WorldWideScience

Sample records for dimensional atomic crystals

  1. Zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons: one-dimensional resonant channels in two-dimensional atomic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez, Carlos J; Pereira, Ana L C; Schulz, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate phosphorene zigzag nanoribbons as a platform for constriction engineering. In the presence of a constriction at one of the edges, quantum confinement of edge-protected states reveals conductance peaks, if the edge is uncoupled from the other edge. If the constriction is narrow enough to promote coupling between edges, it gives rise to Fano-like resonances as well as antiresonances in the transmission spectrum. These effects are shown to mimic an atomic chain like behavior in a two dimensional atomic crystal. PMID:28144546

  2. Zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons: one-dimensional resonant channels in two-dimensional atomic crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos. J. Páez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically investigate phosphorene zigzag nanoribbons as a platform for constriction engineering. In the presence of a constriction at one of the edges, quantum confinement of edge-protected states reveals conductance peaks, if the edge is uncoupled from the other edge. If the constriction is narrow enough to promote coupling between edges, it gives rise to Fano-like resonances as well as antiresonances in the transmission spectrum. These effects are shown to mimic an atomic chain like behavior in a two dimensional atomic crystal.

  3. Optical coupling between atomically thin black phosphorus and a two dimensional photonic crystal nanocavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Yasutomo; Moriya, Rai; Yabuki, Naoto; Arai, Miho; Kakuda, Masahiro; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Machida, Tomoki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2017-05-01

    Atomically thin black phosphorus (BP) is an emerging two dimensional (2D) material exhibiting bright photoluminescence in the near infrared region. Coupling its radiation to photonic nanostructures will be an important step toward the realization of 2D material based nanophotonic devices that operate efficiently in the near infrared region, which includes the technologically important optical telecommunication wavelength bands. In this letter, we demonstrate the optical coupling between atomically thin BP and a 2D photonic crystal nanocavity. We employed a home-build dry transfer apparatus for placing a thin BP flake on the surface of the nanocavity. Their optical coupling was analyzed through measuring cavity mode emission under optical carrier injection at room temperature.

  4. Band structure of one-dimensional doped photonic crystal with three level atoms using the Fresnel coefficients method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, A.; Rahmat, A.; Bakkeshizadeh, S.

    2018-01-01

    We consider a one-dimensional photonic crystal (1DPC) composed of double-layered dielectrics. Electric permittivity and magnetic permeability of this crystal depends on the incident electromagnetic wave frequency. We suppose that three level atoms have been added to the second layer of each dielectric and this photonic crystal (PC) has been doped. These atoms can be added to the layer with different rates. In this paper, we have calculated and compared the band structure of the mentioned PC considering the effect of added atoms to the second layer with different rates through the Fresnel coefficients method. We find out that according to the effective medium theory, the electric permittivity of the second layer changes. Also the band structure of PC for both TE and TM polarizations changes, too. The width of bandgaps related to “zero averaged refractive index” and “Bragg” increases. Moreover, new gap branches appear in new frequencies at both TE and TM polarizations. In specific state, two branches of “zero permittivity” gap appear in the PC band structure related to TM polarization. With increasing the amount of the filling rate of total volume with three level atoms, we observe a lot of changes in the PC band structure.

  5. Phase time delay and Hartman effect in a one-dimensional photonic crystal with four-level atomic defect layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Rabia; Ali, Abu Bakar; Abbas, Muqaddar; Badshah, Fazal; Qamar, Sajid

    2017-08-01

    The Hartman effect is revisited using a Gaussian beam incident on a one-dimensional photonic crystal (1DPC) having a defect layer doped with four-level atoms. It is considered that each atom of the defect layer interacts with three driving fields, whereas a Gaussian beam of width w is used as a probe light to study Hartman effect. The atom-field interaction inside the defect layer exhibits electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The 1DPC acts as positive index material (PIM) and negative index material (NIM) corresponding to the normal and anomalous dispersion of the defect layer, respectively, via control of the phase associated with the driving fields and probe detuning. The positive and negative Hartman effects are noticed for PIM and NIM, respectively, via control of the relative phase corresponding to the driving fields and probe detuning. The advantage of using four-level EIT system is that a much smaller absorption of the transmitted beam occurs as compared to three-level EIT system corresponding to the anomalous dispersion, leading to negative Hartman effect.

  6. Monolayer atomic crystal molecular superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; He, Qiyuan; Halim, Udayabagya; Liu, Yuanyue; Zhu, Enbo; Lin, Zhaoyang; Xiao, Hai; Duan, Xidong; Feng, Ziying; Cheng, Rui; Weiss, Nathan O.; Ye, Guojun; Huang, Yun-Chiao; Wu, Hao; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Shakir, Imran; Liao, Lei; Chen, Xianhui; Goddard, William A., III; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2018-03-01

    Artificial superlattices, based on van der Waals heterostructures of two-dimensional atomic crystals such as graphene or molybdenum disulfide, offer technological opportunities beyond the reach of existing materials. Typical strategies for creating such artificial superlattices rely on arduous layer-by-layer exfoliation and restacking, with limited yield and reproducibility. The bottom-up approach of using chemical-vapour deposition produces high-quality heterostructures but becomes increasingly difficult for high-order superlattices. The intercalation of selected two-dimensional atomic crystals with alkali metal ions offers an alternative way to superlattice structures, but these usually have poor stability and seriously altered electronic properties. Here we report an electrochemical molecular intercalation approach to a new class of stable superlattices in which monolayer atomic crystals alternate with molecular layers. Using black phosphorus as a model system, we show that intercalation with cetyl-trimethylammonium bromide produces monolayer phosphorene molecular superlattices in which the interlayer distance is more than double that in black phosphorus, effectively isolating the phosphorene monolayers. Electrical transport studies of transistors fabricated from the monolayer phosphorene molecular superlattice show an on/off current ratio exceeding 107, along with excellent mobility and superior stability. We further show that several different two-dimensional atomic crystals, such as molybdenum disulfide and tungsten diselenide, can be intercalated with quaternary ammonium molecules of varying sizes and symmetries to produce a broad class of superlattices with tailored molecular structures, interlayer distances, phase compositions, electronic and optical properties. These studies define a versatile material platform for fundamental studies and potential technological applications.

  7. Second quantization and atomic spontaneous emission inside one-dimensional photonic crystals via a quasinormal-modes approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severini, S.; Settimi, A.; Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M.; Napoli, A.; Messina, A.

    2004-01-01

    An extension of the second quantization scheme based on the quasinormal-modes theory to one-dimensional photonic band gap (PBG) structures is discussed. Such structures, treated as double open optical cavities, are studied as part of a compound closed system including the electromagnetic radiative external bath. The electromagnetic field inside the photonic crystal is successfully represented by a new class of modes called quasinormal modes. Starting from this representation we introduce the Feynman's propagator to calculate the decay rate of a dipole inside a PBG structure, related to the density of modes, in the presence of the vacuum fluctuations outside the one-dimensional cavity

  8. Anisotropic diffusion of point defects in a two-dimensional crystal of streptavidin observed by high-speed atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Daisuke; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Kodera, Noriyuki; Ando, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    The diffusion of individual point defects in a two-dimensional streptavidin crystal formed on biotin-containing supported lipid bilayers was observed by high-speed atomic force microscopy. The two-dimensional diffusion of monovacancy defects exhibited anisotropy correlated with the two crystallographic axes in the orthorhombic C 222 crystal; in the 2D plane, one axis (the a-axis) is comprised of contiguous biotin-bound subunit pairs whereas the other axis (the b-axis) is comprised of contiguous biotin-unbound subunit pairs. The diffusivity along the b-axis is approximately 2.4 times larger than that along the a-axis. This anisotropy is ascribed to the difference in the association free energy between the biotin-bound subunit-subunit interaction and the biotin-unbound subunit-subunit interaction. The preferred intermolecular contact occurs between the biotin-unbound subunits. The difference in the intermolecular binding energy between the two types of subunit pair is estimated to be approximately 0.52 kcal mol -1 . Another observed dynamic behavior of point defects was fusion of two point defects into a larger defect, which occurred much more frequently than the fission of a point defect into smaller defects. The diffusivity of point defects increased with increasing defect size. The fusion and the higher diffusivity of larger defects are suggested to be involved in the mechanism for the formation of defect-free crystals

  9. Atomic crystals resistive switching memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chunsen; Zhang David Wei; Zhou Peng

    2017-01-01

    Facing the growing data storage and computing demands, a high accessing speed memory with low power and non-volatile character is urgently needed. Resistive access random memory with 4F 2 cell size, switching in sub-nanosecond, cycling endurances of over 10 12 cycles, and information retention exceeding 10 years, is considered as promising next-generation non-volatile memory. However, the energy per bit is still too high to compete against static random access memory and dynamic random access memory. The sneak leakage path and metal film sheet resistance issues hinder the further scaling down. The variation of resistance between different devices and even various cycles in the same device, hold resistive access random memory back from commercialization. The emerging of atomic crystals, possessing fine interface without dangling bonds in low dimension, can provide atomic level solutions for the obsessional issues. Moreover, the unique properties of atomic crystals also enable new type resistive switching memories, which provide a brand-new direction for the resistive access random memory. (topical reviews)

  10. Atomic lattice excitons: from condensates to crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantian, A; Daley, A J; Toermae, P; Zoller, P

    2007-01-01

    We discuss atomic lattice excitons (ALEs), bound particle-hole pairs formed by fermionic atoms in two bands of an optical lattice. Such a system provides a clean set-up, with tunable masses and interactions, to study fundamental properties of excitons including exciton condensation. We also find that for a large effective mass ratio between particles and holes, effective long-range interactions can mediate the formation of an exciton crystal, for which superfluidity is suppressed. Using a combination of mean-field treatments, bosonized theory based on a Born-Oppenheimer approximation, and one-dimensional (1D) numerical computation, we discuss the properties of ALEs under varying conditions, and discuss in particular their preparation and measurement

  11. Atomic lattice excitons: from condensates to crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantian, A [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Daley, A J [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Toermae, P [Nanoscience Center, Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, PO Box 35, FIN-40014 (Finland); Zoller, P [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2007-11-15

    We discuss atomic lattice excitons (ALEs), bound particle-hole pairs formed by fermionic atoms in two bands of an optical lattice. Such a system provides a clean set-up, with tunable masses and interactions, to study fundamental properties of excitons including exciton condensation. We also find that for a large effective mass ratio between particles and holes, effective long-range interactions can mediate the formation of an exciton crystal, for which superfluidity is suppressed. Using a combination of mean-field treatments, bosonized theory based on a Born-Oppenheimer approximation, and one-dimensional (1D) numerical computation, we discuss the properties of ALEs under varying conditions, and discuss in particular their preparation and measurement.

  12. One-dimensional photonic crystal design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mee, Cornelis van der; Contu, Pietro; Pintus, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    In this article we present a method to determine the band spectrum, band gaps, and discrete energy levels, of a one-dimensional photonic crystal with localized impurities. For one-dimensional crystals with piecewise constant refractive indices we develop an algorithm to recover the refractive index distribution from the period map. Finally, we derive the relationship between the period map and the scattering matrix containing the information on the localized modes.

  13. Experimental investigation of 4-dimensional superspace crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasing, T.; Janner, A.

    1983-09-01

    The symmetry of incommensurate crystals can be described by higher dimensional space groups in the so called superspace approach. The basic ideas are explained and used for showing that superspace groups provide an adequate frame for analyzing experimental results on incommensurate crystals

  14. Electron crystallography of three dimensional protein crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgieva, Dilyana

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes an investigation of the potential of electron diffraction for studying three dimensional sub-micro-crystals of proteins and pharmaceuticals. A prerequisite for using electron diffraction for structural studies is the predictable availability of tiny crystals. A method for

  15. Clean Floquet Time Crystals: Models and Realizations in Cold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Biao; Wu, Ying-Hai; Liu, W. Vincent

    2018-03-01

    Time crystals, a phase showing spontaneous breaking of time-translation symmetry, has been an intriguing subject for systems far away from equilibrium. Recent experiments found such a phase in both the presence and the absence of localization, while in theories localization by disorder is usually assumed a priori. In this work, we point out that time crystals can generally exist in systems without disorder. A series of clean quasi-one-dimensional models under Floquet driving are proposed to demonstrate this unexpected result in principle. Robust time crystalline orders are found in the strongly interacting regime along with the emergent integrals of motion in the dynamical system, which can be characterized by level statistics and the out-of-time-ordered correlators. We propose two cold atom experimental schemes to realize the clean Floquet time crystals, one by making use of dipolar gases and another by synthetic dimensions.

  16. Structural refinement and extraction of hydrogen atomic positions in polyoxymethylene crystal based on the first successful measurements of 2-dimensional high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction and wide-angle neutron diffraction patterns of hydrogenated and deuterated species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, Kohji; Hanesaka, Makoto; Ohhara, Takashi; Kurihara, Kazuo; Tamada, Taro; Kuroki, Ryota; Fujiwara, Satoru; Ozeki, Tomoji; Kitano, Toshiaki; Nishu, Takashi; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2007-01-01

    2-Dimensional X-ray and neutron diffraction patterns have been successfully measured for deuterated and hydrogenated polyoxymethylene (POM) samples obtained by γ-ray induced solid-state polymerization reaction. More than 700 reflections were collected from the X-ray diffraction data at -150degC by utilizing a high-energy synchrotron X-ray beam at SPring-8, Japan, from which the crystal structure of POM has been refined thoroughly including the extraction of hydrogen atomic positions at clearly seen in the difference Fourier synthesis map. As the first trial the nonuniform (9/5) helical model was analyzed with the reliability factor (R factor) 6.9%. The structural analysis was made also using the X-ray reflections of about 400 observed at room temperature (R 8.8%), and the thermal parameters of constituent atoms were compared between the low and high temperatures to discuss the librational thermal motion of the chains. The 2-dimensional neutron diffraction data, collected for the deuterated and hydrogenated POM samples using an imaging plate system specifically built-up for neutron scattering experiment, have allowed us to pick up the D and H atomic positions clearly in the Fourier synthesis maps. Another possible model, (29/16) helix, which was proposed by several researches, has been also investigated on the basis of the X-ray diffraction data at -150degC. The direct method succeeded in extracting this (29/16) model straightforwardly. The R factor was 8.6%, essentially the same as that of (9/5) helical model. This means that the comparison of the diffraction intensity between the data collected from the full-rotation X-ray diffraction pattern and the intensity calculated for both the (9/5) and (29/16) models cannot be used for the unique determination of the superiority of the model, (9/5) or (29/16) helix. However, we have found the existence of 001 and 002 reflections which give the longer repeating period 55.7 A. Besides there observed a series of meridional

  17. Point defects and atomic transport in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidiard, A.B.

    1981-02-01

    There are two principle aspects to the theory of atomic transport in crystals as caused by the action of point defects, namely (1) the calculation of relevant properties of the point defects (energies and other thermodynamic characteristics of the different possible defects, activation energies and other mobility parameters) and (2) the statistical mechanics of assemblies of defects, both equilibrium and non-equilibrium assemblies. In the five lectures given here both these aspects are touched on. The first two lectures are concerned with the calculation of relevant point defect properties, particularly in ionic crystals. The first lecture is more general, the second is concerned particularly with some recent calculations of the free volumes of formation of defects in various ionic solids; these solve a rather long-standing problem in this area. The remaining three lectures are concerned with the kinetic theory of defects mainly in relaxation, drift and diffusion situations

  18. Asymptotics for Two-dimensional Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nam, Phan Thanh; Portmann, Fabian; Solovej, Jan Philip

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the ground state energy of an atom confined to two dimensions with an infinitely heavy nucleus of charge $Z>0$ and $N$ quantum electrons of charge -1 is $E(N,Z)=-{1/2}Z^2\\ln Z+(E^{\\TF}(\\lambda)+{1/2}c^{\\rm H})Z^2+o(Z^2)$ when $Z\\to \\infty$ and $N/Z\\to \\lambda$, where $E^{\\TF}(\\lambd......We prove that the ground state energy of an atom confined to two dimensions with an infinitely heavy nucleus of charge $Z>0$ and $N$ quantum electrons of charge -1 is $E(N,Z)=-{1/2}Z^2\\ln Z+(E^{\\TF}(\\lambda)+{1/2}c^{\\rm H})Z^2+o(Z^2)$ when $Z\\to \\infty$ and $N/Z\\to \\lambda$, where $E......^{\\TF}(\\lambda)$ is given by a Thomas-Fermi type variational problem and $c^{\\rm H}\\approx -2.2339$ is an explicit constant. We also show that the radius of a two-dimensional neutral atom is unbounded when $Z\\to \\infty$, which is contrary to the expected behavior of three-dimensional atoms....

  19. One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical calculations indicate that it should be possible for one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystals (see figure) to exhibit giant dispersions known as the superprism effect. Previously, three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal superprisms have demonstrated strong wavelength dispersion - about 500 times that of conventional prisms and diffraction gratings. Unlike diffraction gratings, superprisms do not exhibit zero-order transmission or higher-order diffraction, thereby eliminating cross-talk problems. However, the fabrication of these 3D photonic crystals requires complex electron-beam substrate patterning and multilayer thin-film sputtering processes. The proposed 1D superprism is much simpler in structural complexity and, therefore, easier to design and fabricate. Like their 3D counterparts, the 1D superprisms can exhibit giant dispersions over small spectral bands that can be tailored by judicious structure design and tuned by varying incident beam direction. Potential applications include miniature gas-sensing devices.

  20. Laser guiding of cold atoms in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasishin, A V; Magnitskiy, Sergey A; Shuvaev, V A; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2000-01-01

    The possibility of using photonic crystals with a lattice defect for the laser guiding of cold atoms is analysed. We have found a configuration of a photonic-crystal lattice and a defect ensuring the distribution of a potential in the defect mode of the photonic crystal allowing the guiding of cold atoms along the defect due to the dipole force acting on atoms. Based on quantitative estimates, we have demonstrated that photonic crystals with a lattice defect permit the guiding of atoms with much higher transverse temperatures and a much higher transverse localisation degree than in the case of hollow-core fibres. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  1. PMMA-Etching-Free Transfer of Wafer-scale Chemical Vapor Deposition Two-dimensional Atomic Crystal by a Water Soluble Polyvinyl Alcohol Polymer Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ngoc, Huynh; Qian, Yongteng; Han, Suk Kil; Kang, Dae Joon

    2016-09-01

    We have explored a facile technique to transfer large area 2-Dimensional (2D) materials grown by chemical vapor deposition method onto various substrates by adding a water-soluble Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) layer between the polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) and the 2D material film. This technique not only allows the effective transfer to an arbitrary target substrate with a high degree of freedom, but also avoids PMMA etching thereby maintaining the high quality of the transferred 2D materials with minimum contamination. We applied this method to transfer various 2D materials grown on different rigid substrates of general interest, such as graphene on copper foil, h-BN on platinum and MoS2 on SiO2/Si. This facile transfer technique has great potential for future research towards the application of 2D materials in high performance optical, mechanical and electronic devices.

  2. Atomically thin two-dimensional organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Letian; Wong, Andrew B.; Yu, Yi; Lai, Minliang; Kornienko, Nikolay; Eaton, Samuel W.; Fu, Anthony; Bischak, Connor G.; Ma, Jie; Ding, Tina; Ginsberg, Naomi S.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Yang, Peidong

    2015-09-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites, which have proved to be promising semiconductor materials for photovoltaic applications, have been made into atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) sheets. We report the solution-phase growth of single- and few-unit-cell-thick single-crystalline 2D hybrid perovskites of (C4H9NH3)2PbBr4 with well-defined square shape and large size. In contrast to other 2D materials, the hybrid perovskite sheets exhibit an unusual structural relaxation, and this structural change leads to a band gap shift as compared to the bulk crystal. The high-quality 2D crystals exhibit efficient photoluminescence, and color tuning could be achieved by changing sheet thickness as well as composition via the synthesis of related materials.

  3. Simulation and understanding of atomic and molecular quantum crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazorla, Claudio; Boronat, Jordi

    2017-07-01

    Quantum crystals abound in the whole range of solid-state species. Below a certain threshold temperature the physical behavior of rare gases (He 4 and Ne), molecular solids (H2 and CH4 ), and some ionic (LiH), covalent (graphite), and metallic (Li) crystals can be explained only in terms of quantum nuclear effects (QNE). A detailed comprehension of the nature of quantum solids is critical for achieving progress in a number of fundamental and applied scientific fields such as planetary sciences, hydrogen storage, nuclear energy, quantum computing, and nanoelectronics. This review describes the current physical understanding of quantum crystals formed by atoms and small molecules, as well as the wide palette of simulation techniques that are used to investigate them. Relevant aspects in these materials such as phase transformations, structural properties, elasticity, crystalline defects, and the effects of reduced dimensionality are discussed thoroughly. An introduction to quantum Monte Carlo techniques, which in the present context are the simulation methods of choice, and other quantum simulation approaches (e.g., path-integral molecular dynamics and quantum thermal baths) is provided. The overarching objective of this article is twofold: first, to clarify in which crystals and physical situations the disregard of QNE may incur in important bias and erroneous interpretations. And second, to promote the study and appreciation of QNE, a topic that traditionally has been treated in the context of condensed matter physics, within the broad and interdisciplinary areas of materials science.

  4. One dimensional coordination polymers: Synthesis, crystal structures and spectroscopic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaağaç, Dursun; Kürkçüoğlu, Güneş Süheyla; Şenyel, Mustafa; Şahin, Onur

    2016-11-01

    Two new one dimensional (1D) cyanide complexes, namely [M(4-aepy)2(H2O)2][Pt(CN)4], (4-aepy = 4-(2-aminoethyl)pyridine M = Cu(II) (1) or Zn(II) (2)), have been synthesized and characterized by vibrational (FT-IR and Raman) spectroscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction, thermal and elemental analyses techniques. The crystallographic analyses reveal that 1 and 2 are isomorphous and isostructural, and crystallize in the monoclinic system and C2 space group. The Pt(II) ions are coordinated by four cyanide-carbon atoms in the square-planar geometry and the [Pt(CN)4]2- ions act as a counter ion. The M(II) ions display an N4O2 coordination sphere with a distorted octahedral geometry, the nitrogen donors belonging to four molecules of the organic 4-aepy that act as unidentate ligands and two oxygen atoms from aqua ligands. The crystal structures of 1 and 2 are similar each other and linked via intermolecular hydrogen bonding, Pt⋯π interactions to form 3D supramolecular network. Vibration assignments of all the observed bands are given and the spectral features also supported to the crystal structures of the complexes.

  5. William Barlow and the Determination of Atomic Arrangement in Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauskopf, Seymour H

    2015-04-01

    William Barlow (1845-1934) was an important if unconventional scientist, known for having developed the 'closest-packing' atomic models of crystal structure. He resumed an early nineteenth-century tradition of utilizing crystallographical and chemical data to determine atomic arrangements in crystals. This essay recounts Barlow's career and scientific activity in three parts: (a) His place in the tradition of determining atomic arrangement in context of this earlier tradition and of contemporaneous developments of crystallography and chemistry, (b) his unconventional career, and (c) the 'success' of his program to determine atomic arrangements in crystals and its influence on the work of William Lawrence Bragg.

  6. Resonance fluorescence based two- and three-dimensional atom localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Abdul; Rahmatullah; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-06-01

    Two- and three-dimensional atom localization in a two-level atom-field system via resonance fluorescence is suggested. For the two-dimensional localization, the atom interacts with two orthogonal standing-wave fields, whereas for the three-dimensional atom localization, the atom interacts with three orthogonal standing-wave fields. The effect of the detuning and phase shifts associated with the corresponding standing-wave fields is investigated. A precision enhancement in position measurement of the single atom can be noticed via the control of the detuning and phase shifts.

  7. Supersonic N-Crowdions in a Two-Dimensional Morse Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, S. V.; Korznikova, E. A.; Chetverikov, A. P.

    2018-03-01

    An interstitial atom placed in a close-packed atomic row of a crystal is called crowdion. Such defects are highly mobile; they can move along the row, transferring mass and energy. We generalize the concept of a classical supersonic crowdion to an N-crowdion in which not one but N atoms move simultaneously with a high velocity. Using molecular dynamics simulations for a close-packed two-dimensional Morse crystal, we show that N-crowdions transfer mass much more efficiently, because they are capable of covering large distances while having a lower total energy than that of a classical 1-crowdion.

  8. From atoms to steps: The microscopic origins of crystal evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrone, Paul N.; Einstein, T. L.; Margetis, Dionisios

    2014-07-01

    The Burton-Cabrera-Frank (BCF) theory of crystal growth has been successful in describing a wide range of phenomena in surface physics. Typical crystal surfaces are slightly misoriented with respect to a facet plane; thus, the BCF theory views such systems as composed of staircase-like structures of steps separating terraces. Adsorbed atoms (adatoms), which are represented by a continuous density, diffuse on terraces, and steps move by absorbing or emitting these adatoms. Here we shed light on the microscopic origins of the BCF theory by deriving a simple, one-dimensional (1D) version of the theory from an atomistic, kinetic restricted solid-on-solid (KRSOS) model without external material deposition. We define the time-dependent adatom density and step position as appropriate ensemble averages in the KRSOS model, thereby exposing the non-equilibrium statistical mechanics origins of the BCF theory. Our analysis reveals that the BCF theory is valid in a low adatom-density regime, much in the same way that an ideal gas approximation applies to dilute gasses. We find conditions under which the surface remains in a low-density regime and discuss the microscopic origin of corrections to the BCF model.

  9. Direct detection of antihydrogen atoms using a BGO crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Y. [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei-shi, 184-8588 Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Physics Research Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Kuroda, N., E-mail: kuroda@phys.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Physics Research Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Ohtsuka, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan); Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Universitá di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Tajima, M.; Torii, H.A. [Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Physics Research Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Zurlo, N. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Universitá di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Matsuda, Y. [Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Physics Research Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Venturelli, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Universitá di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Yamazaki, Y. [Atomic Physics Research Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan)

    2016-12-21

    The ASACUSA collaboration has developed a detector consisting of a large size BGO crystal to detect an atomic antihydrogen beam, and performed the direct detection of antihydrogen atoms. Energy spectra from antihydrogen annihilation on the BGO crystal are discussed in comparison to simulation results from the GEANT4 toolkit. Background mainly originating from cosmic rays were strongly suppressed by analyzing the energy deposited in the BGO and requiring a multiplicity of charged pions. Thus antihydrogen events were identified.

  10. Emergence of quasiparticle Bloch states in artificial crystals crafted atom-by-atom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Girovsky, Jose L. Lado, Floris E. Kalff, Eleonora Fahrenfort, Lucas J. J. M. Peters, Joaquín Fernández-Rossier, Alexander F. Otte

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of electrons with a periodic potential of atoms in crystalline solids gives rise to band structure. The band structure of existing materials can be measured by photoemission spectroscopy and accurately understood in terms of the tight-binding model, however not many experimental approaches exist that allow to tailor artificial crystal lattices using a bottom-up approach. The ability to engineer and study atomically crafted designer materials by scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS helps to understand the emergence of material properties. Here, we use atom manipulation of individual vacancies in a chlorine monolayer on Cu(100 to construct one- and two-dimensional structures of various densities and sizes. Local STS measurements reveal the emergence of quasiparticle bands, evidenced by standing Bloch waves, with tuneable dispersion. The experimental data are understood in terms of a tight-binding model combined with an additional broadening term that allows an estimation of the coupling to the underlying substrate.

  11. Three-dimensional function photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, the properties of the photonic band gaps (PBGs) of three-dimensional (3D) function photonic crystals (PCs) are theoretically investigated by a modified plane wave expansion (PWE) method, whose equations for computations are deduced. The configuration of 3D function PCs is the dielectric spheres inserted in the air background with simple-cubic (SC) lattices whose dielectric constants are the functions of space coordinates, which can be realized by the electro-optical or optical Kerr effect in the practice. The influences of the parameter for 3D function PCs on the PBGs also are discussed. The calculated results show that the bandwidths and number of PBGs can be tuned with different distributions of function dielectrics. Compared with the conventional 3D dielectric PCs with SC lattices, the larger and more PBGs can be obtained in the 3D function PCs. Those results provide a new way to design the novel practical devices.

  12. Two-dimensional atom localization via probe absorption in a four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhi-Ping; Ge Qiang; Ruan Yu-Hua; Yu Ben-Li

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the two-dimensional (2D) atom localization via probe absorption in a coherently driven four-level atomic system by means of a radio-frequency field driving a hyperfine transition. It is found that the detecting probability and precision of 2D atom localization can be significantly improved via adjusting the system parameters. As a result, our scheme may be helpful in laser cooling or the atom nano-lithography via atom localization

  13. High-dimensional atom localization via spontaneously generated coherence in a microwave-driven atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiping; Chen, Jinyu; Yu, Benli

    2017-02-20

    We investigate the two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) atom localization behaviors via spontaneously generated coherence in a microwave-driven four-level atomic system. Owing to the space-dependent atom-field interaction, it is found that the detecting probability and precision of 2D and 3D atom localization behaviors can be significantly improved via adjusting the system parameters, the phase, amplitude, and initial population distribution. Interestingly, the atom can be localized in volumes that are substantially smaller than a cubic optical wavelength. Our scheme opens a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-efficiency atom localization, which provides some potential applications in high-dimensional atom nanolithography.

  14. Atom-atom interactions around the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Jonathan D; Goban, Akihisa; Asenjo-Garcia, Ana; Lu, Mingwu; Yu, Su-Peng; Chang, Darrick E; Kimble, H J

    2016-09-20

    Tailoring the interactions between quantum emitters and single photons constitutes one of the cornerstones of quantum optics. Coupling a quantum emitter to the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) provides a unique platform for tuning these interactions. In particular, the cross-over from propagating fields [Formula: see text] outside the bandgap to localized fields [Formula: see text] within the bandgap should be accompanied by a transition from largely dissipative atom-atom interactions to a regime where dispersive atom-atom interactions are dominant. Here, we experimentally observe this transition by shifting the band edge frequency of the PCW relative to the [Formula: see text] line of atomic cesium for [Formula: see text] atoms trapped along the PCW. Our results are the initial demonstration of this paradigm for coherent atom-atom interactions with low dissipation into the guided mode.

  15. Protein crystal structure analysis using synchrotron radiation at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, Takamasa

    1999-01-01

    We can now obtain a detailed picture of protein, allowing the identification of individual atoms, by interpreting the diffraction of X-rays from a protein crystal at atomic resolution, 1.2 A or better. As of this writing, about 45 unique protein structures beyond 1.2 A resolution have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank. This review provides a simplified overview of how protein crystallographers use such diffraction data to solve, refine, and validate protein structures. (author)

  16. Application of GRID to Foreign Atom Localization in Single Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmann, A; Wesch, W; Weber, B; Börner, H G; Jentschel, M

    2000-01-01

    The application of GRID (Gamma Ray Induced Doppler broadening) spectroscopy to the localization of foreign atoms in single crystals is demonstrated on erbium in YAP. By the investigation of the Doppler broadened secondary γ line for two crystalline directions, the Er was determined to be localized on the Y site. Conditions for the nuclear parameters of the impurity atoms used for the application of GRID spectroscopy are discussed.

  17. Three-Dimensional Self-Assembled Photonic Crystal Waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Kang-Hyun

    Photonic crystals (PCs), two- or three-dimensionally periodic, artificial, and dielectric structures, have a specific forbidden band for electromagnetic waves, referred to as photonic bandgap (PBG). The PBG is analogous to the electronic bandgap in natural crystal structures with periodic atomic arrangement. A well-defined and embedded planar, line, or point defect within the PCs causes a break in its structural periodicity, and introduces a state in the PBG for light localization. It offers various applications in integrated optics and photonics including optical filters, sharp bending light guides and very low threshold lasers. Using nanofabrication processes, PCs of the 2-D slab-type and 3-D layer-by-layer structures have been investigated widely. Alternatively, simple and low-cost self-assembled PCs with full 3-D PBG, inverse opals, have been suggested. A template with face centered cubic closed packed structure, opal, may initially be built by self-assembly of colloidal spheres, and is selectively removed after infiltrating high refractive index materials into the interstitials of spheres. In this dissertation, the optical waveguides utilizing the 3-D self-assembled PCs are discussed. The waveguides were fabricated by microfabrication technology. For high-quality colloidal silica spheres and PCs, reliable synthesis, self-assembly, and characterization techniques were developed. Its theoretical and experimental demonstrations are provided and correlated. They suggest that the self-assembled PCs with PBG are feasible for the applications in integrated optics and photonics.

  18. Atomic imaging of an InSe single-crystal surface with atomic force microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Uosaki, Kohei; Koinuma, Michio

    1993-01-01

    The atomic force microscope was employed to observed in air the surface atomic structure of InSe, one of III-VI compound semiconductors with layered structures. Atomic arrangements were observed in both n-type and p-type materials. The observed structures are in good agreement with those expected from bulk crystal structures. The atomic images became less clear by repeating the imaging process. Wide area imaging after the imaging of small area clearly showed that a mound was created at the sp...

  19. Two-dimensional atom localization via Raman-driven coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmatullah,; Qamar, Sajid, E-mail: sajid_qamar@comsats.edu.pk

    2014-02-07

    A scheme for two-dimensional (2D) atom localization via Raman-driven coherence in a four-level diamond-configuration system is suggested. The atom interacts with two orthogonal standing-wave fields where each standing-wave field is constructed from the superposition of the two-standing wave fields along the corresponding directions. Due to the position-dependent atom–field interaction, the frequency of the spontaneously emitted photon carries the position information about the atom. We investigate the effect of the detunings and phase shifts associated with standing-wave fields. Unique position information of the single atom is obtained by properly adjusting the system parameters. This is an extension of our previous proposal for one-dimensional atom localization via Raman-driven coherence.

  20. Waves in periodic medium. Atomic matter waves in light crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberthaler, M. K.

    1997-07-01

    This work deals with the propagation of matter waves inside a periodic potential. In analogy to photon optics a potential can be described by a refractive index for matter waves. A real potential leads to a refractive spatial structure while an imaginary potential leads to an absorptive structure. A general theoretical description is given in the framework of Floquet theory. The equivalent approach of dynamical diffraction theory will be treated in detail. The analytic solution for weak potentials are given in a general form so that they are applicable for every kind of wave and medium. For our experiments an open two level atom (metastable Argon) propagating inside a standing light wave was used. Detuning the frequency of the light wave from the atomic resonance leads to a real (refractive) periodic potential. Tuning the laser exact on resonance gives rise to a pure imaginary (absorptive) periodic potential. In analogy to solid state crystals in X-ray and neutron optics we call a standing light wave a light crystal. Tuning the standing light field on resonance we demonstrated experimentally the Borrmann effect. This effect describes the increase of the total transmission through a crystal for Bragg incidence. Furthermore, we confirmed that this effect is coherent and that a sinusoidal wave field is formed inside the crystal. The nodes of the wave field were found to coincide with the maxima of absorption. For a detuned standing light field a refractive crystal was realized, for which the expected Pendelloesung effect was demonstrated. In this case the maximum of the wave field inside the crystal was found at the steepest gradient of the potential as predicted by dynamical diffraction theory. Superposing an absorptive and a refractive light crystal a complex light crystal was realized. With such a crystal the violation of Friedel's law was demonstrated in a very clear way. (author)

  1. Protein nanocrystallography: growth mechanism and atomic structure of crystals induced by nanotemplates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechkova, E; Vasile, F; Spera, R; Fiordoro, S; Nicolini, C

    2005-11-01

    Protein nanocrystallography, a new technology for crystal growth based on protein nanotemplates, has recently been shown to produce diffracting, stable and radiation-resistant lysozyme crystals. This article, by computing these lysozyme crystals' atomic structures, obtained by the diffraction patterns of microfocused synchrotron radiation, provides a possible mechanism for this increased stability, namely a significant decrease in water content accompanied by a minor but significant alpha-helix increase. These data are shown to be compatible with the circular dichroism and two-dimensional Fourier transform spectra of high-resolution H NMR of proteins dissolved from the same nanotemplate-based crystal versus those from a classical crystal. Finally, evidence for protein direct transfer from the nanotemplate to the drop and the participation of the template proteins in crystal nucleation and growth is provided by high-resolution NMR spectrometry and mass spectrometry. Furthermore, the lysozyme nanotemplate appears stable up to 523 K, as confirmed by a thermal denaturation study using spectropolarimetry. The overall data suggest that heat-proof lysozyme presence in the crystal provides a possible explanation of the crystal's resistance to synchrotron radiation.

  2. Initiating Heavy-atom Based Phasing by Multi-Dimensional Molecular Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Gourdon, Pontus; Liu, Xiangyu

    2014-01-01

    -based approaches, which however may fail when only poorly diffracting derivative crystals are available, as often the case for e.g. membrane proteins. Here we present an approach for heavy atom site identification based on a Molecular Replacement Parameter Matrix (MRPM) search. It involves an n-dimensional search...... to test a wide spectrum of molecular replacement parameters, such as clusters of different conformations. The result is scored by the ability to identify heavy-atom positions, from anomalous difference Fourier maps, that allow meaningful phases to be determined. The strategy was successfully applied...... but correct molecular replacement solutions with maximum contrast to prime experimental phasing efforts....

  3. Three-dimensional atom localization via electromagnetically induced transparency in a three-level atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiping; Cao, Dewei; Yu, Benli

    2016-05-01

    We present a new scheme for three-dimensional (3D) atom localization in a three-level atomic system via measuring the absorption of a weak probe field. Owing to the space-dependent atom-field interaction, the position probability distribution of the atom can be directly determined by measuring the probe absorption. It is found that, by properly varying the parameters of the system, the probability of finding the atom in 3D space can be almost 100%. Our scheme opens a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-efficiency 3D atom localization, which provides some potential applications in laser cooling or atom nano-lithography via atom localization.

  4. Pair Interaction of Dislocations in Two-Dimensional Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, C.; Gasser, U.; Keim, P.; Maret, G.; von Grünberg, H. H.

    2005-10-01

    The pair interaction between crystal dislocations is systematically explored by analyzing particle trajectories of two-dimensional colloidal crystals measured by video microscopy. The resulting pair energies are compared to Monte Carlo data and to predictions derived from the standard Hamiltonian of the elastic theory of dislocations. Good agreement is found with respect to the distance and temperature dependence of the interaction potential, but not regarding the angle dependence where discrete lattice effects become important. Our results on the whole confirm that the dislocation Hamiltonian allows a quantitative understanding of the formation and interaction energies of dislocations in two-dimensional crystals.

  5. Two-dimensionally confined topological edge states in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barik, Sabyasachi; Miyake, Hirokazu; DeGottardi, Wade; Waks, Edo; Hafezi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    We present an all-dielectric photonic crystal structure that supports two-dimensionally confined helical topological edge states. The topological properties of the system are controlled by the crystal parameters. An interface between two regions of differing band topologies gives rise to topological edge states confined in a dielectric slab that propagate around sharp corners without backscattering. Three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain calculations show these edges to be confined in the out-of-plane direction by total internal reflection. Such nanoscale photonic crystal architectures could enable strong interactions between photonic edge states and quantum emitters. (paper)

  6. Absorption in one-dimensional metallic-dielectric photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Junfei; Shen Yifeng; Liu Xiaohan; Fu Rongtang; Zi Jian; Zhu Zhiqiang

    2004-01-01

    We show theoretically that the absorption of one-dimensional metallic-dielectric photonic crystals can be enhanced considerably over the corresponding constituent metal. By properly choosing the structural and material parameters, the absorption of one-dimensional metallic-dielectric photonic crystals can be enhanced by one order of magnitude in the visible and in the near infrared regions. It is found that the absorptance of such photonic crystals increases with increasing number of periods. Rules on how to obtain a absorption enhancement in a certain frequency range are discussed. (letter to the editor)

  7. Initiating heavy-atom-based phasing by multi-dimensional molecular replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Gourdon, Pontus; Liu, Xiangyu; Karlsen, Jesper Lykkegaard; Nissen, Poul

    2016-03-01

    To obtain an electron-density map from a macromolecular crystal the phase problem needs to be solved, which often involves the use of heavy-atom derivative crystals and concomitant heavy-atom substructure determination. This is typically performed by dual-space methods, direct methods or Patterson-based approaches, which however may fail when only poorly diffracting derivative crystals are available. This is often the case for, for example, membrane proteins. Here, an approach for heavy-atom site identification based on a molecular-replacement parameter matrix (MRPM) is presented. It involves an n-dimensional search to test a wide spectrum of molecular-replacement parameters, such as different data sets and search models with different conformations. Results are scored by the ability to identify heavy-atom positions from anomalous difference Fourier maps. The strategy was successfully applied in the determination of a membrane-protein structure, the copper-transporting P-type ATPase CopA, when other methods had failed to determine the heavy-atom substructure. MRPM is well suited to proteins undergoing large conformational changes where multiple search models should be considered, and it enables the identification of weak but correct molecular-replacement solutions with maximum contrast to prime experimental phasing efforts.

  8. Mechanisms of heterogeneous crystal growth in atomic systems: insights from computer simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulam Razul, M S; Hendry, J G; Kusalik, P G

    2005-11-22

    In this paper we analyze the atomic-level structure of solid/liquid interfaces of Lennard-Jones fcc systems. The 001, 011, and 111 faces are examined during steady-state growth and melting of these crystals. The mechanisms of crystallization and melting are explored using averaged configurations generated during these steady-state runs, where subsequent tagging and labeling of particles at the interface provide many insights into the detailed atomic behavior at the freezing and melting interfaces. The interfaces are generally found to be rough and we observe the structure of freezing and melting interfaces to be very similar. Large structural fluctuations with solidlike and liquidlike characteristics are apparent in both the freezing and melting interfaces. The behavior at the interface observed under either growth or melting conditions reflects a competition between ordering and disordering processes. In addition, we observe atom hopping that imparts liquidlike characteristics to the solid side of the interfaces for all three crystal faces. Solid order is observed to extend as rough, three-dimensional protuberances through the interface, particularly for the 001 and 011 faces. We are also able to reconcile our different measures for the interfacial width and address the onset of asymmetry in the growth rates at high rates of crystal growth/melting.

  9. Large three-dimensional photonic crystals based on monocrystalline liquid crystal blue phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Wei; Hou, Chien-Tsung; Li, Cheng-Chang; Jau, Hung-Chang; Wang, Chun-Ta; Hong, Ching-Lang; Guo, Duan-Yi; Wang, Cheng-Yu; Chiang, Sheng-Ping; Bunning, Timothy J; Khoo, Iam-Choon; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2017-09-28

    Although there have been intense efforts to fabricate large three-dimensional photonic crystals in order to realize their full potential, the technologies developed so far are still beset with various material processing and cost issues. Conventional top-down fabrications are costly and time-consuming, whereas natural self-assembly and bottom-up fabrications often result in high defect density and limited dimensions. Here we report the fabrication of extraordinarily large monocrystalline photonic crystals by controlling the self-assembly processes which occur in unique phases of liquid crystals that exhibit three-dimensional photonic-crystalline properties called liquid-crystal blue phases. In particular, we have developed a gradient-temperature technique that enables three-dimensional photonic crystals to grow to lateral dimensions of ~1 cm (~30,000 of unit cells) and thickness of ~100 μm (~ 300 unit cells). These giant single crystals exhibit extraordinarily sharp photonic bandgaps with high reflectivity, long-range periodicity in all dimensions and well-defined lattice orientation.Conventional fabrication approaches for large-size three-dimensional photonic crystals are problematic. By properly controlling the self-assembly processes, the authors report the fabrication of monocrystalline blue phase liquid crystals that exhibit three-dimensional photonic-crystalline properties.

  10. Translational-rotational interaction in dynamics and thermodynamics of 2D atomic crystal with molecular impurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antsygina, T.N.; Poltavskaya, M.I.; Chishko, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between the rotational degrees of freedom of a diatomic molecular impurity and the phonon excitations of a two-dimensional atomic matrix commensurate with a substrate is investigated theoretically. It is shown, that the translational-rotational interaction changes the form of the rotational kinetic energy operator as compared to the corresponding expression for a free rotator, and also renormalized the parameters of the crystal field without change in its initial form. The contribution of the impurity rotational degrees of freedom to the low-temperature heat capacity for a dilute solution of diatomic molecules in an atomic two-dimensional matrix is calculated. The possibility of experimental observation of the effects obtained is discussed

  11. Two-dimensional photonic crystal accelerator structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M. Cowan

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Photonic crystals provide a method of confining a synchronous speed-of-light mode in an all-dielectric structure, likely a necessary feature in any optical accelerator. We explore computationally a class of photonic crystal structures with translational symmetry in a direction transverse to the electron beam. We demonstrate synchronous waveguide modes and discuss relevant parameters of such modes. We then explore how accelerator parameters vary as the geometry of the structure is changed and consider trade-offs inherent in the design of an accelerator of this type.

  12. Spectrum of a one-atom laser in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florescu, Lucia

    2006-01-01

    The emission spectrum of a single-emitter laser in a photonic crystal is presented. We consider a coherently pumped two-level emitter strongly coupled to a high-quality microcavity engineered within a photonic crystal. We show that the cavity spectrum consists of both elastic and inelastic components, for which we derive analytical expressions. Our study reveals enhanced, spectrally narrower emission resulting from the radiation reservoir of the photonic crystal. The cavity field spectral characteristics are fundamentally distinct from those of a corresponding microcavity in ordinary vacuum. At high pump intensities and for large discontinuities in the photon density of states between Mollow spectral components of atomic resonance fluorescence, the emitted intensity originating from the elastic spectral component increases with the intensity of the pump and the elastic component dominates the spectrum. In the case of a vanishing photon density of states in the spectral range surrounding the lower Mollow sideband and no dipolar dephasing, the cavity spectrum is elastic

  13. Two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals in dielectric barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Weili; Dong Lifang; Zhang Xinchun

    2010-01-01

    A series of two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals have been obtained by filaments' self-organization in atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge with two water electrodes, which undergo the transition from square to square superlattice and finally to the hexagon. The spatio-temporal behaviors of the plasma photonic crystals in nanosecond scale have been studied by optical method, which show that the plasma photonic crystal is actually an integration of different transient sublattices. The photonic band diagrams of the transverse electric (TE) mode and transverse magnetic mode for each sublattice of these plasma photonic crystals have been investigated theoretically. A wide complete band gap is formed in the hexagonal plasma photonic crystal with the TE mode. The changes of the band edge frequencies and the band gap widths in the evolvement of different structures are studied. A kind of tunable plasma photonic crystal which can be controlled both in space and time is suggested.

  14. Black phosphorus-based one-dimensional photonic crystals and microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Ilka; Toffanin, Stefano; Scotognella, Francesco

    2016-11-10

    The latest achievements in the fabrication of thin layers of black phosphorus (BP), toward the technological breakthrough of a phosphorene atomically thin layer, are paving the way for their use in electronics, optics, and optoelectronics. In this work, we have simulated the optical properties of one-dimensional photonic structures, i.e., photonic crystals and microcavities, in which few-layer BP is one of the components. The insertion of the 5-nm black phosphorous layers leads to a photonic band gap in the photonic crystals and a cavity mode in the microcavity that is interesting for light manipulation and emission enhancement.

  15. Interfacial engineering of two-dimensional nano-structured materials by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuiykov, Serge, E-mail: serge.zhuiykov@ugent.be [Ghent University Global Campus, Department of Applied Analytical & Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, 119 Songdomunhwa-ro, Yeonsu-Gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Kawaguchi, Toshikazu [Global Station for Food, Land and Water Resources, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, N10W5 Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Graduate School of Environmental Science, Hokkaido University, N10W5 Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Hai, Zhenyin; Karbalaei Akbari, Mohammad; Heynderickx, Philippe M. [Ghent University Global Campus, Department of Applied Analytical & Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, 119 Songdomunhwa-ro, Yeonsu-Gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Advantages of atomic layer deposition technology (ALD) for two-dimensional nano-crystals. • Conformation of ALD technique and chemistry of precursors. • ALD of semiconductor oxide thin films. • Ultra-thin (∼1.47 nm thick) ALD-developed tungsten oxide nano-crystals on large area. - Abstract: Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is an enabling technology which provides coating and material features with significant advantages compared to other existing techniques for depositing precise nanometer-thin two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures. It is a cyclic process which relies on sequential self-terminating reactions between gas phase precursor molecules and a solid surface. ALD is especially advantageous when the film quality or thickness is critical, offering ultra-high aspect ratios. ALD provides digital thickness control to the atomic level by depositing film one atomic layer at a time, as well as pinhole-free films even over a very large and complex areas. Digital control extends to sandwiches, hetero-structures, nano-laminates, metal oxides, graded index layers and doping, and it is perfect for conformal coating and challenging 2D electrodes for various functional devices. The technique’s capabilities are presented on the example of ALD-developed ultra-thin 2D tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) over the large area of standard 4” Si substrates. The discussed advantages of ALD enable and endorse the employment of this technique for the development of hetero-nanostructure 2D semiconductors with unique properties.

  16. Three-dimensional atom localization via probe absorption in a cascade four-level atomic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Wei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available For an atomic system with cascade four-level type, a useful scheme about three-dimensional (3D atom localization is proposed. In our scheme the atomic system is coherently controlled by using a radio-frequency field to couple with two-folded levels under the condition of the existence of probe absorption. Our results show that detecting precision of 3D atom localization may be obviously improved by properly adjusting the frequency detuning and strength of the radio-frequency driving field. So our scheme could be helpful to realize 3D atom localization with high-efficiency and high-precision . In the field of laser cooling or the atom nano-lithography, our studies provide potential applications.

  17. Three-dimensional atom localization via probe absorption in a cascade four-level atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Deng, Li; Chen, Aixi

    2018-03-01

    For an atomic system with cascade four-level type, a useful scheme about three-dimensional (3D) atom localization is proposed. In our scheme the atomic system is coherently controlled by using a radio-frequency field to couple with two-folded levels under the condition of the existence of probe absorption. Our results show that detecting precision of 3D atom localization may be obviously improved by properly adjusting the frequency detuning and strength of the radio-frequency driving field. So our scheme could be helpful to realize 3D atom localization with high-efficiency and high-precision . In the field of laser cooling or the atom nano-lithography, our studies provide potential applications.

  18. Acoustic transparency in two-dimensional sonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Dehesa, Jose; Torrent, Daniel [Wave Phenomena Group, Department of Electronic Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, C/ Camino de Vera s/n, E-46022 Valencia (Spain); Cai Liangwu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)], E-mail: jsdehesa@upvnet.upv.es

    2009-01-15

    Acoustic transparency is studied in two-dimensional sonic crystals consisting of hexagonal distributions of cylinders with continuously varying properties. The transparency condition is achieved by selectively closing the acoustic bandgaps, which are governed by the structure factor of the cylindrical scatterers. It is shown here that cylindrical scatterers with the proposed continuously varying properties are physically realizable by using metafluids based on sonic crystals. The feasibility of this proposal is analyzed by a numerical experiment based on multiple scattering theory.

  19. Graphene-based one-dimensional photonic crystal

    OpenAIRE

    Berman, Oleg L.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.

    2011-01-01

    A novel type of one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal formed by the array of periodically located stacks of alternating graphene and dielectric stripes embedded into a background dielectric medium is proposed. The wave equation for the electromagnetic wave propagating in such structure solved in the framework of the Kronig-Penney model. The frequency band structure of 1D graphene-based photonic crystal is obtained analytically as a function of the filling factor and the thickness of the diele...

  20. Negative Refraction Angular Characterization in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Lugo, Jesus Eduardo; Doti, Rafael; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    Background Photonic crystals are artificial structures that have periodic dielectric components with different refractive indices. Under certain conditions, they abnormally refract the light, a phenomenon called negative refraction. Here we experimentally characterize negative refraction in a one dimensional photonic crystal structure; near the low frequency edge of the fourth photonic bandgap. We compare the experimental results with current theory and a theory based on the group velocity de...

  1. Atom-atom interactions around the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Jonathan D.; Goban, Akihisa; Asenjo-Garcia, Ana; Lu, Mingwu; Yu, Su-Peng; Chang, Darrick E.; Kimble, H. J.

    2016-09-01

    Tailoring the interactions between quantum emitters and single photons constitutes one of the cornerstones of quantum optics. Coupling a quantum emitter to the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) provides a unique platform for tuning these interactions. In particular, the cross-over from propagating fields E(x)∝e±ikxxE(x)∝e±ikxx outside the bandgap to localized fields E(x)∝e-κx|x|E(x)∝e-κx|x| within the bandgap should be accompanied by a transition from largely dissipative atom-atom interactions to a regime where dispersive atom-atom interactions are dominant. Here, we experimentally observe this transition by shifting the band edge frequency of the PCW relative to the D1D1 line of atomic cesium for N¯=3.0±0.5N¯=3.0±0.5 atoms trapped along the PCW. Our results are the initial demonstration of this paradigm for coherent atom-atom interactions with low dissipation into the guided mode.

  2. Atom interaction propensities of oxygenated chemical functions in crystal packings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Jelsch

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The crystal contacts of several families of hydrocarbon compounds substituted with one or several types of oxygenated chemical groups were analyzed statistically using the Hirshfeld surface methodology. The propensity of contacts to occur between two chemical types is described with the contact enrichment descriptor. The systematic large enrichment ratios of some interactions like the O—H...O hydrogen bonds suggests that these contacts are a driving force in the crystal packing formation. The same statement holds for the weaker C—H...O hydrogen bonds in ethers, esters and ketones, in the absence of polar H atoms. The over-represented contacts in crystals of oxygenated hydrocarbons are generally of two types: electrostatic attractions (hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. While Cl...O interactions are generally avoided, in a minority of chloro-oxygenated hydrocarbons, significant halogen bonding does occur. General tendencies can often be derived for many contact types, but outlier compounds are instructive as they display peculiar or rare features. The methodology also allows the detection of outliers which can be structures with errors. For instance, a significant number of hydroxylated molecules displaying over-represented non-favorable oxygen–oxygen contacts turned out to have wrongly oriented hydroxyl groups. Beyond crystal packings with a single molecule in the asymmetric unit, the behavior of water in monohydrate compounds and of crystals with Z′ = 2 (dimers are also investigated. It was found in several cases that, in the presence of several oxygenated chemical groups, cross-interactions between different chemical groups (e.g. water/alcohols; alcohols/phenols are often favored in the crystal packings. While some trends in accordance with common chemical principles are retrieved, some unexpected results can however appear. For example, in crystals of alcohol–phenol compounds, the strong O—H...O hydrogen bonds between

  3. Scheme of 2-dimensional atom localization for a three-level atom via quantum coherence

    OpenAIRE

    Zafar, Sajjad; Ahmed, Rizwan; Khan, M. Khalid

    2013-01-01

    We present a scheme for two-dimensional (2D) atom localization in a three-level atomic system. The scheme is based on quantum coherence via classical standing wave fields between the two excited levels. Our results show that conditional position probability is significantly phase dependent of the applied field and frequency detuning of spontaneously emitted photons. We obtain a single localization peak having probability close to unity by manipulating the control parameters. The effect of ato...

  4. Photonic Paint Developed with Metallic Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Po; Williams, John D.

    2012-01-01

    This work details the design and simulation of an inconspicuous photonic paint that can be applied onto an object for anticounterfeit and tag, track, and locate (TTL) applications. The paint consists of three-dimensional metallic tilted woodpile photonic crystals embedded into a visible and infrared transparent polymer film, which can be applied to almost any surface. The tilted woodpile photonic crystals are designed with a specific pass band detectable at nearly all incident angles of light. When painted onto a surface, these crystals provide a unique reflective infra-red optical signature that can be easily observed and recorded to verify the location or contents of a package.

  5. Three-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals based on artificial opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshev, A. V.; Kodama, T.; Nishimura, K.; Uchida, H.; Inoue, M.

    2004-06-01

    We fabricated and experimentally investigated three-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals (3D MPCs) based on artificial opals. Opal samples with three-dimensional dielectric lattices were impregnated with different types of magnetic material. Magnetic and structural properties of 3D MPCs were studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, and vibrating sample magnetometer. We have shown that magnetic materials synthesized in voids of opal lattices and the composites obtained have typical magnetic properties.

  6. Three-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals based on artificial opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshev, A.V.; Kodama, T.; Nishimura, K.; Uchida, H.; Inoue, M.

    2004-01-01

    We fabricated and experimentally investigated three-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals (3D MPCs) based on artificial opals. Opal samples with three-dimensional dielectric lattices were impregnated with different types of magnetic material. Magnetic and structural properties of 3D MPCs were studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, and vibrating sample magnetometer. We have shown that magnetic materials synthesized in voids of opal lattices and the composites obtained have typical magnetic properties

  7. Effect of atomic initial phase difference on spontaneous emission of an atom embedded in photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bing, Zhang; Xiu-Dong, Sun; Xiang-Qian, Jiang

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of initial phase difference between the two excited states of a V-type three-level atom on its steady state behaviour of spontaneous emission. A modified density of modes is introduced to calculate the spontaneous emission spectra in photonic crystal. Spectra in free space are also shown to compare with that in photonic crystal with different relative positions of the excited levels from upper band-edge frequency. It is found that the initial phase difference plays an important role in the quantum interference property between the two decay channels. For a zero initial phase, destructive property is presented in the spectra. With the increase of initial phase difference, quantum interference between the two decay channels from upper levels to ground level turns to be constructive. Furthermore, we give an interpretation for the property of these spectra. (atomic and molecular physics)

  8. One-dimensional hypersonic phononic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomopoulos, N; Maschke, D; Koh, C Y; Thomas, E L; Tremel, W; Butt, H-J; Fytas, G

    2010-03-10

    We report experimental observation of a normal incidence phononic band gap in one-dimensional periodic (SiO(2)/poly(methyl methacrylate)) multilayer film at gigahertz frequencies using Brillouin spectroscopy. The band gap to midgap ratio of 0.30 occurs for elastic wave propagation along the periodicity direction, whereas for inplane propagation the system displays an effective medium behavior. The phononic properties are well captured by numerical simulations. The porosity in the silica layers presents a structural scaffold for the introduction of secondary active media for potential coupling between phonons and other excitations, such as photons and electrons.

  9. One-dimensional crystal with a complex periodic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, John K.

    2001-01-01

    A one-dimensional crystal model is constructed with a complex periodic potential. A wave function solution for the crystal model is derived without relying on Bloch functions. The new wave function solution of this model is shown to correspond to the solution for the probability amplitude of a two-level system. The energy discriminant is evaluated using an analytic formula derived from the probability amplitude solution, and based on an expansion parameter related to the energy and potential amplitude. From the wave function energy discriminant the crystal band structure is derived and related to standard energy bands and gaps. It is also shown that several of the properties of the two-level system apply to the one-dimensional crystal model. The two-level system solution which evolves in time is shown to manifest as a spatial configuration of the one-dimensional crystal model. The sensitivity of the wave function probability density is interpreted in the context of the new solution. The spatial configuration of the wave function, and the appearance of a long wavelength in the wave function probability density is explained in terms of the properties of Bessel functions

  10. Influence of index contrast in two dimensional photonic crystal lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mette Marie; Petersen, Sidsel Rübner; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner

    2010-01-01

    The influence of index contrast variations for obtaining single-mode operation and low threshold in dye doped polymer two dimensional photonic crystal (PhC) lasers is investigated. We consider lasers made from Pyrromethene 597 doped Ormocore imprinted with a rectangular lattice PhC having a cavity...

  11. The electromagnetic Brillouin precursor in one-dimensional photonic crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uitham, R.; Hoenders, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    We have calculated the electromagnetic Brillouin precursor that arises in a one-dimensional photonic crystal that consists of two homogeneous slabs which each have a single electron resonance. This forerunner is compared with the Brillouin precursor that arises in a homogeneous double-electron

  12. Folding two dimensional crystals by swift heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochedowski, Oliver; Bukowska, Hanna [Fakultät für Physik and CENIDE, Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Freire Soler, Victor M. [Fakultät für Physik and CENIDE, Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, E08028 Barcelona (Spain); Brökers, Lara [Fakultät für Physik and CENIDE, Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Ban-d' Etat, Brigitte; Lebius, Henning [CIMAP (CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-UCBN), 14070 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Schleberger, Marika, E-mail: marika.schleberger@uni-due.de [Fakultät für Physik and CENIDE, Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2014-12-01

    Ion irradiation of graphene, the showcase model of two dimensional crystals, has been successfully applied to induce various modifications in the graphene crystal. One of these modifications is the formation of origami like foldings in graphene which are created by swift heavy ion irradiation under glancing incidence angle. These foldings can be applied to locally alter the physical properties of graphene like mechanical strength or chemical reactivity. In this work we show that the formation of foldings in two dimensional crystals is not restricted to graphene but can be applied for other materials like MoS{sub 2} and hexagonal BN as well. Further we show that chemical vapour deposited graphene forms foldings after swift heavy ion irradiation while chemical vapour deposited MoS{sub 2} does not.

  13. Folding two dimensional crystals by swift heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochedowski, Oliver; Bukowska, Hanna; Freire Soler, Victor M.; Brökers, Lara; Ban-d'Etat, Brigitte; Lebius, Henning; Schleberger, Marika

    2014-01-01

    Ion irradiation of graphene, the showcase model of two dimensional crystals, has been successfully applied to induce various modifications in the graphene crystal. One of these modifications is the formation of origami like foldings in graphene which are created by swift heavy ion irradiation under glancing incidence angle. These foldings can be applied to locally alter the physical properties of graphene like mechanical strength or chemical reactivity. In this work we show that the formation of foldings in two dimensional crystals is not restricted to graphene but can be applied for other materials like MoS 2 and hexagonal BN as well. Further we show that chemical vapour deposited graphene forms foldings after swift heavy ion irradiation while chemical vapour deposited MoS 2 does not

  14. Resonance fluorescence microscopy via three-dimensional atom localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchadhyayee, Pradipta; Dutta, Bibhas Kumar; Das, Nityananda; Mahapatra, Prasanta Kumar

    2018-02-01

    A scheme is proposed to realize three-dimensional (3D) atom localization in a driven two-level atomic system via resonance fluorescence. The field arrangement for the atom localization involves the application of three mutually orthogonal standing-wave fields and an additional traveling-wave coupling field. We have shown the efficacy of such field arrangement in tuning the spatially modulated resonance in all directions. Under different parametric conditions, the 3D localization patterns originate with various shapes such as sphere, sheets, disk, bowling pin, snake flute, flower vase. High-precision localization is achieved when the radiation field detuning equals twice the combined Rabi frequencies of the standing-wave fields. Application of a traveling-wave field of suitable amplitude at optimum radiation field detuning under symmetric standing-wave configuration leads to 100% detection probability even in sub-wavelength domain. Asymmetric field configuration is also taken into consideration to exhibit atom localization with appreciable precision compared to that of the symmetric case. The momentum distribution of the localized atoms is found to follow the Heisenberg uncertainty principle under the validity of Raman-Nath approximation. The proposed field configuration is suitable for application in the study of atom localization in an optical lattice arrangement.

  15. Strongly-Refractive One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Prisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal prisms can separate a beam of polychromatic electromagnetic waves into constituent wavelength components and can utilize unconventional refraction properties for wavelength dispersion over significant portions of an entire photonic band rather than just near the band edges outside the photonic band gaps. Using a ID photonic crystal simplifies the design and fabrication process and allows the use of larger feature sizes. The prism geometry broadens the useful wavelength range, enables better optical transmission, and exhibits angular dependence on wavelength with reduced non-linearity. The properties of the 1 D photonic crystal prism can be tuned by varying design parameters such as incidence angle, exit surface angle, and layer widths. The ID photonic crystal prism can be fabricated in a planar process, and can be used as optical integrated circuit elements.

  16. Hot atom chemistry of mixed crystals. 35 years of research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.

    1993-01-01

    When this contribution was prepared, the author decided to present the more personal aspects of his work and the concepts that directed him. Since the time when the author interested in solid state hot atom chemistry more than 30 years ago, still now the generally accepted theory has not been existed. The irradiation test by using the BEPO pile in Harwell is reported. The use of glass fiber paper instead of cellulose paper was investigated. The real problem of the different models of primary retention should be solved. The idea of mixed crystal systems was the result of an experimental accident. The attempt of preparing mixed crystals, the papers that the author has written, the procedures of the experiment such as electrophoresis, the results of the electrophoretic separation are discussed. The next step was obviously the investigation of the ligand recoil. The production of the transient ligand vacancy complexes and their final fate resulted in mixed hexachlorobromometallate species is shown for the system K 2 O s Cl 6 -K 2 O s Br 6 (n,γ) 38 Cl. The reaction of the 38 Cl, the information about recoil atom reactions which increased with the complexity of target substances, and the resulted informations are reported. (K.I.)71 refs

  17. One-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals with magnetooptical double layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzhansky, V. N.; Shaposhnikov, A. N.; Prokopov, A. R.; Karavainikov, A. V.; Mikhailova, T. V.; Lukienko, I. N.; Kharchenko, Yu. N.; Golub, V. O.; Salyuk, O. Yu.; Belotelov, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional magnetophotonic microcavity crystals with nongarnet dielectric mirrors are created and investigated. The defect layers in the magnetophotonic crystals are represented by two bismuth-substituted yttrium iron garnet Bi:YIG layers with various bismuth contents in order to achieve a high magnetooptical response of the crystals. The parameters of the magnetophotonic crystal layers are optimized by numerical solution of the Maxwell equations by the transfer matrix method to achieve high values of Faraday rotation angle Θ F and magnetooptical Q factor. The calculated and experimental data agree well with each other. The maximum values of Θ F =–20.6°, Q = 8.1° at a gain t = 16 are obtained for magnetophotonic crystals with m = 7 pairs of layers in Bragg mirrors, and the parameters obtained for crystals with m = 4 and t = 8.5 are Θ F =–12.5° and Q = 14.3°. It is shown that, together with all-garnet and multimicrocavities magnetophotonic crystals, such structures have high magnetooptical characteristics.

  18. One-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals with magnetooptical double layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berzhansky, V. N., E-mail: v.n.berzhansky@gmail.com; Shaposhnikov, A. N.; Prokopov, A. R.; Karavainikov, A. V.; Mikhailova, T. V. [V.I. Vernadsky Crimean Federal University (Russian Federation); Lukienko, I. N.; Kharchenko, Yu. N., E-mail: kharcenko@ilt.kharkov.ua [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering (Ukraine); Golub, V. O., E-mail: v-o-golub@yahoo.com; Salyuk, O. Yu. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Magnetism (Ukraine); Belotelov, V. I., E-mail: belotelov@physics.msu.ru [Russian Quantum Center (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    One-dimensional magnetophotonic microcavity crystals with nongarnet dielectric mirrors are created and investigated. The defect layers in the magnetophotonic crystals are represented by two bismuth-substituted yttrium iron garnet Bi:YIG layers with various bismuth contents in order to achieve a high magnetooptical response of the crystals. The parameters of the magnetophotonic crystal layers are optimized by numerical solution of the Maxwell equations by the transfer matrix method to achieve high values of Faraday rotation angle Θ{sub F} and magnetooptical Q factor. The calculated and experimental data agree well with each other. The maximum values of Θ{sub F} =–20.6°, Q = 8.1° at a gain t = 16 are obtained for magnetophotonic crystals with m = 7 pairs of layers in Bragg mirrors, and the parameters obtained for crystals with m = 4 and t = 8.5 are Θ{sub F} =–12.5° and Q = 14.3°. It is shown that, together with all-garnet and multimicrocavities magnetophotonic crystals, such structures have high magnetooptical characteristics.

  19. Dressed-state analysis of efficient two-dimensional atom localization in a four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    We investigate two-dimensional atom localization via spontaneous emission in a four-level atomic system. It is found that the detection probability and precision of two-dimensional atom localization can be significantly improved due to the interference effect between the spontaneous decay channels and the dynamically induced quantum interference generated by the probe and composite fields. More importantly, a 100% probability of finding an atom within the sub-half-wavelength domain of the standing waves can be reached when the corresponding conditions are satisfied. As a result, our scheme may be helpful in laser cooling or atom nano-lithography via atom localization. (paper)

  20. Preparation of Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystals of Zirconia by Electrodeposition in a Colloidal Crystals Template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Pan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional photonic crystals of zirconia were prepared by electrodeposition in a colloidal crystals template following calcination at 500 °C. Scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, and reflectance spectroscopy were employed to characterize the photonic crystals of zirconia. It was found that hydrated zirconium ions could penetrate the colloidal crystals template and reach the substrate easily by electrodeposition, which resulted in stronger bonding between the substrate and the as-deposited membrane. Moreover, the electrodeposited membrane had low water content, leading to a low amount of shrinkage during calcination. Both these properties could suppress detachment from the substrate upon removal of the colloidal crystals template. Therefore, the three-dimensional photonic crystals of zirconia synthesized in this study exhibited very good preservation of the ordered structures of the colloidal crystals template with a high density. A peak of reflection higher than 70% was formed in the reflectance spectrum because of the strong diffraction of the ordered structures.

  1. Evidence for two-dimensional ising structure in atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacGregor, M.H.

    1976-01-01

    Although the unpaired nucleons in an atomic nucleus exhibit pronounced shell-model-like behavior, the situation with respect to the paired-off ''core region'' nucleons is considerably more obscure. Several recent ''multi-alpha knockout'' and ''quasi-fission'' experiments indicate that nucleon clustering is prevalent throughout the core region of the nucleus; this same conclusion is suggested by nuclear-binding-energy systematics, by the evidence for a ''neutron halo'' in heavy nuclei and by the magnetic-moment systematics of low-mass odd-A nuclei. A number of arguments suggests, in turn, that this nucleon clustering is not spherical or spheroidal in shape, as has generally been assumed, but instead is in the form of two-dimensional Ising-like layers, with the layers arrayed perpendicular to the symmetry axis of the nucleus. The effects of this two-dimensional layering are observed most clearly in low-energy-induced fission, where nuclei with an even (odd) number of Ising layers fission symmetrically (asymmetrically). This picture of the nucleus gives an immediate quantitative explanation for the observed asymmetry in the fission of uranium, and also for the transition from symmetric to asymmetric and back to symmetric fission as the atomic number of the fissioning nuclues increase from A = 197 up to A = 258. These results suggest that, in the shell model formulation of the atomic nucleus, the basis states for the paired-off nucleon core region should be modified so as to contain laminar nucleon cluster correlations

  2. Self-organized defect strings in two-dimensional crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Wolfgang; Polster, David; Maret, Georg; Keim, Peter; Dellago, Christoph

    2013-12-01

    Using experiments with single-particle resolution and computer simulations we study the collective behavior of multiple vacancies injected into two-dimensional crystals. We find that the defects assemble into linear strings, terminated by dislocations with antiparallel Burgers vectors. We show that these defect strings propagate through the crystal in a succession of rapid one-dimensional gliding and rare rotations. While the rotation rate decreases exponentially with the number of defects in the string, the diffusion constant is constant for large strings. By monitoring the separation of the dislocations at the end points, we measure their effective interactions with high precision beyond their spontaneous formation and annihilation, and we explain the double-well form of the dislocation interaction in terms of continuum elasticity theory.

  3. Interfacial Thermal Transport via One-Dimensional Atomic Junction Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohuan Xiong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In modern information technology, as integration density increases rapidly and the dimension of materials reduces to nanoscale, interfacial thermal transport (ITT has attracted widespread attention of scientists. This review introduces the latest theoretical development in ITT through one-dimensional (1D atomic junction model to address the thermal transport across an interface. With full consideration of the atomic structures in interfaces, people can apply the 1D atomic junction model to investigate many properties of ITT, such as interfacial (Kapitza resistance, nonlinear interface, interfacial rectification, and phonon interference, and so on. For the ballistic ITT, both the scattering boundary method (SBM and the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF method can be applied, which are exact since atomic details of actual interfaces are considered. For interfacial coupling case, explicit analytical expression of transmission coefficient can be obtained and it is found that the thermal conductance maximizes at certain interfacial coupling (harmonic mean of the spring constants of the two leads and the transmission coefficient is not a monotonic decreasing function of phonon frequency. With nonlinear interaction—phonon–phonon interaction or electron–phonon interaction at interface, the NEGF method provides an efficient way to study the ITT. It is found that at weak linear interfacial coupling, the nonlinearity can improve the ITT, but it depresses the ITT in the case of strong-linear coupling. In addition, the nonlinear interfacial coupling can induce thermal rectification effect. For interfacial materials case which can be simulated by a two-junction atomic chain, phonons show interference effect, and an optimized thermal coupler can be obtained by tuning its spring constant and atomic mass.

  4. Three-dimensional charge transport in organic semiconductor single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tao; Zhang, Xiying; Jia, Jiong; Li, Yexin; Tao, Xutang

    2012-04-24

    Three-dimensional charge transport anisotropy in organic semiconductor single crystals - both plates and rods (above and below, respectively, in the figure) - is measured in well-performing organic field-effect transistors for the first time. The results provide an excellent model for molecular design and device preparation that leads to good performance. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Topological Valley Transport in Two-dimensional Honeycomb Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuting; Jiang, Hua; Hang, Zhi Hong

    2018-01-25

    Two-dimensional photonic crystals, in analogy to AB/BA stacking bilayer graphene in electronic system, are studied. Inequivalent valleys in the momentum space for photons can be manipulated by simply engineering diameters of cylinders in a honeycomb lattice. The inequivalent valleys in photonic crystal are selectively excited by a designed optical chiral source and bulk valley polarizations are visualized. Unidirectional valley interface states are proved to exist on a domain wall connecting two photonic crystals with different valley Chern numbers. With the similar optical vortex index, interface states can couple with bulk valley polarizations and thus valley filter and valley coupler can be designed. Our simple dielectric PC scheme can help to exploit the valley degree of freedom for future optical devices.

  6. Three-dimensional imaging of atomic four-body processes

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, M; Fischer, D; Kollmus, H; Madison, D H; Jones, S; Ullrich, J

    2003-01-01

    To understand the physical processes that occur in nature we need to obtain a solid concept about the 'fundamental' forces acting between pairs of elementary particles. it is also necessary to describe the temporal and spatial evolution of many mutually interacting particles under the influence of these forces. This latter step, known as the few-body problem, remains an important unsolved problem in physics. Experiments involving atomic collisions represent a useful testing ground for studying the few-body problem. For the single ionization of a helium atom by charged particle impact, kinematically complete experiments have been performed since 1969. The theoretical analysis of such experiments was thought to yield a complete picture of the basic features of the collision process, at least for large collision energies. These conclusions are, however, almost exclusively based on studies of restricted electron-emission geometries. We report three- dimensional images of the complete electron emission pattern for...

  7. Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides as atomically thin semiconductors: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xidong; Wang, Chen; Pan, Anlian; Yu, Ruqin; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2015-12-21

    The discovery of graphene has ignited intensive interest in two-dimensional layered materials (2DLMs). These 2DLMs represent a new class of nearly ideal 2D material systems for exploring fundamental chemistry and physics at the limit of single-atom thickness, and have the potential to open up totally new technological opportunities beyond the reach of existing materials. In general, there are a wide range of 2DLMs in which the atomic layers are weakly bonded together by van der Waals interactions and can be isolated into single or few-layer nanosheets. The van der Waals interactions between neighboring atomic layers could allow much more flexible integration of distinct materials to nearly arbitrarily combine and control different properties at the atomic scale. The transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) (e.g., MoS2, WSe2) represent a large family of layered materials, many of which exhibit tunable band gaps that can undergo a transition from an indirect band gap in bulk crystals to a direct band gap in monolayer nanosheets. These 2D-TMDs have thus emerged as an exciting class of atomically thin semiconductors for a new generation of electronic and optoelectronic devices. Recent studies have shown exciting potential of these atomically thin semiconductors, including the demonstration of atomically thin transistors, a new design of vertical transistors, as well as new types of optoelectronic devices such as tunable photovoltaic devices and light emitting devices. In parallel, there have also been considerable efforts in developing diverse synthetic approaches for the rational growth of various forms of 2D materials with precisely controlled chemical composition, physical dimension, and heterostructure interface. Here we review the recent efforts, progress, opportunities and challenges in exploring the layered TMDs as a new class of atomically thin semiconductors.

  8. Quantum quench in an atomic one-dimensional Ising chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinert, F; Mark, M J; Kirilov, E; Lauber, K; Weinmann, P; Daley, A J; Nägerl, H-C

    2013-08-02

    We study nonequilibrium dynamics for an ensemble of tilted one-dimensional atomic Bose-Hubbard chains after a sudden quench to the vicinity of the transition point of the Ising paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic quantum phase transition. The quench results in coherent oscillations for the orientation of effective Ising spins, detected via oscillations in the number of doubly occupied lattice sites. We characterize the quench by varying the system parameters. We report significant modification of the tunneling rate induced by interactions and show clear evidence for collective effects in the oscillatory response.

  9. Few helium atoms in quasi two-dimensional space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilic, Srecko; Vranjes, Leandra

    2003-01-01

    Two, three and four 3 He and 4 He atoms in quasi two-dimensional space above graphite and cesium surfaces and in 'harmonic' potential perpendicular to the surface have been studied. Using some previously examined variational wave functions and the Diffusion Monte Carlo procedure, it has been shown that all molecules: dimers, trimers and tetramers, are bound more strongly than in pure two- and three-dimensional space. The enhancement of binding with respect to unrestricted space is more pronounced on cesium than on graphite. Furthermore, for 3 He 3 ( 3 He 4 ) on all studied surfaces, there is an indication that the configuration of a dimer and a 'free' particle (two dimers) may be equivalently established

  10. Growth and optical studies of opal films as three-dimensional photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comoretto, D.; Grassi, R.; Marabelli, F.; Andreani, L.C

    2003-01-15

    Three-dimensional artificial opals showing photonic crystals properties are grown by self-assembly of polystyrene nanospheres. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of opal surfaces show domains with regular triangular and squared packing of the spheres separated by cracks whose relative fraction depends on the sample quality. The energy position of an optical pseudo gap in transmittance spectra is observed by varying the angle of incidence and is accounted for by theoretical calculations of the photonic band structure based on a plane-wave expansion method.

  11. Growth and optical studies of opal films as three-dimensional photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comoretto, D.; Grassi, R.; Marabelli, F.; Andreani, L.C.

    2003-01-01

    Three-dimensional artificial opals showing photonic crystals properties are grown by self-assembly of polystyrene nanospheres. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of opal surfaces show domains with regular triangular and squared packing of the spheres separated by cracks whose relative fraction depends on the sample quality. The energy position of an optical pseudo gap in transmittance spectra is observed by varying the angle of incidence and is accounted for by theoretical calculations of the photonic band structure based on a plane-wave expansion method

  12. Growth of two-dimensional Ge crystal by annealing of heteroepitaxial Ag/Ge(111) under N2 ambient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Koichi; Ohta, Akio; Kurosawa, Masashi; Araidai, Masaaki; Ikeda, Mitsuhisa; Makihara, Katsunori; Miyazaki, Seiichi

    2018-06-01

    The growth of a two-dimensional crystal of Ge atoms on an atomically flat Ag(111) surface has been demonstrated by the thermal annealing of a heteroepitaxial Ag/Ge structure in N2 ambient at atmospheric pressure. The surface morphology and chemical bonding features of heteroepitaxial Ag(111) grown on wet-cleaned Ge(111) after annealing at different temperatures and for various times have been systematically investigated to control the surface segregation of Ge atoms and the planarization of the heteroepitaxial Ag(111) surface.

  13. Static and dynamic properties of three-dimensional dot-type magnonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksymov, Artur; Spinu, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    The static and dynamic magnetization of three-dimensional magnonic metamaterials has been investigated. By numerical means it was analyzed the impact of space dimensionality on the properties of magnonic crystal with unit cell consisting of four dots. It is find out the possibility of multi-vortex core formation which is related to the increasing of the crystal height by three-dimensional periodicity of single crystal layer. Additionally is provided the analysis of ferromagnetic resonance phenomenon for two-dimensional and three-dimensional structures. For the unsaturated magnetization of three-dimensional crystal the several pronounced resonance frequencies were detected.

  14. Static and dynamic properties of three-dimensional dot-type magnonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksymov, Artur, E-mail: maxyartur@gmail.com [Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Department of General Physics, Chernivtsi National University, Chernivtsi 58012 (Ukraine); Spinu, Leonard [Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Department of Physics, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The static and dynamic magnetization of three-dimensional magnonic metamaterials has been investigated. By numerical means it was analyzed the impact of space dimensionality on the properties of magnonic crystal with unit cell consisting of four dots. It is find out the possibility of multi-vortex core formation which is related to the increasing of the crystal height by three-dimensional periodicity of single crystal layer. Additionally is provided the analysis of ferromagnetic resonance phenomenon for two-dimensional and three-dimensional structures. For the unsaturated magnetization of three-dimensional crystal the several pronounced resonance frequencies were detected.

  15. Quantum localization in the three-dimensional kicked Rydberg atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Emil; Yoshida, Shuhei; Burgdoerfer, Joachim; Tong, X.-M.; Reinhold, Carlos O.

    2003-01-01

    We study the three-dimensional (3D) unidirectionally kicked Rydberg atom. For parabolic initial states elongated in the direction of the kicks we show that the ionization of the quantum system is suppressed as compared to the classical counterpart and that the quantum wave function is localized along all degrees of freedom, whereas the classical system is globally diffusive. We discuss the connection to the previously studied one-dimensional (1D) model of the kicked Rydberg atom and verify that the 1D model is a good approximation to the 3D quantum case in the limiting case of the most elongated initial states. We further study the quantum phase-space distribution (Husimi distribution) of the eigenstates of the period-one time-evolution (Floquet) operator and show that the eigenstates are localized in phase space. For the most elongated parabolic initial state, we are able to identify the unstable periodic orbits around which Floquet states localize. We discuss the possibility of observing quantum localization in high Rydberg states in n>100

  16. Large-angle illumination STEM: Toward three-dimensional atom-by-atom imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Ryo, E-mail: ishikawa@sigma.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Engineering Innovation, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Lupini, Andrew R. [Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hinuma, Yoyo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Pennycook, Stephen J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, 328 Ferris Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    To fully understand and control materials and their properties, it is of critical importance to determine their atomic structures in all three dimensions. Recent revolutionary advances in electron optics – the inventions of geometric and chromatic aberration correctors as well as electron source monochromators – have provided fertile ground for performing optical depth sectioning at atomic-scale dimensions. In this study we theoretically demonstrate the imaging of top/sub-surface atomic structures and identify the depth of single dopants, single vacancies and the other point defects within materials by large-angle illumination scanning transmission electron microscopy (LAI-STEM). The proposed method also allows us to measure specimen properties such as thickness or three-dimensional surface morphology using observations from a single crystallographic orientation. - Highlights: • We theoretically demonstrate 3D near-atomic depth resolution imaging by large-angle illumination STEM. • This method can be useful to identify the depth of single dopants, single vacancies within materials. • This method can be useful to determine reconstructed surface atomic structures.

  17. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom–atom and atom–wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom–atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the 1S0−3P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time. PMID:24934478

  18. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foteinopoulou, Stavroula [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    In this dissertation, they have undertaken the challenge to understand the unusual propagation properties of the photonic crystal (PC). The photonic crystal is a medium where the dielectric function is periodically modulated. These types of structures are characterized by bands and gaps. In other words, they are characterized by frequency regions where propagation is prohibited (gaps) and regions where propagation is allowed (bands). In this study they focus on two-dimensional photonic crystals, i.e., structures with periodic dielectric patterns on a plane and translational symmetry in the perpendicular direction. They start by studying a two-dimensional photonic crystal system for frequencies inside the band gap. The inclusion of a line defect introduces allowed states in the otherwise prohibited frequency spectrum. The dependence of the defect resonance state on different parameters such as size of the structure, profile of incoming source, etc., is investigated in detail. For this study, they used two popular computational methods in photonic crystal research, the Finite Difference Time Domain method (FDTD) and the Transfer Matrix Method (TMM). The results for the one-dimensional defect system are analyzed, and the two methods, FDTD and TMM, are compared. Then, they shift their attention only to periodic two-dimensional crystals, concentrate on their band properties, and study their unusual refractive behavior. Anomalous refractive phenomena in photonic crystals included cases where the beam refracts on the ''wrong'' side of the surface normal. The latter phenomenon, is known as negative refraction and was previously observed in materials where the wave vector, the electric field, and the magnetic field form a left-handed set of vectors. These materials are generally called left-handed materials (LHM) or negative index materials (NIM). They investigated the possibility that the photonic crystal behaves as a LHM, and how this behavior relates

  19. Electrically Rotatable Polarizer Using One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal with a Nematic Liquid Crystal Defect Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryotaro Ozaki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polarization characteristics of defect mode peaks in a one-dimensional (1D photonic crystal (PC with a nematic liquid crystal (NLC defect layer have been investigated. Two different polarized defect modes are observed in a stop band. One group of defect modes is polarized along the long molecular axis of the NLC, whereas another group is polarized along its short axis. Polarizations of the defect modes can be tuned by field-induced in-plane reorientation of the NLC in the defect layer. The polarization properties of the 1D PC with the NLC defect layer is also investigated by the finite difference time domain (FDTD simulation.

  20. On the Zeeman Effect in highly excited atoms: 2. Three-dimensional case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baseia, B.; Medeiros e Silva Filho, J.

    1984-01-01

    A previous result, found in two-dimensional hydrogen-atoms, is extended to the three-dimensional case. A mapping of a four-dimensional space R 4 onto R 3 , that establishes an equivalence between Coulomb and harmonic potentials, is used to show that the exact solution of the Zeeman effect in highly excited atoms, cannot be reached. (Author) [pt

  1. Dynamics of vacancies in two-dimensional Lennard-Jones crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhenwei; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2015-03-01

    Vacancies represent an important class of crystallographic defects, and their behaviors can be strongly coupled with relevant material properties. We report the rich dynamics of vacancies in two-dimensional Lennard-Jones crystals in several thermodynamic states. Specifically, we numerically observe significantly faster diffusion of the 2-point vacancy with two missing particles in comparison with other types of vacancies; it opens the possibility of doping 2-point vacancies into atomic materials to enhance atomic migration. In addition, the resulting dislocations in the healing of a long vacancy suggest the intimate connection between vacancies and topological defects that may provide an extra dimension in the engineering of defects in extensive crystalline materials for desired properties. We thank the financial support from the U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Office of the Director of Defense Research and Engineering (DDR&E) and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  2. Lateral shifting in one dimensional chiral photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You Yuan; Chen Changyuan

    2012-01-01

    We report the lateral shifts of the transmitted waves in a one dimensional chiral photonic crystal by using the stationary-phase approach. It is revealed that two kinds of lateral shifts are observed due to the existence of cross coupling in chiral materials, which is different from what has been observed in previous non-chiral photonic crystals. Unlike the chiral slab, the positions of lateral shift peaks are closely related to the band edges of band gap characteristics of periodic structure and lateral shifts can be positive as well as negative. Besides, the lateral shifts show a strong dependence on the chiral factor, which varies the lateral shift peaks in both magnitudes and positions. These features are desirable for future device applications.

  3. Lateral shifting in one dimensional chiral photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You Yuan, E-mail: yctcyouyuan@163.com [School of Physics and Electronics, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng, 224002 Jiangsu (China); Chen Changyuan [School of Physics and Electronics, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng, 224002 Jiangsu (China)

    2012-07-01

    We report the lateral shifts of the transmitted waves in a one dimensional chiral photonic crystal by using the stationary-phase approach. It is revealed that two kinds of lateral shifts are observed due to the existence of cross coupling in chiral materials, which is different from what has been observed in previous non-chiral photonic crystals. Unlike the chiral slab, the positions of lateral shift peaks are closely related to the band edges of band gap characteristics of periodic structure and lateral shifts can be positive as well as negative. Besides, the lateral shifts show a strong dependence on the chiral factor, which varies the lateral shift peaks in both magnitudes and positions. These features are desirable for future device applications.

  4. Experiment and simulation on one-dimensional plasma photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lin; Ouyang, Ji-Ting

    2014-01-01

    The transmission characteristics of microwaves passing through one-dimensional plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) have been investigated by experiment and simulation. The PPCs were formed by a series of discharge tubes filled with argon at 5 Torr that the plasma density in tubes can be varied by adjusting the discharge current. The transmittance of X-band microwaves through the crystal structure was measured under different discharge currents and geometrical parameters. The finite-different time-domain method was employed to analyze the detailed properties of the microwaves propagation. The results show that there exist bandgaps when the plasma is turned on. The properties of bandgaps depend on the plasma density and the geometrical parameters of the PPCs structure. The PPCs can perform as dynamical band-stop filter to control the transmission of microwaves within a wide frequency range

  5. Crystallization process of a three-dimensional complex plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmüller, Benjamin; Dietz, Christopher; Kretschmer, Michael; Thoma, Markus H.

    2018-05-01

    Characteristic timescales and length scales for phase transitions of real materials are in ranges where a direct visualization is unfeasible. Therefore, model systems can be useful. Here, the crystallization process of a three-dimensional complex plasma under gravity conditions is considered where the system ranges up to a large extent into the bulk plasma. Time-resolved measurements exhibit the process down to a single-particle level. Primary clusters, consisting of particles in the solid state, grow vertically and, secondarily, horizontally. The box-counting method shows a fractal dimension of df≈2.72 for the clusters. This value gives a hint that the formation process is a combination of local epitaxial and diffusion-limited growth. The particle density and the interparticle distance to the nearest neighbor remain constant within the clusters during crystallization. All results are in good agreement with former observations of a single-particle layer.

  6. Acoustic resonances in two-dimensional radial sonic crystal shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrent, Daniel; Sanchez-Dehesa, Jose, E-mail: jsdehesa@upvnet.upv.e [Wave Phenomena Group, Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, C/Camino de Vera s.n., E-46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    Radial sonic crystals (RSC) are fluidlike structures infinitely periodic along the radial direction that verify the Bloch theorem and are possible only if certain specially designed acoustic metamaterials with mass density anisotropy can be engineered (see Torrent and Sanchez-Dehesa 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 064301). A comprehensive analysis of two-dimensional (2D) RSC shells is reported here. A given shell is in fact a circular slab with a central cavity. These finite crystal structures contain Fabry-Perot-like resonances and modes strongly localized at the central cavity. Semi-analytical expressions are developed to obtain the quality factors of the different resonances, their symmetry features and their excitation properties. The results reported here are completely general and can be extended to equivalent 3D spherical shells and to their photonic counterparts.

  7. Lateral shift in one-dimensional quasiperiodic chiral photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da, Jian, E-mail: dajian521@sina.com [Department of Information Engineering, Huaian Senior Vocational and Technical School, Feiyao road, Huaian 223005, Jiangsu Province (China); Mo, Qi, E-mail: moqiyueyang@163.com [School of Software, Yunnan University, Cuihu Bai Road, Kunming City, Yunnan Province 650091 (China); Cheng, Yaokun [Department of Information Engineering, Huaian Senior Vocational and Technical School, Feiyao road, Huaian 223005, Jiangsu Province (China); Liu, Taixiang [Taishan Vocational College of Nursing, Shandong Province 271000 (China)

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the lateral shift of a one-dimensional quasiperiodic photonic crystal consisting of chiral and conventional dielectric materials. The effect of structural irregularity on lateral shift is evaluated by stationary-phase approach. Our results show that the lateral shift can be modulated by varying the structural irregularity in quasiperiodic structure. Besides, the position of peak in lateral shift spectrum stays sensitive to the chiral factor of chiral materials. In comparison with that of periodic structure, quasiperiodic structure provides an extra degree of freedom to manipulate the lateral shift.

  8. Engineering topological edge states in two dimensional magnetic photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Wu, Tong; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2017-01-01

    Based on a perturbative approach, we propose a simple and efficient method to engineer the topological edge states in two dimensional magnetic photonic crystals. The topological edge states in the microstructures can be constructed and varied by altering the parameters of the microstructure according to the field-energy distributions of the Bloch states at the related Bloch wave vectors. The validity of the proposed method has been demonstrated by exact numerical calculations through three concrete examples. Our method makes the topological edge states "designable."

  9. Four-dimensional Printing of Liquid Crystal Elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambulo, Cedric P; Burroughs, Julia J; Boothby, Jennifer M; Kim, Hyun; Shankar, M Ravi; Ware, Taylor H

    2017-10-25

    Three-dimensional structures capable of reversible changes in shape, i.e., four-dimensional-printed structures, may enable new generations of soft robotics, implantable medical devices, and consumer products. Here, thermally responsive liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) are direct-write printed into 3D structures with a controlled molecular order. Molecular order is locally programmed by controlling the print path used to build the 3D object, and this order controls the stimulus response. Each aligned LCE filament undergoes 40% reversible contraction along the print direction on heating. By printing objects with controlled geometry and stimulus response, magnified shape transformations, for example, volumetric contractions or rapid, repetitive snap-through transitions, are realized.

  10. An atomic-scale model of fcc crystal-growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waal, B.W. van de (Technische Hogeschool Twente, Enschede (Netherlands). Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    Nearly perfect fcc growth may be simulated by the application of a simple growth-algorithm - only sites that are at least 4-coordinated are occupied - to a selected seed. The seed is a 22-atom cluster, being the smallest close-packed structure with two crossing stacking-faults. The stacking-faults produce active surface-sites, that can not be exhausted by occupation; they are arranged in non-vanishing steps, similar to those produced by screw-dislocations. The algorithm prevents further stacking-faults, and ensures ABC-stacking of close-packed (111)-layers, characteristic of the fcc structure. The same algorithm would not produce further growth of perfect fcc clusters or of Mackay icosahedra. It is proposed that the ability to grow fast under near-equilibrium conditions is a better criterion to select clusters as precursors of the bulk-structure than their cohesive energy. The crystal structure problem of the rare gases - why fcc, not hcp - is discussed in connection with the apparent impossibility to simulate hcp growth by an analogous procedure. (orig.).

  11. A new series of two-dimensional silicon crystals with versatile electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Kisung; Kim, Duck Young; Son, Young-Woo

    2018-04-01

    Silicon (Si) is one of the most extensively studied materials owing to its significance to semiconductor science and technology. While efforts to find a new three-dimensional (3D) Si crystal with unusual properties have made some progress, its two-dimensional (2D) phases have not yet been explored as much. Here, based on a newly developed systematic ab initio materials searching strategy, we report a series of novel 2D Si crystals with unprecedented structural and electronic properties. The new structures exhibit perfectly planar outermost surface layers of a distorted hexagonal network with their thicknesses varying with the atomic arrangement inside. Dramatic changes in electronic properties ranging from semimetal to semiconducting with indirect energy gaps and even to one with direct energy gaps are realized by varying thickness as well as by surface oxidation. Our predicted 2D Si crystals with flat surfaces and tunable electronic properties will shed light on the development of silicon-based 2D electronics technology.

  12. Dimensional perturbation theory for the two-electron atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodson, D.Z.

    1987-01-01

    Perturbation theory in δ = 1/D, where D is the dimensionality of space, is applied to the two-electron atom. In Chapter 1 an efficient procedure for calculating the coefficients of the perturbation series for the ground-state energy is developed using recursion relations between the moments of the coordinate operators. Results through tenth order are presented. The series is divergent, but Pade summation gives results comparable in accuracy to the best configuration-interaction calculations. The singularity structure of the Pade approximants confirms the hypothesis that the energy as a function of δ has an infinite sequence of poles on the negative real axis that approaches an essential singularity at δ = O. The essential singularity causes the divergence of the perturbation series. There are also two poles at δ = 1 that slow the asymptotic convergence of the low-order terms. In Chapter 2, various techniques are demonstrated for removing the effect of these poles, and accurate results are thereby obtained, even at very low order. In Chapter 3, the large D limit of the correlation energy (CE) is investigated. In the limit D → infinity it is only 35% smaller than at D = 3. It can be made to vanish in the limit by modifying the Hartree-Fock (HF) wavefunction. In Chapter 4, perturbation theory is applied to the Hooke's-law model of the atom. Prospects for treating more-complicated systems are briefly discussed

  13. Characterization of iron ferromagnetism by the local atomic volume: from three-dimensional structures to isolated atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Sob, M; Wu, Zhe; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2014-02-26

    We present a comprehensive study of the relationship between the ferromagnetism and the structural properties of Fe systems from three-dimensional ones to isolated atoms based on the spin-density functional theory. We have found a relation between the magnetic moment and the volume of the Voronoi polyhedron, determining, in most cases, the value of the total magnetic moment as a function of this volume with an average accuracy of ±0.28 μ(B) and of the 3d magnetic moment with an average accuracy of ±0.07 μ(B) when the atomic volume is larger than 22 ų. It is demonstrated that this approach is applicable for many three-dimensional systems, including high-symmetry structures of perfect body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), hexagonal close-packed (hcp), double hexagonal close-packed (dhcp), and simple cubic (sc) crystals, as well as for lower-symmetry ones, for example atoms near a grain boundary (GB) or a surface, around a vacancy or in a linear chain (for low-dimensional cases, we provide a generalized definition of the Voronoi polyhedron). Also, we extend the validity of the Stoner model to low-dimensional structures, such as atomic chains, free-standing monolayers and surfaces, determining the Stoner parameter for these systems. The ratio of the 3d-exchange splitting to the magnetic moment, corresponding to the Stoner parameter, is found to be I(3d) = (0.998 ± 0.006) eV /μ(B) for magnetic moments up to 3.0 μ(B). Further, the 3d exchange splitting changes nearly linearly in the region of higher magnetic moments (3.0-4.0 μ(B)) and the corresponding Stoner exchange parameter equals I(h)(3d) = (0.272 ± 0.006) eV /μ(B). The existence of these two regions reflects the fact that, with increasing Voronoi volume, the 3d bands separate first and, consequently, the 3d magnetic moment increases. When the Voronoi volume is sufficiently large (≥22 ų), the separation of the 3d bands is complete and the magnetic moment reaches a value of 3.0

  14. Characterization of iron ferromagnetism by the local atomic volume: from three-dimensional structures to isolated atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lei; Šob, M; Wu, Zhe; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the relationship between the ferromagnetism and the structural properties of Fe systems from three-dimensional ones to isolated atoms based on the spin-density functional theory. We have found a relation between the magnetic moment and the volume of the Voronoi polyhedron, determining, in most cases, the value of the total magnetic moment as a function of this volume with an average accuracy of ±0.28 μ B and of the 3d magnetic moment with an average accuracy of ±0.07 μ B when the atomic volume is larger than 22 Å 3 . It is demonstrated that this approach is applicable for many three-dimensional systems, including high-symmetry structures of perfect body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), hexagonal close-packed (hcp), double hexagonal close-packed (dhcp), and simple cubic (sc) crystals, as well as for lower-symmetry ones, for example atoms near a grain boundary (GB) or a surface, around a vacancy or in a linear chain (for low-dimensional cases, we provide a generalized definition of the Voronoi polyhedron). Also, we extend the validity of the Stoner model to low-dimensional structures, such as atomic chains, free-standing monolayers and surfaces, determining the Stoner parameter for these systems. The ratio of the 3d-exchange splitting to the magnetic moment, corresponding to the Stoner parameter, is found to be I 3d = (0.998 ± 0.006) eV /μ B for magnetic moments up to 3.0 μ B . Further, the 3d exchange splitting changes nearly linearly in the region of higher magnetic moments (3.0–4.0 μ B ) and the corresponding Stoner exchange parameter equals I 3d h =(0.272±0.006) eV/μ B . The existence of these two regions reflects the fact that, with increasing Voronoi volume, the 3d bands separate first and, consequently, the 3d magnetic moment increases. When the Voronoi volume is sufficiently large (≥22 Å 3 ), the separation of the 3d bands is complete and the magnetic moment reaches a value of 3.0

  15. Ultra-refractive and extended-range one-dimensional photonic crystal superprisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, D. Z. Y.

    2003-01-01

    We describe theoretical analysis and design of one-dimensional photonic crystal prisms. We found that inside the photonic crystal, for frequencies near the band edges, light propagation direction is extremely sensitive to the variations in wavelength and incident angle.

  16. Protein crystals as scanned probes for recognition atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickremasinghe, Nissanka S; Hafner, Jason H

    2005-12-01

    Lysozyme crystal growth has been localized at the tip of a conventional silicon nitride cantilever through seeded nucleation. After cross-linking with glutaraldehyde, lysozyme protein crystal tips image gold nanoparticles and grating standards with a resolution comparable to that of conventional tips. Force spectra between the lysozyme crystal tips and surfaces covered with antilysozyme reveal an adhesion force that drops significantly upon blocking with free lysozyme, thus confirming that lysozyme crystal tips can detect molecular recognition interactions.

  17. Two-dimensional atom localization via two standing-wave fields in a four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongtao; Wang Hui; Wang Zhiping

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the two-dimensional (2D) localization of an atom in a four-level Y-type atomic system. By applying two orthogonal standing-wave fields, the atoms can be localized at some special positions, leading to the formation of sub-wavelength 2D periodic spatial distributions. The localization peak position and number as well as the conditional position probability can be controlled by the intensities and detunings of optical fields.

  18. Phonon interference control of atomic-scale metamirrors, meta-absorbers, and heat transfer through crystal interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosevich, Yu. A.; Potyomina, L. G.; Darinskii, A. N.; Strelnikov, I. A.

    2018-03-01

    The paper theoretically studies the possibility of using the effects of phonon interference between paths through different interatomic bonds for the control of phonon heat transfer through internal crystal interfaces and for the design of phonon metamirrors and meta-absorbers. These metamirrors and meta-absorbers are considered to be defect nanolayers of atomic-scale thicknesses embedded in a crystal. Several analytically solvable three-dimensional lattice-dynamics models of the phonon metamirrors and meta-absorbers at the internal crystal planes are described. It is shown that due to destructive interference in the two or more phonon paths, the internal crystal planes, fully or partially filled with weakly bound or heavy-isotope defect atoms, can completely reflect or completely absorb phonons at the transmission antiresonances, whose wavelengths are larger than the effective thickness of the metamirror or meta-absorber. Due to cooperative superradiant effect, the spectral widths of the two-path interference antiresonances for the plane waves are given by the square of partial filling fraction in the defect crystal plane. Our analysis reveals that the presence of two or more phonon paths plays the dominant role in the emergence of the transmission antiresonances in phonon scattering at the defect crystal planes and in reduction of the thermal interface conductance in comparison with the Fano-resonance concept. We study analytically phonon transmission through internal crystal plane in a model cubic lattice of Si-like atoms, partially filled with Ge-like defect atoms. Such a plane can serve as interference phonon metamirror with the transmission antiresonances in the vicinities of eigenmode frequencies of Ge-like defect atoms in the terahertz frequency range. We predict the extraordinary phonon transmission induced by the two-path constructive interference of the lattice waves in resonance with the vibrations of rare host atoms, periodically distributed in the

  19. Trapped Atoms in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    2002 J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 19 2052 [39] Koenderink A F, Kafesaki M, Soukoulis C M and Sandoghdar V 2006 J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 23 1196 [40] Manga Rao V S C...032509 [55] Hwang J K, Ryu H Y and Lee Y H 1999 Phys. Rev. B 60 4688–95 [56] Yao P, Manga Rao V S C and Hughes S 2010 Laser Photon. Rev. 4 499–516 New Journal of Physics 15 (2013) 083026 (http://www.njp.org/)

  20. Electrothermally Driven Fluorescence Switching by Liquid Crystal Elastomers Based On Dimensional Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Changxu; Jiang, Yin; Tao, Cheng-An; Yin, Xianpeng; Lan, Yue; Wang, Chen; Wang, Shiqiang; Liu, Xiangyang; Li, Guangtao

    2017-04-05

    In this article, the fabrication of an active organic-inorganic one-dimensional photonic crystal structure to offer electrothermal fluorescence switching is described. The film is obtained by spin-coating of liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) and TiO 2 nanoparticles alternatively. By utilizing the property of LCEs that can change their size and shape reversibly under external thermal stimulations, the λ max of the photonic band gap of these films is tuned by voltage through electrothermal conversion. The shifted photonic band gap further changes the matching degree between the photonic band gap of the film and the emission spectrum of organic dye mounting on the film. With rhodamine B as an example, the enhancement factor of its fluorescence emission is controlled by varying the matching degree. Thus, the fluorescence intensity is actively switched by voltage applied on the system, in a fast, adjustable, and reversible manner. The control chain of using the electrothermal stimulus to adjust fluorescence intensity via controlling the photonic band gap is proved by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and UV-vis reflectance. This mechanism also corresponded to the results from the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. The comprehensive usage of photonic crystals and liquid crystal elastomers opened a new possibility for active optical devices.

  1. Switchable Photonic Crystals Using One-Dimensional Confined Liquid Crystals for Photonic Device Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seong Ho; Gim, Min-Jun; Lee, Wonsuk; Choi, Suk-Won; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2017-01-25

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have recently attracted considerable attention, with much effort devoted to photonic bandgap (PBG) control for varying the reflected color. Here, fabrication of a modulated one-dimensional (1D) anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) PC with a periodic porous structure is reported. The PBG of the fabricated PC can be reversibly changed by switching the ultraviolet (UV) light on/off. The AAO nanopores contain a mixture of photoresponsive liquid crystals (LCs) with irradiation-activated cis/trans photoisomerizable azobenzene. The resultant mixture of LCs in the porous AAO film exhibits a reversible PBG, depending on the cis/trans configuration of azobenzene molecules. The PBG switching is reliable over many cycles, suggesting that the fabricated device can be used in optical and photonic applications such as light modulators, smart windows, and sensors.

  2. Modification of calcite crystal growth by abalone shell proteins: an atomic force microscope study.

    OpenAIRE

    Walters, D A; Smith, B L; Belcher, A M; Paloczi, G T; Stucky, G D; Morse, D E; Hansma, P K

    1997-01-01

    A family of soluble proteins from the shell of Haliotis rufescens was introduced over a growing calcite crystal being scanned in situ by an atomic force microscope (AFM). Atomic step edges on the crystal surface were altered in shape and speed of growth by the proteins. Proteins attached nonuniformly to the surface, indicating different interactions with crystallographically different step edges. The observed changes were consistent with the habit modification induced by this family of protei...

  3. Description of the atomic disorder (local order) in crystals by the mixed-symmetry method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudka, A. P.; Novikova, N. E.

    2017-11-01

    An approach to the description of local atomic disorder (short-range order) in single crystals by the mixed-symmetry method based on Bragg scattering data is proposed, and the corresponding software is developed. In defect-containing crystals, each atom in the unit cell can be described by its own symmetry space group. The expression for the calculated structural factor includes summation over different sets of symmetry operations for different atoms. To facilitate the search for new symmetry elements, an "atomic disorder expert" was developed, which estimates the significance of tested models. It is shown that the symmetry lowering for some atoms correlates with the existence of phase transitions (in langasite family crystals) and the anisotropy of physical properties (in rare-earth dodecaborides RB12).

  4. Seismic isolation of buildings on two dimensional phononic crystal foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lin; Li, Xiao-mei; Zhang, Yan

    2017-11-01

    In order to realize the seismic isolation of buildings, we establish the two dimensional phononic crystal (PC) foundation which has the cell with the size close to the regular concrete test specimens, and is composed of the concrete base, rubber coating and lead cylindrical core. We study the in-plane band gap (BG) characteristics in it, through the analysis of the frequency dispersion relation and frequency response result. To lower the start BG frequency to the seismic frequency range, we also study the influences of material parameters (the elastic modulus of coating and density of cylindrical core) and geometry parameters (the thickness of coating, radius of cylindrical core and lattice constant) on BG ranges. The study could help to design the PC foundation for seismic isolation of building.

  5. One-dimensional plasma photonic crystals with sinusoidal densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, L.; Shang, L.; Zhang, S.

    2014-01-01

    Properties of electromagnetic waves with normal and oblique incidence have been studied for one-dimensional plasma layers with sinusoidal densities. Wave transmittance as a function of wave frequency exhibits photonic band gaps characteristic of photonic crystals. For periodic structures, increasing collision frequency is demonstrated to lead to greater absorption, increasing the modulation factor enlarges the gap width, and increasing incidence angle can change the gap locations of the two polarizations. If a defect layer is introduced by inserting a new plasma layer in the center, a defect mode may appear within the gap. Periodic number, collision frequency, and modulation factor can affect magnitude of the defect mode. The incidence angle enables the frequency to be tuned. Defect layer thickness affects both frequency and number of defect modes. These results may provide theoretical guidance in designing tunable narrow-band filters

  6. Hydrothermal crystallization of amorphous titania films deposited using low temperature atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, D.R.G. [Institute of Materials Engineering, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)], E-mail: drm@ansto.gov.au; Triani, G.; Zhang, Z. [Institute of Materials Engineering, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2008-10-01

    A two stage process (atomic layer deposition, followed by hydrothermal treatment) for producing crystalline titania thin films at temperatures compatible with polymeric substrates (< 130 deg. C) has been assessed. Titania thin films were deposited at 80 deg. C using atomic layer deposition. They were extremely flat, uniform and almost entirely amorphous. They also contained relatively high levels of residual Cl from the precursor. After hydrothermal treatment at 120 deg. C for 1 day, > 50% of the film had crystallized. Crystallization was complete after 10 days of hydrothermal treatment. Crystallization of the film resulted in the formation of coarse grained anatase. Residual Cl was completely expelled from the film upon crystallization. As a result of the amorphous to crystalline transformation voids formed at the crystallization front. Inward and lateral crystal growth resulted in voids being localized to the film/substrate interface and crystallite perimeters resulting in pinholing. Both these phenomena resulted in films with poor adhesion and film integrity was severely compromised.

  7. Negative refraction angular characterization in one-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Eduardo Lugo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Photonic crystals are artificial structures that have periodic dielectric components with different refractive indices. Under certain conditions, they abnormally refract the light, a phenomenon called negative refraction. Here we experimentally characterize negative refraction in a one dimensional photonic crystal structure; near the low frequency edge of the fourth photonic bandgap. We compare the experimental results with current theory and a theory based on the group velocity developed here. We also analytically derived the negative refraction correctness condition that gives the angular region where negative refraction occurs.By using standard photonic techniques we experimentally determined the relationship between incidence and negative refraction angles and found the negative refraction range by applying the correctness condition. In order to compare both theories with experimental results an output refraction correction was utilized. The correction uses Snell's law and an effective refractive index based on two effective dielectric constants. We found good agreement between experiment and both theories in the negative refraction zone.Since both theories and the experimental observations agreed well in the negative refraction region, we can use both negative refraction theories plus the output correction to predict negative refraction angles. This can be very useful from a practical point of view for space filtering applications such as a photonic demultiplexer or for sensing applications.

  8. Negative refraction angular characterization in one-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Jesus Eduardo; Doti, Rafael; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2011-04-06

    Photonic crystals are artificial structures that have periodic dielectric components with different refractive indices. Under certain conditions, they abnormally refract the light, a phenomenon called negative refraction. Here we experimentally characterize negative refraction in a one dimensional photonic crystal structure; near the low frequency edge of the fourth photonic bandgap. We compare the experimental results with current theory and a theory based on the group velocity developed here. We also analytically derived the negative refraction correctness condition that gives the angular region where negative refraction occurs. By using standard photonic techniques we experimentally determined the relationship between incidence and negative refraction angles and found the negative refraction range by applying the correctness condition. In order to compare both theories with experimental results an output refraction correction was utilized. The correction uses Snell's law and an effective refractive index based on two effective dielectric constants. We found good agreement between experiment and both theories in the negative refraction zone. Since both theories and the experimental observations agreed well in the negative refraction region, we can use both negative refraction theories plus the output correction to predict negative refraction angles. This can be very useful from a practical point of view for space filtering applications such as a photonic demultiplexer or for sensing applications.

  9. Simulation and detection of massive Dirac fermions with cold atoms in one-dimensional optical lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Yafei, E-mail: yfyuks@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Shan Chuanjia [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); College of Physics and Electronic Science, Hubei Normal University, Huangshi 435002 (China); Mei Feng; Zhang Zhiming [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2012-09-15

    We propose a simple but feasible experimental scheme to simulate and detect Dirac fermions with cold atoms trapped in one-dimensional optical lattice. In our scheme, through tuning the laser intensity, the one-dimensional optical lattice can have two sites in each unit cell and the atoms around the low energy behave as massive Dirac fermions. Furthermore, we show that these relativistic quasiparticles can be detected experimentally by using atomic density profile measurements and Bragg scattering.

  10. Transmission properties of one-dimensional ternary plasma photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiveshwari, Laxmi; Awasthi, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Omnidirectional photonic band gaps (PBGs) are found in one-dimensional ternary plasma photonic crystals (PPC) composed of single negative metamaterials. The band characteristics and transmission properties are investigated through the transfer matrix method. We show that the proposed structure can trap light in three-dimensional space due to the elimination of Brewster's angle transmission resonance allowing the existence of complete PBG. The results are discussed in terms of incident angle, layer thickness, dielectric constant of the dielectric material, and number of unit cells (N) for TE and TM polarizations. It is seen that PBG characteristics is apparent even in an N ≥ 2 system, which is weakly sensitive to the incident angle and completely insensitive to the polarization. Finite PPC could be used for multichannel transmission filter without introducing any defect in the geometry. We show that the locations of the multichannel transmission peaks are in the allowed band of the infinite structure. The structure can work as a single or multichannel filter by varying the number of unit cells. Binary PPC can also work as a polarization sensitive tunable filter

  11. Transmission properties of one-dimensional ternary plasma photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiveshwari, Laxmi [Department of Physics, K. B. Womens' s College, Hazaribagh 825 301 (India); Awasthi, S. K. [Department of Physics and Material Science and Engineering, Jaypee Institute of Information Technology, Noida 201 304 (India)

    2015-09-15

    Omnidirectional photonic band gaps (PBGs) are found in one-dimensional ternary plasma photonic crystals (PPC) composed of single negative metamaterials. The band characteristics and transmission properties are investigated through the transfer matrix method. We show that the proposed structure can trap light in three-dimensional space due to the elimination of Brewster's angle transmission resonance allowing the existence of complete PBG. The results are discussed in terms of incident angle, layer thickness, dielectric constant of the dielectric material, and number of unit cells (N) for TE and TM polarizations. It is seen that PBG characteristics is apparent even in an N ≥ 2 system, which is weakly sensitive to the incident angle and completely insensitive to the polarization. Finite PPC could be used for multichannel transmission filter without introducing any defect in the geometry. We show that the locations of the multichannel transmission peaks are in the allowed band of the infinite structure. The structure can work as a single or multichannel filter by varying the number of unit cells. Binary PPC can also work as a polarization sensitive tunable filter.

  12. Membrane's Eleven: heavy-atom derivatives of membrane-protein crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morth, Jens Preben; Sørensen, Thomas Lykke-Møller; Nissen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    A database has been assembled of heavy-atom derivatives used in the structure determination of membrane proteins. The database can serve as a guide to the design of experiments in the search for heavy-atom derivatives of new membrane-protein crystals. The database pinpoints organomercurials...

  13. Trapping a single atom with a fraction of a photon using a photonic crystal nanocavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosten, D.; Kuipers, L.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the interaction between a single rubidium atom and a photonic crystal nanocavity. Because of the ultrasmall mode volume of the nanocavity, an extremely strong coupling regime can be achieved in which the atom can shift the cavity resonance by many cavity linewidths. We show that this

  14. A model for the interaction between F centers and H atoms in ionic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumke, V.R.; Souza, M. de

    1975-01-01

    The interaction between an F center and neutral hydrogen atoms, the most simple paramagnetic defects in ionic crystals, is described in terms of a perturbation theory of two square potential wells. The good agreement with experimental data indicates that lattice distortion due to the presence of the hydrogen atoms is negligible [pt

  15. Progress on Crystal Growth of Two-Dimensional Semiconductors for Optoelectronic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingqi Sun

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional (2D semiconductors are thought to belong to the most promising candidates for future nanoelectronic applications, due to their unique advantages and capability in continuing the downscaling of complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS devices while retaining decent mobility. Recently, optoelectronic devices based on novel synthetic 2D semiconductors have been reported, exhibiting comparable performance to the traditional solid-state devices. This review briefly describes the development of the growth of 2D crystals for applications in optoelectronics, including photodetectors, light-emitting diodes (LEDs, and solar cells. Such atomically thin materials with promising optoelectronic properties are very attractive for future advanced transparent optoelectronics as well as flexible and wearable/portable electronic devices.

  16. The method of intersecting spheres for determination of coordination numbers of atoms in crystal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serezhkin, V.N.; Buslaev, Yu.A.; Mikhajlov, Yu.N.

    1997-01-01

    New method for determination of coordination numbers (CN) of atoms in crystal structures, based on the model of interatomic interaction, within the frames whereof each atom is approximated by two spheres with the common center in the atom nuclei, is proposed. One of the spheres specifies conditionally isolated (chemically unbound) atom and its radius is a constant, which for atoms of the given chemical sort in the structure of any compound is equal to quasi-orbital Sleiter radius. The sphere of the other radius specifies chemically bound atom and coincides with the sphere, the volume whereof is equal to the volume of the Voronoj-Dirichlet polyhedron of the corresponding atom in the structure of the concrete crystal. Using a series of examples, workability of the given method for CN determination of atoms in structures of both simple substances and chemical compounds (alkali, transition metals, U, Th). Good agreement of the obtained results with the generally accepted CN s of atoms for the considered crystals is noted and a number of principal advantages of the new method, as compared to classical one of the CNs evaluation, is demonstrated

  17. Atomic structures and mechanical properties of single-crystal GaN nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, B.; Lu, A.J.; Pan, B.C.; Yu, Q.X.

    2005-01-01

    An approach is proposed to theoretically construct a realistic single-crystal GaN nanotube at atomic scale. The generated atomic structures of the single-crystal GaN nanotubes match the structural aspects from experiment very well. Our energetic calculations show that a single-crystal GaN nanotube with [100]-oriented lateral facets is more stable than that with [110]-oriented lateral facets, when they have around the same wall thickness. For a specified orientation of the lateral facets on the single-crystal GaN nanotubes, the energetic stabilities of the tubes obey a P rule, in which P is the ratio of the number of four-coordinated atoms to the number of three-coordinated atoms. Furthermore, the Young's modulus of the considered GaN nanotubes decrease with increasing the ratio of the number of bulk atoms to the number of surface atoms in each type of tube. Our calculations and analysis demonstrate that the surface effect of a single-crystal nanotube enhances its Young's modulus significantly

  18. One dimensional metallic edges in atomically thin WSe2 induced by air exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addou, Rafik; Smyth, Christopher M.; Noh, Ji-Young; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Pan, Yi; Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Fölsch, Stefan; Robinson, Joshua A.; Cho, Kyeongjae; Feenstra, Randall M.; Wallace, Robert M.

    2018-04-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides are a unique class of layered two-dimensional (2D) crystals with extensive promising applications. Tuning the electronic properties of low-dimensional materials is vital for engineering new functionalities. Surface oxidation is of particular interest because it is a relatively simple method of functionalization. By means of scanning probe microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we report the observation of metallic edges in atomically thin WSe2 monolayers grown by chemical vapor deposition on epitaxial graphene. Scanning tunneling microscopy shows structural details of WSe2 edges and scanning tunneling spectroscopy reveals the metallic nature of the oxidized edges. Photoemission demonstrates that the formation of metallic sub-stoichiometric tungsten oxide (WO2.7) is responsible for the high conductivity measured along the edges. Ab initio calculations validate the susceptibility of WSe2 nanoribbon edges to oxidation. The zigzag terminated edge exhibits metallic behavior prior the air-exposure and remains metallic after oxidation. Comprehending and exploiting this property opens a new opportunity for application in advanced electronic devices.

  19. Chiral Asymmetric Structures in Aspartic Acid and Valine Crystals Assessed by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, Omar; Soares, David Mendez

    2016-03-29

    Structures of crystallized deposits formed by the molecular self-assembly of aspartic acid and valine on silicon substrates were imaged by atomic force microscopy. Images of d- and l-aspartic acid crystal surfaces showing extended molecularly flat sheets or regions separated by single molecule thick steps are presented. Distinct orientation surfaces were imaged, which, combined with the single molecule step size, defines the geometry of the crystal. However, single molecule step growth also reveals the crystal chirality, i.e., growth orientations. The imaged ordered lattice of aspartic acid (asp) and valine (val) mostly revealed periodicities corresponding to bulk terminations, but a previously unreported molecular hexagonal lattice configuration was observed for both l-asp and l-val but not for d-asp or d-val. Atomic force microscopy can then be used to identify the different chiral forms of aspartic acid and valine crystals.

  20. Two-dimensional atom localization based on coherent field controlling in a five-level M-type atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangqian; Li, Jinjiang; Sun, Xiudong

    2017-12-11

    We study two-dimensional sub-wavelength atom localization based on the microwave coupling field controlling and spontaneously generated coherence (SGC) effect. For a five-level M-type atom, introducing a microwave coupling field between two upper levels and considering the quantum interference between two transitions from two upper levels to lower levels, the analytical expression of conditional position probability (CPP) distribution is obtained using the iterative method. The influence of the detuning of a spontaneously emitted photon, Rabi frequency of the microwave field, and the SGC effect on the CPP are discussed. The two-dimensional sub-half-wavelength atom localization with high-precision and high spatial resolution is achieved by adjusting the detuning and the Rabi frequency, where the atom can be localized in a region smaller thanλ/10×λ/10. The spatial resolution is improved significantly compared with the case without the microwave field.

  1. Quantum transport of atomic matter waves in anisotropic two-dimensional and three-dimensional disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piraud, M; Pezzé, L; Sanchez-Palencia, L

    2013-01-01

    The macroscopic transport properties in a disordered potential, namely diffusion and weak/strong localization, closely depend on the microscopic and statistical properties of the disorder itself. This dependence is rich in counter-intuitive consequences. It can be particularly exploited in matter wave experiments, where the disordered potential can be tailored and controlled, and anisotropies are naturally present. In this work, we apply a perturbative microscopic transport theory and the self-consistent theory of Anderson localization to study the transport properties of ultracold atoms in anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) speckle potentials. In particular, we discuss the anisotropy of single-scattering, diffusion and localization. We also calculate disorder-induced shift of the energy states and propose a method to include it, which amounts to renormalizing energies in the standard on-shell approximation. We show that the renormalization of energies strongly affects the prediction for the 3D localization threshold (mobility edge). We illustrate the theoretical findings with examples which are relevant for current matter wave experiments, where the disorder is created with laser speckle. This paper provides a guideline for future experiments aiming at the precise location of the 3D mobility edge and study of anisotropic diffusion and localization effects in 2D and 3D. (paper)

  2. muSR-Investigation of a Liquid Crystal Containing Iron Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Mamedov, T N; Galyametdinov, Yu G; Gritsaj, K I; Herlach, D; Kormann, O; Major, J V; Rochev, V Ya; Stoikov, A V; Zimmermann, U

    2000-01-01

    The work is devoted to the investigation of properties of a liquid crystal whose molecule contains iron atom. The compounds of this type are of interest from the point of view of obtaining liquid crystals with magnetic properties. The temperature dependence of the polarization and relaxation rate of positive muon spin in the liquid crystal was measured in the temperature range 4-300 K. The results obtained do not contradict the suggestion that the iron ions from an antiferromagnetically-ordered structure in this liquid crystal at the temperatures below 80 K.

  3. Optical microcavities based on surface modes in two-dimensional photonic crystals and silicon-on-insulator photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui; Qiu, M.

    2007-01-01

    Surface-mode optical microcavities based on two-dimensional photonic crystals and silicon-on-insulator photonic crystals are studied. We demonstrate that a high-quality-factor microcavity can be easily realized in these structures. With an increasing of the cavity length, the quality factor is gr...... is gradually enhanced and the resonant frequency converges to that of the corresponding surface mode in the photonic crystals. These structures have potential applications such as sensing.......Surface-mode optical microcavities based on two-dimensional photonic crystals and silicon-on-insulator photonic crystals are studied. We demonstrate that a high-quality-factor microcavity can be easily realized in these structures. With an increasing of the cavity length, the quality factor...

  4. A simple analytical model for electronic conductance in a one dimensional atomic chain across a defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khater, Antoine; Szczesniak, Dominik

    2011-01-01

    An analytical model is presented for the electronic conductance in a one dimensional atomic chain across an isolated defect. The model system consists of two semi infinite lead atomic chains with the defect atom making the junction between the two leads. The calculation is based on a linear combination of atomic orbitals in the tight-binding approximation, with a single atomic one s-like orbital chosen in the present case. The matching method is used to derive analytical expressions for the scattering cross sections for the reflection and transmission processes across the defect, in the Landauer-Buttiker representation. These analytical results verify the known limits for an infinite atomic chain with no defects. The model can be applied numerically for one dimensional atomic systems supported by appropriate templates. It is also of interest since it would help establish efficient procedures for ensemble averages over a field of impurity configurations in real physical systems.

  5. Three-dimensional crystals of ribosomes and their subunits from eu- and archaebacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotz, C; Müssig, J; Gewitz, H S; Makowski, I; Arad, T; Yonath, A; Wittmann, H G

    1987-11-01

    Ordered three-dimensional crystals of 70S ribosomes as well as of 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits from various bacteria (E. coli, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Thermus thermophilus and Halobacterium marismortui) have been grown by vapour diffusion in hanging drops using mono- and polyalcohols. A new compact crystal form of 50S subunits has been obtained, and it is suitable for crystallographic studies at medium resolution. In addition, from one crystal form large crystals could be grown in X-ray capillaries. In all cases the crystals were obtained from functionally active ribosomal particles, and the particles from dissolved crystals retained their integrity and biological activity.

  6. Two-dimensional sub-half-wavelength atom localization via controlled spontaneous emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ren-Gang; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2011-12-05

    We propose a scheme for two-dimensional (2D) atom localization based on the controlled spontaneous emission, in which the atom interacts with two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Due to the spatially dependent atom-field interaction, the position probability distribution of the atom can be directly determined by measuring the resulting spontaneously emission spectrum. The phase sensitive property of the atomic system leads to quenching of the spontaneous emission in some regions of the standing-waves, which significantly reduces the uncertainty in the position measurement of the atom. We find that the frequency measurement of the emitted light localizes the atom in half-wavelength domain. Especially the probability of finding the atom at a particular position can reach 100% when a photon with certain frequency is detected. By increasing the Rabi frequencies of the driving fields, such 2D sub-half-wavelength atom localization can acquire high spatial resolution.

  7. Laser-cooled atoms inside a hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajcsy, Michal; Hofferberth, S.; Peyronel, Thibault

    2011-01-01

    We describe the loading of laser-cooled rubidium atoms into a single-mode hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber. Inside the fiber, the atoms are confined by a far-detuned optical trap and probed by a weak resonant beam. We describe different loading methods and compare their trade-offs in terms...... of implementation complexity and atom-loading efficiency. The most efficient procedure results in loading of ∼30,000 rubidium atoms, which creates a medium with an optical depth of ∼180 inside the fiber. Compared to our earlier study this represents a sixfold increase in the maximum achieved optical depth...

  8. A new method for mapping the three-dimensional atomic distribution within nanoparticles by atom probe tomography (APT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Ho; Kang, Phil Woong; Park, O Ok; Seol, Jae-Bok; Ahn, Jae-Pyoung; Lee, Ji Yeong; Choi, Pyuck-Pa

    2018-07-01

    We present a new method of preparing needle-shaped specimens for atom probe tomography from freestanding Pd and C-supported Pt nanoparticles. The method consists of two steps, namely electrophoresis of nanoparticles on a flat Cu substrate followed by electrodeposition of a Ni film acting as an embedding matrix for the nanoparticles. Atom probe specimen preparation can be subsequently carried out by means of focused-ion-beam milling. Using this approach, we have been able to perform correlative atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy analyses on both nanoparticle systems. Reliable mass spectra and three-dimensional atom maps could be obtained for Pd nanoparticle specimens. In contrast, atom probe samples prepared from C-supported Pt nanoparticles showed uneven field evaporation and hence artifacts in the reconstructed atom maps. Our developed method is a viable means of mapping the three-dimensional atomic distribution within nanoparticles and is expected to contribute to an improved understanding of the structure-composition-property relationships of various nanoparticle systems. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Atomic-scale friction on stepped surfaces of ionic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Pascal; Gnecco, Enrico; Krok, Franciszek; Budzioch, Janusz; Walczak, Lukasz; Konior, Jerzy; Szymonski, Marek; Meyer, Ernst

    2011-05-06

    We report on high-resolution friction force microscopy on a stepped NaCl(001) surface in ultrahigh vacuum. The measurements were performed on single cleavage step edges. When blunt tips are used, friction is found to increase while scanning both up and down a step edge. With atomically sharp tips, friction still increases upwards, but it decreases and even changes sign downwards. Our observations extend previous results obtained without resolving atomic features and are associated with the competition between the Schwöbel barrier and the asymmetric potential well accompanying the step edges.

  10. Neutral-helium-atom diffraction from a micron-scale periodic structure: Photonic-crystal-membrane characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesse, Torstein; Eder, Sabrina D.; Kaltenbacher, Thomas; Grepstad, Jon Olav; Simonsen, Ingve; Holst, Bodil

    2017-06-01

    Surface scattering of neutral helium beams created by supersonic expansion is an established technique for measuring structural and dynamical properties of surfaces on the atomic scale. Helium beams have also been used in Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction experiments. Due to the short wavelength of the atom beams of typically 0.1 nm or less, Fraunhofer diffraction experiments in transmission have so far been limited to grating structures with a period (pitch) of up to 200 nm. However, larger periods are of interest for several applications, for example, for the characterization of photonic-crystal-membrane structures, where the period is typically in the micron to high submicron range. Here we present helium atom diffraction measurements of a photonic-crystal-membrane structure with a two-dimensional square lattice of 100 ×100 circular holes. The nominal period and the hole radius were 490 and 100 nm, respectively. To our knowledge this is the largest period that has been measured with helium diffraction. The helium diffraction measurements are interpreted using a model based on the helium beam characteristics. It is demonstrated how to successfully extract values from the experimental data for the average period of the grating, the hole diameter, and the width of the virtual source used to model the helium beam.

  11. The directional propagation characteristics of elastic wave in two-dimensional thin plate phononic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Jihong; Yu, Dianlong; Wang Gang; Zhao Honggang; Liu Yaozong; Wen Xisen

    2007-01-01

    The directional propagation characteristics of elastic wave during pass bands in two-dimensional thin plate phononic crystals are analyzed by using the lumped-mass method to yield the phase constant surface. The directions and regions of wave propagation in phononic crystals for certain frequencies during pass bands are predicted with the iso-frequency contour lines of the phase constant surface, which are then validated with the harmonic responses of a finite two-dimensional thin plate phononic crystals with 16x16 unit cells. These results are useful for controlling the wave propagation in the pass bands of phononic crystals

  12. De Haas-van Alphen effect of a two-dimensional ultracold atomic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, B.; Furtado, C.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we show how the ultracold atom analogue of the two-dimensional de Haas-van Alphen effect in electronic condensed matter systems can be induced by optical fields in a neutral atomic system. The interaction between the suitable spatially varying laser fields and tripod-type trapped atoms generates a synthetic magnetic field which leads the particles to organize themselves in Landau levels. Initially, with the atomic gas in a regime of lowest Landau level, we display the oscillatory behaviour of the atomic energy and its derivative with respect to the effective magnetic field (B) as a function of 1/B. Furthermore, we estimate the area of the Fermi circle of the two-dimensional atomic gas.

  13. Three Dimensional Imaging of Cold Atoms in a Magneto Optical Trap with a Light Field Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    with a Light Field Microscope Gordon E. Lott Follow this and additional works at: https://scholar.afit.edu/etd Part of the Atomic, Molecular and......https://scholar.afit.edu/etd/774 THREE-DIMENSIONAL IMAGING OF COLD ATOMS IN A MAGNETO-OPTICAL TRAP WITH A LIGHT FIELD MICROSCOPE DISSERTATION Gordon E

  14. Algorithms for solving atomic structures of nanodimensional clusters in single crystals based on X-ray and neutron diffuse scattering data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrushevskii, N.M.; Shchedrin, B.M.; Simonov, V.I.

    2004-01-01

    New algorithms for solving the atomic structure of equivalent nanodimensional clusters of the same orientations randomly distributed over the initial single crystal (crystal matrix) have been suggested. A cluster is a compact group of substitutional, interstitial or other atoms displaced from their positions in the crystal matrix. The structure is solved based on X-ray or neutron diffuse scattering data obtained from such objects. The use of the mathematical apparatus of Fourier transformations of finite functions showed that the appropriate sampling of the intensities of continuous diffuse scattering allows one to synthesize multiperiodic difference Patterson functions that reveal the systems of the interatomic vectors of an individual cluster. The suggested algorithms are tested on a model one-dimensional structure

  15. Two-dimensionally grown single-crystal silicon nanosheets with tunable visible-light emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Wook; Lee, Jaejun; Sung, Ji Ho; Seo, Dong-jae; Kim, Ilsoo; Jo, Moon-Ho; Kwon, Byoung Wook; Choi, Won Kook; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2014-07-22

    Since the discovery of graphene, growth of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials has greatly attracted attention. However, spontaneous growth of atomic two-dimensional (2D) materials is limitedly permitted for several layered-structure crystals, such as graphene, MoS2, and h-BN, and otherwise it is notoriously difficult. Here we report the gas-phase 2D growth of silicon (Si), that is cubic in symmetry, via dendritic growth and an interdendritic filling mechanism and to form Si nanosheets (SiNSs) of 1 to 13 nm in thickness. Thin SiNSs show strong thickness-dependent photoluminescence in visible range including red, green, and blue (RGB) emissions with the associated band gap energies ranging from 1.6 to 3.2 eV; these emission energies were greater than those from Si quantum dots (SiQDs) of the similar sizes. We also demonstrated that electrically driven white, as well as blue, emission in a conventional organic light-emitting diode (OLED) geometry with the SiNS assembly as the active emitting layers. Tunable light emissions in visible range in our observations suggest practical implications for novel 2D Si nanophotonics.

  16. Low-frequency-field-induced spontaneous-emission interference in a two-level atom placed in an anisotropic photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Gaoxiang; Evers, Joerg; Keitel, Christoph H

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the spontaneous-emission properties of a two-level atom embedded in a three-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystal. In addition to the modified density of states, the atom is driven by a coherent intense low-frequency field (LFF), which creates additional multiphoton decay channels with the exchange of two low-frequency photons and one spontaneous photon during an atomic transition. Due to the low frequency of the applied field, the various transition pathways may interfere with each other and thus give rise to a modified system dynamics. We find that even if all the atomic (bare and induced) transition frequencies are in the conducting band of the photonic crystal, there still may exist a photon-atom bound state in coexistence with propagating modes. The system also allows us to generate narrow lines in the spontaneous-emission spectrum. This spectrum is a function of the distance of the observer from the atom due to the band gap in the photonic crystal. The system properties depend on three characteristic frequencies, which are influenced by quantum interference effects. Thus these results can be attributed to a combination of interference and band-gap effects

  17. One-Dimensional Tunable Photonic-Crystal IR Filter, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MetroLaser proposes to design and develop an innovative narrowband tunable IR filter based on the properties of a one-dimensional photonic crystal structure with a...

  18. One-Dimensional Tunable Photonic-Crystal IR Filter, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MetroLaser proposes to design and develop an innovative narrowband tunable IR filter based on the properties of a one-dimensional photonic crystal structure with a...

  19. On Regularity Criteria for the Two-Dimensional Generalized Liquid Crystal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We establish the regularity criteria for the two-dimensional generalized liquid crystal model. It turns out that the global existence results satisfy our regularity criteria naturally.

  20. Emulation of two-dimensional photonic crystal defect modes in a photonic crystal with a three-dimensional photonic band gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povinelli, M. L.; Johnson, Steven G.; Fan, Shanhui; Joannopoulos, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Using numerical simulations, we demonstrate the construction of two-dimensional- (2D-) like defect modes in a recently proposed 3D photonic crystal structure. These modes, which are confined in all three dimensions by a complete photonic band gap, bear a striking similarity to those in 2D photonic crystals in terms of polarization, field profile, and projected band structures. It is expected that these results will greatly facilitate the observation of widely studied 2D photonic-crystal phenomena in a realistic, 3D physical system

  1. Emulation of two-dimensional photonic crystal defect modes in a photonic crystal with a three-dimensional photonic band gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Povinelli, M. L.; Johnson, Steven G.; Fan, Shanhui; Joannopoulos, J. D.

    2001-08-15

    Using numerical simulations, we demonstrate the construction of two-dimensional- (2D-) like defect modes in a recently proposed 3D photonic crystal structure. These modes, which are confined in all three dimensions by a complete photonic band gap, bear a striking similarity to those in 2D photonic crystals in terms of polarization, field profile, and projected band structures. It is expected that these results will greatly facilitate the observation of widely studied 2D photonic-crystal phenomena in a realistic, 3D physical system.

  2. Dimensional crossover and cold-atom realization of gapless and semi-metallic Mott insulating phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Peter P.; Scheurer, Mathias; Rachel, Stephan

    2014-03-01

    We propose a realistic cold-atom setup which allows for a dimensional crossover from a two-dimensional quantum spin Hall insulating phase to a three-dimensional strong topological insulator phase by simply tuning the hopping between the layers. We further employ cluster slave-rotor mean-field theory to study the effect of additional Hubbard onsite interactions that give rise to various spin liquid-like phases such as gapless and semi-metallic Mott insulating states.

  3. Creation of tunable absolute bandgaps in a two-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystal modulated by a nematic liquid crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chenyang

    2008-01-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have many potential applications because of their ability to control light-wave propagation. We have investigated the tunable absolute bandgap in a two-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystal structures modulated by a nematic liquid crystal. The PC structure composed of an anisotropic-dielectric cylinder in the liquid crystal medium is studied by solving Maxwell's equations using the plane wave expansion method. The photonic band structures are found to exhibit absolute bandgaps for the square and triangular lattices. Numerical simulations show that the absolute bandgaps can be continuously tuned in the square and triangular lattices consisting of anisotropic-dielectric cylinders by infiltrating nematic liquid crystals. Such a mechanism of bandgap adjustment should open up a new application for designing components in photonic integrated circuits

  4. Crystallization of SHARPIN using an automated two-dimensional grid screen for optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieglitz, Benjamin; Rittinger, Katrin; Haire, Lesley F.

    2012-01-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of an N-terminal fragment of SHARPIN are reported. Diffraction-quality crystals were obtained using a two-dimensional grid-screen seeding technique. An N-terminal fragment of human SHARPIN was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained by a one-step optimization of seed dilution and protein concentration using a two-dimensional grid screen. The crystals belonged to the primitive tetragonal space group P4 3 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 61.55, c = 222.81 Å. Complete data sets were collected from native and selenomethionine-substituted protein crystals at 100 K to 2.6 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively

  5. Broadband slow light in one-dimensional logically combined photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagappan, G; Png, C E

    2015-01-28

    Here, we demonstrate the broadband slow light effects in a new family of one dimensional photonic crystals, which are obtained by logically combining two photonic crystals of slightly different periods. The logical combination slowly destroys the original translational symmetries of the individual photonic crystals. Consequently, the Bloch modes of the individual photonic crystals with different wavevectors couple with each other, creating a vast number of slow modes. Specifically, we describe a photonic crystal architecture that results from a logical "OR" mixture of two one dimensional photonic crystals with a periods ratio of r = R/(R - 1), where R > 2 is an integer. Such a logically combined architecture, exhibits a broad region of frequencies in which a dense number of slow modes with varnishing group velocities, appear naturally as Bloch modes.

  6. Atomically Phase-Matched Second-Harmonic Generation in a 2D Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-26

    OPEN ORIGINAL ARTICLE Atomically phase-matched second-harmonic generation in a 2D crystal Mervin Zhao1,2,*, Ziliang Ye1,2,*, Ryuji Suzuki3,4,*, Yu...photoluminescence mapping, Raman spectroscopy and atomic -force microscopy. (b) Image produced via scanning and gathering the SH light produced by the 3R-MoS2...arising from a single atomic layer, where the SH light elucidated important information such as the grain boundaries and electronic structure in these ultra

  7. Pseudo-time-reversal symmetry and topological edge states in two-dimensional acoustic crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Mei, Jun

    2016-09-02

    We propose a simple two-dimensional acoustic crystal to realize topologically protected edge states for acoustic waves. The acoustic crystal is composed of a triangular array of core-shell cylinders embedded in a water host. By utilizing the point group symmetry of two doubly degenerate eigenstates at the Î

  8. Pseudo-time-reversal symmetry and topological edge states in two-dimensional acoustic crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Mei, Jun; Chen, Zeguo; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple two-dimensional acoustic crystal to realize topologically protected edge states for acoustic waves. The acoustic crystal is composed of a triangular array of core-shell cylinders embedded in a water host. By utilizing the point group symmetry of two doubly degenerate eigenstates at the Î

  9. Chiral-nematic liquid crystals as one dimensional photonic materials in optical sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, D.J.; Schenning, A.P.H.J.; Bastiaansen, C.W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Current developments in the field of thermotropic chiral-nematic liquid crystals as sensors are discussed. These one dimensional photonic materials are based on low molecular weight liquid crystals and chiral-nematic polymeric networks. For both low molecular weight LCs and polymer networks,

  10. Spectroscopy of photonic band gaps in mesoporous one-dimensional photonic crystals based on aluminum oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelik, V.S.; Voinov, Yu.P.; Shchavlev, V.V.; Bi, Dongxue; Shang, Guo Liang; Fei, Guang Tao

    2017-01-01

    Mesoporous one-dimensional photonic crystals based on aluminum oxide have been synthesized by electrochemical etching method. Reflection spectra of the obtained mesoporous samples in a wide spectral range that covers several band gaps are presented. Microscopic parameters of photonic crystals are calculated and corresponding reflection spectra for the first six band gaps are presented.

  11. Fabrication and Characterization of Three Dimensional Photonic Crystals Generated by Multibeam Interference Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Chieh

    2009-01-01

    Multibeam interference lithography is investigated as a manufacturing technique for three-dimensional photonic crystal templates. In this research, optimization of the optical setup and the photoresist initiation system leads to a significant improvement of the optical quality of the crystal, as characterized by normal incidence optical…

  12. Removing grain boundaries from three-dimensional colloidal crystals using active dopants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, B.; Dijkstra, M.; Filion, L.C.

    2016-01-01

    Using computer simulations we explore how grain boundaries can be removed from three-dimensional colloidal crystals by doping with a small fraction of active colloids. We show that for sufficient selfpropulsion, the system is driven into a crystal-fluid coexistence. In this phase separated regime,

  13. Current status of three-dimensional silicon photonic crystals operating at infrared wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIN,SHAWN-YU; FLEMING,JAMES G.; SIGALAS,M.M.; BISWAS,R.; HO,K.M.

    2000-05-11

    In this paper, the experimental realization and promises of three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals in the infrared and optical wavelengths will be described. Emphasis will be placed on the development of new 3D photonic crystals, the micro- and nano-fabrication techniques, the construction of high-Q micro-cavities and the creation of 3D waveguides.

  14. Terahertz spectroscopy of three-dimensional photonic band-gap crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezbay, E.; Michel, E.; Tuttle, G.; Biswas, R.; Ho, K.M.; Bostak, J.; Bloom, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    We have fabricated and built three-dimensional photonic band-gap crystals with band-gap frequencies larger than 500 GHz. We built the crystals by stacking micromachined (110) silicon wafers. The transmission and dispersion characteristics of the structures were measured by an all-electronic terahertz spectroscopy setup. The experimental results were in good agreement with theoretical calculations. To our knowledge, our new crystal has the highest reported photonic band-gap frequency

  15. Packaging consideration of two-dimensional polymer-based photonic crystals for laser beam steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xinyuan; Chen, Xiaonan; Chen, Maggie Yihong; Wang, Alan Xiaolong; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Ray T.

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we report the theoretical study of polymer-based photonic crystals for laser beam steering which is based on the superprism effect as well as the experiment fabrication of the two dimensional photonic crystals for the laser beam steering. Superprism effect, the principle for beam steering, was separately studied in details through EFC (Equifrequency Contour) analysis. Polymer based photonic crystals were fabricated through double exposure holographic interference method using SU8-2007. The experiment results were also reported.

  16. Negative refraction at infrared wavelengths in a two-dimensional photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrier, A.; Mulot, M.; Swillo, M.; Qiu, M.; Thylen, L.; Anand, S.; Talneau, A.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the first experimental evidence of negative refraction at telecommunication wavelengths by a two-dimensional photonic crystal field. Samples were fabricated by chemically assisted ion beam etching in the InP-based low-index constrast system. Experiments of beam imaging and light collection show light focusing by the photonic crystal field. Finite-difference time-domain simulations confirm that the observed focusing is due to negative refraction in the photonic crystal area

  17. Synthesis, crystal structure determination of two-dimensional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The 2-D polymeric complex (I) has the formula [Ag(phSE)(NO3)]n, which has been crystallized from methanol-acetonitrile mixture and characterized by elemental analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In this polymer, each Ag(I) ion occupies distorted trigonal pyramidal geometry coordinating with two.

  18. An optimized intermolecular force field for hydrogen-bonded organic molecular crystals using atomic multipole electrostatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyzer-Knapp, Edward O.; Thompson, Hugh P. G.; Day, Graeme M.

    2016-01-01

    An empirically parameterized intermolecular force field is developed for crystal structure modelling and prediction. The model is optimized for use with an atomic multipole description of electrostatic interactions. We present a re-parameterization of a popular intermolecular force field for describing intermolecular interactions in the organic solid state. Specifically we optimize the performance of the exp-6 force field when used in conjunction with atomic multipole electrostatics. We also parameterize force fields that are optimized for use with multipoles derived from polarized molecular electron densities, to account for induction effects in molecular crystals. Parameterization is performed against a set of 186 experimentally determined, low-temperature crystal structures and 53 measured sublimation enthalpies of hydrogen-bonding organic molecules. The resulting force fields are tested on a validation set of 129 crystal structures and show improved reproduction of the structures and lattice energies of a range of organic molecular crystals compared with the original force field with atomic partial charge electrostatics. Unit-cell dimensions of the validation set are typically reproduced to within 3% with the re-parameterized force fields. Lattice energies, which were all included during parameterization, are systematically underestimated when compared with measured sublimation enthalpies, with mean absolute errors of between 7.4 and 9.0%

  19. Atom–atom interactions around the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Jonathan D.; Goban, Akihisa; Asenjo-Garcia, Ana; Lu, Mingwu; Yu, Su-Peng; Chang, Darrick E.; Kimble, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Tailoring the interactions between quantum emitters and single photons constitutes one of the cornerstones of quantum optics. Coupling a quantum emitter to the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) provides a unique platform for tuning these interactions. In particular, the cross-over from propagating fields E(x)∝e±ikxx outside the bandgap to localized fields E(x)∝e−κx|x| within the bandgap should be accompanied by a transition from largely dissipative atom–atom interactions to a regime where dispersive atom–atom interactions are dominant. Here, we experimentally observe this transition by shifting the band edge frequency of the PCW relative to the D1 line of atomic cesium for N¯=3.0±0.5 atoms trapped along the PCW. Our results are the initial demonstration of this paradigm for coherent atom–atom interactions with low dissipation into the guided mode. PMID:27582467

  20. Scattering of atomic and molecular ions from single crystal surfaces of Cu, Ag and Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoest, J.M. van.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis deals with analysis of crystal surfaces of Cu, Ag and Fe with Low Energy Ion scattering Spectroscopy (LEIS). Different atomic and molecular ions with fixed energies below 7 keV are scattered by a metal single crystal (with adsorbates). The energy and direction of the scattered particles are analysed for different selected charge states. In that way information can be obtained concerning the composition and atomic and electronic structure of the single crystal surface. Energy spectra contain information on the composition of the surface, while structural atomic information is obtained by direction measurements (photograms). In Ch.1 a description is given of the experimental equipment, in Ch.2 a characterization of the LEIS method. Ch.3 deals with the neutralization of keV-ions in surface scattering. Two different ways of data interpretation are presented. First a model is treated in which the observed directional dependence of neutralization action of the first atom layer of the surface is presented by a laterally varying thickness of the neutralizing layer. Secondly it is shown that the data can be reproduced by a more realistic, physical model based on atomic transition matrix elements. In Ch.4 the low energy hydrogen scattering is described. The study of the dissociation of H 2 + at an Ag surface r0230ted in a model based on electronic dissociation, initialized by electron capture into a repulsive (molecular) state. In Ch.5 finally the method is applied to the investigation of the surface structure of oxidized Fe. (Auth.)

  1. Controllable optical bistability in photonic-crystal one-atom laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiaoyong; Lue Shuchen

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the property of optical bistability in a photonic-crystal one-atom laser when nonlinear microcavity is present. The physical system consists of a coherently driven two-level light emitter strongly coupled to a high-quality microcavity which is embedded within a photonic crystal and another coherent probing field which has incident into the microcavity. In our case, the microcavity is fabricated by nonlinear material and placed as an impurity in photonic crystal. This study reveals that such a system can exhibit optical bistability. The dependence of threshold value and hysteresis loop on the photonic band gap of the photonic crystal, driving field Rabi frequency and dephasing processes, are studied. Our results clearly illustrate the ability to control optical bistability through suitable photonic-crystal architectures and external coherent driving field, and this study suggests that in a photonic-crystal nonlinear microcavity, the one-atom laser acts as an effective controllable bistable device in the design of all-light digital computing systems in the near future.

  2. Electron cryomicroscopy of two-dimensional crystals of the H+-ATPase from chloroplasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Böttcher, Bettina; Gräber, Peter; Boekema, Egbert J.; Lücken, Uwe

    1995-01-01

    The H+-ATPase from spinach chloroplasts was isolated and purified. Two-dimensional crystals were obtained from the protein/lipid/detergent micelles by treatment with phospholipase and simultaneous removal of detergent and fatty acids by Biobeads. The resulting two-dimensionally ordered arrays were

  3. ELECTRON CRYOMICROSCOPY OF 2-DIMENSIONAL CRYSTALS OF THE H+-ATPASE FROM CHLOROPLASTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOTTCHER, B; GRABER, P; BOEKEMA, EJ; LUCKEN, U

    1995-01-01

    The H+-ATPase from spinach chloroplasts was isolated and purified, Two-dimensional crystals were obtained from the protein/lipid/detergent micelles by treatment with phospholipase and simultaneous removal of detergent and fatty acids by Biobeads. The resulting two-dimensionally ordered arrays were

  4. Enhancement of the fluorescence intensity of DNA intercalators using nano-imprinted 2-dimensional photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Tatsuro; Ueda, China; Hisamoto, Hideaki; Kajita, Hiroshi; Okuda, Norimichi; Tanaka, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    We have fabricated polymer-based 2-dimensional photonic crystals that play a key role in enhancing the fluorescence of DNA intercalators. Highly ordered 2-dimensional photonic crystals possessing triangle-shaped and nm-sized hole arrays were fabricated on a 100 μm thick polymer film using nano-imprint lithography. Samples of double-stranded DNAs (sizes: 4361 and 48502 bp; concentration: 1 pM to 10 nM) were adsorbed on the surface of the 2-dimensional photonic crystal by electrostatic interactions and then treated with intercalators. It is found that the fluorescence intensity of the intercalator is enhanced by a factor of up to 10 compared to the enhancement in the absence of the 2-dimensional photonic crystal. Fluorescence intensity increases with increasing length and concentration of the DNAs. If the 2-dimensional photonic crystal is used as a Bragg reflection mirror, the enhancement of fluorescence intensity can be easily observed using a conventional spectrofluorometer. These results suggest that the printed photonic crystal offers a great potential for highly sensitive intercalator-based fluorescent detection of DNAs. (author)

  5. Cooperative single-photon subradiant states in a three-dimensional atomic array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jen, H.H., E-mail: sappyjen@gmail.com

    2016-11-15

    We propose a complete superradiant and subradiant states that can be manipulated and prepared in a three-dimensional atomic array. These subradiant states can be realized by absorbing a single photon and imprinting the spatially-dependent phases on the atomic system. We find that the collective decay rates and associated cooperative Lamb shifts are highly dependent on the phases we manage to imprint, and the subradiant state of long lifetime can be found for various lattice spacings and atom numbers. We also investigate both optically thin and thick atomic arrays, which can serve for systematic studies of super- and sub-radiance. Our proposal offers an alternative scheme for quantum memory of light in a three-dimensional array of two-level atoms, which is applicable and potentially advantageous in quantum information processing. - Highlights: • Cooperative single-photon subradiant states in a three-dimensional atomic array. • Subradiant state manipulation via spatially-increasing phase imprinting. • Quantum storage of light in the subradiant state in two-level atoms.

  6. Immobilization of single argon atoms in nano-cages of two-dimensional zeolite model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Mengen; Akter, Nusnin; Kestell, John D; Boscoboinik, Alejandro M; Kim, Taejin; Stacchiola, Dario J; Lu, Deyu; Boscoboinik, J Anibal

    2017-07-17

    The confinement of noble gases on nanostructured surfaces, in contrast to bulk materials, at non-cryogenic temperatures represents a formidable challenge. In this work, individual Ar atoms are trapped at 300 K in nano-cages consisting of (alumino)silicate hexagonal prisms forming a two-dimensional array on a planar surface. The trapping of Ar atoms is detected in situ using synchrotron-based ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The atoms remain in the cages upon heating to 400 K. The trapping and release of Ar is studied combining surface science methods and density functional theory calculations. While the frameworks stay intact with the inclusion of Ar atoms, the permeability of gasses (for example, CO) through them is significantly affected, making these structures also interesting candidates for tunable atomic and molecular sieves. These findings enable the study of individually confined noble gas atoms using surface science methods, opening up new opportunities for fundamental research.

  7. The Use of Atomic-Force Microscopy for Studying the Crystallization Process of Amorphous Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmanov, G. N.; Ivanitskaya, E. A.; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Skrytniy, V. I.

    The crystallization process of amorphous alloys is accompanied by the volume changes as a result of structural phase transitions. This leads to changes in the surface topography, which was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The changes of the surface topography, structure and phase composition during multistage crystallization process of the metallic glasses with composition Ni71,5Cr6,8Fe2,7B11,9Si7,1 and Ni63,4Cr7,4Fe4,3Mn0,8B15,6Si8,5 (AWS BNi2) has been investigated. The obtained results on changing of the surface topography in crystallization process are in good agreement with the data of X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The nature of redistribution of some alloy components in the crystallization process has been suggested.

  8. A comparison of VRML and animation of rotation for teaching 3-dimensional crystal lattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauls, Barbara Lynn

    Chemistry students often have difficulty visualizing abstract concepts of molecules and atoms, which may lead to misconceptions. The three-dimensionality of these structures presents a challenge to educators. Typical methods of teaching include text with two-dimensional graphics and structural models. Improved methods to allow visualization of 3D structures may improve learning of these concepts. This research compared the use of Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) and animation of rotation for teaching three-dimensional structures. VRML allows full control of objects by altering angle, size, rotation, and provides the ability to zoom into and through objects. Animations may only be stopped, restarted and replayed. A web-based lesson teaching basic concepts of crystals, which requires comprehension of their three-dimensional structure was given to 100 freshmen chemistry students. Students were stratified by gender then randomly to one of two lessons, which were identical except for the multimedia method used to show the lattices and unit cells. One method required exploration of the structures using VRML, the other provided animations of the same structures rotating. The students worked through an examination as the lesson progressed. A Welch t' test was used to compare differences between groups. No significant difference in mean achievement was found between the two methods, between genders, or within gender. There was no significant difference in mean total SAT in the animation and VRML group. Total time on task had no significant difference nor did enjoyment of the lesson. Students, however, spent 14% less time maneuvering VRML structures than viewing the animations of rotation. Neither method proved superior for presenting three-dimensional information. The students spent less time maneuvering the VRML structures with no difference in mean score so the use of VRML may be more efficient. The investigator noted some manipulation difficulties using VRML to

  9. Prediction of inorganic superconductors with quasi-one-dimensional crystal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkova, L M; Marinin, D V

    2013-01-01

    Models of superconductors having a quasi-one-dimensional crystal structure based on the convoluted into a tube Ginzburg sandwich, which comprises a layered dielectric–metal–dielectric structure, have been suggested. The critical crystal chemistry parameters of the Ginzburg sandwich determining the possibility of the emergence of superconductivity and the T c value in layered high-T c cuprates, which could have the same functions in quasi-one-dimensional fragments (sandwich-type tubes), have been examined. The crystal structures of known low-temperature superconductors, in which one can mark out similar quasi-one-dimensional fragments, have been analyzed. Five compounds with quasi-one-dimensional structures, which can be considered as potential parents of new superconductor families, possibly with high transition temperatures, have been suggested. The methods of doping and modification of these compounds are provided. (paper)

  10. Gamma induced atom displacements in LYSO and LuYAP crystals as used in medical imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piñera, Ibrahin, E-mail: ipinera@ceaden.edu.cu [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnológicas y Desarrollo Nuclear, CEADEN, 30 St. 502, Playa 11300, Havana (Cuba); Cruz, Carlos M.; Abreu, Yamiel; Leyva, Antonio [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnológicas y Desarrollo Nuclear, CEADEN, 30 St. 502, Playa 11300, Havana (Cuba); Van Espen, Piet [University of Antwerp, CGB, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Díaz, Angelina; Cabal, Ana E. [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnológicas y Desarrollo Nuclear, CEADEN, 30 St. 502, Playa 11300, Havana (Cuba); Van Remortel, Nick [University of Antwerp, CGB, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2015-08-01

    The radiation damage, in terms of atom displacements, induced by gamma irradiation in LYSO and LuYAP crystals is presented. {sup 44}Sc, {sup 22}Na and {sup 48}V are used as gamma sources for this study. The energy of gammas from the electron–positron annihilation processes (511 keV) is also included in the study. The atom displacements distributions inside each material are calculated following the Monte Carlo assisted Classical Method introduced by the authors. This procedure also allows to study the atom displacements in-depth distributions inside each crystal. The atom displacements damage in LYSO crystals is found to be higher than in LuYAP crystals, mainly provoked by the displacements of silicon and oxygen atoms. But the difference between atom displacements produced in LYSO and LuYAP decreases when more energetic sources are used. On the other hand, the correlation between the atom displacements and energy deposition in-depth distributions is excellent. The atom displacements to energy deposition ratio is found to increases with more energetic photon sources. LYSO crystals are then more liable to the atom displacements damage than LuYAP crystals.

  11. Overview of Three-Dimensional Atomic-Resolution Holography and Imaging Techniques: Recent Advances in Local-Structure Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimon, Hiroshi

    2018-06-01

    Local three-dimensional (3D) atomic arrangements without periodicity have not been able to be studied until recently. Recently, several holographies and related techniques have been developed to reveal the 3D atomic arrangement around specific atoms with no translational symmetry. This review gives an overview of these new local 3D atomic imaging techniques.

  12. Properties of the localized field emitted from degenerate Λ-type atoms in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroozani, N.; Golshan, M. M.; Mahjoei, M.

    2007-01-01

    The spontaneous emission from a degenerate Λ-type three-level atom, embedded in a photonic crystal, is studied. The emitted field, as a function of time and position, is calculated by solving the three coupled differential equations governing the amplitudes. We show that the spontaneously emitted field is characterized by three components (as in the case of two-level and V-type atoms): a localized part, a traveling part, and a t -3/2 decaying part. Our calculations indicate that under specific conditions the atoms do not emit propagating fields, while the localized field, having shorter localization length and time, is intensified. As a consequence, the population of the upper level, after a short period of oscillations, approaches a constant value. It is also shown that this steady value, under the same conditions, is much larger than its counterpart in V-type atoms

  13. Wave packet fractional revivals in a one-dimensional Rydberg atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veilande, Rita; Bersons, Imants

    2007-01-01

    We investigate many characteristic features of revival and fractional revival phenomena via derived analytic expressions for an autocorrelation function of a one-dimensional Rydberg atom with weighting probabilities modelled by a Gaussian or a Lorentzian distribution. The fractional revival phenomenon in the ionization probabilities of a one-dimensional Rydberg atom irradiated by two short half-cycle pulses is also studied. When many states are involved in the formation of the wave packet, the revival is lower and broader than the initial wave packet and the fractional revivals overlap and disappear with time

  14. Rapid, all-optical crystal orientation imaging of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, Sabrina N.; Zhai, Yao; Zande, Arend M. van der; O'Brien, Kevin; Huang, Pinshane Y.; Chenet, Daniel A.; Hone, James C.; Zhang, Xiang; Yin, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic materials such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have attracted significant research and industrial interest for their electronic, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties. While large-area crystal growth techniques such as chemical vapor deposition have been demonstrated, the presence of grain boundaries and orientation of grains arising in such growths substantially affect the physical properties of the materials. There is currently no scalable characterization method for determining these boundaries and orientations over a large sample area. We here present a second-harmonic generation based microscopy technique for rapidly mapping grain orientations and boundaries of 2D TMDCs. We experimentally demonstrate the capability to map large samples to an angular resolution of ±1° with minimal sample preparation and without involved analysis. A direct comparison of the all-optical grain orientation maps against results obtained by diffraction-filtered dark-field transmission electron microscopy plus selected-area electron diffraction on identical TMDC samples is provided. This rapid and accurate tool should enable large-area characterization of TMDC samples for expedited studies of grain boundary effects and the efficient characterization of industrial-scale production techniques

  15. Multi-dimensional population balance models of crystallization processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meisler, Kresten Troelstrup; von Solms, Nicolas

    A generic and model-based framework for batch cooling crystallization operations has been extended to incorporate continuous and fed-batch processes. Modules for the framework have been developed, including a module for reactions, allowing the study of reactive crystallization within the framework....... A kinetic model library together with an ontology for knowledge representation has been developed, in which kinetic models and relations from the literature are stored along with the references and data. The model library connects to the generic modelling framework as well, as models can be retrieved......, analyzed, used for simulation and stored again. The model library facilitates comparison of expressions for kinetic phenomena and is tightly integrated with the model analysis tools of the framework.Through the framework, a model for a crystallization operation may be systematically generated...

  16. One- and two-dimensional fluids properties of smectic, lamellar and columnar liquid crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Jakli, Antal

    2006-01-01

    Smectic and lamellar liquid crystals are three-dimensional layered structures in which each layer behaves as a two-dimensional fluid. Because of their reduced dimensionality they have unique physical properties and challenging theoretical descriptions, and are the subject of much current research. One- and Two-Dimensional Fluids: Properties of Smectic, Lamellar and Columnar Liquid Crystals offers a comprehensive review of these phases and their applications. The book details the basic structures and properties of one- and two-dimensional fluids and the nature of phase transitions. The later chapters consider the optical, magnetic, and electrical properties of special structures, including uniformly and non-uniformly aligned anisotropic films, lyotropic lamellar systems, helical and chiral structures, and organic anisotropic materials. Topics also include typical and defective features, magnetic susceptibility, and electrical conductivity. The book concludes with a review of current and potential applications ...

  17. Topology optimization of two-dimensional asymmetrical phononic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Hao-Wen [Institute of Engineering Mechanics, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Su, Xiao-Xing [School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Wang, Yue-Sheng, E-mail: yswang@bjtu.edu.cn [Institute of Engineering Mechanics, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Zhang, Chuanzeng [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany)

    2014-01-17

    The multiple elitist genetic algorithm with the adaptive fuzzy fitness granulation (AFFG) is used to design the phononic crystals with large relative bandgap width (BGW) for combined out-of-plane and in-plane wave modes. Without assumption on the symmetry of the unit-cell, we obtain an asymmetrical phononic crystal with the relative BGW which is quite larger than that of the optimized symmetrical structure. With the help of AFFG, the number of the fitness function evaluations is reduced by over 50% and the procedure converges 5 times faster than the conventional evolutionary algorithm to reach the same final fitness values.

  18. Theory of Vortex Crystal Formation in Two-Dimensional Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, D. Z.

    1999-11-01

    The free relaxation of inviscid, incompressible 2D turbulence is often dominated by strong vortices (coherent patches of intense vorticity) that move chaotically and merge. However, recent experiments(K.S. Fine et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75), 3277 (1995). with pure electron plasmas have found that freely relaxing turbulent flows with a single sign of vorticity can spontaneously form ``vortex crystals'' -- symmetric, stable arrays of strong vortices that are immersed in a low vorticity background. In this talk we discuss how these complex equilibria can form from 2D turbulence. First, we formulate a statistical theory of the vortex crystals. We show that vortex crystals are well described as ``regional'' maximum fluid entropy (RMFE) states, which are equilibrium states reached through ergodic mixing of the background by the strong vortices.(D.Z. Jin and D.H.E. Dubin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80), 4434 (1998). Given the dynamically conserved quantities as well as the number and the vorticity distributions of the strong vortices, the theory predicts the positions of the strong vortices and the coarse-grained vorticity distribution of the background. These predictions agree well with the observed vortex crystals. Second, we examine the formation process of the vortex crystals in more detail. In the RMFE theory, the vortex crystal equilibrium can only be predicted if the number Nc of the strong vortices in the final state is given. Here, we estimate Nc from the characteristics of the early turbulent flow. The estimate relies on the idea that vortex crystals form because the chaotic motions of the strong vortices are ``cooled'' due to mixing of the background by the vortices. When the rate of cooling is faster than the rate of pairwise mergers, the vortices fall into a crystal pattern before they can merge. We estimate the merger rate from the observed power law decay of the number of strong vortices in the early stages of the flow, and the cooling rate from the rate of mixing of

  19. Topological aspect of disclinations in two-dimensional crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei-Kai, Qi; Tao, Zhu; Yong, Chen; Ji-Rong, Ren

    2009-01-01

    By using topological current theory, this paper studies the inner topological structure of disclinations during the melting of two-dimensional systems. From two-dimensional elasticity theory, it finds that there are topological currents for topological defects in homogeneous equation. The evolution of disclinations is studied, and the branch conditions for generating, annihilating, crossing, splitting and merging of disclinations are given. (the physics of elementary particles and fields)

  20. X-ray photoelectron spectra and electronic structure of quasi-one-dimensional SbSeI crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Grigas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS of the valence band (VB and of the principal core levels from the (110 and (001 crystal surfaces for the quasi-one-dimensional high permittivity SbSeI single crystal isostructural to ferroelectric SbSI. The XPS were measured with monochromatized Al Ka radiation in the energy range of 0-1400 eV at room temperature. The VB is located from 1.6 to 20 eV below the Fermi level. Experimental energies of the VB and core levels are compared with the results of theoretical ab initio calculations of the molecular model of the SbSeI crystal. The electronic structure of the VB is revealed. Shifts in the core-level binding energies of surface atoms relative to bulk ones, which show a dependency on surface crystallography, have been observed. The chemical shifts of the core levels (CL in the SbSeI crystal for the Sb, I and Se states are obtained.

  1. Effect of Ge atoms on crystal structure and optoelectronic properties of hydrogenated Si-Ge films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianwei; Zhang, Jianjun; Ma, Ying; Yu, Yunwu; Zhao, Ying

    2017-07-01

    Optoelectronic and structural properties of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon-germanium (μc-Si1-xGex:H) alloys prepared by radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) were investigated. When the Ge atoms were predominantly incorporated in amorphous matrix, the dark and photo-conductivity decreased due to the reduced crystalline volume fraction of the Si atoms (XSi-Si) and the increased Ge dangling bond density. The photosensitivity decreased monotonously with Ge incorporation under higher hydrogen dilution condition, which was attributed to the increase in both crystallization of Ge and the defect density.

  2. Cavity quantum electrodynamics with three-dimensional photonic bandgap crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Willem L.; Woldering, L.A.; Ghulinyan, M.; Pavesi, L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is Chapter 8 of the book "Light Localisation and Lasing: Random and Pseudorandom Photonic Structures", edited by Mher Ghulinyan and Lorenzo Pavesi (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2015). It provides an overview of much recent work on 3D photonic crystals with a complete photonic

  3. Slow Light by Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Zhang; Yan, Huang; Xiao-Yu, Mao; Kai-Yu, Cui; Yi-Dong, Huang; Wei, Zhang; Jiang-De, Peng

    2009-01-01

    A simple and effective way to measure the group velocity of photonic crystal waveguides (PCWGs) is developed by using a fiber Mach–Zehnder interferometer. A PCWG with perfect air-bridge structure is fabricated and slow light with group velocity slower than c/80 is demonstrated. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  4. Phononic crystals with one-dimensional defect as sensor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Arafa H.; Mehaney, Ahmed

    2017-09-01

    Recently, sensor technology has attracted great attention in many fields due to its importance in many engineering applications. In the present work, we introduce a study using the innovative properties of phononic crystals in enhancing a new type of sensors based on the intensity of transmitted frequencies inside the phononic band gaps. Based on the transfer matrix method and Bloch theory, the expressions of the reflection coefficient and dispersion relation are presented. Firstly, the influences of filling fraction ratio and the angle of incidence on the band gap width are discussed. Secondly, the localization of waves inside band gaps is discussed by enhancing the properties of the defected phononic crystal. Compared to the periodic structure, localization modes involved within the band structure of phononic crystals with one and two defect layers are presented and compared. Trapped localized modes can be detected easily and provide more information about defected structures. Such method could increase the knowledge of manufacturing defects by measuring the intensity of propagated waves in the resonant cavities and waveguides. Moreover, several factors enhance the role of the defect layer on the transmission properties of defected phononic crystals are presented. The acoustic band gap can be used to detect or sense the type of liquids filling the defect layer. The liquids make specific resonant modes through the phononic band gaps that related to the properties of each liquid. The frequency where the maximum resonant modes occur is correlated to material properties and allows to determine several parameters such as the type of an unknown material.

  5. Ultrafast optical switching in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazurenko, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    The rapidly expanding research on photonic crystals is driven by potential applications in all-optical switches, optical computers, low-threshold lasers, and holographic data storage. The performance of such devices might surpass the speed of traditional electronics by several orders of magnitude

  6. High-efficiency one-dimensional atom localization via two parallel standing-wave fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Wu, Xuqiang; Lu, Liang; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    We present a new scheme of high-efficiency one-dimensional (1D) atom localization via measurement of upper state population or the probe absorption in a four-level N-type atomic system. By applying two classical standing-wave fields, the localization peak position and number, as well as the conditional position probability, can be easily controlled by the system parameters, and the sub-half-wavelength atom localization is also observed. More importantly, there is 100% detecting probability of the atom in the subwavelength domain when the corresponding conditions are satisfied. The proposed scheme may open up a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-efficiency 1D atom localization. (paper)

  7. Manipulation of photons at the surface of three-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Kenji; Noda, Susumu

    2009-07-16

    In three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals, refractive-index variations with a periodicity comparable to the wavelength of the light passing through the crystal give rise to so-called photonic bandgaps, which are analogous to electronic bandgaps for electrons moving in the periodic electrostatic potential of a material's crystal structure. Such 3D photonic bandgap crystals are envisioned to become fundamental building blocks for the control and manipulation of photons in optical circuits. So far, such schemes have been pursued by embedding artificial defects and light emitters inside the crystals, making use of 3D bandgap directional effects. Here we show experimentally that photons can be controlled and manipulated even at the 'surface' of 3D photonic crystals, where 3D periodicity is terminated, establishing a new and versatile route for photon manipulation. By making use of an evanescent-mode coupling technique, we demonstrate that 3D photonic crystals possess two-dimensional surface states, and we map their band structure. We show that photons can be confined and propagate through these two-dimensional surface states, and we realize their localization at arbitrary surface points by designing artificial surface-defect structures through the formation of a surface-mode gap. Surprisingly, the quality factors of the surface-defect mode are the largest reported for 3D photonic crystal nanocavities (Q up to approximately 9,000). In addition to providing a new approach for photon manipulation by photonic crystals, our findings are relevant for the generation and control of plasmon-polaritons in metals and the related surface photon physics. The absorption-free nature of the 3D photonic crystal surface may enable new sensing applications and provide routes for the realization of efficient light-matter interactions.

  8. On crystallization of polypropylene on atomically flat silicate substrate and relationship to mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.Z.; Yuan, Q.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Phyllosilicate was used to probe the nucleation and chain organization in thin films. → Crystal morphology was altered from leaf-like structure to fully developed spherulites. → The lamellae structure changed from well-oriented to cross-hatched implying epitaxial growth. → The good interfacial bonding favored by epitaxial crystallization is beneficial for toughness. - Abstract: Phyllosilicates including mica offer one of the easiest methods to obtain atomically flat surface of macroscopic size by cleavage. Thus, thin films of polypropylene crystallized at different pressure and as a function of polypropylene concentration were investigated. The objective was to probe the nucleation and chain organization in thin films on basal plane surface from the view point of relating the nucleation and growth process to the intergallery space between the clay layers. The crystal morphology was altered from leaf-like structure at high undercooling to fully developed spherulites at low undercooling. Furthermore, the lamellae structure change from well-oriented to cross-hatched with increase in the crystallization pressure was indicative of epitaxial growth between polymer matrix and mica surface. The possible epitaxial mechanism is discussed here. The study provides a method to explore the macro- and microstructure of polymer and epitaxy between polymer matrix and inorganic particle surface. The good interfacial bonding favored by epitaxial crystallization is beneficial for toughness.

  9. Dimensional characterization of extracellular vesicles using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebaihi, N; De Boeck, B; Pétry, J; Yuana, Y; Nieuwland, R

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are small biological entities released from cells into body fluids. EV are recognized as mediators in intercellular communication and influence important physiological processes. It has been shown that the concentration and composition of EV in body fluids may differ from healthy subjects to patients suffering from particular disease. So, EV have gained a strong scientific and clinical interest as potential biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of disease. Due to their small size, accurate detection and characterization of EV remain challenging. The aim of the presented work is to propose a characterization method of erythrocyte-derived EV using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The vesicles are immobilized on anti-CD235a-modified mica and analyzed by AFM under buffer liquid and dry conditions. EV detected under both conditions show very similar sizes namely ∼30 nm high and ∼90 nm wide. The size of these vesicles remains stable over drying time as long as 7 d at room temperature. Since the detected vesicles are not spherical, EV are characterized by their height and diameter, and not only by the height as is usually done for spherical nanoparticles. In order to obtain an accurate measurement of EV diameters, the geometry of the AFM tip was evaluated to account for the lateral broadening artifact inherent to AFM measurements. To do so, spherical polystyrene (PS) nanobeads and EV were concomitantly deposited on the same mica substrate and simultaneously measured by AFM under dry conditions. By applying this procedure, direct calibration of the AFM tip could be performed together with EV characterization under identical experimental conditions minimizing external sources of uncertainty on the shape and size of the tip, thus allowing standardization of EV measurement. (paper)

  10. Inhomogenous Dislocation Nucleation Based on Atom Potential in Hexagonal Noncentrosymmetric Crystal Sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue-Chuan, Zhao; Xiao-Ming, Liu; Zhuo, Zhuang; Zhan-Li, Liu; Yuan, Gao

    2010-01-01

    By introducing internal degree, the deformation of hexagonal noncentrosymmetric crystal sheet can be described by the revised Cauchy–Born rule based on atomic potential. The instability criterion is deduced to investigate the inhomogeneous dislocation nucleation behavior of the crystal sheet under simple loading. The anisotropic characters of dislocation nucleation under uniaxial tension are studied by using the continuum method associated with the instability criterion. The results show a strong relationship between yield stress and crystal sheet chirality. The results also indicate that the instability criterion has sufficient ability to capture the dislocation nucleation site and expansion. To observe the internal dislocation phenomenon, the prediction of the dislocation nucleation site and expansion domain is illustrated by MD simulations. The developed method is another way to explain the dislocation nucleation phenomenon. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  11. New analytical treatment for a kind of two dimensional integrals in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Qifeng; Kuang Yurang

    1994-01-01

    A kind of two-dimensional integrals, separated from two-center matrix elements in ion-atom collisions, is analytically integrated by introducing the Laplace transform into the integrals and expressed by the modified Bessel functions. The traditional Feynman transform is very complicated for this kind of more general integrals related to the excited state capture

  12. Imaging three-dimensional surface objects with submolecular resolution by atomic force microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moreno, C.; Stetsovych, Oleksandr; Shimizu, T.K.; Custance, O.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2015), s. 2257-2262 ISSN 1530-6984 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC- AFM ) * submolecular resolution * three-dimensional dynamic force spectroscopy * high-resolution imaging Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 13.779, year: 2015

  13. Tunable double-channel filter based on two-dimensional ferroelectric photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Ping; Ding, Chengyuan; Hu, Xiaoyong; Gong, Qihuang

    2007-01-01

    A tunable double-channel filter is presented, which is based on a two-dimensional nonlinear ferroelectric photonic crystal made of cerium doped barium titanate. The filtering properties of the photonic crystal filter can be tuned by adjusting the defect structure or by a pump light. The influences of the structure disorders caused by the perturbations in the radius or the position of air holes on the filtering properties are also analyzed

  14. Tunable double-channel filter based on two-dimensional ferroelectric photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Ping [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ding, Chengyuan [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Hu, Xiaoyong [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)]. E-mail: xiaoyonghu@pku.edu.cn; Gong, Qihuang [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)]. E-mail: qhgong@pku.edu.cn

    2007-04-02

    A tunable double-channel filter is presented, which is based on a two-dimensional nonlinear ferroelectric photonic crystal made of cerium doped barium titanate. The filtering properties of the photonic crystal filter can be tuned by adjusting the defect structure or by a pump light. The influences of the structure disorders caused by the perturbations in the radius or the position of air holes on the filtering properties are also analyzed.

  15. Soft-Lithographical Fabrication of Three-dimensional Photonic Crystals in the Optical Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae-Hwang [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes several projects to realize low-cost and high-quality three-dimensional (3D) microfabrication using non-photolithographic techniques for layer-by-layer photonic crystals. Low-cost, efficient 3D microfabrication is a demanding technique not only for 3D photonic crystals but also for all other scientific areas, since it may create new functionalities beyond the limit of planar structures. However, a novel 3D microfabrication technique for photonic crystals implies the development of a complete set of sub-techniques for basic layer-by-layer stacking, inter-layer alignment, and material conversion. One of the conventional soft lithographic techniques, called microtransfer molding (μTM), was developed by the Whitesides group in 1996. Although μTM technique potentially has a number of advantages to overcome the limit of conventional photolithographic techniques in building up 3D microstructures, it has not been studied intensively after its demonstration. This is mainly because of technical challenges in the nature of layer-by-layer fabrication, such as the demand of very high yield in fabrication. After two years of study on conventional μTM, We have developed an advanced microtransfer molding technique, called two-polymer microtransfer molding (2P-μTM) that shows an extremely high yield in layer-by-layer microfabrication sufficient to produce highly layered microstructures. The use of two different photo-curable prepolymers, a filler and an adhesive, allows for fabrication of layered microstructures without thin films between layers. The capabilities of 2P-μTM are demonstrated by the fabrication of a wide-area 12-layer microstructure with high structural fidelity. Second, we also had to develop an alignment technique. We studied the 1st-order diffracted moire fringes of transparent multilayered structures comprised of irregularly deformed periodic patterns. By a comparison study of the diffracted moire fringe pattern and detailed

  16. Ultrafast optical switching in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Mazurenko, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    The rapidly expanding research on photonic crystals is driven by potential applications in all-optical switches, optical computers, low-threshold lasers, and holographic data storage. The performance of such devices might surpass the speed of traditional electronics by several orders of magnitude and may result in a true revolution in nanotechnology. The heart of such devices would likely be an optical switching element. This thesis analyzes different regimes of ultrafast all-optical switchin...

  17. Two-Dimensional Spatial Solitons in Nematic Liquid Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Weiping; Xie Ruihua; Goong Chen; Belic, Milivoj; Yang Zhengping

    2009-01-01

    We study the propagation of spatial solitons in nematic liquid crystals, using the self-similar method. Analytical solutions in the form of self-similar solitons are obtained exactly. We confirm the stability of these solutions by direct numerical simulation, and find that the stable spatial solitons can exist in various forms, such as Gaussian solitons, radially symmetric solitons, multipole solitons, and soliton vortices.

  18. Excitation of atomic nuclei and atoms by relativistic charge particles bound in a one-dimensional potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almaliev, A.N.; Batkin, I.S.; Kopytin, I.V.

    1987-01-01

    The process of exciting atoms and atomic nuclei by relativistic electrons and positrons bound in a one-dimensional potential is investigated theoretically. It is shown that a pole corresponding to the emergence of a virtual photon on a bulk surface occurs in the matrix interaction element under definite kinematic relationships. It is obtained that the probability of the excitation process depends on the lifetime of the level being excited, the virtual photon, and the charged particle in a definite energetic state. An estimate of the magnitude of the excitation section of low-lying nuclear states yields a value exceeding by several orders the section obtained for charged particles in the absence of a binding potential

  19. Deep diode atomic battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, T.R.; Cline, H.E.

    1977-01-01

    A deep diode atomic battery is made from a bulk semiconductor crystal containing three-dimensional arrays of columnar and lamellar P-N junctions. The battery is powered by gamma rays and x-ray emission from a radioactive source embedded in the interior of the semiconductor crystal

  20. Nucleation and Crystal Growth in the Formation of Hierarchical Three-Dimensional Nanoarchitecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xudong [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2018-02-02

    This project is to obtain fundamental understandings of the operation of the Ostwald-Lussac (OL) Law and the oriented attachment (OA) mechanism in nucleation and growth of TiO2 nanorods (NR) via surface-reaction-limited pulsed chemical vapor deposition (SPCVD) process. Three-dimensional (3D) NW networks are a unique type of mesoporous architecture that offers extraordinary surface area density and superior transport properties of electrons, photons, and phonons. It is exceptionally promising for advancing the design and application of functional materials for photovoltaic devices, catalysts beds, hydrogen storage systems, sensors, and battery electrodes. Our group has developed the SPCVD technique by mimicking the mechanism of atomic layer deposition (ALD), which effectively decoupled the crystal growth from precursor concentration while retaining anisotropic 1D growth. For the first time, this technique realized a 3D NW architecture with ultrahigh density and achieved ~4-5 times enhancement on photo-conversion efficiency. Through the support of our current DOE award, we revealed the governing role of the OL Law in the nucleation stage of SPCVD. The formation of NR morphology in SPCVD was identified following the OA mechanism. We also discovered a unique vapor-phase Kirkendall effect in the evolution of tubular or core-shell NR structures. These understandings opened many new opportunities in designing 3D NW architectures with improved properties or new functionalities. Specifically, our accomplishments from this project include five aspects: (1) Observation of the Ostwald-Lussac Law in high-temperature ALD. (2) Observation of vapor-solid Kirkendall effect in ZnO-to-TiO2 nanostructure conversion. (3) Development of highly-efficient capillary photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar-fuel generation. (4) Development of efficient and stable electrochemical protections for black silicon PEC electrodes. (5) Development of doped polymers with tunable electrical properties. This

  1. Crystallization of a self-assembled three-dimensional DNA nanostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rendek, Kimberly N.; Fromme, Raimund; Grotjohann, Ingo; Fromme, Petra

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the crystallization of a self-assembling three-dimensional B-DNA nanostructure is described. The powerful and specific molecular-recognition system present in the base-pairing of DNA allows for the design of a plethora of nanostructures. In this work, the crystallization of a self-assembling three-dimensional B-DNA nanostructure is described. The DNA nanostructure consists of six single-stranded oligonucleotides that hybridize to form a three-dimensional tetrahedron of 80 kDa in molecular mass and 20 bp on each edge. Crystals of the tetrahedron have been successfully produced and characterized. These crystals may form the basis for an X-ray structure of the tetrahedron in the future. Nucleotide crystallography poses many challenges, leading to the fact that only 1352 X-ray structures of nucleic acids have been solved compared with more than 80 000 protein structures. In this work, the crystallization optimization for three-dimensional tetrahedra is also described, with the eventual goal of producing nanocrystals to overcome the radiation-damage obstacle by the use of free-electron laser technology in the future

  2. Three-dimensional structure of porcine pancreatic carboxypeptidase B with an acetate ion and two zinc atoms in the active site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akparov, V. Kh., E-mail: valery@akparov.ru [State Research Institute for Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms (Russian Federation); Timofeev, V. I., E-mail: tostars@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation); Maghsoudi, N. N., E-mail: maghsudi@yahoo.com [Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Neuroscience Research Center (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kuranova, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Crystals of porcine pancreatic carboxypeptidase B (CPB) were grown by the capillary counter-diffusion method in the presence of polyethylene glycol and zinc acetate. The three-dimensional structure of CPB was determined at 1.40 Å resolution using the X-ray diffraction data set collected from the crystals of the enzyme at the SPring 8 synchrotron facility and was refined to R{sub fact} = 17.19%, R{sub free} = 19.78%. The structure contains five zinc atoms, two of which are present in the active site of the enzyme, and an acetate ion. The arrangement of an additional zinc atom in the active site and the acetate ion is different from that reported by Yoshimoto et al.

  3. High-precision two-dimensional atom localization via quantum interference in a tripod-type system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for high-precision two-dimensional atom localization in a four-level tripod-type atomic system via measurement of the excited state population. It is found that because of the position-dependent atom–field interaction, the precision of 2D atom localization can be significantly improved by appropriately adjusting the system parameters. Our scheme may be helpful in laser cooling or atom nanolithography via high-precision and high-resolution atom localization. (letter)

  4. Optical properties of an atomic ensemble coupled to a band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Ewan; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Chang, Darrick E.

    2017-08-01

    We study the optical properties of an ensemble of two-level atoms coupled to a 1D photonic crystal waveguide (PCW), which mediates long-range coherent dipole-dipole interactions between the atoms. We show that the long-range interactions can dramatically alter the linear and nonlinear optical behavior, as compared to a typical atomic ensemble. In particular, in the linear regime, we find that the transmission spectrum contains multiple transmission dips, whose properties we characterize. Moreover, we show how the linear spectrum may be used to infer the number of atoms present in the system, constituting an important experimental tool in a regime where techniques for conventional ensembles break down. We also show that some of the transmission dips are associated with an effective ‘two-level’ resonance that forms due to the long-range interactions. In particular, under strong global driving and appropriate conditions, we find that the atomic ensemble is only capable of absorbing and emitting single collective excitations at a time. Our results are of direct relevance to atom-PCW experiments that should soon be realizable.

  5. Quantitative study of two- and three-dimensional strong localization of matter waves by atomic scatterers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antezza, Mauro; Castin, Yvan; Hutchinson, David A. W.

    2010-01-01

    We study the strong localization of atomic matter waves in a disordered potential created by atoms pinned at the nodes of a lattice, for both three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) systems. The localization length of the matter wave, the density of localized states, and the occurrence of energy mobility edges (for the 3D system), are numerically investigated as a function of the effective scattering length between the atomic matter wave and the pinned atoms. Both positive and negative matter wave energies are explored. Interesting features of the density of states are discovered at negative energies, where maxima in the density of bound states for the system can be interpreted in terms of bound states of a matter wave atom with a few pinned atomic scatterers. In 3D we found evidence of up to three mobility edges, one at positive energies, and two at negative energies, the latter corresponding to transitions between extended and localized bound states. In 2D, no mobility edge is found, and a rapid exponential-like increase of the localization length is observed at high energy.

  6. Illusion optics via one-dimensional ultratransparent photonic crystals with shifted spatial dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhongqi; Luo, Jie; Lai, Yun

    2017-12-11

    In this work, we propose that one-dimensional ultratransparent dielectric photonic crystals with wide-angle impedance matching and shifted elliptical equal frequency contours are promising candidate materials for illusion optics. The shift of the equal frequency contour does not affect the refractive behaviors, but enables a new degree of freedom in phase modulation. With such ultratransparent photonic crystals, we demonstrate some applications in illusion optics, including creating illusions of a different-sized scatterer and a shifted source with opposite phase. Such ultratransparent dielectric photonic crystals may establish a feasible platform for illusion optics devices at optical frequencies.

  7. Ultra-compact laser beam steering device using holographically formed two dimensional photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xinyuan; Chen, Xiaonan; Chen, Maggie Yihong; Wang, Alan Xiaolong; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Ray T

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we report the theoretical study of polymer-based photonic crystals for laser beam steering which is based on the superprism effect as well as the experiment fabrication of the two dimensional photonic crystals for the laser beam steering. Superprism effect, the principle for beam steering, was separately studied in details through EFC (Equifrequency Contour) analysis. Polymer based photonic crystals were fabricated through double exposure holographic interference method using SU8-2007. The experiment results showed a beam steering angle of 10 degree for 30 nm wavelength variation.

  8. Convergent-beam electron diffraction study of incommensurately modulated crystals. Pt. 2. (3 + 1)-dimensional space groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terauchi, Masami; Takahashi, Mariko; Tanaka, Michiyoshi

    1994-01-01

    The convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) method for determining three-dimensional space groups is extended to the determination of the (3 + 1)-dimensional space groups for one-dimensional incommensurately modulated crystals. It is clarified than an approximate dynamical extinction line appears in the CBED discs of the reflections caused by an incommensurate modulation. The extinction enables the space-group determination of the (3 + 1)-dimensional crystals or the one-dimensional incommensurately modulated crystals. An example of the dynamical extinction line is shown using an incommensurately modulated crystal of Sr 2 Nb 2 O 7 . Tables of the dynamical extinction lines appearing in CBED patterns are given for all the (3 + 1)-dimensional space groups of the incommensurately modulated crystal. (orig.)

  9. Study on sensing property of one-dimensional ring mirror-defect photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Luo, Pei; Cao, Huiying; Zhao, Zhiyong; Zhu, Qiguang

    2018-02-01

    Based on the photon localization and the photonic bandgap characteristics of photonic crystals (PCs), one-dimensional (1D) ring mirror-defect photonic crystal structure is proposed. Due to the introduction of mirror structure, a defect cavity is formed in the center of the photonic crystal, and then the resonant transmission peak can be obtained in the bandgap of transmission spectrum. The transfer matrix method is used to establish the relationship model between the resonant transmission peak and the structure parameters of the photonic crystals. Using the rectangular air gate photonic crystal structure, the dynamic monitoring of the detected gas sample parameters can be achieved from the shift of the resonant transmission peak. The simulation results show that the Q-value can attain to 1739.48 and the sensitivity can attain to 1642 nm ṡ RIU-1, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the sensing structure. The structure can provide certain theoretical reference for air pollution monitoring and gas component analysis.

  10. Investigating the crystal growth behavior of biodegradable polymer blend thin films using in situ atomic force microscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malwela, T

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the crystal growth behavior of biodegradable polylactide (PLA)/poly[(butylene succinate)-co-adipate] (PBSA) blend thin films using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Currently, polymer thin films have received increased research...

  11. Metallic and highly conducting two-dimensional atomic arrays of sulfur enabled by molybdenum disulfide nanotemplate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shuze; Geng, Xiumei; Han, Yang; Benamara, Mourad; Chen, Liao; Li, Jingxiao; Bilgin, Ismail; Zhu, Hongli

    2017-10-01

    Element sulfur in nature is an insulating solid. While it has been tested that one-dimensional sulfur chain is metallic and conducting, the investigation on two-dimensional sulfur remains elusive. We report that molybdenum disulfide layers are able to serve as the nanotemplate to facilitate the formation of two-dimensional sulfur. Density functional theory calculations suggest that confined in-between layers of molybdenum disulfide, sulfur atoms are able to form two-dimensional triangular arrays that are highly metallic. As a result, these arrays contribute to the high conductivity and metallic phase of the hybrid structures of molybdenum disulfide layers and two-dimensional sulfur arrays. The experimentally measured conductivity of such hybrid structures reaches up to 223 S/m. Multiple experimental results, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transition electron microscope (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), agree with the computational insights. Due to the excellent conductivity, the current density is linearly proportional to the scan rate until 30,000 mV s-1 without the attendance of conductive additives. Using such hybrid structures as electrode, the two-electrode supercapacitor cells yield a power density of 106 Wh kg-1 and energy density 47.5 Wh kg-1 in ionic liquid electrolytes. Our findings offer new insights into using two-dimensional materials and their Van der Waals heterostructures as nanotemplates to pattern foreign atoms for unprecedented material properties.

  12. Interaction and dynamics of add-atoms with 2-dimensional structures

    CERN Multimedia

    The interaction and dynamics of add-atoms with graphene, graphene-derivate structures and, later, MoSi$_2$, two-dimensional – single and few – atomic layers will be studied with the Perturbed Angular Correlation – PAC – technique. Graphene is also envisaged as new platform for growing semiconductor nanostructure devices, such as quantum dots and as a particularly powerful catalyst. Understanding nucleation of nanostructures and clusters on graphene and related phases in wet conditions as they are used in chemical methods in research and industry require complementary studies. These systems will therefore be studied systematically using radioactive probe atoms attaching via a transfer media (e.g., water in catalysis process) or being deposited with soft-landing techniques under vacuum and UHV conditions, as put in place at the ASPIC setup at ISOLDE. The hyperfine fields obtained under different environments are expected to reveal basic information on the rich atomic and physical mechanisms associated w...

  13. Three Dimensional Positron Annihilation Momentum Spectroscopy of Lithium Tetraborate Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    Mount Design 1- I l~"! Ovuq,JQ_ fta ..c~\\ ’"’ r.ont "’ _ , \\.A•r ’fj ::..--", ~,·r ( . ’ •/?..’ ’ ~,..,_ .. {-.J.. n""’’f"’\\..+ ..... N>~ sj...Technique Applied to Measure Oxygen-Atom Defects in 6H Silicon Carbide." AFIT PhD Dissertation. AFIT/DS/ENP/10-M02, ( Mar 2010) [4] Charlton, M., and...University of Michigan Positron Research Website. http://positrons.physics.lsa.umich.edu/current/nanopos/PALS- intro/psitronphysics.htm Accessed 6 Mar

  14. Three-dimensional theory for interaction between atomic ensembles and free-space light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, L.-M.; Cirac, J.I.; Zoller, P.

    2002-01-01

    Atomic ensembles have shown to be a promising candidate for implementations of quantum information processing by many recently discovered schemes. All these schemes are based on the interaction between optical beams and atomic ensembles. For description of these interactions, one assumed either a cavity-QED model or a one-dimensional light propagation model, which is still inadequate for a full prediction and understanding of most of the current experimental efforts that are actually taken in the three-dimensional free space. Here, we propose a perturbative theory to describe the three-dimensional effects in interaction between atomic ensembles and free-space light with a level configuration important for several applications. The calculations reveal some significant effects that were not known before from the other approaches, such as the inherent mode-mismatching noise and the optimal mode-matching conditions. The three-dimensional theory confirms the collective enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio which is believed to be one of the main advantages of the ensemble-based quantum information processing schemes, however, it also shows that this enhancement needs to be understood in a more subtle way with an appropriate mode-matching method

  15. Three-dimensional rearrangement of single atoms using actively controlled optical microtraps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woojun; Kim, Hyosub; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-05-02

    We propose and demonstrate three-dimensional rearrangements of single atoms. In experiments performed with single 87Rb atoms in optical microtraps actively controlled by a spatial light modulator, we demonstrate various dynamic rearrangements of up to N = 9 atoms including rotation, 2D vacancy filling, guiding, compactification, and 3D shuffling. With the capability of a phase-only Fourier mask to generate arbitrary shapes of the holographic microtraps, it was possible to place single atoms at arbitrary geometries of a few μm size and even continuously reconfigure them by conveying each atom. For this purpose, we loaded a series of computer-generated phase masks in the full frame rate of 60 Hz of the spatial light modulator, so the animation of phase mask transformed the holographic microtraps in real time, driving each atom along the assigned trajectory. Possible applications of this method of transformation of single atoms include preparation of scalable quantum platforms for quantum computation, quantum simulation, and quantum many-body physics.

  16. Three-dimensional time-dependent computer modeling of the electrothermal atomizers for analytical spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivilskiy, I. V.; Nagulin, K. Yu.; Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.

    2016-02-01

    A full three-dimensional nonstationary numerical model of graphite electrothermal atomizers of various types is developed. The model is based on solution of a heat equation within solid walls of the atomizer with a radiative heat transfer and numerical solution of a full set of Navier-Stokes equations with an energy equation for a gas. Governing equations for the behavior of a discrete phase, i.e., atomic particles suspended in a gas (including gas-phase processes of evaporation and condensation), are derived from the formal equations molecular kinetics by numerical solution of the Hertz-Langmuir equation. The following atomizers test the model: a Varian standard heated electrothermal vaporizer (ETV), a Perkin Elmer standard THGA transversely heated graphite tube with integrated platform (THGA), and the original double-stage tube-helix atomizer (DSTHA). The experimental verification of computer calculations is carried out by a method of shadow spectral visualization of the spatial distributions of atomic and molecular vapors in an analytical space of an atomizer.

  17. The three-dimensional crystal structure of cholera toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Rong-Guang; Westbrook, M.L.; Nance, S.; Spangler, B.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Scott, D.L. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry; Westbrook, E.M. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1996-02-01

    The clinical manifestations of cholera are largely attributable to the actions of a secreted hexameric AB{sub 5} enterotoxin (choleragen). We have solved the three-dimensional structure of choleragen at 2.5 {Angstrom} resolution and compared the refined coordinates with those of choleragenoid (isolated B pentamer) and the heat-labile enterotoxin from Escherichia coli (LT). The crystalline coordinates provide a detailed view of the stereochemistry implicated in binding to GM1 gangliosides and in carrying out ADP-ribosylation. The A2 chain of choleragen, in contrast to that of LT, is a nearly continuous {alpha}-helix with an interpretable carboxyl tail.

  18. Laser-Assisted Field Evaporation and Three-Dimensional Atom-by-Atom Mapping of Diamond Isotopic Homojunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Samik; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N; Moutanabbir, Oussama

    2016-02-10

    It addition to its high evaporation field, diamond is also known for its limited photoabsorption, strong covalent bonding, and wide bandgap. These characteristics have been thought for long to also complicate the field evaporation of diamond and make its control hardly achievable on the atomistic-level. Herein, we demonstrate that the unique behavior of nanoscale diamond and its interaction with pulsed laser lead to a controlled field evaporation thus enabling three-dimensional atom-by-atom mapping of diamond (12)C/(13)C homojunctions. We also show that one key element in this process is to operate the pulsed laser at high energy without letting the dc bias increase out of bounds for diamond nanotip to withstand. Herein, the role of the dc bias in evaporation of diamond is essentially to generate free charge carriers within the nanotip via impact ionization. The mobile free charges screen the internal electric field, eventually creating a hole rich surface where the pulsed laser is effectively absorbed leading to an increase in the nanotip surface temperature. The effect of this temperature on the uncertainty in the time-of-flight of an ion, the diffusion of atoms on the surface of the nanotip, is also discussed. In addition to paving the way toward a precise manipulation of isotopes in diamond-based nanoscale and quantum structures, this result also elucidates some of the basic properties of dielectric nanostructures under high electric field.

  19. Optical Tamm states in one-dimensional superconducting photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Abouti, O. [LPMR, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Mohammed 1, 60000 Oujda (Morocco); El Boudouti, E. H. [LPMR, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Mohammed 1, 60000 Oujda (Morocco); IEMN, UMR-CNRS 8520, UFR de Physique, Université de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); El Hassouani, Y. [ESIM, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, Université Moulay Ismail, Boutalamine BP 509, 52000 Errachidia (Morocco); Noual, A. [LPMR, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Mohammed 1, 60000 Oujda (Morocco); Ecole Normale Supérieur de Tétouan, Université Abdelmalek Essaadi, Tétouan (Morocco); Djafari-Rouhani, B. [IEMN, UMR-CNRS 8520, UFR de Physique, Université de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2016-08-15

    In this study, we investigate localized and resonant optical waves associated with a semi-infinite superlattice made out of superconductor-dielectric bilayers and terminated with a cap layer. Both transverse electric and transverse magnetic waves are considered. These surface modes are analogous to the so-called Tamm states associated with electronic states found at the surface of materials. The surface guided modes induced by the cap layer strongly depend on whether the superlattice ends with a superconductor or a dielectric layer, the thickness of the surface layer, the temperature of the superconductor layer as well as on the polarization of the waves. Different kinds of surface modes are found and their properties examined. These structures can be used to realize the highly sensitive photonic crystal sensors.

  20. One-dimensional position sensitive detector based on photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Feng; Qin Lan; Xue Lian; Duan Ying

    2013-01-01

    Position sensitive detectors (PSDs) are an important class of optical sensors which utilizes the lateral photovoltaic effect (LPVE). According to the operation principle of PSD, we demonstrate that LPVE can be enhanced by lengthening the lifetime of photo-generated carriers. A PSD based on photonic crystals (PCs) composed of MgF 2 and InP is proposed and designed. The transmittances of the defect PC and the reflectance of the perfect PC in the PSD are obtained with transfer matrix method. The theoretical research on the designed device shows that LPVE is enhanced by improving the transmittance of the defect PC and the reflectance of the perfect PC to lengthen the lifetime of photo-generated carriers. (authors)

  1. Anisotropic confinement effects in a two-dimensional plasma crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laut, I; Zhdanov, S K; Räth, C; Thomas, H M; Morfill, G E

    2016-01-01

    The spectral asymmetry of the wave-energy distribution of dust particles during mode-coupling-induced melting, observed for the first time in plasma crystals by Couëdel et al. [Phys. Rev. E 89, 053108 (2014)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.89.053108], is studied theoretically and by molecular-dynamics simulations. It is shown that an anisotropy of the well confining the microparticles selects the directions of preferred particle motion. The observed differences in intensity of waves of opposed directions are explained by a nonvanishing phonon flux. Anisotropic phonon scattering by defects and Umklapp scattering are proposed as possible reasons for the mean phonon flux.

  2. Science and technology roadmap for graphene, related two-dimensional crystals, and hybrid systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrari, A.C.; Dekker, C.; Vandersypen, L.M.K.; Van Der Zant, H.S.J.

    2014-01-01

    We present the science and technology roadmap for graphene, related two-dimensional crystals, and hybrid systems, targeting an evolution in technology, that might lead to impacts and benefits reaching into most areas of society. This roadmap was developed within the framework of the European

  3. A Bloch modal approach for engineering waveguide and cavity modes in two-dimensional photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Mørk, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    uses no external excitation and determines the quasi-normal modes as unity eigenvalues of the cavity roundtrip matrix. We demonstrate the method and the quasi-normal modes for two types of two-dimensional photonic crystal structures, and discuss the quasi-normal mode eld distributions and Q-factors...

  4. Design, Fabrication, and Measurement of Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Slab Waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Zhang; Xuan, Tang; Xiao-Yu, Mao; Kai-Yu, Cui; Lei, Cao; Yi-Dong, Huang; Wei, Zhang; Jiang-De, Peng

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional photonic crystal slab waveguides on SOI wafer are designed and fabricated. Photonic band gap, band gap guided mode, and index guided mode are observed by measuring the transmission spectra. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical ones

  5. Ultrafast optical switching of three-dimensional Si inverse opal photonic band gap crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Euser, T.G.; Wei, Hong; Kalkman, Jeroen; Jun, Yoonho; Polman, Albert; Norris, David J.; Vos, Willem L.

    2007-01-01

    We present ultrafast optical switching experiments on three-dimensional photonic band gap crystals. Switching the Si inverse opal is achieved by optically exciting free carriers by a two-photon process. We probe reflectivity in the frequency range of second order Bragg diffraction where the photonic

  6. Coupling reducing k-points for supercell models of defects in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2004-01-01

    The optimum choice of k-point for supercell calculations of defect states in a three-dimensional photonic crystal is investigated for the case of a supercell with a simple cubic (SC) structure. By using the k-point (1/4,1/4,1/4) it is possible to eliminate the symmetric part of the repeated...

  7. Fabricating large two-dimensional single colloidal crystals by doping with active particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, B; Filion, L; Dijkstra, M

    2016-01-01

    Using simulations we explore the behaviour of two-dimensional colloidal (poly)crystals doped with active particles. We show that these active dopants can provide an elegant new route to removing grain boundaries in polycrystals. Specifically, we show that active dopants both generate and are

  8. Hydrogen atom trapping in a self-organized one-dimensional dimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Takami

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs have attracted widespread attention owing to their unusual structure and properties produced by their nanospaces. However, many MOFs possess the similar three-dimensional frameworks, limiting their structural variety and operating capacity for hydrogen storage under ambient conditions. Here we report the synthesis and structural characterization of a single-crystal one-dimensional dimer whose structure, operating capacity, and physical mechanism contrast with those of existing MOFs. The hydrogen storage capacity of 2.6 wt.% is comparable to the highest capacity achieved by existing MOFs at room temperature. This exceptional storage capacity is realized by self-organization during crystal growth using a weak base.

  9. Positron states and nanoobjects in proton-irradiated quartz single crystals: Positronium atom in quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grafutin, V. I.; Zaluzhnyi, A. G.; Timoshenkov, S. P.; Britkov, O. M.; Ilyukhina, O. V.; Myasishcheva, G. G.; Prokop'ev, E. P.; Funtikov, Yu. V.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of proton bombardment and metal atom impurities on the structure of quartz single crystals has been studied. The related defects have been studied using positron annihilation spectroscopy (angular correlation of positron-annihilation photons), acoustic absorption, and optical absorption measurements. It is shown that the presence of a narrow component f in the angular distribution of annihilation photons (ADAP), which is related to the formation of parapositronium, determines a high sensitivity of this method with respect to features of the crystal structure of quartz. It is established that the defectness of the structure of irradiated quartz crystals can be characterized by the ratio f/f 0 of the relative intensities of narrow components in the ADAP curves measured before (f 0 ) and after (f) irradiation. Any process leading to a decrease in the probability of positronium formation (e.g., positron loss as a result of the trapping on defects and the interaction with impurity atoms and lattice distortions) decreases the intensity of the narrow component. Based on the ADAP data, estimates of the radii and concentrations of nanodefects in quartz have been obtained and their variation upon annealing at temperatures up to T = 873 K has been studied

  10. Construction of high-dimensional neural network potentials using environment-dependent atom pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, K V Jovan; Artrith, Nongnuch; Behler, Jörg

    2012-05-21

    An accurate determination of the potential energy is the crucial step in computer simulations of chemical processes, but using electronic structure methods on-the-fly in molecular dynamics (MD) is computationally too demanding for many systems. Constructing more efficient interatomic potentials becomes intricate with increasing dimensionality of the potential-energy surface (PES), and for numerous systems the accuracy that can be achieved is still not satisfying and far from the reliability of first-principles calculations. Feed-forward neural networks (NNs) have a very flexible functional form, and in recent years they have been shown to be an accurate tool to construct efficient PESs. High-dimensional NN potentials based on environment-dependent atomic energy contributions have been presented for a number of materials. Still, these potentials may be improved by a more detailed structural description, e.g., in form of atom pairs, which directly reflect the atomic interactions and take the chemical environment into account. We present an implementation of an NN method based on atom pairs, and its accuracy and performance are compared to the atom-based NN approach using two very different systems, the methanol molecule and metallic copper. We find that both types of NN potentials provide an excellent description of both PESs, with the pair-based method yielding a slightly higher accuracy making it a competitive alternative for addressing complex systems in MD simulations.

  11. Crystal engineering of giant molecules based on perylene diimide conjugated polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nano-atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, He

    Molecular architectures and topologies are found contributing to the formation of supramolecular structures of giant molecules. Dr. Cheng's research group developed a diverse of giant molecules via precisely controlled chemistry synthetic routes. These giant molecules can be categorized into several different families, namely giant surfactants, giant shape amphiphiles and giant polyhedron. By analyzing the hierarchical structures of these carefully designed and precisely synthesized giant molecules, the structural factors which affect, or even dominates, in some cases, the formation of supramolecular structures are revealed in these intensive researches. The results will further contribute to the understanding of dependence of supramolecular structures on molecular designs as well as molecular topology, and providing a practical solution to the scaling up of microscopic molecular functionalities to macroscopic material properties. Molecular Nano Particles (MNPs), including fullerene (C60), POSS, Polyoxometalate (POM) and proteins etc., is defined and applied as a specific type of building blocks in the design and synthesis of giant molecules. The persistence in shape and symmetry is considered as one of the major properties of MNPs. This persistence will support the construction of giant molecules for further supramolecular structures' study by introducing specific shapes, or precisely located side groups which will facilitate self-assembling behaviors with pre-programmed secondary interactions. Dictating material physical properties by its chemical composition is an attractive yet currently failed approach in the study of materials. However, the pursuit of determining material properties by microscopic molecular level properties is never seized, and found its solution when the idea of crystal engineering is raised: should each atom in the material is located exactly where it is designed to be and is properly bonded, the property of the material is hence determined

  12. Electroconvection in one-dimensional liquid crystal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jong-Hoon

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the alternating current (ac) -driven electroconvection (EC) in one-dimensional cells (1DCs) under the in-plane switching mode. In 1DCs, defect-free EC can be realized. In the presence and absence of external multiplicative noise, the features of traveling waves (TWs), such as their Hopf frequency fH and velocity, are examined in comparison with those of conventional two-dimensional cells (2DCs) accompanying defects of EC rolls. In particular, we show that the defects significantly contribute to the features of the TWs. Additionally, owing to the defect-free EC in the 1DCs, the effects of the ac and noise fields on the TW are clarified. The ac field linearly increases fH, independent of the ac frequency f . The noise increases fH monotonically, but fH does not vary below a characteristic noise intensity VN*. In addition, soliton-like waves and unfamiliar oscillation of EC vortices in 1DCs are observed, in contrast to the localized EC (called worms) and the oscillation of EC rolls in 2DCs.

  13. Collimation of a thulium atomic beam by two-dimensional optical molasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukachev, D D; Kalganova, E S; Sokolov, A V; Savchenkov, A V; Vishnyakova, G A; Golovizin, A A; Akimov, A V; Kolachevsky, Nikolai N; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2013-04-30

    The number of laser cooled and trapped thulium atoms in a magneto-optical trap is increased by a factor of 3 using a two-dimensional optical molasses which collimated the atomic beam before entering a Zeeman slower. A diode laser operating at 410.6 nm was employed to form optical molasses: The laser was heated to 70 Degree-Sign C by a two-step temperature stabilisation system. The laser system consisting of a master oscillator and an injection-locked amplifier emitted more than 100 mW at 410 nm and had a spectral linewidth of 0.6 MHz. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  14. Expectation-based approach for one-dimensional randomly disordered phononic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Feng; Gao, Qiang; Xu, Xiaoming; Zhong, Wanxie

    2014-01-01

    An expectation-based approach to the statistical theorem is proposed for the one-dimensional randomly disordered phononic crystal. In the proposed approach, the expectations of the random eigenstates of randomly disordered phononic crystals are investigated. In terms of the expectations of the random eigenstates, the wave propagation and localization phenomenon in the random phononic crystal could be understood in a statistical perspective. Using the proposed approach, it is proved that for a randomly disordered phononic crystal, the Bloch theorem holds in the perspective of expectation. A one-dimensional randomly disordered binary phononic crystal consisting of two materials with the random geometry size or random physical parameter is addressed by using the proposed approach. From the result, it can be observed that with the increase of the disorder degree, the localization of the expectations of the eigenstates is strengthened. The effect of the random disorder on the eigenstates at higher frequencies is more significant than that at lower frequencies. Furthermore, after introducing the random disorder into phononic crystals, some random divergent eigenstates are changed to localized eigenstates in expectation sense.

  15. Interbasis expansion and SO(3) symmetry in the two-dimensional hydrogen atom.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres del Castillo, G.F.; Lopez Villanueva, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2001-04-01

    Making use of the SO(3) symmetry of the two-dimensional hydrogen atom, each of the bases for the bound states formed by the separable solutions of the Schroedinger equation in polar and parabolic coordinates are expressed in terms of the other. [Spanish] Usando la simetria SO(3) del atomo de hidrogeno en dos dimensiones, cada una de las bases para los estados ligados formadas por las soluciones separables de la ecuacion de Schroedinger en coordenadas polares y parabolicas se expresan en terminos de la otra.

  16. Two dimensional tunable photonic crystals and n doped semiconductor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsayed, Hussein A.; El-Naggar, Sahar A.; Aly, Arafa H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we theoretically investigate the effect of the doping concentration on the properties of two dimensional semiconductor photonic band structures. We consider two structures; type I(II) that is composed of n doped semiconductor (air) rods arranged into a square lattice of air (n doped semiconductor). We consider three different shapes of rods. Our numerical method is based on the frequency dependent plane wave expansion method. The numerical results show that the photonic band gaps in type II are more sensitive to the changes in the doping concentration than those of type I. In addition, the width of the gap of type II is less sensitive to the shape of the rods than that of type I. Moreover, the cutoff frequency can be strongly tuned by the doping concentrations. Our structures could be of technical use in optical electronics for semiconductor applications

  17. Normal Modes of Magnetized Finite Two-Dimensional Yukawa Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marleau, Gabriel-Dominique; Kaehlert, Hanno; Bonitz, Michael

    2009-11-01

    The normal modes of a finite two-dimensional dusty plasma in an isotropic parabolic confinement, including the simultaneous effects of friction and an external magnetic field, are studied. The ground states are found from molecular dynamics simulations with simulated annealing, and the influence of screening, friction, and magnetic field on the mode frequencies is investigated in detail. The two-particle problem is solved analytically and the limiting cases of weak and strong magnetic fields are discussed.[4pt] [1] C. Henning, H. K"ahlert, P. Ludwig, A. Melzer, and M.Bonitz. J. Phys. A 42, 214023 (2009)[2] B. Farokhi, M. Shahmansouri, and P. K. Shukla. Phys.Plasmas 16, 063703 (2009)[3] L. Cândido, J.-P. Rino, N. Studart, and F. M. Peeters. J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 10, 11627--11644 (1998)

  18. Creating physically-based three-dimensional microstructures: Bridging phase-field and crystal plasticity models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hojun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Owen, Steven J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Abdeljawad, Fadi F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanks, Byron [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In order to better incorporate microstructures in continuum scale models, we use a novel finite element (FE) meshing technique to generate three-dimensional polycrystalline aggregates from a phase field grain growth model of grain microstructures. The proposed meshing technique creates hexahedral FE meshes that capture smooth interfaces between adjacent grains. Three dimensional realizations of grain microstructures from the phase field model are used in crystal plasticity-finite element (CP-FE) simulations of polycrystalline a -iron. We show that the interface conformal meshes significantly reduce artificial stress localizations in voxelated meshes that exhibit the so-called "wedding cake" interfaces. This framework provides a direct link between two mesoscale models - phase field and crystal plasticity - and for the first time allows mechanics simulations of polycrystalline materials using three-dimensional hexahedral finite element meshes with realistic topological features.

  19. Contact and Bandgap Engineering in Two Dimensional Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tao

    At the heart of semiconductor research, bandgap is one of the key parameters for materials and determine their applications in modern technologies. For traditional bulk semiconductors, the bandgap is determined by the chemical composition and specific arrangement of the crystal lattices, and usually invariant during the device operation. Nevertheless, it is highly desirable for many optoelectronic and electronic applications to have materials with continuously tunable bandgap available. In the past decade, 2D layered materials including graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have sparked interest in the scientific community, owing to their unique material properties and tremendous potential in various applications. Among many newly discovered properties that are non-existent in bulk materials, the strong in-plane bonding and weak van der Waals inter-planar interaction in these 2D layered structures leads to a widely tunable bandgap by electric field. This provides an extra knob to engineer the fundamental material properties and open a new design space for novel device operation. This thesis focuses on this field controlled dynamic bandgap and can be divided into three parts: (1) bilayer graphene is the first known 2D crystal with a bandgap can be continuously tuned by electric field. However, the electrical transport bandgaps is much smaller than both theoretical predictions and extracted bandgaps from optical measurements. In the first part of the thesis, the limiting factors of preventing achieving a large transport bandgap in bilayer graphene are investigated and different strategies to achieve a large transport bandgap are discussed, including the vertically scaling of gate oxide and patterning channel into ribbon structure. With a record large transport bandgap of ~200meV, a dual-gated semiconducting bilayer graphene P/N junction with extremely scaled gap of 20nm in-between is fabricated. A tunable local maxima feature, associated with 1D v

  20. Levitation of atoms by interference and Two-dimensional transport in the presence of disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert De Saint Vincent, M.

    2010-12-01

    This thesis presents two experiments of atomic physics, realized on an ultra-cold sample of Rubidium 87. We tackle the topics of atom interferometry, and of the transport properties in disordered medium. In the first experiment, we demonstrate a technique for suspending atoms against gravity, which could help increase the interrogation time of atom interferometers. The atoms are periodically diffracted on a light standing wave, used as Bragg mirror to reflect the atoms and thus prevent their fall. However, when getting close to the thin grating limit, the matter wave-packet is split into many trajectories that periodically recombine. We show that the interference between these multiple components can be used to cancel the losses towards falling channels. This original interferometer could be an interesting alternative to suspend an inertial sensor or an atom clock in a limited volume, whilst allowing simultaneous measurement of the forces acting on the atoms. The second experiment is devoted to the study of the transport properties in a 2-dimensional (2D) disordered medium. In particular, matter wave interference can prevent the transport - a phenomenon known as Anderson Localization. The atoms are confined between two repulsive sheets of light, and the disorder is generated by a speckle pattern shined onto the cloud. We observe a diffusive expansion in these potentials, and extract diffusion coefficients in agreement with a numerical simulation. We then explore the dynamic at lower energies, where sub-diffusion, classical trapping under the percolation threshold, and Anderson Localization may be observed. Finally, the study of the interplay between disorder and the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in 2D is now within reach. (author)

  1. Direct Identification of Atomic-Like Electronic Levels in InAs Nano crystal Quantum Dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millo, O.; Katz, D.

    1999-01-01

    The size dependent level structure of InAs nano crystals in the range 2-7 nm in diameter is investigated using both tunneling and optical spectroscopies. The tunneling measurements are performed using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope on individual nano crystals that, are attached to a gold substrate via dithiol molecules. The tunneling I-V characteristics manifest an interplay between single electron charging and quantum size effects. We are able to directly identify quantum confined states of isolated InAs nano crystals having s and p symmetries. These states are observed in the I-V curves as two and six-fold single electron charging multiplets. Excellent agreement is found between the strongly allowed optical transitions [1] and the spacing of levels detected in the tunneling experiment. This correlation provides new information on the quantum-dot level structure, from which we conclude that the top-most valence band state has both s and p characteristics. The interplay between level structure singles electron charging of the nano crystals obeys an atomic-like Aufbau sequential electron level occupation

  2. Quartz-crystal microbalance study for characterizing atomic oxygen in plasma ash tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, A.K.; Sakthivel, P.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses the measurement of atomic oxygen (AO) concentrations in an oxygen discharge using a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM). This is a device that has been previously used for monitoring thin-film deposition, among several other applications. The sensor consists of a silver-coated quartz crystal that oscillates at its specific resonant frequency (typically, at about 6 MHz), which is dependent on the mass of the crystal. When exposed to AO, the silver oxidizes rapidly, resulting in a change in its mass, and a consequent change in this frequency. The frequency change is measured with a counter, and when plotted versus time, it may be fit to a standard diffusion-limited oxide-growth model. This model is then used to determine the specific AO flux to the crystal, and by inference, to the wafer. Initial results of QCM measurements in the FusionGemini Plasma Asher (GPL TM -standard downstream microwave asher) and FusionGemini Enhanced Strip (GES TM -fluorine compatible enhanced strip asher) are presented in this article. The results indicate AO densities of the order of 10 12 cm -3 on the wafer. There is a marked increase in AO concentration with addition of nitrogen into the plasma, and a decrease in AO concentration with increasing pressure at constant flow. Effects of increasing the total plasma volume in the enhanced strip tool on AO production are discussed

  3. Crystallization of SHARPIN using an automated two-dimensional grid screen for optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz, Benjamin; Rittinger, Katrin; Haire, Lesley F

    2012-07-01

    An N-terminal fragment of human SHARPIN was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained by a one-step optimization of seed dilution and protein concentration using a two-dimensional grid screen. The crystals belonged to the primitive tetragonal space group P4(3)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 61.55, c = 222.81 Å. Complete data sets were collected from native and selenomethionine-substituted protein crystals at 100 K to 2.6 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively.

  4. Band structures of two dimensional solid/air hierarchical phononic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y.L.; Tian, X.G.; Chen, C.Q.

    2012-01-01

    The hierarchical phononic crystals to be considered show a two-order “hierarchical” feature, which consists of square array arranged macroscopic periodic unit cells with each unit cell itself including four sub-units. Propagation of acoustic wave in such two dimensional solid/air phononic crystals is investigated by the finite element method (FEM) with the Bloch theory. Their band structure, wave filtering property, and the physical mechanism responsible for the broadened band gap are explored. The corresponding ordinary phononic crystal without hierarchical feature is used for comparison. Obtained results show that the solid/air hierarchical phononic crystals possess tunable outstanding band gap features, which are favorable for applications such as sound insulation and vibration attenuation.

  5. Band structures of two dimensional solid/air hierarchical phononic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y.L.; Tian, X.G. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Structure Strength and Vibration, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Chen, C.Q., E-mail: chencq@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Mechanics, AML and CNMM, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-06-15

    The hierarchical phononic crystals to be considered show a two-order 'hierarchical' feature, which consists of square array arranged macroscopic periodic unit cells with each unit cell itself including four sub-units. Propagation of acoustic wave in such two dimensional solid/air phononic crystals is investigated by the finite element method (FEM) with the Bloch theory. Their band structure, wave filtering property, and the physical mechanism responsible for the broadened band gap are explored. The corresponding ordinary phononic crystal without hierarchical feature is used for comparison. Obtained results show that the solid/air hierarchical phononic crystals possess tunable outstanding band gap features, which are favorable for applications such as sound insulation and vibration attenuation.

  6. Reflectance properties of one-dimensional metal-dielectric ternary photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, G. N., E-mail: gnpandey2009@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Amity Institute of Applied Sciences, AmityUniversity, Noida (U.P.) (India); Kumar, Narendra [Department of Physics (CASH), Modi University of Science and Technology, Lakshmangarh, Sikar, Rajsthan (India); Thapa, Khem B. [Department of Physics, U I E T, ChhatrapatiShahu Ji Maharaj University, Kanpur- (UP) (India); Ojha, S. P. [Department of Physics IIT, Banaras Hindu University (India)

    2016-05-06

    Metallic photonic crystal has a very important application in absorption enhancement in solar cells. It has been found that an ultra-thin metallic layer becomes transparent due to internal scattering of light through the each interface of the dielectric and metal surfaces. The metal has absorption due to their surface plasmon and the plasmon has important parameters for changing optical properties of the metal. We consider ternary metallic-dielectric photonic crystal (MDPC) for having large probabilities to change the optical properties of the MDPC and the photonic crystals may be changed by changing dimensionality, symmetry, lattice parameters, Filling fraction and effective refractive index refractive index contrast. In this present communication, we try to show that the photonic band gap in ternary metal-dielectric photonic crystal can be significantly enlarged when air dielectric constant is considered. All the theoretical analyses are made based on the transfer matrix method together with the Drude model of metal.

  7. Atom-field interaction in the single-quantum limit in a two dimensional travelling-wave cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Sun Hyun; Chough, Young Tak; An, Kyung Won

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the interaction of an atom with two dimensional travelling-wave cavity modes in the strong coupling region, with the quantized atomic center of mass motion taken into account. Analytic and numerical calculation shows that the atom in two independent pairs of travelling wave modes can be made to interact only with a particular travelling mode by matching the initial momentum and the detuning of the cavities. We also numerically investigate the atomic momentum deflection in the cavities

  8. Ion beam focusing by the atomic chains of a crystal lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulga, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    A study is made of the focusing of a parallel ion beam by a pair of close packed atomic chains of a crystal. The focal length of this system has been calculated to the approximation of continuous potential of chain in the general form and also for a number of specific potentials of ion-atom interactions. Ar ion beam focusing by a Cu chain pair is discusssed in detail. For this case, the focal length has been calculated as a function of ion energy using the method of computer simulation of ion trajectories in the chain field. The calculations were made on the basis of the Born-Mayer potential with various constants. A pronounced dependence of focal length on the constant in this potential has been found. (author)

  9. Atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2} for integration into three-dimensional metal-insulator-metal devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assaud, Loic [Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, CINAM, Marseille (France); ICMMO-ERIEE, Universite Paris-Sud / Universite Paris-Saclay, CNRS, Orsay (France); Pitzschel, Kristina; Barr, Maissa K.S.; Petit, Matthieu; Hanbuecken, Margrit; Santinacci, Lionel [Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, CINAM, Marseille (France); Monier, Guillaume [Universite Clermont Auvergne, Universite Blaise Pascal, CNRS, Institut Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2017-12-15

    HfO{sub 2} nanotubes have been fabricated via a template-assisted deposition process for further use in three-dimensional metal-insulator-metal (MIM) devices. HfO{sub 2} thin layers were grown by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) in anodic alumina membranes (AAM). The ALD was carried out using tetrakis(ethylmethylamino)hafnium and water as Hf and O sources, respectively. Long exposure durations to the precursors have been used to maximize the penetration depth of the HfO{sub 2} layer within the AAM and the effect of the process temperature was investigated. The morphology, the chemical composition, and the crystal structure were studied as a function of the deposition parameters using transmission and scanning electron microscopies, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, respectively. As expected, the HfO{sub 2} layers grown at low-temperature (T = 150 C) were amorphous, while for a higher temperature (T = 250 C), polycrystalline films were observed. The electrical characterizations have shown better insulating properties for the layers grown at low temperature. Finally, TiN/HfO{sub 2}/TiN multilayers were grown in an AAM as proof-of-concept for three-dimensional MIM nanostructures. (orig.)

  10. Three-dimensional modelling of thermal stress in floating zone silicon crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plate, Matiss; Krauze, Armands; Virbulis, Jānis

    2018-05-01

    During the growth of large diameter silicon single crystals with the industrial floating zone method, undesirable level of thermal stress in the crystal is easily reached due to the inhomogeneous expansion as the crystal cools down. Shapes of the phase boundaries, temperature field and elastic material properties determine the thermal stress distribution in the solid mono crystalline silicon during cylindrical growth. Excessive stress can lead to fracture, generation of dislocations and altered distribution of intrinsic point defects. Although appearance of ridges on the crystal surface is the decisive factor of a dislocation-free growth, the influence of these ridges on the stress field is not completely clear. Here we present the results of thermal stress analysis for 4” and 5” diameter crystals using a quasi-stationary three dimensional mathematical model including the material anisotropy and the presence of experimentally observed ridges which cannot be addressed with axis-symmetric models. The ridge has a local but relatively strong influence on thermal stress therefore its relation to the origin of fracture is hypothesized. In addition, thermal stresses at the crystal rim are found to increase for a particular position of the crystal radiation reflector.

  11. Stereo photograph of atomic arrangement by circularly-polarized-light two-dimensional photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daimon, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    A stereo photograph of atomic arrangement was obtained for the first time. The stereo photograph was displayed directly on the screen of display-type spherical-mirror analyzer without any computer-aided conversion process. This stereo photography was realized taking advantage of the phenomenon of circular dichroism in photoelectron angular distribution due to the reversal of orbital angular momentum of photoelectrons. The azimuthal shifts of forward focusing peaks in a photoelectron angular distribution pattern taken with left and right helicity light in a special arrangement are the same as the parallaxes in a stereo view of atoms. Hence a stereoscopic recognition of three-dimensional atomic arrangement is possible, when the left eye and the right eye respectively view the two images obtained by left and right helicity light simultaneously. (author)

  12. Irradiation-induced precipitation in a SUS316 stainless steel using three-dimensional atom probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatakeyama, M.; Yamagata, I.

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation and segregation were investigated in a compositionally modified 316 austenitic stainless steel, neutron-irradiated at 862 K using a three-dimensional atom probe. In the solution-annealed specimen, Mo, Ti, Nb, C and P enrichment were observed in a silicide, with nominal composition Fe 3 Cr 2 Ni 2 Mo 2 Si 2 . In a Ti-rich carbide, nominaling Fe 5 Cr 8 Ni 10 Mo 2 Ti 11 Si 2 C 6 , enrichment of Mo, Si, O, and Nb was observed. Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) at the precipitate–matrix interface was also investigated at an atomic scale. RIS of Ni and P atoms, which are undersized in Fe, was also analyzed around the interface of the Ti-rich carbide and matrix. Results suggest that the carbide–matrix interface is a sink with an interstitial bias. In the cold-worked specimen, complex-precipitates consisting of silicide and carbide were formed

  13. Gain assisted coherent control of microwave pulse in a one dimensional array of artificial atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqas, Mohsin; Ayaz, M. Q.; Waseem, M.; Qamar, Sajid; Qamar, Shahid

    2018-06-01

    We study the coherent propagation of a microwave pulse through a one-dimensional array of artificial atoms. The scheme is based upon gain assisted propagation of the pulse using two-photon Raman transition in a three-level superconducting artificial atoms (SAAs) coupled to a microwave transmission line. Our results show that the group velocity can be significantly reduced by increasing the Rabi frequency of the pump fields which in turn can lead to an efficient storage of the pulse inside a 1D array of SAAs. Further, the intensity of the transmitted pulse increases with the number of artificial atoms owing to the gain associated with the two-photon Raman transition. Our results also show that the window width decreases for both scattering and negligible scattering cases with the increase in the number of SAAs. The fidelity of the system also remains high even after the passage of the pulse through a large number of SAAs.

  14. Atomic structure of a metal-supported two-dimensional germania film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Adrián Leandro; Schlexer, Philomena; Büchner, Christin; Davis, Earl M.; Burrall, Hannah; Burson, Kristen M.; Schneider, Wolf-Dieter; Heyde, Markus; Pacchioni, Gianfranco; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2018-03-01

    The growth and microscopic characterization of two-dimensional germania films is presented. Germanium oxide monolayer films were grown on Ru(0001) by physical vapor deposition and subsequent annealing in oxygen. We obtain a comprehensive image of the germania film structure by combining intensity-voltage low-energy electron diffraction (I/V-LEED) and ab initio density functional theory (DFT) analysis with atomic-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging. For benchmarking purposes, the bare Ru(0001) substrate and the (2 ×2 )3 O covered Ru(0001) were analyzed with I/V-LEED with respect to previous reports. STM topographic images of the germania film reveal a hexagonal network where the oxygen and germanium atom positions appear in different imaging contrasts. For quantitative LEED, the best agreement has been achieved with DFT structures where the germanium atoms are located preferentially on the top and fcc hollow sites of the Ru(0001) substrate. Moreover, in these atomically flat germania films, local site geometries, i.e., tetrahedral building blocks, ring structures, and domain boundaries, have been identified, indicating possible pathways towards two-dimensional amorphous networks.

  15. Large Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystals Based on Monocrystalline Liquid Crystal Blue Phases (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-28

    a pair of glass slides with plastic spacers to determine the cell gap: 100 and 300 μm for the polymer-free BPLCs and 12 μm for the polymer-stabilized...Nissan) and rubbed with cloth to induce uniform planar alignment. Measurements. Reflection and transmission spectra were taken using a spectro- meter...thermal recycles . Opt. Mater. Express 2, 1149–1155 (2012). 34. Onusseit, H. & Stegemeyer, H. Liquid single crystals of cholesteric blue phases. Z

  16. Use of three-dimensional parameters in the analysis of crystal structures under compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balic Zunic, Tonci

    2007-01-01

    . For a complete understanding of structural changes, the behaviour of all coordination polyhedra plus the voids that separate them must be investigated. The structural voids in a framework are identified by a Voronoi tessellation. It can be performed e.g. on the anionic framework alone to find the centres...... information. Accurate determination of atomic coordinations is difficult in cases where a clear bond gap does not exist. In such instances the most reliable existing method is the determination of atomic domains in electron density, which can be performed even for experimental high-pressure crystal structure...

  17. Femtosecond X-ray diffraction from two-dimensional protein crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Frank

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available X-ray diffraction patterns from two-dimensional (2-D protein crystals obtained using femtosecond X-ray pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL are presented. To date, it has not been possible to acquire transmission X-ray diffraction patterns from individual 2-D protein crystals due to radiation damage. However, the intense and ultrafast pulses generated by an XFEL permit a new method of collecting diffraction data before the sample is destroyed. Utilizing a diffract-before-destroy approach at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Bragg diffraction was acquired to better than 8.5 Å resolution for two different 2-D protein crystal samples each less than 10 nm thick and maintained at room temperature. These proof-of-principle results show promise for structural analysis of both soluble and membrane proteins arranged as 2-D crystals without requiring cryogenic conditions or the formation of three-dimensional crystals.

  18. Proposal for efficient two-dimensional atom localization using probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue; Xiong Hao; Zhang Duo

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of two-dimensional (2D) atom localization is explored by monitoring the probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic medium under the action of two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Because of the position-dependent atom-field interaction, the information about the position of the atom can be obtained via the absorption measurement of the weak probe field. It is found that the localization behavior is significantly improved due to the joint quantum interference induced by the standing-wave and microwave-driven fields. Most importantly, the atom can be localized at a particular position and the maximal probability of finding the atom in one period of the standing-wave fields reaches unity by properly adjusting the system parameters. The proposed scheme may provide a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-resolution 2D atom localization.

  19. The Effect of Disinfection by Spray Atomization on Dimensional Accuracy of Condensation Silicone Impressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Saleh Saber

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. The condensation silicone impression materials are available, but there is little knowledge of their accuracy after disinfection. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the disinfection by spray atomization on dimensional accuracy of condensation silicone impressions. Materials and methods. Impressions were made on a stainless steel master model containing a simulated two complete crown preparation with an edentulous space interposed using Spidex® and Rapid® impression materials. 44 impressions were made with each material, of which 16 were disinfected with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 16 were disinfected with 10% iodophor and 12 were not disinfected. Three dimensional measurements of working casts, including interpreparation distance, height, and diameter, were calculated using a measuring microscope graduated at 0.001 mm. Dimensional changes (mm between the disinfected and non-disinfected working casts were compared. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was employed to analyze the data (α=0.05. Results. Disinfection of each condensation silicone material by spraying atomization with two different disinfectant material resulted in significant change in interpreparation distance (p<0.05. Changes in height and diameter were only significant in Spidex® impressions (p<0.05. Conclusion. Significant changes in the mean dimensions were seen as a result of disinfection by spraying; however, the dimensional changes do not seem great enough to cause critical positional distortion of teeth when fixed partial denture restorations are made.

  20. Semi-analytical model for a slab one-dimensional photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libman, M.; Kondratyev, N. M.; Gorodetsky, M. L.

    2018-02-01

    In our work we justify the applicability of a dielectric mirror model to the description of a real photonic crystal. We demonstrate that a simple one-dimensional model of a multilayer mirror can be employed for modeling of a slab waveguide with periodically changing width. It is shown that this width change can be recalculated to the effective refraction index modulation. The applicability of transfer matrix method of reflection properties calculation was demonstrated. Finally, our 1-D model was employed to analyze reflection properties of a 2-D structure - a slab photonic crystal with a number of elliptic holes.

  1. Slow-light-enhanced upconversion for photovoltaic applications in one-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Craig M; Reece, Peter J; Conibeer, Gavin J

    2011-10-15

    We present an approach to realizing enhanced upconversion efficiency in erbium (Er)-doped photonic crystals. Slow-light-mode pumping of the first Er excited state transition can result in enhanced emission from higher-energy levels that may lead to finite subbandgap external quantum efficiency in crystalline silicon solar cells. Using a straightforward electromagnetic model, we calculate potential field enhancements of more than 18× within he slow-light mode of a one-dimensional photonic crystal and discuss design trade-offs and considerations for photovoltaics.

  2. Selection rule for Dirac-like points in two-dimensional dielectric photonic crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    We developed a selection rule for Dirac-like points in two-dimensional dielectric photonic crystals. The rule is derived from a perturbation theory and states that a non-zero, mode-coupling integral between the degenerate Bloch states guarantees a Dirac-like point, regardless of the type of the degeneracy. In fact, the selection rule can also be determined from the symmetry of the Bloch states even without computing the integral. Thus, the existence of Dirac-like points can be quickly and conclusively predicted for various photonic crystals independent of wave polarization, lattice structure, and composition. © 2013 Optical Society of America.

  3. Time-dependent Bragg diffraction and short-pulse reflection by one-dimensional photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    André, Jean-Michel; Jonnard, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The time-dependence of the Bragg diffraction by one-dimensional photonic crystals and its influence on the short pulse reflection are studied in the framework of the coupled-wave theory. The indicial response of the photonic crystal is calculated and it appears that it presents a time-delay effect with a transient time conditioned by the extinction length. A numerical simulation is presented for a Bragg mirror in the x-ray domain and a pulse envelope modelled by a sine-squared shape. The potential consequences of the time-delay effect in time-dependent optics of short-pulses are emphasized. (paper)

  4. Magnetic susceptibility of one-dimensional ferromagnetic CsFeCl3 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboi, T.; Chiba, M.

    1989-01-01

    The parallel and perpendicular magnetic susceptibilities of one-dimensional ferromagnetic CsFeCl 3 crystals have been calculated from magnetization measured as a function of temperature in the range 0 to 70 K by means of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The experimental results have been compared with data from the literature for other Cs-and Rb-containing crystals with ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic linear chains. Reliable values of the exchange and anisotropy energies can be estimated from experimental susceptibility data using theoretical g-values and the dynamical correlated-effective field approximation

  5. Electro-optic tunable multi-channel filter in two-dimensional ferroelectric photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Yulan; Zhang, Jiaxiang; Hu, Xiaoyong; Gong, Qihuang

    2010-01-01

    An electro-optic tunable multi-channel filter is presented, which is based on a two-dimensional ferroelectric photonic crystal made of barium titanate. The filtering properties of the photonic crystal filter can be tuned by an applied voltage or by adjusting the structural parameters. The channel shifts about 30 nm under excitation of an applied voltage of 54.8 V. The influences of the structural disorders caused by the perturbations in the radius or the position of air holes on the filtering properties are also analyzed

  6. Spectral properties of a two dimensional photonic crystal with quasi-integrable geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz-Bueno, J J; Méndez-Bermúdez, J A; Arriaga, J

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we study the statistical properties of the allowed frequencies for electromagnetic waves propagating in two-dimensional photonic crystals with quasi-integrable geometry. We compute the level spacing, group velocity, and curvature distributions (P(s), P(v), and P(c), respectively) and compare them with the corresponding random matrix theory predictions. Due to the quasi-integrability of the crystal we observe signatures of intermediate statistics in P(s) and P(c) for high refractive index contrasts

  7. Dispersion relation of electromagnetic waves in one-dimensional plasma photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojo, Hitoshi; Mase, Atsushi

    2004-01-01

    The dispersion relation of electromagnetic waves in one-dimensional plasma photonic crystals is studied. The plasma photonic crystal is a periodic array composed of alternating thin plasma and dielectric material. The dispersion relation is obtained by solving a Maxwell wave equation using a method analogous to Kronig-Penny's problem in quantum mechanics, and it is found that the frequency gap and cut-off appear in the dispersion relation. The frequency gap is shown to become larger with the increase of the plasma density as well as plasma width. (author)

  8. Wave dispersion relation of two-dimensional plasma crystals in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, G.; Konopka, U.; Morfill, G.

    2004-01-01

    The wave dispersion relation in a two-dimensional strongly coupled plasma crystal is studied by theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics simulation taking into account a constant magnetic field parallel to the crystal normal. The expression for the wave dispersion relation clearly shows that high-frequency and low-frequency branches exist as a result of the coupling of longitudinal and transverse modes due to the Lorenz force acting on the dust particles. The high-frequency and the low-frequency branches are found to belong to right-hand and left-hand polarized waves, respectively

  9. Control of spontaneous emission from a microwave-field-driven four-level atom in an anisotropic photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Duo, E-mail: zhangduo10@gmail.com [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Wuhan Polytechnic University, Wuhan 430023 (China); Li, Jiahua, E-mail: huajia_li@163.com [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Ding, Chunling; Yang, Xiaoxue [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2012-05-21

    The spontaneous emission properties of a microwave-field-driven four-level atom embedded in anisotropic double-band photonic crystals (PCs) are investigated. We discuss the influences of the band-edge positions, Rabi frequency and detuning of the microwave field on the emission spectrum. It is found that several interesting features such as spectral-line enhancement, spectral-line suppression, spectral-line overlap, and multi-peak structures can be observed in the spectra. The proposed scheme can be achieved by use of a microwave-coupled field into hyperfine levels in rubidium atom confined in a photonic crystal. These theoretical investigations may provide more degrees of freedom to manipulate the atomic spontaneous emission. -- Highlights: ► Spontaneous emission properties of an atom embedded in PCs are investigated. ► Spectral-line enhancement, suppression and overlapping are observed. ► The results provide more degrees of freedom to control atomic spontaneous emission.

  10. Control of spontaneous emission from a microwave-field-driven four-level atom in an anisotropic photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Duo; Li, Jiahua; Ding, Chunling; Yang, Xiaoxue

    2012-01-01

    The spontaneous emission properties of a microwave-field-driven four-level atom embedded in anisotropic double-band photonic crystals (PCs) are investigated. We discuss the influences of the band-edge positions, Rabi frequency and detuning of the microwave field on the emission spectrum. It is found that several interesting features such as spectral-line enhancement, spectral-line suppression, spectral-line overlap, and multi-peak structures can be observed in the spectra. The proposed scheme can be achieved by use of a microwave-coupled field into hyperfine levels in rubidium atom confined in a photonic crystal. These theoretical investigations may provide more degrees of freedom to manipulate the atomic spontaneous emission. -- Highlights: ► Spontaneous emission properties of an atom embedded in PCs are investigated. ► Spectral-line enhancement, suppression and overlapping are observed. ► The results provide more degrees of freedom to control atomic spontaneous emission.

  11. Influence of the atomic structure of crystal surfaces on the surface diffusion in medium temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousty, J.P.

    1981-12-01

    In this work, we have studied the influence of atomic structure of crystal surface on surface self-diffusion in the medium temperature range. Two ways are followed. First, we have measured, using a radiotracer method, the self-diffusion coefficient at 820 K (0.6 T melting) on copper surfaces both the structure and the cleanliness of which were stable during the experiment. We have shown that the interaction between mobile surface defects and steps can be studied through measurements of the anisotropy of surface self diffusion. Second, the behavior of an adatom and a surface vacancy is simulated via a molecular dynamics method, on several surfaces of a Lennard Jones crystal. An inventory of possible migration mechanisms of these surface defects has been drawn between 0.35 and 0.45 Tsub(m). The results obtained with both the methods point out the influence of the surface atomic structure in surface self-diffusion in the medium temperature range [fr

  12. Irradiation induced defects containing oxygen atoms in germanium crystal as studied by deep level transient spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Noboru; Kambe, Yoshiyuki; Saito, Haruo; Matsuda, Koji.

    1984-05-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy was applied to the electron trapping levels which are associated with the irradiation induced lattice defects in germanium crystals. The germanium crystals used in the study were doped with oxygen, antimony or arsenic and the defects were formed by electron irradiation of 1.5MeV or 10MeV. The nature of so called ''thermal defect'' formed by heat treatment at about 670K was also studied. The trapping levels at Esub(c)-0.13eV, Esub(c)-0.25eV and Esub(c)-0.29eV were found to be associated with defects containing oxygen atoms. From the experimental results the Esub(c)-0.25eV level was attributed to the germanium A-center (interstitial oxygen atom-vacancy pair). Another defect associated with the 715cm -1 infrared absorption band was found to have a trapping level at the same position at Esub(c)-0.25eV. The Esub(c)-0.23eV and Esub(c)-0.1eV levels were revealed to be associated with thermal donors formed by heat treatment at about 670K. Additional two peaks (levels) were observed in the DLTS spectrum. The annealing behavior of the levels suggests that the thermal donors originate from not a single type but several types of defects. (author)

  13. Localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds in protein crystals using molecular replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahms, Sven O; Kuester, Miriam; Streb, Carsten; Roth, Christian; Sträter, Norbert; Than, Manuel E

    2013-02-01

    Heavy-atom clusters (HA clusters) containing a large number of specifically arranged electron-dense scatterers are especially useful for experimental phase determination of large complex structures, weakly diffracting crystals or structures with large unit cells. Often, the determination of the exact orientation of the HA cluster and hence of the individual heavy-atom positions proves to be the critical step in successful phasing and subsequent structure solution. Here, it is demonstrated that molecular replacement (MR) with either anomalous or isomorphous differences is a useful strategy for the correct placement of HA cluster compounds. The polyoxometallate cluster hexasodium α-metatungstate (HMT) was applied in phasing the structure of death receptor 6. Even though the HA cluster is bound in alternate partially occupied orientations and is located at a special position, its correct localization and orientation could be determined at resolutions as low as 4.9 Å. The broad applicability of this approach was demonstrated for five different derivative crystals that included the compounds tantalum tetradecabromide and trisodium phosphotungstate in addition to HMT. The correct placement of the HA cluster depends on the length of the intramolecular vectors chosen for MR, such that both a larger cluster size and the optimal choice of the wavelength used for anomalous data collection strongly affect the outcome.

  14. Crystal quality of two-dimensional gallium telluride and gallium selenide using Raman fingerprint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannatul Susoma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We have established Raman fingerprint of GaTe and GaSe to investigate their crystal quality. As unencapsulated, they both oxidise in ambient conditions which can be detected in their Raman analysis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analysis shows a good agreement with Raman analysis. 50-nm-thick Al2O3 encapsulation layer deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD inhibits degradation in ambient conditions.

  15. Lattice location of diffused Zn atoms in GaAs and InP single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, L.Y.; Yu, K.M.; Ben-Tzur, M.; Haller, E.E.; Jaklevic, J.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Hanson, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the saturation phenomenon of the free carrier concentration in p-type GaAs and InP single crystals doped by zinc diffusion. The free hole saturation occurs at 10 20 cm -3 for GaAs, but the maximum concentration for InP appears at mid 10 18 cm -3 . The difference in the saturation hole concentrations for these materials is investigated by studying the incorporation and the lattice location of the impurity zinc, an acceptor when located on a group III atom site. Zinc is diffused into the III-V wafers in a sealed quartz ampoule. Particle-induced x-ray emission with ion-channeling techniques are employed to determine the exact lattice location of the zinc atoms. We have found that over 90% of all zinc atoms occupy Ga sites in the diffused GaAs samples, while for the InP case, the zinc substitutionality is dependent on the cooling rate of the sample after high-temperature diffusion. For the slowly cooled sample, a large fraction (∼90%) of the zinc atoms form random precipitates of Zn 3 P 2 and elemental Zn. However, when rapidly cooled only 60% of the zinc forms such precipitates while the rest occupies specific sites in the InP. We analyze our results in terms of the amphoteric native defect model. We show that the difference in the electrical activity of the Zn atoms in GaAs and InP is a consequence of the different location of the Fermi level stabilization energy in these two materials

  16. Deducing 2D crystal structure at the liquid/solid interface with atomic resolution: a combined STM and SFG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Arthur A; Ahn, Seokhoon; Matzger, Adam J; Chen, Zhan

    2009-11-17

    Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) has been applied to study two-dimensional (2D) crystals formed by an isophthalic acid diester on the surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, providing complementary measurements to scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and computational modeling. SFG results indicate that both aromatic and C=O groups in the 2D crystal tilt from the surface. This study demonstrates that a combination of SFG and STM techniques can be used to gain a more complete picture of 2D crystal structure, and it is necessary to consider solvent-2D crystal interactions and dynamics in the computer models to achieve an accurate representation of interfacial structure.

  17. Localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds in protein crystals using molecular replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahms, Sven O.; Kuester, Miriam; Streb, Carsten; Roth, Christian; Sträter, Norbert; Than, Manuel E.

    2013-01-01

    A new approach is presented that allows the efficient localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds used in experimental phasing by a molecular replacement procedure. This permits the calculation of meaningful phases up to the highest resolution of the diffraction data. Heavy-atom clusters (HA clusters) containing a large number of specifically arranged electron-dense scatterers are especially useful for experimental phase determination of large complex structures, weakly diffracting crystals or structures with large unit cells. Often, the determination of the exact orientation of the HA cluster and hence of the individual heavy-atom positions proves to be the critical step in successful phasing and subsequent structure solution. Here, it is demonstrated that molecular replacement (MR) with either anomalous or isomorphous differences is a useful strategy for the correct placement of HA cluster compounds. The polyoxometallate cluster hexasodium α-metatungstate (HMT) was applied in phasing the structure of death receptor 6. Even though the HA cluster is bound in alternate partially occupied orientations and is located at a special position, its correct localization and orientation could be determined at resolutions as low as 4.9 Å. The broad applicability of this approach was demonstrated for five different derivative crystals that included the compounds tantalum tetradecabromide and trisodium phosphotungstate in addition to HMT. The correct placement of the HA cluster depends on the length of the intramolecular vectors chosen for MR, such that both a larger cluster size and the optimal choice of the wavelength used for anomalous data collection strongly affect the outcome

  18. Application of discrete solvent reaction field model with self-consistent atomic charges and atomic polarizabilities to calculate the χ(1) and χ(2) of organic molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shih-I.

    2018-01-01

    We use the discrete solvent reaction field model to evaluate the linear and second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities of 3-methyl-4-nitropyridine-1-oxyde crystal. In this approach, crystal environment is created by supercell architecture. A self-consistent procedure is used to obtain charges and polarizabilities for environmental atoms. Impact of atomic polarizabilities on the properties of interest is highlighted. This approach is shown to give the second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities within error bar of experiment as well as the linear optical susceptibilities in the same order as experiment. Similar quality of calculations are also applied to both 4-N,N-dimethylamino-3-acetamidonitrobenzene and 2-methyl-4-nitroaniline crystals.

  19. Quantum incommensurate skyrmion crystals and commensurate to in-commensurate transitions in cold atoms and materials with spin-orbit couplings in a Zeeman field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fadi; Ye, Jinwu; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we study strongly interacting spinor atoms in a lattice subject to a two dimensional (2d) anisotropic Rashba type of spin orbital coupling (SOC) and an Zeeman field. We find the interplay between the Zeeman field and the SOC provides a new platform to host rich and novel classes of quantum commensurate and in-commensurate phases, excitations and phase transitions. These commensurate phases include two collinear states at low and high Zeeman field, two co-planar canted states at mirror reflected SOC parameters respectively. Most importantly, there are non-coplanar incommensurate Skyrmion (IC-SkX) crystal phases surrounded by the four commensurate phases. New excitation spectra above all the five phases, especially on the IC-SKX phase are computed. Three different classes of quantum commensurate to in-commensurate transitions from the IC-SKX to its four neighboring commensurate phases are identified. Finite temperature behaviors and transitions are discussed. The critical temperatures of all the phases can be raised above that reachable by current cold atom cooling techniques simply by tuning the number of atoms N per site. In view of recent impressive experimental advances in generating 2d SOC for cold atoms in optical lattices, these new many-body phenomena can be explored in the current and near future cold atom experiments. Applications to various materials such as MnSi, {Fe}}0.5 {Co}}0.5Si, especially the complex incommensurate magnetic ordering in Li2IrO3 are given.

  20. Rainbow trapping in one-dimensional chirped photonic crystals composed of alternating dielectric slabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Yun; Fu, Jiwu; Yu, Guoping

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A simple one-dimensional chirped photonic crystal is proposed to realize rainbow trapping. → The results show different wavelengths can be trapped at different spatial positions. → The structure can be used for optical buffer, memories and filter, sorter, etc. -- Abstract: One-dimensional chirped photonic crystals composed of alternating dielectric slabs are proposed to realize rainbow trapping. We theoretically and numerically demonstrate that not only significantly reduced group velocity can be achieved in the proposed chirped structures, but different wavelengths can be localized in different spatial positions, indicating trapped rainbow. Our results imply a feasible way to slow or even trap light in simple systems, which can be used for optical buffer, memory, data processor and filter, sorter, etc.

  1. Elastic wave localization in two-dimensional phononic crystals with one-dimensional random disorder and aperiodicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Zhizhong; Zhang Chuanzeng; Wang Yuesheng

    2011-01-01

    The band structures of in-plane elastic waves propagating in two-dimensional phononic crystals with one-dimensional random disorder and aperiodicity are analyzed in this paper. The localization of wave propagation is discussed by introducing the concept of the localization factor, which is calculated by the plane-wave-based transfer-matrix method. By treating the random disorder and aperiodicity as the deviation from the periodicity in a special way, three kinds of aperiodic phononic crystals that have normally distributed random disorder, Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro sequence in one direction and translational symmetry in the other direction are considered and the band structures are characterized using localization factors. Besides, as a special case, we analyze the band gap properties of a periodic planar layered composite containing a periodic array of square inclusions. The transmission coefficients based on eigen-mode matching theory are also calculated and the results show the same behaviors as the localization factor does. In the case of random disorders, the localization degree of the normally distributed random disorder is larger than that of the uniformly distributed random disorder although the eigenstates are both localized no matter what types of random disorders, whereas, for the case of Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro structures, the band structures of Thue-Morse sequence exhibit similarities with the quasi-periodic (Fibonacci) sequence not present in the results of the Rudin-Shapiro sequence.

  2. Photodetection in p–n junctions formed by electrolyte-gated transistors of two-dimensional crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Kozawa, Daichi

    2016-11-16

    Transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers have attracted much attention due to their strong light absorption and excellent electronic properties. These advantages make this type of two-dimensional crystal a promising one for optoelectronic device applications. In the case of photoelectric conversion devices such as photodetectors and photovoltaic cells, p–n junctions are one of the most important devices. Here, we demonstrate photodetection with WSe2 monolayer films. We prepare the electrolyte-gated ambipolar transistors and electrostatic p–n junctions are formed by the electrolyte-gating technique at 270 K. These p-n junctions are cooled down to fix the ion motion (and p-n junctions) and we observed the reasonable photocurrent spectra without the external bias, indicating the formation of p-n junctions. Very interestingly, two-terminal devices exhibit higher photoresponsivity than that of three-terminal ones, suggesting the formation of highly balanced anion and cation layers. The maximum photoresponsivity reaches 5 mA/W in resonance with the first excitonic peak. Our technique provides important evidence for optoelectronics in atomically thin crystals.

  3. Three-dimensional oriented attachment growth of single-crystal pre-perovskite PbTiO3 hollowed fibers

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Ruoyu

    2017-12-11

    Hollowed single-crystal pre-perovskite PbTiO fibers (PP-PTF) were successfully synthesized via a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) assisted hydrothermal process. The as-prepared PP-PTF were characterized to be 0.3-1 μm in diameter and tens of micrometers in length by adjusting the concentration of PVA to 0.8 g L. Microstructure characterization of the samples at different reaction times revealed that PP-PTF were formed via a three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical oriented attachment (OA) growth process. The initial growth units were determined to be single-crystal pre-perovskite PbTiO fibers with a diameter of 10-20 nm. Zeta potential measurement suggested that the main driving force of the OA process is the surface electrostatic force, which is induced by the incompletely bonded Pb and O atomic layers on the surface of the {110} plane. Moreover, molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to reveal a stable configuration of the initial pre-perovskite PbTiO growth units, agreeing well with the experimental results.

  4. Photodetection in p–n junctions formed by electrolyte-gated transistors of two-dimensional crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Kozawa, Daichi; Pu, Jiang; Shimizu, Ryo; Kimura, Shota; Chiu, Ming-Hui; Matsuki, Keiichiro; Wada, Yoshifumi; Sakanoue, Tomo; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Li, Lain-Jong; Takenobu, Taishi

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers have attracted much attention due to their strong light absorption and excellent electronic properties. These advantages make this type of two-dimensional crystal a promising one for optoelectronic device applications. In the case of photoelectric conversion devices such as photodetectors and photovoltaic cells, p–n junctions are one of the most important devices. Here, we demonstrate photodetection with WSe2 monolayer films. We prepare the electrolyte-gated ambipolar transistors and electrostatic p–n junctions are formed by the electrolyte-gating technique at 270 K. These p-n junctions are cooled down to fix the ion motion (and p-n junctions) and we observed the reasonable photocurrent spectra without the external bias, indicating the formation of p-n junctions. Very interestingly, two-terminal devices exhibit higher photoresponsivity than that of three-terminal ones, suggesting the formation of highly balanced anion and cation layers. The maximum photoresponsivity reaches 5 mA/W in resonance with the first excitonic peak. Our technique provides important evidence for optoelectronics in atomically thin crystals.

  5. Transverse Kerr effect in one-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals: Experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erokhin, S.; Boriskina, Yu.; Vinogradov, A.; Inoue, M.; Kobayashi, D.; Fedyanin, A.; Gan'shina, E.; Kochneva, M.; Granovsky, A.

    2006-01-01

    Magneto-optical transverse Kerr and Faraday effects are studied experimentally and theoretically in one-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals fabricated from a stack of four repetitions of layers of Bi-substituted yttrium iron garnet and SiO 2 layers. The results of theoretical calculations in the framework of modified matrices approach are consistent with the obtained experimental data with the exception of the one cusp at 480 nm in the transverse Kerr effect spectra. Possible mechanisms of this disagreement are discussed

  6. Study on the Reflection Spectra of One Dimensional Plasma Photonic Crystals Having Exponentially Graded Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, S.; Singh, Vivek; Singh, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    The transfer matrix method is used to study the effect of the permittivity profile on the reflectivity of a one dimensional plasma photonic crystal having exponentially graded material. The analysis shows that the proposed structure works as a perfect mirror within a certain frequency range. These frequency ranges can be completely controlled by the permittivity profile of a graded dielectric layer. As expected we observed that these frequency ranges are also controlled by plasma parameters. (plasma technology)

  7. Localized electromagnetic modes and transmission spectrum of one-dimensional photon crystal with lattice defects

    CERN Document Server

    Vetrov, S Y

    2001-01-01

    The properties of the localized electromagnetic modes in the one-dimensional photon crystal with a structural defective layer are studied. The anisotropic layer of the nematic liquid layer is considered as the defect. It is shown that the frequency and coefficient of the defective modes attenuation essentially depend on the defective layer thickness and nematic optical axis orientation. The spectrum of the photon crystal transmittance with one or two defects in the lattice is studied. The possibility of controlling the the photon crystal transmittance spectrum on the count of changing the orientation of the nematic optical axis, for example, through the external electric field is shown with an account of strong anisotropy of the dielectric permittivity

  8. Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals for Sensitive Microscale Chemical and Biochemical Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Photonic crystals – optical devices able to respond to changes in the refractive index of a small volume of space – are an emerging class of label-free chemical-and bio-sensors. This review focuses on one class of photonic crystal, in which light is confined to a patterned planar material layer of sub-wavelength thickness. These devices are small (on the order of tens to 100s of microns square), suitable for incorporation into lab-on-a-chip systems, and in theory can provide exceptional sensitivity. We introduce the defining characteristics and basic operation of two-dimensional photonic crystal sensors, describe variations of their basic design geometry, and summarize reported detection results from chemical and biological sensing experiments. PMID:25563402

  9. Tamm-plasmon polaritons in one-dimensional photonic quasi-crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Mukesh Kumar; Das, Ritwick

    2018-02-01

    We present an investigation to ascertain the existence of Tamm-plasmon-polariton-like modes in one-dimensional (1D) quasi-periodic photonic systems. Photonic bandgap formation in quasi-crystals is essentially a consequence of long-range periodicity exhibited by multilayers and, thus, it can be explained using the dispersion relation in the Brillouin zone. Defining a "Zak"-like topological phase in 1D quasi-crystals, we propose a recipe to ascertain the existence of Tamm-like photonic surface modes in a metal-terminated quasi-crystal lattice. Additionally, we also explore the conditions of efficient excitation of such surface modes along with their dispersion characteristics.

  10. Broadband one-dimensional photonic crystal wave plate containing single-negative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yihang

    2010-09-13

    The properties of the phase shift of wave reflected from one-dimensional photonic crystals consisting of periodic layers of single-negative (permittivity- or permeability-negative) materials are demonstrated. As the incident angle increases, the reflection phase shift of TE wave decreases, while that of TM wave increases. The phase shifts of both polarized waves vary smoothly as the frequency changes across the photonic crystal stop band. Consequently, the difference between the phase shift of TE and that of TM wave could remain constant in a rather wide frequency range inside the stop band. These properties are useful to design wave plate or retarder which can be used in wide spectral band. In addition, a broadband photonic crystal quarter-wave plate is proposed.

  11. Dispersion characteristics of two-dimensional unmagnetized dielectric plasma photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li-Mei, Qi; Zi-Qiang, Yang; Feng, Lan; Xi, Gao; Da-Zhi, Li

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies dispersion characteristics of the transverse magnetic (TM) mode for two-dimensional unmagnetized dielectric plasma photonic crystal by a modified plane wave method. First, the cutoff behaviour is made clear by using the Maxwell–Garnett effective medium theory, and the influences of dielectric filling factor and dielectric constant on effective plasma frequency are analysed. Moreover, the occurence of large gaps in dielectric plasma photonic crystal is demonstrated by comparing the skin depth with the lattice constant, and the influence of plasma frequency on the first three gaps is also studied. Finally, by using the particle-in-cell simulation method, a transmission curve in the Γ – X direction is obtained in dielectric plasma photonic crystal, which is in accordance with the dispersion curves calculated by the modified plane wave method, and the large gap between the transmission points of 27 GHz and 47 GHz is explained by comparing the electric field patterns in particle-in-cell simulation

  12. One-dimensional modulation instability in biased two-photon photorefractive-photovoltaic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan Kaiyun; Hou Chunfeng; Li Xin

    2010-01-01

    The one-dimensional modulation instability of broad optical beams in biased two-photon photorefractive-photovoltaic crystals is investigated under steady-state conditions. Our analysis indicates that the modulation instability growth rate depends on the external bias field, the bulk photovoltaic effect and the ratio of the intensity of the incident beam to that of the dark irradiance. Moreover, our results show that this modulation instability growth rate is the same as that in two-photon photorefractive-photovoltaic crystals under open circuit conditions in the absence of an external bias field, and the modulation instability growth rate in two-photon biased photorefractive-nonphotovoltaic crystals can be predicted when the bulk photovoltaic effect is neglected.

  13. TWO-DIMENSIONAL LOCALIZATION OF ATOMIC POPULATIONS IN FOUR-LEVEL QUANTUM SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Efremova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with investigation of one aspect of fundamental problem of laser radiation interaction with the matter. This problem is spatial localization of atomic populations due to fields impact of few running waves. We are the first to propose in our work two–dimensional spatial localization of atomic populations in medium with tripod–like configuration of levels under the field influence of running waves only. Three running waves, propagating along one plane 120o angle-wise to each other, form the system of standing waves in this plane. Atomic populations can be localized in the field of these standing waves. Moreover, the degree of such localization can make up hundredth parts of the wavelength of the incident optical radiation. It is shown that an excitation of the central transition of the tripod-like system using a field of multidirectional linearly polarized running waves is the necessary condition of the population dependence from spatial coordinates in the XY – plane. The two–dimensional shapes that appear in this system can have very complicated structure such as “double – craters”.

  14. Three-dimensional atomic-image reconstruction from a single-energy Si(100) photoelectron hologram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, T.; Agui, A.; Yoshigoe, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: J. J. Barton proposed a basic algorithm for three-dimensional atomic-image reconstruction from photoelectron hologram, which is based on the Fourier transform(FT). In the use of a single-energy hologram, the twin-image appears in principle. The twin image disappears in the use of multi-energy hologram, which requires longer measuring time and variable-energy light source. But the reconstruction in the use of a simple FT is difficult because the scattered electron wave is not s-symmetric wave. Many theoretical and experimental approaches based on the FT have been researched. We propose a new algorithm so-called 'scattering pattern matrix', which is not based on the FT. The algorithm utilizes the 'scattering pattern', and iterative gradient method. Real space image can be reconstructed from a single-energy hologram without initial model. In addition, the twin image disappears. We reconstructed the three-dimensional atomic image of Si bulk structure from an experimental single-energy hologram of Si(100) 2s emission, which is shown The experiment was performed with using a Al-K α light source. The experimental setup is shown in. Then we calculated a vertical slice image of the reconstructed Si bulk structure, which is shown. The atomic images appear around the expected positions

  15. Far-Field Focus and Dispersionless Anticrossing Bands in Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoshuang Chen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the simulation work for the far-field focus and dispersionless anticrossing bands in two-dimensional (2D photonic crystals. In a two-dimensional photonic-crystal-based concave lens, the far-field focus of a plane wave is given by the distance between the focusing point and the lens. Strong and good-quality far-field focusing of a transmitted wave, explicitly following the well-known wave-beam negative refraction law, can be achieved. The spatial frequency information of the Bloch mode in multiple Brillouin zones (BZs is investigated in order to indicate the wave propagation in two different regions. When considering the photonic transmission in a 2D photonic crystal composed of a negative phase-velocity medium (NPVM, it is shown that the dispersionless anticrossing bands are generated by the couplings among the localized surface polaritons of the NPVM rods. The photonic band structures of the NPVM photonic crystals are characterized by a topographical continuous dispersion relationship accompanied by many anticrossing bands.

  16. Dimensional crossover and cold-atom realization of topological Mott insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheurer, Mathias S.; Rachel, Stephan; Orth, Peter P.

    2015-02-01

    Interacting cold-atomic gases in optical lattices offer an experimental approach to outstanding problems of many body physics. One important example is the interplay of interaction and topology which promises to generate a variety of exotic phases such as the fractionalized Chern insulator or the topological Mott insulator. Both theoretically understanding these states of matter and finding suitable systems that host them have proven to be challenging problems. Here we propose a cold-atom setup where Hubbard on-site interactions give rise to spin liquid-like phases: weak and strong topological Mott insulators. They represent the celebrated paradigm of an interacting and topological quantum state with fractionalized spinon excitations that inherit the topology of the non-interacting system. Our proposal shall help to pave the way for a controlled experimental investigation of this exotic state of matter in optical lattices. Furthermore, it allows for the investigation of a dimensional crossover from a two-dimensional quantum spin Hall insulating phase to a three-dimensional strong topological insulator by tuning the hopping between the layers.

  17. Three-dimensional interactive Molecular Dynamics program for the study of defect dynamics in crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patriarca, M.; Kuronen, A.; Robles, M.; Kaski, K.

    2007-01-01

    The study of crystal defects and the complex processes underlying their formation and time evolution has motivated the development of the program ALINE for interactive molecular dynamics experiments. This program couples a molecular dynamics code to a Graphical User Interface and runs on a UNIX-X11 Window System platform with the MOTIF library, which is contained in many standard Linux releases. ALINE is written in C, thus giving the user the possibility to modify the source code, and, at the same time, provides an effective and user-friendly framework for numerical experiments, in which the main parameters can be interactively varied and the system visualized in various ways. We illustrate the main features of the program through some examples of detection and dynamical tracking of point-defects, linear defects, and planar defects, such as stacking faults in lattice-mismatched heterostructures. Program summaryTitle of program:ALINE Catalogue identifier:ADYJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYJ_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: Computers:DEC ALPHA 300, Intel i386 compatible computers, G4 Apple Computers Installations:Laboratory of Computational Engineering, Helsinki University of Technology, Helsinki, Finland Operating systems under which the program has been tested:True64 UNIX, Linux-i386, Mac OS X 10.3 and 10.4 Programming language used:Standard C and MOTIF libraries Memory required to execute with typical data:6 Mbytes but may be larger depending on the system size No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:16 901 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:449 559 Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of physical problem:Some phenomena involving defects take place inside three-dimensional crystals at times which can be hardly predicted. For this reason they are

  18. Crystallization Process of Protein Rv0731c from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis for a Successful Atomic Resolution Crystal Structure at 1.2 Angstrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Liang Cong

    2009-06-08

    Proteins are bio-macromolecules consisting of basic 20 amino acids and have distinct three-dimensional folds. They are essential parts of organisms and participate in every process within cells. Proteins are crucial for human life, and each protein within the body has a specific function, such as antibodies, contractile proteins, enzymes, hormonal proteins, structural proteins, storage proteins and transport proteins. Determining three-dimensional structure of a protein can help researchers discover the remarkable protein folding, binding site, conformation and etc, in order to understand well of protein interaction and aid for possible drug design. The research on protein structure by X-ray protein crystallography carried by Li-Wei Hung's research group in the Physical Bioscience Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is focusing on protein crystallography. The research in this lab is in the process of from crystallizing the proteins to determining the three dimensional crystal structures of proteins. Most protein targets are selected from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. TB (Tuberculosis) is a possible fatal infectious disease. By studying TB target protein can help discover antituberculer drugs, and find treatment for TB. The high-throughput mode of crystallization, crystal harvesting, crystal screening and data collection are applied to the research pipeline (Figure 1). The X-ray diffraction data by protein crystals can be processed and analyzed to result in a three dimensional representation of electron density, producing a detailed model of protein structure. Rv0731c is a conserved hypothetical protein with unknown function from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. This paper is going to report the crystallization process and brief structure information of Rv0731c.

  19. Three-dimensional theory of quantum memories based on Λ-type atomic ensembles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeuthen, Emil; Grodecka-Grad, Anna; Soerensen, Anders S.

    2011-01-01

    We develop a three-dimensional theory for quantum memories based on light storage in ensembles of Λ-type atoms, where two long-lived atomic ground states are employed. We consider light storage in an ensemble of finite spatial extent and we show that within the paraxial approximation the Fresnel number of the atomic ensemble and the optical depth are the only important physical parameters determining the quality of the quantum memory. We analyze the influence of these parameters on the storage of light followed by either forward or backward read-out from the quantum memory. We show that for small Fresnel numbers the forward memory provides higher efficiencies, whereas for large Fresnel numbers the backward memory is advantageous. The optimal light modes to store in the memory are presented together with the corresponding spin waves and outcoming light modes. We show that for high optical depths such Λ-type atomic ensembles allow for highly efficient backward and forward memories even for small Fresnel numbers F(greater-or-similar sign)0.1.

  20. Quantum phases of low-dimensional ultra-cold atom systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathey, Ludwig G.

    2007-06-01

    In this thesis we derive and explore the quantum phases of various types of ultracold atom systems, as well as their experimental signature. The technology of cooling, trapping and manipulating ultracold atoms has advanced in an amazing fashion during the last decade, which has led to the study of many-body effects of atomic ensembles. We first consider atomic mixtures in one dimension, which show a rich structure of phases, using a Luttinger liquid description. We then go on to consider how noise correlations in time-of-flight images of one-dimensional systems can be used to draw conclusions about the many-body state that they're in. Thirdly, we consider the quantum phases of Bose-Fermi mixtures in optical lattices, either square lattices or triangular lattices, using the powerful method of functional renormalization group analysis. Lastly, we study the phases of two-coupled quasi-superfluids in two dimensions, which shows unusual phases, and which could be used to realize the Kibble-Zurek mechanism, i.e. the generation of topological defects by ramping across a phase transition, first proposed in the context of an early universe scenario.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of atomic short range order and cluster formation in two dimensional model alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas T, J.; Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima; Manrique C, E.; Torres T, E.

    2002-01-01

    Using monte Carlo simulation have been carried out an atomistic description of the structure and ordering processes in the system Cu-Au in a two-dimensional model. The ABV model of the alloy is a system of N atoms A and B, located in rigid lattice with some vacant sites. In the model we assume pair wise interactions between nearest neighbors with constant ordering energy J = 0,03 eV. The dynamics was introduced by means of a vacancy that exchanges of place with any atom of its neighbors. The simulations were carried out in a square lattice with 1024 and 4096 particles, using periodic boundary conditions to avoid border effects. We calculate the first two parameters of short range order of Warren-Cowley as function of the concentration and temperature. It was also studied the probabilities of formation of different atomic clusters that consist of 9 atoms as function of the concentration of the alloy and temperatures in a wide range of values. In some regions of temperature and concentration it was observed compositional and thermal polymorphism

  2. Analytical investigation of one-dimensional Rydberg atoms interacting with half-cycle pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bersons, I.; Veilande, R.

    2004-01-01

    Classical, quantum-mechanical, and semiclassical expressions for the transition probability in one-dimensional Rydberg atom irradiated by short half-cycle pulse are derived and compared. The simple formulas obtained for excitation of Rydberg atom by two time delayed weak half-cycle pulses reproduce well the experimental data and the solutions of time-dependent Schroedinger equation. When the transferred momenta are stronger and positive, the transition probabilities exhibit fast oscillations with time delay between the pulses. The classical transition probability is constant in time. For negative transferred momenta a focusing phenomenon is observed, and there is a region in time delay, where the transition probabilities oscillate with the Kepler period

  3. Local atomic and crystal structure rearrangement during the martensitic transformation in Ti50Ni25Cu25 shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menushenkov, Alexey; Grishina, Olga; Shelyakov, Alexander; Yaroslavtsev, Alexander; Zubavichus, Yan; Veligzhanin, Alexey; Bednarcik, Jozef; Chernikov, Roman; Sitnikov, Nikolay

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Local crystalline structure of TiNiCu SMA is investigated using EXAFS. • Peculiarities of Ni and Cu local environment are found. • Ti atoms show greater mobility relative to Ni atoms. • Ni local environment change is significant for shape memory effect. -- Abstract: The changes of crystal structure and local crystalline environment of Ti, Ni and Cu atoms in Ti 50 Ni 25 Cu 25 shape memory alloy are investigated using X-ray diffraction and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) in temperature range of martensite transformation. The analysis of the EXAFS-spectra shows that the bonds involving Ni atoms have the highest degree of disorder and the change in the local environment around Ni atoms is significant for the occurrence of the shape memory effect, while Cu atoms occupy the normal positions in the crystallographic structure and have the lowest displacement amplitude leading to the stabilization of both phases

  4. Numerical study on characteristic of two-dimensional metal/dielectric photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Yi-Xin; Xia, Jian-Bai; Wu, Hai-Bin

    2017-04-01

    An improved plan-wave expansion method is adopted to theoretically study the photonic band diagrams of two-dimensional (2D) metal/dielectric photonic crystals. Based on the photonic band structures, the dependence of flat bands and photonic bandgaps on two parameters (dielectric constant and filling factor) are investigated for two types of 2D metal/dielectric (M/D) photonic crystals, hole and cylinder photonic crystals. The simulation results show that band structures are affected greatly by these two parameters. Flat bands and bandgaps can be easily obtained by tuning these parameters and the bandgap width may reach to the maximum at certain parameters. It is worth noting that the hole-type photonic crystals show more bandgaps than the corresponding cylinder ones, and the frequency ranges of bandgaps also depend strongly on these parameters. Besides, the photonic crystals containing metallic medium can obtain more modulation of photonic bands, band gaps, and large effective refractive index, etc. than the dielectric/dielectric ones. According to the numerical results, the needs of optical devices for flat bands and bandgaps can be met by selecting the suitable geometry and material parameters. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB922200) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 605210010).

  5. Optical Properties and Wave Propagation in Semiconductor-Based Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mario Agio

    2002-01-01

    This work is a theoretical investigation on the physical properties of semiconductor-based two-dimensional photonic crystals, in particular for what concerns systems embedded in planar dielectric waveguides (GaAs/AlGaAs, GaInAsP/InP heterostructures, and self-standing membranes) or based on macro-porous silicon. The photonic-band structure of photonic crystals and photonic-crystal slabs is numerically computed and the associated light-line problem is discussed, which points to the issue of intrinsic out-of-lane diffraction losses for the photonic bands lying above the light line. The photonic states are then classified by the group theory formalism: each mode is related to an irreducible representation of the corresponding small point group. The optical properties are investigated by means of the scattering matrix method, which numerically implements a variable-angle-reflectance experiment; comparison with experiments is also provided. The analysis of surface reflectance proves the existence of selection rules for coupling an external wave to a certain photonic mode. Such rules can be directly derived from symmetry considerations. Lastly, the control of wave propagation in weak-index contrast photonic-crystal slabs is tackled in view of designing building blocks for photonic integrated circuits. The proposed designs are found to comply with the major requirements of low-loss propagation, high and single-mode transmission. These notions are then collected to model a photonic-crystal combiner for an integrated multi-wavelength-source laser

  6. Numerical study on characteristic of two-dimensional metal/dielectric photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zong Yi-Xin; Xia Jian-Bai; Wu Hai-Bin

    2017-01-01

    An improved plan-wave expansion method is adopted to theoretically study the photonic band diagrams of two-dimensional (2D) metal/dielectric photonic crystals. Based on the photonic band structures, the dependence of flat bands and photonic bandgaps on two parameters (dielectric constant and filling factor) are investigated for two types of 2D metal/dielectric (M/D) photonic crystals, hole and cylinder photonic crystals. The simulation results show that band structures are affected greatly by these two parameters. Flat bands and bandgaps can be easily obtained by tuning these parameters and the bandgap width may reach to the maximum at certain parameters. It is worth noting that the hole-type photonic crystals show more bandgaps than the corresponding cylinder ones, and the frequency ranges of bandgaps also depend strongly on these parameters. Besides, the photonic crystals containing metallic medium can obtain more modulation of photonic bands, band gaps, and large effective refractive index, etc. than the dielectric/dielectric ones. According to the numerical results, the needs of optical devices for flat bands and bandgaps can be met by selecting the suitable geometry and material parameters. (paper)

  7. Direct Writing of Three-Dimensional Macroporous Photonic Crystals on Pressure-Responsive Shape Memory Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yin; Ni, Yongliang; Leo, Sin-Yen; Wang, Bingchen; Basile, Vito; Taylor, Curtis; Jiang, Peng

    2015-10-28

    Here we report a single-step direct writing technology for making three-dimensional (3D) macroporous photonic crystal patterns on a new type of pressure-responsive shape memory polymer (SMP). This approach integrates two disparate fields that do not typically intersect: the well-established templating nanofabrication and shape memory materials. Periodic arrays of polymer macropores templated from self-assembled colloidal crystals are squeezed into disordered arrays in an unusual shape memory "cold" programming process. The recovery of the original macroporous photonic crystal lattices can be triggered by direct writing at ambient conditions using both macroscopic and nanoscopic tools, like a pencil or a nanoindenter. Interestingly, this shape memory disorder-order transition is reversible and the photonic crystal patterns can be erased and regenerated hundreds of times, promising the making of reconfigurable/rewritable nanooptical devices. Quantitative insights into the shape memory recovery of collapsed macropores induced by the lateral shear stresses in direct writing are gained through fundamental investigations on important process parameters, including the tip material, the critical pressure and writing speed for triggering the recovery of the deformed macropores, and the minimal feature size that can be directly written on the SMP membranes. Besides straightforward applications in photonic crystal devices, these smart mechanochromic SMPs that are sensitive to various mechanical stresses could render important technological applications ranging from chromogenic stress and impact sensors to rewritable high-density optical data storage media.

  8. Optical Properties and Wave Propagation in Semiconductor-Based Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agio, Mario [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-12-31

    This work is a theoretical investigation on the physical properties of semiconductor-based two-dimensional photonic crystals, in particular for what concerns systems embedded in planar dielectric waveguides (GaAs/AlGaAs, GaInAsP/InP heterostructures, and self-standing membranes) or based on macro-porous silicon. The photonic-band structure of photonic crystals and photonic-crystal slabs is numerically computed and the associated light-line problem is discussed, which points to the issue of intrinsic out-of-lane diffraction losses for the photonic bands lying above the light line. The photonic states are then classified by the group theory formalism: each mode is related to an irreducible representation of the corresponding small point group. The optical properties are investigated by means of the scattering matrix method, which numerically implements a variable-angle-reflectance experiment; comparison with experiments is also provided. The analysis of surface reflectance proves the existence of selection rules for coupling an external wave to a certain photonic mode. Such rules can be directly derived from symmetry considerations. Lastly, the control of wave propagation in weak-index contrast photonic-crystal slabs is tackled in view of designing building blocks for photonic integrated circuits. The proposed designs are found to comply with the major requirements of low-loss propagation, high and single-mode transmission. These notions are then collected to model a photonic-crystal combiner for an integrated multi-wavelength-source laser.

  9. Mott Transition of Fermionic Atoms in a Three-Dimensional Optical Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmes, R. W.; Rosch, A.; Costi, T. A.

    2008-01-01

    We study theoretically the Mott metal-insulator transition for a system of fermionic atoms confined in a three-dimensional optical lattice and a harmonic trap. We describe an inhomogeneous system of several thousand sites using an adaptation of dynamical mean-field theory solved efficiently with the numerical renormalization group method. Above a critical value of the on-site interaction, a Mott-insulating phase appears in the system. We investigate signatures of the Mott phase in the density profile and in time-of-flight experiments

  10. Ultracold atoms in one-dimensional optical lattices approaching the Tonks-Girardeau regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollet, L.; Rombouts, S.M.A.; Denteneer, P.J. H.

    2004-01-01

    Recent experiments on ultracold atomic alkali gases in a one-dimensional optical lattice have demonstrated the transition from a gas of soft-core bosons to a Tonks-Girardeau gas in the hard-core limit, where one-dimensional bosons behave like fermions in many respects. We have studied the underlying many-body physics through numerical simulations which accommodate both the soft-core and hard-core limits in one single framework. We find that the Tonks-Girardeau gas is reached only at the strongest optical lattice potentials. Results for slightly higher densities, where the gas develops a Mott-like phase already at weaker optical lattice potentials, show that these Mott-like short-range correlations do not enhance the convergence to the hard-core limit

  11. Ex situ investigation of the step bunching on crystal surfaces by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasinski, Mariusz J.

    1997-07-01

    We are describing ex situ observation of step bunching on the surfaces of solution grown potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) and sodium chlorate monocrystals. The measurements have been done with the use of atomic force microscope. The use of this equipment allowed us to see directly the structure of macrosteps. Observation confirmed the existence of step pinning which is one of the proposed mechanisms of step bunching. Despite the very high resolution of AFM it was not possible to determine the nature of pinning point. The monatomic steps on KDP and sodium chlorate crystal surfaces are mainly one unit cell high what seems to be the result of the steps pairing. The origin of observed step pattern is discussed in frames of existing theories.

  12. A versatile atomic force microscope for three-dimensional nanomanipulation and nanoassembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Hui; Haliyo, Dogan Sinan; Regnier, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    A conventional atomic force microscope (AFM) has been successfully applied to manipulating nanoparticles (zero-dimensional), nanowires (one-dimensional) or nanotubes (one- or two-dimensional) by widely used pushing or pulling operations on a single surface. However, pick-and-place nanomanipulation in air is still a challenge. In this research, a modified AFM, called a three-dimensional (3D) manipulation force microscope (3DMFM), was developed to realize 3D nanomanipulation in air. This system consists of two individually actuated cantilevers with protruding tips that are facing each other, constructing a nanotweezer for the pick-and-place nanomanipulation. Before manipulation, one of the cantilevers is employed to position nano-objects and locate the tip of the other cantilever by image scanning. During the manipulation, these two cantilevers work collaboratively as a nanotweezer to grasp, transport and place the nano-objects with real-time force sensing. The manipulation capabilities of the nanotweezer were demonstrated by grabbing and manipulating silicon nanowires to build 3D nanowire crosses. 3D nanomanipulation and nanoassembly performed in air could become feasible through this newly developed 3DMFM.

  13. Comprehensive three-dimensional analysis of surface plasmon polariton modes at uniaxial liquid crystal-metal interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Yin-Ray; Lee, Tsun-Hsiun; Wu, Zheng-Yu; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Hung, Yu-Ju

    2015-12-14

    This paper describes the derivation of surface plasmon polariton modes associated with the generalized three-dimensional rotation of liquid crystal molecules on a metal film. The calculated dispersion relation was verified by coupling laser light into surface plasmon polariton waves in a one-dimensional grating device. The grating-assisted plasmon coupling condition was consistent with the formulated k(spp) value. This provides a general rule for the design of liquid-crystal tunable plasmonic devices.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF SURFACE OF THE (010 FACE OF BORAX CRYSTALS USING EX SITU ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY (AFM:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suharso Suharso

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface topology of borax crystals grown at a relative supersaturation of 0.21 has been investigated using ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM. It was found that the cleavage of borax crystals along the (010 face planes has features of the cleavage of layered compounds, exhibiting cleavage steps of low heights. The step heights of the cleavage of the (010 face of borax crystal are from one unit cell to three unit cells of this face.   Keywords: AFM, cleavage, borax.

  15. Dual curved photonic crystal ring resonator based channel drop filter using two-dimensional photonic crystal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhipa, Mayur Kumar, E-mail: mayurchhipa1@gmail.com [Deptt. of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Government Engineering College Ajmer Rajasthan INDIA (India); Dusad, Lalit Kumar [Rajasthan Technical University Kota, Rajasthan (India)

    2016-05-06

    In this paper channel drop filter (CDF) is designed using dual curved photonic crystal ring resonator (PCRR). The photonic band gap (PBG) is calculated by plane wave expansion (PWE) method and the photonic crystal (PhC) based on two dimensional (2D) square lattice periodic arrays of silicon (Si) rods in air structure have been investigated using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The number of rods in Z and X directions is 21 and 20 respectively with lattice constant 0.540 nm and rod radius r = 0.1 µm. The channel drop filter has been optimized for telecommunication wavelengths λ = 1.591 µm with refractive indices 3.533. In the designed structure further analysis is also done by changing whole rods refractive index and it has been observed that this filter may be used for filtering several other channels also. The designed structure is useful for CWDM systems. This device may serve as a key component in photonic integrated circuits. The device is ultra compact with the overall size around 123 µm{sup 2}.

  16. Two dimensional crystals of LH2 light-harvesting complexes from Ectothiorhodospira sp. and Rhodobacter capsulatus investigated by electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oling, Frank; Boekema, EJ; deZarate, IO; Visschers, R; vanGrondelle, R; Keegstra, W; Brisson, A; Picorel, R

    1996-01-01

    Two-dimensional crystals of LH2 (B800-850) light-harvesting complexes from Ectothiorhodospira sp, and Rhodobacter capsulatus were obtained by reconstitution of purified protein into phospholipid vesicles and characterized by electron microscopy. The size of the crystals was up to several

  17. Clustered atom-replaced structure in single-crystal-like metal oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Takeshi; Hayashi, Mariko; Ishii, Hirotaka; Yokoe, Daisaku; Yoshida, Ryuji; Kato, Takeharu; Nishijima, Gen; Matsumoto, Akiyoshi

    2018-06-01

    By means of metal organic deposition using trifluoroacetates (TFA-MOD), we replaced and localized two or more atoms in a single-crystalline structure having almost perfect orientation. Thus, we created a new functional structure, namely, clustered atom-replaced structure (CARS), having single-crystal-like metal oxide. We replaced metals in the oxide with Sm and Lu and localized them. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy results, where the Sm signal increases with the Lu signal in the single-crystalline structure, confirm evidence of CARS. We also form other CARS with three additional metals, including Pr. The valence number of Pr might change from 3+ to approximately 4+, thereby reducing the Pr–Ba distance. We directly observed the structure by a high-angle annular dark-field image, which provided further evidence of CARS. The key to establishing CARS is an equilibrium chemical reaction and a combination of additional larger and smaller unit cells to matrix cells. We made a new functional metal oxide with CARS and expect to realize CARS in other metal oxide structures in the future by using the above-mentioned process.

  18. About effect of the Ramsauer-Townsend type at scattering of relativistic electrons by crystal atomic string

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shul'ga, N.F.; Truten', V.I.

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that a considerable decrease in a total cross-section of the elastic scattering of relativistic electrons by a crystal atomic string can take place at certain values of particle incidence angles. This effect is similar to the Ramsauer-Townsend effect of slow electrons scattering by an atom. It is shown that the decrease in the angle of particles incidence on the atomic string essentially changes the process of particles scattering. The phenomena of the particle rainbow scattering and orbiting may occur in this case. 14 refs., 5 figs

  19. He atom-surface scattering: Surface dynamics of insulators, overlayers and crystal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Investigations in this laboratory have focused on the surface structure and dynamics of ionic insulators and on epitaxial growth onto alkali halide crystals. In the later the homoepitaxial growth of NaCl/NaCl(001) and the heteroepitaxial growth of KBr/NaCl(001), NaCl/KBr(001) and KBr/RbCl(001) have been studied by monitoring the specular He scattering as a function of the coverage and by measuring the angular and energy distributions of the scattered He atoms. These data provide information on the surface structure, defect densities, island sizes and surface strain during the layer-by-layer growth. The temperature dependence of these measurements also provides information on the mobilities of the admolecules. He atom scattering is unique among surface probes because the low-energy, inert atoms are sensitive only to the electronic structure of the topmost surface layer and are equally applicable to all crystalline materials. It is proposed for the next year to exploit further the variety of combinations possible with the alkali halides in order to carry out a definitive study of epitaxial growth in the ionic insulators. The work completed so far, including measurements of the Bragg diffraction and surface dispersion at various stages of growth, appears to be exceptionally rich in detail, which is particularly promising for theoretical modeling. In addition, because epitaxial growth conditions over a wide range of lattice mismatches is possible with these materials, size effects in growth processes can be explored in great depth. Further, as some of the alkali halides have the CsCl structure instead of the NaCl structure, we can investigate the effects of the heteroepitaxy with materials having different lattice preferences. Finally, by using co-deposition of different alkali halides, one can investigate the formation and stability of alloys and even alkali halide superlattices

  20. Synthesis, crystal structure, characterizations and magnetic study of a novel two-dimensional iron fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouketaya, Sabrine; Smida, Mouna; Abdelbaky, Mohammed S. M.; Dammak, Mohamed; García-Granda, Santiago

    2018-06-01

    A new hybrid compound formulated as [Fe3F8(H2O)2](Am2TAZ)2 (Am2TAZ= 3,5-diamino-1,2,4-triazole) was prepared under hydrothermal conditions. The crystal structure was solved by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and the bulk was characterized by thermal analyses (TG-MS), vibrational spectroscopy (FTIR, Raman), Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX). It crystallizes in the triclinic system space group P 1 ̅ with unit cell parameters a= 7.100(2) Å, b= 7.658(2) Å, c= 8.321(2) Å, α = 107.330(20)°, β = 111.842(18)°, γ = 93.049(17)°, Z = 1 and V= 394.01(17) Å3. The studied X-ray crystal structure shows the two oxidation states for iron atoms (Fe2+, Fe3+) and generates a 2D inorganic network, built up of inorganic layers constructed from infinite inorganic chains running along a axis. In fact, these chains are connected via (Fe3+(3)F6) octahedral. OW-H…F and N-H…F hydrogen bonds, making up the whole 3D network, are strongly linked in the layers. Magnetization measurements were performed, exhibiting the paramagnetic feature of the studied compound above 150 K.

  1. High mobility In2O3:H transparent conductive oxides prepared by atomic layer deposition and solid phase crystallization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macco, B.; Wu, Y.; Vanhemel, D.; Kessels, W.M.M.

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of high-quality In2O3:H, as transparent conductive oxide (TCO), is demonstrated at low temperatures. Amorphous In2O3:H films were deposited by atomic layer deposition at 100 °C, after which they underwent solid phase crystallization by a short anneal at 200 °C. TEM analysis has shown

  2. Periodic order and defects in Ni-based inverse opal-like crystals on the mesoscopic and atomic scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chumakova, A. V.; Valkovskiy, G. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Dyadkin, V. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Petukhov, Andrei V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of inverse opal crystals based on nickel was probed on the mesoscopic and atomic levels by a set of complementary techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron microradian and wide-angle diffraction. The microradian diffraction revealed the mesoscopic-scale

  3. Irradiation-induced precipitation in a SUS316 stainless steel using three-dimensional atom probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatakeyama, M., E-mail: hatake@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, IMR/Tohoku University, Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Yamagata, I. [Japan Atom Energy Agency, Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Precipitation and segregation were investigated in a compositionally modified 316 austenitic stainless steel, neutron-irradiated at 862 K using a three-dimensional atom probe. In the solution-annealed specimen, Mo, Ti, Nb, C and P enrichment were observed in a silicide, with nominal composition Fe{sub 3}Cr{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}Si{sub 2}. In a Ti-rich carbide, nominaling Fe{sub 5}Cr{sub 8}Ni{sub 10}Mo{sub 2}Ti{sub 11}Si{sub 2}C{sub 6}, enrichment of Mo, Si, O, and Nb was observed. Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) at the precipitate–matrix interface was also investigated at an atomic scale. RIS of Ni and P atoms, which are undersized in Fe, was also analyzed around the interface of the Ti-rich carbide and matrix. Results suggest that the carbide–matrix interface is a sink with an interstitial bias. In the cold-worked specimen, complex-precipitates consisting of silicide and carbide were formed.

  4. Final results of the fifth three-dimensional dynamic Atomic Energy Research benchmark problem calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadek, J.

    1999-01-01

    The paper gives a brief survey of the fifth three-dimensional dynamic Atomic Energy Research benchmark calculation results received with the code DYN3D/ATHLET at NRI Rez. This benchmark was defined at the seventh Atomic Energy Research Symposium (Hoernitz near Zittau, 1997). Its initiating event is a symmetrical break of the main steam header at the end of the first fuel cycle and hot shutdown conditions with one stuck out control rod group. The calculations were performed with the externally coupled codes ATHLET Mod.1.1 Cycle C and DYN3DH1.1/M3. The standard WWER-440/213 input deck of ATHLET code was adopted for benchmark purposes and for coupling with the code DYN3D. The first part of paper contains a brief characteristics of NPP input deck and reactor core model. The second part shows the time dependencies of important global and local parameters. In comparison with the results published at the eighth Atomic Energy Research Symposium (Bystrice nad Pernstejnem, 1998), the results published in this paper are based on improved ATHLET descriptions of control and safety systems. (Author)

  5. Two-dimensional ferroelectric topological insulators in functionalized atomically thin bismuth layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Liangzhi; Fu, Huixia; Ma, Yandong; Yan, Binghai; Liao, Ting; Du, Aijun; Chen, Changfeng

    2018-02-01

    We introduce a class of two-dimensional (2D) materials that possess coexisting ferroelectric and topologically insulating orders. Such ferroelectric topological insulators (FETIs) occur in noncentrosymmetric atomic layer structures with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC). We showcase a prototype 2D FETI in an atomically thin bismuth layer functionalized by C H2OH , which exhibits a large ferroelectric polarization that is switchable by a ligand molecule rotation mechanism and a strong SOC that drives a band inversion leading to the topologically insulating state. An external electric field that switches the ferroelectric polarization also tunes the spin texture in the underlying atomic lattice. Moreover, the functionalized bismuth layer exhibits an additional quantum order driven by the valley splitting at the K and K' points in the Brillouin zone stemming from the symmetry breaking and strong SOC in the system, resulting in a remarkable state of matter with the simultaneous presence of the quantum spin Hall and quantum valley Hall effect. These phenomena are predicted to exist in other similarly constructed 2D FETIs, thereby offering a unique quantum material platform for discovering novel physics and exploring innovative applications.

  6. Crystallization and atomic diffusion behavior of high coercive Ta/Nd-Fe-B/Ta-based permanent magnetic thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Na; Zhang, Xiao; You, Caiyin; Fu, Huarui [Xi' an University of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an (China); Shen, Qianlong [Logistics University of People' s Armed Police Force, Tianjin (China)

    2017-06-15

    A high coercivity of about 20.4 kOe was obtained through post-annealing the sputtered Ta/Nd-Fe-B/Ta-based permanent magnetic thin films. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses were performed to investigate the crystallization and atomic diffusion behaviors during post-annealing. The results show that the buffer and capping Ta layers prefered to intermix with Fe and B atoms, and Nd tends to be combined with O atoms. The preferred atomic combination caused the appearance of the soft magnetic phase of Fe-Ta-B, resulting in a kink of the second quadratic magnetic hysteresis loop. The preferred atomic diffusion and phase formation of the thin films were well explained in terms of the formation enthalpy of the various compounds. (orig.)

  7. Magnon band structure and magnon density in one-dimensional magnonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Rong-ke; Huang, Te; Zhang, Zhi-dong

    2014-01-01

    By using Callen's Green's function method and the Tyablikov and Anderson–Callen decoupling approximations, we systematically study the magnon band structure and magnon density perpendicular to the superlattice plane of one-dimensional magnonic crystals, with a superlattice consisting of two magnetic layers with ferromagnetic (FM) or antiferromagnetic (AFM) interlayer exchange coupling. The effects of temperature, interlayer coupling, anisotropy and external magnetic field on the magnon-energy band and magnon density in the K x -direction are investigated in three situations: a) the magnon band of magnetic superlattices with FM interlayer coupling, b) separate and c) overlapping magnon bands of magnetic superlattices with AFM interlayer coupling. In the present work, a quantum approach is developed to study the magnon band structure and magnon density of magnonic crystals and the results are beneficial for the design of magnonic-crystal waveguides or gigahertz-range spin-wave filters. - Highlights: • A quantum approach has been developed to study the magnon band of magnonic crystals. • The separate and overlapping magnon bands of magnetic superlattices are investigated. • The results are beneficial for the design of gigahertz-range spin-wave filters

  8. Magnon band structure and magnon density in one-dimensional magnonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Rong-ke, E-mail: rkqiu@163.com [Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110870 (China); Huang, Te [Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110870 (China); Zhang, Zhi-dong [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2014-11-15

    By using Callen's Green's function method and the Tyablikov and Anderson–Callen decoupling approximations, we systematically study the magnon band structure and magnon density perpendicular to the superlattice plane of one-dimensional magnonic crystals, with a superlattice consisting of two magnetic layers with ferromagnetic (FM) or antiferromagnetic (AFM) interlayer exchange coupling. The effects of temperature, interlayer coupling, anisotropy and external magnetic field on the magnon-energy band and magnon density in the K{sub x}-direction are investigated in three situations: a) the magnon band of magnetic superlattices with FM interlayer coupling, b) separate and c) overlapping magnon bands of magnetic superlattices with AFM interlayer coupling. In the present work, a quantum approach is developed to study the magnon band structure and magnon density of magnonic crystals and the results are beneficial for the design of magnonic-crystal waveguides or gigahertz-range spin-wave filters. - Highlights: • A quantum approach has been developed to study the magnon band of magnonic crystals. • The separate and overlapping magnon bands of magnetic superlattices are investigated. • The results are beneficial for the design of gigahertz-range spin-wave filters.

  9. Research on bandgaps in two-dimensional phononic crystal with two resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Nansha; Wu, Jiu Hui; Yu, Lie

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, the bandgap properties of a two-dimensional phononic crystal with the two resonators is studied and embedded in a homogenous matrix. The resonators are not connected with the matrix but linked with connectors directly. The dispersion relationship, transmission spectra, and displacement fields of the eigenmodes of this phononic crystal are studied with finite-element method. In contrast to the phononic crystals with one resonators and hollow structure, the proposed structures with two resonators can open bandgaps at lower frequencies. This is a very interesting and useful phenomenon. Results show that, the opening of the bandgaps is because of the local resonance and the scattering interaction between two resonators and matrix. An equivalent spring-pendulum model can be developed in order to evaluate the frequencies of the bandgap edge. The study in this paper is beneficial to the design of opening and tuning bandgaps in phononic crystals and isolators in low-frequency range. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Full melting of a two-dimensional complex plasma crystal triggered by localized pulsed laser heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couëdel, L.; Nosenko, V.; Rubin-Zuzic, M.; Zhdanov, S.; Elskens, Y.; Hall, T.; Ivlev, A. V.

    2018-04-01

    The full melting of a two-dimensional plasma crystal was induced in a principally stable monolayer by localized laser stimulation. Two distinct behaviors of the crystal after laser stimulation were observed depending on the amount of injected energy: (i) below a well-defined threshold, the laser melted area recrystallized; (ii) above the threshold, it expanded outwards in a similar fashion to mode-coupling instability-induced melting, rapidly destroying the crystalline order of the whole complex plasma monolayer. The reported experimental observations are due to the fluid mode-coupling instability, which can pump energy into the particle monolayer at a rate surpassing the heat transport and damping rates in the energetic localized melted spot, resulting in its further growth. This behavior exhibits remarkable similarities with impulsive spot heating in ordinary reactive matter.

  11. Geometrically distributed one-dimensional photonic crystals for light-reflection in all angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagappan, G; Wu, P

    2009-07-06

    We demonstrate that a series of one-dimensional photonic crystals made of any dielectric materials, with the periods are distributed in a geometrical progression of a common ratio, r rc (theta,P), where rc is a structural parameter that depends on the angle of incidence, theta, and polarization, P, is capable of blocking light of any spectral range. If an omni-directional reflection is desired for all polarizations and for all incident angles smaller than thetao, then r rc (theta(o),p), where p is the polarization with the electric field parallel to the plane of incidence. We present simple and formula like expressions for rc, width of the bandgap, and minimum number of photonic crystals to achieve a perfect light reflection.

  12. Low frequency phononic band structures in two-dimensional arc-shaped phononic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zhenlong; Wu, Fugen; Guo, Zhongning

    2012-01-01

    The low frequency phononic band structures of two-dimensional arc-shaped phononic crystals (APCs) were studied by the transfer matrix method in cylindrical coordinates. The results showed the first phononic band gaps (PBGs) of APCs from zero Hz with low modes. Locally resonant (LR) gaps were obtained with higher-order rotation symmetry, due to LR frequencies corresponding to the speeds of acoustic waves in the materials. These properties can be efficiently used in a structure for low frequencies that are forbidden, or in a device that permits a narrow window of frequencies. -- Highlights: ► We report a new class of quasi-periodic hetero-structures, arc-shaped phononic crystals (APCs). ► The results show the first PBGs start with zero Hz with low modes. ► Locally resonant (LR) gaps were obtained with higher-order rotation symmetry, due to LR frequencies corresponding to the speeds of acoustic waves in the materials.

  13. Negative refraction imaging of solid acoustic waves by two-dimensional three-component phononic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jing; Liu Zhengyou; Qiu Chunyin

    2008-01-01

    By using of the multiple scattering methods, we study the negative refraction imaging effect of solid acoustic waves by two-dimensional three-component phononic crystals composed of coated solid inclusions placed in solid matrix. We show that localized resonance mechanism brings on a group of flat single-mode bands in low-frequency region, which provides two equivalent frequency surfaces (EFS) close to circular. The two constant frequency surfaces correspond to two Bloch modes, a right-handed and a left-handed, whose leading mode are respectively transverse (T) and longitudinal (L) modes. The negative refraction behaviors of the two kinds of modes have been demonstrated by simulation of a Gaussian beam through a finite system. High-quality far-field imaging by a planar lens for transverse or longitudinal waves has been realized separately. This three-component phononic crystal may thus serve as a mode selector in negative refraction imaging of solid acoustic waves

  14. Wave propagation in one-dimensional solid-fluid quasi-periodic and aperiodic phononic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Ali, E-mail: alchen@bjtu.edu.cn [Institute of Engineering Mechanics, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Wang Yuesheng [Institute of Engineering Mechanics, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Zhang Chuanzeng [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany)

    2012-02-01

    The propagation of the elastic waves in one-dimensional (1D) solid-fluid quasi-periodic phononic crystals is studied by employing the concept of the localization factor, which is calculated by the transfer matrix method. The solid-fluid interaction effect at the interfaces between the solid and the fluid components is considered. For comparison, the periodic systems and aperiodic Thue-Morse sequence are also analyzed in this paper. The splitting phenomenon of the pass bands and bandgaps are discussed for these 1D solid-fluid systems. At last the influences of the material impedance ratios on the band structures of the 1D solid-fluid quasi-periodic phononic crystals arranged as Fibonacci sequence are discussed.

  15. Atomic layer deposition of epitaxial layers of anatase on strontium titanate single crystals: Morphological and photoelectrochemical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Theodore J.; Nepomnyashchii, Alexander B.; Parkinson, B. A., E-mail: bparkin1@uwyo.edu [Department of Chemistry, School of Energy Resources, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition was used to grow epitaxial layers of anatase (001) TiO{sub 2} on the surface of SrTiO{sub 3} (100) crystals with a 3% lattice mismatch. The epilayers grow as anatase (001) as confirmed by x-ray diffraction. Atomic force microscope images of deposited films showed epitaxial layer-by-layer growth up to about 10 nm, whereas thicker films, of up to 32 nm, revealed the formation of 2–5 nm anatase nanocrystallites oriented in the (001) direction. The anatase epilayers were used as substrates for dye sensitization. The as received strontium titanate crystal was not sensitized with a ruthenium-based dye (N3) or a thiacyanine dye (G15); however, photocurrent from excited state electron injection from these dyes was observed when adsorbed on the anatase epilayers. These results show that highly ordered anatase surfaces can be grown on an easily obtained substrate crystal.

  16. Scanning tunneling microscopy of the atomically smooth (001) surface of vanadium pentoxide V_2O_5 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muslimov, A. E.; Butashin, A. V.; Kanevsky, V. M.

    2017-01-01

    The (001) cleavage surface of vanadium pentoxide (V_2O_5) crystal has been studied by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STM). It is shown that the surface is not reconstructed; the STM image allows geometric lattice parameters to be determined with high accuracy. The nanostructure formed on the (001) cleavage surface of crystal consists of atomically smooth steps with a height multiple of unit-cell parameter c = 4.37 Å. The V_2O_5 crystal cleavages can be used as references in calibration of a scanning tunneling microscope under atmospheric conditions both along the (Ñ…, y) surface and normally to the sample surface (along the z axis). It is found that the terrace surface is not perfectly atomically smooth; its roughness is estimated to be ~0.5 Å. This circumstance may introduce an additional error into the microscope calibration along the z coordinate.

  17. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  18. A more general expression for the average X-ray diffraction intensity of crystals with an incommensurate one-dimensional modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, E.J.W.; Beurskens, P.T.; Smaalen, S. van

    1994-01-01

    Statistical methods are used to derive an expression for the average X-ray diffraction intensity, as a function of (sinθ)/λ, of crystals with an incommensurate one-dimensional modulation. Displacive and density modulations are considered, as well as a combination of these two. The atomic modulation functions are given by truncated Fourier series that may contain higher-order harmonics. The resulting expression for the average X-ray diffraction intensity is valid for main reflections and low-order satellite reflections. The modulation of individual atoms is taken into account by the introduction of overall modulation amplitudes. The accuracy of this expression for the average X-ray diffraction intensity is illustrated by comparison with model structures. A definition is presented for normalized structure factors of crystals with an incommensurate one-dimensional modulation that can be used in direct-methods procedures for solving the phase problem in X-ray crystallography. A numerical fitting procedure is described that can extract a scale factor, an overall temperature parameter and overall modulation amplitudes from experimental reflection intensities. (orig.)

  19. Control of spontaneous emission from a microwave-field-driven four-level atom in an anisotropic photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Duo; Li, Jiahua; Ding, Chunling; Yang, Xiaoxue

    2012-05-01

    The spontaneous emission properties of a microwave-field-driven four-level atom embedded in anisotropic double-band photonic crystals (PCs) are investigated. We discuss the influences of the band-edge positions, Rabi frequency and detuning of the microwave field on the emission spectrum. It is found that several interesting features such as spectral-line enhancement, spectral-line suppression, spectral-line overlap, and multi-peak structures can be observed in the spectra. The proposed scheme can be achieved by use of a microwave-coupled field into hyperfine levels in rubidium atom confined in a photonic crystal. These theoretical investigations may provide more degrees of freedom to manipulate the atomic spontaneous emission.

  20. X-ray diffraction analysis of LiCu2O2 crystals with additives of silver atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirotinkin, V. P.; Bush, A. A.; Kamentsev, K. E.; Dau, H. S.; Yakovlev, K. A.; Tishchenko, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Silver-containing LiCu 2 O 2 crystals up to 4 × 8 × 8 mm in size were grown by the crystallization of 80(1-x)CuO · 20 x AgNO 3 · 20Li 2 CO 3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) mixture melt. According to the X-ray spectral and Rietveld X-ray diffraction data, the maximum amount of silver incorporated in the LiCu 2 O 2 structure is about 4 at % relative to the copper content. It was established that silver atoms occupy statistically crystallographic positions of lithium atoms. The incorporation of silver atoms is accompanied by a noticeable increase in parameter c of the LiCu 2 O 2 rhombic unit cell, a slight increase in parameter a, and a slight decrease in parameter b

  1. Effect of interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness on 2-dimensional materials’ frictional properties at atomic-scale steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, Haojie; Peng, Yitian; Zeng, Xingzhong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Bending of uncovered step edge of 2-dimensional materials could be a common phenomenon during friction processes. • 2-dimensional materials with large interlayer bonding strength possess good frictional properties at step. • Increased bending stiffness of step edge could be the major reason that lateral force increased with step height. - Abstract: Atomic-scale steps generally presented in 2-dimensional materials have important influence on the overall nanotribological properties of surface. Frictional properties at atomic-scale steps of two types of 2-dimensional materials are studied using calibrated atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip sliding against the steps. The lateral force at uncovered step is larger than covered step due to the bending of step edge. The lateral force at monolayer uncovered step edge of h-BN is lower than graphene because h-BN possesses higher interlayer bonding strength than graphene and the bending of h-BN step edge is suppressed to some extent. The high uncovered step exhibits much larger lateral force than low uncovered step, which could be mainly induced by increased bending stiffness of step edge rather than increased step height. The results revealed that interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness have great influence on the lateral force at atomic-scale steps. The studies can provide a further understanding of frictional properties at atomic scale steps and could be helpful for the applications of 2-dimensional materials as lubricant coating.

  2. Effect of interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness on 2-dimensional materials’ frictional properties at atomic-scale steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Haojie; Peng, Yitian, E-mail: yitianpeng@dhu.edu.cn; Zeng, Xingzhong

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Bending of uncovered step edge of 2-dimensional materials could be a common phenomenon during friction processes. • 2-dimensional materials with large interlayer bonding strength possess good frictional properties at step. • Increased bending stiffness of step edge could be the major reason that lateral force increased with step height. - Abstract: Atomic-scale steps generally presented in 2-dimensional materials have important influence on the overall nanotribological properties of surface. Frictional properties at atomic-scale steps of two types of 2-dimensional materials are studied using calibrated atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip sliding against the steps. The lateral force at uncovered step is larger than covered step due to the bending of step edge. The lateral force at monolayer uncovered step edge of h-BN is lower than graphene because h-BN possesses higher interlayer bonding strength than graphene and the bending of h-BN step edge is suppressed to some extent. The high uncovered step exhibits much larger lateral force than low uncovered step, which could be mainly induced by increased bending stiffness of step edge rather than increased step height. The results revealed that interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness have great influence on the lateral force at atomic-scale steps. The studies can provide a further understanding of frictional properties at atomic scale steps and could be helpful for the applications of 2-dimensional materials as lubricant coating.

  3. High-precision two-dimensional atom localization from four-wave mixing in a double-Λ four-level atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Tao; Yang, Wen-Xing; Chen, Ai-Xi; Liu, Shaopeng; Li, Ling; Zhu, Zhonghu

    2018-03-01

    We propose a scheme for high-precision two-dimensional (2D) atom localization via the four-wave mixing (FWM) in a four-level double-Λ atomic system. Due to the position-dependent atom-field interaction, the 2D position information of the atoms can be directly determined by the measurement of the normalized light intensity of output FWM-generated field. We further show that, when the position-dependent generated FWM field has become sufficiently intense, efficient back-coupling to the FWM generating state becomes important. This back-coupling pathway leads to competitive multiphoton destructive interference of the FWM generating state by three supplied and one internally generated fields. We find that the precision of 2D atom localization can be improved significantly by the multiphoton destructive interference and depends sensitively on the frequency detunings and the pump field intensity. Interestingly enough, we show that adjusting the frequency detunings and the pump field intensity can modify significantly the FWM efficiency, and consequently lead to a redistribution of the atoms. As a result, the atom can be localized in one of four quadrants with holding the precision of atom localization.

  4. Anisotropic Defect-Mediated Melting of Two-Dimensional Colloidal Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, C.; Gasser, U.; Keim, P.; Maret, G.

    2004-09-01

    The melting transition of anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) crystals is studied in a model system of superparamagnetic colloids. The anisotropy of the induced dipole-dipole interaction is varied by tilting the external magnetic field off the normal to the particle plane. By analyzing the time-dependent Lindemann parameter as well as translational and orientational order we observe a 2D smecticlike phase. The Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young scenario of isotropic melting is modified: dislocation pairs and dislocations appear with different probabilities depending on their orientation with respect to the in-plane field.

  5. Transverse Kerr effect in one-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals: Experiment and theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erokhin, S. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 11992 Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: yerokhin@magn.ru; Boriskina, Yu. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 11992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Vinogradov, A. [Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Izhorskaya 13/19, 127412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Inoue, M. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibari-Ga-Oka, Tempaku, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan); Kobayashi, D. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibari-Ga-Oka, Tempaku, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan); Fedyanin, A. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 11992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gan' shina, E. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 11992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kochneva, M. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 11992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Granovsky, A. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 11992 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-05-15

    Magneto-optical transverse Kerr and Faraday effects are studied experimentally and theoretically in one-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals fabricated from a stack of four repetitions of layers of Bi-substituted yttrium iron garnet and SiO{sub 2} layers. The results of theoretical calculations in the framework of modified matrices approach are consistent with the obtained experimental data with the exception of the one cusp at 480 nm in the transverse Kerr effect spectra. Possible mechanisms of this disagreement are discussed.

  6. Band gap of two-dimensional fiber-air photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shu, E-mail: yangshu5678@163.com; Li, Masha

    2016-04-15

    A two-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) composed of textile fiber and air is initially discussed in this paper. Textile materials are so called soft materials, which are different from the previous PCs composed of rigid materials. The plain wave expansion method is used to calculate band structure of different PCs by altering component properties or structural parameters. Results show that the dielectric constant of textile fibers, fiber filling ratio and lattice arrangement are effective factors which influence PCs' band gap. Yet lattice constant and fiber diameter make inconspicuous influence on the band gap feature.

  7. Photonic band structures in one-dimensional photonic crystals containing Dirac materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Li-Gang

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the band structures of one-dimensional photonic crystals (1DPCs) composed of Dirac materials and ordinary dielectric media. It is found that there exist an omnidirectional passing band and a kind of special band, which result from the interaction of the evanescent and propagating waves. Due to the interface effect and strong dispersion, the electromagnetic fields inside the special bands are strongly enhanced. It is also shown that the properties of these bands are invariant upon the lattice constant but sensitive to the resonant conditions

  8. Experimental observation of both negative and positive phase velocities in a two-dimensional sonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Ming-Hui; Feng, Liang; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Kang; Chen, Yan-Feng; Zhu, Yong-Yuan; Mao, Yi-Wei; Zi, Jian

    2007-01-01

    Both negative and positive phase velocities for acoustic waves have been experimentally established in a two-dimensional triangular sonic crystal (SC) consisting of steel cylinders embedded in air at first. With the increase of the SCs thickness layer by layer in the experiments, phase shifts decrease in the second band but increase in the first band, showing the negative and the positive phase velocities, respectively. Moreover, the dispersion relation of the SC is constructed by the phase information, which is consistent well with the theoretical results. These abundant characteristics of acoustic wave propagation in the SC might be useful for the device applications

  9. Analytic theory for the selection of a two-dimensional needle crystal at arbitrary Peclet number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanveer, S.

    1989-01-01

    An accurate analytic theory is presented for the velocity selection of a two-dimensional needle crystal for arbitrary Peclet number for small values of the surface tension parameter. The velocity selection is caused by the effect of transcendentally small terms which are determined by analytic continuation to the complex plane and analysis of nonlinear equations. The work supports the general conclusion of previous small Peclet number analytical results of other investigators, though there are some discrepancies in details. It also addresses questions raised on the validity of selection theory owing to assumptions made on shape corrections at large distances from the tip.

  10. Controlling the light propagation in one-dimensional photonic crystal via incoherent pump and interdot tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasabadi, Majid; Sahrai, Mostafa

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the propagation of an electromagnetic pulse through a one-dimensional photonic crystal doped with quantum-dot (QD) molecules in a defect layer. The QD molecules behave as a three-level quantum system and are driven by a coherent probe laser field and an incoherent pump field. No coherent coupling laser fields were introduced, and the coherence was created by the interdot tunnel effect. Further studied was the effect of tunneling and incoherent pumping on the group velocity of the transmitted and reflected probe pulse.

  11. Wave propagation inside one-dimensional photonic crystals with single-negative materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ligang; Chen Hong; Zhu Shiyao

    2006-01-01

    The propagation of light waves in one-dimensional photonic crystals (1DPCs) composed of alternating layers of two kinds of single-negative materials is investigated theoretically. The phase velocity is negative when the frequency of the light wave is smaller than the certain critical frequency ω cr , while the Poynting vector is always positive. At normal incidence, such 1DPCs may act as equivalent left-handed materials. At the inclined incidence, the effective wave vectors inside such 1DPCs do refract negatively, while the effective energy flows do not refract negatively. Therefore, at the inclined incidence, the 1DPCs are not equivalent to the left-handed materials

  12. Some optical properties of one dimensional annular photonic crystal with plasma frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandeya, G. N.; Thapa, Khem B.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents the reflection bands, photonic band gaps, of the one-dimensional annul photonic crystal (APC) containing double negative (DNG) metamaterials and air. The proposed annular structure consists of the alternate layers of dispersive DNG material and air immersed in free space. The reflectance properties of the APC by employing the transfer matrix method (TMM) in the cylindrical waves for TE polarization is studied theoretically. In addition of this, we have also studied the effect of plasma frequency on the reflection behavior of the considered annular structure.

  13. Wideband absorption in one dimensional photonic crystal with graphene-based hyperbolic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yongqiang; Liu, Hongmei

    2018-02-01

    A broadband absorber which was proposed by one dimensional photonic crystal (1DPC) containing graphene-based hyperbolic metamaterials (GHMM) is theoretically investigated. For TM mode, it was demonstrated to absorb roughly 90% of all available electromagnetic waves at a 14 THz absorption bandwidth at normal incidence. The absorption bandwidth was affected by Fermi energy and thickness of dielectric layer. When the incident angle was increased, the absorption value decreased, and the absorption band had a gradual blue shift. These findings have potential applications for designing broadband optoelectronic devices at mid-infrared and THz frequency range.

  14. Symmetrical analysis of the defect level splitting in two-dimensional photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkova, N; Kim, S; Gopalan, V

    2003-01-01

    In this paper doubly degenerate defect states in the band gap of the two-dimensional photonic crystal are studied. These states can be split by a convenient distortion of the lattice. Through analogy with the Jahn-Teller effect in solids, we present a group theoretical analysis of the lifting of the degeneracy of doubly degenerate states in a square lattice by different vibronic modes. The effect is supported by the supercell plane-wave model and by the finite difference time domain technique. We suggest ways for using the effect in photonic switching devices and waveguides

  15. Polarization-selective transmission in stacked two-dimensional complementary plasmonic crystal slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Masanobu

    2010-02-01

    It has been experimentally and numerically shown that transmission at near infrared wavelengths is selectively controlled by polarizations in two-dimensional complementary plasmonic crystal slabs (2D c-PlCSs) of stacked unit cell. This feature is naturally derived by taking account of Babinet's principle. Moreover, the slight structural modification of the unit cell has been found to result in a drastic change in linear optical responses of stacked 2D c-PlCSs. These results substantiate the feasibility of 2D c-PlCSs for producing efficient polarizers with subwavelength thickness.

  16. Aspherical-atom modeling of coordination compounds by single-crystal X-ray diffraction allows the correct metal atom to be identified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Birger; Wandtke, Claudia M; Meents, Alke; Pröpper, Kevin; Mondal, Kartik Chandra; Samuel, Prinson P; Amin Sk, Nurul; Singh, Amit Pratap; Roesky, Herbert W; Sidhu, Navdeep

    2015-02-02

    Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) is often considered the gold standard in analytical chemistry, as it allows element identification as well as determination of atom connectivity and the solid-state structure of completely unknown samples. Element assignment is based on the number of electrons of an atom, so that a distinction of neighboring heavier elements in the periodic table by XRD is often difficult. A computationally efficient procedure for aspherical-atom least-squares refinement of conventional diffraction data of organometallic compounds is proposed. The iterative procedure is conceptually similar to Hirshfeld-atom refinement (Acta Crystallogr. Sect. A- 2008, 64, 383-393; IUCrJ. 2014, 1,61-79), but it relies on tabulated invariom scattering factors (Acta Crystallogr. Sect. B- 2013, 69, 91-104) and the Hansen/Coppens multipole model; disordered structures can be handled as well. Five linear-coordinate 3d metal complexes, for which the wrong element is found if standard independent-atom model scattering factors are relied upon, are studied, and it is shown that only aspherical-atom scattering factors allow a reliable assignment. The influence of anomalous dispersion in identifying the correct element is investigated and discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Semiconductor Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystals with Novel Layer-by-Layer Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Iwamoto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional photonic crystals (3D PhCs are a fascinating platform for manipulating photons and controlling their interactions with matter. One widely investigated structure is the layer-by-layer woodpile structure, which possesses a complete photonic bandgap. On the other hand, other types of 3D PhC structures also offer various possibilities for controlling light by utilizing the three dimensional nature of structures. In this article, we discuss our recent research into novel types of layer-by-layer structures, including the experimental demonstration of a 3D PhC nanocavity formed in a <110>-layered diamond structure and the realization of artificial optical activity in rotationally stacked woodpile structures.

  18. Pair creation, motion, and annihilation of topological defects in two-dimensional nematic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Dario; Eggers, Jens; Liverpool, Tanniemola B.

    2018-02-01

    We present a framework for the study of disclinations in two-dimensional active nematic liquid crystals and topological defects in general. The order tensor formalism is used to calculate exact multiparticle solutions of the linearized static equations inside a planar uniformly aligned state so that the total charge has to vanish. Topological charge conservation then requires that there is always an equal number of q =1 /2 and q =-1 /2 charges. Starting from a set of hydrodynamic equations, we derive a low-dimensional dynamical system for the parameters of the static solutions, which describes the motion of a half-disclination pair or of several pairs. Within this formalism, we model defect production and annihilation, as observed in experiments. Our dynamics also provide an estimate for the critical density at which production and annihilation rates are balanced.

  19. Athermal mechanisms of size-dependent crystal flow gleaned from three-dimensional discrete dislocation simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, S.I.; Dimiduk, D.M.; Parthasarathy, T.A.; Uchic, M.D.; Tang, M.; Woodward, C.

    2008-01-01

    Recent experimental studies have revealed that micrometer-scale face-centered cubic (fcc) crystals show strong strengthening effects, even at high initial dislocation densities. We use large-scale three-dimensional discrete dislocation simulations (DDS) to explicitly model the deformation behavior of fcc Ni microcrystals in the size range of 0.5-20 μm. This study shows that two size-sensitive athermal hardening processes, beyond forest hardening, are sufficient to develop the dimensional scaling of the flow stress, stochastic stress variation, flow intermittency and high initial strain-hardening rates, similar to experimental observations for various materials. One mechanism, source-truncation hardening, is especially potent in micrometer-scale volumes. A second mechanism, termed exhaustion hardening, results from a breakdown of the mean-field conditions for forest hardening in small volumes, thus biasing the statistics of ordinary dislocation processes

  20. Two-dimensional carbon crystals. Electrical transport in single- and double-layer graphene; Zweidimensionale Kohlenstoffkristalle. Elektrischer Transport in Einzel- und Doppellagen-Graphen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Hennrik

    2012-02-03

    In his work atomically thin layers of carbon, socalled graphene, are investigated. These systems exhibit outstanding electronic properties which are analysed using magnetotransport measurements. For this purpose, different types of samples are prepared, analysed and discussed. In addition to conventional single layer and single crystal bilayer systems, folded flakes with twisted planes are examined. Since monolayer graphene is a two dimensional crystal in which every atom sits at the surface, it is very sensitive to any type of perturbation. Three different cases are investigated: Firstly, dopants are removed from the surface and the change in transport properties is monitored. Secondly, the regime of small carrier concentrations is used to observe field induced recharging of inhomogeneities. Thirdly, an atomic force microscope is used to alter the graphene itself in a defined region. The implications of this modification are again investigated using magnetotransport measurements. The influence of one layer on another one is studied in decoupled two layer samples. A folded sample with separatly contacted layers is used to show transport through the folded region. For jointly contacted layers parallel transport measurements are performed to analyse screening effects of an applied electric field and substrate influence. The interaction of the two layers is shown by a significant reduction of the Fermivelocity.

  1. He atom surface scattering: Surface dynamics of insulators, overlayers and crystal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Investigations have focused primarily on surface structure and dynamics of ionic insulators, epitaxial growth onto alkali halide crystals and multiphoton studies. The surface dynamics of RbCl has been re-examined. We have developed a simple force constant model which provides insight into the dynamics of KBr overlayers on NaCl(001), a system with a large lattice mismatch. The KBr/NaCl(001) results are compared to Na/Cu(001) and NaCl/Ge(001). We have completed epitaxial growth experiments for KBr onto RbCl(001). Slab dynamics calculations using a shell model for this system with very small lattice mismatch are being carried out in collaboration with Professor Manson of Clemson University and with Professor Schroeder in Regensburg, Germany. Extensive experiments on multiphoton scattering of helium atoms onto NaCl and, particularly, LiF have been carried out and the theory has been developed to a rather advanced stage by Professor Manson. This work will permit the extraction of more information from time-of-flight spectra. It is shown that the theoretical model provides a very good description of the multiphoton scattering from organic films. Work has started on self-assembling organic films on gold (alkyl thiols/Au(111)). We have begun to prepare and characterize the gold crystal; one of the group members has spent two weeks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory learning the proper Au(111) preparation techniques. One of our students has carried out neutron scattering experiments on NiO, measuring both bulk phonon and magnon dispersion curves

  2. Two-dimensional atom localization via a coherence-controlled absorption spectrum in an N-tripod-type five-level atomic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhan Zhiming [School of Physics and Information Engineering, Jianghan University, Wuhan 430056 (China); Liu Jibing, E-mail: clding2006@126.com, E-mail: huajia_li@163.com [Department of Physics, Hubei Normal University, Huangshi 435002 (China)

    2011-07-28

    A scheme of two-dimensional atom localization based on a coherence-controlled absorption spectrum in an N-tripod-type five-level system is proposed, in which the atom interacts with a weak probe field and three standing-wave fields. Position information of the atom can be achieved by measuring the probe absorption. It is found that the localization properties are significantly improved due to the interaction of dark resonances. It is also shown that the localization factors depend strongly on the system parameters that lead to such spatial structures of localization as chain-like, wave-like, '8'-like, spike-like, crater-like and heart-like patterns. By properly adjusting the system parameters, we can achieve a high-precision and high-resolution atom localization under certain conditions.

  3. Two-dimensional atom localization via a coherence-controlled absorption spectrum in an N-tripod-type five-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue; Zhan Zhiming; Liu Jibing

    2011-01-01

    A scheme of two-dimensional atom localization based on a coherence-controlled absorption spectrum in an N-tripod-type five-level system is proposed, in which the atom interacts with a weak probe field and three standing-wave fields. Position information of the atom can be achieved by measuring the probe absorption. It is found that the localization properties are significantly improved due to the interaction of dark resonances. It is also shown that the localization factors depend strongly on the system parameters that lead to such spatial structures of localization as chain-like, wave-like, '8'-like, spike-like, crater-like and heart-like patterns. By properly adjusting the system parameters, we can achieve a high-precision and high-resolution atom localization under certain conditions.

  4. Deducing 2D Crystal Structure at the Solid/Liquid Interface with Atomic Resolution by Combined STM and SFG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Arthur; Ahn, Seokhoon; Matzger, Adam J.; Chen, Zhan

    2009-03-01

    Supplemented by computed models, Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) can provide detailed structure of 2D crystals formed at the liquid/solid interface with atomic resolution. However, some structural information such as functional group orientations in such 2D crystals needs to be tested experimentally to ensure the accuracy of the deduced structures. Due to the limited sensitivity, many other experimental techniques such as Raman and infrared spectroscopy have not been allowed to provide such structural information of 2D crystals. Here we showed that Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy (SFG) can measure average orientation of functional groups in such 2D crystals, or physisorbed monolayers, providing key experimental data to aid in the modeling and interpretation of the STM images. The usefulness of combining these two techniques is demonstrated with a phthalate diesters monolayer formed at the 1-phenyloctane/ highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) interface. The spatial orientation of the ester C=O of the monolayer was successfully determined using SFG.

  5. Micropatterning of bacteria on two-dimensional lattice protein surface observed by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Y.J.; Jo, W.; Lim, J.; Park, S.; Kim, Y.S.; Kim, Y.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we characterized the two-dimensional lattice of bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a chemical and physical barrier against bacterial adhesion, using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The lattice of BSA on glass surface was fabricated by micro-contact printing (μCP), which is a useful way to pattern a wide range of molecules into microscale features on different types of substrates. The contact-mode AFM measurements showed that the average height of the printed BSA monolayer was 5-6 nm. Escherichia coli adhered rapidly on bare glass slide, while the bacterial adhesion was minimized on the lattices in the range of 1-3 μm 2 . Especially, the bacterial adhesion was completely inhibited on a 1 μm 2 lattice. The results suggest that the anti-adhesion effects are due by the steric repulsion forces exerted by BSA

  6. Tunable spin-orbit coupling for ultracold atoms in two-dimensional optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grusdt, Fabian; Li, Tracy; Bloch, Immanuel; Demler, Eugene

    2017-06-01

    Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is at the heart of many exotic band structures and can give rise to many-body states with topological order. Here we present a general scheme based on a combination of microwave driving and lattice shaking for the realization of two-dimensional SOC with ultracold atoms in systems with inversion symmetry. We show that the strengths of Rashba and Dresselhaus SOC can be independently tuned in a spin-dependent square lattice. More generally, our method can be used to open gaps between different spin states without breaking time-reversal symmetry. We demonstrate that this allows for the realization of topological insulators with nontrivial spin textures closely related to the Kane-Mele model.

  7. Band Gap Tuning and Defect Tolerance of Atomically Thin Two- Dimensional Organic-Inorganic Halide Perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Mohnish; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2016-01-01

    Organic−inorganic halide perovskites have proven highly successful for photovoltaics but suffer from low stability, which deteriorates their performance over time. Recent experiments have demonstrated that low dimensional phases of the hybrid perovskites may exhibit improved stability. Here we...... report first-principles calculations for isolated monolayers of the organometallic halide perovskites (C4H9NH3)2MX2Y2, where M = Pb, Ge, Sn and X,Y = Cl, Br, I. The band gaps computed using the GLLB-SC functional are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental photoluminescence data...... for the already synthesized perovskites. Finally, we study the effect of different defects on the band structure. We find that the most common defects only introduce shallow or no states in the band gap, indicating that these atomically thin 2D perovskites are likely to be defect tolerant....

  8. Verification of the validity of the short-pulse approximation for one-dimensional Rydberg atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopyciuk, T; Grajek, M

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the short-pulse approximation (SPA) for one-dimensional Rydberg atoms. We analyse the limits that SPA has to fulfil in order to be applicable. These concern the shape, the duration and the displacement caused by the pulse. The correctness of SPA is tested by comparing the results obtained using SPA with a numerical solution of the set of time-dependent Schroedinger equations. We show that the limit for the displacement caused by the pulse is of greatest importance. Violation of the limit for the duration of the pulse is shown to lead to concurrent violation of the limit for the displacement. We also show that the shape of the pulse has no influence on the created wave packet.

  9. Exponential and nonexponential localization of the one-dimensional periodically kicked Rydberg atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, S.; Reinhold, C. O.; Kristoefel, P.; Burgdoerfer, J.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the quantum localization of the one-dimensional Rydberg atom subject to a unidirectional periodic train of impulses. For high frequencies of the train the classical system becomes chaotic and leads to fast ionization. By contrast, the quantum system is found to be remarkably stable. We identify for this system the coexistence of different localization mechanisms associated with resonant and nonresonant diffusion. We find for the suppression of nonresonant diffusion an exponential localization whose localization length can be related to the classical dynamics in terms of the ''scars'' of the unstable periodic orbits. We show that the localization length is determined by the energy excursion along the periodic orbits. The suppression of resonant diffusion along the sequence of photonic peaks is found to be nonexponential due to the presence of high harmonics in the driving force. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  10. Factors influencing epitaxial growth of three-dimensional Ge quantum dot crystals on pit-patterned Si substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Y J; Zhong, Z; Yang, X J; Fan, Y L; Jiang, Z M

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the molecular beam epitaxy growth of three-dimensional (3D) Ge quantum dot crystals (QDCs) on periodically pit-patterned Si substrates. A series of factors influencing the growth of QDCs were investigated in detail and the optimized growth conditions were found. The growth of the Si buffer layer and the first quantum dot (QD) layer play a key role in the growth of QDCs. The pit facet inclination angle decreased with increasing buffer layer thickness, and its optimized value was found to be around 21°, ensuring that all the QDs in the first layer nucleate within the pits. A large Ge deposition amount in the first QD layer favors strain build-up by QDs, size uniformity of QDs and hence periodicity of the strain distribution; a thin Si spacer layer favors strain correlation along the growth direction; both effects contribute to the vertical ordering of the QDCs. Results obtained by atomic force microscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy showed that 3D ordering was achieved in the Ge QDCs with the highest ever areal dot density of 1.2 × 10 10 cm −2 , and that the lateral and the vertical interdot spacing were ∼10 and ∼2.5 nm, respectively. (paper)

  11. Quantum phase transition in a coupled two-level system embedded in anisotropic three-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, H Z; Shao, X Q; Wang, G C; Zhao, X L; Yi, X X

    2016-01-01

    The quantum phase transition (QPT) describes a sudden qualitative change of the macroscopic properties mapped from the eigenspectrum of a quantum many-body system. It has been studied intensively in quantum systems with the spin-boson model, but it has barely been explored for systems in coupled spin-boson models. In this paper, we study the QPT with coupled spin-boson models consisting of coupled two-level atoms embedded in three-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystals. The dynamics of the system is derived exactly by means of the Laplace transform method, which has been proven to be equivalent to the dissipationless non-Markovian dynamics. Drawing on methods for analyzing the ground state, we obtain the phase diagrams through two exact critical equations and two QPTs are found: one QPT is that from the phase without one bound state to the phase with one bound state and another is that from one phase with the bound state having one eigenvalue to another phase where the bound state has two eigenvalues. Our analytical results also suggest a way of control to overcome the effect of decoherence by engineering the spectrum of the reservoirs to approach the non-Markovian regime and to form the bound state of the whole system for quantum devices and quantum statistics.

  12. Factors influencing epitaxial growth of three-dimensional Ge quantum dot crystals on pit-patterned Si substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y J; Zhong, Z; Yang, X J; Fan, Y L; Jiang, Z M

    2013-01-11

    We investigated the molecular beam epitaxy growth of three-dimensional (3D) Ge quantum dot crystals (QDCs) on periodically pit-patterned Si substrates. A series of factors influencing the growth of QDCs were investigated in detail and the optimized growth conditions were found. The growth of the Si buffer layer and the first quantum dot (QD) layer play a key role in the growth of QDCs. The pit facet inclination angle decreased with increasing buffer layer thickness, and its optimized value was found to be around 21°, ensuring that all the QDs in the first layer nucleate within the pits. A large Ge deposition amount in the first QD layer favors strain build-up by QDs, size uniformity of QDs and hence periodicity of the strain distribution; a thin Si spacer layer favors strain correlation along the growth direction; both effects contribute to the vertical ordering of the QDCs. Results obtained by atomic force microscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy showed that 3D ordering was achieved in the Ge QDCs with the highest ever areal dot density of 1.2 × 10(10) cm(-2), and that the lateral and the vertical interdot spacing were ~10 and ~2.5 nm, respectively.

  13. Two-dimensional phononic crystals with time-varying properties: a multiple scattering analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, D W; Cobbold, R S C

    2010-01-01

    Multiple scattering theory is a versatile two- and three-dimensional method for characterizing the acoustic wave transmission through many scatterers. It provides analytical solutions to wave propagation in scattering structures, and its computational complexity grows logarithmically with the number of scatterers. In this paper we show how the 2D method can be adapted to include the effects of time-varying material parameters. Specifically, a new T-matrix is defined to include the effects of frequency modulation that occurs in time-varying phononic crystals. Solutions were verified against finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations and showed excellent agreement. This new method enables fast characterization of time-varying phononic crystals without the need to resort to lengthy FDTD simulations. Also, the method of combining T-matrices to form the T-supermatrix remains unchanged provided that the new matrix definitions are used. The method is quite compatible with existing implementations of multiple scattering theory and could be readily extended to three-dimensional multiple scattering theory

  14. Quantitative characterization of new supramolecular synthons involving fluorine atoms in the crystal structures of di- and tetrafluorinated benzamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Pradip Kumar; Yadav, Hare Ram; Choudhury, Angshuman Roy; Chopra, Deepak

    2017-10-01

    Strong hydrogen bonds play a significant role in crystal packing. In particular, the involvement of interactions involving fluorine in controlling the crystal packing requires appropriate attention, especially in the presence of other strong hydrogen bonds. In the present study, a detailed quantitative assessment has been performed of the nature, energetics and topological properties derived from the electron density in model compounds based on fluorinated benzamides (a total of 46 fluorine-substituted benzamides containing multiple fluorine atoms) in the solid state. The primary motivation in the design of such molecules is to enhance the acidity of the interacting H atoms in the presence of an increasing number of F atoms on the molecular scaffold, resulting in increased propensity towards the formation of intermolecular interactions involving organic fluorine. This exercise has resulted in the identification of new and frequently occurring supramolecular synthons involving F atoms in the packing of molecules in the solid state. The energetics associated with short and directional intermolecular Csp 2 -H...F-Csp 2 interactions with significantly high electrostatic contributions is noteworthy, and the topological analysis reveals the bonding character of these ubiquitous interactions in crystal packing in addition to the presence of Csp 2 -F...F-Csp 2 contacts.

  15. The crystal structures of three pyrazine-2,5-dicarboxamides: three-dimensional supramolecular structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilovan S. Cati

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The complete molecules of the title compounds, N2,N5-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethylpyrazine-2,5-dicarboxamide, C18H16N6O2 (I, 3,6-dimethyl-N2,N5-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethylpyrazine-2,5-dicarboxamide, C20H20N6O2 (II, and N2,N5-bis(pyridin-4-ylmethylpyrazine-2,5-dicarboxamide, C18H16N6O2 (III, are generated by inversion symmetry, with the pyrazine rings being located about centres of inversion. Each molecule has an extended conformation with the pyridine rings inclined to the pyrazine ring by 89.17 (7° in (I, 75.83 (8° in (II and by 82.71 (6° in (III. In the crystal of (I, molecules are linked by N—H...N hydrogen bonds, forming layers lying parallel to the bc plane. The layers are linked by C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional supramolecular structure. In the crystal of (II, molecules are also linked by N—H...N hydrogen bonds, forming layers lying parallel to the (10-1 plane. As in (I, the layers are linked by C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional supramolecular structure. In the crystal of (III, molecules are again linked by N—H...N hydrogen bonds, but here form corrugated sheets lying parallel to the bc plane. Within the sheets, neighbouring pyridine rings are linked by offset π–π interactions [intercentroid distance = 3.739 (1 Å]. The sheets are linked by C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional supramolecular structure. Compound (I crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c. Another monoclinic polymorph, space group C2/c, has been reported on by Cockriel et al. [Inorg. Chem. Commun. (2008, 11, 1–4]. The molecular structures of the two polymorphs are compared.

  16. Modeling and Optimization of Optical Half Adder in Two Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonth, Mahesh V.; Soma, Savita; Gowre, Sanjaykumar C.; Biradar, Nagashettappa

    2018-05-01

    The output of photonic integrated devices is enhanced using crystal waveguides and cavities but optimization of these devices is a topic of research. In this paper, optimization of the optical half adder in two-dimensional (2-D) linear photonic crystals using four symmetric T-shaped waveguides with 180° phase shift inputs is proposed. The input section of a T-waveguide acts as a beam splitter, and the output section acts as a power combiner. The constructive and destructive interference phenomenon will provide an output optical power. Output port Cout will receive in-phase power through the 180° phase shifter cavity designed near the junction. The optical half adder is modeled in a 2-D photonic crystal using the finite difference time domain method (FDTD). It consists of a cubic lattice with an array of 39 × 43 silicon rods of radius r 0.12 μm and 0.6 μm lattice constant a. The extinction ratio r e of 11.67 dB and 12.51 dB are achieved at output ports using the RSoft FullWAVE-6.1 software package.

  17. Band structures in two-dimensional phononic crystals with periodic Jerusalem cross slot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinggang; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng; Yu, Kunpeng; Song, Ruifang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel two-dimensional phononic crystal composed of periodic Jerusalem cross slot in air matrix with a square lattice is presented. The dispersion relations and the transmission coefficient spectra are calculated by using the finite element method based on the Bloch theorem. The formation mechanisms of the band gaps are analyzed based on the acoustic mode analysis. Numerical results show that the proposed phononic crystal structure can yield large band gaps in the low-frequency range. The formation mechanism of opening the acoustic band gaps is mainly attributed to the resonance modes of the cavities inside the Jerusalem cross slot structure. Furthermore, the effects of the geometrical parameters on the band gaps are further explored numerically. Results show that the band gaps can be modulated in an extremely large frequency range by the geometry parameters such as the slot length and width. These properties of acoustic waves in the proposed phononic crystals can potentially be applied to optimize band gaps and generate low-frequency filters and waveguides.

  18. Two-dimensional nanowires on homoepitaxial interfaces: Atomic-scale mechanism of breakdown and disintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailov, Michail; Ranguelov, Bogdan

    2018-03-01

    We present a model for hole-mediated spontaneous breakdown of ahomoepitaxial two-dimensional (2D) flat nanowire based exclusively on random, thermally-activated motion of atoms. The model suggests a consecutive three-step mechanism driving the rupture and complete disintegration of the nanowire on a crystalline surface. The breakdown scenario includes: (i) local narrowing of a part of the stripe to a monatomic chain, (ii) formation of a recoverable single vacancy or a 2D vacancy cluster that causes temporary nanowire rupture, (iii) formation of a non-recoverable 2D hole leading to permanent nanowire breakdown. These successive events in the temporal evolution of the nanowire morphology bring the nanowire stripe into an irreversible unstable state, leading to a dramatic change in its peculiar physical properties and conductivity. The atomistic simulations also reveal a strong increase of the nanowire lifetime with an enlargement of its width and open up a way for a fine atomic-scale control of the nanowire lifetime and structural, morphological and thermodynamic stability.

  19. Three-dimensional atomic mapping of hydrogenated polymorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wanghua, E-mail: wanghua.chen@polytechnique.edu; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere [LPICM, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Pareige, Philippe [GPM, CNRS, Université et INSA de Rouen, Normandie Université, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France)

    2016-06-20

    Hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H) is a nanostructured material consisting of silicon nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous silicon matrix. Its use as the intrinsic layer in thin film p-i-n solar cells has led to good cell properties in terms of stability and efficiency. Here, we have been able to assess directly the concentration and distribution of nanocrystals and impurities (dopants) in p-i-n solar cells, by using femtosecond laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT). An effective sample preparation method for APT characterization is developed. Based on the difference in atomic density between hydrogenated amorphous and crystalline silicon, we are able to distinguish the nanocrystals from the amorphous matrix by using APT. Moreover, thanks to the three-dimensional reconstruction, we demonstrate that Si nanocrystals are homogeneously distributed in the entire intrinsic layer of the solar cell. The influence of the process pressure on the incorporation of nanocrystals and their distribution is also investigated. Thanks to APT we could determine crystalline fractions as low as 4.2% in the pm-Si:H films, which is very difficult to determine by standard techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Moreover, we also demonstrate a sharp p/i interface in our solar cells.

  20. Atomic resolution holography using advanced reconstruction techniques for two-dimensional detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marko, M; Szakal, A; Cser, L [Neutron Spectroscopy Department, Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, PO Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Krexner, G [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Schefer, J, E-mail: marko@szfki.h [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering (LNS), Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2010-06-15

    Atomic resolution holography is based on two concepts. Either the emitter of the radiation used is embedded in the sample (internal source concept) or, on account of the optical reciprocity law, the detector forms part of the sample (internal detector concept). In many cases, holographic objects (atoms and nuclei) simultaneously adopt the roles of both source and detector. Thus, the recorded image contains a mixture of both inside source and inside detector holograms. When reconstructing one type of hologram, the presence of the other hologram causes serious distortions. In the present work, we propose a new method, the so-called double reconstruction (DR), which not only suppresses the mutual distortions but also exploits the information content of the measured hologram more effectively. This novel approach also decreases the level of distortion arising from diffraction and statistical noise. The efficiency of the DR technique is significantly enhanced by employing two-dimensional (2D) area detectors. The power of the method is illustrated here by applying it to a real measurement on a palladium-hydrogen sample.

  1. Galvanomagnetic properties of atomic-disordered Sr2RuO4 single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar'kin, A.E.; Naumov, S.V.; Goshchitskij, V.N.; Balbashov, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of neutron-bombardment-induced atomic disorder on the galvanomagnetic properties of Sr 2 RuO 4 single crystals has been experimentally studied in a broad range of temperatures (1.7-380 K) and magnetic fields (up to 13.6 T). The disorder leads to the appearance of negative temperature coefficients for both the in-plane electric resistivity (ρ a ) and that along the c axis (ρ c ), as well as the negative magnetoresistance Δρ, which is strongly anisotropic to the magnetic field orientation (H || a and H || c), with the easy magnetization direction along the c axis and a weak dependence on the probing current direction in the low-temperature region. The experimental ρ a (T) and ρ c (T) curves obtained for the initial and radiation-disordered samples can be described in the framework of a theoretical model with two conductivity channels. The first channel corresponds to the charge carriers with increased effective masses and predominantly electron-electron scattering, the second channel corresponds to the charge carriers with lower effective masses exhibiting magnetic scattering at low temperatures [ru

  2. Mechanisms for the reflection of light atoms from crystal surfaces at kilovolt energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, M.; Robinson, M.T.

    1978-01-01

    The computer program MARLOWE was used to investigate the backscattering of protons from the (110) surface of a nickel crystal. Grazing incidence was considered so that anisotropic effects originated mainly from the surface region. The contribution of aligned scattering was studied by comparing the results with similar calculations for an amorphous target. Energy distributions of backscattered particles were investigated for incident energies ranging from 0.1 to 5 keV. The structure of these distributions was explained by making calculations for several target thickness. Specular reflection was found to depend on the structure of the first few atomic planes only. The (110) rows in the surface plane were responsible for focusing into surface semichannels. Focusing in these semichannels was found to be the strongest under total reflection conditions (below about 1.3 keV) while the scattering intensity from surface rows increased with increasing incident energy. The orientation of the plane of incidence was found to have large influence on the relative contributions of the reflection mechanisms involved. (orig.) [de

  3. Atomic force microscopy for two-dimensional materials: A tutorial review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Huang, Junxiang; Wang, Yongwei; Liu, Rui; Huai, Xiulan; Jiang, Jingjing; Anfuso, Chantelle

    2018-01-01

    Low dimensional materials exhibit distinct properties compared to their bulk counterparts. A plethora of examples have been demonstrated in two-dimensional (2-D) materials, including graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). These novel and intriguing properties at the nano-, molecular- and even monatomic scales have triggered tremendous interest and research, from fundamental studies to practical applications and even device fabrication. The unique behaviors of 2-D materials result from the special structure-property relationships that exist between surface topographical variations and mechanical responses, electronic structures, optical characteristics, and electrochemical properties. These relationships are generally convoluted and sensitive to ambient and external perturbations. Characterizing these systems thus requires techniques capable of providing multidimensional information under controlled environments, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM). Today, AFM plays a key role in exploring the basic principles underlying the functionality of 2-D materials. In this tutorial review, we provide a brief introduction to some of the unique properties of 2-D materials, followed by a summary of the basic principles of AFM and the various AFM modes most appropriate for studying these systems. Following that, we will focus on five important properties of 2-D materials and their characterization in more detail, including recent literature examples. These properties include nanomechanics, nanoelectromechanics, nanoelectrics, nanospectroscopy, and nanoelectrochemistry.

  4. Spontaneous emission near the band edge of a three-dimensional photonic crystal: a fractional calculus approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, S-C; Wu, J-N; Tsai, M-R; Hsieh, W-F

    2009-01-01

    We suggest a better mathematical method, fractional calculus, for studying the behavior of the atom-field interaction in photonic crystals. By studying the spontaneous emission of an atom in a photonic crystal with a one-band isotropic model, we found that the long-time inducing memory of the spontaneous emission is a fractional phenomenon. This behavior could be well described by fractional calculus. The results show no steady photon-atom bound state for the atomic resonant transition frequency lying in the proximity of the allowed band edge which was encountered in a previous study (Woldeyohannes and John 2003 J. Opt. B: Quantum Semiclass. Opt. 5 R43). The correctness of this result is validated by the 'cut-off smoothing' density of photon states (DOS) with fractional calculus. By obtaining a rigorous solution without the multiple-valued problem for the system, we show that the method of fractional calculus has a logically concise property.

  5. Bandgap optimization of two-dimensional photonic crystals using semidefinite programming and subspace methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Men, H.; Nguyen, N.C.; Freund, R.M.; Parrilo, P.A.; Peraire, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the optimal design of photonic crystal structures for two-dimensional square lattices. The mathematical formulation of the bandgap optimization problem leads to an infinite-dimensional Hermitian eigenvalue optimization problem parametrized by the dielectric material and the wave vector. To make the problem tractable, the original eigenvalue problem is discretized using the finite element method into a series of finite-dimensional eigenvalue problems for multiple values of the wave vector parameter. The resulting optimization problem is large-scale and non-convex, with low regularity and non-differentiable objective. By restricting to appropriate eigenspaces, we reduce the large-scale non-convex optimization problem via reparametrization to a sequence of small-scale convex semidefinite programs (SDPs) for which modern SDP solvers can be efficiently applied. Numerical results are presented for both transverse magnetic (TM) and transverse electric (TE) polarizations at several frequency bands. The optimized structures exhibit patterns which go far beyond typical physical intuition on periodic media design.

  6. Scalable solution-phase epitaxial growth of symmetry-mismatched heterostructures on two-dimensional crystal soft template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhaoyang; Yin, Anxiang; Mao, Jun; Xia, Yi; Kempf, Nicholas; He, Qiyuan; Wang, Yiliu; Chen, Chih-Yen; Zhang, Yanliang; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Ren, Zhifeng; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-10-01

    Epitaxial heterostructures with precisely controlled composition and electronic modulation are of central importance for electronics, optoelectronics, thermoelectrics, and catalysis. In general, epitaxial material growth requires identical or nearly identical crystal structures with small misfit in lattice symmetry and parameters and is typically achieved by vapor-phase depositions in vacuum. We report a scalable solution-phase growth of symmetry-mismatched PbSe/Bi 2 Se 3 epitaxial heterostructures by using two-dimensional (2D) Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates as soft templates. The dangling bond-free surface of 2D Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates guides the growth of PbSe crystal without requiring a one-to-one match in the atomic structure, which exerts minimal restriction on the epitaxial layer. With a layered structure and weak van der Waals interlayer interaction, the interface layer in the 2D Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates can deform to accommodate incoming layer, thus functioning as a soft template for symmetry-mismatched epitaxial growth of cubic PbSe crystal on rhombohedral Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates. We show that a solution chemistry approach can be readily used for the synthesis of gram-scale PbSe/Bi 2 Se 3 epitaxial heterostructures, in which the square PbSe (001) layer forms on the trigonal/hexagonal (0001) plane of Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates. We further show that the resulted PbSe/Bi 2 Se 3 heterostructures can be readily processed into bulk pellet with considerably suppressed thermal conductivity (0.30 W/m·K at room temperature) while retaining respectable electrical conductivity, together delivering a thermoelectric figure of merit ZT three times higher than that of the pristine Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates at 575 K. Our study demonstrates a unique epitaxy mode enabled by the 2D nanocrystal soft template via an affordable and scalable solution chemistry approach. It opens up new opportunities for the creation of diverse epitaxial heterostructures with highly disparate structures and functions.

  7. VO{sub 2}-like thermo-optical switching effect in one-dimensional nonlinear defective photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Juan, E-mail: juanzhang@staff.shu.edu.cn, E-mail: ywang@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Rongjun [Key Laboratory of Specialty Fiber Optics and Optical Access Networks, School of Communication and Information Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Wang, Yang, E-mail: juanzhang@staff.shu.edu.cn, E-mail: ywang@siom.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of High Power Laser Materials, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-06-07

    A new approach to achieve VO{sub 2}-like thermo-optical switching in a one-dimensional photonic crystal by the combination of thermo-optical and optical Kerr effects was proposed and numerically demonstrated in this study. The switching temperature and the hysteresis width can be tuned in a wide temperature range. Steep transition, high optical contrast, and low pumping power can be achieved at the same time. This kind of one-dimensional photonic crystal-based bistable switch will be low-cost, easy-to-fabricate, and versatile in practical applications compared with traditional VO{sub 2}-type one.

  8. Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffray, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The atom through centuries, has been imagined, described, explored, then accelerated, combined...But what happens truly inside the atom? And what are mechanisms who allow its stability? Physicist and historian of sciences, Jean-Paul Auffray explains that these questions are to the heart of the modern physics and it brings them a new lighting. (N.C.)

  9. Application of two-dimensional crystallography and image processing to atomic resolution Z-contrast images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, David G; Ramasse, Quentin M; Browning, Nigel D

    2009-06-01

    Zone axis images recorded using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM or Z-contrast imaging) reveal the atomic structure with a resolution that is defined by the probe size of the microscope. In most cases, the full images contain many sub-images of the crystal unit cell and/or interface structure. Thanks to the repetitive nature of these images, it is possible to apply standard image processing techniques that have been developed for the electron crystallography of biological macromolecules and have been used widely in other fields of electron microscopy for both organic and inorganic materials. These methods can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise present in the original images, to remove distortions in the images that arise from either the instrumentation or the specimen itself and to quantify properties of the material in ways that are difficult without such data processing. In this paper, we describe briefly the theory behind these image processing techniques and demonstrate them for aberration-corrected, high-resolution HAADF-STEM images of Si(46) clathrates developed for hydrogen storage.

  10. Fabrication of a three-dimensional photonic band-gap crystal of air-spheres in a titania matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diop, M.; Maurin, G.; Tork, Amir; Lessard, Roger A.

    2003-02-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) colloidal crystal have been grown from an aqueous colloidal solution of highly monodisperse submicrometer-sized polystyrene spheres using a self-assembly processing technique. The electromagnetic waves diffracted by this crystal can interfere and give rise to a photonic band-gap. However, due to the low refractive index contrast within this material the band-gap is incomplete. By filling the voids between the spheres of the colloidal crystal with titania and removing the polystyrene beads by sublimation, we obtained an inverse-opal structure with an increased refractive index contrast showing strong opalescence.

  11. Vertical versus Lateral Two-Dimensional Heterostructures: On the Topic of Atomically Abrupt p/n-Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ruiping; Ostwal, Vaibhav; Appenzeller, Joerg

    2017-08-09

    The key appeal of two-dimensional (2D) materials such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), or phosphorene for electronic applications certainly lies in their atomically thin nature that offers opportunities for devices beyond conventional transistors. It is also this property that makes them naturally suited for a type of integration that is not possible with any three-dimensional (3D) material, that is, forming heterostructures by stacking dissimilar 2D materials together. Recently, a number of research groups have reported on the formation of atomically sharp p/n-junctions in various 2D heterostructures that show strong diode-type rectification. In this article, we will show that truly vertical heterostructures do exhibit much smaller rectification ratios and that the reported results on atomically sharp p/n-junctions can be readily understood within the framework of the gate and drain voltage response of Schottky barriers that are involved in the lateral transport.

  12. Circular dichroism in a three-dimensional semiconductor chiral photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, S.; Ota, Y.; Tatebayashi, J. [Institute of Nano Quantum Information Electronics, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Tajiri, T. [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y. [Institute of Nano Quantum Information Electronics, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2014-08-04

    Circular dichroism covering the telecommunication band is experimentally demonstrated in a semiconductor-based three-dimensional chiral photonic crystal (PhC). We design a rotationally stacked woodpile PhC structure where neighboring layers are rotated by 60° and three layers construct a single helical unit. The mirror-asymmetric PhC made from GaAs with sub-micron periodicity is fabricated by a micro-manipulation technique. Due to the large contrast of refractive indices between GaAs and air, the experimentally obtained circular dichroism extends over a wide wavelength range, with the transmittance of right-handed circularly polarized incident light being 85% and that of left-handed light being 15% at a wavelength of 1.3 μm. The obtained results show good agreement with numerical simulations.

  13. Analysis and synthesis of one-dimensional magneto-photonic crystals using coupled mode theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saghirzadeh Darki, Behnam, E-mail: b.saghirzadeh@ec.iut.ac.ir; Nezhad, Abolghasem Zeidaabadi; Firouzeh, Zaker Hossein

    2017-03-15

    We utilize our previously developed temporal coupled mode approach to investigate the performance of one-dimensional magneto-photonic crystals (MPCs). We analytically demonstrate that a double-defect MPC provides adequate degrees of freedom to design a structure for arbitrary transmittance and Faraday rotation. By using our developed analytic approach along with the numerical transfer matrix method, we present a procedure for the synthesis of an MPC to generate any desired transmittance and Faraday rotation in possible ranges. However it is seen that only discrete values of transmittance and Faraday rotation are practically obtainable. To remedy this problem along with having short structures, we introduce a class of MPC heterostructures which are combinations of stacks with high and low optical contrast ratios.

  14. Valley-dependent spin-orbit torques in two-dimensional hexagonal crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Hang; Wang, Xuhui; Manchon, Aurelien

    2016-01-01

    We study spin-orbit torques in two-dimensional hexagonal crystals such as graphene, silicene, germanene, and stanene. The torque possesses two components, a fieldlike term due to inverse spin galvanic effect and an antidamping torque originating from Berry curvature in mixed spin-k space. In the presence of staggered potential and exchange field, the valley degeneracy can be lifted and we obtain a valley-dependent Berry curvature, leading to a tunable antidamping torque by controlling the valley degree of freedom. The valley imbalance can be as high as 100% by tuning the bias voltage or magnetization angle. These findings open new venues for the development of current-driven spin-orbit torques by structural design.

  15. Design and Fabrication Challenges for Millimeter-Scale Three-Dimensional Phononic Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frieder Lucklum

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available While phononic crystals can be theoretically modeled with a variety of analytical and numerical methods, the practical realization and comprehensive characterization of complex designs is often challenging. This is especially important for the nearly limitless possibilities of periodic, three-dimensional structures. In this contribution, we take a look at these design and fabrication challenges of different 3D phononic elements based on recent research using additive manufacturing. Different fabrication technologies introduce specific limitations in terms of, e.g., material choices, minimum feature size, aspect ratios, or support requirements that have to be taken into account during design and theoretical modeling. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of additive technologies suitable for millimeter and sub-millimeter feature sizes. Furthermore, we present comprehensive experimental characterization of finite, simple cubic lattices in terms of wave polarization and propagation direction to demonstrate the substantial differences between complete phononic band gap and application oriented directional band gaps of selected propagation modes.

  16. Valley-dependent spin-orbit torques in two-dimensional hexagonal crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Hang

    2016-01-11

    We study spin-orbit torques in two-dimensional hexagonal crystals such as graphene, silicene, germanene, and stanene. The torque possesses two components, a fieldlike term due to inverse spin galvanic effect and an antidamping torque originating from Berry curvature in mixed spin-k space. In the presence of staggered potential and exchange field, the valley degeneracy can be lifted and we obtain a valley-dependent Berry curvature, leading to a tunable antidamping torque by controlling the valley degree of freedom. The valley imbalance can be as high as 100% by tuning the bias voltage or magnetization angle. These findings open new venues for the development of current-driven spin-orbit torques by structural design.

  17. Propagation of Elastic Waves in a One-Dimensional High Aspect Ratio Nanoridge Phononic Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellatif Gueddida

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the propagation of elastic waves in a one-dimensional (1D phononic crystal constituted by high aspect ratio epoxy nanoridges that have been deposited at the surface of a glass substrate. With the help of the finite element method (FEM, we calculate the dispersion curves of the modes localized at the surface for propagation both parallel and perpendicular to the nanoridges. When the direction of the wave is parallel to the nanoridges, we find that the vibrational states coincide with the Lamb modes of an infinite plate that correspond to one nanoridge. When the direction of wave propagation is perpendicular to the 1D nanoridges, the localized modes inside the nanoridges give rise to flat branches in the band structure that interact with the surface Rayleigh mode, and possibly open narrow band gaps. Filling the nanoridge structure with a viscous liquid produces new modes that propagate along the 1D finite height multilayer array.

  18. Opening complete band gaps in two dimensional locally resonant phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoling; Wang, Longqi

    2018-05-01

    Locally resonant phononic crystals (LRPCs) which have low frequency band gaps attract a growing attention in both scientific and engineering field recently. Wide complete locally resonant band gaps are the goal for researchers. In this paper, complete band gaps are achieved by carefully designing the geometrical properties of the inclusions in two dimensional LRPCs. The band structures and mechanisms of different types of models are investigated by the finite element method. The translational vibration patterns in both the in-plane and out-of-plane directions contribute to the full band gaps. The frequency response of the finite periodic structures demonstrate the attenuation effects in the complete band gaps. Moreover, it is found that the complete band gaps can be further widened and lowered by increasing the height of the inclusions. The tunable properties by changing the geometrical parameters provide a good way to open wide locally resonant band gaps.

  19. Giant enhancement of Kerr rotation in two-dimensional Bismuth iron garnet/Ag photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Hong; Zhang Qiang; Liu Huan; Fu Shu-Fang; Zhou Sheng; Wang Xuan-Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Kerr effects of two-dimensional (2D) Bismuth iron garnet (BIG)/Ag photonic crystals (PCs) combined magnetic and plasmonic functionalities is investigated with the effective medium theory. An analytical expression of Kerr rotation angles is derived, in which the effects of the surface pasmons polaritons (SPP) on magneto–optical (MO) activities are reflected. The largest enhancement of Kerr rotation up to now is demonstrated, which is improved three orders of magnitude compared with that of BIG film. When λ < 750 nm all of the reflection are over 10% for the arbitrary filling ratio f 1 , in addition, the enhancement of Kerr rotation angles are at least one order of magnitude. (paper)

  20. Temporal coupled mode analysis of one-dimensional magneto-photonic crystals with cavity structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saghirzadeh Darki, Behnam, E-mail: b.saghirzadeh@ec.iut.ac.ir; Zeidaabadi Nezhad, Abolghasem; Firouzeh, Zaker Hossein

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we propose the time-dependent coupled mode analysis of one-dimensional magneto-photonic crystals including one, two or multiple defect layers. The performance of the structures, namely the total transmission, Faraday rotation and ellipticity, is obtained using the proposed method. The results of the developed analytic approach are verified by comparing them to the results of the exact numerical transfer matrix method. Unlike the widely used numerical method, our proposed analytic method seems promising for the synthesis as well as the analysis purposes. Moreover, the proposed method has not the restrictions of the previously examined analytic methods. - Highlights: • A time-dependent coupled mode analysis is proposed for the cavity-type 1D MPCs. • Analytical formalism is presented for the single, double and multiple-defect MPCs. • Transmission, Faraday rotation and ellipticity are gained using the proposed method. • The proposed analytic method has advantages over the previously examined methods.

  1. Theoretical study of two-dimensional phononic crystals with viscoelasticity based on fractional derivative models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yaozong; Yu Dianlong; Zhao Honggang; Wen Jihong; Wen Xisen

    2008-01-01

    Wave propagation in two-dimensional phononic crystals (PCs) with viscoelasticity is investigated using a finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) method. The viscoelasticity is evaluated using the Kelvin-Voigt model with fractional derivatives (FDs) so that both the dispersion and dissipation are considered. Numerical approximation of FDs is integrated into the FDTD scheme to simulate wave propagation in such PCs. All the constituent materials are treated as isotropic and homogeneous. The gaps are substantially displaced and widened and the attenuation is noticeably enhanced due to the dispersion and dissipation of host material and the complicated multiple scattering between scatterers. These results indicate that the viscoelasticity of the damping host has significant influence on wave propagation in PCs and should be considered

  2. Imaging off-plane shear waves with a two-dimensional phononic crystal lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang Chenyu; Luan Pigang

    2010-01-01

    A two-dimensional flat phononic crystal (PC) lens for focusing off-plane shear waves is proposed. The lens consists of a triangular lattice hole-array, embedded in a solid matrix. The self-collimation effect is employed to guide the shear waves propagating through the lens along specific directions. The Dirichlet-to-Neumann maps (DtN) method is employed to calculate the band structure of the PC, which can avoid the problems of bad convergence and fake bands automatically in the void-solid PC structure. When the lens is illuminated by the off-plane shear waves emanating from a point source, a subwavelength image appears in the far-field zone. The imaging characteristics are investigated by calculating the displacement fields explicitly using the multiple scattering method, and the results are in good agreement with the ray-trace predictions. Our results may provide insights for designing new phononic devices.

  3. Two-dimensional nanopatterning by PDMS relief structures of polymeric colloidal crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hye Jin; Kim, Ju-Hee; Jung, Duk-Young; Park, Jong Bae; Lee, Hae Seong

    2008-06-01

    A new constructive method of fabricating a nanoparticle self-assembly on the patterned surface of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) relief nanostructure was demonstrated. Patterned PDMS templates with close-packed microwells were fabricated by molding against a self-assembled monolayer of polystyrene spheres. Alkanethiol-functionalized gold nanoparticles with an average particle size of 2.5 nm were selectively deposited onto a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer printed on the substrate by the micro-contact printing (μCP) of the prepared PDMS microwell, in which the patterned gold nanoparticles consisted of close-packed hexagons with an average diameter of 370 nm. In addition, two-dimensional colloidal crystals derived from PMMA microspheres with a diameter of 380 nm and a negative surface charge were successfully formed on the hemispherical microwells by electrostatic force using positively charged PAH-coated PDMS as a template to produce multidimensional nanostructures.

  4. Two-Dimensional Spatial Imaging of Charge Transport in Germanium Crystals at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffatt, Robert [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    In this dissertation, I describe a novel apparatus for studying the transport of charge in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures. The motivation to conduct this experiment originated from an asymmetry observed between the behavior of electrons and holes in the germanium detector crystals used by the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS). This asymmetry is a consequence of the anisotropic propagation of electrons in germanium at cryogenic temperatures. To better model our detectors, we incorporated this effect into our Monte Carlo simulations of charge transport. The purpose of the experiment described in this dissertation is to test those models in detail. Our measurements have allowed us to discover a shortcoming in our most recent Monte Carlo simulations of electrons in germanium. This discovery would not have been possible without the measurement of the full, two-dimensional charge distribution, which our experimental apparatus has allowed for the first time at cryogenic temperatures.

  5. Disorder-induced modification of the transmission of light through two-dimensional photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beggs, D M; Kaliteevski, M A; Abram, R A; Cassagne, D; Albert, J P

    2005-01-01

    Disordered two-dimensional photonic crystals with a complete photonic band-gap have been investigated. Transmission and reflection spectra have been modelled for both ballistic and scattered light. The density of states and electromagnetic field profiles of disorder-induced localized states have also been calculated, for various levels of disorder. It is found that there is a threshold-like behaviour in the amount of disorder. Below the threshold, it is seen that there is a vanishing probability of disorder-induced localized states being introduced into the centre of the photonic band-gap, but that edge-states narrow the band-gap. Above the threshold, there is a non-zero probability of disorder-induced localized states throughout the photonic band-gap, and the modification of the transmission and reflection spectra due to disorder rapidly increases with increasing disorder

  6. ONE-DIMENSIONAL ORDERING OF IN ATOMS IN A CU(100) SURFACE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BREEMAN, M; BARKEMA, GT; BOERMA, DO

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study of the ordering of In atoms embedded in the top layer of a Cu(100) surface is presented. The interaction energies between the In and Cu atoms were derived from atom-embedding calculations, with Finnis-Sinclair potentials. It was found that the interaction between In atoms in the

  7. Experimental investigation of photonic band gap in one-dimensional photonic crystals with metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yihang; Wang, Xinggang; Yong, Zehui; Zhang, Yunjuan; Chen, Zefeng; He, Lianxing; Lee, P.F.; Chan, Helen L.W.; Leung, Chi Wah; Wang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Composite right/left-handed transmission lines with lumped element series capacitors and shunt inductors are used to experimentally realize the one-dimensional photonic crystals composed of single-negative metamaterials. The simulated and experimental results show that a special photonic band gap corresponding to zero-effective-phase (zero-φ eff ) may appear in the microwave regime. In contrast to the Bragg gap, by changing the length ratio of the two component materials, the width and depth of the zero-φ eff gap can be conveniently adjusted while keeping the center frequency constant. Furthermore, the zero-φ eff gap vanishes when both the phase-matching and impedance-matching conditions are satisfied simultaneously. These transmission line structures provide a good way for realizing microwave devices based on the zero-φ eff gap. -- Highlights: ► 1D photonic crystals with metamaterials were investigated experimentally. ► Both Bragg gap and zero-φ eff gap were observed in the microwave regime. ► The width and depth of the zero-φ eff gap were experimentally adjusted. ► Zero-φ eff gap was observed to be close when two match conditions were satisfied.

  8. Experimental investigation of photonic band gap in one-dimensional photonic crystals with metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yihang, E-mail: eon.chen@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Applied Physics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Laboratory of Quantum Information Technology, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou (China); Wang, Xinggang [Laboratory of Quantum Information Technology, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou (China); Yong, Zehui; Zhang, Yunjuan [Department of Applied Physics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Chen, Zefeng [Laboratory of Quantum Information Technology, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou (China); He, Lianxing; Lee, P.F.; Chan, Helen L.W.; Leung, Chi Wah [Department of Applied Physics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Yu, E-mail: apywang@inet.polyu.edu.hk [Department of Applied Physics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2012-03-19

    Composite right/left-handed transmission lines with lumped element series capacitors and shunt inductors are used to experimentally realize the one-dimensional photonic crystals composed of single-negative metamaterials. The simulated and experimental results show that a special photonic band gap corresponding to zero-effective-phase (zero-φ{sub eff}) may appear in the microwave regime. In contrast to the Bragg gap, by changing the length ratio of the two component materials, the width and depth of the zero-φ{sub eff} gap can be conveniently adjusted while keeping the center frequency constant. Furthermore, the zero-φ{sub eff} gap vanishes when both the phase-matching and impedance-matching conditions are satisfied simultaneously. These transmission line structures provide a good way for realizing microwave devices based on the zero-φ{sub eff} gap. -- Highlights: ► 1D photonic crystals with metamaterials were investigated experimentally. ► Both Bragg gap and zero-φ{sub eff} gap were observed in the microwave regime. ► The width and depth of the zero-φ{sub eff} gap were experimentally adjusted. ► Zero-φ{sub eff} gap was observed to be close when two match conditions were satisfied.

  9. Electromagnetic-field amplification in finite one-dimensional photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Kapaev, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    The electromagnetic-field distribution in a finite one-dimensional photonic crystal is studied using the numerical solution of Maxwell’s equations by the transfer-matrix method. The dependence of the transmission coefficient T on the period d (or the wavelength λ) has the characteristic form with M–1 (M is the number of periods in the structure) maxima with T = 1 in the allowed band of an infinite crystal and zero values in the forbidden band. The field-modulus distribution E(x) in the structure for parameters that correspond to the transmission maxima closest to the boundaries of forbidden bands has maxima at the center of the structure; the value at the maximum considerably exceeds the incident-field strength. For the number of periods M ~ 50, more than an order of magnitude increase in the field amplification is observed. The numerical results are interpreted with an analytic theory constructed by representing the solution in the form of a linear combination of counterpropagating Floquet modes in a periodic structure.

  10. Dipolar local field in homogeneously magnetized quasi-two-dimensional crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, H; Estevez-Rams, E

    2009-01-01

    A formalism to calculate the dipolar local field in homogeneously magnetized quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) crystals is comprehensively presented. Two fundamental tests for this formalism are accomplished: the transition from the Q2D quantities to the corresponding 3D ones; and the recovering of the macroscopic quantities of the 3D continuum theory. The additive separation between lattice and shape contributions to the local field allows an unambiguous interpretation of the respective effects. Calculated demagnetization tensors for square and circular lateral geometries of dipole layers show that for a single crystal layer an extremely thin film, but still with a finite thickness, is a better physical representation than a strictly 2D plane. Distinct close-packed structures are simulated and calculations of the local field at the nodes of the stacked 2D lattices allow one to establish the number of significantly coupled dipole layers, depending on the ratio between the interlayer distance and the 2D lattice constant. The conclusions drawn are of interest for the study of the dipolar interaction in magnetic ultrathin films and other nanostructured materials, where magnetic nanoparticles are embedded in non-magnetic matrices.

  11. Band structures in a two-dimensional phononic crystal with rotational multiple scatterers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ailing; Wang, Xiaopeng; Chen, Tianning; Wan, Lele

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the acoustic wave propagation in a two-dimensional phononic crystal composed of rotational multiple scatterers is investigated. The dispersion relationships, the transmission spectra and the acoustic modes are calculated by using finite element method. In contrast to the system composed of square tubes, there exist a low-frequency resonant bandgap and two wide Bragg bandgaps in the proposed structure, and the transmission spectra coincide with band structures. Specially, the first bandgap is based on locally resonant mechanism, and the simulation results agree well with the results of electrical circuit analogy. Additionally, increasing the rotation angle can remarkably influence the band structures due to the transfer of sound pressure between the internal and external cavities in low-order modes, and the redistribution of sound pressure in high-order modes. Wider bandgaps are obtained in arrays composed of finite unit cells with different rotation angles. The analysis results provide a good reference for tuning and obtaining wide bandgaps, and hence exploring the potential applications of the proposed phononic crystal in low-frequency noise insulation.

  12. Optical transmission properties of an anisotropic defect cavity in one-dimensional photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchani, Noama; El Moussaouy, Abdelaziz; Aynaou, Hassan; El Hassouani, Youssef; El Boudouti, El Houssaine; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram

    2018-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the possibility to control the optical transmission in the visible and infrared regions by a defective one dimensional photonic crystal formed by a combination of a finite isotropic superlattice and an anisotropic defect layer. The Green's function approach has been used to derive the reflection and the transmission coefficients, as well as the densities of states of the optical modes. We evaluate the delay times of the localized modes and we compare their behavior with the total densities of states. We show that the birefringence of an anisotropic defect layer has a significant impact on the behavior of the optical modes in the electromagnetic forbidden bands of the structure. The amplitudes of the defect modes in the transmission and the delay time spectrum, depend strongly on the position of the cavity layer within the photonic crystal. The anisotropic defect layer induces transmission zeros in one of the two components of the transmission as a consequence of a destructive interference of the two polarized waves within this layer, giving rise to negative delay times for some wavelengths in the visible and infrared light ranges. This property is a typical characteristic of the anisotropic photonic layer and is without analogue in their counterpart isotropic defect layers. This structure offers several possibilities for controlling the frequencies, transmitted intensities and the delay times of the optical modes in the visible and infrared regions. It can be a good candidate for realizing high-precision optical filters.

  13. Pseudo-One-Dimensional Magnonic Crystals for High-Frequency Nanoscale Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Chandrima; Choudhury, Samiran; Sinha, Jaivardhan; Barman, Anjan

    2017-07-01

    The synthetic magnonic crystals (i.e., periodic composites consisting of different magnetic materials) form one fascinating class of emerging research field, which aims to command the process and flow of information by means of spin waves, such as in magnonic waveguides. One of the intriguing features of magnonic crystals is the presence and tunability of band gaps in the spin-wave spectrum, where the high attenuation of the frequency bands can be utilized for frequency-dependent control on the spin waves. However, to find a feasible way of band tuning in terms of a realistic integrated device is still a challenge. Here, we introduce an array of asymmetric saw-tooth-shaped width-modulated nanoscale ferromagnetic waveguides forming a pseudo-one-dimensional magnonic crystal. The frequency dispersion of collective modes measured by the Brillouin light-scattering technique is compared with the band diagram obtained by numerically solving the eigenvalue problem derived from the linearized Landau-Lifshitz magnetic torque equation. We find that the magnonic band-gap width, position, and the slope of dispersion curves are controllable by changing the angle between the spin-wave propagation channel and the magnetic field. The calculated profiles of the dynamic magnetization reveal that the corrugation at the lateral boundary of the waveguide effectively engineers the edge modes, which forms the basis of the interactive control in magnonic circuits. The results represent a prospective direction towards managing the internal field distribution as well as the dispersion properties, which find potential applications in dynamic spin-wave filters and magnonic waveguides in the gigahertz frequency range.

  14. Effect of magnetic field on the wave dispersion relation in three-dimensional dusty plasma crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xuefeng; Wang Zhengxiong

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional plasma crystals under microgravity condition are investigated by taking into account an external magnetic field. The wave dispersion relations of dust lattice modes in the body centered cubic (bcc) and the face centered cubic (fcc) plasma crystals are obtained explicitly when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the wave motion. The wave dispersion relations of dust lattice modes in the bcc and fcc plasma crystals are calculated numerically when the magnetic field is in an arbitrary direction. The numerical results show that one longitudinal mode and two transverse modes are coupled due to the Lorentz force in the magnetic field. Moreover, three wave modes, i.e., the high frequency phonon mode, the low frequency phonon mode, and the optical mode, are obtained. The optical mode and at least one phonon mode are hybrid modes. When the magnetic field is neither parallel nor perpendicular to the primitive wave motion, all the three wave modes are hybrid modes and do not have any intersection points. It is also found that with increasing the magnetic field strength, the frequency of the optical mode increases and has a cutoff at the cyclotron frequency of the dust particles in the limit of long wavelength, and the mode mixings for both the optical mode and the high frequency phonon mode increase. The acoustic velocity of the low frequency phonon mode is zero. In addition, the acoustic velocity of the high frequency phonon mode depends on the angle of the magnetic field and the wave motion but does not depend on the magnetic field strength.

  15. Sites of Au atoms in Sn crystals as determined by channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.W.; Gemmell, D.S.; Holland, R.E.; Poizat, J.C.; Worthington, J.N.; Loess, R.E.

    1974-01-01

    The position of Au atoms diffused into Sn monocrystals has been studied by channeling and backscattering of 2.5-MeV Ne ions. For equilibrium conditions at 217 0 C, Au atoms are found almost entirely in substitutional positions, so that the unusually fast diffusion of Au in Sn most likely arises from a small fraction of Au atoms migrating interstitially

  16. One-way mode transmission in one-dimensional phononic crystal plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuefeng; Zou, Xinye; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jianchun

    2010-12-01

    We investigate theoretically the band structures of one-dimensional phononic crystal (PC) plates with both antisymmetric and symmetric structures, and show how unidirectional transmission behavior can be obtained for either antisymmetric waves (A modes) or symmetric waves (S modes) by exploiting mode conversion and selection in the linear plate systems. The theoretical approach is illustrated for one PC plate example where unidirectional transmission behavior is obtained in certain frequency bands. Employing harmonic frequency analysis, we numerically demonstrate the one-way mode transmission for the PC plate with finite superlattice by calculating the steady-state displacement fields under A modes source (or S modes source) in forward and backward direction, respectively. The results show that the incident waves from A modes source (or S modes source) are transformed into S modes waves (or A modes waves) after passing through the superlattice in the forward direction and the Lamb wave rejections in the backward direction are striking with a power extinction ratio of more than 1000. The present structure can be easily extended to two-dimensional PC plate and efficiently encourage practical studies of experimental realization which is believed to have much significance for one-way Lamb wave mode transmission.

  17. Schottky nanocontact of one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures probed by using conductive atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Ah; Rok Lim, Young; Jung, Chan Su; Choi, Jun Hee; Im, Hyung Soon; Park, Kidong; Park, Jeunghee; Kim, Gyu Tae

    2016-10-01

    To develop the advanced electronic devices, the surface/interface of each component must be carefully considered. Here, we investigate the electrical properties of metal-semiconductor nanoscale junction using conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). Single-crystalline CdS, CdSe, and ZnO one-dimensional nanostructures are synthesized via chemical vapor transport, and individual nanobelts (or nanowires) are used to fabricate nanojunction electrodes. The current-voltage (I -V) curves are obtained by placing a C-AFM metal (PtIr) tip as a movable contact on the nanobelt (or nanowire), and often exhibit a resistive switching behavior that is rationalized by the Schottky (high resistance state) and ohmic (low resistance state) contacts between the metal and semiconductor. We obtain the Schottky barrier height and the ideality factor through fitting analysis of the I-V curves. The present nanojunction devices exhibit a lower Schottky barrier height and a higher ideality factor than those of the bulk materials, which is consistent with the findings of previous works on nanostructures. It is shown that C-AFM is a powerful tool for characterization of the Schottky contact of conducting channels between semiconductor nanostructures and metal electrodes.

  18. Numerical path integral solution to strong Coulomb correlation in one dimensional Hooke's atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruokosenmäki, Ilkka; Gholizade, Hossein; Kylänpää, Ilkka; Rantala, Tapio T.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new approach based on real time domain Feynman path integrals (RTPI) for electronic structure calculations and quantum dynamics, which includes correlations between particles exactly but within the numerical accuracy. We demonstrate that incoherent propagation by keeping the wave function real is a novel method for finding and simulation of the ground state, similar to Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method, but introducing new useful tools lacking in DMC. We use 1D Hooke's atom, a two-electron system with very strong correlation, as our test case, which we solve with incoherent RTPI (iRTPI) and compare against DMC. This system provides an excellent test case due to exact solutions for some confinements and because in 1D the Coulomb singularity is stronger than in two or three dimensional space. The use of Monte Carlo grid is shown to be efficient for which we determine useful numerical parameters. Furthermore, we discuss another novel approach achieved by combining the strengths of iRTPI and DMC. We also show usefulness of the perturbation theory for analytical approximates in case of strong confinements.

  19. Predicting Ligand Binding Sites on Protein Surfaces by 3-Dimensional Probability Density Distributions of Interacting Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Jhih-Wei; Elumalai, Pavadai; Pitti, Thejkiran; Wu, Chih Yuan; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Peng, Hung-Pin; Yang, An-Suei

    2016-01-01

    Predicting ligand binding sites (LBSs) on protein structures, which are obtained either from experimental or computational methods, is a useful first step in functional annotation or structure-based drug design for the protein structures. In this work, the structure-based machine learning algorithm ISMBLab-LIG was developed to predict LBSs on protein surfaces with input attributes derived from the three-dimensional probability density maps of interacting atoms, which were reconstructed on the query protein surfaces and were relatively insensitive to local conformational variations of the tentative ligand binding sites. The prediction accuracy of the ISMBLab-LIG predictors is comparable to that of the best LBS predictors benchmarked on several well-established testing datasets. More importantly, the ISMBLab-LIG algorithm has substantial tolerance to the prediction uncertainties of computationally derived protein structure models. As such, the method is particularly useful for predicting LBSs not only on experimental protein structures without known LBS templates in the database but also on computationally predicted model protein structures with structural uncertainties in the tentative ligand binding sites. PMID:27513851

  20. Structural study of quasi-one-dimensional vanadium pyroxene LiVSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Yuto [Department of Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Matsushita, Yoshitaka [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Oda, Migaku; Yoshida, Hiroyuki [Department of Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    Single crystals of quasi-one-dimensional vanadium pyroxene LiVSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} were synthesized and the crystal structures at 293 K and 113 K were studied using X-ray diffraction experiments. We found a structural phase transition from the room-temperature crystal structure with space group C2/c to a low-temperature structure with space group P2{sub 1}/c, resulting from a rotational displacement of SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra. The temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility shows a broad maximum around 116 K, suggesting an opening of the Haldane gap expected for one-dimensional antiferromagnets with S=1. However, an antiferromagnetic long-range order was developed below 24 K, probably caused by a weak inter-chain magnetic coupling in the compound. - Graphical abstract: Low temperature crystal structure of LiVSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} and an orbital arrangement within the V-O zig-zag chain along the c-axis. - Highlights: • A low temperature structure of LiVSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction measurements. • The origin of the structural transition is a rotational displacement of SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra. • The uniform orbital overlap in the V-O zigzag chain makes the system a quasi one-dimensional antiferromagnet.

  1. Enhancement of Solar Cell Efficiency for Space Applications Using Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postigo P.A.

    2017-01-01

    with the area of photonic crystal patterning has been clearly observed. Finally, a low-cost nanofabrication procedure to obtain high quality two-dimensional photonic crystals in large areas (up to square cm is described.

  2. Tunable Channel Drop Filter in a Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Modulated by a Nematic Liquid Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Photonic crystals (PCs have many potential applications because of their ability to control light-wave propagation and because PC-based waveguides may be integrated into optical circuits. We propose a novel tunable PC channel drop filter based on nematic liquid crystals and investigate its properties numerically by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD method. The refractive indices of liquid crystals can be actively modulated after infiltrating nematic liquid crystals into the microcavity in PC waveguides with square lattices. Then we can control light propagation in a PC waveguide. We analyze the Q -factors and resonance frequencies of a tunable PC channel drop filter by considering various indices modulation of liquid crystals. The novel component can be used as wavelength division multiplexing in photonic integrated circuits.

  3. Assembling three-dimensional nanostructures on metal surfaces with a reversible vertical single-atom manipulation: A theoretical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Tianxing; Ye Xiang; Huang Lei; Xie Yiqun; Ke Sanhuang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We simulate the reversible vertical single-atom manipulations on several metal surfaces. ► We propose a method to predict whether a reversible vertical single-atom manipulation can be successful on several metal surfaces. ► A 3-dimensional Ni nanocluster is assembled on the Ni(1 1 1) surface using a Ni trimer-apex tip. - Abstract: We propose a theoretical model to show that pulling up an adatom from an atomic step requires a weaker force than from the flat surfaces of Al(0 0 1), Ni(1 1 1), Pt(1 1 0) and Au(1 1 0). Single adatom in the atomic step can be extracted vertically by a trimer-apex tip while can be released to the flat surface. This reversible vertical manipulation can then be used to fabricate a supported three-dimensional (3D) nanostructure on the Ni(1 1 1) surface. The present modeling can be used to predict whether the reversible vertical single-atom manipulation and thus the assembling of 3D nanostructures can be achieved on a metal surface.

  4. Atomic-scale investigations of grain boundary segregation in astrology with a three dimensional atom-probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blavette, D. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique]|[Institut Universitaire de France (France); Letellier, L. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique; Duval, P. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique; Guttmann, M. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique]|[Institut de Recherches de la Siderurgie Francaise (IRSID), 57 - Maizieres-les-Metz (France)

    1996-08-01

    Both conventional and 3D atom-probes were applied to the investigation of grain-boundary (GB) segregation phenomena in two-phase nickel base superalloys Astroloy. 3D images as provided by the tomographic atom-probe reveal the presence of a strong segregation of both boron and molybdenum at grain-boundaries. Slight carbon enrichment is also detected. Considerable chromium segregation is exhibited at {gamma}`-{gamma}` grain-boundaries. All these segregants are distributed in a continuous manner along the boundary over a width close to 0.5 nm. Experiments show that segregation occurs during cooling and more probably between 1000 C and 800 C. Boron and molybdenum GB enrichments are interpreted as due to an equilibrium type-segregation while chromium segregation is thought to be induced by {gamma}` precipitation at GB`s and stabilised by the presence of boron. No segregation of zirconium is detected. (orig.)

  5. A three-dimensional relaxation model for calculation of atomic mixing and topography changes induces by ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, R.; Perez-Martin, A.M.C.; Dominguez-Vazquez, J.; Jimenez-Rodriguez, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    A simple model for three-dimensional material relaxation associated with atomic mixing is presented. The relaxation of the solid to accommodate the extra effective displacement volume Ω of an implanted or relocated atom is modelled by treating the surrounding solid as an incompressible medium. This leads to a tractable general formalism which can be used to predict implant distribution and changes in surface topography induced by ion beams, both in monatomic and multicomponent targets. The two-component case is discussed in detail. (orig.)

  6. Research on the Band Gap Characteristics of Two-Dimensional Phononic Crystals Microcavity with Local Resonant Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new two-dimensional locally resonant phononic crystal with microcavity structure is proposed. The acoustic wave band gap characteristics of this new structure are studied using finite element method. At the same time, the corresponding displacement eigenmodes of the band edges of the lowest band gap and the transmission spectrum are calculated. The results proved that phononic crystals with microcavity structure exhibited complete band gaps in low-frequency range. The eigenfrequency of the lower edge of the first gap is lower than no microcavity structure. However, for no microcavity structure type of quadrilateral phononic crystal plate, the second band gap disappeared and the frequency range of the first band gap is relatively narrow. The main reason for appearing low-frequency band gaps is that the proposed phononic crystal introduced the local resonant microcavity structure. This study provides a good support for engineering application such as low-frequency vibration attenuation and noise control.

  7. Classical and quantum analysis of one-dimensional velocity selection for ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, J K; Kim, H A; Mishra, S R; Myrskog, S H; Jofre, A M; Segal, L R; Kim, J B; Steinberg, A M

    2005-01-01

    We discuss a velocity selection technique for obtaining cold atoms, in which all atoms below a certain energy are spatially selected from the surrounding atom cloud. Velocity selection can in some cases be more efficient than other cooling techniques for the preparation of ultracold atom clouds in one dimension. With quantum mechanical and classical simulations and theory we present a scheme using a dipole force barrier to select the coldest atoms from a magnetically trapped atom cloud. The dipole and magnetic potentials create a local minimum which traps the coldest atoms. A unique advantage of this technique is the sharp cut-off in the velocity distribution of the sample of selected atoms. Such a non-thermal distribution should prove useful for a variety of experiments, including proposed studies of atomic tunnelling and scattering from quantum potentials. We show that when the rms size of the atom cloud is smaller than the local minimum in which the selected atoms are trapped, the velocity selection technique can be more efficient in one dimension than some common techniques such as evaporative cooling. For example, one simulation shows nearly 6% of the atoms retained at a temperature 100 times lower than the starting condition

  8. Characterization technique for detection of atom-size crystalline defects and strains using two-dimensional fast-Fourier-transform sampling Moiré method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodera, Masako; Wang, Qinghua; Ri, Shien; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Akira; Sugiyama, Toru; Hamamoto, Takeshi; Miyashita, Naoto

    2018-04-01

    Recently, we have developed a two-dimensional (2D) fast-Fourier-transform (FFT) sampling Moiré technique to visually and quantitatively determine the locations of minute defects in a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image. We applied this technique for defect detection with GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) devices, and successfully and clearly visualized atom-size defects in AlGaN/GaN crystalline structures. The defect density obtained in the AlGaN/GaN structures is ∼1013 counts/cm2. In addition, we have successfully confirmed that the distribution and number of defects closely depend on the process conditions. Thus, this technique is quite useful for a device development. Moreover, the strain fields in an AlGaN/GaN crystal were effectively calculated with nm-scale resolution using this method. We also demonstrated that this sampling Moiré technique is applicable to silicon devices, which have principal directions different from those of AlGaN/GaN crystals. As a result, we believe that the 2D FFT sampling Moiré method has great potential applications to the discovery of new as yet unknown phenomena occurring between the characteristics of a crystalline material and device performance.

  9. Delocalization of Relativistic Dirac Particles in Disordered One-Dimensional Systems and Its Implementation with Cold Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shiliang; Zhang Danwei; Wang, Z. D.

    2009-01-01

    We study theoretically the localization of relativistic particles in disordered one-dimensional chains. It is found that the relativistic particles tend to delocalization in comparison with the nonrelativistic particles with the same disorder strength. More intriguingly, we reveal that the massless Dirac particles are entirely delocalized for any energy due to the inherent chiral symmetry, leading to a well-known result that particles are always localized in one-dimensional systems for arbitrary weak disorders to break down. Furthermore, we propose a feasible scheme to detect the delocalization feature of the Dirac particles with cold atoms in a light-induced gauge field.

  10. Dynamics of attractively interacting Fermi atoms in one-dimensional optical lattices: Non-equilibrium simulations of fermion superfluidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, M., E-mail: okumura.masahiko@jaea.go.j [CCSE, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 6-9-3 Higashi-Ueno, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-0015 (Japan); CREST (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Onishi, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Yamada, S. [CCSE, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 6-9-3 Higashi-Ueno, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-0015 (Japan); CREST (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Machida, M. [CCSE, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 6-9-3 Higashi-Ueno, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-0015 (Japan); CREST (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan) and JST, TRIP, Sambancho Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    We study center of mass (CoM) motions of attractively interacting fermionic atoms loaded on an one-dimensional optical lattice confined by a harmonic potential at zero temperature by using adaptive time-dependent density-matrix renormalization-group method. We find that the CoM motions in weak and strong attraction show underdamped and overdamped motions, respectively, which are consistent with the experimental results of the CoM motion in the three-dimensional optical lattice. In addition, we find spin-imbalance effects on the CoM motion, which slow the CoM motion down.

  11. Two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded polymers in the crystal structures of the ammonium salts of phenoxyacetic acid, (4-fluorophenoxyacetic acid and (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Smith

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The structures of the ammonium salts of phenoxyacetic acid, NH4+·C8H6O3−, (I, (4-fluorophenoxyacetic acid, NH4+·C8H5FO3−, (II, and the herbicidally active (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA, NH4+·C9H8ClO3−·0.5H2O, (III have been determined. All have two-dimensional layered structures based on inter-species ammonium N—H...O hydrogen-bonding associations, which give core substructures consisting primarily of conjoined cyclic motifs. The crystals of (I and (II are isomorphous with the core comprising R12(5, R12(4 and centrosymmetric R42(8 ring motifs, giving two-dimensional layers lying parallel to (100. In (III, the water molecule of solvation lies on a crystallographic twofold rotation axis and bridges two carboxyl O atoms in an R44(12 hydrogen-bonded motif, creating two R43(10 rings, which together with a conjoined centrosymmetric R42(8 ring incorporating both ammonium cations, generate two-dimensional layers lying parallel to (100. No π–π ring associations are present in any of the structures.

  12. Inhomogeneous distribution of manganese atoms in ferromagnetic ZnSnAs{sub 2}:Mn thin films on InP revealed by three-dimensional atom probe investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchitomi, Naotaka, E-mail: uchitomi@nagaokaut.ac.jp; Inoue, Hiroaki; Kato, Takahiro; Toyota, Hideyuki [Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan); Uchida, Hiroshi [Toshiba Nanoanalysis Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8522 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    Atomic-scale Mn distributions in ferromagnetic ZnSnAs{sub 2}:Mn thin films grown on InP substrates have been studied by applying three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) microscopy. It is found that Mn atoms in cross-sectional 3DAP maps show the presence of inhomogeneities in Mn distribution, which is characteristic patterns of a spinoidal decomposition phase with slightly high and low concentration regions. The high Mn concentration regions are expected to be coherently clustered MnAs in the zinc-blende structure, resulting in the formation of Mn-As random connecting patterns. The origin of room-temperature ferromagnetism in ZnSnAs{sub 2}:Mn on InP can be well explained by the formation of atomic-scale magnetic clustering by spinoidal decomposition without breaking the continuity of the zinc-blende structure, which has been suggested by previous theoretical works. The lattice-matching between magnetic epi-layers and substrates should be one of the most important factors to avoid the formation of secondary hexagonal MnAs phase precipitates in preparing ferromagnetic semiconductor thin films.

  13. Two-Dimensional Nucleation on the Terrace of Colloidal Crystals with Added Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Jun; Uda, Satoshi; Guo, Suxia; Hu, Sumeng; Toyotama, Akiko; Yamanaka, Junpei; Okada, Junpei; Koizumi, Haruhiko

    2017-04-04

    Understanding nucleation dynamics is important both fundamentally and technologically in materials science and other scientific fields. Two-dimensional (2D) nucleation is the predominant growth mechanism in colloidal crystallization, in which the particle interaction is attractive, and has recently been regarded as a promising method to fabricate varieties of complex nanostructures possessing innovative functionality. Here, polymers are added to a colloidal suspension to generate a depletion attractive force, and the detailed 2D nucleation process on the terrace of the colloidal crystals is investigated. In the system, we first measured the nucleation rate at various area fractions of particles on the terrace, ϕ area . In situ observations at single-particle resolution revealed that nucleation behavior follows the framework of classical nucleation theory (CNT), such as single-step nucleation pathway and existence of critical size. Characteristic nucleation behavior is observed in that the nucleation and growth stage are clearly differentiated. When many nuclei form in a small area of the terrace, a high density of kink sites of once formed islands makes growth more likely to occur than further nucleation because nucleation has a higher energy barrier than growth. The steady-state homogeneous 2D nucleation rate, J, and the critical size of nuclei, r*, are measured by in situ observations based on the CNT, which enable us to obtain the step free energy, γ, which is an important parameter for characterizing the nucleation process. The γ value is found to change according to the strength of attraction, which is tuned by the concentration of the polymer as a depletant.

  14. A new 28Si single crystal: counting the atoms for the new kilogram definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartl, G.; Becker, P.; Beckhoff, B.; Bettin, H.; Beyer, E.; Borys, M.; Busch, I.; Cibik, L.; D'Agostino, G.; Darlatt, E.; Di Luzio, M.; Fujii, K.; Fujimoto, H.; Fujita, K.; Kolbe, M.; Krumrey, M.; Kuramoto, N.; Massa, E.; Mecke, M.; Mizushima, S.; Müller, M.; Narukawa, T.; Nicolaus, A.; Pramann, A.; Rauch, D.; Rienitz, O.; Sasso, C. P.; Stopic, A.; Stosch, R.; Waseda, A.; Wundrack, S.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. W.

    2017-10-01

    A new single crystal from isotopically enriched silicon was used to determine the Avogadro constant N A by the x-ray-crystal density method. The new crystal, named Si28-23Pr11, has a higher enrichment than the former ‘AVO28’ crystal allowing a smaller uncertainty of the molar mass determination. Again, two 1 kg spheres were manufactured from this crystal. The crystal and the spheres were measured with improved and new methods. One sphere, Si28kg01a, was measured at NMIJ and PTB with very consistent results. The other sphere, Si28kg01b, was measured only at PTB and yielded nearly the same Avogadro constant value. The mean result for both 1 kg spheres is N A  =  6.022 140 526(70)  ×  1023 mol-1 with a relative standard uncertainty of 1.2  ×  10-8. This value deviates from the Avogadro value published in 2015 for the AVO28 crystal by about 3.9(2.1)  ×  10-8. Possible reasons for this difference are discussed and additional measurements are proposed.

  15. X-ray diffraction from ideal mosaic crystals in external fields of certain types. I. Atomic displacements and the corresponding diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treushnikov, E.N.

    2000-01-01

    The problem of the theoretical description of X-ray diffraction from ideal mosaic crystals under the effect of various external fields has been formulated. Electric, magnetic, electromagnetic, and acoustic perturbations are considered. The atomic displacements in crystals under the effect of external fields and the types of the corresponding diffraction patterns are analyzed for various types of perturbations. The crystal classes are determined in which atomic displacements can be recorded experimentally. Diffraction patterns formed under the effect of various external factors are considered on the basis of the derived dependence of the structure factor on the characteristics of an applied force field

  16. Electronic structure engineering in silicene via atom substitution and a new two-dimensional Dirac structure Si3C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Na; Dai, Ying; Wei, Wei; Huang, Baibiao

    2018-04-01

    A lot of efforts have been made towards the band gap opening in two-dimensional silicene, the silicon version of graphene. In the present work, the electronic structures of single atom doped (B, N, Al and P) and codoped (B/N and Al/P) silicene monolayers are systematically examined on the base of density functional electronic calculations. Our results demonstrate that single atom doping can realize electron or hole doping in the silicene; while codoping, due to the syergistic effects, results in finite band gap in silicene at the Dirac point without significantly degrading the electronic properties. In addition, the characteristic of band gap shows dependence on the doping concentration. Importantly, we predict a new two-dimensional Dirac structure, the graphene-like Si3C, which also shows linear band dispersion relation around the Fermi level. Our results demonstrates an important perspective to engineer the electronic and optical properties of silicene.

  17. An investigation of one- versus two-dimensional semiclassical transition state theory for H atom abstraction and exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Samuel M; Shan, Xiao; Clary, David C

    2016-02-28

    We investigate which terms in Reduced-Dimensionality Semiclassical Transition State Theory (RD SCTST) contribute most significantly in rate constant calculations of hydrogen extraction and exchange reactions of hydrocarbons. We also investigate the importance of deep tunneling corrections to the theory. In addition, we introduce a novel formulation of the theory in Jacobi coordinates. For the reactions of H atoms with methane, ethane, and cyclopropane, we find that a one-dimensional (1-D) version of the theory without deep tunneling corrections compares well with 2-D SCTST results and accurate quantum scattering results. For the "heavy-light-heavy" H atom exchange reaction between CH3 and CH4, deep tunneling corrections are needed to yield 1-D results that compare well with 2-D results. The finding that accurate rate constants can be obtained from derivatives of the potential along only one dimension further validates RD SCTST as a computationally efficient yet accurate rate constant theory.

  18. Effects of disorder on atomic density waves and spin-singlet dimers in one-dimensional optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xianlong

    2008-01-01

    Using the Bethe-ansatz density-functional theory, we study a one-dimensional Hubbard model of confined attractively interacting fermions in the presence of a uniformly distributed disorder. The strongly correlated Luther-Emery nature of the attractive one-dimensional Hubbard model is fully taken into account as the reference system in the density-functional theory. The effects of the disorder are investigated on the atomic density waves in the weak-to-intermediate attractive interaction and on the spin-singlet dimers of doubly occupied sites in the strongly attractive regime. It is found that atomic density waves are sensitive to the disorder and the spin-singlet dimers of doubly occupied sites are quite unstable against the disorder. We also show that a very weak disorder could smear the singularities in the stiffness, thus, suppresses the spin-singlet pairs

  19. Scale-free crystallization of two-dimensional complex plasmas: Domain analysis using Minkowski tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böbel, A.; Knapek, C. A.; Räth, C.

    2018-05-01

    Experiments of the recrystallization processes in two-dimensional complex plasmas are analyzed to rigorously test a recently developed scale-free phase transition theory. The "fractal-domain-structure" (FDS) theory is based on the kinetic theory of Frenkel. It assumes the formation of homogeneous domains, separated by defect lines, during crystallization and a fractal relationship between domain area and boundary length. For the defect number fraction and system energy a scale-free power-law relation is predicted. The long-range scaling behavior of the bond-order correlation function shows clearly that the complex plasma phase transitions are not of the Kosterlitz, Thouless, Halperin, Nelson, and Young type. Previous preliminary results obtained by counting the number of dislocations and applying a bond-order metric for structural analysis are reproduced. These findings are supplemented by extending the use of the bond-order metric to measure the defect number fraction and furthermore applying state-of-the-art analysis methods, allowing a systematic testing of the FDS theory with unprecedented scrutiny: A morphological analysis of lattice structure is performed via Minkowski tensor methods. Minkowski tensors form a complete family of additive, motion covariant and continuous morphological measures that are sensitive to nonlinear properties. The FDS theory is rigorously confirmed and predictions of the theory are reproduced extremely well. The predicted scale-free power-law relation between defect fraction number and system energy is verified for one more order of magnitude at high energies compared to the inherently discontinuous bond-order metric. It is found that the fractal relation between crystalline domain area and circumference is independent of the experiment, the particular Minkowski tensor method, and the particular choice of parameters. Thus, the fractal relationship seems to be inherent to two-dimensional phase transitions in complex plasmas. Minkowski

  20. Growth of potassium sulfate crystals in the presence of organic dyes: in situ characterization by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Andrea; Moret, Massimo

    2000-01-01

    In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to observe potassium sulfate crystals growing in the presence of acid fuchsin and pyranine. These polysulfonated dyes are well known for their ability to adsorb onto the {1 1 0} and {0 1 0} (pyranine only) crystal faces. Using AFM, we analyzed the changes in surface micromorphology induced by the additives on advancing steps for the {1 1 0} and {0 1 0} surfaces. In situ AFM showed that layers grow by step flow at pre-existing steps by the addition of growth units at the step edges. It has been found that dye concentrations as low as ˜2×10 -6 M for pyranine and ˜4×10 -4 M for acid fuchsin produce significant changes in the step morphology and growth rates. The additive molecules attach to the terraces and pin the growing front. As a consequence, the edges of the growing steps become jagged as the dye molecules are adsorbed onto the crystal surface. At critical dye concentrations crystal growth is heavily hampered or even stopped along certain crystallographic directions producing, on a macroscopic scale, strong habit modifications. The formation of dye inclusions by means of macrosteps overgrowing the poisoned surface was also imaged. Interestingly, comparison of the in situ AFM experiments with previous habit modification studies showed acid fuchsin is also able to enter the {0 1 0} surfaces, a previously unnoticed phenomenon.

  1. Thermal annealing and recoil reactions of 128I atoms in thermal neutron activated iodate-nitrate mixed crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.P.; Sharma, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Recoil reaction of 128 I atoms in neutron irradiated mixed crystals (iodate-nitrate) have been studied by thermal annealing methods. The retention of 128 I (i.e. radioactivity of 128 I retained in the parent chemi cal form) decreases sharply in the beginning and then attains saturation value with the increase in concentration of nitrate. The annealing followed the usual characteristic pattern, viz., a steep rise in retention within the first few minutes and then a saturation value thereafter but these saturation values in case of mixed crystals are lower in comparison to those of pure iodate targets. The process obeys simple first order kinetics and the activation energy obtained are of lower order than those obtained in case of pure targets. The results are discussed in the light of present ideas and the role of nitrate ion and its radiolytic products have also been invoked. (author)

  2. Evaluation of preparation methods for suspended nano-objects on substrates for dimensional measurements by atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Fiala, Petra; G?hler, Daniel; Wessely, Benno; Stintz, Michael; Lazzerini, Giovanni Mattia; Yacoot, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Dimensional measurements on nano-objects by atomic force microscopy (AFM) require samples of safely fixed and well individualized particles with a suitable surface-specific particle number on flat and clean substrates. Several known and proven particle preparation methods, i.e., membrane filtration, drying, rinsing, dip coating as well as electrostatic and thermal precipitation, were performed by means of scanning electron microscopy to examine their suitability for preparing samples for dime...

  3. Three-dimensional photonic crystals as intermediate filter for thin-film tandem solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielawny, Andreas; Miclea, Paul T.; Wehrspohn, Ralf B.; Lee, Seung-Mo; Knez, Mato; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Lisca, Marian; Lederer, Falk L.; Carius, Reinhard

    2008-04-01

    The concept of a 3D photonic crystal structure as diffractive and spectrally selective intermediate filter within 'micromorphous' (a-Si/μc-Si) tandem solar cells has been investigated numerically and experimentally. Our device aims for the enhancement of the optical pathway of incident light within the amorphous silicon top cell in its spectral region of low absorption. From our previous simulations, we expect a significant improvement of the tandem cell efficiency of about absolutely 1.3%. This increases the efficiency for a typical a-Si / μc-Si tandem cell from 11.1% to 12.4%, as a result of the optical current-matching of the two junctions. We suggest as wavelength-selective optical element a 3D-structured optical thin-film, prepared by self-organized artificial opal templates and replicated with atomic layer deposition. The resulting samples are highly periodic thin-film inverted opals made of conducting and transparent zinc-oxide. We describe the fabrication processes and compare experimental data on the optical properties in reflection and transmission with our simulations and photonic band structure calculations.

  4. Periodic order and defects in Ni-based inverse opal-like crystals on the mesoscopic and atomic scale

    OpenAIRE

    Chumakova, A. V.; Valkovskiy, G. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Dyadkin, V. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Petukhov, Andrei V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of inverse opal crystals based on nickel was probed on the mesoscopic and atomic levels by a set of complementary techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron microradian and wide-angle diffraction. The microradian diffraction revealed the mesoscopic-scale face-centered-cubic (fcc) ordering of spherical voids in the inverse opal-like structure with unit cell dimension of 750±10nm. The diffuse scattering data were used to map defects in the fcc structure as a f...

  5. Modification and control of the spontaneous emission from an M-type atom embedded in an anisotropic photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue; Lue Xinyou

    2011-01-01

    We describe the spontaneous emission properties of an M-type five-level atom embedded in a photonic crystal (PC), which is coherently driven by two external laser fields. It leads to two types of quantum interference: reservoir-induced interference and laser-induced interference. Considering different detunings of atomic transition frequencies from band edges, we reveal some interesting phenomena such as spectral-line enhancement, spectral-line suppression, spectral-line narrowing, reservoir-induced cancellation of spontaneous emission and the appearance of dark lines, which originate from the quantum interference effects and the control of external laser fields. These investigations suggest possible applications in quantum optics, optical communications and in the fabrication of novel optoelectronic devices.

  6. Omnidirectional photonic band gap in magnetron sputtered TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} one dimensional photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jena, S., E-mail: shuvendujena9@gmail.com [Atomic & Molecular Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Tokas, R.B.; Sarkar, P. [Atomic & Molecular Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Misal, J.S.; Maidul Haque, S.; Rao, K.D. [Photonics & Nanotechnology Section, BARC-Vizag, Autonagar, Atomic & Molecular Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre facility, Visakhapatnam 530 012 (India); Thakur, S.; Sahoo, N.K. [Atomic & Molecular Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2016-01-29

    One dimensional photonic crystal (1DPC) of TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} multilayer has been fabricated by sequential asymmetric bipolar pulsed dc magnetron sputtering of TiO{sub 2} and radio frequency magnetron sputtering of SiO{sub 2} to achieve wide omnidirectional photonic band in the visible region. The microstructure and optical response of the TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} photonic crystal have been characterized by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and spectrophotometry respectively. The surface of the photonic crystal is very smooth having surface roughness of 2.6 nm. Reflection and transmission spectra have been measured in the wavelength range 300 to 1000 nm for both transverse electric and transverse magnetic waves. Wide high reflection photonic band gap (∆ λ = 245 nm) in the visible and near infrared regions (592–837 nm) at normal incidence has been achieved. The measured photonic band gap (PBG) is found well matching with the calculated photonic band gap of an infinite 1DPC. The experimentally observed omnidirectional photonic band 592–668 nm (∆ λ = 76 nm) in the visible region with band to mid-band ratio ∆ λ/λ = 12% for reflectivity R > 99% over the incident angle range of 0°–70° is found almost matching with the calculated omnidirectional PBG. The omnidirectional reflection band is found much wider as compared to the values reported in literature so far in the visible region for TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} periodic photonic crystal. - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} 1DPC has been fabricated using magnetron sputtering technique. • Experimental optical response is found good agreement with simulation results. • Wide omnidirectional photonic band in the visible spectrum has been achieved.

  7. Three-dimensional imaging of a complex concaved cuboctahedron copper sulfide crystal by x-ray nanotomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jie; Tian Jinping; Li Wenjie; Tian Yangchao; Wu Chunyan; Yu Shuhong

    2008-01-01

    By combining Fresnel zone-plate based transmission x-ray microscopy with computed tomography, the nanoscale features in materials with complex shapes can be imaged using synchrotron radiation. The tomographic data sets of a complex copper sulfide crystal were acquired in the angle range ±70 deg. at photon energy of 8.0 keV and then were reconstructed by a standard filtered-back-projection algorithm. This experiment shows the quantifiable three-dimensional information of the copper sulfide crystal, which offers a complete understanding of the concaved cuboctahedron structure with 14 faces comprising of six squares and eight triangles

  8. Strongly nonexponential time-resolved fluorescence of quantum-dot ensembles in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaev, Ivan S.; Lodahl, Peter; van Driel, A. Floris

    2007-01-01

    We observe experimentally that ensembles of quantum dots in three-dimensional 3D photonic crystals reveal strongly nonexponential time-resolved emission. These complex emission decay curves are analyzed with a continuous distribution of decay rates. The log-normal distribution describes the decays...... parameter. This interpretation qualitatively agrees with the calculations of the 3D projected local density of states. We therefore conclude that fluorescence decay of ensembles of quantum dots is highly nonexponential to an extent that is controlled by photonic crystals....

  9. Glass-embedded two-dimensional silicon photonic crystal devices with a broad bandwidth waveguide and a high quality nanocavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Seung-Woo; Han, Jin-Kyu; Song, Bong-Shik; Noda, Susumu

    2010-08-30

    To enhance the mechanical stability of a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab structure and maintain its excellent performance, we designed a glass-embedded silicon photonic crystal device consisting of a broad bandwidth waveguide and a nanocavity with a high quality (Q) factor, and then fabricated the structure using spin-on glass (SOG). Furthermore, we showed that the refractive index of the SOG could be tuned from 1.37 to 1.57 by varying the curing temperature of the SOG. Finally, we demonstrated a glass-embedded heterostructured cavity with an ultrahigh Q factor of 160,000 by adjusting the refractive index of the SOG.

  10. The focusing effect of electromagnetic waves in two-dimensional photonic crystals with gradually varying lattice constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Bakhshi Garmi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we studied the focusing effect of electromagnetic wave in the two-dimensional graded photonic crystal consisting of Silicon rods in the air background with gradually varying lattice constant. The results showed that graded photonic crystal can focus wide beams on a narrow area at frequencies near the lower edge of the band gap, where equal frequency contours are not concave. For calculation of photonic band structure and equal frequency contours, we have used plane wave expansion method and revised plane wave expansion method, respectively. The calculation of the electric and magnetic fields was performed by finite difference time domain method.

  11. Fast fringe-field switching of a liquid crystal cell by two-dimensional confinement with virtual walls

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Tae-Hoon; Oh, Seung-Won; Park, Young-Jin; Choi, Yeongyu; Yoon, Tae-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    We report a simple method for reducing the response time of a fringe-field switching liquid crystal cell by using two-dimensional confinement of the liquid crystals. Through both numerical calculations and experiments, we show that the switching speed can be increased by several fold in a fringe-field switching cell by simply using a rubbing angle of zero, which causes virtual walls to be built when an electric field is applied between the interdigitated electrodes and the common electrode, w...

  12. Analysis of cutoff frequency in a one-dimensional superconductor-metamaterial photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Arafa H; Aghajamali, Alireza; Elsayed, Hussein A.; Mobarak, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Our results show that the appearance of the cutoff frequency, below which the incident electromagnetic waves cannot propagate in the structure. We demonstrate that the cutoff frequency shows an upward trend as the thickness of the superconductor layer as well as the thickness of the metamaterial increase. • The cutoff frequency can be tuned by the operating temperature. Our structures are good candidates for many optical devices such as optical filters, switches, temperature controlled optical shutter, and among photoelectronic applications in gigahertz. - Abstract: In this paper, using the two-fluid model and the characteristic matrix method, we investigate the transmission characteristics of the one-dimensional photonic crystal. Our structure composed of the layers of low-temperature superconductor material (NbN) and double-negative metamaterial. We target studying the effect of many parameters such as the thickness of the superconductor material, the thickness of the metamaterial layer, and the operating temperature. We show that the cut-off frequency can be tuned efficiently by the operating temperature as well as the thicknesses of the constituent materials.

  13. Acoustic Band Gaps in Three-Dimensional NaCl-Type Acoustic Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nong-Yu, Fang; Fu-Gen, Wu; Xin, Zhang

    2008-01-01

    We present the acoustic band gaps (ABGs) for a geometry of three-dimensional complex acoustic crystals: the NaCl-type structure. By using the super cell method based on the plane-wave expansion method (PWE), we study the three configurations formed by water objects (either a sphere of different sizes or a cube) located at the vertices of simple cubic (SC) lattice and surrounded by mercury background. The numerical results show that ABGs larger than the original SC structure for all the three configurations can be obtained by adjusting the length-diameter ratio of adjacent objects but keeping the filling fraction (f = 0.25) of the unit cell unchanged. We also compare our results with that of 3D solid composites and find that the ABGs in liquid composites are insensitive to the shapes as that in the solid composites. We further prove that the decrease of the translation group symmetry is more efficient in creating the ABGs in 3D water-mercury systems. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  14. Surface topography to reflectivity mapping in two-dimensional photonic crystals designed in germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husanu, M.A.; Ganea, C.P. [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105b, 077125 Magurele, Ilfov (Romania); Anghel, I. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma & Radiation Physics, Atomistilor 409, 077125 Magurele (Romania); University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, Atomistilor 405, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Florica, C.; Rasoga, O. [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105b, 077125 Magurele, Ilfov (Romania); Popescu, D.G., E-mail: dana.popescu@infim.ro [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105b, 077125 Magurele, Ilfov (Romania)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Laser ablation is used for drilling a periodic 2D photonic structure. • Confinement of radiation is revealed by infra-red spectromicroscopy correlated with numerical calculations. • Telecommunication range is accessible upon tuning conveniently the processing parameters. - Abstract: Light confinement in a two dimensional photonic crystal (2D PhC) with hexagonal symmetry is studied using infra-red reflectance spectromicroscopy and numerical calculations. The structure has been realized by laser ablation, using a pulsed laser (λ = 775 nm), perforating an In-doped Ge wafer and creating a lattice of holes with well-defined symmetry. Correlating the spectral signature of the photonic gaps recorded experimentally with the results obtained in the finite difference time domain and finite difference frequency domain calculations, we established the relationship between the geometric parameters of the structure (lattice constants, shape of the hole) and its efficiency in trapping and guiding the radiation in a well-defined frequency range. Besides the gap in the low energy range of transversal electric modes, a second one is identified in the telecommunication range, originating in the localization of the leaky modes within the radiation continuum. The emerging picture is of a device with promising characteristics as an alternative to Si-based technology in photonic device fabrication with special emphasize in energy storage and conversion.

  15. Investigating Optical Properties of One-Dimensional Photonic Crystals Containing Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahshid Mokhtarnejad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined MQWs made of InGaAs/GaAs, InAlAs/InP, and InGaAs/InP in terms of their band structure and reflectivity. We also demonstrated that the reflectivity of MQWs under normal incident was at maximum, while both using a strong pump and changing incident angle reduced it. Reflectivity of the structure for a weak probe pulse depends on polarization, intensity of the pump pulse, and delay between the probe pulse and the pump pulse. So this system can be used as an ultrafast all-optical switch which is inspected by the transfer matrix method. After studying the band structure of the one-dimensional photonic crystal, the optical stark effect (OSE was considered on it. Due to the OSE on virtual exciton levels, the switching time can be in the order of picoseconds. Moreover, it is demonstrated that, by introducing errors in width of barrier and well as well as by inserting defect, the reflectivity is reduced. Thus, by employing the mechanism of stark effect MQWs band-gaps can be easily controlled which is useful in designing MWQ based optical switches and filters. By comparing the results, we observe that the reflectivity of MWQ containing 200 periods of InAlAs/InP quantum wells shows the maximum reflectivity of 96%.

  16. The band structures of three-dimensional nonlinear plasma photonic crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Feng Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the properties of the photonic band gaps (PBGs for three-dimensional (3D nonlinear plasma photonic crystals (PPCs are theoretically investigated by the plane wave expansion method, whose equations for calculations also are deduced. The configuration of 3D nonlinear PPCs is the Kerr nonlinear dielectric spheres (Kerr effect is considered inserted in the plasma background with simple-cubic lattices. The inserted dielectric spheres are Kerr nonlinear dielectrics whose relative permittivities are the functions of the external light intensity. Three different Kerr nonlinear dielectrics are considered, which can be expressed as the functions of space coordinates. The influences of the parameters for the Kerr nonlinear dielectrics on the PBGs also are discussed. The calculated results demonstrate that the locations, bandwidths and number of PBGs can be manipulated with the different Kerr nonlinear dielectrics. Compared with the conventional 3D dielectric PCs and PPCs with simple-cubic lattices, the more PBGs or larger PBG can be achieved in the 3D nonlinear PPCs. Those results provide a new way to design the novel devices based on the PPCs.

  17. Optical properties of a defective one-dimensional photonic crystal containing graphene nanaolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entezar, S. Roshan; Saleki, Z.; Madani, A.

    2015-01-01

    The transmission properties of a defective one-dimensional photonic crystal containing graphene nanolayers have been investigated using the transfer matrix method. It is shown that two kinds of the defect modes can be found in the band gaps of the structure. One kind is the traditional defect mode which is created in the Bragg gaps of the structure and is due to the breaking of the periodicity of the dielectric lattice. The other one is created in the graphene induced band gap. Such a defect mode which we call it the graphene induced defect mode is due to the breaking of the periodicity of the graphene lattice. However, our investigations reveal that only in the case of wide defect layers one can obtain the graphene induced defect modes. The effects of many parameters such as the incident angle, the state of polarization and the chemical potential of the graphene nanolayers on the properties of the graphene induced defect modes are discussed. Moreover, the possibility of external control of the graphene induced defect modes using a gate voltage is shown.

  18. Electromagnetically induced reflectance and Fano resonance in one dimensional superconducting photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athe, Pratik; Srivastava, Sanjay; Thapa, Khem B.

    2018-04-01

    In the present work, we demonstrate the generation of optical Fano resonance and electromagnetically induced reflectance (EIR) in one-dimensional superconducting photonic crystal (1D SPC) by numerical simulation using transfer matrix method as analysis tool. We investigated the optical response of 1D SPC structure consisting of alternate layer of two different superconductors and observed that the optical spectra of this structure exhibit two narrow reflectance peaks with zero reflectivity of sidebands. Further, we added a dielectric cap layer to this 1D SPC structure and found that addition of dielectric cap layer transforms the line shape of sidebands around the narrow reflectance peaks which leads to the formation of Fano resonance and EIR line shape in reflectance spectra. We also studied the effects of the number of periods, refractive index and thickness of dielectric cap layer on the lineshape of EIR and Fano resonances. It was observed that the amplitude of peak reflectance of EIR achieves 100% reflectance by increasing the number of periods.

  19. Surface acoustic waves in two dimensional phononic crystal with anisotropic inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketata H.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available An analysis is given to the band structure of the two dimensional solid phononic crystal considered as a semi infinite medium. The lattice includes an array of elastic anisotropic materials with different shapes embedded in a uniform matrix. For illustration two kinds of phononic materials are assumed. A particular attention is devoted to the computational procedure which is mainly based on the plane wave expansion (PWE method. It has been adapted to Matlab environment. Numerical calculations of the dispersion curves have been achieved by introducing particular functions which transform motion equations into an Eigen value problem. Significant improvements are obtained by increasing reasonably the number of Fourier components even when a large elastic mismatch is assumed. Such approach can be generalized to different types of symmetry and permit new physical properties as piezoelectricity to be added. The actual semi infinite phononic structure with a free surface has been shown to support surface acoustic waves (SAW. The obtained dispersion curves reveal band gaps in the SAW branches. It has been found that the influence, of the filling factor and anisotropy on their band gaps, is different from that of bulk waves.

  20. Two-dimensional photonic crystal bandedge laser with hybrid perovskite thin film for optical gain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Hyungrae [Department of Biophysics and Chemical Biology, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Inter-University Semiconductor Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Seunghwan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myungjae [Inter-University Semiconductor Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Heonsu, E-mail: hsjeon@snu.ac.kr [Department of Biophysics and Chemical Biology, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Inter-University Semiconductor Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-02

    We report optically pumped room temperature single mode laser that contains a thin film of hybrid perovskite, an emerging photonic material, as gain medium. Two-dimensional square lattice photonic crystal (PhC) backbone structure enables single mode laser operation via a photonic bandedge mode, while a thin film of methyl-ammonium lead iodide (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}) spin-coated atop provides optical gain for lasing. Two kinds of bandedge modes, Γ and M, are employed, and both devices laser in single mode at similar laser thresholds of ∼200 μJ/cm{sup 2} in pulse energy density. Polarization dependence measurements reveal a clear difference between the two kinds of bandedge lasers: isotropic for the Γ-point laser and highly anisotropic for the M-point laser. These observations are consistent with expected modal properties, confirming that the lasing actions indeed originate from the corresponding PhC bandedge modes.

  1. Two-dimensional NMR investigations of the dynamic conformations of phospholipids and liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Mei [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Applied Science and Technology

    1996-05-01

    Two-dimensional 13C, 1H, and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are developed and used to study molecular structure and dynamics in liquid-crystalline systems, primarily phospholipids and nematic liquid crystals. NMR spectroscopy characterizes molecular conformation in terms of orientations and distances of molecular segments. In anisotropically mobile systems, this is achieved by measuring motionally-averaged nuclear dipolar couplings and chemical shift anisotropies. The short-range couplings yield useful bond order parameters, while the long-range interactions constrain the overall conformation. In this work, techniques for probing proton dipolar local fields are further developed to obtain highlyresolved dipolar couplings between protons and rare spins. By exploiting variable-angle sample spinning techniques, orientation-sensitive NMR spectra are resolved according to sitespecific isotropic chemical shifts. Moreover, the signs and magnitudes of various short-range dipolar couplings are obtained. They are used in novel theoretical analyses that provide information about segmental orientations and their distributions. Such information is obtained in a model-independent fashion or with physically reasonable assumptions. The structural investigation of phospholipids is focused on the dynam

  2. Two-dimensional photonic crystal arrays for polymer:fullerene solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sungho; Han, Jiyoung; Do, Young Rag; Kim, Hwajeong; Yim, Sanggyu; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2011-11-18

    We report the application of two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PC) array substrates for polymer:fullerene solar cells of which the active layer is made with blended films of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The 2D PC array substrates were fabricated by employing a nanosphere lithography technique. Two different hole depths (200 and 300 nm) were introduced for the 2D PC arrays to examine the hole depth effect on the light harvesting (trapping). The optical effect by the 2D PC arrays was investigated by the measurement of optical transmittance either in the direction normal to the substrate (direct transmittance) or in all directions (integrated transmittance). The results showed that the integrated transmittance was higher for the 2D PC array substrates than the conventional planar substrate at the wavelengths of ca. 400 nm, even though the direct transmittance of 2D PC array substrates was much lower over the entire visible light range. The short circuit current density (J(SC)) was higher for the device with the 2D PC array (200 nm hole depth) than the reference device. However, the device with the 2D PC array (300 nm hole depth) showed a slightly lower J(SC) value at a high light intensity in spite of its light harvesting effect proven at a lower light intensity.

  3. NanoFIBrication of a two-dimensional phononic crystal in a free standing membrane.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leseman, Zayd C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Goettler, Drew F. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Su, Mehmet F. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); El-Kady, Ihab Fathy; Olsson, Roy H., III

    2010-06-01

    A two-dimensional phononic crystal (PnC) that can operate in the GHz range is created in a freestanding silicon substrate using NanoFIBrication (using a focused ion beam (FIB) to fabricate nanostructures). First, a simple cubic 6.75 x 6.75 ?m array of vias with 150 nm spacing is generated. After patterning the vias, they are backfilled with void-free tungsten scatterers. Each via has a diameter of 48 nm. Numerical calculations predict this 2D PnC will generate a band gap near 22 GHz. A protective layer of chromium on top of the thin (100 nm) silicon membrane confines the surface damage to the chromium, which can be removed at a later time. Inspection of the underside of the membrane shows the vias flaring out at the exit, which we are dubbing the 'trumpet effect'. The trumpet effect is explained by modeling the lateral damage in a freestanding membrane.

  4. A One-Dimensional Quantum Interface between a Few Atoms and Weak Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Béguin, Jean-Baptiste Sylvain

    Quantum interfaces between light and the collective degrees of freedom of an ensemble of identical atoms have been proposed as a valuable and promising alternative to cavity quantum electrodynamics enhanced interaction with single particles. Many features of the quantum world (e. g. multipartite...... entanglement, squeezed states), which are central to the future developments of Quantum Information Science and Metrology, can be explored with mesoscopic collective states of atoms. An efficient quantum interface needs a high optical depth for the atomic ensemble and a measurement sensitivity limited by both...... the intrinsic quantum noise of light and the quantum projection noise of atoms. This was achieved in the past in a free space optical dipole trap ensemble of Nat ∼ 10^6 atoms, which triggered the operation of a collective Ramsey atomic clock assisted by entanglement. We have characterized and prepared non...

  5. About vortex-like atomic motion in a loaded single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, A. I.; Nikonov, A. Yu.

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents a molecular dynamics study of internal stress and atomic displacement redistributions in a preliminary loaded solid. The study demonstrates the possibility of self-organized vortices as dynamic defects of typical size 1-5 nm due to atomic motion in the elastic region at the stage of relaxation. The simulation results agree well with experimental data on strain localization in elastic distortion regions which gives rise to nanodipoles of partial disclinations.

  6. A new computationally-efficient two-dimensional model for boron implantation into single-crystal silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, K.M.; Park, C.; Yang, S.; Morris, S.; Do, V.; Tasch, F.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a new computationally-efficient two-dimensional model for boron implantation into single-crystal silicon. This paper reports that this new model is based on the dual Pearson semi-empirical implant depth profile model and the UT-MARLOWE Monte Carlo boron ion implantation model. This new model can predict with very high computational efficiency two-dimensional as-implanted boron profiles as a function of energy, dose, tilt angle, rotation angle, masking edge orientation, and masking edge thickness

  7. Atomic force microscopy: A three-dimensional reconstructive tool of oral microbiota in gingivitis and periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Sunder Salavadhi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims to ascertain the advantages of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM in the morphologic study of microorganisms and their interactions within the subgingival biofilm in patients with gingivitis and periodontitis. Settings and Design: Conducted a study on twenty patients, ten patients with severe periodontitis with probing the pocket depth of ≥8 mm, with a clinical attachment loss (CAL of ≥6 mm CAL and ten patients with gingivitis: ≥5 mm pocket depth, and no attachment loss, was selected for the study. Materials and Methods: Bacterial biofilms were collected and slide preparation done. Morphological study was done using AFM. AFM consists of a cantilever-mounted tip, a piezoelectric scanner, a photodetector diode, a laser diode, and a feedback control. The laser beam is reflected from back of the cantilever into the quadrant of the photodetector. AFM works on the principle of interaction between the tip and the sample which causes the cantilever to deflect, thereby changing the position of laser onto the photodetector. Methodology used for studying the bacteria through AFM includes the following: (1 Probe type: Platinum coated silicon nitrate tip. (2 Probe force: 0.11 N/m. (3 Probe geometry: Triangular shaped tip. (4 Probe frequency: 22 KHz. (5 Probe immobilization: Used in Contact mode. AFM Solver Pro-M (NT-MDT equipped with ETALON probe was used to take images in Nova software. Results: The investigation showed various morphological features, such as shape, size, and secretory product-like vesicles of the bacterial species involved in gingivitis and periodontitis. More bacterial surface details were studied by reproducing a three-dimensional reconstruction using AFM. Conclusions: The morphological variations of bacteria of different sizes, and shapes, cell wall structures, secretory product-like vesicles flagellated and filamentous microorganisms, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and bacterial coaggregation analysis were done by

  8. Integration of Generic Multi-dimensional Model and Operational Policies for Batch Cooling Crystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Samad, Noor Asma Fazli; Singh, Ravendra; Sin, Gürkan

    2011-01-01

    Crystallization processes form an important class of separation methods that are frequently used in the chemical, the pharmaceutical and the food industry. The specifications of the crystal product are usually given in terms of crystal size, shape and purity. In order to predict the desired cryst...

  9. Serial crystallography captures enzyme catalysis in copper nitrite reductase at atomic resolution from one crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Horrell

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Relating individual protein crystal structures to an enzyme mechanism remains a major and challenging goal for structural biology. Serial crystallography using multiple crystals has recently been reported in both synchrotron-radiation and X-ray free-electron laser experiments. In this work, serial crystallography was used to obtain multiple structures serially from one crystal (MSOX to study in crystallo enzyme catalysis. Rapid, shutterless X-ray detector technology on a synchrotron MX beamline was exploited to perform low-dose serial crystallography on a single copper nitrite reductase crystal, which survived long enough for 45 consecutive 100 K X-ray structures to be collected at 1.07–1.62 Å resolution, all sampled from the same crystal volume. This serial crystallography approach revealed the gradual conversion of the substrate bound at the catalytic type 2 Cu centre from nitrite to nitric oxide, following reduction of the type 1 Cu electron-transfer centre by X-ray-generated solvated electrons. Significant, well defined structural rearrangements in the active site are evident in the series as the enzyme moves through its catalytic cycle, namely nitrite reduction, which is a vital step in the global denitrification process. It is proposed that such a serial crystallography approach is widely applicable for studying any redox or electron-driven enzyme reactions from a single protein crystal. It can provide a `catalytic reaction movie' highlighting the structural changes that occur during enzyme catalysis. The anticipated developments in the automation of data analysis and modelling are likely to allow seamless and near-real-time analysis of such data on-site at some of the powerful synchrotron crystallographic beamlines.

  10. Permeability of two-dimensional graphene and hexagonal-boron nitride to hydrogen atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Varun; Kumar, Ankit; Ray, Nirat

    2018-05-01

    The permeability of atomic hydrogen in monolayer hexagonal Boron Nitride(h-BN) and graphene has been studied using first-principles density functional theory based simulations. For the specific cases of physisorption and chemisoroption, barrier heights are calculated using the nudged elastic band approach. We find that the barrier potential for physisorption through the ring is lower for graphene than h-BN. In the case of chemisorption, where the H atom passes through by making bonds with the atoms in the ring, the barrier potential for the graphene was found to be higher than that of h-BN. We conclude that the penetration of H atom with notable kinetic energy (graphene as compared to h-BN. Whereas through chemisorption, lower kinetic energy (>3eV) H-atoms have a higher chance to penetrate through h-BN than graphene.

  11. Three-Dimensional Atomic Structure of Metastable Nanoclusters in Doped Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couillard, Martin; Radtke, Guillaume; Knights, Andrew P.; Botton, Gianluigi A.

    2011-10-01

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy is used to determine the atomic structure of nanoclusters of cerium dopant atoms embedded in silicon. By channeling electrons along two crystallographic orientations, we identify a characteristic zinc-blende chemical ordering within CeSi clusters coherent with the silicon host matrix. Strain energy limits the size of these ordered arrangements to just above 1 nm. With the local order identified, we then determine the atomic configuration of an individual subnanometer cluster by quantifying the scattering intensity under weak channeling condition in terms of the number of atoms. Analysis based on single-atom visualization also evidences the presence of split-vacancy impurity complexes, which supports the hypothesis of a vacancy-assisted formation of these metastable CeSi nanophases.

  12. Resonant Coulomb excitation of atomic nuclei propagating through a crystal in the channeling mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    The Coulomb-excitation total cross section and the distribution of decay products originating from a resonant state of a nucleus interacting with a crystal lattice has been calculated for the case of a single inelastic collision (with respect to internal degrees of freedom in a nucleus). These observables have been expressed in terms of time-dependent correlators which describe thermal oscillations of lattice nuclei and the motion of the center of mass of a nucleus propagating across a crystal target in the channelling mode. An expression generalizing the spectrum of equivalent photons calculated by the Weizsaecker-Williams method is given

  13. Influence of gamma radiation and impurity atoms on the photoconductivity of GeS single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madatov, R.S.; Alekperov, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Wide opportunities for using of layered semiconductors, particularly in optoelectronics have generated considerable interest to them. Recently it was created the unique device from GeS for the storage of solar energy. The investigated GeS 1 -xNd x S single crystals were grown by the Bridgman method. The samples were irradiated by gamma-quanta and was conducted to install 60Co at room temperature. Irradiation of p-GeS 1 -xNd x S single crystals by small doses of gamma rays increases the photoconductivity on 40%

  14. Effect of the defect on the focusing in a two-dimensional photonic-crystal-based flat lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhifang; Wang Xiuguo; Li Zhiyuan; Zhang Daozhong

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated in detail the influence of defect on the focusing of electromagnetic waves in a two-dimensional photonic-crystal flat lens by using the finite-difference time-domain method. The result shows that many focusings can be observed at the symmetrical positions when a defect is introduced into the lens. Furthermore, the wave-guides in the lens can confine the transmission wave effectively and improve the quality of the focusing

  15. Near equilibrium dynamics and one-dimensional spatial—temporal structures of polar active liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiao-Gang; Wang Qi; Forest, M. Gregory

    2014-01-01

    We systematically explore near equilibrium, flow-driven, and flow-activity coupled dynamics of polar active liquid crystals using a continuum model. Firstly, we re-derive the hydrodynamic model to ensure the thermodynamic laws are obeyed and elastic stresses and forces are consistently accounted. We then carry out a linear stability analysis about constant steady states to study near equilibrium dynamics around the steady states, revealing long-wave instability inherent in this model system and how active parameters in the model affect the instability. We then study model predictions for one-dimensional (1D) spatial—temporal structures of active liquid crystals in a channel subject to physical boundary conditions. We discuss the model prediction in two selected regimes, one is the viscous stress dominated regime, also known as the flow-driven regime, while the other is the full regime, in which all active mechanisms are included. In the viscous stress dominated regime, the polarity vector is driven by the prescribed flow field. Dynamics depend sensitively on the physical boundary condition and the type of the driven flow field. Bulk-dominated temporal periodic states and spatially homogeneous states are possible under weak anchoring conditions while spatially inhomogeneous states exist under strong anchoring conditions. In the full model, flow-orientation interaction generates a host of planar as well as out-of-plane spatial—temporal structures related to the spontaneous flows due to the molecular self-propelled motion. These results provide contact with the recent literature on active nematic suspensions. In addition, symmetry breaking patterns emerge as the additional active viscous stress due to the polarity vector is included in the force balance. The inertia effect is found to limit the long-time survival of spatial structures to those with small wave numbers, i.e., an asymptotic coarsening to long wave structures. A rich set of mechanisms for generating

  16. Bipolarons in nonmetallic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinetskii, V.L.; Pashitskii, E.A.; Yanchuk, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    The binding energy of a bipolaron in an ionic crystal increases substantially in the case of strong anisotropy of the effective masses of the free carriers of the easy plane type or easy axis type. In the second case the polaron is cigar-like in shape and the coaxial configuration of bipolarons is energetically favorable. In this case a significant gain in the binding energy and in the width of the region of existence of the bipolaron, with respect to the dielectric constant and the magnitude of the electron-phonon interaction constant, compared with an isotropic crystal, is obtained only for quasi-two-dimensional, or layered, and quasi-one-dimensional, or chainlike, crystals. This work shows that a significant gain in the binding energy can be obtained by taking into account the anisotropy of the dielectric constant of the crystal and localization of the electron wave functions in directions perpendicular to the layers and chains of atoms

  17. Structural origin of dynamic heterogeneity in three-dimensional colloidal glass formers and its link to crystal nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Takeshi; Tanaka, Hajime

    2010-06-16

    The physical understanding of glass transition remains a major challenge of physics and materials science. Among various glass-forming liquids, a colloidal liquid interacting with hard-core repulsion is now regarded as one of the most ideal model systems. Here we study the structure and dynamics of three-dimensional polydisperse colloidal liquids by Brownian dynamics simulations. We reveal that medium-range crystalline bond orientational order of the hexagonal close packed structure grows in size and lifetime with increasing packing fraction. We show that dynamic heterogeneity may be a direct consequence of this transient structural ordering, which suggests its origin is thermodynamic rather than kinetic. We also reveal that nucleation of crystals preferentially occurs in regions of high medium-range order, reflecting the low crystal-liquid interfacial energy there. These findings may shed new light not only on the fundamental nature of the glass transition, but also the mechanism of crystal nucleation.

  18. Periodic order and defects in Ni-based inverse opal-like crystals on the mesoscopic and atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumakova, A. V.; Valkovskiy, G. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Dyadkin, V. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Petukhov, A. V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2014-10-01

    The structure of inverse opal crystals based on nickel was probed on the mesoscopic and atomic levels by a set of complementary techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron microradian and wide-angle diffraction. The microradian diffraction revealed the mesoscopic-scale face-centered-cubic (fcc) ordering of spherical voids in the inverse opal-like structure with unit cell dimension of 750±10nm. The diffuse scattering data were used to map defects in the fcc structure as a function of the number of layers in the Ni inverse opal-like structure. The average lateral size of mesoscopic domains is found to be independent of the number of layers. 3D reconstruction of the reciprocal space for the inverse opal crystals with different thickness provided an indirect study of original opal templates in a depth-resolved way. The microstructure and thermal response of the framework of the porous inverse opal crystal was examined using wide-angle powder x-ray diffraction. This artificial porous structure is built from nickel crystallites possessing stacking faults and dislocations peculiar for the nickel thin films.

  19. Intregrating metallic wiring with three-dimensional polystyrene colloidal crystals using electron-beam lithography and three-dimensional laser lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Yaolan; Isotalo, Tero J; Konttinen, Mikko P; Li, Jiawei; Heiskanen, Samuli; Geng, Zhuoran; Maasilta, Ilari J

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a method to fabricate narrow, down to a few micron wide metallic leads on top of a three-dimensional (3D) colloidal crystal self-assembled from polystyrene (PS) nanospheres of diameter 260 nm, using electron-beam lithography. This fabrication is not straightforward due to the fact that PS nanospheres cannot usually survive the harsh chemical treatments required in the development and lift-off steps of electron-beam lithography. We solve this problem by increasing the chemical resistance of the PS nanospheres using an additional electron-beam irradiation step, which allows the spheres to retain their shape and their self-assembled structure, even after baking to a temperature of 160 °C, the exposure to the resist developer and the exposure to acetone, all of which are required for the electron-beam lithography step. Moreover, we show that by depositing an aluminum oxide capping layer on top of the colloidal crystal after the e-beam irradiation, the surface is smooth enough so that continuous metal wiring can be deposited by the electron-beam lithography. Finally, we also demonstrate a way to self-assemble PS colloidal crystals into a microscale container, which was fabricated using direct-write 3D laser-lithography. Metallic wiring was also successfully integrated with the combination of a container structure and a PS colloidal crystal. Our goal is to make a device for studies of thermal transport in 3D phononic crystals, but other phononic or photonic crystal applications could also be envisioned. (paper)

  20. On the wavelength dependence of the reflectivity of one-dimensionally distorted crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guigay, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    Scaling properties of the integrated reflectivity of non-absorbing perfect or ideally imperfect crystals as a function of wavelength, in the symmetrical Laue and Bragg cases, are shown also to be valid for distorted crystals where the gradient of the lattice phase factor is perpendicular to the crystal surfaces. This result is obtained by an analysis of the Taupin-Takagi equations. Some previous experiments (test of a proposal for extinction-free measurements of F M /F N in polarized neutron scattering by magnetic crystals, and neutron diffraction from curved and non-curved crystals) are discussed from this point of view. (orig.)