WorldWideScience

Sample records for dimensional atomic crystals

  1. Two-dimensional atomic crystals beyond graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B.

    2014-06-01

    Carbon-based nanostructures have been the center of intense research and development for more than two decades now. Of these materials, graphene, a two-dimensional (2D) layered material system, has had a significant impact on science and technology over the past decade after monolayers of this material were experimentally isolated in 2004. The recent emergence of other classes of 2D graphene-like layered materials has added yet more exciting dimensions for research in exploring the diverse properties and applications arising from these 2D material systems. For example, hexagonal-BN, a layered material closest in structure to graphene, is an insulator, while NbSe2, a transition metal di-chalcogenide, is metallic and monolayers of other transition metal di-chalcogenides such as MoS2 are direct band-gap semiconductors. The rich spectrum of properties that 2D layered material systems offer can potentially be engineered ondemand, and creates exciting prospects for using such materials in applications ranging from electronics, sensing, photonics, energy harvesting and flexible electronics over the coming years.

  2. Gate-induced superconductivity in two-dimensional atomic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) crystals are attracting growing interest in condensed matter physics, since these systems exhibit not only rich electronic and photonic properties but also exotic electronic phase transitions including superconductivity and charge density wave. Moreover, owing to the recent development of transfer methods after exfoliation and electric-double-layer transistors, superconducting 2D atomic crystals, the thicknesses of which are below 1-2 nm, have been successfully obtained. Here, we present a topical review on the recent discoveries of 2D crystalline superconductors by ionic-liquid gating and a series of their novel properties. In particular, we highlight two topics; quantum metallic states (or possible metallic ground states) and superconductivity robust against in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena can be discussed with the effects of weakened disorder and/or broken spacial inversion symmetry leading to valley-dependent spin-momentum locking (spin-valley locking). These examples suggest the superconducting 2D crystals are new platforms for investigating the intrinsic quantum phases as well as exotic nature in 2D superconductors.

  3. Zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons: one-dimensional resonant channels in two-dimensional atomic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez, Carlos J; Pereira, Ana L C; Schulz, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate phosphorene zigzag nanoribbons as a platform for constriction engineering. In the presence of a constriction at one of the edges, quantum confinement of edge-protected states reveals conductance peaks, if the edge is uncoupled from the other edge. If the constriction is narrow enough to promote coupling between edges, it gives rise to Fano-like resonances as well as antiresonances in the transmission spectrum. These effects are shown to mimic an atomic chain like behavior in a two dimensional atomic crystal. PMID:28144546

  4. Zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons: one-dimensional resonant channels in two-dimensional atomic crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos. J. Páez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically investigate phosphorene zigzag nanoribbons as a platform for constriction engineering. In the presence of a constriction at one of the edges, quantum confinement of edge-protected states reveals conductance peaks, if the edge is uncoupled from the other edge. If the constriction is narrow enough to promote coupling between edges, it gives rise to Fano-like resonances as well as antiresonances in the transmission spectrum. These effects are shown to mimic an atomic chain like behavior in a two dimensional atomic crystal.

  5. Crystal-Phase Quantum Wires: One-Dimensional Heterostructures with Atomically Flat Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corfdir, Pierre; Li, Hong; Marquardt, Oliver; Gao, Guanhui; Molas, Maciej R; Zettler, Johannes K; van Treeck, David; Flissikowski, Timur; Potemski, Marek; Draxl, Claudia; Trampert, Achim; Fernández-Garrido, Sergio; Grahn, Holger T; Brandt, Oliver

    2018-01-10

    In semiconductor quantum-wire heterostructures, interface roughness leads to exciton localization and to a radiative decay rate much smaller than that expected for structures with flat interfaces. Here, we uncover the electronic and optical properties of the one-dimensional extended defects that form at the intersection between stacking faults and inversion domain boundaries in GaN nanowires. We show that they act as crystal-phase quantum wires, a novel one-dimensional quantum system with atomically flat interfaces. These quantum wires efficiently capture excitons whose radiative decay gives rise to an optical doublet at 3.36 eV at 4.2 K. The binding energy of excitons confined in crystal-phase quantum wires is measured to be more than twice larger than that of the bulk. As a result of their unprecedented interface quality, these crystal-phase quantum wires constitute a model system for the study of one-dimensional excitons.

  6. Electronic Properties of Graphene Encapsulated with Different Two-Dimensional Atomic Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Kretinin, A. V.; Cao, Y.; Tu, J. S.; Yu, G. L.; Jalil, R.; Novoselov, K. S.; Haigh, S. J.; Gholinia, A.; Mishchenko, A.; Lozada, M.; Georgiou, T.; Woods, C. R.; Withers, F.; Blake, P.; Eda, G.

    2014-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride is the only substrate that has so far allowed graphene devices exhibiting micron-scale ballistic transport. Can other atomically flat crystals be used as substrates for making quality graphene heterostructures? Here we report on our search for alternative substrates. The devices fabricated by encapsulating graphene with molybdenum or tungsten disulphides and hBN are found to exhibit consistently high carrier mobilities of about 60,000 cm$^{2}$V$^{-1}$s$^{-1}$. In contr...

  7. Band structure of one-dimensional doped photonic crystal with three level atoms using the Fresnel coefficients method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, A.; Rahmat, A.; Bakkeshizadeh, S.

    2018-01-01

    We consider a one-dimensional photonic crystal (1DPC) composed of double-layered dielectrics. Electric permittivity and magnetic permeability of this crystal depends on the incident electromagnetic wave frequency. We suppose that three level atoms have been added to the second layer of each dielectric and this photonic crystal (PC) has been doped. These atoms can be added to the layer with different rates. In this paper, we have calculated and compared the band structure of the mentioned PC considering the effect of added atoms to the second layer with different rates through the Fresnel coefficients method. We find out that according to the effective medium theory, the electric permittivity of the second layer changes. Also the band structure of PC for both TE and TM polarizations changes, too. The width of bandgaps related to “zero averaged refractive index” and “Bragg” increases. Moreover, new gap branches appear in new frequencies at both TE and TM polarizations. In specific state, two branches of “zero permittivity” gap appear in the PC band structure related to TM polarization. With increasing the amount of the filling rate of total volume with three level atoms, we observe a lot of changes in the PC band structure.

  8. Electronic properties of graphene encapsulated with different two-dimensional atomic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretinin, A V; Cao, Y; Tu, J S; Yu, G L; Jalil, R; Novoselov, K S; Haigh, S J; Gholinia, A; Mishchenko, A; Lozada, M; Georgiou, T; Woods, C R; Withers, F; Blake, P; Eda, G; Wirsig, A; Hucho, C; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Geim, A K; Gorbachev, R V

    2014-06-11

    Hexagonal boron nitride is the only substrate that has so far allowed graphene devices exhibiting micrometer-scale ballistic transport. Can other atomically flat crystals be used as substrates for making quality graphene heterostructures? Here we report on our search for alternative substrates. The devices fabricated by encapsulating graphene with molybdenum or tungsten disulfides and hBN are found to exhibit consistently high carrier mobilities of about 60 000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). In contrast, encapsulation with atomically flat layered oxides such as mica, bismuth strontium calcium copper oxide, and vanadium pentoxide results in exceptionally low quality of graphene devices with mobilities of ∼1000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). We attribute the difference mainly to self-cleansing that takes place at interfaces between graphene, hBN, and transition metal dichalcogenides. Surface contamination assembles into large pockets allowing the rest of the interface to become atomically clean. The cleansing process does not occur for graphene on atomically flat oxide substrates.

  9. Monolayer atomic crystal molecular superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; He, Qiyuan; Halim, Udayabagya; Liu, Yuanyue; Zhu, Enbo; Lin, Zhaoyang; Xiao, Hai; Duan, Xidong; Feng, Ziying; Cheng, Rui; Weiss, Nathan O.; Ye, Guojun; Huang, Yun-Chiao; Wu, Hao; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Shakir, Imran; Liao, Lei; Chen, Xianhui; Goddard, William A., III; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2018-03-01

    Artificial superlattices, based on van der Waals heterostructures of two-dimensional atomic crystals such as graphene or molybdenum disulfide, offer technological opportunities beyond the reach of existing materials. Typical strategies for creating such artificial superlattices rely on arduous layer-by-layer exfoliation and restacking, with limited yield and reproducibility. The bottom-up approach of using chemical-vapour deposition produces high-quality heterostructures but becomes increasingly difficult for high-order superlattices. The intercalation of selected two-dimensional atomic crystals with alkali metal ions offers an alternative way to superlattice structures, but these usually have poor stability and seriously altered electronic properties. Here we report an electrochemical molecular intercalation approach to a new class of stable superlattices in which monolayer atomic crystals alternate with molecular layers. Using black phosphorus as a model system, we show that intercalation with cetyl-trimethylammonium bromide produces monolayer phosphorene molecular superlattices in which the interlayer distance is more than double that in black phosphorus, effectively isolating the phosphorene monolayers. Electrical transport studies of transistors fabricated from the monolayer phosphorene molecular superlattice show an on/off current ratio exceeding 107, along with excellent mobility and superior stability. We further show that several different two-dimensional atomic crystals, such as molybdenum disulfide and tungsten diselenide, can be intercalated with quaternary ammonium molecules of varying sizes and symmetries to produce a broad class of superlattices with tailored molecular structures, interlayer distances, phase compositions, electronic and optical properties. These studies define a versatile material platform for fundamental studies and potential technological applications.

  10. Atomic force microscopy studies of surface and dimensional changes in Li xCoO2 crystals during lithium de-intercalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemencon, A.; Appapillai, A.T.; Kumar, S.; Shao-Horn, Y.

    2007-01-01

    An in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) cell was developed to study surface and dimensional changes of individual Li x CoO 2 crystals during lithium de-intercalation. Discrete Li 2 CO 3 particles having 50-250 nm in diameter and 5-15 nm in height were observed on the surface of stoichiometric LiCoO 2 crystals and they were shown to gradually dissolve into the LiPF 6 -containing electrolyte. The dimensional change of individual Li x CoO 2 crystals along the c hex. axis was monitored in situ during lithium de-intercalation. Evidence of surface instability or structural instability was not found in Li x CoO 2 single crystals upon de-intercalation to 4.2 V versus Li

  11. Atomic crystals resistive switching memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chunsen; Zhang David Wei; Zhou Peng

    2017-01-01

    Facing the growing data storage and computing demands, a high accessing speed memory with low power and non-volatile character is urgently needed. Resistive access random memory with 4F 2 cell size, switching in sub-nanosecond, cycling endurances of over 10 12 cycles, and information retention exceeding 10 years, is considered as promising next-generation non-volatile memory. However, the energy per bit is still too high to compete against static random access memory and dynamic random access memory. The sneak leakage path and metal film sheet resistance issues hinder the further scaling down. The variation of resistance between different devices and even various cycles in the same device, hold resistive access random memory back from commercialization. The emerging of atomic crystals, possessing fine interface without dangling bonds in low dimension, can provide atomic level solutions for the obsessional issues. Moreover, the unique properties of atomic crystals also enable new type resistive switching memories, which provide a brand-new direction for the resistive access random memory. (topical reviews)

  12. Atomic lattice excitons: from condensates to crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantian, A; Daley, A J; Toermae, P; Zoller, P

    2007-01-01

    We discuss atomic lattice excitons (ALEs), bound particle-hole pairs formed by fermionic atoms in two bands of an optical lattice. Such a system provides a clean set-up, with tunable masses and interactions, to study fundamental properties of excitons including exciton condensation. We also find that for a large effective mass ratio between particles and holes, effective long-range interactions can mediate the formation of an exciton crystal, for which superfluidity is suppressed. Using a combination of mean-field treatments, bosonized theory based on a Born-Oppenheimer approximation, and one-dimensional (1D) numerical computation, we discuss the properties of ALEs under varying conditions, and discuss in particular their preparation and measurement

  13. Atomic lattice excitons: from condensates to crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantian, A [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Daley, A J [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Toermae, P [Nanoscience Center, Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, PO Box 35, FIN-40014 (Finland); Zoller, P [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2007-11-15

    We discuss atomic lattice excitons (ALEs), bound particle-hole pairs formed by fermionic atoms in two bands of an optical lattice. Such a system provides a clean set-up, with tunable masses and interactions, to study fundamental properties of excitons including exciton condensation. We also find that for a large effective mass ratio between particles and holes, effective long-range interactions can mediate the formation of an exciton crystal, for which superfluidity is suppressed. Using a combination of mean-field treatments, bosonized theory based on a Born-Oppenheimer approximation, and one-dimensional (1D) numerical computation, we discuss the properties of ALEs under varying conditions, and discuss in particular their preparation and measurement.

  14. Oscillations of atomic nuclei in crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Vdovenkov, V. A.

    2002-01-01

    Oscillations of atomic nuclei in crystals are considered in this paper. It is shown that elastic nuclei oscillations relatively electron envelops (inherent, I-oscillations) and waves of such oscillations can exist in crystals at adiabatic condition. The types and energy quantums of I-oscillations for different atoms are determined. In this connection the adiabatic crystal model is offered. Each atom in the adiabatic model is submitted as I-oscillator whose stationary oscillatory terms are sho...

  15. One-dimensional photonic crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, Huaizhong; Wang, Zhanhua; Wu, Yuxin; Yang, Bai

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional photonic crystal (1DPC), which is a periodic nanostructure with a refractive index distribution along one direction, has been widely studied by scientists. In this review, materials and methods for 1DPC fabrication are summarized. Applications are listed, with a special emphasis

  16. Positronium atom coherent photoproduction in crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunashenko, Yu.P.; Pivovarov, Yu.L.

    1990-01-01

    Coherent production of relativistic positronium atom by a high energy photon under the axial orientation is considered. The consideration is based on the interactions with a separate axis, i.e. with the chain of N atoms. In this case the cross section positronium atom production is formed by summation of production amplitudes on N atoms, calculation of modulus square of complete amplitude and summation by all photon states of a crystal. It is shown that application of photon beams of accelerators can serve as an effective method for positronium atom generation

  17. Sieving hydrogen isotopes through two dimensional crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Lozada-Hidalgo, M.; Hu, S.; Marshall, O.; Mishchenko, A.; Grigorenko, A. N.; Dryfe, R. A. W.; Radha, B.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Geim, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    One-atom-thick crystals are impermeable to atoms and molecules, but hydrogen ions (thermal protons) penetrate through them. We show that monolayers of graphene and boron nitride can be used to separate hydrogen ion isotopes. Employing electrical measurements and mass spectrometry, we find that deuterons permeate through these crystals much slower than protons, resulting in a separation factor of ~10 at room temperature. The isotope effect is attributed to a difference of about 60 meV between ...

  18. Atomic force microscopy on liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Christian; Schulz, Benjamin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the atomic force microscopy (AFM) on thermotropic liquid crystals. We first give a general introduction to the technique of AFM and then describe the special requirements that have to be met for the imaging of liquid-crystalline surfaces. We also discuss the relation between the quality or reliability of the imaging results and various parameters of the scanning conditions. We briey review the existing work on AFM on liquid crystals and finally describe applications beyond the imaging, such as molecular force spectroscopy or manipulation of surface structures.

  19. One-dimensional photonic crystal design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mee, Cornelis van der; Contu, Pietro; Pintus, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    In this article we present a method to determine the band spectrum, band gaps, and discrete energy levels, of a one-dimensional photonic crystal with localized impurities. For one-dimensional crystals with piecewise constant refractive indices we develop an algorithm to recover the refractive index distribution from the period map. Finally, we derive the relationship between the period map and the scattering matrix containing the information on the localized modes.

  20. Electron crystallography of three dimensional protein crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgieva, Dilyana

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes an investigation of the potential of electron diffraction for studying three dimensional sub-micro-crystals of proteins and pharmaceuticals. A prerequisite for using electron diffraction for structural studies is the predictable availability of tiny crystals. A method for

  1. Clean Floquet Time Crystals: Models and Realizations in Cold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Biao; Wu, Ying-Hai; Liu, W. Vincent

    2018-03-01

    Time crystals, a phase showing spontaneous breaking of time-translation symmetry, has been an intriguing subject for systems far away from equilibrium. Recent experiments found such a phase in both the presence and the absence of localization, while in theories localization by disorder is usually assumed a priori. In this work, we point out that time crystals can generally exist in systems without disorder. A series of clean quasi-one-dimensional models under Floquet driving are proposed to demonstrate this unexpected result in principle. Robust time crystalline orders are found in the strongly interacting regime along with the emergent integrals of motion in the dynamical system, which can be characterized by level statistics and the out-of-time-ordered correlators. We propose two cold atom experimental schemes to realize the clean Floquet time crystals, one by making use of dipolar gases and another by synthetic dimensions.

  2. Sieving hydrogen isotopes through two-dimensional crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozada-Hidalgo, M; Hu, S; Marshall, O; Mishchenko, A; Grigorenko, A N; Dryfe, R A W; Radha, B; Grigorieva, I V; Geim, A K

    2016-01-01

    One-atom-thick crystals are impermeable to atoms and molecules, but hydrogen ions (thermal protons) penetrate through them. We show that monolayers of graphene and boron nitride can be used to separate hydrogen ion isotopes. Using electrical measurements and mass spectrometry, we found that deuterons permeate through these crystals much slower than protons, resulting in a separation factor of ≈10 at room temperature. The isotope effect is attributed to a difference of ≈60 milli-electron volts between zero-point energies of incident protons and deuterons, which translates into the equivalent difference in the activation barriers posed by two-dimensional crystals. In addition to providing insight into the proton transport mechanism, the demonstrated approach offers a competitive and scalable way for hydrogen isotope enrichment. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Point defects and atomic transport in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidiard, A.B.

    1981-02-01

    There are two principle aspects to the theory of atomic transport in crystals as caused by the action of point defects, namely (1) the calculation of relevant properties of the point defects (energies and other thermodynamic characteristics of the different possible defects, activation energies and other mobility parameters) and (2) the statistical mechanics of assemblies of defects, both equilibrium and non-equilibrium assemblies. In the five lectures given here both these aspects are touched on. The first two lectures are concerned with the calculation of relevant point defect properties, particularly in ionic crystals. The first lecture is more general, the second is concerned particularly with some recent calculations of the free volumes of formation of defects in various ionic solids; these solve a rather long-standing problem in this area. The remaining three lectures are concerned with the kinetic theory of defects mainly in relaxation, drift and diffusion situations

  4. Asymptotics for Two-dimensional Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nam, Phan Thanh; Portmann, Fabian; Solovej, Jan Philip

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the ground state energy of an atom confined to two dimensions with an infinitely heavy nucleus of charge $Z>0$ and $N$ quantum electrons of charge -1 is $E(N,Z)=-{1/2}Z^2\\ln Z+(E^{\\TF}(\\lambda)+{1/2}c^{\\rm H})Z^2+o(Z^2)$ when $Z\\to \\infty$ and $N/Z\\to \\lambda$, where $E^{\\TF}(\\lambd......We prove that the ground state energy of an atom confined to two dimensions with an infinitely heavy nucleus of charge $Z>0$ and $N$ quantum electrons of charge -1 is $E(N,Z)=-{1/2}Z^2\\ln Z+(E^{\\TF}(\\lambda)+{1/2}c^{\\rm H})Z^2+o(Z^2)$ when $Z\\to \\infty$ and $N/Z\\to \\lambda$, where $E......^{\\TF}(\\lambda)$ is given by a Thomas-Fermi type variational problem and $c^{\\rm H}\\approx -2.2339$ is an explicit constant. We also show that the radius of a two-dimensional neutral atom is unbounded when $Z\\to \\infty$, which is contrary to the expected behavior of three-dimensional atoms....

  5. Laser guiding of cold atoms in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasishin, A V; Magnitskiy, Sergey A; Shuvaev, V A; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2000-01-01

    The possibility of using photonic crystals with a lattice defect for the laser guiding of cold atoms is analysed. We have found a configuration of a photonic-crystal lattice and a defect ensuring the distribution of a potential in the defect mode of the photonic crystal allowing the guiding of cold atoms along the defect due to the dipole force acting on atoms. Based on quantitative estimates, we have demonstrated that photonic crystals with a lattice defect permit the guiding of atoms with much higher transverse temperatures and a much higher transverse localisation degree than in the case of hollow-core fibres. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  6. One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical calculations indicate that it should be possible for one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystals (see figure) to exhibit giant dispersions known as the superprism effect. Previously, three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal superprisms have demonstrated strong wavelength dispersion - about 500 times that of conventional prisms and diffraction gratings. Unlike diffraction gratings, superprisms do not exhibit zero-order transmission or higher-order diffraction, thereby eliminating cross-talk problems. However, the fabrication of these 3D photonic crystals requires complex electron-beam substrate patterning and multilayer thin-film sputtering processes. The proposed 1D superprism is much simpler in structural complexity and, therefore, easier to design and fabricate. Like their 3D counterparts, the 1D superprisms can exhibit giant dispersions over small spectral bands that can be tailored by judicious structure design and tuned by varying incident beam direction. Potential applications include miniature gas-sensing devices.

  7. Simulation and understanding of atomic and molecular quantum crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazorla, Claudio; Boronat, Jordi

    2017-07-01

    Quantum crystals abound in the whole range of solid-state species. Below a certain threshold temperature the physical behavior of rare gases (He 4 and Ne), molecular solids (H2 and CH4 ), and some ionic (LiH), covalent (graphite), and metallic (Li) crystals can be explained only in terms of quantum nuclear effects (QNE). A detailed comprehension of the nature of quantum solids is critical for achieving progress in a number of fundamental and applied scientific fields such as planetary sciences, hydrogen storage, nuclear energy, quantum computing, and nanoelectronics. This review describes the current physical understanding of quantum crystals formed by atoms and small molecules, as well as the wide palette of simulation techniques that are used to investigate them. Relevant aspects in these materials such as phase transformations, structural properties, elasticity, crystalline defects, and the effects of reduced dimensionality are discussed thoroughly. An introduction to quantum Monte Carlo techniques, which in the present context are the simulation methods of choice, and other quantum simulation approaches (e.g., path-integral molecular dynamics and quantum thermal baths) is provided. The overarching objective of this article is twofold: first, to clarify in which crystals and physical situations the disregard of QNE may incur in important bias and erroneous interpretations. And second, to promote the study and appreciation of QNE, a topic that traditionally has been treated in the context of condensed matter physics, within the broad and interdisciplinary areas of materials science.

  8. A theoretical model describing the one-dimensional growth of single crystals on free sustained substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ziran; Wang, Ke; Lu, Chenxi; Jin, Ying; Sui, Chenghua; Yan, Bo; Gao, Fan; Cai, Pinggen; Lv, Bin; Li, Yun; Chen, Naibo; Sun, Guofang; Xu, Fengyun; Ye, Gaoxiang

    2018-03-01

    We develop a theoretical model that interprets the growth mechanism of zinc (Zn) crystal nanorods on a liquid substrate by thermal evaporation. During deposition, Zn atoms diffuse randomly on an isotropic and quasi-free sustained substrate, the nucleation of the atoms results in the primary nanorod (or seed crystal) growth. Subsequently, a characteristic one-dimensional atomic aggregation is proposed, which leads to the accelerating growth of the crystal nanorod along its preferential growth direction until the growth terminates. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental findings.

  9. Direct detection of antihydrogen atoms using a BGO crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Y. [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei-shi, 184-8588 Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Physics Research Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Kuroda, N., E-mail: kuroda@phys.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Physics Research Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Ohtsuka, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan); Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Universitá di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Tajima, M.; Torii, H.A. [Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Physics Research Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Zurlo, N. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Universitá di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Matsuda, Y. [Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Physics Research Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Venturelli, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Universitá di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Yamazaki, Y. [Atomic Physics Research Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan)

    2016-12-21

    The ASACUSA collaboration has developed a detector consisting of a large size BGO crystal to detect an atomic antihydrogen beam, and performed the direct detection of antihydrogen atoms. Energy spectra from antihydrogen annihilation on the BGO crystal are discussed in comparison to simulation results from the GEANT4 toolkit. Background mainly originating from cosmic rays were strongly suppressed by analyzing the energy deposited in the BGO and requiring a multiplicity of charged pions. Thus antihydrogen events were identified.

  10. A crystal-chemical model of atomic interactions. Pt. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslanov, L.A.; Markov, V.T.

    1992-01-01

    Commonly occurring structures are considered from the point of view of a crystal-chemical model of atomic interactions. It is shown that these structures sometimes contain coordination polyhedra distinct from Platonic, Archimedean and Zalgaller's polyhedra. These polyhedra have two or more groups of atoms into which all the vertices of the coordination polyhedron can be divided and which differ in distance from the central atom. The reasons for such polyhedra are considered. The crystal structure of NiTi 2 is analyzed and the causes of the quasicrystal state are revealed. (orig.)

  11. Two-dimensional atom localization via probe absorption in a four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhi-Ping; Ge Qiang; Ruan Yu-Hua; Yu Ben-Li

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the two-dimensional (2D) atom localization via probe absorption in a coherently driven four-level atomic system by means of a radio-frequency field driving a hyperfine transition. It is found that the detecting probability and precision of 2D atom localization can be significantly improved via adjusting the system parameters. As a result, our scheme may be helpful in laser cooling or the atom nano-lithography via atom localization

  12. High-dimensional atom localization via spontaneously generated coherence in a microwave-driven atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiping; Chen, Jinyu; Yu, Benli

    2017-02-20

    We investigate the two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) atom localization behaviors via spontaneously generated coherence in a microwave-driven four-level atomic system. Owing to the space-dependent atom-field interaction, it is found that the detecting probability and precision of 2D and 3D atom localization behaviors can be significantly improved via adjusting the system parameters, the phase, amplitude, and initial population distribution. Interestingly, the atom can be localized in volumes that are substantially smaller than a cubic optical wavelength. Our scheme opens a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-efficiency atom localization, which provides some potential applications in high-dimensional atom nanolithography.

  13. Crystallization behavior of single isotactic poly(methyl methacrylate) chains visualized by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Takahiro; Kawauchi, Mariko; Kawauchi, Takehiro; Kumaki, Jiro

    2015-01-08

    We have, for the first time, successfully visualized the crystallization behavior of a single isolated polymer chain at the molecular level by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Previously, we found that isotactic poly(methyl methacrylate) (it-PMMA) formed two-dimensional folded chain crystals composed of double-stranded helices upon compression of its Langmuir monolayer on a water surface, and the molecular images of the crystals deposited on mica were clearly visualized by AFM (Kumaki, J.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 5788). In the present study, a high-molecular-weight it-PMMA was diluted in a monolayer of an it-PMMA oligomer which cannot crystallize at the experimental temperature due to its low molecular weight. At a low surface pressure, isolated amorphous chains of the high-molecular-weight it-PMMA solubilized in the oligomer monolayer were observed. On compression, the isolated chains converted to crystals composed of a single chain, typically some small crystallites linked by an amorphous chain like a necklace. Detailed AFM observations of the crystals indicated that the crystalline nuclei preferentially formed at the ends of the chains, and the size of the nuclei was almost independent of the molecular weight of it-PMMA over a wide range. At an extremely slow compression, crystallization was promoted, resulting in crystallization of the whole chain. The crystallization behavior of a single isolated chain provides new insights in understanding the polymer crystallization process.

  14. Atom-atom interactions around the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Jonathan D; Goban, Akihisa; Asenjo-Garcia, Ana; Lu, Mingwu; Yu, Su-Peng; Chang, Darrick E; Kimble, H J

    2016-09-20

    Tailoring the interactions between quantum emitters and single photons constitutes one of the cornerstones of quantum optics. Coupling a quantum emitter to the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) provides a unique platform for tuning these interactions. In particular, the cross-over from propagating fields [Formula: see text] outside the bandgap to localized fields [Formula: see text] within the bandgap should be accompanied by a transition from largely dissipative atom-atom interactions to a regime where dispersive atom-atom interactions are dominant. Here, we experimentally observe this transition by shifting the band edge frequency of the PCW relative to the [Formula: see text] line of atomic cesium for [Formula: see text] atoms trapped along the PCW. Our results are the initial demonstration of this paradigm for coherent atom-atom interactions with low dissipation into the guided mode.

  15. Materials applications of an advanced 3-dimensional atom probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerezo, A; Gibuoin, D; Sijbrandij, SJ; Venker, FM; Warren, PJ; Wilde, J; Smith, GDW

    An advanced 3-dimensional atom probe system has been constructed, based on an optical position-sensitive atom probe (OPoSAP) detector with energy compensation using a reflectron lens. The multi-hit detection capability of the OPoSAP lends to significant improvements in the efficiency of the

  16. One-dimensional Bose gas on an atom chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amerongen, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    We describe experiments investigating the (coherence) properties of a finite-temperature one-dimensional (1D) Bose gas with repulsive interactions. The confining magnetic field is generated with a micro-electronic circuit. This microtrap for atoms or `atom chip' is particularly suited to generate a

  17. Protein crystal structure analysis using synchrotron radiation at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, Takamasa

    1999-01-01

    We can now obtain a detailed picture of protein, allowing the identification of individual atoms, by interpreting the diffraction of X-rays from a protein crystal at atomic resolution, 1.2 A or better. As of this writing, about 45 unique protein structures beyond 1.2 A resolution have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank. This review provides a simplified overview of how protein crystallographers use such diffraction data to solve, refine, and validate protein structures. (author)

  18. Application of GRID to Foreign Atom Localization in Single Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmann, A; Wesch, W; Weber, B; Börner, H G; Jentschel, M

    2000-01-01

    The application of GRID (Gamma Ray Induced Doppler broadening) spectroscopy to the localization of foreign atoms in single crystals is demonstrated on erbium in YAP. By the investigation of the Doppler broadened secondary γ line for two crystalline directions, the Er was determined to be localized on the Y site. Conditions for the nuclear parameters of the impurity atoms used for the application of GRID spectroscopy are discussed.

  19. Crystal structures and atomic model of NADPH oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnani, Francesca; Nenci, Simone; Fananas, Elisa Millana; Ceccon, Marta; Romero, Elvira; Fraaije, Marco W.; Mattevi, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    NADPH oxidases (NOXs) are the only enzymes exclusively dedicated to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Dysregulation of these polytopic membrane proteins impacts the redox signaling cascades that control cell proliferation and death. We describe the atomic crystal structures of the catalytic

  20. Crystal-chemical model of atomic interactions. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslanov, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    A crystal-chemical model of atomic interactions has been suggested to explain the diversity of inorganic structure types, their translational symmetry, and other basic characteristics. The model is based on the concepts of the minimum potential energy of a crystal and energy contributions to the total energy of a crystal which come not only from the first coordination sphere but also from the second, third and subsequent coordination spheres. The minimum potential energy is provided by coordination spheres in the shape of the Platonic regular solids or Archemedean semiregular solids and also by polyhedra having triangular faces. The model is applicable to materials with different types of chemical bonding - metals, nonmetals (diamond), ionic compounds and substances with van der Waals atomic interactions. (orig.)

  1. Three-dimensional atom localization via electromagnetically induced transparency in a three-level atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiping; Cao, Dewei; Yu, Benli

    2016-05-01

    We present a new scheme for three-dimensional (3D) atom localization in a three-level atomic system via measuring the absorption of a weak probe field. Owing to the space-dependent atom-field interaction, the position probability distribution of the atom can be directly determined by measuring the probe absorption. It is found that, by properly varying the parameters of the system, the probability of finding the atom in 3D space can be almost 100%. Our scheme opens a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-efficiency 3D atom localization, which provides some potential applications in laser cooling or atom nano-lithography via atom localization.

  2. Initiating Heavy-atom Based Phasing by Multi-Dimensional Molecular Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Gourdon, Pontus; Liu, Xiangyu

    2014-01-01

    -based approaches, which however may fail when only poorly diffracting derivative crystals are available, as often the case for e.g. membrane proteins. Here we present an approach for heavy atom site identification based on a Molecular Replacement Parameter Matrix (MRPM) search. It involves an n-dimensional search...... to test a wide spectrum of molecular replacement parameters, such as clusters of different conformations. The result is scored by the ability to identify heavy-atom positions, from anomalous difference Fourier maps, that allow meaningful phases to be determined. The strategy was successfully applied...... but correct molecular replacement solutions with maximum contrast to prime experimental phasing efforts....

  3. Initiating heavy-atom-based phasing by multi-dimensional molecular replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Gourdon, Pontus; Liu, Xiangyu; Karlsen, Jesper Lykkegaard; Nissen, Poul

    2016-03-01

    To obtain an electron-density map from a macromolecular crystal the phase problem needs to be solved, which often involves the use of heavy-atom derivative crystals and concomitant heavy-atom substructure determination. This is typically performed by dual-space methods, direct methods or Patterson-based approaches, which however may fail when only poorly diffracting derivative crystals are available. This is often the case for, for example, membrane proteins. Here, an approach for heavy-atom site identification based on a molecular-replacement parameter matrix (MRPM) is presented. It involves an n-dimensional search to test a wide spectrum of molecular-replacement parameters, such as different data sets and search models with different conformations. Results are scored by the ability to identify heavy-atom positions from anomalous difference Fourier maps. The strategy was successfully applied in the determination of a membrane-protein structure, the copper-transporting P-type ATPase CopA, when other methods had failed to determine the heavy-atom substructure. MRPM is well suited to proteins undergoing large conformational changes where multiple search models should be considered, and it enables the identification of weak but correct molecular-replacement solutions with maximum contrast to prime experimental phasing efforts.

  4. Localization of Electrons in a One-Dimensional Disordered Crystal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Localization of electrons in a one-dimensional disorder crystal and suppression of conduction were investigated in the research work. These were achieved by modeling the disorders within the crystal lattice with random potential barriers. The transmission coefficients of the electron (non-interacting electron) in the random ...

  5. Plenoptic Imaging of a Three Dimensional Cold Atom Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Gordon

    2017-04-01

    A plenoptic imaging system is capable of sampling the rays of light in a volume, both spatially and angularly, providing information about the three dimensional (3D) volume being imaged. The extraction of the 3D structure of a cold atom cloud is demonstrated, using a single plenoptic camera and a single image. The reconstruction is tested against a reference image and the results discussed along with the capabilities and limitations of the imaging system. This capability is useful when the 3D distribution of the atoms is desired, such as determining the shape of an atom trap, particularly when there is limited optical access. Gratefully acknowledge support from AFRL.

  6. Quantum melting of a two-dimensional Wigner crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgopolov, V. T.

    2017-10-01

    The paper reviews theoretical predictions about the behavior of two-dimensional low-density electron systems at nearly absolute zero temperatures, including the formation of an electron (Wigner) crystal, crystal melting at a critical electron density, and transitions between crystal modifications in more complex (for example, two-layer) systems. The paper presents experimental results obtained from real two-dimensional systems in which the nonconducting (solid) state of the electronic system with indications of collective localization is actually realized. Experimental methods for detecting a quantum liquid–solid phase interface are discussed.

  7. Translational-rotational interaction in dynamics and thermodynamics of 2D atomic crystal with molecular impurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antsygina, T.N.; Poltavskaya, M.I.; Chishko, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between the rotational degrees of freedom of a diatomic molecular impurity and the phonon excitations of a two-dimensional atomic matrix commensurate with a substrate is investigated theoretically. It is shown, that the translational-rotational interaction changes the form of the rotational kinetic energy operator as compared to the corresponding expression for a free rotator, and also renormalized the parameters of the crystal field without change in its initial form. The contribution of the impurity rotational degrees of freedom to the low-temperature heat capacity for a dilute solution of diatomic molecules in an atomic two-dimensional matrix is calculated. The possibility of experimental observation of the effects obtained is discussed

  8. Electron Rydberg wave packets in one-dimensional atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An expression for the transition probability or form factor in one-dimensional Rydberg atom irradiated by short half-cycle pulse was constructed. In applicative contexts, our expression was found to be more useful than the corresponding result given by Landau and Lifshitz. Using the new expression for the form factor, the ...

  9. Spectrum of a one-atom laser in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florescu, Lucia

    2006-01-01

    The emission spectrum of a single-emitter laser in a photonic crystal is presented. We consider a coherently pumped two-level emitter strongly coupled to a high-quality microcavity engineered within a photonic crystal. We show that the cavity spectrum consists of both elastic and inelastic components, for which we derive analytical expressions. Our study reveals enhanced, spectrally narrower emission resulting from the radiation reservoir of the photonic crystal. The cavity field spectral characteristics are fundamentally distinct from those of a corresponding microcavity in ordinary vacuum. At high pump intensities and for large discontinuities in the photon density of states between Mollow spectral components of atomic resonance fluorescence, the emitted intensity originating from the elastic spectral component increases with the intensity of the pump and the elastic component dominates the spectrum. In the case of a vanishing photon density of states in the spectral range surrounding the lower Mollow sideband and no dipolar dephasing, the cavity spectrum is elastic

  10. Three-dimensional atom localization via probe absorption in a cascade four-level atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Deng, Li; Chen, Aixi

    2018-03-01

    For an atomic system with cascade four-level type, a useful scheme about three-dimensional (3D) atom localization is proposed. In our scheme the atomic system is coherently controlled by using a radio-frequency field to couple with two-folded levels under the condition of the existence of probe absorption. Our results show that detecting precision of 3D atom localization may be obviously improved by properly adjusting the frequency detuning and strength of the radio-frequency driving field. So our scheme could be helpful to realize 3D atom localization with high-efficiency and high-precision . In the field of laser cooling or the atom nano-lithography, our studies provide potential applications.

  11. Three-dimensional atom localization via probe absorption in a cascade four-level atomic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Wei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available For an atomic system with cascade four-level type, a useful scheme about three-dimensional (3D atom localization is proposed. In our scheme the atomic system is coherently controlled by using a radio-frequency field to couple with two-folded levels under the condition of the existence of probe absorption. Our results show that detecting precision of 3D atom localization may be obviously improved by properly adjusting the frequency detuning and strength of the radio-frequency driving field. So our scheme could be helpful to realize 3D atom localization with high-efficiency and high-precision . In the field of laser cooling or the atom nano-lithography, our studies provide potential applications.

  12. Large three-dimensional photonic crystals based on monocrystalline liquid crystal blue phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Wei; Hou, Chien-Tsung; Li, Cheng-Chang; Jau, Hung-Chang; Wang, Chun-Ta; Hong, Ching-Lang; Guo, Duan-Yi; Wang, Cheng-Yu; Chiang, Sheng-Ping; Bunning, Timothy J; Khoo, Iam-Choon; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2017-09-28

    Although there have been intense efforts to fabricate large three-dimensional photonic crystals in order to realize their full potential, the technologies developed so far are still beset with various material processing and cost issues. Conventional top-down fabrications are costly and time-consuming, whereas natural self-assembly and bottom-up fabrications often result in high defect density and limited dimensions. Here we report the fabrication of extraordinarily large monocrystalline photonic crystals by controlling the self-assembly processes which occur in unique phases of liquid crystals that exhibit three-dimensional photonic-crystalline properties called liquid-crystal blue phases. In particular, we have developed a gradient-temperature technique that enables three-dimensional photonic crystals to grow to lateral dimensions of ~1 cm (~30,000 of unit cells) and thickness of ~100 μm (~ 300 unit cells). These giant single crystals exhibit extraordinarily sharp photonic bandgaps with high reflectivity, long-range periodicity in all dimensions and well-defined lattice orientation.Conventional fabrication approaches for large-size three-dimensional photonic crystals are problematic. By properly controlling the self-assembly processes, the authors report the fabrication of monocrystalline blue phase liquid crystals that exhibit three-dimensional photonic-crystalline properties.

  13. Black phosphorus-based one-dimensional photonic crystals and microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Ilka; Toffanin, Stefano; Scotognella, Francesco

    2016-11-10

    The latest achievements in the fabrication of thin layers of black phosphorus (BP), toward the technological breakthrough of a phosphorene atomically thin layer, are paving the way for their use in electronics, optics, and optoelectronics. In this work, we have simulated the optical properties of one-dimensional photonic structures, i.e., photonic crystals and microcavities, in which few-layer BP is one of the components. The insertion of the 5-nm black phosphorous layers leads to a photonic band gap in the photonic crystals and a cavity mode in the microcavity that is interesting for light manipulation and emission enhancement.

  14. Scheme of 2-dimensional atom localization for a three-level atom via quantum coherence

    OpenAIRE

    Zafar, Sajjad; Ahmed, Rizwan; Khan, M. Khalid

    2013-01-01

    We present a scheme for two-dimensional (2D) atom localization in a three-level atomic system. The scheme is based on quantum coherence via classical standing wave fields between the two excited levels. Our results show that conditional position probability is significantly phase dependent of the applied field and frequency detuning of spontaneously emitted photons. We obtain a single localization peak having probability close to unity by manipulating the control parameters. The effect of ato...

  15. Two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals in dielectric barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Weili; Dong Lifang; Zhang Xinchun

    2010-01-01

    A series of two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals have been obtained by filaments' self-organization in atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge with two water electrodes, which undergo the transition from square to square superlattice and finally to the hexagon. The spatio-temporal behaviors of the plasma photonic crystals in nanosecond scale have been studied by optical method, which show that the plasma photonic crystal is actually an integration of different transient sublattices. The photonic band diagrams of the transverse electric (TE) mode and transverse magnetic mode for each sublattice of these plasma photonic crystals have been investigated theoretically. A wide complete band gap is formed in the hexagonal plasma photonic crystal with the TE mode. The changes of the band edge frequencies and the band gap widths in the evolvement of different structures are studied. A kind of tunable plasma photonic crystal which can be controlled both in space and time is suggested.

  16. Two-dimensional atom localization induced by a squeezed vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Xu, Jun

    2016-10-01

    A scheme of two-dimensional (2D) atom localization induced by a squeezed vacuum is proposed, in which the three-level V-type atoms interact with two classical standing-wave fields. It is found that when the environment is changed from an ordinary vacuum to a squeezed vacuum, the 2D atom localization is realized by detecting the position-dependent resonance fluorescence spectrum. For comparison, we demonstrate that the atom localization originating from the quantum interference effect is distinct from that induced by a squeezed vacuum. Furthermore, the combined effects of the squeezed vacuum and quantum interference are also discussed under appropriate conditions. The internal physical mechanism is analyzed in terms of dressed-state representation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11574179 and 11204099) and the Natural Science Foundation of Hubei Province, China (Grant No. 2014CFC1148).

  17. Two-dimensional photonic crystal accelerator structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M. Cowan

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Photonic crystals provide a method of confining a synchronous speed-of-light mode in an all-dielectric structure, likely a necessary feature in any optical accelerator. We explore computationally a class of photonic crystal structures with translational symmetry in a direction transverse to the electron beam. We demonstrate synchronous waveguide modes and discuss relevant parameters of such modes. We then explore how accelerator parameters vary as the geometry of the structure is changed and consider trade-offs inherent in the design of an accelerator of this type.

  18. Atom interaction propensities of oxygenated chemical functions in crystal packings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Jelsch

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The crystal contacts of several families of hydrocarbon compounds substituted with one or several types of oxygenated chemical groups were analyzed statistically using the Hirshfeld surface methodology. The propensity of contacts to occur between two chemical types is described with the contact enrichment descriptor. The systematic large enrichment ratios of some interactions like the O—H...O hydrogen bonds suggests that these contacts are a driving force in the crystal packing formation. The same statement holds for the weaker C—H...O hydrogen bonds in ethers, esters and ketones, in the absence of polar H atoms. The over-represented contacts in crystals of oxygenated hydrocarbons are generally of two types: electrostatic attractions (hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. While Cl...O interactions are generally avoided, in a minority of chloro-oxygenated hydrocarbons, significant halogen bonding does occur. General tendencies can often be derived for many contact types, but outlier compounds are instructive as they display peculiar or rare features. The methodology also allows the detection of outliers which can be structures with errors. For instance, a significant number of hydroxylated molecules displaying over-represented non-favorable oxygen–oxygen contacts turned out to have wrongly oriented hydroxyl groups. Beyond crystal packings with a single molecule in the asymmetric unit, the behavior of water in monohydrate compounds and of crystals with Z′ = 2 (dimers are also investigated. It was found in several cases that, in the presence of several oxygenated chemical groups, cross-interactions between different chemical groups (e.g. water/alcohols; alcohols/phenols are often favored in the crystal packings. While some trends in accordance with common chemical principles are retrieved, some unexpected results can however appear. For example, in crystals of alcohol–phenol compounds, the strong O—H...O hydrogen bonds between

  19. Strongly interacting atom lasers in three-dimensional optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hen, Itay; Rigol, Marcos

    2010-10-29

    We show that the dynamical melting of a Mott insulator in a three-dimensional lattice leads to condensation at nonzero momenta, a phenomenon that can be used to generate strongly interacting atom lasers in optical lattices. For infinite on-site repulsion, the case considered here, the momenta at which bosons condense are determined analytically and found to have a simple dependence on the hopping amplitudes. The occupation of the condensates is shown to scale linearly with the total number of atoms in the initial Mott insulator. Our results are obtained by using a Gutzwiller-type mean-field approach, gauged against exact-diagonalization solutions of small systems.

  20. Acoustic transparency in two-dimensional sonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Dehesa, Jose; Torrent, Daniel [Wave Phenomena Group, Department of Electronic Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, C/ Camino de Vera s/n, E-46022 Valencia (Spain); Cai Liangwu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)], E-mail: jsdehesa@upvnet.upv.es

    2009-01-15

    Acoustic transparency is studied in two-dimensional sonic crystals consisting of hexagonal distributions of cylinders with continuously varying properties. The transparency condition is achieved by selectively closing the acoustic bandgaps, which are governed by the structure factor of the cylindrical scatterers. It is shown here that cylindrical scatterers with the proposed continuously varying properties are physically realizable by using metafluids based on sonic crystals. The feasibility of this proposal is analyzed by a numerical experiment based on multiple scattering theory.

  1. Effect of atomic initial phase difference on spontaneous emission of an atom embedded in photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bing, Zhang; Xiu-Dong, Sun; Xiang-Qian, Jiang

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of initial phase difference between the two excited states of a V-type three-level atom on its steady state behaviour of spontaneous emission. A modified density of modes is introduced to calculate the spontaneous emission spectra in photonic crystal. Spectra in free space are also shown to compare with that in photonic crystal with different relative positions of the excited levels from upper band-edge frequency. It is found that the initial phase difference plays an important role in the quantum interference property between the two decay channels. For a zero initial phase, destructive property is presented in the spectra. With the increase of initial phase difference, quantum interference between the two decay channels from upper levels to ground level turns to be constructive. Furthermore, we give an interpretation for the property of these spectra. (atomic and molecular physics)

  2. Photonic Paint Developed with Metallic Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Po; Williams, John D.

    2012-01-01

    This work details the design and simulation of an inconspicuous photonic paint that can be applied onto an object for anticounterfeit and tag, track, and locate (TTL) applications. The paint consists of three-dimensional metallic tilted woodpile photonic crystals embedded into a visible and infrared transparent polymer film, which can be applied to almost any surface. The tilted woodpile photonic crystals are designed with a specific pass band detectable at nearly all incident angles of light. When painted onto a surface, these crystals provide a unique reflective infra-red optical signature that can be easily observed and recorded to verify the location or contents of a package.

  3. Resonance fluorescence microscopy via three-dimensional atom localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchadhyayee, Pradipta; Dutta, Bibhas Kumar; Das, Nityananda; Mahapatra, Prasanta Kumar

    2018-02-01

    A scheme is proposed to realize three-dimensional (3D) atom localization in a driven two-level atomic system via resonance fluorescence. The field arrangement for the atom localization involves the application of three mutually orthogonal standing-wave fields and an additional traveling-wave coupling field. We have shown the efficacy of such field arrangement in tuning the spatially modulated resonance in all directions. Under different parametric conditions, the 3D localization patterns originate with various shapes such as sphere, sheets, disk, bowling pin, snake flute, flower vase. High-precision localization is achieved when the radiation field detuning equals twice the combined Rabi frequencies of the standing-wave fields. Application of a traveling-wave field of suitable amplitude at optimum radiation field detuning under symmetric standing-wave configuration leads to 100% detection probability even in sub-wavelength domain. Asymmetric field configuration is also taken into consideration to exhibit atom localization with appreciable precision compared to that of the symmetric case. The momentum distribution of the localized atoms is found to follow the Heisenberg uncertainty principle under the validity of Raman-Nath approximation. The proposed field configuration is suitable for application in the study of atom localization in an optical lattice arrangement.

  4. The electromagnetic Brillouin precursor in one-dimensional photonic crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uitham, R.; Hoenders, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    We have calculated the electromagnetic Brillouin precursor that arises in a one-dimensional photonic crystal that consists of two homogeneous slabs which each have a single electron resonance. This forerunner is compared with the Brillouin precursor that arises in a homogeneous double-electron

  5. Hot atom chemistry of mixed crystals. 35 years of research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.

    1993-01-01

    When this contribution was prepared, the author decided to present the more personal aspects of his work and the concepts that directed him. Since the time when the author interested in solid state hot atom chemistry more than 30 years ago, still now the generally accepted theory has not been existed. The irradiation test by using the BEPO pile in Harwell is reported. The use of glass fiber paper instead of cellulose paper was investigated. The real problem of the different models of primary retention should be solved. The idea of mixed crystal systems was the result of an experimental accident. The attempt of preparing mixed crystals, the papers that the author has written, the procedures of the experiment such as electrophoresis, the results of the electrophoretic separation are discussed. The next step was obviously the investigation of the ligand recoil. The production of the transient ligand vacancy complexes and their final fate resulted in mixed hexachlorobromometallate species is shown for the system K 2 O s Cl 6 -K 2 O s Br 6 (n,γ) 38 Cl. The reaction of the 38 Cl, the information about recoil atom reactions which increased with the complexity of target substances, and the resulted informations are reported. (K.I.)71 refs

  6. Atomic mercury vapor inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Ulrich; Peuntinger, Christian; Joly, Nicolas Y; Russell, Philip St J; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate high atomic mercury vapor pressure in a kagomé-style hollow-core photonic crystal fiber at room temperature. After a few days of exposure to mercury vapor the fiber is homogeneously filled and the optical depth achieved remains constant. With incoherent optical pumping from the ground state we achieve an optical depth of 114 at the 6(3)P(2) - 6(3)D(3) transition, corresponding to an atomic mercury number density of 6 × 10(10) cm(-3). The use of mercury vapor in quasi one-dimensional confinement may be advantageous compared to chemically more active alkali vapor, while offering strong optical nonlinearities in the ultraviolet region of the optical spectrum.

  7. One-dimensional hypersonic phononic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomopoulos, N; Maschke, D; Koh, C Y; Thomas, E L; Tremel, W; Butt, H-J; Fytas, G

    2010-03-10

    We report experimental observation of a normal incidence phononic band gap in one-dimensional periodic (SiO(2)/poly(methyl methacrylate)) multilayer film at gigahertz frequencies using Brillouin spectroscopy. The band gap to midgap ratio of 0.30 occurs for elastic wave propagation along the periodicity direction, whereas for inplane propagation the system displays an effective medium behavior. The phononic properties are well captured by numerical simulations. The porosity in the silica layers presents a structural scaffold for the introduction of secondary active media for potential coupling between phonons and other excitations, such as photons and electrons.

  8. Folding two dimensional crystals by swift heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochedowski, Oliver; Bukowska, Hanna; Freire Soler, Victor M.; Brökers, Lara; Ban-d'Etat, Brigitte; Lebius, Henning; Schleberger, Marika

    2014-01-01

    Ion irradiation of graphene, the showcase model of two dimensional crystals, has been successfully applied to induce various modifications in the graphene crystal. One of these modifications is the formation of origami like foldings in graphene which are created by swift heavy ion irradiation under glancing incidence angle. These foldings can be applied to locally alter the physical properties of graphene like mechanical strength or chemical reactivity. In this work we show that the formation of foldings in two dimensional crystals is not restricted to graphene but can be applied for other materials like MoS 2 and hexagonal BN as well. Further we show that chemical vapour deposited graphene forms foldings after swift heavy ion irradiation while chemical vapour deposited MoS 2 does not

  9. Folding two dimensional crystals by swift heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochedowski, Oliver; Bukowska, Hanna [Fakultät für Physik and CENIDE, Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Freire Soler, Victor M. [Fakultät für Physik and CENIDE, Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, E08028 Barcelona (Spain); Brökers, Lara [Fakultät für Physik and CENIDE, Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Ban-d' Etat, Brigitte; Lebius, Henning [CIMAP (CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-UCBN), 14070 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Schleberger, Marika, E-mail: marika.schleberger@uni-due.de [Fakultät für Physik and CENIDE, Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2014-12-01

    Ion irradiation of graphene, the showcase model of two dimensional crystals, has been successfully applied to induce various modifications in the graphene crystal. One of these modifications is the formation of origami like foldings in graphene which are created by swift heavy ion irradiation under glancing incidence angle. These foldings can be applied to locally alter the physical properties of graphene like mechanical strength or chemical reactivity. In this work we show that the formation of foldings in two dimensional crystals is not restricted to graphene but can be applied for other materials like MoS{sub 2} and hexagonal BN as well. Further we show that chemical vapour deposited graphene forms foldings after swift heavy ion irradiation while chemical vapour deposited MoS{sub 2} does not.

  10. Dressed-state analysis of efficient two-dimensional atom localization in a four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    We investigate two-dimensional atom localization via spontaneous emission in a four-level atomic system. It is found that the detection probability and precision of two-dimensional atom localization can be significantly improved due to the interference effect between the spontaneous decay channels and the dynamically induced quantum interference generated by the probe and composite fields. More importantly, a 100% probability of finding an atom within the sub-half-wavelength domain of the standing waves can be reached when the corresponding conditions are satisfied. As a result, our scheme may be helpful in laser cooling or atom nano-lithography via atom localization. (paper)

  11. Large Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystals Based on Monocrystalline Liquid Crystal Blue Phases (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-29

    3D) photonic crystals, an optical analogue of atomic lattices, are attractive materials for versatile manipulation of light .1–9 In a 3D photonic...orientation is also of crucial importance5,7,8,30 (e.g. preserving the transverse optical wavefront integrity of light ). Additionally, randomly distributed...Each platelet is approximated by an enclosing circle of diameter. c, Microscope images of BPII and BPI crystals as a function of time (scale bars

  12. Strongly-Refractive One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Prisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal prisms can separate a beam of polychromatic electromagnetic waves into constituent wavelength components and can utilize unconventional refraction properties for wavelength dispersion over significant portions of an entire photonic band rather than just near the band edges outside the photonic band gaps. Using a ID photonic crystal simplifies the design and fabrication process and allows the use of larger feature sizes. The prism geometry broadens the useful wavelength range, enables better optical transmission, and exhibits angular dependence on wavelength with reduced non-linearity. The properties of the 1 D photonic crystal prism can be tuned by varying design parameters such as incidence angle, exit surface angle, and layer widths. The ID photonic crystal prism can be fabricated in a planar process, and can be used as optical integrated circuit elements.

  13. One-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals with magnetooptical double layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzhansky, V. N.; Shaposhnikov, A. N.; Prokopov, A. R.; Karavainikov, A. V.; Mikhailova, T. V.; Lukienko, I. N.; Kharchenko, Yu. N.; Golub, V. O.; Salyuk, O. Yu.; Belotelov, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional magnetophotonic microcavity crystals with nongarnet dielectric mirrors are created and investigated. The defect layers in the magnetophotonic crystals are represented by two bismuth-substituted yttrium iron garnet Bi:YIG layers with various bismuth contents in order to achieve a high magnetooptical response of the crystals. The parameters of the magnetophotonic crystal layers are optimized by numerical solution of the Maxwell equations by the transfer matrix method to achieve high values of Faraday rotation angle Θ F and magnetooptical Q factor. The calculated and experimental data agree well with each other. The maximum values of Θ F =–20.6°, Q = 8.1° at a gain t = 16 are obtained for magnetophotonic crystals with m = 7 pairs of layers in Bragg mirrors, and the parameters obtained for crystals with m = 4 and t = 8.5 are Θ F =–12.5° and Q = 14.3°. It is shown that, together with all-garnet and multimicrocavities magnetophotonic crystals, such structures have high magnetooptical characteristics.

  14. One-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals with magnetooptical double layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berzhansky, V. N., E-mail: v.n.berzhansky@gmail.com; Shaposhnikov, A. N.; Prokopov, A. R.; Karavainikov, A. V.; Mikhailova, T. V. [V.I. Vernadsky Crimean Federal University (Russian Federation); Lukienko, I. N.; Kharchenko, Yu. N., E-mail: kharcenko@ilt.kharkov.ua [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering (Ukraine); Golub, V. O., E-mail: v-o-golub@yahoo.com; Salyuk, O. Yu. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Magnetism (Ukraine); Belotelov, V. I., E-mail: belotelov@physics.msu.ru [Russian Quantum Center (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    One-dimensional magnetophotonic microcavity crystals with nongarnet dielectric mirrors are created and investigated. The defect layers in the magnetophotonic crystals are represented by two bismuth-substituted yttrium iron garnet Bi:YIG layers with various bismuth contents in order to achieve a high magnetooptical response of the crystals. The parameters of the magnetophotonic crystal layers are optimized by numerical solution of the Maxwell equations by the transfer matrix method to achieve high values of Faraday rotation angle Θ{sub F} and magnetooptical Q factor. The calculated and experimental data agree well with each other. The maximum values of Θ{sub F} =–20.6°, Q = 8.1° at a gain t = 16 are obtained for magnetophotonic crystals with m = 7 pairs of layers in Bragg mirrors, and the parameters obtained for crystals with m = 4 and t = 8.5 are Θ{sub F} =–12.5° and Q = 14.3°. It is shown that, together with all-garnet and multimicrocavities magnetophotonic crystals, such structures have high magnetooptical characteristics.

  15. Interfacial Thermal Transport via One-Dimensional Atomic Junction Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohuan Xiong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In modern information technology, as integration density increases rapidly and the dimension of materials reduces to nanoscale, interfacial thermal transport (ITT has attracted widespread attention of scientists. This review introduces the latest theoretical development in ITT through one-dimensional (1D atomic junction model to address the thermal transport across an interface. With full consideration of the atomic structures in interfaces, people can apply the 1D atomic junction model to investigate many properties of ITT, such as interfacial (Kapitza resistance, nonlinear interface, interfacial rectification, and phonon interference, and so on. For the ballistic ITT, both the scattering boundary method (SBM and the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF method can be applied, which are exact since atomic details of actual interfaces are considered. For interfacial coupling case, explicit analytical expression of transmission coefficient can be obtained and it is found that the thermal conductance maximizes at certain interfacial coupling (harmonic mean of the spring constants of the two leads and the transmission coefficient is not a monotonic decreasing function of phonon frequency. With nonlinear interaction—phonon–phonon interaction or electron–phonon interaction at interface, the NEGF method provides an efficient way to study the ITT. It is found that at weak linear interfacial coupling, the nonlinearity can improve the ITT, but it depresses the ITT in the case of strong-linear coupling. In addition, the nonlinear interfacial coupling can induce thermal rectification effect. For interfacial materials case which can be simulated by a two-junction atomic chain, phonons show interference effect, and an optimized thermal coupler can be obtained by tuning its spring constant and atomic mass.

  16. Two-dimensional photonic crystal polarizer modulated by silicon resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chunhua; Huang, Xuguang

    2007-11-01

    Photonic crystals(PCs)have many potential applications because of their ability to control light-wave propagation. In this paper, we theoretically investigate the tunability of light propagation in photonic crystal waveguides in two-dimensional photonic crystals with square lattices composed of heat-resistant silicon resin. Waveguides can be obtained by the infiltration of silicon resin into air regions in two-dimensional photonic crystals composed of air holes with square lattices of dielectric cylinders. The refractive index of silicon resin can be changed by manipulating the temperature of the sample. Numerical simulation by solving Maxwell's equations using the plane wave expansion(PWE) method shows that the band gaps can be continuously tuned by silicon resin, accordingly the light propagation in photonic crystal waveguides can be controlled. The band gap is analyzed in the temperature range of 20°C-120°C. In our work, the gap map for a square lattice of dielectric cylinders is also simulated. The method can separate TM- and TE-polarized modes in the waveguide. Such a mechanism of band gap adjustment should open up a new application for designing field-sensitive polarizer in photonic integrated circuits.

  17. Three-dimensional imaging of atomic four-body processes

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, M; Fischer, D; Kollmus, H; Madison, D H; Jones, S; Ullrich, J

    2003-01-01

    To understand the physical processes that occur in nature we need to obtain a solid concept about the 'fundamental' forces acting between pairs of elementary particles. it is also necessary to describe the temporal and spatial evolution of many mutually interacting particles under the influence of these forces. This latter step, known as the few-body problem, remains an important unsolved problem in physics. Experiments involving atomic collisions represent a useful testing ground for studying the few-body problem. For the single ionization of a helium atom by charged particle impact, kinematically complete experiments have been performed since 1969. The theoretical analysis of such experiments was thought to yield a complete picture of the basic features of the collision process, at least for large collision energies. These conclusions are, however, almost exclusively based on studies of restricted electron-emission geometries. We report three- dimensional images of the complete electron emission pattern for...

  18. Supramolecular [60]fullerene liquid crystals formed by self-organized two-dimensional crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Ren, Xiangkui; Gu, Yan; Song, Bo; Sun, Hao-Jan; Yang, Shuang; Chen, Erqiang; Tu, Yingfeng; Li, Xiaohong; Yang, Xiaoming; Li, Yaowen; Zhu, Xiulin

    2015-01-02

    Fullerene-based liquid crystalline materials have both the excellent optical and electrical properties of fullerene and the self-organization and external-field-responsive properties of liquid crystals (LCs). Herein, we demonstrate a new family of thermotropic [60]fullerene supramolecular LCs with hierarchical structures. The [60]fullerene dyads undergo self-organization driven by π-π interactions to form triple-layer two-dimensional (2D) fullerene crystals sandwiched between layers of alkyl chains. The lamellar packing of 2D crystals gives rise to the formation of supramolecular LCs. This design strategy should be applicable to other molecules and lead to an enlarged family of 2D crystals and supramolecular liquid crystals. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Preparation of Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystals of Zirconia by Electrodeposition in a Colloidal Crystals Template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Pan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional photonic crystals of zirconia were prepared by electrodeposition in a colloidal crystals template following calcination at 500 °C. Scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, and reflectance spectroscopy were employed to characterize the photonic crystals of zirconia. It was found that hydrated zirconium ions could penetrate the colloidal crystals template and reach the substrate easily by electrodeposition, which resulted in stronger bonding between the substrate and the as-deposited membrane. Moreover, the electrodeposited membrane had low water content, leading to a low amount of shrinkage during calcination. Both these properties could suppress detachment from the substrate upon removal of the colloidal crystals template. Therefore, the three-dimensional photonic crystals of zirconia synthesized in this study exhibited very good preservation of the ordered structures of the colloidal crystals template with a high density. A peak of reflection higher than 70% was formed in the reflectance spectrum because of the strong diffraction of the ordered structures.

  20. Self-organized defect strings in two-dimensional crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Wolfgang; Polster, David; Maret, Georg; Keim, Peter; Dellago, Christoph

    2013-12-01

    Using experiments with single-particle resolution and computer simulations we study the collective behavior of multiple vacancies injected into two-dimensional crystals. We find that the defects assemble into linear strings, terminated by dislocations with antiparallel Burgers vectors. We show that these defect strings propagate through the crystal in a succession of rapid one-dimensional gliding and rare rotations. While the rotation rate decreases exponentially with the number of defects in the string, the diffusion constant is constant for large strings. By monitoring the separation of the dislocations at the end points, we measure their effective interactions with high precision beyond their spontaneous formation and annihilation, and we explain the double-well form of the dislocation interaction in terms of continuum elasticity theory.

  1. A stable "flat" form of two-dimensional crystals: could graphene, silicene, germanene be minigap semiconductors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, A; Kusmartsev, F V; Kugel, K I

    2012-02-08

    The discovery of a flat two-dimensional crystal known as graphene has contradicted Landau-Peierls-Mermin-Wagner arguments that there is no stable flat form of such crystals. Here, we show that the "flat" shape of graphene arises due to a microscopic buckling at the smallest possible interatomic scale. We show that the graphene, silicene, and other two-dimensional crystals are stable due to transverse short-range displacements of appropriate atoms. The distortions are small and form various patterns, which we describe in a framework of Ising model with competing interactions. We show that when temperature decreases, two transitions, disorder into order and order into disorder, arise. The ordered state has a form of stripes where carbon atoms are shifted regularly with respect to the plane. The flat graphene, silicene, or germanene planes look like a microscopic "washboard" with the wavelength of about couple of interatomic spacing of appropriate sublattices, which for graphene is about 1.8-3.6 Å. At lower temperatures, the ordered state transforms into a glass. Because of up-down asymmetry in buckled graphene, silicene and other two-dimensional crystals deposited on substrate, a minibandgap may arise. We derive a criterion for the minigap formation and show how it is related to the buckling and to the graphene-substrate interaction. Because of the bandgap, there may arise new phenomena and in particular a rectification of ac current induced by microwave or infrared radiation. We show that the amplitude of direct current arising at wave mixing of two harmonics of microwave electromagnetic radiation is huge. Moreover, we predict the existence of miniexcitons and a new type of fermionic minipolaritons whose behavior can be controlled by the microwave and terahertz radiation. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  2. One Dimensional Polymeric Organic Photonic Crystals for DFB Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Scotognella

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a very simple method to realize a one-dimensional photonic crystal (1D PC, consisting of a dye-doped polymeric multilayer. Due to the high photonic density of states at the edges of the photonic band-gap (PBG, a surface emitting distributed feedback (DFB laser is obtained with this structure. Furthermore, the incidence angle dependence of the PBG of the polymeric multilayer is reported.

  3. Quantum localization in the three-dimensional kicked Rydberg atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Emil; Yoshida, Shuhei; Burgdoerfer, Joachim; Tong, X.-M.; Reinhold, Carlos O.

    2003-01-01

    We study the three-dimensional (3D) unidirectionally kicked Rydberg atom. For parabolic initial states elongated in the direction of the kicks we show that the ionization of the quantum system is suppressed as compared to the classical counterpart and that the quantum wave function is localized along all degrees of freedom, whereas the classical system is globally diffusive. We discuss the connection to the previously studied one-dimensional (1D) model of the kicked Rydberg atom and verify that the 1D model is a good approximation to the 3D quantum case in the limiting case of the most elongated initial states. We further study the quantum phase-space distribution (Husimi distribution) of the eigenstates of the period-one time-evolution (Floquet) operator and show that the eigenstates are localized in phase space. For the most elongated parabolic initial state, we are able to identify the unstable periodic orbits around which Floquet states localize. We discuss the possibility of observing quantum localization in high Rydberg states in n>100

  4. Topological Valley Transport in Two-dimensional Honeycomb Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuting; Jiang, Hua; Hang, Zhi Hong

    2018-01-25

    Two-dimensional photonic crystals, in analogy to AB/BA stacking bilayer graphene in electronic system, are studied. Inequivalent valleys in the momentum space for photons can be manipulated by simply engineering diameters of cylinders in a honeycomb lattice. The inequivalent valleys in photonic crystal are selectively excited by a designed optical chiral source and bulk valley polarizations are visualized. Unidirectional valley interface states are proved to exist on a domain wall connecting two photonic crystals with different valley Chern numbers. With the similar optical vortex index, interface states can couple with bulk valley polarizations and thus valley filter and valley coupler can be designed. Our simple dielectric PC scheme can help to exploit the valley degree of freedom for future optical devices.

  5. Graphene-based one-dimensional photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Oleg L; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya

    2012-01-11

    A novel type of one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal formed by an array of periodically located stacks of alternating graphene and dielectric stripes embedded into a background dielectric medium is proposed. The wave equation for the electromagnetic wave propagating in such a structure is solved in the framework of the Kronig-Penney model. The frequency band structure of the 1D graphene-based photonic crystal is obtained analytically as a function of the filling factor and the thickness of the dielectric between the graphene stripes. The photonic frequency corresponding to the electromagnetic wave localized by a defect of the photonic crystal formed by an extra dielectric placed in the position of one stack of alternating graphene and dielectric stripes is obtained.

  6. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom–atom and atom–wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom–atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the 1S0−3P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time. PMID:24934478

  7. On the Zeeman Effect in highly excited atoms: 2. Three-dimensional case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baseia, B.; Medeiros e Silva Filho, J.

    1984-01-01

    A previous result, found in two-dimensional hydrogen-atoms, is extended to the three-dimensional case. A mapping of a four-dimensional space R 4 onto R 3 , that establishes an equivalence between Coulomb and harmonic potentials, is used to show that the exact solution of the Zeeman effect in highly excited atoms, cannot be reached. (Author) [pt

  8. Two-dimensional silicon crystals with sizable band gaps and ultrahigh carrier mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Zhiwen; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jinlong

    2018-01-18

    Due to their compatibility in the well-developed Si-based semiconductor industry, exploring two-dimensional (2D) silicon crystals with both sizable band gaps and high carrier mobility is important to develop high-performance electronic and optoelectronic devices on the nanoscale. Here, eleven new 2D silicon crystals are reported based on the strategy of mixing 3-fold and 4-fold coordinated silicon atoms in 2D confined phases and first-principles calculations. We establish that these 2D silicon crystals can be obtained by functionalizing silicene with silicon atoms, dimers, or chains, which exhibit lower formation energy than that of silicene. Their dynamic stability and thermal stability are confirmed by phonon calculations and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamic simulation at temperatures up to 700 K. Electronic structure calculations reveal that these 2D silicon crystals are semiconductors with sizable and tunable band gaps, ranging from 1.12 to 1.67 eV, and four of them are direct or quasi-direct band gap semiconductors with strong absorption in the visible-light frequency. The calculated Young's stiffness of 2D silicon crystals ranges from 31 to 88 N m -1 , which are comparable to phosphorene, but remarkably smaller than those of MoS 2 monolayer and graphene. Remarkably, C z -P2/c-Si 12 possesses a negative Poisson's ratio with a maximum value of -0.055. In particular, 2D silicon crystals possess ultrahigh carrier mobility of up to 1.7 × 10 5 and 1.3 × 10 4 cm 2 V -1 s -1 at room temperature for electrons and holes, respectively, suitable for high-speed electronic and optoelectronic applications on the nanoscale.

  9. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foteinopoulou, Stavroula [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    In this dissertation, they have undertaken the challenge to understand the unusual propagation properties of the photonic crystal (PC). The photonic crystal is a medium where the dielectric function is periodically modulated. These types of structures are characterized by bands and gaps. In other words, they are characterized by frequency regions where propagation is prohibited (gaps) and regions where propagation is allowed (bands). In this study they focus on two-dimensional photonic crystals, i.e., structures with periodic dielectric patterns on a plane and translational symmetry in the perpendicular direction. They start by studying a two-dimensional photonic crystal system for frequencies inside the band gap. The inclusion of a line defect introduces allowed states in the otherwise prohibited frequency spectrum. The dependence of the defect resonance state on different parameters such as size of the structure, profile of incoming source, etc., is investigated in detail. For this study, they used two popular computational methods in photonic crystal research, the Finite Difference Time Domain method (FDTD) and the Transfer Matrix Method (TMM). The results for the one-dimensional defect system are analyzed, and the two methods, FDTD and TMM, are compared. Then, they shift their attention only to periodic two-dimensional crystals, concentrate on their band properties, and study their unusual refractive behavior. Anomalous refractive phenomena in photonic crystals included cases where the beam refracts on the ''wrong'' side of the surface normal. The latter phenomenon, is known as negative refraction and was previously observed in materials where the wave vector, the electric field, and the magnetic field form a left-handed set of vectors. These materials are generally called left-handed materials (LHM) or negative index materials (NIM). They investigated the possibility that the photonic crystal behaves as a LHM, and how this behavior relates

  10. Dynamics of vacancies in two-dimensional Lennard-Jones crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhenwei; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2015-03-01

    Vacancies represent an important class of crystallographic defects, and their behaviors can be strongly coupled with relevant material properties. We report the rich dynamics of vacancies in two-dimensional Lennard-Jones crystals in several thermodynamic states. Specifically, we numerically observe significantly faster diffusion of the 2-point vacancy with two missing particles in comparison with other types of vacancies; it opens the possibility of doping 2-point vacancies into atomic materials to enhance atomic migration. In addition, the resulting dislocations in the healing of a long vacancy suggest the intimate connection between vacancies and topological defects that may provide an extra dimension in the engineering of defects in extensive crystalline materials for desired properties. We thank the financial support from the U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Office of the Director of Defense Research and Engineering (DDR&E) and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  11. Electrically Rotatable Polarizer Using One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal with a Nematic Liquid Crystal Defect Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryotaro Ozaki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polarization characteristics of defect mode peaks in a one-dimensional (1D photonic crystal (PC with a nematic liquid crystal (NLC defect layer have been investigated. Two different polarized defect modes are observed in a stop band. One group of defect modes is polarized along the long molecular axis of the NLC, whereas another group is polarized along its short axis. Polarizations of the defect modes can be tuned by field-induced in-plane reorientation of the NLC in the defect layer. The polarization properties of the 1D PC with the NLC defect layer is also investigated by the finite difference time domain (FDTD simulation.

  12. Crystal structures and atomic model of NADPH oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Francesca; Nenci, Simone; Millana Fananas, Elisa; Ceccon, Marta; Romero, Elvira; Fraaije, Marco W; Mattevi, Andrea

    2017-06-27

    NADPH oxidases (NOXs) are the only enzymes exclusively dedicated to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Dysregulation of these polytopic membrane proteins impacts the redox signaling cascades that control cell proliferation and death. We describe the atomic crystal structures of the catalytic flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)- and heme-binding domains of Cylindrospermum stagnale NOX5. The two domains form the core subunit that is common to all seven members of the NOX family. The domain structures were then docked in silico to provide a generic model for the NOX family. A linear arrangement of cofactors (NADPH, FAD, and two membrane-embedded heme moieties) injects electrons from the intracellular side across the membrane to a specific oxygen-binding cavity on the extracytoplasmic side. The overall spatial organization of critical interactions is revealed between the intracellular loops on the transmembrane domain and the NADPH-oxidizing dehydrogenase domain. In particular, the C terminus functions as a toggle switch, which affects access of the NADPH substrate to the enzyme. The essence of this mechanistic model is that the regulatory cues conformationally gate NADPH-binding, implicitly providing a handle for activating/deactivating the very first step in the redox chain. Such insight provides a framework to the discovery of much needed drugs that selectively target the distinct members of the NOX family and interfere with ROS signaling.

  13. Investigating the fundamentals of drug crystal growth using Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Claire

    2003-01-01

    The importance of crystals to the pharmaceutical industry is evident - over 90% of pharmaceutical products contain a drug in crystalline form. However, the crystallization phenomena of drug compounds are poorly understood. An increased understanding of these processes may allow a greater degree of control over the crystallization outcomes, such as morphology, purity, or stability. In these studies, we have applied Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to the in situ investigations of drug crystal gro...

  14. Lateral shifting in one dimensional chiral photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You Yuan; Chen Changyuan

    2012-01-01

    We report the lateral shifts of the transmitted waves in a one dimensional chiral photonic crystal by using the stationary-phase approach. It is revealed that two kinds of lateral shifts are observed due to the existence of cross coupling in chiral materials, which is different from what has been observed in previous non-chiral photonic crystals. Unlike the chiral slab, the positions of lateral shift peaks are closely related to the band edges of band gap characteristics of periodic structure and lateral shifts can be positive as well as negative. Besides, the lateral shifts show a strong dependence on the chiral factor, which varies the lateral shift peaks in both magnitudes and positions. These features are desirable for future device applications.

  15. Acoustic resonances in two-dimensional radial sonic crystal shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrent, Daniel; Sanchez-Dehesa, Jose, E-mail: jsdehesa@upvnet.upv.e [Wave Phenomena Group, Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, C/Camino de Vera s.n., E-46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    Radial sonic crystals (RSC) are fluidlike structures infinitely periodic along the radial direction that verify the Bloch theorem and are possible only if certain specially designed acoustic metamaterials with mass density anisotropy can be engineered (see Torrent and Sanchez-Dehesa 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 064301). A comprehensive analysis of two-dimensional (2D) RSC shells is reported here. A given shell is in fact a circular slab with a central cavity. These finite crystal structures contain Fabry-Perot-like resonances and modes strongly localized at the central cavity. Semi-analytical expressions are developed to obtain the quality factors of the different resonances, their symmetry features and their excitation properties. The results reported here are completely general and can be extended to equivalent 3D spherical shells and to their photonic counterparts.

  16. Acoustic resonances in two-dimensional radial sonic crystal shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent, Daniel; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2010-07-01

    Radial sonic crystals (RSC) are fluidlike structures infinitely periodic along the radial direction that verify the Bloch theorem and are possible only if certain specially designed acoustic metamaterials with mass density anisotropy can be engineered (see Torrent and Sánchez-Dehesa 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 064301). A comprehensive analysis of two-dimensional (2D) RSC shells is reported here. A given shell is in fact a circular slab with a central cavity. These finite crystal structures contain Fabry-Perot-like resonances and modes strongly localized at the central cavity. Semi-analytical expressions are developed to obtain the quality factors of the different resonances, their symmetry features and their excitation properties. The results reported here are completely general and can be extended to equivalent 3D spherical shells and to their photonic counterparts.

  17. Three-dimensional spirals of atomic layered MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liming; Liu, Kaihui; Wong, Andrew Barnabas; Kim, Jonghwan; Hong, Xiaoping; Liu, Chong; Cao, Ting; Louie, Steven G; Wang, Feng; Yang, Peidong

    2014-11-12

    Atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) layered materials, including graphene, boron nitride, and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), can exhibit novel phenomena distinct from their bulk counterparts and hold great promise for novel electronic and optoelectronic applications. Controlled growth of such 2D materials with different thickness, composition, and symmetry are of central importance to realize their potential. In particular, the ability to control the symmetry of TMD layers is highly desirable because breaking the inversion symmetry can lead to intriguing valley physics, nonlinear optical properties, and piezoelectric responses. Here we report the first chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of spirals of layered MoS2 with atomically thin helical periodicity, which exhibits a chiral structure and breaks the three-dimensional (3D) inversion symmetry explicitly. The spirals composed of tens of connected MoS2 layers with decreasing areas: each basal plane has a triangular shape and shrinks gradually to the summit when spiraling up. All the layers in the spiral assume an AA lattice stacking, which is in contrast to the centrosymmetric AB stacking in natural MoS2 crystals. We show that the noncentrosymmetric MoS2 spiral leads to a strong bulk second-order optical nonlinearity. In addition, we found that the growth of spirals involves a dislocation mechanism, which can be generally applicable to other 2D TMD materials.

  18. Lateral shift in one-dimensional quasiperiodic chiral photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da, Jian, E-mail: dajian521@sina.com [Department of Information Engineering, Huaian Senior Vocational and Technical School, Feiyao road, Huaian 223005, Jiangsu Province (China); Mo, Qi, E-mail: moqiyueyang@163.com [School of Software, Yunnan University, Cuihu Bai Road, Kunming City, Yunnan Province 650091 (China); Cheng, Yaokun [Department of Information Engineering, Huaian Senior Vocational and Technical School, Feiyao road, Huaian 223005, Jiangsu Province (China); Liu, Taixiang [Taishan Vocational College of Nursing, Shandong Province 271000 (China)

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the lateral shift of a one-dimensional quasiperiodic photonic crystal consisting of chiral and conventional dielectric materials. The effect of structural irregularity on lateral shift is evaluated by stationary-phase approach. Our results show that the lateral shift can be modulated by varying the structural irregularity in quasiperiodic structure. Besides, the position of peak in lateral shift spectrum stays sensitive to the chiral factor of chiral materials. In comparison with that of periodic structure, quasiperiodic structure provides an extra degree of freedom to manipulate the lateral shift.

  19. A new series of two-dimensional silicon crystals with versatile electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Kisung; Kim, Duck Young; Son, Young-Woo

    2018-04-01

    Silicon (Si) is one of the most extensively studied materials owing to its significance to semiconductor science and technology. While efforts to find a new three-dimensional (3D) Si crystal with unusual properties have made some progress, its two-dimensional (2D) phases have not yet been explored as much. Here, based on a newly developed systematic ab initio materials searching strategy, we report a series of novel 2D Si crystals with unprecedented structural and electronic properties. The new structures exhibit perfectly planar outermost surface layers of a distorted hexagonal network with their thicknesses varying with the atomic arrangement inside. Dramatic changes in electronic properties ranging from semimetal to semiconducting with indirect energy gaps and even to one with direct energy gaps are realized by varying thickness as well as by surface oxidation. Our predicted 2D Si crystals with flat surfaces and tunable electronic properties will shed light on the development of silicon-based 2D electronics technology.

  20. Epitaxial top-gated atomic-scale silicon wire in a three-dimensional architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibbin, S R; Scappucci, G; Pok, W; Simmons, M Y

    2013-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) control of dopant profiles in silicon is a critical requirement for fabricating atomically precise transistors. We demonstrate conductance modulation through an atomic scale 3 nm wide δ-doped silicon-phosphorus wire using a vertically separated epitaxial doped Si:P top-gate. We show that intrinsic crystalline silicon grown at low temperatures (∼250 °C) serves as an effective gate dielectric permitting us to achieve large gate ranges (∼2.6 V) with leakage currents below 1 pA. Combining scanning tunneling lithography for precise lateral confinement, with monolayer doping and low temperature epitaxial overgrowth for precise vertical confinement, we can realize multiple layers of nano-patterned dopants in a single crystal material. These results demonstrate the viability of highly doped, vertically separated epitaxial gates in an all-crystalline architecture with long-term implications for monolithic 3D silicon circuits and for the realization of atomically precise donor architectures for quantum computing.

  1. Two-dimensional atom localization via two standing-wave fields in a four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongtao; Wang Hui; Wang Zhiping

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the two-dimensional (2D) localization of an atom in a four-level Y-type atomic system. By applying two orthogonal standing-wave fields, the atoms can be localized at some special positions, leading to the formation of sub-wavelength 2D periodic spatial distributions. The localization peak position and number as well as the conditional position probability can be controlled by the intensities and detunings of optical fields.

  2. Resolution extension by image summing in serial femtosecond crystallography of two-dimensional membrane-protein crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia M. Casadei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous proof-of-concept measurements on single-layer two-dimensional membrane-protein crystals performed at X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs have demonstrated that the collection of meaningful diffraction patterns, which is not possible at synchrotrons because of radiation-damage issues, is feasible. Here, the results obtained from the analysis of a thousand single-shot, room-temperature X-ray FEL diffraction images from two-dimensional crystals of a bacteriorhodopsin mutant are reported in detail. The high redundancy in the measurements boosts the intensity signal-to-noise ratio, so that the values of the diffracted intensities can be reliably determined down to the detector-edge resolution of 4 Å. The results show that two-dimensional serial crystallography at X-ray FELs is a suitable method to study membrane proteins to near-atomic length scales at ambient temperature. The method presented here can be extended to pump–probe studies of optically triggered structural changes on submillisecond timescales in two-dimensional crystals, which allow functionally relevant large-scale motions that may be quenched in three-dimensional crystals.

  3. Phonon interference control of atomic-scale metamirrors, meta-absorbers, and heat transfer through crystal interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosevich, Yu. A.; Potyomina, L. G.; Darinskii, A. N.; Strelnikov, I. A.

    2018-03-01

    The paper theoretically studies the possibility of using the effects of phonon interference between paths through different interatomic bonds for the control of phonon heat transfer through internal crystal interfaces and for the design of phonon metamirrors and meta-absorbers. These metamirrors and meta-absorbers are considered to be defect nanolayers of atomic-scale thicknesses embedded in a crystal. Several analytically solvable three-dimensional lattice-dynamics models of the phonon metamirrors and meta-absorbers at the internal crystal planes are described. It is shown that due to destructive interference in the two or more phonon paths, the internal crystal planes, fully or partially filled with weakly bound or heavy-isotope defect atoms, can completely reflect or completely absorb phonons at the transmission antiresonances, whose wavelengths are larger than the effective thickness of the metamirror or meta-absorber. Due to cooperative superradiant effect, the spectral widths of the two-path interference antiresonances for the plane waves are given by the square of partial filling fraction in the defect crystal plane. Our analysis reveals that the presence of two or more phonon paths plays the dominant role in the emergence of the transmission antiresonances in phonon scattering at the defect crystal planes and in reduction of the thermal interface conductance in comparison with the Fano-resonance concept. We study analytically phonon transmission through internal crystal plane in a model cubic lattice of Si-like atoms, partially filled with Ge-like defect atoms. Such a plane can serve as interference phonon metamirror with the transmission antiresonances in the vicinities of eigenmode frequencies of Ge-like defect atoms in the terahertz frequency range. We predict the extraordinary phonon transmission induced by the two-path constructive interference of the lattice waves in resonance with the vibrations of rare host atoms, periodically distributed in the

  4. Ultra-refractive and extended-range one-dimensional photonic crystal superprisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, D. Z. Y.

    2003-01-01

    We describe theoretical analysis and design of one-dimensional photonic crystal prisms. We found that inside the photonic crystal, for frequencies near the band edges, light propagation direction is extremely sensitive to the variations in wavelength and incident angle.

  5. Observations on structural features and characteristics of biological apatite crystals. 5. Three-dimensional observation on ultrastructure of human enamel crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijo, T; Yamashita, Y; Terashima, T

    1993-09-01

    In a series of studies to investigate the structural features of the biological crystals, such as the tooth and bone, using an electron microscope, we examined the ultrastructure of the enamel, dentin, and bone crystals at near atomic resolution and showed the configuration of the hydroxyapatite structure through the cross and longitudinal sections of the crystals. Thereafter, based on the results of the observations by the authors of the ultrastructure of the tooth and bone crystals, thinking that it might be possible to conduct direct three-dimensional observation of the configuration composing the unit cell of the hydroxyapatite crystals, we conducted a study on this. These results indicated that it was possible to sterically observe the configuration of the hydroxyapatite structure composing the enamel crystal. The materials used for this study were the middle layer of the noncarious enamel from the freshly extracted human erupted permanent molars. The small cubes of the enamel were fixed in glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide and embedded in epoxy resin using the routine methods. The ultrathin sections were cut with a diamond knife without decalcification and were examined with the HITACHI H-9000 H type transmission electron microscope operated at 300 kV. Each crystal was observed at an initial magnification of 500,000 times and at the final magnification of 10,000,000 times and over. We sincerely believe that the electron micrographs shown in this report are the first to show three-dimensionally the configuration of the hydroxyapatite structure composing the crystal in the cross and longitudinal sections of an enamel crystal.

  6. Trapped Atoms in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    2002 J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 19 2052 [39] Koenderink A F, Kafesaki M, Soukoulis C M and Sandoghdar V 2006 J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 23 1196 [40] Manga Rao V S C...032509 [55] Hwang J K, Ryu H Y and Lee Y H 1999 Phys. Rev. B 60 4688–95 [56] Yao P, Manga Rao V S C and Hughes S 2010 Laser Photon. Rev. 4 499–516 New Journal of Physics 15 (2013) 083026 (http://www.njp.org/)

  7. Description of the atomic disorder (local order) in crystals by the mixed-symmetry method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudka, A. P.; Novikova, N. E.

    2017-11-01

    An approach to the description of local atomic disorder (short-range order) in single crystals by the mixed-symmetry method based on Bragg scattering data is proposed, and the corresponding software is developed. In defect-containing crystals, each atom in the unit cell can be described by its own symmetry space group. The expression for the calculated structural factor includes summation over different sets of symmetry operations for different atoms. To facilitate the search for new symmetry elements, an "atomic disorder expert" was developed, which estimates the significance of tested models. It is shown that the symmetry lowering for some atoms correlates with the existence of phase transitions (in langasite family crystals) and the anisotropy of physical properties (in rare-earth dodecaborides RB12).

  8. Crystal growth mechanisms and morphological control of the prototypical metal-organic framework MOF-5 revealed by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillas, Pablo; Anderson, Michael W; Attfield, Martin P

    2012-11-26

    Crystal growth of the metal-organic framework MOF-5 was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the first time. Growth under low supersaturation conditions was found to occur by a two-dimensional or spiral crystal growth mechanism. Observation of developing nuclei during the former reveals growth occurs through a process of nucleation and spreading of metastable and stable sub-layers revealing that MOFs may be considered as dense phase structures in terms of crystal growth, even though they contain sub-layers consisting of ordered framework and disordered non-framework components. These results also support the notion this may be a general mechanism of surface crystal growth at low supersaturation applicable to crystalline nanoporous materials. The crystal growth mechanism at the atomistic level was also seen to vary as a function of the growth solution Zn/H(2)bdc ratio producing square terraces with steps parallel to the direction or rhombus-shaped terraces with steps parallel to the direction when the Zn/H(2)bdc ratio was >1 or about 1, respectively. The change in relative growth rates can be explained in terms of changes in the solution species concentrations and their influence on growth at different terrace growth sites. These results were successfully applied to the growth of as-synthesized cube-shaped crystals to increase expression of the {111} faces and to grow octahedral crystals of suitable quality to image using AFM. This modulator-free route to control the crystal morphology of MOF-5 crystals should be applicable to a wide variety of MOFs to achieve the desired morphological control for performance enhancement in applications. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Membrane's Eleven: heavy-atom derivatives of membrane-protein crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morth, Jens Preben; Sørensen, Thomas Lykke-Møller; Nissen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    A database has been assembled of heavy-atom derivatives used in the structure determination of membrane proteins. The database can serve as a guide to the design of experiments in the search for heavy-atom derivatives of new membrane-protein crystals. The database pinpoints organomercurials, plat...

  10. Trapping a single atom with a fraction of a photon using a photonic crystal nanocavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosten, D.; Kuipers, L.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the interaction between a single rubidium atom and a photonic crystal nanocavity. Because of the ultrasmall mode volume of the nanocavity, an extremely strong coupling regime can be achieved in which the atom can shift the cavity resonance by many cavity linewidths. We show that this

  11. A model for the interaction between F centers and H atoms in ionic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumke, V.R.; Souza, M. de

    1975-01-01

    The interaction between an F center and neutral hydrogen atoms, the most simple paramagnetic defects in ionic crystals, is described in terms of a perturbation theory of two square potential wells. The good agreement with experimental data indicates that lattice distortion due to the presence of the hydrogen atoms is negligible [pt

  12. Electrothermally Driven Fluorescence Switching by Liquid Crystal Elastomers Based On Dimensional Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Changxu; Jiang, Yin; Tao, Cheng-An; Yin, Xianpeng; Lan, Yue; Wang, Chen; Wang, Shiqiang; Liu, Xiangyang; Li, Guangtao

    2017-04-05

    In this article, the fabrication of an active organic-inorganic one-dimensional photonic crystal structure to offer electrothermal fluorescence switching is described. The film is obtained by spin-coating of liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) and TiO 2 nanoparticles alternatively. By utilizing the property of LCEs that can change their size and shape reversibly under external thermal stimulations, the λ max of the photonic band gap of these films is tuned by voltage through electrothermal conversion. The shifted photonic band gap further changes the matching degree between the photonic band gap of the film and the emission spectrum of organic dye mounting on the film. With rhodamine B as an example, the enhancement factor of its fluorescence emission is controlled by varying the matching degree. Thus, the fluorescence intensity is actively switched by voltage applied on the system, in a fast, adjustable, and reversible manner. The control chain of using the electrothermal stimulus to adjust fluorescence intensity via controlling the photonic band gap is proved by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and UV-vis reflectance. This mechanism also corresponded to the results from the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. The comprehensive usage of photonic crystals and liquid crystal elastomers opened a new possibility for active optical devices.

  13. Switchable Photonic Crystals Using One-Dimensional Confined Liquid Crystals for Photonic Device Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seong Ho; Gim, Min-Jun; Lee, Wonsuk; Choi, Suk-Won; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2017-01-25

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have recently attracted considerable attention, with much effort devoted to photonic bandgap (PBG) control for varying the reflected color. Here, fabrication of a modulated one-dimensional (1D) anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) PC with a periodic porous structure is reported. The PBG of the fabricated PC can be reversibly changed by switching the ultraviolet (UV) light on/off. The AAO nanopores contain a mixture of photoresponsive liquid crystals (LCs) with irradiation-activated cis/trans photoisomerizable azobenzene. The resultant mixture of LCs in the porous AAO film exhibits a reversible PBG, depending on the cis/trans configuration of azobenzene molecules. The PBG switching is reliable over many cycles, suggesting that the fabricated device can be used in optical and photonic applications such as light modulators, smart windows, and sensors.

  14. Seismic isolation of buildings on two dimensional phononic crystal foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lin; Li, Xiao-mei; Zhang, Yan

    2017-11-01

    In order to realize the seismic isolation of buildings, we establish the two dimensional phononic crystal (PC) foundation which has the cell with the size close to the regular concrete test specimens, and is composed of the concrete base, rubber coating and lead cylindrical core. We study the in-plane band gap (BG) characteristics in it, through the analysis of the frequency dispersion relation and frequency response result. To lower the start BG frequency to the seismic frequency range, we also study the influences of material parameters (the elastic modulus of coating and density of cylindrical core) and geometry parameters (the thickness of coating, radius of cylindrical core and lattice constant) on BG ranges. The study could help to design the PC foundation for seismic isolation of building.

  15. Negative refraction angular characterization in one-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Eduardo Lugo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Photonic crystals are artificial structures that have periodic dielectric components with different refractive indices. Under certain conditions, they abnormally refract the light, a phenomenon called negative refraction. Here we experimentally characterize negative refraction in a one dimensional photonic crystal structure; near the low frequency edge of the fourth photonic bandgap. We compare the experimental results with current theory and a theory based on the group velocity developed here. We also analytically derived the negative refraction correctness condition that gives the angular region where negative refraction occurs.By using standard photonic techniques we experimentally determined the relationship between incidence and negative refraction angles and found the negative refraction range by applying the correctness condition. In order to compare both theories with experimental results an output refraction correction was utilized. The correction uses Snell's law and an effective refractive index based on two effective dielectric constants. We found good agreement between experiment and both theories in the negative refraction zone.Since both theories and the experimental observations agreed well in the negative refraction region, we can use both negative refraction theories plus the output correction to predict negative refraction angles. This can be very useful from a practical point of view for space filtering applications such as a photonic demultiplexer or for sensing applications.

  16. One dimensional metallic edges in atomically thin WSe2 induced by air exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addou, Rafik; Smyth, Christopher M.; Noh, Ji-Young; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Pan, Yi; Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Fölsch, Stefan; Robinson, Joshua A.; Cho, Kyeongjae; Feenstra, Randall M.; Wallace, Robert M.

    2018-04-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides are a unique class of layered two-dimensional (2D) crystals with extensive promising applications. Tuning the electronic properties of low-dimensional materials is vital for engineering new functionalities. Surface oxidation is of particular interest because it is a relatively simple method of functionalization. By means of scanning probe microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we report the observation of metallic edges in atomically thin WSe2 monolayers grown by chemical vapor deposition on epitaxial graphene. Scanning tunneling microscopy shows structural details of WSe2 edges and scanning tunneling spectroscopy reveals the metallic nature of the oxidized edges. Photoemission demonstrates that the formation of metallic sub-stoichiometric tungsten oxide (WO2.7) is responsible for the high conductivity measured along the edges. Ab initio calculations validate the susceptibility of WSe2 nanoribbon edges to oxidation. The zigzag terminated edge exhibits metallic behavior prior the air-exposure and remains metallic after oxidation. Comprehending and exploiting this property opens a new opportunity for application in advanced electronic devices.

  17. Two-dimensional atom localization based on coherent field controlling in a five-level M-type atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangqian; Li, Jinjiang; Sun, Xiudong

    2017-12-11

    We study two-dimensional sub-wavelength atom localization based on the microwave coupling field controlling and spontaneously generated coherence (SGC) effect. For a five-level M-type atom, introducing a microwave coupling field between two upper levels and considering the quantum interference between two transitions from two upper levels to lower levels, the analytical expression of conditional position probability (CPP) distribution is obtained using the iterative method. The influence of the detuning of a spontaneously emitted photon, Rabi frequency of the microwave field, and the SGC effect on the CPP are discussed. The two-dimensional sub-half-wavelength atom localization with high-precision and high spatial resolution is achieved by adjusting the detuning and the Rabi frequency, where the atom can be localized in a region smaller thanλ/10×λ/10. The spatial resolution is improved significantly compared with the case without the microwave field.

  18. Transmission properties of one-dimensional ternary plasma photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiveshwari, Laxmi [Department of Physics, K. B. Womens' s College, Hazaribagh 825 301 (India); Awasthi, S. K. [Department of Physics and Material Science and Engineering, Jaypee Institute of Information Technology, Noida 201 304 (India)

    2015-09-15

    Omnidirectional photonic band gaps (PBGs) are found in one-dimensional ternary plasma photonic crystals (PPC) composed of single negative metamaterials. The band characteristics and transmission properties are investigated through the transfer matrix method. We show that the proposed structure can trap light in three-dimensional space due to the elimination of Brewster's angle transmission resonance allowing the existence of complete PBG. The results are discussed in terms of incident angle, layer thickness, dielectric constant of the dielectric material, and number of unit cells (N) for TE and TM polarizations. It is seen that PBG characteristics is apparent even in an N ≥ 2 system, which is weakly sensitive to the incident angle and completely insensitive to the polarization. Finite PPC could be used for multichannel transmission filter without introducing any defect in the geometry. We show that the locations of the multichannel transmission peaks are in the allowed band of the infinite structure. The structure can work as a single or multichannel filter by varying the number of unit cells. Binary PPC can also work as a polarization sensitive tunable filter.

  19. Optical microcavities based on surface modes in two-dimensional photonic crystals and silicon-on-insulator photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui; Qiu, M.

    2007-01-01

    Surface-mode optical microcavities based on two-dimensional photonic crystals and silicon-on-insulator photonic crystals are studied. We demonstrate that a high-quality-factor microcavity can be easily realized in these structures. With an increasing of the cavity length, the quality factor...... is gradually enhanced and the resonant frequency converges to that of the corresponding surface mode in the photonic crystals. These structures have potential applications such as sensing....

  20. Quantum transport of atomic matter waves in anisotropic two-dimensional and three-dimensional disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piraud, M; Pezzé, L; Sanchez-Palencia, L

    2013-01-01

    The macroscopic transport properties in a disordered potential, namely diffusion and weak/strong localization, closely depend on the microscopic and statistical properties of the disorder itself. This dependence is rich in counter-intuitive consequences. It can be particularly exploited in matter wave experiments, where the disordered potential can be tailored and controlled, and anisotropies are naturally present. In this work, we apply a perturbative microscopic transport theory and the self-consistent theory of Anderson localization to study the transport properties of ultracold atoms in anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) speckle potentials. In particular, we discuss the anisotropy of single-scattering, diffusion and localization. We also calculate disorder-induced shift of the energy states and propose a method to include it, which amounts to renormalizing energies in the standard on-shell approximation. We show that the renormalization of energies strongly affects the prediction for the 3D localization threshold (mobility edge). We illustrate the theoretical findings with examples which are relevant for current matter wave experiments, where the disorder is created with laser speckle. This paper provides a guideline for future experiments aiming at the precise location of the 3D mobility edge and study of anisotropic diffusion and localization effects in 2D and 3D. (paper)

  1. A simple analytical model for electronic conductance in a one dimensional atomic chain across a defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khater, Antoine; Szczesniak, Dominik

    2011-01-01

    An analytical model is presented for the electronic conductance in a one dimensional atomic chain across an isolated defect. The model system consists of two semi infinite lead atomic chains with the defect atom making the junction between the two leads. The calculation is based on a linear combination of atomic orbitals in the tight-binding approximation, with a single atomic one s-like orbital chosen in the present case. The matching method is used to derive analytical expressions for the scattering cross sections for the reflection and transmission processes across the defect, in the Landauer-Buttiker representation. These analytical results verify the known limits for an infinite atomic chain with no defects. The model can be applied numerically for one dimensional atomic systems supported by appropriate templates. It is also of interest since it would help establish efficient procedures for ensemble averages over a field of impurity configurations in real physical systems.

  2. A simple analytical model for electronic conductance in a one dimensional atomic chain across a defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khater, Antoine; Szczesniak, Dominik [Laboratoire de Physique de l' Etat Condense UMR 6087, Universite du Maine, 72085 Le Mans (France)

    2011-04-01

    An analytical model is presented for the electronic conductance in a one dimensional atomic chain across an isolated defect. The model system consists of two semi infinite lead atomic chains with the defect atom making the junction between the two leads. The calculation is based on a linear combination of atomic orbitals in the tight-binding approximation, with a single atomic one s-like orbital chosen in the present case. The matching method is used to derive analytical expressions for the scattering cross sections for the reflection and transmission processes across the defect, in the Landauer-Buttiker representation. These analytical results verify the known limits for an infinite atomic chain with no defects. The model can be applied numerically for one dimensional atomic systems supported by appropriate templates. It is also of interest since it would help establish efficient procedures for ensemble averages over a field of impurity configurations in real physical systems.

  3. μSR-investigation of a liquid crystal containing iron atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamedov, T.N.; Gritsaj, K.I.; Stojkov, A.V.; Bekeshev, V.G.; Rochev, V.Ya.; Galyametdinov, Yu.G.; Herlach, D.; Zimmermann, U.; Kormann, O.; Major, J.

    2000-01-01

    The work is devoted to the investigation of properties of a liquid crystal whose molecule contains iron atom. The compounds of this type are of interest from the point of view of obtaining liquid crystals with magnetic properties. The temperature dependence of the polarization and relaxation rate of positive muon spin in the liquid crystal was measured in the temperature range 4-300 K. The results obtained do not contradict the suggestion that the iron ions form an antiferromagnetically-ordered structure in this liquid crystal at the temperatures below 80 K

  4. muSR-Investigation of a Liquid Crystal Containing Iron Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Mamedov, T N; Galyametdinov, Yu G; Gritsaj, K I; Herlach, D; Kormann, O; Major, J V; Rochev, V Ya; Stoikov, A V; Zimmermann, U

    2000-01-01

    The work is devoted to the investigation of properties of a liquid crystal whose molecule contains iron atom. The compounds of this type are of interest from the point of view of obtaining liquid crystals with magnetic properties. The temperature dependence of the polarization and relaxation rate of positive muon spin in the liquid crystal was measured in the temperature range 4-300 K. The results obtained do not contradict the suggestion that the iron ions from an antiferromagnetically-ordered structure in this liquid crystal at the temperatures below 80 K.

  5. Two-dimensional sub-half-wavelength atom localization via controlled spontaneous emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ren-Gang; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2011-12-05

    We propose a scheme for two-dimensional (2D) atom localization based on the controlled spontaneous emission, in which the atom interacts with two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Due to the spatially dependent atom-field interaction, the position probability distribution of the atom can be directly determined by measuring the resulting spontaneously emission spectrum. The phase sensitive property of the atomic system leads to quenching of the spontaneous emission in some regions of the standing-waves, which significantly reduces the uncertainty in the position measurement of the atom. We find that the frequency measurement of the emitted light localizes the atom in half-wavelength domain. Especially the probability of finding the atom at a particular position can reach 100% when a photon with certain frequency is detected. By increasing the Rabi frequencies of the driving fields, such 2D sub-half-wavelength atom localization can acquire high spatial resolution.

  6. Template-Free Supracolloidal Self-Assembly of Atomically Precise Gold Nanoclusters: From 2D Colloidal Crystals to Spherical Capsids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonappa; Lahtinen, Tanja; Haataja, Johannes S; Tero, Tiia-Riikka; Häkkinen, Hannu; Ikkala, Olli

    2016-12-23

    We report supracolloidal self-assembly of atomically precise and strictly monodisperse gold nanoclusters involving p-mercaptobenzoic acid ligands (Au 102 -pMBA 44 ) under aqueous conditions into hexagonally packed monolayer-thick two-dimensional facetted colloidal crystals (thickness 2.7 nm) and their bending to closed shells leading to spherical capsids (d ca. 200 nm), as controlled by solvent conditions. The 2D colloidal assembly is driven in template-free manner by the spontaneous patchiness of the pMBA ligands around the Au 102 -pMBA 44 nanoclusters preferably towards equatorial plane, thus promoting inter-nanocluster hydrogen bonds and high packing to planar sheets. More generally, the findings encourage to explore atomically precise nanoclusters towards highly controlled colloidal self-assemblies. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. A new method for mapping the three-dimensional atomic distribution within nanoparticles by atom probe tomography (APT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Ho; Kang, Phil Woong; Park, O Ok; Seol, Jae-Bok; Ahn, Jae-Pyoung; Lee, Ji Yeong; Choi, Pyuck-Pa

    2018-04-13

    We present a new method of preparing needle-shaped specimens for atom probe tomography from freestanding Pd and C-supported Pt nanoparticles. The method consists of two steps, namely electrophoresis of nanoparticles on a flat Cu substrate followed by electrodeposition of a Ni film acting as an embedding matrix for the nanoparticles. Atom probe specimen preparation can be subsequently carried out by means of focused-ion-beam milling. Using this approach, we have been able to perform correlative atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy analyses on both nanoparticle systems. Reliable mass spectra and three-dimensional atom maps could be obtained for Pd nanoparticle specimens. In contrast, atom probe samples prepared from C-supported Pt nanoparticles showed uneven field evaporation and hence artifacts in the reconstructed atom maps. Our developed method is a viable means of mapping the three-dimensional atomic distribution within nanoparticles and is expected to contribute to an improved understanding of the structure-composition-property relationships of various nanoparticle systems. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Laser-cooled atoms inside a hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajcsy, Michal; Hofferberth, S.; Peyronel, Thibault

    2011-01-01

    We describe the loading of laser-cooled rubidium atoms into a single-mode hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber. Inside the fiber, the atoms are confined by a far-detuned optical trap and probed by a weak resonant beam. We describe different loading methods and compare their trade-offs in terms...... of implementation complexity and atom-loading efficiency. The most efficient procedure results in loading of ∼30,000 rubidium atoms, which creates a medium with an optical depth of ∼180 inside the fiber. Compared to our earlier study this represents a sixfold increase in the maximum achieved optical depth...

  9. Electron Rydberg wave packets in one-dimensional atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transient phase-space localization of the wave packet produced ... that the atom undergoes a free evolution from a classical, to a nonclassical, and back to ... for the weight factors in superposing energy eigenstates to construct the wave packet for a 1D atom. In terms of these transition amplitudes the Rydberg wave packet.

  10. Atomic resolution of structural changes in elastic crystals of copper(II) acetylacetonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Anna; Grosjean, Arnaud; Pfrunder, Michael C.; Xu, Yanan; Yan, Cheng; Edwards, Grant; Clegg, Jack K.; McMurtrie, John C.

    2018-01-01

    Single crystals are typically brittle, inelastic materials. Such mechanical responses limit their use in practical applications, particularly in flexible electronics and optical devices. Here we describe single crystals of a well-known coordination compound—copper(II) acetylacetonate—that are flexible enough to be reversibly tied into a knot. Mechanical measurements indicate that the crystals exhibit an elasticity similar to that of soft materials such as nylon, and thus display properties normally associated with both hard and soft matter. Using microfocused synchrotron radiation, we mapped the changes in crystal structure that occur on bending, and determined the mechanism that allows this flexibility with atomic precision. We show that, under strain, the molecules in the crystal reversibly rotate, and thus reorganize to allow the mechanical compression and expansion required for elasticity and still maintain the integrity of the crystal structure.

  11. Atomic-scale friction on stepped surfaces of ionic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Pascal; Gnecco, Enrico; Krok, Franciszek; Budzioch, Janusz; Walczak, Lukasz; Konior, Jerzy; Szymonski, Marek; Meyer, Ernst

    2011-05-06

    We report on high-resolution friction force microscopy on a stepped NaCl(001) surface in ultrahigh vacuum. The measurements were performed on single cleavage step edges. When blunt tips are used, friction is found to increase while scanning both up and down a step edge. With atomically sharp tips, friction still increases upwards, but it decreases and even changes sign downwards. Our observations extend previous results obtained without resolving atomic features and are associated with the competition between the Schwöbel barrier and the asymmetric potential well accompanying the step edges.

  12. Neutral-helium-atom diffraction from a micron-scale periodic structure: Photonic-crystal-membrane characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesse, Torstein; Eder, Sabrina D.; Kaltenbacher, Thomas; Grepstad, Jon Olav; Simonsen, Ingve; Holst, Bodil

    2017-06-01

    Surface scattering of neutral helium beams created by supersonic expansion is an established technique for measuring structural and dynamical properties of surfaces on the atomic scale. Helium beams have also been used in Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction experiments. Due to the short wavelength of the atom beams of typically 0.1 nm or less, Fraunhofer diffraction experiments in transmission have so far been limited to grating structures with a period (pitch) of up to 200 nm. However, larger periods are of interest for several applications, for example, for the characterization of photonic-crystal-membrane structures, where the period is typically in the micron to high submicron range. Here we present helium atom diffraction measurements of a photonic-crystal-membrane structure with a two-dimensional square lattice of 100 ×100 circular holes. The nominal period and the hole radius were 490 and 100 nm, respectively. To our knowledge this is the largest period that has been measured with helium diffraction. The helium diffraction measurements are interpreted using a model based on the helium beam characteristics. It is demonstrated how to successfully extract values from the experimental data for the average period of the grating, the hole diameter, and the width of the virtual source used to model the helium beam.

  13. Surface morphology study on CdZnTe crystals by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azoulay, M.; George, M.A.; Burger, A.; Collins, W.E.; Silberman, E. [Fisk Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The study of the crystal surface morphology of CdZnTe is important for the understanding of the fundamentals of crystal growth in order to improve the crystal quality which is essential in applications such as substrates for epitaxy or performance of devices, i.e., room temperature nuclear spectrometers. We present a first atomic force microscopy study on CdZnTe. Cleaved (110) surfaces were imaged in the ambient and an atomic layer step structure was revealed. The effects of thermal annealing on the atomic steps together with Te precipitation along these steps are discussed in terms of deformation due to stress relief and the diffusion of tellurium precipitates. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Membrane's Eleven: heavy-atom derivatives of membrane-protein crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morth, Jens Preben; Sørensen, Thomas Lykke-Møller; Nissen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    A database has been assembled of heavy-atom derivatives used in the structure determination of membrane proteins. The database can serve as a guide to the design of experiments in the search for heavy-atom derivatives of new membrane-protein crystals. The database pinpoints organomercurials......, platinum(II) and trimethyllead compounds as being particularly useful. On the other hand, lanthanide and uranyl compounds are poorly represented, which may be a consequence of these compounds having aggressive effects in crystal-soaking procedures. Furthermore, the database highlights the variety...... of methods applied in the preparation of heavy-atom-derivatized crystals and in phasing. Cocrystallization can be further exploited. Phases have predominantly been obtained by SIRAS/MIRAS methods rather than SAD/MAD in recent structure determinations....

  15. De Haas-van Alphen effect of a two-dimensional ultracold atomic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, B.; Furtado, C.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we show how the ultracold atom analogue of the two-dimensional de Haas-van Alphen effect in electronic condensed matter systems can be induced by optical fields in a neutral atomic system. The interaction between the suitable spatially varying laser fields and tripod-type trapped atoms generates a synthetic magnetic field which leads the particles to organize themselves in Landau levels. Initially, with the atomic gas in a regime of lowest Landau level, we display the oscillatory behaviour of the atomic energy and its derivative with respect to the effective magnetic field (B) as a function of 1/B. Furthermore, we estimate the area of the Fermi circle of the two-dimensional atomic gas.

  16. Influence of ions on two-dimensional and three-dimensional atomic force microscopy at fluorite-water interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Miyazawa, Keisuke; Watkins, Matthew Benjamin; Shluger, Alexander L.; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Recent advancement in liquid-environment atomic force microscopy (AFM) has enabled us to visualize three-dimensional (3D) hydration structures as well as two-dimensional (2D) surface structures with subnanometer-scale resolution at solid-water interfaces. However, the influence of ions present in solution on the 2D- and 3D-AFM measurements has not been well understood. In this study, we perform atomic-scale 2D- and 3D-AFM measurements at fluorite-water interfaces in pure water and a supersatu...

  17. A Smart Colorful Supercapacitor with One Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cihui; Liu, Xing; Xuan, Hongyun; Ren, Jiaoyu; Ge, Liqin

    2015-12-01

    To meet the pressing demands for portable and flexible equipment in contemporary society, developing flexible, lightweight, and sustainable supercapacitor systems with large power densities, long cycle life, and ease of strongly required. However, estimating the state-of-charge of existing supercapacitors is difficult, and thus their service life is limited. In this study, we fabricate a flexible color indicative supercapacitor device with mesoporous polyaniline (mPANI)/Poly(N-Isopropyl acrylamide-Graphene Oxide-Acrylic Acid) (P(NiPPAm-GO-AA)) one dimensional photonic crystals (1DPCs) as the electrode material through a low-cost, eco-friendly, and scalable fabrication process. We found that the state-of-charge could be monitored by the structural color oscillation due to the change in the photonic band gap position of the 1DPCs. The flexible 1DPCs supercapacitor is thin at 3 mm and exhibits good specific capacitance of 22.6 F g-1 with retention of 91.1% after 3,000 cycles. This study shows the application of the 1DPCs supercapacitor as a visual ultrathin power source. The technology may find many applications in future wearable electronics.

  18. A Smart Colorful Supercapacitor with One Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cihui; Liu, Xing; Xuan, Hongyun; Ren, Jiaoyu; Ge, Liqin

    2015-01-01

    To meet the pressing demands for portable and flexible equipment in contemporary society, developing flexible, lightweight, and sustainable supercapacitor systems with large power densities, long cycle life, and ease of strongly required. However, estimating the state-of-charge of existing supercapacitors is difficult, and thus their service life is limited. In this study, we fabricate a flexible color indicative supercapacitor device with mesoporous polyaniline (mPANI)/Poly(N-Isopropyl acrylamide-Graphene Oxide-Acrylic Acid) (P(NiPPAm-GO-AA)) one dimensional photonic crystals (1DPCs) as the electrode material through a low-cost, eco-friendly, and scalable fabrication process. We found that the state-of-charge could be monitored by the structural color oscillation due to the change in the photonic band gap position of the 1DPCs. The flexible 1DPCs supercapacitor is thin at 3 mm and exhibits good specific capacitance of 22.6 F g−1 with retention of 91.1% after 3,000 cycles. This study shows the application of the 1DPCs supercapacitor as a visual ultrathin power source. The technology may find many applications in future wearable electronics. PMID:26689375

  19. On the critical behaviour of two-dimensional liquid crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.l. Fariñas-Sánchez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lebwohl-Lasher (LL model is the traditional model used to describe the nematic-isotropic transition of real liquid crystals. In this paper, we develop a numerical study of the temperature behaviour and of finite-size scaling of the two-dimensional (2D LL-model. We discuss two possible scenarios. In the first one, the 2D LL-model presents a phase transition similar to the topological transition appearing in the 2D XY-model. In the second one, the 2D LL-model does not exhibit any critical transition, but its low temperature behaviour is rather characterized by a crossover from a disordered phase to an ordered phase at zero temperature. We realize and discuss various comparisons with the 2D XY-model and the 2D Heisenberg model. Having added finite-size scaling behaviour of the order parameter and conformal mapping of order parameter profile to previous studies, we analyze the critical scaling of the probability distribution function, hyperscaling relations and stiffness order parameter and conclude that the second scenario (no critical transition is the most plausible.

  20. Algorithms for solving atomic structures of nanodimensional clusters in single crystals based on X-ray and neutron diffuse scattering data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrushevskii, N.M.; Shchedrin, B.M.; Simonov, V.I.

    2004-01-01

    New algorithms for solving the atomic structure of equivalent nanodimensional clusters of the same orientations randomly distributed over the initial single crystal (crystal matrix) have been suggested. A cluster is a compact group of substitutional, interstitial or other atoms displaced from their positions in the crystal matrix. The structure is solved based on X-ray or neutron diffuse scattering data obtained from such objects. The use of the mathematical apparatus of Fourier transformations of finite functions showed that the appropriate sampling of the intensities of continuous diffuse scattering allows one to synthesize multiperiodic difference Patterson functions that reveal the systems of the interatomic vectors of an individual cluster. The suggested algorithms are tested on a model one-dimensional structure

  1. Low-frequency-field-induced spontaneous-emission interference in a two-level atom placed in an anisotropic photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Gaoxiang; Evers, Joerg; Keitel, Christoph H

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the spontaneous-emission properties of a two-level atom embedded in a three-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystal. In addition to the modified density of states, the atom is driven by a coherent intense low-frequency field (LFF), which creates additional multiphoton decay channels with the exchange of two low-frequency photons and one spontaneous photon during an atomic transition. Due to the low frequency of the applied field, the various transition pathways may interfere with each other and thus give rise to a modified system dynamics. We find that even if all the atomic (bare and induced) transition frequencies are in the conducting band of the photonic crystal, there still may exist a photon-atom bound state in coexistence with propagating modes. The system also allows us to generate narrow lines in the spontaneous-emission spectrum. This spectrum is a function of the distance of the observer from the atom due to the band gap in the photonic crystal. The system properties depend on three characteristic frequencies, which are influenced by quantum interference effects. Thus these results can be attributed to a combination of interference and band-gap effects

  2. Atomically Phase-Matched Second-Harmonic Generation in a 2D Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-26

    intensity on layer number as a result of atomically phase-matched nonlinear dipoles in layers of the 3R crystal that constructively interfere . By...orientation but shift along the in-plane direction. The alignment of the in-plane dipole of each 3R layer allows for an atomic phase match and leads to the...constructive interference of the SH polarization in the thin-film limit below the coherence length, where we expect the intensity to scale

  3. Study of atomic jumps in quasi-crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyonnard, S.

    1997-01-01

    The terminology phason used in quasicrystals to refer to atomic jumps. The study of the hopping process is important for the understanding of many basic issues in quasi-crystallography: structure, stability, diffusion, phase transitions between quasicrystals and approximants, mechanical properties. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering allows to find the characteristics of each elementary jump: chemical species involves, relaxation times, activation energies, jump distances and orientations. We performed a series of experiments in the perfect icosahedral phases AlFeCu and AlMnPd, on both powders and single domain samples, using time-of-flight, backscattering and triple axis spectrometers. We evidenced the existence of very fast phason hopping, and studied about ten different atomic jumps. An unusual temperature dependence has been found systematically: each process is assisted by a thermally activated mechanism. The assistance process has to be determined case by case, but the more plausible explanation invokes assistance by phonons or phason clouds. Moreover, the dependence of the quasi elastic signal as a function of the momentum transfer shows that the jumps are local and do not give rise to any long-range diffusion. Phason hopping mainly corresponds to the atom moving forwards and backwards between two energetically equivalent sites. Finally, we have been able to show that the jumps occur along the various quasi-crystalline symmetry axes. (author)

  4. Determination of three-dimensional strain state in crystals using self-interfered split HOLZ lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herring, Rodney, E-mail: rherring@uvic.ca [CAMTEC, MENG, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada V8W 2Y2 (Canada); Norouzpour, Mana [CAMTEC, MENG, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada V8W 2Y2 (Canada); Saitoh, Koh; Tanaka, Nobuo; Tanji, Takayoshi [EcoTopia, Nagoya University, Nagoya 461-8603 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    An experimental method to measure the strain through the thickness of a crystal is demonstrated. This enables the full three-dimensional stress–strain state of a crystal at the nanoscale to be determined taking the current practice from two-dimensional strain state determination. Knowing the 3D strain state is desired by crystal growers in order to improve their crystal's quality. This method involves combining electron diffraction with electron interferometry in a transmission electron microscope. The electron diffraction uses a split higher order Laue zone (HOLZ) line and the electron interferometry uses an electron biprism.

  5. The directional propagation characteristics of elastic wave in two-dimensional thin plate phononic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Jihong; Yu, Dianlong; Wang Gang; Zhao Honggang; Liu Yaozong; Wen Xisen

    2007-01-01

    The directional propagation characteristics of elastic wave during pass bands in two-dimensional thin plate phononic crystals are analyzed by using the lumped-mass method to yield the phase constant surface. The directions and regions of wave propagation in phononic crystals for certain frequencies during pass bands are predicted with the iso-frequency contour lines of the phase constant surface, which are then validated with the harmonic responses of a finite two-dimensional thin plate phononic crystals with 16x16 unit cells. These results are useful for controlling the wave propagation in the pass bands of phononic crystals

  6. Dimensional crossover and cold-atom realization of gapless and semi-metallic Mott insulating phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Peter P.; Scheurer, Mathias; Rachel, Stephan

    2014-03-01

    We propose a realistic cold-atom setup which allows for a dimensional crossover from a two-dimensional quantum spin Hall insulating phase to a three-dimensional strong topological insulator phase by simply tuning the hopping between the layers. We further employ cluster slave-rotor mean-field theory to study the effect of additional Hubbard onsite interactions that give rise to various spin liquid-like phases such as gapless and semi-metallic Mott insulating states.

  7. Hot atom reactions in mixed crystals of iron group metallocenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yassine, T.; Blackburn, R.

    1989-01-01

    Neutron irradiations of mixed crystals of pairs of ferrocene, ruthenocene, and osmocene were carried out and a theoretical model is proposed to explain the behaviour of recoil metal species in the irradiated matrices. The proposed model is based on ion-molecule reactions which are controlled by several factors, which include the ionisation potentials of the reactants and the internal energies of both reactants and products. Most of the observed retention data on the mixed metallocene systems appear to be consistent with the proposed explanation. (author)

  8. Hot atom reactions in mixed crystals of iron group metallocenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yassine, T.; Blackburn, R.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron irradiations of mixed crystals of pairs of ferrocene, ruthenocene, and osmoscene were carried out and a theoretical model is proposed to explain the behaviour of recoil metal species in the irradiated matrices. The proposed model is based on ion-molecule reactions which are controlled by several factors, which include the ionisation potentials of the reactants and the internal energies of both reactants and products. Most of the observed retention data on the mixed metallocene systems appear to be consistent with the proposed explanation. (author). 9 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Switching and counting with atomic vapors in photonic-crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peyronel, Thibault; Bajcsy, Michal; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    We review our recent experiments demonstrating a hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber loaded with laser-cooled atomic vapor as a system for all-optical switching with pulses containing few hundred photons. Additionally, we discuss the outlooks for improving the efficiency of this switching scheme...

  10. Atom–atom interactions around the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Jonathan D.; Goban, Akihisa; Asenjo-Garcia, Ana; Lu, Mingwu; Yu, Su-Peng; Chang, Darrick E.; Kimble, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Tailoring the interactions between quantum emitters and single photons constitutes one of the cornerstones of quantum optics. Coupling a quantum emitter to the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) provides a unique platform for tuning these interactions. In particular, the cross-over from propagating fields E(x)∝e±ikxx outside the bandgap to localized fields E(x)∝e−κx|x| within the bandgap should be accompanied by a transition from largely dissipative atom–atom interactions to a regime where dispersive atom–atom interactions are dominant. Here, we experimentally observe this transition by shifting the band edge frequency of the PCW relative to the D1 line of atomic cesium for N¯=3.0±0.5 atoms trapped along the PCW. Our results are the initial demonstration of this paradigm for coherent atom–atom interactions with low dissipation into the guided mode. PMID:27582467

  11. One-Dimensional Tunable Photonic-Crystal IR Filter, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MetroLaser proposes to design and develop an innovative narrowband tunable IR filter based on the properties of a one-dimensional photonic crystal structure with a...

  12. One-Dimensional Tunable Photonic-Crystal IR Filter, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MetroLaser proposes to design and develop an innovative narrowband tunable IR filter based on the properties of a one-dimensional photonic crystal structure with a...

  13. On Regularity Criteria for the Two-Dimensional Generalized Liquid Crystal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We establish the regularity criteria for the two-dimensional generalized liquid crystal model. It turns out that the global existence results satisfy our regularity criteria naturally.

  14. Electron crystallography of ultrathin 3D protein crystals: atomic model with charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonekura, Koji; Kato, Kazuyuki; Ogasawara, Mitsuo; Tomita, Masahiro; Toyoshima, Chikashi

    2015-03-17

    Membrane proteins and macromolecular complexes often yield crystals too small or too thin for even the modern synchrotron X-ray beam. Electron crystallography could provide a powerful means for structure determination with such undersized crystals, as protein atoms diffract electrons four to five orders of magnitude more strongly than they do X-rays. Furthermore, as electron crystallography yields Coulomb potential maps rather than electron density maps, it could provide a unique method to visualize the charged states of amino acid residues and metals. Here we describe an attempt to develop a methodology for electron crystallography of ultrathin (only a few layers thick) 3D protein crystals and present the Coulomb potential maps at 3.4-Å and 3.2-Å resolution, respectively, obtained from Ca(2+)-ATPase and catalase crystals. These maps demonstrate that it is indeed possible to build atomic models from such crystals and even to determine the charged states of amino acid residues in the Ca(2+)-binding sites of Ca(2+)-ATPase and that of the iron atom in the heme in catalase.

  15. Emulation of two-dimensional photonic crystal defect modes in a photonic crystal with a three-dimensional photonic band gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povinelli, M. L.; Johnson, Steven G.; Fan, Shanhui; Joannopoulos, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Using numerical simulations, we demonstrate the construction of two-dimensional- (2D-) like defect modes in a recently proposed 3D photonic crystal structure. These modes, which are confined in all three dimensions by a complete photonic band gap, bear a striking similarity to those in 2D photonic crystals in terms of polarization, field profile, and projected band structures. It is expected that these results will greatly facilitate the observation of widely studied 2D photonic-crystal phenomena in a realistic, 3D physical system

  16. Density functional theory calculations of stability and diffusion mechanisms of impurity atoms in Ge crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeta, Takahiro [Graduate School of System Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja, Okayama 719-1197 (Japan); GlobalWafers Japan Co., Ltd., Higashikou, Seirou-machi, Kitakanbara-gun, Niigata 957-0197 (Japan); Sueoka, Koji [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja, Okayama 719-1197 (Japan)

    2014-08-21

    Ge-based substrates are being developed for applications in advanced nano-electronic devices because of their higher intrinsic carrier mobility than Si. The stability and diffusion mechanism of impurity atoms in Ge are not well known in contrast to those of Si. Systematic studies of the stable sites of 2nd to 6th row element impurity atoms in Ge crystal were undertaken with density functional theory (DFT) and compared with those in Si crystal. It was found that most of the impurity atoms in Ge were stable at substitutional sites, while transition metals in Si were stable at interstitial sites and the other impurity atoms in Si were stable at substitutional sites. Furthermore, DFT calculations were carried out to clarify the mechanism responsible for the diffusion of impurity atoms in Ge crystals. The diffusion mechanism for 3d transition metals in Ge was found to be an interstitial-substitutional diffusion mechanism, while in Si this was an interstitial diffusion mechanism. The diffusion barriers in the proposed diffusion mechanisms in Ge and Si were quantitatively verified by comparing them to the experimental values in the literature.

  17. Scattering of atomic and molecular ions from single crystal surfaces of Cu, Ag and Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoest, J.M. van.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis deals with analysis of crystal surfaces of Cu, Ag and Fe with Low Energy Ion scattering Spectroscopy (LEIS). Different atomic and molecular ions with fixed energies below 7 keV are scattered by a metal single crystal (with adsorbates). The energy and direction of the scattered particles are analysed for different selected charge states. In that way information can be obtained concerning the composition and atomic and electronic structure of the single crystal surface. Energy spectra contain information on the composition of the surface, while structural atomic information is obtained by direction measurements (photograms). In Ch.1 a description is given of the experimental equipment, in Ch.2 a characterization of the LEIS method. Ch.3 deals with the neutralization of keV-ions in surface scattering. Two different ways of data interpretation are presented. First a model is treated in which the observed directional dependence of neutralization action of the first atom layer of the surface is presented by a laterally varying thickness of the neutralizing layer. Secondly it is shown that the data can be reproduced by a more realistic, physical model based on atomic transition matrix elements. In Ch.4 the low energy hydrogen scattering is described. The study of the dissociation of H 2 + at an Ag surface r0230ted in a model based on electronic dissociation, initialized by electron capture into a repulsive (molecular) state. In Ch.5 finally the method is applied to the investigation of the surface structure of oxidized Fe. (Auth.)

  18. Creation of tunable absolute bandgaps in a two-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystal modulated by a nematic liquid crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chenyang

    2008-01-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have many potential applications because of their ability to control light-wave propagation. We have investigated the tunable absolute bandgap in a two-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystal structures modulated by a nematic liquid crystal. The PC structure composed of an anisotropic-dielectric cylinder in the liquid crystal medium is studied by solving Maxwell's equations using the plane wave expansion method. The photonic band structures are found to exhibit absolute bandgaps for the square and triangular lattices. Numerical simulations show that the absolute bandgaps can be continuously tuned in the square and triangular lattices consisting of anisotropic-dielectric cylinders by infiltrating nematic liquid crystals. Such a mechanism of bandgap adjustment should open up a new application for designing components in photonic integrated circuits

  19. Broadband slow light in one-dimensional logically combined photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagappan, G; Png, C E

    2015-01-28

    Here, we demonstrate the broadband slow light effects in a new family of one dimensional photonic crystals, which are obtained by logically combining two photonic crystals of slightly different periods. The logical combination slowly destroys the original translational symmetries of the individual photonic crystals. Consequently, the Bloch modes of the individual photonic crystals with different wavevectors couple with each other, creating a vast number of slow modes. Specifically, we describe a photonic crystal architecture that results from a logical "OR" mixture of two one dimensional photonic crystals with a periods ratio of r = R/(R - 1), where R > 2 is an integer. Such a logically combined architecture, exhibits a broad region of frequencies in which a dense number of slow modes with varnishing group velocities, appear naturally as Bloch modes.

  20. Ultratough CVD single crystal diamond and three dimensional growth thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemley, Russell J [Washington, DC; Mao, Ho-kwang [Washington, DC; Yan, Chih-shiue [Washington, DC

    2009-09-29

    The invention relates to a single-crystal diamond grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition that has a toughness of at least about 30 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention also relates to a method of producing a single-crystal diamond with a toughness of at least about 30 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention further relates to a process for producing a single crystal CVD diamond in three dimensions on a single crystal diamond substrate.

  1. Controllable optical bistability in photonic-crystal one-atom laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiaoyong; Lue Shuchen

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the property of optical bistability in a photonic-crystal one-atom laser when nonlinear microcavity is present. The physical system consists of a coherently driven two-level light emitter strongly coupled to a high-quality microcavity which is embedded within a photonic crystal and another coherent probing field which has incident into the microcavity. In our case, the microcavity is fabricated by nonlinear material and placed as an impurity in photonic crystal. This study reveals that such a system can exhibit optical bistability. The dependence of threshold value and hysteresis loop on the photonic band gap of the photonic crystal, driving field Rabi frequency and dephasing processes, are studied. Our results clearly illustrate the ability to control optical bistability through suitable photonic-crystal architectures and external coherent driving field, and this study suggests that in a photonic-crystal nonlinear microcavity, the one-atom laser acts as an effective controllable bistable device in the design of all-light digital computing systems in the near future.

  2. Solid state single crystal growth of three-dimensional faceted LaFeAsO crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappenberger, Rhea; Aswartham, Saicharan; Scaravaggi, Francesco; Blum, Christian G. F.; Sturza, Mihai I.; Wolter, Anja U. B.; Wurmehl, Sabine; Büchner, Bernd

    2018-02-01

    Solid state single crystal growth (SSCG) is a crystal growth technique where crystals are grown from a polycrystalline matrix. Here, we present single crystals of the iron pnictide LaFeAsO grown via SSCG using NaAs as a liquid phase to aid crystallization. The size of the as-grown crystals are up to 2 × 3 × 0.4 mm3. Typical for this method, but very uncommon for crystals of the pnictide superconductors and especially for the oxypnictides, the crystals show pronounced facets caused by considerable growth in c direction. The crystals were characterized regarding their composition, structure, magnetic, and thermodynamic properties. This sets the stage for further measurements for which single crystals are crucial such as any c axis and reciprocal space dependent measurements.

  3. Fabrication and Characterization of Three Dimensional Photonic Crystals Generated by Multibeam Interference Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Chieh

    2009-01-01

    Multibeam interference lithography is investigated as a manufacturing technique for three-dimensional photonic crystal templates. In this research, optimization of the optical setup and the photoresist initiation system leads to a significant improvement of the optical quality of the crystal, as characterized by normal incidence optical…

  4. Pseudo-time-reversal symmetry and topological edge states in two-dimensional acoustic crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Mei, Jun

    2016-09-02

    We propose a simple two-dimensional acoustic crystal to realize topologically protected edge states for acoustic waves. The acoustic crystal is composed of a triangular array of core-shell cylinders embedded in a water host. By utilizing the point group symmetry of two doubly degenerate eigenstates at the Î

  5. Cooperative single-photon subradiant states in a three-dimensional atomic array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jen, H.H., E-mail: sappyjen@gmail.com

    2016-11-15

    We propose a complete superradiant and subradiant states that can be manipulated and prepared in a three-dimensional atomic array. These subradiant states can be realized by absorbing a single photon and imprinting the spatially-dependent phases on the atomic system. We find that the collective decay rates and associated cooperative Lamb shifts are highly dependent on the phases we manage to imprint, and the subradiant state of long lifetime can be found for various lattice spacings and atom numbers. We also investigate both optically thin and thick atomic arrays, which can serve for systematic studies of super- and sub-radiance. Our proposal offers an alternative scheme for quantum memory of light in a three-dimensional array of two-level atoms, which is applicable and potentially advantageous in quantum information processing. - Highlights: • Cooperative single-photon subradiant states in a three-dimensional atomic array. • Subradiant state manipulation via spatially-increasing phase imprinting. • Quantum storage of light in the subradiant state in two-level atoms.

  6. Kinetic Roughening and Energetics of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystal Growth: A Preliminary Atomic Force Microscopy Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2004-01-01

    We examined particulars of crystal growth from measurements obtained at both microscopic and molecular levels. The crystal growth measurements performed at the microscopic level are well characterized by a model that balances the flux of macromolecules towards the crystal surface with the flux of the crystal surface. Numerical evaluation of model with measurements of crystal growth, in time, provided accurate estimates for the average growth velocities. Growth velocities thus obtained were also interpreted using well-established phenomenological theories. Moreover, we find that microscopic measurements of growth velocity measurements obtained as a function of temperature best characterizes changes in crystal growth modes, when present. We also examined the possibility of detecting a change in crystal growth modes at the molecular level using atomic force microscopy, AFM. From preliminary AFM measurements performed at various supersaturations, we find that magnitude of surface height fluctuations, h(x), increases with supersaturation. Further examination of surface height fluctuations using methods established for fluctuation spectroscopy also enabled the discovery of the existence of a characteristic length, c, which may possibly determine the mode of crystal growth. Although the results are preliminary, we establish the non- critical divergence of 5 and the root-mean-square (rms) magnitude of height-height fluctuations as the kinetic roughening transition temperatures are approached. Moreover, we also examine approximate models for interpreting the non-critical behavior of both 6 and rms magnitude of height-height fluctuations, as the solution supersaturation is increased towards the kinetic roughening supersaturation.

  7. Immobilization of single argon atoms in nano-cages of two-dimensional zeolite model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Mengen; Akter, Nusnin; Kestell, John D; Boscoboinik, Alejandro M; Kim, Taejin; Stacchiola, Dario J; Lu, Deyu; Boscoboinik, J Anibal

    2017-07-17

    The confinement of noble gases on nanostructured surfaces, in contrast to bulk materials, at non-cryogenic temperatures represents a formidable challenge. In this work, individual Ar atoms are trapped at 300 K in nano-cages consisting of (alumino)silicate hexagonal prisms forming a two-dimensional array on a planar surface. The trapping of Ar atoms is detected in situ using synchrotron-based ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The atoms remain in the cages upon heating to 400 K. The trapping and release of Ar is studied combining surface science methods and density functional theory calculations. While the frameworks stay intact with the inclusion of Ar atoms, the permeability of gasses (for example, CO) through them is significantly affected, making these structures also interesting candidates for tunable atomic and molecular sieves. These findings enable the study of individually confined noble gas atoms using surface science methods, opening up new opportunities for fundamental research.

  8. Immobilization of single argon atoms in nano-cages of two-dimensional zeolite model systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Mengen; Akter, Nusnin; Kestell, John D.; Boscoboinik, Alejandro M.; Kim, Taejin; Stacchiola, Dario J.; Lu, Deyu; Boscoboinik, J. Anibal

    2017-07-01

    The confinement of noble gases on nanostructured surfaces, in contrast to bulk materials, at non-cryogenic temperatures represents a formidable challenge. In this work, individual Ar atoms are trapped at 300 K in nano-cages consisting of (alumino)silicate hexagonal prisms forming a two-dimensional array on a planar surface. The trapping of Ar atoms is detected in situ using synchrotron-based ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The atoms remain in the cages upon heating to 400 K. The trapping and release of Ar is studied combining surface science methods and density functional theory calculations. While the frameworks stay intact with the inclusion of Ar atoms, the permeability of gasses (for example, CO) through them is significantly affected, making these structures also interesting candidates for tunable atomic and molecular sieves. These findings enable the study of individually confined noble gas atoms using surface science methods, opening up new opportunities for fundamental research.

  9. Investigation of quasi-one-dimensional finite phononic crystal with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the results analysed by the finite element software, ANSYS. We hope that the results will be helpful in practical applications of phononic crystals. Keywords. Finite phononic crystal; band gap; frequency-response functions. PACS Nos 43.20.+g; 43.40.+s; 63.20.−e. 1. Introduction. In recent years, the propagation of classical ...

  10. Three-dimensional elemental mapping at the atomic scale in bimetallic nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goris, Bart; De Backer, Annick; Van Aert, Sandra; Gómez-Graña, Sergio; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Bals, Sara

    2013-09-11

    A thorough understanding of the three-dimensional (3D) atomic structure and composition of core-shell nanostructures is indispensable to obtain a deeper insight on their physical behavior. Such 3D information can be reconstructed from two-dimensional (2D) projection images using electron tomography. Recently, different electron tomography techniques have enabled the 3D characterization of a variety of nanostructures down to the atomic level. However, these methods have all focused on the investigation of nanomaterials containing only one type of chemical element. Here, we combine statistical parameter estimation theory with compressive sensing based tomography to determine the positions and atom type of each atom in heteronanostructures. The approach is applied here to investigate the interface in core-shell Au@Ag nanorods but it is of great interest in the investigation of a broad range of nanostructures.

  11. Gamma induced atom displacements in LYSO and LuYAP crystals as used in medical imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piñera, Ibrahin, E-mail: ipinera@ceaden.edu.cu [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnológicas y Desarrollo Nuclear, CEADEN, 30 St. 502, Playa 11300, Havana (Cuba); Cruz, Carlos M.; Abreu, Yamiel; Leyva, Antonio [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnológicas y Desarrollo Nuclear, CEADEN, 30 St. 502, Playa 11300, Havana (Cuba); Van Espen, Piet [University of Antwerp, CGB, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Díaz, Angelina; Cabal, Ana E. [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnológicas y Desarrollo Nuclear, CEADEN, 30 St. 502, Playa 11300, Havana (Cuba); Van Remortel, Nick [University of Antwerp, CGB, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2015-08-01

    The radiation damage, in terms of atom displacements, induced by gamma irradiation in LYSO and LuYAP crystals is presented. {sup 44}Sc, {sup 22}Na and {sup 48}V are used as gamma sources for this study. The energy of gammas from the electron–positron annihilation processes (511 keV) is also included in the study. The atom displacements distributions inside each material are calculated following the Monte Carlo assisted Classical Method introduced by the authors. This procedure also allows to study the atom displacements in-depth distributions inside each crystal. The atom displacements damage in LYSO crystals is found to be higher than in LuYAP crystals, mainly provoked by the displacements of silicon and oxygen atoms. But the difference between atom displacements produced in LYSO and LuYAP decreases when more energetic sources are used. On the other hand, the correlation between the atom displacements and energy deposition in-depth distributions is excellent. The atom displacements to energy deposition ratio is found to increases with more energetic photon sources. LYSO crystals are then more liable to the atom displacements damage than LuYAP crystals.

  12. Electron cryomicroscopy of two-dimensional crystals of the H+-ATPase from chloroplasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Böttcher, Bettina; Gräber, Peter; Boekema, Egbert J.; Lücken, Uwe

    1995-01-01

    The H+-ATPase from spinach chloroplasts was isolated and purified. Two-dimensional crystals were obtained from the protein/lipid/detergent micelles by treatment with phospholipase and simultaneous removal of detergent and fatty acids by Biobeads. The resulting two-dimensionally ordered arrays were

  13. ELECTRON CRYOMICROSCOPY OF 2-DIMENSIONAL CRYSTALS OF THE H+-ATPASE FROM CHLOROPLASTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOTTCHER, B; GRABER, P; BOEKEMA, EJ; LUCKEN, U

    1995-01-01

    The H+-ATPase from spinach chloroplasts was isolated and purified, Two-dimensional crystals were obtained from the protein/lipid/detergent micelles by treatment with phospholipase and simultaneous removal of detergent and fatty acids by Biobeads. The resulting two-dimensionally ordered arrays were

  14. INTENSITY STATISTICS AND NORMALIZED STRUCTURE FACTORS FOR CRYSTALS WITH AN INCOMMENSURATE ONE-DIMENSIONAL MODULATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LAM, EJW; BEURSKENS, PT; VANSMAALEN, S

    1993-01-01

    An analytical expression is derived for the probability density function (p.d.f.) of X-ray structure-factor amplitudes of a crystal with an incommensurate one-dimensional modulation. The influence of the (3+1)-dimensional superspace symmetry is taken into account. It is shown that, in first-order

  15. Likelihood of atom–atom contacts in crystal structures of halogenated organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Jelsch

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The likelihood of occurrence of intermolecular contacts in crystals of halogenated organic compounds has been analysed statistically using tools based on the Hirshfeld surface. Several families of small halogenated molecules (containing organic F, Cl, Br or I atoms were analysed, based on chemical composition and aromatic or aliphatic character. The behaviour of crystal contacts was also probed for molecules containing O or N. So-called halogen bonding (a halogen making short interactions with O or N, or a π interaction with C is generally disfavoured, except when H is scarce on the molecular surface. Similarly, halogen...halogen contacts are more rare than expected, except for molecules that are poor in H. In general, the H atom is found to be the preferred partner of organic halogen atoms in crystal structures. On the other hand, C...C interactions in parallel π-stacking have a high propensity to occur in halogenated aromatic molecules. The behaviour of the four different halogen species (F, Cl, Br, I is compared in several chemical composition contexts. The analysis tool can be refined by distinguishing several types for a given chemical species, such as H atoms bound to O or C. Such distinction shows, for instance, that C—H...Cl and O—H...O are the preferred interactions in compounds containing both O and Cl.

  16. A simple nonbinary scattering model applicable to atomic collisions is crystals at 1ow energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans Henrik; Sigmund, Peter

    1966-01-01

    the projectile and each ring atom is described by a Born-Mayer potential, and the scattering is assumed to be elastic and governed by the classical equations of motion. Because of symmetry, the problem can be reduced to plane motion of a particle in a potential of elliptic symmetry. The elliptic force field......Presents the solution of a special scattering problem which may be important in the theory of slowing-down of atomic particles in crystals. A projectile moves along the centre axis of a regular ring of n equal atoms which are free and do not interact with each other. The interaction between...... the asymptotic velocities of the ring atoms as well as the energy loss of the projectile. Furthermore, it can be decided whether the projectile is reflected by the ring. Both the feasibility of assumptions specifying the problem and the validity of different approximations made in the transformation from...

  17. Properties of the localized field emitted from degenerate Λ-type atoms in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroozani, N.; Golshan, M. M.; Mahjoei, M.

    2007-01-01

    The spontaneous emission from a degenerate Λ-type three-level atom, embedded in a photonic crystal, is studied. The emitted field, as a function of time and position, is calculated by solving the three coupled differential equations governing the amplitudes. We show that the spontaneously emitted field is characterized by three components (as in the case of two-level and V-type atoms): a localized part, a traveling part, and a t -3/2 decaying part. Our calculations indicate that under specific conditions the atoms do not emit propagating fields, while the localized field, having shorter localization length and time, is intensified. As a consequence, the population of the upper level, after a short period of oscillations, approaches a constant value. It is also shown that this steady value, under the same conditions, is much larger than its counterpart in V-type atoms

  18. Enhancement of the fluorescence intensity of DNA intercalators using nano-imprinted 2-dimensional photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Tatsuro; Ueda, China; Hisamoto, Hideaki; Kajita, Hiroshi; Okuda, Norimichi; Tanaka, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    We have fabricated polymer-based 2-dimensional photonic crystals that play a key role in enhancing the fluorescence of DNA intercalators. Highly ordered 2-dimensional photonic crystals possessing triangle-shaped and nm-sized hole arrays were fabricated on a 100 μm thick polymer film using nano-imprint lithography. Samples of double-stranded DNAs (sizes: 4361 and 48502 bp; concentration: 1 pM to 10 nM) were adsorbed on the surface of the 2-dimensional photonic crystal by electrostatic interactions and then treated with intercalators. It is found that the fluorescence intensity of the intercalator is enhanced by a factor of up to 10 compared to the enhancement in the absence of the 2-dimensional photonic crystal. Fluorescence intensity increases with increasing length and concentration of the DNAs. If the 2-dimensional photonic crystal is used as a Bragg reflection mirror, the enhancement of fluorescence intensity can be easily observed using a conventional spectrofluorometer. These results suggest that the printed photonic crystal offers a great potential for highly sensitive intercalator-based fluorescent detection of DNAs. (author)

  19. Effective medium theory with dimensionality reduction for band structures of photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Li; Ho, C.-C.; Wei, H.-S.; Wu, G. Y.

    2007-03-01

    Making use of the effective medium theory, we reduce the two-dimensional photonic crystals to an effective one-dimensional model. This one-dimensional model not only predicts correctly the dispersion in the long-wavelength limit (where the wavelength is much larger than the period of material) but also gives a good approximation for shorter wavelength. We further use the perturbation theory to improve the calculation of dispersion up to medium wavelength (which is of the order of space period of the material). Our work gives an insight into the modes of electromagnetic field propagating in photonic crystals.

  20. One-dimensional Si-in-Si(001) template for single-atom wire growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, J. H. G.; Bianco, F.; Köster, S. A.; Mazur, D.; Bowler, D. R.; Renner, Ch.

    2010-08-01

    Single atom metallic wires of arbitrary length are of immense technological and scientific interest. We present atomic-resolution scanning tunneling microscope data of a silicon-only template, which modeling predicts to enable the self-organized growth of isolated micrometer long surface and subsurface single-atom chains. It consists of a one-dimensional, defect-free Si reconstruction four dimers wide—the Haiku core—formed by hydrogenation of self-assembled Bi-nanolines on Si(001) terraces, independent of any step edges. We discuss the potential of this Si-in-Si template as an appealing alternative to vicinal surfaces for nanoscale patterning.

  1. Crystal lattice imaging of the silica and alumina faces of kaolinite using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vishal; Hampton, Marc A; Nguyen, Anh V; Miller, Jan D

    2010-12-01

    The crystal lattice images of the two faces of kaolinite (the silica face and the alumina face) have been obtained using contact-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions. Lattice resolution images reveal the hexagonal surface lattice of these two faces of kaolinite. Analysis of the silica face of kaolinite showed that the hexagonal surface lattice ring of oxygen atoms had a periodicity of 0.50±0.04nm between neighboring oxygen atoms, which is in good agreement with the surface lattice structure of the mica basal plane. The center of the hexagonal ring of oxygen atoms is vacant. Analysis of the alumina face of kaolinite showed that the hexagonal surface lattice ring of hydroxyls surround a hydroxyl in the center of the ring. The atomic spacing between neighboring hydroxyls was determined as 0.36±0.04nm. Ordering of the kaolinite particles for examination of the silica and alumina surfaces was accomplished using different substrates, a procedure previously established. Crystal lattice imaging supports previous results and independently confirms that the two faces of kaolinite have been properly identified. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. High-efficiency one-dimensional atom localization via two parallel standing-wave fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Wu, Xuqiang; Lu, Liang; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    We present a new scheme of high-efficiency one-dimensional (1D) atom localization via measurement of upper state population or the probe absorption in a four-level N-type atomic system. By applying two classical standing-wave fields, the localization peak position and number, as well as the conditional position probability, can be easily controlled by the system parameters, and the sub-half-wavelength atom localization is also observed. More importantly, there is 100% detecting probability of the atom in the subwavelength domain when the corresponding conditions are satisfied. The proposed scheme may open up a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-efficiency 1D atom localization. (paper)

  3. Deep diode atomic battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, T.R.; Cline, H.E.

    1977-01-01

    A deep diode atomic battery is made from a bulk semiconductor crystal containing three-dimensional arrays of columnar and lamellar P-N junctions. The battery is powered by gamma rays and x-ray emission from a radioactive source embedded in the interior of the semiconductor crystal

  4. Rapid, all-optical crystal orientation imaging of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, Sabrina N.; Zhai, Yao; Zande, Arend M. van der; O'Brien, Kevin; Huang, Pinshane Y.; Chenet, Daniel A.; Hone, James C.; Zhang, Xiang; Yin, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic materials such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have attracted significant research and industrial interest for their electronic, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties. While large-area crystal growth techniques such as chemical vapor deposition have been demonstrated, the presence of grain boundaries and orientation of grains arising in such growths substantially affect the physical properties of the materials. There is currently no scalable characterization method for determining these boundaries and orientations over a large sample area. We here present a second-harmonic generation based microscopy technique for rapidly mapping grain orientations and boundaries of 2D TMDCs. We experimentally demonstrate the capability to map large samples to an angular resolution of ±1° with minimal sample preparation and without involved analysis. A direct comparison of the all-optical grain orientation maps against results obtained by diffraction-filtered dark-field transmission electron microscopy plus selected-area electron diffraction on identical TMDC samples is provided. This rapid and accurate tool should enable large-area characterization of TMDC samples for expedited studies of grain boundary effects and the efficient characterization of industrial-scale production techniques

  5. Atomic-like high-harmonic generation from two-dimensional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tancogne-Dejean, Nicolas; Rubio, Angel

    2018-02-01

    The generation of high-order harmonics from atomic and molecular gases enables the production of high-energy photons and ultrashort isolated pulses. Obtaining efficiently similar photon energy from solid-state systems could lead, for instance, to more compact extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray sources. We demonstrate from ab initio simulations that it is possible to generate high-order harmonics from free-standing monolayer materials, with an energy cutoff similar to that of atomic and molecular gases. In the limit in which electrons are driven by the pump laser perpendicularly to the monolayer, they behave qualitatively the same as the electrons responsible for high-harmonic generation (HHG) in atoms, where their trajectories are described by the widely used semiclassical model, and exhibit real-space trajectories similar to those of the atomic case. Despite the similarities, the first and last steps of the well-established three-step model for atomic HHG are remarkably different in the two-dimensional materials from gases. Moreover, we show that the electron-electron interaction plays an important role in harmonic generation from monolayer materials because of strong local-field effects, which modify how the material is ionized. The recombination of the accelerated electron wave packet is also found to be modified because of the infinite extension of the material in the monolayer plane, thus leading to a more favorable wavelength scaling of the harmonic yield than in atomic HHG. Our results establish a novel and efficient way of generating high-order harmonics based on a solid-state device, with an energy cutoff and a more favorable wavelength scaling of the harmonic yield similar to those of atomic and molecular gases. Two-dimensional materials offer a unique platform where both bulk and atomic HHG can be investigated, depending on the angle of incidence. Devices based on two-dimensional materials can extend the limit of existing sources.

  6. X-ray photoelectron spectra and electronic structure of quasi-one-dimensional SbSeI crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Grigas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS of the valence band (VB and of the principal core levels from the (110 and (001 crystal surfaces for the quasi-one-dimensional high permittivity SbSeI single crystal isostructural to ferroelectric SbSI. The XPS were measured with monochromatized Al Ka radiation in the energy range of 0-1400 eV at room temperature. The VB is located from 1.6 to 20 eV below the Fermi level. Experimental energies of the VB and core levels are compared with the results of theoretical ab initio calculations of the molecular model of the SbSeI crystal. The electronic structure of the VB is revealed. Shifts in the core-level binding energies of surface atoms relative to bulk ones, which show a dependency on surface crystallography, have been observed. The chemical shifts of the core levels (CL in the SbSeI crystal for the Sb, I and Se states are obtained.

  7. Dimensional characterization of extracellular vesicles using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebaihi, N; De Boeck, B; Pétry, J; Yuana, Y; Nieuwland, R

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are small biological entities released from cells into body fluids. EV are recognized as mediators in intercellular communication and influence important physiological processes. It has been shown that the concentration and composition of EV in body fluids may differ from healthy subjects to patients suffering from particular disease. So, EV have gained a strong scientific and clinical interest as potential biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of disease. Due to their small size, accurate detection and characterization of EV remain challenging. The aim of the presented work is to propose a characterization method of erythrocyte-derived EV using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The vesicles are immobilized on anti-CD235a-modified mica and analyzed by AFM under buffer liquid and dry conditions. EV detected under both conditions show very similar sizes namely ∼30 nm high and ∼90 nm wide. The size of these vesicles remains stable over drying time as long as 7 d at room temperature. Since the detected vesicles are not spherical, EV are characterized by their height and diameter, and not only by the height as is usually done for spherical nanoparticles. In order to obtain an accurate measurement of EV diameters, the geometry of the AFM tip was evaluated to account for the lateral broadening artifact inherent to AFM measurements. To do so, spherical polystyrene (PS) nanobeads and EV were concomitantly deposited on the same mica substrate and simultaneously measured by AFM under dry conditions. By applying this procedure, direct calibration of the AFM tip could be performed together with EV characterization under identical experimental conditions minimizing external sources of uncertainty on the shape and size of the tip, thus allowing standardization of EV measurement. (paper)

  8. Dimensional characterization of extracellular vesicles using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebaihi, N.; De Boeck, B.; Yuana, Y.; Nieuwland, R.; Pétry, J.

    2017-03-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are small biological entities released from cells into body fluids. EV are recognized as mediators in intercellular communication and influence important physiological processes. It has been shown that the concentration and composition of EV in body fluids may differ from healthy subjects to patients suffering from particular disease. So, EV have gained a strong scientific and clinical interest as potential biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of disease. Due to their small size, accurate detection and characterization of EV remain challenging. The aim of the presented work is to propose a characterization method of erythrocyte-derived EV using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The vesicles are immobilized on anti-CD235a-modified mica and analyzed by AFM under buffer liquid and dry conditions. EV detected under both conditions show very similar sizes namely ~30 nm high and ~90 nm wide. The size of these vesicles remains stable over drying time as long as 7 d at room temperature. Since the detected vesicles are not spherical, EV are characterized by their height and diameter, and not only by the height as is usually done for spherical nanoparticles. In order to obtain an accurate measurement of EV diameters, the geometry of the AFM tip was evaluated to account for the lateral broadening artifact inherent to AFM measurements. To do so, spherical polystyrene (PS) nanobeads and EV were concomitantly deposited on the same mica substrate and simultaneously measured by AFM under dry conditions. By applying this procedure, direct calibration of the AFM tip could be performed together with EV characterization under identical experimental conditions minimizing external sources of uncertainty on the shape and size of the tip, thus allowing standardization of EV measurement.

  9. Squeezing in the output field from a one-dimensional atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshino, Kazuki

    2006-01-01

    It is revealed that quadrature squeezing occurs in the output field from a one-dimensional atom driven by a classical field. The degree of squeezing depends on the intensity of the input field, and reaches 28% at the maximum. It can roughly be regarded that the output field is in a superposition of coherent and number states

  10. Numerical Studies of Collective Phenomena in Two-Dimensional Electron and Cold Atom Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezayi, Edward

    2013-07-25

    Numerical calculations were carried out to investigate a number of outstanding questions in both two-dimensional electron and cold atom systems. These projects aimed to increase our understanding of the properties of and prospects for non-Abelian states in quantum Hall matter.

  11. Modeling of inelastic transport in one-dimensional metallic atomic wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads; Lorente, N

    2004-01-01

    devices. A full description of the transport properties of atomic-size conductors therefore requires a quantum mechanical treatment of both the electronic and mechanical degrees of freedom. In this paper, we study a one-dimensional tight-binding model of the conducting electrons combined with a balls-and-springs...

  12. Imaging three-dimensional surface objects with submolecular resolution by atomic force microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moreno, C.; Stetsovych, Oleksandr; Shimizu, T.K.; Custance, O.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2015), s. 2257-2262 ISSN 1530-6984 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC- AFM ) * submolecular resolution * three-dimensional dynamic force spectroscopy * high-resolution imaging Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 13.779, year: 2015

  13. New analytical treatment for a kind of two dimensional integrals in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Qifeng; Kuang Yurang

    1994-01-01

    A kind of two-dimensional integrals, separated from two-center matrix elements in ion-atom collisions, is analytically integrated by introducing the Laplace transform into the integrals and expressed by the modified Bessel functions. The traditional Feynman transform is very complicated for this kind of more general integrals related to the excited state capture

  14. Dispersion relations for stationary light in one-dimensional atomic ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakoupov, Ivan; Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Chang, Darrick E

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the dispersion relations for light coupled to one-dimensional ensembles of atoms with different level schemes. The unifying feature of all the considered setups is that the forward and backward propagating quantum fields are coupled by the applied classical drives such that the gro...

  15. One- and two-dimensional fluids properties of smectic, lamellar and columnar liquid crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Jakli, Antal

    2006-01-01

    Smectic and lamellar liquid crystals are three-dimensional layered structures in which each layer behaves as a two-dimensional fluid. Because of their reduced dimensionality they have unique physical properties and challenging theoretical descriptions, and are the subject of much current research. One- and Two-Dimensional Fluids: Properties of Smectic, Lamellar and Columnar Liquid Crystals offers a comprehensive review of these phases and their applications. The book details the basic structures and properties of one- and two-dimensional fluids and the nature of phase transitions. The later chapters consider the optical, magnetic, and electrical properties of special structures, including uniformly and non-uniformly aligned anisotropic films, lyotropic lamellar systems, helical and chiral structures, and organic anisotropic materials. Topics also include typical and defective features, magnetic susceptibility, and electrical conductivity. The book concludes with a review of current and potential applications ...

  16. High-precision two-dimensional atom localization via quantum interference in a tripod-type system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for high-precision two-dimensional atom localization in a four-level tripod-type atomic system via measurement of the excited state population. It is found that because of the position-dependent atom–field interaction, the precision of 2D atom localization can be significantly improved by appropriately adjusting the system parameters. Our scheme may be helpful in laser cooling or atom nanolithography via high-precision and high-resolution atom localization. (letter)

  17. Electronic Structure Changes Due to Crystal Phase Switching at the Atomic Scale Limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsson, Johan Valentin; Lehmann, Sebastian; Hjort, Martin; Lundgren, Edvin; Dick, Kimberly A; Timm, Rainer; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2017-10-24

    The perfect switching between crystal phases with different electronic structure in III-V nanowires allows for the design of superstructures with quantum wells only a single atomic layer wide. However, it has only been indirectly inferred how the electronic structure will vary down to the smallest possible crystal segments. We use low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to directly probe the electronic structure of Zinc blende (Zb) segments in Wurtzite (Wz) InAs nanowires with atomic-scale precision. We find that the major features in the band structure change abruptly down to a single atomic layer level. Distinct Zb electronic structure signatures are observed on both the conduction and valence band sides for the smallest possible Zb segment: a single InAs bilayer. We find evidence of confined states in the region of both single and double bilayer Zb segments indicative of the formation of crystal segment quantum wells due to the smaller band gap of Zb as compared to Wz. In contrast to the internal electronic structure of the nanowire, surface states located in the band gap were found to be only weakly influenced by the presence of the smallest Zb segments. Our findings directly demonstrate the feasibility of crystal phase switching for the ultimate limit of atomistic band structure engineering of quantum confined structures. Further, it indicates that band gap values obtained for the bulk are reasonable to use even for the smallest crystal segments. However, we also find that the suppression of surface and interface states could be necessary in the use of this effect for engineering of future electronic devices.

  18. Three-dimensional structure of porcine pancreatic carboxypeptidase B with an acetate ion and two zinc atoms in the active site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akparov, V. Kh., E-mail: valery@akparov.ru [State Research Institute for Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms (Russian Federation); Timofeev, V. I., E-mail: tostars@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation); Maghsoudi, N. N., E-mail: maghsudi@yahoo.com [Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Neuroscience Research Center (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kuranova, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Crystals of porcine pancreatic carboxypeptidase B (CPB) were grown by the capillary counter-diffusion method in the presence of polyethylene glycol and zinc acetate. The three-dimensional structure of CPB was determined at 1.40 Å resolution using the X-ray diffraction data set collected from the crystals of the enzyme at the SPring 8 synchrotron facility and was refined to R{sub fact} = 17.19%, R{sub free} = 19.78%. The structure contains five zinc atoms, two of which are present in the active site of the enzyme, and an acetate ion. The arrangement of an additional zinc atom in the active site and the acetate ion is different from that reported by Yoshimoto et al.

  19. Multi-dimensional population balance models of crystallization processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meisler, Kresten Troelstrup; von Solms, Nicolas

    A generic and model-based framework for batch cooling crystallization operations has been extended to incorporate continuous and fed-batch processes. Modules for the framework have been developed, including a module for reactions, allowing the study of reactive crystallization within the framework......, analyzed, used for simulation and stored again. The model library facilitates comparison of expressions for kinetic phenomena and is tightly integrated with the model analysis tools of the framework.Through the framework, a model for a crystallization operation may be systematically generated...... and parameters for the simulation can be found in the database. A procedure for parameter estimation has been illustrated based on experimental work. The identifiability of the models has been discussed in relation to parameter estimation using sensitivity analysis. Some important identifiability issues have...

  20. Topology optimization of two-dimensional asymmetrical phononic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Hao-Wen [Institute of Engineering Mechanics, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Su, Xiao-Xing [School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Wang, Yue-Sheng, E-mail: yswang@bjtu.edu.cn [Institute of Engineering Mechanics, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Zhang, Chuanzeng [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany)

    2014-01-17

    The multiple elitist genetic algorithm with the adaptive fuzzy fitness granulation (AFFG) is used to design the phononic crystals with large relative bandgap width (BGW) for combined out-of-plane and in-plane wave modes. Without assumption on the symmetry of the unit-cell, we obtain an asymmetrical phononic crystal with the relative BGW which is quite larger than that of the optimized symmetrical structure. With the help of AFFG, the number of the fitness function evaluations is reduced by over 50% and the procedure converges 5 times faster than the conventional evolutionary algorithm to reach the same final fitness values.

  1. Theory of Vortex Crystal Formation in Two-Dimensional Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, D. Z.

    1999-11-01

    The free relaxation of inviscid, incompressible 2D turbulence is often dominated by strong vortices (coherent patches of intense vorticity) that move chaotically and merge. However, recent experiments(K.S. Fine et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75), 3277 (1995). with pure electron plasmas have found that freely relaxing turbulent flows with a single sign of vorticity can spontaneously form ``vortex crystals'' -- symmetric, stable arrays of strong vortices that are immersed in a low vorticity background. In this talk we discuss how these complex equilibria can form from 2D turbulence. First, we formulate a statistical theory of the vortex crystals. We show that vortex crystals are well described as ``regional'' maximum fluid entropy (RMFE) states, which are equilibrium states reached through ergodic mixing of the background by the strong vortices.(D.Z. Jin and D.H.E. Dubin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80), 4434 (1998). Given the dynamically conserved quantities as well as the number and the vorticity distributions of the strong vortices, the theory predicts the positions of the strong vortices and the coarse-grained vorticity distribution of the background. These predictions agree well with the observed vortex crystals. Second, we examine the formation process of the vortex crystals in more detail. In the RMFE theory, the vortex crystal equilibrium can only be predicted if the number Nc of the strong vortices in the final state is given. Here, we estimate Nc from the characteristics of the early turbulent flow. The estimate relies on the idea that vortex crystals form because the chaotic motions of the strong vortices are ``cooled'' due to mixing of the background by the vortices. When the rate of cooling is faster than the rate of pairwise mergers, the vortices fall into a crystal pattern before they can merge. We estimate the merger rate from the observed power law decay of the number of strong vortices in the early stages of the flow, and the cooling rate from the rate of mixing of

  2. Effect of mechanical deformations on the growth of crystals (according to atomic force microscopy data)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskunova, N. N.; Askhabov, A. M.

    2017-05-01

    Nanosized morphological transformations occurring on the surface of a crystal in the area drawn by a probe needle during the growth of a scratch and the growth kinetics of crystals subjected to mechanical impact have been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). A series of experiments with mechanical impact on topographically different areas of a growing face (100) of a dioxidine crystal has been performed. It has been shown that even slight local contact between the probe needle and the surface on a nanoscale leads to essential crystallogenetic (morphological and kinetic) consequences, and its effect is perceptible for a long time. Among these consequences are the coarsening of stages, the appearance of great fluctuations in the growth rate of stages, the loss of morphological stability by the surface even at a distance of several tens of micrometers from the contact area, and also the phenomenon of simultaneous growth and dissolution in neighboring areas of stages.

  3. Characterization of single-crystal sapphire substrates by X-ray methods and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokhorov, I. A.; Zakharov, B. G.; Asadchikov, V. E.; Butashin, A. V.; Roshchin, B. S.; Tolstikhina, A. L.; Zanaveskin, M. L.; Grishchenko, Yu. V.; Muslimov, A. E.; Yakimchuk, I. V.; Volkov, Yu. O.; Kanevskii, V. M.; Tikhonov, E. O.

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of characterizing a number of practically important parameters of sapphire substrates by X-ray methods is substantiated. These parameters include wafer bending, traces of an incompletely removed damaged layer that formed as a result of mechanical treatment (scratches and marks), surface roughness, damaged layer thickness, and the specific features of the substrate real structure. The features of the real structure of single-crystal sapphire substrates were investigated by nondestructive methods of double-crystal X-ray diffraction and plane-wave X-ray topography. The surface relief of the substrates was investigated by atomic force microscopy and X-ray scattering. The use of supplementing analytical methods yields the most complete information about the structural inhomogeneities and state of crystal surface, which is extremely important for optimizing the technology of substrate preparation for epitaxy.

  4. Quantitative study of two- and three-dimensional strong localization of matter waves by atomic scatterers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antezza, Mauro; Castin, Yvan; Hutchinson, David A. W.

    2010-01-01

    We study the strong localization of atomic matter waves in a disordered potential created by atoms pinned at the nodes of a lattice, for both three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) systems. The localization length of the matter wave, the density of localized states, and the occurrence of energy mobility edges (for the 3D system), are numerically investigated as a function of the effective scattering length between the atomic matter wave and the pinned atoms. Both positive and negative matter wave energies are explored. Interesting features of the density of states are discovered at negative energies, where maxima in the density of bound states for the system can be interpreted in terms of bound states of a matter wave atom with a few pinned atomic scatterers. In 3D we found evidence of up to three mobility edges, one at positive energies, and two at negative energies, the latter corresponding to transitions between extended and localized bound states. In 2D, no mobility edge is found, and a rapid exponential-like increase of the localization length is observed at high energy.

  5. Manipulation of photons at the surface of three-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Kenji; Noda, Susumu

    2009-07-16

    In three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals, refractive-index variations with a periodicity comparable to the wavelength of the light passing through the crystal give rise to so-called photonic bandgaps, which are analogous to electronic bandgaps for electrons moving in the periodic electrostatic potential of a material's crystal structure. Such 3D photonic bandgap crystals are envisioned to become fundamental building blocks for the control and manipulation of photons in optical circuits. So far, such schemes have been pursued by embedding artificial defects and light emitters inside the crystals, making use of 3D bandgap directional effects. Here we show experimentally that photons can be controlled and manipulated even at the 'surface' of 3D photonic crystals, where 3D periodicity is terminated, establishing a new and versatile route for photon manipulation. By making use of an evanescent-mode coupling technique, we demonstrate that 3D photonic crystals possess two-dimensional surface states, and we map their band structure. We show that photons can be confined and propagate through these two-dimensional surface states, and we realize their localization at arbitrary surface points by designing artificial surface-defect structures through the formation of a surface-mode gap. Surprisingly, the quality factors of the surface-defect mode are the largest reported for 3D photonic crystal nanocavities (Q up to approximately 9,000). In addition to providing a new approach for photon manipulation by photonic crystals, our findings are relevant for the generation and control of plasmon-polaritons in metals and the related surface photon physics. The absorption-free nature of the 3D photonic crystal surface may enable new sensing applications and provide routes for the realization of efficient light-matter interactions.

  6. Ultrafast optical switching in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazurenko, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    The rapidly expanding research on photonic crystals is driven by potential applications in all-optical switches, optical computers, low-threshold lasers, and holographic data storage. The performance of such devices might surpass the speed of traditional electronics by several orders of magnitude

  7. Synthesis, crystal structure determination of two-dimensional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The fingerprint plots demonstrate that these weak non-bonding interactions are important for stabilizing the crystal packing. Keywords. Distorted trigonal pyramidal geometry; anti-conformation; steric hindrance; sql type topology; fingerprint plots. 1. Introduction. Ag(I) being soft acid is often used for coordination to soft bases ...

  8. Cavity quantum electrodynamics with three-dimensional photonic bandgap crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Willem L.; Woldering, L.A.; Ghulinyan, M.; Pavesi, L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is Chapter 8 of the book "Light Localisation and Lasing: Random and Pseudorandom Photonic Structures", edited by Mher Ghulinyan and Lorenzo Pavesi (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2015). It provides an overview of much recent work on 3D photonic crystals with a complete photonic

  9. Using Two-Dimensional Colloidal Crystals to Understand Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Stephanie A.; Loening, Nikolaus M.

    2008-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is an essential technique for modern chemistry and biochemistry, but it is infrequently encountered by undergraduate students owing to lack of access to equipment, the time-scale for generating diffraction-quality molecular crystals, and the level of mathematics involved in analyzing the resulting diffraction patterns.…

  10. Phononic crystals with one-dimensional defect as sensor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Arafa H.; Mehaney, Ahmed

    2017-09-01

    Recently, sensor technology has attracted great attention in many fields due to its importance in many engineering applications. In the present work, we introduce a study using the innovative properties of phononic crystals in enhancing a new type of sensors based on the intensity of transmitted frequencies inside the phononic band gaps. Based on the transfer matrix method and Bloch theory, the expressions of the reflection coefficient and dispersion relation are presented. Firstly, the influences of filling fraction ratio and the angle of incidence on the band gap width are discussed. Secondly, the localization of waves inside band gaps is discussed by enhancing the properties of the defected phononic crystal. Compared to the periodic structure, localization modes involved within the band structure of phononic crystals with one and two defect layers are presented and compared. Trapped localized modes can be detected easily and provide more information about defected structures. Such method could increase the knowledge of manufacturing defects by measuring the intensity of propagated waves in the resonant cavities and waveguides. Moreover, several factors enhance the role of the defect layer on the transmission properties of defected phononic crystals are presented. The acoustic band gap can be used to detect or sense the type of liquids filling the defect layer. The liquids make specific resonant modes through the phononic band gaps that related to the properties of each liquid. The frequency where the maximum resonant modes occur is correlated to material properties and allows to determine several parameters such as the type of an unknown material.

  11. Synthesis, crystal structure determination of two-dimensional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The 2-D polymeric complex (I) has the formula [Ag(phSE)(NO3)]n, which has been crystallized ..... complex (I). Figure 4. (a) Ball-n-stick model; (b) Polyhedral representation of 2-D sheet or network as shown in ab plane of complex (I). Figure 5. (a) π-π interactions .... integration allows the separation of contribution from.

  12. Investigating the crystal growth behavior of biodegradable polymer blend thin films using in situ atomic force microscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malwela, T

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the crystal growth behavior of biodegradable polylactide (PLA)/poly[(butylene succinate)-co-adipate] (PBSA) blend thin films using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Currently, polymer thin films have received increased research...

  13. High-dimensional Controlled-phase Gate Between a 2 N -dimensional Photon and N Three-level Artificial Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yun-Ming; Wang, Tie-Jun

    2017-10-01

    Higher-dimensional quantum system is of great interest owing to the outstanding features exhibited in the implementation of novel fundamental tests of nature and application in various quantum information tasks. High-dimensional quantum logic gate is a key element in scalable quantum computation and quantum communication. In this paper, we propose a scheme to implement a controlled-phase gate between a 2 N -dimensional photon and N three-level artificial atoms. This high-dimensional controlled-phase gate can serve as crucial components of the high-capacity, long-distance quantum communication. We use the high-dimensional Bell state analysis as an example to show the application of this device. Estimates on the system requirements indicate that our protocol is realizable with existing or near-further technologies. This scheme is ideally suited to solid-state integrated optical approaches to quantum information processing, and it can be applied to various system, such as superconducting qubits coupled to a resonator or nitrogen-vacancy centers coupled to a photonic-band-gap structures.

  14. Refining spatial distribution maps for atom probe tomography via data dimensionality reduction methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suram, Santosh K; Rajan, Krishna

    2012-10-01

    A mathematical framework based on singular value decomposition is used to analyze the covariance among interatomic frequency distributions in spatial distribution maps (SDMs). Using this approach, singular vectors that capture the covariance within the SDM data are obtained. The structurally relevant singular vectors (SRSVs) are identified. Using the SRSVs, we extract information from z-SDMs that not only captures the offset between the atomic planes but also captures the covariance in the atomic structure among the neighborhood atomic planes. These refined z-SDMs classify the Δ(Δz) slices in the SDMs into structurally relevant information, noise, and aberrations. The SRSVs are used to construct refined xy-SDMs that provide enhanced structural information for three-dimensional atom probe tomography.

  15. Interaction and dynamics of add-atoms with 2-dimensional structures

    CERN Multimedia

    The interaction and dynamics of add-atoms with graphene, graphene-derivate structures and, later, MoSi$_2$, two-dimensional – single and few – atomic layers will be studied with the Perturbed Angular Correlation – PAC – technique. Graphene is also envisaged as new platform for growing semiconductor nanostructure devices, such as quantum dots and as a particularly powerful catalyst. Understanding nucleation of nanostructures and clusters on graphene and related phases in wet conditions as they are used in chemical methods in research and industry require complementary studies. These systems will therefore be studied systematically using radioactive probe atoms attaching via a transfer media (e.g., water in catalysis process) or being deposited with soft-landing techniques under vacuum and UHV conditions, as put in place at the ASPIC setup at ISOLDE. The hyperfine fields obtained under different environments are expected to reveal basic information on the rich atomic and physical mechanisms associated w...

  16. Influence of ions on two-dimensional and three-dimensional atomic force microscopy at fluorite-water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, K.; Watkins, M.; Shluger, A. L.; Fukuma, T.

    2017-06-01

    Recent advancement in liquid-environment atomic force microscopy (AFM) has enabled us to visualize three-dimensional (3D) hydration structures as well as two-dimensional (2D) surface structures with subnanometer-scale resolution at solid-water interfaces. However, the influence of ions present in solution on the 2D- and 3D-AFM measurements has not been well understood. In this study, we perform atomic-scale 2D- and 3D-AFM measurements at fluorite-water interfaces in pure water and a supersaturated solution of fluorite. The images obtained in these two environments are compared to understand the influence of the ions in solution on these measurements. In the 2D images, we found clear difference in the nanoscale structures but no significant difference in the atomic-scale contrasts. However, the 3D force images show clear difference in the subnanometer-scale contrasts. The force contrasts measured in pure water largely agree with those expected from the molecular dynamics simulation and the solvent tip approximation model. In the supersaturated solution, an additional force peak is observed over the negatively charged fluorine ion site. This location suggests that the observed force peak may originate from cations adsorbed on the fluorite surface. These results demonstrate that the ions can significantly alter the subnanometer-scale force contrasts in the 3D-AFM images.

  17. Crystal conversion between metal-organic frameworks with different crystal topologies for efficient crystal design on two-dimensional substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruoka, Takaaki; Inoue, Kohei; Miyanaga, Ayumi; Tobiishi, Kaho; Ohhashi, Takashi; Hata, Manami; Takashima, Yohei; Akamatsu, Kensuke

    2018-04-01

    Crystal conversion of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) between different crystal topologies on a polymer substrate has been successfully achieved by localized dissolution of MOF crystals followed by a rapid self-assembly of framework components. Upon addition of the desired organic linkers to the reaction system containing MOF crystals on the substrate, reversible crystal conversion between the [Cu2(btc)3]n and [Cu2(ndc)2(dabco)]n frameworks (btc = 1,3,5-benzene tricarboxylate, ndc = 1,4-naphthalene dicarboxylate, dabco = 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane) could be routinely achieved in high yields. Most surprisingly, in the case of conversion from the [Cu2(ndc)2(dabco)]n to [Cu2(btc)3]n frameworks, the [Cu2(btc)3]n crystals with unique shapes (cuboctahedron and truncated cube) could be prepared using butanol as a reaction medium.

  18. Tunable double-channel filter based on two-dimensional ferroelectric photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Ping; Ding, Chengyuan; Hu, Xiaoyong; Gong, Qihuang

    2007-01-01

    A tunable double-channel filter is presented, which is based on a two-dimensional nonlinear ferroelectric photonic crystal made of cerium doped barium titanate. The filtering properties of the photonic crystal filter can be tuned by adjusting the defect structure or by a pump light. The influences of the structure disorders caused by the perturbations in the radius or the position of air holes on the filtering properties are also analyzed

  19. Tunable double-channel filter based on two-dimensional ferroelectric photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Ping [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ding, Chengyuan [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Hu, Xiaoyong [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)]. E-mail: xiaoyonghu@pku.edu.cn; Gong, Qihuang [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)]. E-mail: qhgong@pku.edu.cn

    2007-04-02

    A tunable double-channel filter is presented, which is based on a two-dimensional nonlinear ferroelectric photonic crystal made of cerium doped barium titanate. The filtering properties of the photonic crystal filter can be tuned by adjusting the defect structure or by a pump light. The influences of the structure disorders caused by the perturbations in the radius or the position of air holes on the filtering properties are also analyzed.

  20. Nucleation and Crystal Growth in the Formation of Hierarchical Three-Dimensional Nanoarchitecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xudong [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2018-02-02

    This project is to obtain fundamental understandings of the operation of the Ostwald-Lussac (OL) Law and the oriented attachment (OA) mechanism in nucleation and growth of TiO2 nanorods (NR) via surface-reaction-limited pulsed chemical vapor deposition (SPCVD) process. Three-dimensional (3D) NW networks are a unique type of mesoporous architecture that offers extraordinary surface area density and superior transport properties of electrons, photons, and phonons. It is exceptionally promising for advancing the design and application of functional materials for photovoltaic devices, catalysts beds, hydrogen storage systems, sensors, and battery electrodes. Our group has developed the SPCVD technique by mimicking the mechanism of atomic layer deposition (ALD), which effectively decoupled the crystal growth from precursor concentration while retaining anisotropic 1D growth. For the first time, this technique realized a 3D NW architecture with ultrahigh density and achieved ~4-5 times enhancement on photo-conversion efficiency. Through the support of our current DOE award, we revealed the governing role of the OL Law in the nucleation stage of SPCVD. The formation of NR morphology in SPCVD was identified following the OA mechanism. We also discovered a unique vapor-phase Kirkendall effect in the evolution of tubular or core-shell NR structures. These understandings opened many new opportunities in designing 3D NW architectures with improved properties or new functionalities. Specifically, our accomplishments from this project include five aspects: (1) Observation of the Ostwald-Lussac Law in high-temperature ALD. (2) Observation of vapor-solid Kirkendall effect in ZnO-to-TiO2 nanostructure conversion. (3) Development of highly-efficient capillary photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar-fuel generation. (4) Development of efficient and stable electrochemical protections for black silicon PEC electrodes. (5) Development of doped polymers with tunable electrical properties. This

  1. Diffusion Mechanisms of Ag atom in ZnO crystal: A First Principles Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoumi, Saeed; Noori, Amirreza; Nadimi, Ebrahim

    2017-12-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is currently under intensive investigation, as a result of its various applications in micro, nano and optoelectronics. However, a stable and reproducible p-type doping of ZnO is still a main challenging issue. Group IB elements such as Au, Cu and Ag, are promising candidates for p-type doping. Particularly, Ag atoms has been shown to be able to easily diffuse through the crystal structure of ZnO and lead to the p-type doping of the host crystal. However, the current understanding of Ag defects and their mobility in the ZnO crystal is still not fully explored. In this work, we report the results of our first-principles calculations based on density functional theory for Ag defects, particularly the interstitial and substitutional defects in ZnO crystal. Defect formation energies are calculated in different charged states as a function of Fermi energy in order to clarify the p-type behaviour of Ag-doped ZnO. We also investigate the diffusion behaviour and migration paths of Ag in ZnO crystal in the framework of density functional theory applying climbing image (CI) nudged elastic band method (NEB).

  2. Two-Dimensional Spatial Solitons in Nematic Liquid Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Weiping; Xie Ruihua; Goong Chen; Belic, Milivoj; Yang Zhengping

    2009-01-01

    We study the propagation of spatial solitons in nematic liquid crystals, using the self-similar method. Analytical solutions in the form of self-similar solitons are obtained exactly. We confirm the stability of these solutions by direct numerical simulation, and find that the stable spatial solitons can exist in various forms, such as Gaussian solitons, radially symmetric solitons, multipole solitons, and soliton vortices.

  3. Three-dimensional rearrangement of single atoms using actively controlled optical microtraps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woojun; Kim, Hyosub; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-05-02

    We propose and demonstrate three-dimensional rearrangements of single atoms. In experiments performed with single 87Rb atoms in optical microtraps actively controlled by a spatial light modulator, we demonstrate various dynamic rearrangements of up to N = 9 atoms including rotation, 2D vacancy filling, guiding, compactification, and 3D shuffling. With the capability of a phase-only Fourier mask to generate arbitrary shapes of the holographic microtraps, it was possible to place single atoms at arbitrary geometries of a few μm size and even continuously reconfigure them by conveying each atom. For this purpose, we loaded a series of computer-generated phase masks in the full frame rate of 60 Hz of the spatial light modulator, so the animation of phase mask transformed the holographic microtraps in real time, driving each atom along the assigned trajectory. Possible applications of this method of transformation of single atoms include preparation of scalable quantum platforms for quantum computation, quantum simulation, and quantum many-body physics.

  4. Laser-Assisted Field Evaporation and Three-Dimensional Atom-by-Atom Mapping of Diamond Isotopic Homojunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Samik; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N; Moutanabbir, Oussama

    2016-02-10

    It addition to its high evaporation field, diamond is also known for its limited photoabsorption, strong covalent bonding, and wide bandgap. These characteristics have been thought for long to also complicate the field evaporation of diamond and make its control hardly achievable on the atomistic-level. Herein, we demonstrate that the unique behavior of nanoscale diamond and its interaction with pulsed laser lead to a controlled field evaporation thus enabling three-dimensional atom-by-atom mapping of diamond (12)C/(13)C homojunctions. We also show that one key element in this process is to operate the pulsed laser at high energy without letting the dc bias increase out of bounds for diamond nanotip to withstand. Herein, the role of the dc bias in evaporation of diamond is essentially to generate free charge carriers within the nanotip via impact ionization. The mobile free charges screen the internal electric field, eventually creating a hole rich surface where the pulsed laser is effectively absorbed leading to an increase in the nanotip surface temperature. The effect of this temperature on the uncertainty in the time-of-flight of an ion, the diffusion of atoms on the surface of the nanotip, is also discussed. In addition to paving the way toward a precise manipulation of isotopes in diamond-based nanoscale and quantum structures, this result also elucidates some of the basic properties of dielectric nanostructures under high electric field.

  5. Illusion optics via one-dimensional ultratransparent photonic crystals with shifted spatial dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhongqi; Luo, Jie; Lai, Yun

    2017-12-11

    In this work, we propose that one-dimensional ultratransparent dielectric photonic crystals with wide-angle impedance matching and shifted elliptical equal frequency contours are promising candidate materials for illusion optics. The shift of the equal frequency contour does not affect the refractive behaviors, but enables a new degree of freedom in phase modulation. With such ultratransparent photonic crystals, we demonstrate some applications in illusion optics, including creating illusions of a different-sized scatterer and a shifted source with opposite phase. Such ultratransparent dielectric photonic crystals may establish a feasible platform for illusion optics devices at optical frequencies.

  6. Size effect on atomic structure in low-dimensional Cu-Zr amorphous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W B; Liu, J; Lu, S H; Zhang, H; Wang, H; Wang, X D; Cao, Q P; Zhang, D X; Jiang, J Z

    2017-08-04

    The size effect on atomic structure of a Cu 64 Zr 36 amorphous system, including zero-dimensional small-size amorphous particles (SSAPs) and two-dimensional small-size amorphous films (SSAFs) together with bulk sample was investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. We revealed that sample size strongly affects local atomic structure in both Cu 64 Zr 36 SSAPs and SSAFs, which are composed of core and shell (surface) components. Compared with core component, the shell component of SSAPs has lower average coordination number and average bond length, higher degree of ordering, and lower packing density due to the segregation of Cu atoms on the shell of Cu 64 Zr 36 SSAPs. These atomic structure differences in SSAPs with various sizes result in different glass transition temperatures, in which the glass transition temperature for the shell component is found to be 577 K, which is much lower than 910 K for the core component. We further extended the size effect on the structure and glasses transition temperature to Cu 64 Zr 36 SSAFs, and revealed that the T g decreases when SSAFs becomes thinner due to the following factors: different dynamic motion (mean square displacement), different density of core and surface and Cu segregation on the surface of SSAFs. The obtained results here are different from the results for the size effect on atomic structure of nanometer-sized crystalline metallic alloys.

  7. Construction of high-dimensional neural network potentials using environment-dependent atom pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, K V Jovan; Artrith, Nongnuch; Behler, Jörg

    2012-05-21

    An accurate determination of the potential energy is the crucial step in computer simulations of chemical processes, but using electronic structure methods on-the-fly in molecular dynamics (MD) is computationally too demanding for many systems. Constructing more efficient interatomic potentials becomes intricate with increasing dimensionality of the potential-energy surface (PES), and for numerous systems the accuracy that can be achieved is still not satisfying and far from the reliability of first-principles calculations. Feed-forward neural networks (NNs) have a very flexible functional form, and in recent years they have been shown to be an accurate tool to construct efficient PESs. High-dimensional NN potentials based on environment-dependent atomic energy contributions have been presented for a number of materials. Still, these potentials may be improved by a more detailed structural description, e.g., in form of atom pairs, which directly reflect the atomic interactions and take the chemical environment into account. We present an implementation of an NN method based on atom pairs, and its accuracy and performance are compared to the atom-based NN approach using two very different systems, the methanol molecule and metallic copper. We find that both types of NN potentials provide an excellent description of both PESs, with the pair-based method yielding a slightly higher accuracy making it a competitive alternative for addressing complex systems in MD simulations.

  8. Pair creation, motion, and annihilation of topological defects in two-dimensional nematic liquid crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Cortese, Dario; Eggers, Jens; Liverpool, Tanniemola

    2018-01-01

    We present a novel framework for the study of disclinations in two-dimensional active nematic liquid crystals, and topological defects in general. The order tensor formalism is used to calculate exact multi-particle solutions of the linearized static equations inside a uniformly aligned state. Topological charge conservation requires a fixed difference between the number of half charges. Starting from a set of hydrodynamic equations, we derive a low-dimensional dynamical system for the parame...

  9. Study on sensing property of one-dimensional ring mirror-defect photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Luo, Pei; Cao, Huiying; Zhao, Zhiyong; Zhu, Qiguang

    2018-02-01

    Based on the photon localization and the photonic bandgap characteristics of photonic crystals (PCs), one-dimensional (1D) ring mirror-defect photonic crystal structure is proposed. Due to the introduction of mirror structure, a defect cavity is formed in the center of the photonic crystal, and then the resonant transmission peak can be obtained in the bandgap of transmission spectrum. The transfer matrix method is used to establish the relationship model between the resonant transmission peak and the structure parameters of the photonic crystals. Using the rectangular air gate photonic crystal structure, the dynamic monitoring of the detected gas sample parameters can be achieved from the shift of the resonant transmission peak. The simulation results show that the Q-value can attain to 1739.48 and the sensitivity can attain to 1642 nm ṡ RIU-1, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the sensing structure. The structure can provide certain theoretical reference for air pollution monitoring and gas component analysis.

  10. Transmission and reflection properties of two-dimensional finite metal crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkiewicz, Agata; Nasalski, Wojciech

    2017-07-01

    Optical characteristics of a finite two-dimensional silver stripe photonic crystal of a square lattice are numerically analysed with use of multilayer Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis. Qualitative changes in optical response of the crystal originated from modifications of the thickness and filling factors of each layer and the polarization direction of the incident wave are shown. The crystal manifests its various characteristics in wideband or narrowband reflection and transmission, while absorption remains low. The behaviour of the crystal is determined by its structure geometry yielding excitation of localized plasmons and collective modes together with interactions between them. The optical response of the square lattice structure is also compared with the response of a triangular lattice crystal.

  11. Ultracold atoms in quasi-one-dimensional traps: A step beyond the Lieb-Liniger model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachymski, Krzysztof; Meinert, Florian; Veksler, Hagar; Julienne, Paul S.; Fishman, Shmuel

    2017-05-01

    Ultracold atoms placed in a tight cigar-shaped trap are usually described in terms of the Lieb-Liniger model. We study the extensions of this model which arise when van der Waals interaction between atoms is taken into account. We find that the corrections induced by the finite range of interactions can become especially important in the vicinity of narrow Feshbach resonances and suggest realistic schemes of their experimental detection. The interplay of confinement and interactions can lead to effective transparency where the one-dimensional interactions are weak in a wide range of parameters.

  12. Hydrogen atom trapping in a self-organized one-dimensional dimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Takami

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs have attracted widespread attention owing to their unusual structure and properties produced by their nanospaces. However, many MOFs possess the similar three-dimensional frameworks, limiting their structural variety and operating capacity for hydrogen storage under ambient conditions. Here we report the synthesis and structural characterization of a single-crystal one-dimensional dimer whose structure, operating capacity, and physical mechanism contrast with those of existing MOFs. The hydrogen storage capacity of 2.6 wt.% is comparable to the highest capacity achieved by existing MOFs at room temperature. This exceptional storage capacity is realized by self-organization during crystal growth using a weak base.

  13. Crystal engineering of giant molecules based on perylene diimide conjugated polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nano-atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, He

    Molecular architectures and topologies are found contributing to the formation of supramolecular structures of giant molecules. Dr. Cheng's research group developed a diverse of giant molecules via precisely controlled chemistry synthetic routes. These giant molecules can be categorized into several different families, namely giant surfactants, giant shape amphiphiles and giant polyhedron. By analyzing the hierarchical structures of these carefully designed and precisely synthesized giant molecules, the structural factors which affect, or even dominates, in some cases, the formation of supramolecular structures are revealed in these intensive researches. The results will further contribute to the understanding of dependence of supramolecular structures on molecular designs as well as molecular topology, and providing a practical solution to the scaling up of microscopic molecular functionalities to macroscopic material properties. Molecular Nano Particles (MNPs), including fullerene (C60), POSS, Polyoxometalate (POM) and proteins etc., is defined and applied as a specific type of building blocks in the design and synthesis of giant molecules. The persistence in shape and symmetry is considered as one of the major properties of MNPs. This persistence will support the construction of giant molecules for further supramolecular structures' study by introducing specific shapes, or precisely located side groups which will facilitate self-assembling behaviors with pre-programmed secondary interactions. Dictating material physical properties by its chemical composition is an attractive yet currently failed approach in the study of materials. However, the pursuit of determining material properties by microscopic molecular level properties is never seized, and found its solution when the idea of crystal engineering is raised: should each atom in the material is located exactly where it is designed to be and is properly bonded, the property of the material is hence determined

  14. Photonic quantum state transfer between a cold atomic gas and a crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maring, Nicolas; Farrera, Pau; Kutluer, Kutlu; Mazzera, Margherita; Heinze, Georg; de Riedmatten, Hugues

    2017-11-01

    Interfacing fundamentally different quantum systems is key to building future hybrid quantum networks. Such heterogeneous networks offer capabilities superior to those of their homogeneous counterparts, as they merge the individual advantages of disparate quantum nodes in a single network architecture. However, few investigations of optical hybrid interconnections have been carried out, owing to fundamental and technological challenges such as wavelength and bandwidth matching of the interfacing photons. Here we report optical quantum interconnection of two disparate matter quantum systems with photon storage capabilities. We show that a quantum state can be transferred faithfully between a cold atomic ensemble and a rare-earth-doped crystal by means of a single photon at 1,552  nanometre telecommunication wavelength, using cascaded quantum frequency conversion. We demonstrate that quantum correlations between a photon and a single collective spin excitation in the cold atomic ensemble can be transferred to the solid-state system. We also show that single-photon time-bin qubits generated in the cold atomic ensemble can be converted, stored and retrieved from the crystal with a conditional qubit fidelity of more than 85 per cent. Our results open up the prospect of optically connecting quantum nodes with different capabilities and represent an important step towards the realization of large-scale hybrid quantum networks.

  15. Photonic quantum state transfer between a cold atomic gas and a crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maring, Nicolas; Farrera, Pau; Kutluer, Kutlu; Mazzera, Margherita; Heinze, Georg; de Riedmatten, Hugues

    2017-11-22

    Interfacing fundamentally different quantum systems is key to building future hybrid quantum networks. Such heterogeneous networks offer capabilities superior to those of their homogeneous counterparts, as they merge the individual advantages of disparate quantum nodes in a single network architecture. However, few investigations of optical hybrid interconnections have been carried out, owing to fundamental and technological challenges such as wavelength and bandwidth matching of the interfacing photons. Here we report optical quantum interconnection of two disparate matter quantum systems with photon storage capabilities. We show that a quantum state can be transferred faithfully between a cold atomic ensemble and a rare-earth-doped crystal by means of a single photon at 1,552  nanometre telecommunication wavelength, using cascaded quantum frequency conversion. We demonstrate that quantum correlations between a photon and a single collective spin excitation in the cold atomic ensemble can be transferred to the solid-state system. We also show that single-photon time-bin qubits generated in the cold atomic ensemble can be converted, stored and retrieved from the crystal with a conditional qubit fidelity of more than 85 per cent. Our results open up the prospect of optically connecting quantum nodes with different capabilities and represent an important step towards the realization of large-scale hybrid quantum networks.

  16. Interbasis expansion and SO(3) symmetry in the two-dimensional hydrogen atom.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres del Castillo, G.F.; Lopez Villanueva, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2001-04-01

    Making use of the SO(3) symmetry of the two-dimensional hydrogen atom, each of the bases for the bound states formed by the separable solutions of the Schroedinger equation in polar and parabolic coordinates are expressed in terms of the other. [Spanish] Usando la simetria SO(3) del atomo de hidrogeno en dos dimensiones, cada una de las bases para los estados ligados formadas por las soluciones separables de la ecuacion de Schroedinger en coordenadas polares y parabolicas se expresan en terminos de la otra.

  17. Levitation of atoms by interference and Two-dimensional transport in the presence of disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert De Saint Vincent, M.

    2010-12-01

    This thesis presents two experiments of atomic physics, realized on an ultra-cold sample of Rubidium 87. We tackle the topics of atom interferometry, and of the transport properties in disordered medium. In the first experiment, we demonstrate a technique for suspending atoms against gravity, which could help increase the interrogation time of atom interferometers. The atoms are periodically diffracted on a light standing wave, used as Bragg mirror to reflect the atoms and thus prevent their fall. However, when getting close to the thin grating limit, the matter wave-packet is split into many trajectories that periodically recombine. We show that the interference between these multiple components can be used to cancel the losses towards falling channels. This original interferometer could be an interesting alternative to suspend an inertial sensor or an atom clock in a limited volume, whilst allowing simultaneous measurement of the forces acting on the atoms. The second experiment is devoted to the study of the transport properties in a 2-dimensional (2D) disordered medium. In particular, matter wave interference can prevent the transport - a phenomenon known as Anderson Localization. The atoms are confined between two repulsive sheets of light, and the disorder is generated by a speckle pattern shined onto the cloud. We observe a diffusive expansion in these potentials, and extract diffusion coefficients in agreement with a numerical simulation. We then explore the dynamic at lower energies, where sub-diffusion, classical trapping under the percolation threshold, and Anderson Localization may be observed. Finally, the study of the interplay between disorder and the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in 2D is now within reach. (author)

  18. Extraordinarily Bound Quasi-One-Dimensional Trions in Two-Dimensional Phosphorene Atomic Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Renjing; Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Fan; Yang, Jiong; Wang, Zhu; Pei, Jiajie; Myint, Ye Win; Xing, Bobin; Yu, Zongfu; Fu, Lan; Qin, Qinghua; Lu, Yuerui

    2016-02-23

    We report a trion (charged exciton) binding energy of ∼162 meV in few-layer phosphorene at room temperature, which is nearly 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than those in two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenide semiconductors (20-30 meV) and quasi-2D quantum wells (∼1-5 meV). Such a large binding energy has only been observed in truly one-dimensional (1D) materials such as carbon nanotubes, whose optoelectronic applications have been severely hindered by their intrinsically small optical cross sections. Phosphorene offers an elegant way to overcome this hurdle by enabling quasi-1D excitonic and trionic behaviors in a large 2D area, allowing optoelectronic integration. We experimentally validated the quasi-1D nature of excitonic and trionic dynamics in phospherene by demonstrating completely linearly polarized light emission from excitons and trions in few-layer phosphorene. The implications of the extraordinarily large trion binding energy in a higher-than-one-dimensional material are far-reaching. It provides a room-temperature 2D platform to observe the fundamental many-body interactions in the quasi-1D region.

  19. Atom-field interaction in the single-quantum limit in a two dimensional travelling-wave cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Sun Hyun; Chough, Young Tak; An, Kyung Won

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the interaction of an atom with two dimensional travelling-wave cavity modes in the strong coupling region, with the quantized atomic center of mass motion taken into account. Analytic and numerical calculation shows that the atom in two independent pairs of travelling wave modes can be made to interact only with a particular travelling mode by matching the initial momentum and the detuning of the cavities. We also numerically investigate the atomic momentum deflection in the cavities

  20. Two-dimensional atomic hydrogen concentration maps in hot-filament diamond-deposition environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larjo, J.; Koivikko, H.; Lahtonen, K.; Hernberg, R.

    This paper reports the two-dimensional mapping of atomic hydrogen concentration with two-photon excited laser induced fluorescence in a multi-wire grid hot-filament chemical vapor deposition reactor. The measurements were made in a diamond film deposition environment under different filament temperatures and wire configurations. The measurement was calibrated with a titration reaction using NO2 as a titrant. The kinetic gas temperature in the reactor was measured from the Doppler broadening of the Lyman-β transition excited in the fluorescence. The filament temperature was found to have a significant effect on atomic hydrogen production and transfer to the substrate. The axial concentration distributions were compared to a one-dimensional kinetic gas-surface chemistry model with good agreement. The model produced a reasonable estimate for the bulk diamond film growth rate.

  1. Three-dimensional imaging of trapped cold atoms with a light field microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Gordon E; Marciniak, Michael A; Burke, John H

    2017-11-01

    This research images trapped atoms in three dimensions, utilizing light field imaging. Such a system is of interest in the development of atom interferometer accelerometers in dynamic systems where strictly defined focal planes may be impractical. In this research, a light field microscope was constructed utilizing a Lytro Development Kit micro lens array and sensor. It was used to image fluorescing rubidium atoms in a magneto optical trap. The three-dimensional (3D) volume of the atoms is reconstructed using a modeled point spread function (PSF), taking into consideration that the low magnification (1.25) of the system changed typical assumptions used in the optics model for the PSF. The 3D reconstruction is analyzed with respect to a standard off-axis fluorescence image. Optical axis separation between two atom clouds is measured to a 100 μm accuracy in a 3 mm deep volume, with a 16 μm in-focus standard resolution with a 3.9 mm by 3.9 mm field of view. Optical axis spreading is observed in the reconstruction and discussed. The 3D information can be used to determine properties of the atom cloud with a single camera and single image, and can be applied anywhere 3D information is needed but optical access may be limited.

  2. Mid-infrared characterization of two-dimensional photonic crystal slabs fabricated in silicon with laser interference lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prodan, L.G.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the present work was to perform mid-infrared characterization of two dimensional photonic crystal slabs fabricated in silicon with laser interference lithography. A two-dimensional (2D) silicon photonic crystal (PhC), which is designed to provide a modified dispersion for photon energies

  3. Quasi one-dimensional photonic crystals as building block for compact integrated optical refractometric sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, W.C.L.; Pottier, Pierre; Yudistira, D.; van Lith, J.; Lambeck, Paul; De La Rue, Richard; Driessen, A.; Hoekstra, Hugo; de Ridder, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    A quasi one-dimensional photonic crystal has been fabricated and the applicability of this strong grating for optical sensing has been investigated by measuring the transmission spectra as a function of the cladding refractive index. The cladding index was varied a small range. By monitoring the

  4. Spatial dispersion in two-dimensional plasmonic crystals: Large blueshifts promoted by diffraction anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Christin; Christensen, Johan; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-01-01

    We develop a methodology to incorporate nonlocal optical response of the free electron gas due to quantum-interaction effects in metal components of periodic two-dimensional plasmonic crystals and study the impact of spatial dispersion on promising building blocks for photonic circuits. Within th...

  5. Geometrically distributed one-dimensional photonic crystals for light-reflection in all angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagappan, G; Wu, P

    2009-07-06

    We demonstrate that a series of one-dimensional photonic crystals made of any dielectric materials, with the periods are distributed in a geometrical progression of a common ratio, r light of any spectral range. If an omni-directional reflection is desired for all polarizations and for all incident angles smaller than thetao, then r light reflection.

  6. A Bloch modal approach for engineering waveguide and cavity modes in two-dimensional photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Mørk, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    uses no external excitation and determines the quasi-normal modes as unity eigenvalues of the cavity roundtrip matrix. We demonstrate the method and the quasi-normal modes for two types of two-dimensional photonic crystal structures, and discuss the quasi-normal mode eld distributions and Q...

  7. Coupling reducing k-points for supercell models of defects in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2004-01-01

    The optimum choice of k-point for supercell calculations of defect states in a three-dimensional photonic crystal is investigated for the case of a supercell with a simple cubic (SC) structure. By using the k-point (1/4,1/4,1/4) it is possible to eliminate the symmetric part of the repeated...

  8. Integration of Generic Multi-dimensional Model and Operational Policies for Batch Cooling Crystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Samad, Noor Asma Fazli; Singh, Ravendra; Sin, Gürkan

    2011-01-01

    A generic multi-dimensional modeling framework for studying batch cooling crystallization processes under generated operational policies is presented. The generic nature of the modeling allows the study of a wide range of chemical systems under different operational scenarios, enabling thereby, t...

  9. Deexcitation of one-dimensional Rydberg atoms with a chirped train of half-cycle pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopyciuk, T.

    2010-01-01

    A protocol for deexcitation of one-dimensional high Rydberg states with the use of a chirped train of half-cycle pulses is given. It is found that the parameters of the efficiently deexciting train are directly related to the phenomenon of the dynamical stabilization of the initial state. Finally, numerical calculations are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the protocol. The protocol allows to deexcite Rydberg atoms to states lying just above the ground one.

  10. Quartz-crystal microbalance study for characterizing atomic oxygen in plasma ash tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, A.K.; Sakthivel, P.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses the measurement of atomic oxygen (AO) concentrations in an oxygen discharge using a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM). This is a device that has been previously used for monitoring thin-film deposition, among several other applications. The sensor consists of a silver-coated quartz crystal that oscillates at its specific resonant frequency (typically, at about 6 MHz), which is dependent on the mass of the crystal. When exposed to AO, the silver oxidizes rapidly, resulting in a change in its mass, and a consequent change in this frequency. The frequency change is measured with a counter, and when plotted versus time, it may be fit to a standard diffusion-limited oxide-growth model. This model is then used to determine the specific AO flux to the crystal, and by inference, to the wafer. Initial results of QCM measurements in the FusionGemini Plasma Asher (GPL TM -standard downstream microwave asher) and FusionGemini Enhanced Strip (GES TM -fluorine compatible enhanced strip asher) are presented in this article. The results indicate AO densities of the order of 10 12 cm -3 on the wafer. There is a marked increase in AO concentration with addition of nitrogen into the plasma, and a decrease in AO concentration with increasing pressure at constant flow. Effects of increasing the total plasma volume in the enhanced strip tool on AO production are discussed

  11. The three-dimensional crystal structure of cholera toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Rong-Guang; Westbrook, M.L.; Nance, S.; Spangler, B.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Scott, D.L. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry; Westbrook, E.M. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1996-02-01

    The clinical manifestations of cholera are largely attributable to the actions of a secreted hexameric AB{sub 5} enterotoxin (choleragen). We have solved the three-dimensional structure of choleragen at 2.5 {Angstrom} resolution and compared the refined coordinates with those of choleragenoid (isolated B pentamer) and the heat-labile enterotoxin from Escherichia coli (LT). The crystalline coordinates provide a detailed view of the stereochemistry implicated in binding to GM1 gangliosides and in carrying out ADP-ribosylation. The A2 chain of choleragen, in contrast to that of LT, is a nearly continuous {alpha}-helix with an interpretable carboxyl tail.

  12. Quantum ground state of self-organized atomic crystals in optical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Vidal, Sonia; de Chiara, Gabriele; Larson, Jonas; Morigi, Giovanna

    2010-04-01

    Cold atoms, driven by a laser and simultaneously coupled to the quantum field of an optical resonator, may self-organize in periodic structures. These structures are supported by the optical lattice, which emerges from the laser light they scatter into the cavity mode and form when the laser intensity exceeds a threshold value. We study theoretically the quantum ground state of these structures above the pump threshold of self-organization by mapping the atomic dynamics of the self-organized crystal to a Bose-Hubbard model. We find that the quantum ground state of the self-organized structure can be the one of a Mott insulator, depending on the pump strength of the driving laser. For very large pump strengths, where the intracavity-field intensity is maximum and one would expect a Mott-insulator state, we find intervals of parameters where the phase is compressible. These states could be realized in existing experimental setups.

  13. Ion beam focusing by the atomic chains of a crystal lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulga, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    A study is made of the focusing of a parallel ion beam by a pair of close packed atomic chains of a crystal. The focal length of this system has been calculated to the approximation of continuous potential of chain in the general form and also for a number of specific potentials of ion-atom interactions. Ar ion beam focusing by a Cu chain pair is discusssed in detail. For this case, the focal length has been calculated as a function of ion energy using the method of computer simulation of ion trajectories in the chain field. The calculations were made on the basis of the Born-Mayer potential with various constants. A pronounced dependence of focal length on the constant in this potential has been found. (author)

  14. Modulation of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization by citrate through selective binding to atomic steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, S R; Wierzbicki, A; Salter, E A; Zepeda, S; Orme, C A; Hoyer, J R; Nancollas, G H; Cody, A M; De Yoreo, J J

    2004-10-19

    The majority of human kidney stones are composed primarily of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals. Thus, determining the molecular mechanisms by which urinary constituents modulate calcium oxalate crystallization is crucial for understanding and controlling urolithiassis in humans. A comprehensive molecular-scale view of COM shape modification by citrate, a common urinary constituent, obtained through a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling is now presented. We show that citrate strongly influences the growth morphology and kinetics on the (-101) face but has much lower effect on the (010) face. Moreover, binding energy calculations show that the strength of the citrate-COM interaction is much greater at steps than on terraces and is highly step-specific. The maximum binding energy, -166.5 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, occurs for the [101] step on the (-101) face. In contrast, the value is only -56.9 kJ {center_dot} mol-1 for the [012] step on the (010) face. The binding energies on the (-101) and (010) terraces are also much smaller, -65.4 and -48.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} respectively. All other binding energies lie between these extremes. This high selectivity leads to preferential binding of citrate to the acute [101] atomic steps on the (-101) face. The strong citrate-step interactions on this face leads to pinning of all steps, but the anisotropy in interaction strength results in anisotropic reductions in step kinetics. These anisotropic changes in step kinetics are, in turn, responsible for changes in the shape of macroscopic COM crystals. Thus, the molecular scale growth morphology and the bulk crystal habit in the presence of citrate are similar, and the predictions of molecular simulations are fully consistent with the experimental observations.

  15. Two-Dimensional Crystallization Procedure, from Protein Expression to Sample Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qie Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins play important roles for living cells. Structural studies of membrane proteins provide deeper understanding of their mechanisms and further aid in drug design. As compared to other methods, electron microscopy is uniquely suitable for analysis of a broad range of specimens, from small proteins to large complexes. Of various electron microscopic methods, electron crystallography is particularly well-suited to study membrane proteins which are reconstituted into two-dimensional crystals in lipid environments. In this review, we discuss the steps and parameters for obtaining large and well-ordered two-dimensional crystals. A general description of the principle in each step is provided since this information can also be applied to other biochemical and biophysical methods. The examples are taken from our own studies and published results with related proteins. Our purpose is to give readers a more general idea of electron crystallography and to share our experiences in obtaining suitable crystals for data collection.

  16. Role of current profiles and atomic force microscope tips on local electric crystallization of amorphous silicon

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verveniotis, Elisseos; Rezek, Bohuslav; Šípek, Emil; Stuchlík, Jiří; Kočka, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 518, č. 21 (2010), s. 5965-5970 ISSN 0040-6090 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD202/09/H041; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06040; GA AV ČR KAN400100701; GA MŠk LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : amorphous materials * atomic force microscopy (AFM) * conductivity * crystallization * nanostructures * silicon * nickel Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.909, year: 2010

  17. Simultaneous atomic force microscope and quartz crystal microbalance measurements: Investigation of human plasma fibrinogen adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, K.-H.; Friedt, J.-M.; Frederix, F.; Campitelli, A.; Borghs, G.

    2002-01-01

    We have combined the tapping-mode atomic force microscope (AFM) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) for simultaneous investigation of human plasma fibrinogen adsorption on a metallic surface using these two instruments. The AFM images show the surface changes with molecular resolution while the corresponding resonance frequency shift of the QCM provides quantitative adsorbed mass estimates over the whole sensing area. The combination of AFM with QCM allowing the simultaneous measurements with two techniques working at very different scales and probing different properties of the adsorbed layer provides quantitative and qualitative information that can distinguish different protein adsorption mechanisms

  18. A simple nonbinary scattering model applicable to atomic collisions is crystals at 1ow energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans Henrik; Sigmund, Peter

    1966-01-01

    the projectile and each ring atom is described by a Born-Mayer potential, and the scattering is assumed to be elastic and governed by the classical equations of motion. Because of symmetry, the problem can be reduced to plane motion of a particle in a potential of elliptic symmetry. The elliptic force field...... the elliptic to the spherical potential are investigated. Special attention is paid to proper definitions of collision time and collision length which are important in collisions in crystals. Limitations to classical scattering arising from the uncertainty principle prove to be more serious than assumed...

  19. Stereo photograph of atomic arrangement by circularly-polarized-light two-dimensional photoelectron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Daimon, H

    2003-01-01

    A stereo photograph of atomic arrangement was obtained for the first time. The stereo photograph was displayed directly on the screen of display-type spherical-mirror analyzer without any computer-aided conversion process. This stereo photography was realized taking advantage of the phenomenon of circular dichroism in photoelectron angular distribution due to the reversal of orbital angular momentum of photoelectrons. The azimuthal shifts of forward focusing peaks in a photoelectron angular distribution pattern taken with left and right helicity light in a special arrangement are the same as the parallaxes in a stereo view of atoms. Hence a stereoscopic recognition of three-dimensional atomic arrangement is possible, when the left eye and the right eye respectively view the two images obtained by left and right helicity light simultaneously.

  20. Proposal for efficient two-dimensional atom localization using probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue; Xiong Hao; Zhang Duo

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of two-dimensional (2D) atom localization is explored by monitoring the probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic medium under the action of two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Because of the position-dependent atom-field interaction, the information about the position of the atom can be obtained via the absorption measurement of the weak probe field. It is found that the localization behavior is significantly improved due to the joint quantum interference induced by the standing-wave and microwave-driven fields. Most importantly, the atom can be localized at a particular position and the maximal probability of finding the atom in one period of the standing-wave fields reaches unity by properly adjusting the system parameters. The proposed scheme may provide a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-resolution 2D atom localization.

  1. Expectation-based approach for one-dimensional randomly disordered phononic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Feng; Gao, Qiang; Xu, Xiaoming; Zhong, Wanxie

    2014-01-01

    An expectation-based approach to the statistical theorem is proposed for the one-dimensional randomly disordered phononic crystal. In the proposed approach, the expectations of the random eigenstates of randomly disordered phononic crystals are investigated. In terms of the expectations of the random eigenstates, the wave propagation and localization phenomenon in the random phononic crystal could be understood in a statistical perspective. Using the proposed approach, it is proved that for a randomly disordered phononic crystal, the Bloch theorem holds in the perspective of expectation. A one-dimensional randomly disordered binary phononic crystal consisting of two materials with the random geometry size or random physical parameter is addressed by using the proposed approach. From the result, it can be observed that with the increase of the disorder degree, the localization of the expectations of the eigenstates is strengthened. The effect of the random disorder on the eigenstates at higher frequencies is more significant than that at lower frequencies. Furthermore, after introducing the random disorder into phononic crystals, some random divergent eigenstates are changed to localized eigenstates in expectation sense.

  2. Atomic structure of a metal-supported two-dimensional germania film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Adrián Leandro; Schlexer, Philomena; Büchner, Christin; Davis, Earl M.; Burrall, Hannah; Burson, Kristen M.; Schneider, Wolf-Dieter; Heyde, Markus; Pacchioni, Gianfranco; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2018-03-01

    The growth and microscopic characterization of two-dimensional germania films is presented. Germanium oxide monolayer films were grown on Ru(0001) by physical vapor deposition and subsequent annealing in oxygen. We obtain a comprehensive image of the germania film structure by combining intensity-voltage low-energy electron diffraction (I/V-LEED) and ab initio density functional theory (DFT) analysis with atomic-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging. For benchmarking purposes, the bare Ru(0001) substrate and the (2 ×2 )3 O covered Ru(0001) were analyzed with I/V-LEED with respect to previous reports. STM topographic images of the germania film reveal a hexagonal network where the oxygen and germanium atom positions appear in different imaging contrasts. For quantitative LEED, the best agreement has been achieved with DFT structures where the germanium atoms are located preferentially on the top and fcc hollow sites of the Ru(0001) substrate. Moreover, in these atomically flat germania films, local site geometries, i.e., tetrahedral building blocks, ring structures, and domain boundaries, have been identified, indicating possible pathways towards two-dimensional amorphous networks.

  3. Photon scattering by an atomic ensemble coupled to a one-dimensional nanophotonic waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guo-Zhu; Munro, Ewan; Nie, Wei; Deng, Fu-Guo; Yang, Guo-Jian; Kwek, Leong-Chuan

    2017-10-01

    We theoretically investigate the quantum scattering of a weak coherent input field interacting with an ensemble of Λ -type three-level atoms coupled to a one-dimensional waveguide. With an effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian, we study the collective interaction between the atoms mediated by the waveguide mode. In our scheme, the atoms are randomly placed in the lattice along the axis of the one-dimensional waveguide. Many interesting optical properties occur in our waveguide-atom system, such as electromagnetically induced transparency. We quantify the influence of decoherence originating from both dephasing and population relaxation, and analyze the effect of the inhomogeneous broadening on the transport properties of the incident field. Moreover, we observe that strong photon-photon correlation with quantum beats can be generated in the off-resonant case, which provides an effective method for producing nonclassical light in experiment. With remarkable progress in waveguide-emitter systems, our scheme may be experimentally feasible in the near future.

  4. Creating physically-based three-dimensional microstructures: Bridging phase-field and crystal plasticity models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hojun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Owen, Steven J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Abdeljawad, Fadi F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanks, Byron [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In order to better incorporate microstructures in continuum scale models, we use a novel finite element (FE) meshing technique to generate three-dimensional polycrystalline aggregates from a phase field grain growth model of grain microstructures. The proposed meshing technique creates hexahedral FE meshes that capture smooth interfaces between adjacent grains. Three dimensional realizations of grain microstructures from the phase field model are used in crystal plasticity-finite element (CP-FE) simulations of polycrystalline a -iron. We show that the interface conformal meshes significantly reduce artificial stress localizations in voxelated meshes that exhibit the so-called "wedding cake" interfaces. This framework provides a direct link between two mesoscale models - phase field and crystal plasticity - and for the first time allows mechanics simulations of polycrystalline materials using three-dimensional hexahedral finite element meshes with realistic topological features.

  5. The Effect of Disinfection by Spray Atomization on Dimensional Accuracy of Condensation Silicone Impressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Saleh Saber

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. The condensation silicone impression materials are available, but there is little knowledge of their accuracy after disinfection. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the disinfection by spray atomization on dimensional accuracy of condensation silicone impressions. Materials and methods. Impressions were made on a stainless steel master model containing a simulated two complete crown preparation with an edentulous space interposed using Spidex® and Rapid® impression materials. 44 impressions were made with each material, of which 16 were disinfected with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 16 were disinfected with 10% iodophor and 12 were not disinfected. Three dimensional measurements of working casts, including interpreparation distance, height, and diameter, were calculated using a measuring microscope graduated at 0.001 mm. Dimensional changes (mm between the disinfected and non-disinfected working casts were compared. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was employed to analyze the data (α=0.05. Results. Disinfection of each condensation silicone material by spraying atomization with two different disinfectant material resulted in significant change in interpreparation distance (p<0.05. Changes in height and diameter were only significant in Spidex® impressions (p<0.05. Conclusion. Significant changes in the mean dimensions were seen as a result of disinfection by spraying; however, the dimensional changes do not seem great enough to cause critical positional distortion of teeth when fixed partial denture restorations are made.

  6. Photoluminescence polarization anisotropy for studying long-range structural ordering within semiconductor multi-atomic alloys and organic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prutskij, T.; Percino, J. [Instituto de Ciencias, BUAP, Privada 17 Norte, No 3417, col. San Miguel Huyeotlipan, 72050, Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Orlova, T. [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN (United States); Vavilova, L. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St Petersburg 194021, Russian Federation (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-04

    Long-range structural ordering within multi-component semiconductor alloys and organic crystals leads to significant optical anisotropy and, in particular, to anisotropy of the photoluminescence (PL) emission. The PL emission of ternary and quaternary semiconductor alloys is polarized if there is some amount of the atomic ordering within the crystal structure. We analyze the polarization of the PL emission from the quaternary GaInAsP semiconductor alloy grown by Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE) and conclude that it could be caused by low degree atomic ordering within the crystal structure together with the thermal biaxial strain due to difference between the thermal expansion coefficients of the layer and the substrate. We also study the state of polarization of the PL from organic crystals in order to identify different features of the crystal PL spectrum.

  7. Two dimensional tunable photonic crystals and n doped semiconductor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsayed, Hussein A. [Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Beni-Suef University (Egypt); El-Naggar, Sahar A. [Dept. of Engineering Math. and Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Aly, Arafa H., E-mail: arafa16@yahoo.com [Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Beni-Suef University (Egypt)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we theoretically investigate the effect of the doping concentration on the properties of two dimensional semiconductor photonic band structures. We consider two structures; type I(II) that is composed of n doped semiconductor (air) rods arranged into a square lattice of air (n doped semiconductor). We consider three different shapes of rods. Our numerical method is based on the frequency dependent plane wave expansion method. The numerical results show that the photonic band gaps in type II are more sensitive to the changes in the doping concentration than those of type I. In addition, the width of the gap of type II is less sensitive to the shape of the rods than that of type I. Moreover, the cutoff frequency can be strongly tuned by the doping concentrations. Our structures could be of technical use in optical electronics for semiconductor applications.

  8. Reflectance properties of one-dimensional metal-dielectric ternary photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, G. N., E-mail: gnpandey2009@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Amity Institute of Applied Sciences, AmityUniversity, Noida (U.P.) (India); Kumar, Narendra [Department of Physics (CASH), Modi University of Science and Technology, Lakshmangarh, Sikar, Rajsthan (India); Thapa, Khem B. [Department of Physics, U I E T, ChhatrapatiShahu Ji Maharaj University, Kanpur- (UP) (India); Ojha, S. P. [Department of Physics IIT, Banaras Hindu University (India)

    2016-05-06

    Metallic photonic crystal has a very important application in absorption enhancement in solar cells. It has been found that an ultra-thin metallic layer becomes transparent due to internal scattering of light through the each interface of the dielectric and metal surfaces. The metal has absorption due to their surface plasmon and the plasmon has important parameters for changing optical properties of the metal. We consider ternary metallic-dielectric photonic crystal (MDPC) for having large probabilities to change the optical properties of the MDPC and the photonic crystals may be changed by changing dimensionality, symmetry, lattice parameters, Filling fraction and effective refractive index refractive index contrast. In this present communication, we try to show that the photonic band gap in ternary metal-dielectric photonic crystal can be significantly enlarged when air dielectric constant is considered. All the theoretical analyses are made based on the transfer matrix method together with the Drude model of metal.

  9. Atomic force microscopy studies on growth mechanisms of LAP crystals grown in solution containing excessive amount of L-arginine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, Y.L.; Xu, D.; Sun, D.L.; Du, W.; Liu, H.Y.; Zhang, G.H.; Wang, X.Q.

    2005-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to investigate the growth mechanisms of the L-arginine phosphate monohydrate (LAP) crystal grown from the aqueous solution containing excessive amount of L-arginine molecules. Under this condition, the LAP crystals grow by both 2D nucleation mechanism and spiral dislocation mechanism. 2D nucleation growth is the intrinsical growth mechanism owing to the crystal structure of LAP. The spiral growth mechanism probably results from the distortion of the crystal lattices produced by the LA n P unit or separated L-arginine molecule. Pinning points of impurities and curved step type induced by them are also explored

  10. Optical properties of one-dimensional photonic crystals obtained by micromatchining silicon (a review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolmachev, V. A.

    2017-04-01

    The theoretical and experimental investigations of photonic band gaps in one-dimensional photonic crystals created by micromatchining silicon, which have been performed by the author as part of his doctoral dissertation, are presented. The most important result of the work is the development of a method of modeling photonic crystals based on photonic band gap maps plotted in structure-property coordinates, which can be used with any optical materials and in any region of electromagnetic radiation, and also for nonperiodic structures. This method made it possible to realize the targeted control of the optical contrast of photonic crystals and to predict the optical properties of optical heterostructures and three-component and composite photonic crystals. The theoretical findings were experimentally implemented using methods of micromatchining silicon, which can be incorporated into modern technological lines for the production of microchips. In the IR spectra of a designed and a fabricated optical heterostructure (a composite photonic crystal), extended bands with high reflectivities were obtained. In a Si-based three-component photonic crystal, broad transmission bands and photonic band gaps in the middle IR region have been predicted and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Si-liquid crystal periodic structures with electric-field tunable photonic band-gap edges have been investigated. The one-dimensional photonic crystals developed based on micromatchining silicon can serve as a basis for creating components of optical processors, as well as highly sensitive chemical and biological sensors in a wide region of the IR spectrum (from 1 to 20 μm) for lab-on-a-chip applications.

  11. Influence of the atomic structure of crystal surfaces on the surface diffusion in medium temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousty, J.P.

    1981-12-01

    In this work, we have studied the influence of atomic structure of crystal surface on surface self-diffusion in the medium temperature range. Two ways are followed. First, we have measured, using a radiotracer method, the self-diffusion coefficient at 820 K (0.6 T melting) on copper surfaces both the structure and the cleanliness of which were stable during the experiment. We have shown that the interaction between mobile surface defects and steps can be studied through measurements of the anisotropy of surface self diffusion. Second, the behavior of an adatom and a surface vacancy is simulated via a molecular dynamics method, on several surfaces of a Lennard Jones crystal. An inventory of possible migration mechanisms of these surface defects has been drawn between 0.35 and 0.45 Tsub(m). The results obtained with both the methods point out the influence of the surface atomic structure in surface self-diffusion in the medium temperature range [fr

  12. Localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds in protein crystals using molecular replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahms, Sven O; Kuester, Miriam; Streb, Carsten; Roth, Christian; Sträter, Norbert; Than, Manuel E

    2013-02-01

    Heavy-atom clusters (HA clusters) containing a large number of specifically arranged electron-dense scatterers are especially useful for experimental phase determination of large complex structures, weakly diffracting crystals or structures with large unit cells. Often, the determination of the exact orientation of the HA cluster and hence of the individual heavy-atom positions proves to be the critical step in successful phasing and subsequent structure solution. Here, it is demonstrated that molecular replacement (MR) with either anomalous or isomorphous differences is a useful strategy for the correct placement of HA cluster compounds. The polyoxometallate cluster hexasodium α-metatungstate (HMT) was applied in phasing the structure of death receptor 6. Even though the HA cluster is bound in alternate partially occupied orientations and is located at a special position, its correct localization and orientation could be determined at resolutions as low as 4.9 Å. The broad applicability of this approach was demonstrated for five different derivative crystals that included the compounds tantalum tetradecabromide and trisodium phosphotungstate in addition to HMT. The correct placement of the HA cluster depends on the length of the intramolecular vectors chosen for MR, such that both a larger cluster size and the optimal choice of the wavelength used for anomalous data collection strongly affect the outcome.

  13. Application of discrete solvent reaction field model with self-consistent atomic charges and atomic polarizabilities to calculate the χ(1) and χ(2) of organic molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shih-I.

    2018-01-01

    We use the discrete solvent reaction field model to evaluate the linear and second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities of 3-methyl-4-nitropyridine-1-oxyde crystal. In this approach, crystal environment is created by supercell architecture. A self-consistent procedure is used to obtain charges and polarizabilities for environmental atoms. Impact of atomic polarizabilities on the properties of interest is highlighted. This approach is shown to give the second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities within error bar of experiment as well as the linear optical susceptibilities in the same order as experiment. Similar quality of calculations are also applied to both 4-N,N-dimethylamino-3-acetamidonitrobenzene and 2-methyl-4-nitroaniline crystals.

  14. Femtosecond X-ray diffraction from two-dimensional protein crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Frank

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available X-ray diffraction patterns from two-dimensional (2-D protein crystals obtained using femtosecond X-ray pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL are presented. To date, it has not been possible to acquire transmission X-ray diffraction patterns from individual 2-D protein crystals due to radiation damage. However, the intense and ultrafast pulses generated by an XFEL permit a new method of collecting diffraction data before the sample is destroyed. Utilizing a diffract-before-destroy approach at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Bragg diffraction was acquired to better than 8.5 Å resolution for two different 2-D protein crystal samples each less than 10 nm thick and maintained at room temperature. These proof-of-principle results show promise for structural analysis of both soluble and membrane proteins arranged as 2-D crystals without requiring cryogenic conditions or the formation of three-dimensional crystals.

  15. Localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds in protein crystals using molecular replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahms, Sven O.; Kuester, Miriam; Streb, Carsten; Roth, Christian; Sträter, Norbert; Than, Manuel E.

    2013-01-01

    A new approach is presented that allows the efficient localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds used in experimental phasing by a molecular replacement procedure. This permits the calculation of meaningful phases up to the highest resolution of the diffraction data. Heavy-atom clusters (HA clusters) containing a large number of specifically arranged electron-dense scatterers are especially useful for experimental phase determination of large complex structures, weakly diffracting crystals or structures with large unit cells. Often, the determination of the exact orientation of the HA cluster and hence of the individual heavy-atom positions proves to be the critical step in successful phasing and subsequent structure solution. Here, it is demonstrated that molecular replacement (MR) with either anomalous or isomorphous differences is a useful strategy for the correct placement of HA cluster compounds. The polyoxometallate cluster hexasodium α-metatungstate (HMT) was applied in phasing the structure of death receptor 6. Even though the HA cluster is bound in alternate partially occupied orientations and is located at a special position, its correct localization and orientation could be determined at resolutions as low as 4.9 Å. The broad applicability of this approach was demonstrated for five different derivative crystals that included the compounds tantalum tetradecabromide and trisodium phosphotungstate in addition to HMT. The correct placement of the HA cluster depends on the length of the intramolecular vectors chosen for MR, such that both a larger cluster size and the optimal choice of the wavelength used for anomalous data collection strongly affect the outcome

  16. TWO-DIMENSIONAL LOCALIZATION OF ATOMIC POPULATIONS IN FOUR-LEVEL QUANTUM SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Efremova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with investigation of one aspect of fundamental problem of laser radiation interaction with the matter. This problem is spatial localization of atomic populations due to fields impact of few running waves. We are the first to propose in our work two–dimensional spatial localization of atomic populations in medium with tripod–like configuration of levels under the field influence of running waves only. Three running waves, propagating along one plane 120o angle-wise to each other, form the system of standing waves in this plane. Atomic populations can be localized in the field of these standing waves. Moreover, the degree of such localization can make up hundredth parts of the wavelength of the incident optical radiation. It is shown that an excitation of the central transition of the tripod-like system using a field of multidirectional linearly polarized running waves is the necessary condition of the population dependence from spatial coordinates in the XY – plane. The two–dimensional shapes that appear in this system can have very complicated structure such as “double – craters”.

  17. Semi-analytical model for a slab one-dimensional photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libman, M.; Kondratyev, N. M.; Gorodetsky, M. L.

    2018-02-01

    In our work we justify the applicability of a dielectric mirror model to the description of a real photonic crystal. We demonstrate that a simple one-dimensional model of a multilayer mirror can be employed for modeling of a slab waveguide with periodically changing width. It is shown that this width change can be recalculated to the effective refraction index modulation. The applicability of transfer matrix method of reflection properties calculation was demonstrated. Finally, our 1-D model was employed to analyze reflection properties of a 2-D structure - a slab photonic crystal with a number of elliptic holes.

  18. Electro-optic tunable multi-channel filter in two-dimensional ferroelectric photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Yulan; Zhang, Jiaxiang; Hu, Xiaoyong; Gong, Qihuang

    2010-01-01

    An electro-optic tunable multi-channel filter is presented, which is based on a two-dimensional ferroelectric photonic crystal made of barium titanate. The filtering properties of the photonic crystal filter can be tuned by an applied voltage or by adjusting the structural parameters. The channel shifts about 30 nm under excitation of an applied voltage of 54.8 V. The influences of the structural disorders caused by the perturbations in the radius or the position of air holes on the filtering properties are also analyzed

  19. Selection rule for Dirac-like points in two-dimensional dielectric photonic crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    We developed a selection rule for Dirac-like points in two-dimensional dielectric photonic crystals. The rule is derived from a perturbation theory and states that a non-zero, mode-coupling integral between the degenerate Bloch states guarantees a Dirac-like point, regardless of the type of the degeneracy. In fact, the selection rule can also be determined from the symmetry of the Bloch states even without computing the integral. Thus, the existence of Dirac-like points can be quickly and conclusively predicted for various photonic crystals independent of wave polarization, lattice structure, and composition. © 2013 Optical Society of America.

  20. Crystal quality of two-dimensional gallium telluride and gallium selenide using Raman fingerprint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannatul Susoma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We have established Raman fingerprint of GaTe and GaSe to investigate their crystal quality. As unencapsulated, they both oxidise in ambient conditions which can be detected in their Raman analysis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analysis shows a good agreement with Raman analysis. 50-nm-thick Al2O3 encapsulation layer deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD inhibits degradation in ambient conditions.

  1. Rapid Fabrication of Three-Dimensional Woodpile Photonic Crystals by Means of Two-Photon Photopolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming; Kong, Jun-Jie; Yang, Hai-Feng; Yan, Feng; Cai, Lan

    2007-11-01

    Two-photon photopolymerization (TPP) of femtosecond laser is a promising method to fabricate three-dimensional woodpile photonic crystals (PCs). We build micro-fabrication system based on the principle of TPP. Three-dimensional woodpile PCs consisting of in-plane rod distances ranging from 1000 nm to 2000 nm are fabricated by focusing femtosecond laser in photosensitive liquid resin ORMOCER. The properties of the PCs are also discussed, and fundamental photonic band gaps in middle-infrared range are measured, whose in-plane rod distances are 1500 nm and 2000 nm. Three-dimensional woodpile PC devices with desired defects, such as cross-waveguide and micro-laser structures, are introduced easily by TPP. We fabricate the three-dimensional woodpile PCs in the liquid resin at the fast scanning speed of 120 μm/s.

  2. Atomic force microscopy measurements of crystal nucleation and growth rates in thin films of amorphous Te alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, J.; Spaepen, F.; Wuttig, M.

    2004-06-01

    Ex situ atomic force microscopy in combination with a high-precision furnace has been employed for a systematic study of crystallization kinetics of sputtered amorphous Ag0.055In0.065Sb0.59Te0.29, Ge4Sb1Te5, and Ge2Sb2Te5 thin films used for optical data storage. Direct observation of crystals enabled us to establish the temperature dependence of the crystal nucleation rate and crystal growth velocity around 150°C. While these alloys exhibited similar crystal growth characteristics, the crystal nucleation behavior of Ag0.055In0.065Sb0.59Te0.29 differed significantly from that of Ge4Sb1Te5 and Ge2Sb2Te5. These observations provide an explanation for the different recrystallization mechanisms observed upon laser heating of amorphous marks.

  3. Dimensional crossover and cold-atom realization of topological Mott insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheurer, Mathias S.; Rachel, Stephan; Orth, Peter P.

    2015-02-01

    Interacting cold-atomic gases in optical lattices offer an experimental approach to outstanding problems of many body physics. One important example is the interplay of interaction and topology which promises to generate a variety of exotic phases such as the fractionalized Chern insulator or the topological Mott insulator. Both theoretically understanding these states of matter and finding suitable systems that host them have proven to be challenging problems. Here we propose a cold-atom setup where Hubbard on-site interactions give rise to spin liquid-like phases: weak and strong topological Mott insulators. They represent the celebrated paradigm of an interacting and topological quantum state with fractionalized spinon excitations that inherit the topology of the non-interacting system. Our proposal shall help to pave the way for a controlled experimental investigation of this exotic state of matter in optical lattices. Furthermore, it allows for the investigation of a dimensional crossover from a two-dimensional quantum spin Hall insulating phase to a three-dimensional strong topological insulator by tuning the hopping between the layers.

  4. Ternary rare earth metal boride carbides containing two-dimensional boron carbon network: The crystal and electronic structure of R2B4C (R=Tb, Dy, Ho, Er)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhetskyy, Volodymyr; Zheng, Chong; Mattausch, Hansjürgen; Simon, Arndt

    2007-12-01

    The ternary rare earth boride carbides R2B4C (R=Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) have been synthesized by reacting the elements at temperatures between 1800 and 2000K. The crystal structure of Dy2B4C has been determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. It crystallizes in a new structure type in the orthorhombic space group Immm (a=3.2772(6) Å, b=6.567(2) Å, c=7.542(1) Å, Z=2, R1=0.035 (wR2=0.10) for 224 reflections with Io>2σ(Io)). Boron atoms form infinite chains of fused B6 rings in [100] joined with carbon atoms into planar, two-dimensional networks which alternate with planar sheets of rare earth metal atoms. The electronic structure of Dy2B4C was also analyzed using the tight-binding extended Hückel method.

  5. Photonic crystal defect mode cavity modelling: a phenomenological dimensional reduction approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weidong; Qiang, Zexuan; Chen, Li

    2007-05-01

    A phenomenological dimensional reduction approach (PDRA) for the cavity characteristics in defect mode based photonic crystal (PC) lasers is presented. Based on the fully vectorial three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (3D FDTD) technique, simultaneous enhancement and suppression in spontaneous emission and absorption were obtained in an absorptive photonic crystal slab (PCS) cavity. Effective index perturbation (EIP) was proposed for fast and accurate determination of the effective index and the dominant resonant cavity frequency in a 3D PCS structure, with two-dimensional (2D) FDTD simulation. Further dimensional reduction from 2D to one-dimensional planar cavity enables phenomenological modelling of lasing characteristics via the effective reflectivity calculation and rate equation analysis. Very fast and accurate results have been achieved with this PDRA approach. A high spontaneous emission factor and cavity quality factor Q were obtained in a single defect cavity, which led to over an order reduction in lasing gain threshold. The model offers a fast and accurate tool for the design and modelling of PC defect mode cavity based devices and aids the research in the proposed novel defect mode based devices such as ultra-compact light sources on Si and spectrally resolved PC infrared photodetectors.

  6. Low-Temperature Growth of Two-Dimensional Layered Chalcogenide Crystals on Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yubing; Deng, Bing; Zhou, Yu; Ren, Xibiao; Yin, Jianbo; Jin, Chuanhong; Liu, Zhongfan; Peng, Hailin

    2016-03-09

    The growth of high-quality two-dimensional (2D) layered chalcogenide crystals is highly important for practical applications in future electronics, optoelectronics, and photonics. Current route for the synthesis of 2D chalcogenide crystals by vapor deposition method mainly involves an energy intensive high-temperature growth process on solid substrates, often suffering from inhomogeneous nucleation density and grain size distribution. Here, we first demonstrate a facile vapor-phase synthesis of large-area high-quality 2D layered chalcogenide crystals on liquid metal surface with relatively low surface energy at a growth temperature as low as ∼100 °C. Uniform and large-domain-sized 2D crystals of GaSe and GaxIn1-xSe were grown on liquid metal surface even supported on a polyimide film. As-grown 2D GaSe crystals have been fabricated to flexible photodetectors, showing high photoresponse and excellent flexibility. Our strategy of energy-sustainable low-temperature growth on liquid metal surface may open a route to the synthesis of high-quality 2D crystals of Ga-, In-, Bi-, Hg-, Pb-, or Sn-based chalcogenides and halides.

  7. Theory of two-dimensional self-assembly of Janus colloids: crystallization and orientational ordering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Homin; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2014-01-14

    We study the rich crystalline phase behavior of amphiphilic spherical Janus colloids using a new formulation of self-consistent phonon theory that includes coupled translational and rotational entropic and enthalpic contributions to the free energy. In contrast to homogeneous spheres, broken rotational symmetry can result in more exotic crystals that possess distinct orientational patterns, and also plastic crystals. Ground states are identified based on the compatibility between the patch geometry of particles (e.g., patch coverage, number, shape) and lattice symmetry. We derive the explicit coupled self-consistent equations for translational and rotational localization parameters for effectively 2-dimensional dense monolayers of Janus crystals. The equations are numerically solved for a given crystal symmetry, thermodynamic state, and patch orientational order, and the thermodynamic stability of different phases is determined. For hexagonal packing, we predict with increasing temperature or decreasing attraction strength the possibility of a phase sequence of maximally bonded zigzag stripe, trimer, and rotationally disordered plastic crystal phases (or a phase sequence of trimer, dimer, and plastic crystal), which depends sensitively on particle chemical composition (Janus balance) and pressure. The role of rotational entropy in stabilizing the intermediate trimer (or dimer) phase at intermediate temperatures and high pressures is discussed in detail. Evolution of the center-of-mass vibrational and rotational amplitudes with thermodynamic state and Janus balance is also determined.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of atomic short range order and cluster formation in two dimensional model alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas T, J.; Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima; Manrique C, E.; Torres T, E.

    2002-01-01

    Using monte Carlo simulation have been carried out an atomistic description of the structure and ordering processes in the system Cu-Au in a two-dimensional model. The ABV model of the alloy is a system of N atoms A and B, located in rigid lattice with some vacant sites. In the model we assume pair wise interactions between nearest neighbors with constant ordering energy J = 0,03 eV. The dynamics was introduced by means of a vacancy that exchanges of place with any atom of its neighbors. The simulations were carried out in a square lattice with 1024 and 4096 particles, using periodic boundary conditions to avoid border effects. We calculate the first two parameters of short range order of Warren-Cowley as function of the concentration and temperature. It was also studied the probabilities of formation of different atomic clusters that consist of 9 atoms as function of the concentration of the alloy and temperatures in a wide range of values. In some regions of temperature and concentration it was observed compositional and thermal polymorphism

  9. Universal structure conversion method for organic molecules: From atomic connectivity to three-dimensional geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeon Joon; Kim, Woo Youn

    2015-01-01

    We present a powerful method for the conversion of molecular structures from atomic connectivity to bond orders to three-dimensional (3D) geometries. There are a number of bond orders and 3D geometries corresponding to a given atomic connectivity. To uniquely determine an energetically more favorable one among them, we use general chemical rules without invoking any empirical parameter, which makes our method valid for any organic molecule. Specifically, we first assign a proper bond order to each atomic pair in the atomic connectivity so as to maximize their sum and the result is converted to a SMILES notation using graph theory. The corresponding 3D geometry is then obtained using force field or ab initio calculations. This method successfully reproduced the bond order matrices and 3D geometries of 10 000 molecules randomly sampled from the PubChem database with high success rates of near 100% except a few exceptional cases. As an application, we demonstrate that it can be used to search for molecular isomers efficiently

  10. Quantum phases of low-dimensional ultra-cold atom systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathey, Ludwig G.

    2007-06-01

    In this thesis we derive and explore the quantum phases of various types of ultracold atom systems, as well as their experimental signature. The technology of cooling, trapping and manipulating ultracold atoms has advanced in an amazing fashion during the last decade, which has led to the study of many-body effects of atomic ensembles. We first consider atomic mixtures in one dimension, which show a rich structure of phases, using a Luttinger liquid description. We then go on to consider how noise correlations in time-of-flight images of one-dimensional systems can be used to draw conclusions about the many-body state that they're in. Thirdly, we consider the quantum phases of Bose-Fermi mixtures in optical lattices, either square lattices or triangular lattices, using the powerful method of functional renormalization group analysis. Lastly, we study the phases of two-coupled quasi-superfluids in two dimensions, which shows unusual phases, and which could be used to realize the Kibble-Zurek mechanism, i.e. the generation of topological defects by ramping across a phase transition, first proposed in the context of an early universe scenario.

  11. Analytical investigation of one-dimensional Rydberg atoms interacting with half-cycle pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bersons, I.; Veilande, R.

    2004-01-01

    Classical, quantum-mechanical, and semiclassical expressions for the transition probability in one-dimensional Rydberg atom irradiated by short half-cycle pulse are derived and compared. The simple formulas obtained for excitation of Rydberg atom by two time delayed weak half-cycle pulses reproduce well the experimental data and the solutions of time-dependent Schroedinger equation. When the transferred momenta are stronger and positive, the transition probabilities exhibit fast oscillations with time delay between the pulses. The classical transition probability is constant in time. For negative transferred momenta a focusing phenomenon is observed, and there is a region in time delay, where the transition probabilities oscillate with the Kepler period

  12. Photodetection in p–n junctions formed by electrolyte-gated transistors of two-dimensional crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Kozawa, Daichi

    2016-11-16

    Transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers have attracted much attention due to their strong light absorption and excellent electronic properties. These advantages make this type of two-dimensional crystal a promising one for optoelectronic device applications. In the case of photoelectric conversion devices such as photodetectors and photovoltaic cells, p–n junctions are one of the most important devices. Here, we demonstrate photodetection with WSe2 monolayer films. We prepare the electrolyte-gated ambipolar transistors and electrostatic p–n junctions are formed by the electrolyte-gating technique at 270 K. These p-n junctions are cooled down to fix the ion motion (and p-n junctions) and we observed the reasonable photocurrent spectra without the external bias, indicating the formation of p-n junctions. Very interestingly, two-terminal devices exhibit higher photoresponsivity than that of three-terminal ones, suggesting the formation of highly balanced anion and cation layers. The maximum photoresponsivity reaches 5 mA/W in resonance with the first excitonic peak. Our technique provides important evidence for optoelectronics in atomically thin crystals.

  13. Three-dimensional oriented attachment growth of single-crystal pre-perovskite PbTiO3 hollowed fibers

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Ruoyu

    2017-12-11

    Hollowed single-crystal pre-perovskite PbTiO fibers (PP-PTF) were successfully synthesized via a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) assisted hydrothermal process. The as-prepared PP-PTF were characterized to be 0.3-1 μm in diameter and tens of micrometers in length by adjusting the concentration of PVA to 0.8 g L. Microstructure characterization of the samples at different reaction times revealed that PP-PTF were formed via a three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical oriented attachment (OA) growth process. The initial growth units were determined to be single-crystal pre-perovskite PbTiO fibers with a diameter of 10-20 nm. Zeta potential measurement suggested that the main driving force of the OA process is the surface electrostatic force, which is induced by the incompletely bonded Pb and O atomic layers on the surface of the {110} plane. Moreover, molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to reveal a stable configuration of the initial pre-perovskite PbTiO growth units, agreeing well with the experimental results.

  14. Photodetection in p-n junctions formed by electrolyte-gated transistors of two-dimensional crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozawa, Daichi; Pu, Jiang; Shimizu, Ryo; Kimura, Shota; Chiu, Ming-Hui; Matsuki, Keiichiro; Wada, Yoshifumi; Sakanoue, Tomo; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Li, Lain-Jong; Takenobu, Taishi

    2016-11-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers have attracted much attention due to their strong light absorption and excellent electronic properties. These advantages make this type of two-dimensional crystal a promising one for optoelectronic device applications. In the case of photoelectric conversion devices such as photodetectors and photovoltaic cells, p-n junctions are one of the most important devices. Here, we demonstrate photodetection with WSe2 monolayer films. We prepare the electrolyte-gated ambipolar transistors and electrostatic p-n junctions are formed by the electrolyte-gating technique at 270 K. These p-n junctions are cooled down to fix the ion motion (and p-n junctions) and we observed the reasonable photocurrent spectra without the external bias, indicating the formation of p-n junctions. Very interestingly, two-terminal devices exhibit higher photoresponsivity than that of three-terminal ones, suggesting the formation of highly balanced anion and cation layers. The maximum photoresponsivity reaches 5 mA/W in resonance with the first excitonic peak. Our technique provides important evidence for optoelectronics in atomically thin crystals.

  15. Local atomic and crystal structure rearrangement during the martensitic transformation in Ti50Ni25Cu25 shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menushenkov, Alexey; Grishina, Olga; Shelyakov, Alexander; Yaroslavtsev, Alexander; Zubavichus, Yan; Veligzhanin, Alexey; Bednarcik, Jozef; Chernikov, Roman; Sitnikov, Nikolay

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Local crystalline structure of TiNiCu SMA is investigated using EXAFS. • Peculiarities of Ni and Cu local environment are found. • Ti atoms show greater mobility relative to Ni atoms. • Ni local environment change is significant for shape memory effect. -- Abstract: The changes of crystal structure and local crystalline environment of Ti, Ni and Cu atoms in Ti 50 Ni 25 Cu 25 shape memory alloy are investigated using X-ray diffraction and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) in temperature range of martensite transformation. The analysis of the EXAFS-spectra shows that the bonds involving Ni atoms have the highest degree of disorder and the change in the local environment around Ni atoms is significant for the occurrence of the shape memory effect, while Cu atoms occupy the normal positions in the crystallographic structure and have the lowest displacement amplitude leading to the stabilization of both phases

  16. Elastic wave localization in two-dimensional phononic crystals with one-dimensional random disorder and aperiodicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Zhizhong; Zhang Chuanzeng; Wang Yuesheng

    2011-01-01

    The band structures of in-plane elastic waves propagating in two-dimensional phononic crystals with one-dimensional random disorder and aperiodicity are analyzed in this paper. The localization of wave propagation is discussed by introducing the concept of the localization factor, which is calculated by the plane-wave-based transfer-matrix method. By treating the random disorder and aperiodicity as the deviation from the periodicity in a special way, three kinds of aperiodic phononic crystals that have normally distributed random disorder, Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro sequence in one direction and translational symmetry in the other direction are considered and the band structures are characterized using localization factors. Besides, as a special case, we analyze the band gap properties of a periodic planar layered composite containing a periodic array of square inclusions. The transmission coefficients based on eigen-mode matching theory are also calculated and the results show the same behaviors as the localization factor does. In the case of random disorders, the localization degree of the normally distributed random disorder is larger than that of the uniformly distributed random disorder although the eigenstates are both localized no matter what types of random disorders, whereas, for the case of Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro structures, the band structures of Thue-Morse sequence exhibit similarities with the quasi-periodic (Fibonacci) sequence not present in the results of the Rudin-Shapiro sequence.

  17. Crystallization Process of Protein Rv0731c from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis for a Successful Atomic Resolution Crystal Structure at 1.2 Angstrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Liang Cong

    2009-06-08

    Proteins are bio-macromolecules consisting of basic 20 amino acids and have distinct three-dimensional folds. They are essential parts of organisms and participate in every process within cells. Proteins are crucial for human life, and each protein within the body has a specific function, such as antibodies, contractile proteins, enzymes, hormonal proteins, structural proteins, storage proteins and transport proteins. Determining three-dimensional structure of a protein can help researchers discover the remarkable protein folding, binding site, conformation and etc, in order to understand well of protein interaction and aid for possible drug design. The research on protein structure by X-ray protein crystallography carried by Li-Wei Hung's research group in the Physical Bioscience Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is focusing on protein crystallography. The research in this lab is in the process of from crystallizing the proteins to determining the three dimensional crystal structures of proteins. Most protein targets are selected from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. TB (Tuberculosis) is a possible fatal infectious disease. By studying TB target protein can help discover antituberculer drugs, and find treatment for TB. The high-throughput mode of crystallization, crystal harvesting, crystal screening and data collection are applied to the research pipeline (Figure 1). The X-ray diffraction data by protein crystals can be processed and analyzed to result in a three dimensional representation of electron density, producing a detailed model of protein structure. Rv0731c is a conserved hypothetical protein with unknown function from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. This paper is going to report the crystallization process and brief structure information of Rv0731c.

  18. Highly luminescent two dimensional excitons in atomically thin CdSe nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halder, O.; Pradhani, A.; Rath, S., E-mail: srath@iitbbs.ac.in [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Toshali Bhawan, Satyanagar, Bhubaneswar 751 007 (India); Sahoo, P. K. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Sachivalaya marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Satpati, B. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2014-05-05

    Atomically thin Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) nanosheets have been synthesized using a surfactant mediated growth technique. The transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the presence of single layered nanosheets with thickness 1.31 nm and their stacking structures which are complemented by the small angle x-ray scattering measurements. The strongly bound and polarized character of two dimensional excitonic states with enhanced oscillator strength yielding distinct narrow blue luminescence has been observed from the CdSe nanosheets using room temperature based optical studies.

  19. Room temperature strong light-matter coupling in three dimensional terahertz meta-atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulillo, B., E-mail: bruno.paulillo@u-psud.fr; Manceau, J.-M., E-mail: jean-michel.manceau@u-psud.fr; Colombelli, R., E-mail: raffaele.colombelli@u-psud.fr [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, Univ. Paris Sud, UMR8622 CNRS, 91405 Orsay (France); Li, L. H.; Davies, A. G.; Linfield, E. H. [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Woodhouse Lane, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-07

    We demonstrate strong light-matter coupling in three dimensional terahertz meta-atoms at room temperature. The intersubband transition of semiconductor quantum wells with a parabolic energy potential is strongly coupled to the confined circuital mode of three-dimensional split-ring metal-semiconductor-metal resonators that have an extreme sub-wavelength volume (λ/10). The frequency of these lumped-element resonators is controlled by the size and shape of the external antenna, while the interaction volume remains constant. This allows the resonance frequency to be swept across the intersubband transition and the anti-crossing characteristic of the strong light-matter coupling regime to be observed. The Rabi splitting, which is twice the Rabi frequency (2Ω{sub Rabi}), amounts to 20% of the bare transition at room temperature, and it increases to 28% at low-temperature.

  20. Scalable interference lithography alignment for fabrication of three-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigel, A; Kotler, Z; Sfez, B

    2002-05-01

    Holographic lithography is an ideal technique for fabricating three-dimensional photonic crystals. However, a critical stage in the fabrication is the minute alignment of the layers with one another. We present a simple moirelike alignment technique with better than 20-nm translation resolution and 45-murad rotation resolution. This technique can easily be extended to other situations when low-cost, high-precision alignment is needed.

  1. Study on the Reflection Spectra of One Dimensional Plasma Photonic Crystals Having Exponentially Graded Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, S.; Singh, Vivek; Singh, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    The transfer matrix method is used to study the effect of the permittivity profile on the reflectivity of a one dimensional plasma photonic crystal having exponentially graded material. The analysis shows that the proposed structure works as a perfect mirror within a certain frequency range. These frequency ranges can be completely controlled by the permittivity profile of a graded dielectric layer. As expected we observed that these frequency ranges are also controlled by plasma parameters. (plasma technology)

  2. The electric polarizability of a particle bound by a one-dimensional ionic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balderas, Daniel; González, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    We consider the problem of a particle confined to a one-dimensional ionic crystal of finite length modeled by repulsive and attractive delta functions and subject to the application of an external constant electric field. Exact expressions for the electric polarizability of the system via the Dalgarno–Lewis technique are obtained in second order perturbation theory. The study uncovers the behavior of the electric polarizability as a function of the number of ions in the system. (paper)

  3. Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals for Sensitive Microscale Chemical and Biochemical Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Photonic crystals – optical devices able to respond to changes in the refractive index of a small volume of space – are an emerging class of label-free chemical-and bio-sensors. This review focuses on one class of photonic crystal, in which light is confined to a patterned planar material layer of sub-wavelength thickness. These devices are small (on the order of tens to 100s of microns square), suitable for incorporation into lab-on-a-chip systems, and in theory can provide exceptional sensitivity. We introduce the defining characteristics and basic operation of two-dimensional photonic crystal sensors, describe variations of their basic design geometry, and summarize reported detection results from chemical and biological sensing experiments. PMID:25563402

  4. Tamm-plasmon polaritons in one-dimensional photonic quasi-crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Mukesh Kumar; Das, Ritwick

    2018-02-01

    We present an investigation to ascertain the existence of Tamm-plasmon-polariton-like modes in one-dimensional (1D) quasi-periodic photonic systems. Photonic bandgap formation in quasi-crystals is essentially a consequence of long-range periodicity exhibited by multilayers and, thus, it can be explained using the dispersion relation in the Brillouin zone. Defining a "Zak"-like topological phase in 1D quasi-crystals, we propose a recipe to ascertain the existence of Tamm-like photonic surface modes in a metal-terminated quasi-crystal lattice. Additionally, we also explore the conditions of efficient excitation of such surface modes along with their dispersion characteristics.

  5. Topological solitons and dislocations in two- and three-dimensional anisotropic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Savin, A.V.; Zolotaryuk, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    is not considered as a given external spatially periodic force, but it is constructed in a self-consistent manner, such that any disturbance in one of the chains causes a violation of spatial periodicity in the adjacent chains of the crystal. Static and moving soliton (kink and antikink) solutions are found...... numerically in two-and three-dimensional anisotropic crystals. Bound states of kink-antikink and kink-kink; (antikink-antikink) pairs and their dynamical properties are studied. Arrays of soliton states are shown to form dislocations of the edge type and their deformation energy distribution on the crystal...... lattice is calculated. In finding the soliton profiles and energy distributions on the lattice, we apply the minimization scheme that has proven to be an effective numerical method for seeking solitary wave solutions in complex systems. The collision dynamics of the point defects are also investigated....

  6. A versatile atomic force microscope for three-dimensional nanomanipulation and nanoassembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Hui; Haliyo, Dogan Sinan; Regnier, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    A conventional atomic force microscope (AFM) has been successfully applied to manipulating nanoparticles (zero-dimensional), nanowires (one-dimensional) or nanotubes (one- or two-dimensional) by widely used pushing or pulling operations on a single surface. However, pick-and-place nanomanipulation in air is still a challenge. In this research, a modified AFM, called a three-dimensional (3D) manipulation force microscope (3DMFM), was developed to realize 3D nanomanipulation in air. This system consists of two individually actuated cantilevers with protruding tips that are facing each other, constructing a nanotweezer for the pick-and-place nanomanipulation. Before manipulation, one of the cantilevers is employed to position nano-objects and locate the tip of the other cantilever by image scanning. During the manipulation, these two cantilevers work collaboratively as a nanotweezer to grasp, transport and place the nano-objects with real-time force sensing. The manipulation capabilities of the nanotweezer were demonstrated by grabbing and manipulating silicon nanowires to build 3D nanowire crosses. 3D nanomanipulation and nanoassembly performed in air could become feasible through this newly developed 3DMFM.

  7. Nature of the Insulating Ground State of the Two-Dimensional Sn Atom Lattice on SiC(0001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Seho; Lee, Hunpyo; Choi, Jin-Ho; Cho, Jun-Hyung

    2016-07-28

    Semiconductor surfaces with narrow surface bands provide unique playgrounds to search for Mott-insulating state. Recently, a combined experimental and theoretical study of the two-dimensional (2D) Sn atom lattice on a wide-gap SiC(0001) substrate proposed a Mott-type insulator driven by strong on-site Coulomb repulsion U within a single-band Hubbard model. However, our systematic density-functional theory (DFT) study with local, semilocal, and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals shows that the Sn dangling-bond state largely hybridizes with the substrate Si 3p and C 2p states to split into three surface bands due to the crystal field. Such a hybridization gives rise to the stabilization of the antiferromagnetic order via superexchange interactions. The band gap and the density of states predicted by the hybrid DFT calculation agree well with photoemission data. Our findings not only suggest that the Sn/SiC(0001) system can be represented as a Slater-type insulator driven by long-range magnetism, but also have an implication that taking into account long-range interactions beyond the on-site interaction would be of importance for properly describing the insulating nature of Sn/SiC(0001).

  8. Three-dimensional atomic models from a single projection using Z-contrast imaging: verification by electron tomography and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, A; Jones, L; Lobato, I; Altantzis, T; Goris, B; Nellist, P D; Bals, S; Van Aert, S

    2017-06-29

    In order to fully exploit structure-property relations of nanomaterials, three-dimensional (3D) characterization at the atomic scale is often required. In recent years, the resolution of electron tomography has reached the atomic scale. However, such tomography typically requires several projection images demanding substantial electron dose. A newly developed alternative circumvents this by counting the number of atoms across a single projection. These atom counts can be used to create an initial atomic model with which an energy minimization can be applied to obtain a relaxed 3D reconstruction of the nanoparticle. Here, we compare, at the atomic scale, this single projection reconstruction approach with tomography and find an excellent agreement. This new approach allows for the characterization of beam-sensitive materials or where the acquisition of a tilt series is impossible. As an example, the utility is illustrated by the 3D atomic scale characterization of a nanodumbbell on an in situ heating holder of limited tilt range.

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF SURFACE OF THE (010 FACE OF BORAX CRYSTALS USING EX SITU ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY (AFM:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suharso Suharso

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface topology of borax crystals grown at a relative supersaturation of 0.21 has been investigated using ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM. It was found that the cleavage of borax crystals along the (010 face planes has features of the cleavage of layered compounds, exhibiting cleavage steps of low heights. The step heights of the cleavage of the (010 face of borax crystal are from one unit cell to three unit cells of this face.   Keywords: AFM, cleavage, borax.

  10. About effect of the Ramsauer-Townsend type at scattering of relativistic electrons by crystal atomic string

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shul'ga, N.F.; Truten', V.I.

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that a considerable decrease in a total cross-section of the elastic scattering of relativistic electrons by a crystal atomic string can take place at certain values of particle incidence angles. This effect is similar to the Ramsauer-Townsend effect of slow electrons scattering by an atom. It is shown that the decrease in the angle of particles incidence on the atomic string essentially changes the process of particles scattering. The phenomena of the particle rainbow scattering and orbiting may occur in this case. 14 refs., 5 figs

  11. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  12. Numerical study on characteristic of two-dimensional metal/dielectric photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zong Yi-Xin; Xia Jian-Bai; Wu Hai-Bin

    2017-01-01

    An improved plan-wave expansion method is adopted to theoretically study the photonic band diagrams of two-dimensional (2D) metal/dielectric photonic crystals. Based on the photonic band structures, the dependence of flat bands and photonic bandgaps on two parameters (dielectric constant and filling factor) are investigated for two types of 2D metal/dielectric (M/D) photonic crystals, hole and cylinder photonic crystals. The simulation results show that band structures are affected greatly by these two parameters. Flat bands and bandgaps can be easily obtained by tuning these parameters and the bandgap width may reach to the maximum at certain parameters. It is worth noting that the hole-type photonic crystals show more bandgaps than the corresponding cylinder ones, and the frequency ranges of bandgaps also depend strongly on these parameters. Besides, the photonic crystals containing metallic medium can obtain more modulation of photonic bands, band gaps, and large effective refractive index, etc. than the dielectric/dielectric ones. According to the numerical results, the needs of optical devices for flat bands and bandgaps can be met by selecting the suitable geometry and material parameters. (paper)

  13. Direct Writing of Three-Dimensional Macroporous Photonic Crystals on Pressure-Responsive Shape Memory Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yin; Ni, Yongliang; Leo, Sin-Yen; Wang, Bingchen; Basile, Vito; Taylor, Curtis; Jiang, Peng

    2015-10-28

    Here we report a single-step direct writing technology for making three-dimensional (3D) macroporous photonic crystal patterns on a new type of pressure-responsive shape memory polymer (SMP). This approach integrates two disparate fields that do not typically intersect: the well-established templating nanofabrication and shape memory materials. Periodic arrays of polymer macropores templated from self-assembled colloidal crystals are squeezed into disordered arrays in an unusual shape memory "cold" programming process. The recovery of the original macroporous photonic crystal lattices can be triggered by direct writing at ambient conditions using both macroscopic and nanoscopic tools, like a pencil or a nanoindenter. Interestingly, this shape memory disorder-order transition is reversible and the photonic crystal patterns can be erased and regenerated hundreds of times, promising the making of reconfigurable/rewritable nanooptical devices. Quantitative insights into the shape memory recovery of collapsed macropores induced by the lateral shear stresses in direct writing are gained through fundamental investigations on important process parameters, including the tip material, the critical pressure and writing speed for triggering the recovery of the deformed macropores, and the minimal feature size that can be directly written on the SMP membranes. Besides straightforward applications in photonic crystal devices, these smart mechanochromic SMPs that are sensitive to various mechanical stresses could render important technological applications ranging from chromogenic stress and impact sensors to rewritable high-density optical data storage media.

  14. Optical Properties and Wave Propagation in Semiconductor-Based Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agio, Mario [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-12-31

    This work is a theoretical investigation on the physical properties of semiconductor-based two-dimensional photonic crystals, in particular for what concerns systems embedded in planar dielectric waveguides (GaAs/AlGaAs, GaInAsP/InP heterostructures, and self-standing membranes) or based on macro-porous silicon. The photonic-band structure of photonic crystals and photonic-crystal slabs is numerically computed and the associated light-line problem is discussed, which points to the issue of intrinsic out-of-lane diffraction losses for the photonic bands lying above the light line. The photonic states are then classified by the group theory formalism: each mode is related to an irreducible representation of the corresponding small point group. The optical properties are investigated by means of the scattering matrix method, which numerically implements a variable-angle-reflectance experiment; comparison with experiments is also provided. The analysis of surface reflectance proves the existence of selection rules for coupling an external wave to a certain photonic mode. Such rules can be directly derived from symmetry considerations. Lastly, the control of wave propagation in weak-index contrast photonic-crystal slabs is tackled in view of designing building blocks for photonic integrated circuits. The proposed designs are found to comply with the major requirements of low-loss propagation, high and single-mode transmission. These notions are then collected to model a photonic-crystal combiner for an integrated multi-wavelength-source laser.

  15. Optical Properties and Wave Propagation in Semiconductor-Based Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mario Agio

    2002-01-01

    This work is a theoretical investigation on the physical properties of semiconductor-based two-dimensional photonic crystals, in particular for what concerns systems embedded in planar dielectric waveguides (GaAs/AlGaAs, GaInAsP/InP heterostructures, and self-standing membranes) or based on macro-porous silicon. The photonic-band structure of photonic crystals and photonic-crystal slabs is numerically computed and the associated light-line problem is discussed, which points to the issue of intrinsic out-of-lane diffraction losses for the photonic bands lying above the light line. The photonic states are then classified by the group theory formalism: each mode is related to an irreducible representation of the corresponding small point group. The optical properties are investigated by means of the scattering matrix method, which numerically implements a variable-angle-reflectance experiment; comparison with experiments is also provided. The analysis of surface reflectance proves the existence of selection rules for coupling an external wave to a certain photonic mode. Such rules can be directly derived from symmetry considerations. Lastly, the control of wave propagation in weak-index contrast photonic-crystal slabs is tackled in view of designing building blocks for photonic integrated circuits. The proposed designs are found to comply with the major requirements of low-loss propagation, high and single-mode transmission. These notions are then collected to model a photonic-crystal combiner for an integrated multi-wavelength-source laser

  16. Chemically Engineered Substrates for Patternable Growth of Two-Dimensional Chalcogenide Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingzhan; Wu, Jinxiong; Lin, Li; Liu, Yujing; Deng, Bing; Guo, Yunfan; Lin, Yuanwei; Xie, Tian; Dang, Wenhui; Zhou, Yubing; Peng, Hailin

    2016-11-22

    The key challenge of direct integration of two-dimensional (2D) chalcogenide crystals into functional modules is precise control of the nucleation sites of the building blocks. Herein, we exploit the chemical activities and surface engineering of the substrates to manipulate the nucleation energy barrier of 2D crystals and thereby realize the patternable growth of 2D crystals. The selective-region chemical modifications of the substrates are achieved via microcontact printing combined with the elegant self-assembly of octadecyltrichlorosilane molecules on the substrates. The patternable growth method is versatile and can be used as a general strategy for growing a broad class of high-quality 2D chalcogenide crystals with tailorable configurations on a variety of chemically engineered substrates. Moreover, we demonstrate flexible transparent electrodes based on large-scale patterned nanogrids of topological insulator Bi 2 Se 3 , which possess tailored trade-off between electric conductivity and optical transmittance across the visible to near-infrared regime. We hope this method may open an avenue to the efficient integration and batch production of 2D chalcogenide crystals and could inspire ongoing efforts of the fabrication of van der Waals heterostructures.

  17. Comprehensive three-dimensional analysis of surface plasmon polariton modes at uniaxial liquid crystal-metal interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Yin-Ray; Lee, Tsun-Hsiun; Wu, Zheng-Yu; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Hung, Yu-Ju

    2015-12-14

    This paper describes the derivation of surface plasmon polariton modes associated with the generalized three-dimensional rotation of liquid crystal molecules on a metal film. The calculated dispersion relation was verified by coupling laser light into surface plasmon polariton waves in a one-dimensional grating device. The grating-assisted plasmon coupling condition was consistent with the formulated k(spp) value. This provides a general rule for the design of liquid-crystal tunable plasmonic devices.

  18. He atom-surface scattering: Surface dynamics of insulators, overlayers and crystal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Investigations in this laboratory have focused on the surface structure and dynamics of ionic insulators and on epitaxial growth onto alkali halide crystals. In the later the homoepitaxial growth of NaCl/NaCl(001) and the heteroepitaxial growth of KBr/NaCl(001), NaCl/KBr(001) and KBr/RbCl(001) have been studied by monitoring the specular He scattering as a function of the coverage and by measuring the angular and energy distributions of the scattered He atoms. These data provide information on the surface structure, defect densities, island sizes and surface strain during the layer-by-layer growth. The temperature dependence of these measurements also provides information on the mobilities of the admolecules. He atom scattering is unique among surface probes because the low-energy, inert atoms are sensitive only to the electronic structure of the topmost surface layer and are equally applicable to all crystalline materials. It is proposed for the next year to exploit further the variety of combinations possible with the alkali halides in order to carry out a definitive study of epitaxial growth in the ionic insulators. The work completed so far, including measurements of the Bragg diffraction and surface dispersion at various stages of growth, appears to be exceptionally rich in detail, which is particularly promising for theoretical modeling. In addition, because epitaxial growth conditions over a wide range of lattice mismatches is possible with these materials, size effects in growth processes can be explored in great depth. Further, as some of the alkali halides have the CsCl structure instead of the NaCl structure, we can investigate the effects of the heteroepitaxy with materials having different lattice preferences. Finally, by using co-deposition of different alkali halides, one can investigate the formation and stability of alloys and even alkali halide superlattices

  19. Double epitaxy as a paradigm for templated growth of highly ordered three-dimensional mesophase crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Yongsoon; Tao, Jinhui; Arey, Bruce W.; Wang, Chongmin; Exarhos, Gregory J.; De Yoreo, James J.; Sushko, Maria L.; Liu, Jun

    2016-08-30

    Molecular templating and self-assembly are fundamental mechanisms for controlling the morphology of biominerals, while in synthetic two-dimensional layered materials similar levels of control over materials structure can be achieved through the epitaxial relationship with the substrate. In this study these two concepts are combined to provide an approach for the nucleation and growth of three-dimensional ordered mesophases on solid surfaces. A combined experimental and theoretical study revealed how atomic ordering of the substrate controls the structure of surfactant template and the orientation and morphology of the epitaxially grown inorganic material. Such dual epitaxial relationship between the substrate, surfactant template and inorganic mesophase gives rise to a highly ordered porous mesophase with a well-defined cubic lattice of pores. The level of control over material’s three-dimensional architecture achieved in this one-step synthesis is reminiscent to that in biomineralization.

  20. Real-time imaging of melting and crystallization in poly(ethylene oxide) by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearce, R.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    1998-01-01

    The processes of melting and crystallization of poly(ethylene oxide) are followed in real time at elevated temperature by atomic force microscopy using a simple hot stage apparatus. Hedritic development at a temperature of 57°C is monitored, including the process of lamellar splaying to yield a

  1. Large-Scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) Simulations of the Molecular Crystal alphaRDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    vectors, f and u. 3. This Work The GSF concepts introduced in the previous section work well for atomic and metallic crystals like copper because the...HRA MAIL & RECORDS MGMT ATTN RDRL CIO LL TECHL LIB 2 US ARMY RSRCH LAB (PDFS) ATTN RDRL CIH C L MUNDAY B RICE 62 INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK.

  2. Crystallization and atomic diffusion behavior of high coercive Ta/Nd-Fe-B/Ta-based permanent magnetic thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Na; Zhang, Xiao; You, Caiyin; Fu, Huarui [Xi' an University of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an (China); Shen, Qianlong [Logistics University of People' s Armed Police Force, Tianjin (China)

    2017-06-15

    A high coercivity of about 20.4 kOe was obtained through post-annealing the sputtered Ta/Nd-Fe-B/Ta-based permanent magnetic thin films. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses were performed to investigate the crystallization and atomic diffusion behaviors during post-annealing. The results show that the buffer and capping Ta layers prefered to intermix with Fe and B atoms, and Nd tends to be combined with O atoms. The preferred atomic combination caused the appearance of the soft magnetic phase of Fe-Ta-B, resulting in a kink of the second quadratic magnetic hysteresis loop. The preferred atomic diffusion and phase formation of the thin films were well explained in terms of the formation enthalpy of the various compounds. (orig.)

  3. The three-dimensional nature of microbands in a channel die compressed Goss-oriented Ni single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afrin, N.; Quadir, M.Z.; Bassman, L.; Driver, J.H.; Albou, A.; Ferry, M.

    2011-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of microband boundaries in a plane strain compressed Goss-oriented nickel single crystal was generated by the electron backscatter diffraction technique. Rather than being perfectly planar, microband boundaries generally contained bumps and curves. The planar segments of these boundaries have orientations that coincide closely with one of the expected {1 1 1} slip planes of this crystal.

  4. High-precision two-dimensional atom localization from four-wave mixing in a double-Λ four-level atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Tao; Yang, Wen-Xing; Chen, Ai-Xi; Liu, Shaopeng; Li, Ling; Zhu, Zhonghu

    2018-03-01

    We propose a scheme for high-precision two-dimensional (2D) atom localization via the four-wave mixing (FWM) in a four-level double-Λ atomic system. Due to the position-dependent atom-field interaction, the 2D position information of the atoms can be directly determined by the measurement of the normalized light intensity of output FWM-generated field. We further show that, when the position-dependent generated FWM field has become sufficiently intense, efficient back-coupling to the FWM generating state becomes important. This back-coupling pathway leads to competitive multiphoton destructive interference of the FWM generating state by three supplied and one internally generated fields. We find that the precision of 2D atom localization can be improved significantly by the multiphoton destructive interference and depends sensitively on the frequency detunings and the pump field intensity. Interestingly enough, we show that adjusting the frequency detunings and the pump field intensity can modify significantly the FWM efficiency, and consequently lead to a redistribution of the atoms. As a result, the atom can be localized in one of four quadrants with holding the precision of atom localization.

  5. Dual curved photonic crystal ring resonator based channel drop filter using two-dimensional photonic crystal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhipa, Mayur Kumar, E-mail: mayurchhipa1@gmail.com [Deptt. of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Government Engineering College Ajmer Rajasthan INDIA (India); Dusad, Lalit Kumar [Rajasthan Technical University Kota, Rajasthan (India)

    2016-05-06

    In this paper channel drop filter (CDF) is designed using dual curved photonic crystal ring resonator (PCRR). The photonic band gap (PBG) is calculated by plane wave expansion (PWE) method and the photonic crystal (PhC) based on two dimensional (2D) square lattice periodic arrays of silicon (Si) rods in air structure have been investigated using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The number of rods in Z and X directions is 21 and 20 respectively with lattice constant 0.540 nm and rod radius r = 0.1 µm. The channel drop filter has been optimized for telecommunication wavelengths λ = 1.591 µm with refractive indices 3.533. In the designed structure further analysis is also done by changing whole rods refractive index and it has been observed that this filter may be used for filtering several other channels also. The designed structure is useful for CWDM systems. This device may serve as a key component in photonic integrated circuits. The device is ultra compact with the overall size around 123 µm{sup 2}.

  6. Effect of interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness on 2-dimensional materials’ frictional properties at atomic-scale steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, Haojie; Peng, Yitian; Zeng, Xingzhong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Bending of uncovered step edge of 2-dimensional materials could be a common phenomenon during friction processes. • 2-dimensional materials with large interlayer bonding strength possess good frictional properties at step. • Increased bending stiffness of step edge could be the major reason that lateral force increased with step height. - Abstract: Atomic-scale steps generally presented in 2-dimensional materials have important influence on the overall nanotribological properties of surface. Frictional properties at atomic-scale steps of two types of 2-dimensional materials are studied using calibrated atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip sliding against the steps. The lateral force at uncovered step is larger than covered step due to the bending of step edge. The lateral force at monolayer uncovered step edge of h-BN is lower than graphene because h-BN possesses higher interlayer bonding strength than graphene and the bending of h-BN step edge is suppressed to some extent. The high uncovered step exhibits much larger lateral force than low uncovered step, which could be mainly induced by increased bending stiffness of step edge rather than increased step height. The results revealed that interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness have great influence on the lateral force at atomic-scale steps. The studies can provide a further understanding of frictional properties at atomic scale steps and could be helpful for the applications of 2-dimensional materials as lubricant coating.

  7. Effect of interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness on 2-dimensional materials’ frictional properties at atomic-scale steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Haojie; Peng, Yitian, E-mail: yitianpeng@dhu.edu.cn; Zeng, Xingzhong

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Bending of uncovered step edge of 2-dimensional materials could be a common phenomenon during friction processes. • 2-dimensional materials with large interlayer bonding strength possess good frictional properties at step. • Increased bending stiffness of step edge could be the major reason that lateral force increased with step height. - Abstract: Atomic-scale steps generally presented in 2-dimensional materials have important influence on the overall nanotribological properties of surface. Frictional properties at atomic-scale steps of two types of 2-dimensional materials are studied using calibrated atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip sliding against the steps. The lateral force at uncovered step is larger than covered step due to the bending of step edge. The lateral force at monolayer uncovered step edge of h-BN is lower than graphene because h-BN possesses higher interlayer bonding strength than graphene and the bending of h-BN step edge is suppressed to some extent. The high uncovered step exhibits much larger lateral force than low uncovered step, which could be mainly induced by increased bending stiffness of step edge rather than increased step height. The results revealed that interlayer bonding strength and bending stiffness have great influence on the lateral force at atomic-scale steps. The studies can provide a further understanding of frictional properties at atomic scale steps and could be helpful for the applications of 2-dimensional materials as lubricant coating.

  8. Atomic Migration Induced Crystal Structure Transformation and Core-Centered Phase Transition in Single Crystal Ge2Sb2Te5Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hyeon; Jeon, Deok-Jin; Han, Jaehyun; Yeo, Jong-Souk

    2016-10-12

    A phase change nanowire holds a promise for nonvolatile memory applications, but its transition mechanism has remained unclear due to the analytical difficulties at atomic resolution. Here we obtain a deeper understanding on the phase transition of a single crystalline Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 nanowire (GST NW) using atomic scale imaging, diffraction, and chemical analysis. Our cross-sectional analysis has shown that the as-grown hexagonal close-packed structure of the single crystal GST NW transforms to a metastable face-centered cubic structure due to the atomic migration to the pre-existing vacancy layers in the hcp structure going through iterative electrical switching. We call this crystal structure transformation "metastabilization", which is also confirmed by the increase of set-resistance during the switching operation. For the set to reset transition between crystalline and amorphous phases, high-resolution imaging indicates that the longitudinal center of the nanowire mainly undergoes phase transition. According to the atomic scale analysis of the GST NW after repeated electrical switching, partial crystallites are distributed around the core-centered amorphous region of the nanowire where atomic migration is mainly induced, thus potentially leading to low power electrical switching. These results provide a novel understanding of phase change nanowires, and can be applied to enhance the design of nanowire phase change memory devices for improved electrical performance.

  9. X-ray diffraction analysis of LiCu2O2 crystals with additives of silver atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirotinkin, V. P.; Bush, A. A.; Kamentsev, K. E.; Dau, H. S.; Yakovlev, K. A.; Tishchenko, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Silver-containing LiCu 2 O 2 crystals up to 4 × 8 × 8 mm in size were grown by the crystallization of 80(1-x)CuO · 20 x AgNO 3 · 20Li 2 CO 3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) mixture melt. According to the X-ray spectral and Rietveld X-ray diffraction data, the maximum amount of silver incorporated in the LiCu 2 O 2 structure is about 4 at % relative to the copper content. It was established that silver atoms occupy statistically crystallographic positions of lithium atoms. The incorporation of silver atoms is accompanied by a noticeable increase in parameter c of the LiCu 2 O 2 rhombic unit cell, a slight increase in parameter a, and a slight decrease in parameter b

  10. Many-particle interactions and rainbow effects in grazing scattering of Ar atoms on the Al(1 1 1), Ag(1 1 1) crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babenko, P. Yu.; Meluzova, D. S.; Shergin, A. P.; Zinoviev, A. N.

    2017-09-01

    Computer simulation of rainbow and "ion focusing" effects taking place in scattering of Ar atoms on Al(1 1 1) and Ag(1 1 1) crystal surfaces have been performed. The trajectory calculation and vector summation of forces of the projectile atom interaction with crystal atoms have been shown to provide good fitting of the available experimental data. The thermal vibration amplitude for atoms located on the surface of crystals under study has been determined. A functional form of the potential has been proposed that fits well the experimental data.

  11. Aspherical-atom modeling of coordination compounds by single-crystal X-ray diffraction allows the correct metal atom to be identified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Birger; Wandtke, Claudia M; Meents, Alke; Pröpper, Kevin; Mondal, Kartik Chandra; Samuel, Prinson P; Amin Sk, Nurul; Singh, Amit Pratap; Roesky, Herbert W; Sidhu, Navdeep

    2015-02-02

    Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) is often considered the gold standard in analytical chemistry, as it allows element identification as well as determination of atom connectivity and the solid-state structure of completely unknown samples. Element assignment is based on the number of electrons of an atom, so that a distinction of neighboring heavier elements in the periodic table by XRD is often difficult. A computationally efficient procedure for aspherical-atom least-squares refinement of conventional diffraction data of organometallic compounds is proposed. The iterative procedure is conceptually similar to Hirshfeld-atom refinement (Acta Crystallogr. Sect. A- 2008, 64, 383-393; IUCrJ. 2014, 1,61-79), but it relies on tabulated invariom scattering factors (Acta Crystallogr. Sect. B- 2013, 69, 91-104) and the Hansen/Coppens multipole model; disordered structures can be handled as well. Five linear-coordinate 3d metal complexes, for which the wrong element is found if standard independent-atom model scattering factors are relied upon, are studied, and it is shown that only aspherical-atom scattering factors allow a reliable assignment. The influence of anomalous dispersion in identifying the correct element is investigated and discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Two-dimensional atom localization via a coherence-controlled absorption spectrum in an N-tripod-type five-level atomic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhan Zhiming [School of Physics and Information Engineering, Jianghan University, Wuhan 430056 (China); Liu Jibing, E-mail: clding2006@126.com, E-mail: huajia_li@163.com [Department of Physics, Hubei Normal University, Huangshi 435002 (China)

    2011-07-28

    A scheme of two-dimensional atom localization based on a coherence-controlled absorption spectrum in an N-tripod-type five-level system is proposed, in which the atom interacts with a weak probe field and three standing-wave fields. Position information of the atom can be achieved by measuring the probe absorption. It is found that the localization properties are significantly improved due to the interaction of dark resonances. It is also shown that the localization factors depend strongly on the system parameters that lead to such spatial structures of localization as chain-like, wave-like, '8'-like, spike-like, crater-like and heart-like patterns. By properly adjusting the system parameters, we can achieve a high-precision and high-resolution atom localization under certain conditions.

  13. Two-dimensional atom localization via a coherence-controlled absorption spectrum in an N-tripod-type five-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue; Zhan Zhiming; Liu Jibing

    2011-01-01

    A scheme of two-dimensional atom localization based on a coherence-controlled absorption spectrum in an N-tripod-type five-level system is proposed, in which the atom interacts with a weak probe field and three standing-wave fields. Position information of the atom can be achieved by measuring the probe absorption. It is found that the localization properties are significantly improved due to the interaction of dark resonances. It is also shown that the localization factors depend strongly on the system parameters that lead to such spatial structures of localization as chain-like, wave-like, '8'-like, spike-like, crater-like and heart-like patterns. By properly adjusting the system parameters, we can achieve a high-precision and high-resolution atom localization under certain conditions.

  14. Carbon sandwich preparation preserves quality of two-dimensional crystals for cryo-electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Abe, Kazuhiro; Tani, Kazutoshi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    Received 7 June 2013; accepted 21 June 2013Abstract Electron crystallography is an important method for determining the structure of membrane proteins. In this paper, we show the impact of a carbon sandwich preparation on the preservation of crystalline sample quality, using characteristic examples of two-dimensional (2D) crystals from gastric H+,K+-ATPase and their analyzed images. Compared with the ordinary single carbon support film preparation, the carbon sandwich preparation dramatically enhanced the resolution of images from flat sheet 2D crystals. As water evaporation is restricted in the carbon-sandwiched specimen, the improvement could be due to the strong protective effect of the retained water against drastic changes in the environment surrounding the specimen, such as dehydration and increased salt concentrations. This protective effect by the carbon sandwich technique helped to maintain the inherent and therefore best crystal conditions for analysis. Together with its strong compensation effect for the image shift due to beam-induced specimen charging, the carbon sandwich technique is a powerful method for preserving crystals of membrane proteins with larger hydrophilic regions, such as H+,K+-ATPase, and thus constitutes an efficient and high-quality method for collecting data for the structural analysis of these types of membrane proteins by electron crystallography. PMID:23883606

  15. Nucleation kinetics of the formation of low dimensional calcium sulfate dihydrate crystals in isopropyl alcohol medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhya, S.; Sureshbabu, S.; Varma, H.K.; Komath, Manoj [Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum 695 012 (India)

    2012-07-15

    Calcium sulfate dihydrate, constituted as uniform crystals of low dimensions, is a potential biomaterial for clinical applications like bone graft substitution and drug delivery. In this work, isopropyl alcohol has been used as a solvent to obtain low dimensional calcium sulfate dihydrate crystals from calcium nitrate - sulfuric acid system. Reactants in 0.5 molar concentration at ambient conditions generated uniform rod-shaped crystals of length 3-5 {mu}m. Analysis using X-ray Diffractometry and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry showed the material to be well crystallized, phase-pure calcium sulfate dihydrate. The nucleation kinetics has been studied by observing the induction time of phase formation in solutions of millimolar concentrations through turbidimetry at 300 K. The data have been analysed using classical nucleation theory to deduce parameters like interfacial tension (or surface free energy), nucleation rate and critical radius. The surface free energy obtained (5.6 mJ/m{sup 2}) is comparatively lower than that reported for aqueous precipitation, which could be attributed to the presence of isopropyl alcohol. On escalating the supersaturation ratio, the nucleation rate drastically increased and the critical radius decreased exponentially. Particles formed at supersaturation 1.39 showed a monomodal distribution centered at 8.2 nm in Dynamic Light Scattering analysis. Comparable particle sizes were obtained in Transmission Electron Microscopy. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Double Dirac cone in two-dimensional phononic crystals beyond circular cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hongqing; Liu, Tingting; Jiao, Junrui; Xia, Baizhan; Yu, Dejie

    2017-04-01

    A double Dirac cone plays a significant role in the design of zero-refractive-index metamaterials without phase variation and topological insulators with pseudospin states. We present a study on the formation of a double Dirac cone in two-dimensional phononic crystals consisting of either hexagonal or triangular columns in air. We arranged hexagonal and triangular columns separately in a honeycomb lattice to explore the influence of phononic crystal symmetry on the formation of the double Dirac cone. The results show that phononic crystals forming a honeycomb lattice with C6v or C6 symmetry induce an accidental degeneracy, but C3v and C3 cannot. We also demonstrate that by varying the filling ratio of the hexagonal columns, a topological phase transformation induced by energy band inversion with dipolar and quadrupolar states occurs near the double Dirac cone. Transmission properties for acoustic tunneling and waveform shaping are confirmed in two numerical simulation examples. A discussion is given on the formation of the double Dirac cone in different phononic crystal symmetries in a honeycomb lattice. The conclusions suggest a new route for designing topological and zero-refractive-index acoustic devices.

  17. Carbon sandwich preparation preserves quality of two-dimensional crystals for cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Abe, Kazuhiro; Tani, Kazutoshi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2013-12-01

    Electron crystallography is an important method for determining the structure of membrane proteins. In this paper, we show the impact of a carbon sandwich preparation on the preservation of crystalline sample quality, using characteristic examples of two-dimensional (2D) crystals from gastric H(+),K(+)-ATPase and their analyzed images. Compared with the ordinary single carbon support film preparation, the carbon sandwich preparation dramatically enhanced the resolution of images from flat sheet 2D crystals. As water evaporation is restricted in the carbon-sandwiched specimen, the improvement could be due to the strong protective effect of the retained water against drastic changes in the environment surrounding the specimen, such as dehydration and increased salt concentrations. This protective effect by the carbon sandwich technique helped to maintain the inherent and therefore best crystal conditions for analysis. Together with its strong compensation effect for the image shift due to beam-induced specimen charging, the carbon sandwich technique is a powerful method for preserving crystals of membrane proteins with larger hydrophilic regions, such as H(+),K(+)-ATPase, and thus constitutes an efficient and high-quality method for collecting data for the structural analysis of these types of membrane proteins by electron crystallography.

  18. Negative refraction imaging of solid acoustic waves by two-dimensional three-component phononic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jing; Liu Zhengyou; Qiu Chunyin

    2008-01-01

    By using of the multiple scattering methods, we study the negative refraction imaging effect of solid acoustic waves by two-dimensional three-component phononic crystals composed of coated solid inclusions placed in solid matrix. We show that localized resonance mechanism brings on a group of flat single-mode bands in low-frequency region, which provides two equivalent frequency surfaces (EFS) close to circular. The two constant frequency surfaces correspond to two Bloch modes, a right-handed and a left-handed, whose leading mode are respectively transverse (T) and longitudinal (L) modes. The negative refraction behaviors of the two kinds of modes have been demonstrated by simulation of a Gaussian beam through a finite system. High-quality far-field imaging by a planar lens for transverse or longitudinal waves has been realized separately. This three-component phononic crystal may thus serve as a mode selector in negative refraction imaging of solid acoustic waves

  19. Fault-tolerant bandstructure of two-dimensional square photonic crystals with different dielectric rod shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoman, D.; Breazu, C.

    2017-05-01

    Based on simulations using the plane-wave expansion method, we show that the position of the first bandgap for TM polarized electromagnetic radiation in a high-filling ratio two-dimensional square photonic crystal is practically insensitive to the shape of dielectric rods with the same cross-sectional area. The width of this bandgap depends on the rod shape, but the difference between photonic crystals with circular and regular polygonal rod shapes with a number of edges higher than six can be neglected. For higher-order bandgaps the difference is larger. These results suggest that the fabrication tolerances related to the shape of dielectric rods in a PBG are not as strict as previously thought.

  20. Wave propagation in one-dimensional solid-fluid quasi-periodic and aperiodic phononic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Ali, E-mail: alchen@bjtu.edu.cn [Institute of Engineering Mechanics, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Wang Yuesheng [Institute of Engineering Mechanics, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Zhang Chuanzeng [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany)

    2012-02-01

    The propagation of the elastic waves in one-dimensional (1D) solid-fluid quasi-periodic phononic crystals is studied by employing the concept of the localization factor, which is calculated by the transfer matrix method. The solid-fluid interaction effect at the interfaces between the solid and the fluid components is considered. For comparison, the periodic systems and aperiodic Thue-Morse sequence are also analyzed in this paper. The splitting phenomenon of the pass bands and bandgaps are discussed for these 1D solid-fluid systems. At last the influences of the material impedance ratios on the band structures of the 1D solid-fluid quasi-periodic phononic crystals arranged as Fibonacci sequence are discussed.

  1. Simultaneous three-dimensional imaging and manipulation of grain boundaries in colloidal crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmond, Kazem V.; Liu, Yanyan; Curran, Arran; Aarts, Dirk G. A. L.; Sacanna, Stefano; Dullens, Roel P. A.

    Characterizing the properties of grains and grain boundaries is critical for understanding and controlling material properties. We investigate the dynamics of grain boundaries in crystalline materials using concentrated colloidal suspensions of microspheres. The micron-sized particles are suspended in a mixture of solvents whose refractive index and density nearly match those of the particles, enabling three-dimensional visualization and negating gravitational effects. Throughout the sample we disperse specially designed core-shell particles whose cores have a higher refractive index that can be optically trapped. Via optical tweezing, these core-shell particles enable us to directly interact with and probe grain boundaries in 3D within the colloidal crystal. We use a uniquely developed optical microscopy system that combines confocal imaging with holographic trapping, enabling quantitative imaging and precise manipulation simultaneously in three dimensions. Our experiments provide direct insight into the properties of grain boundaries in crystals.

  2. Visualization of surface plasmon polariton waves in two-dimensional plasmonic crystal by cathodoluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, K; Yamamoto, N

    2011-06-20

    A cathodoluminescence technique using a 200-keV transmission electron microscope revealed the dispersion patterns of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in a two-dimensional plasmonic crystal with cylindrical hole arrays. The dispersion curves of the SPP modes involving the Γ point were derived from the angle-resolved spectrum patterns. The contrast along the dispersion curves changed with the polarization direction of the emitted light due to the property of the SPP modes. The SPP modes at the Γ point were identified from the photon maps, which mimicked standing SPP waves in a real space. The beam-scan spectral images across the plasmonic crystal edge clearly demonstrated the dependence of the SPP to light conversion efficiency on the emission angle and polarization of light.

  3. He atom surface scattering: Surface dynamics of insulators, overlayers and crystal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Investigations have focused primarily on surface structure and dynamics of ionic insulators, epitaxial growth onto alkali halide crystals and multiphoton studies. The surface dynamics of RbCl has been re-examined. We have developed a simple force constant model which provides insight into the dynamics of KBr overlayers on NaCl(001), a system with a large lattice mismatch. The KBr/NaCl(001) results are compared to Na/Cu(001) and NaCl/Ge(001). We have completed epitaxial growth experiments for KBr onto RbCl(001). Slab dynamics calculations using a shell model for this system with very small lattice mismatch are being carried out in collaboration with Professor Manson of Clemson University and with Professor Schroeder in Regensburg, Germany. Extensive experiments on multiphoton scattering of helium atoms onto NaCl and, particularly, LiF have been carried out and the theory has been developed to a rather advanced stage by Professor Manson. This work will permit the extraction of more information from time-of-flight spectra. It is shown that the theoretical model provides a very good description of the multiphoton scattering from organic films. Work has started on self-assembling organic films on gold (alkyl thiols/Au(111)). We have begun to prepare and characterize the gold crystal; one of the group members has spent two weeks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory learning the proper Au(111) preparation techniques. One of our students has carried out neutron scattering experiments on NiO, measuring both bulk phonon and magnon dispersion curves

  4. Toward the Application of Three-Dimensional Approach to Few-body Atomic Bound States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadizadeh M.R.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The first step toward the application of an effective non partial wave (PW numerical approach to few-body atomic bound states has been taken. The two-body transition amplitude which appears in the kernel of three-dimensional Faddeev-Yakubovsky integral equations is calculated as function of two-body Jacobi momentum vectors, i.e. as a function of the magnitude of initial and final momentum vectors and the angle between them. For numerical calculation the realistic interatomic interactions HFDHE2, HFD-B, LM2M2 and TTY are used. The angular and momentum dependence of the fully off-shell transition amplitude is studied at negative energies. It has been numerically shown that, similar to the nuclear case, the transition amplitude exhibits a characteristic angular behavior in the vicinity of 4He dimer pole.

  5. Tunable spin-orbit coupling for ultracold atoms in two-dimensional optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grusdt, Fabian; Li, Tracy; Bloch, Immanuel; Demler, Eugene

    2017-06-01

    Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is at the heart of many exotic band structures and can give rise to many-body states with topological order. Here we present a general scheme based on a combination of microwave driving and lattice shaking for the realization of two-dimensional SOC with ultracold atoms in systems with inversion symmetry. We show that the strengths of Rashba and Dresselhaus SOC can be independently tuned in a spin-dependent square lattice. More generally, our method can be used to open gaps between different spin states without breaking time-reversal symmetry. We demonstrate that this allows for the realization of topological insulators with nontrivial spin textures closely related to the Kane-Mele model.

  6. Exponential and nonexponential localization of the one-dimensional periodically kicked Rydberg atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, S.; Reinhold, C. O.; Kristoefel, P.; Burgdoerfer, J.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the quantum localization of the one-dimensional Rydberg atom subject to a unidirectional periodic train of impulses. For high frequencies of the train the classical system becomes chaotic and leads to fast ionization. By contrast, the quantum system is found to be remarkably stable. We identify for this system the coexistence of different localization mechanisms associated with resonant and nonresonant diffusion. We find for the suppression of nonresonant diffusion an exponential localization whose localization length can be related to the classical dynamics in terms of the ''scars'' of the unstable periodic orbits. We show that the localization length is determined by the energy excursion along the periodic orbits. The suppression of resonant diffusion along the sequence of photonic peaks is found to be nonexponential due to the presence of high harmonics in the driving force. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  7. Two-dimensional carbon crystals. Electrical transport in single- and double-layer graphene; Zweidimensionale Kohlenstoffkristalle. Elektrischer Transport in Einzel- und Doppellagen-Graphen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Hennrik

    2012-02-03

    In his work atomically thin layers of carbon, socalled graphene, are investigated. These systems exhibit outstanding electronic properties which are analysed using magnetotransport measurements. For this purpose, different types of samples are prepared, analysed and discussed. In addition to conventional single layer and single crystal bilayer systems, folded flakes with twisted planes are examined. Since monolayer graphene is a two dimensional crystal in which every atom sits at the surface, it is very sensitive to any type of perturbation. Three different cases are investigated: Firstly, dopants are removed from the surface and the change in transport properties is monitored. Secondly, the regime of small carrier concentrations is used to observe field induced recharging of inhomogeneities. Thirdly, an atomic force microscope is used to alter the graphene itself in a defined region. The implications of this modification are again investigated using magnetotransport measurements. The influence of one layer on another one is studied in decoupled two layer samples. A folded sample with separatly contacted layers is used to show transport through the folded region. For jointly contacted layers parallel transport measurements are performed to analyse screening effects of an applied electric field and substrate influence. The interaction of the two layers is shown by a significant reduction of the Fermivelocity.

  8. Enhancement of photoluminescence and raman scattering in one-dimensional photonic crystals based on porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonchar, K. A., E-mail: k.a.gonchar@gmail.com [Moscow State University, Physics Faculty (Russian Federation); Musabek, G. K.; Taurbayev, T. I. [Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Physics Department (Kazakhstan); Timoshenko, V. Yu. [Moscow State University, Physics Faculty (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-15

    In porous-silicon-based multilayered structures that exhibit the properties of one-dimensional photonic crystals, an increase in the photoluminescence and Raman scattering intensities is observed upon optical excitation at the wavelength 1.064 {mu}m. When the excitation wavelength falls within the edge of the photonic band gap of the structures, a multiple increase (by a factor larger than 400) in the efficiency of Raman scattering is detected. The effect is attributed to partial localization of excitation light and, correspondingly, to the much longer time of interaction of light with the material in the structures.

  9. Analytic theory for the selection of a two-dimensional needle crystal at arbitrary Peclet number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanveer, S.

    1989-01-01

    An accurate analytic theory is presented for the velocity selection of a two-dimensional needle crystal for arbitrary Peclet number for small values of the surface tension parameter. The velocity selection is caused by the effect of transcendentally small terms which are determined by analytic continuation to the complex plane and analysis of nonlinear equations. The work supports the general conclusion of previous small Peclet number analytical results of other investigators, though there are some discrepancies in details. It also addresses questions raised on the validity of selection theory owing to assumptions made on shape corrections at large distances from the tip.

  10. Three-dimensional dielectric photonic crystal structures for laser-driven acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M. Cowan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the design and simulation of a three-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide for linear laser-driven acceleration in vacuum. The structure confines a synchronous speed-of-light accelerating mode in both transverse dimensions. We report the properties of this mode, including sustainable gradient and optical-to-beam efficiency. We present a novel method for confining a particle beam using optical fields as focusing elements. This technique, combined with careful structure design, is shown to have a large dynamic aperture and minimal emittance growth, even over millions of optical wavelengths.

  11. Wideband absorption in one dimensional photonic crystal with graphene-based hyperbolic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yongqiang; Liu, Hongmei

    2018-02-01

    A broadband absorber which was proposed by one dimensional photonic crystal (1DPC) containing graphene-based hyperbolic metamaterials (GHMM) is theoretically investigated. For TM mode, it was demonstrated to absorb roughly 90% of all available electromagnetic waves at a 14 THz absorption bandwidth at normal incidence. The absorption bandwidth was affected by Fermi energy and thickness of dielectric layer. When the incident angle was increased, the absorption value decreased, and the absorption band had a gradual blue shift. These findings have potential applications for designing broadband optoelectronic devices at mid-infrared and THz frequency range.

  12. Steady state bifurcations for phase field crystal equations with underlying two dimensional kernel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appolinaire Abourou Ella

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the study of some properties of stationary solutions to phase field crystal equations bifurcating from a trivial solution. It is assumed that at this trivial solution, the kernel of the underlying linearized operator has dimension two. By means of the multiparameter method, we give a second order approximation of these bifurcating solutions and analyse their stability properties. The main result states that the stability of these solutions can be described by the variation of a certain angle in a two dimensional parameter space. The behaviour of the parameter curve is also investigated.

  13. Band gap of two-dimensional fiber-air photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shu, E-mail: yangshu5678@163.com; Li, Masha

    2016-04-15

    A two-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) composed of textile fiber and air is initially discussed in this paper. Textile materials are so called soft materials, which are different from the previous PCs composed of rigid materials. The plain wave expansion method is used to calculate band structure of different PCs by altering component properties or structural parameters. Results show that the dielectric constant of textile fibers, fiber filling ratio and lattice arrangement are effective factors which influence PCs' band gap. Yet lattice constant and fiber diameter make inconspicuous influence on the band gap feature.

  14. Effects of symmetry reduction on magnon band gaps in two-dimensional magnonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Zhang, Huaiwu; Tang, Xiaoli; Su, Hua; Bai, Feiming; Jing, Yulan; Zhong, Zhiyong

    2014-02-01

    Effects of symmetry reduction on the magnon band gaps (MBGs) in two-dimensional (2D) magnonic crystals (MCs) were investigated by solving the Landau-Lifshitz equation with the plane wave method. The symmetry reduction is achieved by introducing additional scatterers into each unit cell or by reorienting noncircular scatterers. The numerical results show that the MBGs in a square lattice can be improved by introducing additional scatterers or rotating the square rods. In honeycomb and triangular lattices, the MBGs can be improved only by introducing additional scatterers, however, rotating the square rods is an invalid way to increase the MBGs.

  15. Symmetrical analysis of the defect level splitting in two-dimensional photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkova, N; Kim, S; Gopalan, V

    2003-01-01

    In this paper doubly degenerate defect states in the band gap of the two-dimensional photonic crystal are studied. These states can be split by a convenient distortion of the lattice. Through analogy with the Jahn-Teller effect in solids, we present a group theoretical analysis of the lifting of the degeneracy of doubly degenerate states in a square lattice by different vibronic modes. The effect is supported by the supercell plane-wave model and by the finite difference time domain technique. We suggest ways for using the effect in photonic switching devices and waveguides

  16. Properties of density of modes in one dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, S., E-mail: prasad.surendra@gmail.com; Sharma, Y.; Shukla, S.; Singh, V. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2016-03-15

    The electromagnetic density of modes in a finite one dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystal is computed using Wigner time approach. Structural parameters are varied to observe its effect on the density of modes. It is found that cyclotron frequency, collision frequency, incident angle, dielectric constant of constituent material, and filling factor of plasma strongly influence the value of density of modes on the band gap edges and in the mid frequency. It is observed that the value of density of modes at the left edge of the band gap is always higher than those at the right edge and in the midpoint of the band gap.

  17. Effective mass of photons in a one-dimensional photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andre, J-M; Jonnard, Ph, E-mail: jean-michel.andre1@upmc.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matiere et Rayonnement, CNRS UMR 7614 and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris CEDEX 05 (France)

    2011-09-15

    Photons propagating within photonic crystals (PCs) can be regarded as quasi-particles having an effective mass. Methods of calculation of this mass from the photonic density of modes are presented for the case of a one-dimensional PC, from both infinite and finite structure. The model is implemented to calculate the influence of the number of unit cells and of absorption for bilayered Bragg structure used as reflectors in the soft-x-ray domain. The physical meaning of the effective photon mass concept is discussed.

  18. Controlling the light propagation in one-dimensional photonic crystal via incoherent pump and interdot tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasabadi, Majid; Sahrai, Mostafa

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the propagation of an electromagnetic pulse through a one-dimensional photonic crystal doped with quantum-dot (QD) molecules in a defect layer. The QD molecules behave as a three-level quantum system and are driven by a coherent probe laser field and an incoherent pump field. No coherent coupling laser fields were introduced, and the coherence was created by the interdot tunnel effect. Further studied was the effect of tunneling and incoherent pumping on the group velocity of the transmitted and reflected probe pulse.

  19. Athermal mechanisms of size-dependent crystal flow gleaned from three-dimensional discrete dislocation simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, S.I.; Dimiduk, D.M.; Parthasarathy, T.A.; Uchic, M.D.; Tang, M.; Woodward, C.

    2008-01-01

    Recent experimental studies have revealed that micrometer-scale face-centered cubic (fcc) crystals show strong strengthening effects, even at high initial dislocation densities. We use large-scale three-dimensional discrete dislocation simulations (DDS) to explicitly model the deformation behavior of fcc Ni microcrystals in the size range of 0.5-20 μm. This study shows that two size-sensitive athermal hardening processes, beyond forest hardening, are sufficient to develop the dimensional scaling of the flow stress, stochastic stress variation, flow intermittency and high initial strain-hardening rates, similar to experimental observations for various materials. One mechanism, source-truncation hardening, is especially potent in micrometer-scale volumes. A second mechanism, termed exhaustion hardening, results from a breakdown of the mean-field conditions for forest hardening in small volumes, thus biasing the statistics of ordinary dislocation processes

  20. Tunable terahertz multichannel filter based on one-dimensional superconductor-dielectric photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang [Department of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Department of Basics, Air Force Early Warning Academy, Wuhan 430019 (China); Yi, Lin, E-mail: plasma@hust.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-12-14

    By means of the transfer matrix method, the transmission properties of one-dimensional photonic crystals (PCs) consisting of superconductor and dielectric have been systematically investigated within the terahertz frequency range (0.1–10 THz). It is shown that comb-like resonant peaks in transmission band can be formed without adding any defect layer in superconductor-dielectric PCs, which means that such a one-dimensional periodic structure can serve as a tunable terahertz multichannel filter by using the PCs passband. Furthermore, the influences coming from the period of the structure, the thickness of the components, the permittivity of the dielectric layers, temperature, and the normal conducting electrons on the filtering properties are also numerically investigated.

  1. Pair creation, motion, and annihilation of topological defects in two-dimensional nematic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Dario; Eggers, Jens; Liverpool, Tanniemola B.

    2018-02-01

    We present a framework for the study of disclinations in two-dimensional active nematic liquid crystals and topological defects in general. The order tensor formalism is used to calculate exact multiparticle solutions of the linearized static equations inside a planar uniformly aligned state so that the total charge has to vanish. Topological charge conservation then requires that there is always an equal number of q =1 /2 and q =-1 /2 charges. Starting from a set of hydrodynamic equations, we derive a low-dimensional dynamical system for the parameters of the static solutions, which describes the motion of a half-disclination pair or of several pairs. Within this formalism, we model defect production and annihilation, as observed in experiments. Our dynamics also provide an estimate for the critical density at which production and annihilation rates are balanced.

  2. Quantitative characterization of new supramolecular synthons involving fluorine atoms in the crystal structures of di- and tetrafluorinated benzamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Pradip Kumar; Yadav, Hare Ram; Choudhury, Angshuman Roy; Chopra, Deepak

    2017-10-01

    Strong hydrogen bonds play a significant role in crystal packing. In particular, the involvement of interactions involving fluorine in controlling the crystal packing requires appropriate attention, especially in the presence of other strong hydrogen bonds. In the present study, a detailed quantitative assessment has been performed of the nature, energetics and topological properties derived from the electron density in model compounds based on fluorinated benzamides (a total of 46 fluorine-substituted benzamides containing multiple fluorine atoms) in the solid state. The primary motivation in the design of such molecules is to enhance the acidity of the interacting H atoms in the presence of an increasing number of F atoms on the molecular scaffold, resulting in increased propensity towards the formation of intermolecular interactions involving organic fluorine. This exercise has resulted in the identification of new and frequently occurring supramolecular synthons involving F atoms in the packing of molecules in the solid state. The energetics associated with short and directional intermolecular Csp 2 -H...F-Csp 2 interactions with significantly high electrostatic contributions is noteworthy, and the topological analysis reveals the bonding character of these ubiquitous interactions in crystal packing in addition to the presence of Csp 2 -F...F-Csp 2 contacts.

  3. Modelling three-dimensional-quench cooling for alkaline-earth atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Mehlstaeubler, T E; Douillet, A; Rehbein, N; Rasel, E M; Ertmer, W

    2003-01-01

    Quench cooling is a promising technique to reach ultra-cold temperatures in alkaline-earth atoms by Doppler cooling on ultra-narrow transitions. The principles of quench cooling are derived from an effective two-level system with a linewidth adjustable by the quenching laser. A tunable linewidth reconciles the contradictory requirements of a fast cooling rate and a high velocity selectivity at high and low temperatures, respectively. In this paper, we investigate the efficiency of quench cooling in alkaline-earth systems. We present a one-dimensional analytical description of the quenching process. Cooling and trapping in three dimensions is studied with semi-classical Monte Carlo simulations. Our results for magnesium indicate a loading efficiency of up to 40% of pre-cooled atoms at 2 mK into a QuenchMOT. Final temperatures of 9 mu K and an increase in phase-space density by almost five orders of magnitude are observed in the simulations.

  4. Atomic force microscopy for two-dimensional materials: A tutorial review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Huang, Junxiang; Wang, Yongwei; Liu, Rui; Huai, Xiulan; Jiang, Jingjing; Anfuso, Chantelle

    2018-01-01

    Low dimensional materials exhibit distinct properties compared to their bulk counterparts. A plethora of examples have been demonstrated in two-dimensional (2-D) materials, including graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). These novel and intriguing properties at the nano-, molecular- and even monatomic scales have triggered tremendous interest and research, from fundamental studies to practical applications and even device fabrication. The unique behaviors of 2-D materials result from the special structure-property relationships that exist between surface topographical variations and mechanical responses, electronic structures, optical characteristics, and electrochemical properties. These relationships are generally convoluted and sensitive to ambient and external perturbations. Characterizing these systems thus requires techniques capable of providing multidimensional information under controlled environments, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM). Today, AFM plays a key role in exploring the basic principles underlying the functionality of 2-D materials. In this tutorial review, we provide a brief introduction to some of the unique properties of 2-D materials, followed by a summary of the basic principles of AFM and the various AFM modes most appropriate for studying these systems. Following that, we will focus on five important properties of 2-D materials and their characterization in more detail, including recent literature examples. These properties include nanomechanics, nanoelectromechanics, nanoelectrics, nanospectroscopy, and nanoelectrochemistry.

  5. Atomically thin two-dimensional materials as hole extraction layers in organolead halide perovskite photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Geun; Kwon, Ki Chang; Le, Quyet Van; Hong, Kootak; Jang, Ho Won; Kim, Soo Young

    2016-07-01

    Atomically thin two-dimensional materials such as MoS2, WS2, and graphene oxide (GO) are used as hole extraction layers (HEL) in organolead halide perovskites solar cells (PSCs) instead of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) HEL. MoS2 and WS2 layers with a polycrystalline structure were synthesized by a chemical deposition method using a uniformly spin-coated (NH4)MoS4 and (NH4)WS4 precursor solution. GO was synthesized by the oxidation of natural graphite powder using Hummers' method. The work functions of MoS2, WS2, and GO are measured to be 5.0, 4.95, and 5.1 eV, respectively. The X-ray diffraction spectrum indicated that the synthesized perovskite material is CH3NH3PbI3-xClx. The PSCs with the p-n junction structure were fabricated based on the CH3NH3PbI3-xClx perovskite layer. The power conversion efficiencies of the MoS2, WS2, and GO-based PSCs were 9.53%, 8.02%, and 9.62%, respectively, which are comparable to those obtained from PEDOT:PSS-based devices (9.93%). These results suggest that two-dimensional materials such as MoS2, WS2, and GO can be promising candidates for the formation of HELs in the PSCs.

  6. Galvanomagnetic properties of atomic-disordered Sr2RuO4 single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar'kin, A.E.; Naumov, S.V.; Goshchitskij, V.N.; Balbashov, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of neutron-bombardment-induced atomic disorder on the galvanomagnetic properties of Sr 2 RuO 4 single crystals has been experimentally studied in a broad range of temperatures (1.7-380 K) and magnetic fields (up to 13.6 T). The disorder leads to the appearance of negative temperature coefficients for both the in-plane electric resistivity (ρ a ) and that along the c axis (ρ c ), as well as the negative magnetoresistance Δρ, which is strongly anisotropic to the magnetic field orientation (H || a and H || c), with the easy magnetization direction along the c axis and a weak dependence on the probing current direction in the low-temperature region. The experimental ρ a (T) and ρ c (T) curves obtained for the initial and radiation-disordered samples can be described in the framework of a theoretical model with two conductivity channels. The first channel corresponds to the charge carriers with increased effective masses and predominantly electron-electron scattering, the second channel corresponds to the charge carriers with lower effective masses exhibiting magnetic scattering at low temperatures [ru

  7. Quantum phase transition in a coupled two-level system embedded in anisotropic three-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, H Z; Shao, X Q; Wang, G C; Zhao, X L; Yi, X X

    2016-01-01

    The quantum phase transition (QPT) describes a sudden qualitative change of the macroscopic properties mapped from the eigenspectrum of a quantum many-body system. It has been studied intensively in quantum systems with the spin-boson model, but it has barely been explored for systems in coupled spin-boson models. In this paper, we study the QPT with coupled spin-boson models consisting of coupled two-level atoms embedded in three-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystals. The dynamics of the system is derived exactly by means of the Laplace transform method, which has been proven to be equivalent to the dissipationless non-Markovian dynamics. Drawing on methods for analyzing the ground state, we obtain the phase diagrams through two exact critical equations and two QPTs are found: one QPT is that from the phase without one bound state to the phase with one bound state and another is that from one phase with the bound state having one eigenvalue to another phase where the bound state has two eigenvalues. Our analytical results also suggest a way of control to overcome the effect of decoherence by engineering the spectrum of the reservoirs to approach the non-Markovian regime and to form the bound state of the whole system for quantum devices and quantum statistics.

  8. The crystal structures of three pyrazine-2,5-dicarboxamides: three-dimensional supramolecular structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilovan S. Cati

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The complete molecules of the title compounds, N2,N5-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethylpyrazine-2,5-dicarboxamide, C18H16N6O2 (I, 3,6-dimethyl-N2,N5-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethylpyrazine-2,5-dicarboxamide, C20H20N6O2 (II, and N2,N5-bis(pyridin-4-ylmethylpyrazine-2,5-dicarboxamide, C18H16N6O2 (III, are generated by inversion symmetry, with the pyrazine rings being located about centres of inversion. Each molecule has an extended conformation with the pyridine rings inclined to the pyrazine ring by 89.17 (7° in (I, 75.83 (8° in (II and by 82.71 (6° in (III. In the crystal of (I, molecules are linked by N—H...N hydrogen bonds, forming layers lying parallel to the bc plane. The layers are linked by C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional supramolecular structure. In the crystal of (II, molecules are also linked by N—H...N hydrogen bonds, forming layers lying parallel to the (10-1 plane. As in (I, the layers are linked by C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional supramolecular structure. In the crystal of (III, molecules are again linked by N—H...N hydrogen bonds, but here form corrugated sheets lying parallel to the bc plane. Within the sheets, neighbouring pyridine rings are linked by offset π–π interactions [intercentroid distance = 3.739 (1 Å]. The sheets are linked by C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional supramolecular structure. Compound (I crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c. Another monoclinic polymorph, space group C2/c, has been reported on by Cockriel et al. [Inorg. Chem. Commun. (2008, 11, 1–4]. The molecular structures of the two polymorphs are compared.

  9. Multiwavelength excitation Raman scattering analysis of bulk and two-dimensional MoS2: vibrational properties of atomically thin MoS2 layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Placidi, Marcel; Dimitrievska, Mirjana; Izquierdo-Roca, Victor; Fontané, Xavier; Espindola-Rodriguez, Moises; López-Marino, Simon; Neuschitzer, Markus; Pérez-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Pérez-Tomás, Amador; Mestres, Narcis; Bermudez, Veronica; Yaremko, Anatoliy

    2015-01-01

    In order to deepen the knowledge of the vibrational properties of two-dimensional (2D) MoS 2 atomic layers, a complete and systematic Raman scattering analysis has been performed using both bulk single-crystal MoS 2 samples and atomically thin MoS 2 layers. Raman spectra have been measured under non-resonant and resonant conditions using seven different excitation wavelengths from near-infrared (NIR) to ultraviolet (UV). These measurements have allowed us to observe and identify 41 peaks, among which 22 have not been previously experimentally observed for this compound, and characterize the existence of different resonant excitation conditions for the different excitation wavelengths. This has also included the first analysis of resonant Raman spectra that are achieved using UV excitation conditions. In addition, the analysis of atomically thin MoS 2 layers has corroborated the higher potential of UV resonant Raman scattering measurements for the non-destructive assessment of 2D MoS 2 samples. Analysis of the relative integral intensity of the additional first- and second-order peaks measured under UV resonant excitation conditions is proposed for the non-destructive characterization of the thickness of the layers, complementing previous studies based on the changes of the peak frequencies. (paper)

  10. Spontaneous emission near the band edge of a three-dimensional photonic crystal: a fractional calculus approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, S-C; Wu, J-N; Tsai, M-R; Hsieh, W-F

    2009-01-01

    We suggest a better mathematical method, fractional calculus, for studying the behavior of the atom-field interaction in photonic crystals. By studying the spontaneous emission of an atom in a photonic crystal with a one-band isotropic model, we found that the long-time inducing memory of the spontaneous emission is a fractional phenomenon. This behavior could be well described by fractional calculus. The results show no steady photon-atom bound state for the atomic resonant transition frequency lying in the proximity of the allowed band edge which was encountered in a previous study (Woldeyohannes and John 2003 J. Opt. B: Quantum Semiclass. Opt. 5 R43). The correctness of this result is validated by the 'cut-off smoothing' density of photon states (DOS) with fractional calculus. By obtaining a rigorous solution without the multiple-valued problem for the system, we show that the method of fractional calculus has a logically concise property.

  11. Light trapping and near-unity solar absorption in a three-dimensional photonic-crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Ping; Deinega, Alexei; Hsieh, Mei-Li; John, Sajeev; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2013-10-15

    We report what is to our knowledge the first observation of the effect of parallel-to-interface-refraction (PIR) in a three-dimensional, simple-cubic photonic-crystal. PIR is an acutely negative refraction of light inside a photonic-crystal, leading to light-bending by nearly 90 deg over broad wavelengths (λ). The consequence is a longer path length of light in the medium and an improved light absorption beyond the Lambertian limit. As an illustration of the effect, we show near-unity total absorption (≥98%) in λ=520-620 nm and an average absorption of ~94% over λ=400-700 nm for our α-Si:H photonic-crystal sample of an equivalent bulk thickness of t˜=450 nm. Furthermore, we have achieved an ultra-wide angular acceptance of light over θ=0°-80°. This demonstration opens up a new door for light trapping and near-unity solar absorption over broad λs and wide angles.

  12. Adsorption of Water on Two-Dimensional Crystals: Water/Graphene and Water/Silicatene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Burghaus

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of water on solid surfaces is a scientific evergreen which again recently prompted considerable attention in the materials, nano-, and surface science communities, respectively, due to conflicting evidence presented in the most highly regarded scientific journals. This mini review is a brief and personal perspective of the current literature (and our own data about water adsorption for two examples, namely graphene and silicatene, which are both two-dimensional (2D crystals. Silicatene, an inorganic companion of graphene, is intriguing as it presents us with the possibility to synthesize a 2D analog to zeolites by doping this crystalline silicon film. The wettability by water and whether or not support effects of epitaxial 2D crystals are present is of concern. Regarding applications: some 2D crystals appear promising for the hydrogen evolution reaction, i.e., hydrogen generation from water; a functionalization of graphene (by oxygen/water to graphene oxide may be interesting for metal-free catalysis; the latest highlight in this field appears to be “icephobicity”, an application related to the hydrophobicity of surfaces.

  13. The hydrogen-atom environment of the ether oxygen atom in crystal structures of some representative muscarinic agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, J.; Scherrenberg, R. L.; Kooijman, H.; Kanters, J. A.

    1990-06-01

    The hypothesis that the ether oxygen atom in muscarinic agonists acts as a hydrogen-bond acceptor is supported by evidence from crystallographic data. The same evidence suggests that in such interactions N +CH⋯O bonds donated by the ligand to the receptor may be involved.

  14. Electron Scattering and Doping Mechanisms in Solid-Phase-Crystallized In2O3:H Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macco, Bart; Knoops, Harm C M; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M

    2015-08-05

    Hydrogen-doped indium oxide (In2O3:H) has recently emerged as an enabling transparent conductive oxide for solar cells, in particular for silicon heterojunction solar cells because its high electron mobility (>100 cm(2)/(V s)) allows for a simultaneously high electrical conductivity and optical transparency. Here, we report on high-quality In2O3:H prepared by a low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) process and present insights into the doping mechanism and the electron scattering processes that limit the carrier mobility in such films. The process consists of ALD of amorphous In2O3:H at 100 °C and subsequent solid-phase crystallization at 150-200 °C to obtain large-grained polycrystalline In2O3:H films. The changes in optoelectronic properties upon crystallization have been monitored both electrically by Hall measurements and optically by analysis of the Drude response. After crystallization, an excellent carrier mobility of 128 ± 4 cm(2)/(V s) can be obtained at a carrier density of 1.8 × 10(20) cm(-3), irrespective of the annealing temperature. Temperature-dependent Hall measurements have revealed that electron scattering is dominated by unavoidable phonon and ionized impurity scattering from singly charged H-donors. Extrinsic defect scattering related to material quality such as grain boundary and neutral impurity scattering was found to be negligible in crystallized films indicating that the carrier mobility is maximized. Furthermore, by comparison of the absolute H-concentration and the carrier density in crystallized films, it is deduced that <4% of the incorporated H is an active dopant in crystallized films. Therefore, it can be concluded that inactive H atoms do not (significantly) contribute to defect scattering, which potentially explains why In2O3:H films are capable of achieving a much higher carrier mobility than conventional In2O3:Sn (ITO).

  15. Scalable solution-phase epitaxial growth of symmetry-mismatched heterostructures on two-dimensional crystal soft template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhaoyang; Yin, Anxiang; Mao, Jun; Xia, Yi; Kempf, Nicholas; He, Qiyuan; Wang, Yiliu; Chen, Chih-Yen; Zhang, Yanliang; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Ren, Zhifeng; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-10-01

    Epitaxial heterostructures with precisely controlled composition and electronic modulation are of central importance for electronics, optoelectronics, thermoelectrics, and catalysis. In general, epitaxial material growth requires identical or nearly identical crystal structures with small misfit in lattice symmetry and parameters and is typically achieved by vapor-phase depositions in vacuum. We report a scalable solution-phase growth of symmetry-mismatched PbSe/Bi 2 Se 3 epitaxial heterostructures by using two-dimensional (2D) Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates as soft templates. The dangling bond-free surface of 2D Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates guides the growth of PbSe crystal without requiring a one-to-one match in the atomic structure, which exerts minimal restriction on the epitaxial layer. With a layered structure and weak van der Waals interlayer interaction, the interface layer in the 2D Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates can deform to accommodate incoming layer, thus functioning as a soft template for symmetry-mismatched epitaxial growth of cubic PbSe crystal on rhombohedral Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates. We show that a solution chemistry approach can be readily used for the synthesis of gram-scale PbSe/Bi 2 Se 3 epitaxial heterostructures, in which the square PbSe (001) layer forms on the trigonal/hexagonal (0001) plane of Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates. We further show that the resulted PbSe/Bi 2 Se 3 heterostructures can be readily processed into bulk pellet with considerably suppressed thermal conductivity (0.30 W/m·K at room temperature) while retaining respectable electrical conductivity, together delivering a thermoelectric figure of merit ZT three times higher than that of the pristine Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates at 575 K. Our study demonstrates a unique epitaxy mode enabled by the 2D nanocrystal soft template via an affordable and scalable solution chemistry approach. It opens up new opportunities for the creation of diverse epitaxial heterostructures with highly disparate structures and functions.

  16. ONE-DIMENSIONAL ORDERING OF IN ATOMS IN A CU(100) SURFACE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BREEMAN, M; BARKEMA, GT; BOERMA, DO

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study of the ordering of In atoms embedded in the top layer of a Cu(100) surface is presented. The interaction energies between the In and Cu atoms were derived from atom-embedding calculations, with Finnis-Sinclair potentials. It was found that the interaction between In atoms in the

  17. VO{sub 2}-like thermo-optical switching effect in one-dimensional nonlinear defective photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Juan, E-mail: juanzhang@staff.shu.edu.cn, E-mail: ywang@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Rongjun [Key Laboratory of Specialty Fiber Optics and Optical Access Networks, School of Communication and Information Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Wang, Yang, E-mail: juanzhang@staff.shu.edu.cn, E-mail: ywang@siom.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of High Power Laser Materials, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-06-07

    A new approach to achieve VO{sub 2}-like thermo-optical switching in a one-dimensional photonic crystal by the combination of thermo-optical and optical Kerr effects was proposed and numerically demonstrated in this study. The switching temperature and the hysteresis width can be tuned in a wide temperature range. Steep transition, high optical contrast, and low pumping power can be achieved at the same time. This kind of one-dimensional photonic crystal-based bistable switch will be low-cost, easy-to-fabricate, and versatile in practical applications compared with traditional VO{sub 2}-type one.

  18. Sites of Au atoms in Sn crystals as determined by channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.W.; Gemmell, D.S.; Holland, R.E.; Poizat, J.C.; Worthington, J.N.; Loess, R.E.

    1974-01-01

    The position of Au atoms diffused into Sn monocrystals has been studied by channeling and backscattering of 2.5-MeV Ne ions. For equilibrium conditions at 217 0 C, Au atoms are found almost entirely in substitutional positions, so that the unusually fast diffusion of Au in Sn most likely arises from a small fraction of Au atoms migrating interstitially

  19. High aspect ratio iridescent three-dimensional metal–insulator–metal capacitors using atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Micheal, E-mail: micheal.burke@tyndall.ie; Blake, Alan; Djara, Vladimir; O' Connell, Dan; Povey, Ian M.; Cherkaoui, Karim; Monaghan, Scott; Scully, Jim; Murphy, Richard; Hurley, Paul K.; Pemble, Martyn E.; Quinn, Aidan J., E-mail: aidan.quinn@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2015-01-01

    The authors report on the structural and electrical properties of TiN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiN metal–insulator–metal (MIM) capacitor structures in submicron three-dimensional (3D) trench geometries with an aspect ratio of ∼30. A simplified process route was employed where the three layers for the MIM stack were deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD) in a single run at a process temperature of 250 °C. The TiN top and bottom electrodes were deposited via plasma-enhanced ALD using a tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium precursor. 3D trench devices yielded capacitance densities of 36 fF/μm{sup 2} and quality factors >65 at low frequency (200 Hz), with low leakage current densities (<3 nA/cm{sup 2} at 1 V). These devices also show strong optical iridescence which, when combined with the covert embedded capacitance, show potential for system in package (SiP) anticounterfeiting applications.

  20. Controllable atomic layer deposition of one-dimensional nanotubular TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangbo; Banis, Mohammad Norouzi; Geng, Dongsheng; Li, Xifei; Zhang, Yong; Li, Ruying; Abou-Rachid, Hakima; Sun, Xueliang

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed at synthesizing one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of TiO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The precursors used are titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP, Ti(OCH(CH3)2)4) and deionized water. It was found that the morphologies and structural phases of as-deposited TiO2 are controllable through adjusting cycling numbers of ALD and growth temperatures. Commonly, a low temperature (150 °C) produced amorphous TiO2 while a high temperature (250 °C) led to crystalline anatase TiO2 on both AAO and CNTs. In addition, it was revealed that the deposition of TiO2 is also subject to the influences of the applied substrates. The work well demonstrated that ALD is a precise route to synthesize 1D nanostructures of TiO2. The resultant nanostructured TiO2 can be important candidates in many applications, such as water splitting, solar cells, lithium-ion batteries, and gas sensors.

  1. Numerical path integral solution to strong Coulomb correlation in one dimensional Hooke's atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruokosenmäki, Ilkka; Gholizade, Hossein; Kylänpää, Ilkka; Rantala, Tapio T.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new approach based on real time domain Feynman path integrals (RTPI) for electronic structure calculations and quantum dynamics, which includes correlations between particles exactly but within the numerical accuracy. We demonstrate that incoherent propagation by keeping the wave function real is a novel method for finding and simulation of the ground state, similar to Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method, but introducing new useful tools lacking in DMC. We use 1D Hooke's atom, a two-electron system with very strong correlation, as our test case, which we solve with incoherent RTPI (iRTPI) and compare against DMC. This system provides an excellent test case due to exact solutions for some confinements and because in 1D the Coulomb singularity is stronger than in two or three dimensional space. The use of Monte Carlo grid is shown to be efficient for which we determine useful numerical parameters. Furthermore, we discuss another novel approach achieved by combining the strengths of iRTPI and DMC. We also show usefulness of the perturbation theory for analytical approximates in case of strong confinements.

  2. Predicting Ligand Binding Sites on Protein Surfaces by 3-Dimensional Probability Density Distributions of Interacting Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Jhih-Wei; Elumalai, Pavadai; Pitti, Thejkiran; Wu, Chih Yuan; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Peng, Hung-Pin; Yang, An-Suei

    2016-01-01

    Predicting ligand binding sites (LBSs) on protein structures, which are obtained either from experimental or computational methods, is a useful first step in functional annotation or structure-based drug design for the protein structures. In this work, the structure-based machine learning algorithm ISMBLab-LIG was developed to predict LBSs on protein surfaces with input attributes derived from the three-dimensional probability density maps of interacting atoms, which were reconstructed on the query protein surfaces and were relatively insensitive to local conformational variations of the tentative ligand binding sites. The prediction accuracy of the ISMBLab-LIG predictors is comparable to that of the best LBS predictors benchmarked on several well-established testing datasets. More importantly, the ISMBLab-LIG algorithm has substantial tolerance to the prediction uncertainties of computationally derived protein structure models. As such, the method is particularly useful for predicting LBSs not only on experimental protein structures without known LBS templates in the database but also on computationally predicted model protein structures with structural uncertainties in the tentative ligand binding sites. PMID:27513851

  3. Crystallization studies on phase-change optical recording media by use of a two-dimensional periodic mark array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xun, Xiaodong; Erwin, James K.; Bletscher, Warren; Choi, Jinhan; Kallenbach, Senta; Mansuripur, Masud

    2001-12-01

    We present the results of crystallization studies in thin-film samples of amorphous and crystalline GexSbyTez. The experiments, conducted at moderately elevated temperatures, are based on measurements of the first-order diffraction efficiency from a two-dimensional periodic array of recorded marks. When the samples are slowly heated above room temperature, changes in the efficiencies of various diffracted orders give information about the on-going crystallization process within the sample. Two different compositions of the GeSbTe alloy are used in these experiments. Measurements on Ge2Sb2,3Te5 films show crystallization dominated by nucleation. For the Sb-rich eutectic composition Ge-(SbTe), crystallization is found to be dominated by growth from crystalline boundaries. We also show that crystalline marks written by relatively high-power laser pulses are different in their optical properties from the regions crystallized by slow heating of the sample to moderate temperatures.

  4. Coupling reducing k-points for supercell models of defects in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2004-01-01

    The optimum choice of k-point for supercell calculations of defect states in a three-dimensional photonic crystal is investigated for the case of a supercell with a simple cubic (SC) structure. By using the k-point (1/4,1/4,1/4) it is possible to eliminate the symmetric part of the repeated......-image couplings for the first three neighbour shells in the SC lattice. This result is shown to hold also for the case of non-equivalent axes (e.g. a distorted lattice, or an asymmetric defect structure). A specific example of a donor defect in a woodpile structure demonstrates that use of this k-point can lead...

  5. Valley-dependent spin-orbit torques in two-dimensional hexagonal crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Hang

    2016-01-11

    We study spin-orbit torques in two-dimensional hexagonal crystals such as graphene, silicene, germanene, and stanene. The torque possesses two components, a fieldlike term due to inverse spin galvanic effect and an antidamping torque originating from Berry curvature in mixed spin-k space. In the presence of staggered potential and exchange field, the valley degeneracy can be lifted and we obtain a valley-dependent Berry curvature, leading to a tunable antidamping torque by controlling the valley degree of freedom. The valley imbalance can be as high as 100% by tuning the bias voltage or magnetization angle. These findings open new venues for the development of current-driven spin-orbit torques by structural design.

  6. Disorder-induced modification of the transmission of light through two-dimensional photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beggs, D M; Kaliteevski, M A; Abram, R A; Cassagne, D; Albert, J P

    2005-01-01

    Disordered two-dimensional photonic crystals with a complete photonic band-gap have been investigated. Transmission and reflection spectra have been modelled for both ballistic and scattered light. The density of states and electromagnetic field profiles of disorder-induced localized states have also been calculated, for various levels of disorder. It is found that there is a threshold-like behaviour in the amount of disorder. Below the threshold, it is seen that there is a vanishing probability of disorder-induced localized states being introduced into the centre of the photonic band-gap, but that edge-states narrow the band-gap. Above the threshold, there is a non-zero probability of disorder-induced localized states throughout the photonic band-gap, and the modification of the transmission and reflection spectra due to disorder rapidly increases with increasing disorder

  7. Analysis and synthesis of one-dimensional magneto-photonic crystals using coupled mode theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saghirzadeh Darki, Behnam, E-mail: b.saghirzadeh@ec.iut.ac.ir; Nezhad, Abolghasem Zeidaabadi; Firouzeh, Zaker Hossein

    2017-03-15

    We utilize our previously developed temporal coupled mode approach to investigate the performance of one-dimensional magneto-photonic crystals (MPCs). We analytically demonstrate that a double-defect MPC provides adequate degrees of freedom to design a structure for arbitrary transmittance and Faraday rotation. By using our developed analytic approach along with the numerical transfer matrix method, we present a procedure for the synthesis of an MPC to generate any desired transmittance and Faraday rotation in possible ranges. However it is seen that only discrete values of transmittance and Faraday rotation are practically obtainable. To remedy this problem along with having short structures, we introduce a class of MPC heterostructures which are combinations of stacks with high and low optical contrast ratios.

  8. Temporal coupled mode analysis of one-dimensional magneto-photonic crystals with cavity structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saghirzadeh Darki, Behnam, E-mail: b.saghirzadeh@ec.iut.ac.ir; Zeidaabadi Nezhad, Abolghasem; Firouzeh, Zaker Hossein

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we propose the time-dependent coupled mode analysis of one-dimensional magneto-photonic crystals including one, two or multiple defect layers. The performance of the structures, namely the total transmission, Faraday rotation and ellipticity, is obtained using the proposed method. The results of the developed analytic approach are verified by comparing them to the results of the exact numerical transfer matrix method. Unlike the widely used numerical method, our proposed analytic method seems promising for the synthesis as well as the analysis purposes. Moreover, the proposed method has not the restrictions of the previously examined analytic methods. - Highlights: • A time-dependent coupled mode analysis is proposed for the cavity-type 1D MPCs. • Analytical formalism is presented for the single, double and multiple-defect MPCs. • Transmission, Faraday rotation and ellipticity are gained using the proposed method. • The proposed analytic method has advantages over the previously examined methods.

  9. Imaging off-plane shear waves with a two-dimensional phononic crystal lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang Chenyu; Luan Pigang

    2010-01-01

    A two-dimensional flat phononic crystal (PC) lens for focusing off-plane shear waves is proposed. The lens consists of a triangular lattice hole-array, embedded in a solid matrix. The self-collimation effect is employed to guide the shear waves propagating through the lens along specific directions. The Dirichlet-to-Neumann maps (DtN) method is employed to calculate the band structure of the PC, which can avoid the problems of bad convergence and fake bands automatically in the void-solid PC structure. When the lens is illuminated by the off-plane shear waves emanating from a point source, a subwavelength image appears in the far-field zone. The imaging characteristics are investigated by calculating the displacement fields explicitly using the multiple scattering method, and the results are in good agreement with the ray-trace predictions. Our results may provide insights for designing new phononic devices.

  10. Band Structures Analysis Method of Two-Dimensional Phononic Crystals Using Wavelet-Based Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A wavelet-based finite element method (WFEM is developed to calculate the elastic band structures of two-dimensional phononic crystals (2DPCs, which are composed of square lattices of solid cuboids in a solid matrix. In a unit cell, a new model of band-gap calculation of 2DPCs is constructed using plane elastomechanical elements based on a B-spline wavelet on the interval (BSWI. Substituting the periodic boundary conditions (BCs and interface conditions, a linear eigenvalue problem dependent on the Bloch wave vector is derived. Numerical examples show that the proposed method performs well for band structure problems when compared with those calculated by traditional FEM. This study also illustrates that filling fractions, material parameters, and incline angles of a 2DPC structure can cause band-gap width and location changes.

  11. Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction in Transmission Mode for Mapping Crystal Grain Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cereser, Alberto; Strobl, Markus; Hall, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    constituting the material. This article presents a new non-destructive 3D technique to study centimeter-sized bulk samples with a spatial resolution of hundred micrometers: time-of-flight three-dimensional neutron diffraction (ToF 3DND). Compared to existing analogous X-ray diffraction techniques, ToF 3DND......-of-flight neutron beamline. The technique was developed and tested with data collected at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Complex (J-PARC) for an iron sample. We successfully reconstructed the shape of 108 grains and developed an indexing procedure....... The reconstruction algorithms have been validated by reconstructing two stacked Co-Ni-Ga single crystals, and by comparison with a grain map obtained by post-mortem electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)....

  12. Phase-field study of crystal growth in three-dimensional capillaries: Effects of crystalline anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debierre, Jean-Marc; Guérin, Rahma; Kassner, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    Phase-field simulations are performed to explore the thermal solidification of a pure melt in three-dimensional capillaries. Motivated by our previous work for isotropic or slightly anisotropic materials, we focus here on the more general case of anisotropic materials. Different channel cross sections are compared (square, hexagonal, circular) to reveal the influence of geometry and the effects of a competition between the crystal and the channel symmetries. In particular, a compass effect toward growth directions favored by the surface energy is identified. At given undercooling and anisotropy, the simulations generally show the coexistence of several growth modes. The relative stability of these growth modes is tested by submitting them to a strong spatiotemporal noise for a short time, which reveals a subtle hierarchy between them. Similarities and differences with experimental growth modes in confined geometry are discussed qualitatively.

  13. Design and Fabrication Challenges for Millimeter-Scale Three-Dimensional Phononic Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frieder Lucklum

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available While phononic crystals can be theoretically modeled with a variety of analytical and numerical methods, the practical realization and comprehensive characterization of complex designs is often challenging. This is especially important for the nearly limitless possibilities of periodic, three-dimensional structures. In this contribution, we take a look at these design and fabrication challenges of different 3D phononic elements based on recent research using additive manufacturing. Different fabrication technologies introduce specific limitations in terms of, e.g., material choices, minimum feature size, aspect ratios, or support requirements that have to be taken into account during design and theoretical modeling. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of additive technologies suitable for millimeter and sub-millimeter feature sizes. Furthermore, we present comprehensive experimental characterization of finite, simple cubic lattices in terms of wave polarization and propagation direction to demonstrate the substantial differences between complete phononic band gap and application oriented directional band gaps of selected propagation modes.

  14. A Bloch modal approach for engineering waveguide and cavity modes in two-dimensional photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lasson, Jakob R.; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Mørk, Jesper; Gregersen, Niels

    2013-05-01

    In open nanophotonic structures, the natural modes are so-called quasi-normal modes satisfying an outgoing wave boundary condition. We present a new scheme based on a modal expansion technique, a scattering matrix approach and Bloch modes of periodic structures for determining these quasi-normal modes. As opposed to spatial discretization methods like the finite-difference time-domain method and the finite element method, the present approach satisfies automatically the outgoing wave boundary condition in the propagation direction which represents a significant advantage of our new method. The scheme uses no external excitation and determines the quasi-normal modes as unity eigenvalues of the cavity roundtrip matrix. We demonstrate the method and the quasi-normal modes for two types of two-dimensional photonic crystal structures, and discuss the quasi-normal mode field distributions and Q-factors in relation to the transmission spectra of these structures.

  15. Two-dimensional nanopatterning by PDMS relief structures of polymeric colloidal crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hye Jin; Kim, Ju-Hee; Jung, Duk-Young; Park, Jong Bae; Lee, Hae Seong

    2008-06-01

    A new constructive method of fabricating a nanoparticle self-assembly on the patterned surface of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) relief nanostructure was demonstrated. Patterned PDMS templates with close-packed microwells were fabricated by molding against a self-assembled monolayer of polystyrene spheres. Alkanethiol-functionalized gold nanoparticles with an average particle size of 2.5 nm were selectively deposited onto a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer printed on the substrate by the micro-contact printing (μCP) of the prepared PDMS microwell, in which the patterned gold nanoparticles consisted of close-packed hexagons with an average diameter of 370 nm. In addition, two-dimensional colloidal crystals derived from PMMA microspheres with a diameter of 380 nm and a negative surface charge were successfully formed on the hemispherical microwells by electrostatic force using positively charged PAH-coated PDMS as a template to produce multidimensional nanostructures.

  16. Opening complete band gaps in two dimensional locally resonant phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoling; Wang, Longqi

    2018-05-01

    Locally resonant phononic crystals (LRPCs) which have low frequency band gaps attract a growing attention in both scientific and engineering field recently. Wide complete locally resonant band gaps are the goal for researchers. In this paper, complete band gaps are achieved by carefully designing the geometrical properties of the inclusions in two dimensional LRPCs. The band structures and mechanisms of different types of models are investigated by the finite element method. The translational vibration patterns in both the in-plane and out-of-plane directions contribute to the full band gaps. The frequency response of the finite periodic structures demonstrate the attenuation effects in the complete band gaps. Moreover, it is found that the complete band gaps can be further widened and lowered by increasing the height of the inclusions. The tunable properties by changing the geometrical parameters provide a good way to open wide locally resonant band gaps.

  17. Two-Dimensional Spatial Imaging of Charge Transport in Germanium Crystals at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffatt, Robert [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    In this dissertation, I describe a novel apparatus for studying the transport of charge in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures. The motivation to conduct this experiment originated from an asymmetry observed between the behavior of electrons and holes in the germanium detector crystals used by the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS). This asymmetry is a consequence of the anisotropic propagation of electrons in germanium at cryogenic temperatures. To better model our detectors, we incorporated this effect into our Monte Carlo simulations of charge transport. The purpose of the experiment described in this dissertation is to test those models in detail. Our measurements have allowed us to discover a shortcoming in our most recent Monte Carlo simulations of electrons in germanium. This discovery would not have been possible without the measurement of the full, two-dimensional charge distribution, which our experimental apparatus has allowed for the first time at cryogenic temperatures.

  18. Cavity polaritons in one-dimensional photonic crystals containing dye molecule-titanate nanosheet hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kenta; Suzuki, Makoto; Chen, Changdong; Feng, Qi; Nakanishi, Shunsuke; Tsurumachi, Noriaki

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the optical properties of one dimensional photonic crystal (1D-PC) microcavity with a wedge-shaped cavity layer containing fluorescent pseudoisocyanine (PIC)-gelatin and nonfluorescent PIC-H1.07Ti1.73O4•nH2O (HTO) nanohybrids. In the case of the PIC-gelatin, the formation of cavity polaritons with a Rabi splitting energy of 49.2 meV was clearly observed. Contrary to our expectations, the formation of cavity polaritons in the case of the PIC-HTO nanohybrids was also observed, even though their splitting energy of 5.8 meV was small. Although different possible explanations were considered, at present, there is insufficient information to completely explain the phenomena. The formation of cavity polaritons with nonfluorescent excitons is indeed very rare and therefore interesting.

  19. Assembling three-dimensional nanostructures on metal surfaces with a reversible vertical single-atom manipulation: A theoretical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Tianxing; Ye Xiang; Huang Lei; Xie Yiqun; Ke Sanhuang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We simulate the reversible vertical single-atom manipulations on several metal surfaces. ► We propose a method to predict whether a reversible vertical single-atom manipulation can be successful on several metal surfaces. ► A 3-dimensional Ni nanocluster is assembled on the Ni(1 1 1) surface using a Ni trimer-apex tip. - Abstract: We propose a theoretical model to show that pulling up an adatom from an atomic step requires a weaker force than from the flat surfaces of Al(0 0 1), Ni(1 1 1), Pt(1 1 0) and Au(1 1 0). Single adatom in the atomic step can be extracted vertically by a trimer-apex tip while can be released to the flat surface. This reversible vertical manipulation can then be used to fabricate a supported three-dimensional (3D) nanostructure on the Ni(1 1 1) surface. The present modeling can be used to predict whether the reversible vertical single-atom manipulation and thus the assembling of 3D nanostructures can be achieved on a metal surface.

  20. Evidence of two-dimensional quantum Wigner Crystal in a zero magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken

    2014-03-01

    In disorder-dominated cases, Anderson localization occurs as a result of destructive interference effects caused by (short-ranged) random disorders. On the other hand, in interaction-dominated scenarios, striking manifestations of quantum physics emerge in response to strong inter-particle Coulomb energy (EC). The most prominent interaction-driven effect is the Wigner crystallization (WC) of electrons, an electron solid made up with spatially separated charges settling in a form of a lattice. The classical version of the crystallization, with the Debye temperature ΘD desired quantum version with the Fermi energy EF <dimensional hole (2DH) systems in a genuine interaction-driven regime. A high resolution dc VI measurement reveals a pA level threshold transport accompanied by resistivity oscillations, indicating the coexistence of a pinned quantum WC with discrete edge filaments of unpinned carriers. NSF DMR 1105183

  1. Geometric tuning of thermal conductivity in three-dimensional anisotropic phononic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhiyong; Wehmeyer, Geoff; Dames, Chris; Chen, Yunfei

    2016-10-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the thermal transport properties of a three-dimensional (3D) anisotropic phononic crystal consisting of silicon nanowires and films. The calculation shows that the in-plane thermal conductivity is negatively correlated with the out-of-plane thermal conductivity upon making geometric changes, whether varying the nanowire diameter or the film thickness. This enables the anisotropy ratio of thermal conductivity to be tailored over a wide range, in some cases by more than a factor of 20. Similar trends in thermal conductivity are also observed from an independent phonon ray tracing simulation considering only diffuse boundary scattering effects, though the range of anisotropy ratios is smaller than that obtained in MD simulation. By analyzing the phonon dispersion relation with varied geometric parameters, it is found that increasing the nanowire diameter increases the out-of-plane acoustic phonon group velocities, but reduces the in-plane longitudinal and fast transverse acoustic phonon group velocities. The calculated phonon irradiation further verified the negative correlation between the in-plane and the out-of-plane thermal conductivity. The proposed 3D phononic crystal may find potential application in thermoelectrics, energy storage, catalysis and sensing applications owing to its widely tailorable thermal conductivity.

  2. Optical transmission properties of an anisotropic defect cavity in one-dimensional photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchani, Noama; El Moussaouy, Abdelaziz; Aynaou, Hassan; El Hassouani, Youssef; El Boudouti, El Houssaine; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram

    2018-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the possibility to control the optical transmission in the visible and infrared regions by a defective one dimensional photonic crystal formed by a combination of a finite isotropic superlattice and an anisotropic defect layer. The Green's function approach has been used to derive the reflection and the transmission coefficients, as well as the densities of states of the optical modes. We evaluate the delay times of the localized modes and we compare their behavior with the total densities of states. We show that the birefringence of an anisotropic defect layer has a significant impact on the behavior of the optical modes in the electromagnetic forbidden bands of the structure. The amplitudes of the defect modes in the transmission and the delay time spectrum, depend strongly on the position of the cavity layer within the photonic crystal. The anisotropic defect layer induces transmission zeros in one of the two components of the transmission as a consequence of a destructive interference of the two polarized waves within this layer, giving rise to negative delay times for some wavelengths in the visible and infrared light ranges. This property is a typical characteristic of the anisotropic photonic layer and is without analogue in their counterpart isotropic defect layers. This structure offers several possibilities for controlling the frequencies, transmitted intensities and the delay times of the optical modes in the visible and infrared regions. It can be a good candidate for realizing high-precision optical filters.

  3. Effect of magnetic field on the wave dispersion relation in three-dimensional dusty plasma crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Xuefeng [School of Mathematical Sciences, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang Zhengxiong [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2012-07-15

    Three-dimensional plasma crystals under microgravity condition are investigated by taking into account an external magnetic field. The wave dispersion relations of dust lattice modes in the body centered cubic (bcc) and the face centered cubic (fcc) plasma crystals are obtained explicitly when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the wave motion. The wave dispersion relations of dust lattice modes in the bcc and fcc plasma crystals are calculated numerically when the magnetic field is in an arbitrary direction. The numerical results show that one longitudinal mode and two transverse modes are coupled due to the Lorentz force in the magnetic field. Moreover, three wave modes, i.e., the high frequency phonon mode, the low frequency phonon mode, and the optical mode, are obtained. The optical mode and at least one phonon mode are hybrid modes. When the magnetic field is neither parallel nor perpendicular to the primitive wave motion, all the three wave modes are hybrid modes and do not have any intersection points. It is also found that with increasing the magnetic field strength, the frequency of the optical mode increases and has a cutoff at the cyclotron frequency of the dust particles in the limit of long wavelength, and the mode mixings for both the optical mode and the high frequency phonon mode increase. The acoustic velocity of the low frequency phonon mode is zero. In addition, the acoustic velocity of the high frequency phonon mode depends on the angle of the magnetic field and the wave motion but does not depend on the magnetic field strength.

  4. Investigation of the atomic and electronic structures of highly ordered two-dimensional germanium on Au(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Uhrberg, R. I. G.

    2017-12-01

    Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and photoelectron spectroscopy have been used to study an ordered structure formed by Ge atoms deposited onto the Au(111) surface. Based on a careful analysis of STM images and LEED patterns, we propose a ( 5 0 8 -14 ) unit cell for the atomic structure of the Ge layer. Core-level data indicate that some Ge atoms diffuse into the Au(111) crystal during annealing after deposition at room temperature. This is further corroborated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) measured for different amounts of Ge remaining after sputtering and annealing. The results of the ARPES study clearly disprove an earlier assignment of a parabolic band, centered at normal emission, as a part of a Dirac cone of germanene.

  5. A three-dimensional relaxation model for calculation of atomic mixing and topography changes induces by ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, R.; Perez-Martin, A.M.C.; Dominguez-Vazquez, J.; Jimenez-Rodriguez, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    A simple model for three-dimensional material relaxation associated with atomic mixing is presented. The relaxation of the solid to accommodate the extra effective displacement volume Ω of an implanted or relocated atom is modelled by treating the surrounding solid as an incompressible medium. This leads to a tractable general formalism which can be used to predict implant distribution and changes in surface topography induced by ion beams, both in monatomic and multicomponent targets. The two-component case is discussed in detail. (orig.)

  6. Atomic-scale investigations of grain boundary segregation in astrology with a three dimensional atom-probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blavette, D. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique]|[Institut Universitaire de France (France); Letellier, L. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique; Duval, P. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique; Guttmann, M. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique]|[Institut de Recherches de la Siderurgie Francaise (IRSID), 57 - Maizieres-les-Metz (France)

    1996-08-01

    Both conventional and 3D atom-probes were applied to the investigation of grain-boundary (GB) segregation phenomena in two-phase nickel base superalloys Astroloy. 3D images as provided by the tomographic atom-probe reveal the presence of a strong segregation of both boron and molybdenum at grain-boundaries. Slight carbon enrichment is also detected. Considerable chromium segregation is exhibited at {gamma}`-{gamma}` grain-boundaries. All these segregants are distributed in a continuous manner along the boundary over a width close to 0.5 nm. Experiments show that segregation occurs during cooling and more probably between 1000 C and 800 C. Boron and molybdenum GB enrichments are interpreted as due to an equilibrium type-segregation while chromium segregation is thought to be induced by {gamma}` precipitation at GB`s and stabilised by the presence of boron. No segregation of zirconium is detected. (orig.)

  7. Use of three-dimensional parameters in the analysis of crystal structures under compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balic Zunic, Tonci

    2007-01-01

    Volume-related parameters of atomic coordinations are an important tool for the analysis of structural changes. Unlike usual tables of bond distances and angles they directly depict three-dimensional properties of coordination polyhedra, and in many instances give more profound structural...... data through use of a procrystal model. For non-regular coordination polyhedra a determination of the point with the minimum variation of distances to the vertices (the centroid of coordination) is a necessary prerequisite for a calculation of the volume-related parameters. The three parameters...... of the coordination polyhedra of cations and the voids that separate them. Analysis of individual compressional characteristics of structural components gives clues for the strong and weak parts of structures under high pressures and paths for structural transformations. The expected behaviour of distortion...

  8. Comment on "Atomic force microscopy characterization of stable faces in cubic C60 single crystals": possible evidence for growth-promoting cross-twinning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Waal, B.W.

    1994-01-01

    An explanation is given for a molecular arrangement on a face of a C60 fcc single crystal as observed recently with atomic force microscopy (B. Keita et al., Chem. Phys. 179 (1994) 595). The explanation relies on a cross-twinning model of fcc crystal growth, and involves local fivefold symmetry.

  9. Towards true 3-dimensional BCC colloidal crystals with controlled lattice orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dziomkina, N.; Hempenius, Mark A.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2009-01-01

    A fabrication method of colloidal crystals possessing the BCC crystal structure is described. BCC colloidal crystals with a thickness of up to seven colloidal layers were grown in the direction of the (100) crystal plane. Defect free colloidal crystals with a homogeneous surface coverage were

  10. Classical and quantum analysis of one-dimensional velocity selection for ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, J K; Kim, H A; Mishra, S R; Myrskog, S H; Jofre, A M; Segal, L R; Kim, J B; Steinberg, A M

    2005-01-01

    We discuss a velocity selection technique for obtaining cold atoms, in which all atoms below a certain energy are spatially selected from the surrounding atom cloud. Velocity selection can in some cases be more efficient than other cooling techniques for the preparation of ultracold atom clouds in one dimension. With quantum mechanical and classical simulations and theory we present a scheme using a dipole force barrier to select the coldest atoms from a magnetically trapped atom cloud. The dipole and magnetic potentials create a local minimum which traps the coldest atoms. A unique advantage of this technique is the sharp cut-off in the velocity distribution of the sample of selected atoms. Such a non-thermal distribution should prove useful for a variety of experiments, including proposed studies of atomic tunnelling and scattering from quantum potentials. We show that when the rms size of the atom cloud is smaller than the local minimum in which the selected atoms are trapped, the velocity selection technique can be more efficient in one dimension than some common techniques such as evaporative cooling. For example, one simulation shows nearly 6% of the atoms retained at a temperature 100 times lower than the starting condition

  11. Local crystal structures of Ge2Sb2Te5 revealed by the atomic pair distribution function analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamoto, Shin-ichi; Kodama, Katsuaki; Iikubo, Satoshi; Taguchi, Tomitsugu; Yamada, Noboru; Proffen, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Two types of optical recording crystalline material Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 have been studied by neutron and X-ray powder diffraction measurements. One is the crystalline cubic-phase Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 . The other is nanocrystalline-phase Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 . In the former, a large atomic displacement of germanium atoms was found by the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of neutron powder diffraction data. According to the electronic band structure calculation of isoelectronic GeTe, the electrical conductivity at the valence band with holes is not severely affected by the randomness at the cation site, whereas the thermal conductivity is significantly reduced by the randomness. For the nanocrystalline phase, the local crystal structure and the particle size distribution were obtained simultaneously by PDF analysis using a spherical-particle form factor. The lattice parameter is longer than that of the crystalline phase, suggesting an antimony-richer composition than the matrix. This compositional deviation would form the nanoparticle, resulting in nucleation-dominated crystal growth. (author)

  12. An analytical approach to thermal modeling of Bridgman type crystal growth: One dimensional analysis. Computer program users manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cothran, E. K.

    1982-01-01

    The computer program written in support of one dimensional analytical approach to thermal modeling of Bridgman type crystal growth is presented. The program listing and flow charts are included, along with the complete thermal model. Sample problems include detailed comments on input and output to aid the first time user.

  13. Atomic layer deposition of TiO2 photonic crystal waveguide biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jardinier, E.; Pandraud, G.; Pham, M.H.; French, P.J.; Sarro, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    A photonic crystal waveguide biosensor in the visible is presented for biosensing. The sensor is applied to Refractive Index (RI) measurements. The sensitivity at different wavelength is presented for both air holes and air core configurations of photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) made of TiO2. It is

  14. Temperature-induced order-disorder structural phase transitions of two-dimensional isostructural hexamethylenetetramine co-crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Tze Shyang; Quah, Ching Kheng

    2017-10-01

    Hexamethylenetetramine-benzoic acid (1/2) (HBA) and hexamethylenetetramine-4-methylbenzoic acid (1/2) (HMBA) co-crystals undergo order-disorder structural phase transition from a low-temperature monoclinic crystal structure to a high-temperature orthorhombic crystal structure at the transition temperatures of 257.5 (5) K (Pn ↔ Fmm2) and 265.5 (5) K (P2 1 /n ↔ Cmcm), respectively, using variable-temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The observed phase transitions were confirmed to be reversible first-order transitions as indicated by the sharp endothermic and exothermic peaks in the differential scanning calorimetry measurement. The three-molecule aggregate of HBA and HMBA consists of a hexamethylenetetramine molecule and two benzoic acid or two 4-methylbenzoic acid molecules, respectively. The acid molecules are ordered at the low-temperature phase and are equally disordered over two positions, which are related by a mirror symmetry, at the high-temperature phase. The two-dimensional supramolecular constructs common to both co-crystals are formed by three-molecule aggregates via weak intermolecular C-H...O and C-H...π interactions into molecular trilayers parallel to the ac plane with small XPac dissimilarity indices and parameters. The PIXEL interaction energies of all corresponding molecular contacts were calculated and the results are comparable between HBA and HMBA co-crystals, resulting in similar lattice energies and transition temperatures despite their two-dimensional isostructural relationship. The observed phase transitions of these two energetically similar co-crystals are triggered by similar mechanisms, i.e. the molecular rotator ordering and structural order-disorder transformation, which induced non-merohedral twinning with similar twin matrices in the low-temperature crystal form of both co-crystals.

  15. Electronic structure engineering in silicene via atom substitution and a new two-dimensional Dirac structure Si3C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Na; Dai, Ying; Wei, Wei; Huang, Baibiao

    2018-04-01

    A lot of efforts have been made towards the band gap opening in two-dimensional silicene, the silicon version of graphene. In the present work, the electronic structures of single atom doped (B, N, Al and P) and codoped (B/N and Al/P) silicene monolayers are systematically examined on the base of density functional electronic calculations. Our results demonstrate that single atom doping can realize electron or hole doping in the silicene; while codoping, due to the syergistic effects, results in finite band gap in silicene at the Dirac point without significantly degrading the electronic properties. In addition, the characteristic of band gap shows dependence on the doping concentration. Importantly, we predict a new two-dimensional Dirac structure, the graphene-like Si3C, which also shows linear band dispersion relation around the Fermi level. Our results demonstrates an important perspective to engineer the electronic and optical properties of silicene.

  16. Enhancement of Solar Cell Efficiency for Space Applications Using Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postigo P.A.

    2017-01-01

    with the area of photonic crystal patterning has been clearly observed. Finally, a low-cost nanofabrication procedure to obtain high quality two-dimensional photonic crystals in large areas (up to square cm is described.

  17. Tunable Channel Drop Filter in a Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Modulated by a Nematic Liquid Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Photonic crystals (PCs have many potential applications because of their ability to control light-wave propagation and because PC-based waveguides may be integrated into optical circuits. We propose a novel tunable PC channel drop filter based on nematic liquid crystals and investigate its properties numerically by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD method. The refractive indices of liquid crystals can be actively modulated after infiltrating nematic liquid crystals into the microcavity in PC waveguides with square lattices. Then we can control light propagation in a PC waveguide. We analyze the Q -factors and resonance frequencies of a tunable PC channel drop filter by considering various indices modulation of liquid crystals. The novel component can be used as wavelength division multiplexing in photonic integrated circuits.

  18. Analytic solution of a relativistic two-dimensional hydrogen-like atom in a constant magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villalba, V.M.

    1998-01-01

    We obtain exact solutions of the Klein-Gordon and Pauli-Schroedinger equations for a two-dimensional hydrogen-like atom in the presence of a constant magnetic field. Analytic solutions for the energy spectrum are obtained for particular values of the magnetic field strength. The results are compared to those obtained in the non-relativistic and spinless case. We obtain that the relativistic spectrum does not present s states. (orig.)

  19. Transverse-electric and transverse-magnetic mode slow light propagation in a two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Donglin; Yu, Zhongyuan; Liu, Yumin; Guo, Xiaotao; Shu, Changgan; Zhou, Shuai

    2013-09-10

    A two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide structure is designed for both TE- and TM-mode slow light propagation. The minimum group index of the waveguide for TE and TM modes can reach to 137.8 and 126.4, and the two polarizations have the same slow light frequency region. The designed structure can provide a large bandwidth range with very low group velocity dispersion for both TE and TM modes. The transmission property investigation for a suspended two-dimensional slab photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) indicates that such slow light character may be retained when perfect reflectors can be fixed on the horizontal surfaces of the slab. Such high group index for both TE and TM modes in two-dimensional PCWs is, to the best of our knowledge, first reported here, and may provide some useful guides for slow light research in theory.

  20. Two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded polymers in the crystal structures of the ammonium salts of phenoxyacetic acid, (4-fluorophenoxyacetic acid and (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Smith

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The structures of the ammonium salts of phenoxyacetic acid, NH4+·C8H6O3−, (I, (4-fluorophenoxyacetic acid, NH4+·C8H5FO3−, (II, and the herbicidally active (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA, NH4+·C9H8ClO3−·0.5H2O, (III have been determined. All have two-dimensional layered structures based on inter-species ammonium N—H...O hydrogen-bonding associations, which give core substructures consisting primarily of conjoined cyclic motifs. The crystals of (I and (II are isomorphous with the core comprising R12(5, R12(4 and centrosymmetric R42(8 ring motifs, giving two-dimensional layers lying parallel to (100. In (III, the water molecule of solvation lies on a crystallographic twofold rotation axis and bridges two carboxyl O atoms in an R44(12 hydrogen-bonded motif, creating two R43(10 rings, which together with a conjoined centrosymmetric R42(8 ring incorporating both ammonium cations, generate two-dimensional layers lying parallel to (100. No π–π ring associations are present in any of the structures.

  1. Ultrafast Crystallization Dynamics at an Organic-Inorganic Interface Revealed in Real Time by Grazing Incidence Fast Atom Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Anouchah; Staicu Casagrande, Elena M; Dechaux, Alexia; Khemliche, Hocine

    2018-02-15

    The poor structural properties of organic-inorganic interfaces and their variability represent the main cause of device under-performance. Understanding and controlling the development of these properties in real time has been a difficult experimental challenge. Using a recent technique based on grazing incidence fast atom diffraction (GIFAD), we were able to directly observe during deposition structural transitions in a perylene monolayer on Ag(110). Crystallization from the liquid phase occurs into two distinct structures with drastically different dynamics. Transition to the most compact packing occurs by self-organization only after a second layer has started to build up; subsequent incorporation of molecules from second to first layer triggers an ultrafast crystallization on a macroscopic sale. The final compact crystalline structure shows a long-range order and superior stability, which opens good perspectives for producing in a controlled manner highly ordered hybrid interfaces for photovoltaics and molecular electronics.

  2. Atomic scale study of surface orientations and energies of Ti 2 O 3 crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Meng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, 1088 Xueyuan Blvd, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055, China; Wang, Zhiguo [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, People' s Republic of China; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Zheng, Jianming [Energy and Environmental Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99352, USA

    2017-10-30

    For nanostructured particles, the faceting planes and their terminating chemical species are two critical factors that govern the chemical behavior of the particle. The surface atomistic structure and termination of the Ti2O3 crystals were analyzed using atomic-scale aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combining with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. STEM imaging reveals that the Ti2O3 crystal are most often faceted along (001), (012), (-114) and (1-20) planes. DFT calculation indicates that the (012) surface with TiO-termination have the lowest cleavage energy and correspondingly the lowest surface energy, indicating that (012) will be the most stable and prevalent surfaces in Ti2O3 nanocrystals. These observations provide insights for exploring the interfacial process involving Ti2O3 nanoparticles.

  3. The study on the nanomachining property and cutting model of single-crystal sapphire by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jen-Ching; Weng, Yung-Jin

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on the nanomachining property and cutting model of single-crystal sapphire during nanomachining. The coated diamond probe is used to as a tool, and the atomic force microscopy (AFM) is as an experimental platform for nanomachining. To understand the effect of normal force on single-crystal sapphire machining, this study tested nano-line machining and nano-rectangular pattern machining at different normal force. In nano-line machining test, the experimental results showed that the normal force increased, the groove depth from nano-line machining also increased. And the trend is logarithmic type. In nano-rectangular pattern machining test, it is found when the normal force increases, the groove depth also increased, but rather the accumulation of small chips. This paper combined the blew by air blower, the cleaning by ultrasonic cleaning machine and using contact mode probe to scan the surface topology after nanomaching, and proposed the "criterion of nanomachining cutting model," in order to determine the cutting model of single-crystal sapphire in the nanomachining is ductile regime cutting model or brittle regime cutting model. After analysis, the single-crystal sapphire substrate is processed in small normal force during nano-linear machining; its cutting modes are ductile regime cutting model. In the nano-rectangular pattern machining, due to the impact of machined zones overlap, the cutting mode is converted into a brittle regime cutting model. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A new 28Si single crystal: counting the atoms for the new kilogram definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartl, G.; Becker, P.; Beckhoff, B.; Bettin, H.; Beyer, E.; Borys, M.; Busch, I.; Cibik, L.; D'Agostino, G.; Darlatt, E.; Di Luzio, M.; Fujii, K.; Fujimoto, H.; Fujita, K.; Kolbe, M.; Krumrey, M.; Kuramoto, N.; Massa, E.; Mecke, M.; Mizushima, S.; Müller, M.; Narukawa, T.; Nicolaus, A.; Pramann, A.; Rauch, D.; Rienitz, O.; Sasso, C. P.; Stopic, A.; Stosch, R.; Waseda, A.; Wundrack, S.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. W.

    2017-10-01

    A new single crystal from isotopically enriched silicon was used to determine the Avogadro constant N A by the x-ray-crystal density method. The new crystal, named Si28-23Pr11, has a higher enrichment than the former ‘AVO28’ crystal allowing a smaller uncertainty of the molar mass determination. Again, two 1 kg spheres were manufactured from this crystal. The crystal and the spheres were measured with improved and new methods. One sphere, Si28kg01a, was measured at NMIJ and PTB with very consistent results. The other sphere, Si28kg01b, was measured only at PTB and yielded nearly the same Avogadro constant value. The mean result for both 1 kg spheres is N A  =  6.022 140 526(70)  ×  1023 mol-1 with a relative standard uncertainty of 1.2  ×  10-8. This value deviates from the Avogadro value published in 2015 for the AVO28 crystal by about 3.9(2.1)  ×  10-8. Possible reasons for this difference are discussed and additional measurements are proposed.

  5. Stability of two-dimensional clusters on crystal surfaces: from Ostwald ripening to single-cluster decay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenfeld, G.; Morgenstern, Karina; Beckmann, Ingo; Wulfhekel, Wulf; Wulfhekel, W.C.U.; Laegsgaard, Erik; Besenbacher, Flemming; Comsa, George

    1998-01-01

    An overview is given of recent work on the decay of two-dimensional clusters on a Ag(111) surface. Experimental studies using scanning tunnelling microscopy are presented, and various approaches to extract quantitative information on the relevant atomic processes from cluster decay experiments are

  6. Growth morphology of {1 1 0} faces of manganese mercury thiocyanate crystals investigated by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, Y.L.; Xu, D.; Wang, X.Q.; Du, W.; Liu, H.Y.; Zhang, G.H.

    2006-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy is employed to investigate the surface morphology of the {1 1 0} faces of MMTC crystals grown at 40 deg. C at a supersaturation of σ = 0.5. Growth hillocks generated by dislocation sources often appear in groups, which leads to faster growth of the local area and forming layers with large height difference up to 30 nm. Growth centers operate nearly equally during the growth process. Serried and sparse monolayer steps dominate alternately on the surface, which is thought to be distinct phenomenon of the two-metal-centered complex compounds family

  7. Research on the Band Gap Characteristics of Two-Dimensional Phononic Crystals Microcavity with Local Resonant Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new two-dimensional locally resonant phononic crystal with microcavity structure is proposed. The acoustic wave band gap characteristics of this new structure are studied using finite element method. At the same time, the corresponding displacement eigenmodes of the band edges of the lowest band gap and the transmission spectrum are calculated. The results proved that phononic crystals with microcavity structure exhibited complete band gaps in low-frequency range. The eigenfrequency of the lower edge of the first gap is lower than no microcavity structure. However, for no microcavity structure type of quadrilateral phononic crystal plate, the second band gap disappeared and the frequency range of the first band gap is relatively narrow. The main reason for appearing low-frequency band gaps is that the proposed phononic crystal introduced the local resonant microcavity structure. This study provides a good support for engineering application such as low-frequency vibration attenuation and noise control.

  8. Atomic mechanism for the growth of wafer-scale single-crystal graphene: theoretical perspective and scanning tunneling microscopy investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Tianchao; Zhang, Jialin; Chen, Wei

    2017-12-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the most promising approach for producing low-cost, high-quality, and large area graphene. Revealing the graphene growth mechanism at the atomic-scale is of great importance for realizing single crystal graphene (SCG) over wafer scale. Density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations are playing an increasingly important role in revealing the structure of the most stable carbon species, understanding the evolution processes, and disclosing the active sites. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is a powerful surface characterization tool to illustrate the real space distribution and atomic structures of growth intermediates during the CVD process. Combining them together can provide valuable information to improve the atomically controlled growth of SCG. Starting from a basic concept of the substrate effect on realizing SCG, this review covers the progress made in theoretical investigations on various carbon species during graphene growth on different transition metal substrates, in the STM study of the structural intermediates on transition metal surfaces, and in synthesizing graphene nanoribbons with atomic-precise width and edge structure, ending with a perspective on the future development of 2D materials beyond graphene.

  9. A One-Dimensional Quantum Interface between a Few Atoms and Weak Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Béguin, Jean-Baptiste Sylvain

    Quantum interfaces between light and the collective degrees of freedom of an ensemble of identical atoms have been proposed as a valuable and promising alternative to cavity quantum electrodynamics enhanced interaction with single particles. Many features of the quantum world (e. g. multipartite...... entanglement, squeezed states), which are central to the future developments of Quantum Information Science and Metrology, can be explored with mesoscopic collective states of atoms. An efficient quantum interface needs a high optical depth for the atomic ensemble and a measurement sensitivity limited by both...... the intrinsic quantum noise of light and the quantum projection noise of atoms. This was achieved in the past in a free space optical dipole trap ensemble of Nat ∼ 10^6 atoms, which triggered the operation of a collective Ramsey atomic clock assisted by entanglement. We have characterized and prepared non...

  10. Low temperature three-dimensional thermoluminescence spectra of undoped YVO{sub 4} single crystals grown by different techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdei, S. [Materials Research Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Kovacs, L. [Research Laboratory for Crystal Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 132, H-1502 Budapest (Hungary)]|[School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Peto, A. [Institute of Isotopes, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 77, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)]|[School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Vandlik, J. [Research Institute of Materials Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, Budapest (Hungary); Townsend, P.D. [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Ainger, F.W. [Materials Research Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Three dimensional (3D) thermoluminescence (TL) spectra of two yttrium orthovanadate (YVO{sub 4}) single crystals grown from YVO{sub 4} melt by the Czochralski (CZ) technique and one additional YVO{sub 4} crystal pulled from lithium-metavanadate (LiVO{sub 3}) flux by the top seeded solution growth (TSSG) method were investigated after x-ray irradiation. The TL spectra were recorded in the 200{endash}800 nm wavelength and 20{endash}300 K temperature ranges before and after annealing of the crystals in an oxygen atmosphere. In spite of the different growth conditions the measured 3D TL spectra of the CZ samples show similar TL characteristics. The main TL emission appears around 450 nm, and between 200 and 250 K. Further weak emissions were also detected at 570, 600, 650, and 710 nm wavelengths, which might be attributed to unwanted impurities. The TL spectrum of the TSSG crystal markedly differs from that of the CZ crystals. On one hand the major TL appears at lower temperatures whereas on the other hand the emission spectrum exhibits a broader band around 500 nm, while the weak bands between 500 and 700 nm could not be detected. Based on these observations the different defect structures in YVO{sub 4} crystals are discussed in the article emphasizing that 3D TL measurement is a useful practical tool for the characterization and identification of YVO{sub 4} crystals grown by different methods. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. About vortex-like atomic motion in a loaded single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, A. I.; Nikonov, A. Yu.

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents a molecular dynamics study of internal stress and atomic displacement redistributions in a preliminary loaded solid. The study demonstrates the possibility of self-organized vortices as dynamic defects of typical size 1-5 nm due to atomic motion in the elastic region at the stage of relaxation. The simulation results agree well with experimental data on strain localization in elastic distortion regions which gives rise to nanodipoles of partial disclinations.

  12. Three-dimensional atomic imaging of colloidal core-shell nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bals, S.; Casavola, M.; van Huis, M.A.; Van Aert, S.; Batenburg, K.J.; Van Tendeloo, G.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Colloidal core–shell semiconductor nanocrystals form an important class of optoelectronic materials, in which the exciton wave functions can be tailored by the atomic configuration of the core, the interfacial layers, and the shell. Here, we provide a trustful 3D characterization at the atomic scale

  13. A high resolution X-ray crystal spectrometer to study electron and heavy-ion impact atomic collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Misra, D.; Kelkar, A. H.; Kadhane, U. R.; Thulasiram, K. V.; Tribedi, Lokesh C.

    2007-06-01

    We have studied fast ion-atom and electron-atom collision processes using a reconditioned high resolution X-ray spectrometer. The X-rays, generated by the collisions, are dispersed by a curved ADP crystal (Johansson geometry) and detected by a gas proportional counter. A self-written LabVIEW based program has been used to give precise and controlled movement to the crystal and for data acquisition. The performance was tested by detecting the Kα diagram and satellite lines of several elements. The Kα satellite lines of Al have been studied in collision with 3-12 keV electrons and 40 MeV C^{4+} ions. In ion collisions as large as four L-vacancies are created simultaneously with the K-vacancy, compared to two satellites in case of the e-impact. In addition, we have measured the X-rays from H-, He- and Li-like Si ions which arise due to the electron loss/capture process in highly charged 80 MeV Si^{7+} ions in collision with thin carbon foil. Approximate charge state distribution has been obtained using this new technique.

  14. Lossless backward second-harmonic generation of extremely narrow subdiffractive beams in two-dimensional photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nistor, C.; Cojocaru, C.; Trull, J.; Karle, T. J.; Raj, R.; Raineri, F.; Staliunas, K.

    2010-01-01

    We report efficient second harmonic generation using extremely narrow beams (with diameter of the order of the wavelength) that propagate in the self-collimation (or nondiffractive) regime in a two-dimensional photonic crystal. We design and numerically test an AlGaAs photonic crystal membrane, where both fundamental and generated second harmonic beams propagate without diffraction and without out-of-plane losses. The characteristics of the generated second harmonic that is mainly propagating in the backward direction and the conversion efficiency of the proposed scheme are obtained by nonlinear finite-difference time-domain numerical simulations.

  15. Strongly nonexponential time-resolved fluorescence of quantum-dot ensembles in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaev, Ivan S.; Lodahl, Peter; van Driel, A. Floris

    2007-01-01

    We observe experimentally that ensembles of quantum dots in three-dimensional 3D photonic crystals reveal strongly nonexponential time-resolved emission. These complex emission decay curves are analyzed with a continuous distribution of decay rates. The log-normal distribution describes the decays...... parameter. This interpretation qualitatively agrees with the calculations of the 3D projected local density of states. We therefore conclude that fluorescence decay of ensembles of quantum dots is highly nonexponential to an extent that is controlled by photonic crystals....

  16. The focusing effect of electromagnetic waves in two-dimensional photonic crystals with gradually varying lattice constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Bakhshi Garmi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we studied the focusing effect of electromagnetic wave in the two-dimensional graded photonic crystal consisting of Silicon rods in the air background with gradually varying lattice constant. The results showed that graded photonic crystal can focus wide beams on a narrow area at frequencies near the lower edge of the band gap, where equal frequency contours are not concave. For calculation of photonic band structure and equal frequency contours, we have used plane wave expansion method and revised plane wave expansion method, respectively. The calculation of the electric and magnetic fields was performed by finite difference time domain method.

  17. Three-dimensional imaging of a complex concaved cuboctahedron copper sulfide crystal by x-ray nanotomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jie; Tian Jinping; Li Wenjie; Tian Yangchao; Wu Chunyan; Yu Shuhong

    2008-01-01

    By combining Fresnel zone-plate based transmission x-ray microscopy with computed tomography, the nanoscale features in materials with complex shapes can be imaged using synchrotron radiation. The tomographic data sets of a complex copper sulfide crystal were acquired in the angle range ±70 deg. at photon energy of 8.0 keV and then were reconstructed by a standard filtered-back-projection algorithm. This experiment shows the quantifiable three-dimensional information of the copper sulfide crystal, which offers a complete understanding of the concaved cuboctahedron structure with 14 faces comprising of six squares and eight triangles

  18. Ultra-directional source of longitudinal acoustic waves based on a two-dimensional solid/solid phononic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morvan, B.; Tinel, A.; Sainidou, R.; Rembert, P. [Laboratoire Ondes et Milieux Complexes, UMR CNRS 6294, Université du Havre, 75 rue Bellot, 76058 Le Havre (France); Vasseur, J. O.; Hladky-Hennion, A.-C. [Institut d' Electronique, de Micro-électronique et de Nanotechnologie, UMR CNRS 8520, Cité Scientifique, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Swinteck, N.; Deymier, P. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2014-12-07

    Phononic crystals (PC) can be used to control the dispersion properties of acoustic waves, which are essential to direct their propagation. We use a PC-based two-dimensional solid/solid composite to demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the spatial filtering of a monochromatic non-directional wave source and its emission in a surrounding water medium as an ultra-directional beam with narrow angular distribution. The phenomenon relies on square-shaped equifrequency contours (EFC) enabling self-collimation of acoustic waves within the phononic crystal. Additionally, the angular width of collimated beams is controlled via the EFC size-shrinking when increasing frequency.

  19. NanoFIBrication of a two-dimensional phononic crystal in a free standing membrane.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leseman, Zayd C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Goettler, Drew F. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Su, Mehmet F. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); El-Kady, Ihab Fathy; Olsson, Roy H., III

    2010-06-01

    A two-dimensional phononic crystal (PnC) that can operate in the GHz range is created in a freestanding silicon substrate using NanoFIBrication (using a focused ion beam (FIB) to fabricate nanostructures). First, a simple cubic 6.75 x 6.75 ?m array of vias with 150 nm spacing is generated. After patterning the vias, they are backfilled with void-free tungsten scatterers. Each via has a diameter of 48 nm. Numerical calculations predict this 2D PnC will generate a band gap near 22 GHz. A protective layer of chromium on top of the thin (100 nm) silicon membrane confines the surface damage to the chromium, which can be removed at a later time. Inspection of the underside of the membrane shows the vias flaring out at the exit, which we are dubbing the 'trumpet effect'. The trumpet effect is explained by modeling the lateral damage in a freestanding membrane.

  20. The band structures of three-dimensional nonlinear plasma photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the properties of the photonic band gaps (PBGs) for three-dimensional (3D) nonlinear plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) are theoretically investigated by the plane wave expansion method, whose equations for calculations also are deduced. The configuration of 3D nonlinear PPCs is the Kerr nonlinear dielectric spheres (Kerr effect is considered) inserted in the plasma background with simple-cubic lattices. The inserted dielectric spheres are Kerr nonlinear dielectrics whose relative permittivities are the functions of the external light intensity. Three different Kerr nonlinear dielectrics are considered, which can be expressed as the functions of space coordinates. The influences of the parameters for the Kerr nonlinear dielectrics on the PBGs also are discussed. The calculated results demonstrate that the locations, bandwidths and number of PBGs can be manipulated with the different Kerr nonlinear dielectrics. Compared with the conventional 3D dielectric PCs and PPCs with simple-cubic lattices, the more PBGs or larger PBG can be achieved in the 3D nonlinear PPCs. Those results provide a new way to design the novel devices based on the PPCs.

  1. Tunable omnidirectional photonic band gap of one-dimensional photonic crystals containing Dirac semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunkun; Zhang, Yuping; Guo, Xiaohan; Liu, Maodong; Chen, Huan; Liu, Shande; Zhang, Huiyun

    2017-12-01

    We have theoretically investigated the tunability of the omnidirectional bandgap (OBG) of a one-dimensional photonic crystal consisting of alternating Dirac semimetals (DSs) and SiO2 dielectrics by adjusting the structural Fermi level. This photonic bandgap (PBG) is strongly dependent on the Fermi level and thickness ratio of the DSs and SiO2 layers. The effects of different parameters such as Fermi level, incident angle, and lattice constant on PBG are analyzed in detail. It is found that the first gap does not change with the change in lattice constant, but it is sensitive to the Fermi level; the width of the omnidirectional PBG increases with the structural Fermi level. The second gap is also sensitive to the Fermi level, the upper and lower frequency limits of this PBG shift to higher frequency, and the width becomes narrower as the Fermi level is increasing, where only one OBG exists in the range of 3.6-4.3 THz for transverse electric polarization. However, as the angle of incidence increases, the photonic bandgap can close for transverse magnetic polarization. All these properties can be applied to tunable optical filters or optical switches.

  2. Analysis of cutoff frequency in a one-dimensional superconductor-metamaterial photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, Arafa H, E-mail: arafa16@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Beni-Suef University (Egypt); Aghajamali, Alireza [Department of Physics, Marvdasht Branch, Islamic Azad University, Marvdasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Elsayed, Hussein A.; Mobarak, Mohamed [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Beni-Suef University (Egypt)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Our results show that the appearance of the cutoff frequency, below which the incident electromagnetic waves cannot propagate in the structure. We demonstrate that the cutoff frequency shows an upward trend as the thickness of the superconductor layer as well as the thickness of the metamaterial increase. • The cutoff frequency can be tuned by the operating temperature. Our structures are good candidates for many optical devices such as optical filters, switches, temperature controlled optical shutter, and among photoelectronic applications in gigahertz. - Abstract: In this paper, using the two-fluid model and the characteristic matrix method, we investigate the transmission characteristics of the one-dimensional photonic crystal. Our structure composed of the layers of low-temperature superconductor material (NbN) and double-negative metamaterial. We target studying the effect of many parameters such as the thickness of the superconductor material, the thickness of the metamaterial layer, and the operating temperature. We show that the cut-off frequency can be tuned efficiently by the operating temperature as well as the thicknesses of the constituent materials.

  3. Electromagnetically induced reflectance and Fano resonance in one dimensional superconducting photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athe, Pratik; Srivastava, Sanjay; Thapa, Khem B.

    2018-04-01

    In the present work, we demonstrate the generation of optical Fano resonance and electromagnetically induced reflectance (EIR) in one-dimensional superconducting photonic crystal (1D SPC) by numerical simulation using transfer matrix method as analysis tool. We investigated the optical response of 1D SPC structure consisting of alternate layer of two different superconductors and observed that the optical spectra of this structure exhibit two narrow reflectance peaks with zero reflectivity of sidebands. Further, we added a dielectric cap layer to this 1D SPC structure and found that addition of dielectric cap layer transforms the line shape of sidebands around the narrow reflectance peaks which leads to the formation of Fano resonance and EIR line shape in reflectance spectra. We also studied the effects of the number of periods, refractive index and thickness of dielectric cap layer on the lineshape of EIR and Fano resonances. It was observed that the amplitude of peak reflectance of EIR achieves 100% reflectance by increasing the number of periods.

  4. Investigating Optical Properties of One-Dimensional Photonic Crystals Containing Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahshid Mokhtarnejad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined MQWs made of InGaAs/GaAs, InAlAs/InP, and InGaAs/InP in terms of their band structure and reflectivity. We also demonstrated that the reflectivity of MQWs under normal incident was at maximum, while both using a strong pump and changing incident angle reduced it. Reflectivity of the structure for a weak probe pulse depends on polarization, intensity of the pump pulse, and delay between the probe pulse and the pump pulse. So this system can be used as an ultrafast all-optical switch which is inspected by the transfer matrix method. After studying the band structure of the one-dimensional photonic crystal, the optical stark effect (OSE was considered on it. Due to the OSE on virtual exciton levels, the switching time can be in the order of picoseconds. Moreover, it is demonstrated that, by introducing errors in width of barrier and well as well as by inserting defect, the reflectivity is reduced. Thus, by employing the mechanism of stark effect MQWs band-gaps can be easily controlled which is useful in designing MWQ based optical switches and filters. By comparing the results, we observe that the reflectivity of MWQ containing 200 periods of InAlAs/InP quantum wells shows the maximum reflectivity of 96%.

  5. The band structures of three-dimensional nonlinear plasma photonic crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Feng Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the properties of the photonic band gaps (PBGs for three-dimensional (3D nonlinear plasma photonic crystals (PPCs are theoretically investigated by the plane wave expansion method, whose equations for calculations also are deduced. The configuration of 3D nonlinear PPCs is the Kerr nonlinear dielectric spheres (Kerr effect is considered inserted in the plasma background with simple-cubic lattices. The inserted dielectric spheres are Kerr nonlinear dielectrics whose relative permittivities are the functions of the external light intensity. Three different Kerr nonlinear dielectrics are considered, which can be expressed as the functions of space coordinates. The influences of the parameters for the Kerr nonlinear dielectrics on the PBGs also are discussed. The calculated results demonstrate that the locations, bandwidths and number of PBGs can be manipulated with the different Kerr nonlinear dielectrics. Compared with the conventional 3D dielectric PCs and PPCs with simple-cubic lattices, the more PBGs or larger PBG can be achieved in the 3D nonlinear PPCs. Those results provide a new way to design the novel devices based on the PPCs.

  6. Two-dimensional NMR investigations of the dynamic conformations of phospholipids and liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Mei [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Applied Science and Technology

    1996-05-01

    Two-dimensional 13C, 1H, and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are developed and used to study molecular structure and dynamics in liquid-crystalline systems, primarily phospholipids and nematic liquid crystals. NMR spectroscopy characterizes molecular conformation in terms of orientations and distances of molecular segments. In anisotropically mobile systems, this is achieved by measuring motionally-averaged nuclear dipolar couplings and chemical shift anisotropies. The short-range couplings yield useful bond order parameters, while the long-range interactions constrain the overall conformation. In this work, techniques for probing proton dipolar local fields are further developed to obtain highlyresolved dipolar couplings between protons and rare spins. By exploiting variable-angle sample spinning techniques, orientation-sensitive NMR spectra are resolved according to sitespecific isotropic chemical shifts. Moreover, the signs and magnitudes of various short-range dipolar couplings are obtained. They are used in novel theoretical analyses that provide information about segmental orientations and their distributions. Such information is obtained in a model-independent fashion or with physically reasonable assumptions. The structural investigation of phospholipids is focused on the dynam

  7. Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction in Transmission Mode for Mapping Crystal Grain Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereser, Alberto; Strobl, Markus; Hall, Stephen A; Steuwer, Axel; Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Tremsin, Anton S; Knudsen, Erik B; Shinohara, Takenao; Willendrup, Peter K; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos; Iyengar, Srinivasan; Larsen, Peter M; Hanashima, Takayasu; Moyoshi, Taketo; Kadletz, Peter M; Krooß, Philipp; Niendorf, Thomas; Sales, Morten; Schmahl, Wolfgang W; Schmidt, Søren

    2017-08-25

    The physical properties of polycrystalline materials depend on their microstructure, which is the nano- to centimeter scale arrangement of phases and defects in their interior. Such microstructure depends on the shape, crystallographic phase and orientation, and interfacing of the grains constituting the material. This article presents a new non-destructive 3D technique to study centimeter-sized bulk samples with a spatial resolution of hundred micrometers: time-of-flight three-dimensional neutron diffraction (ToF 3DND). Compared to existing analogous X-ray diffraction techniques, ToF 3DND enables studies of samples that can be both larger in size and made of heavier elements. Moreover, ToF 3DND facilitates the use of complicated sample environments. The basic ToF 3DND setup, utilizing an imaging detector with high spatial and temporal resolution, can easily be implemented at a time-of-flight neutron beamline. The technique was developed and tested with data collected at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Complex (J-PARC) for an iron sample. We successfully reconstructed the shape of 108 grains and developed an indexing procedure. The reconstruction algorithms have been validated by reconstructing two stacked Co-Ni-Ga single crystals, and by comparison with a grain map obtained by post-mortem electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD).

  8. Optical properties of one-dimensional photonic crystals containing graphene-based hyperbolic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Amir; Entezar, Samad Roshan

    2017-07-01

    The transmission properties of a one-dimensional photonic crystal made of alternate layers of an isotropic ordinary dielectric and a graphene-based hyperbolic metamaterial are studied theoretically using the transfer matrix method. The metamaterial layers show hyperbolic dispersion in certain frequency range and are considered as an anisotropic effective medium in which the optical axis is normal to the graphene layers. It is shown that the structure has some photonic band gaps in both the hyperbolic and elliptical frequency regions of the hyperbolic metamaterial layers, which are tunable by changing the chemical potential of the graphene monolayers. Moreover, the characteristics of the transverse-magnetic (TM)-polarized photonic band gaps remarkably depend on the orientation of the optical axis of the hyperbolic metamaterial layers. It is found that the electric field intensity of the propagating modes from the hyperbolic metamaterial frequency region is concentrated in the high-index isotropic layers and the electric field intensity of the propagating modes from the elliptical frequency region is concentrated in the low-index anisotropic layers.

  9. Optical properties of a defective one-dimensional photonic crystal containing graphene nanaolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Entezar, S. Roshan [Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saleki, Z., E-mail: saleki@tabrizu.ac.ir [Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Madani, A. [Department of Laser and Optical Engineering, University of Bonab, Bonab (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-01

    The transmission properties of a defective one-dimensional photonic crystal containing graphene nanolayers have been investigated using the transfer matrix method. It is shown that two kinds of the defect modes can be found in the band gaps of the structure. One kind is the traditional defect mode which is created in the Bragg gaps of the structure and is due to the breaking of the periodicity of the dielectric lattice. The other one is created in the graphene induced band gap. Such a defect mode which we call it the graphene induced defect mode is due to the breaking of the periodicity of the graphene lattice. However, our investigations reveal that only in the case of wide defect layers one can obtain the graphene induced defect modes. The effects of many parameters such as the incident angle, the state of polarization and the chemical potential of the graphene nanolayers on the properties of the graphene induced defect modes are discussed. Moreover, the possibility of external control of the graphene induced defect modes using a gate voltage is shown.

  10. Optical properties of a defective one-dimensional photonic crystal containing graphene nanaolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entezar, S. Roshan; Saleki, Z.; Madani, A.

    2015-01-01

    The transmission properties of a defective one-dimensional photonic crystal containing graphene nanolayers have been investigated using the transfer matrix method. It is shown that two kinds of the defect modes can be found in the band gaps of the structure. One kind is the traditional defect mode which is created in the Bragg gaps of the structure and is due to the breaking of the periodicity of the dielectric lattice. The other one is created in the graphene induced band gap. Such a defect mode which we call it the graphene induced defect mode is due to the breaking of the periodicity of the graphene lattice. However, our investigations reveal that only in the case of wide defect layers one can obtain the graphene induced defect modes. The effects of many parameters such as the incident angle, the state of polarization and the chemical potential of the graphene nanolayers on the properties of the graphene induced defect modes are discussed. Moreover, the possibility of external control of the graphene induced defect modes using a gate voltage is shown.

  11. Cascaded chirped narrow bandpass filter with flat-top based on two-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yuyang; Chen, Heming; Ji, Ke

    2017-05-10

    We propose a structure of a cascaded chirped narrow bandpass filter with a flat-top based on two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals (PhCs). The filter discussed here consists of three filter units, each with a resonator and two reflectors. Coupled mode theory and transfer matrix method are methodologies applied in the analysis of the features. The calculations show that the bandwidth of the filter can be adjusted by changing the distances between resonators and reflectors, and based on this, a flat-top response can be achieved by chirped-cascading the filter units. According to the theoretical model, we design a narrow bandpass filter based on 2D PhCs with a triangular lattice of air holes, the parameters of which are calculated using the finite element method. The simulation results show that the filter has a center frequency of 193.40 THz, an insertion loss of 0.18 dB, a flat bandwidth of 40 GHz, and ripples of about 0.2 dB in the passband. The filter is suitable for dense-wavelength-division-multiplexed optical communication systems with 100 GHz channel spacing.

  12. Surface acoustic waves in two dimensional phononic crystal with anisotropic inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketata H.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available An analysis is given to the band structure of the two dimensional solid phononic crystal considered as a semi infinite medium. The lattice includes an array of elastic anisotropic materials with different shapes embedded in a uniform matrix. For illustration two kinds of phononic materials are assumed. A particular attention is devoted to the computational procedure which is mainly based on the plane wave expansion (PWE method. It has been adapted to Matlab environment. Numerical calculations of the dispersion curves have been achieved by introducing particular functions which transform motion equations into an Eigen value problem. Significant improvements are obtained by increasing reasonably the number of Fourier components even when a large elastic mismatch is assumed. Such approach can be generalized to different types of symmetry and permit new physical properties as piezoelectricity to be added. The actual semi infinite phononic structure with a free surface has been shown to support surface acoustic waves (SAW. The obtained dispersion curves reveal band gaps in the SAW branches. It has been found that the influence, of the filling factor and anisotropy on their band gaps, is different from that of bulk waves.

  13. Two-dimensional photonic crystal bandedge laser with hybrid perovskite thin film for optical gain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Hyungrae [Department of Biophysics and Chemical Biology, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Inter-University Semiconductor Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Seunghwan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myungjae [Inter-University Semiconductor Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Heonsu, E-mail: hsjeon@snu.ac.kr [Department of Biophysics and Chemical Biology, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Inter-University Semiconductor Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-02

    We report optically pumped room temperature single mode laser that contains a thin film of hybrid perovskite, an emerging photonic material, as gain medium. Two-dimensional square lattice photonic crystal (PhC) backbone structure enables single mode laser operation via a photonic bandedge mode, while a thin film of methyl-ammonium lead iodide (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}) spin-coated atop provides optical gain for lasing. Two kinds of bandedge modes, Γ and M, are employed, and both devices laser in single mode at similar laser thresholds of ∼200 μJ/cm{sup 2} in pulse energy density. Polarization dependence measurements reveal a clear difference between the two kinds of bandedge lasers: isotropic for the Γ-point laser and highly anisotropic for the M-point laser. These observations are consistent with expected modal properties, confirming that the lasing actions indeed originate from the corresponding PhC bandedge modes.

  14. Serial crystallography captures enzyme catalysis in copper nitrite reductase at atomic resolution from one crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Horrell

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Relating individual protein crystal structures to an enzyme mechanism remains a major and challenging goal for structural biology. Serial crystallography using multiple crystals has recently been reported in both synchrotron-radiation and X-ray free-electron laser experiments. In this work, serial crystallography was used to obtain multiple structures serially from one crystal (MSOX to study in crystallo enzyme catalysis. Rapid, shutterless X-ray detector technology on a synchrotron MX beamline was exploited to perform low-dose serial crystallography on a single copper nitrite reductase crystal, which survived long enough for 45 consecutive 100 K X-ray structures to be collected at 1.07–1.62 Å resolution, all sampled from the same crystal volume. This serial crystallography approach revealed the gradual conversion of the substrate bound at the catalytic type 2 Cu centre from nitrite to nitric oxide, following reduction of the type 1 Cu electron-transfer centre by X-ray-generated solvated electrons. Significant, well defined structural rearrangements in the active site are evident in the series as the enzyme moves through its catalytic cycle, namely nitrite reduction, which is a vital step in the global denitrification process. It is proposed that such a serial crystallography approach is widely applicable for studying any redox or electron-driven enzyme reactions from a single protein crystal. It can provide a `catalytic reaction movie' highlighting the structural changes that occur during enzyme catalysis. The anticipated developments in the automation of data analysis and modelling are likely to allow seamless and near-real-time analysis of such data on-site at some of the powerful synchrotron crystallographic beamlines.

  15. Resonant Coulomb excitation of atomic nuclei propagating through a crystal in the channeling mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    The Coulomb-excitation total cross section and the distribution of decay products originating from a resonant state of a nucleus interacting with a crystal lattice has been calculated for the case of a single inelastic collision (with respect to internal degrees of freedom in a nucleus). These observables have been expressed in terms of time-dependent correlators which describe thermal oscillations of lattice nuclei and the motion of the center of mass of a nucleus propagating across a crystal target in the channelling mode. An expression generalizing the spectrum of equivalent photons calculated by the Weizsaecker-Williams method is given

  16. Atomic Distribution in Catalytic Amorphous Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghita Mridha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The atomic distribution in catalytically active metallic glass alloys, Pd43Cu27Ni10P20 and Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5, was investigated using three-dimensional atom probe microscopy. Atom probe analysis showed uniform distribution of constituent elements for both the starting amorphous alloys, with no phase separation. Both the crystallized alloys showed eutectic microstructure with a very sharp interface (~0.5 nm as determined from atom probe. The atomic distribution in the devitrified state is explained based on the “fragile liquid” behavior for these noble-metal glassy alloys.

  17. Stripping scattering of fast atoms on surfaces of metal-oxide crystals and ultrathin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blauth, David

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of the present dissertation the interactions of fast atoms with surfaces of bulk oxides, metals and thin films on metals were studied. The experiments were performed in the regime of grazing incidence of atoms with energies of some keV. The advantage of this scattering geometry is the high surface sensibility and thus the possibility to determine the crystallographic and electronic characteristics of the topmost surface layer. In addition to these experiments, the energy loss and the electron emission induced by scattered projectiles was investigated. The energy for electron emission and exciton excitation on Alumina/NiAl(110) and SiO 2 /Mo(112) are determined. By detection of the number of projectile induced emitted electrons as function of azimuthal angle for the rotation of the target surface, the geometrical structure of atoms forming the topmost layer of different adsorbate films on metal surfaces where determined via ion beam triangulation. (orig.)

  18. Coke Formation in a Zeolite Crystal During the Methanol-to-Hydrocarbons Reaction as Studied with Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Joel E; Poplawsky, Jonathan D; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Attila, Özgün; Fu, Donglong; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Meirer, Florian; Bare, Simon R; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-09-05

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using (13) C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30-60 (13) C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid site density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. This nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  19. Integration of Generic Multi-dimensional Model and Operational Policies for Batch Cooling Crystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Samad, Noor Asma Fazli; Singh, Ravendra; Sin, Gürkan

    2011-01-01

    Crystallization processes form an important class of separation methods that are frequently used in the chemical, the pharmaceutical and the food industry. The specifications of the crystal product are usually given in terms of crystal size, shape and purity. In order to predict the desired cryst...

  20. Effect of the defect on the focusing in a two-dimensional photonic-crystal-based flat lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhifang; Wang Xiuguo; Li Zhiyuan; Zhang Daozhong

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated in detail the influence of defect on the focusing of electromagnetic waves in a two-dimensional photonic-crystal flat lens by using the finite-difference time-domain method. The result shows that many focusings can be observed at the symmetrical positions when a defect is introduced into the lens. Furthermore, the wave-guides in the lens can confine the transmission wave effectively and improve the quality of the focusing

  1. Structural origin of dynamic heterogeneity in three-dimensional colloidal glass formers and its link to crystal nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Takeshi; Tanaka, Hajime

    2010-06-16

    The physical understanding of glass transition remains a major challenge of physics and materials science. Among various glass-forming liquids, a colloidal liquid interacting with hard-core repulsion is now regarded as one of the most ideal model systems. Here we study the structure and dynamics of three-dimensional polydisperse colloidal liquids by Brownian dynamics simulations. We reveal that medium-range crystalline bond orientational order of the hexagonal close packed structure grows in size and lifetime with increasing packing fraction. We show that dynamic heterogeneity may be a direct consequence of this transient structural ordering, which suggests its origin is thermodynamic rather than kinetic. We also reveal that nucleation of crystals preferentially occurs in regions of high medium-range order, reflecting the low crystal-liquid interfacial energy there. These findings may shed new light not only on the fundamental nature of the glass transition, but also the mechanism of crystal nucleation.

  2. Formation mechanism of the low-frequency locally resonant band gap in the two-dimensional ternary phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Liu, Yao-Zong; Wen, Ji-Hong; Yu, Dian-Long

    2006-02-01

    The low-frequency band gap and the corresponding vibration modes in two-dimensional ternary locally resonant phononic crystals are restudied successfully with the lumped-mass method. Compared with the work of C. Goffaux and J. Sánchez-Dehesa (Phys. Rev. B 67 14 4301(2003)), it is shown that there exists an error of about 50% in their calculated results of the band structure and one band is missing in their results. Moreover, the in-plane modes shown in their paper are improper, which results in the wrong conclusion on the mechanism of the ternary locally resonant phononic crystals. Based on the lumped-mass method and better description of the vibration modes according to the band gaps, the locally resonant mechanism in forming the subfrequency gaps is thoroughly analysed. The rule used to judge whether a resonant mode in the phononic crystals can result in a corresponding subfrequency gap is also verified in this ternary case.

  3. Imaging method for downward-looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar based on reweighted atomic norm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Qian; Han, Kuoye; Lin, Yun; Zhang, Bingchen; Liu, Jianguo; Hong, Wen

    2016-01-01

    We propose an imaging algorithm for downward-looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) in the circumstance of cross-track sparse and nonuniform array configuration. Considering the off-grid effect and the resolution improvement, the algorithm combines pseudo-polar formatting algorithm, reweighed atomic norm minimization (RANM), and a parametric relaxation-based cyclic approach (RELAX) to improve the imaging performance with a reduced number of array antennas. RANM is employed in the cross-track imaging after pseudo-polar formatting the DLSLA 3-D SAR echo signal, then the reconstructed results are refined by RELAX. By taking advantage of the reweighted scheme, RANM can improve the resolution of the atomic norm minimization, and outperforms discretized compressive sensing schemes that suffer from off-grid effect. The simulated and real data experiments of DLSLA 3-D SAR verify the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  4. Field Ion Microscopy and Atom Probe Tomography of Metamorphic Magnetite Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, K.; Martens, R. L.; Kelly, T. F.; Evans, N. D.; Miller, M. K.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetite has been analysed using Field Ion Microscopy (FIM) and Atom Probe Tomography (APT), highly attractive techniques for the nanoanalysis of geological materials despite the difficulties inherent in analyzing semiconducting and insulating materials. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Transfer behavior of quantum states between atoms in photonic crystal coupled cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ke; Li Zhiyuan

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the one-excitation dynamics of a quantum system consisting of two two-level atoms each interacting with one of two coupled single-mode cavities via spontaneous emission. When the atoms and cavities are tuned into resonance, a wide variety of time-evolution behaviors can be realized by modulating the atom-cavity coupling strength g and the cavity-cavity hopping strength λ. The dynamics is solved rigorously via the eigenproblem of an ordinary coupled linear system and simple analytical solutions are derived at several extreme situations of g and λ. In the large hopping limit where g >λ, the time-evolution behavior of the system is characterized by the usual slowly varying carrier envelope superimposed upon a fast and violent oscillation. At a certain instant, the energy is fully transferred from the one quantum subsystem to the other. When the two interaction strengths are comparable in magnitude, the dynamics acts as a continuous pulse having irregular frequency and line shape of peaks and valleys, and the complicated time-evolution behaviors are ascribed to the violent competition between all the one-excitation quantum states. The coupled quantum system of atoms and cavities makes a good model to study cavity quantum electrodynamics with great freedoms of many-body interaction.

  6. Anderson Transition of Cold Atoms with Synthetic Spin-Orbit Coupling in Two-Dimensional Speckle Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orso, Giuliano

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the metal-insulator transition occurring in two-dimensional (2D) systems of noninteracting atoms in the presence of artificial spin-orbit interactions and a spatially correlated disorder generated by laser speckles. Based on a high order discretization scheme, we calculate the precise position of the mobility edge and verify that the transition belongs to the symplectic universality class. We show that the mobility edge depends strongly on the mixing angle between Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit couplings. For equal couplings a non-power-law divergence is found, signaling the crossing to the orthogonal class, where such a 2D transition is forbidden.

  7. Atomic resolution crystal structure of Sapp2p, a secreted aspartic protease from Candida parapsilosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dostál, Jiří; Pecina, Adam; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Marečková, L.; Pichová, Iva; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Lepšík, Martin; Brynda, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 12 (2015), s. 2494-2504 ISSN 1399-0047 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23022S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : aspartic protease * Candida parapsilosis * Sapp2p * crystal structure * ultrahigh resolution * interaction energy * quantum mechanics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry; EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (UMG-J) Impact factor: 2.674, year: 2014

  8. Investigations on the two-dimensional aperiodic plasma photonic crystals with fractal Fibonacci sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Feng Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the properties of photonic band gaps (PBGs and defect modes of two-dimensional (2D fractal plasma photonic crystals (PPCs under a transverse-magnetic (TM wave are theoretically investigated by a modified plane wave expansion (PWE method. The configuration of 2D PPCs is the square lattices with the iteration rule of the Fibonacci sequence whose constituents are homogeneous and isotropic. The proposed 2D PPCs is filled with the dielectric cylinders in the plasma background. The accuracy and convergence of the present modified PWE method also are validated by a numerical example. The calculated results illustrate that the enough accuracy and good convergence can be achieved compared to the conventional PWE method, if the number of meshed grids is large enough. The dispersion curves of the proposed PPCs and 2D PPCs with a conventional square lattice are theoretically computed to study the properties of PBGs and defect modes. The simulated results demonstrate that the advantaged properties can be obtained in the proposed PPCs compared to the 2D conventional PPCs with similar lattices. If the Fibonacci sequence is introduced into the 2D PPCs, the larger PBGs and higher cutoff frequency can be achieved. The lower edges of PBGs are flat, which are originated from the Mie resonances. The defect modes can be considered as the quasi-localized states since the Fibonacci sequence has the self-similarity and non-periodicity at the same time. The effects of configurational parameters on the characters of the present PPCs are investigated. The results show that the PBGs and defect modes can be easily manipulated by tuning those parameters.

  9. High resolution imaging of superficial mosaicity in single crystals using grazing incidence fast atom diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalmi, B.; Khemliche, H.; Momeni, A.; Soulisse, P.; Roncin, P.

    2012-11-01

    A new table top technique is used to simultaneously analyze the local morphology of crystalline surfaces as well as the misalignment of large scale domains at the topmost surface layer. The approach is based on fast atom diffraction at grazing incidence (GIFAD); the diffraction pattern yields the structural characteristics and the topology of the surface electronic density with atomic resolution. If superficial mosaicity is present, diffraction patterns arising from each mosaic domain can be distinguished, providing high sensitivity to the properties of each of the domains. Taking NaCl(001) as an example, we observe a discrete tilt angle distribution of the mosaic domains following an arithmetic progression with a 0.025° ± 0.005° difference; a twist mosaic angle of 0.09° ± 0.01° is also observed.

  10. Temperature effects on the atomic structure and kinetics in single crystal electrochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gründer, Yvonne; Markovic, Nenad M.; Thompson, Paul; Lucas, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of temperature on the atomic structure at the electrochemical interface has been studied using in-situ surface x-ray scattering (SXS) during the formation of metal monolayers on a Au(111) electrode. For the surface reconstruction of Au(111), higher temperatures increase the mobility of surface atoms in the unreconstructed phase which then determines the surface ordering during the formation of the reconstruction. For the underpotential deposition (UPD) systems, the surface diffusion of the depositing metal adatoms is significantly reduced at low temperatures which results in the frustration of ordered structures in the case of Cu UPD, occurring on a Br-modified surface, and in the formation of a disordered Ag monolayer during Ag UPD. The results indicate that temperature changes affect the mass transport and diffusion of metal adatoms on the electrode surface. This demonstrates the importance of including temperature as a variable in studying surface structure and reactions at the electrochemical interface.

  11. Direct Atomic Force Microscopy Observation of DNA Tile Crystal Growth at the Single-Molecule Level

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Constantine G.; Hariadi, Rizal F.; Winfree, Erik

    2012-01-01

    While the theoretical implications of models of DNA tile self-assembly have been extensively researched and such models have been used to design DNA tile systems for use in experiments, there has been little research testing the fundamental assumptions of those models. In this paper, we use direct observation of individual tile attachments and detachments of two DNA tile systems on a mica surface imaged with an atomic force microscope (AFM) to compile statistics of tile attachments and detach...

  12. Three dimensional atom probe imaging of GaAsSb quantum rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, A.M.; Marquis, E.A.; Taboada, A.G.; Ripalda, J.M.; Garcia, J.M.; Molina, S.I.

    2011-01-01

    Unambiguous evidence of ring-shaped self-assembled GaSb nanostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy is presented on the basis of atom-probe tomography reconstructions and dark field transmission electron microscopy imaging. The GaAs capping process causes a strong segregation of Sb out of the center of GaSb quantum dots, leading to the self-assembled GaAs x Sb 1-x quantum rings of 20-30 nm in diameter with x∼0.33. -- Highlights: → Atom-probe tomography resolves QR morphology of GaSb self-assembled GaSb buried nanostructures. → From atom-probe tomography compositional distribution has been obtained. → Strong segregation and morphological changes are observed with respect to uncapped QR.

  13. Three dimensional atom probe imaging of GaAsSb quantum rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, A.M., E-mail: ana.beltran@uca.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I.M. y Q.I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Marquis, E.A. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Park roads, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Taboada, A.G.; Ripalda, J.M. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Garcia, J.M. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Columbia University, Department of Physics, New York, NY (United States); Molina, S.I. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I.M. y Q.I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)

    2011-07-15

    Unambiguous evidence of ring-shaped self-assembled GaSb nanostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy is presented on the basis of atom-probe tomography reconstructions and dark field transmission electron microscopy imaging. The GaAs capping process causes a strong segregation of Sb out of the center of GaSb quantum dots, leading to the self-assembled GaAs{sub x}Sb{sub 1-x} quantum rings of 20-30 nm in diameter with x{approx}0.33. -- Highlights: {yields} Atom-probe tomography resolves QR morphology of GaSb self-assembled GaSb buried nanostructures. {yields} From atom-probe tomography compositional distribution has been obtained. {yields} Strong segregation and morphological changes are observed with respect to uncapped QR.

  14. Calculation of spontaneous emission from a V-type three-level atom in photonic crystals using fractional calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Hsieh, Wen-Feng; Wu, Jing-Nuo; Cheng, Szu-Cheng; Li, Yen-Yin

    2011-01-01

    Fractional time derivative, an abstract mathematical operator of fractional calculus, is used to describe the real optical system of a V-type three-level atom embedded in a photonic crystal. A fractional kinetic equation governing the dynamics of the spontaneous emission from this optical system is obtained as a fractional Langevin equation. Solving this fractional kinetic equation by fractional calculus leads to the analytical solutions expressed in terms of fractional exponential functions. The accuracy of the obtained solutions is verified through reducing the system into the special cases whose results are consistent with the experimental observation. With accurate physical results and avoiding the complex integration for solving this optical system, we propose fractional calculus with fractional time derivative as a better mathematical method to study spontaneous emission dynamics from the optical system with non-Markovian dynamics.

  15. Effect of lipid head groups on double-layered two-dimensional crystals formed by aquaporin-0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hite, Richard Kevin; Chiu, Po-Lin; Schuller, Jan Michael; Walz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-0 (AQP0) is a lens-specific water channel that also forms membrane junctions. Reconstitution of AQP0 with dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and E. coli polar lipids (EPL) yielded well-ordered, double-layered two-dimensional (2D) crystals that allowed electron crystallographic structure determination of the AQP0-mediated membrane junction. The interacting tetramers in the two crystalline layers are exactly in register, resulting in crystals with p422 symmetry. The high-resolution density maps also allowed modeling of the annular lipids surrounding the tetramers. Comparison of the DMPC and EPL bilayers suggested that the lipid head groups do not play an important role in the interaction of annular lipids with AQP0. We now reconstituted AQP0 with the anionic lipid dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG), which yielded a mixture of 2D crystals with different symmetries. The different crystal symmetries result from shifts between the two crystalline layers, suggesting that the negatively charged PG head group destabilizes the interaction between the extracellular AQP0 surfaces. Reconstitution of AQP0 with dimyristoyl phosphatidylserine (DMPS), another anionic lipid, yielded crystals that had the usual p422 symmetry, but the crystals showed a pH-dependent tendency to stack through their cytoplasmic surfaces. Finally, AQP0 failed to reconstitute into membranes that were composed of more than 40% dimyristoyl phosphatidic acid (DMPA). Hence, although DMPG, DMPS, and DMPA are all negatively charged lipids, they have very different effects on AQP0 2D crystals, illustrating the importance of the specific lipid head group chemistry beyond its mere charge.

  16. Effect of Lipid Head Groups on Double-Layered Two-Dimensional Crystals Formed by Aquaporin-0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hite, Richard Kevin; Chiu, Po-Lin; Schuller, Jan Michael; Walz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-0 (AQP0) is a lens-specific water channel that also forms membrane junctions. Reconstitution of AQP0 with dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and E. coli polar lipids (EPL) yielded well-ordered, double-layered two-dimensional (2D) crystals that allowed electron crystallographic structure determination of the AQP0-mediated membrane junction. The interacting tetramers in the two crystalline layers are exactly in register, resulting in crystals with p422 symmetry. The high-resolution density maps also allowed modeling of the annular lipids surrounding the tetramers. Comparison of the DMPC and EPL bilayers suggested that the lipid head groups do not play an important role in the interaction of annular lipids with AQP0. We now reconstituted AQP0 with the anionic lipid dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG), which yielded a mixture of 2D crystals with different symmetries. The different crystal symmetries result from shifts between the two crystalline layers, suggesting that the negatively charged PG head group destabilizes the interaction between the extracellular AQP0 surfaces. Reconstitution of AQP0 with dimyristoyl phosphatidylserine (DMPS), another anionic lipid, yielded crystals that had the usual p422 symmetry, but the crystals showed a pH-dependent tendency to stack through their cytoplasmic surfaces. Finally, AQP0 failed to reconstitute into membranes that were composed of more than 40% dimyristoyl phosphatidic acid (DMPA). Hence, although DMPG, DMPS, and DMPA are all negatively charged lipids, they have very different effects on AQP0 2D crystals, illustrating the importance of the specific lipid head group chemistry beyond its mere charge. PMID:25635393

  17. Zak phase induced multiband waveguide by two-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuting; Xu, Tao; Xu, Yun Fei; Hang, Zhi Hong

    2017-08-15

    Interface states in photonic crystals provide efficient approaches to control the flow of light. Photonic Zak phase determines the bulk band properties of photonic crystals, and, by assembling two photonic crystals with different bulk band properties together, deterministic interface states can be realized. By translating each unit cell of a photonic crystal by half the lattice constant, another photonic crystal with identical common gaps but a different Zak phase at each photonic band can be created. By assembling these two photonic crystals together, multiband waveguide can thus be easily created and then experimentally characterized. Our experimental results have good agreement with numerical simulations, and the propagation properties of these measured interface states indicate that this new type of interface state will be a good candidate for future applications of optical communications.

  18. Initiating Heavy-atom Based Phasing by Multi-Dimensional Molecular Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Gourdon, Pontus Emanuel; Liu, Xiangyu

    2014-01-01

    in the determination of a membrane protein structure, the CopA Cu+-ATPase, when other methods had failed to resolve the heavy atom substructure. MRPM is particularly suited for proteins undergoing large conformational changes where multiple search models should be generated, and it enables the identification of weak...... but correct molecular replacement solutions with maximum contrast to prime experimental phasing efforts....

  19. Interaction of Pd single atoms with different CeO2 crystal planes: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bingling; Wang, Jinlong; Ma, Dongwei; Tian, Zhixue; Jiang, Lijuan; Xu, Yan; Cheng, Sujun

    2018-03-01

    The adsorption of single Pd atoms on the various CeO2 surfaces, including (111), (110), and (100), has been studied based on the first-principles calculations. It is found that, according to the calculated adsorption energy, interaction strength between Pd and the three CeO2 surfaces follows the order of (100) > (110) > (111). Interestingly, the effect of the electron localization on the surface Ce ions due to the Pd adsorption on its adsorption stability is more significant for the (110) surface than that for the (111) and (100) surfaces. We also find that the formal oxidation states of Pd0, Pdδ+ (δ < 1) and Pd1+ may appear on the CeO2 (111) surface, and Pdδ+ (δ < 1) and Pd1+ could coexist on the CeO2 (100) surfaces. However, under suitable conditions the CeO2 (110) surface may be covered with Pd2+ ions. Present theoretical results clearly suggest that the interaction between Pd and CeO2 nanocrystals significantly depends on the crystal planes of CeO2. It is expected that our study will give useful insights into the effect of CeO2 crystal plane on the physicochemical and catalytic properties of CeO2 supported Pd catalyst.

  20. Leakage current analysis for dislocations in Na-flux GaN bulk single crystals by conductive atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamachi, T.; Takeuchi, S.; Tohei, T.; Imanishi, M.; Imade, M.; Mori, Y.; Sakai, A.

    2018-04-01

    The mechanisms associated with electrical conduction through individual threading dislocations (TDs) in a Na-flux GaN crystal grown with a multipoint-seed-GaN technique were investigated by conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). To focus on individual TDs, dislocation-related etch pits (DREPs) were formed on the Na-flux GaN surface by wet chemical etching, after which microscopic Pt electrodes were locally fabricated on the DREPs to form conformal contacts to the Na-flux GaN crystal, using electron beam assisted deposition. The C-AFM data clearly demonstrate that the leakage current flows through the individual TD sites. It is also evident that the leakage current and the electrical conduction mechanism vary significantly based on the area within the Na-flux GaN crystal where the TDs are formed. These regions include the c-growth sector (cGS) in which the GaN grows in the [0001 ] direction on top of the point-seed with a c-plane growth front, the facet-growth sector (FGS) in which the GaN grows with {10 1 ¯ 1 } facets on the side of the cGS, the boundary region between the cGS and FGS (BR), and the coalescence boundary region between FGSs (CBR). The local current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the specimen demonstrate space charge limited current conduction and conduction related to band-like trap states associated with TDs in the FGS, BR, and CBR. A detailed analysis of the I-V data indicates that the electrical conduction through TDs in the cGS may proceed via the Poole-Frenkel emission mechanism.

  1. Emergence of Zeolite Analogs and other Microporous Crystals in an Atomic Lattice Model of Silica and Related Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lin; Auerbach, Scott M; Monson, Peter A

    2012-03-15

    The potential of tailored nanopores to transform technologies such as drug delivery, biofuel production, and optical-electronic devices depends on fundamental knowledge of the self-assembly of ordered nanoporous solids. Atomic-level geometries of critical nuclei that lead to such solids have remained hidden in the nanoscale blind spot between local (5 nm) probes of structure. Heroic efforts at molecular simulation of nanopore formation have provided massive libraries of hypothetical structures; (1-5) however, to date no statistical simulation has generated a crystallization pathway from random initial condition to ordered nanoporous solid, until now. In this work, we show that a recently developed atomic lattice model of silica and related materials can form ordered nanoporous solids with a rich variety of structures including known chalcogenides, zeolite analogs, and layered materials. We find that whereas canonical Monte Carlo simulations of the model consistently produce the amorphous solids studied in our previous work, parallel tempering Monte Carlo gives rise to ordered nanoporous solids. The utility of parallel tempering highlights the existence of barriers between amorphous and crystalline phases of our model. Moreover, the self-assembly or nanoporous crystalline phases in the model open the door to detailed understanding of nanopore nucleation.

  2. Contribution of a solute atoms in the relaxation phenomenon at high temperature in Cu-Al single crystal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belamri, C.; Belhas, S.; Rivière, A.

    2009-11-01

    Two Cu-Al single crystals with 7 and 14 at. % Al respectively have been studied using isothermal mechanical spectroscopy (IMS) technique. After a 1% cold work by torsion, the samples have been progressively heated to 1140 K and then cooled until room temperature. IMS experiments allow to compare the isothermal internal friction spectra obtained during the heating (in this case, the annealing temperature is equal to the temperature of measurement) with the measurements performed at various temperature during the cooling after the annealing at 1140 K. Three relaxation peaks were observed. The first one at about 0.4 TM (TM: melting point) is a Zener relaxation peak (PZ) due to the reorientation under constraint of pairs of aluminium atoms. The high temperature annealing does not influence PZ. At about 0.6TM, a peak (P1) related to a dislocation mechanism is evidenced. The relaxation strength of P1 peak decreases with the temperature and a new relaxation peak (P2) is progressively developed. The IMS spectra obtained during the cooling evidenced only P2. The relaxation parameters obtained by the Arrhenius plots and the evolution with the annealing temperature allow to assign P1 and P2 to an interaction between the dislocations and the solute atoms according to the Darinskiy model.

  3. Atomic motion of resonantly vibrating quartz crystal visualized by time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyagi, Shinobu; Osawa, Hitoshi; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Takeda, Shoichi; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Transient atomic displacements during a resonant thickness-shear vibration of AT-cut α-quartz are revealed by time-resolved X-ray diffraction under an alternating electric field. The lattice strain resonantly amplified by the alternating electric field is ∼10 4 times larger than that induced by a static electric field. The resonantly amplified lattice strain is achieved by fast displacements of oxygen anions and collateral resilient deformation of Si−O−Si angles bridging rigid SiO 4 tetrahedra, which efficiently transduce electric energy into elastic energy

  4. Direct atomic force microscopy observation of DNA tile crystal growth at the single-molecule level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Constantine G; Hariadi, Rizal F; Winfree, Erik

    2012-06-27

    While the theoretical implications of models of DNA tile self-assembly have been extensively researched and such models have been used to design DNA tile systems for use in experiments, there has been little research testing the fundamental assumptions of those models. In this paper, we use direct observation of individual tile attachments and detachments of two DNA tile systems on a mica surface imaged with an atomic force microscope (AFM) to compile statistics of tile attachments and detachments. We show that these statistics fit the widely used kinetic Tile Assembly Model and demonstrate AFM movies as a viable technique for directly investigating DNA tile systems during growth rather than after assembly.

  5. Nanoprecipitates in single-crystal molybdenum-alloy nanopillars detected by TEM and atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oveisi, Emad; Bártová, Barbora; Gerstl, Stephan; Zimmermann, Julien; Marichal, Cécile; Van Swygenhoven, Helena; Hébert, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) supported by various chemical analyses techniques as well as atom probe tomography is applied to characterize newly identified nanosized precipitates in Mo-alloy nanopillars that were prepared by directional solidification. It is shown that the α-Mo matrix contains Al-enriched face-centred cubic precipitates which have a 4.12 Å lattice parameter, and exhibit a Kurdjumov–Sachs crystallographic orientation relationship with the matrix. Such precipitates could be responsible for the unusual behaviour of the pillars during compression tests

  6. Atomic-resolution crystal structure of thioredoxin from the acidophilic bacterium Acetobacter aceti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starks, Courtney M; Francois, Julie A; MacArthur, Kelly M; Heard, Brittney Z; Kappock, T Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of thioredoxin (AaTrx) from the acetic acid bacterium Acetobacter aceti was determined at 1 A resolution. This is currently the highest resolution crystal structure available for any thioredoxin. Thioredoxins facilitate thiol-disulfide exchange, a process that is expected to be slow at the low pH values encountered in the A. aceti cytoplasm. Despite the apparent need to function at low pH, neither the active site nor the surface charge distribution of AaTrx is notably different from that of Escherichia coli thioredoxin. Apparently the ancestral thioredoxin was sufficiently stable for use in A. aceti or the need to interact with multiple targets constrained the variation of surface residues. The AaTrx structure presented here provides a clear view of all ionizable protein moieties and waters, a first step in understanding how thiol-disulfide exchange might occur in a low pH cytoplasm, and is a basis for biophysical studies of the mechanism of acid-mediated unfolding. The high resolution of this structure should be useful for computational studies of thioredoxin function, protein structure and dynamics, and side-chain ionization.

  7. Intrinsic retrieval efficiency for quantum memories: A three-dimensional theory of light interaction with an atomic ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujarati, Tanvi P.; Wu, Yukai; Duan, Luming

    2018-03-01

    Duan-Lukin-Cirac-Zoller quantum repeater protocol, which was proposed to realize long distance quantum communication, requires usage of quantum memories. Atomic ensembles interacting with optical beams based on off-resonant Raman scattering serve as convenient on-demand quantum memories. Here, a complete free space, three-dimensional theory of the associated read and write process for this quantum memory is worked out with the aim of understanding intrinsic retrieval efficiency. We develop a formalism to calculate the transverse mode structure for the signal and the idler photons and use the formalism to study the intrinsic retrieval efficiency under various configurations. The effects of atomic density fluctuations and atomic motion are incorporated by numerically simulating this system for a range of realistic experimental parameters. We obtain results that describe the variation in the intrinsic retrieval efficiency as a function of the memory storage time for skewed beam configuration at a finite temperature, which provides valuable information for optimization of the retrieval efficiency in experiments.

  8. Low-dimensional compounds containing cyano groups. XIV. Crystal structure, spectroscopic, thermal and magnetic properties of [CuL 2][Pt(China)4] complexes (L=ethylenediamine or N,N-dimethylethylenediamine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potocnak, Ivan; Vavra, Martin; Cizmar, Erik; Tibenska, Katarina; Orendacova, Alzbeta; Steinborn, Dirk; Wagner, Christoph; Dusek, Michal; Fejfarova, Karla; Schmidt, Harry; Muller, Thomas; Orendac, Martin; Feher, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Violet crystals of [Cu(en) 2 ][Pt(China) 4 ] and blue crystals of [Cu(dmen) 2 ][Pt(China) 4 ] were crystallized from the water-methanol solution containing CuCl 2 .2H 2 O, ethylenediamine (en) or N,N-dimethylethylenediamine (dmen) and K 2 [Pt(China) 4 ].3H 2 O. Both compounds were characterized using elemental analysis, infrared and UV-VIS spectroscopy, magnetic measurements, specific heat measurements and thermal analysis. X-ray structure analysis revealed chain-like structure in both compounds. The covalent chains are built of Cu(II) ions linked by [Pt(China) 4 ] 2- anions in the [111] and [101] direction, respectively. The Cu(II) atoms are hexacoordinated by four nitrogen atoms in the equatorial plane from two molecules of bidentate ligands L with average Cu-N distance of 2.022(2) and 2.049(4) A, respectively. Axial positions are occupied by two nitrogen atoms from bridging [Pt(China) 4 ] 2- anions at longer Cu-N distance of 2.537(2) and 2.600(5) A, respectively. Both materials are characterized by the presence of weak antiferromagnetic exchange coupling. Despite the one-dimensional (1D) character of the structure, the analysis of magnetic properties and specific heat at very low temperatures shows that [Cu(en) 2 ][Pt(China) 4 ] behaves as two-dimensional (2D) spatially anisotropic square lattice Heisenberg magnet, while more pronounced influence of interlayer coupling is observed in [Cu(dmen) 2 ][Pt(China) 4 ]. - Graphical abstract: Chain-like structure in [Cu(en) 2 ][Pt(China) 4 ] (R=H) and [Cu(dmen) 2 ][Pt(China) 4 ] (R=CH 3 ) compounds

  9. crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi; Huang, Yisheng; Zhang, Lizhen; Lin, Zhoubin; Sun, Shijia; Wang, Guofu

    2014-07-01

    A Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal with dimensions of ϕ 17 × 30 mm3 was grown by the Czochralski method. The thermal expansion coefficients of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal are 1.32 × 10-5 K-1 along c-axis and 1.23 × 10-5 K-1 along a-axis, respectively. The spectroscopic characteristics of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal were investigated. The Judd-Ofelt theory was applied to calculate the spectral parameters. The absorption cross sections at 805 nm are 2.17 × 10-20 cm2 with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 15 nm for π-polarization, and 2.29 × 10-20 cm2 with a FWHM of 14 nm for σ-polarization. The emission cross sections are 3.19 × 10-20 cm2 for σ-polarization and 2.67 × 10-20 cm2 for π-polarization at 1,064 nm. The fluorescence quantum efficiency is 67 %. The quasi-cw laser of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal was performed. The maximum output power is 80 mW. The slope efficiency is 7.12 %. The results suggest Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal as a promising laser crystal fit for laser diode pumping.

  10. The finite element method applied to the study of two-dimensional photonic crystals and resonant cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andonegui, Imanol; Garcia-Adeva, Angel J

    2013-02-25

    A critical assessment of the finite element (FE) method for studying two-dimensional dielectric photonic crystals is made. Photonic band structures, transmission coefficients, and quality factors of various two-dimensional, periodic and aperiodic, dielectric photonic crystals are calculated by using the FE (real-space) method and the plane wave expansion or the finite difference time domain (FDTD) methods and a comparison is established between those results. It is found that, contrarily to popular belief, the FE method (FEM) not only reproduces extremely well the results obtained with the standard plane wave method with regards to the eigenvalue analysis (photonic band structure and density of states calculations) but it also allows to study very easily the time-harmonic propagation of electromagnetic fields in finite clusters of arbitrary complexity and, thus, to calculate their transmission coefficients in a simple way. Moreover, the advantages of using this real space method in the context of point defect cluster quality factor calculations are also stressed by comparing the results obtained with this method with those obtained with the FDTD one. As a result of this study, FEM comes out as an stable, robust, rigorous, and reliable tool to study light propagation and confinement in both periodic and aperiodic dielectric photonic crystals and clusters.

  11. Multi-dimensional microanalysis of masklessly implanted atoms using focused heavy ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokuno, Yoshiaki; Iiorino, Yuji; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Kiuchi, Masato; Fujii, Kanenaga; Satou, Mamoru

    1992-01-01

    Multi-dimensional structure fabricated by maskless MeV gold implantation in silicon wafer was analyzed by 3 MeV carbon ion microprobe using a microbeam line developed at GIRIO. The minimum line width of the implanted region was estimated to be about 5 μm. The advantages of heavy ions for microanalysis were demonstrated. (author)

  12. Electronic wave packets in twice-kicked one-dimensional Rydberg atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Aparna; Chatterjee, Supriya; Talukdar, B, E-mail: binoy123@bsnl.i [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan 731235 (India)

    2010-05-01

    We study the coherent control of the shape of an electronic wave packet in a Rydberg atom kicked by two half-cycle pulses. The momentum transferred to excited electrons by the second pulse and its time delay with the first represent two parameters that can be used for shaping the wave packet. We find that rather than working with the momentum transfer, manipulation of the shape using time delay will be more effective in the applicative context. We establish that times of revival and superrevivals of a wave packet in a twice-kicked atom obey a definite law, namely {tau}=2mn{sup 2} (m is an integer and n, the principal quantum number of the electron that receives the initial kick), and are independent of the initial shape of the packet. The revival time is obtained for m=1, and all other values of m give superrevival times.

  13. Three-dimensional atomic imaging of colloidal core-shell nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bals, Sara; Casavola, Marianna; van Huis, Marijn A; Van Aert, Sandra; Batenburg, K Joost; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël

    2011-08-10

    Colloidal core-shell semiconductor nanocrystals form an important class of optoelectronic materials, in which the exciton wave functions can be tailored by the atomic configuration of the core, the interfacial layers, and the shell. Here, we provide a trustful 3D characterization at the atomic scale of a free-standing PbSe(core)-CdSe(shell) nanocrystal by combining electron microscopy and discrete tomography. Our results yield unique insights for understanding the process of cation exchange, which is widely employed in the synthesis of core-shell nanocrystals. The study that we present is generally applicable to the broad range of colloidal heteronanocrystals that currently emerge as a new class of materials with technological importance.

  14. A simple and efficient quasi 3-dimensional viscoelastic model and software for simulation of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solares, Santiago D

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a quasi-3-dimensional (Q3D) viscoelastic model and software tool for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) simulations. The model is based on a 2-dimensional array of standard linear solid (SLS) model elements. The well-known 1-dimensional SLS model is a textbook example in viscoelastic theory but is relatively new in AFM simulation. It is the simplest model that offers a qualitatively correct description of the most fundamental viscoelastic behaviors, namely stress relaxation and creep. However, this simple model does not reflect the correct curvature in the repulsive portion of the force curve, so its application in the quantitative interpretation of AFM experiments is relatively limited. In the proposed Q3D model the use of an array of SLS elements leads to force curves that have the typical upward curvature in the repulsive region, while still offering a very low computational cost. Furthermore, the use of a multidimensional model allows for the study of AFM tips having non-ideal geometries, which can be extremely useful in practice. Examples of typical force curves are provided for single- and multifrequency tapping-mode imaging, for both of which the force curves exhibit the expected features. Finally, a software tool to simulate amplitude and phase spectroscopy curves is provided, which can be easily modified to implement other controls schemes in order to aid in the interpretation of AFM experiments.

  15. Review on one-dimensional nanostructures prepared by electrospinning and atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilágyi, Imre Miklós; Nagy, Dávidné

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the various lD nanostructures, which were prepared by electrospinning and atomic layer deposition (ALD). On the one hand, electrospinning served to make sacrificial polymer templates for the ALD growth; and thus various single or multilayer inorganic nanotubes were obtained. On the other hand, polymer, polymer/inorganic or inorganic nanowire templates were produced by electrospinning. By a consecutive ALD reaction various core/shell nanowires were synthesized

  16. Vacancies and atomic processes in intermetallics - From crystals to quasicrystals and bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Hans-Eckhardt [Institute of Theoretical and Applied Physics, Stuttgart University, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Baier, Falko [Voith Turbo Comp., Alexanderstr. 2, 89552 Heidenheim (Germany); Mueller, Markus A. [GFT Technologies A. G., Filderhauptstr. 142, 70599 Stuttgart (Germany); Reichle, Klaus J. [Philipp-Matthaeus-Hahn School, Jakob-Beutter-Str. 15, 72336 Balingen (Germany); Reimann, Klaus [NXP Semiconductors, Central Research and Development, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Rempel, Andrey A. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ul. Pervomaiskaya 91, 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Sato, Kiminori [Tokyo Gakugei University, Nukuikita 4-1-1, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Ye, Feng [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Xiangyi [Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Sprengel, Wolfgang [Institute of Materials Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria)

    2011-10-15

    A review is given on atomic vacancies in intermetallic compounds. The intermetallic compounds cover crystalline, quasicrystalline, and bulk metallic glass (BMG) structures. Vacancies can be specifically characterized by their positron lifetimes, by the coincident measurement of the Doppler broadening of the two quanta emitted by positron-electron annihilation, or by time-differential dilatometry. By these techniques, high concentrations and low mobilities of thermal vacancies were found in open-structured B2 intermetallics such as FeAl or NiAl, whereas the concentrations of vacancies are low and their mobilities high in close-packed structure as, e.g., L1{sub 2}-Ni{sub 3}Al. The activation volumes of vacancy formation and migration are determined by high-pressure experiments. The favorable sublattice for vacancy formation is found to be the majority sublattice in Fe{sub 61}Al{sub 39} and in MoSi{sub 2}. In the icosahedral quasicrystal Al{sub 70}Pd{sub 21}Mn{sub 9} the thermal vacancy concentration is low, whereas in the BMG Zr{sub 57}Cu{sub 15.4}Ni{sub 12.6}Nb{sub 3}Al{sub 10} thermal vacancies are found in high concentrations with low mobilities. This may determine the basic mechanisms of the glass transition. Making use of the experimentally determined vacancy data, the main features of atomic diffusion studies in crystalline intermetallics, in quasicrystals, and in BMGs can be understood. Manfred Faehnle and his group have substantially contributed to the theoretical understanding of vacancies and diffusion mechanisms in intermetallics. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. The role of lipids and salts in two-dimensional crystallization of the glycine-betaine transporter BetP from Corynebacterium glutamicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsai, Ching-Ju; Ejsing, Christer S.; Shevchenko, Andrej

    2007-01-01

    The osmoregulated and chill-sensitive glycine-betaine transporter (BetP) from Corynebacterium glutamicum was reconstituted into lipids to form two-dimensional (2D) crystals. The sensitivity of BetP partly bases on its interaction with lipids. Here we demonstrate that lipids and salts influence...... crystal morphology and crystallinity of a C-terminally truncated BetP. The salt type and concentration during crystallization determined whether crystals grew in the form of planar-tubes, sheets or vesicles, while the lipid type influenced crystal packing and order. Three different lipid preparations...... for 2D crystallization were compared. Only the use of lipids extracted from C. glutamicum cells led to the formation of large, well-ordered crystalline areas. To understand the lipid-derived influence on crystallinity, lipid extracts from different stages of the crystallization process were analyzed...

  18. Research on the filter properties of the one-dimensional three sects photonic crystal with symmetrical structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-quan; Tian, Xiu-xian; Wang, Hui-bo; Zhang, Tong

    2008-03-01

    To Construct the one-dimensional three sects photonic crystal with symmetrical structure in the form of (AB) N1 (BA) N2, a numerical calculation is conducted using the transfer matrix method of photonic crystal. It is found that in the main prohibitive bands of transmission spectrum there are extremely narrow single transmission peaks. The changing laws of the transmission peak position λ with the changes of the period quantities N i (i=1,2), the refractive rate n j (j=1,2,3) and the thickness a, b and c are analyzed. It is concluded that they can be approximately considered as linear in a small range and N I = N II = 7 is the optimal period quantities in theory. Based on these characteristics, through the adjustment of the parameters, the light needed is distilled in the mixing light in the range of 2280~2396 nm. The result is satisfactory.

  19. Simultaneous sensing of light and sound velocities of fluids in a two-dimensional phoXonic crystal with defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoudache, Samira [Institut d' Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, Université de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Université Mouloud Mammeri, B.P. 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Pennec, Yan, E-mail: yan.pennec@univ-lille1.fr; Djafari Rouhani, Bahram [Institut d' Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, Université de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Khater, Antoine [Institut des Molécules et Matériaux du Mans UMR 6283 CNRS, Université du Maine, 72085 Le Mans (France); Lucklum, Ralf [Institute of Micro and Sensor Systems (IMOS), Otto-von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg (Germany); Tigrine, Rachid [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Université Mouloud Mammeri, B.P. 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria)

    2014-04-07

    We theoretically investigate the potentiality of dual phononic-photonic (the so-called phoxonic) crystals for liquid sensing applications. We study the transmission through a two-dimensional (2D) crystal made of infinite cylindrical holes in a silicon substrate, where one row of holes oriented perpendicular to the propagation direction is filled with a liquid. The infiltrated holes may have a different radius than the regular holes. We show, in the defect structure, the existence of well-defined features (peaks or dips) in the transmission spectra of acoustic and optical waves and estimate their sensitivity to the sound and light velocity of the analyte. Some of the geometrical requirements behave in opposite directions when searching for an efficient sensing of either sound or light velocities. Hence, a compromise in the choice of the parameters may become necessary in making the phoxonic sensor.

  20. A smart thermo- and pH-responsive microfiltration membrane based on three-dimensional inverse colloidal crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bing; Song, Qianqian; Cong, Hailin; Xu, Xiaodan; Han, Dongwei; Geng, Zhongmin; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Usman, Muhammad

    2017-09-21

    In this paper, a thermo- and pH-responsive microfiltration membrane was prepared based on three-dimensional (3D) inverse colloidal crystals (ICC). To manufacture the smart ICC membrane, the typical thermo-responsive N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) and pH-responsive methacrylic acid (MAA) were polymerized inside silica colloidal crystals. The smart ICC membranes were characterized by SEM, IR and contact angle measurements. Moreover, the permeability of smart microfiltration membrane was carried out by the KCl diffusion tests. The result showed that effective diameter of the polymer ICC membrane can be reversible tuned by temperature and pH. Besides, the functional ICC membrane showed outstanding temperature- and pH-responsive gating property, which was applied to separate particles of different sizes. The savvy environment-responsive gating membranes have potential uses in filtration, separation, purification, sensor and other applications.