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Sample records for dimercaptopropanol

  1. Synthesis and characterization of lipophilic bismuth dimercaptopropanol nanoparticles and their effects on oral microorganisms growth and biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badireddy, Appala Raju; Hernandez-Delgadillo, Rene; Sánchez-Nájera, Rosa Isela; Chellam, Shankararaman; Cabral-Romero, Claudio

    2014-06-01

    The increasing prevalence of resistance among pathogenic microorganisms to common antibiotics has become one of the most significant concerns in modern medicine. Nanotechnology offers a new alternative to develop materials with interesting applications in many areas of biological sciences and medicine. While some bismuth derivatives have been employed to treat vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, and stomach pain, the antimicrobial properties of bismuth in its nanoparticulate form have not been extensively studied. The objective of this investigation was to analyze the bactericidal, fungicidal, and antibiofilm activities of bismuth dimercaptopropanol nanoparticles (BisBAL NPs) against oral microbes. The nanoparticles are composed of 18.7 nm crystallites on average and have a rhombohedral structure, agglomerating into chains-like or clusters of small nanoparticles. Our results showed that stable colloidal BisBAL NPs inhibited Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus gordonii growth by more than 70 % at 0.1 µM, showing a twelve thousand fold higher effectiveness compared with 1.2 mM chlorhexidine, the oral antiseptic most used by dentists. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of BisBAL NPs for S. mutans and S. gordonii was 5 µM. MIC of BisBAL NPs for Candida albicans was 10 µM. However, 100 µM of BisBAL NPs were required to interfere with planktonic growth of and biofilm formation by a multi-species population of bacteria. Our experiments show that bactericidal activity of BisBAL NPs was similar to antibiotics such as vancomycin and rifampicin. Based on MTT cell viability assays, we hypothesize that BisBAL NPs potentially act on key enzymes, altering their metabolism, and cause cell lysis. All together, these findings show the efficacy of BisBAL NPs as a broad spectrum antimicrobial agent which could reduce antibiotic usage.

  2. Chelation therapy in intoxications with mercury, lead and copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, yang; Skaug, Marit Aralt; Andersen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    In the present review we provide an update of the appropriate use of chelating agents in the treatment of intoxications with compounds of mercury, lead and copper. The relatively new chelators meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and 2,3-dimercapto-propanesulphonate (DMPS) can effectively...... mobilize deposits of mercury as well as of lead into the urine. These drugs can be administered orally and have relatively low toxicity compared to the classical antidote dimercaptopropanol (BAL). d-Penicillamine has been widely used in copper overload, although 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid...

  3. A review of pitfalls and progress in chelation treatment of metal poisonings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole; Aaseth, Jan

    2016-01-01

    to clinical settings. Intramuscular administration of dimercaptopropanol (BAL) has until now been used in acute arsenic, lead, and mercury poisonings, but repeated BAL administration increased the brain uptake of As, Pb and Hg in experimental animals. Also, diethyl dithiocarbamate (DDC) has been used...... as antidote in acute experimental animal parenteral Cd poisoning, and both DDC and tetraethylthiuram disulfide (TTD, disulfiram, Antabuse) have been used in nickel allergic patients. However, even one dose of DDC given immediately after oral Cd or Ni increased their brain uptake considerably. The calcium salt...

  4. Chelation in metal intoxication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaseth, Jan; Skaug, Marit Aralt; Cao, yang

    2015-01-01

    The present review provides an update of the general principles for the investigation and use of chelating agents in the treatment of intoxications by metals. The clinical use of the old chelators EDTA (ethylenediamine tetraacetate) and BAL (2,3-dimercaptopropanol) is now limited due to the incon......The present review provides an update of the general principles for the investigation and use of chelating agents in the treatment of intoxications by metals. The clinical use of the old chelators EDTA (ethylenediamine tetraacetate) and BAL (2,3-dimercaptopropanol) is now limited due...... to the inconvenience of parenteral administration, their own toxicity and tendency to increase the neurotoxicity of several metals. The hydrophilic dithiol chelators DMSA (meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid) and DMPS (2,3-dimercapto-propanesulphonate) are less toxic and more efficient than BAL in the clinical treatment...... of heavy metal poisoning, and available as capsules for oral use. In copper overload, DMSA appears to be a potent antidote, although d-penicillamine is still widely used. In the chelation of iron, the thiols are inefficient, since iron has higher affinity for ligands with nitrogen and oxygen, but the new...

  5. Spectroscopic Characterization of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens: Suppression using Sub-Inhibitory Concentrations of Bismuth Thiols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badireddy, Appala R.; Korpol, Bhoom Reddy; Chellam, Shankararaman; Gassman, Paul L.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Lea, Alan S.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2008-10-21

    Free and capsular EPS produced by Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens were characterized in detail using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Total EPS production decreased upon treatment with sub-inhibitory concentrations of lipophilic bismuth thiols (bismuth dimercaptopropanol, BisBAL; bismuth ethanedithiol, BisEDT; and bismuth pyrithione, BisPYR), BisBAL being most effective. Bismuth thiols also influenced acetylation and carboxylation of polysaccharides in EPS from S. marcescens. Extensive homology between EPS samples in the presence and absence of bismuth was observed with proteins, polysaccharides, and nucleic acids varying predominantly only in the total amount expressed. Second derivative analysis of the amide I region of FTIR spectra revealed decreases in protein secondary structures in the presence of bismuth thiols. Hence, anti-fouling properties of bismuth thiols appear to originate in their ability to suppress O-acetylation and protein secondary structures in addition to total EPS secretion.

  6. Selective masking and demasking for the stepwise complexometric determination of aluminium, lead and zinc from the same solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Nahar

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A complexometric method based on selective masking and de-masking has been developed for the rapid determination of aluminium, lead and zinc from the same solution in glass and glass frit samples. The determination is carried out using potassium cyanide to mask zinc, and excess disodium salt of EDTA to mask lead and aluminium. The excess EDTA was titrated with standard Mn(IISO4 solution using Erichrome Black-T as the indicator. Subsequently selective de-masking agents – triethanolamine, 2,3-dimercaptopropanol and a formaldehyde/acetone mixture – were used to determine quantities of aluminium, lead and zinc in a stepwise and selective manner. Results The accuracy of the method was established by analysing glass certified reference material NBS 1412. The standard deviation of the measurements, calculated by analysing five replicates of each sample, was found to be less than 1.5% for the method proposed. Conclusion The novelty of the method lies in its simplicity and accuracy afforded by there not being a need for a prior separation or instrumentation. The proposed method was found to be highly selective for the precise determination of aluminum, zinc and lead in the routine analysis of glass batch and allied materials.

  7. Tributyltin interacts with mitochondria and induces cytochrome c release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikimi, A; Kira, Y; Kasahara, E; Sato, E F; Kanno, T; Utsumi, K; Inoue, M

    2001-01-01

    Although triorganotins are potent inducers of apoptosis in various cell types, the critical targets of these compounds and the mechanisms by which they lead to cell death remain to be elucidated. There are two major pathways by which apoptotic cell death occurs: one is triggered by a cytokine mediator and the other is by a mitochondrion-dependent mechanism. To elucidate the mechanism of triorganotin-induced apoptosis, we studied the effect of tributyltin on mitochondrial function. We found that moderately low doses of tributyltin decrease mitochondrial membrane potential and induce cytochrome c release by a mechanism inhibited by cyclosporine A and bongkrekic acid. Tributyltin-induced cytochrome c release is also prevented by dithiols such as dithiothreitol and 2,3-dimercaptopropanol but not by monothiols such as GSH, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, L-cysteine and 2-mercaptoethanol. Further studies with phenylarsine oxide agarose revealed that tributyltin interacts with the adenine nucleotide translocator, a functional constituent of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, which is selectively inhibited by dithiothreitol. These results suggest that, at low doses, tributyltin interacts selectively with critical thiol residues in the adenine nucleotide translocator and opens the permeability transition pore, thereby decreasing membrane potential and releasing cytochrome c from mitochondria, a series of events consistent with established mechanistic models of apoptosis. PMID:11368793

  8. Rhenium-186 direct labelling HIgG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lungu, V.; Mihailescu, G.; Dumitrescu, G.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop and improve existing radiolabelling techniques of peptides and monoclonal antibodies with 186 Re for achievement of potential agents for cancer targeted radiotherapy. There were selected methods and techniques for the direct labelling of intact HIgG by studding chemical and radiochemical processes of -S-S- bridges prereduction, reduction of 186 ReO 4 - and coupling reaction of rhenium with HIgG. The -S-S- bridges prereduction of HIgG to sulfhydryls was effected using different reducing agents: ascorbic acid, 2,3 dimercaptopropanol, cysteine, active hydrogen. The prereduction reactions are controlled by masic ratios of HIgG/reduction agent, pH, temperature and time of incubation. A pH=4.5 and a 24 hours incubation time are in the advantage of the prereduction yield. The labelling with 186 Re of prereduced HIgG with ascorbic acid or active hydrogen and 37 deg. C incubation in 22 hours releases 92% radiochemical purity. (author)

  9. Biomolecule labelling by 186 Re

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lungu, Valeria Viorica; Mihailescu, Gabriela; Dumitrescu, Gabriela

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop and improve the existing radiolabelling techniques of peptides and monoclonal antibodies with 186 Re and 188 Re as potential agents for cancer targeted radiotherapy. We selected the following methods and techniques for direct labelling of peptides and monoclonal antibody: 1. Prereduction of -S-S- bridges of biomolecule to sulfhydryls using reducing agents: ascorbic acid, cysteine, active hydrogen, 2,3 dimercaptopropanol. The prereduction reactions are controlled by massic ratios of reduction agents/biomolecule, pH, temperature and time of incubation; 2. Reduction of 186 Re O 4 - stannous chloride in acid and alkaline pH; 3. Coupling reaction of 186 Re (red) with the biomolecule controlled by the time and temperature of incubation, the influence of pH regarding the binding of 186 Re to the biomolecules. The quality control was effected by chromatography techniques (paper and elution gel chromatography) on labeled biomolecule before and after purification. The elution gel chromatography was spectrophotometricaly monitored at 280 nm. In the same time the radioactivity of samples was measured using a gamma counter. All the results confirm in vitro stability of labeled biomolecule. The biological evaluation studies regarding accumulation and biological affinity will be controlled by scintigraphy method. Biodistribution studies will be effected to Walker tumor bearing animals at 4 and 24 hours after injections. (authors)

  10. Metal chelators and neurotoxicity: lead, mercury, and arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørklund, Geir; Mutter, Joachim; Aaseth, Jan

    2017-12-01

    This article reviews the clinical use of the metal chelators sodium 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanesulfonate (DMPS), meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), and calcium disodium edetate (CaEDTA, calcium EDTA) in overexposure and poisonings with salts of lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), and arsenic (As). DMSA has considerably lower toxicity than the classic heavy metal antagonist BAL (2,3-dimercaptopropanol) and is also less toxic than DMPS. Because of its adverse effects, CaEDTA should be replaced by DMSA as the antidote of choice in treating moderate Pb poisoning. Combination therapy with BAL and CaEDTA was previously recommended in cases of severe acute Pb poisoning with encephalopathy. We suggest that BAL in such cases acted as a shuttling Pb transporter from the intra- to the extracellular space. The present paper discusses if a combination of the extracellularly distributed DMSA with the ionophore, Monensin may provide a less toxic combination for Pb mobilization by increasing both the efflux of intracellularly deposited Pb and the urinary Pb excretion. Anyhow, oral therapy with DMSA should be continued with several intermittent courses. DMPS and DMSA are also promising antidotes in Hg poisoning, whereas DMPS seems to be a more efficient agent against As poisoning. However, new insight indicates that a combination of low-dosed BAL plus DMPS could be a preferred antidotal therapy to obtain mobilization of the intracerebral deposits into the circulation for subsequent rapid urinary excretion.

  11. Modeling the chelation of As(III) in lewisite by dithiols using density functional theory and solvent-assisted proton exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Lenora K; Bayse, Craig A

    2015-12-01

    Dithiols such as British anti-lewisite (BAL, rac-2,3-dimercaptopropanol) are an important class of antidotes for the blister agent lewisite (trans-2-chlorovinyldichloroarsine) and, more generally, are chelating agents for arsenic and other toxic metals. The reaction of the vicinal thiols of BAL with lewisite through the chelation of the As(III) center has been modeled using density functional theory (DFT) and solvent-assisted proton exchange (SAPE), a microsolvation method that uses a network of water molecules to mimic the role of bulk solvent in models of aqueous phase chemical reactions. The small activation barriers for the stepwise SN2-type nucleophilic attack of BAL on lewisite (0.7-4.9kcal/mol) are consistent with the favorable leaving group properties of the chloride and the affinity of As(III) for soft sulfur nucleophiles. Small, but insignificant, differences in activation barriers were found for the initial attack of the primary versus secondary thiol of BAL and the R vs S enantiomer. An examination of the relative stability of various dithiol-lewisite complexes shows that ethanedithiols like BAL form the most favorable chelation complexes because the angles formed in five-membered ring are most consistent with the hybridization of As(III). More obtuse S-As-S angles are required for larger chelate rings, but internal As⋯N or As⋯O interactions can enhance the stability of moderate-sized rings. The low barriers for lewisite detoxification by BAL and the greater stability of the chelation complexes of small dithiols are consistent with the rapid reversal of toxicity demonstrated in previously reported animal models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A review of pitfalls and progress in chelation treatment of metal poisonings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Ole; Aaseth, Jan

    2016-12-01

    Most acute and chronic human metal poisonings are due to oral or inhalation exposure. Almost 80% of published animal experiments on chelation in metal poisoning used single or repeated intraperitoneal, intramuscular or intravenous administration of metal and chelator, impeding extrapolation to clinical settings. Intramuscular administration of dimercaptopropanol (BAL) has until now been used in acute arsenic, lead, and mercury poisonings, but repeated BAL administration increased the brain uptake of As, Pb and Hg in experimental animals. Also, diethyl dithiocarbamate (DDC) has been used as antidote in acute experimental animal parenteral Cd poisoning, and both DDC and tetraethylthiuram disulfide (TTD, disulfiram, Antabuse) have been used in nickel allergic patients. However, even one dose of DDC given immediately after oral Cd or Ni increased their brain uptake considerably. The calcium salt of ethylenediamminetetraacetic acid (CaEDTA) but not dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) increased the brain uptake of Pb. In oral Cd or Hg poisoning, early oral administration of DMSA or dimercaptopropane sulfonate (DMPS) increased survival and reduced intestinal metal uptake. Oral administration of Prussian Blue or resins with fixed chelating groups that are not absorbed offer chelation approaches for decorporation after oral exposure to various metals. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) nebulizers for pulmonary chelation after inhalation exposure need further development. Also, combined chelation with more than one compound may offer extensive advances. Solid knowledge on the chemistry of metal chelates together with relevant animal experiments should guide development of chelation procedures to alleviate and not aggravate the clinical status of poisoned patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Developing the 186 Re radiolabelling procedures of peptides and monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lungu, V.; Mihailescu, G.

    1999-01-01

    Mono and poli-clonal antibodies are the most recent candidate molecules for the radiopharmaceutical preparation used in radioimmunotherapy and radiodiagnostic. Our study presents results in 186 Re direct labelling of HIgG (Human Immunoglobulin G) poli-clonal antibody. The steps in labelling process are: 1. pre-reduction -S-S- bridges of HIgG molecule with ascorbic acid in pH = 3.5 - 4.5; 2. preparation of the reducing system for 186 ReO 4 - in presence of Sn 2+ ions excess and 3. coupling 186 Re (red) to -SH groups of biomolecules. The specific reactions of each step above are controlled by: incubation time and temperature, pH, molar ratio 186 Re: HIgG. 186 Re-HIgG samples were purified by gel elution chromatography method and the quality control was performed by chromatography techniques. To labelled of HIgG we effected the pre-reduction of -S-S- bridges of biomolecules to sulfhydryls using the following reducing agents: ascorbic acid, cysteine, active hydrogen, 2,3 dimercaptopropanol. The pre-reduction reactions are controlled by mass ratios of reduction agent/biomolecule, pH, temperature and time of incubation. HIgG was the biomolecule used in the pre-reduction reactions. The specific parameters for each systems are presented. The stannous chloride was used as reducing agent in two systems, SnCl 2 : 0.05 N HCl and SnCl 2 : 20 mg/ml citric acid. The coupling reaction of 186 Re (red) with the biomolecule has been controlled by time and incubation temperature and the influence of pH regarding the binding of 186 Re to the biomolecule. 186 Re-HIgG was obtained by: i) incubation at the room temperature, 1 hour time of HIgG in thiol form and 186 Re in reducing form and ii) incubation of HIgG in thiol form, at 37 deg C and 22 hours time, with adding after pre-reduction of SnCl 2 and Na 186 ReO 4 . Quality control was effected by chromatography techniques (paper and gel chromatography) on labelled biomolecule before and after purification. The elution gel chromatography