes is under consideration. These wastes could be mixed in a grout composed of industrially available cement (Portland, calcium aluminate…). Within the alkaline pore solution of these matrixes, magnesium alloys are imperfectly protected by a layer of Brucite resulting in a slow corrosion releasing hydrogen. As the production of this gas must be considered for the storage safety, and the quality of wasteform, it is important to select a cement matrix capable of lowering the corrosion kinetics. Many types of calcium based cements have been tested and most of them have caused strong hydrogen production when magnesium alloys and graphite are conditioned together because of galvanic corrosion. Exceptions are binders based on alkali hydroxide activated ground granulated blast furnace slag (BFS) which are presented in this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Intended long term performances of cementitious engineered barriers for future storage and disposal facilities for radioactive wastes in Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Sociu F.; Georgescu R.; Toma R.; Barariu Gh.; Fako R.

    2013-01-01

    Considering the EU statements, Romania is engaged to endorse in the near future the IAEA relevant publications on geological repository (CNCANa), to update the Medium and Long Term National Strategy for Safe Management of Radioactive Waste and to approve the Road Map for Geological Repository Development. Currently, for example, spent fuel is wet stored for 6 years and after this period it is transported to dry storage in MACSTOR-200 (a concrete monolithic module) where it is intended to rema...

  20. Magnesium alloys and graphite wastes encapsulated in cementitious materials: Reduction of galvanic corrosion using alkali hydroxide activated blast furnace slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartier, D., E-mail: david.chartier@cea.fr [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA, DEN, DTCD, SPDE, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Muzeau, B. [DEN-Service d’Etude du Comportement des Radionucléides (SECR), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Stefan, L. [AREVA NC/D& S - France/Technical Department, 1 place Jean Millier 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Sanchez-Canet, J. [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA, DEN, DTCD, SPDE, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Monguillon, C. [DEN-Service d’Etude du Comportement des Radionucléides (SECR), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Embedded in cement, magnesium is corroded by residual water present in porosity of the matrix. • Corrosion is enhanced by galvanic phenomenon when magnesium is in contact with graphite. • Galvanic corrosion of magnesium in contact with graphite debris is shown to be severe with ordinary Portland cement. • Galvanic corrosion is significantly lowered in high alkali medium such as sodium hydroxide. • Sodium hydroxide activated blast furnace slag is a convenient binder to embed magnesium. - Abstract: Magnesium alloys and graphite from spent nuclear fuel have been stored together in La Hague plant. The packaging of these wastes is under consideration. These wastes could be mixed in a grout composed of industrially available cement (Portland, calcium aluminate…). Within the alkaline pore solution of these matrixes, magnesium alloys are imperfectly protected by a layer of Brucite resulting in a slow corrosion releasing hydrogen. As the production of this gas must be considered for the storage safety, and the quality of wasteform, it is important to select a cement matrix capable of lowering the corrosion kinetics. Many types of calcium based cements have been tested and most of them have caused strong hydrogen production when magnesium alloys and graphite are conditioned together because of galvanic corrosion. Exceptions are binders based on alkali hydroxide activated ground granulated blast furnace slag (BFS) which are presented in this article.

  1. Study on utilization of industrial waste residue for production of microporous cementitious materials%利用工业废渣生产多微孔胶凝材料的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周君生; 徐伟; 陈益兰; 潘荣伟

    2012-01-01

    A new inorganic cementitious material with microporous structure was prepared by single low-temperature sintering process with fly ash,carbide slag,and desulfurization gypsum as raw materials and with adding a small amount of mineralizer,adhesive agent,and pore-forming agent and the material's performances were also studied.Taking the optimized formula and under the conditions of pre-heat temperature 400 ℃, roasting temperature 1 220 ℃, and holding time 25 min, water absorption, apparent density, and 3 d compressive strength of the prepared microporous cementitious material were 2.10% ,1.32 g/cm3,and 8.56 MPa,respectively.XRD analysis showed the main phases of synthesized material were calcium silicate and gehlenite.Using industrial waste slag as raw material as well as the combination of porosity and cementitious character made the microporous cementitious material can partially replace cement and lightweight aggregates (haydite) to prepare insulating mortar so that the purpose of environmental protection and energy saving could be realized.%以粉煤灰、电石渣和脱硫石膏为主要原料,掺加少量矿化剂、黏结剂和造孔剂,采用一次低温烧成工艺,制备出具有多微孔结构的新型无机胶凝材料,并对产品性能进行了研究.采用优化配方,在预热温度为400℃、焙烧温度为1 220℃、保温时间为25 min条件下制备的多微孔胶凝材料,其吸水率为2.10%、表观密度为1.32 g/cm3,3d抗压强度为8.56 MPa.通过XRD分析可知,合成材料的主要矿物相为硅酸钙和钙铝黄长石.材料采用工业废渣制备,集多孔性和胶凝性,可部分代替水泥和陶粒制成保温砂浆,达到环保节能的目的.

  2. Concrete mixture characterization. Cementitious barriers partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Protiere, Yannick [SIMCO Technologies, Inc., Quebec (Canada)

    2014-12-01

    This report summarizes the characterization study performed on two concrete mixtures used for radioactive waste storage. Both mixtures were prepared with approximately 425 kg of binder. The testing protocol mostly focused on determining the transport properties of the mixtures; volume of permeable voids (porosity), diffusion coefficients, and water permeability were evaluated. Tests were performed after different curing durations. In order to obtain data on the statistical distribution of transport properties, the measurements after 2 years of curing were performed on 10+ samples. Overall, both mixtures exhibited very low tortuosities and permeabilities, a direct consequence of their low water-to-binder ratio and the use of supplementary cementitious materials. The data generated on 2-year old samples showed that porosity, tortuosity and permeability follow a normal distribution. Chloride ponding tests were also performed on test samples. They showed limited chloride ingress, in line with measured transport properties. These test results also showed that both materials react differently with chloride, a consequence of the differences in the binder chemical compositions.

  3. Cementitious barriers partnership concrete mixture characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Protiere, Yannick [SIMCO Technologies, Inc., Quebec (Canada)

    2014-12-01

    This report summarizes the characterization study performed on two concrete mixtures used for radioactive waste storage. Both mixtures were prepared with approximately 425 kg of binder. The testing protocol mostly focused on determining the transport properties of the mixtures; volume of permeable voids (porosity), diffusion coefficients, and water permeability were evaluated. Tests were performed after different curing durations. In order to obtain data on the statistical distribution of transport properties, the measurements after 2 years of curing were performed on 10+ samples. Overall, both mixtures exhibited very low tortuosities and permeabilities, a direct consequence of their low water-to-binder ratio and the use of supplementary cementitious materials. The data generated on 2-year old samples showed that porosity, tortuosity and permeability follow a normal distribution. Chloride ponding tests were also performed on test samples. They showed limited chloride ingress, in line with measured transport properties. These test results also showed that both materials react differently with chloride, a consequence of the differences in the binder chemical compositions.

  4. REFERENCE CASES FOR USE IN THE CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C

    2009-01-06

    The Cementitious Barriers Project (CBP) is a multidisciplinary cross cutting project initiated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a reasonable and credible set of tools to improve understanding and prediction of the structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in nuclear applications. The period of performance is >100 years for operating facilities and > 1000 years for waste management. The CBP has defined a set of reference cases to provide the following functions: (1) a common set of system configurations to illustrate the methods and tools developed by the CBP, (2) a common basis for evaluating methodology for uncertainty characterization, (3) a common set of cases to develop a complete set of parameter and changes in parameters as a function of time and changing conditions, and (4) a basis for experiments and model validation, and (5) a basis for improving conceptual models and reducing model uncertainties. These reference cases include the following two reference disposal units and a reference storage unit: (1) a cementitious low activity waste form in a reinforced concrete disposal vault, (2) a concrete vault containing a steel high-level waste tank filled with grout (closed high-level waste tank), and (3) a spent nuclear fuel basin during operation. Each case provides a different set of desired performance characteristics and interfaces between materials and with the environment. Examples of concretes, grout fills and a cementitious waste form are identified for the relevant reference case configurations.

  5. Hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance of a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Li, Hongxu; Zhao, Yazhao; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-04-05

    Calcium silicate slag is an alkali leaching waste generated during the process of extracting Al2O3 from high-alumina fly ash. In this research, a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was developed, and its mechanical and physical properties, hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance were investigated. The results show that an optimal design for the cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was determined by the specimen CFSC7 containing 30% calcium silicate slag, 5% high-alumina fly ash, 24% blast furnace slag, 35% clinker and 6% FGD gypsum. This blended system yields excellent physical and mechanical properties, confirming the usefulness of CFSC7. The hydration products of CFSC7 are mostly amorphous C-A-S-H gel, rod-like ettringite and hexagonal-sheet Ca(OH)2 with small amount of zeolite-like minerals such as CaAl2Si2O8·4H2O and Na2Al2Si2O8·H2O. As the predominant hydration products, rod-like ettringite and amorphous C-A-S-H gel play a positive role in promoting densification of the paste structure, resulting in strength development of CFSC7 in the early hydration process. The leaching toxicity and radioactivity tests results indicate that the developed cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag is environmentally acceptable. This study points out a promising direction for the proper utilization of calcium silicate slag in large quantities.

  6. VARIABILITY OF KD VALUES IN CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS AND SEDIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almond, P.; Kaplan, D.; Shine, E.

    2012-02-02

    Measured distribution coefficients (K{sub d} values) for environmental contaminants provide input data for performance assessments (PA) that evaluate physical and chemical phenomena for release of radionuclides from wasteforms, degradation of engineered components and subsequent transport of radionuclides through environmental media. Research efforts at SRNL to study the effects of formulation and curing variability on the physiochemical properties of the saltstone wasteform produced at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) are ongoing and provide information for the PA and Saltstone Operations. Furthermore, the range and distribution of plutonium K{sub d} values in soils is not known. Knowledge of these parameters is needed to provide guidance for stochastic modeling in the PA. Under the current SRS liquid waste processing system, supernate from F & H Tank Farm tanks is processed to remove actinides and fission products, resulting in a low-curie Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS). At the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF), DSS is mixed with premix, comprised of blast furnace slag (BFS), Class F fly ash (FA), and portland cement (OPC) to form a grout mixture. The fresh grout is subsequently placed in SDF vaults where it cures through hydration reactions to produce saltstone, a hardened monolithic waste form. Variation in saltstone composition and cure conditions of grout can affect the saltstone's physiochemical properties. Variations in properties may originate from variables in DSS, premix, and water to premix ratio, grout mixing, placing, and curing conditions including time and temperature (Harbour et al. 2007; Harbour et al. 2009). There are no previous studies reported in the literature regarding the range and distribution of K{sub d} values in cementitious materials. Presently, the Savannah River Site (SRS) estimate ranges and distributions of K{sub d} values based on measurements of K{sub d} values made in sandy SRS sediments (Kaplan 2010). The actual

  7. Updated Liquid Secondary Waste Grout Formulation and Preliminary Waste Form Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saslow, Sarah A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Um, Wooyong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Russell, Renee L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Asmussen, Robert M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sahajpal, Rahul [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This report describes the results from liquid secondary waste grout (LSWG) formulation and cementitious waste form qualification tests performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS). New formulations for preparing a cementitious waste form from a high-sulfate liquid secondary waste stream simulant, developed for Effluent Management Facility (EMF) process condensates merged with low activity waste (LAW) caustic scrubber, and the release of key constituents (e.g. 99Tc and 129I) from these monoliths were evaluated. This work supports a technology development program to address the technology needs for Hanford Site Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) liquid secondary waste (LSW) solidification and supports future Direct Feed Low-Activity Waste (DFLAW) operations. High-priority activities included simulant development, LSWG formulation, and waste form qualification. The work contained within this report relates to waste form development and testing and does not directly support the 2017 integrated disposal facility (IDF) performance assessment (PA). However, this work contains valuable information for use in PA maintenance past FY17, and for future waste form development efforts. The provided data should be used by (i) cementitious waste form scientists to further understanding of cementitious dissolution behavior, (ii) IDF PA modelers who use quantified constituent leachability, effective diffusivity, and partitioning coefficients to advance PA modeling efforts, and (iii) the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractors and decision makers as they assess the IDF PA program. The results obtained help fill existing data gaps, support final selection of a LSWG waste form, and improve the technical defensibility of long-term waste form performance estimates.

  8. Degradation of cementitious materials associated with salstone disposal units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, F. G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-09-01

    The Saltstone facilities at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) stabilize and dispose of low-level radioactive salt solution originating from liquid waste storage tanks at the site. The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives treated salt solution and mixes the aqueous waste with dry cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash to form a grout slurry which is mechanically pumped into concrete disposal cells that compose the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The solidified grout is termed “saltstone”. Cementitious materials play a prominent role in the design and long-term performance of the SDF. The saltstone grout exhibits low permeability and diffusivity, and thus represents a physical barrier to waste release. The waste form is also reducing, which creates a chemical barrier to waste release for certain key radionuclides, notably Tc-99. Similarly, the concrete shell of a saltstone disposal unit (SDU) represents an additional physical and chemical barrier to radionuclide release to the environment. Together the waste form and the SDU compose a robust containment structure at the time of facility closure. However, the physical and chemical state of cementitious materials will evolve over time through a variety of phenomena, leading to degraded barrier performance over Performance Assessment (PA) timescales of thousands to tens of thousands of years. Previous studies of cementitious material degradation in the context of low-level waste disposal have identified sulfate attack, carbonation influenced steel corrosion, and decalcification (primary constituent leaching) as the primary chemical degradation phenomena of most relevance to SRS exposure conditions. In this study, degradation time scales for each of these three degradation phenomena are estimated for saltstone and concrete associated with each SDU type under conservative, nominal, and best estimate assumptions.

  9. Cementitious Barriers Partnership - FY2015 End-Year Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, H. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Flach, G. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Langton, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, F. G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Kosson, D. S. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). School of Engineering; Brown, K. G. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). School of Engineering; Samson, E. [SIMCO Technologies, Inc., QC (Canada); Meeussen, J. C. L. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG); Seignette, Paul [Energy Research Center of the Netherlands; van der Sloot, H. A. [Hans van der Sloot Consultancy

    2015-09-17

    The DOE-EM Office of Tank Waste Management Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) is chartered with providing the technical basis for implementing cement-based waste forms and radioactive waste containment structures for long-term disposal. Therefore, the CBP ultimate purpose is to support progress in final treatment and disposal of legacy waste and closure of High-Level Waste (HLW) tanks in the DOE complex. This status report highlights the CBP 2015 Software and Experimental Program efforts and accomplishments that support DOE needs in environmental cleanup and waste disposal. DOE needs in this area include: Long-term performance predictions to provide credibility (i.e., a defensible technical basis) for regulator and DOE review and approvals, Facility flow sheet development/enhancements, and Conceptual designs for new disposal facilities. In 2015, the CBP developed a beta release of the CBP Software Toolbox – “Version 3.0”, which includes new STADIUM carbonation and damage models, a new SRNL module for estimating hydraulic properties and flow in fractured and intact cementitious materials, and a new LeachXS/ORCHESTRA (LXO) oxidation module. In addition, the STADIUM sulfate attack and chloride models have been improved as well as the LXO modules for sulfate attack, carbonation, constituent leaching, and percolation with radial diffusion (for leaching and transport in cracked cementitious materials). These STADIUM and LXO models are applicable to and can be used by both DOE and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) end-users for service life prediction and long-term leaching evaluations of radioactive waste containment structures across the DOE complex.

  10. Electrochemical migration technique to accelerate ageing of cementitious materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Z.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Durability assessment of concrete structures for constructions in nuclear waste repositories requires long term service life predictions. As deposition of low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW takes up to 100 000 years, it is necessary to analyze the service life of cementitious materials in this time perspective. Using acceleration methods producing aged specimens would decrease the need of extrapolating short term data sets. Laboratory methods are therefore, needed for accelerating the ageing process without making any influencing distortion in the properties of the materials. This paper presents an electro-chemical migration method to increase the rate of calcium leaching from cementitious specimens. This method is developed based on the fact that major long term deterioration process of hardened cement paste in concrete structures for deposition of LILW is due to slow diffusion of calcium ions. In this method the cementitious specimen is placed in an electrochemical cell as a porous path way through which ions can migrate at a rate far higher than diffusion process. The electrical field is applied to the cell in a way to accelerate the ion migration without making destructions in the specimen’s micro and macroscopic properties. The anolyte and catholyte solutions are designed favoring dissolution of calcium hydroxide and compensating for the leached calcium ions with another ion like lithium.

  11. Electrochemical migration technique to accelerate ageing of cementitious materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaahmadi, A.; Tang, L.; Abbas, Z.

    2013-07-01

    Durability assessment of concrete structures for constructions in nuclear waste repositories requires long term service life predictions. As deposition of low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) takes up to 100 000 years, it is necessary to analyze the service life of cementitious materials in this time perspective. Using acceleration methods producing aged specimens would decrease the need of extrapolating short term data sets. Laboratory methods are therefore, needed for accelerating the ageing process without making any influencing distortion in the properties of the materials. This paper presents an electro-chemical migration method to increase the rate of calcium leaching from cementitious specimens. This method is developed based on the fact that major long term deterioration process of hardened cement paste in concrete structures for deposition of LILW is due to slow diffusion of calcium ions. In this method the cementitious specimen is placed in an electrochemical cell as a porous path way through which ions can migrate at a rate far higher than diffusion process. The electrical field is applied to the cell in a way to accelerate the ion migration without making destructions in the specimen's micro and macroscopic properties. The anolyte and catholyte solutions are designed favoring dissolution of calcium hydroxide and compensating for the leached calcium ions with another ion like lithium.

  12. Cementitious Barriers Partnership FY2013 End-Year Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Langton, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Burns, H. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Smith, F. G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Kosson, D. S. [Vanderbilt University, School of Engineering, Nashville, TN (United States); Brown, K. G. [Vanderbilt University, School of Engineering, Nashville, TN (United States); Samson, E. [SIMCO Technologies, Inc., Quebec (Canada); Meeussen, J. C.L. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (The Netherlands); van der Sloot, H. A. [Hans van der Sloot Consultancy, Langedijk (The Netherlands); Garboczi, E. J. [Materials & Construction Research Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2013-11-01

    hydraulic and constituent mass transfer parameters needed in modeling. Two CBP software demonstrations were conducted in FY2013, one to support the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) at SRS and the other on a representative Hanford high-level waste tank. The CBP Toolbox demonstration on the SDF provided analysis on the most probable degradation mechanisms to the cementitious vault enclosure caused by sulfate and carbonation ingress. This analysis was documented and resulted in the issuance of a SDF Performance Assessment Special Analysis by Liquid Waste Operations this fiscal year. The two new software tools supporting chloride attack and dual-regime flow will provide additional degradation tools to better evaluate performance of DOE and commercial cementitious barriers. The CBP SRNL experimental program produced two patent applications and field data that will be used in the development and calibration of CBP software tools being developed in FY2014. The CBP software and simulation tools varies from other efforts in that all the tools are based upon specific and relevant experimental research of cementitious materials utilized in DOE applications. The CBP FY2013 program involved continuing research to improve and enhance the simulation tools as well as developing new tools that model other key degradation phenomena not addressed in Version 1.0. Also efforts to continue to verify the various simulation tools through laboratory experiments and analysis of field specimens are ongoing and will continue into FY2014 to quantify and reduce the uncertainty associated with performance assessments. This end-year report summarizes FY2013 software development efforts and the various experimental programs that are providing data for calibration and validation of the CBP developed software.

  13. OVERVIEW OF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT APPROACHES: CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Burns, H.

    2009-05-29

    Engineered barriers including cementitious barriers are used at sites disposing or contaminated with low-level radioactive waste to enhance performance of the natural environment with respect to controlling the potential spread of contaminants. Drivers for using cementitious barriers include: high radionuclide inventory, radionuclide characteristics (e.g., long half-live, high mobility due to chemical form/speciation, waste matrix properties, shallow water table, and humid climate that provides water for leaching the waste). This document comprises the first in a series of reports being prepared for the Cementitious Barriers Partnership. The document is divided into two parts which provide a summary of: (1) existing experience in the assessment of performance of cementitious materials used for radioactive waste management and disposal and (2) sensitivity and uncertainty analysis approaches that have been applied for assessments. Each chapter is organized into five parts: Introduction, Regulatory Considerations, Specific Examples, Summary of Modeling Approaches and Conclusions and Needs. The objective of the report is to provide perspective on the state of the practice for conducting assessments for facilities involving cementitious barriers and to identify opportunities for improvements to the existing approaches. Examples are provided in two contexts: (1) performance assessments conducted for waste disposal facilities and (2) performance assessment-like analyses (e.g., risk assessments) conducted under other regulatory regimes. The introductory sections of each section provide a perspective on the purpose of performance assessments and different roles of cementitious materials for radioactive waste management. Significant experience with assessments of cementitious materials associated with radioactive waste disposal concepts exists in the US Department of Energy Complex and the commercial nuclear sector. Recently, the desire to close legacy facilities has created

  14. Concrete and cement composites used for radioactive waste deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koťátková, Jaroslava; Zatloukal, Jan; Reiterman, Pavel; Kolář, Karel

    2017-08-23

    This review article presents the current state-of-knowledge of the use of cementitious materials for radioactive waste disposal. An overview of radwaste management processes with respect to the classification of the waste type is given. The application of cementitious materials for waste disposal is divided into two main lines: i) as a matrix for direct immobilization of treated waste form; and ii) as an engineered barrier of secondary protection in the form of concrete or grout. In the first part the immobilization mechanisms of the waste by cement hydration products is briefly described and an up-to date knowledge about the performance of different cementitious materials is given, including both traditional cements and alternative binder systems. The advantages, disadvantages as well as gaps in the base of information in relation to individual materials are stated. The following part of the article is aimed at description of multi-barrier systems for intermediate level waste repositories. It provides examples of proposed concepts by countries with advanced waste management programmes. In the paper summary, the good knowledge of the material durability due to its vast experience from civil engineering is highlighted however with the urge for specific approach during design and construction of a repository in terms of stringent safety requirements. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Development and Demonstration of Material Properties Database and Software for the Simulation of Flow Properties in Cementitious Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Flach, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-03-30

    This report describes work performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in fiscal year 2014 to develop a new Cementitious Barriers Project (CBP) software module designated as FLOExcel. FLOExcel incorporates a uniform database to capture material characterization data and a GoldSim model to define flow properties for both intact and fractured cementitious materials and estimate Darcy velocity based on specified hydraulic head gradient and matric tension. The software module includes hydraulic parameters for intact cementitious and granular materials in the database and a standalone GoldSim framework to manipulate the data. The database will be updated with new data as it comes available. The software module will later be integrated into the next release of the CBP Toolbox, Version 3.0. This report documents the development efforts for this software module. The FY14 activities described in this report focused on the following two items that form the FLOExcel package; 1) Development of a uniform database to capture CBP data for cementitious materials. In particular, the inclusion and use of hydraulic properties of the materials are emphasized; and 2) Development of algorithms and a GoldSim User Interface to calculate hydraulic flow properties of degraded and fractured cementitious materials. Hydraulic properties are required in a simulation of flow through cementitious materials such as Saltstone, waste tank fill grout, and concrete barriers. At SRNL these simulations have been performed using the PORFLOW code as part of Performance Assessments for salt waste disposal and waste tank closure.

  16. Waste Package Data Processing by Direct Upload to the SRS Waste Information System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casella, V.R.

    2002-06-20

    Hundreds of waste packages are generated each month at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC. Most of these waste packages are compactable, low level waste (LLW) either in 55-gallon drums or B-25 boxes, and TRU waste is put in DOT Type A 55-gallon drums. Several methods are used for assay of the waste package contents, including direct assay, dose-to-curie measurements, and smear-to-curie measurements. These assays generate many thousands of data that must be entered manually into the SRS Waste Information Tracking System (WITS) by a Generation Certification Official, even though much of this data is already available electronically. Since spreadsheets are routinely used to collect data for manual entry into WITS, direct data upload would greatly improve data entry. WITS was originally written as an interactive program, requiring each data item to be entered individually with subsequent tests being performed on each data entry to ensure that acceptance criteria were me t. An error message was displayed if the acceptance criteria were not met, and either corrected data had to be re-entered or a deviation had to be approved by WITS personnel. This system did not allow batch data entry, where essentially all the data could be entered, and then all of this data were evaluated against the acceptance criteria. A WITS user interface has been written for batch data entry for over twenty waste generators. This interface accepts all the data for a waste package, and an error report is generated listing non-conforming data. This interface allows direct uploads of electronic data for waste packages by dumping this data into Microsoft Excel spreadsheets that are formatted for direct data entry into WITS. Therefore, programs can be written to transfer any electronic data to the WITS interface spreadsheet for direct uploads of waste data. The whole process is now much less labor intensive, more cost effective, and more accurate.

  17. Efficiency of energy recovery from waste incineration, in the light of the new Waste Framework Directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosso, Mario; Motta, Astrid; Rigamonti, Lucia

    2010-07-01

    This paper deals with a key issue related to municipal waste incineration, which is the efficiency of energy recovery. A strong driver for improving the energy performances of waste-to-energy plants is the recent Waste Framework Directive (Directive 2008/98/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 19 November 2008 on waste and repealing certain Directives), which allows high efficiency installations to benefit from a status of "recovery" rather than "disposal". The change in designation means a step up in the waste hierarchy, where the lowest level of priority is now restricted to landfilling and low efficiency wastes incineration. The so-called "R1 formula" reported in the Directive, which counts for both production of power and heat, is critically analyzed and correlated to the more scientific-based approach of exergy efficiency. The results obtained for waste-to-energy plants currently operating in Europe reveal some significant differences in their performance, mainly related to the average size and to the availability of a heat market (district heating).

  18. Hybrid fiber reinforcement and crack formation in Cementitious Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, E.B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, J.A.O.

    2011-01-01

    reinforcement systems. The research described in this paper shows that the multi-scale conception of cracking and the use of hybrid fiber reinforcements do not necessarily result in an improved tensile behavior of the composite. Particular material design requirements may nevertheless justify the use of hybrid......The use of different types of fibers simultaneously for reinforcing cementitious matrices is motivated by the concept of a multi-scale nature of the crack propagation process. Fibers with different geometrical and mechanical properties are used to bridge cracks of different sizes from the micro......- to the macroscale. In this study, the performance of different fiber reinforced cementitious composites is assessed in terms of their tensile stress-crack opening behavior. The results obtained from this investigation allow a direct quantitative comparison of the behavior obtained from the different fiber...

  19. Direction of CRT waste glass processing: electronics recycling industry communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Julia R; Boehm, Michael W; Drummond, Charles

    2012-08-01

    Cathode Ray Tube, CRT, waste glass recycling has plagued glass manufacturers, electronics recyclers and electronics waste policy makers for decades because the total supply of waste glass exceeds demand, and the formulations of CRT glass are ill suited for most reuse options. The solutions are to separate the undesirable components (e.g. lead oxide) in the waste and create demand for new products. Achieving this is no simple feat, however, as there are many obstacles: limited knowledge of waste glass composition; limited automation in the recycling process; transportation of recycled material; and a weak and underdeveloped market. Thus one of the main goals of this paper is to advise electronic glass recyclers on how to best manage a diverse supply of glass waste and successfully market to end users. Further, this paper offers future directions for academic and industry research. To develop the recommendations offered here, a combination of approaches were used: (1) a thorough study of historic trends in CRT glass chemistry; (2) bulk glass collection and analysis of cullet from a large-scale glass recycler; (3) conversations with industry members and a review of potential applications; and (4) evaluation of the economic viability of specific uses for recycled CRT glass. If academia and industry can solve these problems (for example by creating a database of composition organized by manufacturer and glass source) then the reuse of CRT glass can be increased.

  20. Degradation Of Cementitious Materials Associated With Saltstone Disposal Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G. P; Smith, F. G. III

    2013-03-19

    The Saltstone facilities at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) stabilize and dispose of low-level radioactive salt solution originating from liquid waste storage tanks at the site. The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives treated salt solution and mixes the aqueous waste with dry cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash to form a grout slurry which is mechanically pumped into concrete disposal cells that compose the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The solidified grout is termed “saltstone”. Cementitious materials play a prominent role in the design and long-term performance of the SDF. The saltstone grout exhibits low permeability and diffusivity, and thus represents a physical barrier to waste release. The waste form is also reducing, which creates a chemical barrier to waste release for certain key radionuclides, notably Tc-99. Similarly, the concrete shell of an SDF disposal unit (SDU) represents an additional physical and chemical barrier to radionuclide release to the environment. Together the waste form and the SDU compose a robust containment structure at the time of facility closure. However, the physical and chemical state of cementitious materials will evolve over time through a variety of phenomena, leading to degraded barrier performance over Performance Assessment (PA) timescales of thousands to tens of thousands of years. Previous studies of cementitious material degradation in the context of low-level waste disposal have identified sulfate attack, carbonation influenced steel corrosion, and decalcification (primary constituent leaching) as the primary chemical degradation phenomena of most relevance to SRS exposure conditions. In this study, degradation time scales for each of these three degradation phenomena are estimated for saltstone and concrete associated with each SDU type under conservative, nominal, and best estimate assumptions. The nominal value (NV) is an intermediate result that is more probable than the conservative

  1. Absorption type water chiller fired directly by waste heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, K. L.; Kalwar, K.

    1982-08-01

    The direct use of waste heat as heating element in a water chiller of the absorption type was studied. The chilled water is used as cooling element in the industrial process, producing the waste heat or for conditioning the workplace or further located places. The heat source is gaseous or liquid. The cooling capacity is in the range from 10 to 120 kW. After reviewing the different absorption systems, LiBr/H20 proved to be the most suitable. The process retained for experimenting was the manufacturing of synthetic materials polymer industry and was tested in two different factories. It is proved that the use of absorption type water chillers is practicable with an efficiency of 10% to 25% of the waste heat energy, but that the existing chillers need extensive conversion for obtaining economical operation when using a low temperature heating source.

  2. Service life prediction and cementitious composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoklund Larsen, E.

    The present Ph.D.thesis describes and discusses the applicability of a systematic methodology recommended by CIB W80/RILEM-PSL for sevice life prediction. The report describes the most important inherent and environmental factors affecting the service life of structures of cementitious composites....... On the basis of this discription of factors and experience from a test programme described in SBI Report 222, Service life prediction and fibre reinforced cementitious composites, the applicabillity of the CIB/RILEM methodology is discussed....

  3. Fracture propagation in cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skocek, Jan

    is put on phenomena of a similar scale as is the characteristic size of inhomogeneities of the material, a model which re ects the heterogeneous nature of the material needs to be applied. This is, indeed, the case for prediction of mechanical properties of a material based on the knowledge of properties...... of the materials needs to be able to take this complexity into account. In this thesis, two frameworks for prediction of strengths of cementitious materials are developed. The rst one relates the strength of materials with aggregates with the properties of the matrix and distribution of aggregates. The second one...... relates the strength of cement paste with the properties of cement phases and its microstructure. The frameworks consist of an experimental part, an identication of material properties from the experiments and a modeling part based on an approximative discrete particle model. In the case of mortar...

  4. Analysis of waste hierarchy in the European waste directive 2008/98/EC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharfalkar, Mangesh; Court, Richard; Campbell, Callum; Ali, Zulfiqur; Hillier, Graham

    2015-05-01

    Loss of recoverable resources in linear resource flow systems is likely to contribute to the depletion of natural resources and environmental degradation. The 'waste hierarchy' in the European Commission's latest Waste Framework Directive 2008/98/EC (WFD2008) makes recommendations on how to address this issue. The WFD2008 is analysed in this work for its adequacy in ensuring return of 'recoverable waste' as a 'resource' into the productive system. Despite the release of guidance documents by the DG Environment, DEFRA and WRAP UK on the interpretation of key provisions of the WFD2008, lack of clarity still exists around the WFD2008 'waste hierarchy'. There is also an overlap between measures such as 'prevention' and 'reduction', 'preparing for reuse' and 'reuse' and lack of clarity on why the measure of 'reuse' is included in the WFD2008 definition of 'prevention'. Finally, absence of the measures of 'recovery' and 'reuse' from the WFD2008 'waste hierarchy' reduces its effectiveness as a resource efficiency tool. Without clarity on the WFD2008 'waste hierarchy', it is challenging for decision makers to take direct action to address inefficiencies existing within their operations or supply chains. This paper proposes the development of an alternative 'hierarchy of resource use' and alternative 'definitions' that attempt to fill identified gaps in the WFD2008 and bring clarity to the key measures of waste prevention, reduction and recovery. This would help the key stakeholders in driving resource effectiveness, which in turn would assist in conservation of natural resources and prevention of environmental degradation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. a Methodology for Thermal Characterization of Cementitious Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousan, Akram Abdel-Majeed

    This study was an attempt to develop and utilize a method to measure thermal conductivity of cementitious materials without affecting the state of equilibrium of the sample. The thermal comparator method employed and developed here was proved to be suitable for this kind of material. The method was used to measure thermal conductivity of neat cement and cement plus additives. An attempt was also made to study other thermal properties of cementitious materials, such as thermal expansion and early heat of hydration. Class C portland cement was used in this study, mixed with different water to cement ratios and with additives and admixtures (fine quartz, fly ash, and quartz and basalt sands); and the thermal properties were measured at curing times up to three months. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion were found to be dependent upon curing times, moisture contents, and concentrations and types of admixed phases. Mathematical relations of thermal conductivity as a function of additive contents were obtained at different curing times for the additives used in this study. Both thermal conductivity and thermal expansion were found to reach constant values when cementitious materials approach maturity. It was shown that thermal conductivity of mature hydrated additives can be estimated using the experimental results from measurements on composites. The hydration rate was also studied and the effect of additives as accelerators or retarders was explored using the rate of heat evolution curves. Results indicate that inert additives like quartz have no significant effect on the hydration rate, and reactive additives like fly ash tend, in general, to accelerate the reaction. Applications of the methods to the determination of properties of seal materials for geologic repositories for nuclear waste are discussed.

  6. OVERVIEW OF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT APPROACHES: CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Burns, H.

    2009-05-29

    Engineered barriers including cementitious barriers are used at sites disposing or contaminated with low-level radioactive waste to enhance performance of the natural environment with respect to controlling the potential spread of contaminants. Drivers for using cementitious barriers include: high radionuclide inventory, radionuclide characteristics (e.g., long half-live, high mobility due to chemical form/speciation, waste matrix properties, shallow water table, and humid climate that provides water for leaching the waste). This document comprises the first in a series of reports being prepared for the Cementitious Barriers Partnership. The document is divided into two parts which provide a summary of: (1) existing experience in the assessment of performance of cementitious materials used for radioactive waste management and disposal and (2) sensitivity and uncertainty analysis approaches that have been applied for assessments. Each chapter is organized into five parts: Introduction, Regulatory Considerations, Specific Examples, Summary of Modeling Approaches and Conclusions and Needs. The objective of the report is to provide perspective on the state of the practice for conducting assessments for facilities involving cementitious barriers and to identify opportunities for improvements to the existing approaches. Examples are provided in two contexts: (1) performance assessments conducted for waste disposal facilities and (2) performance assessment-like analyses (e.g., risk assessments) conducted under other regulatory regimes. The introductory sections of each section provide a perspective on the purpose of performance assessments and different roles of cementitious materials for radioactive waste management. Significant experience with assessments of cementitious materials associated with radioactive waste disposal concepts exists in the US Department of Energy Complex and the commercial nuclear sector. Recently, the desire to close legacy facilities has created

  7. Transport properties of damaged materials. Cementitious barriers partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) project is to develop tools to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term structural, hydraulic, and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in low-level waste storage applications. One key concern for the long-term durability of concrete is the degradation of the cementitious matrix, which occurs as a result of aggressive chemical species entering the material or leaching out in the environment, depending on the exposure conditions. The objective of the experimental study described in this report is to provide experimental data relating damage in cementitious materials to changes in transport properties, which can eventually be used to support predictive model development. In order to get results within a reasonable timeframe and to induce as much as possible uniform damage level in materials, concrete samples were exposed to freezing and thawing (F/T) cycles. The methodology consisted in exposing samples to F/T cycles and monitoring damage level with ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements. Upon reaching pre-selected damage levels, samples were tested to evaluate changes in transport properties. Material selection for the study was motivated by the need to get results rapidly, in order to assess the relevance of the methodology. Consequently, samples already available at SIMCO from past studies were used. They consisted in three different concrete mixtures cured for five years in wet conditions. The mixtures had water-to-cement ratios of 0.5, 0.65 and 0.75 and were prepared with ASTM Type I cement only. The results showed that porosity is not a good indicator for damage caused by the formation of microcracks. Some materials exhibited little variations in porosity even for high damage levels. On the other hand, significant variations in tortuosity were measured in all materials. This implies that damage caused by internal pressure does not necessarily create additional pore space in

  8. Cementitious barriers partnership transport properties of damaged materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) project is to develop tools to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term structural, hydraulic, and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in low level waste storage applications. One key concern for the long-term durability of concrete is the degradation of the cementitious matrix, which occurs as a result of aggressive chemical species entering the material or leaching out in the environment, depending on the exposure conditions. The objective of the experimental study described in this report is to provide experimental data relating damage in cementitious materials to changes in transport properties, which can eventually be used to support predictive model development. In order to get results within a reasonable timeframe and to induce as much as possible uniform damage level in materials, concrete samples were exposed to freezing and thawing (F/T) cycles. The methodology consisted in exposing samples to F/T cycles and monitoring damage level with ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements. Upon reaching pre-selected damage levels, samples were tested to evaluate changes in transport properties. Material selection for the study was motivated by the need to get results rapidly, in order to assess the relevance of the methodology. Consequently, samples already available at SIMCO from past studies were used. They consisted in three different concrete mixtures cured for five years in wet conditions. The mixtures had water-to-cement ratios of 0.5, 0.65 and 0.75 and were prepared with ASTM Type I cement only. The results showed that porosity is not a good indicator for damage caused by the formation of microcracks. Some materials exhibited little variations in porosity even for high damage levels. On the other hand, significant variations in tortuosity were measured in all materials. This implies that damage caused by internal pressure do not necessarily creates additional pore space in

  9. LONG-TERM TECHNETIUM INTERACTIONS WITH REDUCING CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D.; Lilley, M.; Almond, P.; Powell, B.

    2011-03-15

    Technetium is among the key risk drivers at the Saltstone Facility. The way that it is immobilized in this cementitious waste form is by converting its highly mobile Tc(VII) form to a much less mobile Tc(IV) form through reduction by the cement's blast furnace slag. This report includes a review of published data and experimental results dealing with Tc leaching from Portland cement waste forms. The objectives for the literature study were to document previous reports of Tc interactions with slag-containing cementitious materials. The objectives for the laboratory study were to measure Tc-saltstone Kd values under reducing conditions. From the literature it was concluded: (1) Spectroscopic evidence showed that when Tc(IV) in a slag-cement was exposed to an oxidizing environment, it will convert to the more mobile Tc(VII) species within a short time frame, 2.5 years. (2) SRS saltstone will reduce Tc(VII) in the absence of NaS or sodium dithionite in a reducing atmosphere. (3) Only trace concentrations of atmospheric oxygen (30 to 60 ppm O{sub 2}; Eh 120 mV) at the high pH levels of cementitious systems is required to maintain Tc as Tc(VII). (4) Experimental conditions must be responsible for wide variability of measured K{sub d} values, such that they are either very low, {approx}1 mL/g, or they are very high {approx}1000 mL/g, suggesting that Tc(VII) or Tc(IV) dominate the systems. Much of this variability appears to be the result of experimental conditions, especially direct controls of oxygen contact with the sample. (5) A field study conducted at SRS in the 1980s indicated that a slag-saltstone immobilized Tc for 2.5 years. Below background concentrations of Tc leached out of the slag-containing saltstone, whereas Tc leached out of the slag-free saltstone at the rate of nitrate loss. One possible explanation for the immobilization of Tc in this study was that the slag-saltstone maintained reducing conditions within the core of the 55-gallon sample, whereas

  10. Treated Coconut Coir Pith as Component of Cementitious Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Koňáková

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper deals with utilization of raw and treated coir pith as potential component of cementitious composites. The studied material is coir pith originating from a coconut production. Its applicability as cement mixture component was assessed in terms of the physical properties of concrete containing different amount of coir pith. Basic physical properties, compressive and bending strength, and hygric transport characteristics as well as thermal properties belong among the studied characteristics. It was proved that the concrete with 5% (by mass of cement of this waste material shows appropriate physical properties and it gives rise to an applicable material for building structures. Generally, the coir pith can be regarded as lightening additive. When 10% of coir pith was added, it has led to higher deterioration of properties than what is acceptable since such dosing is greatly increasing the total porosity. The influence of chemical treatment of coir pith was evaluated as well; both tested treatment methods improved the performance of cementitious composites while the acetylation was somewhat more effective the treatment by NaOH.

  11. Hybrid fiber reinforcement and crack formation in Cementitious Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, E.B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, J.A.O.

    2011-01-01

    reinforcement systems. The research described in this paper shows that the multi-scale conception of cracking and the use of hybrid fiber reinforcements do not necessarily result in an improved tensile behavior of the composite. Particular material design requirements may nevertheless justify the use of hybrid......- to the macroscale. In this study, the performance of different fiber reinforced cementitious composites is assessed in terms of their tensile stress-crack opening behavior. The results obtained from this investigation allow a direct quantitative comparison of the behavior obtained from the different fiber...

  12. 77 FR 32022 - Direct Final Negative Declaration and Withdrawal of Large Municipal Waste Combustors State Plan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-31

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Direct Final Negative Declaration and Withdrawal of Large Municipal Waste... from ``Large Municipal Waste Combustors'' (LMWC). DATES: This direct final rule will be effective July... Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is taking direct final action to approve Illinois...

  13. Mechanisms governing the direct removal of wastes from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository caused by exploratory drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglund, J.W. [New Mexico Engineering Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-12-01

    Two processes are identified that can influence the quantity of wastes brought to the ground surface when a waste disposal room of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is inadvertently penetrated by an exploratory borehole. The first mechanism is due to the erosion of the borehole wall adjacent to the waste caused by the flowing drilling fluid (mud); a quantitative computational model based upon the flow characteristics of the drilling fluid (laminar or turbulent) and other drilling parameters is developed and example results shown. The second mechanism concerns the motion of the waste and borehole spall caused by the flow of waste-generated gas to the borehole. Some of the available literature concerning this process is discussed, and a number of elastic and elastic-plastic finite-difference and finite-element calculations are described that confirm the potential importance of this process in directly removing wastes from the repository to the ground surface. Based upon the amount of analysis performed to date, it is concluded that it is not unreasonable to expect that volumes of waste several times greater than that resulting from direct cutting of a gauge borehole could eventually reach the ground surface. No definitive quantitative model for waste removal as a result of the second mechanism is presented; it is concluded that decomposed waste constitutive data must be developed and additional experiments performed to assess further the full significance of this latter mechanism.

  14. Evaporation Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Direct Feed Low Activity Waste Effluent Management Facility Core Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Mcclane, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate, LMOGC) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation, and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream is to evaporate it in a new evaporator, in the Effluent Management Facility (EMF), and then return it to the LAW melter. It is important to understand the composition of the effluents from the melter, and new evaporator so that the disposition of these streams can be accurately planned and accommodated. Furthermore, alternate disposition of the LMOGC stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would reduce the need for closely integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Long-term implementation of this option after WTP start-up would decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste, amongst the other operational complexities such a recycle stream presents. In order to accurately plan for the disposition path, it is key to experimentally determine the fate of contaminants. To do this, testing is needed to accurately account for the buffering chemistry of the components, determine the achievable evaporation end point, identify insoluble solids that form, and determine the distribution of key regulatory-impacting constituents.

  15. Technetium Sorption by Cementitious Materials Under Reducing Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Estes, Shanna L. [Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Powell, Brian A. [Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States)

    2012-09-28

    slowly until the termination of the desorption experiment after 20 days. Although the cementitious materials investigated demonstrated the ability to strongly sequester aqueous {sup 99}Tc under anoxic conditions, the introduction of oxygen resulted in the rapid remobilization of {sup 99}Tc. These studies provide experimental support for the use of a solubility based model under reducing saltstone conditions where Tc(IV) is expected to be the dominant species. The existing Kd model would be appropriate for oxidized saltstone conditions (aged saltstone, not directly evaluated in this study) where Tc(VII) is expected to be the dominant species.

  16. Direct chemical oxidation of mixed or toxic wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balazs, G B; Cooper, J F; Farmer, J C; Lewis, P

    1999-05-01

    Direct Chemical Oxidation (DCO) is an ambient-pressure, low-temperature (<100 C), and aqueous-based process for general-purpose destruction of the organic fraction of hazardous or mixed waste. It uses the peroxydisulfate anion (S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2{minus}}) in acid or base solutions. The byproduct of the oxidation reaction, typically sodium or ammonium hydrogen sulfate, may be recycled electrolytically to produce the oxidant. The oxidation kinetic reaction is first order with respect to the peroxydisulfate concentration, expressed in equivalents. The rate constant is constant for nearly all dissolved organic compounds: k{sub a} = 0.01 {+-} 0.005 min{sup {minus}1}. This reflects a common rate-determining step, which is the decomposition of the peroxydisulfate anion into the chemically active derivative, the sulfate radical anion, SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}. This decomposition is promoted in DCO by raising the operating temperature into the range of 80-100 C. Rates are given for approximately 30 substances with diverse functional groups at low concentrations, and for a number of solid and liquid wastes typical of nuclear and chemical industries. The process has been scale up for treatment studies on chlorinated hydrocarbons, in which the hydrolysis of solvent mixtures was followed by oxidation of products in a series of stirred tank reactors. Cost estimates, safety considerations, and a comprehensive bibliography are given.

  17. Hazardous Waste, Generated, Shipped, Received 2001-2007 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set reports the Hazardous Waste Generated, Shipped, and Received by State and Other Area. Covers hazardous waste regulated under the Resource Conservation...

  18. 78 FR 72581 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerator Negative Declaration for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerator Negative... negative declarations from Michigan and Wisconsin regarding Hospital/Medical/ Infectious Waste Incinerator...) requirements to existing solid waste combustors, including HMIWIs, and provide that EPA should include, as...

  19. Timing of Getter Material Addition in Cementitious Wasteforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawter, A.; Qafoku, N. P.; Asmussen, M.; Neeway, J.; Smith, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    A cementitious waste form, Cast Stone, is being evaluated as a possible supplemental immobilization technology for the Hanford sites's low activity waste (LAW), which contains radioactive 99Tc and 129I, as part of the tank waste cleanup mission. Cast Stone is made of a dry blend 47% blast furnace slag, 45% fly ash, and 8% ordinary Portland cement, mixed with a low-activity waste (LAW). To improve the retention of Tc and/or I in Cast Stone, materials with a high affinity for Tc and/or I, termed "getters," can be added to provide a stable domain for the radionuclides of concern. Previous testing conducted with a variety of getters has identified Tin(II)-Apatite and Silver Exchanged Zeolite as promising candidates for Tc and I, respectively. Investigation into the sequence in which getters are added to Cast Stone was performed following two methods: 1) adding getters to the Cast Stone dry blend, and then mixing with liquid waste, and 2) adding getters to the liquid waste first, followed by addition of the Cast Stone dry blend. Cast Stone monolith samples were prepared with each method and leach tests, following EPA method 1315, were conducted in either distilled water or simulated vadose zone porewater for a period of up to 63 days. The leachate was analyzed for Tc, I, Na, NO3-, NO2- and Cr with ICP-MS, ICP-OES and ion chromatography and the results indicated that the Cast Stone with getter addition in the dry blend mix (method 1) has lower rates of Tc and I leaching. The mechanisms of radionuclide release from the Cast Stone were also investigated with a variety of solid phase characterization techniques of the monoliths before and after leaching, such as XRD, SEM/EDS, TEM/SAED and other spectroscopic techniques.

  20. A review: Self-healing in cementitious materials and engineered cementitious composite as a self-healing material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Min; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Cementitious Composite (ECC) is a new type of cement-based materials, which has unique properties compared with traditional cementitious materials. Further, a summary about the research status of self-healing on ECC is given. It shows that ECC bears great potential in realizing effective self-healing due......Cementitious materials are the most widely used building materials all over the word. However, deterioration is inevitable even since the very beginning of the service life, then maintenance and repair work, which are often labor- and capital-intensive, would be followed. Thus, self-healing...... of the affected cementitious materials is of great importance. Self-healing phenomenon in cementitious materials has been noticed and been studying for a long time. The possible mechanisms for self-healing phenomenon in cementitious materials, which are summarized based on substantial experimental studies...

  1. Service life prediction and fibre reinforced cementitious composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoklund Larsen, E.

    The present Ph.D.thesis addresses the service life concept on the fibre reinforced cementitious composites. The advantages and problems of adding fibre to a cementitious matrix and the influence on service life are described. In SBI Report 221, Service life prediction and cementitious somposites......, the factors affecting the pure cementitious composite are described. Different sizes and types of fibre reinforced crmentitious composites have been chosen to illustrate different ageing and deterioration mechanisms. Some ageing mechanisms can be accelerated and others cannot which is demonstrated in a test...

  2. Evaporation Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Direct Feed Low Activity Waste Effluent Management Facility Core Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Mcclane, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate, LMOGC) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation, and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream is to evaporate it in a new evaporator, in the Effluent Management Facility (EMF), and then return it to the LAW melter. It is important to understand the composition of the effluents from the melter and new evaporator, so that the disposition of these streams can be accurately planned and accommodated. Furthermore, alternate disposition of the LMOGC stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would reduce the need for closely integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Long-term implementation of this option after WTP start-up would decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste, amongst the other operational complexities such a recycle stream presents. In order to accurately plan for the disposition path, it is key to experimentally determine the fate of contaminants. To do this, testing is needed to accurately account for the buffering chemistry of the components, determine the achievable evaporation end point, identify insoluble solids that form, and determine the distribution of key regulatory-impacting constituents. The LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate stream will contain components that are volatile at melter temperatures, have limited solubility in the glass waste form, and represent a materials corrosion concern, such as halides and sulfate. Because this stream will recycle within WTP, these components will accumulate in the Melter Condensate

  3. Can superabsorbent polymers mitigate shrinkage in cementitious materials blended with supplementary cementitious materials?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoeck, Didier; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; De Belie, Nele

    2016-01-01

    A promising way to mitigate autogenous shrinkage in cementitious materials with a low water-to-binder ratio is internal curing by the use of superabsorbent polymers. Superabsorbent polymers are able to absorb multiple times their weight in water and can be applied as an internal water reservoir...... shrinkage in materials blended with fly ash or blast-furnace slag remain scarce, especially after one week of age. This paper focuses on the autogenous shrinkage by performing manual and automated shrinkage measurements up to one month of age. Without superabsorbent polymers, autogenous shrinkage...... was reduced in cement pastes with the supplementary cementitious materials versus Portland cement pastes. At later ages, the rate of autogenous shrinkage is higher due to the pozzolanic activity of the supplementary cementitious materials. Internal curing by means of superabsorbent polymers is successful...

  4. Solid waste management in Croatia in response to the European Landfill Directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanic-Maruna, Ira; Fellner, Johann

    2012-08-01

    The European Landfill Directive 99/31/EC represents the most influential piece of waste legislation on the management of municipal solid waste. In addition to technical standards regarding the design and location of landfills, it calls for a decrease in the amount of biodegradable waste landfilled. In order to meet the reduction targets set in the Landfill Directive, national solid waste strategies need to be changed. This article outlines the impact of the Landfill Directive on the Croatian waste management strategy and discusses the key challenges of its implementation. In addition, three scenarios of future waste management (mechanical biological pre-treatment, waste-to-energy and landfilling) have been investigated and evaluated regarding environmental impacts and affordability. The results of the analysis show that Croatia has transposed the said Directive into its own legislation in an exemplary way. The developed national waste management strategy foresees the set up of a separate collection of recyclables, waste pre-treatment of MSW, as well as the upgrading of existing disposal sites to sanitary landfills. However, the practical progress of carrying out provisions implemented on paper is lagging behind. Concerning the investigated scenarios the results of the evaluation indicate that mechanical biological pre-treatment in conjunction with separate collection of recyclables appears to be the most feasible option (in terms of economic and ecologic parameters). This result is in line with the proposed national waste management strategy.

  5. Cementitious composite materials with improved self-healing potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia BAERA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cement-based composites have proved, over the time, certain abilities of self-healing the damages (cracks and especially microcracs that occur within their structure. Depending on the level of damage and of the composite type in which this occurs, the self - healing process (SH can range from crack closing or crack sealing to the stage of partial or even complete recovery of material physical - mechanical properties. The aim of this paper is to present the general concept of Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECCs with their unique properties including their self-healing (SH capacity, as an innovative direction for a global sustainable infrastructure. The experimental steps initiated for the development in Romania of this unique category of materials, using materials available on the local market, are also presented.

  6. Non-cementitious compositions comprising vaterite and methods thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devenney, Martin; Fernandez, Miguel; Morgan, Samuel O.

    2015-09-15

    Non-cementitious compositions and products are provided. The compositions of the invention include a carbonate additive comprising vaterite such as reactive vaterite. Additional aspects of the invention include methods of making and using the non-cementitious compositions and products.

  7. Direct Carbon Fuel Cells: Converting Waste to Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    provide waste heat for hot water and energy to drive absorption chillers for cooling. If no attractive opportunities exist for energy savings as a result...07-32 2 Table 1. Operating characteristics of conventional fuel cells vs. DCFCs. PEMFC PAFC MCFC SOFC DCFC Electrolyte Polymer Phosphoric acid...consuming facilities. Currently, waste heat generated by 200–250 kW Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) and Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell ( MCFC ) units

  8. The Expanded Capabilities Of The Cementitious Barriers Partnership Software Toolbox Version 2.0 - 14331

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Heather; Flach, Greg; Smith, Frank; Langton, Christine; Brown, Kevin; Kosson, David; Samson, Eric; Mallick, Pramod

    2014-01-10

    The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) Project is a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) Office of Tank Waste Management. The CBP program has developed a set of integrated tools (based on state-of-the-art models and leaching test methods) that help improve understanding and predictions of the long-term structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in nuclear applications. The CBP Software Toolbox – “Version 1.0” was released early in FY2013 and was used to support DOE-EM performance assessments in evaluating various degradation mechanisms that included sulfate attack, carbonation and constituent leaching. The sulfate attack analysis predicted the extent and damage that sulfate ingress will have on concrete vaults over extended time (i.e., > 1000 years) and the carbonation analysis provided concrete degradation predictions from rebar corrosion. The new release “Version 2.0” includes upgraded carbonation software and a new software module to evaluate degradation due to chloride attack. Also included in the newer version are a dual regime module allowing evaluation of contaminant release in two regimes – both fractured and un-fractured. The integrated software package has also been upgraded with new plotting capabilities and many other features that increase the “user-friendliness” of the package. Experimental work has been generated to provide data to calibrate the models to improve the credibility of the analysis and reduce the uncertainty. Tools selected for and developed under this program have been used to evaluate and predict the behavior of cementitious barriers used in near-surface engineered waste disposal systems for periods of performance up to or longer than 100 years for operating facilities and longer than 1000 years for waste disposal. The CBP Software Toolbox is and will continue to produce tangible benefits to the working DOE

  9. Waste to Energy : The Waste Incineration Directive and its Implementation in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duman, Murat; Boels, Luciaan

    2007-01-01

    Essent operates a coal-fired power plant, called AC-9, in Geertruidenberg. A gasifier connected to AC-9 thermally treats waste wood through gasification. The waste wood Essent used is demolition and construction wood, the so-called B-wood. The gas produced through gasification is fed into the

  10. Waste to Energy : The Waste Incineration Directive and its Implementation in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duman, Murat; Boels, Luciaan

    2007-01-01

    Essent operates a coal-fired power plant, called AC-9, in Geertruidenberg. A gasifier connected to AC-9 thermally treats waste wood through gasification. The waste wood Essent used is demolition and construction wood, the so-called B-wood. The gas produced through gasification is fed into the connec

  11. Absorbency of Superabsorbent Polymers in Cementitious Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, Luis Pedro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2012-01-01

    Optimal use of superabsorbent polymers (SAP) in cement-based materials relies on knowledge on how SAP absorbency is influenced by different physical and chemical parameters. These parameters include salt concentration in the pore fluid, temperature of the system and SAP particle size. The present...... composition of the exposure liquid is investigated with atomic absorption spectroscopy. The paper provides the reader with knowledge about the absorption capacity of SAP in a cementitious environment, and how the absorption process may influence the cement pore fluid....

  12. Self-degradable Cementitious Sealing Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, T.; Butcher, T., Lance Brothers, Bour, D.

    2010-10-01

    A self-degradable alkali-activated cementitious material consisting of a sodium silicate activator, slag, Class C fly ash, and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) additive was formulated as one dry mix component, and we evaluated its potential in laboratory for use as a temporary sealing material for Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells. The self-degradation of alkali-activated cementitious material (AACM) occurred, when AACM heated at temperatures of {ge}200 C came in contact with water. We interpreted the mechanism of this water-initiated self-degradation as resulting from the in-situ exothermic reactions between the reactants yielded from the dissolution of the non-reacted or partially reacted sodium silicate activator and the thermal degradation of the CMC. The magnitude of self-degradation depended on the CMC content; its effective content in promoting degradation was {ge}0.7%. In contrast, no self-degradation was observed from CMC-modified Class G well cement. For 200 C-autoclaved AACMs without CMC, followed by heating at temperatures up to 300 C, they had a compressive strength ranging from 5982 to 4945 psi, which is {approx}3.5-fold higher than that of the commercial Class G well cement; the initial- and final-setting times of this AACM slurry at 85 C were {approx}60 and {approx}90 min. Two well-formed crystalline hydration phases, 1.1 nm tobermorite and calcium silicate hydrate (I), were responsible for developing this excellent high compressive strength. Although CMC is an attractive, as a degradation-promoting additive, its addition to both the AACM and the Class G well cement altered some properties of original cementitious materials; among those were an extending their setting times, an increasing their porosity, and lowering their compressive strength. Nevertheless, a 0.7% CMC-modified AACM as self-degradable cementitious material displayed the following properties before its breakdown by water; {approx}120 min initial- and {approx}180 min final

  13. Chloride diffusion in partially saturated cementitious material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Erik Pram; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2003-01-01

    The paper proposes a combined application of composite theory and Powers' model for microstructural development for the estimation of the diffusion coefficient as a function of the moisture content of a defect-free cementitious material. Measurements of chloride diffusion in mortar samples (440 kg....../m(3) rapid-hardening Portland cement, w/c = 0.5, maturity minimum 6 months) stored at 65% and 85% RH, as well as in vacuum-saturated mortar samples, illustrate the applicability of the method. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  14. Direct oxidation of strong waste waters, simulating combined wastes in extended-mission space cabins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    The applications of modern technology to the resolution of the problem of solid wastes in space cabin environments was studied with emphasis on the exploration of operating conditions that would permit lowering of process temperatures in wet oxidation of combined human wastes. It was found that the ultimate degree of degradation is not enhanced by use of a catalyst. However, the rate of oxidation is increased, and the temperature of oxidation is reduced to 400 F.

  15. Strengthening masonry infill panels using engineered cementitious composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehghani, Ayoub; Fischer, Gregor; Nateghi Alahi, Fariborz

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive experimental study aims at investigating the behavior of masonry infill panels strengthened by fiber reinforced engineered cementitious composites (ECC). The experimental program included testing of materials, masonry elements and panels. Material tests were carried out first f...

  16. 75 FR 60632 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Direct Final Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and analytical data from the Beaumont Refinery, Beaumont, Texas facility. C. How will Beaumont... offsite Landfill, so no ground water monitoring data for disposal of this waste stream in the landfill is... environmental data (including but not limited to leachate data or ground water monitoring data) or any...

  17. Studies of ancient concrete as analogs of cementitious sealing materials for a repository in tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, D.M.; Langton, C.A.

    1989-03-01

    The durability of ancient cementitious materials has been investigated to provide data applicable to determining the resistance to weathering of concrete materials for sealing a repository for storage of high-level radioactive waste. Because tuff and volcanic ash are used in the concretes in the vicinity of Rome, the results are especially applicable to a waste repository in tuff. Ancient mortars, plasters, and concretes collected from Rome, Ostia, and Cosa dating to the third century BC show remarkable durability. The aggregates used in the mortars, plasters, and concretes included basic volcanic and pyroclastic rocks (including tuff), terra-cotta, carbonates, sands, and volcanic ash. The matrices of ancient cementitious materials have been characterized and classified into four categories: (1) hydraulic hydrated lime and hydrated lime cements, (2) hydraulic aluminous and ferruginous hydrated lime cements ({plus_minus} siliceous components), (3) pozzolana/hydrated lime cements, and (4) gypsum cements. Most of the materials investigated are in category (3). The materials were characterized to elucidate aspects of the technology that produced them and their response to the environmental exposure throughout their centuries of existence. Their remarkable properties are the result of a combination of chemical, mineralogical, and microstructural factors. Their durability was found to be affected by the matrix mineralogy, particle size, and porosity; aggregate type, grading and proportioning; and the methodology of placement. 30 refs.

  18. Studies of ancient concrete as analogs of cementitious sealing materials for a repository in tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, D.M.; Langton, C.A.

    1989-03-01

    The durability of ancient cementitious materials has been investigated to provide data applicable to determining the resistance to weathering of concrete materials for sealing a repository for storage of high-level radioactive waste. Because tuff and volcanic ash are used in the concretes in the vicinity of Rome, the results are especially applicable to a waste repository in tuff. Ancient mortars, plasters, and concretes collected from Rome, Ostia, and Cosa dating to the third century BC show remarkable durability. The aggregates used in the mortars, plasters, and concretes included basic volcanic and pyroclastic rocks (including tuff), terra-cotta, carbonates, sands, and volcanic ash. The matrices of ancient cementitious materials have been characterized and classified into four categories: (1) hydraulic hydrated lime and hydrated lime cements, (2) hydraulic aluminous and ferruginous hydrated lime cements ({plus_minus} siliceous components), (3) pozzolana/hydrated lime cements, and (4) gypsum cements. Most of the materials investigated are in category (3). The materials were characterized to elucidate aspects of the technology that produced them and their response to the environmental exposure throughout their centuries of existence. Their remarkable properties are the result of a combination of chemical, mineralogical, and microstructural factors. Their durability was found to be affected by the matrix mineralogy, particle size, and porosity; aggregate type, grading and proportioning; and the methodology of placement. 30 refs.

  19. Food waste-to-energy conversion technologies: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thi Phuong Thuy; Kaushik, Rajni; Parshetti, Ganesh K; Mahmood, Russell; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2015-04-01

    Food waste represents a significantly fraction of municipal solid waste. Proper management and recycling of huge volumes of food waste are required to reduce its environmental burdens and to minimize risks to human health. Food waste is indeed an untapped resource with great potential for energy production. Utilization of food waste for energy conversion currently represents a challenge due to various reasons. These include its inherent heterogeneously variable compositions, high moisture contents and low calorific value, which constitute an impediment for the development of robust, large scale, and efficient industrial processes. Although a considerable amount of research has been carried out on the conversion of food waste to renewable energy, there is a lack of comprehensive and systematic reviews of the published literature. The present review synthesizes the current knowledge available in the use of technologies for food-waste-to-energy conversion involving biological (e.g. anaerobic digestion and fermentation), thermal and thermochemical technologies (e.g. incineration, pyrolysis, gasification and hydrothermal oxidation). The competitive advantages of these technologies as well as the challenges associated with them are discussed. In addition, the future directions for more effective utilization of food waste for renewable energy generation are suggested from an interdisciplinary perspective. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Direct Grout Stabilization of High Cesium Salt Waste: Salt Alternative Phase III Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.A.

    1998-12-07

    The direct grout alternative is a viable option for treatment/stabilization and disposal of salt waste containing Cs-137 concentrations of 1-3 Ci/gal. The composition of the direct grout salt solution is higher in sodium salts and contains up to a few hundred ppm Cs-137 more than the current reference salt solution. However it is still similar to the composition of the current reference salt solution. Consequently, the processing, setting, and leaching properties (including TCLP for Cr and Hg) of the direct grout and current saltstone waste forms are very similar. The significant difference between these waste solutions is that the high cesium salt solution will contain between 1 and 3 Curies of Cs-137 per gallon compared to a negligible amount in the current salt solution. This difference will require special engineering and shielding for a direct grout processing facility and disposal units to achieve acceptable radiation exposure conditions. The Cs-137 concentration in the direct grout salt solution will also affect the long-term curing temperature of the waste form since 4.84 Watts of energy are generated per 1000 Ci of Cs-137. The temperature rise of the direct grout during long-term curing has been calculated by A. Shaddy, SRTC.1 The effect of curing temperature on the strength, leaching and physical durability of the direct grout saltstone is described in this report. At the present time, long term curing at 90 degrees C appears to be unacceptable because of cracking which will affect the structural integrity as evaluated in the immersion test. (The experiments conducted in this feasibility study do not address the effect of cracking on leaching of contaminants other than Cr, Hg, and Cs.) No cracking of the direct grout or reference saltstone waste forms was observed for samples cured at 70 degrees C. At the present time the implications of waste form cracking at elevated curing temperatures has not been fully addressed. The direct grout falls within the

  1. Wet-Treated MSWI Fly Ash Used as Supplementary Cementitious Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Keppert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI is a common technique in treatment of domestic waste. This technique annually produces approximately 25 Mt solid residues (i.e., bottom and fly ash worldwide which is also a major issue in current research. In this research we are concerned with reusing the fly ash (FA as supplementary cementitious material (SCM in concrete. Such application solves the problem with heavy metal immobilization as well. To remove the high content of undesired soluble salts, number of washing treatments has been applied. Chemical composition of FA has been examined before and after treatments. The impact of cement substitution by FA in concrete was evaluated by measurement of its compressive strength and durability.

  2. X-ray computed microtomography of three-dimensional microcracks and self-healing in engineered cementitious composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shuai; Li, Mo

    2015-01-01

    Concrete cracking and deterioration can potentially be addressed by innovative self-healing cementitious materials, which can autogenously regain transport properties and mechanical characteristics after the damage self-healing process. For the development of such materials, it is crucial, but challenging, to precisely characterize the extent and quality of self-healing due to a variety of factors. This study adopted x-ray computed microtomography (μCT) to derive three-dimensional morphological data on microcracks before and after healing in engineered cementitious composite (ECC). Scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were also used to morphologically and chemically analyze the healing products. This work showed that the evolution of the microcrack 3D structure due to self-healing in cementitious materials can be directly and quantitatively characterized by μCT. A detailed description of the μCT image analysis method applied to ECC self-healing was presented. The results revealed that the self-healing extent and rate strongly depended on initial surface crack width, with smaller crack width favoring fast and robust self-healing. We also found that the self-healing mechanism in cementitious materials is dependent on crack depth. The region of a crack close to the surface (from 0 to around 50-150 μm below the surface) can be sealed quickly with crystalline precipitates. However, at greater depths the healing process inside the crack takes a significantly longer time to occur, with healing products more likely resulting from continued hydration and pozzolanic reactions. Finally, the μCT method was compared with other self-healing characterization methods, with discussions on its importance in generating new scientific knowledge for the development of robust self-healing cementitious materials.

  3. New cementitious system: The case of glass frit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Galal

    Canada ranks as the world's third largest aluminium producer, and more than 80% of its aluminum industry is concentrated in Quebec. However, the spent pot-liner waste produced by the aluminium smelters accumulates with time into a considerable amount threatening the Canadian environment, especially that of Quebec. A new-engineered material, known as glass fit (GF) has been developed through the chemical treatment of such waste. GF shows potential hydraulic and pozzolanic properties. GF has been studied as a binder itself and as a supplementary cementitious material (SCM). The activation of industrial by-products into clinkerless binders is a novel trend that has attracted the attention of many researchers. The activation of GF into binder to produce paste, mortar and concrete was the first aim of this study. Potential activation of GF using different types and combinations of inorganic activators and temperatures of activation was successfully achieved and high strength concretes were obtained. Moreover, mortars with high compressive strength were obtained with well-formulated activators at ambient temperature. On the other hand, the utilization of industrial by-products as a partial replacement for cement in concrete is a widespread practice. As GF contains a high concentration of sodium in its structure, there is a concern as to the effect of sodium content on the development of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) expansion of concrete. Therefore, this study also aimed to investigate the effect of GF sodium content in the enhancement of ASR expansion and to find new synergistic mixtures that can effectively mitigate ASR expansion in the long term. We observed that ASR expansion decreases with the replacement level of GF. Different synergistic diagrams containing known SCM (silica fume, fly ash, and slag) were achieved from which different effective mixtures can effectively alleviate ASR expansion. In conclusion, the use of GF in the manufacture of concrete has great

  4. Temporary Cementitious Sealers in Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Butcher, T.; Brothers, L.; Bour, D.

    2011-12-31

    Unlike conventional hydrothennal geothermal technology that utilizes hot water as the energy conversion resources tapped from natural hydrothermal reservoir located at {approx}10 km below the ground surface, Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) must create a hydrothermal reservoir in a hot rock stratum at temperatures {ge}200 C, present in {approx}5 km deep underground by employing hydraulic fracturing. This is the process of initiating and propagating a fracture as well as opening pre-existing fractures in a rock layer. In this operation, a considerable attention is paid to the pre-existing fractures and pressure-generated ones made in the underground foundation during drilling and logging. These fractures in terms of lost circulation zones often cause the wastage of a substantial amount of the circulated water-based drilling fluid or mud. Thus, such lost circulation zones must be plugged by sealing materials, so that the drilling operation can resume and continue. Next, one important consideration is the fact that the sealers must be disintegrated by highly pressured water to reopen the plugged fractures and to promote the propagation of reopened fractures. In response to this need, the objective of this phase I project in FYs 2009-2011 was to develop temporary cementitious fracture sealing materials possessing self-degradable properties generating when {ge} 200 C-heated scalers came in contact with water. At BNL, we formulated two types of non-Portland cementitious systems using inexpensive industrial by-products with pozzolanic properties, such as granulated blast-furnace slag from the steel industries, and fly ashes from coal-combustion power plants. These byproducts were activated by sodium silicate to initiate their pozzolanic reactions, and to create a cemetitious structure. One developed system was sodium silicate alkali-activated slag/Class C fly ash (AASC); the other was sodium silicate alkali-activated slag/Class F fly ash (AASF) as the binder of temper

  5. Mechanisms of cementitious material deterioration in biogas digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voegel, C; Bertron, A; Erable, B

    2016-11-15

    Digesters produce biogas from organic wastes through anaerobic digestion processes. These digesters, often made of concrete, suffer severe premature deterioration caused mainly by the presence of fermentative microorganisms producing metabolites that are aggressive towards cementitious materials. To clarify the degradation mechanisms in an anaerobic digestion medium, ordinary Portland cement paste specimens were immersed in the liquid fraction of a running, lab-scale digester for 4weeks. The anaerobic digestion medium was a mixture of a biowaste substrate and sludge from municipal wastewater treatment plant used as a source of anaerobic bacteria. The chemical characteristics of the anaerobic digestion liquid phase were monitored over time using a pH metre, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and ion chromatography (HPIC). An initial critical period of low pH in the bioreactors was observed before the pH stabilized around 8. Acetic, propionic and butyric acids were produced during the digestion with a maximum total organic acid concentration of 50mmolL(-1). The maximum ammonium content of the liquid phase was 40mmolL(-1), which was about seven times the upper limit of the highly aggressive chemical environment class (XA3) as defined by the European standard for the specification of concrete design in chemically aggressive environments (EN 206). The changes in the mineralogical, microstructural and chemical characteristics of the cement pastes exposed to the solid and liquid phase of the digesters were analysed at the end of the immersion period by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and electron-probe micro-analysis (EPMA). A 700-μm thick altered layer was identified in the cement paste specimens. The main biodeterioration patterns in the bioreactors' solid/liquid phase were calcium leaching and carbonation of the cement matrix.

  6. Bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akgun, H.; Daemen, J.J.K. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Dept. of Mining and Geological Engineering

    1991-02-01

    Axial loads on plugs or seals in an underground repository due to gas, water pressures and temperature changes induced subsequent to waste and plug emplacement lead to shear stresses at the plug/rock contact. Therefore, the bond between the plug and rock is a critical element for the design and effectiveness of plugs in boreholes, shafts or tunnels. This study includes a systematic investigation of the bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff. Analytical and numerical analysis of borehole plug-rock stress transfer mechanics is performed. The interface strength and deformation are studied as a function of Young`s modulus ratio of plug and rock, plug length and rock cylinder outside-to-inside radius ratio. The tensile stresses in and near an axially loaded plug are analyzed. The frictional interface strength of an axially loaded borehole plug, the effect of axial stress and lateral external stress, and thermal effects are also analyzed. Implications for plug design are discussed. The main conclusion is a strong recommendation to design friction plugs in shafts, drifts, tunnels or boreholes with a minimum length to diameter ratio of four. Such a geometrical design will reduce tensile stresses in the plug and in the host rock to a level which should minimize the risk of long-term deterioration caused by excessive tensile stresses. Push-out tests have been used to determine the bond strength by applying an axial load to cement plugs emplaced in boreholes in welded tuff cylinders. A total of 130 push-out tests have been performed as a function of borehole size, plug length, temperature, and degree of saturation of the host tuff. The use of four different borehole radii enables evaluation of size effects. 119 refs., 42 figs., 20 tabs.

  7. Development of a Waste Vault Directional Assay System (VDAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFleur, Adrienne Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-08

    We are developing a portable neutron and gamma detector called VDAS with sufficient sensitivity and directional capability such that it could operate in high gamma dose rate environments. This detector will be designed such that it can be remotely deployed and adaptable to a broad range of possible facility infrastructure to record a 3D array of gross neutron and gamma measurements, including axial and radial rotation, for identifying potential SNM material locations.

  8. Bioreceptivity evaluation of cementitious materials designed to stimulate biological growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Sandra; De Muynck, Willem; Segura, Ignacio; Aguado, Antonio; Steppe, Kathy; Boon, Nico; De Belie, Nele

    2014-05-15

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC), the most used binder in construction, presents some disadvantages in terms of pollution (CO2 emissions) and visual impact. For this reason, green roofs and façades have gain considerable attention in the last decade as a way to integrate nature in cities. These systems, however, suffer from high initial and maintenance costs. An alternative strategy to obtain green facades is the direct natural colonisation of the cementitious construction materials constituting the wall, a phenomenon governed by the bioreceptivity of such material. This work aims at assessing the suitability of magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) materials to allow a rapid natural colonisation taking carbonated OPC samples as a reference material. For that, the aggregate size, the w/c ratio and the amount of cement paste of mortars made of both binders were modified. The assessment of the different bioreceptivities was conducted by means of an accelerated algal fouling test. MPC samples exhibited a faster fouling compared to OPC samples, which could be mainly attributed to the lower pH of the MPC binder. In addition to the binder, the fouling rate was governed by the roughness and the porosity of the material. MPC mortar with moderate porosity and roughness appears to be the most feasible material to be used for the development of green concrete walls.

  9. Uniaxial Compressive Properties of Ultra High Toughness Cementitious Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xiangrong; XU Shilang

    2011-01-01

    Uniaxial compression tests were conducted to characterize the main compressive performance of ultra high toughness cementitious composite(UHTCC)in terms of strength and toughness and to obtain its stress-strain relationships.The compressive strength investigated ranges from 30 MPa to 60 MPa.Complete stress-strain curves were directly obtained,and the strength indexes,including uniaxial compressive strength,compressive strain at peak stress,elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio,were calculated.The comparisons between UHTCC and matrix were also carried out to understand the fiber effect on the compressive strength indexes.Three dimensionless toughness indexes were calculated,which either represent its relative improvement in energy absorption capacity because of fiber addition or provide an indication of its behavior relative to a rigid-plastic material.Moreover,two new toughness indexes,which were named as post-crack deformation energy and equivalent compressive strength,were proposed and calculated with the aim at linking up the compressive toughness of UHTCC with the existing design concept of concrete.The failure mode was also given.The study production provides material characteristics for the practical engineering application of UHTCC.

  10. Study on cementitious properties of steel slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu G.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The converter steel slag chemical and mineral components in China’s main steel plants have been analysed in the present paper. The electronic microscope, energy spectrum analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the main mineral compositions in the converter slag. Converter slag of different components were grounded to obtain a powder with specific surface area over 400m2/kg, making them to take place some part of the cement in the concrete as the admixture and carry out the standard tests. The results indicate that the converter slag can be used as cementitious materials for construction. Furthermore, physical mechanic and durability tests on the concrete that certain amount of cement be substituted by converter steel slag powder from different steel plants are carried out, the results show that the concrete with partial substitution of steel slag powder has the advantages of higher later period strength, better frost resistance, good wear resistance and lower hydration heat, etc. This study can be used as the technical basis for “Steel Slag Powder Used For Cement And Concrete”, “Steel Slag Portland Cement”, “Low Heat Portland Steel Slag Cement”, “Steel Slag Road Cement” in China, as well as a driving force to the works of steel slag utilization with high-value addition, circular economy, energy conservation and discharge reduction in the iron and steel industry.

  11. Status and direction of waste minimization in the chemical and petrochemical industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englande Junior, A.J. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States). School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an evaluation of the status and direction of toxic/hazardous waste reduction in chemical and petrochemical industries from an international perspective. In almost all cases studied savings have resulted. The importance of pollution prevention by `clean technologies` instead of remediation is stressed. 6 refs., 4 tabs.

  12. Directed Evolution Strategies for Enantiocomplementary Haloalkane Dehalogenases : From Chemical Waste to Enantiopure Building Blocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Jan G. E.; Wijma, Hein J.; Floor, Robert J.; van der Laan, Jan-Metske; Janssen, Dick B.

    2012-01-01

    We used directed evolution to obtain enantiocomplementary haloalkane dehalogenase variants that convert the toxic waste compound 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP) into highly enantioenriched (R)- or (S)-2,3-dichloropropan-1-ol, which can easily be converted into optically active

  13. Characterization of cracking in Strain-Hardening Cementitious Composites using the compact tension test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Eduardo B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, Joaquim A. O.

    The characterization of the tensile behavior of strain hardening cementitious composites (SHCC) is of significant importance to the material design. In a previous work the tensile stress-crack opening response of different types of SHCC was characterized using notched specimens tested in direct...... plate specimens and the eccentrically applied tensile load create the local conditions necessary to the initiation of a single crack at the tip of the notch. Further propagation and opening of the crack in Mode I allow the assessment of the tensile load-displacement relationship. The experimental...

  14. Direct and indirect generation of waste in the Spanish paper industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Peñalver, Soraya María; Rodríguez Molina, Mercedes; Camacho Ballesta, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The paper industry has a relatively high degree of reliance on suppliers when compared to other industries. Exploring the role of the paper industry in terms of consumption of intermediate inputs from other industries may help to understand how the production of paper does not only generate waste by itself but also affects the amount of waste generated by other industries. The product Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a useful analytical tool to examine and assess environmental impacts over the entire life cycle of a product "from cradle to grave" but it is costly and time intensive. In contrast, Economic Input Output Life Cycle Assessment Models (IO-LCA) that combine LCA with Input-Output analysis (IO) are more accurate and less expensive, as they employ publicly available data. This paper represents one of the first Spanish studies aimed at estimating the waste generated in the production of paper by applying IO-LCA. One of the major benefits is the derivation of the contribution of direct and indirect suppliers to the paper industry. The results obtained show that there was no direct relationship between the impact on output and the impact on waste generation exerted by the paper industry. The major contributors to waste generation were the mining industry and the forestry industry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of Direct Assessment Approaches and Methodologies to Cathodically Protected Nuclear Waste Transfer Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, Megan M. [ARES Corporation, Richland, WA (United States); Pikas, Joseph [Schiff Associates, Sugar Land TX (United States); Edgemon, Glenn L. [ARES Corporation, Richland, WA (United States); Philo, Sarah [ARES Corporation, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is responsible for the safe storage, retrieval, treatment, and disposal of approximately 54 million gallons (204 million liters) of radioactive waste generated since the site's inception in 1943. Today, the major structures involved in waste management at Hanford include 149 carbon steel single-shell tanks, 28 carbon-steel double-shell tanks, plus a network of buried metallic transfer lines and ancillary systems (pits, vaults, catch tanks, etc.) required to store, retrieve, and transfer waste within the tank farm system. Many of the waste management systems at Hanford are still in use today. In response to uncertainties regarding the structural integrity of these systems,' an independent, comprehensive integrity assessment of the Hanford Site piping system was performed. It was found that regulators do not require the cathodically protected pipelines located within the Hanford Site to be assessed by External Corrosion Direct Assessment (ECDA) or any other method used to ensure integrity. However, a case study is presented discussing the application of the direct assessment process on pipelines in such a nuclear environment. Assessment methodology and assessment results are contained herein. An approach is described for the monitoring, integration of outside data, and analysis of this information in order to identify whether coating deterioration accompanied by external corrosion is a threat for these waste transfer lines.

  16. Direct oxidation of waste vegetable oil in solid-oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z. F.; Kumar, R.; Thakur, S. T.; Rudnick, L. R.; Schobert, H.; Lvov, S. N.

    Solid-oxide fuel cells with ceria, ceria-Cu, and ceria-Rh anode were demonstrated to generate stable electric power with waste vegetable oil through direct oxidation of the fuel. The only pre-treatment to the fuel was a filtration to remove particulates. The performance of the fuel cell was stable over 100 h for the waste vegetable oil without dilution. The generated power was up to 0.25 W cm -2 for ceria-Rh fuel cell. This compares favorably with previously studied hydrocarbon fuels including jet fuels and Pennsylvania crude oil.

  17. Direct power generation from waste coffee grounds in a biomass fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hansaem; Ocon, Joey D.; Lee, Seunghwa; Lee, Jae Kwang; Lee, Jaeyoung

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of direct power generation from waste coffee grounds (WCG) via high-temperature carbon fuel cell technology. At 900 °C, the WCG-powered fuel cell exhibits a maximum power density that is twice than carbon black. Our results suggest that the heteroatoms and hydrogen contained in WCG are crucial in providing good cell performance due to its in-situ gasification, without any need for pre-reforming. As a first report on the use of coffee as a carbon-neutral fuel, this study shows the potential of waste biomass (e.g. WCG) in sustainable electricity generation in fuel cells.

  18. 77 FR 24403 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan...). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is approving Illinois' revised State Plan to control air pollutants from ``Hazardous/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators'' (HMIWI). The Illinois Environmental...

  19. 77 FR 24451 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan...). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve, through direct final rulemaking, Illinois' revised State Plan to control air pollutants from Hazardous/ Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI...

  20. 77 FR 24405 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan...). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is approving Indiana's revised State Plan to control air pollutants from ``Hazardous/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators'' (HMIWI). The Indiana Department of...

  1. Direct Aqueous Mineral Carbonation of Waste Slate Using Ammonium Salt Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwanju Jo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The carbonation of asbestos-containing waste slate using a direct aqueous mineral carbonation method was evaluated. Leaching and carbonation tests were conducted on asbestos-containing waste slate using ammonium salt (CH3COONH4, NH4NO3, and NH4HSO4 solutions at various concentrations. The CH3COONH4 solution had the highest Ca-leaching efficiency (17%–35% and the NH4HSO4 solution had the highest Mg-leaching efficiency (7%–24% at various solid dosages and solvent concentrations. The CaCO3 content of the reacted materials based on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA was approximately 10%–17% higher than that of the as-received material for the 1 M CH3COONH4 and the 1 M NH4HSO4 solutions. The carbonates were precipitated on the surface of chrysotile, which was contained in the waste slate reacted with CO2. These results imply that CO2 can be sequestered by a direct aqueous mineral carbonation using waste slate.

  2. Adsorption of direct dye onto activated carbon prepared from areca nut pod--an agricultural waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswami, P; Sivakumar, N; Ponnuswamy, S; Venkateswaren, V; Kavitha, G

    2010-10-01

    Activated carbons are made from various agricultural wastes by physical and chemical activation. The preparation of activated carbon from agricultural waste could increase economic return and also provides an excellent method for the solid waste disposal thereby reduce pollution. Areca nut pod, which is an agricultural waste, has been used as a raw material to produce activated carbon (AAC) by four different methods. The adsorption of Direct blue dye used in textile industry on the porous areca nut pod activated carbon was investigated. The activated carbon AAC has an average surface area of 502 m2/g. CAC, the commercial reference was mainly micro porous with a surface area of 1026 m2/g .The study investigated the removal of direct dye from simulated water. The effects of adsorbent dosage, initial dye concentration, pH and contact time were studied. The results showed that as the amount of the adsorbent was increased, the percentage of dye removal increased accordingly. The results indicate that AAC could be employed as low-cost alternative to commercial activated carbon in wastewater treatment for the removal of acid dyes.

  3. Research paper 2000-B-8: the implementation of the municipal waste incineration directives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lulofs, K. [Twente Univ., Center for Clean Technology and Environmental Policy, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    End-of-pipe options are needed whenever recycling and source reduction can not cope with waste streams at acceptable costs. One of the disposal options is waste incineration. The incineration of waste was considered 'clean' for a long time. In the 1970's and 1980's it proved that the incineration of municipal waste was a significant source of air pollution. Notorious pollutants were hydrogen chloride, hydrogen florid, sulphur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, fine particulate matter, 'heavy metals' and dioxines and furans. Most notorious and issue of public anxiety in some countries were emissions of dioxines and that might cause cancer and birth defects. Municipal waste is domestic waste from households and comparable waste from markets and companies. Consent is present that in the long history of waste incinerators, incineration in plants started in Europe around 1900, important steps to secure health and the environment have been taken and will be taken in the future. Debates are still going on the level of emissions that is negligible and acceptable. Also in the European arena waste management is about knowledge, perceptions, uncertainties and negotiations. Arguments are on the right level of ambition and the right level of fine-tuning where precautionary measures are discussed. The European Union decided to issue two European Directives on the atmospheric emissions from municipal waste incineration in 1989. This chapter focuses on the implementation and effects of the 1989 Directives. In section 2 of this chapter we summarize the bargaining on the 1989 European Directives. Section 2 indicates that characteristics of municipal waste incineration and the level of pre-existing national regulation sectors in individual member states played decisive roles. When the 1989 Directives came into force, the requirements had to be integrated in the national legislation in European Member States. In section 3 Germany and the Netherlands will prove

  4. Formulation and preparation on Hanford Waste Treatment Plan direct feed low activity waste effluent management facility core simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, Charles A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL; Adamson, Duane J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL

    2016-05-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate, LMOGC) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream is to evaporate it in a new evaporator in the Effluent Management Facility (EMF) and then return it to the LAW melter. It is important to understand the composition of the effluents from the melter and new evaporator so that the disposition of these streams can be accurately planned and accommodated. Furthermore, alternate disposition of the LMOGC stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Alternate disposition would also eliminate this stream from recycling within WTP when it begins operations and would decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste, amongst the other problems such a recycle stream present. This LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate stream will contain components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form, such as halides and sulfate. Because this stream will recycle within WTP, these components accumulate in the Melter Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Diverting the stream reduces the halides and sulfate in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. This overall program examines the potential treatment and immobilization of this stream to enable alternative disposal. The objective of this task was to formulate and prepare a simulant of the LAW Melter

  5. Formulation and preparation of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant direct feed low activity waste Effluent Management Facility core simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, Charles A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL; Adamson, Duane J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL

    2016-05-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate, LMOGC) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream is to evaporate it in a new evaporator in the Effluent Management Facility (EMF) and then return it to the LAW melter. It is important to understand the composition of the effluents from the melter and new evaporator so that the disposition of these streams can be accurately planned and accommodated. Furthermore, alternate disposition of the LMOGC stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Alternate disposition would also eliminate this stream from recycling within WTP when it begins operations and would decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste, amongst the other problems such a recycle stream present. This LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate stream will contain components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form, such as halides and sulfate. Because this stream will recycle within WTP, these components accumulate in the Melter Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Diverting the stream reduces the halides and sulfate in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. This overall program examines the potential treatment and immobilization of this stream to enable alternative disposal. The objective of this task was to formulate and prepare a simulant of the LAW Melter

  6. Experimental Study on Cementitious Composites Embedded with Organic Microcapsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X.; Xing, F.; Zhang, M.; Han, N.; Qian, Z.

    2013-01-01

    The recovery behavior for strength and impermeability of cementitious composites embedded with organic microcapsules was investigated in this study. Mortar specimens were formed by mixing the organic microcapsules and a catalyst with cement and sand. The mechanical behaviors of flexural and compress

  7. Performance of alusilica as mineral admixture in cementitious systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Lin; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study of the effect of alusilica (ALS) as a mineral admixture on the fresh properties and development of mechanical properties of cementitious systems. Cement was substituted with ALS with the ratio of 10% during grinding or blended during mixing. The produced ALS......, it is believed that ALS can be a useful cement substitution....

  8. Thermodynamics of Autogenous Self-healing in Cementitious Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, H.

    2014-01-01

    Concrete is a brittle composite cementitious material that easily fractures under tensile loading. Microcracks can appear throughout the concrete prior to application of any load because of temperature-induced strain and autogenous and drying shrinkage. There is no doubt that these cracks provide pr

  9. Decorative application of strain-hardening cementitious composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ibrovic, V.; Lukovic, M.; Schlangen, E.

    2014-01-01

    Strain hardening cementitious composites (SHCC) have been used in variety of structural applications. Apart from this, they are also suitable for non-structural applications. In this work, the application of SHCC for producing cover plates for light switches and power sockets is presented. For desig

  10. Decorative application of strain-hardening cementitious composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ibrovic, V.; Lukovic, M.; Schlangen, E.

    2014-01-01

    Strain hardening cementitious composites (SHCC) have been used in variety of structural applications. Apart from this, they are also suitable for non-structural applications. In this work, the application of SHCC for producing cover plates for light switches and power sockets is presented. For

  11. Thermodynamics of Autogenous Self-healing in Cementitious Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, H.

    2014-01-01

    Concrete is a brittle composite cementitious material that easily fractures under tensile loading. Microcracks can appear throughout the concrete prior to application of any load because of temperature-induced strain and autogenous and drying shrinkage. There is no doubt that these cracks provide

  12. Optimization of SO3 Content in Blended Cementitious Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Mei-zhu; LIANG Wen-quan; HE Zhen; LI Bei-xing

    2003-01-01

    Experimental investigation was conducted on the effects of gypsum types and SO3 content on the fluidity and strengths of different cementitious systems.The experimental results show that influences of gypsum in various cementitious materials are different.For cementitious materials blended with various proportions of slag-fly ash and 5% gypsum content,influences of gypsum and calcined gypsum on the fluidity and flexural/compressive strength are similar.It is revealed that "combination effect" and "synergistic effect" of slag and fly ash play an important role during hydration.For cementitious materials with 45% clinkers,30%slag,20%fly ash and 5%limestone,the optimized SO3 contents in gypsum and calcined gypsum are 3.13% and 3.51% respectively and the optimized gypsum content is 6.5%.While both of them are blended,the optimum ratio of gypsum to calcined gypsum is 40%∶60%(total gypsum content 6.5%),correspondingly the optimum ratio of SO3 is 19.3%∶32.4%.

  13. A Plastic Damage Mechanics Model for Engineered Cementitious Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Lars; Stang, Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the establishment of a plasticity-based damage mechanics model for Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC). The present model differs from existing models by combining a matrix and fiber description in order to describe the behavior of the ECC material. The model provides in...

  14. 高韧性纤维增强水泥基复合材料与老混凝土的界面直剪试验研究%Experiment and Study on Direct Shear Behavior for Adhesion of Fiber Reinforced High Ductility Cementitious Composites on Existing Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓宗才; 薛会青

    2011-01-01

    Fiber reinforced high ductility cementitious composites(ECC) has high ductility and could effectively control micro-crack width. The experiment of direct shear behavior is researched for adhesion of ECC on existing concrete and provides records for retrofitting or strengthening concrete. Experimental results show that compressive and flexural strength of ECC are improved with increase of age; Interface shear strength of ECC bonding specimens is improved with increase of S/C, indicating the behavior of adhesion of ECC on existing concrete is improved with increase of S/C; The behavior of adhesion of ECC on existing concrete is much better than on self-compacting concrete and plain concrete. ECC is perfect material for retrofitting deck and pavement, strengthening reservoir and dam.%高韧性纤维增强水泥基复合材料(ECC)具备很好的延展性和微裂缝宽度控制能力,通过ECC与老混凝土之间的界面直剪试验,研究高韧性复合材料与普通混凝土之间的界面黏结性能,为混凝土工程的维修或加固提供试验数据.试验结果表明:随着龄期的增加,ECC抗压强度与抗折强度逐渐提高;随着砂灰比的增加,ECC黏结试件的界面抗剪强度逐渐提高,说明增加砂灰比可以提高ECC与老混凝土间的界面黏结性能;ECC与老混凝土间的界面黏结性能远优于自密实混凝土和普通混凝土,高韧性水泥基复合材料是修补桥面、路面和加固水库、大坝等混凝土工程的理想材料.

  15. Acceleration of percolation for cementitious sensors using conductive paint filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Irvin Jude Joseph

    Structural health monitoring has emerged as an important branch of civil engineering in recent times, with the need to automatically monitor structural performance over time to ensure structural integrity. More recently, the advent of smart sensing materials has given this field a major boost. Research has shown that smart sensing materials fabricated with conductive filler at a concentration close to the percolation threshold results in high sensitivity to strain due to the piezoresistive effect. Of particular interest to this research are cementitious sensors fabricated using carbon black fillers. Carbon black is considered because of its widespread availability and low cost over other conductive fillers such as carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers. A challenge in the fabrication of these sensors is that cementitious materials require a significant amount of carbon black to percolate, resulting in a loss in mechanical properties. This research investigates a new method to accelerate percolation of the materials, enabling cementitious sensors with fewer carbon black particles. A carbon black-based conductive paint that allows earlier percolation by facilitating conducting networks in cementitious sensors is used. The conductive paint consists of a block copolymer, SEBS (styrene-co-ethylene-co-butylene-co-styrene), filled with carbon black particles. The percolation thresholds of sensors fabricated both with and without conductive paint are, as well as their strain sensing characteristics and compressive strength. The study found that SEBS could successfully reduce the percolation threshold by 42%, and that samples with SEBS showed better electrical responses in dynamic conditions. Despite showing lower compressive strength, cementitious sensors fabricated with this novel conductive paint show promise for real time health monitoring applications.

  16. SCM Paste Samples Exposed To Aggressive Solutions. Cementitious Barriers Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-12-01

    This report summarizes experimental work performed by SIMCO Technologies Inc. (SIMCO) as part of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) project. The test series followed an experimental program dedicated to the study of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) hydrated cement pastes exposed to aggressive solutions. In the present study, the scope is extended to hydrated cement pastes incorporating supplementary cementitious materials (SCM) such as fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS). Also, the range of aggressive contact solutions was expanded. The experimental program aimed at testing aggressive contact solutions that more closely mimic the chemical composition of saltstone pore solution. Five different solutions, some of which incorporated high levels of carbonate and nitrate, were placed in contact with four different hydrated cement paste mixes. In all solutions, 150 mmol/L of SO42– (14 400 ppm) were present. The solutions included different pH conditions and different sodium content. Two paste mixes were equivalent to Vault 1/4 and Vault 2 concrete mixes used at SRS in storage structures. Two additional paste mixes, cast at the same water-to-cement ratio and using the same cements but without SCMs, were also tested. The damage evolution in samples was monitored using ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) and mass measurements. After three and twelve months of exposure conditions, samples were taken out of solution containers and analyzed to perform migration tests and porosity measurements. Globally, results were in line with the previous study and confirmed that high pH may limit the formation of some deleterious phases like gypsum. In this case, ettringite may form but is not necessarily associated with damage. However, the high concentration of sodium may be associated with the formation of an AFm-like mineral called U-phase. The most significant evidences of damage were all associated with the Vault 2 paste analog. This

  17. SCM Paste Samples Exposed To Aggressive Solutions. Cementitious Barriers Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-12-01

    This report summarizes experimental work performed by SIMCO Technologies Inc. (SIMCO) as part of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) project. The test series followed an experimental program dedicated to the study of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) hydrated cement pastes exposed to aggressive solutions. In the present study, the scope is extended to hydrated cement pastes incorporating supplementary cementitious materials (SCM) such as fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS). Also, the range of aggressive contact solutions was expanded. The experimental program aimed at testing aggressive contact solutions that more closely mimic the chemical composition of saltstone pore solution. Five different solutions, some of which incorporated high levels of carbonate and nitrate, were placed in contact with four different hydrated cement paste mixes. In all solutions, 150 mmol/L of SO42– (14 400 ppm) were present. The solutions included different pH conditions and different sodium content. Two paste mixes were equivalent to Vault 1/4 and Vault 2 concrete mixes uses at SRS in storage structures. Two additional paste mixes, cast at the same water-to-cement ratio and using the same cements but without SCMs, were also tested. The damage evolution in samples was monitored using ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) and mass measurements. After three and twelve months of exposure conditions, samples were taken out of solution containers and analyzed to perform migration tests and porosity measurements. Globally, results were in line with the previous study and confirmed that high pH may limit the formation of some deleterious phases like gypsum. In this case, ettringite may form but is not necessarily associated with damage. However, the high concentration of sodium may be associated with the formation of an AFm-like mineral called U-phase. The most significant evidences of damage were all associated with the Vault 2 paste analog. This

  18. Quantifying moisture transport in cementitious materials using neutron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Catherine L.

    A portion of the concrete pavements in the US have recently been observed to have premature joint deterioration. This damage is caused in part by the ingress of fluids, like water, salt water, or deicing salts. The ingress of these fluids can damage concrete when they freeze and expand or can react with the cementitious matrix causing damage. To determine the quality of concrete for assessing potential service life it is often necessary to measure the rate of fluid ingress, or sorptivity. Neutron imaging is a powerful method for quantifying fluid penetration since it can describe where water has penetrated, how quickly it has penetrated and the volume of water in the concrete or mortar. Neutrons are sensitive to light atoms such as hydrogen and thus clearly detect water at high spatial and temporal resolution. It can be used to detect small changes in moisture content and is ideal for monitoring wetting and drying in mortar exposed to various fluids. This study aimed at developing a method to accurately estimate moisture content in mortar. The common practice is to image the material dry as a reference before exposing to fluid and normalizing subsequent images to the reference. The volume of water can then be computed using the Beer-Lambert law. This method can be limiting because it requires exact image alignment between the reference image and all subsequent images. A model of neutron attenuation in a multi-phase cementitious composite was developed to be used in cases where a reference image is not available. The attenuation coefficients for water, un-hydrated cement, and sand were directly calculated from the neutron images. The attenuation coefficient for the hydration products was then back-calculated. The model can estimate the degree of saturation in a mortar with known mixture proportions without using a reference image for calculation. Absorption in mortars exposed to various fluids (i.e., deionized water and calcium chloride solutions) were investigated

  19. Direct measurements of the ozone formation potential from livestock and poultry waste emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Cody J; Kumar, Anuj; Mitloehner, Frank; Stackhouse, Kimberly; Green, Peter G; Flocchini, Robert G; Kleeman, Michael J

    2010-04-01

    The global pattern of expanding urban centers and increasing agricultural intensity is leading to more frequent interactions between air pollution emissions from urban and agricultural sources. The confluence of these emissions that traditionally have been separated by hundreds of kilometers is creating new air quality challenges in numerous regions across the United States. An area of particular interest is California's San Joaquin Valley (SJV), which has an agricultural output higher than many countries, a rapidly expanding human population, and ozone concentrations that are already higher than many dense urban areas. New regulations in the SJV restrict emissions of reactive organic gases (ROGs) from animal sources in an attempt to meet Federal and State ozone standards designed to protect human health. The objective of this work is to directly measure the ozone formation potential (OFP) of agricultural animal plus waste sources in representative urban and rural atmospheres using a transportable "smog" chamber. Four animal types were examined: beef cattle, dairy cattle, swine, and poultry. Emissions from each animal plus waste type were captured in a 1 m(3) Teflon bag, mixed with representative background NO(x) and ROG concentrations, and then exposed to UV radiation so that ozone formation could be quantified. The emitted ROG composition was also measured so that the theoretical incremental reactivity could be calculated for a variety of atmospheres and directly compared with the measured OFP under the experimental conditions. The results demonstrate that OFP associated with waste ROG emissions from swine (0.39 +/- 0.04 g-O(3) per g-ROG), beef cattle (0.51 +/- 0.10 g-O(3) per g-ROG), and dairy cattle (0.42 +/- 0.07 g-O(3) per g-ROG) are lower than OFP associated with ROG emissions from gasoline powered light-duty vehicles (LDV) (0.69 +/- 0.05 g-O(3) per g-ROG). The OFP of ROG emitted from poultry waste (1.35 +/- 0.73 g-O(3) per g-ROG) is approximately double the

  20. Principles and Applications of Ultrasonic-Based Nondestructive Methods for Self-Healing in Cementitious Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eunjong; Kim, Hyunjun; Sim, Sung-Han; Shin, Sung Woo; Shin, Myoungsu

    2017-03-10

    Recently, self-healing technologies have emerged as a promising approach to extend the service life of social infrastructure in the field of concrete construction. However, current evaluations of the self-healing technologies developed for cementitious materials are mostly limited to lab-scale experiments to inspect changes in surface crack width (by optical microscopy) and permeability. Furthermore, there is a universal lack of unified test methods to assess the effectiveness of self-healing technologies. Particularly, with respect to the self-healing of concrete applied in actual construction, nondestructive test methods are required to avoid interrupting the use of the structures under evaluation. This paper presents a review of all existing research on the principles of ultrasonic test methods and case studies pertaining to self-healing concrete. The main objective of the study is to examine the applicability and limitation of various ultrasonic test methods in assessing the self-healing performance. Finally, future directions on the development of reliable assessment methods for self-healing cementitious materials are suggested.

  1. Principles and Applications of Ultrasonic-Based Nondestructive Methods for Self-Healing in Cementitious Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunjong Ahn

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, self-healing technologies have emerged as a promising approach to extend the service life of social infrastructure in the field of concrete construction. However, current evaluations of the self-healing technologies developed for cementitious materials are mostly limited to lab-scale experiments to inspect changes in surface crack width (by optical microscopy and permeability. Furthermore, there is a universal lack of unified test methods to assess the effectiveness of self-healing technologies. Particularly, with respect to the self-healing of concrete applied in actual construction, nondestructive test methods are required to avoid interrupting the use of the structures under evaluation. This paper presents a review of all existing research on the principles of ultrasonic test methods and case studies pertaining to self-healing concrete. The main objective of the study is to examine the applicability and limitation of various ultrasonic test methods in assessing the self-healing performance. Finally, future directions on the development of reliable assessment methods for self-healing cementitious materials are suggested.

  2. Continuous Flow Metathesis for Direct Valorization of Food Waste: An Example of Cocoa Butter Triglyceride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schotten, Christiane; Plaza, Dorota; Manzini, Simone; Nolan, Steven P; Ley, Steven V; Browne, Duncan L; Lapkin, Alexei

    2015-07-06

    The direct chemical conversion of cocoa butter triglycerides, a material available as a postmanufacture waste stream from the food industry, to 1-decene by way of ethenolysis is reported. The conversion of the raw waste material was made possible by use of 1 mol % of the [RuCl2(iBu-phoban)2(3-phenylindenyl)] catalyst. The process has been investigated in both batch and flow conditions, where the latter approach employs a Teflon AF-2400 tube-in-tube gas-liquid membrane contactor to deliver ethylene to the reaction system. These preliminary studies culminate in a continuous processing system, which maintained a constant output over a 150 min period tested.

  3. Monitoring early age cementitious materials using ultrasonic guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerson, Jacob L.

    The evaluation of early age concrete is critical for reducing construction times and ensuring quality. In this study, the use of ultrasonic guided waves for monitoring the development of early age cementitious materials is investigated. A torsional wave is transmitted and received through a waveguide that is embedded in early age mortar or concrete. As the cementitious material sets and hardens, the received wave(s) change, indicating the transition from a semifluid to a solid state. This thesis proposes two systems. The first system is a through-transmission system; a wave is transmitted on one end of an embedded waveguide using a sensor arrangement and then it is received on the opposite end of the rod with another sensor. This approach monitors the attenuation of the fundamental torsional wave mode, resulting from the leakage of energy from the cylindrical steel rod to the surrounding cementitious material. The evolution of the material's properties is related to the energy leakage or attenuation of the guided wave. The second system is a pulse-echo system; a wave is transmitted on one end of a partially embedded waveguide via a sensor arrangement that also receives the reflected signals. This approach monitors both the reflection from the end of the rod and the reflection from the point where the waveguide enters the material. The development of the cementitious material's mechanical properties is related to both the energy leaked into the surrounding material and the energy reflected at the point of entry. The ability of this method to only require access to one side of the specimen makes it attractive for monitoring early age cementitious materials in the field. Experiments were performed on mixtures with varying water-cement ratios (w/c = 0.40, 0.50, and 0.60), chemical admixtures (accelerant and retardant), mineral admixtures (silica fume and fly ash), and coarse aggregate (pea gravel). The time of setting and compressive strength of the various mixtures

  4. Water absorption of superabsorbent polymers in a cementitious environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the water absorption of superabsorbent polymers in a cementitious environment. The paper discusses different techniques to measure the water absorption capacity, and in particular it describes a technique which enables a simple and quick estimation of the water absorption...... capacity in a cementitious environment. The challenges met in defining the concept of water absorption capacity are treated, and the appropriateness of different types of superabsorbent polymers is also briefly dealt with. The concept “water absorption capacity” and its measurement seem straightforwardly...... simple, but a closer examination of the topic discloses many, significant difficulties. However, given proper cautiousness it is possible both to quickly estimate the water absorption capacity through a simple measurement as well as to examine how it will be influenced by different factors....

  5. Progress in Research on Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As one-dimensional (1D nanofiber, carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been widely used to improve the performance of nanocomposites due to their high strength, small dimensions, and remarkable physical properties. Progress in the field of CNTs presents a potential opportunity to enhance cementitious composites at the nanoscale. In this review, current research activities and key advances on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs reinforced cementitious composites are summarized, including the effect of MWCNTs on modulus of elasticity, porosity, fracture, and mechanical and microstructure properties of cement-based composites. The issues about the improvement mechanisms, MWCNTs dispersion methods, and the major factors affecting the mechanical properties of composites are discussed. In addition, large-scale production methods of MWCNTs and the effects of CNTs on environment and health are also summarized.

  6. Strain and Cracking Surveillance in Engineered Cementitious Composites by Piezoresistive Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Huan Yu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECCs are novel cement-based ultraductile materials which is crack resistant and undergoes strain hardening when loaded in tension. In particular, the material is piezoresistive with changes in electrical resistance correlated with mechanical strain. The unique electrical properties of ECC render them a smart material capable of measuring strain and the evolution of structural damage. In this study, the conductivity of the material prior to loading was quantified. The piezoresistive property of ECC structural specimens are exploited to directly measure levels of cracking pattern and tensile strain. Changes in ECC electrical resistance are measured using a four-probe direct-current (DC resistance test as specimens are monotonically loaded in tension. The change in piezoresistivity correlates the cracking and strain in the ECC matrix and results in a nonlinear change in the material conductivity.

  7. Direct Measurement of Surface Dissolution Rates in Potential Nuclear Waste Forms: The Example of Pyrochlore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Cornelius; Finkeldei, Sarah; Brandt, Felix; Bosbach, Dirk; Luttge, Andreas

    2015-08-19

    The long-term stability of ceramic materials that are considered as potential nuclear waste forms is governed by heterogeneous surface reactivity. Thus, instead of a mean rate, the identification of one or more dominant contributors to the overall dissolution rate is the key to predict the stability of waste forms quantitatively. Direct surface measurements by vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) and their analysis via material flux maps and resulting dissolution rate spectra provide data about dominant rate contributors and their variability over time. Using pyrochlore (Nd2Zr2O7) pellet dissolution under acidic conditions as an example, we demonstrate the identification and quantification of dissolution rate contributors, based on VSI data and rate spectrum analysis. Heterogeneous surface alteration of pyrochlore varies by a factor of about 5 and additional material loss by chemo-mechanical grain pull-out within the uppermost grain layer. We identified four different rate contributors that are responsible for the observed dissolution rate range of single grains. Our new concept offers the opportunity to increase our mechanistic understanding and to predict quantitatively the alteration of ceramic waste forms.

  8. Energy implications of mechanical and mechanical–biological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cimpan, Ciprian, E-mail: cic@kbm.sdu.dk; Wenzel, Henrik

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Compared systems achieve primary energy savings between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste.} • Savings magnitude is foremost determined by chosen primary energy and materials production. • Energy consumption and process losses can be upset by increased technology efficiency. • Material recovery accounts for significant shares of primary energy savings. • Direct waste-to-energy is highly efficient if cogeneration (CHP) is possible. - Abstract: Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanical–biological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials for recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste}, in the different scenario settings. The energy footprint of transportation needs, pre-treatment and reprocessing of recyclable materials was 3–9.5%, 1–18% and 1–8% respectively, relative to total energy savings. Mass combustion WtE achieved the highest savings in scenarios with CHP production, nonetheless, MBT-based systems had similarly high performance if SRF streams were co-combusted with coal. When RDF and SRF was only used in dedicated WtE plants, MBT-based systems totalled lower savings due to inherent system losses and additional energy costs. In scenarios without heat

  9. Engineered cementitious composites for strengthening masonry infilled reinforced concrete frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehghani, Ayoub; Nateghi-Alahi, Fariborz; Fischer, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    The results of the second part of a comprehensive experimental program, aimed at investigating the behavior of masonry infilled reinforced concrete (RC) frames strengthened with fiber reinforced engineered cementitious composites (ECC) used as an overlay on the masonry wall, are presented in this...... and energy absorption capacity of the infilled frame, prevent brittle failure modes in the infill wall, and provide a reasonable system overstrength....

  10. Thermodynamics of Autogenous Self-healing in Cementitious Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, H.

    2014-01-01

    Concrete is a brittle composite cementitious material that easily fractures under tensile loading. Microcracks can appear throughout the concrete prior to application of any load because of temperature-induced strain and autogenous and drying shrinkage. There is no doubt that these cracks provide preferential access for aggressive agents to penetrate into the concrete, probably causing corrosion of reinforcement steel and degradation of concrete. As a result, the service life of reinforced co...

  11. Characterization of supplementary cementitious materials by thermal analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Bernal, S. A.; Juenger, M.C.G.; Ke, X.; Matthes, W.; Lothenbach, B; De Belie, N.; Provis, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Working Group 1 of RILEM TC 238-SCM ‘Hydration and microstructure of concrete with supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs)’ is defining best practices for the physical and chemical characterization of SCMs, and this paper focusses on their thermal analysis. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) can provide valuable data on the chemical and mineralogical composition of SCMs. Loss-on-ignition (LOI) testing is a commonly used, standardized, but less sophisticated version of TGA that measures mass...

  12. Development of an accurate pH measurement methodology for the pore fluids of low pH cementitious materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, M. C.; Garcia Calvo, J. L. [The Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Walker, C. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    2012-08-15

    The main objective of this project has been the development of an agreed set of protocols for the pH measurement of the pore fluid of a low pH cementitious material. Three protocols have been developed (Chapter 2), a reference method, based on pore fluid expression (PFE), and two routine methods with and without filtering, based on Ex Situ Leaching (ESL) procedures. Templates have been designed on which to record details of the pH measurement for the reference (PFE) method (Appendix C) and the routine (ESL) methods without and with filtering (Appendix D). Preliminary protocols were based on a broad review of the literature (Appendix A) and refined through a series of test experiments of the more critical parameters (Appendix B). After definition of the preliminary protocols, two phases of interlaboratory tests were performed. The first phase (Chapter 3) used the same low pH cement paste and enabled the nine participating laboratories to use, become familiar with and to identify any problems/uncertainties in the preliminary protocols. The reported pH values were subjected to a statistical analysis of the (within laboratory) repeatability and (between-laboratory) reproducibility and so provided a reliability test of the preliminary protocols. The second phase (Chapter 4) of interlaboratory tests used four different candidate low pH cementitious materials in the same nine laboratories, which allowed testing, validation and comparison of the reported pH values, which were obtained using the final protocols for the reference (PFE) and routine (ESL) methods by statistical analysis. The proposed final protocols (Chapter 2) have resulted in the reported pH values having low deviation and high reproducibility and repeatability. This will allow confidence in the pH value when selecting a candidate low pH cementitious material to be used in the engineered component of a high-level nuclear waste repository.

  13. Mechanical properties of gangue-containing aluminosilicate based cementitious materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    High performance aluminosilicate based cementitious materials were produced using calcined gangue as one of the major raw materials.The gangue was calcined at 500℃.The main constituent was calcined gangue, fly ash and slag, while alkali-silicate solutions were used as the diagenetic agent.The structure of gangue-containing aluminosilicate based cementitious materials was studied by the methods of IR, NMR and SEM.The results show that the mechanical properties are affected by the mass ratio between the gangue, slag and fly ash, the kind of activator and additional salt.For 28-day curing time, the compressive strength of the sample with a mass proportion of 2:1:1 (gangue: slag: fly ash) is 58.9 MPa, while the compressive strength of the sample containing 80wt%gangue can still be up to 52.3 MPa.The larger K+ favors the formation of large silicate oligomers with which Al(OH)4- prefers to bind.Therefore, in Na-K compounding activator solutions more oligomers exist which result in a stronger compressive strength of aluminosilicate-based cementitious materials than in the case of Na-containing activator.The reasons for this were found through IR and NMR analysis.Glauber's salt reduces the 3-day compressive strength of the paste, but increases its 7-day and 28-day compressive strengths.

  14. Dense packing properties of mineral admixtures in cementitious material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanzhou Peng; Shuguang Hu; Qingjun Ding

    2009-01-01

    The effect of ultra-fine fly ash (UFFA), steel slag (SS) and silica fume (SF) on packing density of binary, ternary and quaternary cementitious materials was studied in this paper in terms of minimum water requirement of cement. The influence of mineral admixtures on the relative density of pastes with low water/binder ratios was analyzed and the relationship between paste density and compressive strength of the corresponding hardened mortars was discussed. The results indicate that the incorporation of mineral admixtures can effectively improve the packing density of cementitious materials; the increase in packing density of a composite with incorporation of two or three kinds of mineral admixtures is even more obvious than that with only one mineral admixture. Moreover, an optimal amount of mineral admixture imparts to the mixture maximum packing density. The dense packing effect of a mineral admixture can increase the packing density of the resulting cementitious material and also the density of paste with low water/binder ratio, which evidently enhances the compressive strength of the hardened mortar.

  15. Characterization of Direct Push Vadose Zone Sediments from the T and TY Waste Management Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Iovin, Cristian; Clayton, Ray E.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Clayton, Eric T.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Orr, Robert D.

    2007-06-08

    This report contains all the geochemical and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from 5 direct push characterization holes emplaced to investigate vadose zone contamination associated with leaks from tanks 241-TY-105 (UPR-200-W-152) and 241-TY-106 (UPR-200-W-153). Tank 241-TY-105 is estimated to have leaked 35,000 gal of tributyl phosphate (TBP) waste from the uranium recovery process to the vadose zone in 1960. Tank 241-TY-106 is estimated to have leaked 20,000 gal of TBP-uranium recovery waste to the vadose zone in 1959. Although several drywells in the vicinity of tank 241-TY-106 contain measurable quantities of cesium-137 and/or cobalt-60, their relatively low concentrations indicate that the contaminant inventory in the vadose zone around tank 241-TY-106 is quite small. Additionally, this report contains all the geochemical and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from 7 direct push characterization holes emplaced to investigate vadose zone contamination associated with an overfill event and leak from tank 241-T-101.

  16. Glass cullet as a new supplementary cementitious material (SCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzahosseini, Mohammadreza

    Finely ground glass has the potential for pozzolanic reactivity and can serve as a supplementary cementitious material (SCM). Glass reaction kinetics depends on both temperature and glass composition. Uniform composition, amorphous nature, and high silica content of glass make ground glass an ideal material for studying the effects of glass type and particle size on reactivity at different temperature. This study focuses on how three narrow size ranges of clear and green glass cullet, 63--75 mum, 25--38 mum, and smaller than 25 mum, as well as combination of glass types and particle sizes affects the microstructure and performance properties of cementitious systems containing glass cullet as a SCM. Isothermal calorimetry, chemical shrinkage, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), quantitative analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD), and analysis of scanning electron microscope (SEM) images in backscattered (BS) mode were used to quantify the cement reaction kinetics and microstructure. Additionally, compressive strength and water sorptivity experiments were performed on mortar samples to correlate reactivity of cementitious materials containing glass to the performance of cementitious mixtures. A recently-developed modeling platform called "muic the model" was used to simulated pozzolanic reactivity of single type and fraction size and combined types and particle sizes of finely ground glass. Results showed that ground glass exhibits pozzolanic properties, especially when particles of clear and green glass below 25 mum and their combination were used at elevated temperatures, reflecting that glass cullet is a temperature-sensitive SCM. Moreover, glass composition was seen to have a large impact on reactivity. In this study, green glass showed higher reactivity than clear glass. Results also revealed that the simultaneous effect of sizes and types of glass cullet (surface area) on the degree of hydration of glass particles can be accounted for through a linear addition

  17. Direct releases to the surface and associated complementary cumulative distribution functions in the 1996 performance assessments for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Direct brine release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STOELZEL,D.M.; O' BRIEN,D.G.; GARNER,J.W.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; JOHNSON,J.D.; SCOTT,L.N.

    2000-05-19

    The following topics related to the treatment of direct brine releases to the surface environment in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are presented (1) mathematical description of models, (2) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results arising from subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty for individual releases, (3) construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) arising from stochastic (i.e., aleatory) uncertainty, and (4) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for CCDFs. The presented analyses indicate that direct brine releases do not constitute a serious threat to the effectiveness of the WIPP as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. Even when the effects of uncertain analysis inputs are taken into account, the CCDFs for direct brine releases fall substantially to the left of the boundary line specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (4O CFR 191.40 CFR 194).

  18. Research paper 2000-B-1: the implementation of the municipal waste incineration directive (89/429) in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schucht, S.

    2000-07-01

    This paper constitutes a contribution to the project 'IMPOL - The Implementation of EU Environmental Policies: Efficiency Issues'. The paper deals with the implementation of the EU Directives directed at atmospheric emissions from new (89/369/EEC) and existing (89/429/EEC) municipal waste incineration plants in France. The goal of this paper is twofold: a historic review of the implementation processes and their evaluation following economic criteria of environmental effectiveness and economic efficiency. The focus is on the implementation of the Directives' requirements towards existing municipal waste incineration plants, i.e. those plants having received their operation licence after December 1, 1990. For France we find a general picture of poor compliance. This result has to be differentiated, though: the current compliance rate of plants of a capacity above 6 t/h is almost 100% (although compliance often came late) while the majority of smaller plants does not comply with the Directive's requirements. With a waste incineration park of about 250 plants currently, many of which are very small plants and only treat weak amounts of waste, France constitutes an exception compared to other European countries. A further specific characteristic of France is the high share of waste incineration in total waste treatment (especially in the big cities) which amounts to almost 40%. The outline of the paper is the following: chapter two gives some context information on the French municipal waste incineration plant park and its structure, on the development of waste quantities, on the legal framework and on available subsidy schemes. Chapter three assesses environmental effectiveness, i.e. goal attainment and factors explaining the results. Chapter four comprises the assessment of cost efficiency. Chapter five contains the historic review, i.e. a characterisation of the implementation process, and chapter six concludes, linking the characterisation of

  19. Direct utilization of waste water algal biomass for ethanol production by cellulolytic Clostridium phytofermentans DSM1183.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathima, Anwar Aliya; Sanitha, Mary; Kumar, Thangarathinam; Iyappan, Sellamuthu; Ramya, Mohandass

    2016-02-01

    Direct bioconversion of waste water algal biomass into ethanol using Clostridium phytofermentans DSM1183 was demonstrated in this study. Fermentation of 2% (w/v) autoclaved algal biomass produced ethanol concentration of 0.52 g L(-1) (solvent yield of 0.19 g/g) where as fermentation of acid pretreated algal biomass (2%, w/v) produced ethanol concentration of 4.6 g L(-1) in GS2 media (solvent yield of 0.26 g/g). The control experiment with 2% (w/v) glucose in GS2 media produced ethanol concentration of 2.8 g L(-1) (solvent yield of 0.25 g/g). The microalgal strains from waste water algal biomass were identified as Chlamydomonas dorsoventralis, Graesiella emersonii, Coelastrum proboscideum, Scenedesmus obliquus, Micractinium sp., Desmodesmus sp., and Chlorella sp., based on ITS-2 molecular marker. The presence of glucose, galactose, xylose and rhamnose were detected by high performance liquid chromatography in the algal biomass. Scanning Electron Microscopy observations of fermentation samples showed characteristic morphological changes in algal cells and bioaccessibility of C. phytofermentans.

  20. A spontaneous and passive waste-management device (PWMD) for a micro direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yun-Ju; Chieng, Ching-Chang; Pan, Chin; Luo, Shih-Jin; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2007-05-01

    This paper introduces a passive waste-management device (PWMD) for a micro direct methanol fuel cell to exhale CO2 gas and to gather and transport water and methanol residue during operation. It passively employs condensation, temperature gradient, surface tension gradient and droplet coalescence to accumulate liquid, separate liquid and gas, and transport droplets without the need of external power. CO2 gas can be breathed out through hydrophobic micro holes with the assistance of buoyancy force while water/methanol vapor is condensing into droplets, coalescing with smaller droplets and is transported toward a cooler and more hydrophilic waste tank through wettability gradient. The wettability gradient is prepared by diffusion-controlled silanization with a gradient from 117° to 28° and is radial toward the outer boundary, which can drive droplets down to 1 µl with a speed of up to 20 mm s-1. With the assistance of coalescence along with the wettability gradient, the condensed water droplets can reach a double speed of 40 mm s-1. The maximum water removal rate of the PWMD can approach 6.134 µl s-1 cm-2, which is at least one order of magnitude higher than the demand of a standard µDMFC with power generation ability of 100 mW cm-2.

  1. CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP FY13 MID-YEAR REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, H.; Flach, G.; Langton, C.; KOSSON, D.; BROWN, K.; SAMSON, E.; MEEUSSEN, J.; SLOOT, H.; GARBOCZI, E.

    2013-05-01

    In FY2013, the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) is continuing in its effort to develop and enhance software tools demonstrating tangible progress toward fulfilling the objective of developing a set of tools to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in nuclear applications. In FY2012, the CBP released the initial inhouse “Beta-version” of the CBP Software Toolbox, a suite of software for simulating reactive transport in cementitious materials and important degradation phenomena. The current primary software components are LeachXS/ORCHESTRA, STADIUM, and a GoldSim interface for probabilistic analysis of selected degradation scenarios. THAMES is a planned future CBP Toolbox component (FY13/14) focused on simulation of the microstructure of cementitious materials and calculation of resultant hydraulic and constituent mass transfer parameters needed in modeling. This past November, the CBP Software Toolbox Version 1.0 was released that supports analysis of external sulfate attack (including damage mechanics), carbonation, and primary constituent leaching. The LeachXS component embodies an extensive material property measurements database along with chemical speciation and reactive mass transport simulation cases with emphasis on leaching of major, trace and radionuclide constituents from cementitious materials used in DOE facilities, such as Saltstone (Savannah River) and Cast Stone (Hanford), tank closure grouts, and barrier concretes. STADIUM focuses on the physical and structural service life of materials and components based on chemical speciation and reactive mass transport of major cement constituents and aggressive species (e.g., chloride, sulfate, etc.). The CBP issued numerous reports and other documentation that accompanied the “Version 1.0” release including a CBP Software Toolbox User Guide and Installation Guide. These documents, as well as, the

  2. Shear behavior of reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC) beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of the shear behavior of beams consisting of steel reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC). Based on the strain hardening and multiple cracking behavior of ECC, this study investigates the extent to which ECC can improve the shear...... randomly distributed PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) fiber beams with different stirrup spacing and reinforced concrete (RC) beams for comparison. Displacement and strain measurements taken using the ARAMIS photogrammetric data acquisition system by means of processing at high frame rate captured images of applied...

  3. Crushing damage estimation for pavement with lightly cementitious bases

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Beer, Morris

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available , Pretoria, South Africa. De Beer, M. 2013. Revision of the South African Pavement Design Method. Project Focus Area: Bound Materials: Damage Laws. Cementitious Materials: Expanded/Revised Damage Laws for Crushing Failure. Contract Report SANRAL/SAPDM-D3... stream_source_info De Beer_2014.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 25820 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name De Beer_2014.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 CRUSHING DAMAGE ESTIMATION...

  4. Talc-based cementitious products: Effect of talc calcination

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the use of calcined talc for cementitious products making. The calcination is used to enhance the availability of magnesium from talc to react with phosphate for cement phase formation. It is shown that previous calcination of talc leads to products having enhanced mechanical performance due to the formation of more cement phase than in products based on raw talc. Talc fired at 900 °C was found to be the one in which magnesium release was maximal. Firing at temperature high...

  5. Direction in charge of the management of wastes. 1998 activity report; Direction chargee de la gestion des dechets. Rapport d'activite 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This document is the 1998 activity report of the direction in charge of the management of radioactive wastes (DGD) of the French atomic energy commission (CEA). The role of the DGD is the elimination of radioactive wastes, the management of spent fuels, the cleansing and dismantling of shut-down and decommissioned installations at the CEA. This report summarizes the highlights of the 1998 year: the cleansing plan of the CEA (current policy, plan scheme, quality assurance, financing, public relation); the radioactive wastes (general considerations, management of liquid and solid effluents, management of sealed sources, modernization of equipments and new projects, relations with the Andra, studies in progress); the spent fuels (general considerations, solutions, long-term storage); the dismantling of shut-down installations (general considerations about decommissioning, dismantling actions at the CEA, main works performed, dismantling actions in progress); the management of wastes at the CEA-direction for military applications (DAM); the cleansing of the CEA-Marcoule site; 1998 status of the management of wastes (appendix). (J.S.)

  6. Designing added functions in engineered cementitious composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, En-Hua

    In this dissertation, a new and systematic material design approach is developed for ECC with added functions through material microstructures linkage to composite macroscopic behavior. The thesis research embodies theoretical development by building on previous ECC micromechanical models, and experimental investigations into three specific new versions of ECC with added functions aimed at addressing societal demands of our built infrastructure. Specifically, the theoretical study includes three important ECC modeling elements: Steady-state crack propagation analyses and simulation, predictive accuracy of the fiber bridging constitutive model, and development of the rate-dependent strain-hardening criteria. The first element establishes the steady-state cracking criterion as a fundamental requirement for multiple cracking behavior in brittle matrix composites. The second element improves the accuracy of crack-width prediction in ECC. The third element establishes the micromechanics basis for impact-resistant ECC design. Three new ECCs with added functions were developed and experimentally verified in this thesis research through the enhanced theoretical framework. A green ECC incorporating a large volume of industrial waste was demonstrated to possess reduced crack width and drying shrinkage. The self-healing ECC designed with tight crack width was demonstrated to recover transport and mechanical properties after microcrack damage when exposed to wet and dry cycles. The impact-resistant ECC was demonstrated to retain tensile ductility with increased strength under moderately high strain-rate loading. These new versions of ECC with added functions are expected to contribute greatly to enhancing the sustainability, durability, and safety of civil infrastructure built with ECC. This research establishes the effectiveness of micromechanics-based design and material ingredient tailoring for ECC with added new attributes but without losing its basic tensile ductile

  7. Modelling of water permeability in cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guang, Ye; Lura, Pietro; van Breugel, K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a network model to predict the permeability of cement paste from a numerical simulation of its microstructure. Based on a linked list pore network structure, the effective hydraulic conductivity is estimated and the fluid flow is calculated according to the Hagen-Poiseuille law....... The pressure gradient at all nodes is calculated with the Gauss elimination method and the absolute permeability of the pore network is calculated directly from Darcy's law. Finally, the permeability model is validated by comparison with direct water permeability measurements. According to this model......, the predicted permeability of hydrating cement pastes is extremely sensitive to the particle size distribution of the cement and especially to the minimum size of the cement particles. Both in simulations and experiments, the permeability of cement pastes is mainly determined by the critical diameter...

  8. Dynamic damage and stress-strain relations of ultra-high performance cementitious composites subjected to repeated impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Ultra-high performance cementitious composites (UHPCC) were prepared by replacing 60% of cement with ultra-fine industrial waste powders.The dynamic damage and compressive stress-strain relations of UHPCC were studied using split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB).The damage of UHPCC subjected to repeated impact was measured by the ultrasonic pulse velocity method.Results show that the dynamic damage of UHPCC increases linearly with impact times and the abilities of repeated impact resistance of UHPCC are improved with increasing fiber volume fraction.The stress waves on impact were recorded and the average stress,strain and strain rate of UHPCC were calculated based on the wave propagation theory.The effects of strain rate,fibers volume fraction and impact times on the stress-strain relations of UHPCC were studied.Results show that the peak stress and elastic modulus decrease while the strain rate and peak strain increase gradually with increasing impact times.

  9. Effect of silicate solutions on metakaolinite based cementitious material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Xue-jun; LI Hua-jian; SUN Heng-hu

    2006-01-01

    High performance metakaolinite based cementitious materials were prepared with metakaolinite as main component, and the different modules of Na and Na-K silicate solutions as diagenetic agent. The results show that the mechanical properties are affected by different silicate solutions, compressive strengths of pastes hydrated for 3 d and 28 d with Na-K silicate solution (The modulus is 1) are about 43.68 and 78.52 MPa respectively. By analyzing the mechanical properties of Metakaolinite based cementitious materials, the diagenetic effect of lower module is better than higher module, and Na-K silicate solution is better than Na silicate solution. The structure of the Na and Na-K silicate solutions is studied with IR and 29Si NMR, the reason of the lower module and Na-K silicate solution improving the mechanical properties is that the low module silicate solution has lower polymeric degree of silicon dioxide, and the higher polymeric degree of silicon oxide tetrahedron(Q4) in Na-K silicate solution is less than Na silicate solution.

  10. Experimental Study on Cementitious Composites Embedded with Organic Microcapsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Qian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The recovery behavior for strength and impermeability of cementitious composites embedded with organic microcapsules was investigated in this study. Mortar specimens were formed by mixing the organic microcapsules and a catalyst with cement and sand. The mechanical behaviors of flexural and compression strength were tested. The results showed that strength could increase by up to nine percent with the addition of a small amount of microcapsules and then decrease with an increasing amount of microcapsules. An orthogonal test for investigating the strength recovery rate was designed and implemented for bending and compression using the factors of water/cement ratio, amount of microcapsules, and preloading rate. It is shown that the amount of microcapsules plays a key role in the strength recovery rate. Chloride ion permeability tests were also carried out to investigate the recovery rate and healing effect. The initial damage was obtained by subjecting the specimens to compression. Both the recovery rate and the healing effect were nearly proportional to the amount of microcapsules. The obtained cementitious composites can be seen as self-healing owing to their recovery behavior for both strength and permeability.

  11. Experimental Study on Cementitious Composites Embedded with Organic Microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianfeng; Xing, Feng; Zhang, Ming; Han, Ningxu; Qian, Zhiwei

    2013-09-16

    The recovery behavior for strength and impermeability of cementitious composites embedded with organic microcapsules was investigated in this study. Mortar specimens were formed by mixing the organic microcapsules and a catalyst with cement and sand. The mechanical behaviors of flexural and compression strength were tested. The results showed that strength could increase by up to nine percent with the addition of a small amount of microcapsules and then decrease with an increasing amount of microcapsules. An orthogonal test for investigating the strength recovery rate was designed and implemented for bending and compression using the factors of water/cement ratio, amount of microcapsules, and preloading rate. It is shown that the amount of microcapsules plays a key role in the strength recovery rate. Chloride ion permeability tests were also carried out to investigate the recovery rate and healing effect. The initial damage was obtained by subjecting the specimens to compression. Both the recovery rate and the healing effect were nearly proportional to the amount of microcapsules. The obtained cementitious composites can be seen as self-healing owing to their recovery behavior for both strength and permeability.

  12. Residential Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Fruergaard, Thilde; Matsufuji, Y.

    2011-01-01

    are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing residential waste is faced with the problem that many residences already divert some waste away from the official collection systems, for example performing home composting of vegetable waste and garden waste, having their bundled newspaper picked up by the scouts...... twice a year or bringing their used furniture to the flea markets organized by charity clubs. Thus, much of the data available on residential waste represents collected waste and not necessarily all generated waste. The latter can only be characterized by careful studies directly at the source......Residential waste comes from residential areas with multi-family and single-family housing and includes four types of waste: household waste, garden waste, bulky waste and household hazardous waste. Typical unit generation rates, material composition, chemical composition and determining factors...

  13. Residential Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Fruergaard, Thilde; Matsufuji, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Residential waste comes from residential areas with multi-family and single-family housing and includes four types of waste: household waste, garden waste, bulky waste and household hazardous waste. Typical unit generation rates, material composition, chemical composition and determining factors...... are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing residential waste is faced with the problem that many residences already divert some waste away from the official collection systems, for example performing home composting of vegetable waste and garden waste, having their bundled newspaper picked up by the scouts...... twice a year or bringing their used furniture to the flea markets organized by charity clubs. Thus, much of the data available on residential waste represents collected waste and not necessarily all generated waste. The latter can only be characterized by careful studies directly at the source...

  14. Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2012-09-26

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone – a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

  15. Preparation of New Cementitious System using Fly Ash and Dehydrated Autoclaved Aerated Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHUI Zhonghe; LU Jianxin; TIAN Sufang; SHEN Peiliang; DING Sha

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally studied the interaction between pozzolanic material (fly ash) and dehydrated autoclaved aerated concrete (DAAC). The DAAC powder was obtained by grinding aerated concrete waste to particles finer than 75μm and was then heated to temperatures up to 900℃. New cementitious material was prepared by proportioning fly ash and DAAC, named as AF. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was employed to identify the crystalline phases of DAAC before and after rehydration. The hydration process of AF was analyzed by the heat of hydration and non-evaporable water content (Wn). The experimental results show that the highest reactivity of DAAC can be obtained by calcining the powder at 700℃and the dehydrated products are mainlyβ-C2S and CaO. The cumulative heat of hydration and Wn was found to be strongly dependent on the replacement level of fly ash, increasing the replacement level of fly ash lowered them in AF. The strength contribution rates on pozzolanic effect of fly ash in AF are always negative, showing a contrary tendency of that of cement-fly ash system.

  16. Technetium Sorption By Cementitious Materials Under Reducing Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel I. [Savannah River National Lab., Aiken, SC (United States); Estes, Shanna L. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences; Arai, Yuji [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences; Powell, Brian A. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences

    2013-07-18

    The objective of this study was to measure Tc sorption to cementitious materials under reducing conditions to simulate Saltstone Disposal Facility conditions. Earlier studies were conducted and the experimental conditions were found not to simulate those of the facility. Through a five month subcontract with Clemson University, sorption of {sup 99}Tc to four cementitious materials was examined within an anaerobic glovebag targeting a 0.1% H{sub 2}(g)/ 99.9% N{sub 2}(g) atmosphere. Early experiments based on Tc sorption and Eh indicated that 0.1% H{sub 2}(g) (a reductant) was necessary to preclude experimental impacts from O{sub 2}(g) diffusion into the glovebag. Preliminary data to date (up to 56 days) indicates that sorption of {sup 99}Tc to cementitious materials increased with increasing slag content for simulated saltstone samples. This is consistent with the conceptual model that redox active sulfide groups within the reducing slag facilitate reduction of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV). These experiments differ from previous experiments where a 2% H{sub 2}(g) atmosphere was maintained (Kaplan et al., 2011 (SRNL-STI-2010-00668)). The impact of the 2% H{sub 2}(g) reducing atmosphere on this data was examined and determined to cause the reduction of Tc in experimental samples without slag. In the present ongoing study, after 56 days, Tc sorption by the 50-year old cement samples (no slag) was undetectable, whereas Tc sorption in the cementitious materials containing slag continues to increase with contact time (measured after 1, 4, 8, 19 and 56 days). Sorption was not consistent with spike concentrations and steady state has not been demonstrated after 56 days. The average conditional K{sub d} value for the Vault 2 cementitious material was 873 mL/g (17% slag), for the TR547 Saltstone (45% slag) the conditional K{sub d} was 168 mL/g, and for TR545 (90% slag) the conditional K{sub d} was 1,619 mL/g. It is anticipated that additional samples will be collected until steady state

  17. From waste to value - direct utilization of limonene from orange peel in a biocatalytic cascade reaction towards chiral carvolactone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oberleitner, N.; Ressmann, A. K.; Bica, K.; Gaertner, P.; Fraaije, M. W.; Bornscheuer, U. T.; Rudroff, F.; Mihovilovic, M. D.

    2017-01-01

    In this proof of concept study we demonstrate direct utilization of limonene containing waste product orange peel as starting material for a biocatalytic cascade reaction. The product of this cascade is chiral carvolactone, a promising building block for thermoplastic polymers. Four different concep

  18. Development of Ecoefficient Engineered Cementitious Composites Using Supplementary Cementitious Materials as a Binder and Bottom Ash Aggregate as Fine Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wook Bang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop ecoefficient engineered cementitious composites (ECC using supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs, including fly ash (FA and blast furnace slag (SL as a binder material. The cement content of the ECC mixtures was replaced by FA and SL with a replacement rate of 25%. In addition, the fine aggregate of the ECC was replaced by bottom ash aggregate (BA with a substitution rate of 10%, 20%, and 30%. The influences of ecofriendly aggregates on fresh concrete properties and on mechanical properties were experimentally investigated. The test results revealed that the substitution of SCMs has an advantageous effect on fresh concrete’s properties; however, the increased water absorption and the irregular shape of the BA can potentially affect the fresh concrete’s properties. The substitution of FA and SL in ECC led to an increase in frictional bond at the interface between PVA fibers and matrix, improved the fiber dispersion, and showed a tensile strain capacity ranging from 3.3% to 3.5%. It is suggested that the combination of SCMs (12.5% FA and 12.5% SL and the BA aggregate with the substitution rate of 10% can be effectively used in ECC preparation.

  19. [The main directions of improving the system of state accounting and control of radioactive substances and radioactive waste products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a modification of the basic directions of state accounting and control of radioactive substances and radioactive waste products, whose implementation will significantly improve the efficiency of its operation at the regional level. Selected areas are designed to improve accounting and control system for the submission of the enterprises established by the reporting forms, the quality of the information contained in them, as well as structures of information and process for collecting, analyzing and data processing concerning radioactive substances and waste products.

  20. Composition of plastics from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) by direct sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinho, Graça; Pires, Ana; Saraiva, Luanha; Ribeiro, Rita

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes a direct analysis study carried out in a recycling unit for waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) in Portugal to characterize the plastic constituents of WEEE. Approximately 3400 items, including cooling appliances, small WEEE, printers, copying equipment, central processing units, cathode ray tube (CRT) monitors and CRT televisions were characterized, with the analysis finding around 6000 kg of plastics with several polymer types. The most common polymers are polystyrene, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene, polycarbonate blends, high-impact polystyrene and polypropylene. Additives to darken color are common contaminants in these plastics when used in CRT televisions and small WEEE. These additives can make plastic identification difficult, along with missing polymer identification and flame retardant identification marks. These drawbacks contribute to the inefficiency of manual dismantling of WEEE, which is the typical recycling process in Portugal. The information found here can be used to set a baseline for the plastics recycling industry and provide information for ecodesign in electrical and electronic equipment production.

  1. Innovative Structural Materials and Sections with Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Vikram

    The motivation of this work is based on development of new construction products with strain hardening cementitious composites (SHCC) geared towards sustainable residential applications. The proposed research has three main objectives: automation of existing manufacturing systems for SHCC laminates; multi-level characterization of mechanical properties of fiber, matrix, interface and composites phases using servo-hydraulic and digital image correlation techniques. Structural behavior of these systems were predicted using ductility based design procedures using classical laminate theory and structural mechanics. SHCC sections are made up of thin sections of matrix with Portland cement based binder and fine aggregates impregnating continuous one-dimensional fibers in individual or bundle form or two/three dimensional woven, bonded or knitted textiles. Traditional fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) use random dispersed chopped fibers in the matrix at a low volume fractions, typically 1-2% to avoid to avoid fiber agglomeration and balling. In conventional FRC, fracture localization occurs immediately after the first crack, resulting in only minor improvement in toughness and tensile strength. However in SHCC systems, distribution of cracking throughout the specimen is facilitated by the fiber bridging mechanism. Influence of material properties of yarn, composition, geometry and weave patterns of textile in the behavior of laminated SHCC skin composites were investigated. Contribution of the cementitious matrix in the early age and long-term performance of laminated composites was studied with supplementary cementitious materials such as fly ash, silica fume, and wollastonite. A closed form model with classical laminate theory and ply discount method, coupled with a damage evolution model was utilized to simulate the non-linear tensile response of these composite materials. A constitutive material model developed earlier in the group was utilized to characterize and

  2. HARMONIZATION OF CROATIAN LEGAL REGULATIONS WITH EU DIRECTIVES CONCERNING PETROLEUM INDUSTRY WASTE DISPOSAL INTO SUITABLE GEOLOGICAL FORMATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Brkić

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Exploration and production of mineral resources, especially hydrocarbons, are from ecological point of view, one of the most sensitive activities. Concerning global ecological standards, which have also been enforced into petroleum industry, exploration and production of mineral energy sources have to be based on compliance with introduced environmental and human health protection requirements. Since it is expected that Croatia will join European Union in the near future, it is necessary to develop institutional and legislative frameworks for enabling and regulating the harmonization of mineral resources exploration and production waste disposal with European Union directives and regulations. Petroleum industry waste disposal by injection into suitable geological formations is one of environmentally acceptable methods for petroleum industry waste management (the paper is published in Croatian.

  3. Porosimetry by DraMuTS applied to DEM-produced cementitious materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroeven, P.; Le, L.B.N.

    2013-01-01

    Porosimetry of matured cementitious materials is of hiigh interest, because durability is governed by the capillary pore network structure. Experimental approaches are time-consuming, laborious and thus expensive. Fast developments in computer technology make it nowadays possible quite realistically

  4. Porosimetry by DraMuTS applied to DEM-produced cementitious materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroeven, P.; Le, L.B.N.

    2013-01-01

    Porosimetry of matured cementitious materials is of hiigh interest, because durability is governed by the capillary pore network structure. Experimental approaches are time-consuming, laborious and thus expensive. Fast developments in computer technology make it nowadays possible quite realistically

  5. Predicting the Probability of Failure of Cementitious Sewer Pipes Using Stochastic Finite Element Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alani, Amir M; Faramarzi, Asaad

    2015-06-10

    In this paper, a stochastic finite element method (SFEM) is employed to investigate the probability of failure of cementitious buried sewer pipes subjected to combined effect of corrosion and stresses. A non-linear time-dependant model is used to determine the extent of concrete corrosion. Using the SFEM, the effects of different random variables, including loads, pipe material, and corrosion on the remaining safe life of the cementitious sewer pipes are explored. A numerical example is presented to demonstrate the merit of the proposed SFEM in evaluating the effects of the contributing parameters upon the probability of failure of cementitious sewer pipes. The developed SFEM offers many advantages over traditional probabilistic techniques since it does not use any empirical equations in order to determine failure of pipes. The results of the SFEM can help the concerning industry (e.g., water companies) to better plan their resources by providing accurate prediction for the remaining safe life of cementitious sewer pipes.

  6. Talc-based cementitious products: Effect of talc calcination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.J. Ngally Sabouang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the use of calcined talc for cementitious products making. The calcination is used to enhance the availability of magnesium from talc to react with phosphate for cement phase formation. It is shown that previous calcination of talc leads to products having enhanced mechanical performance due to the formation of more cement phase than in products based on raw talc. Talc fired at 900 °C was found to be the one in which magnesium release was maximal. Firing at temperature higher than 900 °C leads to the stabilization of enstatite, which decreased the magnesium availability. The cement phase is struvite, which was better detected on the X-ray patterns of the products involving fired talc. All the products have very rapid setting time and low shrinkage.

  7. Dynamic fracture behaviour in fibre-reinforced cementitious composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rena C.; Cifuentes, Héctor; Rivero, Ignacio; Ruiz, Gonzalo; Zhang, Xiaoxin

    2016-08-01

    The object of this work is to simulate the dynamic fracture propagation in fibre-reinforced cementitious composites, in particular, in steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC). Beams loaded in a three-point bend configuration through a drop-weight impact device are considered. A single cohesive crack is assumed to propagate at the middle section; the opening of this crack is governed by a rate-dependent cohesive law; the fibres around the fracture plane are explicitly represented through truss elements. The fibre pull-out behaviour is depicted by an equivalent constitutive law, which is obtained from an analytical load-slip curve. The obtained load-displacement curves and crack propagation velocities are compared with their experimental counterparts. The good agreement with experimental data testifies to the feasibility of the proposed methodology and paves the way to its application in a multi-scale framework.

  8. STEREOLOGICAL ESTIMATES FOR ROUGHNESS AND TORTUOSITY IN CEMENTITIOUS COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piet Stroeven

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Relatively weak interfaces between aggregate grains and the cementitious matrix initiate the damage evolution process leading to fracture. Coalescence between nearby interface cracks is promoted by the small nearest neighbour distances in a dense random packing of the aggregate. The fracture surface is therefore modelled as a dividing plane from which particles protrude. Assuming spherical aggregate, roughness is obtained as the global geometrical-statistical expression for the increase in fracture surface area due to a multitude of dome-like caps of various sizes. Transport phenomena in concrete are equally influenced by the aggregate, because traversing water-born molecules or ions have to go around the dense grains. This route is additionally promoted by the relatively high porosity in the interfacial transition zone. The planar and linear concepts of tortuosity in the transport path are analogous to those of roughness.

  9. Energy implications of mechanical and mechanical–biological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cimpan, Ciprian; Wenzel, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanical–biological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials...... for recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different...... background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140 MJprimary/100 MJinput waste, in the different...

  10. Implementation of the Urban Waste Water Treatment Directive in Norway - An Evaluation of the Norwegian Approach regarding Wastewater Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Källqvist, T.; Molvær, J.; Oug, E.; Berge, D.; Tjomsland, T; Stene-Johansen, S.

    2002-01-01

    This report discusses the effects and benefits of full implementation of the Urban Waste Water Treatment Directive in Norway. The Norwegian policy for wastewater treatment has targeted phosphorus removal as the primary measure to reduce adverse effects of discharge of wastewater to freshwater and marine recipients. Chemical precipitation is therefore used at more than 70% of the wastewater treatment plants. This technique is very efficient in reducing the phosphorus concentration and in addit...

  11. Mechanical behavior of cementitious composites with processed sugar cane bagasse ashes; Comportamento mecanico de cimento Portland com cinza de bagaco de cana-de-acucar processada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, Augusto C.S.; Saraiva, Sergio L.C.; Sena, Natalia O.; Pereira, Gabriela M.; Rodrigues, Conrado S.; Ferreira, Maria C.N.F., E-mail: augustobezerra@des.cefetmg.br [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), MG (Brazil); Castro, Laurenn W.A.; Silva, Marcos V.M.S. [Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais, MG (Brazil); Gomes, Romero C. [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil); Aguilar, Maria T.P. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), MG (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Sugar cane bagasse is waste from the sugar and ethanol industry and is primarily intended for burning in boilers to generate energy. As waste from the cogeneration of energy, sugar cane bagasse ashes (SCBA) are produced with no honorable destination. This paper studies the use of SCBA to partially replace Portland cement in producing cementitious composites. The ashes were processed by reburning and grinding, and after processing were characterized by a scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffraction, laser granulometry, and x-ray fluorescence spectrometry. After characterization, cement compounds were fashioned, replacing 0, 10, 20 and 30% of the cement with SCBA. The composites were mechanically evaluated by means of compression strength tests, tensile strength tests by bending. The results proved significant, indicating the possible use of SCBA when added to the cement on manufacture. (author)

  12. 碱-激发再生胶凝材料的研究%Study on of Alkali-activated Recycled Cementitious Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琦

    2015-01-01

    The waste cement paste in concrete crushing,sieving separated,then cement paste powder obtained after ball milling,sieving,and then the cement paste powder after 800 ℃ calcined to ob-tain Recycled Cementitious Material.According to the properties of Recycled Cementitious Mate-rial choice Na2 SO4、CaSO4、Ca (HCO3 )2 and Na2 SiO4 as the object of study of activator,the stand-ard of cement mortar strength test.The test results show that,the dosage of 2•5% Na2 SO4 has good effect on the of the excitation of Recycled Cementitious Material.%将废弃混凝土中的水泥浆经过破碎、筛分分离出来,再经过球磨、筛分得到水泥浆体粉末,再将水泥浆体粉末经过800℃煅烧得到再生胶凝材料。根据再生胶凝材料的性质选择了Na2 SO4、CaSO4、Ca(HCO3)2和Na2 SiO4为激发剂的研究对象,进行标准水泥胶砂强度试验。试验结果表明,掺量为2•5%的Na2 SO4对再生胶凝材料具有良好的激发效果。

  13. DuraLith geopolymer waste form for Hanford secondary waste: Correlating setting behavior to hydration heat evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hui; Gong, Weiliang, E-mail: gongw@vsl.cua.edu; Syltebo, Larry; Lutze, Werner; Pegg, Ian L.

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Quantitative correlations firstly established for cementitious waste forms. • Quantitative correlations firstly established for geopolymeric materials. • Ternary DuraLith geopolymer waste forms for Hanford radioactive wastes. • Extended setting times which improve workability for geopolymer waste forms. • Reduced hydration heat release from DuraLith geopolymer waste forms. - Abstract: The binary furnace slag-metakaolin DuraLith geopolymer waste form, which has been considered as one of the candidate waste forms for immobilization of certain Hanford secondary wastes (HSW) from the vitrification of nuclear wastes at the Hanford Site, Washington, was extended to a ternary fly ash-furnace slag-metakaolin system to improve workability, reduce hydration heat, and evaluate high HSW waste loading. A concentrated HSW simulant, consisting of more than 20 chemicals with a sodium concentration of 5 mol/L, was employed to prepare the alkaline activating solution. Fly ash was incorporated at up to 60 wt% into the binder materials, whereas metakaolin was kept constant at 26 wt%. The fresh waste form pastes were subjected to isothermal calorimetry and setting time measurement, and the cured samples were further characterized by compressive strength and TCLP leach tests. This study has firstly established quantitative linear relationships between both initial and final setting times and hydration heat, which were never discovered in scientific literature for any cementitious waste form or geopolymeric material. The successful establishment of the correlations between setting times and hydration heat may make it possible to efficiently design and optimize cementitious waste forms and industrial wastes based geopolymers using limited testing results.

  14. Reaction and Diffusion of Cementitious Water in Bentonite: Results of `Blind' Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, C.; Hane, K.; Savage, D.; Benbow, S.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez, R.

    2009-04-01

    The potential deleterious geochemical interactions of clay with cement/concrete may provide a constraint on the use of the latter material in deep geological disposal facilities for radioactive wastes. Consequently, it is important to have a fundamental understanding of these interactions to be able to assess their likely impact over the long timescales appropriate to the isolation of radioactive wastes from the human environment. Here, a laboratory experiment investigating the effects of cementitious water diffusing through bentonite has been simulated using a coupled reactive-transport geochemical modelling code. The modelling study was carried out before the results of the experiments were available, as an exercise in ‘blind' modelling. A sensitivity study was carried out to investigate uncertainties associated with a number of input parameters, such as the precise nature of kinetic and ion-exchange reactions, diffusion coefficients, pore water composition, and montmorillonite dissolution models. The experiments used two types of fluid; one saturated with calcium hydroxide showed little mineralogical alteration, which was predicted by the computer simulations. A high pH K-Na-OH-based water however, caused alteration (pore blocking by hydrotalcite, gibbsite and brucite growth) to a depth of 2 mm in the bentonite after a period of 1 year. Experimental evidence showed that ion exchange of Mg-montmorillonite to K-montmorillonite was not confined to this thin region however, and was found to extend throughout the whole of the bentonite sample. The pore blocking by mineral precipitation and movement of ion exchange fronts through the bentonite were accurately simulated by the model. The choice of dissolution model for montmorillonite played an important role in the outcome of the simulations. Of the cases considered in the sensitivity study, that employing the so-called ‘Yamaguchi model' was clearly the best match, exhibiting all the main characteristics of the

  15. Solidifications/stabilization treatability study of a mixed waste sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, R.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Stine, E.F. [International Technologies Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States). Technology Development Lab.

    1996-03-01

    The Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office signed a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement with the US Environmental Protection Agency Region IV regarding mixed wastes from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) subject to the land disposal restriction provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This agreement required treatability studies of solidification/stabilization (S/S) on mixed wastes from the ORR. This paper reports the results of the cementitious S/S studies conducted on a waste water treatment sludge generated from biodenitrification and heavy metals precipitation. For the cementitious waste forms, the additives tested were Portland cement, ground granulated blast furnace slag, Class F fly ash, and perlite. The properties measured on the treated waste were density, free-standing liquid, unconfined compressive strength, and TCLP performance. Spiking up to 10,000, 10,000, and 4,400 mg/kg of nickel, lead, and cadmium, respectively, was conducted to test waste composition variability and the stabilization limitations of the binding agents. The results indicated that nickel, lead and cadmium were stabilized fairly well in the high pH hydroxide-carbonate- ``bug bones`` sludge, but also clearly confirmed the established stabilization potential of cementitious S/S for these RCRA metals.

  16. Direct valorisation of waste cocoa butter triglycerides via catalytic epoxidation, ring‐opening and polymerisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Dorota D; Strobel, Vinzent; Heer, Parminder Kaur KS; Sellars, Andrew B; Hoong, Seng‐Soi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND Development of circular economy requires significant advances in the technologies for valorisation of waste, as waste becomes new feedstock. Food waste is a particularly important feedstock, containing large variation of complex chemical functionality. Although most food waste sources are complex mixtures, waste from food processing, no longer suitable for the human food chain, may also represent relatively clean materials. One such material requiring valorisation is cocoa butter. RESULTS Epoxidation of a triglyceride from a food waste source, processing waste cocoa butter, into the corresponding triglyceride epoxide was carried out using a modified Ishii‐Venturello catalyst in batch and continuous flow reactors. The batch reactor achieved higher yields due to the significant decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in the laminar flow tubular reactor. Integral and differential models describing the reaction and the phase transfer kinetics were developed for the epoxidation of cocoa butter and the model parameters were estimated. Ring‐opening of the epoxidised cocoa butter was undertaken to provide polyols of varying molecular weight (Mw = 2000–84 000 Da), hydroxyl value (27–60 mg KOH g−1) and acid value (1–173 mg KOH g−1), using either aqueous ortho‐phosphoric acid (H3PO4 ) or boron trifluoride diethyl etherate (BF3 ·OEt2)‐mediated oligomerisation in bulk, using hexane or tetrahydrofuran (THF) as solvents. The thermal and tensile properties of the polyurethanes obtained from the reaction of these polyols with 4,4′‐methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) are described. CONCLUSION The paper presents a complete valorisation scheme for a food manufacturing industry waste stream, starting from the initial chemical transformation, developing a process model for the design of a scaled‐up process, and leading to synthesis of the final product, in this case a polymer. This work describes aspects of optimisation of the conversion route

  17. Direct valorisation of waste cocoa butter triglycerides via catalytic epoxidation, ring-opening and polymerisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Dorota D; Strobel, Vinzent; Heer, Parminder Kaur Ks; Sellars, Andrew B; Hoong, Seng-Soi; Clark, Andrew J; Lapkin, Alexei A

    2017-09-01

    Development of circular economy requires significant advances in the technologies for valorisation of waste, as waste becomes new feedstock. Food waste is a particularly important feedstock, containing large variation of complex chemical functionality. Although most food waste sources are complex mixtures, waste from food processing, no longer suitable for the human food chain, may also represent relatively clean materials. One such material requiring valorisation is cocoa butter. Epoxidation of a triglyceride from a food waste source, processing waste cocoa butter, into the corresponding triglyceride epoxide was carried out using a modified Ishii-Venturello catalyst in batch and continuous flow reactors. The batch reactor achieved higher yields due to the significant decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in the laminar flow tubular reactor. Integral and differential models describing the reaction and the phase transfer kinetics were developed for the epoxidation of cocoa butter and the model parameters were estimated. Ring-opening of the epoxidised cocoa butter was undertaken to provide polyols of varying molecular weight (Mw = 2000-84 000 Da), hydroxyl value (27-60 mg KOH g(-1)) and acid value (1-173 mg KOH g(-1)), using either aqueous ortho-phosphoric acid (H 3 PO 4) or boron trifluoride diethyl etherate (BF 3·OEt2)-mediated oligomerisation in bulk, using hexane or tetrahydrofuran (THF) as solvents. The thermal and tensile properties of the polyurethanes obtained from the reaction of these polyols with 4,4'-methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) are described. The paper presents a complete valorisation scheme for a food manufacturing industry waste stream, starting from the initial chemical transformation, developing a process model for the design of a scaled-up process, and leading to synthesis of the final product, in this case a polymer. This work describes aspects of optimisation of the conversion route, focusing on clean synthesis and also demonstrates the

  18. Effect of alkali-activation on aluminosilicate-based cementitious materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    High-performance aluminosilieate-based eementitious materials were produced with fly ash from a coal power plant as one of the major raw materials.The structures of fly ash containing aluminosilicate-based cementitious materials were compared before and after treatment by the methods of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).During the 28 d curing time,the compressive strength of water glass and fly ash samples increased from 9.08 MPa to 26.75 MPa.The results show that most of the stiff shells are destroyed after mechanical grinding and chemical activation.Magic angle spinning (MAS)NMR of 27Al shows that the wide peak becomes narrow and the main peak shifts to the direction of low field,indicating the decrease of polymerization degree,the enhancing of activity,the decrease of six-coordination structure,and the increase of small and symmetrical four-coordination polyhedron structure within the aluminum-oxygen polyhedron network.Comparisons between MAS NMR of 29Si with different treatments suggest that Q0 disappears,the quantity of Q2 increases,and the quantity of Q4 decreases.The polym

  19. Laboratory Report on Performance Evaluation of Key Constituents during Pre-Treatment of High Level Waste Direct Feed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Heinz J.

    2013-06-24

    The analytical capabilities of the 222-S Laboratory are tested against the requirements for an optional start up scenario of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant on the Hanford Site. In this case, washed and in-tank leached sludge would be sent directly to the High Level Melter, bypassing Pretreatment. The sludge samples would need to be analyzed for certain key constituents in terms identifying melter-related issues and adjustment needs. The analyses on original tank waste as well as on washed and leached material were performed using five sludge samples from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-AZ-102, 241-AN-106, 241-AW-105, and 241-SY-102. Additionally, solid phase characterization was applied to determine the changes in mineralogy throughout the pre-treatment steps.

  20. Direct waste heat recovery via thermoelectric materials - chosen issues of the thermodynamic description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasiński, Piotr; Kolasińska, Ewa

    2016-02-01

    The effective waste heat recovery is one of the present-day challenges in the industry and power engineering. The energy systems dedicated for waste heat conversion into electricity are usually characterized by low efficiency and are complicated in the design. The possibility of waste heat recovery via thermoelectric materials may be an interesting alternative to the currently used technologies. In particular, due to their material characteristics, conducting polymers may be competitive when compared with the power machinery and equipment. These materials can be used in a wide range of the geometries e.g. the bulk products, thin films, pristine form or composites and the others. In this article, the authors present selected issues related to the mathematical and thermodynamic description of the heat transfer processes in the thermoelectric materials dedicated for the waste heat recovery. The link of these models with electrical properties of the material and a material solution based on a conducting polymer have also been presented in this paper.

  1. Alkali-activated cementitious materials: Mechanisms, microstructure and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weimin

    The goal of this study was to examine the activation reaction, microstructure, properties, identify the mechanisms of activation, and achieve an enhanced understanding of activation processes occurring during the synthesis of alkali activated cementitious materials (AAC). The discussions classify the following categories. (1) alkali activated slag cement; (2) alkali activated portland-slag cement; (3) alkali activated fly ash-slag cement; (4) alkali activated pozzolana-lime cement; (5) alkali activated pozzolana cement. The activators involved are NaOH, KOH; Nasb2SOsb4;\\ Nasb2COsb3;\\ CaSOsb4, and soluble silicate of sodium and potassium. The effect of alkali activation on the microstructure of these materials were analyzed at the micro-nanometer scale by SEM, EDS, ESEM, and TEM. Also sp{29}Si and sp{27}Al MAS-NMR, IR, Raman, TGA, and DTA were performed to characterize the phase in these systems. Slag, fly ash, silica fume, as well as blended cements containing mixtures of these and other components were characterized. A set of ordinary portland cement paste samples served as a control. This study confirmed that AAC materials have great potential because they could generate very early high strength, greater durability and high performance. Among the benefits to be derived from this research is a better understanding of the factors that control concrete properties when using AAC materials, and by controlling the chemistry and processing to produce desired microstructures and properties, as well as their durability.

  2. Nano-modification to improve the ductility of cementitious composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeşilmen, Seda [Department of Civil Engineering, Çankaya University, Ankara (Turkey); Al-Najjar, Yazin [Department of Civil Engineering, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep (Turkey); Balav, Mohammad Hatam [Department of Civil Engineering, Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey); Şahmaran, Mustafa, E-mail: sahmaran@gazi.edu.tr [Department of Civil Engineering, Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey); Yıldırım, Gürkan [Department of Civil Engineering, Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey); Lachemi, Mohamed [Department of Civil Engineering, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    Effect of nano-sized mineral additions on ductility of engineered cementitious composites (ECC) containing high volumes of fly ash was investigated at different hydration degrees. Various properties of ECC mixtures with different mineral additions were compared in terms of microstructural properties of matrix, fiber-matrix interface, and fiber surface to assess improvements in ductility. Microstructural characterization was made by measuring pore size distributions through mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). Hydration characteristics were assessed using thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), and fiber-matrix interface and fiber surface characteristics were assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) through a period of 90 days. Moreover, compressive and flexural strength developments were monitored for the same period. Test results confirmed that mineral additions could significantly improve both flexural strength and ductility of ECC, especially at early ages. Cheaper Nano-CaCO{sub 3} was more effective compared to nano-silica. However, the crystal structure of CaCO{sub 3} played a very important role in the range of expected improvements.

  3. Mesoscale Fracture Analysis of Multiphase Cementitious Composites Using Peridynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Yaghoobi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is a complex heterogeneous material, and thus, it is important to develop numerical modeling methods to enhance the prediction accuracy of the fracture mechanism. In this study, a two-dimensional mesoscale model is developed using a non-ordinary state-based peridynamic (NOSBPD method. Fracture in a concrete cube specimen subjected to pure tension is studied. The presence of heterogeneous materials consisting of coarse aggregates, interfacial transition zones, air voids and cementitious matrix is characterized as particle points in a two-dimensional mesoscale model. Coarse aggregates and voids are generated using uniform probability distributions, while a statistical study is provided to comprise the effect of random distributions of constituent materials. In obtaining the steady-state response, an incremental and iterativesolverisadopted for the dynamic relaxation method. Load-displacement curves and damage patterns are compared with available experimental and finite element analysis (FEA results.Although the proposed model uses much simpler material damage models and discretization schemes, the load-displacementcurvesshownodifferencefromtheFEAresults. Furthermore,nomeshrefinement is necessary, as fracture is inherently characterized by bond breakages. Finally, a sensitivity study is conducted to understand the effect of aggregate volume fraction and porosity on the load capacity of the proposed mesoscale model

  4. Performance of alusilica as mineral admixture in cementitious systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Lin; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    The aim of this project is to study the effect of alusilica (ALS) as a mineral admixture on the fresh properties and development of mechanical properties of cementitious systems. ALS consists of relatively pure, amorphous silicium-dioxide – a chemical compound which is known to be useful as mineral...... to the total binder mass (cement+ALS). The water/binder-ratio (w/b) is 0.5 for all mixtures. The produced ALS-substituted powder was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX) to investigate if the ALS agglomerates in the raw material were broken by the grinding...... procedure. On the fresh mortar air content was measured by the pressure method, ASTM C231/C231M-14 and the flow was measured by ASTM C1437-13. Casting was done in standard mortar molds 4×4×16 cm3. After demolding, each mortar specimen was weighed over and under water to evaluate their homogeneity and air...

  5. Significance of Shrinkage Induced Clamping Pressure in Fiber-Matrix Bonding in Cementitious Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    The present paper accesses the significance of shrinkage inducedclamping pressure in fiber/matrix bonding mechanisms incementitious composite materials. The paper contains a description of an experimental setup whichallows mbox{measurement} of the clamping pressure which develops on anelastic...... acting on any elastic inhomogeneityembedded in the same cementitious matrix material. Fiber-shaped inhomogeneities are of special interest in cementitious composite material systems andresults are presented for the development of clamping pressure on three typical fiber types in two typical cementpastes...... used in high performance cementitious composite materials.Assuming a Coulomb type of friction on the fiber/matrix interface andusing typical values for the frictional coefficient it is shownthat the shrinkage induced clamping pressure could be one of the mostimportant factors determining the frictional...

  6. Iron ore tailings used for the preparation of cementitious material by compound thermal activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-lai Yi; Heng-hu Sun; Xiu-quan Wei; Chao Li

    2009-01-01

    In the background of little reuse and large stockpile for iron ore railings, iron ore tailing from Chinese Tonghua were used as raw material to prepare cementitious materials. Cementitious properties of the iron ore tailings activated by compound thermal ac-tivation were studied. Testing methods, such as XRD, TG-DTA, and IR were used for researching the phase and structure variety of the iron ore tailings in the process of compound thermal activation. The results reveal that a new cementitious material that contains 30wt% of the iron ore tailings can be obtained by compounded thermal activation, whose mortar strength can come up to the stan-dard of 42.5 cement of China.

  7. Cracks and pores - Their roles in the transmission of water confined in cementitious materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordallo, H. N.; Aldridge, L. P.; Wuttke, J.; Fernando, K.; Bertram, W. K.; Pardo, L. C.

    2010-10-01

    Cement paste is formed through a process called hydration by combining water with a cementitious material. Concrete, the worlds most versatile and most widely used material, can then be obtained when aggregates (sand, gravel, crushed stone) are added to the paste. The quality of hardened concrete is greatly influenced by the water confined in the cementitious materials and how it is transmitted through cracks and pores. Here we demonstrate that the water transport in cracks and capillary pores of hardened cement pastes can be approximately modeled by simple equations. Our findings highlight the significance of arresting the development of cracks in cementitious materials used in repository barriers. We also show that neutron scattering is an advantageous technique for understanding how water transmission is effected by gel pore structures. Defining measurable differences in gel pores may hold a key to prediction of the reduction of water transport through cement barriers.

  8. Effect of hybrid fiber reinforcement on the cracking process in fiber reinforced cementitious composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Eduardo B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, Joaquim A.O.

    2012-01-01

    The simultaneous use of different types of fibers as reinforcement in cementitious matrix composites is typically motivated by the underlying principle of a multi-scale nature of the cracking processes in fiber reinforced cementitious composites. It has been hypothesized that while undergoing...... tensile deformations in the composite, the fibers with different geometrical and mechanical properties restrain the propagation and further development of cracking at different scales from the micro- to the macro-scale. The optimized design of the fiber reinforcing systems requires the objective...... assessment of the contribution of each type of fiber to the overall tensile response. Possible synergistic effects resulting from particular combinations of fibers need to be clearly identified. In the present study, the evaluation of the response of different fiber reinforced cementitious composite...

  9. Effect of Matrix Modification on Durability of Cementitious Composites in an Acid Rain Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Kui; YANG Hui; LU Zhenbao; JIA Fangfang; WANG Erpo; DONG Quanxiao

    2014-01-01

    The durability of silane-modified mortar, a cementitious composite, in acid rain environment was investigated given its extensive usage as a structural material. The results indicated that the addition of silane decreased the compressive strength of the cementitious composite. Wetting angle was increased by incorporating silane into the matrix. Decrease in both water absorption ability and coefficient of capillary suction confirmed hydrophobicity as induced by silane addition. Results of mechanical testing, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction showed that the sulfuric acid resistance of mortar was enhanced by silane. Based on these results, it is revealed that silane addition inhibits the diffusion of water, and consequently, sulfate ion diffusion rate decreases, thereby resulting in reduction in the rate of corrosion of cementitious composites by sulfuric acid.

  10. Carbonation of ternary cementitious concrete systems containing fly ash and silica fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eehab Ahmed Badreldin Khalil

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbonation is quite a complex physical negative effect phenomenon on concrete especially in the ones containing ternary blends of Portland Cement, fly ash, and silica fume. Nine selected concrete mixtures were prepared with various water to cementitious materials’ ratios and various cementitious contents. The concrete mixtures were adapted in such a way to have the same workability and air content. The fresh concrete properties were kept near identical in slump, air content, and unit weight. The variation was in the hardened concrete mechanical properties of compression and tension strength. The carbonation phenomenon was studied for these mixes showing at which mixes of ternary cementitious content heavy carbonation attacks maybe produced. The main components of such mixes that do affect the carbonation process with time were presented.

  11. Influence of Glass Powder on Hydration Kinetics of Composite Cementitious Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of glass powder (GP on hydration kinetics of composite cementitious materials has been investigated by isothermal calorimetry test and hydration kinetics methods in this paper. The hydration heat emission rate and hydration heat decrease gradually while the induction and acceleration period increase with the increase of GP content. According to Krstulovic-Dabic model, the hydration process of composite cementitious materials containing GP is controlled by a variety of complicated reaction mechanisms, which can be divided into three periods: nucleation and crystal growth (NG, phase boundary reaction (I, and diffusion (D. The NG and I process are shortened after incorporating GP.

  12. Method for characterization of the rate of movement of an oxidation front in cementitious materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, Philip M.; Langton, Christine A.; Stefanko, David B.

    2016-03-01

    Disclosed are methods for determining the redox condition of cementitious materials. The methods are leaching methods that utilize a redox active transition metal indicator that is present in the cementitious material and exhibits variable solubility depending upon the oxidation state of the indicator. When the leaching process is carried out under anaerobic conditions, the presence or absence of the indicator in the leachate can be utilized to determine the redox condition of and location of the oxidation front in the material that has been subjected to the leaching process.

  13. Energy implications of mechanical and mechanical-biological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimpan, Ciprian; Wenzel, Henrik

    2013-07-01

    Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanical-biological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials for recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140 MJprimary/100 MJinput waste, in the different scenario settings. The energy footprint of transportation needs, pre-treatment and reprocessing of recyclable materials was 3-9.5%, 1-18% and 1-8% respectively, relative to total energy savings. Mass combustion WtE achieved the highest savings in scenarios with CHP production, nonetheless, MBT-based systems had similarly high performance if SRF streams were co-combusted with coal. When RDF and SRF was only used in dedicated WtE plants, MBT-based systems totalled lower savings due to inherent system losses and additional energy costs. In scenarios without heat recovery, the biodrying MBS-based system achieved the highest savings, on the condition of SRF co-combustion. As a sensitivity scenario, alternative utilisation of SRF in cement kilns was modelled. It supported similar or higher net savings for all pre-treatment systems compared to mass combustion WtE, except when WtE CHP was possible in the first two background energy scenarios. Recovery of plastics for recycling before energy recovery increased net energy savings in most scenario variations, over those of full

  14. Mechanical resilience and cementitious processes in Imperial Roman architectural mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Marie D; Landis, Eric N; Brune, Philip F; Vitti, Massimo; Chen, Heng; Li, Qinfei; Kunz, Martin; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J M; Ingraffea, Anthony R

    2014-12-30

    The pyroclastic aggregate concrete of Trajan's Markets (110 CE), now Museo Fori Imperiali in Rome, has absorbed energy from seismic ground shaking and long-term foundation settlement for nearly two millenia while remaining largely intact at the structural scale. The scientific basis of this exceptional service record is explored through computed tomography of fracture surfaces and synchroton X-ray microdiffraction analyses of a reproduction of the standardized hydrated lime-volcanic ash mortar that binds decimeter-sized tuff and brick aggregate in the conglomeratic concrete. The mortar reproduction gains fracture toughness over 180 d through progressive coalescence of calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate (C-A-S-H) cementing binder with Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.8-0.9 and crystallization of strätlingite and siliceous hydrogarnet (katoite) at ≥ 90 d, after pozzolanic consumption of hydrated lime was complete. Platey strätlingite crystals toughen interfacial zones along scoria perimeters and impede macroscale propagation of crack segments. In the 1,900-y-old mortar, C-A-S-H has low Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.45-0.75. Dense clusters of 2- to 30-µm strätlingite plates further reinforce interfacial zones, the weakest link of modern cement-based concrete, and the cementitious matrix. These crystals formed during long-term autogeneous reaction of dissolved calcite from lime and the alkali-rich scoriae groundmass, clay mineral (halloysite), and zeolite (phillipsite and chabazite) surface textures from the Pozzolane Rosse pyroclastic flow, erupted from the nearby Alban Hills volcano. The clast-supported conglomeratic fabric of the concrete presents further resistance to fracture propagation at the structural scale.

  15. Mechanical resilience and cementitious processes in Imperial Roman architectural mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Eric N.; Brune, Philip F.; Vitti, Massimo; Chen, Heng; Li, Qinfei; Kunz, Martin; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    The pyroclastic aggregate concrete of Trajan’s Markets (110 CE), now Museo Fori Imperiali in Rome, has absorbed energy from seismic ground shaking and long-term foundation settlement for nearly two millenia while remaining largely intact at the structural scale. The scientific basis of this exceptional service record is explored through computed tomography of fracture surfaces and synchroton X-ray microdiffraction analyses of a reproduction of the standardized hydrated lime–volcanic ash mortar that binds decimeter-sized tuff and brick aggregate in the conglomeratic concrete. The mortar reproduction gains fracture toughness over 180 d through progressive coalescence of calcium–aluminum-silicate–hydrate (C-A-S-H) cementing binder with Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.8–0.9 and crystallization of strätlingite and siliceous hydrogarnet (katoite) at ≥90 d, after pozzolanic consumption of hydrated lime was complete. Platey strätlingite crystals toughen interfacial zones along scoria perimeters and impede macroscale propagation of crack segments. In the 1,900-y-old mortar, C-A-S-H has low Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.45–0.75. Dense clusters of 2- to 30-µm strätlingite plates further reinforce interfacial zones, the weakest link of modern cement-based concrete, and the cementitious matrix. These crystals formed during long-term autogeneous reaction of dissolved calcite from lime and the alkali-rich scoriae groundmass, clay mineral (halloysite), and zeolite (phillipsite and chabazite) surface textures from the Pozzolane Rosse pyroclastic flow, erupted from the nearby Alban Hills volcano. The clast-supported conglomeratic fabric of the concrete presents further resistance to fracture propagation at the structural scale. PMID:25512521

  16. Design of engineered cementitious composites for ductile seismic resistant elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Tetsushi

    This dissertation focuses on designing Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC) to achieve high performance seismic resistant elements. To attain this goal, three major tasks have been accomplished. Task 1 aims at achieving new ECCs involving low cost fiber, which often involve fiber rupture in crack bridging, thus named as "Fiber Rupture Type ECC". Achieving the new ECC requires a new practical and comprehensive composite design theory. For this theory, single fiber behavior was first investigated. Specifically, fiber rupture in composite and chemical bond in fiber/matrix interface were experimentally examined and mathematically modeled. Then this model for single fiber behavior was implemented into a proposed bridging law, a theoretical model for relationship between fiber bridging stress of composite and Crack Opening Displacement (COD). This new bridging law was finally employed to establish a new composite design theory. Task 2 was initiated to facilitate structural interpretation of ECC's material behavior investigated in Task 1. For this purpose, uniaxial tensile behavior, one of the most important ECC's properties, was theoretically characterized with stress-strain relation from micromechanics view point. As a result, a theory is proposed to express ECC's tensile stress-strain relation in terms of micromechanics parameters of composites, such as bond strengths. Task 3 primarily demonstrates an integrated design scheme for ductile seismic elements that covers from micromechanics in single fiber level to structural design tool, such as with non-linear FEM analysis. The significance of this design scheme is that the influences of ECC's microstructure on element's structural performance is quantitatively captured. This means that a powerful tool is obtained for tailoring constitutive micromechanics parameters in order to maximize structural performance of elements. While the tool is still preliminary, completing this tool in future studies will enable one to

  17. Polyhydroxybutyrate production by direct use of waste activated sludge in phosphorus-limited fed-batch culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaillé, Laëtitia; Grousseau, Estelle; Pocquet, Mathieu; Lepeuple, Anne-Sophie; Uribelarrea, Jean-Louis; Hernandez-Raquet, Guillermina; Paul, Etienne

    2013-12-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production directly by waste activated sludge (WAS) was investigated in aerobic fed-batch conditions using acetic acid as substrate. PHB production was induced by phosphorus limitation. WAS of different origin were tested with various degrees of phosphorus limitation and PHB contents of up to 70% (gCOD PHB/gCOD particulate) were obtained. This strategy showed the importance of maintaining cell growth for PHB production in order to increase PHB concentration and that the degree of phosphorus limitation has a direct impact on the quantity of PHB produced. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA transcripts showed changes in the active bacteria of the WAS microbial community as well as the acclimation of populations depending on sludge origin. The monitoring of the process appeared as the key factor for optimal PHB production by WAS. Different strategies are discussed and compared in terms of carbon yield and PHB content with the feast and famine selection process.

  18. Direct hydrogen production from cellulosic waste materials with a single-step dark fermentation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnusson, Lauren; Islam, Rumana; Levin, David; Cicek, Nazim [Department of Biosystems Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Sparling, Richard [Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Biohydrogen production from cellulosic waste materials using dark fermentation is a promising technology for producing renewable energy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate residual cellulosic materials generated from local sources for their H{sub 2} production potential without any pretreatment. Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405, a cellulolytic, thermophilic bacterium that has been shown to be capable of H{sub 2} production on both cellobiose and {alpha}-cellulose substrates, was used in simultaneous batch fermentation experiments with dried distillers grain (DDGs), barley hulls (BH) and fusarium head blight contaminated barley hulls (CBH) as the carbon source. Overall, the dried distillers grain produced the highest concentration of hydrogen gas at 1.27 mmol H{sub 2}/glucose equivalent utilized. CBH and BH produced 1.18 and 1.24 mmol H{sub 2}/glucose equivalent utilized, respectively. Overall, this study indicates that hydrogen derived from a variety of cellulosic waste biomass sources is a possible candidate for the development of sustainable energy. (author)

  19. Turning waste into valuable resource: potential of electric arc furnace dust as photocatalytic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapiña, M; Jimenez-Relinque, E; Castellote, M

    2014-10-01

    This paper explores the potential of a hazardous waste of difficult management, electric arc furnace dust (EAFD), as photocatalytic material. Starting from a real waste coming from a Spanish steel factory, chemical, mineralogical, and optical characterizations have been carried out. Direct trials on EAFD and mortar containing this waste have been performed to evaluate its potential as photocatalyst itself and within a cementitious material. The analysis of photocatalytic properties has been done by two different methods: degradation of NO x and degradation of rhodamine (RhB). As a result, it can be said that EAFD exhibited photocatalytic activity for both configurations with UV and visible light, having the mortar enhanced photocatalytic activity for NO x with respect to the EAFD itself. Additionally, in direct trials on the EAFD, it has been able to degrade RhB even in the dark, which has been attributed to transfer of electrons between the adsorbed RhB and the conduction band of some oxides in the dust.

  20. Performance assessments insights on the use of cements in waste management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snyder K.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of cementitious materials has been proposed in a variety of waste management systems because these materials can have a variety of desirable performance characteristics: hydraulic isolation, chemical isolation, structural stability. Cementitious barriers are commonly engineered with a goal of achieving the highest quality material possible (e.g. minimizing hydraulic conductivity, porosity, tortuosity, diffusivity. However, a single performance goal may not be optimum when practical considerations of designs and performance characteristics are considered simultaneously. In addition, laboratory-scale optimized designs may have field-scale characteristics that are less than ideal.

  1. Laws, directives and policy instruments important for the development of the waste management system; Lagar, direktiv och styrmedel viktiga foer avfallssystemets utveckling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Karolina; Sundberg, Johan

    2010-01-15

    This report gives a survey and a description of present and future policy instruments that have been or will become important for the development of the waste management system. Policy instruments here refers to laws, directives, taxes/fees, national/local goals and other regulating measures that the society introduce to steer the development of the waste management system. This work can thus be used as a dictionary or a guideline for these measures. The investigation has two goals: 1. To give representatives of the Swedish waste management system a summary of important policy instruments for the future development of the waste management system. 2. To give Waste Refinery a summary of these policy instruments that can be used for the discussions of how the research within the centre should develop during stage 2. A large number of policy instruments have been found during the study. These instruments have been, most likely will become, or may become important for the development of the waste management system. Most of them are described in this report. The selection made is presented in Table 1. Focus for the selection has been policy instruments that are important for the research activities within Waste Refinery, meaning policy instruments that direct or indirect can change the use of thermal and/or biological treatment as well as techniques and methods supporting these treatment methods. [Table 1. Policy instruments that are presented in the report

  2. Final Report: Fiscal Year 1997 demonstration of omnivorous non-thermal mixed waste treatment: Direct chemical oxidation of organic solids and liquids using peroxydisulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Direct Chemical Oxidation (DCO) is a non-thermal, ambient pressure, aqueous-based technology for the oxidative destruction of the organic components of hazardous or mixed waste streams. The process has been developed for applications in waste treatment, chemical demilitarization and decontamination at LLNL since 1992. The process uses solutions of the peroxydisulfate ion (typically sodium or ammonium salts) to completely mineralize the organics to carbon dioxide and water. The expended oxidant may be electrolytically regenerated to minimize secondary waste. The paper briefly describes: free radical and secondary oxidant formation; electrochemical regeneration; offgas stream; and throughput.

  3. Reactive transport simulations of the evolution of a cementitious repository in clay-rich host rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosakowski, Georg; Berner, Urs; Kulik, Dmitrii A.

    2010-05-01

    In Switzerland, the deep geological disposal in clay-rich rocks is foreseen not only for high-level radioactive waste, but also for intermediate-level (ILW) and low-level (LLW) radioactive waste. Typically, ILW and LLW repositories contain huge amounts of cementitious materials used for waste conditioning, confinement, and as backfill for the emplacement caverns. We are investigating the interactions of such a repository with the surrounding clay rocks and with other clay-rich materials such as sand/bentonite mixtures that are foreseen for backfilling the access tunnels. With the help of a numerical reactive transport model, we are comparing the evolution of cement/clay interfaces for different geochemical and transport conditions. In this work, the reactive transport of chemical components is simulated with the multi-component reactive transport code OpenGeoSys-GEM. It employs the sequential non-iterative approach to couple the mass transport code OpenGeoSys (http://www.ufz.de/index.php?en=18345) with the GEMIPM2K (http://gems.web.psi.ch/) code for thermodynamic modeling of aquatic geochemical systems which is using the Gibbs Energy Minimization (GEM) method. Details regarding code development and verification can be found in Shao et al. (2009). The mineral composition and the pore solution of a CEM I 52.5 N HTS hydrated cement as described by Lothenbach & Wieland (2006) are used as an initial state of the cement compartment. The setup is based on the most recent CEMDATA07 thermodynamic database which includes several ideal solid solutions for hydrated cement minerals and is consistent with the Nagra/PSI thermodynamic database 01/01. The smectite/montmorillonite model includes cation exchange processes and amphotheric≡SOH sites and was calibrated on the basis of data by Bradbury & Baeyens (2002). In other reactive transport codes based on the Law of Mass Action (LMA) for solving geochemical equilibria, cation exchange processes are usually calculated assuming

  4. The direct environmental impact of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement: a surgical waste audit of five cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sa, Darren; Stephens, Kellee; Kuang, Michelle; Simunovic, Nicole; Karlsson, Jon; Ayeni, Olufemi R

    2016-07-01

    Health care facilities produce significant waste (2200 kg/bed/year) creating 2% of greenhouse gas emissions and 1% total solid waste nationwide, with 20-70% of waste coming from operating rooms. We performed a waste audit of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) to understand its environmental impact and identify areas for greening practices. A waste audit of five hip arthroscopy procedures for FAI was performed. All waste was collected and separated into six waste streams in real time: (i) normal/landfill waste; (ii) recyclable cardboards and plastics; (iii) biohazard waste; (iv) sharp items; (v) linens and (vi) sterile wrapping. The surgical waste (except laundered linens) from five FAI surgeries totaled 47.4 kg, including 21.7 kg (45.7%) of biohazard waste, 11.7 kg (24.6%) of sterile wrap, 6.4 kg (13.5%) of normal/landfill waste, 6.4 kg (13.5%) of recyclable plastics and 1.2 kg (2.6%) of sharp items. An average of 9.4 kg (excluding laundered linens) of waste was produced per procedure. Given the considerable biohazard waste produced by FAI procedures, additional recycling programs, continued adherence to proper waste segregation and an emphasis on 'green outcomes' is encouraged to demonstrate environmental responsibility and effectively manage and allocate finite resources.

  5. Oxidation of carbon fiber surfaces for use as reinforcement in high-temperature cementitious material systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1990-01-01

    The interfacial bond characteristics between carbon fiber and a cement matrix, in high temperature fiber-reinforced cementitious composite systems, can be improved by the oxidative treatment of the fiber surfaces. Compositions and the process for producing the compositions are disclosed.

  6. Interaction between microcapsules and cementitious matrix after cracking in a self-healing system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X.; Xing, F.; Zhang, M.; Han, N.; Qian, Z.

    2013-01-01

    A new type of self-healing cementitious composites by using organic microcapsules is designed in Guangdong Key Laboratory of Durability for Coastal Civil Engineering, Shenzhen University. For the organic microcapsules, the shell material is urea formoldehyde (UF), and the core healing agent is Epoxy

  7. Solidification/stabilization of chromite ore processing residue using alkali-activated composite cementitious materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao; Zhuang, RanLiang; Muhammad, Faheem; Yu, Lin; Shiau, YanChyuan; Li, Dongwei

    2017-02-01

    Chromite Ore Processing Residue (COPR) produced in chromium salt production process causes a great health and environmental risk with Cr(VI) leaching. The solidification/stabilization (S/S) of COPR using alkali-activated blast furnace slag (BFS) and fly ash (FA) based cementitious material was investigated in this study. The optimum percentage of BFS and FA for preparing the alkali-activated BFS-FA binder had been studied. COPR was used to replace the amount of BFS-FA or ordinary Portland cement (OPC) for the preparation of the cementitious materials, respectively. The immobilization effect of the alkali-activated BFS-FA binder on COPR was much better than that of OPC based cementitious material. The potential for reusing the final treatment product as a readily available construction material was evaluated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) analysis indicated that COPR had been effectively immobilized. The solidification mechanism is the combined effect of reduction, ion exchange, precipitation, adsorption and physical fixation in the alkali-activated composite cementitious material.

  8. Shock Wave Propagation in Cementitious Materials at Micro/Meso Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-31

    ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Shock wave response of heterogeneous materials like cement and concrete is greatly influenced by the...2015 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Shock Wave Propagation in Cementitious Materials at Micro/Meso Scales The views...Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 shock propagation, micro and macro scales, finite element modeling REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11

  9. Design of microcapsule system used for self-healing cementitious material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, M.; Han, N.; Xing, F.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.

    2013-01-01

    For a microcapsule based self-healing system in the cementitious material, a fundamental issue is to find and facilitate a suitable microcapsule system, concerning either the material selection or design and manufacture process. In this study, urea formaldehyde resin is used for the shell of

  10. Phenomenological interpretation of the shear behavior of reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composite beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of the shear behavior of beams consisting of steel Reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites (R/ECC). This study investigates and quantifies the effect of ECC's strain hardening and multiple cracking behavior on the shear capacity of beams lo...

  11. THERMALLY CONDUCTIVE CEMENTITIOUS GROUTS FOR GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMPS. PROGRESS REPORT BY 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALLAN,M.L.; PHILIPPACOPOULOS,A.J.

    1998-11-01

    Research commenced in FY 97 to determine the suitability of superplasticized cement-sand grouts for backfilling vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pump (GHP) systems. The overall objectives were to develop, evaluate and demonstrate cementitious grouts that could reduce the required bore length and improve the performance of GHPs. This report summarizes the accomplishments in FY 98.

  12. Micro-mechanical Analysis of Fiber Reinforced Cementitious Composites using Cohesive Crack Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Lars; Stang, Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the mechanism appearing during fiber debonding in fiber reinforced cementitious composite. The investigation is performed on the micro scale by use of a Finite Element Model. The model is 3 dimensional and the fictitious crack model and a mixed mode stress formulation...

  13. Penetration of corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Brad J.; Peterova, Adela;

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes experimental investigations on corrosion-induced deterioration in reinforced cementitious materials and the subsequent development and implementation of a novel conceptual model. Rejnforced mortar specimens of varying water-to-cement ratios were subjected to current-induced c......This paper describes experimental investigations on corrosion-induced deterioration in reinforced cementitious materials and the subsequent development and implementation of a novel conceptual model. Rejnforced mortar specimens of varying water-to-cement ratios were subjected to current......-induced corrosion (10, 50, and 100 mu A/cm(2)). X-ray attenuation measurements and visual investigations provided both qualitative and quantitative information on the penetration of solid corrosion products into the surrounding cementitious matrix. X-ray attenuation measurements provided time- and location......-dependent concentrations of corrosion products averaged through the specimen thickness. Digital image correlation (DIC) was used to measure corrosion-induced deformations including deformations between steel and cementitious matrix as well as formation and propagation of corrosion-induced cracks. Based on experimental...

  14. Predicting the Probability of Failure of Cementitious Sewer Pipes Using Stochastic Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir M. Alani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a stochastic finite element method (SFEM is employed to investigate the probability of failure of cementitious buried sewer pipes subjected to combined effect of corrosion and stresses. A non-linear time-dependant model is used to determine the extent of concrete corrosion. Using the SFEM, the effects of different random variables, including loads, pipe material, and corrosion on the remaining safe life of the cementitious sewer pipes are explored. A numerical example is presented to demonstrate the merit of the proposed SFEM in evaluating the effects of the contributing parameters upon the probability of failure of cementitious sewer pipes. The developed SFEM offers many advantages over traditional probabilistic techniques since it does not use any empirical equations in order to determine failure of pipes. The results of the SFEM can help the concerning industry (e.g., water companies to better plan their resources by providing accurate prediction for the remaining safe life of cementitious sewer pipes.

  15. Design of microcapsule system used for self-healing cementitious material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, M.; Han, N.; Xing, F.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.

    2013-01-01

    For a microcapsule based self-healing system in the cementitious material, a fundamental issue is to find and facilitate a suitable microcapsule system, concerning either the material selection or design and manufacture process. In this study, urea formaldehyde resin is used for the shell of microca

  16. Producer responsibility, waste minimisation and the WEEE Directive: case studies in eco-design from the European lighting sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottberg, Annika; Morris, Joe; Pollard, Simon; Mark-Herbert, Cecilia; Cook, Matthew

    2006-04-15

    The EU Directive on Waste Electrical and Electrical Equipment (WEEE) (2002/96/EC), to be implemented in stages from August 2004, attempts to tackle the growing quantity WEEE by making producers responsible for the costs of the collection and recycling of their products at the end of usable life. This is considered to give producers a financial incentive to reduce waste at source through eco-design. This link is, however, under-researched and little is known generally about the effectiveness of extended producer responsibility (EPR) and policies to promote it. This paper presents the findings of an exploratory study to address these important gaps in knowledge. Literature review was used to develop an analytical framework to explain the relationships between the drivers for eco-design and the role of policies to promote EPR. This was applied to eight case studies of firms from the European lighting sector. While quantitative data to confirm the link between EPR and eco-design were difficult to obtain, the case studies showed that EPR has had little effect on product development so far. Within the sector studied, most producers have been able to pass on incremental costs associated with EPR to customers with negligible effects on sales. This reflects perceptions in the lighting sector that, because demand for products is relatively price inelastic and the regulation affects all producers equally, EPR is unlikely to drive eco-design at least in the short run. The cases also showed that choice between individual and centrally provided waste recovery schemes rested on perceptions of relative costs and practicability. It was evident that other drivers, such as bans on hazardous substances, product declarations and supply chain pressures, were often more effective promoters of eco-design. Thus it seems a mix of policy measures is required rather than reliance on economic instruments alone.

  17. DuraLith geopolymer waste form for Hanford secondary waste: correlating setting behavior to hydration heat evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Gong, Weiliang; Syltebo, Larry; Lutze, Werner; Pegg, Ian L

    2014-08-15

    The binary furnace slag-metakaolin DuraLith geopolymer waste form, which has been considered as one of the candidate waste forms for immobilization of certain Hanford secondary wastes (HSW) from the vitrification of nuclear wastes at the Hanford Site, Washington, was extended to a ternary fly ash-furnace slag-metakaolin system to improve workability, reduce hydration heat, and evaluate high HSW waste loading. A concentrated HSW simulant, consisting of more than 20 chemicals with a sodium concentration of 5 mol/L, was employed to prepare the alkaline activating solution. Fly ash was incorporated at up to 60 wt% into the binder materials, whereas metakaolin was kept constant at 26 wt%. The fresh waste form pastes were subjected to isothermal calorimetry and setting time measurement, and the cured samples were further characterized by compressive strength and TCLP leach tests. This study has firstly established quantitative linear relationships between both initial and final setting times and hydration heat, which were never discovered in scientific literature for any cementitious waste form or geopolymeric material. The successful establishment of the correlations between setting times and hydration heat may make it possible to efficiently design and optimize cementitious waste forms and industrial wastes based geopolymers using limited testing results.

  18. Physico-chemical interactions at the concrete-bitumen interface of nuclear waste repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sablayrolles C.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the fate of nitrate and organic acids at the bitumenconcrete-steel interface within a repository storage cell for long-lived, intermediatelevel, radioactive wastes. The interface was simulated by a multiphase system in which cementitious matrices (CEM V-paste specimens were exposed to bitumen model leachates consisting of nitrates and acetic acid with and without oxalic acid, chemical compounds likely to be released by bitumen. Leaching experiments were conducted with daily renewal of the solutions in order to accelerate reactions. C-steel chips, simulating the presence of steel in the repository, were added in the systems for some experiments. The concentrations of anions (acetate, oxalate, nitrate, and nitrite and cations (calcium, potassium, ammonium and the pH were monitored over time. Mineralogical changes of the cementitious matrices were analysed by XRD. The results confirmed the stability of nitrates in the absence of steel, whereas, reduction of nitrates was observed in the presence of steel (production of NH4+. The action of acetic acid on the cementitious matrix was similar to that of ordinary leaching; no specific interaction was detected between acetate and cementitious cations. The reaction of oxalic acid with the cementitious phases led to the precipitation of calcium oxalate salts in the outer layer of the matrix. The concentration of oxalate was reduced by 65% inside the leaching medium.

  19. Transplanting EU waste law : The European waste electrical and electronic equipment directives as a source of inspiration to Brazilian law and policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes Más, Heyd

    2016-01-01

    What are the legal instruments and policy choices producing improvements in e-waste management strategies worldwide? Could they be used from one legal system to another? The EU’s tradition of focusing on waste management and setting goals and responsibilities for all stakeholders involved in product

  20. Direct extraction of palladium and silver from waste printed circuit boards powder by supercritical fluids oxidation-extraction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Fu-Shen

    2016-11-15

    The current study was carried out to develop an environmental benign process for direct recovery of palladium (Pd) and silver (Ag) from waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) powder. The process ingeniously combined supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) and supercritical carbon dioxide (Sc-CO2) extraction techniques. SCWO treatment could effectively enrich Pd and Ag by degrading non-metallic component, and a precious metal concentrate (PMC) could be obtained, in which the enrichment factors of Pd and Ag reached 5.3 and 4.8, respectively. In the second stage, more than 93.7% Pd and 96.4% Ag could be extracted from PMC by Sc-CO2 modified with acetone and KI-I2 under optimum conditions. Mechanism study indicated that Pd and Ag extraction by Sc-CO2 was a complicated physiochemical process, involving oxidation, complexation, anion exchange, mass transfer and migration approaches. Accordingly, this study established a benign and effective process for selective recovery of dispersal precious metals from waste materials.

  1. On the Application of Inertial Microfluidics for the Size-Based Separation of Polydisperse Cementitious Particulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Aditya; Lewis, Peter; Balonis, Magdalena; Di Carlo, Dino; Sant, Gaurav

    2015-06-01

    The early-age performance of concrete is determined by the properties of the cementitious binder and the evolution of its chemical reactions. The chemical reactivity, and to some extent, the composition of cementitious particles can depend on particle size. Therefore, it is valuable to physically separate cementing minerals into well-defined size classes so that the influences of both particle size and composition on reaction progress can be studied without the confounding effects of a broad particle size distribution. However, conventional particle separation methods (e.g., density fractionation, wet sieving, field-flow extraction, ultrasonification-sedimentation) are time-consuming and cumbersome and result in poor particle yields and size-selectivity, thus, making them unsuitable for processing larger volumes of cementitious powders (on the order of grams). This study applies a novel inertial microfluidics (IMF) based procedure to separate cementitious powders on the basis of their size. Special attention is paid to optimizing operating variables to ensure that particles in a fluid streamline achieve unique equilibrium positions within the device. From such positions, particles can be retrieved as per their size using symmetrical outlet configurations with tuned fluidic resistances. The approach is critically assessed in terms of: (1) its ability to separate cementitious powders into narrow size bins, and therefore its feasibility as a fractionation procedure, and (2) quantitatively relating the operating parameters to the particle yield and size selectivity. The study establishes metrics for assessing the ability of IMF methods to classify minerals and other polydisperse particles on the basis of their size.

  2. Direct green waste land application: How to reduce its impacts on greenhouse gas and volatile organic compound emissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu-Barker, Xia; Burger, Martin; Horwath, William R; Green, Peter G

    2016-06-01

    Direct land application as an alternative to green waste (GW) disposal in landfills or composting requires an understanding of its impacts on greenhouse gas (GHG) and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. We investigated the effects of two approaches of GW direct land application, surface application and soil incorporation, on carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4), and VOC emissions for a 12month period. Five treatments were applied in fall 2013 on fallow land under a Mediterranean climate in California: 30cm height GW on surface; 15cm height GW on surface; 15cm height GW tilled into soil; control+till; control+no till. In addition, a laboratory experiment was conducted to develop a mechanistic understanding of the influence of GW application on soil O2 consumption and GHG emission. The annual cumulative N2O, CO2 and VOC emissions ranged from 1.6 to 5.5kgN2O-Nha(-1), 5.3 to 40.6MgCO2-Cha(-1) and 0.6 to 9.9kgVOCha(-1), respectively, and were greatly reduced by GW soil incorporation compared to surface application. Application of GW quickly consumed soil O2 within one day in the lab incubation. These results indicate that to reduce GHG and VOC emissions of GW direct land application, GW incorporation into soil is recommended.

  3. Laboratory Optimization Tests of Technetium Decontamination of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Direct Feed Low Activity Waste Melter Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-12-23

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  4. Renewable platform chemicals from directional microwave-assisted liquefaction coupling stepwise extraction of waste biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junfeng Feng; Chungyun Hse; Zhongzhi Yang; Kui Wang; Jianchun Jiang; Junming Xu

    2017-01-01

    Directional microwave-assisted liquefaction and stepwise extraction are introduced for producing platform chemicals: aromatics and monosaccharides. When sulfuric acid was used as a catalyst, a 45% monosaccharides yield and a 29% aromatics yield were obtained from bamboo with 0.3 g catalyst per 18 g methanol and 2 g bamboo at 160 °C with 10 min. Approximately 78–86 wt%...

  5. Transition from Multiple Macro-Cracking to Multiple Micro-Cracking in Cementitious Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun; LENG Bing

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the possibility of transition from multiple macro-cracking to multiple micro-cracking in cementitious composites.Conventional polyvinyl alcohol fiber reinforced cementitious composites normally exhibit macroscopic strain-hardening and multiple cracking after the first cracks appear.However,the individual crack width at the saturated stage is normally 60 to 80 μm.In the current study,the effect of fine aggregate size on the cracking performance,especially the individual crack width in the strain-hardening stage was studied by bending tests.The results show that the individual crack widths can be reduced from 60-80 μm to 10-30 μm by modifying the particle size of the fine aggregates used in the composites.

  6. Properties and Microstructure of Polymer Emulsions Modified Fibers Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ying; SUN Qianyao; KONG Lian; FANG He

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a new class of cementitious composites filled with polymer emulsions were investigated, and their superior mechanical strength and durability properties compared to composites devoid of fillers were reported. Polymer emulsions were utilized to mechanically reinforce the composite and bridge the cement, fly ash, aggregate and fibers. The results reveal that the epoxy emulsion and poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) emulsion markedly enhance the mechanical and durability properties of cemetitious composites. The fibers can be pulled out in the form of slip-hardening and the abrasion phenomenon can be observed clearly on the surface of the fibers. The hydration extent of cement is higher than that of the pristine composites. The polymer modified cementitious composites designed on micromechanics, have flexibility and plasticity which could be applied for a novel form of multifunctional materials with a range of pipeline coatings applications.

  7. Hydration kinetics of cementitious materials composed of red mud and coal gangue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Li, Hong-xu; Liu, Xiao-ming

    2016-10-01

    To elucidate the intrinsic reaction mechanism of cementitious materials composed of red mud and coal gangue (RGC), the hydration kinetics of these cementitious materials at 20°C was investigated on the basis of the Krstulović-Dabić model. An isothermal calorimeter was used to characterize the hydration heat evolution. The results show that the hydration of RGC is controlled by the processes of nucleation and crystal growth (NG), interaction at phase boundaries (I), and diffusion (D) in order, and the pozzolanic reactions of slag and compound-activated red mud-coal gangue are mainly controlled by the I process. Slag accelerates the clinker hydration during NG process, whereas the compound-activated red mud-coal gangue retards the hydration of RGC and the time required for I process increases with increasing dosage of red mud-coal gangue in RGC.

  8. Effect of phase separation structure on cementitious reactivity of blast furnace slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu; SUN HengHu; LIU XiaoMing; CUI ZengDi

    2009-01-01

    Blast furnace slag samples with phase separation structure were prepared by re-melting and then water quenching process. By use of XRD, DTA and SEM technologies in combination with mechanical prop-erty experiment, the structure characteristics of samples were determined and their effects on cemen-titious reactivity were investigated. The results show that the samples with phase separation have better cementitious reactivity than sample with homogenous glass and sample with crystalline phases, which mainly contributes to its grass structure with coexistence of Ca-O rich phase and Si-O rich phase. Moreover, the amorphous samples possess hydrability which is affected by their formation process, since phase separation extends the range of possible Ca-rich crystalline phases.

  9. Effect of phase separation structure on cementitious reactivity of blast furnace slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Blast furnace slag samples with phase separation structure were prepared by re-melting and then water quenching process. By use of XRD,DTA and SEM technologies in combination with mechanical property experiment,the structure characteristics of samples were determined and their effects on cementitious reactivity were investigated. The results show that the samples with phase separation have better cementitious reactivity than sample with homogenous glass and sample with crystalline phases,which mainly contributes to its glass structure with coexistence of Ca-O rich phase and Si-O rich phase. Moreover,the amorphous samples possess hydrability which is affected by their formation process,since phase separation extends the range of possible Ca-rich crystalline phases.

  10. Ion Transport and Microstructure of Sandwich Cementitious Materials Exposed to Chloride Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xingang; WANG Kai; WANG Rui; XIE Tao; HUANG Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport of sandwich cementitious materials (SCM) exposed to chloride environment was investigated by accelerated diffusion method and natural diffusion method. Pore structure and micromorphology of SCM were investigated by MIP and SEM-EDS. In comparison with the monolayer structural high performance concrete (HPC), conductive charge for 6 hours, chloride diffusion coefficient, and apparent chloride diffusion coefifcient of SCM were decreased by 30%-40%, two orders of magnitude and 40%-50%, respectively. Pore structure of ultra low ion permeability cementitious materials (ULIPCM) prepared for the facesheet is superior to that of HPC prepared for the core. As for porosity, the most probable pore radius, the content of pores with radius 50 nm and the surface area of pores, the order is ULIPCM

  11. X-ray diffraction of slag-based sodium salt waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Missimer, D. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-09-30

    The attached report documents sample preparation and x-ray diffraction results for a series of cement and blended cement matrices prepared with either water or a 4.4 M Na salt solution. The objective of the study was to provide initial phase characterization for the Cementitious Barriers Partnership reference case cementitious salt waste form. This information can be used to: 1) generate a base line for the evolution of the waste form as a function of time and conditions, 2) potentially to design new binders based on mineralogy of the binder, 3) understand and predict anion and cation leaching behavior of contaminants of concern, and 4) predict performance of the waste forms for which phase solubility and thermodynamic data are available.

  12. Final Report - Assessment of Potential Phosphate Ion-Cementitious Materials Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Mattus, Catherine H [ORNL; Dole, Leslie Robert [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to: (1) review the potential for degradation of cementitious materials due to exposure to high concentrations of phosphate ions; (2) provide an improved understanding of any significant factors that may lead to a requirement to establish exposure limits for concrete structures exposed to soils or ground waters containing high levels of phosphate ions; (3) recommend, as appropriate, whether a limitation on phosphate ion concentration in soils or ground water is required to avoid degradation of concrete structures; and (4) provide a "primer" on factors that can affect the durability of concrete materials and structures in nuclear power plants. An assessment of the potential effects of phosphate ions on cementitious materials was made through a review of the literature, contacts with concrete research personnel, and conduct of a "bench-scale" laboratory investigation. Results of these activities indicate that: no harmful interactions occur between phosphates and cementitious materials unless phosphates are present in the form of phosphoric acid; phosphates have been incorporated into concrete as set retarders, and phosphate cements have been used for infrastructure repair; no standards or guidelines exist pertaining to applications of reinforced concrete structures in high-phosphate environments; interactions of phosphate ions and cementitious materials has not been a concern of the research community; and laboratory results indicate similar performance of specimens cured in phosphate solutions and those cured in a calcium hydroxide solution after exposure periods of up to eighteen months. Relative to the "primer," a separate NUREG report has been prepared that provides a review of pertinent factors that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures.

  13. Self-Healing of Microcracks in Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC) Under a Natural Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Victor C.; Emily N. Herbert

    2013-01-01

    This paper builds on previous self-healing engineered cementitious composites (ECC) research by allowing ECC to heal outdoors, in the natural environment, under random and sometimes extreme environmental conditions. Development of an ECC material that can heal itself in the natural environment could lower infrastructure maintenance costs and allow for more sustainable development in the future by increasing service life and decreasing the amount of resources and energy needed for repairs. Det...

  14. Impact of alkali salts on the kinetics and microstructural development of cementitious systems

    OpenAIRE

    Mota Gassó, Berta

    2015-01-01

    Supplementary cementitious materials (SCM) lower the environmental impact of cement and concrete but react more slowly than Portland cement, which therefore limits the levels of substitution possible as reasonable early strengths are necessary. One of the main factors affecting the reaction of the SCMs is the alkalinity of the pore solution. However, alkalis do not only affect SCMs, but also the clinker phases. It is generally accepted that alkalis accelerate the hydration of Portland cement ...

  15. Evaluation of natural colonisation of cementitious materials: effect of bioreceptivity and environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Sandra; Calvo-Torras, María Ángeles; De Belie, Nele; Segura, Ignacio; Aguado, Antonio

    2015-04-15

    Incorporation of living organisms, such as photosynthetic organisms, on the structure envelope has become a priority in the area of architecture and construction due to aesthetical, economic and ecological advantages. Important research efforts are made to achieve further improvements, such as for the development of cementitious materials with an enhanced bioreceptivity to stimulate biological growth. Previously, the study of the bioreceptivity of cementitious materials has been carried out mainly under laboratory conditions although field-scale experiments may present different results. This work aims at analysing the colonisation of cementitious materials with different levels of bioreceptivity by placing them in three different environmental conditions. Specimens did not present visual colonisation, which indicates that environmental conditions have a greater impact than intrinsic properties of the material at this stage. Therefore, it appears that in addition to an optimized bioreceptivity of the concrete (i.e., composition, porosity and roughness), extra measures are indispensable for a rapid development of biological growth on concrete surfaces. An analysis of the colonisation in terms of genus and quantity of the most representative microorganisms found on the specimens for each location was carried out and related to weather conditions, such as monthly average temperature and total precipitation, and air quality in terms of NOx, SO2, CO and O3. OPC-based specimens presented a higher colonisation regarding both biodiversity and quantity. However, results obtained in a previous experimental programme under laboratory conditions suggested a higher suitability of Magnesium Phosphate Cement-based (MPC-based) specimens for algal growth. Consequently, carefully considering the environment and the relationships between the different organisms present in an environment is vital for successfully using a cementitious material as a substrate for biological growth

  16. A new low carbon cementitious binder for stabilising weak ground conditions through deep soil mixing.

    OpenAIRE

    Sargent, P.; Hughes, P. N.; Rouainia, M.

    2016-01-01

    Soft alluvial soils present unfavourable conditions for engineering developments due to their poor bearing capacities and high potential for experiencing shrinkage and swelling. This paper focusses on deep dry soil mixing (DDSM), which introduces cementitious binders to soft soils via a rotating auger drill, thereby producing soil-cement columns. Ordinary Portland cement (CEM-I) is globally used across the construction industry and is the most commonly used binder for DDSM applications due to...

  17. Interaction between microcapsules and cementitious matrix after cracking in a self-healing system

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, X.; Xing, F.(Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom); Zhang, M.; Han, N.; Qian, Z.

    2013-01-01

    A new type of self-healing cementitious composites by using organic microcapsules is designed in Guangdong Key Laboratory of Durability for Coastal Civil Engineering, Shenzhen University. For the organic microcapsules, the shell material is urea formoldehyde (UF), and the core healing agent is Epoxy. The effect of organic microcapsules on mechanical behaviors of the composite specimens and the interaction between an organic microcapsule and an approaching crack is investigated in this study. ...

  18. Design of microcapsule system used for self-healing cementitious material

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, M.; Han, N.; Xing, F.(Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom); Schlangen, H.E.J.G.

    2013-01-01

    For a microcapsule based self-healing system in the cementitious material, a fundamental issue is to find and facilitate a suitable microcapsule system, concerning either the material selection or design and manufacture process. In this study, urea formaldehyde resin is used for the shell of microcapsule, and bisphenol – an epoxy resin E-51 diluted by n-butyl glycidy ether (BGE) is adopted as the heal-agent inside the microcapsule. The production process mainly includes pre-polymerization pre...

  19. Preparation of circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ash-based cementitious materials with carbide slag%利用电石渣改性固硫灰制备胶凝材料的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍琳; 李军; 卢忠远

    2012-01-01

    基于固硫灰自身的火山灰活性和自硬性,提出用钙质激发剂激发固硫灰活性制备固硫灰基胶凝材料.实验研究表明在激发剂的作用下,掺入偏高岭土后胶凝材料强度提高80%以上.用内掺50%偏高岭土的固硫灰,采用电石渣或熟石灰复合水玻璃作为激发剂制备胶凝材料都在体系的碱含量为30%,水玻璃的模数为2.0,养护温度为60℃时强度达到最大,两种激发剂对强度的影响差异不大,而采用电石渣作为激发剂更节约成本,更具优势.%Based on the pozzolanic activity and self-hardening property of circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) fly ash, this paper proposes to prepare CFBC fly ash-based cementitious materials by stimulating the CFBC fly ash with calcium activator. Experimental studies have shown thai the strength of the cementitious materials mixed with metakaolin in the role of the activator increased by more than 80%.The cementitious material prepared with CFBC fly ash and 50% metakaolin and activated by carbide slag or lime mixed with water glass solution can achieve optimal strength on following conditions: alkali content was 30% , modulus of water glass was 2.0, and curing under 60℃,. The two activators had no significant impact on the strength, while taking carbide slag as activator was more sensible than taking lime since it was industrial waste.

  20. Cementitious Spray Dryer Ash-Tire Fiber Material for Maximizing Waste Diversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles E. Riley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spray dryer absorber (SDA material, also known as spray dryer ash, is a byproduct of coal combustion and flue gas scrubbing processes that has self-cementing properties similar to those of class C fly ash. SDA material does not usually meet the existing standards for use as a pozzolan in Portland cement concrete due to its characteristically high sulfur content, and thus unlike fly ash, it is rarely put to beneficial use. This paper presents the results of a study with the objective of developing beneficial uses for SDA material in building materials when combined with tire fiber reinforcement originating from a recycling process. Specifically, spray dryer ash was investigated for use as the primary or even the sole binding component in a mortar or concrete. This study differs from previous research in that it focuses on very high contents of spray dryer ash (80 to 100 percent in a hardened product. The overarching objective is to divert products that are normally sent to landfills and provide benefit to society in beneficial applications.

  1. Use of polypropylene fibers coated with nano-silica particles into a cementitious mortar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppola, B., E-mail: bcoppola@unisa.it; Di Maio, L.; Scarfato, P.; Incarnato, L. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Salerno Via Giovanni Paolo II n. 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    Fiber reinforced cementitious composite (FRCC) materials have been widely used during last decades in order to overcome some of traditional cementitious materials issues: brittle behaviour, fire resistance, cover spalling, impact strength. For composite materials, fiber/matrix bond plays an important role because by increasing fiber/matrix interactions is possible to increase the behaviour of the entire material. In this study, in order to improve fiber to matrix adhesion, two chemical treatments of polypropylene fibers were investigated: alkaline hydrolysis and nano-silica sol-gel particles deposition. Treatmtents effect on fibers morphology and mechanical properties was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tensile tests. SEM investigations report the presence of spherical nano-silica particles on fiber surface, in the case of sol-gel process, while alkaline hydrolysis leads to an increase of fibers roughness. Both treatments have negligible influence on fibers mechanical properties confirming the possibility of their use in a cementitious mortar. Pullout tests were carried out considering three embedded length of fibers in mortar samples (10, 20 and 30 mm, respectively) showing an increase of pullout energy for treated fibers. The influence on fiber reinforced mortar mechanical properties was investigated by three-point flexural tests on prismatic specimens considering two fibers length (15 and 30 mm) and two fibers volume fractions (0.50 and 1.00 %). A general increase of flexural strength over the reference mix was achieved and an overall better behaviour is recognizable for mortars containing treated fibers.

  2. Bond Characteristics of Macro Polypropylene Fiber in Cementitious Composites Containing Nanosilica and Styrene Butadiene Latex Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Woong Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the bond properties of polypropylene (PP fiber in plain cementitious composites (PCCs and styrene butadiene latex polymer cementitious composites (LCCs at different nanosilica contents. The bond tests were evaluated according to JCI SF-8, in which the contents of nanosilica in the cement were 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 wt%, based on cement weight. The addition of nanosilica significantly affected the bond properties between macro PP fiber and cementitious composites. For PCCs, the addition of 0–2 wt% nanosilica enhanced bond strength and interface toughness, whereas the addition of 4 wt% or more reduced bond strength and interface toughness. The bond strength and interfacial toughness of LCCs also increased with the addition of up to 6% nanosilica. The analysis of the relative bond strength showed that the addition of nanosilica affects the bond properties of both PCC and LCC. This result was confirmed via microstructural analysis of the macro PP fiber surface after the bond tests, which revealed an increase in scratches due to frictional forces and fiber tearing.

  3. In situ measurement of the rheological properties and agglomeration on cementitious pastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hong [School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, 50 UNIST-gil, Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Hong Jae, E-mail: yimhj@knu.ac.kr [Department of Construction and Disaster Prevention Engineering, Kyungpook National University, 2559 Gyeongsang-daero, Sangju, Gyeongsangbuk-do 742-711 (Korea, Republic of); Ferron, Raissa Douglas [Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 301 East Dean Keeton Street, C1748, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Various factors influence the rheology of cementitious pastes, with the most important being the mixing protocol, mixture proportions, and mixture composition. This study investigated the influence of ground-granulated blast-furnace slag, on the rheological behavior of cementitious pastes. In tandem with the rheological measurements, fresh state microstructural measurements were conducted using three different techniques: A coupled stroboscope-rheometer, a coupled laser backscattering-rheometer, and a conventional laser diffraction technique. Laser diffraction and the coupled stroboscope-rheometer were not good measures of the in situ state of flocculation of a sample. Rather, only the laser backscattering technique allowed for in situ measurement on a highly concentrated suspension (cementitious paste). Using the coupled laser backscattering-rheometer technique, a link between the particle system and rheological behavior was determined through a modeling approach that takes into account agglomeration properties. A higher degree of agglomeration was seen in the ordinary Portland cement paste than pastes containing the slag and this was related to the degree of capillary pressure in the paste systems.

  4. Setup of Extruded Cementitious Hollow Tubes as Containing/Releasing Devices in Self-Healing Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formia, Alessandra; Terranova, Salvatore; Antonaci, Paola; Pugno, Nicola Maria; Tulliani, Jean Marc

    2015-04-21

    The aim of this research is to produce self-healing cementitious composites based on the use of cylindrical capsules containing a repairing agent. Cementitious hollow tubes (CHT) having two different internal diameters (of 2 mm and 7.5 mm) were produced by extrusion and used as containers and releasing devices for cement paste/mortar healing agents. Based on the results of preliminary mechanical tests, sodium silicate was selected as the healing agent. The morphological features of several mix designs used to manufacture the extruded hollow tubes, as well as the coatings applied to increase the durability of both core and shell materials are discussed. Three-point bending tests were performed on samples produced with the addition of the above-mentioned cementitious hollow tubes to verify the self-healing effectiveness of the proposed solution. Promising results were achieved, in particular when tubes with a bigger diameter were used. In this case, a substantial strength and stiffness recovery was observed, even in specimens presenting large cracks (>1 mm). The method is inexpensive and simple to scale up; however, further research is needed in view of a final optimization.

  5. Micromechanical Properties of a New Polymeric Microcapsule for Self-Healing Cementitious Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Leyang; Schlangen, Erik; Yang, Zhengxian; Xing, Feng

    2016-12-20

    Self-healing cementitious materials containing a microencapsulated healing agent are appealing due to their great application potential in improving the serviceability and durability of concrete structures. In this study, poly(phenol-formaldehyde) (PF) microcapsules that aim to provide a self-healing function for cementitious materials were prepared by an in situ polymerization reaction. Size gradation of the synthesized microcapsules was achieved through a series of sieving processes. The shell thickness and the diameter of single microcapsules was accurately measured under environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The relationship between the physical properties of the synthesized microcapsules and their micromechanical properties were investigated using nanoindentation. The results of the mechanical tests show that, with the increase of the mean size of microcapsules and the decrease of shell thickness, the mechanical force required to trigger the self-healing function of microcapsules increased correspondingly from 68.5 ± 41.6 mN to 198.5 ± 31.6 mN, featuring a multi-sensitive trigger function. Finally, the rupture behavior and crack surface of cement paste with embedded microcapsules were observed and analyzed using X-ray computed tomography (XCT). The synthesized PF microcapsules may find potential application in self-healing cementitious materials.

  6. Micromechanical Properties of a New Polymeric Microcapsule for Self-Healing Cementitious Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyang Lv

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-healing cementitious materials containing a microencapsulated healing agent are appealing due to their great application potential in improving the serviceability and durability of concrete structures. In this study, poly(phenol–formaldehyde (PF microcapsules that aim to provide a self-healing function for cementitious materials were prepared by an in situ polymerization reaction. Size gradation of the synthesized microcapsules was achieved through a series of sieving processes. The shell thickness and the diameter of single microcapsules was accurately measured under environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM. The relationship between the physical properties of the synthesized microcapsules and their micromechanical properties were investigated using nanoindentation. The results of the mechanical tests show that, with the increase of the mean size of microcapsules and the decrease of shell thickness, the mechanical force required to trigger the self-healing function of microcapsules increased correspondingly from 68.5 ± 41.6 mN to 198.5 ± 31.6 mN, featuring a multi-sensitive trigger function. Finally, the rupture behavior and crack surface of cement paste with embedded microcapsules were observed and analyzed using X-ray computed tomography (XCT. The synthesized PF microcapsules may find potential application in self-healing cementitious materials.

  7. Setup of Extruded Cementitious Hollow Tubes as Containing/Releasing Devices in Self-Healing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Formia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to produce self-healing cementitious composites based on the use of cylindrical capsules containing a repairing agent. Cementitious hollow tubes (CHT having two different internal diameters (of 2 mm and 7.5 mm were produced by extrusion and used as containers and releasing devices for cement paste/mortar healing agents. Based on the results of preliminary mechanical tests, sodium silicate was selected as the healing agent. The morphological features of several mix designs used to manufacture the extruded hollow tubes, as well as the coatings applied to increase the durability of both core and shell materials are discussed. Three-point bending tests were performed on samples produced with the addition of the above-mentioned cementitious hollow tubes to verify the self-healing effectiveness of the proposed solution. Promising results were achieved, in particular when tubes with a bigger diameter were used. In this case, a substantial strength and stiffness recovery was observed, even in specimens presenting large cracks (>1 mm. The method is inexpensive and simple to scale up; however, further research is needed in view of a final optimization.

  8. Cementitious Near-Field Sorption Data Base for Performance Assessment of an ILW Repository in Opalinus Clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieland, E.; Van Loon, L. R

    2003-08-01

    The present report describes a cement sorption database (SDB) for the safety-relevant radionuclides to be disposed of in the planned Swiss repository for long-lived intermediate-level radioactive wastes (ILW). This report is an update on earlier SDBs, which were compiled for the cementitious near field of a repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes (L/ILW) by BRADBURY + SAROTT (1995) and BRADBURY + VAN LOON (1998). The radionuclide inventories are determined by the waste streams to be disposed of in the ILW repository. A list of the safety-relevant radionuclides was provided based on the currently available information on ILW inventories. The compositions of the cement porewaters in the near fields of the L/ILW and ILW repositories, which had been calculated using well-established codes for modelling cement degradation, were compared to identify any differences in the near-field conditions and to assess their influence on radionuclide sorption. Sorption values were selected based on the previously reported SDBs for the near field of the L/ILW repository. Sorption values were revised if new information and/or data were available which allowed changes to or re-appraisals of the data to be made. The sorption values recommended in this report were either selected on the basis of data from in-house experimental studies or from literature data. For some key radioelements, i.e., Cs(l), Sr(II), Ni(II), Eu(lll), Th(IV) and Sn(IV), new data were available from in-house measurements. These elements had been selected for experimental studies due to their relevance to safety assessment and/or their importance as appropriate chemical analogues. Degradation products of bitumen and cellulose, concrete admixtures and cement-derived near-field colloids were taken into account as the main potential perturbations, which could reduce radionuclide sorption in the near field. Possible impacts of the perturbing factors on radionuclide mobility were considered and

  9. Fuel spray combustion of waste cooking oil and palm oil biodiesel: Direct photography and detailed chemical kinetics

    KAUST Repository

    Kuti, Olawole

    2013-10-14

    This paper studies the ignition processes of two biodiesel from two different feedstock sources, namely waste cooked oil (WCO) and palm oil (PO). They were investigated using the direct photography through high-speed video observations and detailed chemical kinetics. The detailed chemical kinetics modeling was carried out to complement data acquired using the high-speed video observations. For the high-speed video observations, an image intensifier combined with OH* filter connected to a high-speed video camera was used to obtain OH* chemiluminscence image near 313 nm. The OH* images were used to obtain the experimental ignition delay of the biodiesel fuels. For the high-speed video observations, experiments were done at an injection pressure of 100, 200 and 300 MPa using a 0.16 mm injector nozzle. Also a detailed chemical kinetics for the biodiesel fuels was carried out using ac chemical kinetics solver adopting a 0-D reactor model to obtain the chemical ignition delay of the combusting fuels. Equivalence ratios obtained from the experimental ignition delay were used for the detailed chemical kinetics analyses. The Politecnico di Milano\\'s thermochemical and reaction kinetic data were adopted to simulate the ignition processes of the biodiesels using the five fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) major components in the biodiesel fuels. From the high-speed video observations, it was observed that at increasing injection pressure, experimental ignition delay increased as a result of improvement in fuel and air mixing effects. Also the palm oil biodiesel has a shorter ignition delay compared to waste cooked oil biodiesel. This phenomenon could be attributed to the higher cetane number of palm biodiesel. The fuel spray ignition properties depend on both the physical ignition delay and chemical ignition delay. From the detailed chemical kinetic results it was observed that at the low temperature, high ambient pressure conditions reactivity increased as equivalent ratio

  10. Current situation and developing direction of textile waste comprehensive utilization%我国废旧纺织品综合利用现状及发展方向

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾明明; 唐世君

    2012-01-01

    通过分析废旧纺织品综合利用现状,总结了纯棉废旧纺织品、废旧民用纺织品、废旧军服等领域综合利用的初步进展,提出了我国目前废旧纺织品综合利用存在的主要问题,明确了废旧纺织品综合利用的发展方向,即废旧纺织品综合利用必须紧紧围绕“合理规划、分类回收、技术保障、市场拓展、政策引导、舆论宣传、全社会广泛参与”的指导方针,通过长期而系统的推进,最终实现行业规范化、专业化、集约化的健康科学发展。%Based on an analysis of the current situation of textile waste comprehensive utilization, the paper summarized the initial utilization progress of cotton waste, civilian waste and military uniforms waste. The major problems in textile waste utilization were pointed out, and the developing direction of textile waste comprehensive utilization was proposed. Comprehensive utilization of textile waste must focus on "rational planning, sorting recovery, technical support, market expansion, policy guidance, media publicity and extensive public participation", so as to realize normalized, specialized, intensified scientific development of the industry.

  11. Developing a holistic strategy for integrated waste management within municipal planning: challenges, policies, solutions and perspectives for Hellenic municipalities in the zero-waste, low-cost direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotos, G; Karagiannidis, A; Zampetoglou, S; Malamakis, A; Antonopoulos, I-S; Kontogianni, S; Tchobanoglous, G

    2009-05-01

    The present position paper addresses contemporary waste management options, weaknesses and opportunities faced by Hellenic local authorities. It focuses on state-of-the-art, tested as well as innovative, environmental management tools on a municipal scale and identifies a range of different collaboration schemes between local authorities and related service providers. Currently, a policy implementation gap is still experienced among Hellenic local authorities; it appears that administration at the local level is inadequate to manage and implement many of the general policies proposed; identify, collect, monitor and assess relevant data; and safeguard efficient and effective implementation of MSWM practices in the framework of integrated environmental management as well. This shortfall is partly due to the decentralisation of waste management issues to local authorities without a parallel substantial budgetary and capacity support, thus resulting in local activity remaining often disoriented and isolated from national strategies, therefore yielding significant planning and implementation problems and delays against pressing issues at hand as well as loss or poor use of available funds. This paper develops a systemic approach for MSWM at both the household and the non-household level, summarizes state-of-the-art available tools and compiles a set of guidelines for developing waste management master plans at the municipal level. It aims to provide a framework in the MSWM field for municipalities in Greece as well as other countries facing similar problems under often comparable socioeconomic settings.

  12. Secondary Waste Form Screening Test Results—THOR® Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Product in a Geopolymer Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, Richard P.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Mattigod, Shas V.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.

    2011-07-14

    Screening tests are being conducted to evaluate waste forms for immobilizing secondary liquid wastes from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Plans are underway to add a stabilization treatment unit to the Effluent Treatment Facility to provide the needed capacity for treating these wastes from WTP. The current baseline is to use a Cast Stone cementitious waste form to solidify the wastes. Through a literature survey, DuraLith alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer, fluidized-bed steam reformation (FBSR) granular product encapsulated in a geopolymer matrix, and a Ceramicrete phosphate-bonded ceramic were identified both as candidate waste forms and alternatives to the baseline. These waste forms have been shown to meet waste disposal acceptance criteria, including compressive strength and universal treatment standards for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals (as measured by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure [TCLP]). Thus, these non-cementitious waste forms should also be acceptable for land disposal. Information is needed on all four waste forms with respect to their capability to minimize the release of technetium. Technetium is a radionuclide predicted to be in the secondary liquid wastes in small quantities, but the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) risk assessment analyses show that technetium, even at low mass, produces the largest contribution to the estimated IDF disposal impacts to groundwater.

  13. Hydration mechanism and leaching behavior of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Na; Li, Hongxu [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Rare and Precious Metals Green Recycling and Extraction, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Xiaoming, E-mail: liuxm@ustb.edu.cn [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Rare and Precious Metals Green Recycling and Extraction, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Nanocrystalline regions in size of ∼5 nm were found in the amorphous C-A-S-H gel. • A hydration model was proposed to clarify the hydration mechanism. • The developed cementitious materials are environmentally acceptable. - Abstract: A deep investigation on the hydration mechanism of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials was conducted from viewpoints of hydration products and hydration heat analysis. As a main hydration product, the microstructure of C-A-S-H gel was observed using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the C-A-S-H gel is composed of amorphous regions and nanocrystalline regions. Most of regions in the C-A-S-H gel are amorphous with continuous distribution, and the nanocrystalline regions on scale of ∼5 nm are dispersed irregularly within the amorphous regions. The hydration heat of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials is much lower than that of the ordinary Portland cement. A hydration model was proposed for this kind of cementitious materials, and the hydration process mainly consists of four stages which are dissolution of materials, formation of C-A-S-H gels and ettringite, cementation of hydration products, and polycondensation of C-A-S-H gels. There are no strict boundaries among these four basic stages, and they proceed crossing each other. Moreover, the leaching toxicity tests were also performed to prove that the developed red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials are environmentally acceptable.

  14. Waste minimization strategies at Trail operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higginson, J. [Teck Cominco Metals Ltd., Trail, BC (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    The industrial facility at Teck Cominco in Trail, British Columbia represents one of the largest integrated zinc-lead production facilities in the world. It processes more than 600,000 tonnes per year of various metal concentrates, resulting in large amounts of waste. The company has implemented clear strategies designed to minimize or utilize the wastes. The input of unwanted species into the operation has been reduced through concentrated efforts. Recoveries were maximized through internal recycling and through the development of marketable products from materials that were once considered to be wastes. The company's results with sulphur product diversification were particularly successful, along with the use of smelter slag to make GS-CEM{sup TM}, which is used as an attractive supplementary cementitious material. figs.

  15. Physical and mechanical properties of mortars containing PET and PC waste aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannawi, Kinda; Kamali-Bernard, Siham; Prince, William

    2010-11-01

    Non-biodegradable plastic aggregates made of polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) waste are used as partial replacement of natural aggregates in mortar. Various volume fractions of sand 3%, 10%, 20% and 50% are replaced by the same volume of plastic. This paper investigates the physical and mechanical properties of the obtained composites. The main results of this study show the feasibility of the reuse of PC and PET waste aggregates materials as partial volume substitutes for natural aggregates in cementitious materials. Despite of some drawbacks like a decrease in compressive strength, the use of PC and PET waste aggregates presents various advantages. A reduction of the specific weight of the cementitious materials and a significant improvement of their post-peak flexural behaviour are observed. The calculated flexural toughness factors increase significantly with increasing volume fraction of PET and PC-aggregates. Thus, addition of PC and PET plastic aggregates in cementitious materials seems to give good energy absorbing materials which is very interesting for several civil engineering applications like structures subjected to dynamic or impact efforts. The present study has shown quite encouraging results and opened new way for the recycling of PC waste aggregate in cement and concrete composites. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Preparation of Cementitious Material Using Smelting Slag and Tailings and the Solidification and Leaching of Pb2+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The composite cementitious materials were prepared with lead-zinc tailings, lead-zinc smelting slag, and cement clinker. The effect of material ratio on the mechanical properties, the phase analysis, and microstructures were investigated. The effect of the pH and stripping time on the leaching amount of lead ion was discussed. The results show that the additive amount of the tailings should be minimized for the cementitious materials meeting the strength requirements, controlled within 10%. The leaching amount of cementitious materials remains low in a larger range of pH, which can effectively reduce the leaching of heavy metal lead. The leaching kinetics of lead ions in the three kinds of samples could be better described by the pseudo-second-model.

  17. A Review on Nanomaterial Dispersion, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties of Carbon Nanotube and Nanofiber Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shama Parveen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Excellent mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs and nanofibers (CNFs have motivated the development of advanced nanocomposites with outstanding and multifunctional properties. After achieving a considerable success in utilizing these unique materials in various polymeric matrices, recently tremendous interest is also being noticed on developing CNT and CNF reinforced cement-based composites. However, the problems related to nanomaterial dispersion also exist in case of cementitious composites, impairing successful transfer of nanomaterials' properties into the composites. Performance of cementitious composites also depends on their microstructure which is again strongly influenced by the presence of nanomaterials. In this context, the present paper reports a critical review of recent literature on the various strategies for dispersing CNTs and CNFs within cementitious matrices and the microstructure and mechanical properties of resulting nanocomposites.

  18. Process Design Concepts for Stabilization of High Level Waste Calcine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. R. Thomas; A. K. Herbst

    2005-06-01

    in the hydroceramic grout process (i.e., 21 m) appears to be about the same as that estimated by the Direct Cementitious Waste Process in 1998, for which a conceptual design was developed. Some of the conceptual design efforts in the 1998 study may be applicable to the stabilizer processes addressed in this EDF. (e) The gamma radiation fields near the process vessels handling HLW calcine would vary from a range of about 300-350 R/hr at a distance of 2.5 cm from the side of the vessels to a range of about 50-170 R/hr at a distance of 100 cm from the side of the vessels. The calculations were made for combined calcine, which was defined as the total HLW calcine inventory uniformly mixed. (f) The gamma radiation fields near the stabilized waste in canisters would range from about 25-170 R/hr at 2.5 cm from the side of the canister and 5-35 R/hr at 100 cm from the side of the canister, depending on the which bin set was the source of calcine.

  19. Conductivity-based strain monitoring and damage characterization of fiber reinforced cementitious structural components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tsung-Chin; Lynch, Jerome P.

    2005-05-01

    In recent years, a new class of cementitious composite has been proposed for the design and construction of durable civil structures. Termed engineered cementitious composites (ECC), ECC utilizes a low volume fraction of short fibers (polymer, steel, carbon) within a cementitious matrix resulting in a composite that strain hardens when loaded in tension. By refining the mechanical properties of the fiber-cement interface, the material exhibits high tolerance to damage. This study explores the electrical properties of ECC materials to monitor their performance and health when employed in the construction of civil structures. In particular, the conductivity of ECC changes in proportion to strain indicating that the material is piezoresistive. In this paper, the piezoresistive properties of various ECC composites are thoroughly explored. To measure the electrical resistance of ECC structures in the field, a low-cost wireless active sensing unit is proposed. The wireless active sensing unit is capable of applying DC and AC voltage signals to ECC elements while simultaneously measuring their corresponding voltages away from the signal input. By locally processing the corresponding input-output electrical signals recorded by the wireless active sensing units, the magnitude of strain in ECC elements can be calculated. In addition to measuring strain, the study seeks to correlate changes in ECC electrical properties to the magnitude of crack damage witnessed in tested specimens. A large number of ECC specimens are tested in the laboratory including a large-scale ECC bridge pier laterally loaded under cyclically repeated drift reversals. The novel self-sensing properties of ECC exploited by a wireless monitoring system hold tremendous promise for the advancement of structural health monitoring of ECC structures.

  20. Study on reinforcement of soil for suppressing fugitive dust by bio-cementitious material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Qiwei; Qian, Chunxiang

    2017-06-01

    Microbial-induced reinforcement of soil, as a new green and environmental-friendly method, is being paid extensive attention to in that it has low cost, simple operation and rapid effects. In this research, reinforcement of soil for suppressing fugitive dust by bio-cementitious material was investigated. Soil cemented by bio-cementitious material had superior mechanical properties, such as hardness, compressive strength, microstructure, wind-erosion resistance, rainfall-erosion resistance and freeze-thaw resistance. The average hardness of sandy soil, floury soil and clay soil is 18.9 º, 25.2 º and 26.1 º, while average compressive strength of samples is 0.43 MPa, 0.54 MPa and 0.69 MPa, respectively; meanwhile, the average calcite content of samples is 6.85 %, 6.09 %, and 5.96 %, respectively. Compared with the original sandy soil, floury soil and clay soil, the porosity decreases by 38.5 %, 33.7 % and 29.2 %. When wind speed is 12 m/s, the mass loss of sandy soil, floury soil and clay soil cemented by bio-cementitious material are all less than 30 g/(m2·h). After three cycles of rainfall erosion of 2.5 mm/h, the mass loss are less than 25 g/(m2·h) and the compressive strength residual ratio are more than 98.0 %. Under 25 cycles of freeze-thaw, the mass loss ratio are less than 3.0 %.

  1. Early-age characteristics of red mud-coal gangue cementitious material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Sun, Henghu; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Jixiu

    2009-08-15

    This experimental research was to investigate the possibility of incorporating red mud and coal gangue as raw materials for the production of red mud-coal gangue cementitious material, abbreviated as RGC, including analyses of its chemical composition, physical properties, mechanical properties and hydration products. The red mud and coal gangue (at a ratio of 3:2) were mixed together and shaped in small spheres with a water to solid ratio of 0.30 and then calcined at 600 degrees C for 2h. Subsequently, the RGC was prepared by blending 50% the resultant red mud-coal gangue mixtures, 24% blast-furnace slag, 20% clinker and 6% gypsum. The hydration products of RGC were characterized by XRD, TG-DTA and SEM-EDS. The results showed that it is feasible to use red mud and coal gangue to replace up to 50% of the raw materials to produce cementitious material, which can be called as silica-alumina based cementitious material. The hydration products of RGC are mostly ettringite, calcium hydroxide and C-S-H gel. As the dominant products, C-S-H gel and ettringite are principally responsible for the strength development of RGC in early hydration process. The content of Ca(OH)(2) initially increased but later was depleted after reaching the peak value at 21 days. Moreover, it is found that the composition of the C-S-H gel shifted towards higher Si, Al and Na contents with the increase of hydration age, whereas that of Ca shifted towards lower content.

  2. Direct assessment of tensile stress-crack opening behavior of Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites (SHCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Eduardo B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, Joaquim A.O.

    2012-01-01

    at the level of a single crack. The derived tensile stress-crack opening behavior is utilized to analyze and compare the influence of various composite parameters on the resulting tensile behavior. The deformations occurring during tensile loading are furthermore examined using a digital image...

  3. Influence of supplementary cementitious materials on hydration, microstructure development, and durability of concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Simcic, Tina

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the use of supplementary cementitious materials in the production of concrete has become an ever more frequent trend, since such use contributes to a sustainable concrete industry. The main reason for this lies in the reduction of the specific energy requirement and of carbon dioxide emissions in the production of cement (OPC). One such environmentally friendly product is fly ash (FA), which occurs as a by-product of coal-fired thermal power plants. In the first part of the...

  4. Effects of Technological Parameters on the Mechanical Performances of SAC-cementitious Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A new type of SAC-cementitious material was manufactured by taking sulphoaluminate cement(SAC) as the basic material, polyvinyl alcohol(PVA) as the organic polymer and adding coupling agent(KH). Its flexural strength can reach 165 MPa, the compressive strength can be larger than 267 MPa.A set of fitable technological parameters of the material were gained through experiments. In addition, the flexural strength and toughness can be improved greatly by adding KH, whose values can be increased by 49.76% and 14.55%, respectively.

  5. Cost-Effective Cementitious Material Compatible with Yucca Mountain Repository Geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dole, LR

    2004-12-17

    The current plans for the Yucca Mountain (YM) repository project (YMP) use steel structures to stabilize the disposal drifts and connecting tunnels that are collectively over 100 kilometers in length. The potential exist to reduce the underground construction cost by 100s of millions of dollars and improve the repository's performance. These economic and engineering goals can be achieved by using the appropriate cementitious materials to build out these tunnels. This report describes the required properties of YM compatible cements and reviews the literature that proves the efficacy of this approach. This report also describes a comprehensive program to develop and test materials for a suite of underground construction technologies.

  6. Energy Efficient Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants (o-HAPs) from Industrial Waste Streams by Direct Electron Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testoni, A. L.

    2011-10-19

    This research program investigated and quantified the capability of direct electron beam destruction of volatile organic compounds and organic hazardous air pollutants in model industrial waste streams and calculated the energy savings that would be realized by the widespread adoption of the technology over traditional pollution control methods. Specifically, this research determined the quantity of electron beam dose required to remove 19 of the most important non-halogenated air pollutants from waste streams and constructed a technical and economic model for the implementation of the technology in key industries including petroleum refining, organic & solvent chemical production, food & beverage production, and forest & paper products manufacturing. Energy savings of 75 - 90% and green house gas reductions of 66 - 95% were calculated for the target market segments.

  7. Progress and future direction for the interim safe storage and disposal of Hanford high-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzer, J.E.; Wodrich, D.D. [Dept. of Energy, Richland, WA (United States); Bacon, R.F. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the progress made at the largest environmental cleanup program in the United States. Substantial advances in methods to start interim safe storage of Hanford Site high-level wastes, waste characterization to support both safety- and disposal-related information needs, and proceeding with cost-effective disposal by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its Hanford Site contractors, have been realized. Challenges facing the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program, which is charged with the dual and parallel missions of interim safe storage and disposal of the high-level tank waste stored at the Hanford Site, are described. In these times of budget austerity, implementing an ongoing program that combines technical excellence and cost effectiveness is the near-term challenge. The technical initiatives and progress described in this paper are made more cost effective by DOE`s focus on work force productivity improvement, reduction of overhead costs, and reduction, integration and simplification of DOE regulations and operations requirements to more closely model those used in the private sector.

  8. Power plant ash and slag waste management technological direction when Kansk-Achinsk brown coal is burned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihach Snejana A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Today resource efficiency technology development in all industries where conventional raw material is being replaced by local natural resources and industrial waste is an essential matter. Along with that most producing operations are overload with wide range of waste produced during technological process. Thermal power stations are real world evidence. Their main waste is ash and slag which accumulated in great amounts in often overfull ash dumps. The goal of present work is to find perspective ash dump waste utilization methods. The study will be based on experimentally obtained data: elementary compound and properties of Kansk-Achinsk brown coal. Research methods: experimental, chemical silicate analysis, mineralogical forms identification within samples by using ASM X-ray diffraction analysis. Experiments resulted with the following conclusions: silica is ash main component, and ash has the form of ore concentrate analogy in a number of elements. We think that ASM main properties which make it useful for utilization are: high content of calcium oxide; high ash sorption properties; ASM radiation safety class which makes them safe to be used in materials, goods, and structures production for residence and public buildings construction and reconstruction; sufficiently high content of individual elements.

  9. Supplemental Immobilization Cast Stone Technology Development and Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Pierce, Eric M.; Cozzi, Alex; Chung, Chul-Woo; Swanberg, David J.

    2013-05-31

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment facility will have the capacity to separate all of the tank wastes into the HLW and LAW fractions, and the HLW Vitrification Facility will have the capacity to vitrify all of the HLW. However, a second immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A number of alternatives, including Cast Stone—a cementitious waste form—are being considered to provide the additional LAW immobilization capacity.

  10. Mechanisms and modelling of waste-cement and cement-host rock interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Safe and sustainable disposal of hazardous and radioactive waste is a major concern in today's industrial societies. The hazardous waste forms originate from residues of thermal treatment of waste, fossil fuel combustion and ferrous/non-ferrous metal smelting being the most important ones in terms of waste production. Low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste is produced in the course of nuclear applications in research and energy production. For both waste forms encapsulation in alkaline, cement-based matrices is considered to ensure long-term safe disposal. Cementitious materials are in routine use as industrial materials and have mainly been studied with respect to their evolution over a typical service life of several decades. Use of these materials in waste management applications, however, requires assessments of their performance over much longer time periods on the order of thousands to several ten thousands of years.

  11. Sequestration of phosphorus from wastewater by cement-based or alternative cementitious materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinjun; Chen, Jiding; Kong, Yaping; Shi, Xianming

    2014-10-01

    Cement-based and alternative cementitious materials were tested in the laboratory for their capability of removing phosphate from wastewater. The results demonstrated that both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were suitable for describing the adsorption characteristics of these materials. Among the four types of filter media tested, the cement-based mortar A has the highest value of maximum adsorption (30.96 mg g(-1)). The P-bonding energy (KL) and adsorption capacity (K) exhibited a positive correlation with the total content of Al2O3 and Fe2O3 in each mortar. The maximum amount of P adsorbed (Qm) and adsorption intensity (1/n) exhibited a positive correlation with the CaO content in each mortar. For three of them, the P-removal rates were in excess of 94 percent for phosphorus concentrations ranging from 20 to 1000 mg L(-1). The underlying mechanisms were examined using field emission scanning microscopy (FESEM), coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The results reveal that the removal of phosphate predominantly followed a precipitation mechanism in addition to weak physical interactions between the surface of adsorbent filter media and the metallic salts of phosphate. The use of cement-based or alternative cementitious materials in the form of ground powder shows great promise for developing a cost-effective and environmentally sustainable technology for P-sequestration and for wastewater treatment.

  12. RC beams shear-strengthened with fabric-reinforced-cementitious-matrix (FRCM) composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreto, Giovanni; Babaeidarabad, Saman; Leardini, Lorenzo; Nanni, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    The interest in retrofit/rehabilitation of existing concrete structures has increased due to degradation and/or introduction of more stringent design requirements. Among the externally-bonded strengthening systems fiber-reinforced polymers is the most widely known technology. Despite its effectiveness as a material system, the presence of an organic binder has some drawbacks that could be addressed by using in its place a cementitious binder as in fabric-reinforced cementitious matrix (FRCM) systems. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened in shear with U-wraps made of FRCM. An extensive experimental program was undertaken in order to understand and characterize this composite when used as a strengthening system. The laboratory results demonstrate the technical viability of FRCM for shear strengthening of RC beams. Based on the experimental and analytical results, FRCM increases shear strength but not proportionally to the number of fabric plies installed. On the other hand, FRCM failure modes are related with a high consistency to the amount of external reinforcement applied. Design considerations based on the algorithms proposed by ACI guidelines are also provided.

  13. The Influence of Calcium Chloride Salt Solution on the Transport Properties of Cementitious Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaghoob Farnam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical interaction between calcium chloride (CaCl2 and cementitious binder may alter the transport properties of concrete which are important in predicting the service life of infrastructure elements. This paper presents a series of fluid and gas transport measurements made on cementitious mortars before and after exposure to various solutions with concentrations ranging from 0% to 29.8% CaCl2 by mass. Fluid absorption, oxygen diffusivity, and oxygen permeability were measured on mortar samples prepared using Type I and Type V cements. Three primary factors influence the transport properties of mortar exposed to CaCl2: (1 changes in the degree of saturation, (2 calcium hydroxide leaching, and (3 formation of chemical reaction products (i.e., Friedel’s salt, Kuzel’s salt, and calcium oxychloride. It is shown that an increase in the degree of saturation decreases oxygen permeability. At lower concentrations (~12%, the formation of chemical reaction products (mainly calcium oxychloride is a dominant factor decreasing the fluid and gas transport in concrete.

  14. Thermal conductivity of cementitious grouts for geothermal heat pumps. Progress report FY 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, M.L.

    1997-11-01

    Grout is used to seal the annulus between the borehole and heat exchanger loops in vertical geothermal (ground coupled, ground source, GeoExchange) heat pump systems. The grout provides a heat transfer medium between the heat exchanger and surrounding formation, controls groundwater movement and prevents contamination of water supply. Enhanced heat pump coefficient of performance (COP) and reduced up-front loop installation costs can be achieved through optimization of the grout thermal conductivity. The objective of the work reported was to characterize thermal conductivity and other pertinent properties of conventional and filled cementitious grouts. Cost analysis and calculations of the reduction in heat exchanger length that could be achieved with such grouts were performed by the University of Alabama. Two strategies to enhance the thermal conductivity of cementitious grouts were used simultaneously. The first of these was to incorporate high thermal conductivity filler in the grout formulations. Based on previous tests (Allan and Kavanaugh, in preparation), silica sand was selected as a suitable filler. The second strategy was to reduce the water content of the grout mix. By lowering the water/cement ratio, the porosity of the hardened grout is decreased. This results in higher thermal conductivity. Lowering the water/cement ratio also improves such properties as permeability, strength, and durability. The addition of a liquid superplasticizer (high range water reducer) to the grout mixes enabled reduction of water/cement ratio while retaining pumpability. Superplasticizers are commonly used in the concrete and grouting industry to improve rheological properties.

  15. Computational modelling of fibre-reinforced cementitious composites: An analysis of discrete and mesh-independent techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radtke, F.K.F.

    2012-01-01

    Failure patterns and mechanical behaviour of high performance fibre-reinforced cementitious composites depend to a large extent on the distribution of fibres within a specimen. A discrete treatment of fibres enables us to study the influence of various fibre distributions on the mechanical propertie

  16. Hydration mechanism and leaching behavior of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Li, Hongxu; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-08-15

    A deep investigation on the hydration mechanism of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials was conducted from viewpoints of hydration products and hydration heat analysis. As a main hydration product, the microstructure of C-A-S-H gel was observed using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the C-A-S-H gel is composed of amorphous regions and nanocrystalline regions. Most of regions in the C-A-S-H gel are amorphous with continuous distribution, and the nanocrystalline regions on scale of ∼5nm are dispersed irregularly within the amorphous regions. The hydration heat of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials is much lower than that of the ordinary Portland cement. A hydration model was proposed for this kind of cementitious materials, and the hydration process mainly consists of four stages which are dissolution of materials, formation of C-A-S-H gels and ettringite, cementation of hydration products, and polycondensation of C-A-S-H gels. There are no strict boundaries among these four basic stages, and they proceed crossing each other. Moreover, the leaching toxicity tests were also performed to prove that the developed red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials are environmentally acceptable.

  17. Experimental study of the diffusion of {sup 1}37Cs in mortars used in nuclear waste repositories medium and low activity; Estudio experimental de la difusion de {sup 1}37Cs en morteros utilizados en almacenamientos de residuos radiactivos de media y baja actividad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Missana, T.; Mingarro, M.; Morejon, J.

    2013-07-01

    Cement is a largely used material in radioactive waste repository for conditioning and isolating the waste. In this study, the adequacy of different type of cement to act as barrier to the {sup 1}37Cs migration has been analyzed. {sup 1}37Cs is a very important fission product in low and medium radioactive waste repository. As diffusion is the main transport process in cementitious materials, in this study the diffusion behavior of the radionuclide was especially evaluated.

  18. Developing a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in Connecticut: Update on progress and new directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gingerich, R.E. [Connecticut Hazardous Waste Management Service, Hartford, CT (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Connecticut is a member of the Northeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (Northeast LLRW Compact). The other member of the Northeast LLRW Compact is New Jersey. The Northeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission (Northeast Compact Commission), the Northeast LLRW Compact`s governing body, has designated both Connecticut and New Jersey as host states for disposal facilities. The Northeast Compact Commission has recommended that, for purposes of planning for each state`s facility, the siting agency for the state should use projected volumes and characteristics of the LLW generated in its own state. In 1987 Connecticut enacted legislation that assigns major responsibilities for developing a LLW disposal facility in Connecticut to the Connecticut Hazardous Waste Management Service (CHWMS). The CHWMS is required to: prepare and revise, as necessary, a LLW Management Plan for the state; select a site for a LLW disposal facility; select a disposal technology to be used at the site; select a firm to obtain the necessary approvals for the facility and to develop and operate it; and serve as the custodial agency for the facility. This paper discusses progress in developing a facility.

  19. Stabilization Using Phosphate Bonded Ceramics. Salt Containing Mixed Waste Treatment. Mixed Waste Focus Area. OST Reference No. 117

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    Throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex there are large inventories of homogeneous mixed waste solids, such as wastewater treatment residues, fly ashes, and sludges that contain relatively high concentrations (greater than 15% by weight) of salts. The inherent solubility of salts (e.g., nitrates, chlorides, and sulfates) makes traditional treatment of these waste streams difficult, expensive, and challenging. One alternative is low-temperature stabilization by chemically bonded phosphate ceramics (CBPCs). The process involves reacting magnesium oxide with monopotassium phosphate with the salt waste to produce a dense monolith. The ceramic makes a strong environmental barrier, and the metals are converted to insoluble, low-leaching phosphate salts. The process has been tested on a variety of surrogates and actual mixed waste streams, including soils, wastewater, flyashes, and crushed debris. It has also been demonstrated at scales ranging from 5 to 55 gallons. In some applications, the CBPC technology provides higher waste loadings and a more durable salt waste form than the baseline method of cementitious grouting. Waste form test specimens were subjected to a variety of performance tests. Results of waste form performance testing concluded that CBPC forms made with salt wastes meet or exceed both RCRA and recommended Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) low-level waste (LLW) disposal criteria. Application of a polymer coating to the CBPC may decrease the leaching of salt anions, but continued waste form evaluations are needed to fully assess the deteriorating effects of this leaching, if any, over time.

  20. Effects of Using Silica Fume and Polycarboxylate-Type Superplasticizer on Physical Properties of Cementitious Grout Mixtures for Semiflexible Pavement Surfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Mahmud, Hilmi; Mashaan, Nuha S.; Katman, Herdayati; Husain, Nadiah Md

    2014-01-01

    Semi-flexible pavement surfacing is a composite pavement that utilizes the porous pavement structure of the flexible bituminous pavement, which is subsequently grouted with appropriate cementitious materials. This study aims to investigate the compressive strength, flexural strength, and workability performance of cementitious grout. The grout mixtures are designed to achieve high strength and maintain flow properties in order to allow the cement slurries to infiltrate easily through unfilled compacted skeletons. A paired-sample t-test was carried out to find out whether water/cement ratio, SP percentages, and use of silica fume influence the cementitious grout performance. The findings showed that the replacement of 5% silica fume with an adequate amount of superplasticizer and water/cement ratio was beneficial in improving the properties of the cementitious grout. PMID:24526911

  1. 欧盟废物焚烧指令的研究与借鉴%Comparison Between European Union Waste Incineration Directive and Chinese Solid Waste Incineration Management System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙绍锋; 郭瑞; 金晶; 胡华龙

    2016-01-01

    为进一步完善我国废物焚烧标准体系,防控废物焚烧环境风险,本文对欧盟废物焚烧指令与我国焚烧标准体系进行了对比分析。欧盟废物焚烧指令分别对专用焚烧厂和协同焚烧厂从废物运输到处理处置全过程的污染物排放控制做出了相关规定,适用于危险废物和非危险废物的焚烧以及常规污染物和有毒污染物的控制。欧盟废物焚烧指令对不同规模的焚烧设施采用统一标准,以日均值和半小时均值为污染物排放限值,更客观、准确地评价了污染物排放对环境的影响。与欧盟废物焚烧指令相比,我国废物焚烧标准涉及废物联合利用处置的相关条文较少,内容不详,项目缺失。我国烟尘、HCl的排放限值均在欧盟标准限值6倍以上,SO2的排放限值是欧盟标准的4~8倍。除CO、NOx的排放限值外,其他污染物排放限值也明显高于欧盟标准限值。我国采用抽样监测方法,监测结果可能在日常排放值的95%置信区间外,不具备代表性。我国可借鉴欧盟废物焚烧指令的成果制定协同焚烧标准,并严格污染物排放限值,考虑采用日均值或半小时均值的评价方法,提高我国废物焚烧标准的精确性和可执行性。%To improve the standards of solid waste incineration management and environmental risk controlling system, the comparison between European Union (EU) and China was studied in this article. The Waste Incineration Directive (WID) is a directive issued by the EU and relates to standards and methodologies required by Europe for the practice and technology of incineration, which illustrated the permit of air emission for incineration plant and co-incineration plant passing through the whole waste treatment process, including delivery, treatment and final disposal. This directive is applied to both incinerations of hazardous waste and non-hazardous waste for controlling the emission

  2. Influence of cementitious additions on rheological and mechanical properties of reactive powder concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenati, A.; Arroudj, K.; Lanez, M.; Oudjit, M. N.

    2009-11-01

    Following needs of concrete market and the economic and ecological needs, several researchers, all over the world, studied the beneficial effect which the incorporation of the mineral additions in Portland cement industry can bring. It was shown that the incorporation of local mineral additions can decrease the consumption of crushing energy of cements, and reduce the CO2 emission. Siliceous additions, moreover their physical role of filling, play a chemical role pozzolanic. They contribute to improving concrete performances and thus their durability. The abundance of dunes sand and blast furnace slag in Algeria led us to study their effect like cementitious additions. The objective of this paper is to study the effect of the incorporation of dunes sand and slag, finely ground on rheological and mechanical properties of reactive powder concretes containing ternary binders.

  3. Numerical modeling of polyurea coated cementitious materials for flexure and impact loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothula, Naga Deepika

    The research focuses on predicting the mechanical properties of various cementitious based materials coated with polyurea using the finite element program ABAQUS. To determine the effect of the polyurea coated systems, simple finite element analyses are performed on the beam model for flexure and the concrete slab model for impact. The experimental results carried out by Hyungjoo Choi [1, 2] are used to validate the model and to study the effect of the coating conditions of polyurea (plain, top, bottom, both). The load-displacement curves are plotted. Results show that using polyurea coating increases of deflection and load at failure (ductility), ultimate strength and strain, of Poly (Vinyl Butyral) (PVB) and Poly (Vinyl Alcohol) (PVA) fiber reinforced specimens. The simulation response for various models matched the experimental results very closely. Impact models depict the stresses developed and show that applying polyurea coating on the bottom seems to produce the best results.

  4. MORTAR INCORPORATING SUPPLEMENTARY CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS: STRENGTH, ISOTHERMAL CALORIMETRY AND ACIDS ATTACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Senhadji

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs prove to be effective to meet most of the requirements of durable concrete and leads to a significant reduction in CO2 emissions. This research studies the effect different SCMs (natural pozzolan (PN/ limestone fine (FC at various remplacement levels on the physical and mechano-chemical resistance of blended mortar. The paper primarily deals with the characteristics of these materials, including heat of hydration, strength and effects of aggressive chemical environments (using sulphuric acid and nitric acid. Over 6 mixes were made and compared to the control mix. Tests were conducted at different ages up to 360 days. The experimental results in general showed that Algerian mineral admixtures (PN/FC were less vulnerable to nitric and sulphuric acid attack and improved the properties of mortars, but at different rates depending on the quantity of binder.

  5. Multiscale characterization of chemical–mechanical interactions between polymer fibers and cementitious matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández-Cruz, Daniel; Hargis, Craig W.; Bae, Sungchul; Itty, Pierre A.; Meral, Cagla; Dominowski, Jolee; Radler, Michael J.; Kilcoyne, David A.; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2014-04-01

    Together with a series of mechanical tests, the interactions and potential bonding between polymeric fibers and cementitious materials were studied using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and microtomography (lCT). Experimental results showed that these techniques have great potential to characterize the polymer fiber-hydrated cement-paste matrix interface, as well as differentiating the chemistry of the two components of a bi-polymer (hybrid) fiber the polypropylene core and the ethylene acrylic acid copolymer sheath. Similarly, chemical interactions between the hybrid fiber and the cement hydration products were observed, indicating the chemical bonding between the sheath and the hardened cement paste matrix. Microtomography allowed visualization of the performance of the samples, and the distribution and orientation of the two types of fiber in mortar. Beam flexure tests confirmed improved tensile strength of mixes containing hybrid fibers, and expansion bar tests showed similar reductions in expansion for the polypropylene and hybrid fiber mortar bars.

  6. Single and Multiple Dynamic Impacts Behaviour of Ultra-high Performance Cementitious Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wenhua; ZHANG Yunsheng; ZHANG Guorong

    2011-01-01

    Single and multiple dynamic impacts tests were conducted on ultra-high performance cementitious composite (UHPCC) with various volume fractions of steel fibers (0,1%,2%,3%,4%) by using the split hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB).Besides,the ultrasonic velocity method was used to test the damage on specimens caused by dynamic impacts.For single dynamic impact,the data suggest that UHPCC obviously presents dynamic strength enhancement.With increasing of strain rate,the peak stress and peak strain increase rapidly.For multiple dynamic impacts,the results show that addition of steel fibers can obviously enhance the properties of UHPCC to resist the repeated dynamic impacts.Firstly,the number of impacts sharply increases with the increasing of volume fraction of steel fibers.Secondly,the energy absorption ability linearly increases with addition of steel fibers.Thirdly,the steel fibers can prevent the disruption phenomenon and maintain the integrity of specimen.

  7. Self-healing of Micro-cracks in Engineered Cementitious Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryanto B.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The performance of an Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC to self-heal micro-cracks under a controlled laboratory environment is presented. Ten dog-bone shaped samples were prepared; five of them were preloaded to known strains and then left to heal in water in a temperature-controlled laboratory. Ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV measurements were undertaken to monitor the crack-healing process. It was found that all samples exhibited recoveries in UPV and were able to recover to between 96.6% and 98% of their pre-test UPV values over a period of four weeks. An accelerated rate of healing was observed in the initial two-day period immediately following the preloading test.

  8. An Elastoplastic Damage Constitutive Model for Cementitious Materials under Wet-Dry Cyclic Sulfate Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of cement mortars subjected to wet-dry cyclic sulfate attack were studied by the compression strength test. The results showed that the ultimate compressive strength increased with number of cycles at the initial stage. However, after a certain time, it started to decrease with further increases in the number of cycles. Moreover, the concentration of the sodium sulfate solution proved to be an important factor affecting the ultimate compressive strength. Based on continuum damage mechanics theory, an elastoplastic damage constitutive model is presented to describe the mechanical behavior of cementitious materials under compressive stress. The results obtained agree well with the experimentally observed elastic, plastic, and damage characteristics of cement mortars under compressive stress.

  9. Excellent bonding behaviour of novel surface-tailored fibre composite rods with cementitious matrix

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fernando Cunha; Sohel Rana; Raul Fangueiro; Graça Vasconcelos

    2014-08-01

    Novel composite rods were produced by a special braiding technique that involves braiding of polyester yarns around a core of resin-impregnated carbon fibres and subsequent curing. The surface roughness of these braided rods was tailored by replacing one or two simple yarns in the outer-braided layer with braided yarns (produced from 8 simple yarns) and adjusting the take-up velocity. Pull-out tests were carried out to characterize the bond behaviour of these composite rods with cementitious matrix. It was observed that the rod produced with two braided yarns in the outer cover and highest take-up speed was ruptured completely before pull-out, leading to full utilization of its tensile strength, and exhibited 134% higher pull-out force as compared to the rods produced using only simple braiding yarns.

  10. Modelling the influence of steel fibres on the electrical resistivity of cementitious composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Anders Ole Stubbe; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    work concerns the electrical resistivity of cementitious composites and some of the parameters influencing it in order to get a more thorough understanding of the factors governing the overall resistivity. The basis of the present study is an experimental investigation of the electrical resistivity...... the overall resistivity of the material and thereby the corrosion rate of the embedded reinforcement. To the knowledge of the authors, only preliminary studies have been made on the influence of corrosion of the reinforcement bars from the addition of the electrical conductive steel fibres. Thus the present......One of the governing factors on the corrosion of embedded reinforcement is the electrical resistivity of the concrete. The combination of steel fibres and conventional reinforcement bars has been used in a number of structures. However, the addition of electrical con-ductive fibres might influence...

  11. Impact Properties of Engineered Cementitious Composites with High Volume Fly Ash Using SHPB Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhitao; YANG Yingzi; YAO Yan

    2012-01-01

    The split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) testing with diameter 40 mm was used to investigate the dynamic mechanical properties of engineered cementitious composites (ECCs) with different fly ash content.The basic properties including deformation,energy absorption capacity,strain-stress relationship and failure patterns were discussed.The ECCs showed strain-rate dependency and kept better plastic flow during impact process compared with reactive powder concrete (RPC) and concrete,but the critical compressive strength was lower than that of R-PC and concrete.The bridging effect of PVA fiber and addition of fly ash can significantly improve the deformation and energy absorption capacities of ECCs.With the increase of fly ash content in ECCs,the static and dynamic compressive strength lowered and the dynamic increase factor enhanced,Therefore,to meet different engineering needs,the content of fly ash can be an important index to control the static and dynamic mechanical properties of ECCs.

  12. Strength Correlation and Prediction of Engineered Cementitious Composites with Microwave Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok L. Chung

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of microwave and mechanical measurements of engineered cementitious composites (ECCs using a nondestructive microwave near-field detecting technique. The objective of this research is to investigate the correlations between effective conductance and compressive strength of ECCs at various curing ages under the influence of different initial water contents. Parallel measurements and regression analysis on compressive strength and microwave conductance were undertaken. It is shown that the strength evolution of ECCs can be accurately modeled and predicted by using microwave conductance at the early ages using bi-exponential functions. Compressive strength grows as a function of decreasing effective conductance, whereas the regression coefficients of the correlation models have a linear variation with water-to-binder ratios. These findings have highlighted the effectiveness of the microwave technique in detecting the variation of liquid phase morphology and pore structure.

  13. Image-based detection and analysis of crack propagation in cementitious composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, E.B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, J.A.O.

    2011-01-01

    after the cracking process has occurred. The alternative nondestructive methods are often either not precise enough or experimentally too demanding. In this study, the use of an image analysis procedure to capture the crack initiation and propagation process is described, which utilizes digital images......The initiation and propagation of cracking in concrete and other cementitious materials is a governing mechanism for many physical and mechanical material properties. The observation of these cracking processes in concrete is typically taking place at discrete locations using destructive methods...... of the concrete while undergoing the cracking process. The results obtained with this method have shown that it is possible to monitor relatively small displacements on the specimen surface independently of the scale of the representative area of interest. The formed cracks are visible at relatively small crack...

  14. Titanium dioxide coated cementitious materials for air purifying purposes: Preparation, characterization and toluene removal potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, Anibal Maury; De Belie, Nele [Magnel Laboratory for Concrete Research, Department of Structural Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Ghent University, Technologiepark Zwijnaarde 904, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium); Demeestere, Kristof [Research Group EnVOC, Department of Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653. B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Maentylae, Tapio; Levaenen, Erkki [Department of Materials Science, Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, FIN-33720 Tampere (Finland)

    2010-04-15

    This work presents promising results for air purification by heterogeneous photocatalysis on new titanium dioxide loaded cementitious materials. A set of eight concretes and plasters is enriched with TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst by dip-coating and/or sol-gel methods. First, the macro-structural features of the cementitious materials have been studied in terms of porosity and roughness. The first parameter has been determined using mercury intrusion porosimetry or by vacuum saturation, and ranged between 9 and 75%, with the highest values obtained for autoclaved aerated white concrete. Surface roughness, determined by laser profilometry, has been characterized by the R{sub a} factor. This expresses the mean deviation of the profile from the centre line and ranged between 0.7 and 252 {mu}m, with the highest value obtained for conventional grey concrete finished with surface brush. Secondly, the weathering resistance of the TiO{sub 2} coatings has been determined by exposing them to different abrasive conditions and by performing SEM-Edax analyses to measure quantitatively the coating's titanium content. Hereby, it is shown that high porosity and roughness are favourable for TiO{sub 2} particles retention. Finally, the preliminary air purification potential of both dip-coated and sol-gel coated TiO{sub 2} enriched concrete samples has been investigated on lab-scale using toluene as a model pollutant. High removal efficiencies (up to 86%) were obtained with the dip-coated samples, indicating their attractive photocatalytic properties for future application as air purifying building materials. (author)

  15. Embedded sensor for the continuous measurement of mechanical resistance in structures made from cementitious material, method for producing the sensor, and system and method for the continuous measurement of mechanical resistance in structures made from cementitious materials

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira Cabo, Jesús; Anaya Velayos, José Javier; González Hernández, Margarita; Aparicio Secanellas, Sofía; Varga, Ratislav; Rovnak, Marian; Fuentes Ramírez, José Vicente

    2015-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a sensor for the continuous measurement of mechanical resistance in a structure made from cementitious material. The invention also relates to two measurement systems using the aforementioned sensor: a continuous measurement system based on an electromagnetic induction effect, and a continuous measurement system based on a magnetic inductance effect, as well as to the measurement method of each system and a method for the production of the sensor. The sensor is e...

  16. Experimental study and modelling of physico-chemical mechanisms of clay-concrete interactions in the radioactive waste geological disposal context; Etude experimentale et modelisation des mecanismes physico-chimiques des interactions beton-argile dans le contexte du stockage geologique des dechetsradioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauzeres, A.

    2010-09-15

    These research works are carried out as part of the radioactive wastes geological disposal feasibility study. The current option developed by Andra, includes several cementitious materials in contact with the surrounding Callovo-Oxfordian (COX) (an argillite). Concretes and argillite present very different pore solutions (ionic concentrations and pH). Controlled by the concentrations differences, the aqueous species diffusion in the solids generates chemical and physical disturbances. This study is based on experimental, analytical and numerical works, in order to identify the mechanisms controlling the clayey environment influence on cementitious materials. (author)

  17. Comparative Studies on Dyeability with Direct, Acid and Reactive Dyes after Chemical Modification of Jute with Mixed Amino Acids Obtained from Extract of Waste Soya Bean Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Nilendu Sekhar; Konar, Adwaita; Roy, Alok Nath; Samanta, Ashis Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Jute fabric was treated with mixed natural amino acids obtained from waste soya bean seed extract for chemical modification of jute for its cataionization and to enhance its dyeability with anionic dyes (like direct, reactive and acid dye) as well enabling soya modified jute for salt free dyeing with anionic reactive dyes maintaining its eco-friendliness. Colour interaction parameters including surface colour strength were assessed and compared for both bleached and soya-modified jute fabric for reactive dyeing and compared with direct and acid dye. Improvement in K/S value (surface colour strength) was observed for soya-modified jute even in absence of salt applied in dye bath for reactive dyes as well as for direct and acid dyes. In addition, reactive dye also shows good dyeability even in acid bath in salt free conditions. Colour fastness to wash was evaluated for bleached and soya-modified jute fabric after dyeing with direct, acid and reactive dyes are reported. Treatment of jute with soya-extracted mixed natural amino acids showed anchoring of some amino/aldemine groups on jute cellulosic polymer evidenced from Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) Spectroscopy. This amino or aldemine group incorporation in bleached jute causes its cationization and hence when dyed in acid bath for reactive dye (instead of conventional alkali bath) showed dye uptake for reactive dyes. Study of surface morphology by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) of said soya-modified jute as compared to bleached jute was studied and reported.

  18. Direct probe atmospheric pressure photoionization/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry for fast screening of flame retardants and plasticizers in products and waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros-Gómez, A; Brandsma, S H; de Boer, J; Leonards, P E G

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we develop fast screening methods for flame retardants and plasticizers in products and waste based on direct probe (DP) atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) coupled to a high-resolution (HR) time-of-flight mass spectrometer. DP-APPI is reported for the first time in this study, and DP-APCI that has been scarcely exploited is optimized for comparison. DP-APPI was more selective than DP-APCI and also more sensitive for the most hydrophobic compounds. No sample treatment was necessary, and only a minimal amount of sample (few milligrams) was used for analysis that was performed within a few minutes. Both methods were applied to the analysis of plastic products, electronic waste, and car interiors. Polybrominated diphenylethers, new brominated flame retardants, and organophosphorus flame retardants were present in most of the samples. The combination of DP with HR mass spectra and data processing based on mass accuracy and isotopic patterns allowed the unambiguous identification of chemicals at low levels of about 0.025 % (w/w). Under untargeted screening, resorcinol bis(biphenylphosphate) and bisphenol A bis(bisphenylphosphate) were identified in many of the consumer products of which literature data are still very limited.

  19. Multi-physics corrosion modeling for sustainability assessment of steel reinforced high performance fiber reinforced cementitious composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lepech, M.; Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Using a newly developed multi-physics transport, corrosion, and cracking model, which models these phenomena as a coupled physiochemical processes, the role of HPFRCC crack control and formation in regulating steel reinforcement corrosion is investigated. This model describes transport of water...... tension-softening cementitious composites. Finally, these results are extended to provide greater insight into the assessment and design of more sustainable steel reinforced HPFRCC structures....

  20. The Influence of Nano-Fe3O4 on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Cementitious Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Pawel; Horszczaruk, Elzbieta; Cendrowski, Krzysztof; Mijowska, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade, nanotechnology has been gathering a spectacular amount of attention in the field of building materials. The incorporation of nanosized particles in a small amount to the building materials can influence their properties significantly. And it can contribute to the creation of novel and sustainable structures. In this work, the effect of nano-Fe3O4 as an admixture (from 1 to 5 wt.% in mass of the cement) on the mechanical and microstructural properties of cementitious composites has been characterised. The study showed that Fe3O4 nanoparticles acted as a filler which improved the microstructure of a cementitious composite and reduced its total porosity, thus increasing the density of the composite. The presence of nanomagnetite did not affect the main hydration products and the rate of cement hydration. In addition, the samples containing nanomagnetite exhibited compressive strength improvement (up to 20 %). The study showed that 3 wt.% of nano-Fe3O4 in the cementitious composite was the optimal amount to improve both its mechanical and microstructural properties.

  1. Electrical percolation threshold of cementitious composites possessing self-sensing functionality incorporating different carbon-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dahawi, Ali; Haroon Sarwary, Mohammad; Öztürk, Oğuzhan; Yıldırım, Gürkan; Akın, Arife; Şahmaran, Mustafa; Lachemi, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    An experimental study was carried out to understand the electrical percolation thresholds of different carbon-based nano- and micro-scale materials in cementitious composites. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) and carbon black (CB) were selected as the nano-scale materials, while 6 and 12 mm long carbon fibers (CF6 and CF12) were used as the micro-scale carbon-based materials. After determining the percolation thresholds of different electrical conductive materials, mechanical properties and piezoresistive properties of specimens produced with the abovementioned conductive materials at percolation threshold were investigated under uniaxial compressive loading. Results demonstrate that regardless of initial curing age, the percolation thresholds of CNT, GNP, CB and CFs in ECC mortar specimens were around 0.55%, 2.00%, 2.00% and 1.00%, respectively. Including different carbon-based conductive materials did not harm compressive strength results; on the contrary, it improved overall values. All cementitious composites produced with carbon-based materials, with the exception of the control mixtures, exhibited piezoresistive behavior under compression, which is crucial for sensing capability. It is believed that incorporating the sensing attribute into cementitious composites will enhance benefits for sustainable civil infrastructures.

  2. Reactivity of nitrate and organic acids at the concrete–bitumen interface of a nuclear waste repository cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertron, A., E-mail: bertron@insa-toulouse.fr [Université de Toulouse (France); UPS, INSA (France); LMDC (Laboratoire Matériaux et Durabilité des Constructions), 135, avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077, Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Jacquemet, N. [Université de Toulouse (France); UPS, INSA (France); LMDC (Laboratoire Matériaux et Durabilité des Constructions), 135, avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077, Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Erable, B. [Université de Toulouse (France); INPT, UPS (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, 4, Allée Emile Monso, F-31030 Toulouse (France); Sablayrolles, C. [Université de Toulouse (France); INP (France); LCA (Laboratoire de Chimie Agro-Industrielle), ENSIACET, 4 allée Emile Monso, BP 44 362, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); INRA (France); LCA (Laboratoire de Chimie Agro-Industrielle), F-31029 Toulouse (France); Escadeillas, G. [Université de Toulouse (France); UPS, INSA (France); LMDC (Laboratoire Matériaux et Durabilité des Constructions), 135, avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077, Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Albrecht, A. [Andra, 1-7, rue Jean-Monnet, 92298 Châtenay-Malabry (France)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Interactions of cement paste and organic acid–nitrate solutions were investigated. • Cement leaching imposed alkaline pH (>10) very rapidly in the liquid media. • Acetic acid action on cement paste was similar to that of classical leaching. • Oxalic acid attack formed Ca-oxalate salts; organic matter in solution decreased. • Nitrate was stable under abiotic conditions and with organic matter. - Abstract: This study investigates the fate of nitrate and organic acids at the bitumen–concrete interface within repository cell for long-lived, intermediate-level, radioactive wastes. The interface was simulated by a multiphase system in which cementitious matrices (CEM V cement paste specimens) were exposed to bitumen model leachates consisting of nitrates and acetic acid with and without oxalic acid, chemical compounds likely to be released by bitumen. Leaching experiments were conducted with daily renewal of the solutions in order to accelerate reactions. The concentrations of anions (acetate, oxalate, nitrate, and nitrite) and cations (calcium, potassium) and the pH were monitored over time. Mineralogical changes of the cementitious matrices were analysed by XRD. The results confirmed the stability of nitrates in the abiotic conditions of the experiments. The action of acetic acid on the cementitious matrix was similar to that of ordinary leaching in the absence of organic acids (i.e. carried out with water or strong acids); no specific interaction was detected between acetate and cementitious cations. The reaction of oxalic acid with the cementitious phases led to the precipitation of calcium oxalate salts in the outer layer of the matrix. The concentration of oxalate was reduced by 65% inside the leaching medium.

  3. Toward Sustainability in Concrete Industry by Using Of Solid Wastes from Palm Oil Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pordesari Alireza Javadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, one of the most important construction materials is concrete. By the advances of the industries in the urban areas, concrete is considered as one of the highest demands. As a result, the large amount of unprocessed materials is needed for making concrete. In the meantime, the agricultural wastes and solid material disposal are giving serious damages to the environment. As a result, by employing the agricultural wastes as a cementitious material, the undesirable impacts of the concrete industry to the environment will be dramatically decreased. That’s because the source of these newly developed concretes is both reliable and environmental friendly. In this study, the utilization of agricultural wastes as a complementary cementitious material for producing the concrete is explained. In addition, it discusses the possibility of deploying the agricultural wastes by considering their engineering, physical and chemical properties. In addition, the successful use of agricultural wastes from oil palm industry such as oil palm shell, palm oil fuel ash and palm oil fibre in the concrete mixture was reported.

  4. Overview of recent work on self-healing in cementitious materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cracks, especially microcracks, in concrete are of paramount importance to the durability and the service life of cementitious composite. However, the self-healing technology, including autogenous healing and autonomous healing, is expected to be one of effective tools to overcome this boring problem. In this paper, we focus on the autogenous healing of concrete material and a few of recent works of autonomous healing are also mentioned. The durability and the mechanical properties improved by the self-healing phenomenon are reviewed from experimental investigation and practical experience. Several aspects of researches, such as autogenous healing capability of an innovative concrete incorporated geo-materials, self-healing of engineered cementitious composite and fire-damaged concrete, effect of mineral and admixtures on mechanism and efficiency of self-healing concrete are summarized to evaluate the presented progresses in the past several years and to outline the perspective for the further developments. Moreover, a special emphasis is given on the analytical models and computer simulation method of the researches of self-healing in cementitious materials.Las fisuras, y sobre todo las microfisuras, tienen una gran repercusión en la durabilidad y en la vida útil de los materiales cementantes. Ante este problema, la tecnología de la autorreparación, tanto autógena como autónoma, se presenta como una solución eficaz. El artículo se centra en la reparación autógena del hormigón, así como en algunos trabajos recientes sobre la reparación autónoma. Se describen las mejoras de las propiedades de durabilidad y de resistencia que proporciona la técnica del hormigón autorreparable, tanto desde el punto de vista de la investigación experimental como del de la experiencia práctica. A fin de evaluar los avances logrados en los últimos años y de trazar las grandes líneas de desarrollo futuro, se resumen varios de los aspectos

  5. Performance assessment of the direct disposal in unsaturated tuff or spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste owned by USDOE: Volume 2, Methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechard, R.P. [ed.

    1995-03-01

    This assessment studied the performance of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a hypothetical repository in unsaturated tuff. The results of this 10-month study are intended to help guide the Office of Environment Management of the US Department of Energy (DOE) on how to prepare its wastes for eventual permanent disposal. The waste forms comprised spent fuel and high-level waste currently stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Hanford reservations. About 700 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of the waste under study is stored at INEL, including graphite spent nuclear fuel, highly enriched uranium spent fuel, low enriched uranium spent fuel, and calcined high-level waste. About 2100 MTHM of weapons production fuel, currently stored on the Hanford reservation, was also included. The behavior of the waste was analyzed by waste form and also as a group of waste forms in the hypothetical tuff repository. When the waste forms were studied together, the repository was assumed also to contain about 9200 MTHM high-level waste in borosilicate glass from three DOE sites. The addition of the borosilicate glass, which has already been proposed as a final waste form, brought the total to about 12,000 MTHM.

  6. Cementitious near-field sorption data bases for performance assessment of a L/ILW repository in a Palfris marl host rock. CEM-94: update I, June 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Loon, L.R. van [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1998-01-01

    This report is an update on an earlier cementitious sorption data base (SDB) prepared by Bradbury and Sarott (1994). The aim is to review any new information or data which have become available in the intervening time and modify the existing SDB appropriately. Discussions will be confined predominantly to areas which have led to significant changes to or reappraisals of the data/values or procedures for obtaining/modifying them. From this point of view this update and the previous SDB are closely related and belong together. The complexation of radionuclides with organic ligands from the chemical degradation of cellulose, and the subsequent negative effects on sorption properties, were identified as being processes of great importance. Since 1994 significant progress has been made in this field and a major part of this work is devoted to a reassessment of the impact of `organics` on near-field sorption. In particular, the very conservative assumptions which had been made previously because of the general lack of good quality data available at that time, could be replaced by realistic parameter estimates based on new knowledge. For example, maximum likely concentrations of cellulose degradation products and cement additives in the cement pore waters could be calculated allowing the potential effects of these organic ligands on sorption to be bounded. Sorption values for safety relevant radionuclides corresponding to the three broad stages of cement/concrete degradation during the lifetime of the repository are presented in tabulated form. The influence of the wide variety of organic ligands existing in the different waste categories, SMA-1 to SMA-4, is quantified in terms of sorption reduction factors. In the compilation of this cement SDB update, radionuclide uptake onto the vast quantities of aggregate materials and corrosion products from iron/steel was not taken into account. (author) 10 figs., 8 tabs., refs.

  7. Tailoring of fiber-reinforced cementitious composites (FRCC) for flexural strength and reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obla, Karthikeyan Hariya

    Bending is the most common form of loading for many construction elements. The bending strength or Modulus of Rupture (MOR) and flexural ductility are therefore critical properties particularly for those elements which are not reinforced by rebars. Such elements include highway barriers, certain wall panels, thin sheet elements and small diameter pipes. The tensile and bending strengths of concrete are very low. In addition, as a brittle material, concrete also demonstrates a large variability in bending strength. A large variability in MOR leads to inefficient use of the material since the design strength has to be close to the lower bound of the material's strength distribution. The potential of fiber in improving MOR is well recognized in fiber reinforced concrete. The use of fiber to enhance material reliability is much less studied. This thesis addresses both aspects employing a combination of theoretical and experimental treatments. Research findings are reported as Part I and Part II of this thesis. Carbon fibers are increasingly attractive for reinforcing cementitious composites. They can be manufactured to yield a wide range in modulus and strength. Carbon fibers are non-corrosive, and fire and alkali. In addition, the price of pitch based carbon fibers are dropping rapidly to make them economically viable for the building and construction industries. In Part I of the thesis, a study on the optimization of the bending strength of carbon FRCC using a fracture based flexural model that links the fiber, interface, and matrix micro-parameters to composite bending strength is presented. Carbon fiber, interface and matrix parameters were tailored to yield optimal properties such as high MOR and ductility. Four point bend tests were conducted on CFRCCs to confirm the findings. Some problems specially affecting carbon FRCCs such as fiber breakage during mixing were also studied and its effects on composite uniaxial tensile properties analyzed by developing new

  8. Impact assessment of shallow land burial for low-level waste: modelling of the water flow and transport of radionuclides in the near-field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walravens, J.; Volckaert, G.

    1996-09-18

    The Belgian concept for disposal of low-level waste consists of storage of waste drums into a concrete vault backfilled with a cementitious grout. The vault is placed above the water table and will be covered with a multilayer cap of clay, gravel, and sandy materials. The SCK/CEN is charged with the long-term performance assessment of the disposal site. The main processes and parameters determining the radioactivity release from the site are identified. The principal processes are the infiltration through the top cover and the sorption of waste on the backfill. The release of radionuclides from the site was modelled with the PORFLOW numerical code.

  9. Implementation - more than monitoring and enforcement: evidence from the implementation of the 1989 municipal waste incineration directive (89/429/EEC) in four member states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schucht, S. [CERNA, Centre d' Economie Industrielle, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Paris, 75 - Paris (France); Bultmann, A. [UFZ-Center for Environmental Research (Germany); Eames, M. [Sussex Univ., Brighton (United Kingdom). Science Policy Research Unit; Lulofs, K. [Twente Univ.-CSTM, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2000-12-01

    Researchers and policy-makers accept that implementation decisively influences the effectiveness of European (EU) environmental policy. Some Member States lead the development of EU policy and implement Directives with little problem. Others follow a variety of compliance (or non-compliance) paths. Implementation gaps and policy failures are prevalent. Policy outcomes often differ radically between even neighbouring Member States. What are the reasons for these differences? Why do Member States follow different compliance paths? Why do implementation gaps and policy failures occur? What factors can explain the different policy outcomes achieved? Is it only 'classical' implementation variables i.e. the monitoring and enforcement actions of public authorities that count? What lessons can we draw for the future? This paper addresses these questions through a comparative analysis of the implementation of the European Directive on the reduction of air pollution from existing municipal waste incineration plants (89/429/EEC) in Germany, the Netherlands, France and the United Kingdom: four neighbouring Member States that exhibit quite divergent compliance paths and policy outcomes. Monitoring and enforcement are found to have only limited explanatory power. In practice national contextual variables, such as: public and political environmental awareness; interactions both with environmental and non-environmental policies; regulatory anticipation and uncertainty; the degree of autonomy and scope of regulatory agencies; and, industrial and market structure of the regulated industry, must also be considered. The article is structured as follows. Section two presents the emission standards imposed by the Directive, briefly summarises the transposition of the Directive into national legislation and presents the compliance paths of the four countries. In sections three to six the specific implementation processes in the four countries are described, focusing on factors

  10. Experimental studies on the inventory of cement-derived colloids in the pore water of a cementitious backfill material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieland, E

    2001-06-01

    The potential role of near-field colloids for the colloid-facilitated migration of radionuclides has stimulated investigations concerning the generation and presence of colloids in the near-field of a repository for low- and intermediate level waste (L/ILW). The highly gas permeable mortar (Nagra designation: mortar M1) is currently favoured as backfill material for the engineered barrier of the planned Swiss L/ILW repository. The cementitious backfill is considered to be a chemical environment with some potential for colloid generation. In a series of batch-style laboratory experiments the physico-chemical processes controlling the inventory of colloids in cement pore water of the backfill were assessed for chemical conditions prevailing in the initial stage of the cement degradation. In these experiments, backfill mortar M1 or quartz, respectively, which may be used as aggregate material for the backfill, were immersed in artificial cement pore water (a NaOH/KOH rich cement fluid). Colloid concentrations in the cement pore water were recorded as a function of time for different experimental settings. The results indicate that a colloid-colloid interaction process (coagulation) controlled the colloid inventory. The mass concentration of dispersed colloids was found to be typically lower than 0.02 ppm in undisturbed batch systems. An upper-bound value was estimated to be 0.1 ppm taking into account uncertainties on the measurements. To assess the potential for colloid generation in a dynamic system, colloid concentrations were determined in the pore water of a column filled with backfill mortar. The chemical conditions established in the mortar column corresponded to conditions observed in the second stage of the cement degradation (a Ca(OH){sub 2{sup -}} controlled cement system). In this dynamic system, the upper-bound value for the colloid mass concentration was estimated to be 0.1 ppm. Implications for radionuclide mobility were deduced taking into account the

  11. 利用高炉冲渣水余热直接供暖的应用%Application of Direct Heating of Blast Furnace Waste Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐小刚; 杨世辉

    2014-01-01

    A-direct-heat-transfer-with-blast-furnace-waste-for-heating-water-was-introduced,which-has-been-running-for-nearly-5-months-in-a-iron-and-steel-factory-in-China.The-operation-results-showed-that-the-new-single-channel-heat-exchanger-without-contact-point-could-avoid-corrosion-and-block-problems-caused-by-impurity-in-blast-furnace-waste-water.The-temperature-of-slag-flushing-water-through-the-heat-exchanger-can-be-reduced-to-less-than-55-℃-which-meets-the-requirement-of-flush-slag-process.The-heating-water-temperature-can-be-increased-from-50℃-to-67.7℃-which-meets-the-heating-requirements.The-economic-and-environmental-benefits-of-the-system-are-significant.%介绍某钢铁企业近5个月的高炉冲渣水直接换热供暖应用情况。结果显示:新型无触点的单通道换热器可以有效避免冲渣水杂质对换热器的堵塞和腐蚀。冲渣水经过换热后,温度能降低到55℃以下,满足冲渣工艺用水要求,而采暖水温度则能够从50℃提高到67.7℃,满足供暖要求。该系统经济效益和环境效益都十分突出。

  12. Waste Sites - Municipal Waste Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — A Municipal Waste Operation is a DEP primary facility type related to the Waste Management Municipal Waste Program. The sub-facility types related to Municipal Waste...

  13. Self-Healing of Microcracks in Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC Under a Natural Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor C. Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper builds on previous self-healing engineered cementitious composites (ECC research by allowing ECC to heal outdoors, in the natural environment, under random and sometimes extreme environmental conditions. Development of an ECC material that can heal itself in the natural environment could lower infrastructure maintenance costs and allow for more sustainable development in the future by increasing service life and decreasing the amount of resources and energy needed for repairs. Determining to what extent current ECC materials self-heal in the natural environment is the first step in the development of an ECC that can completely heal itself when exposed to everyday environmental conditions. This study monitored outdoor ECC specimens for one year using resonant frequency (RF and mechanical reloading to determine the rate and extent of self-healing in the natural environment. It was found that the level of RF, stiffness, and first cracking strength recovery increased as the duration of natural environment exposure increased. For specimens that underwent multiple damage cycles, it was found that the level of recovery was highly dependent on the average temperature and amount of precipitation between each damage event. However, RF, stiffness, and first cracking strength recovery data for specimens that underwent multiple loading cycles suggest that self-healing functionality can be maintained under multiple damage events.

  14. Improvements in self-consolidating cementitious composites by using micro carbonized aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Andrea Ferro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the use of self-consolidating cementitious systems in construction industry. The present research was conducted to enhance the mechanical performance of cement composites by the utilization of micro-sized inert particles. This paper deals with the synthesis of micro-sized inert carbonized particles from hemp hurds. The synthesized carbonized particles were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM. These particles were further used as additive in self-consolidating cement composites. Total of four different wt% additions (i.e. 0.08, 0.20, 1.00 and 3.00 by wt% of cement were investigated. The cement composites containing carbonized particles inclusions were characterized by three point bending and compression tests. The results indicate that the carbonized particles additions enhanced the flexural and compressive strengths of the cement composites. It was also observed that the fracture properties and the energy absorption capability of the cement composites were enhanced substantially.

  15. The influence of rainwater composition on the conservation state of cementitious building materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morillas, Héctor, E-mail: hector.morillas@ehu.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, P.O. Box 644, 48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain); Marcaida, Iker [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, P.O. Box 644, 48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain); Maguregui, Maite [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, P.O. Box 450, 01080 Vitoria-Gasteiz, Basque Country (Spain); Carrero, Jose Antonio; Madariaga, Juan Manuel [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, P.O. Box 644, 48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Rainwater is one of the main pollution tracers around the world. There are many reasons that can explain the presence of high concentrations of certain hazardous elements (HEs) in the rainwater (traffic, marine port activities, industry, etc.). In this work, rainwater samples were collected at six different locations in the Metropolitan Bilbao (Basque Country, north of Spain) during November 2014. HE concentrations were determined by means of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and anions by ion chromatography. The pH and redox potential values on these samples were also assessed. According to the obtained results, different trends along the estuary of Bilbao have been observed. To corroborate some hypothesis, thermodynamic simulations and correlation analyses were also carried out using quantitative data. These trends are closely related to the surrounding pollution and marine influence. Finally, in order to ascertain the influence of the Metropolitan Bilbao rainwater on buildings materials, a recent construction was characterized. Using techniques such as Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (SEM–EDS) and Raman Spectroscopy, different types of sulfates and nitrates were observed. - Highlights: • Rainwater from six sampling points along Nervion River (Bilbao, Spain) were analyzed. • Ion chromatography, ICP-MS and chemometrics were used for the rainwater analyses. • The interaction between wet depositions and building materials was studied. • Cementitious materials were analyzed using µ-Raman spectroscopy and SEM–EDS.

  16. Microstructural changes in a cementitious membrane due to the application of a DC electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covelo, Alba; Diaz, Belen; Freire, Lorena; Novoa, X Ramon; Perez, M Consuelo

    2008-07-01

    The use of electromigration techniques to accelerate chloride ions motion is commonly employed to characterise the permeability of cementitious samples to chlorides, a relevant parameter in reinforced concrete corrosion. This paper is devoted to the study of microstructure's changes occurring in mortar samples when submitted to natural diffusion and migration experiments. The application of an electric field reduces testing time in about one order of magnitude with respect to natural diffusion experiments. Nevertheless, the final sample's microstructure differs in both tests. Impedance Spectroscopy is employed for real time monitoring of microstructural changes. During migration experiments the global impedance undergoes important increase in shorter period of time compared to natural diffusion tests. So, the forced motion of ions through the concrete membrane induces significant variations in the porous structure, as confirmed by Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry. After migration experiments, an important increase in the capillary pore size (10-100 nm) was detected. Conversely, no relevant variations are found after natural diffusion tests. Results presented in this work cast doubt on the significance of diffusion coefficient values obtained under accelerated conditions.

  17. Preparation of Self-compacting Ultra-high Toughness Cementitious Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiufang; XU Shilang; TIAN Yanhua

    2011-01-01

    A self-compacting ultra-high toughness cementitious composite(UHTCC)reinforced by discontinuous short polyvinyl alcohol(PVA)fibers,which exhibits self-compacting performance in the fresh state and strain-hardening and multiple cracking behavior in the hardened state,was developed through controlling flow properties of fresh mortar matrix at constant ingredients concentrations determined by micromechanical design and ensuring uniform fibers dispersion.The superplasticizer was utilized to adjust its flow properties in the fresh state.A series of flow tests,including deformability test,flow rate test,and self-placing test,were conducted to characterize and quantify the fluidity performance of fresh mortar matrix and self-compactability of fresh UHTCC.It is revealed that the utilization of superplasticizer is efficient in producing the fresh mortar matrix with desirable fluidity and the resulting self-compacting UHTCC.In addition,results of four point bending tests on the developed self-compacting UHTCC confirm the insensitivity of mechanical performance of self-compacting UHTCC to the presence of external vibrations as well as the flexural characteristics of deformation hardening and multiple cracking.

  18. Monitoring the cementitious materials subjected to sulfate attack with optical fiber excitation Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yanfei; Bai, Yun; Muhammed Basheer, P. A.; Boland, John J.; Wang, Jing Jing

    2013-10-01

    Formation of ettringite and gypsum from sulfate attack together with carbonation and chloride ingress have been considered as the most serious deterioration mechanisms of concrete structures. Although electrical resistance sensors and fiber optic chemical sensors could be used to monitor the latter two mechanisms on site, currently there is no system for monitoring the deterioration mechanisms of sulfate attack. In this paper, a preliminary study was carried out to investigate the feasibility of monitoring sulfate attack with optical fiber excitation Raman spectroscopy through characterizing the ettringite and gypsum formed in deteriorated cementitious materials under an optical fiber excitation + objective collection configuration. Bench-mounted Raman spectroscopy analysis was also conducted to validate the spectrum obtained from the fiber-objective configuration. The results showed that the expected Raman bands of ettringite and gypsum in the sulfate-attacked cement paste can be clearly identified by the optical fiber excitation Raman spectrometer and are in good agreement with those identified from bench-mounted Raman spectrometer. Therefore, based on these preliminary results, it is considered that there is a good potential for developing an optical fiber-based Raman system to monitor the deterioration mechanisms of concrete subjected to sulfate attack in the future.

  19. Self-Healing of Microcracks in Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC) Under a Natural Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Emily N; Li, Victor C

    2013-07-15

    This paper builds on previous self-healing engineered cementitious composites (ECC) research by allowing ECC to heal outdoors, in the natural environment, under random and sometimes extreme environmental conditions. Development of an ECC material that can heal itself in the natural environment could lower infrastructure maintenance costs and allow for more sustainable development in the future by increasing service life and decreasing the amount of resources and energy needed for repairs. Determining to what extent current ECC materials self-heal in the natural environment is the first step in the development of an ECC that can completely heal itself when exposed to everyday environmental conditions. This study monitored outdoor ECC specimens for one year using resonant frequency (RF) and mechanical reloading to determine the rate and extent of self-healing in the natural environment. It was found that the level of RF, stiffness, and first cracking strength recovery increased as the duration of natural environment exposure increased. For specimens that underwent multiple damage cycles, it was found that the level of recovery was highly dependent on the average temperature and amount of precipitation between each damage event. However, RF, stiffness, and first cracking strength recovery data for specimens that underwent multiple loading cycles suggest that self-healing functionality can be maintained under multiple damage events.

  20. Thermally conductive cementitious grouts for geothermal heat pumps. Progress report FY 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, M.L.; Philippacopoulos, A.J.

    1998-11-01

    Research commenced in FY 97 to determine the suitability of superplasticized cement-sand grouts for backfilling vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pump (GHP) systems. The overall objectives were to develop, evaluate and demonstrate cementitious grouts that could reduce the required bore length and improve the performance of GHPs. This report summarizes the accomplishments in FY 98. The developed thermally conductive grout consists of cement, water, a particular grade of silica sand, superplasticizer and a small amount of bentonite. While the primary function of the grout is to facilitate heat transfer between the U-loop and surrounding formation, it is also essential that the grout act as an effective borehole sealant. Two types of permeability (hydraulic conductivity) tests was conducted to evaluate the sealing performance of the cement-sand grout. Additional properties of the proposed grout that were investigated include bleeding, shrinkage, bond strength, freeze-thaw durability, compressive, flexural and tensile strengths, elastic modulus, Poisson`s ratio and ultrasonic pulse velocity.

  1. GEOTECHNICAL/GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COAL PROCESS WASTE STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin S. Olson; Charles J. Moretti

    1999-11-01

    Thirteen solid wastes, six coals and one unreacted sorbent produced from seven advanced coal utilization processes were characterized for task three of this project. The advanced processes from which samples were obtained included a gas-reburning sorbent injection process, a pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion process, a coal-reburning process, a SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, RO{sub x}, BOX process, an advanced flue desulfurization process, and an advanced coal cleaning process. The waste samples ranged from coarse materials, such as bottom ashes and spent bed materials, to fine materials such as fly ashes and cyclone ashes. Based on the results of the waste characterizations, an analysis of appropriate waste management practices for the advanced process wastes was done. The analysis indicated that using conventional waste management technology should be possible for disposal of all the advanced process wastes studied for task three. However, some wastes did possess properties that could present special problems for conventional waste management systems. Several task three wastes were self-hardening materials and one was self-heating. Self-hardening is caused by cementitious and pozzolanic reactions that occur when water is added to the waste. All of the self-hardening wastes setup slowly (in a matter of hours or days rather than minutes). Thus these wastes can still be handled with conventional management systems if care is taken not to allow them to setup in storage bins or transport vehicles. Waste self-heating is caused by the exothermic hydration of lime when the waste is mixed with conditioning water. If enough lime is present, the temperature of the waste will rise until steam is produced. It is recommended that self-heating wastes be conditioned in a controlled manner so that the heat will be safely dissipated before the material is transported to an ultimate disposal site. Waste utilization is important because an advanced process waste will not require

  2. A fermentative approach towards optimizing directed biosynthesis of fumaric acid by Rhizopus oryzae 1526 utilizing apple industry waste biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ratul Kumar; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Verma, Mausam

    2015-12-01

    The present research account deals with the bioproduction of fumaric acid (FA) from apple pomace ultrafiltration sludge (APUS) and apple pomace (AP) through fermentation. The filamentous fungus Rhizopus oryzae 1526 was used as a biocatalyst and its morphological impact on FA production was analysed in detail. For submerged fermentation, 40 g L(-1) of total solids concentration of APUS, pH 6.0, 30 °C, 200 rpm flask shaking speed and 72 h of incubation were found to be optimum for FA production (25.2 ± 1.0 g L(-1), 0.350 g (L(-1) h(-1))). Broth viscosity (cP), residual reducing sugar (g L(-1)) and ethanol (g L(-1)) produced as by-product, were also analysed. Plastic trays were used for solid state fermentation and at optimized level of moisture and incubation period, 52 ± 2.67 g FA per kg dry weight of AP was obtained. Changes in the total phenolic content (mg g(-1) dry weight of AP) were monitored at regular intervals. Utilization of APUS and AP for the directed synthesis of the high-value platform chemical FA by the fungal strain R. oryzae 1526 was an excellent display of fungal physiological and morphological control over a fermentative product.

  3. Effects of colemanite waste, coal bottom ash, and fly ash on the properties of cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kula, I.; Olgun, A.; Erdogan, Y.; Sevinc, V. [Celal Bayar University, Manisa (Turkey)

    2001-03-01

    The physical and chemical properties of colemanite ore waste from concentrator, coal bottom ash, fly ash, cement+ash mixtures, cement+colemanite ore waste, and their effects on the mechanical properties of concrete were investigated. These materials with different proportion were substituted with Portland cement. Physical properties such as setting time, volume expansion, and compressive strength were determined and compared to reference mixture and Turkish standards (TS). The results showed that cement replacement materials had clear effects on the mechanical properties. The use of fly ash and bottom ash even at the concentration of 25% showed either comparable or better result compared to reference mixture. Although replacement of Portland cement by 9 wt.% of colemanite ore waste causes reduction in the compressive strength, the values obtained are within the limit of TS. As a result, colemanite ore waste, fly ash, and bottom ash may be used as cementitious materials.

  4. Reuse and recycling of construction and demolition according to the directive 2008/98/EC on waste; Reutilizacion y reciclado de residuos de construccion y demolicion segun la directiva 2008/98/CE sobre residuos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenas, F.J.

    2010-07-01

    With the approval of the current framework directive amending the definitions of recovery in article 3.15 is to legitimize the doctrine of the function or purpose useful to define the operatins of valorization and disposal, in this sense, 'valorization' means any operation the principal result of which is waste serving a useful purpose by replacing other materials that would otherwise have been used to fulfill a particular function, or that the waste is prepared to fulfill that function, in the installation or the economy in general.

  5. Nuclear waste and hazardous waste in the public perception

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruetli, Pius; Seidl, Roman; Stauffacher, Michael [ETH Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. for Environmental Decisions

    2015-07-01

    The disposal of nuclear waste has gained attention of the public for decades. Accordingly, nuclear waste has been a prominent issue in natural, engineer and social science for many years. Although bearing risks for todays and future generations hazardous waste in contrast is much less an issue of public concern. In 2011, we conducted a postal survey among Swiss Germans (N = 3.082) to learn more about, how nuclear waste is perceived against hazardous waste. We created a questionnaire with two versions, nuclear waste and hazardous waste, respectively. Each version included an identical part with well-known explanatory factors for risk perception on each of the waste types separately and additional questions directly comparing the two waste types. Results show that basically both waste types are perceived similarly in terms of risk/benefit, emotion, trust, knowledge and responsibility. However, in the direct comparison of the two waste types a complete different pattern can be observed: Respondents perceive nuclear waste as more long-living, more dangerous, less controllable and it, furthermore, creates more negative emotions. On the other hand, respondents feel more responsible for hazardous waste and indicate to have more knowledge about this waste type. Moreover, nuclear waste is perceived as more carefully managed. We conclude that mechanisms driving risk perception are similar for both waste types but an overarching negative image of nuclear waste prevails. We propose that hazardous waste should be given more attention in the public as well as in science which may have implications on further management strategies of hazardous waste.

  6. The influence of superabsorbent polymers on the autogenous shrinkage properties of cement pastes with supplementary cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoeck, D.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; De Belie, N.

    2015-01-01

    Fly ash and blast-furnace slag containing binders are frequently used in the construction industry and it is important to know the extent of autogenous shrinkage and its (ideal) mitigation by superabsorbent polymers in these systems as a function of their age. In this paper, the autogenous...... shrinkage was determined by manual and automated shrinkage measurements. Autogenous shrinkage was reduced in cement pastes with the supplementary cementitious materials versus Portland cement pastes. At later ages, the rate of autogenous shrinkage is higher due to the pozzolanic activity. Internal curing...

  7. Mechanical interaction of Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC) reinforced with Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) rebar in tensile loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lárusson, Lárus Helgi; Fischer, Gregor; Jönsson, Jeppe

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a preliminary study of the composite interaction of Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC), reinforced with Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) rebar. The main topic of this paper will focus on the interaction of the two materials (ECC and GFRP) during axial loading......, particularly in post cracking phase of the concrete matrix. The experimental program carried out in this study examined composite behavior under monotonic and cyclic loading of the specimens in the elastic and inelastic deformation phases. The stiffness development of the composite during loading was evaluated...

  8. Measurement of volume change in cementitious materials at early ages - Review of testing protocols and interpretation of results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sant, Gaurav; Lura, Pietro; Weiss, Jason

    2006-01-01

    Early-age cracking in concrete bridge decks, pavements, and superstructure elements has served as the impetus for substantial research on early-age shrinkage in cementitious materials. Much of this research has indicated how mixture proportions, constituent materials, and construction operations...... measurement in a rigid mold, and the ASTM C 157 standard. The results of the autogenous and chemical shrinkage tests are compared with one another to describe fully early-age length change. It is shown that through careful experimentation and interpretation, the results of these tests can be completely...

  9. Hazardous Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you throw these substances away, they become hazardous waste. Some hazardous wastes come from products in our homes. Our garbage can include such hazardous wastes as old batteries, bug spray cans and paint ...

  10. Problems and technologies of reduction control of dioxins. Part 3. Reduction of dioxins emission using direct melting incineration furnace for municipal and industrial solid wastes; Haikibutsu chokusetsu yoyuro ni yoru daiokishin rui haishutsu yokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasaki, M.; Uchida, M. [Chiyoda Chemical Engineering and Construction Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    Dioxins are deadly toxic substances which are generated accidentally from various kinds of generation sources. City waste incinerators are deemed to be the greatest generation sources of dioxins, and it becomes a serious social problem now. In such a situation, gasification and melting technology of wastes are paid attention as the waste incinerating and treating technology suitable for the reduction of dioxins emission. In this paper, reduction of dioxin emission using a high oxygen concentration type direct melting furnace is introduced as one of the above-mentioned technologies. High oxygen concentration type direct melting furnace is a vertical shaft furnace wherein high concentration oxygen gas separated and refined from the atmosphere by an oxygen producing apparatus such as a pressure swing absorption tower is introduced from the bottom of the furnace. Wastes supplied into the furnace is dried to move the moisture therein in a drying area, and then decomposed into thermal decomposed gas, carbon-rich char, and ash in a thermal decomposition area. The removal rate of dioxins contained in exhaust gas is about 95%. 13 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Numerical Studies of the Effects of Water Capsules on Self-Healing Efficiency and Mechanical Properties in Cementitious Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoliang Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, self-healing due to further hydration of unhydrated cement particles is taken as an example for investigating the effects of capsules on the self-healing efficiency and mechanical properties of cementitious materials. The efficiency of supply of water by using capsules as a function of capsule dosages and sizes was determined numerically. By knowing the amount of water supplied via capsules, the efficiency of self-healing due to further hydration of unhydrated cement was quantified. In addition, the impact of capsules on mechanical properties was investigated numerically. The amount of released water increases with the dosage of capsules at different slops as the size of capsules varies. Concerning the best efficiency of self-healing, the optimizing size of capsules is 6.5 mm for capsule dosages of 3%, 5%, and 7%, respectively. Both elastic modulus and tensile strength of cementitious materials decrease with the increase of capsule. The decreasing tendency of tensile strength is larger than that of elastic modulus. However, it was found that the increase of positive effect (the capacity of inducing self-healing of capsules is larger than that of negative effects (decreasing mechanical properties when the dosage of capsules increases.

  12. Pathogens and fecal indicators in waste stabilization pond systems with direct reuse for irrigation: Fate and transport in water, soil and crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbyla, M E; Iriarte, M M; Mercado Guzmán, A; Coronado, O; Almanza, M; Mihelcic, J R

    2016-05-01

    Wastewater use for irrigation is expanding globally, and information about the fate and transport of pathogens in wastewater systems is needed to complete microbial risk assessments and develop policies to protect public health. The lack of maintenance for wastewater treatment facilities in low-income areas and developing countries results in sludge accumulation and compromised performance over time, creating uncertainty about the contamination of soil and crops. The fate and transport of pathogens and fecal indicators was evaluated in waste stabilization ponds with direct reuse for irrigation, using two systems in Bolivia as case studies. Results were compared with models from the literature that have been recommended for design. The removal of Escherichia coli in both systems was adequately predicted by a previously-published dispersed flow model, despite more than 10years of sludge accumulation. However, a design equation for helminth egg removal overestimated the observed removal, suggesting that this equation may not be appropriate for systems with accumulated sludge. To assess the contamination of soil and crops, ratios were calculated of the pathogen and fecal indicator concentrations in soil or on crops to their respective concentrations in irrigation water (termed soil-water and crop-water ratios). Ratios were similar within each group of microorganisms but differed between microorganism groups, and were generally below 0.1mLg(-1) for coliphage, between 1 and 100mLg(-1) for Giardia and Cryptosporidium, and between 100 and 1000mLg(-1) for helminth eggs. This information can be used for microbial risk assessments to develop safe water reuse policies in support of the United Nations' 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda.

  13. Micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Na; Yao, Yuan; Sun, Henghu; Feng, Huan

    2013-11-15

    In this research, the micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials has been investigated through SEM-EDS, (27)Al MAS NMR and (29)Si MAS NMR techniques, in which the used red mud was derived from the bauxite calcination method. The results show that the red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials mainly form fibrous C-A-S-H gel, needle-shaped/rod-like AFt in the early hydration period. With increasing of the hydration period, densification of the pastes were promoted resulting in the development of strength. EDS analysis shows that with the Ca/Si of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials increases, the average Ca/Si and Ca/(Si+Al) atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel increases, while the average Al/Si atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel decreases. MAS NMR analysis reveals that Al in the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials exists in the forms of Al(IV) and Al(VI), but mainly in the form of Al(VI). Increasing the Ca/Si ratio of raw material promotes the conversion of [AlO4] to [AlO6] and inhibits the combination between [AlO4] and [SiO4] to form C-A-S-H gel. Meanwhile, the polymerization degree of [SiO4] in the hydration products declines.

  14. CEM V based special cementitious materials investigated by means of SANS method. Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragolici, A. C.; Balasoiu, M.; Orelovich, O. L.; Ionascu, L.; Nicu, M.; Soloviov, D. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Lizunov, E. I.; Dragolici, F.

    2017-05-01

    The management of the radioactive waste assume the conditioning in a cement matrix as an embedding, stable, disposal material. Cement matrix is the first and most important engineering barrier against the migration in the environment of the radionuclides contained in the waste packages. Knowing how the microstructure develops is therefore desirable in order to assess the compatibility of radioactive streams with cement and predict waste form performance during storage and disposal. For conditioning wastes containing radioactive aluminum new formulas of low basicity cements, using coatings as a barrier between the metal and the conditioning environment or introducing a corrosion inhibitor in the matrix system are required. Preliminary microstructure investigation of such improved CEM V based cement matrix is reported.

  15. USE OF CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS FOR SRS REACTOR FACILITY IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING - 11620

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.; Serrato, M.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Waymer, J.; Matheny, D.; Singh, D.

    2010-12-07

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., producing (reactor facilities), processing (isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The Savannah River Site 105-P and 105-R Reactor Facility ISD requires about 250,000 cubic yards of grout to fill the below grade structure. The fills are designed to prevent subsidence, reduce water infiltration, and isolate contaminated materials. This work is being performed as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensations and Liability Act (CERCLA) action and is part of the overall soil and groundwater completion projects for P- and R-Areas. Cementitious materials were designed for the following applications: (1) Below grade massive voids/rooms: Portland cement-based structural flowable fills for - Bulk filling, Restricted placement and Underwater placement. (2) Special below grade applications for reduced load bearing capacity needs: Cellular portland cement lightweight fill (3) Reactor vessel fills that are compatible with reactive metal (aluminum metal) components in the reactor vessels: Calcium sulfoaluminate flowable fill, and Magnesium potassium phosphate flowable fill. (4) Caps to prevent water infiltration and intrusion into areas with the highest levels of radionuclides: Portland cement based shrinkage compensating concrete. A system engineering approach was used to identify functions and requirements of the fill and capping materials. Laboratory testing was performed to identify candidate formulations and develop final design mixes. Scale-up testing was performed to verify material production and placement as well as fresh and cured properties. The 105-P and 105-R ISD projects are currently in progress and are expected to be complete in 2012. The focus of this paper is to describe the (1) grout mixes

  16. Self-decomposable Fibrous Bridging Additives for Temporary Cementitious Fracture Sealers in EGS Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.; Kisslinger, K.; Iverson, B.; Bour, D.

    2012-11-01

    This study evaluates compatibility of a self-degradable temporary fracture sealer with the drilling mud and plugging and self-degrading performance of different fibers to be used in combination with the sealer. The sodium silicate-activated slag/Class C fly ash (SSASC) cementitious sealer must plug fractures at 85oC to allow continuous well drilling and it must degrade and leave the fractures open for water at later times when exposed to temperatures above 200oC. The sealer showed good compatibility with the mud. Even the blend of 80/20 vol.% of sealer/mud reached a compressive strength of more than 2000 psi set as one of the material criteria, mostly due to the additional activation of the slag and Class C fly ash by the alkaline ingredient present in the drilling fluid. In contrast, the drilling fluid was detrimental to the compressive strength development in conventional Class G well cement, so that it failed to meet this criterion. Among several organic fibers tested both polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-and nylon-based fibers showed adequate plugging of the sealer in slot nozzles of 1-in. wide x 6-in. long x 0.08 in. and 0.24 in. high under pressures up to 700 psi. PVA fibers displayed better compressive toughness and self-degrading properties than nylon. The compressive toughness of sealers made by adding 1.0 wt% 6 mm-length PVA and 0.5 wt% 19 mm-length PVA was 9.5-fold higher than that of a non-bridged sealer. One factor governing the development of such high toughness was an excellent adherence of PVA to the SSASC cement. The alkali-catalyzed self-decomposition of PVA at 200°C led to the morphological transformation of the material from a fibrous structure to a microscale flake-like structure that helped the desirable conversion of the sealer into small fragments. In contrast, nylon’s decomposition provided a reticular network structure in the self-degraded sealer resulting in bigger fragments compared against the sealer with PVA. The PVA fiber has a high

  17. Corrosion resistance and development length of steel reinforcement with cementitious coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xiaofei

    This research program focused on the corrosion resistance and development length of reinforcing steel coated with Cementitious Capillary Crystalline Waterproofing (CCCW) materials. The first part of this research program involved using the half-cell potential method to evaluate the corrosion resistance of CCCW coating materials. One hundred and two steel bars were embedded in concrete cylinders and monitored. In total, 64 steel reinforcing bars were coated with CCCW prior to embedment, 16 mortar cylinders were externally coated with CCCW, and 22 control (uncoated) samples were tested. All the samples were immersed in a 3.5% concentration chloride solution for a period of one year. Three coating types were studied: CCCW-B, CCCW-B+ C and CCCW-C+D. The test results showed that the CCCW coating materials delayed the corrosion activity to varying degrees. In particular, CCCW-C+D applied on the reinforcing steel surface dramatically delayed the corrosion activity when compared to the control samples. After being exposed to the chloride solution for a period of one year, no sign of corrosion was observed for the cylinders where the concrete surface was coated. The second part of this research evaluated the bond strength and development length of reinforcing steel coated with two types of CCCW coating materials (CCCW-B+C and CCCW-C+D) using a modified pull-out test method. A self-reacting inverted T-shaped beam was designed to avoid compression in the concrete surrounding the reinforcing steel. Steel reinforcing bars were embedded along the web portion of the T-beam with various embedded lengths and were staggered side by side. In total, six T-beams were fabricated and each beam contained 8 samples. Both short-term (7 days) and long-term (3 months) effects of water curing were evaluated. The reinforcing steel bars coated with CCCW-B+C demonstrated a higher bond strength than did samples coated with CCCW-C+D. However, the bond strengths of samples with coating materials

  18. Polychlorinated biphenyls in the surrounding of an e-waste recycling facility in North-Rhine Westphalia: Levels in plants and dusts, spatial distribution, homologue pattern and source identification using the combination of plants and wind direction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klees, Marcel; Hombrecher, Katja; Gladtke, Dieter

    2017-12-15

    During this study the occurrence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the surrounding of an e-waste recycling facility in North-Rhine Westphalia was analysed. PCB levels were analysed in curly kale, spruce needles, street dusts and dusts. Conspicuously high PCB concentrations in curly kale and spruce needles were found directly northwards of the industrial premises. Furthermore a concentration gradient originating from the industrial premises to the residential areas in direction southwest to northeast was evident. Homologue patterns of highly PCB contaminated dusts and street dusts were comparable to the homologue patterns of PCB in curly kale and spruce needles. This corroborates the suspicion that the activities at the e-waste recycling facility were responsible for the elevated PCB levels in curly kale and spruce needles. The utilization of multiple linear regression of wind direction data and analysed PCB concentrations in spruce needles proved that the e-waste recycling facility caused the PCB emissions to the surrounding. Additionally, this evaluation enabled the calculation of source specific accumulation constants for certain parts of the facility. Consequently the different facility parts contribute with different impacts to the PCB levels in bioindicators. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Damage development, phase changes, transport properties, and freeze-thaw performance of cementitious materials exposed to chloride based salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnam, Yaghoob

    Recently, there has been a dramatic increase in premature deterioration in concrete pavements and flat works that are exposed to chloride based salts. Chloride based salts can cause damage and deterioration in concrete due to the combination of factors which include: increased saturation, ice formation, salt crystallization, osmotic pressure, corrosion in steel reinforcement, and/or deleterious chemical reactions. This thesis discusses how chloride based salts interact with cementitious materials to (1) develop damage in concrete, (2) create new chemical phases in concrete, (3) alter transport properties of concrete, and (4) change the concrete freeze-thaw performance. A longitudinal guarded comparative calorimeter (LGCC) was developed to simultaneously measure heat flow, damage development, and phase changes in mortar samples exposed to sodium chloride (NaCl), calcium chloride (CaCl 2), and magnesium chloride (MgCl2) under thermal cycling. Acoustic emission and electrical resistivity measurements were used in conjunction with the LGCC to assess damage development and electrical response of mortar samples during cooling and heating. A low-temperature differential scanning calorimetry (LT-DSC) was used to evaluate the chemical interaction that occurs between the constituents of cementitious materials (i.e., pore solution, calcium hydroxide, and hydrated cement paste) and salts. Salts were observed to alter the classical phase diagram for a salt-water system which has been conventionally used to interpret the freeze-thaw behavior in concrete. An additional chemical phase change was observed for a concrete-salt-water system resulting in severe damage in cementitious materials. In a cementitious system exposed to NaCl, the chemical phase change occurs at a temperature range between -6 °C and 8 °C due to the presence of calcium sulfoaluminate phases in concrete. As a result, concrete exposed to NaCl can experience additional freeze-thaw cycles due to the chemical

  20. ZERO WASTE

    OpenAIRE

    Upadhyaya, Luv

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was to develop a clear vision on better waste management system. The thesis introduced the sustainable waste management along with innovation. The aim of the research was to find out the types of waste being introduced to environment, their consequence on human beings and surroundings, best policies, principles and practices to minimize the effect of the waste to lowest. The study was based on literature. The thesis includes the introduction of types of waste, clarifi...

  1. Research paper 2000-B-6: adjustments in the Dutch domestic waste incineration sector in the context of the European directive 89/429/EEC. A case study on national implementation, environmental effectiveness, allocative efficiency, productive efficiency and administrative costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lulofs, K. [Twente Univ., Center for Clean Technology and Environmental Policy, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    Within the context of the IMPOL project several fields of European environmental policy are studied on aspects as national implementation and environmental and efficiency outcomes. For the IMPOL project a case study was done on the transformation of the Dutch sector of domestic waste incineration in the context of the European Directive Directives 89/369/EEC and 89/429/ EEC. The case study was done and indicators for environmental effectiveness, allocative efficiency, productive efficiency and administrative costs were chosen in line with a document to coordinate the efforts in the four IMPOL countries. The European Directives 89/369/EEC and 89/429/ EEC regulate Plants for Domestic waste Incineration on the emissions of several pollutants. These emissions are relevant for air quality in general, acidification and the spreading of toxic substances. In the empirical part of this report emphasis is laid on 'existing' incineration plants, being permitted before 1990. In chapter 2 of this report the implementation of the directives 89/369/EEC and 89/429/EEC in the Netherlands is described. In section 2.1 already existing 'older' Dutch policy and regulation is presented. In paragraph 2.2 the integration of the European Directives into Dutch national law is described. In chapter 2.3 the efforts and outcomes on monitoring and enforcement are presented. Chapter 3 goes into the environmental effectiveness. Section 3.1 describes the abatement performance of the whole municipal waste incineration sector during the period of research. Section 3.2 goes into factors that explain the environmental outcomes. Within the IMPOL research-team the decision was taken to concentrate on a number of pollutants of existing waste incinerators. In section 3.3 the data for the existing incinerators are given. In chapter 4 the allocative efficiency of adjustments is elaborated. In section 4.1 the abatement patterns of existing municipal waste incineration plants are presented

  2. Pathogens and fecal indicators in waste stabilization pond systems with direct reuse for irrigation: Fate and transport in water, soil and crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbyla, M.E., E-mail: verbylam@mail.usf.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Avenue, Tampa, FL (United States); Iriarte, M.M.; Mercado Guzmán, A.; Coronado, O.; Almanza, M. [Centro de Aguas y Saneamiento Ambiental, Universidad Mayor de San Simón, Cochabamba (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Mihelcic, J.R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Avenue, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Wastewater use for irrigation is expanding globally, and information about the fate and transport of pathogens in wastewater systems is needed to complete microbial risk assessments and develop policies to protect public health. The lack of maintenance for wastewater treatment facilities in low-income areas and developing countries results in sludge accumulation and compromised performance over time, creating uncertainty about the contamination of soil and crops. The fate and transport of pathogens and fecal indicators was evaluated in waste stabilization ponds with direct reuse for irrigation, using two systems in Bolivia as case studies. Results were compared with models from the literature that have been recommended for design. The removal of Escherichia coli in both systems was adequately predicted by a previously-published dispersed flow model, despite more than 10 years of sludge accumulation. However, a design equation for helminth egg removal overestimated the observed removal, suggesting that this equation may not be appropriate for systems with accumulated sludge. To assess the contamination of soil and crops, ratios were calculated of the pathogen and fecal indicator concentrations in soil or on crops to their respective concentrations in irrigation water (termed soil-water and crop-water ratios). Ratios were similar within each group of microorganisms but differed between microorganism groups, and were generally below 0.1 mL g{sup −1} for coliphage, between 1 and 100 mL g{sup −1} for Giardia and Cryptosporidium, and between 100 and 1000 mL g{sup −1} for helminth eggs. This information can be used for microbial risk assessments to develop safe water reuse policies in support of the United Nations' 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda. - Highlights: • Study of health risks from reclaimed wastewater irrigation from aging pond systems • Coliphages, protozoan parasites, and helminths were measured in water/soil/crops. • Sludge accumulation in

  3. A performative definition of waste prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvellec, Hervé

    2016-06-01

    The increasing importance being placed on waste prevention in European waste governance raises the question of how waste prevention is defined in practice. This paper presents a qualitative analysis of a sample of fifty-one Swedish waste prevention initiatives with the purpose of identifying which kind of actions are imagined, promoted, and set into motion under the label of waste prevention. The analysis shows that despite their apparent variety, the initiatives in the sample boil down to three main types of actions: raising awareness about the need to prevent waste, increasing material efficiency, and developing sustainable consumption. In contradistinction to the formal definition of waste prevention in the European Waste Framework Directive (2008/98/EC), what emerges from analyzing the initiatives in the sample is a performative definition of waste prevention as something heterogeneous, contradictory, and evolving. Such a definition of waste prevention in practice provides an understanding of the organizational dynamics of waste prevention.

  4. Liquid secondary waste: Waste form formulation and qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzi, A. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dixon, K. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hill, K. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nichols, R. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-07-31

    The Hanford Site Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) currently treats aqueous waste streams generated during site cleanup activities. When the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) begins operations, including Direct Feed Low Activity Waste (DFLAW) vitrification, a liquid secondary waste (LSW) stream from the WTP will need to be treated. The volume of effluent for treatment at the ETF will increase significantly. The powdered salt waste form produced by the ETF will be replaced by a stabilized solidified waste form for disposal in Hanford’s Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Washington River Protection Solutions is implementing a Secondary Liquid Waste Immobilization Technology Development Plan to address the technology needs for a waste form and solidification process to treat the increased volume of waste planned for disposal at the IDF. Waste form testing to support this plan is composed of work in the near term to provide data as input to a performance assessment (PA) for Hanford’s IDF. In 2015, three Hanford Liquid Secondary Waste simulants were developed based on existing and projected waste streams. Using these waste simulants, fourteen mixes of Hanford Liquid Secondary Waste were prepared and tested varying the waste simulant, the water-to-dry materials ratio, and the dry materials blend composition.1 In FY16, testing was performed using a simulant of the EMF process condensate blended with the caustic scrubber—from the Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter—, processed through the ETF. The initial EMF-16 simulant will be based on modeling efforts performed to determine the mass balance of the ETF for the DFLAW.2 The compressive strength of all of the mixes exceeded the target of 3.4 MPa (500 psi) to meet the requirements identified as potential IDF Waste Acceptance Criteria in Table 1 of the Secondary Liquid Waste Immobilization Technology Development Plan.3 The hydraulic properties of the waste forms tested (hydraulic conductivity

  5. Using Converter Dust to Produce Low Cost Cementitious Composites by in situ Carbon Nanotube and Nanofiber Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Ludvig

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs and nanofibers (CNFs were synthesized on clinker and silica fume particles in order to create a low cost cementitious nanostructured material. The synthesis was carried out by an in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD process using converter dust, an industrial byproduct, as iron precursor. The use of these materials reduces the cost, with the objective of application in large-scale nanostructured cement production. The resulting products were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and were found to be polydisperse in size and to have defective microstructure. Some enhancement in the mechanical behavior of cement mortars was observed due to the addition of these nano-size materials. The contribution of these CNTs/CNFs to the mechanical strength of mortar specimens is similar to that of high quality CNTs incorporated in mortars by physical mixture.

  6. Local waste management constraints and waste administrators in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shan Shan; Lo, Carlos W H

    2008-01-01

    Local level waste authorities and their officials directly interact and serve the people on behalf of higher governments. Given the influential positions they have on the quality of life of the citizens, these local waste authorities deserve more attention from researchers. This study throws light on the factors related to local waste management and administrators that have caused waste management failures in three mainland Chinese cities. Based on a survey conducted in 2002-2003, it was found that waste administrators in these cities are not professionally competent in their jobs and they are also not confident in using economic instruments to address waste management issues in their cities. These local waste authorities are generally under-funded, and funding politics has to some extent eroded the incentives to carry out the instructions of higher waste authorities. The community at large also does not respect local waste management work. The residents frequently litter, are unobservant of waste collection times and are unwilling to pay for waste collection service. All of these are handicapping environmentally sound waste management.

  7. Significance of steel electrical resistance method in the evaluation of reinforcement corrosion in cementitious systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krajci, L.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The suitable detection system of steel reinforcement corrosion in concrete structures contributes to the reduction of their maintenance costs. Method of steel electrical resistance represents non-destructive monitoring of steel in cementitious systems. Specially prepared and arranged test specimen of steel as a corrosion sensor is embedded in mortar specimen. Verification tests of this method based on chloride corrosion of steel in mortars as well as its visual inspection are introduced. Significance of steel electrical resistance method lies in the expression of steel corrosion by these quantitative parameters: reduction of cross-section of steel, thickness of corroded layer and loss of weight of steel material. This method is an integral method that allows the indirect determination of mentioned corrosion characteristics. The comparison of verified method with gravimetric evaluation of steel corrosion gives a good correspondence. Test results on mortars with calcium chloride dosages between 0.5% and 4.0% by weight of cement prove high sensitiveness and reliability of steel electrical resistance method.

    La utilización de un sistema de detección de la corrosión de las armaduras en estructuras de hormigón puede contribuir a la reducción de sus costes de mantenimiento. El método de la resistencia eléctrica del acero consiste en la monitorización no-destructiva realizada sobre el acero en sistemas cementantes. Dentro de la muestra de mortero se coloca el sistema de detección, especialmente preparado y fijado, actuando como un sensor de la corrosión. En este trabajo se presentan ensayos de verificación de este método, junto con inspecciones visuales, en morteros sometidos a corrosión de armaduras por efecto de los cloruros. La efectividad de este método de la resistencia eléctrica del acero se expresa, en la corrosión de armaduras, de acuerdo a los siguientes parámetros cuantitativos: reducción de la sección transversal del

  8. The structure of the Dutch waste sector and impediments for waste reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, P.; Wolsink, M.

    1997-01-01

    The way in which organizations collect, treat and dispose of waste in The Netherlands frustrates the achievement of waste reduction goals. The possibility that directed modification of the structure of the waste sector may contribute to stimulating consumers (i.e. all waste producers using services

  9. Stabilization/solidification of incinerator fly ash for the manufacture of artificial aggregate by cementitious granulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colangelo, F.; Cioffi, R. [Univ. Pathenope of Naples (Italy). Dept. of Technology; Montagnaro, F.; Santoro, L. [Univ. Federico 2 of Naples (Italy). Dept. of Chemistry; Di Giacomo, C.; Roncone, A. [Extra Group Co., Citta Sant' Angelo (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    This paper presented the results of a study in which municipal, hospital, and industrial waste ash from an incineration plant equipped with rotary and stoker furnaces was used in a stabilization/solidification granulation process with cement, lime, and coal fly ash as binder components. The ash from the incineration plant was classified as hazardous. The granulation process was conducted with a range of waste ash mixtures in order to determine the appropriate waste ash percentage for the safe manufacture of artificial aggregates. Waste ash content ranging from 50 to 70 per cent was incorporated within the binding matrix. A 2-step granulation process was then conducted with a pure binder in order to encapsulate the granules from the initial process within an outer shell. The granules obtained from the processes were tested to assess their physico-mechanical and leaching properties. Concrete mixtures were then prepared with some of the artificial aggregates made using the granulation process. Results of the study demonstrated that the granules were suitable for the manufacture of concrete blocks. 19 refs., 8 tabs., 1 fig.

  10. Analysis of Hanford Cast Stone Supplemental LAW using Composition Adjusted SRS Tank 50 Salt Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Cozzi, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hill, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Ramsey, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-04-25

    Vitrification is the primary disposition path for Low Activity Waste (LAW) at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. A cementitious waste form is one of the alternatives being considered for the supplemental immobilization of the LAW that will not be treated by the primary vitrification facility. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has been directed to generate and collect data on cementitious or pozzolanic waste forms such as Cast Stone.

  11. Waste management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark.......The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark....

  12. Waste management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark.......The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark....

  13. Constraints to waste utilization and disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steadman, E.N.; Sondreal, E.A.; Hassett, D.J.; Eylands, K.E.; Dockter, B.A. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The value of coal combustion by-products for various applications is well established by research and commercial practice worldwide. As engineering construction materials, these products can add value and enhance strength and durability while simultaneously reducing cost and providing the environmental benefit of reduced solid waste disposal. In agricultural applications, gypsum-rich products can provide plant nutrients and improve the tilth of depleted soils over large areas of the country. In waste stabilization, the cementitious and pozzolanic properties of these products can immobilize hazardous nuclear, organic, and metal wastes for safe and effective environmental disposal. Although the value of coal combustion by-products for various applications is well established, the full utilization of coal combustion by-products has not been realized in most countries. The reasons for the under utilization of these materials include attitudes that make people reluctant to use waste materials, lack of engineering standards for high-volume uses beyond eminent replacement, and uncertainty about the environmental safety of coal ash utilization. More research and education are needed to increase the utilization of these materials. Standardization of technical specifications should be pursued through established standards organizations. Adoption of uniform specifications by government agencies and user trade associations should be encouraged. Specifications should address real-world application properties, such as air entrainment in concrete, rather than empirical parameters (e.g., loss on ignition). The extensive environmental assessment data already demonstrating the environmental safety of coal ash by-products in many applications should be more widely used, and data should be developed to include new applications.

  14. Radioactive Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of radioactive waste disposal, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the studies included are: (1) high-level and long-lived wastes, and (2) release and burial of low-level wastes. A list of 42 references is also presented. (HM)

  15. CO2 sequestration using waste concrete and anorthosite tailings by direct mineral carbonation in gas-solid-liquid and gas-solid routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ghacham, Alia; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Pasquier, Louis-César; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy

    2015-11-01

    Mineral carbonation (MC) represents a promising alternative for sequestering CO2. In this work, the CO2 sequestration capacity of the available calcium-bearing materials waste concrete and anorthosite tailings is assessed in gas-solid-liquid and gas-solid routes using 18.2% flue CO2 gas. The objective is to screen for a better potential residue and phase route and as the ultimate purpose to develop a cost-effective process. The results indicate the possibility of removing 66% from inlet CO2 using waste concrete for the aqueous route. However, the results that were obtained with the carbonation of anorthosite were less significant, with 34% as the maximal percentage of CO2 removal. The difference in terms of reactivity could be explained by the accessibility to calcium. In fact, anorthosite presents a framework structure wherein the calcium is trapped, which could slow the calcium dissolution into the aqueous phase compared to the concrete sample, where calcium can more easily leach. In the other part of the study concerning gas-solid carbonation, the results of CO2 removal did not exceed 15%, which is not economically interesting for scaling up the process. The results obtained with waste concrete samples in aqueous phase are interesting. In fact, 34.6% of the introduced CO2 is converted into carbonate after 15 min of contact with the gas without chemical additives and at a relatively low gas pressure. Research on the optimization of the aqueous process using waste concrete should be performed to enhance the reaction rate and to develop a cost-effective process.

  16. Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low-Activity Waste: Cast Stone Screening Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Mercier, Theresa M.; Russell, Renee L.; Cozzi, Alex; Daniel, William E.; Eibling, Russell E.; Hansen, E. K.; Reigel, Marissa M.; Swanberg, David J.

    2013-09-30

    More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the wastes and immobilize them in a glass waste form. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) containing most of the radioactivity and a larger volume of low-activity waste (LAW) containing most of the nonradioactive chemicals. The HLW will be converted to glass in the HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. At least a portion (~35%) of the LAW will be converted to glass in the LAW vitrification facility and will be disposed of onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize the wastes destined for each facility. However, a second LAW immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A cementitious waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with the waste acceptance criteria for the disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. Further, the waste form must be tested to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support risk assessment and performance assessment (PA) analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the waste disposal in the IDF

  17. MEASUREMENT OF WASTE LOADING IN SALTSTONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harbour, J; Vickie Williams, V

    2008-07-18

    One of the goals of the Saltstone variability study is to identify the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone grout mixtures. One of those properties of importance is the Waste Loading (WL) of the decontaminated salt solution (DSS) in the Saltstone waste form. Waste loading is a measure of the amount of waste that can be incorporated within a waste form. The value of the Saltstone waste loading ultimately determines the number of vaults that will be required to disposition all of the DSS. In this report, the waste loading is defined as the volume in milliliters of DSS per liter of Saltstone waste form. The two most important parameters that determine waste loading for Saltstone are water to cementitious material (w/cm) ratio and the cured grout density. Data are provided that show the dependence of waste loading on the w/cm ratio for a fixed DSS composition using the current premix material (45% Blast Furnace Slag (BFS), 45% Fly Ash (FA) and 10% Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC)). The impact of cured grout density on waste loading was also demonstrated. Mixes (at 0.60 w/cm) made with a Modular Caustic side extraction Unit (MCU) simulant and either OPC or BFS have higher cured grout densities than mixes made with premix and increase the WL to 709 mL/L for the OPC mix and 689 mL/L for the BFS mix versus the value of 653 mL/L for MCU in premix at 0.60 w/cm ratio. Bleed liquid reduces the waste loading and lowers the effective w/cm ratio of Saltstone. A method is presented (and will be used in future tasks) for correcting the waste loading and the w/cm ratio of the as-batched mixes in those cases where bleed liquid is present. For example, the Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjustment (DDA) mix at an as-batched 0.60 w/cm ratio, when corrected for % bleed, gives a mix with a 0.55 w/cm ratio and a WL that has been reduced from 662 to 625 mL/L. An example is provided that

  18. Anaerobic biogasification of domestic wastes and direct solar energy use to produce biogas, biofertilizer and distilled water in a city - a pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    kumar, R.A.; Pandya, N.H.; Patil, A.M.; Annamalai, M.; Iyer, M.V.; Nirmala, K.A.; Venkatesh, P.; Prasad, C.R.; Subramani, C.

    1982-01-01

    Domestic wastes are a source of gas of high calorific value as well as biofertilizer and distilled water. A pilot project undertaken by the Tata Electric Cos., Bombay on recycling sewage, garbage and garden wastes of a community by converting them into biogas, organic fertilizer and distilled water is described. Techniques used are anaerobic fermentation and Solar drying using Solar stills. A fish pond also can be fed the output slurry as feed material. In this pilot plant, 1 to 2 m/sup 3/ raw sewage and one to two tons of processed garden wastes and garbage would be input daily into the digester. The production is expected to be about 100 m/sup 3/ of gas per day, along with about 1500 litres of slurry from which organic fertilizer of 100 200 Kgs can be bagged and transported as well as distilled water of about 500 to 1000 litres Laboratory studies and studies on an approximate scale model of the plant are described. Scaling up to a pilot plant by about 2000 times would increase the efficiency of the rate of gas production as has been found by other workers. These tests and studies have shown that the project is technically and eonomically viable. Applications of the process on a mass scale would result in increasing replacement of fossil energy intensive processes with negentropic methods of economic and social activities.

  19. Follow-up of the project 'Methodology for classification of the H14 criterion in the EU Directive on waste'; Uppfoeljning till projektet 'Metodik foer klassificering av H14-kriteriet i Avfallsfoerordningen'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiernstroem, Sara; Bengtsson, Bengt-Erik; Breitholtz, Magnus (Dept. of Applied Environmental Science (ITM), Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden)); Hemstroem, Kristian; Wik, Ola (Swedish Geotechnical Inst., Linkoeping (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    Within the European Union, ash materials and other waste types, which may cause ecotoxicological effects, should be classified based on their inherent hazardous effects under criterion H-14 ('Ecotoxic': substances and preparations which present or may present immediate or delayed risks for one or more sectors of the environment) in the Directive on waste 2008/98/EC. According this directive the classification of waste as hazardous waste should also be based on the Community legislation on chemicals, in particular concerning the regulation for classification and labelling CLP. In recent years, recommendations on how to classify waste based on analytical measurement of solid material have been published by Swedish organizations and/or interest groups. A limitation of these recommendations is that a classification procedure based on measurement of metals and metal compounds in many cases are defective with respect to speciation and bioavailability of the metals. This makes it difficult to evaluate inherent hazardous properties, and may lead to either over- or underestimations of hazard potential of the waste material. To overcome this limitation, there is currently an international consensus that biological test systems can be used for the ecotoxicological characterization and classification of the intrinsic properties of waste in general. Today, there are, however, no quantitative criterions on how to feed in information from ecotoxicological tests to the regulatory system. A further shortcoming is that the proposed test methods for classification of waste with regards to H-14 mainly have been used for hazard assessment and classification of single chemical substances, which means that they may not be optimal for classification of complex waste materials. The main aim with current study was to further refine the methods proposed (both for biological testing and leaching) and used in earlier studies for classification of waste as hazardous waste. In view of

  20. Vitrification of nanotoxic waste (Ru) from the production of nano-catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells; Vitrificacao de nano-residuos toxicos (Ru) provenientes da producao de nano-catalisadores para celulas a combustivel de etanol direto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, A.C.; Julio-Junior, O.; Mello-Castanho, S.R.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Nanostructured catalysts have been developed for ethanol directly use in fuel cells, which due to the economic advantages that should have widespread use in the near future. The catalysts for these devices using nano-structured metal are based, where the toxic nature and environmental risks presented by these metals are largely enhanced by nano-dispersion. Thus, the production of nano-catalysts are potentially generating highly hazardous waste for public health and the environment. This study presents the treatment and inertization of ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles waste containing by the vitrification technique and consequent attainment of silicate glasses for potential commercial use. Compositions were prepared containing up to about 20 wt % of nano-waste by changing the basic composition of glass soda-lime-borosilicate. After the fusion, at a temperature of 1100 deg C, the glasses were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Infra-red in the Fourier transform (FT-IR) techniques. The chemical stability was evaluated by hydrolytic attack test. The glass containing 20 wt % of nano-residue showed a high chemical stability, similar to a usual soda-lime glass. (author)

  1. Micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoming [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy, School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Na [Green Construction Materials and Circulation Economy Center, Architectural Design and Research Institute of Tsinghua University Co., Ltd., Beijing 100084 (China); Yao, Yuan, E-mail: yuanyaocas@163.com [School of Engineering and Computer Science, University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA 95211 (United States); Sun, Henghu; Feng, Huan [School of Engineering and Computer Science, University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA 95211 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Al{sup IV} and Al{sup VI} both exist in the hydration products. • Increase of Ca/Si ratio promotes the conversion from [AlO{sub 4}] to [AlO{sub 6}]. • Polymerization degree of [SiO{sub 4}] in the hydration products declines. -- Abstract: In this research, the micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials has been investigated through SEM-EDS, {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR techniques, in which the used red mud was derived from the bauxite calcination method. The results show that the red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials mainly form fibrous C-A-S-H gel, needle-shaped/rod-like AFt in the early hydration period. With increasing of the hydration period, densification of the pastes were promoted resulting in the development of strength. EDS analysis shows that with the Ca/Si of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials increases, the average Ca/Si and Ca/(Si + Al) atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel increases, while the average Al/Si atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel decreases. MAS NMR analysis reveals that Al in the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials exists in the forms of Al{sup IV} and Al{sup VI}, but mainly in the form of Al{sup VI}. Increasing the Ca/Si ratio of raw material promotes the conversion of [AlO{sub 4}] to [AlO{sub 6}] and inhibits the combination between [AlO{sub 4}] and [SiO{sub 4}] to form C-A-S-H gel. Meanwhile, the polymerization degree of [SiO{sub 4}] in the hydration products declines.

  2. Description of near-tip fracture processes in strain hardening cementitious composites using image-based analysis and the compact tension test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Eduardo B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, Joaquim A.O.

    2013-01-01

    , was characterized under eccentric tensile loading using the Compact Tension Test (CTT). The present research further extends this investigation, with particular emphasis on cementitious composites reinforced with multiple types of fibers. The experimental tensile load-displacement results are discussed and compared...... are discussed, with special emphasis on the topology of the cracks obtained near the crack tip and on the description of the fracture process zone....

  3. Chemical stabilization of chromate in blast furnace slag mixed cementitious materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Amanda H; Kaplan, Daniel I; Powell, Brian A; Arai, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    Cement waste form (CWF) technology is among the leading approaches to disposing of metals and liquid low-level nuclear waste in the United States. One such material, saltstone, includes slag, fly ash and Portland cement to enhance the immobilization of contaminants (e.g., Cr, (99)Tc) in alkaline liquid wastes. To evaluate the stability of such redox sensitive contaminants in saltstone, the effects of slag as a source of reductant on Cr immobilization was evaluated in aged (<300 d) saltstone monoliths. Specifically, we investigated the effects of artificial cement pore waters on the Cr release and the spatially resolved Cr chemical state analysis using synchrotron based microfocused X-ray microprobe analysis. The microprobe analysis indicated the heterogeneous distribution of insoluble Cr(III)-species in saltstone. Although at most of 20% Crtotal was leached at the top few (2-3) millimeter depth, the release of Cr(VI) was small (<5%) at 5-30 mm with slight changes, indirectly suggesting that Cr is likely present as insoluble Cr(III) species throughout the depths. The study suggests that this saltstone formulation can effectively retain/immobilize Cr under the oxic field condition after ⩽300 d of aging time.

  4. Industrial Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    of the system industry has to inform at the planning stage and afterwards in yearly reports on their waste arising and how the waste is managed. If available such information is very helpful in obtaining information about that specific industry. However, in many countries there is very little information......Industrial waste is waste from industrial production and manufacturing. Industry covers many industrial sectors and within each sector large variations are found in terms of which raw materials are used, which production technology is used and which products are produced. Available data on unit...... generation rates and material composition as well as determining factors are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing industrial waste is faced with the problem that often only a part of the waste is handled in the municipal waste system, where information is easily accessible. In addition part...

  5. Innovative methodology for comprehensive utilization of iron ore tailings: part 2: The residues after iron recovery from iron ore tailings to prepare cementitious material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Sun, Henghu; Yi, Zhonglai; Li, Longtu

    2010-02-15

    In order to comprehensive utilization of iron ore tailings, this experimental research was to investigate the possibility of using the residues after iron recovery from iron ore tailings as raw materials for the preparation of cementitious material, abbreviated as TSC, including analyses of its mechanical properties, physical properties and hydration products. The TSC1 was prepared by blending 30% the residues, 34% blast-furnace slag, 30% clinker and 6% gypsum. Meanwhile, the raw iron ore tailings (before iron recovery) with the same proportion of TSC1 were selected to compare the cementitious activity of raw tailings and the residues after magnetizing roasting, denoted by TSC0. The hydration products of them were mostly ettringite, calcium hydroxide and C-S-H gel, characterized by XRD, IR and SEM. It was found that ettringite and C-S-H gel were principally responsible for the strength development of TSC mortars with curing time. The results showed that the kaolinite of the tailings was decomposed completely after magnetizing roasting, which promoted the cementitious property of TSC1. Moreover, the mechanical properties of TSC1 are well comparable with those of 42.5 ordinary Portland cement according to Chinese GB175-2007 standard.

  6. Leaching behaviour and mechanical properties of copper flotation waste in stabilized/solidified products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesci, Başak; Coruh, Semra; Ergun, Osman Nuri

    2009-02-01

    This research describes the investigation of a cement-based solidification/stabilization process for the safe disposal of copper flotation waste and the effect on cement properties of the addition of copper flotation waste (CW) and clinoptilolite (C). In addition to the reference mixture, 17 different mixtures were prepared using different proportions of CW and C. Physical properties such as setting time, specific surface area and compressive strength were determined and compared to a reference mixture and Turkish standards (TS). Different mixtures with the copper flotation waste portion ranging from 2.5 to 12.5% by weight of the mixture were tested for copper leachability. The results show that as cement replacement materials especially clinoptilolite had clear effects on the mechanical properties. Substitution of 5% copper flotation waste for Portland cement gave a similar strength performance to the reference mixture. Higher copper flotation waste addition such as 12.5% replacement yielded lower strength values. As a result, copper flotation waste and clinoptilolite can be used as cementitious materials, and copper flotation waste also can be safely stabilized/solidified in a cement-based solidification/stabilization system.

  7. Long-term effect on the solidified degraded cellulose-based waste slurry in cement matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosam El-Din Mostafa Saleh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The long-term effects on solidification/stabilization (s/s of the secondary wastes, resulting from the oxidative degradation of some solid cellulosic-based wastes, in Portland Cement (CEM I have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (X-RD and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR techniques. The effect of seven years leaching of the cemented waste forms obtained was carried out to assess the long-term immobilization behavior of the radionuclide in the solidified/stabilized waste that maybe exposed to fresh, ground or sea water.The results of this study confirm our previously published work that the oxidative degradation treatment of some cellulosic-based wastes is essential before incorporating into the cementitious inert matrix. In addition, the release of radionuclides from the cemented waste form is a diffusion controlling process, after the first washing out period lasting for nearly thirty days.Based on the results so far obtained it is concluded that Portland Cement could be considered as a potential inert matrix to immobilize the degraded cellulosic-based wastes for a short or long time of storage or a final disposal.

  8. Immobilisation of Higher Activity Wastes from Nuclear Reactor Production of 99Mo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin W. A. Stewart

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of intermediate- and low-level liquid and solid wastes are produced from reactor production of 99Mo using UAl alloy or UO2 targets and in principle can be collectively or individually converted into waste forms. At ANSTO, we have legacy acidic uranyl-nitrate-rich intermediate level waste (ILW from the latter, and an alkaline liquid ILW, a U-rich filter cake, plus a shorter lived liquid stream that rapidly decays to low-level waste (LLW standards, from the former. The options considered consist of cementitious products, glasses, glass-ceramics, or ceramics produced by vitrification or hot isostatic pressing for intermediate-level wastes. This paper discusses the progress in waste form development and processing to treat ANSTO’s ILW streams arising from 99Mo. The various waste forms and the reason for the process option chosen will be reviewed. We also address the concerns over adapting our chosen process for use in a hot-cell environment.

  9. Developing hazardous waste programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    Developing a fully operational hazardous waste regulatory system requires at least 10 to 15 years—even in countries with strong legal and bureaucratic institutions, according to a report on "The Evolution of Hazardous Waste Programs," which was funded by Resources for the Future (RFF) and the World Bank's South Asia Environment Group, and issued on June 4.The report, which compares the experiences of how four developed and four developing countries have created hazardous waste programs, indicates that hazardous waste issues usually do not become a pressing environmental issue until after countries have dealt with more direct threats to public health, such as contaminated drinking water and air pollution. The countries examined include Indonesia, Thailand, Germany, and the United States.

  10. Decommissioning and safety issues of liquid-mercury waste generated from high power spallation sources with particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Chiriki, S; Odoj, R; Moormann, R; Hinssen, H. K; Bukaemskiy, A

    2009-01-01

    Large spallation sources are intended to be constructed in Europe (EURISOL nuclear physics facility and ESS-European Spallation Source). These facilities accumulate more than 20 metric tons of irradiated mercury in the target, which has to be treated as highly radioactive and chemo-toxic waste. Because solids are the only appropriate (immobile) form for this radiotoxic and toxic type of waste solidification is required for irradiated mercury. Our irradiation experimental studies on mercury waste revealed that mercury sulfide is a reasonable solid for disposal and shows larger stability in assumed accidents with water ingress in a repository compared to amalgams. For preparation of mercury sulfide a wet process is more suitable than a dry one. It is easier to perform under hot cell conditions and allows complete Hg-conversion. Embedding HgS in a cementitious matrix increases its stability.

  11. Characterization of Structural Rebuilding and Shear Migration in Cementitious Materials in Consideration of Thixotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ye

    Characterization of structural rebuilding and shear migration in cementitious materials in consideration of thixotropy Ye Qian From initial contact with water until hardening, and deterioration, cement and concrete materials are subjected to various chemical and physical transformations and environmental impacts. This thesis focuses on the properties during the fresh state, shortly after mixing until the induction period. During this period flow history, including shearing and resting, and hydration both play big roles in determining the rheological properties. The rheological properties of cement and concrete not only affect the casting and pumping process, but also very critical for harden properties and durability properties. Compared with conventional concrete, self-consolidating concrete (SCC) can introduce many advantages in construction application. These include readiness to apply, decreasing labor necessary for casting, and enhancing hardened properties. However, challenges still remain, such as issues relating to formwork pressure and multi-layer casting. Each of these issues is closely related to the property of thixotropy. From the microstructural point of view, thixotropy is described as structural buildup (flocculation) under rest and breakdown (deflocculation) under flow. For SCC, as well as other concrete systems, it is about balancing sufficient flowability during casting and rate of structural buildup after placement for the application at hand. For instance, relating to the issue of SCC formwork, it is ideal for the material to be highly flowable to achieve rapid casting, but then exhibit high rate of structural buildup to reduce formwork pressure. This can reduce the cost of formwork and reduce the risk of formwork failure. It is apparent that accurately quantifying the two aspects of thixotropy, i.e. structuration and destructuration, is key to tackling these challenges in field application. Thus, the overall objective of my doctoral study is

  12. Characterization of cementitiously stabilized subgrades for mechanistic-empirical pavement design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Pranshoo

    Pavements are vulnerable to subgrade layer performance because it acts as a foundation. Due to increase in the truck traffic, pavement engineers are challenged to build more strong and long-lasting pavements. To increase the load-bearing capacity of pavements, subgrade layer is often stabilized with cementitious additives. Thus, an overall characterization of stabilized subgrade layer is important for enhanced short- and long-term pavement performance. In this study, the effect of type and amount of additive on the short-term performance in terms of material properties recommended by the new Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG) is examined. A total of four soils commonly encountered as subgrades in Oklahoma are utilized. Results show that the changes in the Mr, ME and UCS values stabilized specimens depend on the soil type and properties of additives. The long-term performance (or durability) of stabilized soil specimens is investigated by conducting freeze-thaw (F-T) cycling, vacuum saturation and tube suction tests on 7-day cured P-, K- and C-soil specimens stabilized with 6% lime, 10% CFA and 10% CKD. This study is motivated by the fact that during the service life of pavement stabilized layers are subjected to F-T cycles and moisture variations. It is found that that UCS value of all the stabilized specimens decreased with increase in the number of F-T cycles. A strong correlation was observed between UCS values retained after vacuum saturation and F-T cycles indicating that vacuum saturation could be used as a time-efficient and inexpensive method for evaluating durability of stabilized soils. In this study, short- and long-term observations from stabilization of sulfate bearing soil with locally available low (CFA), moderate (CKD) and high (lime) calcium-based stabilizers are determined to evaluate and compare the effect of additive type on the phenomenon of sulfate-induced heave. The impact of different factors on the development of the

  13. An overview of waste crime, its characteristics, and the vulnerability of the EU waste sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, J; Curry, R; Cruz, P

    2014-02-01

    While waste is increasingly viewed as a resource to be globally traded, increased regulatory control on waste across Europe has created the conditions where waste crime now operates alongside a legitimate waste sector. Waste crime,is an environmental crime and a form of white-collar crime, which exploits the physical characteristics of waste, the complexity of the collection and downstream infrastructure, and the market opportunities for profit. This paper highlights some of the factors which make the waste sector vulnerable to waste crime. These factors include new legislation and its weak regulatory enforcement, the economics of waste treatment, where legal and safe treatment of waste can be more expensive than illegal operations, the complexity of the waste sector and the different actors who can have some involvement, directly or indirectly, in the movement of illegal wastes, and finally that waste can be hidden or disguised and creates an opportunity for illegal businesses to operate alongside legitimate waste operators. The study also considers waste crime from the perspective of particular waste streams that are often associated with illegal shipment or through illegal treatment and disposal. For each, the nature of the crime which occurs is shown to differ, but for each, vulnerabilities to waste crime are evident. The paper also describes some approaches which can be adopted by regulators and those involved in developing new legislation for identifying where opportunities for waste crime occurs and how to prevent it.

  14. From Solid Waste to Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisely, F. E.; And Others

    A project designed to convert solid waste to energy is explained in this paper. In April, 1972, an investor-owned utility began to burn municipal solid waste as fuel for the direct production of electric power. This unique venture was a cooperative effort between the City of St. Louis, Missouri, and the Union Electric Company, with financial…

  15. SECONDARY WASTE/ETF (EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY) PRELIMINARY PRE-CONCEPTUAL ENGINEERING STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAY TH; GEHNER PD; STEGEN GARY; HYMAS JAY; PAJUNEN AL; SEXTON RICH; RAMSEY AMY

    2009-12-28

    This pre-conceptual engineering study is intended to assist in supporting the critical decision (CD) 0 milestone by providing a basis for the justification of mission need (JMN) for the handling and disposal of liquid effluents. The ETF baseline strategy, to accommodate (WTP) requirements, calls for a solidification treatment unit (STU) to be added to the ETF to provide the needed additional processing capability. This STU is to process the ETF evaporator concentrate into a cement-based waste form. The cementitious waste will be cast into blocks for curing, storage, and disposal. Tis pre-conceptual engineering study explores this baseline strategy, in addition to other potential alternatives, for meeting the ETF future mission needs. Within each reviewed case study, a technical and facility description is outlined, along with a preliminary cost analysis and the associated risks and benefits.

  16. Modeling of concrete carbonation in deep geological disposal of intermediate level waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poyet S.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of atmospheric carbonation of Intermediate-Level Long-lived radioactive Waste (ILLW concrete packages were conducted to evaluate their possible chemical degradations. Two-phase liquid water-air flow is combined with gas component diffusion processes leading to a progressive drying of the concrete.Complete drying of the 11 cm thick waste disposal package wall occurs over a period ranging from 2 years for the low-performance concrete to 10 years for the high-performance concrete. The drying process slows down when transport characteristics of concretes are enhanced. Carbonation depths in the order of 2 to 3 cm in 100 years are predicted for this cementitious component. However, these values are slightly overestimated compared to experimental data. Also the kinetic model of mineral reactivity requires improvements with respect to the protective effect of secondary carbonates and to thermodynamic data.

  17. State of the art of TiO2 containing cementitious materials: self-cleaning properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maury, A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the physico-chemical characteristics of cementitious materials the aesthetic quality of these materials tend to decrease easily. On the other hand, the photocatalytic activity produced by TiO2 loaded cementitious materials have recently allowed them to include self-cleaning and air-purifying properties. However, because a better understanding of these properties is still needed, only a limited number of these materials is present in the construction market. As a strategy to improve this situation, non standards tests based on photodegradation of organic dyes have become widely used to evaluate the photocatalytic action of the different materials. Today, a wide spectrum of non easily comparable results have been produced. In order to improve this situation, this paper focuses on the description of the developed laboratory tests as well as on the evaluation of the self-cleaning potential of the first buildings containing TiO2. Finally, future research challenges in this field are identified.

    Debido a las características físico-químicas de los materiales a base de cemento, la calidad estética de estos materiales tiende a disminuir con facilidad. Por otra parte, la actividad fotocatalítica producida por los materiales a base de cemento que contienen TiO2, ha permitido incorporar recientemente en estos materiales propiedades de auto-limpieza y purificación del aire. Sin embargo, actualmente sólo existe en el mercado un número limitado de dichos materiales, dado que aún se necesita conocer mejor las mencionadas propiedades. Para mejorar esta situación, se vienen desarrollando ensayos no estandarizados donde se evalúa la foto-degradación de colorantes orgánicos producida por los diferentes materiales. Por tanto, se han producido una gran cantidad de resultados no fácilmente comparables entre sí. Este artículo presenta una descripción de los diferentes ensayos de laboratorio desarrollados

  18. Electrosteric stabilization of heteroflocculating suspensions and its application to the processing of self-compacting engineered cementitious composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Hyun-Joon

    This dissertation investigates a dispersion/stabilization technique to improve the fluidity of heteroflocculating concentrated suspensions, and applies the technique to develop self-compacting Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC), defined as a cementitious material which compacts without any external consolidation in the fresh state, while exhibiting strain-hardening performance in the hardened state. To meet the criteria of micromechanical design to achieve the ductile performance and processing design to attain high fluidity, this work has focused on preparing cement suspensions with low viscosity and high cohesiveness at a particle loading determined by the micromechanical design. Therefore, the goal of this work is to quantify how to adjust the strong flocculation between cement particles due to electrostatic and van der Waals attractive forces. For this purpose, a strong polyelectrolyte, melamine formaldehyde sulfonate (MFS), to disperse the oppositely-charged particles present in the cement dispersion, is combined with a non-ionic polymer, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC). The combination of these two polymers to prevent re-flocculation leads to "complementary electrosteric dispersion/ stabilization". With these polymers, suspensions with the desired fluidity for processing are obtained. To quantify the roles of the two polymers in imparting stability, a heteroflocculating model suspension was developed, which facilitates the control of the interactions typical of cement suspensions, but without irreversible hydration. This model suspension is composed of alumina and silica particles, which bear surface potentials of opposite sign at intermediate pHs, as well as has a comparable magnitude of the Hamaker constant as compared to cement particles. As a result, the model system displays not only van der Waals attraction but also electrostatic attraction between dissimilar particles. Rheological studies of the model system stabilized by MFS and HPMC show

  19. Industrial Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Industrial waste is waste from industrial production and manufacturing. Industry covers many industrial sectors and within each sector large variations are found in terms of which raw materials are used, which production technology is used and which products are produced. Available data on unit...... generation rates and material composition as well as determining factors are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing industrial waste is faced with the problem that often only a part of the waste is handled in the municipal waste system, where information is easily accessible. In addition part...... of the industrial waste may in periods, depending on market opportunities and prices, be traded as secondary rawmaterials. Production-specificwaste from primary production, for example steel slag, is not included in the current presentation. In some countries industries must be approved or licensed and as part...

  20. Waste indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall, O.; Lassen, C.; Hansen, E. [Cowi A/S, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2003-07-01

    The Waste Indicator Project focuses on methods to evaluate the efficiency of waste management. The project proposes the use of three indicators for resource consumption, primary energy and landfill requirements, based on the life-cycle principles applied in the EDIP Project. Trial runs are made With the indicators on paper, glass packaging and aluminium, and two models are identified for mapping the Danish waste management, of which the least extensive focuses on real and potential savings. (au)

  1. Acceptable knowledge document for INEEL stored transuranic waste -- Rocky Flats Plant waste. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-23

    This document and supporting documentation provide a consistent, defensible, and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for waste generated at the Rocky Flats Plant which is currently in the accessible storage inventory at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The inventory consists of transuranic (TRU) waste generated from 1972 through 1989. Regulations authorize waste generators and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities to use acceptable knowledge in appropriate circumstances to make hazardous waste determinations. Acceptable knowledge includes information relating to plant history, process operations, and waste management, in addition to waste-specific data generated prior to the effective date of the RCRA regulations. This document is organized to provide the reader a comprehensive presentation of the TRU waste inventory ranging from descriptions of the historical plant operations that generated and managed the waste to specific information about the composition of each waste group. Section 2 lists the requirements that dictate and direct TRU waste characterization and authorize the use of the acceptable knowledge approach. In addition to defining the TRU waste inventory, Section 3 summarizes the historical operations, waste management, characterization, and certification activities associated with the inventory. Sections 5.0 through 26.0 describe the waste groups in the inventory including waste generation, waste packaging, and waste characterization. This document includes an expanded discussion for each waste group of potential radionuclide contaminants, in addition to other physical properties and interferences that could potentially impact radioassay systems.

  2. Packaging wastes management; Gestion integral de los residuos de envases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Ramos, M.

    1996-12-01

    Packaging, having fulfilled their function, become waste and joint the flow of resure we generate every day. Packaging waste is a usable secondary raw material, provided that a suitable integrated management strategy is devised. This article highlights the Integrated Management Strategic Plan for Packaging Waste, following the priority guidelines established by the Community Directives on waste management: Reduction, re-use, Recycling, Energy Recovery and Final Elimination, and the European Directive 94/62/CE about packaging and packaging waste. (Author)

  3. Update to Assessment of Direct Disposal in Unsaturated Tuff of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Waste Owned by U.S. Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. D. Wheatley (INEEL POC); R. P. Rechard (SNL)

    1998-09-01

    The overall purpose of this study is to provide information and guidance to the Office of Environmental Management of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) about the level of characterization necessary to dispose of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The disposal option modeled was codisposal of DOE SNF with defense high-level waste (DHLW). A specific goal was to demonstrate the influence of DOE SNF, expected to be minor, in a predominately commercial repository using modeling conditions similar to those currently assumed by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). A performance assessment (PA) was chosen as the method of analysis. The performance metric for this analysis (referred to as the 1997 PA) was dose to an individual; the time period of interest was 100,000 yr. Results indicated that cumulative releases of 99Tc and 237Np (primary contributors to human dose) from commercial SNF exceed those of DOE SNF both on a per MTHM and per package basis. Thus, if commercial SNF can meet regulatory performance criteria for dose to an individual, then the DOE SNF can also meet the criteria. This result is due in large part to lower burnup of the DOE SNF (less time for irradiation) and to the DOE SNF's small percentage of the total activity (1.5%) and mass (3.8%) of waste in the potential repository. Consistent with the analyses performed for the YMP, the 1997 PA assumed all cladding as failed, which also contributed to the relatively poor performance of commercial SNF compared to DOE SNF.

  4. Food waste or wasted food

    OpenAIRE

    van Graas, Maaike Helene

    2014-01-01

    In the industrialized world large amounts of food are daily disposed of. A significant share of this waste could be avoided if different choices were made by individual households. Each day, every household makes decisions to maximize their happiness while balancing restricted amounts of time and money. Thinking of the food waste issue in terms of the consumer choice problem where households can control the amount of wasted food, we can model how households can make the best decisions. I...

  5. Study of the moisture content gradient in a cementitious material by measuring its impedance and gamma-densitometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilbaud, J. P.

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The local water content in cementitious material depends on the equilibrium between its atmospheric environment and its bulk properties. So, the moisture profile in material can vary with time. The object of this study is to follow the change of this profile by measuring the electrical impedance of the material with pairs of small wires embedded at different depths. This method was applied to young cement paste specimens. The results obtained show that this method is quite satisfactory. The best frequency to be applied, is about 50 or 100 Hz. These results were compared with those obtained with gamma-densitometry.

    El agua contenida en los materiales en base cemento depende del equilibrio entre la atmósfera que le rodea y las propiedades de la matriz sólida. Por lo tanto el perfil de humedad en los materiales puede variar con el tiempo. La finalidad de este estudio es seguir los cambios en dicho perfil, a través de la medición de la impedancia eléctrica del material con varios pares de pequeños conductores situados a diferentes profundidadades. Este sistema se aplicó a diversas muestras de pasta de cemento Jóvenes. Los resultados obtenidos nos hacen ver que el método es satisfactorio, debiendo aplicarse a una frecuencia de 50 a 100 Hz. Dichos resultados se compararon con los obtenidos a través de la gammadensitometría.

  6. Influence of aggregate and supplementary cementitious materials on the properties of hydrated lime (CL90s mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pavía

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrated lime is a historic material currently used in conservation. It hardens slowly by carbonation slowing construction however, supplementary cementitious materials accelerate hardening enhancing strength. Hydrated-lime mortars with rice husk ash–RHA-; ground granulated blastfurnace slag–GGBS- and increasing amounts of two aggregates were studied. Increasing aggregate lowered strength as interfacial zones proliferate; it lowered hygric properties and raised water demand. Aggregate content/composition didn’t affect the high water retention. For the higher aggregate contents (90 days, limestone mortars are c.20% stronger than silica mortars while the (1:1 silica sand mortars are 56% stronger in flexion. Additions increased strength with little impact on hygric properties. GGBS increased strength c.six times. RHA increased strength with little impact on hygric properties due to its great specific surface and high water-demand increasing porosity. GGBS and RHA properties ruling hydrate production and the kinetics of the pozzolanic reaction are considered partially responsible for the mortar property variation.

  7. The Effectiveness of High Quality Supplementary Cementitious Materials for Mitigating ASR Expansion in Concrete with High Alkali Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Prasetia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alkali silica reaction (ASR is influenced by external factors such as the surrounding environment of high alkalinity. Countries with cold climate have a high probability to be exposed to high concentrations of NaCl solution by the deicing salt. This condition will lead to serious ASR problems in concrete, if the aggregates contain reactive silica. The main research work in this paper is to investigate the effect of 15% replacement ratio of high quality fine fly ash (FA15% and 42% replacement ratio of blast furnace slag (BFS42% on the ASR mitigation in concrete with different alkali amount inside the pore solution. The experiments were conducted according to the accelerated mortar bars experiment following the JIS A1146 mortar bar test method. In addition, post-analysis such as observation of ASR gel formation by the Uranyl Acetate Fluorescence Method and observation of thin sections using a Polarizing Microscope were also conducted. The mortar bar tests show a very good mitigation effect of supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs. The results show that only small ASR expansions, which can be categorized as “innocuous”, occurred for specimens with 1.2% Na2Oeq using FA15% and BFS42%. However, larger alkali amount inside the system will require more SCMs amount.

  8. Effect of lime addition during sewage sludge treatment on characteristics of resulting SSA when it is used in cementitious materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouk, D; Nakic, D; Štirmer, N; Baricevic, A

    2017-02-01

    Final disposal of sewage sludge is important not only in terms of satisfying the regulations, but the aspect of choosing the optimal wastewater treatment technology, including the sludge treatment. In most EU countries, significant amounts of stabilized and dewatered sludge are incinerated, and sewage sludge ash (SSA) is generated as a by product. At the same time, lime is one of the commonly used additives in the sewage sludge treatment primarily to stabilize the sludge. In doing so, the question arose how desirable is such addition of lime if the sludge is subsequently incinerated, and the generated ash is further used in the production of cementitious materials. A series of mortars were prepared where 10-20% of the cement fraction was replaced by SSA. Since all three types of analyzed SSA (without lime, with lime added during sludge stabilization and with extra lime added during sludge incineration) yielded nearly same results, it can be concluded that if sludge incineration is accepted solution, lime addition during sludge treatment is unnecessary even from the standpoint of preserving the pozzolanic properties of the resulting SSA. Results of the research carried out on cement mortars point to the great possibilities of using SSA in concrete industry.

  9. Self-Healing Capability of Fiber-Reinforced Cementitious Composites for Recovery of Watertightness and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya Nishiwaki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Various types of fiber reinforced cementitious composites (FRCCs were experimentally studied to evaluate their self-healing capabilities regarding their watertightness and mechanical properties. Cracks were induced in the FRCC specimens during a tensile loading test, and the specimens were then immersed in static water for self-healing. By water permeability and reloading tests, it was determined that the FRCCs containing synthetic fiber and cracks of width within a certain range (<0.1 mm exhibited good self-healing capabilities regarding their watertightness. Particularly, the high polarity of the synthetic fiber (polyvinyl alcohol (PVA series and hybrid fiber reinforcing (polyethylene (PE and steel code (SC series showed high recovery ratio. Moreover, these series also showed high potential of self-healing of mechanical properties. It was confirmed that recovery of mechanical property could be obtained only in case when crack width was sufficiently narrow, both the visible surface cracks and the very fine cracks around the bridging of the SC fibers. Recovery of the bond strength by filling of the very fine cracks around the bridging fibers enhanced the recovery of the mechanical property.

  10. A comparison of finite element analysis to smooth particle hydrodynamics for application to projectile impact on cementitious material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordendale, Nikolas A.; Heard, William F.; Sherburn, Jesse A.; Basu, Prodyot K.

    2016-03-01

    The response of structural components of high-strength cementitious (HSC) materials to projectile impact is characterized by high-rate fragmentation resulting from strong compressive shock waves coupled with reflected tensile waves. Accurate modeling of armor panels of such brittle materials under high-velocity projectile impact is a complex problem requiring meticulous experimental characterization of material properties. In a recent paper by the authors, an approach to handle such problems based on a modified Advanced Fundamental Concrete (AFC) constitutive model was developed. In the HSC panels considered in this study, an analogous approach is applied, and the predictions are verified with ballistic impact test data. Traditional Lagrangian finite element analysis (FEA) of these problems tends to introduce errors and suffers from convergence issues resulting from large deformations at free surfaces. Also, FEA cannot properly account for the issues of secondary impact of spalled fragments when multiple armor panels are used. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is considered to be an attractive alternative to resolve these and other issues. However, SPH-based quantitative results have been found to be less accurate than the FEA-based ones when the deformations are not sufficiently large. This paper primarily focuses on a comparison of FEA and SPH models to predict high-velocity projectile impact on single and stacked HSC panels. Results are compared to recent ballistic experiments performed as a part of this research, and conclusions are drawn based on the findings.

  11. Theoretical analysis on bending behavior of functionally graded composite beam crack-controlled by ultrahigh toughness cementitious composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Ultrahigh toughness cementitious composites (UHTCC) obviously show strain hardening property under tensile or bending loading. The failure pattern of the UHTCC components exhibits multiple fine cracks under uniaxial tensile loading with prominent tensile strain capacity in excess of 3%, with merely 60 μm average crack width even corresponding to the ultimate tensile strain state. The approach adopted is based on the concept of functionally-graded concrete, where part of the concrete, which surrounds the main longitudinal reinforcement in a RC (reinforced concrete) member, is strategically replaced with UHTCC with excellent crack-controlling ability. Investigations on bending behavior of functionally-graded composite beam crack controlled by UHTCC has been carried out, including theo- retical analysis, experimental research on long composite beams without web reinforcement, validation and comparison between experimental and theoretical results, and analysis on crack control. In addition to improving bearing capacity, the results indicate that functionally-graded composite beams using UHTCC has been found to be very effective in preventing corrosion-induced damage compared with RC beams. Therefore, durability and service life of the structure could be enhanced. This paper discusses the development of internal force and crack propagation during loading process, and presents analysis of the internal force in different stages, moment-curvature relationship from loading to damage and calculation of mid-span deflection and ductility index. In the end, the theoretical formulae have been validated by experimental results.

  12. Experimental investigation and analysis on flexural performance of functionally graded composite beam crack-controlled by ultrahigh toughness cementitious composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the concept of functionally graded concrete,UHTCC(ultrahigh toughness cementitious composites)material with excellent crack-controlling ability is strategically substituted for part of the concrete,which surrounds the main longitudinal reinforcement in a reinforced concrete member.Investigations on bending behavior of such a functionally graded composite beam crack-controlled by UHTCC(abbreviated as UHTCC-FGC beam)have been carried out.After establishing a theoretical cal-culation model,the paper discusses the results of four-point bending experiment on long composite beams without web reinforcement,and validates the theoretical formulae through experimental results of UHTCC-FGC beams with different thicknesses of UHTCC layer.Besides improving bearing capacity and saving steel reinforcements,the results indicate that UHTCC-FGC beams can also effectively control the deformation and enhance the ductility of members.At last,the optimal thickness of UHTCC layer in UHTCC-FGC beams has been confirmed,which can not only save materials and improve mechanical performance of members,but also be very effective in preventing corrosion-induced damage and enhancing the durability of members by controlling crack width below 0.05mm under service conditions.

  13. Household waste compositional analysis variation from insular communities in the framework of waste prevention strategy plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zorpas, Antonis A., E-mail: antonis.zorpas@ouc.ac.cy [Cyprus Open University, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, Environmental Conservation and Management, P.O. Box 12794, 2252 Latsia, Nicosia (Cyprus); Lasaridi, Katia, E-mail: klasaridi@hua.gr [Harokopio University, Department of Geography, 70 El. Venizelou, 176 71 Athens, Kallithea (Greece); Voukkali, Irene [Institute of Environmental Technology and Sustainable Development, ENVITECH LTD, Department of Research and Development, P.O. Box 34073, 5309 (Cyprus); Loizia, Pantelitsa, E-mail: irenevoukkali@envitech.org [Institute of Environmental Technology and Sustainable Development, ENVITECH LTD, Department of Research and Development, P.O. Box 34073, 5309 (Cyprus); Chroni, Christina [Harokopio University, Department of Geography, 70 El. Venizelou, 176 71 Athens, Kallithea (Greece)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Waste framework directive has set clear waste prevention procedures. • Household Compositional analysis. • Waste management plans. • Zero waste approach. • Waste generation. - Abstract: Waste management planning requires reliable data regarding waste generation, affecting factors on waste generation and forecasts of waste quantities based on facts. In order to decrease the environmental impacts of waste management the choice of prevention plan as well as the treatment method must be based on the features of the waste that are produced in a specific area. Factors such as culture, economic development, climate, and energy sources have an impact on waste composition; composition influences the need of collecting waste more or less frequently of waste collection and disposition. The research question was to discover the main barriers concerning the compositional analysis in Insular Communities under warm climate conditions and the findings from this study enabled the main contents of a waste management plan to be established. These included advice to residents on waste minimisation, liaison with stakeholders and the expansion of kerbside recycling schemes.

  14. Radioactive Waste Conditioning, Immobilisation, And Encapsulation Processes And Technologies: Overview And Advances (Chapter 7)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, Carol M. [Savannah River National Lab., Aiken SC (United States); Lee, William E. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials; Ojovan, Michael I. [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2012-10-19

    The main immobilization technologies that are available commercially and have been demonstrated to be viable are cementation, bituminization, and vitrification. Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either alkali borosilicate glass or alkali aluminophosphate glass. The exact compositions of nuclear waste glasses are tailored for easy preparation and melting, avoidance of glass-in-glass phase separation, avoidance of uncontrolled crystallization, and acceptable chemical durability, e.g., leach resistance. Glass has also been used to stabilize a variety of low level wastes (LLW) and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) low level wastes (MLLW) from other sources such as fuel rod cladding/decladding processes, chemical separations, radioactive sources, radioactive mill tailings, contaminated soils, medical research applications, and other commercial processes. The sources of radioactive waste generation are captured in other chapters in this book regarding the individual practices in various countries (legacy wastes, currently generated wastes, and future waste generation). Future waste generation is primarily driven by interest in sources of clean energy and this has led to an increased interest in advanced nuclear power production. The development of advanced wasteforms is a necessary component of the new nuclear power plant (NPP) flowsheets. Therefore, advanced nuclear wasteforms are being designed for robust disposal strategies. A brief summary is given of existing and advanced wasteforms: glass, glass-ceramics, glass composite materials (GCM’s), and crystalline ceramic (mineral) wasteforms that chemically incorporate radionuclides and hazardous species atomically in their structure. Cementitious, geopolymer, bitumen, and other encapsulant wasteforms and composites that atomically bond and encapsulate

  15. WASTE MANAGEMENT IN A SCHOOL RESTAURANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Peruchin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the amount of waste generated and its proper final destination is one of the greatest environmental issues. The higher education institutions are an important source of waste due to its diversity of teaching, researching and extension activities undertaken by academic world. The university restaurant supplies meals to the university community and ends up generating a kind of waste similar to the domestic waste, but in a bigger amount. The aim of this study was to investigate the gravimetric composition of the waste generated in the school restaurant of a higher-education institution in southern Brazil and provide a diagnostic of the current waste management. The data were obtained through a characterization process of the solid waste generated in one week; an interview with the responsible managers and direct observation of the local structure. It was found non-existence of a Management Plan for Solid Waste, as well as a lack of practices relative to its management. The waste segregation is impaired due the lack of specific and labeled bins, besides the overworked employees. Along the experimental period it were characterized 547,068 Kg of solid waste, in which more than 80% were organic waste. The paper concludes that the organic waste could be treated by composting. It is recommended the formulation and implementation of an integrated management plan for solid waste in order to provide adequate infrastructure for waste management in the school restaurant.

  16. Process Window for Direct Recycling of Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene and High-Impact Polystyrene from Electrical and Electronic Equipment Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Yamila V; Barbosa, Silvia E

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess recycling process window of ABS (Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene) and HIPS (High impact Polystyrene) from WEEE (waste from electrical and electronic equipment) through a final properties/structure screening study on their blends. Main motivation is to evaluate which amount of one plastic WEEE can be included into the other at least keeping their properties. In this sense, a wider margin of error during sorting could be admitted to obtain recycling materials with similar technological application of recycled ABS and HIPS by themselves. Results are discussed in terms of final blend structure, focusing in the interaction, within blends, of copolymers phases and fillers presents in WEEE. The comparative analysis of mechanical performance and morphology of HIPS/ABS blends indicates that the addition of 50wt% HIPS to ABS even improves 50% the elongation at break maintaining the strength. On the opposite, HIPS maintains its properties with 20wt% of ABS added. This study allows enlarging composition process window of recycling plastic WEEE for similar applications. This could be a sustainable way to improve benefit of e-scrap with low costs and easy processability. In consequence, social interest in the recycling of this kind of plastic scrap could be encourage from either ecological or economical points of view. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of carbonation on the durability of cementitious materials: water transport properties characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Bescop P.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the context of long-lived intermediate level radioactive waste geological disposal, reinforced concrete would be used. In service life conditions, the concrete structures would be subjected to drying and carbonation. Carbonation relates to the reaction between carbon dioxide (CO2 and the main hydrates of the cement paste (portlandite and C-S-H. Beyond the fall of the pore solution pH, indicative of steel depassivation, carbonation induces mineralogical and microstructural changes (due to portlandite and C-S-H dissolution and calcium carbonate precipitation. This results in the modification of the transport properties, which can impact the structure durability. Because concrete durability depends on water transport, this study focuses on the influence of carbonation on water transport properties. In fact, the transport properties of sound materials are known but they still remain to be assessed for carbonated ones. An experimental program has been designed to investigate the transport properties in carbonated materials. Four hardened cement pastes, differing in mineralogy, are carbonated in an accelerated carbonation device (in controlled environmental conditions at CO2 partial pressure of about 3%. Once fully carbonated, all the data needed to describe water transport, using a simplified approach, will be evaluated.

  18. Milestone Report #2: Direct Evaporator Leak and Flammability Analysis Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2013-09-01

    The direct evaporator is a simplified heat exchange system for an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) that generates electricity from a gas turbine exhaust stream. Typically, the heat of the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to the ORC by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. In this project, the goal is to design a direct evaporator where the working fluid is evaporated in the exhaust gas heat exchanger. By eliminating one of the heat exchangers and the intermediate oil loop, the overall ORC system cost can be reduced by approximately 15%. However, placing a heat exchanger operating with a flammable hydrocarbon working fluid directly in the hot exhaust gas stream presents potential safety risks. The purpose of the analyses presented in this report is to assess the flammability of the selected working fluid in the hot exhaust gas stream stemming from a potential leak in the evaporator. Ignition delay time for cyclopentane at temperatures and pressure corresponding to direct evaporator operation was obtained for several equivalence ratios. Results of a computational fluid dynamic analysis of a pinhole leak scenario are given.

  19. Temperature measurements according to directive given by EU regarding combustion of waste. Investigated measurements of temperature and simulations; Maetningar av temperaturer enligt EU:s direktiv om foerbranning av avfall. Undersoekande temperaturmaetningar och simuleringar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blom, Elisabet [AaF-Energi och Miljoe, Stockholm (Sweden); Gaardhagen, Roland; Haegglund, Jonas; Lindqvist, Hans; Wahlstroem, Krister; Loyd, Dan [Linkoepings Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2003-05-01

    The directive regarding combustion of waste (directive 2000/76/EG 4 of December 2000 about combustion of waste) contains new conditions and enhanced demands on pollution to the air and water from the combustion. To be able to follow the directive, it is of most importance to show that the combustion gases stay at a temperature of 850 deg C during at least 2 seconds. The purpose of this project is to examine whether conventional measurement equipment like thermocouple and suction pyrometer are suitable to examine if the boiler fulfills the demands of the directive. Modeling and simulation of the thermocouple have been done with the program FemLab. An analytical model has been implemented in the program Matlab and the purpose of that is to be able to see if an improved version can be used in automatic control system. The models in their present state will show a certain measurement error at a certain gas temperature, which unfortunately is not the case in the real situation. This is due to circumstances in the boiler that varies with time and place. Measurement has been carried out in two kinds of boilers, fluidized bed and grate boiler. The reason for that is to be able to examine if the measurement error varies in different boilers and to find out if a general method can be used for the error calculations. The measurements indicate difficulties to reach the directive set by EU about combustion of waste; these are due to the nature of the measurement error that arises when measuring with thermocouple. It has been shown that the error varies despite constant gas temperature and that it can vary up to 80 deg C. This variation depends to some extent of the emissivity of the gas because the emissivity varies with the composition of gas and disturbances in the boiler. The conclusions are that the heat flow from the gas to the thermocouple is different even though the temperature in the boiler is constant. The measurements indicate that the error is lesser at lower

  20. Regulation, service contract, directional information system. Considerations on the waste sector; Regolamentazione, contratto di servizio, sistema informativo direzionale. Considerazioni sul settore dei rifiuti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, D; Calonaci, M. [Consorzio Quadrifoglio, Florence (Italy)

    2000-02-01

    The reform of the waste sector's regulatory framework requires firms to make significant cultural changes in pursuing critical success factors. Such changes imply not only a quantitative increase in information needs resulting form the creation of a regulatory authority, dealing with the planning and monitoring of the performance of operators, but more importantly imply a substantial qualitative upgrading of the information provided. In the light of this new approach, the service contract represents the main instrument for regulating the relationship between the various local authorities and the firms who manage the services. As the main outlines of the reform have emerged, the Consorzio Quadrifoglio has launched a project to review and improve its own monitoring and management systems. The present article deals with the methodological difficulties encountered along the way and the solutions which have been adopted to arrive a new management information system. [Italian] La riforma della regolamentazione del settore dei rifiuti impone alle imprese un significativo cambiamento culturale con riferimento ai fattori critici di successo. Il cambiamento si traduce non solo in un aumento del fabbisogno informativo, conseguente alla creazione di autorita' di controllo e quindi alle nuove necessita' di pianificazione e controllo dell'attivita' dei gestori, ma anche in una sua sostanziale riqualificazione. Nel nuovo approccio, il contratto di servizio rappresenta lo strumento cardine per la regolazione dei rapporti tra ente locale e le aziende che gestiscono i servizi. Il Consorzio Quadrifoglio, una volta delineatisi gli indirizzi del disegno di riforma, ha avviato un progetto di revisione dei propri strumenti di controllo di gestione. L'articolo riporta le difficolta' metodologiche e le soluzioni adottate per la creazione di un nuovo sistema informativo direzionale.

  1. The Orbital Workshop Waste Management Compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    This image is a wide-angle view of the Orbital Workshop waste management compartment. The waste management facilities presented a unique challenge to spacecraft designers. In addition to collection of liquid and solid human wastes, there was a medical requirement to dry all solid human waste products and to return the residue to Earth for examination. Liquid human waste (urine) was frozen for return to Earth. Total quantities of each astronaut's liquid and solid wastes were precisely measured. Cabin air was drawn into the toilet, shown on the wall at right in this photograph, and over the waste products to generate a flow of the waste in the desired direction. The air was then filtered for odor control and antiseptic purposes prior to being discharged back into the cabin.

  2. Reduced waste generation technical work plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy has established policies for avoiding plutonium losses to the waste streams and minimizing the generation of wastes produced at its nuclear facilities. This policy is evidenced in DOE Order 5820.2, which states Technical and administrative controls shall be directed towards reducing the gross volume of TRU waste generated and the amount of radioactivity in such waste.'' To comply with the DOE directive, the Defense Transuranic Waste Program (DTWP) supports and provides funding for specific research and development tasks at the various DOE sites to reduce the generation of waste. This document has been prepared to give an overview of current and past Reduced Waste Generation task activities which are to be based on technical and cost/benefit factors. The document is updated annually, or as needed, to reflect the status of program direction. Reduced Waste Generation (RWG) tasks encompass a wide range of goals which are basically oriented toward (1) avoiding the generation of waste, (2) changing processes or operations to reduce waste, (3) converting TRU waste into LLW by sorting or decontamination, and (4) reducing volumes through operations such as incineration or compaction.

  3. Utilize Cementitious High Carbon Fly Ash (CHCFA) to Stabilize Cold In-Place Recycled (CIR) Asphalt Pavement as Base Coarse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Haifang; Li, Xiaojun; Edil, Tuncer; O' Donnell, Jonathan; Danda, Swapna

    2011-02-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of cementitious high carbon fly ash (CHCFA) stabilized recycled asphalt pavement as a base course material in a real world setting. Three test road cells were built at MnROAD facility in Minnesota. These cells have the same asphalt surface layers, subbases, and subgrades, but three different base courses: conventional crushed aggregates, untreated recycled pavement materials (RPM), and CHCFA stabilized RPM materials. During and after the construction of the three cells, laboratory and field tests were carried out to characterize the material properties. The test results were used in the mechanistic-empirical pavement design guide (MEPDG) to predict the pavement performance. Based on the performance prediction, the life cycle analyses of cost, energy consumption, and greenhouse gasses were performed. The leaching impacts of these three types of base materials were compared. The laboratory and field tests showed that fly ash stabilized RPM had higher modulus than crushed aggregate and RPM did. Based on the MEPDG performance prediction, the service life of the Cell 79 containing fly ash stabilized RPM, is 23.5 years, which is about twice the service life (11 years) of the Cell 77 with RPM base, and about three times the service life (7.5 years) of the Cell 78 with crushed aggregate base. The life cycle analysis indicated that the usage of the fly ash stabilized RPM as the base of the flexible pavement can significantly reduce the life cycle cost, the energy consumption, the greenhouse gases emission. Concentrations of many trace elements, particularly those with relatively low water quality standards, diminish over time as water flows through the pavement profile. For many elements, concentrations below US water drinking water quality standards are attained at the bottom of the pavement profile within 2-4 pore volumes of flow.

  4. Standard test method for splitting tensile strength for brittle nuclear waste forms

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1989-01-01

    1.1 This test method is used to measure the static splitting tensile strength of cylindrical specimens of brittle nuclear waste forms. It provides splitting tensile-strength data that can be used to compare the strength of waste forms when tests are done on one size of specimen. 1.2 The test method is applicable to glass, ceramic, and concrete waste forms that are sufficiently homogeneous (Note 1) but not to coated-particle, metal-matrix, bituminous, or plastic waste forms, or concretes with large-scale heterogeneities. Cementitious waste forms with heterogeneities >1 to 2 mm and 5 mm can be tested using this procedure provided the specimen size is increased from the reference size of 12.7 mm diameter by 6 mm length, to 51 mm diameter by 100 mm length, as recommended in Test Method C 496 and Practice C 192. Note 1—Generally, the specimen structural or microstructural heterogeneities must be less than about one-tenth the diameter of the specimen. 1.3 This test method can be used as a quality control chec...

  5. Engineering geology of waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentley, S.P. [ed.] [University of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom). School of Engineering

    1996-12-31

    This volume covers a wide spectrum of activities in the field of waste disposal. These activities range from design of new landfills and containment properties of natural clays to investigation, hazard assessment and remediation of existing landfills. Consideration is given to design criteria for hard rock quarries when used for waste disposal. In addition, an entire section concerns the geotechnics of underground repositories. This covers such topics as deep drilling, in situ stress measurement, rock mass characterization, groundwater flows and barrier design. Engineering Geology of Waste Disposal examines, in detail, the active role of engineering geologists in the design of waste disposal facilities on UK and international projects. The book provides an authoritative mix of overviews and detailed case histories. The extensive spectrum of papers will be of practical value to those geologists, engineers and environmental scientists who are directly involved with waste disposal. (UK).

  6. Long-term cement corrosion in chloride-rich solutions relevant to radioactive waste disposal in rock salt - Leaching experiments and thermodynamic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bube, C.; Metz, V.; Bohnert, E.; Garbev, K.; Schild, D.; Kienzler, B.

    Low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes are frequently solidified in a cement matrix. In a potential repository for nuclear wastes, the cementitious matrix is altered upon contact with solution and the resulting secondary phases may provide for significant retention of the radionuclides incorporated in the wastes. In order to assess the secondary phases formed upon corrosion in chloride-rich solutions, which are relevant for nuclear waste disposal in rock salt, leaching experiments were performed. Conventional laboratory batch experiments using powdered hardened cement paste in MgCl2-rich solutions were left to equilibrate for up to three years and full-scale cemented waste products were exposed to NaCl-rich and MgCl2-rich solutions for more than twenty years, respectively. Solid phase analyses revealed that corrosion of hardened cement in MgCl2-rich solutions advanced faster than in NaCl-rich solutions due to the extensive exchange of Mg from solution against Ca from the cementitious solid. Thermodynamic equilibrium simulations compared well to results at the final stages of the respective experiments indicating that close to equilibrium conditions were reached. At high cement product to brine ratios (>0.65 g mL-1), the solution composition in the laboratory-scale experiments was close to that of the full-scale experiments (cement to brine ratio of 2.5 g mL-1) in the MgCl2 systems. The present study demonstrates the applicability of thermodynamic methods used in this approach to adequately describe full-scale long-term experiments with cemented waste simulates.

  7. Waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), DOE/WIPP-069, was initially developed by a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Steering Committee to provide performance requirements to ensure public health and safety as well as the safe handling of transuranic (TRU) waste at the WIPP. This revision updates the criteria and requirements of previous revisions and deletes those which were applicable only to the test phase. The criteria and requirements in this document must be met by participating DOE TRU Waste Generator/Storage Sites (Sites) prior to shipping contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste forms to the WIPP. The WIPP Project will comply with applicable federal and state regulations and requirements, including those in Titles 10, 40, and 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). The WAC, DOE/WIPP-069, serves as the primary directive for assuring the safe handling, transportation, and disposal of TRU wastes in the WIPP and for the certification of these wastes. The WAC identifies strict requirements that must be met by participating Sites before these TRU wastes may be shipped for disposal in the WIPP facility. These criteria and requirements will be reviewed and revised as appropriate, based on new technical or regulatory requirements. The WAC is a controlled document. Revised/changed pages will be supplied to all holders of controlled copies.

  8. Evaluation of test methods used to characterize fiber reinforced cementitious composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    of the tensile properties of Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites (FRCC) over the direct measurement of the tensile behavior because of the more convenient test setup and ease of specimen preparation. Three and four-point bending tests and round determinate panel test were carried out to evaluate the flexural...... and crack development has been quantitatively documented using a digital image correlation (DIC) system to investigate the validity of the commonly made assumptions....

  9. 77 FR 65314 - Missouri: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Missouri: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: The Solid Waste..., Missouri received final authorization to implement its hazardous waste management program effective...

  10. Federal Register Notice for the Mining Waste Exclusion Final Rule, September 1, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Final rule responding to a federal Appeals Court directive to narrow the exclusion of solid waste from the extraction, beneficiation, and processing of ores and minerals from regulation as hazardous waste as it applies to mineral processing wastes.

  11. Engineered waste-package-system design specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-05-01

    This report documents the waste package performance requirements and geologic and waste form data bases used in developing the conceptual designs for waste packages for salt, tuff, and basalt geologies. The data base reflects the latest geotechnical information on the geologic media of interest. The parameters or characteristics specified primarily cover spent fuel, defense high-level waste, and commercial high-level waste forms. The specification documents the direction taken during the conceptual design activity. A separate design specification will be developed prior to the start of the preliminary design activity.

  12. Management of offshore wastes in the United States.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.

    1998-10-22

    During the process of finding and producing oil and gas in the offshore environment operators generate a variety of liquid and solid wastes. Some of these wastes are directly related to exploration and production activities (e.g., drilling wastes, produced water, treatment workover, and completion fluids) while other types of wastes are associated with human occupation of the offshore platforms (e.g., sanitary and domestic wastes, trash). Still other types of wastes can be considered generic industrial wastes (e.g., scrap metal and wood, wastes paints and chemicals, sand blasting residues). Finally, the offshore platforms themselves can be considered waste materials when their useful life span has been reached. Generally, offshore wastes are managed in one of three ways--onsite discharge, injection, or transportation to shore. This paper describes the regulatory requirements imposed by the government and the approaches used by offshore operators to manage and dispose of wastes in the US.

  13. Estimating household food waste in Denmark:case study of single family households

    OpenAIRE

    Edjabou, Vincent Maklawe Essonanawe; Petersen, C; Scheutz, Charlotte; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2014-01-01

    Food waste prevention remains the first priority in the European Waste Framework Directive, which aimed to halve the amount of food wasted within the EU Member States by 2025. Thus, reliable data on food waste composition and quantity are crucial for assessing the current food waste situation and determine potential improvements. In Denmark, although many sorting campaigns involving household waste has been conducted, little attention has been placed on food waste. Comparison of recent studie...

  14. 直接还原-渣金熔分法回收稀土储氢合金冶炼废渣%Recycling of Waste Slag from Melting RE Hydrogen Storage Alloy by Direct Reduction and Melting Separation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜银举; 罗果萍; 马小可; 杨吉春; 刘晓东; 宋绍开

    2012-01-01

    Recycling Fe-Ni-Co alloy and slag containing rare earth oxide from waste slag powders of AB5 type RE hydrogen storage alloy was researched by the method of direct reduction and melting separation. Mixture was obtained by waste slag pow-ders and iron concentrate powders at different ratios. In the direct reduction of mixed powders , iron oxide were reduced to simple substance state and active elements such as RE, Al, Mn ect were transformed into oxide state, meanwhile inert ele-ments such as Ni, Co had been existing as simple substance. After the process of direct reduction, sponge iron containing Ni and Co was obtained, from which Fe-Ni-Co alloy and slag containing rare earth oxide were melted and separated. As recovery rates of Ni and Co were more than 99% , Fe-Ni-Co alloy can be used as raw material of special alloy steel. While, as the con-tent of rare earth oxide in slag reached 48. 27% , the slag has high value to recycle rare earth oxide.%对于AB5型稀土储氢合金冶炼废渣粉,采用直接还原-渣金熔分法回收Fe-Ni-Co合金和稀土氧化物渣.将废渣粉以一定比例配加到铁精矿粉中,在反应罐直接还原过程中,物料中氧化铁还原为单质态,Ni、Co保持单质态,RE、Al、Mn等活性金属元素转化为氧化态,得到的含Ni、Co的海绵铁渣金熔分,其中单质态的元素形成Fe-Ni-Co合金,稀土氧化物与铁精矿中的脉石形成REO-SiO2-Al2O3-MnO2渣.Ni和Co的回收率达到99%以上.Fe-Ni-Co合金可作为冶炼特种钢的原料;渣中稀土氧化物含量达48.27%,具有很高的再利用价值.

  15. Synthesis of a Cementitious Material Nanocement Using Bottom-Up Nanotechnology Concept: An Alternative Approach to Avoid CO2 Emission during Production of Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Wan Jo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The world’s increasing need is to develop smart and sustainable construction material, which will generate minimal climate changing gas during their production. The bottom-up nanotechnology has established itself as a promising alternative technique for the production of the cementitious material. The present investigation deals with the chemical synthesis of cementitious material using nanosilica, sodium aluminate, sodium hydroxide, and calcium nitrate as reacting phases. The characteristic properties of the chemically synthesized nanocement were verified by the chemical composition analysis, setting time measurement, particle size distribution, fineness analysis, and SEM and XRD analyses. Finally, the performance of the nanocement was ensured by the fabrication and characterization of the nanocement based mortar. Comparing the results with the commercially available cement product, it is demonstrated that the chemically synthesized nanocement not only shows better physical and mechanical performance, but also brings several encouraging impacts to the society, including the reduction of CO2 emission and the development of sustainable construction material. A plausible reaction scheme has been proposed to explain the synthesis and the overall performances of the nanocement.

  16. Zero Waste; Energy Recovery From Non-recyclable Mixed Municipal Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Laštůvka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Zero Waste is a strategy offering waste management solutions for today’s businesses. The Zero Waste strategy has been created with the objective of stimulating sustainable utilisation of resources, production and consumption with the highest possible level of recycling of generated waste. Due to the fact that currently there is very little information and only few relevant data available as a base for the implementation of the Zero Waste strategy, waste management specialists approach and apply such a strategy in different manners. On the other hand, there are areas of waste management where such a strategy has already been applied on a long-term basis in spite of non-existing relevant legislative tools. Indicators determined in the Zero Waste strategy may be achieved only if the individual countries clearly define legislative environment and adopt a national Zero Waste strategy with achievable objectives unambiguously determined. The area of waste separation, or handling of fractions of waste non-utilisable as secondary materials after separation, is one of the areas directly connected to the Zero Waste strategy. The objective of this paper is the evaluation of the usage of fractions of waste non-utilisable as secondary materials for energy recovery, providing thus valuable knowledge and information for the implementation of the Zero Waste strategy.

  17. Adhesives in Building--Lamination of Structural Timber Beams, Bonding of Cementitious Materials, Bonding of Gypsum Drywall Construction. Proceedings of a Conference of the Building Research Institute, Division of Engineering and Industrial Research (Spring 1960).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    The role of adhesives in building design is discussed. Three major areas are as follows--(1) lamination of structural timber beams, (2) bonding of cementitious materials, and (3) bonding of gypsum drywall construction. Topical coverage includes--(1) structural lamination today, (2) adhesives in use today, (3) new adhesives needed, (4) production…

  18. Landfills - Municipal Waste Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — A Municipal Waste Operation is a DEP primary facility type related to the Waste Management Municipal Waste Program. The sub-facility types related to Municipal Waste...

  19. Test system for defect detection in cementitious material with artificial neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saowanee Saechai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a newly developed test system for defect detection, classification of number of defects andidentification of defect materials in cement-based products. With the system, the pattern of ultrasonic waves for each case ofspecimen can be obtained from direct and indirect measurements. The machine learning algorithm called artificial neuralnetwork classifier with back-propagation model is employed for classification and verification of the wave patterns obtainedfrom different specimens. By applying the system, the presence or absence of a defect in mortar can be identified. Moreover,the system is applied to identify the number and materials of defects inside the mortar. The methodology is explained and theclassification results are discussed. The effectiveness of the developed test system is evaluated. Comparison of the classification results between different input features with different number of training sets is demonstrated. The results show that thistechnique based on pattern recognition has a potential for practical inspection of concrete structures.

  20. Review on self-healing of engineered cementitious composites materials%超高韧性水泥基复合材料自愈合研究进展∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阚黎黎; 王明智; 史建武; 施惠生

    2015-01-01

    在总结了最近几年国内外相关研究进展的基础上,对超高韧性水泥基复合材料(ECC)及裂缝自愈合进行了综述。着重介绍了裂缝自愈合的最大允许宽度限值以及自愈合机制。提出利用 ECC 所独具的对裂缝宽度的可控性及紧密细小的微裂纹、较低的水胶比及矿物掺合料的二次水化效应可实现其良好的自愈合特性。最后指出该研究领域所面临的挑战及今后的研究方向,为ECC裂缝自愈合的研究提供有价值的理论参考。%This paper summarizes engineered cementitious composites (ECC)materials and the self-healing of crack based on many domestic and international references.Maximum allowable width of crack and mechanism are emphatically introduced.Using its unique crack width control and tight micro-crack property combined with low water-binder ratio and pozzolanic effect of mineral admixtures to realize effective self-healing potential are put forward.Finally,the research challenges and further research direction in this field are pointed out,which provides valuable theoretical reference for crack self-healing research.

  1. Methodology for classification of the H14 criterion according to the directive 2008/98/EC on waste. Proposal of a biotest battery for the classification of hazardous waste. Ecotoxicological testing with bacterium, algae, crustacean and fish embryo; Metodik foer klassificering av H14-kriteriet i Avfallsfoerordningen. Foerslag till biotestbatteri foer klassificering av farligt avfall. Ekotoxikologisk testning med bakterie, alg, kraeftdjur och fiskembryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiernstroem, Sara; Hemstroem, Kristian; Wik, Ola; Carlsson, Gunnar; Breitholtz, Magnus

    2009-02-15

    Waste, including ashes that can cause ecotoxicological effects, should be classified under criterion H-14 in the Directive on Waste 2008/98/EC. The complex nature of ash production and the fact that it has a complex chemical composition makes ecotoxicological hazard and risk assessment of ashes based on mere chemical analysis insufficient. Biological test systems are thus indispensable tools to support the ecotoxicological characterisation and classification of the properties of ashes. The objectives of this study were (1) to develop a leaching procedure suitable for preparation of water extracts for ecotoxicity testing, and (2) to evaluate an ecotoxicological test battery for the characterisation of ashes. A leaching procedure developed for organic compounds was assumed to be more realistic than existing standard methods for preparation of eluates for ecotoxic tests from complex matrices. A modified version of a recirculation column test, the ER-H method, developed for leaching of nonvolatile organic compounds and validated for PAHs and CPs, was used in this study and compared with the batch test EN 14735 (Characterization of waste - Preparation of waste samples for ecotoxicity tests). The ecotoxicological test battery included species representing different trophic levels; the bacterium Vibrio fisheri, a growth inhibition test with the micro algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata formerly known as Selenastrum capricornutum, a larval development test with the copepod Nitocra spinipes and an embryo toxicity test with sebra fish (Danio rerio). These test species show a relatively low sensitivity to elevated salinity levels. This test battery can be used to test a wide variety of matrices (e.g. single chemicals, complex effluents, eluates and sediments), and therefore offers flexible solutions for testing of leachates with differing and difficult properties. Both the ashes and their leachates were also analyzed chemically for organic and inorganic substances. All the

  2. An experimental investigation of innovative bridge columns with engineered cementitious composites and Cu-Al-Mn super-elastic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, F.; Gencturk, B.; Lahpour, S.; Ibague Gil, D.

    2015-08-01

    Recent strong earthquakes have shown that reinforced concrete (RC) bridge columns constructed using conventional materials and techniques suffer from major damage and permanent deformations. The yielding of the longitudinal reinforcement as the main source of energy absorption, and cracking and spalling of concrete results in a dysfunctional bridge structure that does not support the post-disaster recovery efforts. This paper investigates the use of engineered cementitious composites (ECCs) and Cu-Al-Mn super-elastic alloys (SEAs) to improve the performance of bridge columns under seismic loads. A new column design is proposed, which is composed of a pre-fabricated ECC tube that encompasses the longitudinal and transverse steel reinforcement (rebar). The rebar in the plastic hinge region of the cantilever columns was totally or partially replaced with Cu-Al-Mn SEA bars. The tube was filled with conventional concrete after it was placed inside the rebar cage of the foundation. ECC exhibits superior tensile ductility, bonding with steel, energy absorption and shear resistance, in addition to lower permeability and reduced crack widths compared to conventional concrete. Cu-Al-Mn SEA bars are capable of recovering large inelastic deformations exceeding 12% strain. The proposed approach capitalizes on the deformability of ECC with reduced damage, and the energy absorption capacity of Cu-Al-Mn SEA bars without permanent deformation. A total of six column specimens were constructed and tested under simulated seismic loading. The number of rebars replaced with Cu-Al-Mn SEA bars, ECC mixture design, and the ratio of the concrete core area to total column cross-sectional area were the variables investigated in the test program. A comparison of the results indicated that the proposed concept with no Cu-Al-Mn SEA bars provides higher lateral strength, similar energy absorption and reduced damage compared to conventional RC columns; however, similar to a conventional column, it

  3. Influence of supplementary cementitious materials on water transport kinetics and mechanical properties of hydrated lime and cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ince, C.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is an investigation of the possible role of supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs on water transport kinetics and mechanical properties of hydrated lime (CL90 and Portland cement (PC mortars. The properties of hydrated lime are significantly different from those of cement and therefore modifying fresh and hardened properties of these mortars are vital for mortar/substrate optimisation in masonry construction. The parameters investigated in this paper often are the main barriers to the use of hydrated lime in construction practice. The results show that transfer sorptivity and time to dewater freshly-mixed hydrated lime mortars can be modified when binder is partially replaced with SCMs. Compressive strength of CL90 mortars is increased systematically with the increased replacement levels of SCMs and the results are supported with the microstructural images. The ability to modify the water transport kinetics and mechanical properties allows compatibility between the mortar and the substrate unit in masonry construction.El objetivo de este artículo es investigar el papel de los materiales cementantes suplementarios (SCMs en la cinética de transporte del agua y en las propiedades mecánicas de los morteros de cal hidratada (CL90 y cemento Portland. Las propiedades de la cal hidratada son significativamente diferentes a las del cemento y por lo tanto el control de las propiedades de los morteros frescos y endurecidos es fundamental en la optimización mortero/substrato en albañilería. Los parámetros estudiados en este trabajo son a menudo las principales barreras para el uso de la cal hidratada en la práctica de la construcción. Los resultados indican que la absortividad y el tiempo necesario para deshidratar morteros de cal hidratada recién mezclados pueden ser controlados cuando el conglomerante es parcialmente remplazado por SCMs. La resistencia a compresión de los morteros CL90 aumenta sistem

  4. Study on Phosphogypsum Cementitious Materials%磷石膏基胶凝材料的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何玉龙; 陈德玉; 王舒州; 邓磊; 蔡攀

    2015-01-01

    以未经处理的原状磷石膏为主要原料制备磷石膏基胶凝材料,通过微观分析及测试其力学性能,考察石灰掺量,水泥、粉煤灰比例及养护制度对磷石膏基胶凝材料力学性能的影响。结果表明:(1)该体系最优配比为磷石膏60%,水泥与粉煤灰比例为1∶4,生石灰4%,水料比0.25,减水剂0.2%;(2)该胶凝体系中磷石膏掺量超过60%后,抗压、抗折强度急剧下降;(3)蒸养制度对磷石膏基胶凝材料性能影响较大,在75℃下蒸汽养护10 h,基体强度增长较快且耐水性较高,28 d抗压强度为30.1 MPa,吸水率为8.5%,软化系数达到0.82。%The phosphogypsum-based cementitious material is prepared by original untreated phosphogypsum. The mechanical property of the prepared material was tested and effects of quicklime, cement/lfy ash ratio and curing regimes on the mechanical property were investigated. The results showed that the optimal ratio of the system is 60%for phosphogypsum, mass ratio of cement and lfy ash is 1∶4, 4%quicklime,water feed ratio 0.25 and water-reducer 0.2%. Compressive strength and rupture strength declined sharply when the amount of phosphogypsum more than 60%in PFQC system. Steam curing 10 h under 75℃has a greater inlfuence on the compressive strength for the base that 28 d compressive strength is 30.1 MPa, water absorption is 8.5%, softening coefifcient is 0.82.

  5. AN ANALYSIS ON THE RATE OF CONVERGENCE OF AN ALTERNATING DIRECTION CHARACTERISTIC FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR 3-D COMPRESSIBLE FLOW OF CONTAMINATION FROM NUCLEAR WASTE%三维可压核废料污染问题的交替方向特征有限元格式的敛速分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈蔚

    2001-01-01

    An alternating-direction characteristic Galerkin method for 3-D compressible flow of contamination from nuclear waste in porous media is considered.Time-steping along the characteristics of hyperbolic part of the brine, radionuclide and heat equations is shown to result in smaller time-truncation errors than those resulting from standard methods. With an alternating-direction technique,a multidimensional problem can be solved as a series of one-dimensional problems. Optimal order H1-error estimates are derived.

  6. Effect of carbon nanofiber addition in the mechanical properties and durability of cementitious materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galao, O.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on recent work that is directed at studying the changes in the mechanical properties of Portland cement based mortars due to the addition of carbon nanofiber (CNF. Both flexural and compression strength has been determined and related to the CNF addition to the mix, to the curing time and to the porosity and density of the matrix. Also, corrosion of embedded steel rebars in CNF cement pastes exposed to carbonation and chloride attacks has been investigated. The increase in CNF addition implies higher corrosion intensity and higher levels of mechanical properties.En este artículo se han estudiado los cambios en las propiedades mecánicas de los morteros de cemento Portland debido a la adición de nanofibras de carbono (NFC. Se han determinado las resistencias a flexotracción y a compresión de los morteros en relación a la cantidad de NFC añadidas a la mezcla, al tiempo de curado y a la porosidad y densidad de los mismos. Además se han investigado los niveles de corrosión de barras de acero embebidas en pastas de cemento con NFC expuestos al ataque por carbonatación y por ingreso de cloruros. El aumento en el porcentaje de NFC añadido se traduce en un aumento la intensidad de corrosión registrada y una mejora de las propiedades mecánicas.

  7. An inter-disciplinary assessment of the implementation of a European environmental policy. The municipal waste incineration directive (89/429/CEE); Une evaluation interdisciplinaire de la mise en oeuvre d'une politique environnementale europeenne. La directive relative aux incinerateurs des dechets municipaux (89/429/CEE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schucht, S.

    2005-12-15

    In its communications, the European Commission regularly points to a shortfall between the objectives defined by European environmental Directives and their implementation in the Member States. While from the legal perspective of this institution, such implementation gaps are undesirable, from a normative economic point of view they can in certain cases be justified by efficiency considerations, provided the initial policy is subject to inefficiencies. This thesis analyses the implementation of European environmental Directives. More specifically, it studies in detail the efficiency of the Council Directive of 21 June 1989 on the reduction of air pollution from existing municipal waste-incineration plants (89/429/EEC) and the cost-effectiveness of its implementation in France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. One of the guiding questions is whether possible inefficiencies in this policy may have justified an implementation deficit from an economic point of view and whether implementation has (partly) restored the efficiency of the policy. A review of frequent origins of implementation gaps in European environmental policy suggested by political science based literature highlights two features of European policy making: the separation of competences in policy making and implementation which potentially results in policy makers neglecting implementation issues during the policy design phase; and the heterogeneity of national contexts which arc difficult to accommodate by one European policy. Both are important with respect to implementation costs, as one lesson of economic theory is that minimising the overall costs of a regulation requires to properly take into account local situations. Studying the economic efficiency of the municipal waste incineration Directive with respect to its allocation of tasks between the European and the Member State levels and with respect to the cost-effectiveness of its standard differentiation suggests that this policy

  8. Human waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, Md Nurul; Kroeze, Carolien; Strokal, Maryna

    2017-01-01

    Many people practice open defecation in south Asia. As a result, lot of human waste containing nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) enter rivers. Rivers transport these nutrients to coastal waters, resulting in marine pollution. This source of nutrient pollution is, however, ignored in

  9. Waste disposal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    We should like to remind you that you can have all commonplace, conventional waste (combustible, inert, wood, etc.) disposed of by the TS-FM Group. Requests for the removal of such waste should be made by contacting FM Support on tel. 77777 or by e-mail (Fm.Support@cern.ch). For requests to be acted upon, the following information must be communicated to FM Support: budget code to be debited for the provision and removal of the skip / container. type of skip required (1m3, 4 m3, 7 m3, 15 m3, 20 m3, 30 m3). nature of the waste to be disposed of (bulky objects, cardboard boxes, etc.). building concerned. details of requestor (name, phone number, department, group, etc.). We should also like to inform you that the TS-FM Group can arrange for waste to be removed from work-sites for firms under contract to CERN, provided that the prior authorisation of the CERN Staff Member in charge of the contract is obtained and the relevant disposal/handling charges are paid. You are reminded that the selective sorting o...

  10. Waste disposal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    We should like to remind you that you can have all commonplace, conventional waste (combustible, inert, wood, etc.) disposed of by the TS-FM Group. Requests for the removal of such waste should be made by contacting FM Support on tel. 77777 or by e-mail (Fm.Support@cern.ch). For requests to be acted upon, the following information must be communicated to FM Support: budget code to be debited for the provision and removal of the skip / container; type of skip required (1m3, 4 m3, 7 m3, 15 m3, 20 m3, 30 m3); nature of the waste to be disposed of (bulky objects, cardboard boxes, etc.); building concerned; details of requestor (name, phone number, department, group, etc.). We should also like to inform you that the TS-FM Group can arrange for waste to be removed from work-sites for firms under contract to CERN, provided that the prior authorisation of the CERN Staff Member in charge of the contract is obtained and the relevant disposal/handling charges are paid. You are reminded that the selective sorting...

  11. Waste Form Release Data Package for the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Saripalli, Prasad; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, P. F.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Reed, Lunde R.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2004-09-01

    This data package documents the experimentally derived input data on the representative waste glasses; LAWA44, LAWB45, and LAWC22. This data will be used for Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multi-phases (STORM) simulations of the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) for immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). The STORM code will be used to provide the near-field radionuclide release source term for a performance assessment to be issued in July 2005. Documented in this data package are data related to 1) kinetic rate law parameters for glass dissolution, 2) alkali (Na+)-hydrogen (H+) ion exchange rate, 3) chemical reaction network of secondary phases that form in accelerated weathering tests, and 4) thermodynamic equilibrium constants assigned to these secondary phases. The kinetic rate law and Na+-H+ ion exchange rate were determined from single-pass flow-through experiments. Pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) and product consistency (PCT) tests where used for accelerated weathering or aging of the glasses in order to determine a chemical reaction network of secondary phases that form. The majority of the thermodynamic data used in this data package were extracted from the thermody-namic database package shipped with the geochemical code EQ3/6, version 8.0. Because of the expected importance of 129I release from secondary waste streams being sent to IDF from various thermal treatment processes, parameter estimates for diffusional release and solubility-controlled release from cementitious waste forms were estimated from the available literature.

  12. Hanford Tank 241-C-106: Impact of Cement Reactions on Release of Contaminants from Residual Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, William J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2006-09-01

    The CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is producing risk/performance assessments to support the closure of single-shell tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. As part of this effort, staff at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory were asked to develop release models for contaminants of concern that are present in residual sludge remaining in tank 241-C-106 (C-106) after final retrieval of waste from the tank. Initial work to produce release models was conducted on residual tank sludge using pure water as the leaching agent. The results were reported in an earlier report. The decision has now been made to close the tanks after waste retrieval with a cementitious grout to minimize infiltration and maintain the physical integrity of the tanks. This report describes testing of the residual waste with a leaching solution that simulates the composition of water passing through the grout and contacting the residual waste at the bottom of the tank.

  13. Sustainable waste management through end-of-waste criteria development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorpas, Antonis A

    2016-04-01

    The Waste Framework Directive 2000/98 (WFD) contains specific requirements to define end-of-waste criteria (EWC). The main goal of EWC is to remove and eliminate the administrative loads of waste legislation for safe and high-quality waste materials, thereby facilitating and assisting recycling. The target is to produce effective with high quality of recyclables materials, promoting product standardization and quality and safety assurance, and improving harmonization and legal certainty in the recyclable material markets. At the same time, those objectives aim to develop a plan in order to improve the development and wider use of environmental technologies, which reduce pressure on environment and at the same time address the three dimensions of the Lisbon strategy: growth, jobs and environment. This paper presents the importance of EWC, and the approach of setting EWC as EWC affect several management systems as well as sustainable and clean technologies.

  14. Study on phosphogypsum-fly ash composite cementitious material%磷石膏基复合胶结料性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王培新; 谭克锋

    2012-01-01

    通过XRD、SEM微观分析和宏观强度测试手段,探讨了适合作胶凝材料磷石膏颗粒的最大粒径,并对磷石膏-粉煤灰复合胶凝材料的最优配合比、最佳养护条件和凝结硬化机理进行了研究.结果表明,适合做胶凝材料的磷石膏颗粒最大粒径为4.75mm,磷石膏-粉煤灰复合胶凝材料的最优配合比为:m(磷石膏):m(生石灰):m(水泥):m(粉煤灰)=40:15:10:35,最佳养护温度为90℃,养护时间为10h.采用最优配合比90℃蒸汽养护10h后自然养护的7d、28d的抗压强度分别为31.5 MPa、36.0 MPa.%Through XRD,SEM micro-analysis and strength measurements, this paper investigates into the limiting grain size of phosphogypsum suitable for making cementitious material. Simultaneously. it studies on the optimum mix ratio, the best curing method and hardening mechanism of the phosphogypsum-fly ash composite cementitious material. The result shows that the limiting grain size of phosphogypsum suitable for making cementitious material is 4.75 mm. The optimum mix ratio of the phosphogypsum-fly ash composite cemeniitious material is,phosphogypsum:quick lime:cemenrfly ash equal to 40:15:1035.the best curing temperature is 90℃ and the best curing time is 10h. After 90℃steam curing 10 h and then laboratory environment curing, the 7d and 28 d compressive strength reach 31.5MPa.and 36.0 MPa.

  15. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2012-02-28

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  16. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: • DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste • DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW) • DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW) • U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  17. Secondary Waste Form Screening Test Results—Cast Stone and Alkali Alumino-Silicate Geopolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Eric M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Parker, Kent E.; Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2010-06-28

    PNNL is conducting screening tests on the candidate waste forms to provide a basis for comparison and to resolve the formulation and data needs identified in the literature review. This report documents the screening test results on the Cast Stone cementitious waste form and the Geopolymer waste form. Test results suggest that both the Cast Stone and Geopolymer appear to be viable waste forms for the solidification of the secondary liquid wastes to be treated in the ETF. The diffusivity for technetium from the Cast Stone monoliths was in the range of 1.2 × 10-11 to 2.3 × 10-13 cm2/s during the 63 days of testing. The diffusivity for technetium from the Geopolymer was in the range of 1.7 × 10-10 to 3.8 × 10-12 cm2/s through the 63 days of the test. These values compare with a target of 1 × 10-9 cm2/s or less. The Geopolymer continues to show some fabrication issues with the diffusivities ranging from 1.7 × 10-10 to 3.8 × 10-12 cm2/s for the better-performing batch to from 1.2 × 10-9 to 1.8 × 10-11 cm2/s for the poorer-performing batch. In the future more comprehensive and longer term performance testing will be conducted, to further evaluate whether or not these waste forms will meet the regulation and performance criteria needed to cost-effectively dispose of secondary wastes.

  18. Abundance, Excess, Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rox De Luca

    2016-02-01

    Her recent work focuses on the concepts of abundance, excess and waste. These concerns translate directly into vibrant and colourful garlands that she constructs from discarded plastics collected on Bondi Beach where she lives. The process of collecting is fastidious, as is the process of sorting and grading the plastics by colour and size. This initial gathering and sorting process is followed by threading the components onto strings of wire. When completed, these assemblages stand in stark contrast to the ease of disposability associated with the materials that arrive on the shoreline as evidence of our collective human neglect and destruction of the environment around us. The contrast is heightened by the fact that the constructed garlands embody the paradoxical beauty of our plastic waste byproducts, while also evoking the ways by which those byproducts similarly accumulate in randomly assorted patterns across the oceans and beaches of the planet.

  19. Radioactive waste: show time?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhoef, E.V. [COVRA N.V., Spanjeweg 1, 4455 TW Nieuwdorp (Netherlands); McCombie, Charles; Chapman, Neil [Arius Association, Taefernstrasse 1, CH-4050 Baden (Switzerland)

    2010-07-01

    The basic concept within both EC funded SAPIERR I and SAPIERR II projects (FP6) is that of one or more geological repositories developed in collaboration by two or more European countries to accept spent nuclear fuel, vitrified high-level waste and other long-lived radioactive waste from those partner countries. The SAPIERR II project (Strategic Action Plan for Implementation of Regional European Repositories) examines in detail issues that directly influence the practicability and acceptability of such facilities. This paper describes the work in the SAPIERR II project (2006-2008) on the development of a possible practical implementation strategy for shared, regional repositories in Europe and lays out the first steps in implementing that strategy. (authors)

  20. 40 CFR 266.111 - Standards for direct transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Hazardous Waste Burned in Boilers and Industrial Furnaces § 266.111 Standards for... boilers and industrial furnaces subject to §§ 266.102 or 266.103 if hazardous waste is directly...

  1. Rethinking the waste hierarchy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, C.; Vigsoe, D. (eds.)

    2005-03-01

    There is an increasing need to couple environmental and economic considerations within waste management. Consumers and companies alike generate ever more waste. The waste-policy challenges of the future lie in decoupling growth in waste generation from growth in consumption, and in setting priorities for the waste management. This report discusses the criteria for deciding priorities for waste management methods, and questions the current principles of EU waste policies. The basis for the discussion is the so-called waste hierarchy which has dominated the waste policy in the EU since the mid-1970s. The waste hierarchy ranks possible methods of waste management. According to the waste hierarchy, the very best solution is to reduce the amount of waste. After that, reuse is preferred to recycling which, in turn, is preferred to incineration. Disposal at a landfill is the least favourable solution. (BA)

  2. Other Special Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Line Kai-Sørensen; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    separately from MSW. Some of these other special wastes are briefly described in this chapter with respect to their definition, quantity and composition, and management options. The special wastes mentioned here are batteries, tires, polyvinylchloride (PVC) and food waste.......In addition to the main types of special waste related to municipal solid waste (MSW) mentioned in the previous chapters (health care risk waste, WEEE, impregnated wood, hazardous waste) a range of other fractions of waste have in some countries been defined as special waste that must be handled...

  3. Other Special Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Line Kai-Sørensen; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the main types of special waste related to municipal solid waste (MSW) mentioned in the previous chapters (health care risk waste, WEEE, impregnated wood, hazardous waste) a range of other fractions of waste have in some countries been defined as special waste that must be handled...... separately from MSW. Some of these other special wastes are briefly described in this chapter with respect to their definition, quantity and composition, and management options. The special wastes mentioned here are batteries, tires, polyvinylchloride (PVC) and food waste....

  4. The UK waste input-output table: Linking waste generation to the UK economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemdeeb, Ramy; Al-Tabbaa, Abir; Reynolds, Christian

    2016-10-01

    In order to achieve a circular economy, there must be a greater understanding of the links between economic activity and waste generation. This study introduces the first version of the UK waste input-output table that could be used to quantify both direct and indirect waste arisings across the supply chain. The proposed waste input-output table features 21 industrial sectors and 34 waste types and is for the 2010 time-period. Using the waste input-output table, the study results quantitatively confirm that sectors with a long supply chain (i.e. manufacturing and services sectors) have higher indirect waste generation rates compared with industrial primary sectors (e.g. mining and quarrying) and sectors with a shorter supply chain (e.g. construction). Results also reveal that the construction, mining and quarrying sectors have the highest waste generation rates, 742 and 694 tonne per £1m of final demand, respectively. Owing to the aggregated format of the first version of the waste input-output, the model does not address the relationship between waste generation and recycling activities. Therefore, an updated version of the waste input-output table is expected be developed considering this issue. Consequently, the expanded model would lead to a better understanding of waste and resource flows in the supply chain.

  5. Modelling Waste Output from Trout Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frier, J. O.; From, J.; Larsen, Torben

    1995-01-01

    The aim of waste modelling in aquaculture is to provide tools for simulating input, transformation, output and subsidiary degradation in recipients of organic compounds, nitrogen, and phosphorus. The direct purpose of this modelling is to make it possible for caretakers and water authorities...... to calculate waste discharge from existing and planned aquaculture activities. A special purpose is simulating outcome of waste water treatment and altered feeding programmes. Different submodels must be applied for P, N, and organics, as well as for the different phases of food and waste treatment. Altogether...

  6. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  7. Diffusion and Leaching Behavior of Radionuclides in Category 3 Waste Encasement Concrete and Soil Fill Material – Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Parker, Kent E.; Clayton, Libby N.; Powers, Laura; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2011-08-31

    diffusion of radionuclides may be affected by the formation of structural cracks in concrete, the carbonation of the buried waste form, and any potential effect of metallic iron (in the form of rebars) on the mobility of radionuclides. The radionuclides iodine-129 ({sup 129}I), technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc), and uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) are identified as long-term dose contributors in Category 3 waste (Mann et al. 2001; Wood et al. 1995). Because of their anionic nature in aqueous solutions, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, and carbonate-complexed {sup 238}U may readily leach into the subsurface environment (Serne et al. 1989, 1992a, b, 1993, and 1995). The leachability and/or diffusion of radionuclide species must be measured to assess the long-term performance of waste grouts when contacted with vadose-zone pore water or groundwater. Although significant research has been conducted on the design and performance of cementitious waste forms, the current protocol conducted to assess radionuclide stability within these waste forms has been limited to the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure, Method 1311 Federal Registry (EPA 1992) and ANSI/ANS-16.1 leach test (ANSI 1986). These tests evaluate the performance under water-saturated conditions and do not evaluate the performance of cementitious waste forms within the context of waste repositories which are located within water-deficient vadose zones. Moreover, these tests assess only the diffusion of radionuclides from concrete waste forms and neglect evaluating the mechanisms of retention, stability of the waste form, and formation of secondary phases during weathering, which may serve as long-term secondary hosts for immobilization of radionuclides. The results of recent investigations conducted under arid and semi-arid conditions (Al-Khayat et al. 2002; Garrabrants et al. 2002; Garrabrants and Kosson 2003; Garrabrants et al. 2004; Gervais et al. 2004; Sanchez et al. 2002; Sanchez et al. 2003) provide valuable information suggesting

  8. Bonding in cementitious composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mindess, S. (British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada)) Shah, S.P. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA))

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings discuss the papers presented at the symposium on the subject of high performance cement composites. Some of the topics discussed were; calcium hydroxides treated ceramics microspheres and mechanical properties of high temperature light weight cements; microstructure and chemical variations of class F fly ash; microstructure and bond strength of cement and crack propagation as detected by laser holography and acoustic emission.

  9. Advanced Development Waste Processing Unit for Combat Vehicles. Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-29

    designed. The Waste Disposal Port (WDP) was designed so as to permit waste to be placed into the WPU directly from the Pacto toilet currently in the CCPV...designed to fit within the confines of the waste storage compartment under the Pacto toilet in the CCPV. A WDP was Incorporated in the top of the WPU

  10. A model for improving sustainble green waste recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inghels, D.; Dullaert, W.; Bloemhof-Ruwaard, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Green waste, consisting of leaves, wood cuttings from pruning, and grass collected from parks and gardens, is a source of biomass that can be used for material and energy valorization. Until recently, the EU-Waste Directive 2009/28/EC allowed green waste to be used as feedstock only for compost. Thi

  11. Using Financial Incentives to Manage the Solid Waste Stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Charles J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews two approaches to solid waste stream management that encourage recycling in the beverage industry, a model categorizing public policies directed at diverting postconsumer waste from the waste system, and industry initiatives in the context of these policies. Preemptive and compelled partnerships represent innovations in…

  12. Coupling of Nuclear Waste Form Corrosion and Radionuclide Transports in Presence of Relevant Repository Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Nathalie A. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Neeway, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, Nikolla P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    decrease the need for expensive engineered barriers.Our current work aims are 1) quantifying and understanding the processes associated with glass alteration in contact with Fe-bearing materials; 2) quantifying and understanding the processes associated with glass alteration in presence of MgO (example of engineered barrier used in WIPP); 3) identifying glass alteration suppressants and the processes involved to reach glass alteration suppression; 4) quantifying and understanding the processes associated with Saltstone and Cast Stone (SRS and Hanford cementitious waste forms) in various representative groundwaters; 5) investigating positron annihilation as a new tool for the study of glass alteration; and 6) quantifying and understanding the processes associated with glass alteration under gamma irradiation.

  13. Closure Alternatives for Municipal Waste Landfills.Study Case: Municipal Waste Landfill Medias,Sibiu County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHĂIESCU R.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the recent decades, the environmental impact produced by municipal solid wastes has received specialattention. All new EU countries are involved in the process of implementation of the European Council Directive31/99/EC on the landfill of waste in the European Union. As consequence National legislation, adapted to fit the EUrequirements, focuses on integrated waste management and environmental control of municipal solid waste landfills,from start-up to closure and assimilation into the environment. In Romania, by Government decision, HG 349/2005,was established the obligatoriness of closing unconform waste landfills located in urban areas starting at July 2009. Asconsequence the owner of municipal waste landfill Medias started the proceedings of closure for the landfill. The aim ofthis study is to compare, from an environmental point of view, different alternatives for the closure of the municipalsolid waste landfill Somard-Medias (Romania.

  14. [Health services waste management: a biosafety issue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Leila Posenato; Zanetti-Ramos, Betina Giehl

    2004-01-01

    The subject of "health services waste" is controversial and widely discussed. Biosafety, the principles of which include safeguarding occupational health, community health, and environmental safety, is directly involved in the issue of medical waste management. There are controversies as to the risks posed by medical waste, as evidenced by diverging opinions among authors: some advocate severe approaches on the basis that medical waste is hazardous, while others contend that the potential for infection from medical waste is nonexistent. The Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) has published resolution RDC 33/2003 to standardize medical waste management nationwide. There is an evident need to implement biosafety procedures in this area, including heath care workers' training and provision of information to the general population.

  15. Food Waste Avoidance Actions in Food Retailing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulikovskaja, Viktorija; Aschemann-Witzel, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Food waste occurs throughout the entire food supply chain, from production to consumption of food in households. Retailers are in a unique position to contribute to food waste avoidance, not only by minimizing the amount of waste in their distribution channels but also by influencing consumer...... attitudes and behaviors. This explorative study aims to identify which food waste avoidance actions are conducted by retailers in Denmark, to which extent, and how they vary across food categories and supermarket chain. Based on an analysis of secondary and empirical data collected via observations...... at retail stores, the authors identify 22 food waste avoidance actions in Danish retail. The results provide new insights into food waste avoidance in retail. Based on the findings, suggestions for further research directions are developed that should serve to identify the most efficient customer targeted...

  16. Liquid Radioactive Wastes Treatment: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Tse Hung

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive wastes are generated during nuclear fuel cycle operation, production and application of radioisotope in medicine, industry, research, and agriculture, and as a byproduct of natural resource exploitation, which includes mining and processing of ores, combustion of fossil fuels, or production of natural gas and oil. To ensure the protection of human health and the environment from the hazard of these wastes, a planned integrated radioactive waste management practice should be applied. This work is directed to review recent published researches that are concerned with testing and application of different treatment options as a part of the integrated radioactive waste management practice. The main aim from this work is to highlight the scientific community interest in important problems that affect different treatment processes. This review is divided into the following sections: advances in conventional treatment of aqueous radioactive wastes, advances in conventional treatment of organic liquid wastes, and emerged technological options.

  17. Sustainable treatment of municipal waste water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Augusto; Larsen, Henrik Fred

    treatment technologies are to be assessed. This paper will present the first LCA results from running existing life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) methodology on some of the waste water treatment technologies. Keywords: Sustainability, LCA, micropollutants, waste water treatment technologies.......The main goal of the EU FP6 NEPTUNE program is to develop new and improve existing waste water treatment technologies (WWTT) and sludge handling technologies for municipal waste water, in accordance with the concepts behind the EU Water Framework Directive. As part of this work, the project.......e. heavy metals, pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors) in the waste water. As a novel approach, the potential ecotoxicity and human toxicity impacts from a high number of micropollutants and the potential impacts from pathogens will be included. In total, more that 20 different waste water and sludge...

  18. Federal facilities compliance act waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, J; Gates-Anderson, D; Hollister, R; Painter, S

    1999-07-06

    Site Treatment Plans (STPs) developed through the Federal Facilities Compliance Act pose many technical and administrative challenges. Legacy wastes managed under these plans require Land Disposal Restriction (LDR) compliance through treatment and ultimate disposal. Although capacity has been defined for most of the Department of Energy wastes, many waste streams require further characterization and many need additional treatment and handling beyond LDR criteria to be able to dispose of the waste. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Hazardous Waste Management Division has developed a comprehensive Legacy Waste Program. The program directs work to manage low level and mixed wastes to ensure compliance with nuclear facility rules and its STP. This paper provides a survey of work conducted on these wastes at LLNL. They include commercial waste treatment and disposal, diverse forms of characterization, inventory maintenance and reporting, on-site treatment, and treatability studies. These activities are conducted in an integrated fashion to meet schedules defined in the STP. The processes managing wastes are dynamic due to required integration of administrative, regulatory, and technical concerns spanning the gamut to insure safe proper disposal.

  19. Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ELLEFSON, M.D.

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

  20. Waste remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halas, Nancy J.; Nordlander, Peter; Neumann, Oara

    2017-01-17

    A system including a steam generation system and a chamber. The steam generation system includes a complex and the steam generation system is configured to receive water, concentrate electromagnetic (EM) radiation received from an EM radiation source, apply the EM radiation to the complex, where the complex absorbs the EM radiation to generate heat, and transform, using the heat generated by the complex, the water to steam. The chamber is configured to receive the steam and an object, wherein the object is of medical waste, medical equipment, fabric, and fecal matter.

  1. Hazardous Waste Generators

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The HazWaste database contains generator (companies and/or individuals) site and mailing address information, waste generation, the amount of waste generated etc. of...

  2. Household hazardous waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjelsted, Lotte; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2007-01-01

    'Paint waste', a part of the 'household hazardous waste', amounting to approximately 5 tonnes was collected from recycling stations in two Danish cities. Sorting and analyses of the waste showed paint waste comprised approximately 65% of the mass, paint-like waste (cleaners, fillers, etc.......) comprised 15-25% and foreign items comprised 10-20%. Water-based paint was the dominant part of the paint waste. The chemical composition of the paint waste and the paint-like waste was characterized by an analysis of 27 substances in seven waste fractions. The content of critical substances was tow...... and the paint waste was less contaminated with heavy metals than was the ordinary household waste. This may suggest that households no longer need to source-segregate their paint if the household waste is incinerated, since the presence of a small quantity of solvent-based paint will not be harmful when...

  3. Informative document waste plastics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelhout D; Sein AA; Duvoort GL

    1989-01-01

    This "Informative document waste plastics" forms part of a series of "informative documents waste materials". These documents are conducted by RIVM on the indstruction of the Directorate General for the Environment, Waste Materials Directorate, in behalf of the program of

  4. Deployed Force Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-11-01

    Granath J., Baky A., Thhyselius L., (2004). Municipal Solid Waste Management from a Systems Perspective. Journal of Cleaner Production , forthcoming...Municipal Solid Waste Management from a Systems Perspective. Journal of Cleaner Production , forthcoming article In this paper different waste

  5. Export of electronics equipment waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDou, Joseph; Lovegrove, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Electronics equipment waste ("e-waste") includes discarded computers, computer monitors, television sets, and cell phones. Less than 10% of e-waste is currently recycled. The United States and other developed countries export e-waste primarily to Asia, knowing it carries a real harm to the poor communities where it will be discarded. A 2006 directive bans the use of lead, mercury, cadmium, hexavalent chromium, and certain brominated flame retardants in most electronics products sold in the EU. A similar directive facilitates the development and design of clean electronics products with longer lifespans that are safe and easy to repair, upgrade, and recycle, and will not expose workers and the environment to hazardous chemicals. These useful approaches apply only regionally and cover only a fraction of the hazardous substances used in electronics manufacture, however. There is an urgent need for manufacturers of electronics products to take responsibility for their products from production to end-of-life, and for much tighter controls both on the transboundary movement of e-waste and on the manner in which it is recycled. Manufacturers must develop clean products with longer lifespans that are safe and easy to repair, upgrade, and recycle and will not expose workers and the environment to hazardous chemicals.

  6. Waste brick's potential for use as a pozzolan in blended Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kae-Long; Chen, Bor-Yann; Chiou, Chyow-San; An Cheng

    2010-07-01

    This study investigated the pozzolanic reactions and engineering properties of waste brick-blended cements in relation to various replacement ratios (0-50%). The waste brick consisted of SiO(2) (63.21%), Al(2)O(3) (16.41%), Fe(2)O(3) (6.05%), Na(2)O (1.19%), K(2)O (2.83%) and MgO (1.11%), and had a pozzolanic activity index of 107%. The toxic characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results demonstrate that the heavy-metal content in waste bricks met the Environmental Protection Agency regulatory limits. Experimental results indicate that 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50% of cement can be replaced by waste brick, which causes the initial and final setting times to increase. Compressive strength development was slower in waste brick-blended cement (WBBC) pastes in the early ages; however, strength at the later ages increased significantly. Species analyses demonstrate that the hydrates in WBBC pastes primarily consisted of Ca(OH)(2) and calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel, like those found in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) paste. Pozzolanic reaction products formed in the WBBC pastes, in particular, various reaction products, including hydrates of calcium silicates (CSH), aluminates (CAH) and aluminosilicates (CASH), formed as expected, resulting in consumption of Ca(OH)(2) during the late ages of curing. The changes in the properties of WBBC pastes were significant as blend ratio increased, due to the pores of C-S-H gels and CAH filling via pozzolanic reactions. This filling of gel pores resulted in densification and subsequently enhanced the gel/space ratio and degree of hydration. Experimental results demonstrate waste brick can be supplementary cementitious material.

  7. Formation of stable uranium(VI) colloidal nanoparticles in conditions relevant to radioactive waste disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bots, Pieter; Morris, Katherine; Hibberd, Rosemary; Law, Gareth T W; Mosselmans, J Frederick W; Brown, Andy P; Doutch, James; Smith, Andrew J; Shaw, Samuel

    2014-12-09

    The favored pathway for disposal of higher activity radioactive wastes is via deep geological disposal. Many geological disposal facility designs include cement in their engineering design. Over the long term, interaction of groundwater with the cement and waste will form a plume of a hyperalkaline leachate (pH 10-13), and the behavior of radionuclides needs to be constrained under these extreme conditions to minimize the environmental hazard from the wastes. For uranium, a key component of many radioactive wastes, thermodynamic modeling predicts that, at high pH, U(VI) solubility will be very low (nM or lower) and controlled by equilibrium with solid phase alkali and alkaline-earth uranates. However, the formation of U(VI) colloids could potentially enhance the mobility of U(VI) under these conditions, and characterizing the potential for formation and medium-term stability of U(VI) colloids is important in underpinning our understanding of U behavior in waste disposal. Reflecting this, we applied conventional geochemical and microscopy techniques combined with synchrotron based in situ and ex situ X-ray techniques (small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray adsorption spectroscopy (XAS)) to characterize colloidal U(VI) nanoparticles in a synthetic cement leachate (pH > 13) containing 4.2-252 μM U(VI). The results show that in cement leachates with 42 μM U(VI), colloids formed within hours and remained stable for several years. The colloids consisted of 1.5-1.8 nm nanoparticles with a proportion forming 20-60 nm aggregates. Using XAS and electron microscopy, we were able to determine that the colloidal nanoparticles had a clarkeite (sodium-uranate)-type crystallographic structure. The presented results have clear and hitherto unrecognized implications for the mobility of U(VI) in cementitious environments, in particular those associated with the geological disposal of nuclear waste.

  8. In-situ containment and stabilization of buried waste. Annual report FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, M.L.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1993-10-01

    In FY 1993 research continued on development and testing of grout materials for in-situ containment and stabilization of buried waste. Specifically, the work was aimed at remediation of the Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, New Mexico as part of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). The work on grouting materials was initiated in FY 1992 and the accomplishments for that year are documented in the previous annual report (Allan, Kukacka and Heiser, 1992). The remediation plan involves stabilization of the chromium plume, placement of impermeable vertical and horizontal barriers to isolate the landfill and installation of a surface cap. The required depth of subsurface barriers is approximately 33 m (100 ft). The work concentrated on optimization of grout formulations for use as grout and soil cement barriers and caps. The durability of such materials was investigated, in addition to shrinkage cracking resistance, compressive and flexural strength and permeability. The potential for using fibers in grouts to control cracking was studied. Small scale field trials were conducted to test the practicality of using the identified formulations and to measure the long term performance. Large scale trials were conducted at Sandia as part of the Subsurface Barrier Emplacement Technology Program. Since it was already determined in FY 1992 that cementitious grouts could effectively stabilize the chromium plume at the CWL after pre-treatment is performed, the majority of the work was devoted to the containment aspect.

  9. Fatigue Performance and Multiscale Mechanisms of Concrete Toughened by Polymers and Waste Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For improving bending toughness and fatigue performance of brittle cement-based composites, two types of water-soluble polymers (such as dispersible latex powder and polyvinyl alcohol powder and waste tire-rubber powders are added to concrete as admixtures. Multiscale toughening mechanisms of these additions in concretes were comprehensively investigated. Four-point bending fatigue performance of four series concretes is conducted under a stress level of 0.70. The results show that the effects of dispersible latex powder on bending toughness and fatigue life of concrete are better than those of polyvinyl alcohol powder. Furthermore, the bending fatigue lives of concrete simultaneously containing polymers and waste rubber powders are larger than those of concrete with only one type of admixtures. The multiscale physics-chemical mechanisms show that high bonding effect and high elastic modulus of polymer films as well as good elastic property and crack-resistance of waste tire-rubber powders are beneficial for improving bending toughness and fatigue life of cementitious composites.

  10. Waste Characterization Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Naranjo, Felicia Danielle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-02

    This report discusses ways to classify waste as outlined by LANL. Waste Generators must make a waste determination and characterize regulated waste by appropriate analytical testing or use of acceptable knowledge (AK). Use of AK for characterization requires several source documents. Waste characterization documentation must be accurate, sufficient, and current (i.e., updated); relevant and traceable to the waste stream’s generation, characterization, and management; and not merely a list of information sources.

  11. BIOGAS PRODUCTION FROM TOFU LIQUID WASTE ON TREATED AGRICULTURAL WASTES

    OpenAIRE

    Budy Rahmat; Tedi Hartoyo; Yaya Sunarya

    2014-01-01

    The Tofu Liquid Waste (TLW) as a pollution might be processed into biogas which was environmentally friendly and had potential to replace burning wood or oil. However, the waste could not directly be employed as the biogas substrate due to the high nitrogen content which was not suitable to the methanogen microorganism on the biogas digester and did not produce biogas. It was therefore necessary to adapt the carbon-nitrogen ratio in TLW with the addition of other organic materials that had a ...

  12. Waste Transfer Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    tion and transport is usually the most costly part of any waste management system; and when waste is transported over a considerable distance or for a long time, transferring the waste from the collection vehicles to more efficient transportation may be economically beneficial. This involves...... a transfer station where the transfer takes place. These stations may also be accessible by private people, offering flexibility to the waste system, including facilities for bulky waste, household hazardous waste and recyclables. Waste transfer may also take place on the collection route from small...... describes the main features of waste transfer stations, including some considerations about the economical aspects on when transfer is advisable....

  13. Frequent Questions About Universal Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frequent questions such as Who is affected by the universal waste regulations? What is “mercury-containing equipment”? How are waste batteries managed under universal waste? How are waste pesticides managed under universal waste?

  14. Global capacity, potentials and trends of solid waste research and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachukwu, Michael A; Ronald, Mersky; Feng, Huan

    2017-09-01

    In this study, United States, China, India, United Kingdom, Nigeria, Egypt, Brazil, Italy, Germany, Taiwan, Australia, Canada and Mexico were selected to represent the global community. This enabled an overview of solid waste management worldwide and between developed and developing countries. These are countries that feature most in the International Conference on Solid Waste Technology and Management (ICSW) over the past 20 years. A total of 1452 articles directly on solid waste management and technology were reviewed and credited to their original country of research. Results show significant solid waste research potentials globally, with the United States leading by 373 articles, followed by India with 230 articles. The rest of the countries are ranked in the order of: UK > Taiwan > Brazil > Nigeria > Italy > Japan > China > Canada > Germany >Mexico > Egypt > Australia. Global capacity in solid waste management options is in the order of: Waste characterisation-management > waste biotech/composting > waste to landfill > waste recovery/reduction > waste in construction > waste recycling > waste treatment-reuse-storage > waste to energy > waste dumping > waste education/public participation/policy. It is observed that the solid waste research potential is not a measure of solid waste management capacity. The results show more significant research impacts on solid waste management in developed countries than in developing countries where economy, technology and society factors are not strong. This article is targeted to motivate similar study in each country, using solid waste research articles from other streamed databases to measure research impacts on solid waste management.

  15. PLASMA GASIFICATION OF WASTE PLASTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Mączka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the process of obtaining liquid fuels and fuel gas in the process of plasma processing of organic materials, including waste plastics. The concept of plasma pyrolysis of plastics was presented and on its basis a prototype installation was developed. The article describes a general rule of operating the installation and its elements in the process and basic operation parameters determined during its start-up. Initial results of processing plastics and the directions further investigations are also discussed. The effect of the research is to be the design of effective technology of obtaining fuels from gasification/pyrolysis of organic waste and biomass.

  16. Introduction to Waste Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Solid waste management is as old as human civilization, although only considered an engineering discipline for about one century. The change from the previous focus on public cleansing of the cities to modern waste management was primarily driven by industrialization, which introduced new materials...... and chemicals, dramatically changing the types and composition of waste, and by urbanization making waste management in urban areas a complicated and costly logistic operation. This book focuses on waste that commonly appears in the municipal waste management system. This chapter gives an introduction to modern...... waste management, including issues as waste definition, problems associated with waste, waste management criteria and approaches to waste management. Later chapters introduce aspects of engineering (Chapter 1.2), economics (Chapter 1.3) and regulation (Chapter 1.4)....

  17. Benchmarking of DFLAW Solid Secondary Wastes and Processes with UK/Europe Counterparts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Elvie E. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States); Swanberg, David J. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States); Surman, J. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States); Kay, R. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, K. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-05-08

    This report provides information and background on UK solid wastes and waste processes that are similar to those which will be generated by the Direct-Feed Low Activity Waste (DFLAW) facilities at Hanford. The aim is to further improve the design case for stabilizing and immobilizing of solid secondary wastes, establish international benchmarking and review possibilities for innovation.

  18. Chemical composition of material fractions in Danish household waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Christian; Petersen, Claus; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2009-01-01

    The chemical composition of Danish household waste was determined by two approaches: a direct method where the chemical composition (61 substances) of 48 material fractions was determined after hand sorting of about 20 tonnes of waste collected from 2200 households; and an indirect method where...... batches of 80-1200 tonnes of unsorted household waste was incinerated and the content of the waste determined from the content of the outputs from the incinerator. The indirect method is believed to better represent the small but highly contaminated material fractions (e,g., batteries) than the direct...... method, because of the larger quantities included and the more homogenous material to sample from. Differences between the direct and the direct methods led to corrections in the of heavy metal concentration of a few fractions. The majority of the energy content of the waste originates from organic waste...

  19. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 3, Part 1, Waste Management Facility report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous