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Sample records for diaphragmatic motion artifacts

  1. Evaluation of diaphragmatic motion in normal and diaphragmatic paralyzed dogs using M-mode ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mihyun; Lee, Namsoon; Kim, Ahyoung; Keh, Seoyeon; Lee, Jinsoo; Kim, Hyunwook; Choi, Mincheol

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis in dogs is currently based on fluoroscopic detection of unequal movement between the crura. Bilateral paralysis may be more difficult to confirm with fluoroscopy because diaphragmatic movement is sometimes produced by compensatory abdominal muscle contractions. The purpose of this study was to develop a new method to evaluate diaphragmatic movement using M-mode ultrasonography and to describe findings for normal and diaphragmatic paralyzed dogs. Fifty-five clinically normal dogs and two dogs with diaphragmatic paralysis were recruited. Thoracic radiographs were acquired for all dogs and fluoroscopy studies were also acquired for clinically affected dogs. Two observers independently measured diaphragmatic direction of motion and amplitude of excursion using M-mode ultrasonography for dogs meeting study inclusion criteria. Eight of the clinically normal dogs were excluded due to abnormal thoracic radiographic findings. For the remaining normal dogs, the lower limit values of diaphragmatic excursion were 2.85-2.98 mm during normal breathing. One dog with bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis showed paradoxical movement of both crura at the end of inspiration. One dog with unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis had diaphragmatic excursion values of 2.00 ± 0.42 mm on the left side and 4.05 ± 1.48 mm on the right side. The difference between left and right diaphragmatic excursion values was 55%. Findings indicated that M-mode ultrasonography is a relatively simple and objective method for measuring diaphragmatic movement in dogs. Future studies are needed in a larger number of dogs with diaphragmatic paralysis to determine the diagnostic sensitivity of this promising new technique. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  2. Motion artifacts in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.K.

    1979-01-01

    In the year 1972, the first Computed Tomography Scanner (or CT) was introduced and caused a revolution in the field of Diagnostic Radiology. A tomogram is a cross-sectional image of a three-dimensional object obtained through non-invasive measurements. The image that is presented is very similar to what would be seen if a thin cross-sectional slice of the patient was examined. In Computed Tomography, x-rays are passed through the body of a patient in many different directions and their attenuation is detected. By using some mathematical theorems, the attenuation information can be converted into the density of the patient along the x-ray path. Combined with modern sophisticated computer signal processing technology, a cross-sectional image can be generated and displayed on a TV monitor. Usually a good CT image relies on the patient not moving during the x-ray scanning. However, for some unconscious or severely ill patients, this is very difficult to achieve. Thus, the motion during the scan causes the so-called motion artifacts which distort the displayed image and sometimes these motion artifacts make diagnosis impossible. Today, to remove or avoid motion artifacts is one of the major efforts in developing new scanner systems. In this thesis, a better understanding of the motion artifacts problem in CT scaning is gained through computer simulations, real scanner experiments and theoretical analyses. The methods by which the distorted image can be improved are simulated also. In particular, it is assumed that perfect knowledge of the patient motion is known since this represents the theoretical limit on how well the distorted image can be improved

  3. Adaptive cancellation of motion artifact in wearable biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Rasoul; Nourani, Mehrdad; Panahi, Issa

    2012-01-01

    The performance of wearable biosensors is highly influenced by motion artifact. In this paper, a model is proposed for analysis of motion artifact in wearable photoplethysmography (PPG) sensors. Using this model, we proposed a robust real-time technique to estimate fundamental frequency and generate a noise reference signal. A Least Mean Square (LMS) adaptive noise canceler is then designed and validated using our synthetic noise generator. The analysis and results on proposed technique for noise cancellation shows promising performance.

  4. Motion Artifact in the MR imaging of temporomandibular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamamura, Kiyoharu; Miyajima, Hisashi; Nihei, Yoshinobu; Nemoto, Ryuichi; Ohno, Tomoya

    1997-01-01

    Recently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is indispensable for the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Motion Artifacts of MRI occur more frequently than in other conventional methods, because it takes a long time to obtain the images. This paper reported on Motion Artifacts on MRI. MRI studies of 232 temporomandibular joints were performed in 116 patients with TMD by using a 0.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner, with spin echo sequence: protondensity-weighted. And we took MRI slices at opening phase and closing phase. So 232 slices were gathered and we evaluated clinically the incidence of Motion Artifacts, that is to say, double and multiple images and other factors. The 103 slices in 56 patients showed Motion Artifacts. There is no significant difference between sexes. By age group, those in their teens were most frequent, followed by those in their fifties, forties, thirties and twenties. Also the same results were obtained for double image and multiple image. Incidence of Motion Artifact was most frequent at the opening phase. There is no significant difference between double and multiple image. (author)

  5. Two-dimensional analysis of motion artifacts, including flow effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litt, A.M.; Brody, A.S.; Spangler, R.A.; Scott, P.D.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of motion on magnetic resonance images have been theoretically analyzed for the case of a point-like object in simple harmonic motion and for other one-dimensional trajectories. The authors of this paper extend this analysis to a generalized two-dimensional magnetization with an arbitrary motion trajectory. The authors provide specific solutions for the clinically relevant cases of the cross-sections of cylindrical objects in the body, such as the aorta, which has a roughly one-dimensional, simple harmonic motion during respiration. By extending the solution to include inhomogeneous magnetizations, the authors present a model which allows the effects of motion artifacts and flow artifacts to be analyzed simultaneously

  6. Quantification of renal and diaphragmatic interfractional motion in pediatric image-guided radiation therapy: A multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, Sophie C.; van Dijk, Irma W. E. M.; de Jong, Rianne; Visser, Jorrit; Fajardo, Raquel Dávila; Ronckers, Cécile M.; Janssens, Geert O. R. J.; Maduro, John H.; Rasch, Coen R. N.; Alderliesten, Tanja; Bel, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    To quantify renal and diaphragmatic interfractional motion in order to estimate systematic and random errors, and to investigate the correlation between interfractional motion and patient-specific factors. We used 527 retrospective abdominal-thoracic cone beam CT scans of 39 childhood cancer

  7. Quantification of renal and diaphragmatic interfractional motion in pediatric image-guided radiation therapy: A multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, S.C.; Dijk, I.W. van; Jong, R. de; Visser, J.; Fajardo, R.D.; Ronckers, C.M.; Janssens, G.O.R.J.; Maduro, J.H.; Rasch, C.R.; Alderliesten, T.; Bel, A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To quantify renal and diaphragmatic interfractional motion in order to estimate systematic and random errors, and to investigate the correlation between interfractional motion and patient-specific factors. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We used 527 retrospective abdominal-thoracic

  8. Motion-induced dose artifacts in helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bryan; Chen, Jeff; Battista, Jerry [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON (Canada); Kron, Tomas [Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, Melbourne (Australia)], E-mail: bryan.kim@lhsc.on.ca

    2009-10-07

    Tumor motion is a particular concern for a complex treatment modality such as helical tomotherapy, where couch position, gantry rotation and MLC leaf opening all change with time. In the present study, we have investigated the impact of tumor motion for helical tomotherapy, which could result in three distinct motion-induced dose artifacts, namely (1) dose rounding, (2) dose rippling and (3) IMRT leaf opening asynchronization effect. Dose rounding and dose rippling effects have been previously described, while the IMRT leaf opening asynchronization effect is a newly discovered motion-induced dose artifact. Dose rounding is the penumbral widening of a delivered dose distribution near the edges of a target volume along the direction of tumor motion. Dose rippling is a series of periodic dose peaks and valleys observed within the target region along the direction of couch motion, due to an asynchronous interplay between the couch motion and the longitudinal component of tumor motion. The IMRT leaf opening asynchronization effect is caused by an asynchronous interplay between the temporal patterns of leaf openings and tumor motion. The characteristics of each dose artifact were investigated individually as functions of target motion amplitude and period for both non-IMRT and IMRT helical tomotherapy cases, through computer simulation modeling and experimental verification. The longitudinal dose profiles generated by the simulation program agreed with the experimental data within {+-}0.5% and {+-}1.5% inside the PTV region for the non-IMRT and IMRT cases, respectively. The dose rounding effect produced a penumbral increase up to 20.5 mm for peak-to-peak target motion amplitudes ranging from 1.0 cm to 5.0 cm. Maximum dose rippling magnitude of 25% was calculated, when the target motion period approached an unusually high value of 10 s. The IMRT leaf opening asynchronization effect produced dose differences ranging from -29% to 7% inside the PTV region. This information

  9. Rapid estimation of 4DCT motion-artifact severity based on 1D breathing-surrogate periodicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guang, E-mail: lig2@mskcc.org; Caraveo, Marshall [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Wei, Jie [Department of Computer Science, City College of New York, New York, New York 10031 (United States); Rimner, Andreas; Wu, Abraham J.; Goodman, Karyn A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Yorke, Ellen [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Motion artifacts are common in patient four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images, leading to an ill-defined tumor volume with large variations for radiotherapy treatment and a poor foundation with low imaging fidelity for studying respiratory motion. The authors developed a method to estimate 4DCT image quality by establishing a correlation between the severity of motion artifacts in 4DCT images and the periodicity of the corresponding 1D respiratory waveform (1DRW) used for phase binning in 4DCT reconstruction. Methods: Discrete Fourier transformation (DFT) was applied to analyze 1DRW periodicity. The breathing periodicity index (BPI) was defined as the sum of the largest five Fourier coefficients, ranging from 0 to 1. Distortional motion artifacts (excluding blurring) of cine-scan 4DCT at the junctions of adjacent couch positions around the diaphragm were classified in three categories: incomplete, overlapping, and duplicate anatomies. To quantify these artifacts, discontinuity of the diaphragm at the junctions was measured in distance and averaged along six directions in three orthogonal views. Artifacts per junction (APJ) across the entire diaphragm were calculated in each breathing phase and phase-averaged APJ{sup ¯}, defined as motion-artifact severity (MAS), was obtained for each patient. To make MAS independent of patient-specific motion amplitude, two new MAS quantities were defined: MAS{sup D} is normalized to the maximum diaphragmatic displacement and MAS{sup V} is normalized to the mean diaphragmatic velocity (the breathing period was obtained from DFT analysis of 1DRW). Twenty-six patients’ free-breathing 4DCT images and corresponding 1DRW data were studied. Results: Higher APJ values were found around midventilation and full inhalation while the lowest APJ values were around full exhalation. The distribution of MAS is close to Poisson distribution with a mean of 2.2 mm. The BPI among the 26 patients was calculated with a value

  10. Rapid estimation of 4DCT motion-artifact severity based on 1D breathing-surrogate periodicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guang; Caraveo, Marshall; Wei, Jie; Rimner, Andreas; Wu, Abraham J.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Yorke, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Motion artifacts are common in patient four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images, leading to an ill-defined tumor volume with large variations for radiotherapy treatment and a poor foundation with low imaging fidelity for studying respiratory motion. The authors developed a method to estimate 4DCT image quality by establishing a correlation between the severity of motion artifacts in 4DCT images and the periodicity of the corresponding 1D respiratory waveform (1DRW) used for phase binning in 4DCT reconstruction. Methods: Discrete Fourier transformation (DFT) was applied to analyze 1DRW periodicity. The breathing periodicity index (BPI) was defined as the sum of the largest five Fourier coefficients, ranging from 0 to 1. Distortional motion artifacts (excluding blurring) of cine-scan 4DCT at the junctions of adjacent couch positions around the diaphragm were classified in three categories: incomplete, overlapping, and duplicate anatomies. To quantify these artifacts, discontinuity of the diaphragm at the junctions was measured in distance and averaged along six directions in three orthogonal views. Artifacts per junction (APJ) across the entire diaphragm were calculated in each breathing phase and phase-averaged APJ ¯ , defined as motion-artifact severity (MAS), was obtained for each patient. To make MAS independent of patient-specific motion amplitude, two new MAS quantities were defined: MAS D is normalized to the maximum diaphragmatic displacement and MAS V is normalized to the mean diaphragmatic velocity (the breathing period was obtained from DFT analysis of 1DRW). Twenty-six patients’ free-breathing 4DCT images and corresponding 1DRW data were studied. Results: Higher APJ values were found around midventilation and full inhalation while the lowest APJ values were around full exhalation. The distribution of MAS is close to Poisson distribution with a mean of 2.2 mm. The BPI among the 26 patients was calculated with a value ranging from 0

  11. Negligible motion artifacts in scalp electroencephalography (EEG during treadmill walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eNathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent Mobile Brain/Body Imaging (MoBI techniques based on active electrode scalp electroencephalogram (EEG allow the acquisition and real-time analysis of brain dynamics during active unrestrained motor behavior involving whole body movements such as treadmill walking, over-ground walking and other locomotive and non-locomotive tasks. Unfortunately, MoBI protocols are prone to physiological and non-physiological artifacts, including motion artifacts that may contaminate the EEG recordings. A few attempts have been made to quantify these artifacts during locomotion tasks but with inconclusive results due in part to methodological pitfalls. In this paper, we investigate the potential contributions of motion artifacts in scalp EEG during treadmill walking at three different speeds (1.5, 3.0, and 4.5 km/h using a wireless 64 channel active EEG system and a wireless inertial sensor attached to the subject’s head. The experimental setup was designed according to good measurement practices using state-of-the-art commercially-available instruments, and the measurements were analyzed using Fourier analysis and wavelet coherence approaches. Contrary to prior claims, the subjects’ motion did not significantly affect their EEG during treadmill walking although precaution should be taken when gait speeds approach 4.5 km/h. Overall, these findings suggest how MoBI methods may be safely deployed in neural, cognitive, and rehabilitation engineering applications.

  12. Motion Artifact Quantification and Sensor Fusion for Unobtrusive Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Hoog Antink

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sensors integrated into objects of everyday life potentially allow unobtrusive health monitoring at home. However, since the coupling of sensors and subject is not as well-defined as compared to a clinical setting, the signal quality is much more variable and can be disturbed significantly by motion artifacts. One way of tackling this challenge is the combined evaluation of multiple channels via sensor fusion. For robust and accurate sensor fusion, analyzing the influence of motion on different modalities is crucial. In this work, a multimodal sensor setup integrated into an armchair is presented that combines capacitively coupled electrocardiography, reflective photoplethysmography, two high-frequency impedance sensors and two types of ballistocardiography sensors. To quantify motion artifacts, a motion protocol performed by healthy volunteers is recorded with a motion capture system, and reference sensors perform cardiorespiratory monitoring. The shape-based signal-to-noise ratio SNR S is introduced and used to quantify the effect on motion on different sensing modalities. Based on this analysis, an optimal combination of sensors and fusion methodology is developed and evaluated. Using the proposed approach, beat-to-beat heart-rate is estimated with a coverage of 99.5% and a mean absolute error of 7.9 ms on 425 min of data from seven volunteers in a proof-of-concept measurement scenario.

  13. Motion Artifact Quantification and Sensor Fusion for Unobtrusive Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoog Antink, Christoph; Schulz, Florian; Walter, Marian

    2017-01-01

    Sensors integrated into objects of everyday life potentially allow unobtrusive health monitoring at home. However, since the coupling of sensors and subject is not as well-defined as compared to a clinical setting, the signal quality is much more variable and can be disturbed significantly by motion artifacts. One way of tackling this challenge is the combined evaluation of multiple channels via sensor fusion. For robust and accurate sensor fusion, analyzing the influence of motion on different modalities is crucial. In this work, a multimodal sensor setup integrated into an armchair is presented that combines capacitively coupled electrocardiography, reflective photoplethysmography, two high-frequency impedance sensors and two types of ballistocardiography sensors. To quantify motion artifacts, a motion protocol performed by healthy volunteers is recorded with a motion capture system, and reference sensors perform cardiorespiratory monitoring. The shape-based signal-to-noise ratio SNRS is introduced and used to quantify the effect on motion on different sensing modalities. Based on this analysis, an optimal combination of sensors and fusion methodology is developed and evaluated. Using the proposed approach, beat-to-beat heart-rate is estimated with a coverage of 99.5% and a mean absolute error of 7.9 ms on 425 min of data from seven volunteers in a proof-of-concept measurement scenario. PMID:29295594

  14. Motion Artifact Quantification and Sensor Fusion for Unobtrusive Health Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoog Antink, Christoph; Schulz, Florian; Leonhardt, Steffen; Walter, Marian

    2017-12-25

    Sensors integrated into objects of everyday life potentially allow unobtrusive health monitoring at home. However, since the coupling of sensors and subject is not as well-defined as compared to a clinical setting, the signal quality is much more variable and can be disturbed significantly by motion artifacts. One way of tackling this challenge is the combined evaluation of multiple channels via sensor fusion. For robust and accurate sensor fusion, analyzing the influence of motion on different modalities is crucial. In this work, a multimodal sensor setup integrated into an armchair is presented that combines capacitively coupled electrocardiography, reflective photoplethysmography, two high-frequency impedance sensors and two types of ballistocardiography sensors. To quantify motion artifacts, a motion protocol performed by healthy volunteers is recorded with a motion capture system, and reference sensors perform cardiorespiratory monitoring. The shape-based signal-to-noise ratio SNR S is introduced and used to quantify the effect on motion on different sensing modalities. Based on this analysis, an optimal combination of sensors and fusion methodology is developed and evaluated. Using the proposed approach, beat-to-beat heart-rate is estimated with a coverage of 99.5% and a mean absolute error of 7.9 ms on 425 min of data from seven volunteers in a proof-of-concept measurement scenario.

  15. Correcting for motion artifact in handheld laser speckle images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertsakdadet, Ben; Yang, Bruce Y.; Dunn, Cody E.; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Crouzet, Christian; Bernal, Nicole; Durkin, Anthony J.; Choi, Bernard

    2018-03-01

    Laser speckle imaging (LSI) is a wide-field optical technique that enables superficial blood flow quantification. LSI is normally performed in a mounted configuration to decrease the likelihood of motion artifact. However, mounted LSI systems are cumbersome and difficult to transport quickly in a clinical setting for which portability is essential in providing bedside patient care. To address this issue, we created a handheld LSI device using scientific grade components. To account for motion artifact of the LSI device used in a handheld setup, we incorporated a fiducial marker (FM) into our imaging protocol and determined the difference between highest and lowest speckle contrast values for the FM within each data set (Kbest and Kworst). The difference between Kbest and Kworst in mounted and handheld setups was 8% and 52%, respectively, thereby reinforcing the need for motion artifact quantification. When using a threshold FM speckle contrast value (KFM) to identify a subset of images with an acceptable level of motion artifact, mounted and handheld LSI measurements of speckle contrast of a flow region (KFLOW) in in vitro flow phantom experiments differed by 8%. Without the use of the FM, mounted and handheld KFLOW values differed by 20%. To further validate our handheld LSI device, we compared mounted and handheld data from an in vivo porcine burn model of superficial and full thickness burns. The speckle contrast within the burn region (KBURN) of the mounted and handheld LSI data differed by burns. Collectively, our results suggest the potential of handheld LSI with an FM as a suitable alternative to mounted LSI, especially in challenging clinical settings with space limitations such as the intensive care unit.

  16. The relation between respiratory motion artifact correction and lung standardized uptake value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Lijie; Liu Xiaojian; Liu Jie; Xu Rui; Yan Jue

    2014-01-01

    PET/CT is playing an important role in disease diagnosis and therapeutic evaluation. But the respiratory motion artifact may bring trouble in diagnosis and therapy. There are many methods to correct the respiratory motion artifact. Respiratory gated PET/CT is applied most extensively of them. Using respiratory gated PET/CT to correct respiratory motion artifact can increase the maximum standardized uptake value of lung lesion obviously, thereby improving the quality of image and accuracy of diagnosis. (authors)

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance method and apparatus for reducing motion artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailes, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus for imaging a region of a body in which part of the region is moving with a motion such that its displacement with respect to time is a nonmonotonic function during a time period over which a plurality of NMR data signals, which together define an image, are collected. The apparatus is described comprising: excitation means arranged to excite nuclear magnetic spins preferentially in the region; encoding means arranged to encode the magnetic spins; data collection means arranged to collect data signals representative of encoded magnetic spins; display means responsive to collected data signals to display an image of the region; measuring means arranged to produce an output indicative of the displacement of the moving part of the region; and control means for controlling the encoding means during the time period in dependence on the output of the measuring means so that data signals collected during the time period are collected in an order dependent on the motion such that motion artifacts are reduced

  18. Photoplethysmograph signal reconstruction based on a novel motion artifact detection-reduction approach. Part II: Motion and noise artifact removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehizadeh, S M A; Dao, Duy K; Chong, Jo Woon; McManus, David; Darling, Chad; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Chon, Ki H

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a new method to reconstruct motion and noise artifact (MNA) contaminated photoplethysmogram (PPG) data. A method to detect MNA corrupted data is provided in a companion paper. Our reconstruction algorithm is based on an iterative motion artifact removal (IMAR) approach, which utilizes the singular spectral analysis algorithm to remove MNA artifacts so that the most accurate estimates of uncorrupted heart rates (HRs) and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) values recorded by a pulse oximeter can be derived. Using both computer simulations and three different experimental data sets, we show that the proposed IMAR approach can reliably reconstruct MNA corrupted data segments, as the estimated HR and SpO2 values do not significantly deviate from the uncorrupted reference measurements. Comparison of the accuracy of reconstruction of the MNA corrupted data segments between our IMAR approach and the time-domain independent component analysis (TD-ICA) is made for all data sets as the latter method has been shown to provide good performance. For simulated data, there were no significant differences in the reconstructed HR and SpO2 values starting from 10 dB down to -15 dB for both white and colored noise contaminated PPG data using IMAR; for TD-ICA, significant differences were observed starting at 10 dB. Two experimental PPG data sets were created with contrived MNA by having subjects perform random forehead and rapid side-to-side finger movements show that; the performance of the IMAR approach on these data sets was quite accurate as non-significant differences in the reconstructed HR and SpO2 were found compared to non-contaminated reference values, in most subjects. In comparison, the accuracy of the TD-ICA was poor as there were significant differences in reconstructed HR and SpO2 values in most subjects. For non-contrived MNA corrupted PPG data, which were collected with subjects performing walking and stair climbing tasks, the IMAR significantly

  19. Motion artifacts in functional near-infrared spectroscopy: a comparison of motion correction techniques applied to real cognitive data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigadoi, Sabrina; Ceccherini, Lisa; Cutini, Simone; Scarpa, Fabio; Scatturin, Pietro; Selb, Juliette; Gagnon, Louis; Boas, David A.; Cooper, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Motion artifacts are a significant source of noise in many functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) experiments. Despite this, there is no well-established method for their removal. Instead, functional trials of fNIRS data containing a motion artifact are often rejected completely. However, in most experimental circumstances the number of trials is limited, and multiple motion artifacts are common, particularly in challenging populations. Many methods have been proposed recently to correct for motion artifacts, including principle component analysis, spline interpolation, Kalman filtering, wavelet filtering and correlation-based signal improvement. The performance of different techniques has been often compared in simulations, but only rarely has it been assessed on real functional data. Here, we compare the performance of these motion correction techniques on real functional data acquired during a cognitive task, which required the participant to speak aloud, leading to a low-frequency, low-amplitude motion artifact that is correlated with the hemodynamic response. To compare the efficacy of these methods, objective metrics related to the physiology of the hemodynamic response have been derived. Our results show that it is always better to correct for motion artifacts than reject trials, and that wavelet filtering is the most effective approach to correcting this type of artifact, reducing the area under the curve where the artifact is present in 93% of the cases. Our results therefore support previous studies that have shown wavelet filtering to be the most promising and powerful technique for the correction of motion artifacts in fNIRS data. The analyses performed here can serve as a guide for others to objectively test the impact of different motion correction algorithms and therefore select the most appropriate for the analysis of their own fNIRS experiment. PMID:23639260

  20. TARGETED PRINCIPLE COMPONENT ANALYSIS: A NEW MOTION ARTIFACT CORRECTION APPROACH FOR NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel, Meryem A; Selb, Juliette; Cooper, Robert J; Boas, David A

    2014-03-01

    As near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) broadens its application area to different age and disease groups, motion artifacts in the NIRS signal due to subject movement is becoming an important challenge. Motion artifacts generally produce signal fluctuations that are larger than physiological NIRS signals, thus it is crucial to correct for them before obtaining an estimate of stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses. There are various methods for correction such as principle component analysis (PCA), wavelet-based filtering and spline interpolation. Here, we introduce a new approach to motion artifact correction, targeted principle component analysis (tPCA), which incorporates a PCA filter only on the segments of data identified as motion artifacts. It is expected that this will overcome the issues of filtering desired signals that plagues standard PCA filtering of entire data sets. We compared the new approach with the most effective motion artifact correction algorithms on a set of data acquired simultaneously with a collodion-fixed probe (low motion artifact content) and a standard Velcro probe (high motion artifact content). Our results show that tPCA gives statistically better results in recovering hemodynamic response function (HRF) as compared to wavelet-based filtering and spline interpolation for the Velcro probe. It results in a significant reduction in mean-squared error (MSE) and significant enhancement in Pearson's correlation coefficient to the true HRF. The collodion-fixed fiber probe with no motion correction performed better than the Velcro probe corrected for motion artifacts in terms of MSE and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Thus, if the experimental study permits, the use of a collodion-fixed fiber probe may be desirable. If the use of a collodion-fixed probe is not feasible, then we suggest the use of tPCA in the processing of motion artifact contaminated data.

  1. TARGETED PRINCIPLE COMPONENT ANALYSIS: A NEW MOTION ARTIFACT CORRECTION APPROACH FOR NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    YÜCEL, MERYEM A.; SELB, JULIETTE; COOPER, ROBERT J.; BOAS, DAVID A.

    2014-01-01

    As near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) broadens its application area to different age and disease groups, motion artifacts in the NIRS signal due to subject movement is becoming an important challenge. Motion artifacts generally produce signal fluctuations that are larger than physiological NIRS signals, thus it is crucial to correct for them before obtaining an estimate of stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses. There are various methods for correction such as principle component analysis (PCA), wavelet-based filtering and spline interpolation. Here, we introduce a new approach to motion artifact correction, targeted principle component analysis (tPCA), which incorporates a PCA filter only on the segments of data identified as motion artifacts. It is expected that this will overcome the issues of filtering desired signals that plagues standard PCA filtering of entire data sets. We compared the new approach with the most effective motion artifact correction algorithms on a set of data acquired simultaneously with a collodion-fixed probe (low motion artifact content) and a standard Velcro probe (high motion artifact content). Our results show that tPCA gives statistically better results in recovering hemodynamic response function (HRF) as compared to wavelet-based filtering and spline interpolation for the Velcro probe. It results in a significant reduction in mean-squared error (MSE) and significant enhancement in Pearson’s correlation coefficient to the true HRF. The collodion-fixed fiber probe with no motion correction performed better than the Velcro probe corrected for motion artifacts in terms of MSE and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Thus, if the experimental study permits, the use of a collodion-fixed fiber probe may be desirable. If the use of a collodion-fixed probe is not feasible, then we suggest the use of tPCA in the processing of motion artifact contaminated data. PMID:25360181

  2. Investigating the possible effect of electrode support structure on motion artifact in wearable bioelectric signal monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cömert, Alper; Hyttinen, Jari

    2015-05-15

    With advances in technology and increasing demand, wearable biosignal monitoring is developing and new applications are emerging. One of the main challenges facing the widespread use of wearable monitoring systems is the motion artifact. The sources of the motion artifact lie in the skin-electrode interface. Reducing the motion and deformation at this interface should have positive effects on signal quality. In this study, we aim to investigate whether the structure supporting the electrode can be designed to reduce the motion artifact with the hypothesis that this can be achieved by stabilizing the skin deformations around the electrode. We compare four textile electrodes with different support structure designs: a soft padding larger than the electrode area, a soft padding larger than the electrode area with a novel skin deformation restricting design, a soft padding the same size as the electrode area, and a rigid support the same size as the electrode. With five subjects and two electrode locations placed over different kinds of tissue at various mounting forces, we simultaneously measured the motion artifact, a motion affected ECG, and the real-time skin-electrode impedance during the application of controlled motion to the electrodes. The design of the electrode support structure has an effect on the generated motion artifact; good design with a skin stabilizing structure makes the electrodes physically more motion artifact resilient, directly affecting signal quality. Increasing the applied mounting force shows a positive effect up to 1,000 gr applied force. The properties of tissue under the electrode are an important factor in the generation of the motion artifact and the functioning of the electrodes. The relationship of motion artifact amplitude to the electrode movement magnitude is seen to be linear for smaller movements. For larger movements, the increase of motion generated a disproportionally larger artifact. The motion artifact and the induced

  3. A robust post-processing workflow for datasets with motion artifacts in diffusion kurtosis imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianjun; Yang, Jian; Gao, Jie; Luo, Xue; Zhou, Zhenyu; Hu, Yajie; Wu, Ed X; Wan, Mingxi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a robust post-processing workflow for motion-corrupted datasets in diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI). The proposed workflow consisted of brain extraction, rigid registration, distortion correction, artifacts rejection, spatial smoothing and tensor estimation. Rigid registration was utilized to correct misalignments. Motion artifacts were rejected by using local Pearson correlation coefficient (LPCC). The performance of LPCC in characterizing relative differences between artifacts and artifact-free images was compared with that of the conventional correlation coefficient in 10 randomly selected DKI datasets. The influence of rejected artifacts with information of gradient directions and b values for the parameter estimation was investigated by using mean square error (MSE). The variance of noise was used as the criterion for MSEs. The clinical practicality of the proposed workflow was evaluated by the image quality and measurements in regions of interest on 36 DKI datasets, including 18 artifact-free (18 pediatric subjects) and 18 motion-corrupted datasets (15 pediatric subjects and 3 essential tremor patients). The relative difference between artifacts and artifact-free images calculated by LPCC was larger than that of the conventional correlation coefficient (pworkflow improved the image quality and reduced the measurement biases significantly on motion-corrupted datasets (pworkflow was reliable to improve the image quality and the measurement precision of the derived parameters on motion-corrupted DKI datasets. The workflow provided an effective post-processing method for clinical applications of DKI in subjects with involuntary movements.

  4. Induction and separation of motion artifacts in EEG data using a mobile phantom head device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Anderson S; Schlink, Bryan R; Hairston, W David; König, Peter; Ferris, Daniel P

    2016-06-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) can assess brain activity during whole-body motion in humans but head motion can induce artifacts that obfuscate electrocortical signals. Definitive solutions for removing motion artifact from EEG have yet to be found, so creating methods to assess signal processing routines for removing motion artifact are needed. We present a novel method for investigating the influence of head motion on EEG recordings as well as for assessing the efficacy of signal processing approaches intended to remove motion artifact. We used a phantom head device to mimic electrical properties of the human head with three controlled dipolar sources of electrical activity embedded in the phantom. We induced sinusoidal vertical motions on the phantom head using a custom-built platform and recorded EEG signals with three different acquisition systems while the head was both stationary and in varied motion conditions. Recordings showed up to 80% reductions in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and up to 3600% increases in the power spectrum as a function of motion amplitude and frequency. Independent component analysis (ICA) successfully isolated the three dipolar sources across all conditions and systems. There was a high correlation (r > 0.85) and marginal increase in the independent components' (ICs) power spectrum (∼15%) when comparing stationary and motion parameters. The SNR of the IC activation was 400%-700% higher in comparison to the channel data SNR, attenuating the effects of motion on SNR. Our results suggest that the phantom head and motion platform can be used to assess motion artifact removal algorithms and compare different EEG systems for motion artifact sensitivity. In addition, ICA is effective in isolating target electrocortical events and marginally improving SNR in relation to stationary recordings.

  5. A systematic comparison of motion artifact correction techniques for functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Robert J; Selb, Juliette; Gagnon, Louis; Phillip, Dorte; Schytz, Henrik W; Iversen, Helle K; Ashina, Messoud; Boas, David A

    2012-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is susceptible to signal artifacts caused by relative motion between NIRS optical fibers and the scalp. These artifacts can be very damaging to the utility of functional NIRS, particularly in challenging subject groups where motion can be unavoidable. A number of approaches to the removal of motion artifacts from NIRS data have been suggested. In this paper we systematically compare the utility of a variety of published NIRS motion correction techniques using a simulated functional activation signal added to 20 real NIRS datasets which contain motion artifacts. Principle component analysis, spline interpolation, wavelet analysis, and Kalman filtering approaches are compared to one another and to standard approaches using the accuracy of the recovered, simulated hemodynamic response function (HRF). Each of the four motion correction techniques we tested yields a significant reduction in the mean-squared error (MSE) and significant increase in the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the recovered HRF when compared to no correction and compared to a process of rejecting motion-contaminated trials. Spline interpolation produces the largest average reduction in MSE (55%) while wavelet analysis produces the highest average increase in CNR (39%). On the basis of this analysis, we recommend the routine application of motion correction techniques (particularly spline interpolation or wavelet analysis) to minimize the impact of motion artifacts on functional NIRS data.

  6. Correction of computed tomography motion artifacts using pixel-specific back-projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, C.J.; Crawford, C.R.; Godwin, J.D.; Kim, Y. King, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    Cardiac and respiratory motion can cause artifacts in computed tomography scans of the chest. The authors describe a new method for reducing these artifacts called pixel-specific back-projection (PSBP). PSBP reduces artifacts caused by in-plane motion by reconstructing each pixel in a frame of reference that moves with the in-plane motion in the volume being scanned. The motion of the frame of reference is specified by constructing maps that describe the motion of each pixel in the image at the time each projection was measured; these maps are based on measurements of the in-plane motion. PSBP has been tested in computer simulations and with volunteer data. In computer simulations, PSBP removed the structured artifacts caused by motion. In scans of two volunteers, PSBP reduced doubling and streaking in chest scans to a level that made the images clinically useful. PSBP corrections of liver scans were less satisfactory because the motion of the liver is predominantly superior-inferior (S-I). PSBP uses a unique set of motion parameters to describe the motion at each point in the chest as opposed to requiring that the motion be described by a single set of parameters. Therefore, PSBP may be more useful in correcting clinical scans than are other correction techniques previously described

  7. Fascicular Phrenic Nerve Neurotization for Restoring Physiological Motion in a Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Reconstruction With a Reverse Innervated Latissimus Dorsi Muscle Flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Ricardo; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago; Costa, Joana; Estevão-Costa, José; Monteiro, Diana; Dias, Mariana; Braga, José; Silva, Alvaro; Azevedo, Inês; Amarante, José Manuel

    2015-08-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a severe developmental anomaly characterized by the malformation of the diaphragm. An innervated reversed latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction for recurrent congenital diaphragmatic hernia has been described as an alternative to prosthetic patch repair to achieve pleuroperitoneal separation. However, there is very little supporting scientific data; therefore, there is no real basic understanding of the condition of the phrenic nerve in the absence of diaphragmatic muscle or even the neurotization options for restoring neodiaphragmatic muscle motion. We have reviewed the literature regarding phrenic nerve anatomy and neurotization options, and to our knowledge, this is the first time that the application of a fascicular repair is being described where the continuity of one remaining fascicle of the diaphragm has been preserved close to the phrenic nerve distal division. The procedure was undertaken in a 3 year-old boy, with the diagnosis of congenital large posteromedial diaphragmatic hernia and dependence of mechanical ventilation in consequence of severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia.The phrenic nerve divides itself into several terminal branches, usually three, at the diaphragm level, or just above it. This allows the selective coaptation of separate fascicular branches. In the case described, videofluoroscopy evaluation showed no evidence of paradoxical neodiaphragmatic motion, with synchronous contraction movements and intact pleura-peritoneal separation. The child is now asymptomatic and shows improvement of his previous restrictive pulmonary disease.We believe that fascicular repair can achieve some reinnervation of the flap without jeopardizing the potential of diaphragmatic function by contraction of reminiscent native diaphragm.

  8. Improving pulse oximetry accuracy by removing motion artifacts from photoplethysmograms using relative sensor motion: a preliminary study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijshoff, R.W.C.G.R.; Mischi, M.; Woerlee, P.H.; Aarts, R.M.; Van Huffel, S.; Naelaers, G.; Caicedo, A.; Bruley, D.F.; Harrison, D.K.

    2013-01-01

    To expand applicability of pulse oximetry in low-acuity ambulatory settings, the impact of motion on extracted parameters as saturation (SpO2) and pulse rate (PR) needs to be reduced. We hypothesized that sensor motion relative to the skin can be used as an artifact reference in a correlation

  9. Temporal interpolation alters motion in fMRI scans: Magnitudes and consequences for artifact detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Power

    Full Text Available Head motion can be estimated at any point of fMRI image processing. Processing steps involving temporal interpolation (e.g., slice time correction or outlier replacement often precede motion estimation in the literature. From first principles it can be anticipated that temporal interpolation will alter head motion in a scan. Here we demonstrate this effect and its consequences in five large fMRI datasets. Estimated head motion was reduced by 10-50% or more following temporal interpolation, and reductions were often visible to the naked eye. Such reductions make the data seem to be of improved quality. Such reductions also degrade the sensitivity of analyses aimed at detecting motion-related artifact and can cause a dataset with artifact to falsely appear artifact-free. These reduced motion estimates will be particularly problematic for studies needing estimates of motion in time, such as studies of dynamics. Based on these findings, it is sensible to obtain motion estimates prior to any image processing (regardless of subsequent processing steps and the actual timing of motion correction procedures, which need not be changed. We also find that outlier replacement procedures change signals almost entirely during times of motion and therefore have notable similarities to motion-targeting censoring strategies (which withhold or replace signals entirely during times of motion.

  10. Characterization and reduction of motion artifacts in photoplethysmographic signals from a wrist-worn device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tauţan, A.M.; Young, A.; Wentink, E.; Wieringa, F.P.

    2015-01-01

    Methods for analyzing various motion artifacts in photoplethysmography (PPG) signals, recorded by a wristworn device are reported. The analysis looks both at intrinsic PPG signal properties, through standard deviation, skew and kurtosis, but also at its relationship to five possible motion reference

  11. Biased motion vector interpolation for reduced video artifacts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    In a video processing system where motion vectors are estimated for a subset of the blocks of data forming a video frame, and motion vectors are interpolated for the remainder of the blocks of the frame, a method includes determining, for at least at least one block of the current frame for which a

  12. Correction of Motion Artifacts for Real-Time Structured Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilm, Jakob; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2015-01-01

    While the problem of motion is often mentioned in conjunction with structured light imaging, few solutions have thus far been proposed. A method is demonstrated to correct for object or camera motion during structured light 3D scene acquisition. The method is based on the combination of a suitabl...

  13. Elimination of motion and pulsation artifacts using BLADE sequences in shoulder MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavdas, E.; Zaloni, E.; Vlychou, M.; Vassiou, K.; Fezoulidis, I.; Tsagkalis, A.; Dailiana, Z.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of proton-density with fat-suppression BLADE (proprietary name for periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction in MR systems from Siemens Healthcare, PDFS BLADE) and turbo inversion recovery magnitude-BLADE (TIRM BLADE) sequences to reduce motion and pulsation artifacts in shoulder magnetic resonance examinations. Forty-one consecutive patients who had been routinely scanned for shoulder examination participated in the study. The following pairs of sequences with and without BLADE were compared: (a) Oblique coronal proton-density sequence with fat saturation of 25 patients and (b) oblique sagittal T2 TIRM-weighed sequence of 20 patients. Qualitative analysis was performed by two experienced radiologists. Image motion and pulsation artifacts were also evaluated. In oblique coronal PDFS BLADE sequences, motion artifacts have been significantly eliminated, even in five cases of non-diagnostic value with conventional imaging. Similarly, in oblique sagittal T2 TIRM BLADE sequences, image quality has been improved, even in six cases of non-diagnostic value with conventional imaging. Furthermore, flow artifacts have been improved in more than 80% of all the cases. The use of BLADE sequences is recommended in shoulder imaging, especially in uncooperative patients because it effectively eliminates motion and pulsation artifacts. (orig.)

  14. Reference geometry-based detection of (4D-)CT motion artifacts: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, René; Gauer, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    Respiration-correlated computed tomography (4D or 3D+t CT) can be considered as standard of care in radiation therapy treatment planning for lung and liver lesions. The decision about an application of motion management devices and the estimation of patient-specific motion effects on the dose distribution relies on precise motion assessment in the planning 4D CT data { which is impeded in case of CT motion artifacts. The development of image-based/post-processing approaches to reduce motion artifacts would benefit from precise detection and localization of the artifacts. Simple slice-by-slice comparison of intensity values and threshold-based analysis of related metrics suffer from- depending on the threshold- high false-positive or -negative rates. In this work, we propose exploiting prior knowledge about `ideal' (= artifact free) reference geometries to stabilize metric-based artifact detection by transferring (multi-)atlas-based concepts to this specific task. Two variants are introduced and evaluated: (S1) analysis and comparison of warped atlas data obtained by repeated non-linear atlas-to-patient registration with different levels of regularization; (S2) direct analysis of vector field properties (divergence, curl magnitude) of the atlas-to-patient transformation. Feasibility of approaches (S1) and (S2) is evaluated by motion-phantom data and intra-subject experiments (four patients) as well as - adopting a multi-atlas strategy- inter-subject investigations (twelve patients involved). It is demonstrated that especially sorting/double structure artifacts can be precisely detected and localized by (S1). In contrast, (S2) suffers from high false positive rates.

  15. Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Samantha

    2009-01-01

    NASA Headquarters sent a list of items to KSC that were deemed potential artifacts. These items played arole in the Shuttle Program's development and maintenance. Because these items are national assets, many are of interest to museums, schools, other government entities, etc. upon the Space Shuttle's retirement. The list contains over 500 items. All of these items need to be located, photographed, and catalogued with accompanying specific data that needs to be gathered. Initial research suggests that this is a time, labor, and cost intensive project. The purpose of my project was to focus on 20-60 of these 500 items, gather the necessary data, and compile them in a way that can be added to by other users when/if the project goes into full effect.

  16. MuSeSe - A multisensor armchair for unobtrusive vital sign estimation and motion artifact analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antink, Christoph Hoog; Leonhardt, Steffen; Schulz, Florian; Walter, Marian

    2017-07-01

    Unobtrusive vital sign estimation with sensors integrated into objects of everyday living can substantially advance the field of remote monitoring. At the same time, motion artifacts cause severe problems and have to be dealt with. Here, the fusion of multimodal sensor data is a promising approach. In this paper, we present an armchair equipped with capacitively coupled electrocardiogram, two types of ballistocardiographic sensors, photoplethysmographic and two high-frequency impedance sensors. In addition, a video-based sensor for motion analysis is integrated. Using a defined motion protocol, the feasibility of the system is demonstrated in a self-experimentation. Moreover, the influence of different movements on different modalities is analyzed. Finally, robust beat-to-beat interval estimation demonstrates the benefits of multimodal sensor fusion for vital sign estimation in the presence of motion artifacts.

  17. Experimental analysis of motion artifacts in chest radiographs with the AMBER system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boetticher, H. von; Hofmann, K.; Luska, G.

    1999-01-01

    The prerequisites, mechanisms and principles of motion artifacts in AMBER radiographs were analysed. The experiments were performed using metronomes, a moving conventional mammography phantom, and arrangements of oscillating coil spring, spheroid and grid elements. A diagnostic dosimeter and TLDs, respectively, were used to measure exposure times and doses. The deree of distortion in AMBER radiographs depends on the direction of the object movement relative to the AMBER fan beam in a complex manner. The size of the motion artifacts depends on the local exposure time. The maximum value of this time is 75 ms and thus 1.5 times higher than specified by the manufacturer. To interpret AMBER radiographs possible system specific artifacts have to be considered to avoid misinterpretations of potentially significant details. (orig.) [de

  18. Effect of motion artifacts and their correction on near-infrared spectroscopy oscillation data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selb, Juliette; Yücel, Meryem A; Phillip, Dorte

    2015-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy is prone to contamination by motion artifacts (MAs). Motion correction algorithms have previously been proposed and their respective performance compared for evoked rain activation studies. We study instead the effect of MAs on "oscillation" data which...... in the frequency band around 0.1 and 0.04 Hz, suggesting a physiological origin for the difference. We emphasize the importance of considering MAs as a confounding factor in oscillation-based functional near-infrared spectroscopy studies....

  19. sEMG during Whole-Body Vibration Contains Motion Artifacts and Reflex Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Lienhard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether the excessive spikes observed in the surface electromyography (sEMG spectrum recorded during whole-body vibration (WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and/or reflex activity. The occurrence of motion artifacts was tested by electrical recordings of the patella. The involvement of reflex activity was investigated by analyzing the magnitude of the isolated spikes during changes in voluntary background muscle activity. Eighteen physically active volunteers performed static squats while the sEMG was measured of five lower limb muscles during vertical WBV using no load and an additional load of 33 kg. In order to record motion artifacts during WBV, a pair of electrodes was positioned on the patella with several layers of tape between skin and electrodes. Spectral analysis of the patella signal revealed recordings of motion artifacts as high peaks at the vibration frequency (fundamental and marginal peaks at the multiple harmonics were observed. For the sEMG recordings, the root mean square of the spikes increased with increasing additional loads (p < 0.05, and was significantly correlated to the sEMG signal without the spikes of the respective muscle (r range: 0.54 - 0.92, p < 0.05. This finding indicates that reflex activity might be contained in the isolated spikes, as identical behavior has been found for stretch reflex responses evoked during direct vibration. In conclusion, the spikes visible in the sEMG spectrum during WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and possibly reflex activity.

  20. Reduction of motion artifact in pulse oximetry by smoothed pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yuan-ting

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pulse oximeter, a medical device capable of measuring blood oxygen saturation (SpO2, has been shown to be a valuable device for monitoring patients in critical conditions. In order to incorporate the technique into a wearable device which can be used in ambulatory settings, the influence of motion artifacts on the estimated SpO2 must be reduced. This study investigates the use of the smoothed psuedo Wigner-Ville distribution (SPWVD for the reduction of motion artifacts affecting pulse oximetry. Methods The SPWVD approach is compared with two techniques currently used in this field, i.e. the weighted moving average (WMA and the fast Fourier transform (FFT approaches. SpO2 and pulse rate were estimated from a photoplethysmographic (PPG signal recorded when subject is in a resting position as well as in the act of performing four types of motions: horizontal and vertical movements of the hand, and bending and pressing motions of the finger. For each condition, 24 sets of PPG signals collected from 6 subjects, each of 30 seconds, were studied with reference to the PPG signal recorded simultaneously from the subject's other hand, which was stationary at all times. Results and Discussion The SPWVD approach shows significant improvement (p Conclusion The results suggested that the SPWVD approach could potentially be used to reduce motion artifact on wearable pulse oximeters.

  1. A novel algorithm to separate motion artifacts from photoplethysmographic signals obtained with a reflectance pulse oximeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianchu; Warren, Steve

    2004-01-01

    Pulse oximeters are mainstays for acquiring blood oxygen saturation in static environments such as hospital rooms. However, motion artifacts prevent their broad in wearable, ambulatory environments. To this end, we present a novel algorithm to separate the motion artifacts from plethysmographic data gathered by pulse oximeters. This algorithm, based on the Beer-Lambert law, requires photoplethysmographic data acquired at three excitation wavelengths. The algorithm can calculate venous blood oxygen saturation (SvO2) as well as arterial blood oxygen saturation (SaO2). Preliminary results indicate that the extraction of the venous signal, which is assumed to be most affected by motions, is successful with data acquired from a reflectance-mode sensor.

  2. Automatic identification of motion artifacts in EHG recording for robust analysis of uterine contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye-Lin, Yiyao; Garcia-Casado, Javier; Prats-Boluda, Gema; Alberola-Rubio, José; Perales, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Electrohysterography (EHG) is a noninvasive technique for monitoring uterine electrical activity. However, the presence of artifacts in the EHG signal may give rise to erroneous interpretations and make it difficult to extract useful information from these recordings. The aim of this work was to develop an automatic system of segmenting EHG recordings that distinguishes between uterine contractions and artifacts. Firstly, the segmentation is performed using an algorithm that generates the TOCO-like signal derived from the EHG and detects windows with significant changes in amplitude. After that, these segments are classified in two groups: artifacted and nonartifacted signals. To develop a classifier, a total of eleven spectral, temporal, and nonlinear features were calculated from EHG signal windows from 12 women in the first stage of labor that had previously been classified by experts. The combination of characteristics that led to the highest degree of accuracy in detecting artifacts was then determined. The results showed that it is possible to obtain automatic detection of motion artifacts in segmented EHG recordings with a precision of 92.2% using only seven features. The proposed algorithm and classifier together compose a useful tool for analyzing EHG signals and would help to promote clinical applications of this technique.

  3. Automatic Identification of Motion Artifacts in EHG Recording for Robust Analysis of Uterine Contractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyao Ye-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrohysterography (EHG is a noninvasive technique for monitoring uterine electrical activity. However, the presence of artifacts in the EHG signal may give rise to erroneous interpretations and make it difficult to extract useful information from these recordings. The aim of this work was to develop an automatic system of segmenting EHG recordings that distinguishes between uterine contractions and artifacts. Firstly, the segmentation is performed using an algorithm that generates the TOCO-like signal derived from the EHG and detects windows with significant changes in amplitude. After that, these segments are classified in two groups: artifacted and nonartifacted signals. To develop a classifier, a total of eleven spectral, temporal, and nonlinear features were calculated from EHG signal windows from 12 women in the first stage of labor that had previously been classified by experts. The combination of characteristics that led to the highest degree of accuracy in detecting artifacts was then determined. The results showed that it is possible to obtain automatic detection of motion artifacts in segmented EHG recordings with a precision of 92.2% using only seven features. The proposed algorithm and classifier together compose a useful tool for analyzing EHG signals and would help to promote clinical applications of this technique.

  4. A systematic comparison of motion artifact correction techniques for functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, Robert J; Selb, Juliette; Gagnon, Louis

    2012-01-01

    a significant reduction in the mean-squared error (MSE) and significant increase in the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the recovered HRF when compared to no correction and compared to a process of rejecting motion-contaminated trials. Spline interpolation produces the largest average reduction in MSE (55....... Principle component analysis, spline interpolation, wavelet analysis, and Kalman filtering approaches are compared to one another and to standard approaches using the accuracy of the recovered, simulated hemodynamic response function (HRF). Each of the four motion correction techniques we tested yields......%) while wavelet analysis produces the highest average increase in CNR (39%). On the basis of this analysis, we recommend the routine application of motion correction techniques (particularly spline interpolation or wavelet analysis) to minimize the impact of motion artifacts on functional NIRS data....

  5. Effect of high-pitch dual-source CT to compensate motion artifacts: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshad-Amacker, Nadja A; Alkadhi, Hatem; Leschka, Sebastian; Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the potential of high-pitch, dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) for compensation of motion artifacts. Motion artifacts were created using a moving chest/cardiac phantom with integrated stents at different velocities (from 0 to 4-6 cm/s) parallel (z direction), transverse (x direction), and diagonal (x and z direction combined) to the scanning direction using standard-pitch (SP) (pitch = 1) and high-pitch (HP) (pitch = 3.2) 128-detector DSCT (Siemens, Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). The scanning parameters were (SP/HP): tube voltage, 120 kV/120 kV; effective tube current time product, 300 mAs/500 mAs; and a pitch of 1/3.2. Motion artifacts were analyzed in terms of subjective image quality and object distortion. Image quality was rated by two blinded, independent observers using a 4-point scoring system (1, excellent; 2, good with minor object distortion or blurring; 3, diagnostically partially not acceptable; and 4, diagnostically not acceptable image quality). Object distortion was assessed by the measured changes of the object's outer diameter (x) and length (z) and a corresponding calculated distortion vector (d) (d = √(x(2) + z(2))). The interobserver agreement was excellent (k = 0.91). Image quality using SP was diagnostically not acceptable with any motion in x direction (scores 3 and 4), in contrast to HP DSCT where it remained diagnostic up to 2 cm/s (scores 1 and 2). For motion in the z direction only, image quality remained diagnostic for SP and HP DSCT (scores 1 and 2). Changes of the object's diameter (x), length (z), and distortion vectors (d) were significantly greater with SP (overall: x = 1.9 cm ± 1.7 cm, z = 0.6 cm ± 0.8 cm, and d = 1.4 cm ± 1.5 cm) compared to HP DSCT (overall: x = 0.1 cm ± 0.1 cm, z = 0.0 cm ± 0.1 cm, and d = 0.1 cm ± 0.1 cm; each P pitch DSCT significantly decreases motion artifacts in various directions and improves image quality. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Semi-Automated Analysis of Diaphragmatic Motion with Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Healthy Controls and Non-Ambulant Subjects with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney A. Bishop

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Subjects with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD suffer from progressive muscle damage leading to diaphragmatic weakness that ultimately requires ventilation. Emerging treatments have generated interest in better characterizing the natural history of respiratory impairment in DMD and responses to therapy. Dynamic (cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI may provide a more sensitive measure of diaphragm function in DMD than the commonly used spirometry. This study presents an analysis pipeline for measuring parameters of diaphragmatic motion from dynamic MRI and its application to investigate MRI measures of respiratory function in both healthy controls and non-ambulant DMD boys. We scanned 13 non-ambulant DMD boys and 10 age-matched healthy male volunteers at baseline, with a subset (n = 10, 10, 8 of the DMD subjects also assessed 3, 6, and 12 months later. Spirometry-derived metrics including forced vital capacity were recorded. The MRI-derived measures included the lung cross-sectional area (CSA, the anterior, central, and posterior lung lengths in the sagittal imaging plane, and the diaphragm length over the time-course of the dynamic MRI. Regression analyses demonstrated strong linear correlations between lung CSA and the length measures over the respiratory cycle, with a reduction of these correlations in DMD, and diaphragmatic motions that contribute less efficiently to changing lung capacity in DMD. MRI measures of pulmonary function were reduced in DMD, controlling for height differences between the groups: at maximal inhalation, the maximum CSA and the total distance of motion of the diaphragm were 45% and 37% smaller. MRI measures of pulmonary function were correlated with spirometry data and showed relationships with disease progression surrogates of age and months non-ambulatory, suggesting that they provide clinically meaningful information. Changes in the MRI measures over 12 months were consistent with weakening of

  7. Reduction of motion artifacts for PET imaging by respiratory correlated dynamic scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, K.-S.; Chen, T.-J.; Chang, C.-C.; Wu, J.; Chen, S.; Wu, L.-C.; Liu, R.-S.

    2006-01-01

    Organ motion caused by respiration is a major challenge in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. This work proposes a technique to reduce smearing in PET imaging caused by respiratory motion. Dynamic scanning at 1 frame/s is used. A point source, used as a marker, is attached to the object's abdomen during the scan. The source position in the projection view moves with respiratory motion and can be used to represent the respiratory phase within the time interval in which each frame data are acquired. One hundred and twenty frames are obtained for each study. The range of the positions of the marker is divided into four groups, representing different respiratory phases. The frames in which the organ positions (phases) are the same summed to produce a static sub-sinogram. Each sub-sinogram then undergoes regular image reconstruction to yield a motion-free image. The technique is applied to one volunteer under both free and coached breathing conditions. A parameter called the volume reduction factor is adopted to evaluate the effectiveness of this motion-reduction technique. The preliminary results indicate that the proposed technique effectively reduces motion artifacts in the image. Coached breathing yields better results than free breathing condition. The advantages of this method are that (1) the scanning time remains the same; (2) free breathing is allowed during the acquisition of the image; and (3) no user intervention is required

  8. A short study to assess the potential of independent component analysis for motion artifact separation in wearable pulse oximeter signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianchu; Warren, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Motion artifact reduction and separation become critical when medical sensors are used in wearable monitoring scenarios. Previous research has demonstrated that independent component analysis (ICA) can be applied to pulse oximeter signals to separate photoplethysmographic (PPG) data from motion artifacts, ambient light, and other interference in low-motion environments. However, ICA assumes that all source signal component pairs are mutually independent. It is important to assess the statistical independence of the source components in PPG data, especially if ICA is to be applied in ambulatory monitoring environments, where motion artifacts can have a substantial effect on the quality of data received from light-based sensors. This paper addresses the statistical relationship between motion artifacts and PPG data by calculating the correlation coefficients between arterial volume variations and motion over a range of stationary to high-motion conditions. Analyses indicate that motion significantly affects arterial flow, so care must be taken when applying ICA to light-based sensor data acquired from wearable platforms.

  9. Correction of head motion artifacts in SPECT with fully 3-D OS-EM reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulton, R.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: A method which relies on continuous monitoring of head position has been developed to correct for head motion in SPECT studies of the brain. Head position and orientation are monitored during data acquisition by an inexpensive head tracking system (ADL-1, Shooting Star Technology, Rosedale, British Colombia). Motion correction involves changing the projection geometry to compensate for motion (using data from the head tracker), and reconstructing with a fully 3-D OS-EM algorithm. The reconstruction algorithm can accommodate any number of movements and any projection geometry. A single iteration of 3-D OS-EM using all available projections provides a satisfactory 3-D reconstruction, essentially free of motion artifacts. The method has been validated in studies of the 3-D Hoffman brain phantom. Multiple 36- degree acquisitions, each with the phantom in a different position, were performed on a Trionix triple head camera. Movements were simulated by combining projections from the different acquisitions. Accuracy was assessed by comparison with a motion-free reconstruction, visually and by calculating mean squared error (MSE). Motion correction reduced distortion perceptibly and, depending on the motions applied, improved MSE by up to an order of magnitude. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the 128 x 128 x 128 data set took 2- minutes on a SUN Ultra 1 workstation. This motion correction technique can be retro-fitted to existing SPECT systems and could be incorporated in future SPECT camera designs. It appears to be applicable in PET as well as SPECT, to be able to correct for any head movements, and to have the potential to improve the accuracy of tomographic brain studies under clinical imaging conditions

  10. Transient severe respiratory motion artifacts after application of gadoxetate disodium. What we currently know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Well, Lennart; Weinrich, Julius Matthias; Adam, Gerhard; Bannas, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Gadoxetate disodium is an intracellular contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver. Recent publications revealed that injection of gadoxetate disodium can lead to imaging artifacts due to transient severe motion (TSM) in the arterial phase of contrast-enhanced liver MRI. In this review we present and discuss published frequencies of TSM, contrast injection and image acquisition protocols, potential risk factors, and proposed strategies to avoid or minimize the effects of TSM. Two reviewers independently searched the PubMed search engine for ''transient severe motion artifact'' and related terms. Reference lists of retrieved articles were also searched. The two reviewers selected in consensus nine studies that reported both frequencies of TSM and potential risk factors. Study data were extracted by both reviewers, and disagreement was resolved by consensus. TSM is caused by impaired breath-hold ability after gadoxetate disodium injection and occurs in 5 -22% of patients. The dose of applied contrast agent, repeated exposure to gadoxetate disodium, high BMI and pulmonary disease have been described as potential risk factors for TSM. However, there are only few concordant results on this topic and the pathophysiology of TSM has not been identified. Proposed strategies for the prevention of TSM are slow injection rates and low doses of diluted gadoxetate disodium. Accelerated and free-breathing MRI sequence protocols and breath-hold training may minimize the effects of TSM. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these strategies and to identify the underlying mechanism of TSM.

  11. Transient severe respiratory motion artifacts after application of gadoxetate disodium. What we currently know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Well, Lennart; Weinrich, Julius Matthias; Adam, Gerhard; Bannas, Peter [Univ. Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicince

    2018-01-15

    Gadoxetate disodium is an intracellular contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver. Recent publications revealed that injection of gadoxetate disodium can lead to imaging artifacts due to transient severe motion (TSM) in the arterial phase of contrast-enhanced liver MRI. In this review we present and discuss published frequencies of TSM, contrast injection and image acquisition protocols, potential risk factors, and proposed strategies to avoid or minimize the effects of TSM. Two reviewers independently searched the PubMed search engine for ''transient severe motion artifact'' and related terms. Reference lists of retrieved articles were also searched. The two reviewers selected in consensus nine studies that reported both frequencies of TSM and potential risk factors. Study data were extracted by both reviewers, and disagreement was resolved by consensus. TSM is caused by impaired breath-hold ability after gadoxetate disodium injection and occurs in 5 -22% of patients. The dose of applied contrast agent, repeated exposure to gadoxetate disodium, high BMI and pulmonary disease have been described as potential risk factors for TSM. However, there are only few concordant results on this topic and the pathophysiology of TSM has not been identified. Proposed strategies for the prevention of TSM are slow injection rates and low doses of diluted gadoxetate disodium. Accelerated and free-breathing MRI sequence protocols and breath-hold training may minimize the effects of TSM. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these strategies and to identify the underlying mechanism of TSM.

  12. Quality control of structural MRI images applied using FreeSurfer - a hands-on workflow to rate motion artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Luise Backhausen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In structural magnetic resonance imaging motion artifacts are common, especially when not scanning healthy young adults. It has been shown that motion affects the analysis with automated image-processing techniques (e.g. FreeSurfer. This can bias results. Several developmental and adult studies have found reduced volume and thickness of gray matter due to motion artifacts. Thus, quality control is necessary in order to ensure an acceptable level of quality and to define exclusion criteria of images (i.e. determine participants with most severe artifacts. However, information about the quality control workflow and image exclusion procedure is largely lacking in the current literature and the existing rating systems differ. Here we propose a stringent workflow of quality control steps during and after acquisition of T1-weighted images, which enables researchers dealing with populations that are typically affected by motion artifacts to enhance data quality and maximize sample sizes. As an underlying aim we established a thorough quality control rating system for T1-weighted images and applied it to the analysis of developmental clinical data using the automated processing pipeline FreeSurfer. This hands-on workflow and quality control rating system will aid researchers in minimizing motion artifacts in the final data set, and therefore enhance the quality of structural magnetic resonance imaging studies.

  13. The reduction of motion artifacts in digital subtraction angiography by geometrical image transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, J.M.; Pickens, D.R.; Mandava, V.R.; Grefenstette, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    In the diagnosis of arteriosclerosis, radio-opaque dye is injected into the interior of the arteries to make them visible. Because of its increased contrast sensitivity, digital subtraction angiography has the potential for providing diagnostic images of arteries with reduced dye volumes. In the conventional technique, a mask image, acquired before the introduction of the dye, is subtracted from the contrast image, acquired after the dye is introduced, to produce a difference image in which only the dye in the arteries is visible. The usefulness of this technique has been severely limited by the image degradation caused by patient motion during image acquisition. This motion produces artifacts in the difference image that obscure the arteries. One technique for dealing with the problem is to reduce the degradation by means of image registration. The registration is carried out by means of a geometrical transformation of the mask image before subtraction so that it is in registration with the contrast image. This paper describes a technique for determining an optimal transformation. The authors employ a one-to-one elastic mapping and the Jacobian of that mapping to produce a geometrical image transformation. They choose a parameterized class of such mappings and use a heuristic search algorithm to optimize the parameters to minimize the severity of the motion artifacts. To increase the speed of the optimization process they use a statistical image comparison technique that provides a quick approximate evaluation of each image transformation. They present the experimental results of the application of their registration system to mask-contrast pairs, for images acquired from a specially designed phantom, and for clinical images

  14. Mitigation of motion artifacts in CBCT of lung tumors based on tracked tumor motion during CBCT acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, John H; Li Ruijiang; Jia Xun; Watkins, W Tyler; Song, William Y; Jiang, Steve B; Lou, Yifei

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm capable of mitigating respiratory motion blurring artifacts in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) lung tumor images based on the motion of the tumor during the CBCT scan is developed. The tumor motion trajectory and probability density function (PDF) are reconstructed from the acquired CBCT projection images using a recently developed algorithm Lewis et al (2010 Phys. Med. Biol. 55 2505-22). Assuming that the effects of motion blurring can be represented by convolution of the static lung (or tumor) anatomy with the motion PDF, a cost function is defined, consisting of a data fidelity term and a total variation regularization term. Deconvolution is performed through iterative minimization of this cost function. The algorithm was tested on digital respiratory phantom, physical respiratory phantom and patient data. A clear qualitative improvement is evident in the deblurred images as compared to the motion-blurred images for all cases. Line profiles show that the tumor boundaries are more accurately and clearly represented in the deblurred images. The normalized root-mean-squared error between the images used as ground truth and the motion-blurred images are 0.29, 0.12 and 0.30 in the digital phantom, physical phantom and patient data, respectively. Deblurring reduces the corresponding values to 0.13, 0.07 and 0.19. Application of a -700 HU threshold to the digital phantom results in tumor dimension measurements along the superior-inferior axis of 2.8, 1.8 and 1.9 cm in the motion-blurred, ground truth and deblurred images, respectively. Corresponding values for the physical phantom are 3.4, 2.7 and 2.7 cm. A threshold of -500 HU applied to the patient case gives measurements of 3.1, 1.6 and 1.7 cm along the SI axis in the CBCT, 4DCT and deblurred images, respectively. This technique could provide more accurate information about a lung tumor's size and shape on the day of treatment.

  15. Please Don't Move-Evaluating Motion Artifact From Peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography Scans Using Textural Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantalainen, Timo; Chivers, Paola; Beck, Belinda R; Robertson, Sam; Hart, Nicolas H; Nimphius, Sophia; Weeks, Benjamin K; McIntyre, Fleur; Hands, Beth; Siafarikas, Aris

    Most imaging methods, including peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), are susceptible to motion artifacts particularly in fidgety pediatric populations. Methods currently used to address motion artifact include manual screening (visual inspection) and objective assessments of the scans. However, previously reported objective methods either cannot be applied on the reconstructed image or have not been tested for distal bone sites. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to develop and validate motion artifact classifiers to quantify motion artifact in pQCT scans. Whether textural features could provide adequate motion artifact classification performance in 2 adolescent datasets with pQCT scans from tibial and radial diaphyses and epiphyses was tested. The first dataset was split into training (66% of sample) and validation (33% of sample) datasets. Visual classification was used as the ground truth. Moderate to substantial classification performance (J48 classifier, kappa coefficients from 0.57 to 0.80) was observed in the validation dataset with the novel texture-based classifier. In applying the same classifier to the second cross-sectional dataset, a slight-to-fair (κ = 0.01-0.39) classification performance was observed. Overall, this novel textural analysis-based classifier provided a moderate-to-substantial classification of motion artifact when the classifier was specifically trained for the measurement device and population. Classification based on textural features may be used to prescreen obviously acceptable and unacceptable scans, with a subsequent human-operated visual classification of any remaining scans. Copyright © 2017 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Transient severe motion artifact related to gadoxetate disodium-enhanced liver MRI. Frequency and risk evaluation at a German institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Well, Lennart; Rausch, Vanessa Hanna; Adam, Gerhard; Henes, Frank Oliver; Bannas, Peter [Univ. Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2017-07-15

    Varying frequencies (5 - 18%) of contrast-related transient severe motion (TSM) imaging artifacts during gadoxetate disodium-enhanced arterial phase liver MRI have been reported. Since previous reports originated from the United States and Japan, we aimed to determine the frequency of TSM at a German institution and to correlate it with potential risk factors and previously published results. Two age- and sex-matched groups were retrospectively selected (gadoxetate disodium n = 89; gadobenate dimeglumine n = 89) from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI examinations in a single center. Respiratory motion-related artifacts in non-enhanced and dynamic phases were assessed independently by two readers blinded to contrast agents on a 4-point scale. Scores of ≥3 were considered as severe motion artifacts. Severe motion artifacts in arterial phases were considered as TSM if scores in all other phases were < 3. Potential risk factors for TSM were evaluated via logistic regression analysis. For gadoxetate disodium, the mean score for respiratory motion artifacts was significantly higher in the arterial phase (2.2 ± 0.9) compared to all other phases (1.6 ± 0.7) (p < 0.05). The frequency of TSM was significantly higher with gadoxetate disodium (n = 19; 21.1 %) than with gadobenate dimeglumine (n = 1; 1.1%) (p < 0.001). The frequency of TSM at our institution is similar to some, but not all previously published findings. Logistic regression analysis did not show any significant correlation between TSM and risk factors (all p>0.05). We revealed a high frequency of TSM after injection of gadoxetate disodium at a German institution, substantiating the importance of a diagnosis-limiting phenomenon that so far has only been reported from the United States and Japan. In accordance with previous studies, we did not identify associated risk factors for TSM.

  17. Temporal resolution and motion artifacts in single-source and dual-source cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schöndube, Harald; Allmendinger, Thomas; Stierstorfer, Karl; Bruder, Herbert; Flohr, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The temporal resolution of a given image in cardiac computed tomography (CT) has so far mostly been determined from the amount of CT data employed for the reconstruction of that image. The purpose of this paper is to examine the applicability of such measures to the newly introduced modality of dual-source CT as well as to methods aiming to provide improved temporal resolution by means of an advanced image reconstruction algorithm. Methods: To provide a solid base for the examinations described in this paper, an extensive review of temporal resolution in conventional single-source CT is given first. Two different measures for assessing temporal resolution with respect to the amount of data involved are introduced, namely, either taking the full width at half maximum of the respective data weighting function (FWHM-TR) or the total width of the weighting function (total TR) as a base of the assessment. Image reconstruction using both a direct fan-beam filtered backprojection with Parker weighting as well as using a parallel-beam rebinning step are considered. The theory of assessing temporal resolution by means of the data involved is then extended to dual-source CT. Finally, three different advanced iterative reconstruction methods that all use the same input data are compared with respect to the resulting motion artifact level. For brevity and simplicity, the examinations are limited to two-dimensional data acquisition and reconstruction. However, all results and conclusions presented in this paper are also directly applicable to both circular and helical cone-beam CT. Results: While the concept of total TR can directly be applied to dual-source CT, the definition of the FWHM of a weighting function needs to be slightly extended to be applicable to this modality. The three different advanced iterative reconstruction methods examined in this paper result in significantly different images with respect to their motion artifact level, despite exactly the same

  18. Temporal resolution and motion artifacts in single-source and dual-source cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöndube, Harald; Allmendinger, Thomas; Stierstorfer, Karl; Bruder, Herbert; Flohr, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    The temporal resolution of a given image in cardiac computed tomography (CT) has so far mostly been determined from the amount of CT data employed for the reconstruction of that image. The purpose of this paper is to examine the applicability of such measures to the newly introduced modality of dual-source CT as well as to methods aiming to provide improved temporal resolution by means of an advanced image reconstruction algorithm. To provide a solid base for the examinations described in this paper, an extensive review of temporal resolution in conventional single-source CT is given first. Two different measures for assessing temporal resolution with respect to the amount of data involved are introduced, namely, either taking the full width at half maximum of the respective data weighting function (FWHM-TR) or the total width of the weighting function (total TR) as a base of the assessment. Image reconstruction using both a direct fan-beam filtered backprojection with Parker weighting as well as using a parallel-beam rebinning step are considered. The theory of assessing temporal resolution by means of the data involved is then extended to dual-source CT. Finally, three different advanced iterative reconstruction methods that all use the same input data are compared with respect to the resulting motion artifact level. For brevity and simplicity, the examinations are limited to two-dimensional data acquisition and reconstruction. However, all results and conclusions presented in this paper are also directly applicable to both circular and helical cone-beam CT. While the concept of total TR can directly be applied to dual-source CT, the definition of the FWHM of a weighting function needs to be slightly extended to be applicable to this modality. The three different advanced iterative reconstruction methods examined in this paper result in significantly different images with respect to their motion artifact level, despite exactly the same amount of data being used

  19. Real-Time Correction By Optical Tracking with Integrated Geometric Distortion Correction for Reducing Motion Artifacts in fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotenberg, David J.

    Artifacts caused by head motion are a substantial source of error in fMRI that limits its use in neuroscience research and clinical settings. Real-time scan-plane correction by optical tracking has been shown to correct slice misalignment and non-linear spin-history artifacts, however residual artifacts due to dynamic magnetic field non-uniformity may remain in the data. A recently developed correction technique, PLACE, can correct for absolute geometric distortion using the complex image data from two EPI images, with slightly shifted k-space trajectories. We present a correction approach that integrates PLACE into a real-time scan-plane update system by optical tracking, applied to a tissue-equivalent phantom undergoing complex motion and an fMRI finger tapping experiment with overt head motion to induce dynamic field non-uniformity. Experiments suggest that including volume by volume geometric distortion correction by PLACE can suppress dynamic geometric distortion artifacts in a phantom and in vivo and provide more robust activation maps.

  20. A wavelet method for modeling and despiking motion artifacts from resting-state fMRI time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ameera X.; Kundu, Prantik; Rubinov, Mikail; Jones, P. Simon; Vértes, Petra E.; Ersche, Karen D.; Suckling, John; Bullmore, Edward T.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of in-scanner head movement on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals has long been established as undesirable. These effects have been traditionally corrected by methods such as linear regression of head movement parameters. However, a number of recent independent studies have demonstrated that these techniques are insufficient to remove motion confounds, and that even small movements can spuriously bias estimates of functional connectivity. Here we propose a new data-driven, spatially-adaptive, wavelet-based method for identifying, modeling, and removing non-stationary events in fMRI time series, caused by head movement, without the need for data scrubbing. This method involves the addition of just one extra step, the Wavelet Despike, in standard pre-processing pipelines. With this method, we demonstrate robust removal of a range of different motion artifacts and motion-related biases including distance-dependent connectivity artifacts, at a group and single-subject level, using a range of previously published and new diagnostic measures. The Wavelet Despike is able to accommodate the substantial spatial and temporal heterogeneity of motion artifacts and can consequently remove a range of high and low frequency artifacts from fMRI time series, that may be linearly or non-linearly related to physical movements. Our methods are demonstrated by the analysis of three cohorts of resting-state fMRI data, including two high-motion datasets: a previously published dataset on children (N = 22) and a new dataset on adults with stimulant drug dependence (N = 40). We conclude that there is a real risk of motion-related bias in connectivity analysis of fMRI data, but that this risk is generally manageable, by effective time series denoising strategies designed to attenuate synchronized signal transients induced by abrupt head movements. The Wavelet Despiking software described in this article is freely available for download at www

  1. A wavelet method for modeling and despiking motion artifacts from resting-state fMRI time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ameera X; Kundu, Prantik; Rubinov, Mikail; Jones, P Simon; Vértes, Petra E; Ersche, Karen D; Suckling, John; Bullmore, Edward T

    2014-07-15

    The impact of in-scanner head movement on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals has long been established as undesirable. These effects have been traditionally corrected by methods such as linear regression of head movement parameters. However, a number of recent independent studies have demonstrated that these techniques are insufficient to remove motion confounds, and that even small movements can spuriously bias estimates of functional connectivity. Here we propose a new data-driven, spatially-adaptive, wavelet-based method for identifying, modeling, and removing non-stationary events in fMRI time series, caused by head movement, without the need for data scrubbing. This method involves the addition of just one extra step, the Wavelet Despike, in standard pre-processing pipelines. With this method, we demonstrate robust removal of a range of different motion artifacts and motion-related biases including distance-dependent connectivity artifacts, at a group and single-subject level, using a range of previously published and new diagnostic measures. The Wavelet Despike is able to accommodate the substantial spatial and temporal heterogeneity of motion artifacts and can consequently remove a range of high and low frequency artifacts from fMRI time series, that may be linearly or non-linearly related to physical movements. Our methods are demonstrated by the analysis of three cohorts of resting-state fMRI data, including two high-motion datasets: a previously published dataset on children (N=22) and a new dataset on adults with stimulant drug dependence (N=40). We conclude that there is a real risk of motion-related bias in connectivity analysis of fMRI data, but that this risk is generally manageable, by effective time series denoising strategies designed to attenuate synchronized signal transients induced by abrupt head movements. The Wavelet Despiking software described in this article is freely available for download at www

  2. Detection of motion artifacts in optical coherence tomography using the fundus enhancement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaudig, U.; Skevas, C.; Scholz, F.

    2007-01-01

    Extensive artefacts due to major eye movements are detectable in optical coherence tomography images (OCT), but frequency and extent of small eye movements have not been studied. To investigate frequency and extent of irregularities in OCT imaging due to eye movements during the scanning process in OCT. A fundus enhancement system (FES) originally designed to improve retinal image quality in a conventional OCT device (Zeiss Stratus OCT) in order to integrate OCT images into fluorescence angiographies was used to record the scanning process and review OCT-scan acquisition in slow motion. A horizontal and a vertical single line scan of 5 mm length through the center of fixation were obtained in 40 eyes of 20 normal healthy subjects, all with a visual acuity of at least 20/20. Scans were investigated for loss of fixation and eye movements during the scanning process. Outcome measures were presence or absence of eye movements during the scanning process and mean deviation from the intended scan position, measured in millimeter. 7 of 20 patients showed no eye movements in both eyes. 4 of the remaining 13 patients showed eye movements only in one eye. In the eyes with detectable movements, the mean deviation from the intended scan position was 0.2 mm in the horizontal and 0.28 mm in the vertical scans. Fundus imaging in conventional systems can be enhanced to detect artifacts due to minimal eye movements during the scanning process. In this first series with normal healthy subjects, minimal eye movements were present in the over half of the investigations. Although the distances from the intended scan positions seem to be small in normal eyes, further investigations of the phenomenon are necessary. OCT is increasingly used as the primary tool for controlling therapy in macular diseases and the extent of motion artefacts is not known. (author) [de

  3. Transient Severe Motion Artifact Related to Gadoxetate Disodium-Enhanced Liver MRI: Frequency and Risk Evaluation at a German Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Well, Lennart; Rausch, Vanessa Hanna; Adam, Gerhard; Henes, Frank Oliver; Bannas, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Purpose  Varying frequencies (5 - 18 %) of contrast-related transient severe motion (TSM) imaging artifacts during gadoxetate disodium-enhanced arterial phase liver MRI have been reported. Since previous reports originated from the United States and Japan, we aimed to determine the frequency of TSM at a German institution and to correlate it with potential risk factors and previously published results. Materials and Methods  Two age- and sex-matched groups were retrospectively selected (gadoxetate disodium n = 89; gadobenate dimeglumine n = 89) from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI examinations in a single center. Respiratory motion-related artifacts in non-enhanced and dynamic phases were assessed independently by two readers blinded to contrast agents on a 4-point scale. Scores of ≥ 3 were considered as severe motion artifacts. Severe motion artifacts in arterial phases were considered as TSM if scores in all other phases were risk factors for TSM were evaluated via logistic regression analysis. Results  For gadoxetate disodium, the mean score for respiratory motion artifacts was significantly higher in the arterial phase (2.2 ± 0.9) compared to all other phases (1.6 ± 0.7) (p risk factors (all p > 0.05). Conclusion  We revealed a high frequency of TSM after injection of gadoxetate disodium at a German institution, substantiating the importance of a diagnosis-limiting phenomenon that so far has only been reported from the United States and Japan. In accordance with previous studies, we did not identify associated risk factors for TSM. Key Points:   · Gadoxetate disodium causes TSM in a relevant number of patients.. · The frequency of TSM is similar between the USA, Japan and Germany.. · To date, no validated risk factors for TSM could be identified.. Citation Format · Well L, Rausch VH, Adam G et al. Transient Severe Motion Artifact Related to Gadoxetate Disodium-Enhanced Liver MRI: Frequency and Risk Evaluation at a

  4. Detection of motion artifact patterns in photoplethysmographic signals based on time and period domain analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couceiro, R; Carvalho, P; Paiva, R P; Henriques, J; Muehlsteff, J

    2014-01-01

    The presence of motion artifacts in photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals is one of the major obstacles in the extraction of reliable cardiovascular parameters in continuous monitoring applications. In the current paper we present an algorithm for motion artifact detection based on the analysis of the variations in the time and the period domain characteristics of the PPG signal. The extracted features are ranked using a normalized mutual information feature selection algorithm and the best features are used in a support vector machine classification model to distinguish between clean and corrupted sections of the PPG signal. The proposed method has been tested in healthy and cardiovascular diseased volunteers, considering 11 different motion artifact sources. The results achieved by the current algorithm (sensitivity—SE: 84.3%, specificity—SP: 91.5% and accuracy—ACC: 88.5%) show that the current methodology is able to identify both corrupted and clean PPG sections with high accuracy in both healthy (ACC: 87.5%) and cardiovascular diseases (ACC: 89.5%) context. (paper)

  5. A comparative evaluation of adaptive noise cancellation algorithms for minimizing motion artifacts in a forehead-mounted wearable pulse oximeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comtois, Gary; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Ramuka, Piyush

    2007-01-01

    Wearable physiological monitoring using a pulse oximeter would enable field medics to monitor multiple injuries simultaneously, thereby prioritizing medical intervention when resources are limited. However, a primary factor limiting the accuracy of pulse oximetry is poor signal-to-noise ratio since photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals, from which arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate (HR) measurements are derived, are compromised by movement artifacts. This study was undertaken to quantify SpO2 and HR errors induced by certain motion artifacts utilizing accelerometry-based adaptive noise cancellation (ANC). Since the fingers are generally more vulnerable to motion artifacts, measurements were performed using a custom forehead-mounted wearable pulse oximeter developed for real-time remote physiological monitoring and triage applications. This study revealed that processing motion-corrupted PPG signals by least mean squares (LMS) and recursive least squares (RLS) algorithms can be effective to reduce SpO2 and HR errors during jogging, but the degree of improvement depends on filter order. Although both algorithms produced similar improvements, implementing the adaptive LMS algorithm is advantageous since it requires significantly less operations.

  6. Thin-section CT of lung without ECG gating: 64-detector row CT can markedly reduce cardiac motion artifact which can simulate lung lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagawa, Masahiro; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Sumikawa, Hiromitsu; Inoue, Atsuo; Daimon, Tadahisa; Honda, Osamu; Mihara, Naoki; Johkoh, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hironobu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Motion artifacts, which can mimic thickened bronchial wall and the cystic appearance of bronchiectasis, constitute a potential pitfall in the diagnosis of interstitial or bronchial disease. Therefore, purpose of our study was to evaluate whether 64-detector row CT (64-MDCT) enables a reduction in respiratory or cardiac motion artifacts in the lung area on thin-section CT without ECG gating, and to examine the correlation between cardiac motion artifact and heart rate. Materials and methods: Thirty-two patients with suspected diffuse lung disease, who underwent both 8- and 64-MDCT (gantry rotation time, 0.5 and 0.4 s, respectively), were included. The heart rates of an additional 155 patients were measured (range, 48-126 beats per minute; mean, 76 beats per minute) immediately prior to 64-MDCT, and compared to the degree of cardiac motion artifact. Two independent observers evaluated the following artifacts on a monitor without the knowledge of relevant clinical information: (1) artifacts on 8- and 64-MDCT images with 1.25-mm thickness and those on 64-MDCT images with 0.625-mm thickness in 32 patients; and (2) artifacts on 64-MDCT images with 0.625-mm thickness in 155 patients. Results: Interobserver agreement was good in evaluating artifacts on 8-MDCT images with 1.25-mm thickness (weighted Kappa test, κ = 0.61-0.71), and fair or poor in the other evaluations (κ < 0.31). Two observers stated that cardiac motion artifacts were more significant on 8-MDCT than on 64-MDCT in all 32 patients. Statistically significant differences were found at various checkpoints only in comparing artifacts between 8- and 64-MDCT for 1.25-mm thickness (Wilcoxon's signed-rank test, p < 0.0017). Cardiac motion artifacts on 64-MDCT had no significant correlation with heart rate (Spearman's correlation coefficient by rank test). Conclusion: The high temporal resolution of 64-MDCT appears to reduce cardiac motion artifact that can affect thin-section scans of the lung parenchyma

  7. Thin-section CT of lung without ECG gating: 64-detector row CT can markedly reduce cardiac motion artifact which can simulate lung lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagawa, Masahiro [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: m-yanagawa@radiol.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Sumikawa, Hiromitsu; Inoue, Atsuo [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Daimon, Tadahisa [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Jichi Medical University, 3311-1 Yakushiji, Shimotsuke, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan); Honda, Osamu [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Mihara, Naoki [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Radiology, Osaka Advanced Medical Imaging Center, 5-20-1 Momoyamadai, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0854 (Japan); Johkoh, Takeshi [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Medical Physics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nakamura, Hironobu [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: Motion artifacts, which can mimic thickened bronchial wall and the cystic appearance of bronchiectasis, constitute a potential pitfall in the diagnosis of interstitial or bronchial disease. Therefore, purpose of our study was to evaluate whether 64-detector row CT (64-MDCT) enables a reduction in respiratory or cardiac motion artifacts in the lung area on thin-section CT without ECG gating, and to examine the correlation between cardiac motion artifact and heart rate. Materials and methods: Thirty-two patients with suspected diffuse lung disease, who underwent both 8- and 64-MDCT (gantry rotation time, 0.5 and 0.4 s, respectively), were included. The heart rates of an additional 155 patients were measured (range, 48-126 beats per minute; mean, 76 beats per minute) immediately prior to 64-MDCT, and compared to the degree of cardiac motion artifact. Two independent observers evaluated the following artifacts on a monitor without the knowledge of relevant clinical information: (1) artifacts on 8- and 64-MDCT images with 1.25-mm thickness and those on 64-MDCT images with 0.625-mm thickness in 32 patients; and (2) artifacts on 64-MDCT images with 0.625-mm thickness in 155 patients. Results: Interobserver agreement was good in evaluating artifacts on 8-MDCT images with 1.25-mm thickness (weighted Kappa test, {kappa} = 0.61-0.71), and fair or poor in the other evaluations ({kappa} < 0.31). Two observers stated that cardiac motion artifacts were more significant on 8-MDCT than on 64-MDCT in all 32 patients. Statistically significant differences were found at various checkpoints only in comparing artifacts between 8- and 64-MDCT for 1.25-mm thickness (Wilcoxon's signed-rank test, p < 0.0017). Cardiac motion artifacts on 64-MDCT had no significant correlation with heart rate (Spearman's correlation coefficient by rank test). Conclusion: The high temporal resolution of 64-MDCT appears to reduce cardiac motion artifact that can affect thin-section scans of

  8. Reduction of respiratory ghosting motion artifacts in conventional two-dimensional multi-slice Cartesian turbo spin-echo: which k-space filling order is the best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuuji; Yoneyama, Masami; Nakamura, Masanobu; Takemura, Atsushi

    2018-06-01

    The two-dimensional Cartesian turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence is widely used in routine clinical studies, but it is sensitive to respiratory motion. We investigated the k-space orders in Cartesian TSE that can effectively reduce motion artifacts. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the relationship between k-space order and degree of motion artifacts using a moving phantom. We compared the degree of motion artifacts between linear and asymmetric k-space orders. The actual spacing of ghost artifacts in the asymmetric order was doubled compared with that in the linear order in the free-breathing situation. The asymmetric order clearly showed less sensitivity to incomplete breath-hold at the latter half of the imaging period. Because of the actual number of partitions of the k-space and the temporal filling order, the asymmetric k-space order of Cartesian TSE was superior to the linear k-space order for reduction of ghosting motion artifacts.

  9. TU-F-BRB-02: Motion Artifacts and Suppression in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, X.

    2015-01-01

    The current clinical standard of organ respiratory imaging, 4D-CT, is fundamentally limited by poor soft-tissue contrast and imaging dose. These limitations are potential barriers to beneficial “4D” radiotherapy methods which optimize the target and OAR dose-volume considering breathing motion but rely on a robust motion characterization. Conversely, MRI imparts no known radiation risk and has excellent soft-tissue contrast. MRI-based motion management is therefore highly desirable and holds great promise to improve radiotherapy of moving cancers, particularly in the abdomen. Over the past decade, MRI techniques have improved significantly, making MR-based motion management clinically feasible. For example, cine MRI has high temporal resolution up to 10 f/s and has been used to track and/or characterize tumor motion, study correlation between external and internal motions. New MR technologies, such as 4D-MRI and MRI hybrid treatment machines (i.e. MR-linac or MR-Co60), have been recently developed. These technologies can lead to more accurate target volume determination and more precise radiation dose delivery via direct tumor gating or tracking. Despite all these promises, great challenges exist and the achievable clinical benefit of MRI-based tumor motion management has yet to be fully explored, much less realized. In this proposal, we will review novel MR-based motion management methods and technologies, the state-of-the-art concerning MRI development and clinical application and the barriers to more widespread adoption. Learning Objectives: Discuss the need of MR-based motion management for improving patient care in radiotherapy. Understand MR techniques for motion imaging and tumor motion characterization. Understand the current state of the art and future steps for clinical integration. Henry Ford Health System holds research agreements with Philips Healthcare. Research sponsored in part by a Henry Ford Health System Internal Mentored Grant

  10. TU-F-BRB-02: Motion Artifacts and Suppression in MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, X. [Siemens (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    The current clinical standard of organ respiratory imaging, 4D-CT, is fundamentally limited by poor soft-tissue contrast and imaging dose. These limitations are potential barriers to beneficial “4D” radiotherapy methods which optimize the target and OAR dose-volume considering breathing motion but rely on a robust motion characterization. Conversely, MRI imparts no known radiation risk and has excellent soft-tissue contrast. MRI-based motion management is therefore highly desirable and holds great promise to improve radiotherapy of moving cancers, particularly in the abdomen. Over the past decade, MRI techniques have improved significantly, making MR-based motion management clinically feasible. For example, cine MRI has high temporal resolution up to 10 f/s and has been used to track and/or characterize tumor motion, study correlation between external and internal motions. New MR technologies, such as 4D-MRI and MRI hybrid treatment machines (i.e. MR-linac or MR-Co60), have been recently developed. These technologies can lead to more accurate target volume determination and more precise radiation dose delivery via direct tumor gating or tracking. Despite all these promises, great challenges exist and the achievable clinical benefit of MRI-based tumor motion management has yet to be fully explored, much less realized. In this proposal, we will review novel MR-based motion management methods and technologies, the state-of-the-art concerning MRI development and clinical application and the barriers to more widespread adoption. Learning Objectives: Discuss the need of MR-based motion management for improving patient care in radiotherapy. Understand MR techniques for motion imaging and tumor motion characterization. Understand the current state of the art and future steps for clinical integration. Henry Ford Health System holds research agreements with Philips Healthcare. Research sponsored in part by a Henry Ford Health System Internal Mentored Grant.

  11. Simple motion correction strategy reduces respiratory-induced motion artifacts for k-t accelerated and compressed-sensing cardiovascular magnetic resonance perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ruixi; Huang, Wei; Yang, Yang; Chen, Xiao; Weller, Daniel S; Kramer, Christopher M; Kozerke, Sebastian; Salerno, Michael

    2018-02-01

    SSIM (p simple and robust rigid motion compensation strategy greatly reduces motion artifacts and improves image quality for standard k-t PCA and k-t SLR techniques in setting of respiratory motion due to imperfect breath-holding.

  12. Reduction of thoracic aorta motion artifact with high-pitch 128-slice dual-source computed tomographic angiography: a historical control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Junichiro; Tasaki, Osamu; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Azuma, Takeo; Ohnishi, Mitsuo; Ukai, Isao; Tahara, Kenichi; Ogura, Hiroshi; Kuwagata, Yasuyuki; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Electrocardiogram-gated imaging combined with multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) has reduced cardiac motion artifacts, but it was not practical in the emergency setting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of a high-pitch, 128-slice dual-source CT (DSCT) scanner to reduce motion artifacts in patients admitted to the emergency room. This study comprised 100 patients suspected of having thoracic aorta lesions. We examined 47 patients with the 128-slice DSCT scanner (DSCT group), and 53 patients were examined with a 64-slice MDCT scanner (MDCT group). Six anatomic areas in the thoracic aorta were evaluated. Computed tomography images in the DSCT group were distinct, and significant differences were observed in images of all areas between the 2 groups except for the descending aorta. The high-pitch DSCT scanner can reduce motion artifacts of the thoracic aorta and enable radiological diagnosis even in patients with tachycardia and without breath hold.

  13. A trial to reduce cardiac motion artifact on HR-CT images of the lung with the use of subsecond scan and special cine reconstruction algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Fumikazu; Tsuuchi, Yasuhiko; Suzuki, Keiko; Ueno, Keiko; Yamada, Takayuki; Okawa, Tomohiko [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan); Yun, Shen; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Kimura, Fumiko

    1998-05-01

    We describe our trial to reduce cardiac motion artifacts on HR-CT images caused by cardiac pulsation by combining use of subsecond CT (scan time 0.8 s) and a special cine reconstruction algorithm (cine reconstruction algorithm with 180-degree helical interpolation). Eleven to 51 HR-CT images were reconstructed with the special cine reconstruction algorithm at the pitch of 0.1 (0.08 s) from the data obtained by two to six contigious rotation scans at the same level. Images with the fewest cardiac motion artifacts were selected for evaluation. These images were compared with those reconstructed with a conventional cine reconstruction algorithm and step-by-step scan. In spite of its increased radiation exposure, technical complexity and slight degradation of spatial resolution, our method was useful in reducing cardiac motion artifacts on HR-CT images in regions adjacent to the heart. (author)

  14. SU-E-I-51: Use of Blade Sequences in Cervical Spine MR Imaging for Eliminating Motion, Truncation and Flow Artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavroidis, P [University of Texas Health Science Center, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX (United States); Lavdas, E; Kostopoulos, S; Ninos, C; Strikou, A; Glotsos, D; Vlachopoulou, A; Oikonomou, G [Technological Education Institute of Athens, Athens, Athens (Greece); Economopoulos, N [General University Hospital ATTIKON, Athens, Athens (Greece); Roka, V [Health Center of Farkadona, Trikala (Greece); Sakkas, G [Center for Research and Technology of Thessaly, Trikala (Greece); Tsagkalis, A; Batsikas, G [IASO Thessalias Hospital, Larissa (Greece); Statkahis, S [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Papanikolaou, N [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of the BLADE technique to eliminate motion, truncation, flow and other artifacts in Cervical Spine MRI compared to the conventional technique. To study the ability of the examined sequences to reduce the indetention and wrap artifacts, which have been reported in BLADE sagittal sequences. Methods: Forty consecutive subjects, who had been routinely scanned for cervical spine examination using four different image acquisition techniques, were analyzed. More specifically, the following pairs of sequences were compared: a) T2 TSE SAG vs. T2 TSE SAG BLADE and b) T2 TIRM SAG vs. T2 TIRM SAG BLADE. A quantitative analysis was performed using the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and relative contrast (ReCon) measures. A qualitative analysis was also performed by two radiologists, who graded seven image characteristics on a 5-point scale (0:non-visualization; 1:poor; 2:average; 3:good; 4:excellent). The observers also evaluated the presence of image artifacts (motion, truncation, flow, indentation). Results: Based on the findings of the quantitative analysis, the ReCON values of the CSF (cerebrospinal fluid)/SC (spinal cord) between TIRM SAG and TIRM SAG BLADE were found to present statistical significant differences (p<0.001). Regarding motion and truncation artifacts, the T2 TSE SAG BLADE was superior compared to the T2 TSE SAG and the T2 TIRM SAG BLADE was superior compared to the T2 TIRM SAG. Regarding flow artifacts, T2 TIRM SAG BLADE eliminated more artifacts compared to the T2 TIRM SAG. Conclusion: The use of BLADE sequences in cervical spine MR examinations appears to be capable of potentially eliminating motion, pulsatile flow and trancation artifacts. Furthermore, BLADE sequences are proposed to be used in the standard examination protocols based on the fact that a significantly improved image quality could be achieved.

  15. SU-E-I-51: Use of Blade Sequences in Cervical Spine MR Imaging for Eliminating Motion, Truncation and Flow Artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavroidis, P; Lavdas, E; Kostopoulos, S; Ninos, C; Strikou, A; Glotsos, D; Vlachopoulou, A; Oikonomou, G; Economopoulos, N; Roka, V; Sakkas, G; Tsagkalis, A; Batsikas, G; Statkahis, S; Papanikolaou, N

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of the BLADE technique to eliminate motion, truncation, flow and other artifacts in Cervical Spine MRI compared to the conventional technique. To study the ability of the examined sequences to reduce the indetention and wrap artifacts, which have been reported in BLADE sagittal sequences. Methods: Forty consecutive subjects, who had been routinely scanned for cervical spine examination using four different image acquisition techniques, were analyzed. More specifically, the following pairs of sequences were compared: a) T2 TSE SAG vs. T2 TSE SAG BLADE and b) T2 TIRM SAG vs. T2 TIRM SAG BLADE. A quantitative analysis was performed using the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and relative contrast (ReCon) measures. A qualitative analysis was also performed by two radiologists, who graded seven image characteristics on a 5-point scale (0:non-visualization; 1:poor; 2:average; 3:good; 4:excellent). The observers also evaluated the presence of image artifacts (motion, truncation, flow, indentation). Results: Based on the findings of the quantitative analysis, the ReCON values of the CSF (cerebrospinal fluid)/SC (spinal cord) between TIRM SAG and TIRM SAG BLADE were found to present statistical significant differences (p<0.001). Regarding motion and truncation artifacts, the T2 TSE SAG BLADE was superior compared to the T2 TSE SAG and the T2 TIRM SAG BLADE was superior compared to the T2 TIRM SAG. Regarding flow artifacts, T2 TIRM SAG BLADE eliminated more artifacts compared to the T2 TIRM SAG. Conclusion: The use of BLADE sequences in cervical spine MR examinations appears to be capable of potentially eliminating motion, pulsatile flow and trancation artifacts. Furthermore, BLADE sequences are proposed to be used in the standard examination protocols based on the fact that a significantly improved image quality could be achieved

  16. Regularly incremented phase encoding - MR fingerprinting (RIPE-MRF) for enhanced motion artifact suppression in preclinical cartesian MR fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christian E; Wang, Charlie Y; Gu, Yuning; Darrah, Rebecca; Griswold, Mark A; Yu, Xin; Flask, Chris A

    2018-04-01

    The regularly incremented phase encoding-magnetic resonance fingerprinting (RIPE-MRF) method is introduced to limit the sensitivity of preclinical MRF assessments to pulsatile and respiratory motion artifacts. As compared to previously reported standard Cartesian-MRF methods (SC-MRF), the proposed RIPE-MRF method uses a modified Cartesian trajectory that varies the acquired phase-encoding line within each dynamic MRF dataset. Phantoms and mice were scanned without gating or triggering on a 7T preclinical MRI scanner using the RIPE-MRF and SC-MRF methods. In vitro phantom longitudinal relaxation time (T 1 ) and transverse relaxation time (T 2 ) measurements, as well as in vivo liver assessments of artifact-to-noise ratio (ANR) and MRF-based T 1 and T 2 mean and standard deviation, were compared between the two methods (n = 5). RIPE-MRF showed significant ANR reductions in regions of pulsatility (P Reson Med 79:2176-2182, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Optimized statistical parametric mapping procedure for NIRS data contaminated by motion artifacts : Neurometric analysis of body schema extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the spatial distribution of brain activity on body schema (BS) modification induced by natural body motion using two versions of a hand-tracing task. In Task 1, participants traced Japanese Hiragana characters using the right forefinger, requiring no BS expansion. In Task 2, participants performed the tracing task with a long stick, requiring BS expansion. Spatial distribution was analyzed using general linear model (GLM)-based statistical parametric mapping of near-infrared spectroscopy data contaminated with motion artifacts caused by the hand-tracing task. Three methods were utilized in series to counter the artifacts, and optimal conditions and modifications were investigated: a model-free method (Step 1), a convolution matrix method (Step 2), and a boxcar-function-based Gaussian convolution method (Step 3). The results revealed four methodological findings: (1) Deoxyhemoglobin was suitable for the GLM because both Akaike information criterion and the variance against the averaged hemodynamic response function were smaller than for other signals, (2) a high-pass filter with a cutoff frequency of .014 Hz was effective, (3) the hemodynamic response function computed from a Gaussian kernel function and its first- and second-derivative terms should be included in the GLM model, and (4) correction of non-autocorrelation and use of effective degrees of freedom were critical. Investigating z-maps computed according to these guidelines revealed that contiguous areas of BA7-BA40-BA21 in the right hemisphere became significantly activated ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text], respectively) during BS modification while performing the hand-tracing task.

  18. Evaluation and reduction of respiratory motion artifacts in small animal SPECT with GATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.-L.; Park, S.-J.; Kim, H.-J.

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of image quality caused by respiration is a major impediment to accurate lesion detection in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of lung motion on image quantification. A small animal SPECT system with NaI(Tl) was modeled in the Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) simulation for a lung lesion using a 4D mouse whole-body phantom. SPECT images were obtained using 120 projection views acquired from 0 o to 360 o with a 3 o step. Slices were reconstructed using ordered subsets expectation maximization (OS-EM) without attenuation correction with five iterations and four subsets. Image quality was compared between the static mode without respiratory motion, and dynamic mode with respiratory motion in terms of spatial resolution was measured by the full width at half maximum (FWHM), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The FWHM of the non-gated image and the respiratory gated image were also compared. Spatial resolution improved as activity increased and lesion diameter decreased in the static and dynamic modes. The SNR and CNR increased significantly as lesion activity increased and lesion diameter decreased. Our results show that respiratory motion leads to reduced contrast and quantitative accuracy and that image quantification depends on both the amplitude and the pattern of the respiratory motion. We verified that respiratory motion can have a major effect on the accuracy of measurement of lung lesions and that respiratory gating can reduce activity smearing on SPECT images

  19. Evaluation of soft-tissue artifacts when using anatomical and technical markers to measure mandibular motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chih Chen

    2011-06-01

    Conclusions: It appears that markers on the frontal nose bridge are good alternatives to transoral rigid devices for measuring mandibular motion, compared to optical frame markers and other skin markers on the face. The results of the current study will be helpful for establishing guidelines for marker placement when measuring mandibular movements in patients with potential temporomandibular disorders.

  20. Effects of Maternal Valium Administration on Fetal MRI Motion Artifact: A Comparison Study at High Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Mariana L; Mirsky, David M; Dannull, Kimberly A; Tong, Suhong; Crombleholme, Timothy M

    2017-01-01

    Fetal MRI is performed without sedation. In cases of maternal claustrophobia or when reduction of fetal motion is critical, benzodiazepines may help. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of low-dose benzodiazepine on fetal motion MRI and its effect on maternal oxygen levels at higher elevation. A total of 131 fetal MRI scans performed from March 2012 through December 2013 were studied. Nineteen of the cases were performed following Valium administration. Images were graded with a 5-point Likert scale. Using pulse oximetry, maternal oxygen levels were recorded. Results were analyzed for each category combining 3 readers' interpretations. Using a 2-sample t test model, the average imaging scores were better for the control than the Valium group (p = 0.0139). Maternal oxygen levels at different times and positions were compared using independent 2-sample t test between the Valium and control groups showing no change in O2 saturation, except when controlling for altitude and gestational age (p = 0.0326). Administration of low-dose Valium did not decrease fetal motion on MRI. Valium did not pose any risk of maternal hypoxemia, except when controlling for altitude and gestational age on supine position. Thus, caution should be exercised to prevent the risk of fetal hypoxemia. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. MOTION ARTIFACT REDUCTION IN FUNCTIONAL NEAR INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY SIGNALS BY AUTOREGRESSIVE MOVING AVERAGE MODELING BASED KALMAN FILTERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEHDI AMIAN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS is a technique that is used for noninvasive measurement of the oxyhemoglobin (HbO2 and deoxyhemoglobin (HHb concentrations in the brain tissue. Since the ratio of the concentration of these two agents is correlated with the neuronal activity, fNIRS can be used for the monitoring and quantifying the cortical activity. The portability of fNIRS makes it a good candidate for studies involving subject's movement. The fNIRS measurements, however, are sensitive to artifacts generated by subject's head motion. This makes fNIRS signals less effective in such applications. In this paper, the autoregressive moving average (ARMA modeling of the fNIRS signal is proposed for state-space representation of the signal which is then fed to the Kalman filter for estimating the motionless signal from motion corrupted signal. Results are compared to the autoregressive model (AR based approach, which has been done previously, and show that the ARMA models outperform AR models. We attribute it to the richer structure, containing more terms indeed, of ARMA than AR. We show that the signal to noise ratio (SNR is about 2 dB higher for ARMA based method.

  2. Diaphragmatic crural eventration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We evaluated patients with gastric volvulus secondary to diaphragmatic pathology. Materials and Methods: Eight patients (5 males and 3 females presented to the author in a tertiary care center during 1997-2006 were analyzed in terms of age, sex, symptomatology, diagnosis and predisposing factors. Observations: Six had an acute presentation and rest had chronic symptomatology. The two patients who had total gangrene stomach died postoperatively and one patient died preoperatively due to aspiration. All the cases presented with acute symptoms had diaphragmatic pathology, and out of these, three cases had the specific entity, which is named as diaphragmatic crural eventration. Conclusions: Diaphragmatic crural eventration is characterized by the defective development of the right crus of diaphragm, and this is embryologically significant as the right crus and ligaments of the stomach develop from dorsal mesoesophagus and mesogastrium. The author recommends a closer look for this defect of diaphragm while operating a case of gastric volvulus.

  3. Combination of fat saturation and variable bandwidth imaging to increase signal-to-noise ratio and decrease motion artifacts for body MR imaging at high field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the MR imaging examination is a critical component of the quality of the image. Standard methods to increase SNR include signal averaging with multiple excitations, at the expense of imaging time (which on T2-weighted images could be quite significant), or increasing pixel volume by manipulation of field of view, matrix size, and/or section thickness, all at the expense of resolution. Another available method to increase SNR is to reduce the bandwidth of the receiver, which increases SNR by the square root of the amount of the reduction. The penalty imposed on high-field-strength MR examinations of the body is an unacceptable increase in chemical shift artifact. However, presaturating the fat resonance eliminates the chemical shift artifact. Thus, a combination of imaging techniques, fat suppression, and decreased bandwidth imaging can produce images free of chemical shift artifact with increased SNR and no penalty in resolution or imaging time. Early studies also show a reduction in motion artifact when fat saturation is used. This paper reports MR imaging performed with a 1.5-T Signa imager. With this technique, T2-weighted images (2,500/20/80 [repetition time msec/echo time msec/inversion time msec]) illustrating the increase in SNR and T1-weighted images (600/20) demonstrating a decrease in motion artifact are shown

  4. Estimating actigraphy from motion artifacts in ECG and respiratory effort signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Pedro; Aarts, Ronald M; Long, Xi; Rolink, Jérôme; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Recent work in unobtrusive sleep/wake classification has shown that cardiac and respiratory features can help improve classification performance. Nevertheless, actigraphy remains the single most discriminative modality for this task. Unfortunately, it requires the use of dedicated devices in addition to the sensors used to measure electrocardiogram (ECG) or respiratory effort. This paper proposes a method to estimate actigraphy from the body movement artifacts present in the ECG and respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) based on the time-frequency analysis of those signals. Using a continuous wavelet transform to analyze RIP, and ECG and RIP combined, it provides a surrogate measure of actigraphy with moderate correlation (for ECG+RIP, ρ = 0.74, p  <  0.001) and agreement (mean bias ratio of 0.94 and 95% agreement ratios of 0.11 and 8.45) with reference actigraphy. More important, it can be used as a replacement of actigraphy in sleep/wake classification: after cross-validation with a data set comprising polysomnographic (PSG) recordings of 15 healthy subjects and 25 insomniacs annotated by an external sleep technician, it achieves a statistically non-inferior classification performance when used together with respiratory features (average κ of 0.64 for 15 healthy subjects, and 0.50 for a dataset with 40 healthy and insomniac subjects), and when used together with respiratory and cardiac features (average κ of 0.66 for 15 healthy subjects, and 0.56 for 40 healthy and insomniac subjects). Since this method eliminates the need for a dedicated actigraphy device, it reduces the number of sensors needed for sleep/wake classification to a single sensor when using respiratory features, and to two sensors when using respiratory and cardiac features without any loss in performance. It offers a major benefit in terms of comfort for long-term home monitoring and is immediately applicable for legacy ECG and RIP monitoring devices already used in clinical

  5. Genesis of multipeaked waves of the esophagus: repetitive contractions or motion artifact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Neha J; Bhargava, Valmik; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2010-06-01

    Multipeaked waves (MPW) in the distal esophagus occur frequently in patients with esophageal spastic motor disorders and diabetes mellitus and are thought to represent repetitive esophageal contractions. We aimed to investigate whether the relative motion between a stationary pressure sensor and contracted peristaltic esophageal segment that moves with respiration leads to the formation of MPW. We mathematically modeled the effect of relative movement between a moving pressure segment and a fixed pressure sensor on the pressure waveform morphology. We conducted retrospective analysis of 100 swallow-induced esophageal contractions in 10 patients, who demonstrated >30% MPW on high-resolution manometry (HRM) during standardized swallows. Finally, using HRM, we determined the effects of suspended breathing and hyperventilation on the waveform morphology in 10 patients prospectively. Modeling revealed that relative movement between a stationary pressure sensor and a moving contracted segment, contraction duration, contraction amplitude, respiratory frequency, and depth of respiration affects the waveform morphology. Retrospective analysis demonstrated a close temporal association with the onset of second and subsequent contractions in MPW with respiratory phase reversals. Numbers of peaks in MPW and respiratory phase reversals were closely related to the duration of contraction. In the prospective study, suspended breathing and hyperventilation resulted in a significant decrease and increase in the MPW frequency as well as the number of peaks within MPW respectively. We conclude that MPW observed during clinical motility studies are not indicative of repetitive esophageal contraction; rather they represent respiration-related movement of the contracted esophageal segment in relation to the stationary pressure sensor.

  6. Difference in diaphragmatic motion during tidal breathing in a standing position between COPD patients and normal subjects: Time-resolved quantitative evaluation using dynamic chest radiography with flat panel detector system (“dynamic X-ray phrenicography”)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yoshitake; Ueyama, Masako; Abe, Takehiko; Araki, Tetsuro; Abe, Takayuki; Nishino, Mizuki; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Dynamic X-ray phrenicography is a useful method for the evaluation of the diaphragms. • Its radiation dose is comparable to conventional two projection chest radiography. • Diaphragm motion during tidal breathing is larger in COPD than in normal subjects. • Higher BMI is also associated with increased excursions of the bilateral diaphragm. - Abstract: Objectives: To quantitatively compare diaphragmatic motion during tidal breathing in a standing position between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and normal subjects using dynamic chest radiography. Materials and methods: Thirty-nine COPD patients (35 males; age, 71.3 ± 8.4 years) and 47 normal subjects (non-smoker healthy volunteers) (20 males; age, 54.8 ± 9.8 years) underwent sequential chest radiographs during tidal breathing using dynamic chest radiography with a flat panel detector system. We evaluated the excursions and peak motion speeds of the diaphragms. The results were analyzed using an unpaired t-test and a multiple linear regression model. Results: The excursions of the diaphragms in COPD patients were significantly larger than those in normal subjects (right, 14.7 ± 5.5 mm vs. 10.2 ± 3.7 mm, respectively, P < 0.001; left, 17.2 ± 4.9 mm vs. 14.9 ± 4.2 mm, respectively, P = 0.022). Peak motion speeds in inspiratory phase were significantly faster in COPD patients compared to normal subjects (right, 16.3 ± 5.0 mm/s vs. 11.8 ± 4.2 mm/s, respectively, P < 0.001; left, 18.9 ± 4.9 mm/s vs. 16.7 ± 4.0 mm/s, respectively, P = 0.022). The multivariate analysis demonstrated that having COPD and higher body mass index were independently associated with increased excursions of the bilateral diaphragm (all P < 0.05), after adjusting for other clinical variables. Conclusions: Time-resolved quantitative evaluation of the diaphragm using dynamic chest radiography demonstrated that the diaphragmatic motion during tidal breathing in a standing position is larger and

  7. Difference in diaphragmatic motion during tidal breathing in a standing position between COPD patients and normal subjects: Time-resolved quantitative evaluation using dynamic chest radiography with flat panel detector system (“dynamic X-ray phrenicography”)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yoshitake, E-mail: yamada@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis St., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Ueyama, Masako, E-mail: ueyamam@fukujuji.org [Department of Health Care, Fukujuji Hospital, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association, 3-1-24 Matsuyama, Kiyose, Tokyo 204-8522 (Japan); Abe, Takehiko, E-mail: takehikoabe@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Fukujuji Hospital, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association, 3-1-24 Matsuyama, Kiyose, Tokyo 204-8522 (Japan); Araki, Tetsuro, E-mail: TARAKI@partners.org [Department of Radiology, Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis St., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Abe, Takayuki, E-mail: abe.t@keio.jp [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Biostatistics Unit at Clinical and Translational Research Center, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Nishino, Mizuki, E-mail: Mizuki_Nishino11@dfci.harvard.edu [Department of Radiology, Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis St., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Jinzaki, Masahiro, E-mail: jinzaki@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hatabu, Hiroto, E-mail: hhatabu@partners.org [Department of Radiology, Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis St., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); and others

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Dynamic X-ray phrenicography is a useful method for the evaluation of the diaphragms. • Its radiation dose is comparable to conventional two projection chest radiography. • Diaphragm motion during tidal breathing is larger in COPD than in normal subjects. • Higher BMI is also associated with increased excursions of the bilateral diaphragm. - Abstract: Objectives: To quantitatively compare diaphragmatic motion during tidal breathing in a standing position between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and normal subjects using dynamic chest radiography. Materials and methods: Thirty-nine COPD patients (35 males; age, 71.3 ± 8.4 years) and 47 normal subjects (non-smoker healthy volunteers) (20 males; age, 54.8 ± 9.8 years) underwent sequential chest radiographs during tidal breathing using dynamic chest radiography with a flat panel detector system. We evaluated the excursions and peak motion speeds of the diaphragms. The results were analyzed using an unpaired t-test and a multiple linear regression model. Results: The excursions of the diaphragms in COPD patients were significantly larger than those in normal subjects (right, 14.7 ± 5.5 mm vs. 10.2 ± 3.7 mm, respectively, P < 0.001; left, 17.2 ± 4.9 mm vs. 14.9 ± 4.2 mm, respectively, P = 0.022). Peak motion speeds in inspiratory phase were significantly faster in COPD patients compared to normal subjects (right, 16.3 ± 5.0 mm/s vs. 11.8 ± 4.2 mm/s, respectively, P < 0.001; left, 18.9 ± 4.9 mm/s vs. 16.7 ± 4.0 mm/s, respectively, P = 0.022). The multivariate analysis demonstrated that having COPD and higher body mass index were independently associated with increased excursions of the bilateral diaphragm (all P < 0.05), after adjusting for other clinical variables. Conclusions: Time-resolved quantitative evaluation of the diaphragm using dynamic chest radiography demonstrated that the diaphragmatic motion during tidal breathing in a standing position is larger and

  8. Evaluation of scatter limitation correction: a new method of correcting photopenic artifacts caused by patient motion during whole-body PET/CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Kenta; Umeda, Takuro; Murata, Taisuke; Wagatsuma, Kei; Miyaji, Noriaki; Terauchi, Takashi; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2016-02-01

    Overcorrection of scatter caused by patient motion during whole-body PET/computed tomography (CT) imaging can induce the appearance of photopenic artifacts in the PET images. The present study aimed to quantify the accuracy of scatter limitation correction (SLC) for eliminating photopenic artifacts. This study analyzed photopenic artifacts in (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET/CT images acquired from 12 patients and from a National Electrical Manufacturers Association phantom with two peripheral plastic bottles that simulated the human body and arms, respectively. The phantom comprised a sphere (diameter, 10 or 37 mm) containing fluorine-18 solutions with target-to-background ratios of 2, 4, and 8. The plastic bottles were moved 10 cm posteriorly between CT and PET acquisitions. All PET data were reconstructed using model-based scatter correction (SC), no scatter correction (NSC), and SLC, and the presence or absence of artifacts on the PET images was visually evaluated. The SC and SLC images were also semiquantitatively evaluated using standardized uptake values (SUVs). Photopenic artifacts were not recognizable in any NSC and SLC image from all 12 patients in the clinical study. The SUVmax of mismatched SLC PET/CT images were almost equal to those of matched SC and SLC PET/CT images. Applying NSC and SLC substantially eliminated the photopenic artifacts on SC PET images in the phantom study. SLC improved the activity concentration of the sphere for all target-to-background ratios. The highest %errors of the 10 and 37-mm spheres were 93.3 and 58.3%, respectively, for mismatched SC, and 73.2 and 22.0%, respectively, for mismatched SLC. Photopenic artifacts caused by SC error induced by CT and PET image misalignment were corrected using SLC, indicating that this method is useful and practical for clinical qualitative and quantitative PET/CT assessment.

  9. Blunt traumatic diaphragmatic rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Nogueira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injury of the diaphragm ranges from 0.6 to 1.2% and rise up to 5%among patients who were victims of blunt trauma and underwent laparotomy.Clinical suspicion associated with radiological assessment contributes to earlydiagnosis. Isolated diaphragmatic injury has a good prognosis. Generallyworse outcomes are associated with other trauma injuries. Bilateral andright diaphragmatic lesions have worse prognosis. Multi detector computed tomography (MDCT scan of the chest and abdomen provides better diagnosticaccuracy using the possibility of image multiplanar reconstruction. Surgicalrepair via laparotomy and/ or thoracotomy in the acute phase of the injury hasa better outcome and avoids chronic complications of diaphragmatic hernia.The authors present the case of a young male patient, victim of blunt abdominaltrauma due to motor vehicle accident with rupture of the diaphragm, spleenand kidney injuries. The diagnosis was made by computed tomography of thethorax and abdomen and was confirmed during laparotomy.

  10. Free-breathing high-pitch 80kVp dual-source computed tomography of the pediatric chest: Image quality, presence of motion artifacts and radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodelle, Boris; Fischbach, Constanze; Booz, Christian; Yel, Ibrahim; Frellesen, Claudia; Beeres, Martin; Vogl, Thomas J; Scholtz, Jan-Erik

    2017-04-01

    To investigate image quality, presence of motion artifacts and effects on radiation dose of 80kVp high-pitch dual-source CT (DSCT) in combination with an advanced modeled iterative reconstruction algorithm (ADMIRE) of the pediatric chest compared to single-source CT (SSCT). The study was approved by the institutional review board. Eighty-seven consecutive pediatric patients (mean age 9.1±4.9years) received either free-breathing high-pitch (pitch 3.2) chest 192-slice DSCT (group 1, n=31) or standard-pitch (pitch 1.2) 128-slice SSCT (group 2, n=56) with breathing-instructions by random assignment. Tube settings were similar in both groups with 80 kVp and 74 ref. mAs. Images were reconstructed using FBP for both groups. Additionally, ADMIRE was used in group 1. Effective thorax diameter, image noise, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the pectoralis major muscle and the thoracic aorta were calculated. Motion artifacts were measured as doubling boarders of the diaphragm and the heart. Images were rated by two blinded readers for overall image quality and presence of motion artifacts on 5-point-scales. Size specific dose estimates (SSDE, mGy) and effective dose (ED, mSv) were calculated. Age and effective thorax diameter showed no statistically significant differences in both groups. Image noise and SNR were comparable (p>0.64) for SSCT and DSCT with ADMIRE, while DSCT with FBP showed inferior results (pchest DSCT in combination with ADMIRE reduces motion artifacts and increases image quality while lowering radiation exposure in free-breathing pediatric patients without sedation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Free-breathing high-pitch 80 kVp dual-source computed tomography of the pediatric chest: Image quality, presence of motion artifacts and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodelle, Boris, E-mail: bbodelle@googlemail.com; Fischbach, Constanze; Booz, Christian; Yel, Ibrahim; Frellesen, Claudia; Beeres, Martin; Vogl, Thomas J.; Scholtz, Jan-Erik

    2017-04-15

    Objectives: To investigate image quality, presence of motion artifacts and effects on radiation dose of 80 kVp high-pitch dual-source CT (DSCT) in combination with an advanced modeled iterative reconstruction algorithm (ADMIRE) of the pediatric chest compared to single-source CT (SSCT). Materials and methods: The study was approved by the institutional review board. Eighty-seven consecutive pediatric patients (mean age 9.1 ± 4.9 years) received either free-breathing high-pitch (pitch 3.2) chest 192-slice DSCT (group 1, n = 31) or standard-pitch (pitch 1.2) 128-slice SSCT (group 2, n = 56) with breathing-instructions by random assignment. Tube settings were similar in both groups with 80 kVp and 74 ref. mAs. Images were reconstructed using FBP for both groups. Additionally, ADMIRE was used in group 1. Effective thorax diameter, image noise, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the pectoralis major muscle and the thoracic aorta were calculated. Motion artifacts were measured as doubling boarders of the diaphragm and the heart. Images were rated by two blinded readers for overall image quality and presence of motion artifacts on 5-point-scales. Size specific dose estimates (SSDE, mGy) and effective dose (ED, mSv) were calculated. Results: Age and effective thorax diameter showed no statistically significant differences in both groups. Image noise and SNR were comparable (p > 0.64) for SSCT and DSCT with ADMIRE, while DSCT with FBP showed inferior results (p < 0.01). Motion artifacts were reduced significantly (p = 0.001) with DSCT. DSCT with ADMIRE showed the highest overall IQ (p < 0.0001). Radiation dose was lower for DSCT compared to SSCT (median SSDE: 0.82 mGy vs. 0.92 mGy, p < 0.02; median ED: 0.4 mSv vs. 0.48 mSv, p = 0.02). Conclusions: High-pitch 80 kVp chest DSCT in combination with ADMIRE reduces motion artifacts and increases image quality while lowering radiation exposure in free-breathing pediatric patients without sedation.

  12. Free-breathing high-pitch 80 kVp dual-source computed tomography of the pediatric chest: Image quality, presence of motion artifacts and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodelle, Boris; Fischbach, Constanze; Booz, Christian; Yel, Ibrahim; Frellesen, Claudia; Beeres, Martin; Vogl, Thomas J.; Scholtz, Jan-Erik

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate image quality, presence of motion artifacts and effects on radiation dose of 80 kVp high-pitch dual-source CT (DSCT) in combination with an advanced modeled iterative reconstruction algorithm (ADMIRE) of the pediatric chest compared to single-source CT (SSCT). Materials and methods: The study was approved by the institutional review board. Eighty-seven consecutive pediatric patients (mean age 9.1 ± 4.9 years) received either free-breathing high-pitch (pitch 3.2) chest 192-slice DSCT (group 1, n = 31) or standard-pitch (pitch 1.2) 128-slice SSCT (group 2, n = 56) with breathing-instructions by random assignment. Tube settings were similar in both groups with 80 kVp and 74 ref. mAs. Images were reconstructed using FBP for both groups. Additionally, ADMIRE was used in group 1. Effective thorax diameter, image noise, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the pectoralis major muscle and the thoracic aorta were calculated. Motion artifacts were measured as doubling boarders of the diaphragm and the heart. Images were rated by two blinded readers for overall image quality and presence of motion artifacts on 5-point-scales. Size specific dose estimates (SSDE, mGy) and effective dose (ED, mSv) were calculated. Results: Age and effective thorax diameter showed no statistically significant differences in both groups. Image noise and SNR were comparable (p > 0.64) for SSCT and DSCT with ADMIRE, while DSCT with FBP showed inferior results (p < 0.01). Motion artifacts were reduced significantly (p = 0.001) with DSCT. DSCT with ADMIRE showed the highest overall IQ (p < 0.0001). Radiation dose was lower for DSCT compared to SSCT (median SSDE: 0.82 mGy vs. 0.92 mGy, p < 0.02; median ED: 0.4 mSv vs. 0.48 mSv, p = 0.02). Conclusions: High-pitch 80 kVp chest DSCT in combination with ADMIRE reduces motion artifacts and increases image quality while lowering radiation exposure in free-breathing pediatric patients without sedation.

  13. Body composition variation following diaphragmatic breathing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Body composition variation following diaphragmatic breathing. ... effect of commonly prescribed diaphragmatic breathing training on the body composition ... a non-exercising control (NE) group (n = 22) or diaphragmatic breathing (DB) group.

  14. A technique to reduce motion artifact for externally triggered cine-MRI(EC-MRI) based on detecting the onset of the articulated word with spectral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Yasuhiro; Nishimoto, Hironori; Kochiyama, Takanori; Fujimoto, Ichiro; Mano, Hiroaki; Masaki, Shinobu; Murase, Kenya

    2012-01-01

    One issue in externally triggered cine-magnetic resonance imaging (EC-MRI) for the dynamic observation of speech organs is motion artifact in the phase-encoding direction caused by unstable repetitions of speech during data acquisition. We propose a technique to reduce such artifact by rearranging the k-space data used to reconstruct MR images based on the analysis of recorded speech sounds. We recorded the subject's speech sounds during EC-MRI and used post hoc acoustical processing to reduce scanning noise and detect the onset of each utterance based on analysis of the recorded sounds. We selected each line of k-space from several data acquisition sessions and rearranged them to reconstruct a new series of dynamic MR images according to the analyzed time of utterance onset. Comparative evaluation showed significant reduction in motion artifact signal in the dynamic MR images reconstructed by the proposed method. The quality of the reconstructed images was sufficient to observe the dynamic aspects of speech production mechanisms. (author)

  15. Effect of motion artifacts and their correction on near-infrared spectroscopy oscillation data: a study in healthy subjects and stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selb, Juliette; Yücel, Meryem A; Phillip, Dorte; Schytz, Henrik W; Iversen, Helle K; Vangel, Mark; Ashina, Messoud; Boas, David A

    2015-05-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy is prone to contamination by motion artifacts (MAs). Motion correction algorithms have previously been proposed and their respective performance compared for evoked rain activation studies. We study instead the effect of MAs on "oscillation" data which is at the basis of functional connectivity and autoregulation studies. We use as our metric of interest the interhemispheric correlation (IHC), the correlation coefficient between symmetrical time series of oxyhemoglobin oscillations. We show that increased motion content results in a decreased IHC. Using a set of motion-free data on which we add real MAs, we find that the best motion correction approach consists of discarding the segments of MAs following a careful approach to minimize the contamination due to band-pass filtering of data from "bad" segments spreading into adjacent "good" segments. Finally, we compare the IHC in a stroke group and in a healthy group that we artificially contaminated with the MA content of the stroke group, in order to avoid the confounding effect of increased motion incidence in the stroke patients. After motion correction, the IHC remains lower in the stroke group in the frequency band around 0.1 and 0.04 Hz, suggesting a physiological origin for the difference. We emphasize the importance of considering MAs as a confounding factor in oscillation-based functional near-infrared spectroscopy studies.

  16. E-Bra system for women ECG measurement with GPRS communication, Nanosensor, and motion artifact remove algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyeokjun; Oh, Sechang; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2012-10-01

    with conductive gel. However, the gel can be dried when taking long time monitoring. The gold nanowire structure electrodes without consideration of uncomfortable usage of gel are attached on beneath the chest position of a brassiere, and the electrodes convert the physical ECG signal to voltage potential signal. The voltage potential ECG signal is converted to digital signal by AD converter included in microprocessor. The converted ECG signal by AD converter is saved on every 1 sec period in the internal RAM in microprocessor. For transmission of the saved data in the internal RAM to a server computer locating at remote area, the system uses the GPRS communication technology, which can develop the wide area network(WAP) without any gateway and repeater. In addition, the transmission system is operated on client mode of GPRS communication. The remote server is installed a program including the functions of displaying and analyzing the transmitted ECG. To display the ECG data, the program is operated with TCP/IP server mode and static IP address, and to analyze the ECG data, the paper suggests motion artifact remove algorithm including adaptive filter with LMS(least mean square), baseline detection algorithm using predictability estimation theory, a filter with moving weighted factor, low pass filter, peak to peak detection, and interpolation.

  17. Study on motion artifacts in coronary arteries with an anthropomorphic moving heart phantom on an ECG-gated multidetector computed tomography unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greuter, Marcel J.W.; Dorgelo, Joost; Tukker, Wim G.J.; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2005-01-01

    Acquisition time plays a key role in the quality of cardiac multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and is directly related to the rotation time of the scanner. The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of heart rate and a multisector reconstruction algorithm on the image quality of coronary arteries of an anthropomorphic adjustable moving heart phantom on an ECG-gated MDCT unit. The heart phantom and a coronary artery phantom were used on a MDCT unit with a rotation time of 500 ms. The movement of the heart was determined by analysis of the images taken at different phases. The results indicate that the movement of the coronary arteries on the heart phantom is comparable to that in a clinical setting. The influence of the heart rate on image quality and artifacts was determined by analysis of several heart rates between 40 and 80 bpm where the movement of the heart was synchronized using a retrospective ECG-gated acquisition protocol. The resulting reformatted volume rendering images of the moving heart and the coronary arteries were qualitatively compared as a result of the heart rate. The evaluation was performed on three independent series by two independent radiologists for the image quality of the coronary arteries and the presence of artifacts. The evaluation shows that at heart rates above 50 bpm the influence of motion artifacts in the coronary arteries becomes apparent. In addition the influence of a dedicated multisector reconstruction technique on image quality was determined. The results show that the image quality of the coronary arteries is not only related to the heart rate and that the influence of the multisector reconstruction technique becomes significant above 70 bpm. Therefore, this study proves that from the actual acquisition time per heart cycle one cannot determine an actual acquisition time, but only a mathematical acquisition time. (orig.)

  18. Diaphragmatic hernia repair using a rectus abdominis muscle pedicle flap in three dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantawong, P; Komin, K; Banlunara, W; Kalpravidh, M

    2013-01-01

    To report the clinical use of a pedicle flap from the rectus abdominis muscle to repair extensive diaphragmatic tears in dogs with diaphragmatic hernia. Three dogs with a combination of radial and circumferential diaphragmatic tears were studied. The circumferential tear was repaired by suturing the wound edge with the edge at the abdominal wall. A pedicle flap of the rectus abdominis muscle was used for repairing the radial tear. The dogs were examined radiographically for lung and diaphragm appearance and evidence of reherniation at 10 days, and at one, two, and four months after surgery, and fluoroscopically for paradoxical motion of the diaphragm at one and four months. The rectus abdominis muscle pedicle flap was successfully used in all three dogs. The animals recovered uneventfully without evidence of reherniation during the four follow-up months. Fluoroscopic examination revealed no paradoxical motion of the diaphragm. A rectus abdominis muscle pedicle flap can be used for repairing large diaphragmatic defects in dogs.

  19. Reduction of Motion Artifacts and Improvement of R Peak Detecting Accuracy Using Adjacent Non-Intrusive ECG Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minho Choi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-intrusive electrocardiogram (ECG monitoring has many advantages: easy to measure and apply in daily life. However, motion noise in the measured signal is the major problem of non-intrusive measurement. This paper proposes a method to reduce the noise and to detect the R peaks of ECG in a stable manner in a sitting arrangement using non-intrusive sensors. The method utilizes two capacitive ECG sensors (cECGs to measure ECG, and another two cECGs located adjacent to the sensors for ECG are added to obtain the information on motion. Then, active noise cancellation technique and the motion information are used to reduce motion noise. To verify the proposed method, ECG was measured indoors and during driving, and the accuracy of the detected R peaks was compared. After applying the method, the sum of sensitivity and positive predictivity increased 8.39% on average and 26.26% maximally in the data. Based on the results, it was confirmed that the motion noise was reduced and that more reliable R peak positions could be obtained by the proposed method. The robustness of the new ECG measurement method will elicit benefits to various health care systems that require noninvasive heart rate or heart rate variability measurements.

  20. MR diagnosis of diaphragmatic endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, Pascal; Gregory, Jules; Coste, Joel; Rousset-Jablonski, Christine; Hugon-Rodin, Justine; Regnard, Jean-Francois; Chapron, Charles; Golfier, Francois; Revel, Marie-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diaphragmatic endometriosis diagnosis. Over a 2-year period, all diaphragmatic MRI performed in the context of diaphragmatic endometriosis were reviewed. Axial and coronal fat-suppressed T1- and T2-weighted sequences were analyzed by two independent readers for the presence of nodules, plaque lesions, micronodule clustering, or focal liver herniation. MR abnormalities were correlated to surgical findings in women surgically treated. Interobserver agreement was assessed by κ statistics. Twenty-three women with diaphragmatic endometriosis criteria comprised the population; 14 had surgical confirmation and nine had symptoms relief with hormonal treatment. MRI sensitivity was 83 % (19/23; 95 % confidence interval [CI]: 68, 98) for reader 1 and 78 % (18/23; 95 % CI: 61, 95) for reader 2. Kappa value was 0.86 (95 % CI: 0.47, 1.00). Readers 1 and 2 detected 35 and 36 lesions, respectively, all right-sided and agreed for 32 lesions on the type, location, and signal. Lesions were mostly nodules (23/32, 72 %), predominantly posterior (28/32, 87.5 %) and hyperintense on T1 (20/32, 63 %). MRI was negative for both readers in 2 surgically treated patients with small nodules or isolated diaphragmatic holes. MRI allows diaphragmatic endometriosis diagnosis with 78 to 83 % sensitivity and excellent interobserver agreement. (orig.)

  1. MR diagnosis of diaphragmatic endometriosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousset, Pascal [Lyon 1 Claude Bernard University, Villeurbanne (France); Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Radiology Department, Pierre Benite (France); Gregory, Jules; Coste, Joel [Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Groupe Hospitalier Cochin Hotel-Dieu, Biostatistics and Epidemiology department, Paris (France); Rousset-Jablonski, Christine [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Obstetric and Gynecologic Department, Pierre Benite (France); Hugon-Rodin, Justine [Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Groupe Hospitalier Cochin Hotel-Dieu, Gynecology Endocrinology Department, Paris (France); Regnard, Jean-Francois [Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Groupe Hospitalier Cochin Hotel-Dieu, Thoracic Surgery Department, Paris (France); Chapron, Charles [Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Groupe Hospitalier Cochin Hotel-Dieu, Obstetric and Gynecologic Department, Paris (France); Golfier, Francois [Lyon 1 Claude Bernard University, Villeurbanne (France); Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Obstetric and Gynecologic Department, Pierre Benite (France); Revel, Marie-Pierre [Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Groupe Hospitalier Cochin Hotel-Dieu, Radiology Department, Paris (France)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diaphragmatic endometriosis diagnosis. Over a 2-year period, all diaphragmatic MRI performed in the context of diaphragmatic endometriosis were reviewed. Axial and coronal fat-suppressed T1- and T2-weighted sequences were analyzed by two independent readers for the presence of nodules, plaque lesions, micronodule clustering, or focal liver herniation. MR abnormalities were correlated to surgical findings in women surgically treated. Interobserver agreement was assessed by κ statistics. Twenty-three women with diaphragmatic endometriosis criteria comprised the population; 14 had surgical confirmation and nine had symptoms relief with hormonal treatment. MRI sensitivity was 83 % (19/23; 95 % confidence interval [CI]: 68, 98) for reader 1 and 78 % (18/23; 95 % CI: 61, 95) for reader 2. Kappa value was 0.86 (95 % CI: 0.47, 1.00). Readers 1 and 2 detected 35 and 36 lesions, respectively, all right-sided and agreed for 32 lesions on the type, location, and signal. Lesions were mostly nodules (23/32, 72 %), predominantly posterior (28/32, 87.5 %) and hyperintense on T1 (20/32, 63 %). MRI was negative for both readers in 2 surgically treated patients with small nodules or isolated diaphragmatic holes. MRI allows diaphragmatic endometriosis diagnosis with 78 to 83 % sensitivity and excellent interobserver agreement. (orig.)

  2. Electrocardiography-triggered high-resolution CT for reducing cardiac motion artifact. Evaluation of the extent of ground-glass attenuation in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiura, Motoko; Johkoh, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Shuji

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the decreasing of cardiac motion artifact and whether the extent of ground-glass attenuation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) was accurately assessed by electrocardiography (ECG)-triggered high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) by 0.5-s/rotation multidetector-row CT (MDCT). ECG-triggered HRCT were scanned at the end-diastolic phase by a MDCT scanner with the following scan parameters; axial four-slice mode, 0.5 mm collimation, 0.5-s/rotation, 120 kVp, 200 mA/rotation, high-frequency algorithm, and half reconstruction. In 42 patients with IPF, both conventional HRCT (ECG gating (-), full reconstruction) and ECG-triggered HRCT were performed at the same levels (10-mm intervals) with the above scan parameters. The correlation between percent diffusion of carbon monoxide of the lung (%DLCO) and the mean extent of ground-glass attenuation on both conventional HRCT and ECG-triggered HRCT was evaluated with the Spearman rank correlation coefficient test. The correlation between %DLCO and the mean extent of ground-glass attenuation on ECG-triggered HRCT (observer A: r=-0.790, P<0.0001; observer B: r=-0.710, P<0.0001) was superior to that on conventional HRCT (observer A: r=-0.395, P<0.05; observer B: r=-0.577, P=0.002) for both observers. ECG-triggered HRCT by 0.5 s/rotation MDCT can reduce the cardiac motion artifact and is useful for evaluating the extent of ground-glass attenuation of IPF. (author)

  3. SU-F-J-117: Impact of Motion Artifacts On Image Quality and Accuracy of Tumor Motion Reconstruction in 4D CT-On-Rails and MV-CBCT Scans: A Phantom Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, T; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare and quantify respiratory motion artifacts in images from free breathing 4D-CT-on-Rails(CTOR) and those from MV-Cone-beam-CT(MVCB) and facilitate respiratory motion guided radiation therapy. Methods: 4D-CTOR: Siemens Somatom CT-on-Rails system with Anzai belt loaded with pressure sensor load cells. 4D scans were performed in helical mode, pitch 0.1, gantry rotation time 0.5s, 1.5mm slice thickness, 120kVp, 400 mAs. Normal and fast breathing (>12rpm) scanning protocols were investigated. Helical scan, AIP(average intensity projection) and MIP(maximum intensity projection) were generated from 4D-CTOR scans with amplitude sorting into 10 phases.MVCB: Siemens Artiste diamond view(1MV)MVCB was performed with 5MU thorax protocol with 60 second of full rotation.Phantom: Anzai AZ-733V respiratory phantom. The settings were set to normal and resp. modes with repetition rates at 15 rpm and 10 rpm. Surgical clips, acrylic, wooden, rubber and lung density, total six mock-ups were scanned and compared in this study.Signal-to-noise ratio(SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio(CNR) and reconstructed motion volume were compared to different respiratory setups for the mock-ups. Results: Reconstructed motion volume was compared to the real object volume for the six test mock-ups. It shows that free breathing helical in all instances underestimates the object excursions largest to −67.4% and least −6.3%. Under normal breathing settings, MIP can predict very precise motion volume with minimum 0.4% and largest −13.9%. MVCB shows underestimate of the motion volume with −1.11% minimum and −18.0% maximum. With fast breathing, AIP provides bad representation of the object motion; however, the MIP can predict the motion volume with −2.0% to −11.4% underestimate. Conclusion: Respiratory motion guided radiation therapy requires good motion recording. This study shows that regular CTOR helical scans provides bad guidance, 4D CTOR AIP cannot represent the fast breathing

  4. Lévy meets poisson: a statistical artifact may lead to erroneous recategorization of Lévy walk as Brownian motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautestad, Arild O

    2013-03-01

    The flow of GPS data on animal space is challenging old paradigms, such as the issue of the scale-free Lévy walk versus scale-specific Brownian motion. Since these movement classes often require different protocols with respect to ecological analyses, further theoretical development in this field is important. I describe central concepts such as scale-specific versus scale-free movement and the difference between mechanistic and statistical-mechanical levels of analysis. Next, I report how a specific sampling scheme may have produced much confusion: a Lévy walk may be wrongly categorized as Brownian motion if the duration of a move, or bout, is used as a proxy for step length and a move is subjectively defined. Hence, the categorization and recategorization of movement class compliance surrounding the Lévy walk controversy may have been based on a statistical artifact. This issue may be avoided by collecting relocations at a fixed rate at a temporal scale that minimizes over- and undersampling.

  5. iPhone 4s photoplethysmography: which light color yields the most accurate heart rate and normalized pulse volume using the iPhysioMeter Application in the presence of motion artifact?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Matsumura

    Full Text Available Recent progress in information and communication technologies has made it possible to measure heart rate (HR and normalized pulse volume (NPV, which are important physiological indices, using only a smartphone. This has been achieved with reflection mode photoplethysmography (PPG, by using a smartphone's embedded flash as a light source and the camera as a light sensor. Despite its widespread use, the method of PPG is susceptible to motion artifacts as physical displacements influence photon propagation phenomena and, thereby, the effective optical path length. Further, it is known that the wavelength of light used for PPG influences the photon penetration depth and we therefore hypothesized that influences of motion artifact could be wavelength-dependant. To test this hypothesis, we made measurements in 12 healthy volunteers of HR and NPV derived from reflection mode plethysmograms recorded simultaneously at three different spectral regions (red, green and blue at the same physical location with a smartphone. We then assessed the accuracy of the HR and NPV measurements under the influence of motion artifacts. The analyses revealed that the accuracy of HR was acceptably high with all three wavelengths (all rs > 0.996, fixed biases: -0.12 to 0.10 beats per minute, proportional biases: r =  -0.29 to 0.03, but that of NPV was the best with green light (r = 0.791, fixed biases: -0.01 arbitrary units, proportional bias: r = 0.11. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio obtained with green and blue light PPG was higher than that of red light PPG. These findings suggest that green is the most suitable color for measuring HR and NPV from the reflection mode photoplethysmogram under motion artifact conditions. We conclude that the use of green light PPG could be of particular benefit in ambulatory monitoring where motion artifacts are a significant issue.

  6. Artifacts produced during electrical stimulation of the vestibular nerve in cats. [autonomic nervous system components of motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    Evidence is presented to indicate that evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal, the cervical sympathetic, and the phrenic nerve, commonly reported as being elicited by vestibular nerve stimulation, may be due to stimulation of structures other than the vestibular nerve. Experiments carried out in decerebrated cats indicated that stimulation of the petrous bone and not that of the vestibular nerve is responsible for the genesis of evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal and the cervical sympathetic nerves. The phrenic response to electrical stimulation applied through bipolar straight electrodes appears to be the result of stimulation of the facial nerve in the facial canal by current spread along the petrous bone, since stimulation of the suspended facial nerve evoked potentials only in the phrenic nerve and not in the recurrent laryngeal nerve. These findings indicate that autonomic components of motion sickness represent the secondary reactions and not the primary responses to vestibular stimulation.

  7. Elevation of the diaphragmatic cupola

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, V.M.; Talesnik, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    Altogether 45 patients with elevation of the diaphragmatic cupola were examined. A high frequency of erroneous initial interpretation of examination results was noted in inflammatory and tumorous lesions and congenital conditions. Routine and contrast methods (pneumoperitoneum, bronchography, pleurography and fistulography) were used. Disease-related methods of X-ray investigation were proposed. A variety of causes of diaphragm elevation was indicated

  8. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature

  9. Quantifying skin motion artifact error of the hindfoot and forefoot marker clusters with the optical tracking of a multi-segment foot model using single-plane fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, R; Kedgley, A E; Jenkyn, T R

    2011-05-01

    The trajectories of skin-mounted markers tracked with optical motion capture are assumed to be an adequate representation of the underlying bone motions. However, it is well known that soft tissue artifact (STA) exists between marker and bone. This study quantifies the STA associated with the hindfoot and midfoot marker clusters of a multi-segment foot model. To quantify STA of the hindfoot and midfoot marker clusters with respect to the calcaneus and navicular respectively, fluoroscopic images were collected on 27 subjects during four quasi-static positions, (1) quiet standing (non-weight bearing), (2) at heel strike (weight-bearing), (3) at midstance (weight-bearing) and (4) at toe-off (weight-bearing). The translation and rotation components of STA were calculated in the sagittal plane. Translational STA at the calcaneus varied from 5.9±7.3mm at heel-strike to 12.1±0.3mm at toe-off. For the navicular the translational STA ranged from 7.6±7.6mm at heel strike to 16.4±16.7mm at toe-off. Rotational STA was relatively smaller for both bones at all foot positions. For the calcaneus they varied between 0.1±2.2° at heel-strike to 0.2±0.6° at toe-off. For the navicular, the rotational STA ranged from 0.6±0.9° at heel-strike to 0.7±0.7° at toe-off. The largest translational STA found in this study (16mm for the navicular) was smaller than those reported in the literature for the thigh and the lower leg, but was larger than the STA of individual spherical markers affixed to the foot. The largest errors occurred at toe-off position for all subjects for both the hindfoot and midfoot clusters. Future studies are recommended to quantify true three-dimensional STA of the entire foot during gait. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Imaging of congenital diaphragmatic hernias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, George A.; Estroff, Judy A.; Atalabi, Omolola M.

    2009-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernias are complex and life-threatening lesions that are not just anatomic defects of the diaphragm, but represent a complex set of physiologic derangements of the lung, the pulmonary vasculature, and related structures. Imaging plays an increasingly important role in the care of these infants. Prenatal sonography and MRI have allowed early and accurate identification of the defect and associated anomalies. These tools have also been the key to defining the degree of pulmonary hypoplasia and to predicting neonatal survival and need for aggressive respiratory rescue strategies. In the postnatal period, conventional radiography supplemented by cross-sectional imaging in selected cases can be very useful in sorting out the differential diagnosis of intrathoracic masses, in the detection of associated anomalies, and in the management of complications. Understanding the pathogenesis of diaphragmatic defects, the underlying physiologic disturbances, and the strengths and limitations of current imaging protocols is essential to the effective and accurate management of these complex patients. (orig.)

  11. Imaging of congenital diaphragmatic hernias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, George A.; Estroff, Judy A. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Atalabi, Omolola M. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); The College of Medicine/University College Hospital, Ibadan (Nigeria)

    2009-01-15

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernias are complex and life-threatening lesions that are not just anatomic defects of the diaphragm, but represent a complex set of physiologic derangements of the lung, the pulmonary vasculature, and related structures. Imaging plays an increasingly important role in the care of these infants. Prenatal sonography and MRI have allowed early and accurate identification of the defect and associated anomalies. These tools have also been the key to defining the degree of pulmonary hypoplasia and to predicting neonatal survival and need for aggressive respiratory rescue strategies. In the postnatal period, conventional radiography supplemented by cross-sectional imaging in selected cases can be very useful in sorting out the differential diagnosis of intrathoracic masses, in the detection of associated anomalies, and in the management of complications. Understanding the pathogenesis of diaphragmatic defects, the underlying physiologic disturbances, and the strengths and limitations of current imaging protocols is essential to the effective and accurate management of these complex patients. (orig.)

  12. Diaphragmatic Hernia Masquerading as Pleural Effusion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As many as 30% of diaphragmatic hernias present late.[1] We present an unusual case report of a late presentation of isolated diaphragmatic injury, after apparently minor blunt trauma, which was initially misdiagnosed as pleural effusion. CASE REPORT. A 40-year-old man slipped and fell against the edge of his bath tub.

  13. Discrimination of common myocardial tomography artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Hongcheng; Chen Shaoliang; Yao Zhifeng; Zhu Weimin; Liu Wenguan

    2002-01-01

    To study the characteristics of common myocardial tomography artifacts so as to increase the diagnosis accuracy, 132 patients with myocardial perfusion were reviewed. With careful recognition of artifacts, the patients were re-diagnosed and compared with previous results. It was found that attenuation artifacts and motion artifacts were found frequently in thallium SPECT images. Artifacts caused by thoracic wall were frequent in female and showed a fixed defect in anterior or lateral wall; attenuation artifacts caused by left hemi diaphragm were always found in male and showed that the inferior wall became thinner gradually from apex to bottom in vertical long axis slices. The coexistence of defects and hot areas was the characteristics of motion artifacts. Artifacts caused by non-target organs, liver and/or gastrointestinal tracts, were frequently seen in 99m Tc-MIBI SPECT image. By recognizing the artifacts, misdiagnosis rate decreased significantly from 13.6% to 6.8%. Authors' studies show that all kinds of artifacts have their prevalence rate and imaging feature, the artifacts could be eliminated effectively by careful analysis and some correction measures

  14. Diaphragmatic paralysis evaluated by phrenic nerve stimulation during fluoroscopy or real-time ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCauley, R.G.K.; Labib, K.B.

    1984-10-01

    Stimulation of the phrenic nerve by supplying an electrical impulse to the neck during fluoroscopy or real-time ultrasound (sonoscopy) of the diaphragm allows more precise functional evaluation than fluoroscopy and/or sonoscopy alone. This is especially true of patients who are unable to cooperate because the are on a ventilator, unconscious, or very young. The authors cite cases in which diaphragmatic paralysis was diagnosed by conventional methods but stimulation of the phrenic nerve demonstrated good diaphragmatic motion, leading to a change in prognosis in some cases and a change in therapy in others.

  15. Diaphragmatic paralysis evaluated by phrenic nerve stimulation during fluoroscopy or real-time ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCauley, R.G.K.; Labib, K.B.

    1984-01-01

    Stimulation of the phrenic nerve by supplying an electrical impulse to the neck during fluoroscopy or real-time ultrasound (sonoscopy) of the diaphragm allows more precise functional evaluation than fluoroscopy and/or sonoscopy alone. This is especially true of patients who are unable to cooperate because the are on a ventilator, unconscious, or very young. The authors cite cases in which diaphragmatic paralysis was diagnosed by conventional methods but stimulation of the phrenic nerve demonstrated good diaphragmatic motion, leading to a change in prognosis in some cases and a change in therapy in others

  16. Bochdalek Hernia with Adult Diaphragmatic Agenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Akar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available    Diaphragmatic hernia arises from pleuro-peritoneal membranes inability to close pericardioperitoneal membranes. Diaphragmatic defect may be located in esophageal hiatus (hiatal hernia, nearby the hiatus (paraesophageal, retrosternal (Morgagni or posterolateral (Bochdalek. Congenital diaphragmatic hernias (CDH diagnosed after neonatal period are defined as late presenting CDH. This group of patients consist 5-31% of CDHs and lead to diagnostic difficulties. A case of adult type Bochdalek hernia who was admitted to our clinic with respiratory problems and recognized late with the absence of left diaphragm was discussed in the light of clinical and surgical methods.

  17. A Robust Motion Artifact Detection Algorithm for Accurate Detection of Heart Rates From Photoplethysmographic Signals Using Time-Frequency Spectral Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Duy; Salehizadeh, S M A; Noh, Yeonsik; Chong, Jo Woon; Cho, Chae Ho; McManus, Dave; Darling, Chad E; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Chon, Ki H

    2017-09-01

    Motion and noise artifacts (MNAs) impose limits on the usability of the photoplethysmogram (PPG), particularly in the context of ambulatory monitoring. MNAs can distort PPG, causing erroneous estimation of physiological parameters such as heart rate (HR) and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2). In this study, we present a novel approach, "TifMA," based on using the time-frequency spectrum of PPG to first detect the MNA-corrupted data and next discard the nonusable part of the corrupted data. The term "nonusable" refers to segments of PPG data from which the HR signal cannot be recovered accurately. Two sequential classification procedures were included in the TifMA algorithm. The first classifier distinguishes between MNA-corrupted and MNA-free PPG data. Once a segment of data is deemed MNA-corrupted, the next classifier determines whether the HR can be recovered from the corrupted segment or not. A support vector machine (SVM) classifier was used to build a decision boundary for the first classification task using data segments from a training dataset. Features from time-frequency spectra of PPG were extracted to build the detection model. Five datasets were considered for evaluating TifMA performance: (1) and (2) were laboratory-controlled PPG recordings from forehead and finger pulse oximeter sensors with subjects making random movements, (3) and (4) were actual patient PPG recordings from UMass Memorial Medical Center with random free movements and (5) was a laboratory-controlled PPG recording dataset measured at the forehead while the subjects ran on a treadmill. The first dataset was used to analyze the noise sensitivity of the algorithm. Datasets 2-4 were used to evaluate the MNA detection phase of the algorithm. The results from the first phase of the algorithm (MNA detection) were compared to results from three existing MNA detection algorithms: the Hjorth, kurtosis-Shannon entropy, and time-domain variability-SVM approaches. This last is an approach

  18. Dynamics in artifact ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2012-01-01

    We increasingly interact with multiple interactive artifacts with overlapping capabilities during our daily activities. It has previously been shown that the use of an interactive artifact cannot be understood in isolation, but artifacts must be understood as part of an artifact ecology, where...... artifacts influence the use of others. Understanding this interplay becomes more and more essential for interaction design as our artifact ecologies grow. This paper continues a recent discourse on artifact ecologies. Through interviews with iPhone users, we demonstrate that relationships between artifacts...... in artifact ecologies cannot be understood as static, instead they evolve dynamically over time. We provide activity theory-based concepts to explain these dynamics....

  19. Difficult weaning in delayed onset diaphragmatic hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Syed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Diaphragmatic injuries are relatively rare and result from either blunt or penetrating trauma. Regardless of the mechanism, diagnosis is often missed and high index of suspicion is vital. The clinical signs associated with a diaphragmatic hernia can range from no outward signs to immediately life-threatening respiratory compromise. Establishing the clinical diagnosis of diaphragmatic injuries (DI can be challenging as it is often clinically occult. Accurate diagnosis is critical since missed DI may result in grave sequelae due to herniation and strangulation of displaced intra-abdominal organs. We present a case of polytrauma with rib fracture and delayed appearance of diaphragmatic hernia manifesting as difficult weaning from ventilatory support.

  20. Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging of the head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwama, Toru; Andoh, Takashi; Sakai, Noboru; Yamada, Hiromu [Gifu Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Funakoshi, Takashi; Akiyama, Shigeru; Yoshida, Kakuro

    1989-08-01

    The results of 505 magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations of the head disclosed several different types of artifact. Various artifacts observed with two-dimentional Fourier transformation are described and illustrated. All images were obtained with a 0.5 Tesla superconducting MR imager. About 70% of all images contained artifacts. Phase encoding artifacts due to motion or flow were most frequently observed. Center, 'zipper,' truncation, radiofrequency, and ferromagnetic artifacts and contrast error on inversion recovery (IR) images were noted less frequently. Phase encoding artifacts and contrast errors on IR images totally degraded the images, and 'zipper' artifacts were regional. Center artifacts resembled small infarctions, and ferromagnetic artifacts sometimes mimicked hematmas. It is important to recognize these artifacts and to devise methods to avoid their influence on the region of interest. (author).

  1. Endometriosis-related spontaneous diaphragmatic rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triponez, Frédéric; Alifano, Marco; Bobbio, Antonio; Regnard, Jean-François

    2010-10-01

    Non-traumatic, spontaneous diaphragmatic rupture is a rare event whose pathophysiology is not known. We report the case of endometriosis-related spontaneous rupture of the right diaphragm with intrathoracic herniation of the liver, gallbladder and colon. We hypothesize that the invasiveness of endometriotic tissue caused diaphragm fragility, which finally lead to its complete rupture without traumatic event. The treatment consisted of a classical management of diaphragmatic rupture, with excision of the endometriotic nodule followed by medical ovarian suppression for six months.

  2. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia with gastric volvulus

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Prashant; Sanghavi, Beejal; Sanghani, Hemanshi; Parelkar, S. V.; Borwankar, S. S.

    2007-01-01

    Gastric volvulus is a surgical emergency presenting in various forms. Association with diaphragmatic defect is well known. Here we describe three cases of gastric volvulus associated with diaphragmatic defect having varied presentations and their management. A rare case of gastric volvulus with complete gangrene of the stomach is also reported. Three types of gastric volvulus have been described depending on the rotation axis: organoaxial, mesentericoaxial and combination of both types. Opera...

  3. Occult diaphragmatic injuries caused by stab wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppäniemi, Ari; Haapiainen, Reijo

    2003-10-01

    Missed diaphragmatic perforation caused by penetrating trauma can lead to subsequent strangulation of a hollow viscus, which has prompted the use of invasive diagnostic procedures to exclude occult diaphragmatic injuries in asymptomatic, high-risk patients. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of occult diaphragmatic injuries caused by stab wounds of the lower chest and upper abdomen, and to examine the natural history and consequences of missed diaphragmatic injuries. On the basis of patient data from two previous randomized studies from our institution, a retrospective analysis was performed on 97 patients treated for anterior stab wounds located between the nipple line, the umbilical level, and the posterior axillary lines not having indications for immediate surgical exploration. The patients were divided into two groups on the basis of their initial randomized management (open or laparoscopic exploration vs. expectant observation). In the exploration group (n = 47), four diaphragmatic injuries (9%) were detected (three left-sided and one right-sided). Excluding patients with associated injuries requiring surgical repair, the incidence of occult diaphragmatic injuries was 3 of 43 (7%). In the observation group (n = 50), there were two patients (4%) with delayed presentation of missed left-sided diaphragmatic injury 2 and 23 months later, respectively. Both injuries resulted from stab wounds of the left flank and presented with herniation of the stomach or small bowel and colon. The overall incidence of occult diaphragmatic injuries in left-sided thoracoabdominal stab wounds was 4 of 24 (17%), and was much lower after stab wounds of left epigastrium (0%), right lower chest (0%), and right epigastrium (4%). In asymptomatic patients with anterior or flank stab wounds of the lower chest or upper abdominal area, the risk of an occult diaphragmatic injury is approximately 7% which, if undetected, is associated with a high risk of subsequent

  4. Artifacts in digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Whan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shin Gu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Min [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi Woun [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Beakseok Culture University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Digital Radiography is a big part of diagnostic radiology. Because uncorrected digital radiography image supported false effect of Patient’s health care. We must be manage the correct digital radiography image. Thus, the artifact images can have effect to make a wrong diagnosis. We report types of occurrence by analyzing the artifacts that occurs in digital radiography system. We had collected the artifacts occurred in digital radiography system of general hospital from 2007 to 2014. The collected data had analyzed and then had categorize as the occurred causes. The artifacts could be categorized by hardware artifacts, software artifacts, operating errors, system artifacts, and others. Hardware artifact from a Ghost artifact that is caused by lag effect occurred most frequently. The others cases are the artifacts caused by RF noise and foreign body in equipments. Software artifacts are many different types of reasons. The uncorrected processing artifacts and the image processing error artifacts occurred most frequently. Exposure data recognize (EDR) error artifacts, the processing error of commissural line, and etc., the software artifacts were caused by various reasons. Operating artifacts were caused when the user did not have the full understanding of the digital medical image system. System artifacts had appeared the error due to DICOM header information and the compression algorithm. The obvious artifacts should be re-examined, and it could result in increasing the exposure dose of the patient. The unclear artifact leads to a wrong diagnosis and added examination. The ability to correctly determine artifact are required. We have to reduce the artifact occurrences by understanding its characteristic and providing sustainable education as well as the maintenance of the equipments.

  5. Artifacts in digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Jung Whan; Kim, Jung Min; Jeong, Hoi Woun

    2015-01-01

    Digital Radiography is a big part of diagnostic radiology. Because uncorrected digital radiography image supported false effect of Patient’s health care. We must be manage the correct digital radiography image. Thus, the artifact images can have effect to make a wrong diagnosis. We report types of occurrence by analyzing the artifacts that occurs in digital radiography system. We had collected the artifacts occurred in digital radiography system of general hospital from 2007 to 2014. The collected data had analyzed and then had categorize as the occurred causes. The artifacts could be categorized by hardware artifacts, software artifacts, operating errors, system artifacts, and others. Hardware artifact from a Ghost artifact that is caused by lag effect occurred most frequently. The others cases are the artifacts caused by RF noise and foreign body in equipments. Software artifacts are many different types of reasons. The uncorrected processing artifacts and the image processing error artifacts occurred most frequently. Exposure data recognize (EDR) error artifacts, the processing error of commissural line, and etc., the software artifacts were caused by various reasons. Operating artifacts were caused when the user did not have the full understanding of the digital medical image system. System artifacts had appeared the error due to DICOM header information and the compression algorithm. The obvious artifacts should be re-examined, and it could result in increasing the exposure dose of the patient. The unclear artifact leads to a wrong diagnosis and added examination. The ability to correctly determine artifact are required. We have to reduce the artifact occurrences by understanding its characteristic and providing sustainable education as well as the maintenance of the equipments

  6. Lung MRI and impairment of diaphragmatic function in Pompe disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wens, Stephan C A; Ciet, Pierluigi; Perez-Rovira, Adria

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pompe disease is a progressive metabolic myopathy. Involvement of respiratory muscles leads to progressive pulmonary dysfunction, particularly in supine position. Diaphragmatic weakness is considered to be the most important component. Standard spirometry is to some extent indicative ...... tool to visualize diaphragmatic dynamics in Pompe patients and to study chest-walland diaphragmatic movements in more detail. Our data indicate that diaphragmatic displacement may be severely disturbed in patients with Pompe disease....

  7. Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hy D.; Claudet, Andre A.; Oliver, Andrew D.

    2010-09-07

    A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

  8. Imaging of diaphragmatic rupture after trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eren, S.; Kantarci, M.; Okur, A.

    2006-01-01

    Traumatic rupture of the diaphragm usually results from blunt or penetrating injuries, or iatrogenic causes. Most cases are initially overlooked in the acute phase because they present with variable clinical and radiological signs. An overlooked diaphragmatic injury presents as a hernia many years later with potentially serious complications, therefore selection of the most appropriate radiological technique and accurate diagnosis of traumatic diaphragmatic hernias (DH) on the first admission is important. Although the diagnosis of diaphragmatic injuries is problematic, various investigations may be used for diagnosis. We describe the imaging findings of 19 traumatic DH cases with various imaging techniques. The patients were acute trauma cases or cases with prior trauma or thoraco-abdominal surgery with clinical suspicion of DH. An evaluation of the imaging techniques used in the diagnosis of DH is presented

  9. Prognostic factors of congenital diaphragmatic hernia accompanied by cardiovascular malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shigehiro; Sago, Haruhiko; Kanamori, Yutaka; Hayakawa, Masahiro; Okuyama, Hiroomi; Inamura, Noboru; Fujino, Yuji; Usui, Noriaki; Taguchi, Tomoaki

    2013-08-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is associated with cardiovascular malformation. Many prognostic factors have been identified for isolated congenital diaphragmatic hernia; however, reports of concurrent congenital diaphragmatic hernia and cardiovascular malformation in infants are limited. This study evaluated congenital diaphragmatic hernia associated with cardiovascular malformation in infants. Factors associated with prognosis for patients were also identified. This retrospective cohort study was based on a Japanese survey of congenital diaphragmatic hernia patients between 2006 and 2010. Frequency and outcome of cardiovascular malformation among infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia were examined. Severity of congenital diaphragmatic hernia and cardiovascular malformation were compared as predictors of mortality and morbidity. Cardiovascular malformation was identified in 76 (12.3%) of 614 infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Mild cardiovascular malformation was detected in 19 (33.9%) and severe cardiovascular malformation in 37 (66.1%). Their overall survival rate at discharge was 46.4%, and the survival rate without morbidity was 23.2%. Mortality and morbidity at discharge were more strongly associated with severity of cardiovascular malformation (adjusted OR 7.69, 95%CI 1.96-30.27; adjusted OR 7.93, 95%CI 1.76-35.79, respectively) than with severity of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. The prognosis for infants with both congenital diaphragmatic hernia and cardiovascular malformation remains poor. Severity of cardiovascular malformation is a more important predictive factor for mortality and morbidity than severity of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  10. Imaging diagnosis--positive contrast peritoneographic features of true diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jihye; Kim, Hyunwook; Kim, Mieun; Yoon, Junghee

    2009-01-01

    A true diaphragmatic hernia is a congenital diaphragmatic malformation that can appear identical to a peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia (PPDH). True diaphragmatic hernias are rare in dogs. Herein we describe the use of positive contrast peritoneography for diagnosis of a true diaphragmatic hernia in two dogs.

  11. Case Report - Diaphragmatic eventration complicated by gastric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eventration of the diaphragm with gastric volvulus is uncommon. Gastric perforation in these cases is rare and usually associated with acute gastric volvulus with strangulation. We describe a case of diaphragmatic eventration with chronic gastric volvulus with gastric perforation without strangulation in an elderly man.

  12. Radiographic observation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Chung Sik [Ewha Women' s University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1973-12-15

    Five cases of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Case 1: A female infant, birth weight 2.25 kg, Apgar score 10, normal delivery at 11:33 P.M. on Feb.8, 1972. Lt side congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Case 2: A female infant, birth weight 1.48 kg, Apgar score 5, normal delivery at 11:20 A.M. on Oct.14, 1972. Lt. side congenital diaphragmatic hernia. This infant was twin. this infant's mother was toxemia. Case 3; A 33 years old women was admitted to the our hospital because of Lt.hip joint pain without other symptoms. Date of admission: Jan. 8, 1973. Rt side congenital diaphragmentic hernia. Case 4: A 4 month infant male was admitted to the our hospital because of vomiting, dyspnea and abdominal pain. He had cyanosis intermittently after one month ago. This infant was normal delivered. The family history was not contributory. Date of admission: This infant was normal delivered. The family history was not contributory. Date of admission: Aug. 30, 1971. Rt side congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Case 5: A 13 years old girl was admitted to our hospital because of general weakness without other symptoms. This patient was normal delivered. The family history was not contributory. Date of admission: March. 15, 1973. Lt. side congenital diaphragmentic hernia.

  13. Radiographic observation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Chung Sik

    1973-01-01

    Five cases of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Case 1: A female infant, birth weight 2.25 kg, Apgar score 10, normal delivery at 11:33 P.M. on Feb.8, 1972. Lt side congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Case 2: A female infant, birth weight 1.48 kg, Apgar score 5, normal delivery at 11:20 A.M. on Oct.14, 1972. Lt. side congenital diaphragmatic hernia. This infant was twin. this infant's mother was toxemia. Case 3; A 33 years old women was admitted to the our hospital because of Lt.hip joint pain without other symptoms. Date of admission: Jan. 8, 1973. Rt side congenital diaphragmentic hernia. Case 4: A 4 month infant male was admitted to the our hospital because of vomiting, dyspnea and abdominal pain. He had cyanosis intermittently after one month ago. This infant was normal delivered. The family history was not contributory. Date of admission: This infant was normal delivered. The family history was not contributory. Date of admission: Aug. 30, 1971. Rt side congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Case 5: A 13 years old girl was admitted to our hospital because of general weakness without other symptoms. This patient was normal delivered. The family history was not contributory. Date of admission: March. 15, 1973. Lt. side congenital diaphragmentic hernia

  14. Diaphragmatic Hernia Masquerading as Pleural Effusion | Nalladaru ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rupture of the diaphragm is almost always due to major trauma. We present here an unusual and rare case of late presentation of diaphragmatic hernia after an innocuous injury. The patient was initially misdiagnosed as a left pleural effusion on the basis of chest X.ray and ultrasound findings. Finally, the diagnosis was ...

  15. Imaging findings in fetal diaphragmatic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamo, Leonor; Gudinchet, Francois [University Hospital Center of Lausanne, Unit of Radiopediatrics, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Meuli, Reto [University Hospital Center of Lausanne, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    Imaging plays a key role in the detection of a diaphragmatic pathology in utero. US is the screening method, but MRI is increasingly performed. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is by far the most often diagnosed diaphragmatic pathology, but unilateral or bilateral eventration or paralysis can also be identified. Extralobar pulmonary sequestration can be located in the diaphragm and, exceptionally, diaphragmatic tumors or secondary infiltration of the diaphragm from tumors originating from an adjacent organ have been observed in utero. Congenital abnormalities of the diaphragm impair normal lung development. Prenatal imaging provides a detailed anatomical evaluation of the fetus and allows volumetric lung measurements. The comparison of these data with those from normal fetuses at the same gestational age provides information about the severity of pulmonary hypoplasia and improves predictions about the fetus's outcome. This information can help doctors and families to make decisions about management during pregnancy and after birth. We describe a wide spectrum of congenital pathologies of the diaphragm and analyze their embryological basis. Moreover, we describe their prenatal imaging findings with emphasis on MR studies, discuss their differential diagnosis and evaluate the limits of imaging methods in predicting postnatal outcome. (orig.)

  16. Genetics Home Reference: congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of cells in the embryo. Environmental factors that influence development before birth may also increase the risk of ... occur? How can gene mutations affect health and development? More about Mutations and ... is only one affected individual in a family. When congenital diaphragmatic hernia occurs as a feature ...

  17. Management of diaphragmatic rupture from blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, K K; Yan, Z Y; Vijayan, A; Chiu, M T

    2009-12-01

    Diagnosis of diaphragmatic rupture is difficult, and delays could result in a catastrophic outcome. We reviewed our institution's management of patients with diaphragmatic rupture after blunt trauma. All patients in this study were treated at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, from March 2002 to October 2008. Patients with penetrating injuries were excluded. The parameters included age, mechanism of injury, haemodynamic status at admission, Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score, injury severity score (ISS), imaging studies, location of diaphragmatic injuries, associated injuries and outcome. 14 patients with a median age of 38 years formed the study group. Vehicular-related incidents accounted for 71.4 percent of the injuries. The median GCS score on admission was 14 (range 3-15), while the median systolic blood pressure and heart rate were 94 (range 50-164) mmHg and 110 (range 76-140) beats per minute, respectively. The median ISS was 41 (range 14-66). All had chest radiographs performed in the emergency department, six (42.9 percent) had computed tomography performed before surgery, while the remaining eight (57.1 percent) were sent straight to the operating theatre from the emergency department. There were five (35.7 percent) right-sided and nine (64.3 percent) left-sided diaphragmatic ruptures. The mortality rate was 35.7 percent. Some of the associated injuries included eight (57.1 percent) splenic lacerations, five (35.7 percent) haemothorax and lung injuries, four (28.6 percent) bone fractures and three (21.4 percent) liver lacerations. 12 (85.7 percent) patients underwent repair of the diaphragmatic rupture using interrupted polypropylene suture, while the remaining two (14.3 percent) were too haemodynamically unstable to undergo definitive treatment. Advanced age, haemodynamic instability and raised ISS were associated with mortality. An accurate diagnosis of diaphragmatic rupture in trauma patients is difficult, and a thorough examination of both the

  18. Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias: Retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P.A. Sousa

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study classifies cases of traumatic diaphragmatic hernias (TDH in patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU of the Coimbra University Hospitals (HUC from 1990 to 2004. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 34 cases of TDH, studying anatomical location, place and time of diagnosis, complementary tests aiding diagnosis, herniated organs, associated traumatism, morbidity and mortality. Results: Twenty-eight male and six female patients with an average age of 40.5 years ± 20.5, average SAPS score 38.8. Average lenght of stay was 19.1 ± 13.6 days, all suffered from closed traumatism and were put on artificial ventilation. The left-side diaphragm was more frequently affected (94.1% then the right. Diagnosis in 19 cases was made up in the first six hours following the diagnosis of traumatism, in four cases within 12 hours and in the remaining cases between 48 hours and 16 years after traumatism. In 13 patients the diagnosis was established intra-operatively. The stomach was typically one of the herniated organs. The most frequently associated lesions at the thoracic level were pulmonary contusion, haemothorax and pneumothorax, and at the abdominal level, haemoperitoneum and splenic lesion. The rates for complications and mortality were 55.8% and 11.7% respectively. Conclusions: TDH mainly occurs on the left side through closed thoraco-abdominal trauma following road traffic accidents. This group of patients, on average younger than others admitted to ICU, presents a longer average hospitalisation period, but has lower rates of mortality and lower SAPS severity scores. The most commonly herniated organ was the stomach and the most frequently encountered lesions were cranial-encephalic, splenic and pleural traumatisms. Pre-operative diagnosis of diaphragmatic injuries is difficult and a high index of clinical suspicion is needed after thoracoabdominal trauma. This diagnosis should always be considered a possibility in

  19. Motion in radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine Sofia

    2012-01-01

    This review considers the management of motion in photon radiation therapy. An overview is given of magnitudes and variability of motion of various structures and organs, and how the motion affects images by producing artifacts and blurring. Imaging of motion is described, including 4DCT and 4DPE...

  20. Improving the use of principal component analysis to reduce physiological noise and motion artifacts to increase the sensitivity of task-based fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltysik, David A; Thomasson, David; Rajan, Sunder; Biassou, Nadia

    2015-02-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) time series are subject to corruption by many noise sources, especially physiological noise and motion. Researchers have developed many methods to reduce physiological noise, including RETROICOR, which retroactively removes cardiac and respiratory waveforms collected during the scan, and CompCor, which applies principal components analysis (PCA) to remove physiological noise components without any physiological monitoring during the scan. We developed four variants of the CompCor method. The optimized CompCor method applies PCA to time series in a noise mask, but orthogonalizes each component to the BOLD response waveform and uses an algorithm to determine a favorable number of components to use as "nuisance regressors." Whole brain component correction (WCompCor) is similar, except that it applies PCA to time-series throughout the whole brain. Low-pass component correction (LCompCor) identifies low-pass filtered components throughout the brain, while high-pass component correction (HCompCor) identifies high-pass filtered components. We compared the new methods with the original CompCor method by examining the resulting functional contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), sensitivity, and specificity. (1) The optimized CompCor method increased the CNR and sensitivity compared to the original CompCor method and (2) the application of WCompCor yielded the best improvement in the CNR and sensitivity. The sensitivity of the optimized CompCor, WCompCor, and LCompCor methods exceeded that of the original CompCor method. However, regressing noise signals showed a paradoxical consequence of reducing specificity for all noise reduction methods attempted. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia-associated pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harting, Matthew T

    2017-06-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a complex entity wherein a diaphragmatic defect allows intrathoracic herniation of intra-abdominal contents and both pulmonary parenchymal and vascular development are stifled. Pulmonary pathology and pathophysiology, including pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension, are hallmarks of CDH and are associated with disease severity. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is sustained, supranormal pulmonary arterial pressure, and among patients with CDH (CDH-PH), is driven by hypoplastic pulmonary vasculature, including alterations at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels, along with pathophysiologic pulmonary vasoreactivity. This review addresses the basic mechanisms, altered anatomy, definition, diagnosis, and management of CDH-PH. Further, emerging therapies targeting CDH-PH and PH are explored. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Artifacts that mimic ballistic magnetoresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egelhoff, W.F. . E-mail : egelhoff@nist.gov; Gan, L.; Ettedgui, H.; Kadmon, Y.; Powell, C.J.; Chen, P.J.; Shapiro, A.J.; McMichael, R.D.; Mallett, J.J.; Moffat, T.P.; Stiles, M.D.; Svedberg, E.B.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the circumstances underlying recent reports of very large values of ballistic magnetoresistance (BMR) in nanocontacts between magnetic wires. We find that the geometries used are subject to artifacts due to motion of the wires that distort the nanocontact thereby changing its electrical resistance. Since these nanocontacts are often of atomic scale, reliable experiments would require stability on the atomic scale. No method for achieving such stability in macroscopic wires is apparent. We conclude that macroscopic magnetic wires cannot be used to establish the validity of the BMR effect

  3. Small Artifacts - Big Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    The computer IC is the heart of the information and telecommunication technology. It is a tiny artifact, but with incredible organizing powers. We use this physical artifact as the location for studying central problems of the knowledge economy. First, the paper describes the history of chip design...

  4. Congenital posterolateral diaphragmatic hernia : pathophysiological studies and clinical picture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P. Bos (Albert)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractCongenital diaphragmatic hernias are classified according to the location of the defect: posterolateral hernia with or without a sac (Bochdalek-type), parasternal hernia through the foramen of Morgagni, central hernia, and diaphragmatic eventration. The so-called hiatal hernia has a

  5. Posterolateral diaphragmatic hernia with small-bowel incarceration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bochdalek hernia (BH), a closing defect of the peripheral posterior aspect of the diaphragm, is the most common of the congenital diaphragmatic hernias and is usually diagnosed in neonates. Symptomatic presentation of a right-sided diaphragmatic hernia in an adult is unusual. Owing to their rarity and varied presentation, ...

  6. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia with gastrointestinal symptomatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siroka, M.; Bilicky, J.; Hernesniemi, B.

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a case of 6-week-old baby boy with congenital diaphragmatic hernia(CDH). He presented with nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms. CDH is commonly manifested by nonspecific respiratory problems. The symptoms of CDH in older infants are atypical and misleading. Children may have only gastrointestinal problems even the acute abdomen. In our case, the ultrasound examination of abdomen did not detect the exact cause of vomiting and intolerance of oral intake, but the explanation has brought classic chest X-ray. (author)

  7. Epidemiology of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGivern, Mark R.; Best, Kate E.; Rankin, Judith

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Published prevalence rates of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) vary. This study aims to describe the epidemiology of CDH using data from high-quality, population-based registers belonging to the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT). METHODS: Cases of CDH...... for isolated cases (ie, CDH cases that did not occur with any other congenital anomaly). There was significant variation in total and isolated CDH prevalence between registers. The proportion of cases that survived to 1 week was 69.3% (1392 cases) for total CDH cases and 72.7% (1107) for isolated cases...

  8. Motion compensated digital tomosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Reijden, Anneke; van Herk, Marcel; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a limited angle image reconstruction method for cone beam projections that offers patient surveillance capabilities during VMAT based SBRT delivery. Motion compensation (MC) has the potential to mitigate motion artifacts caused by respiratory motion, such as blur. The

  9. Laparoscopic diaphragmatic hernia repair using expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) for delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, Yeseob

    2017-06-01

    Traumatic diaphragmatic hernia (TDH) is an uncommon surgical problem, and diagnosis is often delayed. However, the mortality from bowel necrosis can reach 80%. Therefore, suspicion is needed and surgery is required to prevent complications. A 50-year-old man was transferred due to abdominal pain and vomiting. Chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT) scan showed herniation of the stomach through the left diaphragm. The patient had fallen down 15 months ago and CT scan at that time revealed a small defect of the diaphragm without herniation. We diagnosed delayed herniation of TDH and the patient underwent laparoscopic repair using an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) mesh. Recovery was uneventful and the CT scan at 3 months after the operation showed no recurrence. We reported a delayed presenting TDH and considered a laparoscopic approach to be safe and feasible during elective surgery. Moreover, use of an ePTFE mesh for repair of large diaphragmatic hernia was also feasible.

  10. Dose modulated retrospective ECG-gated versus non-gated 64-row CT angiography of the aorta at the same radiation dose: Comparison of motion artifacts, diagnostic confidence and signal-to-noise-ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schernthaner, Ruediger E.; Stadler, Alfred; Beitzke, Dietrich; Homolka, Peter; Weber, Michael; Lammer, Johannes; Czerny, Martin; Loewe, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare ECG-gated and non-gated CT angiography of the aorta at the same radiation dose, with regard to motion artifacts (MA), diagnostic confidence (DC) and signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs). Materials and methods: Sixty consecutive patients prospectively randomized into two groups underwent 64-row CT angiography, with or without dose-modulated ECG-gating, of the entire aorta, due to several pathologies of the ascending aorta. MA and DC were both assessed using a four-point scale. SNRs were calculated by dividing the mean enhancement by the standard deviation. The dose-length-product (DLP) of each examination was recorded and the effective dose was estimated. Results: Dose-modulated ECG-gating showed statistically significant advantages over non-gated CT angiography, with regard to MA (p < 0.001) and DC (p < 0.001), at the aortic valve, at the origin of the coronary arteries, and at the dissection membrane, with a significant correlation (p < 0.001) between MA and DC. At the aortic wall, however, ECG-gated CT angiography showed statistically significant fewer MA (p < 0.001), but not a statistically significant higher DC (p = 0.137) compared to non-gated CT angiography. At the supra-aortic vessels and the descending aorta, the ECG-triggering showed no statistically significant differences with regard to MA (p = 0.861 and 0.526, respectively) and DC (p = 1.88 and 0.728, respectively). The effective dose of ECG-gated CT angiography (23.24 mSv; range, 18.43–25.94 mSv) did not differ significantly (p = 0.051) from that of non-gated CT angiography (24.28 mSv; range, 19.37–29.27 mSv). Conclusion: ECG-gated CT angiography of the entire aorta reduces MA and results in a higher DC with the same SNR, compared to non-gated CT angiography at the same radiation dose.

  11. A late presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernia misdiagnosed as spontaneous pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra Sanjeev Juwarkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH is described as (1 failure of diaphragmatic closure at development, (2 presence of herniated abdominal contents into chest and (3 pulmonary hypoplasia. Usually, pleural space is drained urgently when there is respiratory distress and radiological appearance of mediastinal shift. We present a case of a 5-month-old baby, diagnosed as tension pneumothorax and treated with chest drain insertion. CDH was the intraoperative diagnosis.

  12. Paper-thinned diaphragm: CT sign of diaphragmatic eventration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Jung Gi; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan; Shim, Young Soo

    1990-01-01

    CT findings of total left hemidiaphragmatic eventration in two adult patients are described. Chest radiograph showed elevated left hemidiaphragm and left hilum. Paper-thinned muscular portion of the diseased diaphragm was clearly demonstrated with CT scan. With demonstration of paper-thinned diaphragm by CT scan, differentiation of the diaphragmatic eventration from recent onset phrenic nerve paralysis by tumor invasion or from post-traumatic diaphragmatic hernia can be made

  13. Paper-thinned diaphragm: CT sign of diaphragmatic eventration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Jung Gi; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan; Shim, Young Soo [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-10-15

    CT findings of total left hemidiaphragmatic eventration in two adult patients are described. Chest radiograph showed elevated left hemidiaphragm and left hilum. Paper-thinned muscular portion of the diseased diaphragm was clearly demonstrated with CT scan. With demonstration of paper-thinned diaphragm by CT scan, differentiation of the diaphragmatic eventration from recent onset phrenic nerve paralysis by tumor invasion or from post-traumatic diaphragmatic hernia can be made.

  14. Late-presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raashid Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was undertaken to highlight the clinical profile, misdiagnosis, surgical treatment,and prognosis of late-presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH cases in a tertiary level hospital. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study included all the babies and children >1 month of age with CDH who were admitted in our Hospital (Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar, Kashmir, India during the period between January 2008 and December 2013. Babies with age <1 month were excluded from the study. Data regarding clinical profile, operative records, and follow-up was reviewed and analysed statistically. Results: A total of 20 patients were included in this study. The clinical picture ranged from respiratory distress (13 patients to non-specific gastrointestinal complaints (5 patients. In two patients, CDH was misdiagnosed as pneumothorax and had got chest tube inserted in other hospitals before referral to this tertiary care centre. In 14 patients chest, X-ray revealed the diagnosis of CDH and in remaining five patients (including the two patients with misdiagnosis further investigations were undertaken to establish the diagnosis. Age ranged from 45 days to 17 years with an average age of 58.9 months. There were 12 male and 8 female patients. In all the 20 patients, surgical procedures were undertaken with the retrieval of herniated contents from the thoracic cavity and repair of the diaphragmatic defect. There was no mortality in our series. All the 20 patients were followed-up for a period ranging from 6 months to 5 years (median 3.1 years. Conclusions: Late-presenting CDH can have diverse clinical presentation. Late diagnosis and misdiagnosis can result in significant morbidity and potential mortality if these cases are not managed properly at an appropriate stage. Outcome is favourable if these patients are expeditiously identified and surgically repaired.

  15. The Information Systems Artifact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatterjee, Surtirtha; Xiao, Xiao; Elbanna, Amany

    2017-01-01

    Passionate debates regarding the defining characteristic of the “IT artifact” continue. Such debates, and also the lack of explicit consideration of the “information” element in the IT artifact, motivate us to propose a revised conception, drawing upon concepts from General Systems Theory (GST). ...

  16. The value of fetal ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of diaphragmatic hernias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amim, Bruno; Guerra, Fernando; Marchiori, Edson; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro

    2008-01-01

    To demonstrate the relevance of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in the prenatal characterization and prognostic evaluation in cases of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Materials And Methods: Fourteen pregnant women (mean gestational age = 28.7 weeks) who had undergone ultrasonography for suspicion of fetuses with congenital diaphragmatic hernia were assessed by means of magnetic resonance imaging on a 1.5 tesla equipment, following the standard protocol. Two radiologists evaluated the images and the findings were defined by consensus. Results: Twelve fetuses had left diaphragmatic hernia and two, right diaphragmatic hernia. Ultrasonography showed the fetal liver inside the thorax of five fetuses (three with left diaphragmatic hernia, and two with right diaphragmatic hernia) and magnetic resonance imaging in eight fetuses (six with left diaphragmatic hernia, and two with right diaphragmatic hernia). Stomach and small bowel loop herniation was observed in all of the fetuses with left diaphragmatic hernia (n = 12) at both magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography. Eight fetuses (seven with left diaphragmatic hernia and one with right diaphragmatic hernia) survived after surgical treatment. Conclusion: Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging are complementary imaging methods in the evaluation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Magnetic resonance imaging is a helpful diagnostic method complementary to ultrasonography for evaluation of the fetal liver positioning, considering its relevance as a prognostic factor in cases of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. (author)

  17. Fractured Ribs and the CT Funky Fat Sign of Diaphragmatic Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iclal Ocak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic diaphragmatic rupture remains a diagnostic challenge for both radiologists and surgeons. In recent years, multidetector CT has markedly improved the diagnosis of diaphragmatic injury in polytrauma patients. Herein, we describe two cases of subacute presentation of traumatic diaphragmatic rupture from a penetrating rib fracture and subsequent intrathoracic herniation of omental fat, representing the CT “funky fat” sign.

  18. 21 CFR 882.5830 - Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator... Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator is a device that provides electrical stimulation of a patient's phrenic nerve to...

  19. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  20. The Human-Artifact Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2011-01-01

    Although devices of all shapes and sizes currently dominate the technological landscape, human–computer interaction (HCI) as a field is not yet theoretically equipped to match this reality. In this article we develop the human–artifact model, which has its roots in activity theoretical HCI....... By reinterpreting the activity theoretical foundation, we present a framework that helps addressing the analysis of individual interactive artifacts while embracing that they are part of a larger ecology of artifacts. We show how the human–artifact model helps structuring the understanding of an artifact's action......-possibilities in relation to the artifact ecology surrounding it. Essential to the model is that it provides four interconnected levels of analysis and addresses the possibilities and problems at these four levels. Artifacts and their use are constantly developing, and we address development in, and of, use. The framework...

  1. Renal artery entrapment by the diaphragmatic crus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thony, F.; Baguet, J.-P.; Rodiere, M.; Sessa, C.; Janbon, B; Ferretti, G.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe renal artery entrapment (RAE) by the diaphragmatic crus and to elucidate the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to this entity. From 1995 to 2002, 15 patients (mean age 65) were found to have a RAE. They were investigated by CT scan (n=14) and/or MRA (n=2) for hypertension (n=7), chronic renal insufficiency (n=4) or aneurysms (n=4). The right (n=11) or the left (n=4) renal artery (RA) was involved. The compression was ostial (n=8) or truncal (n=7), and was ≥50% in eight cases. The course of the RA along the aorta on angiographic views (n=8) or a concentric ostial stenosis in a patient free of atheromatous lesions (n=7) were two findings suggestive of an RAE. Seven RAEs were indicated for treatment but only three were treated, by mean of stenting. Among the latter, two stents were patent at 6-month follow-up and one evolved to restenosis because of a stent fracture. RAEs may be suspected on angiographic views and proved by cross-sectional imaging because of specific imaging features. It is of importance to detect this etiology of RA stenosis because angioplasty with stenting is probably not always advisable. (orig.)

  2. [Congenital diaphragmatic hernia: respiratory and vascular outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennaforte, T; Rakza, T; Sfeir, R; Aubry, E; Bonnevalle, M; Fayoux, P; Deschildre, A; Thumerelle, C; de Lagausie, P; Benachi, A; Storme, L

    2012-02-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a life-threatening anomaly associated with a variable degree of pulmonary hypoplasia (PH) and persistent pulmonary hypertension (PPH). Despite remarkable advances in neonatal resuscitation and intensive care, and new postnatal treatment strategies, the rates of mortality and morbidity in the newborn with CDH remain high as the result of severe respiratory failure secondary to PH and PPH. Later, lung function assessments show obstructive and restrictive impairments due to altered lung structure and lung damage due to prolonged ventilatory support. The long-term consequences of pulmonary hypertension are unknown. Other problems include chronic pulmonary aspiration caused by gastro-oesophageal reflux and respiratory manifestations of allergy such as asthma or rhinitis. Finally, failure to thrive may be caused by increased caloric requirements due to pulmonary morbidity. Follow-up studies that systematically assess long-term sequelae are needed. Based on such studies, a more focused approach for routine multidisciplinary follow-up programs could be established. It is the goal of the French Collaborative Network to promote exchange of knowledge, future research and development of treatment protocols. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Recurrent Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, I.C.; Ko, S.F.; Shieh, C.S.; Huang, C.F.; Chien, S.J.; Liang, C.D.

    2006-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) includes a group of connective tissue disorders with abnormal collagen metabolism and a diverse clinical spectrum. We report two siblings with EDS who both presented with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). The elder sister suffered from recurrent diaphragmatic hernia twice and EDS was overlooked initially. Echocardiography as well as contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) showed dilatation of the pulmonary artery, and marked elongation and tortuosity of the aorta and its branches. A diagnosis of EDS was eventually established when these findings were coupled with the clinical features of hyperelastic skin. Her younger brother also had similar features. This report emphasizes that EDS may present as CDH in a small child which could easily be overlooked. Without appropriate surgery, diaphragmatic hernia might occur. Echocardiographic screening is recommended in patients with CDH. Contrast-enhanced MRA can be helpful in delineation of abnormally tortuous aortic great vessels that are an important clue to the early diagnosis of EDS

  4. Thoracoscopic approach in management of congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Nguyen Thanh

    2013-10-01

    Thoracoscopic repair is feasible and safe for congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). The operation can be performed with three trocars using carbon dioxide insufflations at a pressure of 4-6 mmHG. From January 2001 to July 2012, we performed thoracoscopic repair for 311 children with CDH including 152 newborns and 159 infants and toddlers. Mean operative time was 75 ± 27 min. HFOV was used in 24 patients. Direct closure of two rims of diaphragmatic hernia was carried out in 175 patients. Closure of two rims of diaphragmatic hernia with the thoracic wall was performed in 136 patients. Prosthetic patches were required in 54 patients. Conversion to open surgery was required in 38 patients (12.2%). There were no intraoperative deaths. 38 patients died postoperatively (13.5%).

  5. Formed Due to Traumatic Diaphragmatic Injury, A Case of Gastric Perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceren Sen Tanrikulu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Diaphragmatic hernia may be congenital or traumatic in origin. Diaphragmatic hernias are more common in adult and occur as a result of penetrating injuries are more common than from blunt injuries. Traumatic diaphragmatic hernia may manifest immediately or without any findings that several months/years after the incident. Early diagnosis is difficult, and it is usually made intraoperatively. Frequently during the early phase of traumatic diaphragmatic hernias, abdominal organ injury can be seen, such as stomach, colon and liver. In this study, we presented a case with acute gastric strangulation and perforation in the diaphragmatic injury occurred as a result of penetrating thoracic trauma.

  6. Traumatic diaphragmatic injuries: epidemiological, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiam, Ousmane; Konate, Ibrahima; Gueye, Mohamadou Lamine; Toure, Alpha Omar; Seck, Mamadou; Cisse, Mamadou; Diop, Balla; Dirie, Elias Said; Ka, Ousmane; Thiam, Mbaye; Dieng, Madieng; Dia, Abdarahmane; Toure, Cheikh Tidiane

    2016-01-01

    Diaphragmatic injuries include wounds and diaphragm ruptures, due to a thoracoabdominal blunt or penetrating traumas. Their incidence ranges between 0.8 and 15 %. The diagnosis is often delayed, despite several medical imaging techniques. The surgical management remains controversal, particularly for the choice of the surgical approach and technique. The mortality is mainly related to associated injuries. The aim of our study was to evaluate the incidence of diaphragmatic injuries occuring in thoraco-abdominal traumas, and to discuss their epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment. We performed a retrospective study over a period of 21 years, between January 1994 and June 2015 at the Department of General Surgery of the Aristide Le Dantec hospital in Dakar, Senegal. All patients diagnosed with diaphragmatic injuries were included in the study. Over the study period, 1535 patients had a thoraco-abdominal trauma. There were 859 cases of blunt trauma, and 676 penetrating chest or abdominal trauma. Our study involved 20 cases of diaphragmatic injuries (1.3 %). The sex-ratio was 4. The mean age was 33 years. Brawls represented 83.3 % (17 cases). Stab attacks represented 60 % (12 cases). The incidence of diaphragmatic injury was 2.6 %. The wound was in the thorax in 60 % (seven cases). Chest radiography was contributory in 45 % (nine cases). The diagnosis of wounds or ruptures of the diaphragm was done preoperatively in 45 % (nine cases). The diaphragmatic wound was on the left side in 90 % (18 cases) and its mean size was 4.3 cm. The surgical procedure involved a reduction of herniated viscera and a suture of the diaphragm by "X" non absorbable points in 85 % (17 cases). A thoracic aspiration was performed in all patients. Morbidity rate was 10 % and mortality rate 5 %. The diagnosis of diaphragmatic rupture and wounds remains difficult and often delayed. They should be kept in mind in any blunt or penetrating thoraco-abdominal trauma. Diaphragmatic lesions

  7. Diaphragmatic hernia in the Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvaux, V; Moerman, P; Fryns, J P

    1998-01-01

    At 32 weeks of gestation, delivery of a female fetus was induced because of severe malformations seen on ultrasonogram: congenital diaphragmatic hernia and cerebellar hypoplasia. The diagnosis of Coffin-Siris syndrome was based on the physical examination: coarse face with low-set ears, low nuchal hairline, scalp hypotrichosis and hypoplasia of the nails of fingers and toes with absence of the right fifth fingernail. Autopsy confirmed the prenatally diagnosed major associated abnormalities: hypoplasia of the cerebellum and congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Various clinical entities are included in the differential diagnosis.

  8. Neuralgic Amyotrophy: A Rare Cause of Bilateral Diaphragmatic Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Shinder

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuralgic amyotrophy, also known as brachial neuritis, is a well described clinical entity. Diaphragmatic dysfunction, as a result of phrenic nerve root involvement (cervical roots 3 to 5, is an uncommon, but increasingly recognized association. The case of a previously healthy 61-year-old woman who, after a prodrome of neck and shoulder discomfort, presented with severe orthopnea is described. Pulmonary function and electrophysiological studies led to a diagnosis of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis. The patient's clinical course and the exclusion of other nerve entrapment syndromes and neurological disorders strongly favoured the diagnosis of neuralgic amyotrophy.

  9. Warfarin-Associated Diaphragmatic Hernia: An Unusual Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Vilhena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal warfarin syndrome is a consequence of maternal intake of warfarin during pregnancy and comprises a wide range of manifestations, including some typical facial dysmorphologic features. The authors report a case of prenatal ultrasonographic diagnosis of warfarin embryopathy in an obese woman on unsupervised warfarin prophylaxis at the 16th week of gestation. The fetus presented with facial dysmorphism, pectus excavatum, diaphragmatic hernia, and pulmonary hypoplasia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second reported case of warfarin-associated diaphragmatic hernia.

  10. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia: a modern day approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waag, Karl-Ludwig; Loff, Steffan; Zahn, Katrin; Ali, Mansour; Hien, Steffen; Kratz, Markus; Neff, Wolfgang; Schaffelder, Regine; Schaible, Thomas

    2008-11-01

    Centralization of all complicated congenital diaphragmatic hernias (CDH) was organized in Germany from 1998, collecting 325 consecutive patients with striking increasing survival rates. This series report 244 patients from 2002 to 2007. Today, large defects are detected early in pregnancy by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) patients, prenatal lung head ratio (LHR) was 1.2 (median) at the 34th week of gestation or less than 25 ml lung tissue in MRI. This means that all patients below LHR of 1.4 should be transferred prenatally in a tertiary center. High risk group for survival was defined as LHR below 0.9, ie, 10 ml in MRI planimetry. Inborn patients show better results than outborns. In algorithm therapy, gentle ventilation plays an important role in preventing damage to the lung tissue and avoiding long term ventilation. When PaCO(2) was more than 75 mmHg, ventilation was changed to high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV). Indication for ECMO was seen in preductal PaO(2) less than 50 mmHg over 2-4 h or less than 40 mmHg over 2 h. ECMO related risks included intracerebral bleeding (9%), intrapulmonary bleeding (14%), and convulsions (16%). Surgically, a longitudinal midline incision for exposure of the defect, the duodenal kinking, and probably for abdominal patching was perfect. A cone formed goretex patch provided more abdominal space and reduced abundant intrathoracical cavity. No drain was used. Postoperative complications were described. Overall survival in 244 consecutive patients was 86.5% for all patients born alive. All those who needed ECMO survived in 71%, underlining ECMO as a treatment of last choice. Follow-up for quality of life after CDH is described.

  11. Rolling Shutter Motion Deblurring

    KAUST Repository

    Su, Shuochen

    2015-06-07

    Although motion blur and rolling shutter deformations are closely coupled artifacts in images taken with CMOS image sensors, the two phenomena have so far mostly been treated separately, with deblurring algorithms being unable to handle rolling shutter wobble, and rolling shutter algorithms being incapable of dealing with motion blur. We propose an approach that delivers sharp and undis torted output given a single rolling shutter motion blurred image. The key to achieving this is a global modeling of the camera motion trajectory, which enables each scanline of the image to be deblurred with the corresponding motion segment. We show the results of the proposed framework through experiments on synthetic and real data.

  12. From Ecological Sounding Artifacts Towards Sonic Artifact Ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erkut, Cumhur; Serafin, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    The discipline of sonic interaction design has been focused on the interaction between a single user and an artifact. This strongly limits one of the fundamental aspects of music as a social and interactive experience. In this paper we propose sonic artifact ecologies as a mean to examine interac...

  13. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia and Occupational Therapy: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Angela C.

    2011-01-01

    This case report describes occupational therapy (OT) intervention in an outpatient setting and outcomes for a child diagnosed with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) from 4 to 28 months of age. There is little information on therapy intervention and outcomes of children who have survived. The patient is a white male, born at 35 weeks gestation…

  14. Laparoscopic repair of Morgagni diaphragmatic hernia in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Minimal invasive surgery allows for excellent visualisation of the diaphragm, and is increasingly used for the repair of diaphragmatic hernias in children. This report describes laparoscopic repairs between 2001 and 2007 of four Morgagni hernias in children. All defects were treated successfully using the laparoscopic ...

  15. Emergency traumatic Diaphragmatic injuries in Benin city | Iribhogbe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diaphragmatic injuries (DI) frequently accompany thoracoabdominal trauma. The diagnosis remains a challenge to surgeons and radiologists worldwide but missed injuries to the diaphragm is associated with great morbidity and mortality. We aimed to determine the prevalence of this injury in acute trauma and in general ...

  16. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia: A 4-year experience in a single ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: This study aimed to evaluate congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) patients in our department during a 4-year period. Patients and Methods: A retrospective study of 10 cases of CDH patients managed in the Neonatology and Pediatric Surgery Units of Goztepe Teaching Hospital from 2000 to 2004.

  17. Diaphragmatic excursion: does it predict successful weaning from mechanical ventilation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayat, A.; Khalil, A.

    2017-01-01

    To measure the diaphragmatic excursion and its outcome on weani ng from mechanical ventilation. Study Design: Cross-sectional comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Medical Intensive Care Unit (ICU), Military Hospital (MH), Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from January to December 2014. Methodology: Diaphragmatic excursion (DE) in cm was measured through ultrasound by marking liver and spleen displacement in patients who fulfilled the criteria of removal from ventilatory support. The patients were followed up for 48 hours and classified according to the outcome as successful weaning and weaning failure. Results: Out of 100 cases, 76 patients had a successful weaning while 24 had a failed weaning outcome. At a diaphragmatic excursion of 1.2 cm and more, out of 67 cases, 60 had a successful weaning (89.55%) while 7 cases (10.45%) had a weaning failure. At an excursion of less than 1. 2 cm, 17 out of 33 cases (51.5%) had successful weaning while 16 (48.48%) had weaning failure. At this cut off point (1.2 cm), the sensitivity and specificity for successful weaning were 78.95% and 70.83%, respectively. The positive and negative likelihood ratio (LR) for these values being 2.70 and 0.29, respectively. The positive predictive value was 82.35% and negative predictive value 60.00%. Conclusion: Ultrasonographic measurement of diaphragmatic excursion is a good method for predicting weaning outcome from mechanical ventilation. (author)

  18. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia candidate genes derived from embryonic transcriptomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russell, Meaghan K; Longoni, Mauro; Wells, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common (1 in 3,000 live births) major congenital malformation that results in significant morbidity and mortality. The discovery of CDH loci using standard genetic approaches has been hindered by its genetic heterogeneity. We hypothesized that gene...

  19. Diaphragmatic eventration complicated by gastric volvulus with perforation

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, V; Chandra, A; Gupta, P

    2012-01-01

    Eventration of the diaphragm with gastric volvulus is uncommon. Gastric perforation in these cases is rare and usually associated with acute gastric volvulus with strangulation. We describe a case of diaphragmatic eventration with chronic gastric volvulus with gastric perforation without strangulation in an elderly man.

  20. Diaphragmatic hernia: diagnostic approaches with review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eren, Suat [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)]. E-mail: suateren@atauni.edu.tr; Ciris, Fahri [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2005-06-01

    Because surgical repair is indicated for the treatment of diaphragmatic hernia (DH), preoperative imaging of the diaphragmatic defect, hernia content, and associated complications with other organ's pathologies is important. While various techniques can be used on imaging of DHs, selection of the most effective but the least invasive technique will present the most accurate findings about DH, and will facilitate the management of DH. We reviewed the diaphragmatic hernia types associated with our cases, and we discussed the preferred imaging modalities for different DHs with review of the literature. We evaluated the imaging findings of 21 DH cases. They were Morgagni's hernia (n = 4), Bochdalek hernia (n = 2), iatrogenic DH (n = 4), traumatic DH (n = 6), and hiatal hernia (n = 5). Although its limited findings on DH and indirect findings about the diaphragmatic rupture, plain radiography is firstly preferred technique on DH. We found that ultrasound (US) is a useful tool on DH, on traumatic DH cases especially. Not only it shows diaphragmatic continuity and herniated organs, but also it reveals associated abdominal organ's pathologies. Computed tomography (CT) scan is most effective in many DH cases. It shows the herniated abdominal organs together with complications, such as intestinal strangulation, haemothorax, and rib fractures. We stressed that Multislice CT scan with coronal and sagittal reformatted images is the most effective and useful imaging technique on DH. With high sensitivity for soft tissue, MR imaging may be performed in the selected patients, on the late presenting DH cases or on the cases of the diagnosis still in doubt especially.

  1. Congenital asymptomatic diaphragmatic hernias in adults: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Enrica; Mancini, Paola; De Vito, Stefania; Pompili, Elena; Taurone, Samanta; Guerrisi, Isabella; Guerrisi, Antonino; D'Andrea, Vito; Cantisani, Vito; Artico, Marco

    2013-05-13

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a major malformation occasionally found in newborns and babies. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often to the left and posterolateral, that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The aim of this case series is to provide information on the presentation, diagnosis and outcome of three patients with late-presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernias. The diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia is based on clinical investigation and is confirmed by plain X-ray films and computed tomography scans. In the present report three cases of asymptomatic abdominal viscera herniation within the thorax are described. The first case concerns herniation of some loops of the large intestine into the left hemi-thorax in a 75-year-old Caucasian Italian woman. The second case concerns a rare type of herniation in the right side of the thorax of the right kidney with a part of the liver parenchyma in a 57-year-old Caucasian Italian woman. The third case concerns herniation of the stomach and bowel into the left side of the chest with compression of the left lung in a 32-year-old Caucasian Italian man. This type of hernia may appear later in life, because of concomitant respiratory or gastrointestinal disease, or it may be an incidental finding in asymptomatic adults, such as in the three cases featured here. Patients who present with late diaphragmatic hernias complain of a wide variety of symptoms, and diagnosis may be difficult. Additional investigation and research appear necessary to better explain the development and progression of this type of disease.

  2. Nihilism in the 1990s: the true mortality of congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stege, Gerben; Fenton, Alan; Jaffray, Bruce

    2003-09-01

    Reported survival in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) fails to allow for case selection bias. This study reports the incidence of CDH in a geographically defined population over 11 years and assesses the effect of new therapies (high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, inhaled nitric oxide, and delayed surgery) on survival when case selection is avoided. A retrospective review of cases from a regional case registry, the Northern Region Congenital Anomaly Survey, was conducted. A total of 185 cases were identified. Mortality was 62% and did not vary significantly during the study period. Mortality was unaffected by the introduction of new therapies. There was a significant inverse correlation between the rate of elective termination and survival of live borns. The presence of an additional anomaly increased mortality to 79%. The mortality of CDH when complete case ascertainment is achieved is unaffected by new therapies. The survival rate is principally determined by the rate of antenatal termination and the incidence of associated anomalies. Reports of improved survival of CDH should be interpreted with caution, as variations in outcome are more likely to be explained by case selection artifact.

  3. Analysis of diaphragmatic movement before and after pulmonary rehabilitation using fluoroscopy imaging in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun EM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eun Mi Chun,1 Soo Jeong Han,2 Hitesh N Modi3 1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Rehabilitation Medicine, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 3Scoliosis Research Institute, Department of Orthopedics, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea Background: The diaphragm is the principal inspiratory muscle. The purpose of this study was to assess improvements in diaphragmatic movement before and after pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, using a fluoroscopy-guided chest X-ray.Patients and methods: Among 117 patients with COPD receiving pulmonary rehabilitation who underwent the initial fluoroscopy-guided chest X-ray and pulmonary function test, 37 of those patients who underwent both initial and follow-up fluoroscopy and pulmonary function tests were enrolled in this study. After hospital education, participants received pulmonary rehabilitation through regular home-based training for at least 3 months by the same physiatrist. We assessed the changes in diaphragm area with fluoroscopy-guided posteroanterior chest X-rays between pre- and postpulmonary rehabilitation. To minimize radiation hazards for subjects, the exposure time for fluoroscopy to take chest X-rays was limited to less than 5 seconds.Results: There were significant improvements (2,022.8±1,548.3 mm² to 3,010.7±1,495.6 mm² and 2,382.4±1,475.9 mm² to 3,315.9±1,883.5 mm²; right side P=0.001 and left side P=0.019, respectively in diaphragmatic motion area during full inspiration and expiration in both lungs after pulmonary rehabilitation. Pulmonary function tests showed no statistically significant difference between pre- and postpulmonary rehabilitation.Conclusion: The study suggests that the strategy to assess diaphragm movement using fluoroscopy is a relatively effective tool for the evaluation of pulmonary

  4. Early hemi-diaphragmatic plication following intraoperative phrenic nerve transection during complete AV canal repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamad Alowayshiq

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral diaphragmatic palsy reduces pulmonary function by about 25% in older children and usually it is well tolerated; however, it causes severe respiratory distress in infants and young children. Diaphragmatic plication performed later than 10 days after cardiac surgery for patients under 1 year of age was associated with higher incidence of pneumonia and mortality. The management of the diaphragmatic paralysis due to phrenic nerve injury aiming mainly to preserve the respiratory function. Until now, the optimal management of diaphragmatic palsy in children who have undergone cardiac surgery remains controversial and consists of prolonged ventilation or diaphragmatic plication. In our case, many factors supported early diaphragmatic plication, the age of the patient, post-operative AV canal repair with severe pulmonary hypertension, and clear transection of the left phrenic nerve diagnosed intraoperatively.

  5. Turquoise Artifact from Teotihuacan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, Michael W.; Harbottle, Garman; Weigand, Phil C.

    1999-07-01

    Turquoise artifacts appeared sporadically in Mesoamerica as early as the Formative period (Merry de Morales 1987:100, Figure 8.4; Weigand 1989:43). Most occurrences, however, postdate the collapse of Teotihuacan. In the Late Classic and Postclassic periods increasing quantities are found, often in the form of elaborate mosaics, in a wide variety of contexts in central, west and northwest Mexico. Neutron activation analysis has determined that much of this turquoise derives from sources in the southwestern United States (Weigand et al. 1977; Harbottle and Weigand 1992; Weigand and Harbottle 1993). Teotihuacan played a major role in Mesoamerica during the Terminal Formative and Early-Middle Classic periods. It was the dominant power in central Mexico from about the time of Christ to its collapse at about A.D. 650 (Millon 1988, 1992; Cowgill 1996). Throughout this period goods flowed into Teotihuacan from many parts of the Mesoamerican world. Despite this widespread economic interaction, only two pieces of turquoise have been recovered in the city. In the following pages, the context and implications of one of these finds will be examined.

  6. Successive approximation algorithm for cancellation of artifacts in DSA images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funakami, Raiko; Hiroshima, Kyoichi; Nishino, Junji

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm for cancellation of artifacts in DSA images. We have already proposed an automatic registration method based on the detection of local movements. When motion of the object is large, it is difficult to estimate the exact movement, and the cancellation of artifacts may therefore fail. The algorithm we propose here is based on a simple rigid model. We present the results of applying the proposed method to a series of experimental X-ray images, as well as the results of applying the algorithm as preprocessing for a registration method based on local movement. (author)

  7. Investigating media artifacts with children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    The dissertation’s aim is to explore the everyday relevance media artifacts have for young children. It discusses and further develops analytical concepts that are committed to taking the children’s perspectives on possibilities and limitations of such artifacts seriously. These conceptual...... developments are rooted in the author’s participation in a daycare practice in Berlin, Germany. The daycare’s situational approach precisely attempted to draw on the children’s everyday life experiences so as to engage in problem-oriented learning projects, on media artifacts and beyond....

  8. The effect of anatomic differences on the relationship between renal artery and diaphragmatic crus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esen, K; Tok, S; Balci, Yuksel; Apaydin, F D; Kara, E; Uzmansel, D

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of anatomic differences on the relationship between renal artery and diaphragmatic crus via the touch of two structures. The study included dynamic computed tomography (CT) scans of 308 patients performed mainly for characterisation of liver and renal masses. Anatomic differences including the thickness of the diaphragmatic crus, the localisation of renal artery ostium at the wall of aorta, the level of renal artery origin with respect to superior mesenteric artery were evaluated. Statistical relationships between renal artery-diaphragmatic crus contact and the anatomic differences were assessed. Thickness of the diaphragmatic crus at the level of renal artery origin exhibited a statistically significant relationship to renal artery-diaphragmatic crus contact at the left (p renal artery origin and renal artery- -diaphragmatic crus contact at the left (p renal artery ostium at the wall of aorta (right side, p = 0.436, left side, p = 0.681) did not demonstrate a relationship to renal artery-diaphragmatic crus contact. Thickness of the diaphragmatic crus and high renal artery origin with respect to superior mesenteric artery are crucial anatomic differences determining the relationship of renal artery and diaphragmatic crus. (Folia Morphol 2018; 77, 1: 22-28).

  9. Archaic artifacts resembling celestial spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrakoudis, S.; Papaspyrou, P.; Petoussis, V.; Moussas, X.

    We present several bronze artifacts from the Archaic Age in Greece (750-480 BC) that resemble celestial spheres or forms of other astronomical significance. They are studied in the context of the Dark Age transition from Mycenaean Age astronomical themes to the philosophical and practical revival of astronomy in the Classical Age with its plethora of astronomical devices. These artifacts, mostly votive in nature are spherical in shape and appear in a variety of forms their most striking characteristic being the depiction of meridians and/or an equator. Most of those artifacts come from Thessaly, and more specifically from the temple of Itonia Athena at Philia, a religious center of pan-Hellenic significance. Celestial spheres, similar in form to the small artifacts presented in this study, could be used to measure latitudes, or estimate the time at a known place, and were thus very useful in navigation.

  10. Diaphragmatic lymphatic vessel behavior during local skeletal muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriondo, Andrea; Solari, Eleonora; Marcozzi, Cristiana; Negrini, Daniela

    2015-02-01

    The mechanism through which the stresses developed in the diaphragmatic tissue during skeletal muscle contraction sustain local lymphatic function was studied in 10 deeply anesthetized, tracheotomized adult Wistar rats whose diaphragm was exposed after thoracotomy. To evaluate the direct effect of skeletal muscle contraction on the hydraulic intraluminal lymphatic pressures (Plymph) and lymphatic vessel geometry, the maximal contraction of diaphragmatic fibers adjacent to a lymphatic vessel was elicited by injection of 9.2 nl of 1 M KCl solution among diaphragmatic fibers while Plymph was recorded through micropuncture and vessel geometry via stereomicroscopy video recording. In lymphatics oriented perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis of muscle fibers and located at skeletal muscle contraction (Dmc) decreased to 61.3 ± 1.4% of the precontraction value [resting diameter (Drest)]; however, if injection was at >900 μm from the vessel, Dmc enlarged to 131.1 ± 2.3% of Drest. In vessels parallel to muscle fibers, Dmc increased to 122.8 ± 2.9% of Drest. During contraction, Plymph decreased as much as 22.5 ± 2.6 cmH2O in all submesothelial superficial vessels, whereas it increased by 10.7 ± 5.1 cmH2O in deeper vessels running perpendicular to contracting muscle fibers. Hence, the three-dimensional arrangement of the diaphragmatic lymphatic network seems to be finalized to efficiently exploit the stresses exerted by muscle fibers during the contracting inspiratory phase to promote lymph formation in superficial submesothelial lymphatics and its further propulsion in deeper intramuscular vessels. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Laparoscopic management of diaphragmatic endometriosis by three different approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Horace; Darwish, Basma; Provost, Delphine; Baste, Jean-Marc

    2016-08-01

    To report our three surgical approaches in the management of diaphragmatic endometriosis. Video article presenting laparoscopic surgical techniques, with and without robotic assistance. University hospital. Nulliparas with deep endometriosis associated with multiple endometriosis lesions of the diaphragm. Laparoscopic approach in women who present with small black-pigmented diaphragmatic lesions, with or without infiltration of the diaphragm, which are ablated using plasma energy. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic route in larger deep infiltrating implants, which are resected. To avoid phrenic nerve injury, robotic-assisted thoracoscopy is preferred in large lesions involving the central tendon of the diaphragm. The steps of each technique are emphasized. Surgical technique reports in anonymous patients are exempted from ethical approval by the Institutional Review Board. Seven patients have been managed by these procedures from July 2015 to March 2016. Patients' functional outcomes were uneventful, with no phrenic nerve palsy or residual chest and right shoulder pain. By combining resection and ablation techniques, the laparoscopy and thoracoscopy route, conventional and robotic-assisted minimally invasive approach, we offer a surgical strategy that is as conservative as possible, with an aim to limit postoperative adhesions between the liver and the diaphragm, and avoid diaphragmatic paralysis. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Chronic diaphragmatic hernia in 34 dogs and 16 cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minihan, Anne C; Berg, John; Evans, Krista L

    2004-01-01

    Medical records of 34 dogs and 16 cats undergoing surgical repair of diaphragmatic hernia of >2 weeks' duration were reviewed, and long-term follow-up information was obtained. The most common clinical signs were dyspnea and vomiting; however, many of the animals were presented for nonspecific signs such as anorexia, lethargy, and weight loss. Thoracic radiographs revealed evidence of diaphragmatic hernia in only 66% of the animals, and additional imaging tests were often needed to confirm the diagnosis. Thirty-six hernias were repaired through a midline laparotomy; 14 required a median sternotomy combined with a laparotomy. In 14 animals, division of mature adhesions of the lungs or diaphragm to the herniated organs was necessary to permit reduction of the hernia. Fourteen animals required resection of portions of the lungs, liver, or intestine. All hernias were sutured primarily without the use of tissue flaps or mesh implants. Twenty-one of the animals developed transient complications in the postoperative period; the most common of these was pneumothorax. The mortality rate was 14%. Thirty-four (79%) of the animals that were discharged from the hospital had complete resolution of clinical signs, and none developed evidence of recurrent diaphragmatic hernia during the follow-up period. Nine were lost to follow-up.

  13. Non-Invasive monitoring of diaphragmatic timing by means of surface contact sensors: An experimental study in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galdiz Batxi

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-invasive monitoring of respiratory muscle function is an area of increasing research interest, resulting in the appearance of new monitoring devices, one of these being piezoelectric contact sensors. The present study was designed to test whether the use of piezoelectric contact (non-invasive sensors could be useful in respiratory monitoring, in particular in measuring the timing of diaphragmatic contraction. Methods Experiments were performed in an animal model: three pentobarbital anesthetized mongrel dogs. The motion of the thoracic cage was acquired by means of a piezoelectric contact sensor placed on the costal wall. This signal is compared with direct measurements of the diaphragmatic muscle length, made by sonomicrometry. Furthermore, to assess the diaphragmatic function other respiratory signals were acquired: respiratory airflow and transdiaphragmatic pressure. Diaphragm contraction time was estimated with these four signals. Using diaphragm length signal as reference, contraction times estimated with the other three signals were compared with the contraction time estimated with diaphragm length signal. Results The contraction time estimated with the TM signal tends to give a reading 0.06 seconds lower than the measure made with the DL signal (-0.21 and 0.00 for FL and DP signals, respectively, with a standard deviation of 0.05 seconds (0.08 and 0.06 for FL and DP signals, respectively. Correlation coefficients indicated a close link between time contraction estimated with TM signal and contraction time estimated with DL signal (a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.98, a reliability coefficient of 0.95, a slope of 1.01 and a Spearman's rank-order coefficient of 0.98. In general, correlation coefficients and mean and standard deviation of the difference were better in the inspiratory load respiratory test than in spontaneous ventilation tests. Conclusion The technique presented in this work provides a non

  14. Video-assisted thoracoscopic implantation of a diaphragmatic pacemaker in a child with tetraplegia: indications, technique, and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darcy Ribeiro Pinto Filho

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a child with tetraplegia after cervical trauma, who subsequently underwent diaphragmatic pacemaker implantation. We reviewed the major indications for diaphragmatic pacing and the types of devices employed. We highlight the unequivocal benefit of diaphragmatic pacing in the social and educational reintegration of individuals with tetraplegia.

  15. Artifact detection in electrodermal activity using sparse recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Malia; Palumbo, Richard Vincent; Urbaneja, Alberto; Akcakaya, Murat; Huang, Jeannie; Kleckner, Ian R.; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Quigley, Karen S.; Sejdic, Ervin; Goodwin, Matthew S.

    2017-05-01

    Electrodermal Activity (EDA) - a peripheral index of sympathetic nervous system activity - is a primary measure used in psychophysiology. EDA is widely accepted as an indicator of physiological arousal, and it has been shown to reveal when psychologically novel events occur. Traditionally, EDA data is collected in controlled laboratory experiments. However, recent developments in wireless biosensing have led to an increase in out-of-lab studies. This transition to ambulatory data collection has introduced challenges. In particular, artifacts such as wearer motion, changes in temperature, and electrical interference can be misidentified as true EDA responses. The inability to distinguish artifact from signal hinders analyses of ambulatory EDA data. Though manual procedures for identifying and removing EDA artifacts exist, they are time consuming - which is problematic for the types of longitudinal data sets represented in modern ambulatory studies. This manuscript presents a novel technique to automatically identify and remove artifacts in EDA data using curve fitting and sparse recovery methods. Our method was evaluated using labeled data to determine the accuracy of artifact identification. Procedures, results, conclusions, and future directions are presented.

  16. Diaphragmatic rupture with right colon and small intestine herniation after blunt trauma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muroni Mirko

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias are an unusual presentation of trauma, and are observed in about 10% of diaphragmatic injuries. The diagnosis is often missed because of non-specific clinical signs, and the absence of additional intra-abdominal and thoracic injuries. Case presentation We report a case of a 59-year-old Italian man hospitalized for abdominal pain and vomiting. His medical history included a blunt trauma seven years previously. A chest X-ray showed right diaphragm elevation, and computed tomography revealed that the greater omentum, a portion of the colon and the small intestine had been transposed in the hemithorax through a diaphragm rupture. The patient underwent laparotomy, at which time the colon and small intestine were reduced back into the abdomen and the diaphragm was repaired. Conclusions This was a unusual case of traumatic right-sided diaphragmatic hernia. Diaphragmatic ruptures may be revealed many years after the initial trauma. The suspicion of diaphragmatic rupture in a patient with multiple traumas contributes to early diagnosis. Surgical repair remains the only curative treatment for diaphragmatic hernias. Prosthetic patches may be a good solution when the diaphragmatic defect is severe and too large for primary closure, whereas primary repair remains the gold standard for the closure of small to moderate sized diaphragmatic defects.

  17. Traumatic diaphragmatic hernia in a 5-month-old boxer dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoddinott, Katie

    2013-05-01

    A 5-month-old intact male boxer dog was presented to the Metro Animal Emergency Clinic, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia after being hit by a car. Radiography identified a diaphragmatic hernia with the stomach herniated into the thoracic cavity. Diaphragmatic herniorrhaphy and splenectomy were performed without complication. The patient returned to his regular active lifestyle.

  18. A fatal case of complicated congenital peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia in a Holstein calf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Keltie A.; Britton, Ann P.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia is a rare condition most commonly reported in cats and dogs. A 6-week-old Holstein heifer calf with a congenital peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia complicated by a perforated abomasal ulcer is described. The clinical signs and pathological findings are compared with those reported in other species. PMID:24155464

  19. A fatal case of complicated congenital peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia in a Holstein calf

    OpenAIRE

    Hicks, Keltie A.; Britton, Ann P.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia is a rare condition most commonly reported in cats and dogs. A 6-week-old Holstein heifer calf with a congenital peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia complicated by a perforated abomasal ulcer is described. The clinical signs and pathological findings are compared with those reported in other species.

  20. Isolated Crural Hematoma Mimicking Retroperitoneal Lymphadenopathy, A Unique Sign of Traumatic Diaphragmatic Rupture: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Jha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Diaphragmatic injury following blunt thoracoabdominal trauma is rare and is usually associated with key radiological features like dependent viscera sign, collar sign, diaphragmatic thickening and defects. It may also be associated with secondary signs like intrathoracic herniation of abdominal viscera. Diaphragmatic crura, which are attached to the upper lumbar vertebra represent prominently thickened folds along the posterior diaphragm, are usually inconspicuous on routine Computed Tomography (CT scans. We present a case of a young patient who sustained a motor vehicle accident and developed difficulty in breathing. CT scan of the patient revealed bilateral crural hematomas, with splenic and renal lacerations and no other sign of diaphragmatic injury. The patient was operated and blunt diaphragmatic rupture was confirmed at surgery.

  1. Comparison of Radiography and Ultrasonography for Diagnosis of Diaphragmatic Hernia in Bovines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakim Athar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted on 101 animals suffering from thoracoabdominal disorders; out of which twenty seven animals (twenty six buffaloes and one cow were diagnosed with diaphragmatic hernia based on clinical signs, radiography, ultrasonography, and left flank laparorumenotomy. Radiography alone confirmed diaphragmatic hernia in 18 cases (66.67% with a sac-like structure cranial to the diaphragm. In 15 animals the sac contained metallic densities while in three cases a sac-like structure with no metallic densities was present. Ultrasonography was helpful in confirming diaphragmatic hernia in 23 cases (85.18% and ultrasonographically reticular motility was evident at the level of 4th/5th intercostal space in all the animals. B+M mode ultrasonography was used for the first time for diagnosis of diaphragmatic hernia in bovines and the results suggested that ultrasonography was a reliable diagnostic modality for diaphragmatic hernia in bovines.

  2. Assessment and reduction of diaphragmatic tension during hiatal hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Daniel Davila; Louie, Brian E; Farivar, Alexander S; Wilshire, Candice L; Baik, Peter U; Aye, Ralph W

    2015-04-01

    During hiatal hernia repair there are two vectors of tension: axial and radial. An optimal repair minimizes the tension along these vectors. Radial tension is not easily recognized. There are no simple maneuvers like measuring length that facilitate assessment of radial tension. The aims of this project were to: (1) establish a simple intraoperative method to evaluate baseline tension of the diaphragmatic hiatal muscle closure; and, (2) assess if tension is reduced by relaxing maneuvers and if so, to what degree. Diaphragmatic characteristics and tension were assessed during hiatal hernia repair with a tension gage. We compared tension measured after hiatal dissection and after relaxing maneuvers were performed. Sixty-four patients (29 M:35F) underwent laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair. Baseline hiatal width was 2.84 cm and tension 13.6 dag. There was a positive correlation between hiatal width and tension (r = 0.55) but the strength of association was low (r (2) = 0.31). Four different hiatal shapes (slit, teardrop, "D", and oval) were identified and appear to influence tension and the need for relaxing incision. Tension was reduced by 35.8 % after a left pleurotomy (12 patients); by 46.2 % after a right crural relaxing incision (15 patients); and by 56.1 % if both maneuvers were performed (6 patients). Tension on the diaphragmatic hiatus can be measured with a novel device. There was a limited correlation with width of the hiatal opening. Relaxing maneuvers such as a left pleurotomy or a right crural relaxing incision reduced tension. Longer term follow-up will determine whether outcomes are improved by quantifying and reducing radial tension.

  3. Surgical repair of a congenital pericardial diaphragmatic hernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.P.; Wright, R.; Scott, R.

    1987-01-01

    Objective: To describe the surgical repair and pre- and postoperative management of a peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia (PPDH) in a pregnant dog. Case summary: A pregnant dog was presented for vomiting, lethargy, and pale mucous membranes. Pulsus paradoxus was noted on physical examination. The dog was diagnosed with a PPDH via thoracic radiographs, abdominal ultrasound, and a n echocardiogram. The hernia was surgically repaired and the dog received supportive medical care until the puppies were old enough to be delivered via cesarean section. The mother and all puppies survived. New or unique information provided: This is the first report that describes the surgical repair and postoperative management of a PPDH in a pregnant dog

  4. Hiatal hernia and diaphragmatic eventration in a leopard (Panthera pardus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, K S; Jones, M P; Bright, R M; Toal, R; DeNovo, R; Orosz, S

    2000-09-01

    A 1-yr-old male leopard (Panthera pardus) presented for intermittent anorexia, emaciation, and generalized muscle wasting. Plain radiographs, ultrasonography, and esophageal endoscopy led to a diagnosis of diaphragmatic eventration with probable concurrent hiatal hernia. An exploratory laparotomy confirmed both diagnoses, and surgical repair and stabilization were performed. After surgery, the leopard was maintained on small liquid meals for 4 days, with a gradual return to normal diet over 2 wk. By 4 wk after surgery, the leopard was eating well and gaining weight, and it showed no recurrence of clinical signs for 2 yr subsequently, becoming mildly obese.

  5. Unusual cause of brachial palsy with diaphragmatic palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vishal; Pandita, Aakash; Panghal, Astha; Hassan, Neha

    2018-05-12

    We report a preterm neonate born with respiratory distress. The neonate was found to have diaphragmatic palsy and brachial palsy. The neonate was born by caesarean section and there was no history of birth trauma. On examination, there was bilateral congenital talipes equinovarus and a scar was present on the forearm. The mother had a history of chickenpox during the 16 weeks of pregnancy for which no treatment was sought. On investigation, PCR for varicella was found to be positive in the neonate. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. [Postnatal diagnosis of gastric volvulus revealing congenital diaphragmatic hernia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprahamian, A; Nouyrigat, V; Grévent, D; Hervieux, E; Chéron, G

    2017-05-01

    Postnatally diagnosed congenital diaphragmatic hernias (CDH) are rare and have a better prognosis than those diagnosed prenatally. Postnatal symptoms can be respiratory, digestive, or mixed. Gastric volvulus can reveal CDH. Symptoms are pain, abdominal distension, and/or vomiting. Upper gastrointestinal barium X-ray radiography provides the diagnosis. Prognosis is related to early surgical management in complicated forms with intestinal occlusion or sub-occlusion. We report on an infant who presented with vomiting, which revealed gastric volvulus associated with a CDH. Progression was favorable after surgical treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiological features of 80 cases of diaphragmatic rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, M.; Lee, R.

    1989-01-01

    The films from 80 cases of diaphragmatic rupture in the dog and cat over a 10 year period were examined. The most common findings were loss of the cupola and masking of the cardiac shadow. Identification of the stomach or intestine in the thorax made the diagnosis straightforward. However, in some animals these organs were not visible and there was considerable accumulation of free pleural fluid. The use of barium contrast studies and post drainage films were unable to confirm the presence of a rupture in all cases with inconclusive plain film findings. The identification of a rupture was only made by exploratory surgery in these animals

  8. Checking behavioral conformance of artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fahland, D.; Leoni, de M.; Dongen, van B.F.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.

    2011-01-01

    The usefulness of process models (e.g., for analysis, improvement, or execution) strongly depends on their ability to describe reality. Conformance checking is a technique to validate how good a given process model describes recorded executions of the actual process. Recently, artifacts have been

  9. Toddlers View Artifact Function Normatively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casler, Krista; Terziyan, Treysi; Greene, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    When children use objects like adults, are they simply tracking regularities in others' object use, or are they demonstrating a normatively defined awareness that there are right and wrong ways to act? This study provides the first evidence for the latter possibility. Young 2- and 3-year-olds (n = 32) learned functions of 6 artifacts, both…

  10. Diaphragmatic thickness ratio (inspiratory/expiratory) as a diagnostic method of diaphragmatic palsy associated with interescalene block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Escárraga, V M; Dubos España, K; Castillo Bustos, R H; Peidró, L; Sastre, S; Sala-Blanch, X

    2018-02-01

    Diaphragmatic paralysis is a side-effect associated with interscalene block. Thickness index of the diaphragm muscle (inspiratory thickness/expiratory thickness) obtained by ultrasound has recently been introduced in clinical practice for diagnosis of diaphragm muscle atrophy. Our objective was to evaluate this index for the diagnosis of acute phrenic paresis associated with interscalene block. We designed an observational study in 22 patients scheduled for shoulder arthroscopy. Spirometry was performed (criteria of phrenic paresis was a decrease in FVC and FEV1 ≥20%). Ultrasound apposition zone was assessed in anterior axillary line and diaphragmatic displacement was evaluated on inspiration and expiration (number of intercostal spaces; phrenic paresis considered a reduction ≥25%) and thickness of the diaphragm muscle (a phrenic paresis was considered an index block at C5-C6 with 20ml of 0.5% ropivacaine. Twenty-one patients (95%) presented phrenic nerve block according to one or more of the methods used. One patient did not show any symptoms or signs suggestive of phrenic paralysis and was excluded. All the patients presented phrenic paresis based on the diaphragmatic thickness index, with the pre-block index being 1.8±0.5 and post-block of 1.05±0.06 (Pblock (from 1.9±0.5 intercostal spaces to 0.5±0.3; Pblock. This index does not require a baseline pre-assessment. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Drainage of pleural effusion improves diaphragmatic function in mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbrello, Michele; Mistraletti, Giovanni; Galimberti, Andrea; Piva, Ilaria R; Cozzi, Ottavia; Formenti, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    Pleural effusion adversely affects the pressuregenerating capacity of the diaphragm. It uncouples the lung and chest wall, which may result in diaphragmatic dysfunction. Information on the effects of effusion drainage on diaphragmatic function is limited, but several studies report relief of dyspnoea after drainage, which was attributed to improved diaphragmatic mechanics, even if this issue was never formally addressed. To investigate the effect of drainage of unilateral pleural effusion on diaphragmatic function. In a prospective twostep protocol (at baseline and after drainage of effusion), we conducted a spontaneous breathing trial in fourteen critically ill, mechanically ventilated patients undergoing pressure support ventilation. We used ultrasonography of the ipsilateral hemidiaphragm to evaluate and record respiratory displacement and thickening during tidal and maximal breathing efforts. We recorded and analysed airway pressures, respiratory system compliance, vital capacity, indices of respiratory effort and arterial blood gases. After drainage of the effusion, the respiratory rate decreased and tidal volume increased, but haemodynamic parameters were unaffected and oxygenation levels showed a non-significant increase. Drainage was associated with significant decreases in indices of respiratory drive and the maximal pressure generated by the respiratory muscles, as well as an increased compliance of the respiratory system. Diaphragmatic displacement and thickening significantly increased after drainage. We found there was a significant correlation between the volume of the effusion drained and the increase in tidal diaphragmatic thickening. Drainage of a unilateral pleural effusion during weaning from mechanical ventilation improves diaphragmatic contractile activity and respiratory system performance.

  12. Traumatic diaphragmatic ruptures: clinical presentation, diagnosis and surgical approach in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmann, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Traumatic diaphragmatic injuries are rare, but potentially life-threatening due to herniation of abdominal organs into the pleural cavities. They can be easily overlooked on initial diagnostics and a high index of suspicion is required. The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the clinical presentation, diagnostic methods and surgical management of patients with diaphragmatic rupture at our institution. Methods: A retrospective study was performed to analyze our experience with patients suffering from traumatic diaphragmatic rupture. Charts were reviewed for sex, age, side-location, concomitant injuries, time-to-diagnosis, diagnostic methods, surgical approach and outcome. Results: Fourteen patients (median age: 46 yrs, range 18–71, 9 male, 5 female with diaphragmatic injuries (left side: 10, right side: 4 were treated between July 2003 and September 2011. Mechanism of injury was a penetrating trauma (14%, blunt trauma (50% and others (36%. Associated abdominal injuries included spleen rupture (n=3, liver laceration (n=2, abdominal wall laceration (n=2 and gastric perforation (n=1. Computed tomography was the most sensitive diagnostic method. All patients underwent trans-abdominal repair of the diaphragmatic defect (direct suture: 10, prosthetic mesh insertion: 4. Associated abdominal procedures included splenectomy (n=3, liver packing (n=2, abdominal wall reconstruction (n=2 and partial gastric resection (n=1. Morbidity and hospital mortality rate were 36% and 0%, respectively. Median postoperative hospital stay was 17 days (range: 7–40 days. Conclusion: Morbidity and mortality of diaphragmatic ruptures are mainly determined by associated injuries or complications of diaphragmatic herniation like incarceration of viscera or lung failure. Early diagnosis helps to prevent severe complications. Spiral CT-scan is the most reliable tool for acute diagnosis of diaphragmatic rupture and associated visceral lacerations

  13. Idiopathic diaphragmatic paralysis: Bell's palsy of the diaphragm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crausman, Robert S; Summerhill, Eleanor M; McCool, F Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Idiopathic diaphragm paralysis is probably more common and responsible for more morbidity than generally appreciated. Bell's palsy, or idiopathic paralysis of the seventh cranial nerve, may be seen as an analogous condition. The roles of zoster sine herpete and herpes simplex have increasingly been recognized in Bell's palsy, and there are some data to suggest that antiviral therapy is a useful adjunct to steroid therapy. Thus, we postulated that antiviral therapy might have a positive impact on the course of acute idiopathic diaphragm paralysis which is likely related to viral infection. Three consecutive patients with subacute onset of symptomatic idiopathic hemidiaphragm paralysis were empirically treated with valacyclovir, 1,000 mg twice daily for 1 week. Prior to therapy, diaphragmatic function was assessed via pulmonary function testing and two-dimensional B-mode ultrasound, with testing repeated 1 month later. Diaphragmatic function pre- and post-treatment was compared to that of a historical control group of 16 untreated patients. All three subjects demonstrated ultrasound recovery of diaphragm function 4-6 weeks following treatment with valacyclovir. This recovery was accompanied by improvements in maximum inspiratory pressure (PI(max)) and vital capacity (VC). In contrast, in the untreated cohort, diaphragm recovery occurred in only 11 subjects, taking an average of 14.9 +/- 6.1 months (mean +/- SD). The results of this small, preliminary study suggest that antiviral therapy with valacyclovir may be helpful in the treatment of idiopathic diaphragm paralysis induced by a viral infection.

  14. Delayed diaphragmatic herniation masquerading as a complicated parapneumonic effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, J; Ryan, F

    1999-01-01

    Injury to the diaphragm following blunt or penetrating thoracoabdominal trauma is not uncommon. Recognition of this important complication of trauma continues to be a challenge because of the lack of specific clinical and plain radiographic features, the frequent presence of other serious injuries and the potential for delayed presentation. Delayed diaphragmatic herniation often presents with catastrophic bowel obstruction or strangulation. Early recognition of diaphragmatic injury is required to avoid this potentially lethal complication. The case of a 35-year-old man with a history of a knife wound to the left flank 15 years previously, who presented with unexplained acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and a unilateral exudative pleural effusion that was refractory to tube thoracostomy drainage, is reported. After admission to hospital, he developed gross dilation of his colon; emergency laparotomy revealed an incarcerated colonic herniation into the left hemithorax. Interesting clinical features of this patient's case included the patient's hobby of weightlifting, a persistently deviated mediastinum despite drainage of the pleural effusion and deceptive pleural fluid biochemical indices.

  15. Delayed Diaphragmatic Herniation Masquerading as a Complicated Parapneumonic Effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Tsang

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury to the diaphragm following blunt or penetrating thoraco-abdominal trauma is not uncommon. Recognition of this important complication of trauma continues to be a challenge because of the lack of specific clinical and plain radiographic features, the frequent presence of other serious injuries and the potential for delayed presentation. Delayed diaphragmatic herniation often presents with catastrophic bowel obstruction or strangulation. Early recognition of diaphragmatic injury is required to avoid this potentially lethal complication. The case of a 35-year-old man with a history of a knife wound to the left flank 15 years previously, who presented with unexplained acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and a unilateral exudative pleural effusion that was refractory to tube thoracostomy drainage, is reported. After admission to hospital, he developed gross dilation of his colon; emergency laparotomy revealed an incarcerated colonic herniation into the left hemithorax. Interesting clinical features of this patient's case included the patient's hobby of weightlifting, a persistently deviated mediastinum despite drainage of the pleural effusion and deceptive pleural fluid biochemical indices.

  16. Comorbidity between Klinefelter syndrome and diaphragmatic hernia. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Melendez Valdez

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Intrathoracic cystic lesions have been diagnosed in a wide variety of age groups, and the increasing use of prenatal imaging studies has allowed detection of these defects even in utero.CASE REPORT: A 17-year-old pregnant woman in her second gestation, at 23 weeks of pregnancy, presented an ultrasound with evidence of a cystic anechoic image in the fet al left hemithorax. A morphological ultrasound examination performed at the hospital found that this cystic image measured 3.7 cm x 2.1 cm x 1.6 cm. Polyhydramnios was also present. At this time, the hypothesis of cystic adenomatoid malformation was raised. Fet al echocardiography showed only a dextroposed heart. Fet al magnetic resonance imaging produced an image compatible with a left diaphragmatic hernia containing the stomach and at least the first and second portions of the duodenum, left lobe of the liver, spleen, small intestine segments and portions of the colon. The stomach was greatly distended and the heart was shifted to the right. There was severe volume reduction of the left lung. Fet al karyotyping showed the chromosomal constitution of 47,XXY, compatible with Klinefelter syndrome. In our review of the literature, we found only one case of association between Klinefelter syndrome and diaphragmatic hernia.CONCLUSIONS: We believe that the association observed in this case was merely coincidental, since both conditions are relatively common. The chance of both events occurring simultaneously is estimated to be 1 in 1.5 million births.

  17. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Premature Infants With Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas Guamán, Milenka; Akinkuotu, Adesola C; Cruz, Stephanie M; Griffiths, Pamela A; Welty, Stephen E; Lee, Timothy C; Olutoye, Oluyinka O

    2017-11-14

    Prematurity and low birth weight have been exclusion criteria for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO); however, these criteria are not evidence based. With advances in anticoagulation, improved technology, and surgical expertise, it is difficult to deny a potential therapy based on these criteria alone. We report the outcome of three neonates who were ineligible based on traditional criteria but were offered ECMO as a life-saving measure. We highlight the interdisciplinary nature of modern decision-making. All three neonates had severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia diagnosed prenatally, had normal fetal karyotypes, were born prematurely, and weighed less than 2 kg. All three neonates underwent cervical venoarterial cannulation, stabilization on ECMO, and repair of their congenital diaphragmatic hernia early in their ECMO courses. All three infants had long courses of respiratory support attributable to lung hypoplasia, but there were no short- or long-term complications attributable to ECMO support directly. All three are alive at 2 years of age and were making progress developmentally. In conclusion, with interdisciplinary collaboration and clinical guidelines uniformly implemented, low birth weight infants may benefit from ECMO and should not be denied the therapy arbitrarily based on gestational age or size alone. Further research is essential to determine appropriate patient selection in premature infants.

  18. Artifacts as Authoritative Actors in Educational Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    März, Virginie; Kelchtermans, Geert; Vermeir, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Educational reforms are often translated in and implemented through artifacts. Although research has frequently treated artifacts as merely functional, more recent work acknowledges the complex relationship between material artifacts and human/organizational behavior. This article aims at disentangling this relationship in order to deepen our…

  19. Artifact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    CONCEPTUAL TYPE: TYPE LED BY IDEAS 26/10/12“Where are the idealistic fonts, the artsy fonts, the non fonts, the political fonts, the funny fonts, the difficult fonts, the fonts that don’t look like fonts, the fonts that are frontiers of new beliefs? We would like to focus on the ideas and concept...

  20. In need of a patch UP: Recurrent congenital diaphragmatic hernia presenting with a large pleural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhana Shariff

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of recurrent congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH presenting with a large unilateral pleural effusion. A 12-year old boy who had a left sided CDH repaired in the neonatal period, presented with fever, lethargy, and non-productive cough. Chest radiograph demonstrated a loculated pleural effusion. Computed tomography scan revealed recurrent herniation of abdominal contents. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a recurrent congenital diaphragmatic hernia presenting with large pleural effusion.

  1. An unusual cause of orthopnoea-hashimoto's thyroiditis presenting as bilateral diaphragmatic palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.K. Thulaseedharan, MBBS, MD(General Medicine

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of 36 yr old male without any comorbidities, who presented with a history of gradually progressive dyspnoea and orthopnoea for 6 months. Physical examination revealed bradycardia, paradoxical respiration suggestive of bilateral diaphragmatic palsy. Fluoroscopy demonstrated the presence of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis. Etiological work up showed evidence of autoimmune hypothyroidism due to hashimoto's thyroiditis. Other possibilities were ruled out with appropriate tests. He was started on thyroxine and showed symptomatic improvement.

  2. Identifying decreased diaphragmatic mobility and diaphragm thickening in interstitial lung disease: the utility of ultrasound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Pauliane Vieira; Prina, Elena; Albuquerque, André Luis Pereira; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro; Caruso, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the applicability of ultrasound imaging of the diaphragm in interstitial lung disease (ILD). Methods: Using ultrasound, we compared ILD patients and healthy volunteers (controls) in terms of diaphragmatic mobility during quiet and deep breathing; diaphragm thickness at functional residual capacity (FRC) and at total lung capacity (TLC); and the thickening fraction (TF, proportional diaphragm thickening from FRC to TLC). We also evaluated correlations between diaphragmatic dysfunction and lung function variables. Results: Between the ILD patients (n = 40) and the controls (n = 16), mean diaphragmatic mobility was comparable during quiet breathing, although it was significantly lower in the patients during deep breathing (4.5 ± 1.7 cm vs. 7.6 ± 1.4 cm; p < 0.01). The patients showed greater diaphragm thickness at FRC (p = 0.05), although, due to lower diaphragm thickness at TLC, they also showed a lower TF (p < 0.01). The FVC as a percentage of the predicted value (FVC%) correlated with diaphragmatic mobility (r = 0.73; p < 0.01), and an FVC% cut-off value of < 60% presented high sensitivity (92%) and specificity (81%) for indentifying decreased diaphragmatic mobility. Conclusions: Using ultrasound, we were able to show that diaphragmatic mobility and the TF were lower in ILD patients than in healthy controls, despite the greater diaphragm thickness at FRC in the former. Diaphragmatic mobility correlated with ILD functional severity, and an FVC% cut-off value of < 60% was found to be highly accurate for indentifying diaphragmatic dysfunction on ultrasound. PMID:27167428

  3. Artifacts in MR angiography of the intracranial vessels using the 3D TOF and 3D PC techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dong Woo; Lee, Seung Ro; Hahm, Chang Kok; Kim, Yong Soo; Park, Choong Ki

    1997-01-01

    To classify artifacts and to assess their frequency in magnetic resonance angiography of intracranial vessels using three- dimensional time-of-flight and phase-contrast techniques. One hundred and eleven patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease were imaged on a 1.5T superconducting magnetic resonance machine employing three- dimensional time-of-flight and phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiographic techniques. We retrospectively reviewed the artifacts in three- dimensional time-of-flight and phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography of the intracranial circulatory system, comparing them with routine spin-echo magnetic resonance images and magnetic resonance angiography source images, and partially with conventional angiography. Artifacts in magnetic resonance angiography were classified as flow-related, and flow-unrealted, by patient, hardware, magnetic resonance angiography acquisition and postprocessing techniques. Type and frequency of flow-related artifacts included saturation artifact (100%), dephasing artifact (100%), phase-encoding ghost artifact (97%), turbulence artifact (14%) and flow displacement artifact (5%) on three- dimensional time-of-flight and phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography, and phase aliasing artifact (2%) on three-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography. Type and frequency of flow-unrelated artifacts included stair-step artifact (100%) by three- dimensional reconstruction process, magnetic susceptibility artifact by carotid canal (69%) and metal (4%), maximum intensity projection artifact (30%) by maximum intensity projection algorithm, and motion artifact by respiration (20%) and voluntary movement (8%); these were seen on both time-of-flight and phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography. Paramagnetic substance artifact by fat and paranasal sinus mucosa (100%), hematoma (14%) and gadolinium (5%) were seen on time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography. In three- dimensional time-of-flight and

  4. Preoperative cardiorespiratory trends in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, S T; Schulze, K F; Sahni, R; Wung, J T; Myers, M M; Stolar, C J

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the cardiovascular and pulmonary adaptations of infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) from birth until delayed surgery through the use of continuous monitoring. Continuous cardiovascular (HR, heart rate variability [HR-SD], BP, blood pressure variability [BP-SD], and oxygen saturation) and ventilatory (minute volume, airway pressure, and effective compliance) measurements were made on-line, using a computerized whole-body plethysmograph-incubator (Vital-trends, VT1000), in nine ventilated infants with CDH. Data collection commenced at birth and continued until surgery. Minute mean values for each variable were recorded. Hourly means were computed from the minute means, averaged across infants each hour over the first 50 hours of life, and regressed against postnatal age. Results showed a significant increase in BP (P newborn infants. Deviation from these idealized patterns may identify an infant who is not responding satisfactorily to the given therapy and who may require alternative treatment modalities.

  5. Congenital peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia in a terrier dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Kheirandish

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A one-month-old male terrier dog was referred in shock status with a history of anorexia, tachypnea, abdominal distention and progressive weight loss. Auscultation of right side of the lungs found enhanced respiratory noises. The thorough auscultation of the opposite side of the chest revealed the presence of typical intestinal sounds. Cardiac auscultation revealed muffled heart sounds and a diminished palpable precordial cardiac impulse was evident. The radiograph showed the presence of gas within the bowel in abrupt contrast to the adjacent structures of soft tissue opacity. Conservative treatment was failed and the animal died. At necropsy, cranial displacement of abdominal viscera into the pericardial sac was seen. A definitive diagnosis of peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia was made. Although congenital pericardial diseases are rare in dogs, awareness of the clinical manifestation of these kinds of defects combined with early use of available imaging modalities can yield a preoperative diagnosis.

  6. Bilateral Diaphragmatic Paralysis in a Patient With Critical Illness Polyneuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Chen, Hung-Chen; Lin, Meng-Chih; Liaw, Mei-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis (BDP) manifests as respiratory muscle weakness, and its association with critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP) was rarely reported. Here, we present a patient with BDP related to CIP, who successfully avoided tracheostomy after diagnosis and management. A 71-year-old male presented with acute respiratory failure after sepsis adequately treated. Repeated intubation occurred because of carbon dioxide retention after each extubation. After eliminating possible factors, septic shock-induced respiratory muscle weakness was suspected. Physical examination, a nerve conduction study, and chest ultrasound confirmed our impression. Pulmonary rehabilitation and reconditioning exercises were arranged, and the patient was discharged with a diagnosis of BDP. The diagnosis of BDP is usually delayed, and there are only sporadic reports on its association with polyneuropathy, especially in patients with preserved limb muscle function. Therefore, when physicians encounter patients that are difficult to wean from mechanical ventilation, CIP associated with BDP should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26252301

  7. Fetoscopic tracheal occlusion for severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia: retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica de Fátima de Assunção Braga

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: The temporary fetal tracheal occlusion performed by fetoscopy accelerates lung development and reduces neonatal mortality. The aim of this paper is to present an anesthetic experience in pregnant women, whose fetuses have diaphragmatic hernia, undergoing fetoscopic tracheal occlusion (FETO. Method: Retrospective, descriptive study, approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee. Data were obtained from medical and anesthetic records. Results: FETO was performed in 28 pregnant women. Demographic characteristics: age 29.8 ± 6.5; weight 68.64 ± 12.26; ASA I and II. Obstetric: IG 26.1 ± 1.10 weeks (in FETO; 32.86 ± 1.58 (reversal of occlusion; 34.96 ± 2.78 (delivery. Delivery: cesarean section, vaginal delivery. Fetal data: Weight (g in the occlusion and delivery times, respectively (1045.82 ± 222.2 and 2294 ± 553; RPC in FETO and reversal of occlusion: 0.7 ± 0.15 and 1.32 ± 0.34, respectively. Preoperative maternal anesthesia included ranitidine and metoclopramide, nifedipine (VO and indomethacin (rectal. Preanesthetic medication with midazolam IV. Anesthetic techniques: combination of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (5-10 mg and sufentanil; continuous epidural predominantly with 0.5% bupivacaine associated with sufentanil, fentanyl, or morphine; general. In 8 cases, there was need to complement via catheter, with 5 submitted to PC and 3 to BC. Thirteen patients required intraoperative sedation; ephedrine was used in 15 patients. Fetal anesthesia: fentanyl 10-20 mg.kg-1 and pancuronium 0.1-0.2 mg.kg-1 (IM. Neonatal survival rate was 60.7%. Conclusion: FETO is a minimally invasive technique for severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia repair. Combined blockade associated with sedation and fetal anesthesia proved safe and effective for tracheal occlusion.

  8. Malformations associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia: Impact on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojanić, Katarina; Pritišanac, Ena; Luetić, Tomislav; Vuković, Jurica; Sprung, Juraj; Weingarten, Toby N; Schroeder, Darrell R; Grizelj, Ruža

    2015-11-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is associated with high mortality. Survival is influenced by the extent of pulmonary hypoplasia and additional congenital defects. The purpose of this study was to assess the association of congenital anomalies and admission capillary carbon dioxide levels (PcCO2), as a measure of extent of pulmonary hypoplasia, on survival in neonates with CDH. This is a retrospective review of neonates with CDH admitted to a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit between 1990 and 2014. Logistic regression was used to assess whether hospital survival was associated with admission PcCO2 or associated anomalies (isolated CDH, CDH with cardiovascular anomalies, and CDH with noncardiac anomalies). The probabilities of survival (POS) score, based on birth weight and 5-min Apgar as defined by the Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Study Group were included as a covariate. Of 97 patients, 55 had additional malformations (cardiovascular n=12, noncardiac anomalies n=43). POS was lower in CDH with other anomalies compared to isolated CDH. Survival rate was 61.9%, 53.5% and 41.7% in isolated CDH, CDH with noncardiac anomalies and CDH with cardiovascular anomalies, respectively. After adjusting for POS score the likelihood of survival in CDH groups with additional anomalies was similar to isolated CDH (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.22-4.15, and 1.10, 0.39-3.08, for CDH with and without cardiovascular anomalies, respectively). After adjusting for POS score, lower PcCO2 levels (OR=1.25 per 5mmHg decrease, P=0.003) were associated with better survival. Neonates with CDH have a high prevalence of congenital malformations. However, after adjusting for POS score the presence of additional anomalies was not associated with survival. The POS score and admission PcCO2 were important prognosticating factors for survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Electromyographic permutation entropy quantifies diaphragmatic denervation and reinnervation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Kramer

    Full Text Available Spontaneous reinnervation after diaphragmatic paralysis due to trauma, surgery, tumors and spinal cord injuries is frequently observed. A possible explanation could be collateral reinnervation, since the diaphragm is commonly double-innervated by the (accessory phrenic nerve. Permutation entropy (PeEn, a complexity measure for time series, may reflect a functional state of neuromuscular transmission by quantifying the complexity of interactions across neural and muscular networks. In an established rat model, electromyographic signals of the diaphragm after phrenicotomy were analyzed using PeEn quantifying denervation and reinnervation. Thirty-three anesthetized rats were unilaterally phrenicotomized. After 1, 3, 9, 27 and 81 days, diaphragmatic electromyographic PeEn was analyzed in vivo from sternal, mid-costal and crural areas of both hemidiaphragms. After euthanasia of the animals, both hemidiaphragms were dissected for fiber type evaluation. The electromyographic incidence of an accessory phrenic nerve was 76%. At day 1 after phrenicotomy, PeEn (normalized values was significantly diminished in the sternal (median: 0.69; interquartile range: 0.66-0.75 and mid-costal area (0.68; 0.66-0.72 compared to the non-denervated side (0.84; 0.78-0.90 at threshold p<0.05. In the crural area, innervated by the accessory phrenic nerve, PeEn remained unchanged (0.79; 0.72-0.86. During reinnervation over 81 days, PeEn normalized in the mid-costal area (0.84; 0.77-0.86, whereas it remained reduced in the sternal area (0.77; 0.70-0.81. Fiber type grouping, a histological sign for reinnervation, was found in the mid-costal area in 20% after 27 days and in 80% after 81 days. Collateral reinnervation can restore diaphragm activity after phrenicotomy. Electromyographic PeEn represents a new, distinctive assessment characterizing intramuscular function following denervation and reinnervation.

  10. Reducing 4D CT artifacts using optimized sorting based on anatomic similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Eric; Diehn, Maximilian; Murphy, James D; Loo, Billy W; Maxim, Peter G

    2011-05-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) has been widely used as a tool to characterize respiratory motion in radiotherapy. The two most commonly used 4D CT algorithms sort images by the associated respiratory phase or displacement into a predefined number of bins, and are prone to image artifacts at transitions between bed positions. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate a method of reducing motion artifacts in 4D CT by incorporating anatomic similarity into phase or displacement based sorting protocols. Ten patient datasets were retrospectively sorted using both the displacement and phase based sorting algorithms. Conventional sorting methods allow selection of only the nearest-neighbor image in time or displacement within each bin. In our method, for each bed position either the displacement or the phase defines the center of a bin range about which several candidate images are selected. The two dimensional correlation coefficients between slices bordering the interface between adjacent couch positions are then calculated for all candidate pairings. Two slices have a high correlation if they are anatomically similar. Candidates from each bin are then selected to maximize the slice correlation over the entire data set using the Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm. To assess the reduction of artifacts, two thoracic radiation oncologists independently compared the resorted 4D datasets pairwise with conventionally sorted datasets, blinded to the sorting method, to choose which had the least motion artifacts. Agreement between reviewers was evaluated using the weighted kappa score. Anatomically based image selection resulted in 4D CT datasets with significantly reduced motion artifacts with both displacement (P = 0.0063) and phase sorting (P = 0.00022). There was good agreement between the two reviewers, with complete agreement 34 times and complete disagreement 6 times. Optimized sorting using anatomic similarity significantly reduces 4D CT motion

  11. Use of cognitive artifacts in chemistry learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengin, Ilker

    In everyday life, we interact with cognitive artifacts to receive and/or manipulate information so as to alter our thinking processes. CHEM/TEAC 869Q is a distance course that includes extensive explicit instruction in the use of a cognitive artifact. This study investigates issues related to the design of that online artifact. In order to understand design implications and how cognitive artifacts contribute to students' thinking and learning, a qualitative research methodology was engaged that utilized think aloud sessions. Participants' described constrained and structured cognitive models while using the artifact. The study also was informed by interviews and researcher's field notes. A purposeful sampling method led to the selection of participants, four males and two females, who had no prior history of using a course from the 869 series but who had experienced the scientific content covered by the CHEM869Q course. Analysis of the results showed both that a cognitive artifact may lead users' minds in decision making, and that problem solving processes were affected by cognitive artifact's design. When there is no design flaw, users generally thought that the cognitive artifact was helpful by simplifying steps, overcoming other limitations, and reducing errors in a reliable, effective, and easy to use way. Moreover, results showed that successful implementation of cognitive artifacts into teaching --learning practices depended on user willingness to transfer a task to the artifact. While users may like the idea of benefiting from a cognitive artifact, nevertheless, they may tend to limit their usage. They sometimes think that delegating a task to a cognitive artifact makes them dependent, and that they may not learn how to perform the tasks by themselves. They appear more willing to use a cognitive artifact after they have done the task by themselves.

  12. Prenatal imaging of a fetus with the rare combination of a right congenital diaphragmatic hernia and a giant omphalocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Ayasa; Hidaka, Nobuhiro; Kido, Saki; Fukushima, Kotaro; Kato, Kiyoko

    2014-11-01

    A co-existing right congenital diaphragmatic hernia and omphalocele is rare. We present images of a fetus diagnosed with this rare combination of anomalies. Early neonatal death occurred immediately after full-term birth due to severe respiratory insufficiency. In this case, disturbance of chest wall development due to the omphalocele rather than the diaphragmatic hernia was considered as the main cause of lung hypoplasia. Our experience suggests that caution should be exercised for severe respiratory insufficiency in a neonate with an omphalocele and diaphragmatic hernia, even in the absence of an intra-thoracic liver, one of the indicators of poor outcome for congenital diaphragmatic hernia. © 2014 Japanese Teratology Society.

  13. Designing a compact MRI motion phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmiedel Max

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Even today, dealing with motion artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a challenging task. Image corruption due to spontaneous body motion complicates diagnosis. In this work, an MRI phantom for rigid motion is presented. It is used to generate motion-corrupted data, which can serve for evaluation of blind motion compensation algorithms. In contrast to commercially available MRI motion phantoms, the presented setup works on small animal MRI systems. Furthermore, retrospective gating is performed on the data, which can be used as a reference for novel motion compensation approaches. The motion of the signal source can be reconstructed using motor trigger signals and be utilized as the ground truth for motion estimation. The proposed setup results in motion corrected images. Moreover, the importance of preprocessing the MRI raw data, e.g. phase-drift correction, is demonstrated. The gained knowledge can be used to design an MRI phantom for elastic motion.

  14. MADR: metal artifact detection and reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Sunil Prasad; Ha, Sungsoo; Mueller, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Metal in CT-imaged objects drastically reduces the quality of these images due to the severe artifacts it can cause. Most metal artifacts reduction (MAR) algorithms consider the metal-affected sinogram portions as the corrupted data and replace them via sophisticated interpolation methods. While these schemes are successful in removing the metal artifacts, they fail to recover some of the edge information. To address these problems, the frequency shift metal artifact reduction algorithm (FSMAR) was recently proposed. It exploits the information hidden in the uncorrected image and combines the high frequency (edge) components of the uncorrected image with the low frequency components of the corrected image. Although this can effectively transfer the edge information of the uncorrected image, it also introduces some unwanted artifacts. The essential problem of these algorithms is that they lack the capability of detecting the artifacts and as a result cannot discriminate between desired and undesired edges. We propose a scheme that does better in these respects. Our Metal Artifact Detection and Reduction (MADR) scheme constructs a weight map which stores whether a pixel in the uncorrected image belongs to an artifact region or a non-artifact region. This weight matrix is optimal in the Linear Minimum Mean Square Sense (LMMSE). Our results demonstrate that MADR outperforms the existing algorithms and ensures that the anatomical structures close to metal implants are better preserved.

  15. Pulmonary surfactant protein A, B, and C mRNA and protein expression in the nitrofen-induced congenital diaphragmatic hernia rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tuyl, Minke; Blommaart, Piet jan E.; Keijzer, Richard; Wert, Susan E.; Ruijter, Jan M.; Lamers, Wouter H.; Tibboel, Dick

    2003-01-01

    Neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) suffer from a diaphragmatic defect, lung hypoplasia, and pulmonary hypertension, with poor lung function forming the major clinical challenge. Despite prenatal diagnosis and advanced postnatal treatment strategies, the mortality rate of CDH is

  16. Pulmonary Vascular Defects in Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia : the quest for early factors and intervention : Pulmonale vasculaire defecten in congenitale hernia diafragmatica : de zoektocht naar vroege factoren en interventie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.S. Mous (Daphne)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractCongenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a severe anomaly characterized by a diaphragmatic defect, lung hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension. The associated pulmonary abnormalities are responsible for the high morbidity and mortality among patients with this disease. Vasodilator

  17. The Effect of Diaphragmatic Breathing on Attention, Negative Affect and Stress in Healthy Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Ma

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of empirical studies have revealed that diaphragmatic breathing may trigger body relaxation responses and benefit both physical and mental health. However, the specific benefits of diaphragmatic breathing on mental health remain largely unknown. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of diaphragmatic breathing on cognition, affect, and cortisol responses to stress. Forty participants were randomly assigned to either a breathing intervention group (BIG or a control group (CG. The BIG received intensive training for 20 sessions, implemented over 8 weeks, employing a real-time feedback device, and an average respiratory rate of 4 breaths/min, while the CG did not receive this treatment. All participants completed pre- and post-tests of sustained attention and affect. Additionally, pre-test and post-test salivary cortisol concentrations were determined in both groups. The findings suggested that the BIG showed a significant decrease in negative affect after intervention, compared to baseline. In the diaphragmatic breathing condition, there was a significant interaction effect of group by time on sustained attention, whereby the BIG showed significantly increased sustained attention after training, compared to baseline. There was a significant interaction effect of group and time in the diaphragmatic breathing condition on cortisol levels, whereby the BIG had a significantly lower cortisol level after training, while the CG showed no significant change in cortisol levels. In conclusion, diaphragmatic breathing could improve sustained attention, affect, and cortisol levels. This study provided evidence demonstrating the effect of diaphragmatic breathing, a mind-body practice, on mental function, from a health psychology approach, which has important implications for health promotion in healthy individuals.

  18. The Effect of Diaphragmatic Breathing on Attention, Negative Affect and Stress in Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao; Yue, Zi-Qi; Gong, Zhu-Qing; Zhang, Hong; Duan, Nai-Yue; Shi, Yu-Tong; Wei, Gao-Xia; Li, You-Fa

    2017-01-01

    A growing number of empirical studies have revealed that diaphragmatic breathing may trigger body relaxation responses and benefit both physical and mental health. However, the specific benefits of diaphragmatic breathing on mental health remain largely unknown. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of diaphragmatic breathing on cognition, affect, and cortisol responses to stress. Forty participants were randomly assigned to either a breathing intervention group (BIG) or a control group (CG). The BIG received intensive training for 20 sessions, implemented over 8 weeks, employing a real-time feedback device, and an average respiratory rate of 4 breaths/min, while the CG did not receive this treatment. All participants completed pre- and post-tests of sustained attention and affect. Additionally, pre-test and post-test salivary cortisol concentrations were determined in both groups. The findings suggested that the BIG showed a significant decrease in negative affect after intervention, compared to baseline. In the diaphragmatic breathing condition, there was a significant interaction effect of group by time on sustained attention, whereby the BIG showed significantly increased sustained attention after training, compared to baseline. There was a significant interaction effect of group and time in the diaphragmatic breathing condition on cortisol levels, whereby the BIG had a significantly lower cortisol level after training, while the CG showed no significant change in cortisol levels. In conclusion, diaphragmatic breathing could improve sustained attention, affect, and cortisol levels. This study provided evidence demonstrating the effect of diaphragmatic breathing, a mind-body practice, on mental function, from a health psychology approach, which has important implications for health promotion in healthy individuals.

  19. Detection of movement artifact in recorded pulse oximeter saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poets, C F; Stebbens, V A

    1997-10-01

    Movement artifact (MA) must be detected when analysing recordings of pulse oximeter saturation (SpO2). Visual analysis of individual pulse waveforms is the safest, but also the most tedious, method for this purpose. We wanted to test the reliability of a computer algorithm (Edentec Motion Annotation System), based on a comparison between pulse and heart rate, for MA detection. Ten 12-h recordings of SpO2, pulse waveforms and heart rate from ten preterm infants were analysed for the presence of MA on the pulse waveform signal. These data were used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the computer algorithm, and of the oximeter itself, in detecting MA. Recordings were divided into segments of 2.5 s duration to compare the movement identification methods. Of the segments 31% +/- 6% (mean +/- SD) contained MA. The computer algorithm identified 95% +/- 3% of these segments, the pulse oximeter only 18% +/- 11%. Specificity was 85% +/- 4% and 99% +/- 0%, respectively. SpO2 was signal showed MA during this time, leaving a significant potential for erroneous identification of hypoxaemia. Recordings of SpO2 do not allow a reliable identification of MA. Without additional information about movement artifact, a significant proportion of recording time of pulse oximeter signal may be regarded as demonstrating hypoxaemia which, in fact, simply reflects poor measurement conditions. The computer algorithm used in this study identified periods of movement artifact reliably.

  20. Independent component analysis of gait-related movement artifact recorded using EEG electrodes during treadmill walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Lynne Snyder

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There has been a recent surge in the use of electroencephalography (EEG as a tool for mobile brain imaging due to its portability and fine time resolution. When EEG is combined with independent component analysis (ICA and source localization techniques, it can model electrocortical activity as arising from temporally independent signals located in spatially distinct cortical areas. However, for mobile tasks, it is not clear how movement artifacts influence ICA and source localization. We devised a novel method to collect pure movement artifact data (devoid of any electrophysiological signals with a 256-channel EEG system. We first blocked true electrocortical activity using a silicone swim cap. Over the silicone layer, we placed a simulated scalp with electrical properties similar to real human scalp. We collected EEG movement artifact signals from ten healthy, young subjects wearing this setup as they walked on a treadmill at speeds from 0.4-1.6 m/s. We performed ICA and dipole fitting on the EEG movement artifact data to quantify how accurately these methods would identify the artifact signals as non-neural. ICA and dipole fitting accurately localized 99% of the independent components in non-neural locations or lacked dipolar characteristics. The remaining 1% of sources had locations within the brain volume and low residual variances, but had topographical maps, power spectra, time courses, and event related spectral perturbations typical of non-neural sources. Caution should be exercised when interpreting ICA for data that includes semi-periodic artifacts including artifact arising from human walking. Alternative methods are needed for the identification and separation of movement artifact in mobile EEG signals, especially methods that can be performed in real time. Separating true brain signals from motion artifact could clear the way for EEG brain computer interfaces for assistance during mobile activities, such as walking.

  1. A particle accelerator probes artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dran, J.C.; Calligaro, Th.; Salomon, J.

    2002-01-01

    The AGLAE system is made up of a 2 mega volts electrostatic accelerator and of 3 irradiation lines: one leads to a vacuum enclosure in which targets are irradiated and the 2 others lines are designed to irradiate targets under an air or helium atmosphere. The AGLAE system is located in the premises of the Louvre museum in Paris and is devoted to the study of cultural objects through ion beam analysis (IBA). 4 techniques are used: -) proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) -) proton-induced gamma ray (PIGE) -) Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (NRS) and -) nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). A decisive progress has permitted the direct analysis of artifacts without sampling. The object itself is set just a few millimeters away from the exit window of the beam in an air or helium atmosphere. The exit window must be resistant enough to bear the atmospheric pressure and the damages caused by the proton beam but must be thin enough to not deteriorate the quality of the beam. By using a 10 -7 m thick exit window made of Si 3 N 4 we get a beam whose diameter is 10 -5 m. This new technology presents 4 main advantages: 1) any object of any shape can be studied without sampling, 2) the analysis of very fragile artifacts that might be damaged by the vacuum setting is now possible, 3) a reduction of the thermal side-effects of the beam, and 4) the absence of accumulation of charges in isolating material allows to rid of covering the object with a conducting coating before irradiating it. (A.C.)

  2. Diaphragmatic height index: new diagnostic test for phrenic nerve dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornrattanamaneewong, Chaturong; Limthongthang, Roongsak; Vathana, Torpon; Kaewpornsawan, Kamolporn; Songcharoen, Panupan; Wongtrakul, Saichol

    2012-11-01

    The diaphragmatic height index (DHI) was developed to measure the difference in diaphragm levels. The purpose of this study was to set definite DHI values and test the accuracy of these values for use as a new diagnostic test for phrenic nerve dysfunction. All data for this study were obtained from medical charts and retrospectively reviewed. One hundred sixty-five patients with brachial plexus injury who had undergone nerve transfers between 2005 and 2008 were divided into Groups A and B. Group A consisted of 40 patients (mean age 28.0 years) who had sustained concomitant injury of the brachial plexus and phrenic nerves. Patients in Group A1 had right phrenic nerve injury and those in Group A2 had left phrenic nerve injury. Intraoperative direct electrical stimulation of the phrenic nerve was considered the gold standard in assessing nerve function in all patients with brachial plexus injury. Group B consisted of 125 patients (mean age 28.7 years) with brachial plexus injury and normal phrenic nerve function. Group C, the control group, consisted of 80 patients with nonbrachial plexus injury (mean age 34.0 years) who had undergone other kinds of orthopedic operations between April and June 2009. Standard posteroanterior chest radiographs were blindly interpreted using the Siriraj inhouse picture archiving and communication system in all 245 patients in the study. First, a reference line (R line) was drawn along the inferior endplate of T-10. Then, 2 lines (lines A and B) were drawn through the highest point of each diaphragm and parallel to the R line. The difference between these 2 lines divided by the height of T-10 was defined as the DHI. The cutoff points of the DHI for diagnosing right and left phrenic nerve dysfunction were analyzed with a receiver operating characteristic curve. The accuracy of these DHI values was then evaluated. The DHI in Group C was 0.64 ± 0.44, slightly higher than the DHI in Group B, with no significant difference. Diaphragmatic

  3. The Many Faces of Computational Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Rune; Harper, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Building on data from fieldwork at a medical department, this paper focuses on the varied nature of computational artifacts in practice. It shows that medical practice relies on multiple heterogeneous computational artifacts that form complex constellations. In the hospital studied the computatio...

  4. Reducing artifacts from varying projection truncations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Leise; Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Frikel, Jürgen

    We study samples with full and partial occlusion causing streak artifacts, and propose two modifications of filtered backprojection for artifact removal. Data is obtained by the SPring-8 synchrotron using a monochromatic parallel-beam scan [1]. Thresholding in the sinogram segments the metal...

  5. Phrenic Nerve Conduction Abnormalities Correlate with Diaphragmatic Descent in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tantawi, Gihan A Younis; Imam, Mohamed H; Morsi, Tamer S

    2015-01-01

    Diaphragmatic weakness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is ascribed to hyperinflation-induced diaphragm shortening as well as impairment in cellular and subcellular structures. Although phrenic neuropathy is known to cause diaphragmatic weakness, phrenic neuropathy is rarely considered in COPD. This work aimed at assessing phrenic nerve conduction in COPD and its relation to radiographic hyperinflation and pulmonary function. Forty COPD patients were evaluated. Radiographic parameters of lung hyperinflation were measured on postero-anterior and lateral chest x-ray films. Flow volume loop parameters were obtained from all patients. Motor conduction study of the phrenic nerves was performed and potentials were recorded over the xiphoid process and the ipsilateral 7th intercostal space. Twenty-seven healthy subjects were enrolled as controls. Parameters of phrenic nerve conduction differed significantly in patients compared to controls. Phrenic nerve abnormalities were detected in 17 patients (42.5%). Electrophysiological measures correlated with diaphragmatic angle of depression on lateral view films and with lung height on postero-anterior films. They did not correlate with the flow volume loop data or disease severity score. Phrenic nerve conduction abnormality is an appreciated finding in COPD. Nerve stretching associated with diaphragmatic descent can be a suggested mechanism for nerve lesion. The presence of phrenic neuropathy may be an additional contributing factor to diaphragmatic dysfunction in COPD patients.

  6. Functional restoration of diaphragmatic paralysis: an evaluation of phrenic nerve reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Matthew R; Elkwood, Andrew I; Colicchio, Alan R; CeCe, John; Jarrahy, Reza; Willekes, Lourens J; Rose, Michael I; Brown, David

    2014-01-01

    Unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis causes respiratory deficits and can occur after iatrogenic or traumatic phrenic nerve injury in the neck or chest. Patients are evaluated using spirometry and imaging studies; however, phrenic nerve conduction studies and electromyography are not widely available or considered; thus, the degree of dysfunction is often unknown. Treatment has been limited to diaphragmatic plication. Phrenic nerve operations to restore diaphragmatic function may broaden therapeutic options. An interventional study of 92 patients with symptomatic diaphragmatic paralysis assigned 68 (based on their clinical condition) to phrenic nerve surgical intervention (PS), 24 to nonsurgical (NS) care, and evaluated a third group of 68 patients (derived from literature review) treated with diaphragmatic plication (DP). Variables for assessment included spirometry, the Short-Form 36-Item survey, electrodiagnostics, and complications. In the PS group, there was an average 13% improvement in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (p Phrenic nerve operations for functional restoration of the paralyzed diaphragm should be part of the standard treatment algorithm in the management of symptomatic patients with this condition. Assessment of neuromuscular dysfunction can aid in determining the most effective therapy. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Conceptual Model of Artifacts for Design Science Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We present a conceptual model of design science research artifacts. The model views an artifact at three levels. At the artifact level a selected artifact is viewed as a combination of material and immaterial aspects and a set of representations hereof. At the design level the selected artifact...

  8. Surgical management of the newborn with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Kuojen; Lally, Kevin P

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in the surgical treatment and medical management over the last 20 years, neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) remain one of the most challenging patient groups for all clinicians. Treatment strategies have shifted from emergent surgical repair and maximum ventilatory support to delayed repair and preoperative hemodynamic stabilization with lung-sparing ventilation strategies and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Subsequently, overall survival has improved to as high as 80% in some centers. However, specific treatment criteria are vague and highly variable amongst centers. This lack of consensus of these treatment modalities remains elusive due to the heterogeneity in disease severity as well as heterogeneity in patient care amongst centers. As a result of the rare incidence of disease and limited experience of individual centers, the evidence for CDH is typically reported as a homogenous disease largely supported by case series and networked-based studies. To better evaluate the data and compare treatment strategies, a classification and stratification of disease and centers is needed. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Respiratory insufficiency with preserved diaphragmatic function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Rika; Imai, Tomihiro; Tsuda, Emiko; Hozuki, Takayoshi; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Shimohama, Shun

    2014-01-01

    We performed a longitudinal study to elucidate the correlation between respiratory insufficiency and respiratory biomarkers, including diaphragmatic compound muscle action potential (DCMAP), at the initiation of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The patients were assessed at least every six months. Additional assessments were performed at the start of respiratory therapy when the patients met the criteria for the initiation of NIV. Each assessment consisted of a full neurological examination, a phrenic nerve conduction study, respiratory function tests, and nocturnal pulsed oximetry. We enrolled 43 patients with either definite or probable ALS as defined by the revised El Escorial criteria. The patients were divided into two groups according to the timing of the initiation of respiratory therapy. Seventeen patients (group A) met the criteria for NIV initiation when their DCMAP remained normal. Twenty-six patients (group B) met the criteria when their DCMAP decreased below normal limits. Although respiratory function parameters were significantly worse in group B compared with group A at NIV initiation, more than 80% of the patients in both groups developed nocturnal desaturation during sleep. DCMAP is not always a reliable indicator for determining the optimal timing for NIV initiation during the progression of respiratory insufficiency in ALS. Physicians should be aware of the risk of respiratory insufficiency during sleep in patients with ALS.

  10. Traumatic diaphragmatic injuries in infants and children: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koplewitz, B.Z.; Manson, D.E.; Babyn, P.S.; Ramos, C.; Ein, S.H.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives. Traumatic diaphragmatic injuries (DI) in infants and children are uncommon and are often associated with multiple severe injuries. Delayed presentation can be life threatening due to organ herniation and strangulation. We present the imaging findings in a relatively large population of children who experienced this rare injury. Methods. Medical records of all patients admitted to our Trauma Service from 1977 to 1998 with DI were retrospectively reviewed recording imaging, clinical and surgical or autopsy findings. Results. Of sixteen patients with DI (7 females, 9 males; age 3 weeks to 15 years), 14 suffered from blunt trauma secondary to high-energy impact, and 2 from penetrating injuries. Unilateral DI occurred equally on each side, with one bilateral injury. Associated injuries, present in 81%, included severe head injuries, visceral, mesenteric and vascular injuries and multiple fractures. Six patients died from multiple organ failure (3), head injury (2), and shock (1). Findings in the initial chest X-ray suggested the diagnosis in 13 (81%) of 16 injuries, and CT demonstrated irregularity and thickening of the diaphragm in 4 out of 7. Conclusions. Plain film findings suggested the diagnosis in most; CT and MR were useful adjuncts. High index of suspicion and awareness of the mechanism of injury can lead to prompt diagnosis, early repair, and decreased morbidity and mortality. (orig.)

  11. Imaging modalities used to confirm diaphragmatic hernia in small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.; Leveille, R.; Myer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    When a patient is presented for treatment following a traumatic accident such as being hit by a car, thoracic radiographs are usually an integral part of the overall diagnostic evaluation. Diagnosis at diaphragmatic hernia (DH) is often challenging in small animals. The thorax may contain substantial fluid, thereby masking the presence of cranially displaced abdominal soft tissues (e.g., liver or spleen). The most common cause of decreased radiographic visualization of the diaphragm on survey radiographs is pleural fluid; however, the second most common cause is DH. Obviously, if a gas-filledviscus is identified within the thoracic cavity on survey radiographs, the diagnosis of DH is straightforward and relatively routine. If, however, there is substantial pleural effusion and the herniated structure is a soft tissue parenchymal organ (e.g., liver or spleen), the diagnosis is less clearly defined on survey radiographs. This review discusses the various imaging modalities (survey, positional, and contrast-enhanced radiographs and ultrasonography) that can be used in the diagnosis or confirmation of DH

  12. Thoracic and diaphragmatic endometriosis: Single-institution experience using a novel broadened diagnostic criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larraín, Demetrio; Suárez, Francisco; Braun, Hernán; Chapochnick, Javier; Diaz, Lidia; Rojas, Iván

    2018-06-05

    To describe our experience with the multidisciplinary management of both thoracic/diaphragmatic endometriosis (TED), applying a broadened definition of the “thoracic endometriosis syndrome (TES)” to define cases. We present a retrospective series of consecutive patients affected by pathology-proven TED, treated at our institution, during a period of 7 years. Five women were included. Two cases were referred due to catamenial chest/shoulder pain, one due to recurrent catamenial pneumothorax, one due to new-onset diaphragmatic hernia. One patient had not thoracic symptoms, and diaphragmatic endometriosis was found during gynecologic laparoscopy for pelvic endometriosis. Endometriosis was histologically confirmed in all cases. After follow-up all patients remain asymptomatic. Broadened TES criteria could increase the incidence of TED and determine better knowledge of this condition. Multidisciplinary, minimally invasive surgery is effective and safe, but should be reserved to tertiary referral centers.

  13. Acute Intrathoracic Gastric Volvulus due to Diaphragmatic Hernia: A Rare Emergency Easily Overlooked

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Hun Kim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute intrathoracic gastric volvulus occurs when the stomach undergoes organoaxial torsion in the chest due to either concomitant enlargement of the hiatus or a diaphragmatic hernia. Iatrogenic diaphragmatic hernia can occur after hiatal hernia repair and other surgical procedures, such as nephrectomy, esophagogastrectomy and splenopancreatectomy. We describe a 49-year-old woman who presented to our emergency department with acute moderate epigastric soreness and vomiting. She had undergone extensive gynecologic surgery including splenectomy 1 year before. The chest radiograph obtained in the emergency department demonstrated an elevated gastric air-fluid level in the left lower lung field. An urgent gastroscopy showed twisted structural abnormality of the stomach body. A computed tomography scan demonstrated the distended stomach, located in the left lower hemithorax through a left diaphragmatic defect. Emergent transthoracic repair was performed. Postoperative recovery was uneventful, and the patient did not experience any pain or difficulty with eating.

  14. Image artifacts and technical limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, W.M.

    1987-01-01

    The swift temporal progression of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from experimental prototype design to sophisticated instrument production can be sharply contrasted to the more protracted time course that characterized the development of X-ray computed tomography (CT). Most notably, the current generation of CT scanners represents the product of more than a decade of design innovation and technologic improvement, punctuated by the introduction of a whole new ''generation'' of CT scanners at periodic intervals. The more rapid evolutionary changes unique to MRI have been permitted by the greater abundance of sophisticated technologic expertise and necessitated by economic considerations, especially the desire to avoid premature obsolescence. Quite clearly, ''state-of-the-art'' MRI units available today are intended to remain state of the art for many years into the future. In clinical trials, MRI has proved particularly effacacious for evaluation of suspected neurologic disease, prompting neuroradiologists to welcome this new non-invasive diagnostic tool with unprecedented enthusiasm. In early reports, the lack of ionizing radiation, apparent absence of significant biological hazards, and ''elimination'' of artifacts were all acclaimed as major technical advantages. Now, as this diagnostic modality is undergoing widespread dissemination and a large body of clinical experience begins to accumulate, increasing attention is being focused on the limitations of MRI

  15. A particle accelerator probes artifacts

    CERN Document Server

    Dran, J C; Salomon, J

    2002-01-01

    The AGLAE system is made up of a 2 mega volts electrostatic accelerator and of 3 irradiation lines: one leads to a vacuum enclosure in which targets are irradiated and the 2 others lines are designed to irradiate targets under an air or helium atmosphere. The AGLAE system is located in the premises of the Louvre museum in Paris and is devoted to the study of cultural objects through ion beam analysis (IBA). 4 techniques are used: -) proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) -) proton-induced gamma ray (PIGE) -) Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (NRS) and -) nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). A decisive progress has permitted the direct analysis of artifacts without sampling. The object itself is set just a few millimeters away from the exit window of the beam in an air or helium atmosphere. The exit window must be resistant enough to bear the atmospheric pressure and the damages caused by the proton beam but must be thin enough to not deteriorate the quality of the beam. By using a 10 sup - sup 7 m thick exit w...

  16. Constant flow ventilation as a novel approach to elimination of respiratory artifact in MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shtern, F.; Kersh, R.; Lee, A.; Venegas, J.; Brady, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    This pilot study was performed to evaluate constant flow ventilation (CFV) as a method of respiratory artifact suppression in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In contrast to currently used methods of respiratory artifact suppression, CFV is able to provide adequate ventilation in the absence of any chest wall motion and thus obviates the need for respiratory gating. High-velocity jets of fresh gas delivered through two narrow (2-mm) intrabronchial cannulas promote gas exchange through airway turbulence and enhanced molecular diffusion. One mongrel dog (8.5 kg) was anesthetized with pentobarbital (35 mg/kg). For CFV, endobronchial cannulas were inserted with the aid of bronchoscopy and connected to a flow meter (flow rate, 500 mL/sec). Intrathoracic pressure was monitored via a pressure transducer connected to an air-filled intraesophageal balloon. Conventional ventilation (CV), with a tidal volume of 85 mL and ten breaths per minute, was provided through a cuffed endotracheal tube. After establishment of adequate ventilation (carbon dioxide pressure, 39), muscle paralysis was induced by succinylcholine at 0.1 mg/kg. T2-weighted [1,500/50 (repetition time msec/echo time msec), two excitations] gradient-echo and spin-echo images were obtained at 0.6T with both CV and CFV. MR images with CFV were free of respiratory motion artifact, which was present on all MR images with CV. This pilot study indicates that implementation of CFV results in elimination of respiratory motion artifact

  17. Investigating the Feasibility of Rapid MRI for Image-Guided Motion Management in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Sawant

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cycle-to-cycle variations in respiratory motion can cause significant geometric and dosimetric errors in the administration of lung cancer radiation therapy. A common limitation of the current strategies for motion management is that they assume a constant, reproducible respiratory cycle. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using rapid MRI for providing long-term imaging of the thorax in order to better capture cycle-to-cycle variations. Two nonsmall-cell lung cancer patients were imaged (free-breathing, no extrinsic contrast, and 1.5 T scanner. A balanced steady-state-free-precession (b-SSFP sequence was used to acquire cine-2D and cine-3D (4D images. In the case of Patient 1 (right midlobe lesion, ~40 mm diameter, tumor motion was well correlated with diaphragmatic motion. In the case of Patient 2, (left upper-lobe lesion, ~60 mm diameter, tumor motion was poorly correlated with diaphragmatic motion. Furthermore, the motion of the tumor centroid was poorly correlated with the motion of individual points on the tumor boundary, indicating significant rotation and/or deformation. These studies indicate that image quality and acquisition speed of cine-2D MRI were adequate for motion monitoring. However, significant improvements are required to achieve comparable speeds for truly 4D MRI. Despite several challenges, rapid MRI offers a feasible and attractive tool for noninvasive, long-term motion monitoring.

  18. Investigating the feasibility of rapid MRI for image-guided motion management in lung cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Amit; Keall, Paul; Pauly, Kim Butts; Alley, Marcus; Vasanawala, Shreyas; Loo, Billy W; Hinkle, Jacob; Joshi, Sarang

    2014-01-01

    Cycle-to-cycle variations in respiratory motion can cause significant geometric and dosimetric errors in the administration of lung cancer radiation therapy. A common limitation of the current strategies for motion management is that they assume a constant, reproducible respiratory cycle. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using rapid MRI for providing long-term imaging of the thorax in order to better capture cycle-to-cycle variations. Two nonsmall-cell lung cancer patients were imaged (free-breathing, no extrinsic contrast, and 1.5 T scanner). A balanced steady-state-free-precession (b-SSFP) sequence was used to acquire cine-2D and cine-3D (4D) images. In the case of Patient 1 (right midlobe lesion, ~40 mm diameter), tumor motion was well correlated with diaphragmatic motion. In the case of Patient 2, (left upper-lobe lesion, ~60 mm diameter), tumor motion was poorly correlated with diaphragmatic motion. Furthermore, the motion of the tumor centroid was poorly correlated with the motion of individual points on the tumor boundary, indicating significant rotation and/or deformation. These studies indicate that image quality and acquisition speed of cine-2D MRI were adequate for motion monitoring. However, significant improvements are required to achieve comparable speeds for truly 4D MRI. Despite several challenges, rapid MRI offers a feasible and attractive tool for noninvasive, long-term motion monitoring.

  19. Reduced aliasing artifacts using shaking projection k-space sampling trajectory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan-Chun; Du, Jiang; Yang, Wen-Chao; Duan, Chai-Jie; Wang, Hao-Yu; Gao, Song; Bao, Shang-Lian

    2014-03-01

    Radial imaging techniques, such as projection-reconstruction (PR), are used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for dynamic imaging, angiography, and short-T2 imaging. They are less sensitive to flow and motion artifacts, and support fast imaging with short echo times. However, aliasing and streaking artifacts are two main sources which degrade radial imaging quality. For a given fixed number of k-space projections, data distributions along radial and angular directions will influence the level of aliasing and streaking artifacts. Conventional radial k-space sampling trajectory introduces an aliasing artifact at the first principal ring of point spread function (PSF). In this paper, a shaking projection (SP) k-space sampling trajectory was proposed to reduce aliasing artifacts in MR images. SP sampling trajectory shifts the projection alternately along the k-space center, which separates k-space data in the azimuthal direction. Simulations based on conventional and SP sampling trajectories were compared with the same number projections. A significant reduction of aliasing artifacts was observed using the SP sampling trajectory. These two trajectories were also compared with different sampling frequencies. A SP trajectory has the same aliasing character when using half sampling frequency (or half data) for reconstruction. SNR comparisons with different white noise levels show that these two trajectories have the same SNR character. In conclusion, the SP trajectory can reduce the aliasing artifact without decreasing SNR and also provide a way for undersampling reconstruction. Furthermore, this method can be applied to three-dimensional (3D) hybrid or spherical radial k-space sampling for a more efficient reduction of aliasing artifacts.

  20. Reduced aliasing artifacts using shaking projection k-space sampling trajectory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yan-Chun; Yang Wen-Chao; Wang Hao-Yu; Gao Song; Bao Shang-Lian; Du Jiang; Duan Chai-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Radial imaging techniques, such as projection-reconstruction (PR), are used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for dynamic imaging, angiography, and short-T2 imaging. They are less sensitive to flow and motion artifacts, and support fast imaging with short echo times. However, aliasing and streaking artifacts are two main sources which degrade radial imaging quality. For a given fixed number of k-space projections, data distributions along radial and angular directions will influence the level of aliasing and streaking artifacts. Conventional radial k-space sampling trajectory introduces an aliasing artifact at the first principal ring of point spread function (PSF). In this paper, a shaking projection (SP) k-space sampling trajectory was proposed to reduce aliasing artifacts in MR images. SP sampling trajectory shifts the projection alternately along the k-space center, which separates k-space data in the azimuthal direction. Simulations based on conventional and SP sampling trajectories were compared with the same number projections. A significant reduction of aliasing artifacts was observed using the SP sampling trajectory. These two trajectories were also compared with different sampling frequencies. A SP trajectory has the same aliasing character when using half sampling frequency (or half data) for reconstruction. SNR comparisons with different white noise levels show that these two trajectories have the same SNR character. In conclusion, the SP trajectory can reduce the aliasing artifact without decreasing SNR and also provide a way for undersampling reconstruction. Furthermore, this method can be applied to three-dimensional (3D) hybrid or spherical radial k-space sampling for a more efficient reduction of aliasing artifacts

  1. Iterative Covariance-Based Removal of Time-Synchronous Artifacts: Application to Gastrointestinal Electrical Recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Jonathan C; Putney, Joy; Hilbert, Douglas; Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Cheng, Leo K; O'Grady, Greg; Angeli, Timothy R

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, validate, and apply a fully automated method for reducing large temporally synchronous artifacts present in electrical recordings made from the gastrointestinal (GI) serosa, which are problematic for properly assessing slow wave dynamics. Such artifacts routinely arise in experimental and clinical settings from motion, switching behavior of medical instruments, or electrode array manipulation. A novel iterative Covariance-Based Reduction of Artifacts (COBRA) algorithm sequentially reduced artifact waveforms using an updating across-channel median as a noise template, scaled and subtracted from each channel based on their covariance. Application of COBRA substantially increased the signal-to-artifact ratio (12.8 ± 2.5 dB), while minimally attenuating the energy of the underlying source signal by 7.9% on average ( -11.1 ± 3.9 dB). COBRA was shown to be highly effective for aiding recovery and accurate marking of slow wave events (sensitivity = 0.90 ± 0.04; positive-predictive value = 0.74 ± 0.08) from large segments of in vivo porcine GI electrical mapping data that would otherwise be lost due to a broad range of contaminating artifact waveforms. Strongly reducing artifacts with COBRA ultimately allowed for rapid production of accurate isochronal activation maps detailing the dynamics of slow wave propagation in the porcine intestine. Such mapping studies can help characterize differences between normal and dysrhythmic events, which have been associated with GI abnormalities, such as intestinal ischemia and gastroparesis. The COBRA method may be generally applicable for removing temporally synchronous artifacts in other biosignal processing domains.

  2. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia as a part of Nance-Horan syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun, Molka; Brady, Paul; De Catte, Luc; Deprest, Jan; Devriendt, Koenraad; Vermeesch, Joris Robert

    2018-03-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome is a rare X-linked developmental disorder characterized by bilateral congenital cataract, dental anomalies, facial dysmorphism, and intellectual disability. Here, we identify a patient with Nance-Horan syndrome caused by a new nonsense NHS variant. In addition, the patient presented congenital diaphragmatic hernia. NHS gene expression in murine fetal diaphragm was demonstrated, suggesting a possible involvement of NHS in diaphragm development. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia could result from NHS loss of function in pleuroperitoneal fold or in somites-derived muscle progenitor cells leading to an impairment of their cells migration.

  3. Management of Postoperative Pulmonary Hypertension by Inhaled Nitric Oxide in a Newborn with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fettah, N. D.; Dilli, D.; Beken, S.; Zenciroglu, A.; Okumus, N.; Cavusoglu, H.; Ozgur, S.

    2014-01-01

    Postero-lateral congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a life threatening anomaly characterized by diaphragmatic defect and intrathoracic herniation of abdominal viscera. In patients with CDH, the lungs are hypoplastic and persistent pulmonary hypertension develops in most cases. Although, inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) results in a reduction in pulmonary hypertension with improvement in oxygenation, its benefit in the patients with CDH remains controversial. In this report, the authors present successful management of postoperative pulmonary hypertension by iNO in a newborn with CDH. (author)

  4. Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis after cardiac surgery: ventilatory assistance by nasal mask continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, B; Zschocke, A; Barth, H; Leonhardt, A

    2001-01-01

    The case of an 8-month-old boy with bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis after surgical reoperation for congenital heart disease is presented. In order to avoid repeated intubation and long-term mechanical ventilation or tracheotomy, we used nasal mask continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) as an alternative method for assisted ventilation. Within 24 hours the boy accepted the nasal mask and symptoms such as dyspnea and sweating disappeared. Respiratory movements became regular and oxygen saturation increased. Nasal mask CPAP may serve as an alternative treatment of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis in infants, thereby avoiding tracheotomy or long-term mechanical ventilation.

  5. Radiographic diagnosis of diaphragmatic hernia: review of 60 cases in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Changbaig

    2004-06-01

    Sixty cases of diaphragmatic hernia in dogs and cats were radiologically reviewed and categorized by their characteristic radiographic signs. Any particular predilection for age, sex, or breed was not observed. Liver, stomach and small intestine were more commonly herniated. At least two radiographs, at different angles, were required for a valid diagnosis, because some radiographic signs were not visible in a single radiographic view and more clearly detectable in two radiographic views. In addition to previously reported radiographic signs for diaphragmatic hernia, we found that the location of the stomach axis and the displacement of tracheal and bronchial segments were also useful radiographic signs.

  6. Ripple artifact reduction using slice overlap in slice encoding for metal artifact correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Harder, J Chiel; van Yperen, Gert H; Blume, Ulrike A; Bos, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    Multispectral imaging (MSI) significantly reduces metal artifacts. Yet, especially in techniques that use gradient selection, such as slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC), a residual ripple artifact may be prominent. Here, an analysis is presented of the ripple artifact and of slice overlap as an approach to reduce the artifact. The ripple artifact was analyzed theoretically to clarify its cause. Slice overlap, conceptually similar to spectral bin overlap in multi-acquisition with variable resonances image combination (MAVRIC), was achieved by reducing the selection gradient and, thus, increasing the slice profile width. Time domain simulations and phantom experiments were performed to validate the analyses and proposed solution. Discontinuities between slices are aggravated by signal displacement in the frequency encoding direction in areas with deviating B0. Specifically, it was demonstrated that ripple artifacts appear only where B0 varies both in-plane and through-plane. Simulations and phantom studies of metal implants confirmed the efficacy of slice overlap to reduce the artifact. The ripple artifact is an important limitation of gradient selection based MSI techniques, and can be understood using the presented simulations. At a scan-time penalty, slice overlap effectively addressed the artifact, thereby improving image quality near metal implants. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Sepsis risk factors in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Michaël; Le Sache, Nolwenn; Mokhtari, Mostafa; Fagherazzi, Guy; Cuzon, Gaelle; Bueno, Benjamin; Fouquet, Virginie; Benachi, Alexandra; Eleni Dit Trolli, Sergio; Tissieres, Pierre

    2017-12-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a rare congenital anomaly and remains among the most challenging ICU-managed disease. Beside severe pulmonary hypertension, lung hypoplasia and major abdominal surgery, infective complications remain major determinants of outcome. However, the specific incidence of sepsis as well as associated risk factors is unknown. This prospective, 4-year observational study took place in the pediatric intensive care and neonatal medicine department of the Paris South University Hospitals (Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France), CDH national referral center and involved 62 neonates with CDH. During their ICU stay, 28 patients (45%) developed 38 sepsis episodes. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP: 23/38; 31.9 VAP per 1000 days of mechanical ventilation) and central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSI: 5/38; 5.5 per 1000 line days) were the most frequently encountered infections. Multivariate analysis showed that gestational age at birth and intra-thoracic position of liver were significantly associated with the occurrence of sepsis. Infected patients had longer duration of mechanical and noninvasive ventilation (16.2 and 5.8 days, respectively), longer delay to first feeding (1.2 days) and a longer length of stay in ICU (23 days), but there was no difference in mortality. Healthcare-associated infections, and more specifically VAP, are the main infective threat in children with CDH. Sepsis has a significant impact on the duration of ventilator support and ICU length of stay but does not impact mortality. Low gestational age and intra-thoracic localization of the liver are two independent risk factors associated with sepsis.

  8. Collateral sources of costal and crural diaphragmatic blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockhat, D.; Magder, S.; Roussos, C.

    1985-01-01

    We measured the contribution of aortic, internal mammary, and intercostal arteries to the blood flow to the costal and crural segments of the diaphragm and other respiratory muscles in seven dogs breathing against a fixed inspiratory elastic load. We used radiolabeled microspheres to measure the blood flow with control circulation, occlusion of the aorta distal to the left subclavian artery, combined occlusion of the aorta and both internal mammary arteries, and occlusion of internal mammary arteries alone. With occlusion of the aorta distal to the left subclavian artery, blood flow to the crural diaphragm decreased from 40.3 to 23.5 ml . min-1 X 100 g-1, whereas costal flow did not change significantly (from 41.7 to 38.1 ml . min-1 . 100 g-1). Blood flows to the sternomastoid and scalene muscles (above the occlusion) increased by 200 and 340%, respectively, whereas flows to the other respiratory muscles did not change significantly. Blood flows to organs above the occlusion either remained unchanged or increased, whereas flows to those below the occlusion all decreased. When the internal mammary artery was also occluded, flows to the crural segment decreased further to 12.1 and costal flow decreased to 20.4 ml X min-1 X 100 g-1. Internal mammary arterial occlusion alone in two dogs had no effect on diaphragmatic flow. In conclusion, intercostal collateral vessels are capable of supplying a significant proportion of blood flow to both segments of the diaphragm but the costal segment is better served than the crural segment

  9. Motion of the esophagus due to cardiac motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Palmer

    Full Text Available When imaging studies (e.g. CT are used to quantify morphological changes in an anatomical structure, it is necessary to understand the extent and source of motion which can give imaging artifacts (e.g. blurring or local distortion. The objective of this study was to assess the magnitude of esophageal motion due to cardiac motion. We used retrospective electrocardiogram-gated contrast-enhanced computed tomography angiography images for this study. The anatomic region from the carina to the bottom of the heart was taken at deep-inspiration breath hold with the patients' arms raised above their shoulders, in a position similar to that used for radiation therapy. The esophagus was delineated on the diastolic phase of cardiac motion, and deformable registration was used to sequentially deform the images in nearest-neighbor phases among the 10 cardiac phases, starting from the diastolic phase. Using the 10 deformation fields generated from the deformable registration, the magnitude of the extreme displacements was then calculated for each voxel, and the mean and maximum displacement was calculated for each computed tomography slice for each patient. The average maximum esophageal displacement due to cardiac motion for all patients was 5.8 mm (standard deviation: 1.6 mm, maximum: 10.0 mm in the transverse direction. For 21 of 26 patients, the largest esophageal motion was found in the inferior region of the heart; for the other patients, esophageal motion was approximately independent of superior-inferior position. The esophagus motion was larger at cardiac phases where the electrocardiogram R-wave occurs. In conclusion, the magnitude of esophageal motion near the heart due to cardiac motion is similar to that due to other sources of motion, including respiratory motion and intra-fraction motion. A larger cardiac motion will result into larger esophagus motion in a cardiac cycle.

  10. Evaluating an artifact in design science research

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Herselman, M

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the iterative evaluation of an artifact developed through the application of Design Science Research (DSR) methodology in a resource constrained environment. In the DSR process the aspect of evaluation is often done...

  11. Natural history of extensive diaphragmatic injury on the right side: experimental study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Henrique Rivaben

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the natural healing of the rat diaphragm that suffered an extensive right penetrating injury.METHODS: Animals were submitted to an extensive penetrating injury in right diaphragm. The sample consisted of 40 animals. The variables studied were initial weight, weight 21 days after surgery; healing of the diaphragm, non-healing of the diaphragm, and herniated abdominal contents into the chest.RESULTS: Ten animals were used as controls for weight and 30 animals were operated. Two animals died during the experiment, so 28 animals formed the operated group; healing of the diaphragm occurred in 15 animals (54%, 11 other animals showed diaphragmatic hernia (39% and in two we observed only diaphragmatic injury without hernia (7%. Among the herniated organs, the liver was found in 100% of animals, followed by the omentum in 77%, small bowel in 62%, colon in 46%, stomach in 31% and spleen in 15%. The control group and the diaphragmatic healing subgroup showed increased weight since the beginning of the study and the 21 days after surgery (p <0.001. The unhealed group showed no change in weight (p = 0.228.CONCLUSION: there is a predominance of spontaneous healing in the right diaphragm; animals in which there was no healing of the diaphragm did not gain weight, and the liver was the organ present in 100% the diaphragmatic surface in all rats with healed diaphragm or not.

  12. Crura sign: differentiation between traumatic rupture of the diaphragm and nontraumatic diaphragmatic elevation on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Jin; Han, Hae Ja; Kim, Wang Jung; Youk, Yong Soo; Han, Gi Seok; Cha, Sang Hoon; Park, Kil Sun; Kim, Dae Young

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate whether in patients with diffuse evaluation of a hemidiaphragm on chest radiographs, the apparence of the crura on CT might be helpful in differentiating between traumatic rupture of the diaphragm (TRD) and nontraumatic causes such as diaphragmatic palsy or diffuse diaphragmatic eventration. Among patients with diffuse elevations of a hemidiaphragm on chest radiograph, 27 who had patients undergone CT scans were retrospectively reviewed. Twelve patients had surgically proven TRD, and 15 had nontraumatic elevation of a hemidiaphragm such as diaphragmatic palsy or diffuse diaphragmatic eventration. Under the hypothesis that the affected crus is markedly thinner than the normal side in nontraumatic elevation but is normal in TRD ('crura sign', we optically assessed without measurement the thickness of both crura. In all patients with TRD, the thickness of the affected crus was similar to that of the contralateral side. In all patients with nontraumatic causes, however, the crus of the elevated hemidiaphragm was markedly thinner than that of the normal side. The 'crura sign' may be useful additional CT finding of traumatic rupture the diaphragm

  13. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia: Long-term Risk of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peetsold, Marieke G.; Kneepkens, C. M. F. Frank; Heij, Hugo A.; Ijsselstijn, Hanneke; Tibboel, Dick; Gemke, Reinoud J. B. J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a well-recognized consequence of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Results of studies examining predictive factors for early and late GERD are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of early ( <2 years) and late GERD

  14. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia: Long-term Risk of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peetsold, M.G.; Kneepkens, C.M.F.; Heij, H.A.; IJsselstijn, H.; Tibboel, D.; Gemke, R.J.B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a well-recognized consequence of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Results of studies examining predictive factors for early and lateGERDare inconclusive. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of early (<2 years) and late GERD

  15. Blunt bilateral diaphragmatic rupture—A right side can be easily missed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Michailidou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Blunt diaphragmatic rupture (BDR is uncommon with a reported incidence range of 1%–2%. The true incidence is not known. Bilateral BDR is particularly rare. We presented a case of bilateral BDR and we think that the incidence is under-recognised thanks to an easily missed and difficult to diagnose right sided injury. Keywords: Blunt, Diaphragm, Bilateral, Injury

  16. Clinical, echocardiographic, and radiographic findings of peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia in two dogs and a cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, W.H.; Woodfield, J.A.; Moon, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia was diagnosed in 2 dogs and a cat. One dog was referred because of clinical signs of cardiac tamponade and acute decompensation from liver entrapment within the hernia. Surgical correction of the hernia alleviated clinical signs in all 3 animals. Echocardiography was used in combination with radiography to provide a rapid and accurate diagnosis

  17. Diaphragmatic pacing stimulation in spinal cord injury: anesthetic and perioperative management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel L. Tedde

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The standard therapy for patients with high-level spinal cord injury is long-term mechanical ventilation through a tracheostomy. However, in some cases, this approach results in death or disability. The aim of this study is to highlight the anesthetics and perioperative aspects of patients undergoing insertion of a diaphragmatic pacemaker. METHODS: Five patients with quadriplegia following high cervical traumatic spinal cord injury and ventilator-dependent chronic respiratory failure were implanted with a laparoscopic diaphragmatic pacemaker after preoperative assessments of their phrenic nerve function and diaphragm contractility through transcutaneous nerve stimulation. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01385384. RESULTS: The diaphragmatic pacemaker placement was successful in all of the patients. Two patients presented with capnothorax during the perioperative period, which resolved without consequences. After six months, three patients achieved continuous use of the diaphragm pacing system, and one patient could be removed from mechanical ventilation for more than 4 hours per day. CONCLUSIONS: The implantation of a diaphragmatic phrenic system is a new and safe technique with potential to improve the quality of life of patients who are dependent on mechanical ventilation because of spinal cord injuries. Appropriate indication and adequate perioperative care are fundamental to achieving better results.

  18. Hepatic fibrosarcoma incarcerated in a peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia in a cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Linton

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 14-year-old, female neutered domestic shorthair presented for dyspnoea. Thoracic ultrasonography and radiography showed that a heterogeneous mass was present within the pericardial sac, and the mass continued caudally with the mesenteric fat. On CT, the outline of the diaphragm was not continuous and there was an obvious defect with diaphragmatic thickening present at the mid-level of the liver. A pleural effusion and a small-volume pericardial effusion were also present. A ventral midline coeliotomy and median sternotomy revealed a 5 × 6 × 7 cm firm, irregular, tan-coloured soft tissue mass within the pericardial sac attached to both the diaphragmatic defect and liver. The mass was carefully dissected away from the heart and the diaphragmatic defect was repaired with primary closure. Postoperatively, the cat had a persistent pneumothorax that required continuous pleural suction for 41 h. The cat died 44 h postoperatively. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry confirmed the mass to be a hepatic fibrosarcoma incarcerated in a peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia (PPDH. Relevance and novel information This is the first reported case of metaplastic transformation of liver into a sarcoma in a cat with PPDH. In addition, hepatic fibrosarcoma is a rarely reported location for fibrosarcoma in this species.

  19. Inhalation of nitric oxide as a treatment of pulmonary hypertension in congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, Steen Winther; Jepsen, S; Andersen, P K

    1995-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) still has a mortality risk of around 40%. The concomitant pulmonary hypoplasia and the persistent pulmonary hypertension are of major prognostic importance. The use of a selective pulmonary vasodilator may revert this vicious circle that is fatal to many...

  20. A rare case of diaphragmatic paralysis due to isolated phrenic nerve ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-11-04

    Nov 4, 2008 ... Isolated phrenic nerve palsy is a rare condition resulting from birth injury, with many possible complications such as diaphragmatic paralysis, pulmonary infection, chronic lung disease, growth failure and even death.1-3 I report a case of neonatal isolated phrenic nerve palsy in an infant delivered.

  1. Radionuclide scintigraphy in detection of gastroesophageal reflux in survivors of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, E.J.; Bharathi Dasan, J.; Patel, C.D.; Bal, C.S.; Malhotra, A.; Kumar, R.; Mitra, D.K.; Agarwala, S.; Padhy, A.K.

    2003-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal Reflux is a common cause of long-term morbidity in survivors of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. The present retrospective analysis was undertaken to find out the incidence of GER in survivors of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). A total of 26 survivors of congenital diaphragmatic hernia with a mean age of 19 months were studied. Of these, only 7 had clinical symptoms suggestive of GER such as recurrent respiratory tract infection, vomiting, regurgitation, and epigastric pain. The remaining 19 were asymptomatic and had radionuclide scintigraphy for detection of GER as a part of routine follow-up. All the 26 underwent radionuclide scintigraphy with 100-200 μCi (3.7 -7.4MBq) of Tc99m-Sulphur Colloid. GER was detected in 11 out of 26 patients (4 out of 7 symptomatic patients and 7 out of 19 asymptomatic patients). We concluded that there is high incidence of GER in survivors of congenital diaphragmatic hernia and these patients should be followed up for GER regularly. Scintiscanning being a simple, noninvasive test, may be used for initial evaluation and follow-up of survivors of CDH for GER. (author)

  2. Left-Sided Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia with Multiple Congenital Cardiac Anomalies, Hernia Sac, and Microscopic Hepatic Heterotopia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Arafah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a common congenital anomaly of uncertain etiology. Its association with multiple congenital anomalies in various organs is well recognized and antenatal radiological evidence of congenital diaphragmatic hernia warrants thorough evaluation to detect other anomalies, some of which can be life threatening. Rarely, heterotopic hepatic tissue is identified in the hernia, a rare pathological finding, exhibiting more than one macroscopic and microscopic characteristics, and always associated with cardiac congenital anomalies. Herein, we report a case of left-sided microscopic heterotopic hepatic tissue in a congenital diaphragmatic hernia in an infant with multiple cardiac congenital anomalies, but with preserved pericardium.

  3. An analysis of respiratory induced kidney motion on four-dimensional computed tomography and its implications for stereotactic kidney radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siva, Shankar; Pham, Daniel; Gill, Suki; Bressel, Mathias; Dang, Kim; Devereux, Thomas; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is an emerging treatment modality for primary renal cell carcinoma. To account for respiratory-induced target motion, an internal target volume (ITV) concept is often used in treatment planning of SABR. The purpose of this study is to assess patterns of kidney motion and investigate potential surrogates of kidney displacement with the view of ITV verification during treatment. Datasets from 71 consecutive patients with free breathing four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) planning scans were included in this study. The displacement of the left and right hemi-diaphragm, liver dome and abdominal wall were measured and tested for correlation with the displacement of the both kidneys and patient breathing frequency. Nine patients were excluded due to severe banding artifact. Of 62 evaluable patients, the median age was 68 years, with 41 male patients and 21 female patients. The mean (range) of the maximum, minimum and average breathing frequency throughout the 4DCTs were 20.1 (11–38), 15.1 (9–24) and 17.3 (9–27.5) breaths per minute, respectively. The mean (interquartile range) displacement of the left and right kidneys was 0.74 cm (0.45-0.98 cm) and 0.75 cm (0.49-0.97) respectively. The amplitude of liver-dome motion was correlated with right kidney displacement (r=0.52, p<0.001), but not with left kidney displacement (p=0.796). There was a statistically significant correlation between the magnitude of right kidney displacement and that of abdominal displacement (r=0.36, p=0.004), but not the left kidney (r=0.24, p=0.056). Hemi-diaphragm displacements were correlated with kidney displacements respectively, with a weaker correlation for the left kidney/left diaphragm (r=0.45, [95% CI 0.22 to 0.63], p=<0.001) than for the right kidney/right diaphragm (r=0.57, [95% CI 0.37 to 0.72], p=<0.001). For the majority of patients, maximal left and right kidney displacement is subcentimeter in magnitude. The magnitude of

  4. Sphingolipids in Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia; Results from an International Multicenter Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitty G Snoek

    Full Text Available Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a severe congenital anomaly with significant mortality and morbidity, for instance chronic lung disease. Sphingolipids have shown to be involved in lung injury, but their role in the pathophysiology of chronic lung disease has not been explored. We hypothesized that sphingolipid profiles in tracheal aspirates could play a role in predicting the mortality/ development of chronic lung disease in congenital diaphragmatic hernia patients. Furthermore, we hypothesized that sphingolipid profiles differ between ventilation modes; conventional mechanical ventilation versus high-frequency oscillation.Sphingolipid levels in tracheal aspirates were determined at days 1, 3, 7 and 14 in 72 neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia, born after > 34 weeks gestation at four high-volume congenital diaphragmatic hernia centers. Data were collected within a multicenter trial of initial ventilation strategy (NTR 1310.36 patients (50.0% died or developed chronic lung disease, 34 patients (47.2% by stratification were initially ventilated by conventional mechanical ventilation and 38 patients (52.8% by high-frequency oscillation. Multivariable logistic regression analysis with correction for side of the defect, liver position and observed-to-expected lung-to-head ratio, showed that none of the changes in sphingolipid levels were significantly associated with mortality /development of chronic lung disease. At day 14, long-chain ceramides 18:1 and 24:0 were significantly elevated in patients initially ventilated by conventional mechanical ventilation compared to high-frequency oscillation.We could not detect significant differences in temporal sphingolipid levels in congenital diaphragmatic hernia infants with mortality/development of chronic lung disease versus survivors without development of CLD. Elevated levels of ceramides 18:1 and 24:0 in the conventional mechanical ventilation group when compared to high

  5. Blind retrospective motion correction of MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loktyushin, Alexander; Nickisch, Hannes; Pohmann, Rolf; Schölkopf, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    Subject motion can severely degrade MR images. A retrospective motion correction algorithm, Gradient-based motion correction, which significantly reduces ghosting and blurring artifacts due to subject motion was proposed. The technique uses the raw data of standard imaging sequences; no sequence modifications or additional equipment such as tracking devices are required. Rigid motion is assumed. The approach iteratively searches for the motion trajectory yielding the sharpest image as measured by the entropy of spatial gradients. The vast space of motion parameters is efficiently explored by gradient-based optimization with a convergence guarantee. The method has been evaluated on both synthetic and real data in two and three dimensions using standard imaging techniques. MR images are consistently improved over different kinds of motion trajectories. Using a graphics processing unit implementation, computation times are in the order of a few minutes for a full three-dimensional volume. The presented technique can be an alternative or a complement to prospective motion correction methods and is able to improve images with strong motion artifacts from standard imaging sequences without requiring additional data. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  6. Capillary Electrophoresis Artifact Due to Eosin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kathleen M.; Berg, Karin D.; Geiger, Tanya; Hafez, Michael; Flickinger, Katie A.; Cooper, Lisa; Pearson, Patrick; Eshleman, James R.

    2005-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a commonly used tool in the analysis of fluorescently labeled PCR amplification products. We have identified a CE artifact caused by the tissue stain eosin that can complicate the interpretation of CE data. The artifact was detected during routine analysis of a DNA sample isolated from a formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sample considered histologically suspicious for a B-cell neoplasm. A standard clinical PCR and CE assay for immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene rearrangement revealed a weak polyclonal population of rearranged IGH genes and a 71 base peak suspicious for IGH clonality. The spectral properties of the 71 base peak were unusual in that although the dominant fluorescence of the peak was blue, it also fluoresced in green and yellow (blue>green>yellow), raising the suspicion that the peak might represent an artifact. CE analysis of the genomic DNA sample without PCR amplification demonstrated the presence of the 71 base peak, suggesting that the artifact was caused by a contaminant within the DNA sample itself. We demonstrate that eosin, which was used to stain the formalin-fixed tissue during processing, yields a discrete 71 base peak of similar morphology to the contaminant peak on CE analysis. The data suggest that eosin in the fixed tissue was not completely eliminated during nucleic acid extraction, resulting in the artifact peak. We discuss the implications of this potentially common contaminant on the interpretation of CE data and demonstrate that artifacts caused by eosin can be avoided by using more stringent DNA purification steps. Histological dyes may fluoresce, and artifacts from them should be considered when primary peaks contain additional underlying peaks of other colors. PMID:15681487

  7. Quantification of Artifact Reduction With Real-Time Cine Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Acquisition Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langner, Ulrich W.; Keall, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the magnitude and frequency of artifacts in simulated four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) images using three real-time acquisition methods- direction-dependent displacement acquisition, simultaneous displacement and phase acquisition, and simultaneous displacement and velocity acquisition- and to compare these methods with commonly used retrospective phase sorting. Methods and Materials: Image acquisition for the four 4D CT methods was simulated with different displacement and velocity tolerances for spheres with radii of 0.5 cm, 1.5 cm, and 2.5 cm, using 58 patient-measured tumors and respiratory motion traces. The magnitude and frequency of artifacts, CT doses, and acquisition times were computed for each method. Results: The mean artifact magnitude was 50% smaller for the three real-time methods than for retrospective phase sorting. The dose was ∼50% lower, but the acquisition time was 20% to 100% longer for the real-time methods than for retrospective phase sorting. Conclusions: Real-time acquisition methods can reduce the frequency and magnitude of artifacts in 4D CT images, as well as the imaging dose, but they increase the image acquisition time. The results suggest that direction-dependent displacement acquisition is the preferred real-time 4D CT acquisition method, because on average, the lowest dose is delivered to the patient and the acquisition time is the shortest for the resulting number and magnitude of artifacts.

  8. Pitfalls and artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, M.V.; Patton, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    As a new imaging technique, MRI is subject to new and unfamiliar artifacts. Because of the wide range of pulse sequences used in MRI, the technique is prone to some artifacts, such as even echo rephasing, which are not found in other imaging systems. With newer and stronger magnetic fields, artifacts such as those caused by chemical shift will be more pronounced. For the maintenance of high quality images, new techniques controlling quality are essential. These techniques include the development of new phantoms and new procedures. The American Association of Physicists in Medicine is currently developing guidelines for quality assurance programs. As with other imaging modalities, these quality assurance guidelines could be unique to MRI. The daily or weekly evaluation of signal-to-noise ratio, image uniformity, signal linearity, spatial linearity, spatial resolution, frequencies, etc. is essential. Some guidelines are described in the current literature. With further modifications and improvements in MRI techniques, new artifacts may be discovered. Identification of these artifacts will improve the interpretation of the image and patient management

  9. Artifacts Quantification of Metal Implants in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrachnis, I. N.; Vlachopoulos, G. F.; Maris, T. G.; Costaridou, L. I.

    2017-11-01

    The presence of materials with different magnetic properties, such as metal implants, causes distortion of the magnetic field locally, resulting in signal voids and pile ups, i.e. susceptibility artifacts in MRI. Quantitative and unbiased measurement of the artifact is prerequisite for optimization of acquisition parameters. In this study an image gradient based segmentation method is proposed for susceptibility artifact quantification. The method captures abrupt signal alterations by calculation of the image gradient. Then the artifact is quantified in terms of its extent by an automated cross entropy thresholding method as image area percentage. The proposed method for artifact quantification was tested in phantoms containing two orthopedic implants with significantly different magnetic permeabilities. The method was compared against a method proposed in the literature, considered as a reference, demonstrating moderate to good correlation (Spearman’s rho = 0.62 and 0.802 in case of titanium and stainless steel implants). The automated character of the proposed quantification method seems promising towards MRI acquisition parameter optimization.

  10. Metallic artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Eiji; Okuyama, Koichiro; Ishikawa, Noriyuki; Hongo, Michio; Sato, Kozo; Sashi, Ryuji; Ishikawa, Eijiro.

    1995-01-01

    Seven metallic implants with different content of magnetic materials were compared in terms of the degree of MRI artifact. The degree of artifact well correlated with the total content of iron and cobalt than the total content of ferromagnets (iron, cobalt, nickel). No significant difference was observed regarding artifact among 4 titanium alloys containing very small amount of ferromagnet (0.058%-2.5%). Pedicle screws were made from different alloys in the same shape. Those screws were inserted into the swine vertebrae and artifact was evaluated by MRI. The degree of artifact was SUS316 (stainless steel)>MP-35N (cobalt alloy)>Ti-6AI-4V (titanium alloy), 1.5 Tesla>0.5 Tesla as for magnetic intensity, and T2 (gradient echo)>T2 (long SE)>proton density>T1 as for exposure condition. The condition of the site screw was inserted in the vertebral canal was detectable by T1-weighted images of titanium alloy and cobalt alloy in 0.5 Tesla and T1-weighted images of titanium alloy in 1.5 Tesla. (S.Y)

  11. Spatial and temporal expression of glucocorticoid, retinoid, and thyroid hormone receptors is not altered in lungs of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajatapiti, Prapapan; Keijzer, Richard; Blommaart, Pietjan E.; Lamers, Wouter H.; de Krijger, Ronald R.; Visser, Theo J.; Tibboel, Dick; Rottier, Robbert

    2006-01-01

    The degree of associated pulmonary hypoplasia and persistent pulmonary hypertension are major determination factors for survival in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) patients. Glucocorticoids, thyroid hormone, and vitamin A have been shown to be involved in human lung development. To determine

  12. Markerless motion estimation for motion-compensated clinical brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyme, Andre Z.; Se, Stephen; Meikle, Steven R.; Fulton, Roger R.

    2018-05-01

    Motion-compensated brain imaging can dramatically reduce the artifacts and quantitative degradation associated with voluntary and involuntary subject head motion during positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and computed tomography (CT). However, motion-compensated imaging protocols are not in widespread clinical use for these modalities. A key reason for this seems to be the lack of a practical motion tracking technology that allows for smooth and reliable integration of motion-compensated imaging protocols in the clinical setting. We seek to address this problem by investigating the feasibility of a highly versatile optical motion tracking method for PET, SPECT and CT geometries. The method requires no attached markers, relying exclusively on the detection and matching of distinctive facial features. We studied the accuracy of this method in 16 volunteers in a mock imaging scenario by comparing the estimated motion with an accurate marker-based method used in applications such as image guided surgery. A range of techniques to optimize performance of the method were also studied. Our results show that the markerless motion tracking method is highly accurate (brain imaging and holds good promise for a practical implementation in clinical PET, SPECT and CT systems.

  13. Correlation-based motion vector processing with adaptive interpolation scheme for motion-compensated frame interpolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ai-Mei; Nguyen, Truong

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we address the problems of unreliable motion vectors that cause visual artifacts but cannot be detected by high residual energy or bidirectional prediction difference in motion-compensated frame interpolation. A correlation-based motion vector processing method is proposed to detect and correct those unreliable motion vectors by explicitly considering motion vector correlation in the motion vector reliability classification, motion vector correction, and frame interpolation stages. Since our method gradually corrects unreliable motion vectors based on their reliability, we can effectively discover the areas where no motion is reliable to be used, such as occlusions and deformed structures. We also propose an adaptive frame interpolation scheme for the occlusion areas based on the analysis of their surrounding motion distribution. As a result, the interpolated frames using the proposed scheme have clearer structure edges and ghost artifacts are also greatly reduced. Experimental results show that our interpolated results have better visual quality than other methods. In addition, the proposed scheme is robust even for those video sequences that contain multiple and fast motions.

  14. Human movement analysis using stereophotogrammetry. Part 3. Soft tissue artifact assessment and compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leardini, Alberto; Chiari, Lorenzo; Della Croce, Ugo; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2005-02-01

    When using optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry, skin deformation and displacement causes marker movement with respect to the underlying bone. This movement represents an artifact, which affects the estimation of the skeletal system kinematics, and is regarded as the most critical source of error in human movement analysis. A comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art for assessment, minimization and compensation of the soft tissue artifact (STA) is provided. It has been shown that STA is greater than the instrumental error associated with stereophotogrammetry, has a frequency content similar to the actual bone movement, is task dependent and not reproducible among subjects and, of lower limb segments, is greatest at the thigh. It has been shown that in in vivo experiments only motion about the flexion/extension axis of the hip, knees and ankles can be determined reliably. Motion about other axes at those joints should be regarded with much more caution as this artifact produces spurious effects with magnitudes comparable to the amount of motion actually occurring in those joints. Techniques designed to minimize the contribution of and compensate for the effects of this artifact can be divided up into those which model the skin surface and those which include joint motion constraints. Despite the numerous solutions proposed, the objective of reliable estimation of 3D skeletal system kinematics using skin markers has not yet been satisfactorily achieved and greatly limits the contribution of human movement analysis to clinical practice and biomechanical research. For STA to be compensated for effectively, it is here suggested that either its subject-specific pattern is assessed by ad hoc exercises or it is characterized from a large series of measurements on different subject populations. Alternatively, inclusion of joint constraints into a more general STA minimization approach may provide an acceptable solution.

  15. Superluminal motion (review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malykin, G. B.; Romanets, E. A.

    2012-06-01

    Prior to the development of Special Relativity, no restrictions were imposed on the velocity of the motion of particles and material bodies, as well as on energy transfer and signal propagation. At the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century, it was shown that a charge that moves at a velocity faster than the speed of light in an optical medium, in particular, in vacuum, gives rise to impact radiation, which later was termed the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation. Shortly after the development of Special Relativity, some researchers considered the possibility of superluminal motion. In 1923, the Soviet physicist L.Ya. Strum suggested the existence of tachyons, which, however, have not been discovered yet. Superluminal motions can occur only for images, e.g., for so-called "light spots," which were considered in 1972 by V.L. Ginzburg and B.M. Bolotovskii. These spots can move with a superluminal phase velocity but are incapable of transferring energy and information. Nevertheless, these light spots may induce quite real generation of microwave radiation in closed waveguides and create the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation in vacuum. In this work, we consider various paradoxes, illusions, and artifacts associated with superluminal motion.

  16. Delayed Presentation of Traumatic Diaphragmatic Hernia: The Evaluation of Surgical Treatment Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sadrizadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diaphragmatic hernia could be caused by congenital disorders, blunt trauma or penetrating injuries. The diagnosis of traumatic diaphragmatic hernia is normally neglected during the first presentation leading to late complications and considerably increased mortality and morbidity among the patients. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective, descriptive study, we reviewed the medical records of patients presented with traumatic diaphragmatic hernia who had undergone surgical operations between 1982-2015 in Ghaem Hospital and Omid Hospital affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The studied variables included age, gender, clinical symptoms, location of hernia, involved organs, type of imaging modalities, surgical techniques, length of hospital stay, mortality rate and surgical complications. Results: In this study, 38 patients were diagnosed with traumatic diaphragmatic hernia consisting of 28 men and 10 women. In total, 79% and 21% of the patients suffered from penetrating trauma and blunt trauma, respectively. In addition, left-sided, right-sided and bilateral hernias were present in 33%, 4% and 1% of the patients, respectively. The most frequently herniated organ was the stomach, and the most common clinical symptoms were abdominal pain (84% and dyspnea (53%. Initially, chest radiographs were performed on all the patients, and thoracotomy was performed to repair diaphragmatic tears in all the cases (100%. In this study, 3 patients had previously undergone Hartmann’s operation for gangrenous herniated colon, and devolvulation of gastric volvulus had also been performed on 3 patients. The main post-operative complications were reported to be pneumonia and respiratory insufficiency (2 cases, and the mean length of hospital stay was 6 days (5-8 days which was longer (1-2 months in patients with gangrenous bowel (3 patients. Furthermore, no mortality was reported during the course of hospitalization in these

  17. Therapeutic effects of diaphragmatic plication for acquired unilateral non-malignant diaphragm paralysis in twenty patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Bagheri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acquired paralysis of the diaphragm is a condition caused by trauma, surgical injuries, (lung cancer surgery, esophageal surgery, cardiac surgery, thoracic surgery, and is sometimes of an unknown etiology. It can lead to dyspnea and can affect ventilatory function and patients activity. Diaphragmatic plication is a treatment method which decreases inconsistent function of diaphragm. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcome of diaphragmatic plication in patients with acquired unilateral non-malignant diaphragmatic paralysis. Methods: From 1991 to 2011, 20 patients with acquired unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis who underwent surgery enrolled in our study in Ghaem Hospital Mashhad University of Medical Science. Patients were evaluated in terms of age, sex, BMI, clinical symptoms, dyspnea score (DS, etiology of paralysis, diagnostic methods, respiratory function tests and complication of surgery. Some tests including dyspnea score were carried out again six months after surgery. We evaluated patients with SPSS version 11.5 and Paired t-test or nonparametric equivalent. Results: Twenty patients enrolled in our study. 14 were male and 6 were female. The mean age was 58 years and the average time interval between diagnosis to surgical treatment was 38.3 months. Acquired diaphragmatic paralysis was mostly caused by trauma (in 11 patients and almost occurred on the left side (in 15 patients. Diagnostic methods included chest x-ray, CT scan, ultrasonography and sniff. Test prior to surgery the average FVC was 41.4±7 percent and the average FEV1 was 52.4±6 percent and after surgery they were 80.1±8.6 percent and 74.4±1 percent respectively. The average increase in FEV1 and FVC 63.4±4, 61.1±7.8. Performing surgery also leads to a noticeable improvement in dyspnea score in our study. Conclusion: In patients with acquired unilateral non-malignant diaphragm paralysis diaphragmatic plication is highly recommended due to the

  18. Five-dimensional motion compensation for respiratory and cardiac motion with cone-beam CT of the thorax region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauppe, Sebastian; Hahn, Andreas; Brehm, Marcus; Paysan, Pascal; Seghers, Dieter; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We propose an adapted method of our previously published five-dimensional (5D) motion compensation (MoCo) algorithm1, developed for micro-CT imaging of small animals, to provide for the first time motion artifact-free 5D cone-beam CT (CBCT) images from a conventional flat detector-based CBCT scan of clinical patients. Image quality of retrospectively respiratory- and cardiac-gated volumes from flat detector CBCT scans is deteriorated by severe sparse projection artifacts. These artifacts further complicate motion estimation, as it is required for MoCo image reconstruction. For high quality 5D CBCT images at the same x-ray dose and the same number of projections as todays 3D CBCT we developed a double MoCo approach based on motion vector fields (MVFs) for respiratory and cardiac motion. In a first step our already published four-dimensional (4D) artifact-specific cyclic motion-compensation (acMoCo) approach is applied to compensate for the respiratory patient motion. With this information a cyclic phase-gated deformable heart registration algorithm is applied to the respiratory motion-compensated 4D CBCT data, thus resulting in cardiac MVFs. We apply these MVFs on double-gated images and thereby respiratory and cardiac motion-compensated 5D CBCT images are obtained. Our 5D MoCo approach processing patient data acquired with the TrueBeam 4D CBCT system (Varian Medical Systems). Our double MoCo approach turned out to be very efficient and removed nearly all streak artifacts due to making use of 100% of the projection data for each reconstructed frame. The 5D MoCo patient data show fine details and no motion blurring, even in regions close to the heart where motion is fastest.

  19. Moving metal artifact reduction in cone-beam CT scans with implanted cylindrical gold markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toftegaard, Jakob; Fledelius, Walther; Worm, Esben S.; Poulsen, Per R.; Seghers, Dieter; Huber, Michael; Brehm, Marcus; Elstrøm, Ulrik V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Implanted gold markers for image-guided radiotherapy lead to streaking artifacts in cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans. Several methods for metal artifact reduction (MAR) have been published, but they all fail in scans with large motion. Here the authors propose and investigate a method for automatic moving metal artifact reduction (MMAR) in CBCT scans with cylindrical gold markers. Methods: The MMAR CBCT reconstruction method has six steps. (1) Automatic segmentation of the cylindrical markers in the CBCT projections. (2) Removal of each marker in the projections by replacing the pixels within a masked area with interpolated values. (3) Reconstruction of a marker-free CBCT volume from the manipulated CBCT projections. (4) Reconstruction of a standard CBCT volume with metal artifacts from the original CBCT projections. (5) Estimation of the three-dimensional (3D) trajectory during CBCT acquisition for each marker based on the segmentation in Step 1, and identification of the smallest ellipsoidal volume that encompasses 95% of the visited 3D positions. (6) Generation of the final MMAR CBCT reconstruction from the marker-free CBCT volume of Step 3 by replacing the voxels in the 95% ellipsoid with the corresponding voxels of the standard CBCT volume of Step 4. The MMAR reconstruction was performed retrospectively using a half-fan CBCT scan for 29 consecutive stereotactic body radiation therapy patients with 2–3 gold markers implanted in the liver. The metal artifacts of the MMAR reconstructions were scored and compared with a standard MAR reconstruction by counting the streaks and by calculating the standard deviation of the Hounsfield units in a region around each marker. Results: The markers were found with the same autosegmentation settings in 27 CBCT scans, while two scans needed slightly changed settings to find all markers automatically in Step 1 of the MMAR method. MMAR resulted in 15 scans with no streaking artifacts, 11 scans with 1–4 streaks, and 3 scans

  20. Motion tolerant iterative reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam helical CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hisashi; Goto, Taiga; Hirokawa, Koichi; Miyazaki, Osamu [Hitachi Medical Corporation, Chiba-ken (Japan). CT System Div.

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a new advanced iterative reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam helical CT. The features of this algorithm are: (a) it uses separable paraboloidal surrogate (SPS) technique as a foundation for reconstruction to reduce noise and cone-beam artifact, (b) it uses a view weight in the back-projection process to reduce motion artifact. To confirm the improvement of our proposed algorithm over other existing algorithm, such as Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) or SPS algorithm, we compared the motion artifact reduction, image noise reduction (standard deviation of CT number), and cone-beam artifact reduction on simulated and clinical data set. Our results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm dramatically reduces motion artifacts compared with the SPS algorithm, and decreases image noise compared with the FDK algorithm. In addition, the proposed algorithm potentially improves time resolution of iterative reconstruction. (orig.)

  1. [E-MTAB-587] PCR_artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muino Acuna, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    WARNING: This library was yield low amount of material and it was over-amplified by PCR. This libraries are used study the robustness of several statitical methods against PCR artifacts. ChIP experiments were performed on Arabidopsis wildtype inflorescences using an antibody raised against a

  2. Mediating Artifact in Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Bodil

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on teacher professional development (TPD) in natural science through the 5E model as mediating artifact. The study was conducted in an upper secondary school, grounded in a school-based intervention research project. My contribution to the field of research on TPD is founded on the hypothesis that teachers would be best…

  3. Cooperative learning, problem solving and mediating artifacts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF.MIREKU

    10, 2012. 39. Cooperative learning, problem solving and mediating artifacts. F. Bahmaei6 & N. ... out cooperative learning in the end, post-test was done and by analyzing the tests it was concluded that ... Johnson et al, 1991 b, Reynolds et al. 1995, Vidakovic .... connection of mental constructs (Hiebert, Carpenter, 1992).

  4. Transient mega-esophagus in a neonate with congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhoul, I.R.; Smolkin, T.; Sujov, P.; Shoshany, G.; Epelman, M.

    2001-01-01

    Esophageal dilatation (ED) in neonates is rare. In the present case, ED was detected in a chest radiograph following repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) in a term neonate. A roentgenographic swallow study on the seventh day of life demonstrated ED and a sub-diaphragmatic stomach. The infant thrived adequately on enteral feeding. A swallow study on the twentieth day of life showed a normal-width esophagus with gastroesophageal reflux and small hiatus hernia. The longstanding herniated stomach in the fetus apparently caused kinking, edema, and obstruction of the gastroesophageal junction. This led to a significant ED and concealment of gastroesophageal reflux. We aim to arouse awareness about the occurrence of ED with CDH, and about its benign course under conservative management. (orig.)

  5. [Phrenic nerve stimulation protects against mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction through myogenic regulatory factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, G H; Chen, M; Zhan, W F; Hu, B; Zhang, H X

    2018-02-12

    Objective: To explore the protective effect of electrical stimulation of phrenic nerve on diaphragmatic function during mechanical ventilation. Methods: Forty healthy adult SD rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: blank control group (BC), spontaneous breathing group (SB), electrical stimulation group (ES), mechanical ventilation group (MV), and electrical stimulation and mechanical ventilation group (MS). The rats in each group were treated for 18 h except for the BC group. After treatment, the diaphragm muscle tissue was obtained and the diaphragm contractility including peak-to-peak value(Vpp) and maximum rate of contraction(+ dT/dt max) were measured. Expression of MyoD and myogenin were detected. Results: Except for the ES and the MS groups, there was a significant difference for peak-to-peak value (Vpp) between each 2 groups ( P mechanical ventilation induced diaphragmatic function damage, and therefore plays a protective effect on the diaphragm.

  6. Effect of upper costal and costo-diaphragmatic breathing types on electromyographic activity of respiratory muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celhay, Isabel; Cordova, Rosa; Miralles, Rodolfo; Meza, Francisco; Erices, Pia; Barrientos, Camilo; Valenzuela, Saúl

    2015-04-01

    To compare electromyographic (EMG) activity in young-adult subjects with different breathing types. This study included 50 healthy male subjects with complete natural dentition, and no history of orofacial pain or craniomandibular-cervical-spinal disorders. Subjects were classified into two groups: upper costal breathing type, and costo-diaphragmatic breathing. Bipolar surface electrodes were located on sternocleidomastoid, diaphragm, external intercostal, and latissimus dorsi muscles. Electromyographic activity was recorded during the following tasks: (1) normal quiet breathing; (2) speaking the word 'Mississippi'; (3) swallowing saliva; and (4) forced deep breathing. Sternocleidomastoid and latissimus dorsi EMG activity was not significantly different between breathing types, whereas diaphragm and external intercostal EMG activity was significantly higher in the upper costal than costo-diaphragmatic breathing type in all tasks (P<0·05; Wilcoxon signed rank-sum test). Diaphragm and external intercostal EMG activity suggests that there could be differences in motor unit recruitment strategies depending on the breathing type.

  7. Catamenial pneumothorax revealing diaphragmatic endometriosis: a case report and revue of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aissa, Sana; Benzarti, Wafa; Alimi, Faouzi; Gargouri, Imen; Salem, Halima Ben; Aissa, Amène; Fathallah, Khadija; Abdelkade, Atef Ben; Alouini, Rafika; Garrouche, Abdelhamid; Hayoun, Abdelaziz; Abdelghani, Ahmed; Benzarti, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Catamenial pneumothorax (CP) is a rare entity of spontaneous, recurring pneumothorax in women. We aim to discuss the etiology, clinical course, and surgical treatment of a 42-year-old woman with CP. This patient had a right-sided spontaneous pneumothoraces occurred one week after menses. She had under-gone video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) because of a persistent air leak under chest tube. VATS revealed multiple diaphragmatic fenestrations with an upper right nodule. Defects were removed and a large part of the diaphragm was resected. Pleural abrasion was then performed over the diaphragm. Diaphragmatic endometriosis was confirmed by microscopic examination. Medical treatment with GnRH agonists was prescribed, and after recovery, the patient has been symptoms free for 20 months.

  8. Case report: Non-invasive neurally adjusted ventilatory assist in a newborn with unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosens, Sander; Derriks, Frank; Cools, Filip

    2016-11-01

    Diaphragmatic paralysis is a rare cause of respiratory distress in the newborn. In this paper, a patient with unilateral phrenic nerve injury after traumatic delivery is presented. The child inadequately responded to standard respiratory supportive measures. Non-invasive neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NIV-NAVA®), providing an optimally synchronized respiratory support proportional to the effort of the patient, resulted in prompt clinical and biological improvement of the patient's respiratory condition. NAVA is a relatively new mode of ventilation in neonatal care. In this case of unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis, it provided an alternative strategy of non-invasive respiratory support avoiding prolonged mechanical ventilation. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:E37-E39. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Fluorouracil implants caused a diaphragmatic tumor to be misdiagnosed as liver metastasis: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Yang-Yang; Qin, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Jian-Bo; Wang, Zhen-Dan; Li, Pang; Pang, Kai; Zhang, Bo; Li, Sheng; Cui, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Fluorouracil implants are widely used in peritoneal interstitial chemotherapy. Curative effects have been obtained, but implants have also caused some complications. We performed an analysis of a 66-year-old male patient’s case history, as well as conventional pathological analysis and Raman spectroscopic detection of the diaphragmatic tumor. We also analyzed the underlying causes of this condition to prevent complications and reduce misdiagnoses in future cases. The patient had a history of peritoneal fluorouracil implantation. Pathological analysis of the diaphragmatic mass revealed foreign particles, and Raman detection showed that the mass contained fluorouracil. Fluorouracil implants may persist due to the high concentrations of this drug used in peritoneal chemotherapy. This finding should provide guidance and improve the application of peritoneal implants. In clinical trials, and the diagnosis of liver metastasis should be based on pathological results

  10. Transient megaoesophagus and oesophagitis following diaphragmatic rupture repair in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Rotem; Kuzi, Sharon; Lavy, Eran; Aroch, Itamar

    2008-07-01

    A 6-month-old domestic shorthair female cat was presented with suspected diaphragmatic hernia (DH) that was later confirmed by thoracic radiography. The cat underwent exploratory celiotomy with a diaphragmatic rupture (DR) repair and recovered. Six days later, it was represented with vomiting and anorexia. Megaoesophagus (MO) and gastric dilatation were diagnosed by contrast radiography. A second celiotomy revealed no abnormalities and gastropexy was performed. Endoscopy demonstrated MO, oesophagitis and gastro-oesophageal reflux. MO persisted for several weeks and was an unexpected complication as no association between DR (or DH) and MO has never been described in the veterinary literature. The cat was treated medically with aggressive prokinetic and antacid therapy along with prolonged temporary oesophageal diversion (percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube) with an excellent outcome.

  11. Laparoscopic Treatment of a Rare Right Diaphragmatic Rupture with Small Bowel Herniation after Blunt Thoracic Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hoffmann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt traumatic diaphragmatic rupture (BTDR is a life-threatening condition with an incidence from 0,8%–1,6% in blunt trauma, mostly located on the left side. The main prognostic factors are severe side injuries and the delay of diagnosis. We present a rare case of a 68-year-old female, with an isolated right diaphragm rupture. The diagnosis was done with a delay of 4 days by thoracic radiographs, which showed a herniation of small bowel into the right thoracic cavity. A reposition of the small bowel and a closure of the diaphragmatic defect by running suture were carried out laparoscopicly. Although large prospective studies concerning the outcome of laparoscopic approach to right BTDR are still missing, we could show, that laparoscopy can be performed safely in right traumatic diaphragm rupture.

  12. Transient mega-esophagus in a neonate with congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhoul, I.R.; Smolkin, T.; Sujov, P. [Dept. of Neonatology, Rambam Medical Center and Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Haifa (Israel); Shoshany, G. [Dept. of Pediatric Surgery, Rambam Medical Center and Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Bat-Galim, Haifa (Israel); Epelman, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Rambam Medical Center and Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Bat-Galim, Haifa (Israel)

    2001-05-01

    Esophageal dilatation (ED) in neonates is rare. In the present case, ED was detected in a chest radiograph following repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) in a term neonate. A roentgenographic swallow study on the seventh day of life demonstrated ED and a sub-diaphragmatic stomach. The infant thrived adequately on enteral feeding. A swallow study on the twentieth day of life showed a normal-width esophagus with gastroesophageal reflux and small hiatus hernia. The longstanding herniated stomach in the fetus apparently caused kinking, edema, and obstruction of the gastroesophageal junction. This led to a significant ED and concealment of gastroesophageal reflux. We aim to arouse awareness about the occurrence of ED with CDH, and about its benign course under conservative management. (orig.)

  13. Incarcerated Diaphragmatic Hernia with Bowel Perforation Presenting as a Tension Pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P. Offman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We present an interesting case of a patient with a previously known diaphragmatic hernia in which the colon became incarcerated, ischemic and finally perforated. She had no prior history of abdominal pain or vomiting, yet she present with cardiovascular collapse. To our knowledge, this is the only case report of a tension pneumothorax associated with perforated bowel that was not in the setting of trauma or colonoscopy. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(2:142-144.

  14. Diaphragmatic Breathing during Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy for Aviophobia: Functional Coping Strategy or Avoidance Behavior?

    OpenAIRE

    Mühlbauer, Andreas; Shiban, Youssef; Diemer, Julia Elisabeth; Müller, Jana; Brütting-Schick, Johanna; Pauli, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Background Although there is solid evidence for the efficacy of in vivo and virtual reality (VR) exposure therapy for a specific phobia, there is a significant debate over whether techniques promoting distraction or relaxation have impairing or enhancing effects on treatment outcome. In the present pilot study, we investigated the effect of diaphragmatic breathing (DB) as a relaxation technique during VR exposure treatment. Method Twenty-nine patients with aviophobia were randomly a...

  15. The problem of sterility in men and women after wide area sub-diaphragmatic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dana, M.; Weisgerber, C.; Teillet, F.; Desprez-Curely, J.P.; Goguel, A.; Chotin, G.; Bernard, J.

    1976-01-01

    Sub-diaphragmatic irradiation in an upside down Y pattern for Hodgkin's disease results in sterility in the woman. Protection consists of irradiating the lumbar chain only when possible or by displacement of the ovary before irradiation, and laterally for preference. Although subsequent pregnancy is then possible, the genetic risk remains. In the male, Y irradiation results in prolonged virtually complete azoospermia. Associated chemotherapy also causes definitive sterility in the male. Collection for a sperm bank before treatment is advised [fr

  16. Late versus early surgical correction for congenital diaphragmatic hernia in newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, V; Moya, F; Tibboel, R; Losty, P; Nagaya, M; Lally, K P

    2002-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia, although rare (1 per 2-4,000 births), is associated with high mortality and cost. Opinion regarding the timing of surgical repair has gradually shifted from emergent repair to a policy of stabilization using a variety of ventilatory strategies prior to operation. Whether delayed surgery is beneficial remains controversial. To summarize the available data regarding whether surgical repair in the first 24 hours after birth rather than later than 24 hours of age improves survival to hospital discharge in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia who are symptomatic at or immediately after birth. Search of MEDLINE (1966-2002), EMBASE (1978-2002) and the Cochrane databases using the terms "congenital diaphragmatic hernia" and "surg*"; citations search, and contact with experts in the field to locate other published and unpublished studies. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they were randomized or quasi-randomized trials that addressed infants with CDH who were symptomatic at or shortly after birth, comparing early (24 hours) surgical intervention, and evaluated mortality as the primary outcome. Data were collected regarding study methods and outcomes including mortality, need for ECMO and duration of ventilation, both from the study reports and from personal communication with investigators. Analysis was performed in accordance with the standards of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. Two trials met the pre-specified inclusion criteria for this review. Both were small trials (total n<90) and neither showed any significant difference between groups in mortality. Meta-analysis was not performed because of significant clinical heterogeneity between the trials. There is no clear evidence which favors delayed (when stabilized) as compared with immediate (within 24 hours of birth) timing of surgical repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia, but a substantial advantage to either one cannot be ruled out. A large, multicenter randomized

  17. Prematurity and fetal lung response after tracheal occlusion in fetuses with severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sananes, Nicolas; Rodo, Carlota; Peiro, Jose Luis; Britto, Ingrid Schwach Werneck; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Favre, Romain; Joal, Arnaud; Gaudineau, Adrien; Silva, Marcos Marques da; Tannuri, Uenis; Zugaib, Marcelo; Carreras, Elena; Ruano, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the independent association of fetal pulmonary response and prematurity to postnatal outcomes after fetal tracheal occlusion for congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Fetal pulmonary response, prematurity (prematurity (prematurity was not statistically associated with mortality after controlling for fetal pulmonary response (aOR 0.52, 95% CI 0.12-2.30, p=0.367). Fetal pulmonary response after FETO is the most important factor associated with survival, independently from the gestational age at delivery.

  18. Radiographic diagnosis of diaphragmatic hernia: review of 60 cases in dogs and cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, C.B.

    2004-01-01

    Sixty cases of diaphragmatic hernia in dogs and cats were radiologically reviewed and categorized by their characteristic radiographic signs. Any particular predilection for age, sex, or breed was not observed. Liver, stomach and small intestine were more commonly herniated. At least two radiographs, at different angles, were required for a valid diagnosis, because some radiographic signs were not visible in a single radiographic view and more clearly detectable in two radiographic views

  19. Acute gastric volvulus and congenital diaphragmatic hernia, case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pérez-Egido

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH is the result of the incomplete fusion and closure of the pleuroperitoneal canal during the fetal development. CDH is usually diagnosed prenatally but, if undiagnosed, the clinical presentation ranges from asymptomatic children to serious respiratory or gastrointestinal symptoms. Acute gastric volvulus associated with CDH is a rare surgical emergency in children. We report two cases of acute gastric volvulus associated with CDH and review the literature.

  20. Characteristics of Infants With Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Who Need Follow-Up of Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Ulrike S; Leeuwen, Lisette; Krasemann, Thomas B; Wijnen, René M H; Tibboel, Dick; IJsselstijn, Hanneke

    2018-02-06

    Pulmonary hypertension is one of the main causes of mortality and morbidity in patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Currently, it is unknown whether pulmonary hypertension persists or recurs during the first year of life. Prospective longitudinal follow-up study. Tertiary university hospital. Fifty-two congenital diaphragmatic hernia patients admitted between 2010 and 2014. None. Pulmonary hypertension was measured using echocardiography and electrocardiography at 6 and 12 months old. Characteristics of patients with persistent pulmonary hypertension were compared with those of patients without persistent pulmonary hypertension. At follow-up, pulmonary hypertension persisted in four patients: at 6 months old, in three patients (patients A-C), and at 12 months old, in two patients (patients C and D). Patients with persistent pulmonary hypertension had a longer duration of mechanical ventilation (median 77 d [interquartile range, 49-181 d] vs median 8 d [interquartile range, 5-15 d]; p = 0.002) and hospital stay (median 331 d [interquartile range, 198-407 d) vs median 33 d (interquartile range, 16-59 d]; p = 0.003) than patients without persistent pulmonary hypertension. The proportion of patients with persistent pulmonary hypertension (n = 4) treated with inhaled nitric oxide (100% vs 31%; p = 0.01), sildenafil (100% vs 15%; p = 0.001), and bosentan (100% vs 6%; p pulmonary hypertension (n = 48). At 6 months, all patients with persistent pulmonary hypertension were tube-fed and treated with supplemental oxygen and sildenafil. Less than 10% of congenital diaphragmatic hernia patients had persistent pulmonary hypertension at ages 6 and/or 12 months. Follow-up for pulmonary hypertension should be reserved for congenital diaphragmatic hernia patients with echocardiographic signs of persistent pulmonary hypertension at hospital discharge and/or those treated with medication for pulmonary hypertension at hospital discharge.

  1. Surgical Techniques for Diaphragmatic Resection During Cytoreduction in Advanced or Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Giorgio; Ditto, Antonino; Martinelli, Fabio; Lorusso, Domenica; Chiappa, Valentina; Donfrancesco, Cristina; Di Donato, Violante; Indini, Alice; Aletti, Giovanni; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    Optimal cytoreduction is one the main factors improving survival outcomes in patients affected by ovarian cancer (OC). It is estimated that approximately 40% of OC patients have gross disease located on the diaphragm. However, no mature data evaluating outcomes of surgical techniques for the management of diaphragmatic carcinosis exist. In the present study, we aimed to estimate surgery-related morbidity of different surgical techniques for diaphragmatic cytoreduction in advanced or recurrent OC. PubMed (MEDLINE), Web of Science, and Clincaltrials.gov databases were searched for records estimating outcomes of diaphragmatic peritoneal stripping (DPS) or diaphragmatic full-thickness resection (DFTR) for OC. The meta-analysis was performed using the Cochrane Review software. For the final analysis, 5 articles were available, including 272 patients. Diaphragmatic peritoneal stripping and DFTR were performed in 197 patients (72%) and 75 patients (28%), respectively. Pooled analysis suggested that the estimated pleural effusion rate was 43% and 51% after DPS and DFTR, respectively. The need for pleural punctures or chest tube placement was 4% and 9% after DPS and DFTR, respectively. The rate of postoperative pneumothorax (4% vs 9%; odds ratio, 0.31; 95% confidence interval, 0.05-2.08) and subdiaphragmatic abscess (3% vs 3%; odds ratio, 0.45; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-2.31) were similar after the execution of DPS and DFTR. Diaphragmatic surgery is a crucial step during cytoreduction for advanced or recurrent OC. Obviously, the choice to perform DPS or DFTR depends on the infiltration of the diaphragmatic muscle or not. Both the procedures are associated with a low pulmonary complication and chest tube placement rates.

  2. Interactive inverse kinematics for human motion estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Nørregård, Morten Pol; Hauberg, Søren; Lapuyade, Jerome

    2009-01-01

    We present an application of a fast interactive inverse kinematics method as a dimensionality reduction for monocular human motion estimation. The inverse kinematics solver deals efficiently and robustly with box constraints and does not suffer from shaking artifacts. The presented motion...... to significantly speed up the particle filtering. It should be stressed that the observation part of the system has not been our focus, and as such is described only from a sense of completeness. With our approach it is possible to construct a robust and computationally efficient system for human motion estimation....

  3. Diaphragmatic patch: A useful adjunct in surgical treatment of recurrent catamenial hemothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Nwiloh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Although catamenial hemothorax compared to pneumothorax is a rarer clinical presentation of thoracic endometriosis syndrome (TES, it is more commonly associated with diaphragmatic fenestrations. These openings may serve as entry portals for peritoneal fluid to access into the pleural space thereby perpetuating recurrent pleural effusion even after prior surgical pleurodesis. We report our experience with two patients with recurrent right catamenial hemothorax after previous interventions that were subsequently treated by talc pleurodesis and goretex diaphragmatic patch, and who have had no further recurrence at a mean follow up of 15 months.We therefore recommend that diaphragmatic patch should be considered as an adjunct to talc pleurodesis in patients with recurrent catamenial hemothorax when either multiple diaphragmatic fenestrations are seen at surgery or if there is concomitant bloody peritoneal fluid which could potentially lead to recurrence. The patch by sealing any occult pores and possible future fenestrations appear to decrease recurrent pleural effusion at an intermediate term follow up. Resumo: Embora o hemotórax catamenial comparado com o pneumotórax seja uma apresentação clínica mais rara de síndrome de endometriose torácica (TES, está mais associado a fenestrações diafragmáticas. Estas aberturas podem atuar como portais de entrada para o acesso ao fluido peritoneal na cavidade pleural, perpetuando assim o derrame pleural recorrente mesmo após uma pleurodese cirúrgica prévia. Registamos a nossa experiência em dois pacientes com hemotórax catamenial recorrente do lado direito após outras intervenções, que foram posteriormente tratados com pleurodese com talco e penso diafragmático em gore-tex, e que não apresentaram nenhuma outra recorrência durante um acompanhamento de 15 meses.Recomendamos, então, que o penso diafragmático seja considerado um auxiliar à pleurodese com talco em pacientes com hemot

  4. An image-based approach to understanding the physics of MR artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, John N; Runge, Val M; Ai, Fei; Attenberger, Ulrike; Vu, Lan; Schmeets, Stuart H; Nitz, Wolfgang R; Kirsch, John E

    2011-01-01

    As clinical magnetic resonance (MR) imaging becomes more versatile and more complex, it is increasingly difficult to develop and maintain a thorough understanding of the physical principles that govern the changing technology. This is particularly true for practicing radiologists, whose primary obligation is to interpret clinical images and not necessarily to understand complex equations describing the underlying physics. Nevertheless, the physics of MR imaging plays an important role in clinical practice because it determines image quality, and suboptimal image quality may hinder accurate diagnosis. This article provides an image-based explanation of the physics underlying common MR imaging artifacts, offering simple solutions for remedying each type of artifact. Solutions that have emerged from recent technologic advances with which radiologists may not yet be familiar are described in detail. Types of artifacts discussed include those resulting from voluntary and involuntary patient motion, magnetic susceptibility, magnetic field inhomogeneities, gradient nonlinearity, standing waves, aliasing, chemical shift, and signal truncation. With an improved awareness and understanding of these artifacts, radiologists will be better able to modify MR imaging protocols so as to optimize clinical image quality, allowing greater confidence in diagnosis. Copyright © RSNA, 2011.

  5. Human-Robot Collaboration Dynamic Impact Testing and Calibration Instrument for Disposable Robot Safety Artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagalakis, Nicholas G; Yoo, Jae Myung; Oeste, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Dynamic Impact Testing and Calibration Instrument (DITCI) is a simple instrument with a significant data collection and analysis capability that is used for the testing and calibration of biosimulant human tissue artifacts. These artifacts may be used to measure the severity of injuries caused in the case of a robot impact with a human. In this paper we describe the DITCI adjustable impact and flexible foundation mechanism, which allows the selection of a variety of impact force levels and foundation stiffness. The instrument can accommodate arrays of a variety of sensors and impact tools, simulating both real manufacturing tools and the testing requirements of standards setting organizations. A computer data acquisition system may collect a variety of impact motion, force, and torque data, which are used to develop a variety of mathematical model representations of the artifacts. Finally, we describe the fabrication and testing of human abdomen soft tissue artifacts, used to display the magnitude of impact tissue deformation. Impact tests were performed at various maximum impact force and average pressure levels.

  6. Teaching and Learning the Nature of Technical Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederik, Ineke; Sonneveld, Wim; de Vries, Marc J.

    2011-01-01

    Artifacts are probably our most obvious everyday encounter with technology. Therefore, a good understanding of the nature of technical artifacts is a relevant part of technological literacy. In this article we draw from the philosophy of technology to develop a conceptualization of technical artifacts that can be used for educational purposes.…

  7. Guided interaction exploration in artifact-centric process models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, M.L.; Sidorova, N.; van der Aalst, W.M.P.

    2017-01-01

    Artifact-centric process models aim to describe complex processes as a collection of interacting artifacts. Recent development in process mining allow for the discovery of such models. However, the focus is often on the representation of the individual artifacts rather than their interactions. Based

  8. Supporting Knowledge Transfer through Decomposable Reasoning Artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, William A.; May, Richard A.; Turner, Alan E.

    2007-01-03

    Technology to support knowledge transfer and cooperative inquiry must offer its users the ability to effectively interpret knowledge structures produced by collaborators. Communicating the reasoning processes that underlie a finding is one method for enhancing interpretation, and can result in more effective evaluation and application of shared knowledge. In knowledge management tools, interpretation is aided by creating knowledge artifacts that can expose their provenance to scrutiny and that can be transformed into diverse representations that suit their consumers’ perspectives and preferences. We outline the information management needs of inquiring communities characterized by hypothesis generation tasks, and propose a model for communication, based in theories of hermeneutics, semiotics, and abduction, in which knowledge structures can be decomposed into the lower-level reasoning artifacts that produced them. We then present a proof-of-concept implementation for an environment to support the capture and communication of analytic products, with emphasis on the domain of intelligence analysis.

  9. A Language of Objects and Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    This is a conceptual inquiry about materiality. It gives an introductory overview to the vocabulary of materiality in a chosen selection of theories. The paper shows a language of artifacts and objects as it is used within practice-based approaches to organizational knowing. The examined...... intellectual traditions are interpretive-cultural approaches; activity theory; and sociology of translation. Similarities and differences are presented in the way these three distinct intellectual traditions conceptualize the array of material objects and artifacts which are central in the tales of practice...... concepts do the theories attempt to grasp tools and design objects – furniture, graphics, flutes-in-making and built space? The paper shows which concepts are used and it demonstrates how the interaction between social and material realities are viewed. Furthermore it highlights some of the ontological...

  10. Panning artifacts in digital pathology images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanaki, Ali R. N.; Lanciault, Christian; Espig, Kathryn S.; Xthona, Albert; Kimpe, Tom R. L.

    2017-03-01

    In making a pathologic diagnosis, a pathologist uses cognitive processes: perception, attention, memory, and search (Pena and Andrade-Filho, 2009). Typically, this involves focus while panning from one region of a slide to another, using either a microscope in a traditional workflow or software program and display in a digital pathology workflow (DICOM Standard Committee, 2010). We theorize that during panning operation, the pathologist receives information important to diagnosis efficiency and/or correctness. As compared to an optical microscope, panning in a digital pathology image involves some visual artifacts due to the following: (i) the frame rate is finite; (ii) time varying visual signals are reconstructed using imperfect zero-order hold. Specifically, after pixel's digital drive is changed, it takes time for a pixel to emit the expected amount of light. Previous work suggests that 49% of navigation is conducted in low-power/overview with digital pathology (Molin et al., 2015), but the influence of display factors has not been measured. We conducted a reader study to establish a relationship between display frame rate, panel response time, and threshold panning speed (above which the artifacts become noticeable). Our results suggest visual tasks that involve tissue structure are more impacted by the simulated panning artifacts than those that only involve color (e.g., staining intensity estimation), and that the panning artifacts versus normalized panning speed has a peak behavior which is surprising and may change for a diagnostic task. This is work in progress and our final findings should be considered in designing future digital pathology systems.

  11. An EEG Data Investigation Using Only Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-22

    hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...some conditions, an automation feature was implemented to help the participants find the HVT. When the HVT was within the sensor footprint, a tone...EEG Data Investigation Using Only Artifacts 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 1 Chelsey

  12. Sinus cut-off sign: A helpful sign in the CT diagnosis of diaphragmatic rupture associated with pleural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaya, Seyda Ors; Karabulut, Nevzat; Yuncu, Gokhan; Sevinc, Serpil; Kiroglu, Yilmaz

    2006-01-01

    The objective of our study was to describe the 'sinus cut-off' sign at CT in the diagnosis of diaphragmatic rupture in patients with blunt abdominal trauma complicated with pleural effusion, and evaluate its utility in an experimental model. Between January 2004 and March 2005, we observed an unusual interruption of costophrenic sinus at CT in three patients with blunt abdominal trauma accompanied with pleural effusion. This observation prompted us to evaluate the utility of this sign in an experimental model. Laparotomically, we created 2 cm diapragmatic lacerations at each hemidiaphragm in two rabbits and pushed up the abdominal viscera with omentum through the defect. To simulate hemothorax, we also injected 5-10 mL of diluted contrast material into the pleural space. Using a dual-slice helical CT scanner, limited thoracoabdominal CT examination was performed before and after injection of intrapleural contrast material. The images were analyzed for the presence of CT signs for diaphragmatic injury. The left posterior costophrenic sulcus was interrupted in all of the three patients with left pleural effusion. While it was associated with other findings of diaphragmatic injury, the 'sinus cut-off sign' was the sole finding in one patient. The sinus cut-off sign was observed on the CT scans of 100% of the rabbits with a left and right sided diaphragmatic rupture. The 'sinus cut-off sign' is useful and can increase the CT detection of acute diaphragmatic injury associated with pleural effusion

  13. Posterior diaphragmatic defect detected on chest CT: the incidence according to age and the lateral chest radiographic appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Son Youl; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Heo, Jeong Nam; Park, Choong Ki

    2007-01-01

    We wanted to investigate the incidence of posterior diaphragmatic defect on chest CT in various age groups and its lateral chest radiographic appearances. The chest CT scans of 78 patients of various ages with posterior diaphragmatic defect were selected among 1,991 patients, and they were analyzed for the incidence of defect in various age groups, the defect location and the herniated contents. Their lateral chest radiographs were analyzed for the shape of the posterior diaphragm and the posterior costophrenic sulcus. The patients' ages ranged from 34 to 87 with the tendency of a higher incidence in the older patients. The defect most frequently involved the medial two thirds (n = 49, 50.4%) and middle one third (n = 36, 37%) of the posterior diaphragm. The retroperitoneal fat was herniated into the thorax through the defect in all patients, and sometimes with the kidney (n = 8). Lateral chest radiography showed a normal diaphragmatic contour (n = 51, 49.5%), blunting of the posterior costophrenic sulcus (n = 41, 39.8%), focal humping of the posterior diaphragm (n = 7, 6.8%), or upward convexity (n = 4, 3.9%) of the posterior costophrenic sulcus on the affected side. The posterior diaphragmatic defect discovered in asymptomatic patients who are without a history of peridiaphragmatic disease is most likely acquired, and this malady increases in incidence according to age. An abnormal contour of the posterior diaphragm or the costophrenic sulcus on a lateral chest radiograph may be a finding of posterior diaphragmatic defect

  14. Awe and Artifacts: Religious and Scientific Endeavor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionut Untea

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The article takes as its point of departure the reflections of Henry Adams and Jacques Ellul on the possible gradual replacement of objects used in religious worship with objects used in technological worship, and advances the hypothesis that such a substitution is unlikely. Using information from psychology, history of religions, and history of science, the perspective proposed is that of a parallel historical analogous development of both religious and scientific attitudes of awe by the use of artifacts carrying two functions: firstly, to coagulate social participation around questions dealing with humanity’s destiny and interpersonal relationships across communities, and secondly to offer cultural coherence through a communal sense of social stability, comfort, and security. I argue that, though animated by attitudes of awe (“awefull”, both leading scientists and religious founders have encountered the difficulty in representing and introducing this awe to the large public via “awesome” artifacts. The failure to represent coherently the initial awe via artifacts may give rise to “anomalous awefullness”: intolerance, persecutions, global conflicts.

  15. Voting strategy for artifact reduction in digital breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Tao; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.

    2006-01-01

    Artifacts are observed in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) reconstructions due to the small number of projections and the narrow angular range that are typically employed in tomosynthesis imaging. In this work, we investigate the reconstruction artifacts that are caused by high-attenuation features in breast and develop several artifact reduction methods based on a 'voting strategy'. The voting strategy identifies the projection(s) that would introduce artifacts to a voxel and rejects the projection(s) when reconstructing the voxel. Four approaches to the voting strategy were compared, including projection segmentation, maximum contribution deduction, one-step classification, and iterative classification. The projection segmentation method, based on segmentation of high-attenuation features from the projections, effectively reduces artifacts caused by metal and large calcifications that can be reliably detected and segmented from projections. The other three methods are based on the observation that contributions from artifact-inducing projections have higher value than those from normal projections. These methods attempt to identify the projection(s) that would cause artifacts by comparing contributions from different projections. Among the three methods, the iterative classification method provides the best artifact reduction; however, it can generate many false positive classifications that degrade the image quality. The maximum contribution deduction method and one-step classification method both reduce artifacts well from small calcifications, although the performance of artifact reduction is slightly better with the one-step classification. The combination of one-step classification and projection segmentation removes artifacts from both large and small calcifications

  16. Effects of Cable Sway, Electrode Surface Area, and Electrode Mass on Electroencephalography Signal Quality during Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symeonidou, Evangelia-Regkina; Nordin, Andrew D; Hairston, W David; Ferris, Daniel P

    2018-04-03

    More neuroscience researchers are using scalp electroencephalography (EEG) to measure electrocortical dynamics during human locomotion and other types of movement. Motion artifacts corrupt the EEG and mask underlying neural signals of interest. The cause of motion artifacts in EEG is often attributed to electrode motion relative to the skin, but few studies have examined EEG signals under head motion. In the current study, we tested how motion artifacts are affected by the overall mass and surface area of commercially available electrodes, as well as how cable sway contributes to motion artifacts. To provide a ground-truth signal, we used a gelatin head phantom with embedded antennas broadcasting electrical signals, and recorded EEG with a commercially available electrode system. A robotic platform moved the phantom head through sinusoidal displacements at different frequencies (0-2 Hz). Results showed that a larger electrode surface area can have a small but significant effect on improving EEG signal quality during motion and that cable sway is a major contributor to motion artifacts. These results have implications in the development of future hardware for mobile brain imaging with EEG.

  17. Iatrogenic gastric perforation in a misdiagnosed case of late presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernia: Report of an avoidable complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Kajal

    Full Text Available Introduction: Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH is a defect in diaphragm which usually presents with severe respiratory distress in neonatal period. Presentation of case: We present a case of congenital diaphragmatic hernia presenting at an age of 2.5 years in a male child. It was misdiagnosed as a case of pyothorax for which chest tube was attempted on left side resulting in iatrogenic gastric perforation. The patient was managed by early and prompt surgery. Discussion: Late presentation is usually rare with vast array of respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms. It often leads to clinical and radiological misdiagnosis. Conclusion: Surgical intervention in misdiagnosed cases can lead to catastrophic iatrogenic complications. Keywords: Case report, Congenital diaphragmatic hernia, Pyothorax, Chest tube, Iatrogenic gastric perforation

  18. Comparison of cardiac gating and refocusing pulses for correction of cerebrospinal fluid pulsation artifacts in MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modic, M.T.; Haacke, E.M.; Lenz, G.W.; Masaryk, T.; Kaufman, B.; Ross, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    This study compared cardiac gating and additional refocusing gradient pulses in combination or alone for correction of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsation artifacts in both normal volunteers and in patients with suspected spinal pathology. Refocusing pulses or cardiac gating when used alone produced a decrease in ghosting artifacts on sagittal images and reduced the nonuniformity of the CSF signal on axial images. There is improved thin-section T2 imaging of the cord with long TEs and as few as one excitation. The refocusing pulses reduced ghosting artifacts also from respiratory motion and enhanced the CSF signal with shorter TRs leading to increased CSF contrast. When used together, the results were significantly better than either alone. Refocusing schemes can be used with any TR, do not require gating, and are now routinely employed at the authors' institution

  19. Evaluation of two iterative techniques for reducing metal artifacts in computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, F Edward; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate two methods for reducing metal artifacts in computed tomography (CT)--the metal deletion technique (MDT) and the selective algebraic reconstruction technique (SART)--and compare these methods with filtered back projection (FBP) and linear interpolation (LI). The institutional review board approved this retrospective HIPAA-compliant study; informed patient consent was waived. Simulated projection data were calculated for a phantom that contained water, soft tissue, bone, and iron. Clinical projection data were obtained retrospectively from 11 consecutively identified CT scans with metal streak artifacts, with a total of 178 sections containing metal. Each scan was reconstructed using FBP, LI, SART, and MDT. The simulated scans were evaluated quantitatively by calculating the average error in Hounsfield units for each pixel compared with the original phantom. Two radiologists who were blinded to the reconstruction algorithms used qualitatively evaluated the clinical scans, ranking the overall severity of artifacts for each algorithm. P values for comparisons of the image quality ranks were calculated from the binomial distribution. The simulations showed that MDT reduces artifacts due to photon starvation, beam hardening, and motion and does not introduce new streaks between metal and bone. MDT had the lowest average error (76% less than FBP, 42% less than LI, 17% less than SART). Blinded comparison of the clinical scans revealed that MDT had the best image quality 100% of the time (95% confidence interval: 72%, 100%). LI had the second best image quality, and SART and FBP had the worst image quality. On images from two CT scans, as compared with images generated by the scanner, MDT revealed information of potential clinical importance. For a wide range of scans, MDT yields reduced metal streak artifacts and better-quality images than does FBP, LI, or SART. http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.11101782/-/DC1. RSNA, 2011

  20. Perioperative survival rates after surgery for diaphragmatic hernia in dogs and cats: 92 cases (1990-2002).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Thomas W G; Brisson, Brigitte A; Sears, William

    2005-07-01

    To determine the survival rates of dogs and cats that underwent surgical treatment for traumatic diaphragmatic hernia within 24 hours of admission and determine whether timing of surgery affected perioperative survival rate. Retrospective study. 63 dogs and 29 cats treated surgically for traumatic diaphragmatic hernia. Medical records were reviewed to evaluate associations between perioperative survival rates and variables including timing of surgery in relation to admission and acute versus chronic diaphragmatic hernia. Among the 92 animals, 82 (89.1%) were discharged alive after surgery. Sixty-four (69.6%) patients received surgical intervention within 12 hours of admission, and 84 (91.3%) received surgical intervention within 24 hours of admission. Median time from admission to discharge was 4 days (2 to 33 days). Data for acute cases (68 dogs and cats) were analyzed separately. Sixty-three (92.6%) patients with acute diaphragmatic hernia received surgical intervention within 24 hours of admission to the hospital, and 59 (93.7%) of these patients were discharged alive. Twenty-nine (42.6%) patients with acute diaphragmatic hernia received surgical intervention within 24 hours of trauma, and 26 of 29 (89.7%) patients were discharged alive. An overall acute and chronic perioperative survival rate of 89.7% was observed in dogs and cats that received surgical intervention within 24 hours of admission. Results in 68 dogs and cats that underwent surgery within 24 hours of admission suggested that early surgical intervention for acute diaphragmatic hernia was associated with good perioperative survival rates.

  1. Improving Pulse Rate Measurements during Random Motion Using a Wearable Multichannel Reflectance Photoplethysmograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M. Warren

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Photoplethysmographic (PPG waveforms are used to acquire pulse rate (PR measurements from pulsatile arterial blood volume. PPG waveforms are highly susceptible to motion artifacts (MA, limiting the implementation of PR measurements in mobile physiological monitoring devices. Previous studies have shown that multichannel photoplethysmograms can successfully acquire diverse signal information during simple, repetitive motion, leading to differences in motion tolerance across channels. In this paper, we investigate the performance of a custom-built multichannel forehead-mounted photoplethysmographic sensor under a variety of intense motion artifacts. We introduce an advanced multichannel template-matching algorithm that chooses the channel with the least motion artifact to calculate PR for each time instant. We show that for a wide variety of random motion, channels respond differently to motion artifacts, and the multichannel estimate outperforms single-channel estimates in terms of motion tolerance, signal quality, and PR errors. We have acquired 31 data sets consisting of PPG waveforms corrupted by random motion and show that the accuracy of PR measurements achieved was increased by up to 2.7 bpm when the multichannel-switching algorithm was compared to individual channels. The percentage of PR measurements with error ≤ 5 bpm during motion increased by 18.9% when the multichannel switching algorithm was compared to the mean PR from all channels. Moreover, our algorithm enables automatic selection of the best signal fidelity channel at each time point among the multichannel PPG data.

  2. Motion correction improves image quality of dGEMRIC in finger joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miese, Falk; Kröpil, Patric; Ostendorf, Benedikt; Scherer, Axel; Buchbender, Christian; Quentin, Michael; Lanzman, Rotem S.; Blondin, Dirk; Schneider, Matthias; Bittersohl, Bernd; Zilkens, Christoph; Jellus, Vladimir; Mamisch, Tallal Ch.; Wittsack, Hans-Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess motion artifacts in dGEMRIC of finger joints and to evaluate the effectiveness of motion correction. Materials and methods: In 40 subjects (26 patients with finger arthritis and 14 healthy volunteers) dGEMRIC of metacarpophalangeal joint II was performed. Imaging used a dual flip angle approach (TE 3.72 ms, TR 15 ms, flip angles 5° and 26°). Two sets of T1 maps were calculated for dGEMRIC analysis from the imaging data for each subject: one with and one without motion correction. To compare image quality, visual grading analysis and precision of dGEMRIC measurement of both dGEMRIC maps for each case were evaluated. Results: Motion artifacts were present in 82% (33/40) of uncorrected dGEMRIC maps. Motion artifacts were graded as severe or as rendering evaluation impossible in 43% (17/40) of uncorrected dGEMRIC maps. Motion corrected maps showed significantly less motion artifacts (P < 0.001) and were graded as evaluable in 97% (39/40) of cases. Precision was significantly higher in motion corrected images (coefficient of variation (CV = .176 ± .077), compared to uncorrected images (CV .445 ± .347) (P < .001). Motion corrected dGERMIC was different in volunteers and patients (P = .044), whereas uncorrected dGEMRIC was not (P = .234). Conclusion: Motion correction improves image quality, dGEMRIC measurement precision and diagnostic performance in dGEMRIC of finger joints.

  3. [Prenatal diagnosis of a right thoracic congenital ectopic kidney with a diaphragmatic hernia: a combination with a good prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cessans, C; Pharamin, J; Crouzet, K; Kessler, S; Puget, C; Bouali, O; Galinier, P; Marcoux, M-O

    2015-11-01

    Ectopic intrathoracic kidney is a rare congenital anomaly, usually asymptomatic. This anomaly is sometimes associated with a diaphragmatic hernia. Few cases of this combination have been described, often in the absence of a prenatal diagnosis. We report on the case of a female newborn infant who was diagnosed with an ectopic intrathoracic right kidney and a diaphragmatic hernia upon 33 weeks of gestation. The patient underwent surgery on the first day of life and the respiratory and renal outcomes were simple. We review the literature and discuss the seemingly good prognosis of this combination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. [A case of Crow-Fukase syndrome with respiratory failure due to bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namekawa, Michito; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Hashimoto, Ritsuo; Kawakami, Tadataka; Fujimoto, Ken-ichi; Nakano, Imaharu

    2002-07-01

    A 62-year-old man with well-controlled diabetes mellitus developed numbness of the bilateral feet and hands, followed by subacutely progressive weakness and amyotrophy of extremities. He became bed-ridden state, and dyspnea also appeared, so he was referred to our hospital. Physical examination revealed a lean man, with dark-reddish skin pigmentation, crabbed fingers, bilateral pretibial pitting edema, and bristles in extremities. Thoracoabdominal paradoxical respiration was observed and pulmonary vesicular sounds was decreased markedly in the both lungs. Laboratory data revealed hypoproteinemia, abnormalities of endocrine system, but M-protein was not detected. Serum vascular endothelial growth factor level was quite high. Chest radiography revealed elevation of the bilateral diaphragm, the % vital capacity (%VC) was 24%, and arterial blood gas analysis showed marked hypoxia with hypercapnia. These findings suggested that his respiratory failure was induced by bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis caused by bilateral phrenic nerve palsy due to Crow-Fukase syndrome. He became somnolent because of hypercapnic narcosis, so non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) was started. We treated him with intravenous immunoglobulin and oral corticosteroids therapies, and after these therapies, his symptoms were remarkably recovered and NIPPV became unnecessary soon. The most frequent causes of respiratory failure in Crow-Fukase syndrome are pleural effusion and pulmonary hypertension, and only two cases of this syndrome with respiratory failure caused by bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis were reported until now. When the patients with Crow-Fukase syndrome complain of dyspnea, we should take the diaphragmatic paralysis into consideration, which may be improved by appropriate therapies.

  5. Improving consensus structure by eliminating averaging artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KC Dukka B

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common structural biology methods (i.e., NMR and molecular dynamics often produce ensembles of molecular structures. Consequently, averaging of 3D coordinates of molecular structures (proteins and RNA is a frequent approach to obtain a consensus structure that is representative of the ensemble. However, when the structures are averaged, artifacts can result in unrealistic local geometries, including unphysical bond lengths and angles. Results Herein, we describe a method to derive representative structures while limiting the number of artifacts. Our approach is based on a Monte Carlo simulation technique that drives a starting structure (an extended or a 'close-by' structure towards the 'averaged structure' using a harmonic pseudo energy function. To assess the performance of the algorithm, we applied our approach to Cα models of 1364 proteins generated by the TASSER structure prediction algorithm. The average RMSD of the refined model from the native structure for the set becomes worse by a mere 0.08 Å compared to the average RMSD of the averaged structures from the native structure (3.28 Å for refined structures and 3.36 A for the averaged structures. However, the percentage of atoms involved in clashes is greatly reduced (from 63% to 1%; in fact, the majority of the refined proteins had zero clashes. Moreover, a small number (38 of refined structures resulted in lower RMSD to the native protein versus the averaged structure. Finally, compared to PULCHRA 1, our approach produces representative structure of similar RMSD quality, but with much fewer clashes. Conclusion The benchmarking results demonstrate that our approach for removing averaging artifacts can be very beneficial for the structural biology community. Furthermore, the same approach can be applied to almost any problem where averaging of 3D coordinates is performed. Namely, structure averaging is also commonly performed in RNA secondary prediction 2, which

  6. Iterative CT reconstruction with correction for known rigid motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuyts, Johan [Katholieke Univ. Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Kim, Jung-Ha; Fulton, Roger [Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia). School of Physics; Westmead Hospital, Sydney (Australia). Medical Physics

    2011-07-01

    In PET/CT brain imaging, correction for motion may be needed, in particular for children and psychiatric patients. Motion is more likely to occur in the lengthy PET measurement, but also during the short CT acquisition patient motion is possible. Rigid motion of the head can be measured independently from the PET/CT system with optical devices. In this paper, we propose a method and some preliminary simulation results for iterative CT reconstruction with correction for known rigid motion. We implemented an iterative algorithm for fully 3D reconstruction from helical CT scans. The motion of the head is incorporated in the system matrix as a view-dependent motion of the CT-system. The first simulation results indicate that some motion patterns may produce loss of essential data. This loss precludes exact reconstruction and results in artifacts in the reconstruction, even when motion is taken into account. However, by reducing the pitch during acquisition, the same motion pattern no longer caused artifacts in the motion corrected image. (orig.)

  7. Metallic artifact in MRI after removal of orthopedic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagheri, Mohammad Hadi; Hosseini, Mehrdad Mohammad; Emami, Mohammad Jafar; Foroughi, Amin Aiboulhassani

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the metallic artifacts in MRI of the orthopedic patients after removal of metallic implants. Subjects and methods: From March to August 2009, 40 orthopedic patients operated for removal of orthopedic metallic implants were studied by post-operative MRI from the site of removal of implants. A grading scale of 0–3 was assigned for artifact in MR images whereby 0 was considered no artifact; and I–III were considered mild, moderate, and severe metallic artifacts, respectively. These grading records were correlated with other variables including the type, size, number, and composition of metallic devices; and the site and duration of orthopedic devices stay in the body. Results: Metallic susceptibly artifacts were detected in MRI of 18 of 40 cases (45%). Screws and pins in removed hardware were the most important factors for causing artifacts in MRI. The artifacts were found more frequently in the patients who had more screws and pins in the removed implants. Gender, age, site of implantation of the device, length of the hardware, composition of the metallic implants (stainless steel versus titanium), and duration of implantation of the hardware exerted no effect in producing metallic artifacts after removal of implants. Short TE sequences of MRI (such as T1 weighted) showed fewer artifacts. Conclusion: Susceptibility of metallic artifacts is a frequent phenomenon in MRI of patients upon removal of metallic orthopedic implants.

  8. Metallic artifact in MRI after removal of orthopedic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Mohammad Hadi; Hosseini, Mehrdad Mohammad; Emami, Mohammad Jafar; Foroughi, Amin Aiboulhassani

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the metallic artifacts in MRI of the orthopedic patients after removal of metallic implants. From March to August 2009, 40 orthopedic patients operated for removal of orthopedic metallic implants were studied by post-operative MRI from the site of removal of implants. A grading scale of 0-3 was assigned for artifact in MR images whereby 0 was considered no artifact; and I-III were considered mild, moderate, and severe metallic artifacts, respectively. These grading records were correlated with other variables including the type, size, number, and composition of metallic devices; and the site and duration of orthopedic devices stay in the body. Metallic susceptibly artifacts were detected in MRI of 18 of 40 cases (45%). Screws and pins in removed hardware were the most important factors for causing artifacts in MRI. The artifacts were found more frequently in the patients who had more screws and pins in the removed implants. Gender, age, site of implantation of the device, length of the hardware, composition of the metallic implants (stainless steel versus titanium), and duration of implantation of the hardware exerted no effect in producing metallic artifacts after removal of implants. Short TE sequences of MRI (such as T1 weighted) showed fewer artifacts. Susceptibility of metallic artifacts is a frequent phenomenon in MRI of patients upon removal of metallic orthopedic implants. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Accessing Cultural Artifacts Through Digital Companions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehm, Matthias; Jensen, Martin Lynge

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study that explores how the introduction of a digital companion agent for a museum exploration game changes children’s engagement with the presented artworks. To this end, a mobile application was developed featuring a monster agent that has eaten the artworks, which...... the children had now to find in the museum. Results show that in comparison to the paper-based version of the exploration game, children engaged in more interactions with the actual cultural artifacts and showed a significantly higher retention rate for details of the involved artworks....

  10. A holographic color camera for recording artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jith, Abhay

    2013-01-01

    Advent of 3D televisions has created a new wave of public interest in images with depth. Though these technologies create moving pictures with apparent depth, it lacks the visual appeal and a set of other positive aspects of color holographic images. The above new wave of interest in 3D will definitely help to fuel popularity of holograms. In view of this, a low cost and handy color holography camera is designed for recording color holograms of artifacts. It is believed that such cameras will help to record medium format color holograms outside conventional holography laboratories and to popularize color holography. The paper discusses the design and the results obtained.

  11. Percutaneous transhepatic drainage of lung abscess through a diaphragmatic fistula caused by a penetrating liver abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Masako; Morita, Satoru; Ueno, Eiko; Hayashi, Mitsutoshi; Ishikawa, Motonao; Mae, Masahiro

    2011-11-01

    Liver abscesses occurring just below the diaphragm can penetrate or perforate the thoracic cavity, resulting in lung abscess or pyothorax. Although surgical or percutaneous transpleural drainage is often required in such cases, the latter approach has some risks, including hemothorax and bronchopleural fistula formation when the cavity is surrounded by normal lung parenchyma. The present report describes a treatment technique of percutaneous transhepatic drainage through the diaphragmatic fistula to avoid the risks of a transpulmonary approach in a case of lung abscess caused by a penetrating liver abscess.

  12. Unusual presentation of adult Marfan syndrome as a complex diaphragmatic hiatus hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Shruti; Jhobta, Anupam; Sharma, Brij; Chauhan, Arun; Thakur, Charu S

    2017-07-01

    Marfan syndrome is multisystem connective tissue disorder that primarily involves the skeletal, cardiovascular, and ocular systems. The gastrointestinal complications in Marfan syndrome are rare, with only a few case reports described in the literature. We present a 25-year-old woman who presented with acute abdominal pain for 1 day. The imaging features revealed complex diaphragmatic hiatus hernia with organoaxial gastric volvulus. This is a unique case report about an adult patient with Marfan syndrome who presented with symptomatic paraesophageal hernia and organoaxial gastric volvulus. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  13. Neonatal diabetes mellitus and congenital diaphragmatic hernia: coincidence or concurrent etiology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topiol Emmanuelle S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM is a rare metabolic disorder, affecting approximately 1 in 500,000 live births. The management of NDM is challenging, as the benefits of controlling hyperglycemia must be balanced with the risks of iatrogenic hypoglycemia. NDM occurs in both permanent and transient forms, which have been genetically and phenotypically well characterized. Herein, we present the previously unreported combination of transient NDM (TNDM and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH. In addition to reviewing the management and genetics of NDM we discuss the potential for overlapping genetic or embryologic abnormalities to explain the concurrence of CDH and NDM.

  14. Chylothorax associated with a congenital peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiedt, Chad Weber; Washabaugh, Kate F; Rao, Deepa B; Stepien, Rebecca L

    2009-01-01

    A 2-year-old dog was presented with a 3-month history of increasing respiratory effort and rate, inappetence, and lethargy. Chest radiographs demonstrated significant pleural effusion, which was consistent with chyle on biochemical and cytological evaluations. Further diagnostic evaluation, including a thoracic computed tomographic scan, revealed a peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia (PPDH) resulting in a large, fat-attenuating mass within the pericardium. The dog was taken to surgery for repair of the PPDH, pericardectomy, and cisterna chyli ablation. Rapid and permanent resolution of the chylothorax occurred postoperatively. This is the first reported case of chylothorax secondary to PPDH.

  15. Unusual presentation of adult Marfan syndrome as a complex diaphragmatic hiatus hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Thakur

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is multisystem connective tissue disorder that primarily involves the skeletal, cardiovascular, and ocular systems. The gastrointestinal complications in Marfan syndrome are rare, with only a few case reports described in the literature. We present a 25-year-old woman who presented with acute abdominal pain for 1 day. The imaging features revealed complex diaphragmatic hiatus hernia with organoaxial gastric volvulus. This is a unique case report about an adult patient with Marfan syndrome who presented with symptomatic paraesophageal hernia and organoaxial gastric volvulus.

  16. Acute diaphragmatic paralysis caused by chest-tube trauma to phrenic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahum, E.; Ben-Ari, J.; Schonfeld, T. [Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqva (Israel); Horev, G. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqva (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2001-06-01

    A 3{sup 1}/{sub 2}-year-old child developed unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis after chest drain insertion. Plain chest X-ray demonstrated paravertebral positioning of the chest-tube tip, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed hematomas in the region of the chest-tube tip and the phrenic nerve fibers. The trauma to the phrenic nerve was apparently secondary to malposition of the chest tube. This is a rare complication and has been reported mainly in neonates. Radiologists should notify the treating physicians that the correct position of a chest drain tip is at least 2 cm distant from the vertebrae. (orig.)

  17. Acute diaphragmatic paralysis caused by chest-tube trauma to phrenic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahum, E.; Ben-Ari, J.; Schonfeld, T.; Horev, G.

    2001-01-01

    A 3 1 / 2 -year-old child developed unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis after chest drain insertion. Plain chest X-ray demonstrated paravertebral positioning of the chest-tube tip, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed hematomas in the region of the chest-tube tip and the phrenic nerve fibers. The trauma to the phrenic nerve was apparently secondary to malposition of the chest tube. This is a rare complication and has been reported mainly in neonates. Radiologists should notify the treating physicians that the correct position of a chest drain tip is at least 2 cm distant from the vertebrae. (orig.)

  18. Detection of artifacts from high energy bursts in neonatal EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sourya; Biswas, Arunava; Mukherjee, Jayanta; Majumdar, Arun Kumar; Majumdar, Bandana; Mukherjee, Suchandra; Singh, Arun Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Detection of non-cerebral activities or artifacts, intermixed within the background EEG, is essential to discard them from subsequent pattern analysis. The problem is much harder in neonatal EEG, where the background EEG contains spikes, waves, and rapid fluctuations in amplitude and frequency. Existing artifact detection methods are mostly limited to detect only a subset of artifacts such as ocular, muscle or power line artifacts. Few methods integrate different modules, each for detection of one specific category of artifact. Furthermore, most of the reference approaches are implemented and tested on adult EEG recordings. Direct application of those methods on neonatal EEG causes performance deterioration, due to greater pattern variation and inherent complexity. A method for detection of a wide range of artifact categories in neonatal EEG is thus required. At the same time, the method should be specific enough to preserve the background EEG information. The current study describes a feature based classification approach to detect both repetitive (generated from ECG, EMG, pulse, respiration, etc.) and transient (generated from eye blinking, eye movement, patient movement, etc.) artifacts. It focuses on artifact detection within high energy burst patterns, instead of detecting artifacts within the complete background EEG with wide pattern variation. The objective is to find true burst patterns, which can later be used to identify the Burst-Suppression (BS) pattern, which is commonly observed during newborn seizure. Such selective artifact detection is proven to be more sensitive to artifacts and specific to bursts, compared to the existing artifact detection approaches applied on the complete background EEG. Several time domain, frequency domain, statistical features, and features generated by wavelet decomposition are analyzed to model the proposed bi-classification between burst and artifact segments. A feature selection method is also applied to select the

  19. Motion correction options in PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian

    2015-05-01

    Subject motion is unavoidable in clinical and research imaging studies. Breathing is the most important source of motion in whole-body PET and MRI studies, affecting not only thoracic organs but also those in the upper and even lower abdomen. The motion related to the pumping action of the heart is obviously relevant in high-resolution cardiac studies. These two sources of motion are periodic and predictable, at least to a first approximation, which means certain techniques can be used to control the motion (eg, by acquiring the data when the organ of interest is relatively at rest). Additionally, nonperiodic and unpredictable motion can also occur during the scan. One obvious limitation of methods relying on external devices (eg, respiratory bellows or the electrocardiogram signal to monitor the respiratory or cardiac cycle, respectively) to trigger or gate the data acquisition is that the complex motion of internal organs cannot be fully characterized. However, detailed information can be obtained using either the PET or MRI data (or both) allowing the more complete characterization of the motion field so that a motion model can be built. Such a model and the information derived from simple external devices can be used to minimize the effects of motion on the collected data. In the ideal case, all the events recorded during the PET scan would be used to generate a motion-free or corrected PET image. The detailed motion field can be used for this purpose by applying it to the PET data before, during, or after the image reconstruction. Integrating all these methods for motion control, characterization, and correction into a workflow that can be used for routine clinical studies is challenging but could potentially be extremely valuable given the improvement in image quality and reduction of motion-related image artifacts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Picking Up Artifacts: Storyboarding as a Gateway to Reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, Shahtab; Branham, Stacy M.; Cairco, Lauren; McCrickard, D. Scott; Harrison, Steve

    Storyboarding offers designers the opportunity to illustrate a visual narrative of use. Because designers often refer to past ideas, we argue storyboards can be constructed by reusing shared artifacts. We present a study in which we explore how designers reuse artifacts consisting of images and rationale during storyboard construction. We find images can aid in accessing rationale and that connections among features aid in deciding what to reuse, creating new artifacts, and constructing. Based on requirements derived from our findings, we present a storyboarding tool, PIC-UP, to facilitate artifact sharing and reuse and evaluate its use in an exploratory study. We conclude with remarks on facilitating reuse and future work.

  1. Retrocrural Lymph Node Metastasis Disclosed by (18)F-FDG PET/CT: A Predictor of Supra-diaphragmatic Spread in Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Yong-Il; Paeng, Jin Chul; Chung, June-Key; Kang, Soon-Beom; Lee, Dong Soo

    2012-03-01

    Retrocrural lymph nodes (RCLNs) communicate with retroperitoneal and posterior mediastinal LNs. It is possible that, when RCLNs are involved, supra-diaphragmatic extension will occur in abdomino-pelvic cancers. The authors investigated performance of (18)F-FDG PET/CT to diagnose RCLN metastasis and whether RCLN metastases were associated with supra-diaphragmatic lymphatic metastases of ovarian cancer. Sixty-seven patients with stage IV ovarian cancer who had undergone (18)F-FDG PET/CT were included in this retrospective study. Diagnostic performance of (18)F-FDG PET/CT for RCLN metastasis was evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups by presence or absence of supra-diaphragmatic LN metastasis. The prevalences of RCLN metastasis between the two groups were compared and the odds ratio was calculated. Sensitivity and specificity of (18)F-FDG PET/CT for RCLN metastasis were 96.3 and 100%, respectively. Of the 67 study subjects, 27 patients had RCLN metastases (40.3%). Fifty patients had supra-diaphragmatic LN metastases. (18)F-FDG PET/CT showed 26 RCLN metastases in patients with supra-diaphragmatic LN metastases (54.5%), and only 1 in patients without supra-diaphragmatic LN metastasis (5.9%), and the difference between two groups was statistically significant (P supra-diaphragmatic LN metastasis was 17.3 (95% confidence interval = 2.1 to 140.9, P = 0.008). Performance of (18)F-FDG PET/CT to diagnose RCLN metastasis was excellent. RCLN metastasis revealed by (18)F-FDG PET/CT was strongly associated with supra-diaphragmatic LN spread of ovarian cancer. Thus, RCLN metastasis could be used as a predictor of supra-diaphragmatic lymphatic metastasis of ovarian cancer.

  2. Surgical Outcomes of Pneumatic Compression Using Carbon Dioxide Gas in Thoracoscopic Diaphragmatic Plication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyo Yeong; Kim, Yeong Dae; Hoseok, I; Cho, Jeong Su; Lee, Jonggeun; Son, Joohyung

    2016-12-01

    Surgical correction needs to be considered when diaphragm eventration leads to impaired ventilation and respiratory muscle fatigue. Plication to sufficiently tense the diaphragm by VATS is not as easy to achieve as plication by open surgery. We used pneumatic compression with carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) gas in thoracoscopic diaphragmatic plication and evaluated feasibility and efficacy. Eleven patients underwent thoracoscopic diaphragmatic plication between January 2008 and December 2013 in Pusan National University Hospital. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed, and compared between the group using CO 2 gas and group without using CO 2 gas, for operative time, plication technique, duration of hospital stay, postoperative chest tube drainage, pulmonary spirometry, dyspnea score pre- and postoperation, and postoperative recurrence. The improvement of forced expiratory volume at 1 second in the group using CO 2 gas and the group not using CO 2 gas was 22.46±11.27 and 21.08±5.39 (p=0.84). The improvement of forced vital capacity 3 months after surgery was 16.74±10.18 (with CO 2 ) and 15.6±0.89 (without CO 2 ) (p=0.03). During follow-up (17±17 months), there was no dehiscence in plication site and relapse. No complications or hospital mortalities occurred. Thoracoscopic plication under single lung ventilation using CO 2 insufflation could be an effective, safe option to flatten the diaphragm.

  3. Surgical Outcomes of Pneumatic Compression Using Carbon Dioxide Gas in Thoracoscopic Diaphragmatic Plication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Yeong Ahn

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical correction needs to be considered when diaphragm eventration leads to impaired ventilation and respiratory muscle fatigue. Plication to sufficiently tense the diaphragm by VATS is not as easy to achieve as plication by open surgery. We used pneumatic compression with carbon dioxide (CO2 gas in thoracoscopic diaphragmatic plication and evaluated feasibility and efficacy. Methods: Eleven patients underwent thoracoscopic diaphragmatic plication between January 2008 and December 2013 in Pusan National University Hospital. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed, and compared between the group using CO2 gas and group without using CO2 gas, for operative time, plication technique, duration of hospital stay, postoperative chest tube drainage, pulmonary spirometry, dyspnea score pre- and postoperation, and postoperative recurrence. Results: The improvement of forced expiratory volume at 1 second in the group using CO2 gas and the group not using CO2 gas was 22.46±11.27 and 21.08±5.39 (p=0.84. The improvement of forced vital capacity 3 months after surgery was 16.74±10.18 (with CO2 and 15.6±0.89 (without CO2 (p=0.03. During follow-up (17±17 months, there was no dehiscence in plication site and relapse. No complications or hospital mortalities occurred. Conclusion: Thoracoscopic plication under single lung ventilation using CO2 insufflation could be an effective, safe option to flatten the diaphragm.

  4. Bilious emesis as presenting symptom of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in an 8-month-old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphney Clermont

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH primarily presents in either the prenatal or neonatal period, late presentation has a reported incidence of 2.5–25%. This case report describes an 8-month-old-male who presented to the emergency department with dehydration and a 24-h history of bilious emesis. Work-up led to the diagnosis of a left-sided Bochdalek CDH. He subsequently underwent laparoscopic diaphragmatic hernia repair with reduction of near-total length of incarcerated bowel. The patient had an uneventful recovery. Babies born with CDH are typically unstable at birth, and even with repair, the mortality rate remains high. However, in the case of delayed CDH diagnosis where there are no perinatal issues, surgical repair has very high success rates, provided that there are no complications regarding the delay. If there is not a high index of suspicion based on the patient's history and exam, delayed diagnosis and intervention with late CDH presentations can lead to complications which could otherwise be minimized. The purpose of this case report is to raise awareness and contribute to the growing knowledge about delayed CDH presentation among physicians and surgeons to facilitate early diagnosis and care of a morbid yet manageable condition.

  5. Visceral subpleural hematoma of the left diaphragmatic surface following left upper division segmentectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Mizukami

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary visceral subpleural hematoma is rare. We report visceral subpleural hematoma of the left diaphragmatic surface following left upper division segmentectomy. This very rare case was difficult to distinguish from thoracic abscess. Case presentation A 68-year-old man with hypertension had undergone video-assisted thoracoscopic left upper division segmentectomy for suspected lung carcinoma. Deep vein thrombosis of the lower leg was identified and edoxaban, a so-called novel oral anticoagulant, was started on postoperative day 7. The chest drainage tube was removed on postoperative day 12 because of persistent air leakage, but fever appeared the same day. Computed tomography revealed a cavity with mixed air and fluid, so antibiotics were started on suspicion of abscess. Computed tomography-guided drainage was attempted, but proved unsuccessful. Fever continued and surgical investigation was therefore performed. Visceral subpleural hematoma was identified under the diaphragmatic surface of the left basal lung. We excised the pleura, then performed drainage and applied running sutures. The parenchyma and visceral pleura were covered with polyglycolic acid sheet and fibrin glue. Edoxaban was restarted on postoperative day 12 of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and no recurrence of hematoma has been revealed. Conclusions Visceral subpleural hematoma after thoracic surgery is extremely rare. Furthermore, correct diagnosis was difficult and surgery offered a good diagnostic and therapeutic procedure.

  6. Video-assisted thoracoscopy for diaphragmatic plication: experimental study in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Zamora, Jose F; Perez-Guille, Beatriz; Soriano-Rosales, Rosa E; Jimenez-Bravo-Luna, Miguel A; Gutierrez-Castrellon, Pedro; Ridaura-Sanz, Cecilia; Alvarez, Fernando Villegas

    2005-12-01

    Plication of a nonfunctional hemidiaphragm usually restores altered ventilatory mechanics. This study compared two techniques in performing diaphragmatic plication: video-assisted thoracoscopy (group A) and thoracotomy (group B). Twenty dogs with induced paralysis of the right hemidiaphragm were randomly assigned to one of the two groups. Evaluations were performed before and after plication of the respiratory frequency (f) and lung area (LA) of the affected side. Operative time, time to resumption of walking, ingestion of fluids and solid food, pain intensity, and postoperative complications were measured. Group A had less pain after the surgery (P fluid ingestion (P < 0.05), and earlier resumption of walking (P < 0.019). Four weeks after the procedure, LA was similar in both groups, while a significant decrease in f was recorded in group A (P < 0.02). The remaining evaluated variables showed no differences. Both approaches were effective. Pain recorded in the postoperative period was less and recovery was faster in group A. Complications and surgical times were similar. The video-assisted thoracoscopy is a safe and efficient option for performing diaphragmatic plication in dogs.

  7. Conventional mesh repair of a giant iatrogenic bilateral diaphragmatic hernia with an enterothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingohr P

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Philipp Lingohr,1 Thomas Galetin,2 Boris Vestweber,2 Hanno Matthaei,1 Jörg C Kalff,1 Karl-Heinz Vestweber2 1Department of Surgery, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany; 2Department of Surgery, Klinikum Leverkusen, Leverkusen, Germany Purpose: Diaphragmatic hernias (DHs are divided into congenital and acquired hernias, most of which are congenital. Among acquired DHs, up to 80% are left-sided, only a few iatrogenic DHs have been reported, and bilateral hernias are extremely rare. For diagnostic reasons, many DHs are overlooked by ultrasonography or X-ray and are only recognized at a later stage when complications occur. Methods: In 2009, we performed three partial diaphragm replacements in our clinic for repairing DHs using a PERMACOL™ implant. Results: As all patients had uneventful postoperative courses and the clinical outcomes were very good, we present one special case of a 65-year-old male with a giant iatrogenic bilateral DH with an enterothorax. Conclusion: We see a good indication for diaphragm replacements by using a PERMACOL™ implant for fixing especially DHs with huge hernial gaps and in cases with fragile tissue. Keywords: bilateral diaphragmatic hernia, enterothorax, conventional hernia repair, PERMACOL™, biological implant, diaphragm replacement, mesh repair

  8. Normal appearance and size of the diaphragmatic crura in children: CT evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brengle, M.; Cohen, M.D.; Katz, B.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose. The objectives of the study were to document the normal CT appearance and size of the crura of the diaphragm in children. Materials and methods. The CT scans of 80 children (0-15 years) were reviewed. The children were divided into eight age groups. The maximal transverse diameters of the right and left crura were measured. They were normalized by comparison with the transverse and anterior-posterior diameters of the 12th thoracic vertebra (T12) and the transverse abdominal diameter at T12. The crura were also evaluated as to whether their contour was smooth or nodular. Results. The diaphragmatic crura of smaller children appear large, relative to body size and the diameters of the T12 vertebral body, compared with those in older children. Crural width does not increase significantly with age. Additionally, the crura were found to have a greater tendency to be nodular in appearance in children under the age of 5 years than in older children. Conclusion. Diaphragmatic crura are more nodular and larger relative to body size in younger children. (orig.). With 6 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Spontaneous prematurity in fetuses with congenital diaphragmatic hernia: a retrospective cohort study about prenatal predictive factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Bruna Maria Lopes; Rodrigues, Agatha S; Carvalho, Mario Henrique Burlacchini; Bittar, Roberto Eduardo; Francisco, Rossana Pulcineli Vieira; Bernardes, Lisandra Stein

    2018-01-12

    To evaluate possible predictive factors of spontaneous prematurity in fetuses with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). A retrospective cohort study was performed. Inclusion criteria were presence of CDH; absence of fetoscopy; absence of karyotype abnormality; maximum of one major malformation associated with diaphragmatic hernia; ultrasound monitoring at the Obstetrics Clinic of Clinicas Hospital at the University of São Paulo School of Medicine, from January 2001 to October 2014. The data were obtained through the electronic records and ultrasound system of our fetal medicine service. The following variables were analyzed: maternal age, primiparity, associated maternal diseases, smoking, previous spontaneous preterm birth, fetal malformation associated with hernia, polyhydramnios, fetal growth restriction, presence of intrathoracic liver, invasive procedures performed, side of hernia and observed-to- expected lung to head ratio (o/e LHR). On individual analysis, variables were assessed using the Chi-square test and the Mann-Whitney test. A multiple logistic regression model was applied to select variables independently influencing the prediction of preterm delivery. A ROC curve was constructed with the significant variable, identifying the values with best sensitivity and specificity to be suggested for use in clinical practice. Eighty fetuses were evaluated, of which, 21 (26.25%) were premature. O/e LHR was the only factor associated with prematurity (p = 0.020). The ROC curve showed 93% sensitivity with 48.4% specificity for the cutoff of 40%. O/e LHR was the only predictor of prematurity in this sample.

  10. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia with concurrent aplasia of the pericardium in a foal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tăbăran, Alexandru-Flaviu; Nagy, Andras Laszlo; Cătoi, Cornel; Morar, Iancu; Tăbăran, Alexandra; Mihaiu, Marian; Bolfa, Pompei

    2015-12-30

    In veterinary medicine congenital abnormalities of the diaphragm and pericardium are rare, idiopathic malformations, being reported mainly in dogs. This report documents an unusual case of developmental defects in a foal consisting of diaphragmatic hernia concurrent with pericardial aplasia. Following a normal delivery, a full term, female Friesian stillborn foal with the placenta was presented for necropsy. External morphological examination indicated a normally developed foal. At necropsy, a large oval defect (approximately 20 × 15 cm in size) was observed in the left-dorsal side of the diaphragm (left lumbocostal triangle). This defect allowed the intestinal loops, spleen and partially the liver to translocate into the thorax. The loops of the left ascending colon, including the pelvic flexure and partially the small intestine covered the cranial and dorsal posterior parts of the heart due to the complete absence of the left pericardium. The remaining pericardium presented as a white, semi-transparent strip, partially covering the right side of the heart. The left lung and the main bronchus were severely hypoplastic to approximately one-fifth the size of their right homologue. The intermediate part of the liver, containing mainly the enlarged quadrate lobe was translocated in the thorax, severely enlarged and showed marked fibrosis. Histologically in the herniated lobes we diagnosed hepatic chronic passive congestion, telangiectasia and medial hypertrophy of blood vessels. Concomitant malformation involving diaphragmatic hernia and pericardial aplasia in horses have not been previously reported. Moreover, this is the first case describing pericardial aplasia in horse.

  11. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia: neonatal outcomes following referral to a paediatric surgical centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chukwu, J

    2012-02-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a rare malformation observed in approximately 1 in 3000 live births. Estimates of postnatal survival range from 50 to 70% despite advances in neonatal care. Antenatal diagnosis is associated with termination of pregnancy in 25-50% pregnancy internationally which may not be reflective of the Irish population. We aimed to evaluate the mortality of infants with CDH who survived to admission in a tertiary referral paediatric hospital between 1996 and 2007. The Hospital In-Patient Enquiry system was used to determine the number of neonatal referrals for CDH to OLHSC between 1996 and 2007. Mortality, sex distribution, length of patient stay and the number of cases per year were examined. 141 neonates with CDH were over 12 years with approximately 12 referrals per annum of which 82 (58%) were male and 59 (42%) female. The average length of stay in the hospital was 33 (range 0-364) days. Overall 71% of the patients survived to discharge. In the first epoch (1996-2001) survival was 63% compared with 78% in the later epoch (2002-7). The overall survival for neonates with CDH presenting to OLCHC during the 12 year-period was 71% although this improved to 78% in recent epoch. Further study of associated congenital anomalies, number of terminations of pregnancy, complexity of the diaphragmatic defect and degree of pulmonary hypertension are required to compare this population with other international centres.

  12. Acute gastrointestinal compromise in neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia prior to repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Catherine; Stewart, Michael; King, Sebastian K; Patel, Neil

    2016-12-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) affects 1 in 3000 live births. Modern management strategies include delayed repair of the diaphragm to permit pre-operative optimization of cardiorespiratory status. We describe a cohort of neonates in whom early emergency operative intervention was required for potentially fatal intestinal compromise. A retrospective review was performed of all neonatal CDH patients managed at a tertiary center in an 8-year period (2005-2012). A total of 126 CDH patients were managed during the 8-year period. Five neonates (male - 1; gestation 37+4-39+7; birth weight 2.9-3.7kg; left CDH - 5) required emergency operative intervention for presumed gastrointestinal compromise. All five neonates demonstrated systemic hypotension despite inotropic support, raised serum lactate (>2mmol/L), and abnormal radiographic findings. Operative intervention occurred within 3days of birth (1-3days). Findings included gastric volvulus, jejunal volvulus, and perforated caecum. All patients underwent primary diaphragmatic repair without a patch. Temporary ileostomy was required in 1 patient. All patients remain alive. Gastrointestinal compromise is a rare, but potentially catastrophic, complication of CDH. Emergency operative intervention may be required in a select cohort of patients. Early deterioration following birth should alert clinicians to the possibility of significant intestinal pathology. Level IV case series with no comparison group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiological diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in 17th century Korean mummy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Suk Kim

    Full Text Available Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH is a birth defect of the diaphragm resulting in pulmonary sequelae that threaten the lives of infants. In computed tomography (CT images of a 17th century middle-aged male mummy (the Andong mummy, we observed that the abdominal contents had protruded into the right thoracic cavity through the diaphragmatic defect, accompanied by a mediastinal shift to the left. On autopsy, the defect in the right posterolateral aspect of the diaphragm was reconfirmed, as was the herniation of the abdominal organs. The herniated contents included the right lobe of the liver, the pyloric part of the stomach, a part of the greater omentum, and the right colic flexure connecting the superior part of the ascending colon and the right part of the transverse colon. Taking our CT and autopsy results together, this case was diagnosed as the Bochdalek-type CDH. Herein we make the first ever report of a CT-assisted diagnosis of a pre-modern historical case of CDH. Our results show the promising utility of this modality in investigations of mummified human remains archaeologically obtained.

  14. Interval between injection of contrast material and positive contrast cheliography affects accurate diagnosis of diaphragmatic hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail A. Sen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical, surgical and diagnostic imaging findings in 11 cats and 3 dogs with suspected acute and chronic traumatic diaphragmatic hernia, and to compare the results of positive contrast cheliography (peritoneography taken immediately and 5 min after the injection of contrast material. Thoracic and abdominal radiography, ultrasonography, and positive contrast cheliography of all animals were performed. Eight cases were considered as acute and six cases were considered chronic. The contrast images taken immediately after the injection of contrast material revealed the contrast material in the thoracic cavity in 8/8 acute trauma patients, but in none of the chronic cases. In 5/6 of these cases contrast material was seen in the thoracal cavity only in additional images taken after 5 min. One patient was diagnosed with FIP and excluded from the study. Twelve cases had complete resolution and one animal died during the early postoperative period. Our results suggest that positive contrast cheliography performed immediately after the injection of contrast material may not reveal chronic cases of diaphragmatic hernia and a second imaging (or imaging after 5 min is indicated in order not to overlook chronic cases.

  15. Ultrafast MR imaging with EPI of organs undergoing nonperiodic motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehling, M.K.; Ordidge, R.J.; Howseman, A.M.; Coxon, R.; Chapman, B.; Mansfield, P.

    1988-01-01

    Conventional MR imaging employing repetitive data acquisition is susceptible to motion artifacts. Gating overcomes periodic motion effects. Nonperiodic motion, as encountered in the gastronintestinal tract, cardiac arrhythmias, unsedated children, and fetal imaging, thwarts conventional MR imaging. The EPI derivatives BEST and MBEST create a complex 128 x 128-pixel image in 64 msec and 128 msec, respectively, freezing motion almost completely. Sequentially recorded gastrointestinal-tract images allow quantitative evaluation of gastric and gut motility. Cardiac morphology, movement, and blood flow patterns in valvular heart disease have been depicted during atrial fibrillation. Selected clinical results with accompanying technical details illustrate the scope of EPI as a distinctive imaging modality

  16. Evaluation of lung function changes before and after surfactant application during artificial ventilation in newborn rats with congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C. Scheffers; H. IJsselstijn (Hanneke); R. Tenbrinck (Robert); B.F. Lachmann (Burkhard); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); J.C. Molenaar; D. Tibboel (Dick)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractPatients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) have unilateral or bilateral hypoplasia of the lungs including delayed maturation of the terminal air sacs. Because these lungs are highly susceptible to barotrauma and oxygen toxicity, even in full-term newborns, continued research

  17. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia interval on chromosome 8p23.1 characterized by genetics and protein interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longoni, Mauro; Hansen, Kasper Lage; Russell, Meaghan K.

    2012-01-01

    Chromosome 8p23.1 is a common hotspot associated with major congenital malformations, including congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and cardiac defects. We present findings from high‐resolution arrays in patients who carry a loss (n = 18) or a gain (n = 1) of sub‐band 8p23.1. We confirm a region...

  18. Impact of patient motion on myocardial perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Kemin; Feng Yanlin; He Xiaohong; Wen Guanghua; Yu Fengwen; Liu Shusheng; Liu Dejun; Yuan Jianwei; Yang Ming

    2008-01-01

    Objective: It is well known that patient motion may cause artifacts in myocardial SPECT images and affect clinical diagnosis. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of motion on quality and semi-quantitative results of myocardial perfusion images. Methods: Six healthy volunteers un- derwent myocardial perfusion SPECT. The raw data in each case was manually shifted 1-6 frames and 1 4 pixels, respectively by using the motion correction software. The shifted raw data were then reconstructed. A semi-quantitative software was used to assess the myocardial perfusion of left ventricle. The quality and semi-quantitative results of the tomographic images reconstructed from the raw data with and without motion were compared and analyzed. SPSS 12.0 was used for data analysis. Results: There was no visible artifact and semi-quantitative difference on the data with 1 frame and (or) 1 pixel shift when compared with the original data without shift. The image artifacts became significantly deteriorated when the number of flame and (or) pixel shift was increased. In general, the image artifact of inferior and posterior wall was related to the upward shift, and that of anterior and infero-posterior wall was related to the downward shift, that of septal, anterior, infero-postefior wall and apex was related to right-ward shift, and the septal and infero-posterior wall was related to the left-ward shift. The differences along the x-axis shift were more prominent than that of the y-axis (t=2.848, P<0.01), and the differences in the downward and rightward shift were more severe than the upward and leftward shift (t=2.941, 6.598; all P<0.01), respectively. Conclusions: Image artifacts became significant when there was motion induced by manual shift of more than one flame and (or) one pixel. Different motion directions were closely related to different segments of left ventricle. (authors)

  19. An extension to artifact-free projection overlaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Jianyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In multipinhole single photon emission computed tomography, the overlapping of projections has been used to increase sensitivity. Avoiding artifacts in the reconstructed image associated with projection overlaps (multiplexing) is a critical issue. In our previous report, two types of artifact-free projection overlaps, i.e., projection overlaps that do not lead to artifacts in the reconstructed image, were formally defined and proved, and were validated via simulations. In this work, a new proposition is introduced to extend the previously defined type-II artifact-free projection overlaps so that a broader range of artifact-free overlaps is accommodated. One practical purpose of the new extension is to design a baffle window multipinhole system with artifact-free projection overlaps. Methods: First, the extended type-II artifact-free overlap was theoretically defined and proved. The new proposition accommodates the situation where the extended type-II artifact-free projection overlaps can be produced with incorrectly reconstructed portions in the reconstructed image. Next, to validate the theory, the extended-type-II artifact-free overlaps were employed in designing the multiplexing multipinhole spiral orbit imaging systems with a baffle window. Numerical validations were performed via simulations, where the corresponding 1-pinhole nonmultiplexing reconstruction results were used as the benchmark for artifact-free reconstructions. The mean square error (MSE) was the metric used for comparisons of noise-free reconstructed images. Noisy reconstructions were also performed as part of the validations. Results: Simulation results show that for noise-free reconstructions, the MSEs of the reconstructed images of the artifact-free multiplexing systems are very similar to those of the corresponding 1-pinhole systems. No artifacts were observed in the reconstructed images. Therefore, the testing results for artifact-free multiplexing systems designed using the

  20. Analysis of aliasing artifacts in 16-slice helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wei; Liu Jingkang; Ou Xiaoguang; Li Wenzheng; Liao Weihua; Yan Ang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To recognize the features of aliasing artifacts on CT images, and to investigate the effects of imaging parameters on the magnitude of this artifacts. Methods: An adult dry skull was placed in a plastic water-filled container and scanned with a PHILIPS 16-slice helical CT. All the acquired transaxial images by using several different acquisition or reconstruction parameters were examined for comparative assessment of the aliasing artifacts. Results: The aliasing artifacts could be seen in most instances and characterized as the spokewise patterns emanating from the edges of high contrast structure as its radius varies sharply in the longitudinal direction. The images that scanned with pitch of 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9, respectively, showed aliasing artifacts, and its severities increased with pitches escalated (detector combination 16 x 1.5, reconstruction thickness 2 mm); There were more significant aliasing artifacts on the images reconstructed with 0.8 mm slice width compared with 1-mm slice width, and no aliasing artifacts were observed on the images reconstructed with 2-mm slice width (detector combination 16 x 0.75, pitch 0.6); No artifacts were perceived on the images scanned with detector combination 16 x 0.75, while presented evidently with the use of detector combination 16 x 1.5 (pitch 0.6, reconstruction thickness 2 mm); The degrees of aliasing artifacts were unaltered when reconstruction interval and tube current changed. Conclusions: Aliasing artifacts are caused by undersampling. When the operator choose the thinner sampling thickness, lower pitch and a much wider reconstruction thickness judiciously, aliasing artifacts could be effectively mitigated or suppressed. (authors)

  1. Prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heußer, Thorsten; Brehm, Marcus; Ritschl, Ludwig; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Image quality in computed tomography (CT) often suffers from artifacts which may reduce the diagnostic value of the image. In many cases, these artifacts result from missing or corrupt regions in the projection data, e.g., in the case of metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts. The authors propose a generalized correction method for different kinds of artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data by making use of available prior knowledge to perform data completion. Methods: The proposed prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) method requires prior knowledge in form of a planning CT of the same patient or in form of a CT scan of a different patient showing the same body region. In both cases, the prior image is registered to the patient image using a deformable transformation. The registered prior is forward projected and data completion of the patient projections is performed using smooth sinogram inpainting. The obtained projection data are used to reconstruct the corrected image. Results: The authors investigate metal and truncation artifacts in patient data sets acquired with a clinical CT and limited angle artifacts in an anthropomorphic head phantom data set acquired with a gantry-based flat detector CT device. In all cases, the corrected images obtained by PBAC are nearly artifact-free. Compared to conventional correction methods, PBAC achieves better artifact suppression while preserving the patient-specific anatomy at the same time. Further, the authors show that prominent anatomical details in the prior image seem to have only minor impact on the correction result. Conclusions: The results show that PBAC has the potential to effectively correct for metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts if adequate prior data are available. Since the proposed method makes use of a generalized algorithm, PBAC may also be applicable to other artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data

  2. Aggregated particles caused by instrument artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Ashley M.; Loría-Salazar, S. Marcela; Arnott, W. Patrick; Edwards, Grant C.; Miller, Matthieu B.; Gustin, Mae S.

    2018-04-01

    Previous studies have indicated that superaggregates, clusters of aggregates of soot primary particles, can be formed in large-scale turbulent fires. Due to lower effective densities, higher porosity, and lower aerodynamic diameters, superaggregates may pass through inlets designed to remove particles 2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter were collected on 36 out of 158 sample days. On preliminary analysis, it was thought that these aggregated particles were superaggregates, depositing past PM10 (particles wind speeds, as well as the use of generators on site. Samples with aggregated particles, referred to as aggregates, were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope for size and shape and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used for elemental analysis. It was determined, based on the high amounts of aluminum present in the aggregate samples, that a sampling artifact associated with the sample inlet and prolonged, high wind events was the probable reason for the observed aggregates.

  3. Medical image of the week: polysomnogram artifact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartell J

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A 54 year-old man with a past medical history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, low back pain, and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia presented to the sleep laboratory for evaluation of sleep disordered breathing. Pertinent medications include fluoxetine, ambien, and clonazepam. His Epworth sleepiness score was 18. He had a total sleep time of 12 min. On the night of his sleep study, the patient was restless and repeatedly changed positions in bed. Figures 1 and 2 show the artifact determined to be lead displacement of O1M2 after the patient shifted in bed, inadvertently removing one of his scalp electrodes. The sine waves are 60 Hz in frequency. Once the problem was identified, the lead was quickly replaced to its proper position.

  4. Persuasion through artifacts: Sociological and psychological dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroe Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Research suggests that applicants use various impression management tactics during employment interviews to influence interviewers' evaluations of their performance. Yet, little research has examined inteviewers/perceptions of applicant's impression management and their degree of nonverbal influence. This PhD study examines these questions, using both quantitative and qualitative data: Do interviewers accurately perceive applicant's impression management tactics? How are these perceptions integrated into their evaluations of applicant's nonverbal behaviour? Is perception accuracy influenced by artifacts (professional clothing that interviewees wear? It has cross-cultural design, because describes the differences in European Commission interviewers' social perceptions and Romanian human resources managers on one hand, and between social perceptions of European Commission public servants and Romanian employees on the other hand, concerning 12 key concepts: persuasion, first impressions, professional image, credibility, authenticity, competence, self- confidence, self-management, self-presentation, self-promotion, impression management tactics, professional appearance.

  5. Aggregated particles caused by instrument artifact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Pierce

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have indicated that superaggregates, clusters of aggregates of soot primary particles, can be formed in large-scale turbulent fires. Due to lower effective densities, higher porosity, and lower aerodynamic diameters, superaggregates may pass through inlets designed to remove particles  <  2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5. Ambient particulate matter samples were collected at Peavine Peak, NV, USA (2515 m northwest of Reno, NV, USA from June to November 2014. The Teledyne Advanced Pollution Instrumentation (TAPI 602 BetaPlus particulate monitor was used to collect PM2.5 on two filter types. During this time, aggregated particles  >  2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter were collected on 36 out of 158 sample days. On preliminary analysis, it was thought that these aggregated particles were superaggregates, depositing past PM10 (particles  <  10 µm in aerodynamic diameter pre-impactors and PM2.5 cyclones. However, further analysis revealed that these aggregated particles were dissimilar to superaggregates observed in previous studies, both in morphology and in elemental composition. To determine if the aggregated particles were superaggregates or an instrument artifact, samples were investigated for the presence of certain elements, the occurrence of fires, high relative humidity and wind speeds, as well as the use of generators on site. Samples with aggregated particles, referred to as aggregates, were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope for size and shape and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used for elemental analysis. It was determined, based on the high amounts of aluminum present in the aggregate samples, that a sampling artifact associated with the sample inlet and prolonged, high wind events was the probable reason for the observed aggregates.

  6. WE-G-18C-06: Is Diaphragm Motion a Good Surrogate for Liver Tumor Motion?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); School of Information Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Cai, J; Zheng, C; Czito, B; Palta, M; Yin, F [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Wang, H [School of Information Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Bashir, M [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether diaphragm motion is a good surrogate for liver tumor motion by comparing their motion trajectories obtained from cine-MRI. Methods: Fourteen patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (10/14) or liver metastases (4/14) undergoing radiation therapy were included in this study. All patients underwent single-slice 2D cine-MRI simulations across the center of the tumor in three orthogonal planes. Tumor and diaphragm motion trajectories in the superior-inferior (SI), anteriorposterior (AP), and medial-lateral (ML) directions were obtained using the normalized cross-correlation based tracking technique. Agreement between tumor and diaphragm motions was assessed by calculating the phase difference percentage (PDP), intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), Bland-Altman analysis (Diffs) and paired t-test. The distance (D) between tumor and tracked diaphragm area was analyzed to understand its impact on the correlation between tumor and diaphragm motions. Results: Of all patients, the means (±standard deviations) of PDP were 7.1 (±1.1)%, 4.5 (±0.5)% and 17.5 (±4.5)% in the SI, AP and ML directions, respectively. The means of ICC were 0.98 (±0.02), 0.97 (±0.02), and 0.08 (±0.06) in the SI, AP and ML directions, respectively. The Diffs were 2.8 (±1.4) mm, 2.4 (±1.1) mm, and 2.2 (±0.5) mm in the SI, AP and ML directions, respectively. The p-values derived from the paired t-test were < 0.02 in SI and AP directions, whereas were > 0.58 in ML direction primarily due to the small motion in ML direction. Tumor and diaphragmatic motion had high concordance when the distance between the tumor and tracked diaphragm areas was small. Conclusion: Preliminary results showed that liver tumor motion had good correlations with diaphragm motion in the SI and AP directions, indicating diaphragm motion in the SI and AP directions could potentially be a reliable surrogate for liver tumor motion. NIH (1R21CA165384-01A1), Golfers Against Cancer (GAC

  7. On Lifecycle Constraints of Artifact-Centric Workflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucukoguz, Esra; Su, Jianwen

    Data plays a fundamental role in modeling and management of business processes and workflows. Among the recent "data-aware" workflow models, artifact-centric models are particularly interesting. (Business) artifacts are the key data entities that are used in workflows and can reflect both the business logic and the execution states of a running workflow. The notion of artifacts succinctly captures the fluidity aspect of data during workflow executions. However, much of the technical dimension concerning artifacts in workflows is not well understood. In this paper, we study a key concept of an artifact "lifecycle". In particular, we allow declarative specifications/constraints of artifact lifecycle in the spirit of DecSerFlow, and formulate the notion of lifecycle as the set of all possible paths an artifact can navigate through. We investigate two technical problems: (Compliance) does a given workflow (schema) contain only lifecycle allowed by a constraint? And (automated construction) from a given lifecycle specification (constraint), is it possible to construct a "compliant" workflow? The study is based on a new formal variant of artifact-centric workflow model called "ArtiNets" and two classes of lifecycle constraints named "regular" and "counting" constraints. We present a range of technical results concerning compliance and automated construction, including: (1) compliance is decidable when workflow is atomic or constraints are regular, (2) for each constraint, we can always construct a workflow that satisfies the constraint, and (3) sufficient conditions where atomic workflows can be constructed.

  8. Contrast artifacts in tapping tip atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyhle, Anders; Sørensen, Alexis Hammer; Zandbergen, Julie Bjerring

    1998-01-01

    When recording images with an atomic force microscope using the resonant vibrating cantilever mode, surprising strange results are often achieved. Typical artifacts are strange contours, unexpected height shifts, and sudden changes of the apparent resolution in the acquired images. Such artifacts...

  9. How Do Artifact Models Help Direct SPI Projects?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhrmann, Marco; Richardson, Ita

    2015-01-01

    To overcome shortcomings associated with software process improvement (SPI), we previously recommended that process engineers focus on the artifacts to be developed in SPI projects. These artifacts should define desired outcomes, rather than specific methods. During this prior research, we develo...

  10. Metal and calcification artifact reduction for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklein, Julia; Jerebko, Anna; Ritschl, Ludwig; Mertelmeier, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Tomosynthesis images of the breast suffer from artifacts caused by the presence of highly absorbing materials. These can be either induced by metal objects like needles or clips inserted during biopsy devices, or larger calcifications inside the examined breast. Mainly two different kinds of artifacts appear after the filtered backprojection procedure. The first type is undershooting artifacts near edges of high-contrast objects caused by the filtering step. The second type is out-of-plane (ripple) artifacts that appear even in slices where the metal object or macrocalcifications does not exist. Due to the limited angular range of tomosynthesis systems, overlapping structures have high influence on neighboring regions. To overcome these problems, a segmentation of artifact introducing objects is performed on the projection images. Both projection versions, with and without high-contrast objects are filtered independently to avoid undershootings. During backprojection a decision is made for each reconstructed voxel, if it is artifact or high-contrast object. This is based on a mask image, gained from the segmentation of high-contrast objects. This procedure avoids undershooting artifacts and additionally reduces out-of-plane ripple. Results are demonstrated for different kinds of artifact inducing objects and calcifications.

  11. Making Digital Artifacts on the Web Verifiable and Reliable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhn, T.; Dumontier, M.

    2015-01-01

    The current Web has no general mechanisms to make digital artifacts - such as datasets, code, texts, and images - verifiable and permanent. For digital artifacts that are supposed to be immutable, there is moreover no commonly accepted method to enforce this immutability. These shortcomings have a

  12. Incidental ferumoxytol artifacts in clinical brain MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowser, Bruce A.; Campeau, Norbert G.; Carr, Carrie M.; Diehn, Felix E.; McDonald, Jennifer S.; Miller, Gary M.; Kaufmann, Timothy J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Ferumoxytol (Feraheme) is a parenteral therapy approved for treatment of iron deficiency anemia. The product insert for ferumoxytol states that it may affect the diagnostic ability of MRI for up to 3 months. However, the expected effects may not be commonly recognized among clinical neuroradiologists. Our purpose is to describe the artifacts we have seen at our institution during routine clinical practice. We reviewed the patients at our institution that had brain MRI performed within 90 days of receiving intravenous ferumoxytol. The imaging was reviewed for specific findings, including diffusion-weighted imaging vascular susceptibility artifact, gradient-echo echo-planar T2*-weighted vascular susceptibility artifact, SWI/SWAN vascular susceptibility artifact, hypointense vascular signal on T2-weighted images, pre-gadolinium contrast vascular enhancement on magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo (MPRAGE) imaging, and effects on post-gadolinium contrast T1 imaging. Multiple artifacts were observed in patients having a brain MRI within 3 days of receiving intravenous ferumoxytol. These included susceptibility artifact on DWI, GRE, and SWAN/SWI imaging, pre-gadolinium contrast increased vascular signal on MPRAGE imaging, and decreased expected enhancement on post-gadolinium contrast T1-weighted imaging. Ferumoxytol can create imaging artifacts which complicate clinical interpretation when brain MRI is performed within 3 days of administration. Recognition of the constellation of artifacts produced by ferumoxytol is important in order to obviate additional unnecessary examinations and mitigate errors in interpretation. (orig.)

  13. Quantification of Rain Induced Artifacts on Digital Satellite Television ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of artifacts on the high definition television (TV) content and the eventual loss of the digital TV signals to rain is still a major concern to satellite operators, digital satellite television (DSTV) and terrestrial television content providers. In this paper, the artifacts present in a typical DSTV signal is examined on a ...

  14. Distributed Cognition and Distributed Morality: Agency, Artifacts and Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heersmink, Richard

    2017-04-01

    There are various philosophical approaches and theories describing the intimate relation people have to artifacts. In this paper, I explore the relation between two such theories, namely distributed cognition and distributed morality theory. I point out a number of similarities and differences in these views regarding the ontological status they attribute to artifacts and the larger systems they are part of. Having evaluated and compared these views, I continue by focussing on the way cognitive artifacts are used in moral practice. I specifically conceptualise how such artifacts (a) scaffold and extend moral reasoning and decision-making processes, (b) have a certain moral status which is contingent on their cognitive status, and (c) whether responsibility can be attributed to distributed systems. This paper is primarily written for those interested in the intersection of cognitive and moral theory as it relates to artifacts, but also for those independently interested in philosophical debates in extended and distributed cognition and ethics of (cognitive) technology.

  15. Mutations in STRA6 cause a broad spectrum of malformations including anophthalmia, congenital heart defects, diaphragmatic hernia, alveolar capillary dysplasia, lung hypoplasia, and mental retardation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasutto, Francesca; Sticht, Heinrich; Hammersen, Gerhard; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Fitzpatrick, David R.; Nuernberg, Gudrun; Brasch, Frank; Schirmer-Zimmermann, Heidemarie; Tolmie, John L.; Chitayat, David; Houge, Gunnar; Fernandez-Martinez, Lorena; Keating, Sarah; Mortier, Geert; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; von der Wense, Axel; Slavotinek, Anne; Meinecke, Peter; Bitoun, Pierre; Becker, Christian; Nuernberg, Peter; Reis, Andre; Rauch, Anita

    2007-01-01

    We observed two unrelated consanguineous families with malformation syndromes sharing anophthalmia and distinct eyebrows as common signs, but differing for alveolar capillary dysplasia or complex congenital heart defect in one and diaphragmatic hernia in the other family. Homozygosity mapping

  16. Combined mitral valve replacement associated with the Bentall procedure, diaphragmatic hernia repair and reconstruction of the pectus excavatum in a 26-year-old patient with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stępiński, Piotr; Stankowski, Tomasz; Aboul-Hassan, Sleiman Sebastian; Szymańska, Anna; Marczak, Jakub; Cichoń, Romuald

    2016-06-01

    A 26-year-old man with Marfan syndrome was admitted as an emergency patient with ascending aorta aneurysm, severe mitral and aortic regurgitation, diaphragmatic hernia and pectus excavatum. After completion of diagnostics a combined surgical procedure was performed.

  17. Combined mitral valve replacement associated with the Bentall procedure, diaphragmatic hernia repair and reconstruction of the pectus excavatum in a 26-year-old patient with Marfan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    St?pi?ski, Piotr; Stankowski, Tomasz; Aboul-Hassan, Sleiman Sebastian; Szyma?ska, Anna; Marczak, Jakub; Cicho?, Romuald

    2016-01-01

    A 26-year-old man with Marfan syndrome was admitted as an emergency patient with ascending aorta aneurysm, severe mitral and aortic regurgitation, diaphragmatic hernia and pectus excavatum. After completion of diagnostics a combined surgical procedure was performed.

  18. Diaphragmatic rupture causing repeated vomiting in a combined abdominal and head injury patient: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Symeonidis Dimitrios

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diaphragmatic rupture after blunt abdominal injury is a rare trauma condition. Delayed diagnosis is not uncommon especially in the emergency room setting. Associated injuries often shift diagnosis and treatment priorities towards other more life-threatening conditions. Case presentation We present a challenging case of a young male with combined abdominal and head trauma. Repeated episodes of vomiting dominated on clinical presentation that in the presence of a deep scalp laceration and facial bruising shifted differential diagnosis towards a traumatic brain injury. However, a computed tomography scan of the brain ruled out any intracranial pathology. Finally, a more meticulous investigation with additional imaging studies confirmed the presence of diaphragmatic rupture that justified the clinical symptoms. Conclusions The combination of diaphragmatic rupture with head injury creates a challenging trauma scenario. Increased level of suspicion is essential in order to diagnose timely diaphragmatic rupture in multiple trauma patients.

  19. Inter-slice motion correction using spatiotemporal interpolation for functional magnetic resonance imaging of the moving fetus

    OpenAIRE

    Limperopoulos, Catherine; You, Wonsang

    2017-01-01

    Fetal motion continues to be one of the major artifacts in in-utero functional MRI; interestingly few methods have been developed to address fetal motion correction. In this study, we propose a robust method for motion correction in fetal fMRI by which both inter-slice and inter-volume motion artifacts are jointly corrected. To accomplish this, an original volume is temporally split into odd and even slices, and then voxel intensities are spatially and temporally interpolated in the process o...

  20. Retrocrural Lymph Node Metastasis Disclosed by 18F-FDG PET/CT: A Predictor of Supra-diaphragmatic Spread in Ovarian Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Hyung Jun; Kim, Yong il; Paeng, Jin Chul; Chung, June Key; Kang, Soon Beom; Lee, Dong Soo

    2012-01-01

    Retrocrual lymph nodes (RCLNs) communicate with retroperitoneal and posterior mediastinal LNs. It is possible that, when RCLNs are involved, supra diaphragmatic extension will occur in abdomino pelvic cancers. The authors investigated performance of 18F FDG PET/CT to diagnose RCLN metastasis and whether RCLN metastases were associated with supra diaphragmatic lymphatic metastases of ovarian cancer. Sixty seven patients with stage IV ovarian cancer who had undergone 18F FDG PET/CT were included in this retrospective study. Diagnostic performance of 18F FDG PET/CT for RCLN metastasis was evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups by presence or absence of supra diaphragmatic LN metastasis. The prevalences of RCLN metastasis between the two groups were compared and the odds ratio was calculated. Sensitivity and specificity of 18F FDG PET/CT for RCLN metastasis were 96.3 and 100%, respectively. Of the 67 study subjects, 27 patients had RCLN metastases (40.3%). Fifty patients had supra diaphragmatic LN metastases. 18F FDG PET/CT showed 26 RCLN metastases in patients with supra diaphragmatic LN metastases (54.5%), and only 1 in patients without supra diaphragmatic LN metastasis (5.9%), and the difference between two groups was statistically significant (P 18F FDG PET/CT to diagnose RCLN metastasis was excellent. RCLN metastasis revealed by 18F FDG PET/CT was strongly associated with supra diaphragmatic LN spread of ovarian cancer. Thus, RCLN metastasis could be used as a predictor of supra diaphragmatic lymphatic metastasis of ovarian cancer

  1. Associated morbidities to congenital diaphragmatic hernia and a relationship to human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froh, Elizabeth B; Spatz, Diane L

    2012-08-01

    The majority of what is known in the recent literature regarding human milk studies in the neonatal intensive care setting is specific to term and/or preterm infants (including very-low-birth-weight preterm infants). However, there is a lack of human milk and breastfeeding literature concerning infants with congenital anomalies, specifically infants diagnosed with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). By applying human milk research conducted among other populations of infants, this article highlights how human milk may have a significant impact on infants with CDH. Recent human milk studies are reviewed and then applied to the CDH population in regard to respiratory and gastrointestinal morbidities, as well as infection and length of stay. In addition, clinical implications of these relationships are discussed and suggestions for future research are presented.

  2. Contribution of respiratory muscle blood flow to exercise-induced diaphragmatic fatigue in trained cyclists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Athanasopoulos, Dimitris; Boushel, Robert Christopher

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether the greater degree of exercise-induced diaphragmatic fatigue previously reported in highly trained athletes in hypoxia (compared with normoxia) could have a contribution from limited respiratory muscle blood flow. Seven trained cyclists completed three constant load 5 min...... exercise tests at inspired O(2) fractions (FIO2) of 0.13, 0.21 and 1.00 in balanced order. Work rates were selected to produce the same tidal volume, breathing frequency and respiratory muscle load at each FIO2 (63 +/- 1, 78 +/- 1 and 87 +/- 1% of normoxic maximal work rate, respectively). Intercostals......(-1) and 95.1 +/- 7.8 ml (100 ml)(-1) min(-1), respectively). Neither IMBF was different across hypoxia, normoxia and hyperoxia (53.6 +/- 8.5, 49.9 +/- 5.9 and 52.9 +/- 5.9 ml (100 ml)(-1) min(-1), respectively). We conclude that when respiratory muscle energy requirement is not different between...

  3. Distal 4p microdeletion in a case of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaccia, Germana; Mobili, Luisa; Braguglia, Annabella; Santoro, Francesco; Bagolan, Pietro

    2006-03-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a well-known genetic condition characterized by typical facial anomalies, midline defects, skeletal anomalies, prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, hypotonia, mental retardation, and seizures. Affected patients with a microdeletion on distal 4p present a milder phenotype that lacks congenital malformations. WHS is rarely associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), and only 8 cases are reported in the literature. In almost all cases of CDH and WHS a large deletion of the short arm of chromosome 4 is present. A microdeletion of 2.6 Mb on distal 4p associated with CDH and multiple congenital malformations (i.e., cleft palate) is reported for the first time. Such a microdeletion should prompt a molecular study for WHS when in a fetus/newborn with CDH the association with cleft lip/palate and typical facial appearance (flat facial profile, hypertelorism) is found. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Rare combination of left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia and omphalocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Yuet Yee; Wong, Siu Chun Mabel; Wong, Ming Sum Rosanna

    2017-08-07

    We reported a rare case of left-sided posterolateral congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and omphalocele, which is not associated with chromosomal abnormalities or other syndromes. Omphalocele was detected antenatally (CDH was not detected in antenatal ultrasound). The patient suffered from respiratory failure secondary to severe pulmonary hypertension. As the combination of CDH and omphalocele is rare and with the abdominal content herniating into the omphalocele instead of the thorax, antenatal diagnosis of such condition can be difficult. Unlike other reported cases in the literature, our patient's respiratory condition has been improving with time and is surviving beyond the infancy period. We believe this to be the first such survival case reported in the literature. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia: a retrospective study of 31 cats and eight dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banz, Angela C; Gottfried, Sharon D

    2010-01-01

    The records of 31 cats and eight dogs undergoing surgical correction of peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia (PPDH) from 2000 through 2007 were reviewed. Weimaraners and long-haired cats of varying breeds, particularly Maine Coon cats, appear to be at higher risk of PPDH. Presenting complaints were most commonly related to the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts in both dogs and cats, although respiratory signs were more prevalent in cats, and gastrointestinal signs were more common in dogs. The most common herniated organs were liver, gallbladder, and small intestine. Mortality associated with surgical repair of PPDH in cats and dogs was low in the first 2 weeks postoperatively, and prognosis for return to normal function was excellent. Peri-and postoperative complications were typically minor and self-limiting.

  6. Budd-chiari syndrome caused by diaphragmatic hernia of the liver: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jae Min; Yoon, Jung Won; Kim, Jae Wook; Chung, Woo Kyoung; Chung, Hee Sun; Kim, Joo Hyung; Choi, Jun Ho; Kim, Seung Ho [Armed Forces Capital Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    Budd-Chiari syndrome is an uncommon disorder, and it is caused by obstruction of the hepatic venous out-flow or inferior vena cava above the hepatic vein. It may result from a large number of conditions, including primary congenital obstructions of the hepatic veins or inferior vena cava by webs or bands. Secondary causes include trauma, polycythemia vera, chronic leukemia, pregnancy, tumors and use of oral contraceptives. No definitive etiologic factors have been identified in two thirds of all cases. We recently experienced a case of Budd-Chiari syndrome caused by diaphragmatic hernia in 21-year-old man. Postoperative follow up CT showed normal venous flow after reintroduction of the liver into the abdominal cavity and closure of the diaphragm defect.

  7. Budd-chiari syndrome caused by diaphragmatic hernia of the liver: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jae Min; Yoon, Jung Won; Kim, Jae Wook; Chung, Woo Kyoung; Chung, Hee Sun; Kim, Joo Hyung; Choi, Jun Ho; Kim, Seung Ho

    2007-01-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome is an uncommon disorder, and it is caused by obstruction of the hepatic venous out-flow or inferior vena cava above the hepatic vein. It may result from a large number of conditions, including primary congenital obstructions of the hepatic veins or inferior vena cava by webs or bands. Secondary causes include trauma, polycythemia vera, chronic leukemia, pregnancy, tumors and use of oral contraceptives. No definitive etiologic factors have been identified in two thirds of all cases. We recently experienced a case of Budd-Chiari syndrome caused by diaphragmatic hernia in 21-year-old man. Postoperative follow up CT showed normal venous flow after reintroduction of the liver into the abdominal cavity and closure of the diaphragm defect

  8. CONGENITAL DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA IN A TWO-DAY-OLD NEONATE: ANAESTHETIC MANAGEMENT AND CHALLENGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tridip Jyoti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Congenital diaphragmatic hernia in a neonate is a challenging task to any anaesthesiologist. CDH occurs due to an early developmental defect that results in the extrusion of intra-abdominal organs (i.e. stomach, small intestines, spleen, liver into the thoracic cavity. In 85% of the cases it is left sided. This leads to lung hypoplasia, pulmonary hypertension, and pulmonary arteriolar dysregulation/reactivity. Historically, CDH was considered to be a surgical emergency and aggressive hyperventilatory strategies with high peak inspiratory pressures were employed to improve survival. But recent multicentre studies have shown the beneficial effect of conservative low volume ventilation with low inflation pressures and permissive hypercapnia. We present to you the successful management of a two day old neonate with this ventilation strategy.

  9. Mesentro-axial gastric volvulus in a morgagni diaphragmatic hernia in an old female

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fansur, M.; Atiq, S.

    2011-01-01

    A Morgagni diaphragmatic hernia is a rare congenital anteromedial defect in adults (5%). Symptoms of visceral herniation are attributable to the organs involved. Imaging is the mainstay of diagnosis either in an asymptomatic person or in a person with respiratory and/or gastrointestinal symptoms, ultimately requiring surgical intervention because of the risk of incarceration. We present a rare case of 80 years old female with vague upper abdominal pain and recurrent vomiting. An anteromedial parasternal defect was established on conventional as well as on cross-sectional imaging in right hemi diaphragm through which the upper abdominal contents were protruding in the right hemi thorax, all enclosed in a peritoneal sac. The herniation resulted in mesentro-axial gastric volvulus. Due to age and anaesthesia risk, patient was conservatively managed. (author)

  10. Adiabatic Low-Pass J Filters for Artifact Suppression in Heteronuclear NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Sebastian; Benie, Andrew J; Duus, Jens Øllgaard

    2009-01-01

    NMR artifact purging: Modern NMR experiments depend on efficient coherence transfer pathways for their sensitivity and on suppression of undesired pathways leading to artifacts for their spectral clarity. A novel robust adiabatic element suppresses hard-to-get-at artifacts....

  11. Ultrasound assessment of diaphragmatic function in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Riccardo; Mandrioli, Jessica; Zona, Stefano; Antenora, Federico; Iattoni, Andrea; Monelli, Marco; Fini, Nicola; Tonelli, Roberto; Clini, Enrico; Marchioni, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    Evaluation of diaphragm function in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is critical in determining when to commence non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV). Currently, forced vital capacity (FVC) and sniff nasal inspiratory pressure (SNIP) are volitional measures for this evaluation, but require collaboration and are poorly specific. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether diaphragmatic thickness measured by ultrasound (US) correlates with lung function impairment in ALS patients. The secondary aim was then to compare US diaphragm thickness index (ΔTdi) with a new parameter (ΔTmax index). 41 patients with ALS and 30 healthy subjects were enrolled in the study. All subjects underwent spirometry, SNIP and diaphragm US evaluation, while arterial blood gases were measured in some patients only. US assessed diaphragm thickness (Tdi) at tidal volume (Vt) or total lung capacity (TLC), and their ratio (ΔTmax) were recorded. Changes (Δ) in Tdi indices during tidal volume (ΔTdiVt) and maximal inspiration (ΔTdiTLC) were also assessed. ΔTdiTLC (p <0.001) and ΔTmax (p = 0.007), but not ΔTdiVt, differed between patients and controls. Significant correlation (p < 0.05) was found between ΔTdiTLC, ΔTmax and FVC. The ROC curve analysis for comparison of individual testing showed better accuracy with Δtmax than with ΔtdiTLC for FVC (AUC 0.76 and 0.27) and SNIP (AUC 0.71 and 0.25). Diaphragm thickness assessed by ultrasound significantly correlates with global respiratory alterations in patients with ALS. ΔTmax represents a new US index of early diaphragmatic dysfunction, better related with the routinely performed lung function tests. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  12. Paresia diafragmática bilateral idiopática Idiopathic bilateral diaphragmatic paresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Corso Pereira

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Relata-se o caso de um paciente com dispnéia intensa ao se deitar, em que foram excluídas doenças pulmonares, neuromusculares ou cardíacas, cuja investigação revelou paresia diafragmática bilateral. Um sinal chave para o diagnóstico foi a evidência de respiração paradoxal com o doente em decúbito supino. Havia piora da oxigenação e da capacidade vital forçada com a mudança da posição ortostática para supina. A fluoroscopia ortostática foi normal. A pressão inspiratória máxima estava muito reduzida. A estimulação elétrica transcutânea do diafragma foi normal, e a eletroestimulação do nervo frênico mostrou ausência de resposta, permitindo o diagnóstico de paresia bilateral do diafragma.We report the case of a patient with severe dyspnea upon reclining. Lung disease, neuromuscular disorders and heart disease were ruled out. However, during the course of the investigation, bilateral diaphragmatic paresis was discovered. A key sign leading to the diagnosis was evidence of paradoxical respiration in the dorsal decubitus position. When the patient was moved from the orthostatic position to the dorsal decubitus position, oxygenation and forced vital capacity worsened. The orthostatic fluoroscopy was normal. Maximal inspiratory pressure was severely reduced. The responses to transcutaneous electric stimulation of the diaphragm were normal. However, electric stimulation of the phrenic nerve produced no response, leading to the diagnosis of bilateral diaphragmatic paresis.

  13. Searching for alien artifacts on the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P. C. W.; Wagner, R. V.

    2013-08-01

    The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) has a low probability of success, but it would have a high impact if successful. Therefore it makes sense to widen the search as much as possible within the confines of the modest budget and limited resources currently available. To date, SETI has been dominated by the paradigm of seeking deliberately beamed radio messages. However, indirect evidence for extraterrestrial intelligence could come from any incontrovertible signatures of non-human technology. Existing searchable databases from astronomy, biology, earth and planetary sciences all offer low-cost opportunities to seek a footprint of extraterrestrial technology. In this paper we take as a case study one particular new and rapidly-expanding database: the photographic mapping of the Moon's surface by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to 0.5 m resolution. Although there is only a tiny probability that alien technology would have left traces on the moon in the form of an artifact or surface modification of lunar features, this location has the virtue of being close, and of preserving traces for an immense duration. Systematic scrutiny of the LRO photographic images is being routinely conducted anyway for planetary science purposes, and this program could readily be expanded and outsourced at little extra cost to accommodate SETI goals, after the fashion of the SETI@home and Galaxy Zoo projects.

  14. Colorectal Cancer "Methylator Phenotype": Fact or Artifact?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Anacleto

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that human colorectal tumors can be classified into two groups: one in which methylation is rare, and another with methylation of several loci associated with a "CpG island methylated phenotype (CIMP," characterized by preferential proximal location in the colon, but otherwise poorly defined. There is considerable overlap between this putative methylator phenotype and the well-known mutator phenotype associated with microsatellite instability (MSI. We have examined hypermethylation of the promoter region of five genes (DAPK, MGMT, hMLH1, p16INK4a, and p14ARF in 106 primary colorectal cancers. A graph depicting the frequency of methylated loci in the series of tumors showed a continuous, monotonically decreasing distribution quite different from the previously claimed discontinuity. We observed a significant association between the presence of three or more methylated loci and the proximal location of the tumors. However, if we remove from analysis the tumors with hMLH1 methylation or those with MSI, the significance vanishes, suggesting that the association between multiple methylations and proximal location was indirect due to the correlation with MSI. Thus, our data do not support the independent existence of the so-called methylator phenotype and suggest that it rather may represent a statistical artifact caused by confounding of associations.

  15. A Combined Methodology to Eliminate Artifacts in Multichannel Electrogastrogram Based on Independent Component Analysis and Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengottuvel, S; Khan, Pathan Fayaz; Mariyappa, N; Patel, Rajesh; Saipriya, S; Gireesan, K

    2018-06-01

    Cutaneous measurements of electrogastrogram (EGG) signals are heavily contaminated by artifacts due to cardiac activity, breathing, motion artifacts, and electrode drifts whose effective elimination remains an open problem. A common methodology is proposed by combining independent component analysis (ICA) and ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) to denoise gastric slow-wave signals in multichannel EGG data. Sixteen electrodes are fixed over the upper abdomen to measure the EGG signals under three gastric conditions, namely, preprandial, postprandial immediately, and postprandial 2 h after food for three healthy subjects and a subject with a gastric disorder. Instantaneous frequencies of intrinsic mode functions that are obtained by applying the EEMD technique are analyzed to individually identify and remove each of the artifacts. A critical investigation on the proposed ICA-EEMD method reveals its ability to provide a higher attenuation of artifacts and lower distortion than those obtained by the ICA-EMD method and conventional techniques, like bandpass and adaptive filtering. Characteristic changes in the slow-wave frequencies across the three gastric conditions could be determined from the denoised signals for all the cases. The results therefore encourage the use of the EEMD-based technique for denoising gastric signals to be used in clinical practice.

  16. Physiological artifacts in scalp EEG and ear-EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, Simon L; Looney, David; Mandic, Danilo P; Kidmose, Preben

    2017-08-11

    A problem inherent to recording EEG is the interference arising from noise and artifacts. While in a laboratory environment, artifacts and interference can, to a large extent, be avoided or controlled, in real-life scenarios this is a challenge. Ear-EEG is a concept where EEG is acquired from electrodes in the ear. We present a characterization of physiological artifacts generated in a controlled environment for nine subjects. The influence of the artifacts was quantified in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) deterioration of the auditory steady-state response. Alpha band modulation was also studied in an open/closed eyes paradigm. Artifacts related to jaw muscle contractions were present all over the scalp and in the ear, with the highest SNR deteriorations in the gamma band. The SNR deterioration for jaw artifacts were in general higher in the ear compared to the scalp. Whereas eye-blinking did not influence the SNR in the ear, it was significant for all groups of scalps electrodes in the delta and theta bands. Eye movements resulted in statistical significant SNR deterioration in both frontal, temporal and ear electrodes. Recordings of alpha band modulation showed increased power and coherence of the EEG for ear and scalp electrodes in the closed-eyes periods. Ear-EEG is a method developed for unobtrusive and discreet recording over long periods of time and in real-life environments. This study investigated the influence of the most important types of physiological artifacts, and demonstrated that spontaneous activity, in terms of alpha band oscillations, could be recorded from the ear-EEG platform. In its present form ear-EEG was more prone to jaw related artifacts and less prone to eye-blinking artifacts compared to state-of-the-art scalp based systems.

  17. Grain-boundary, glassy-phase identification and possible artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Y.K.; Carter, C.B.; Sklad, P.; Bentley, J.

    1985-01-01

    Specimen artifacts such as grain boundary grooving, surface damage of the specimen, and Si contamination are shown experimentally to arise from the ion milling used in the preparation of transmission electron microscopy specimens. These artifacts in polycrystalline, ceramic specimens can cause clean grain boundaries to appear to contain a glassy phase when the dark-field diffuse scattering technique, the Fresnel fringe technique, and analytical electron microscopy (energy dispersive spectroscopy) are used to identify glassy phases at a grain boundary. The ambiguity in interpreting each of these techniques due to the ion milling artifacts will be discussed from a theoretical view point and compared to experimental results obtained for alumina

  18. Towards a concept of community artifact ecology in HCI?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saad-Sulonen, Joanna; Korsgaard, Henrik

    or workplaces do. This has implications on understanding how to research and design HCI for communities but also on refining the ecological perspective in HCI. We look in particular at examples from preliminary research on a local self-organised urban community and discuss what existing concepts in the ecology......In this paper we introduce the concept of community artifact ecology. We argue that taking a community perspective on the concept of artifact ecologies is relevant in HCI because communities are also dealing with multitudes of artifacts, in ways di↵erent that individuals, organizations...

  19. Thermoluminescent determination of prehistoric heat treatment of chert artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melcher, C.L.; Zimmerman, D.W.

    1977-01-01

    In recent years archeologists have become interested in the extent to which prehistoric peoples heat-treated chert prior to shaping it into tools. Thermoluminescent determination of the radiation dose accumulated by an artifact since it was formed or last heated provides a simple, reliable test for such heat treatment. This test can be applied to single artifacts without the need for raw source material for comparison. Results on 25 artifacts from four sites indicate that, for many chert sources, color and luster are not useful indicators of heat treatment by prehistoric peoples

  20. Artifacts Affecting Musculoskeletal Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Their Origins and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Eira; Hoff, Michael; Richardson, Michael L; Ha, Alice S; Porrino, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Among articles within the radiology literature, few present the manifestations of magnetic resonance imaging artifacts in a clinically oriented manner. Recognizing such artifacts is imperative given the increasing clinical use of magnetic resonance imaging and the emphasis by the American Board of Radiology on practical physics applications. The purpose of this article is to present magnetic resonance physics principles visually and conceptually in the context of common musculoskeletal radiology artifacts and their solutions, described using nonmathematical explanations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel Assessment of Renal Motion in Children as Measured via Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S.; Sharma, Shelly; Naik, Mihir H.; Wu, Shengjie; Hua, Chiaho; Beltran, Chris; Krasin, Matthew J.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Abdominal intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy require quantification of target and organ motion to optimize localization and treatment. Although addressed in adults, there is no available literature on this issue in pediatric patients. We assessed physiologic renal motion in pediatric patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty free-breathing pediatric patients at a median age of 8 years (range, 2–18 years) with intra-abdominal tumors underwent computed tomography simulation and four-dimensional computed tomography acquisition (slice thickness, 3 mm). Kidneys and diaphragms were contoured during eight phases of respiration to estimate center-of-mass motion. We quantified center of kidney mass mobility vectors in three dimensions: anteroposterior (AP), mediolateral (ML), and superoinferior (SI). Results: Kidney motion decreases linearly with decreasing age and height. The 95% confidence interval for the averaged minima and maxima of renal motion in children younger than 9 years was 5–9 mm in the ML direction, 4–11 mm in the AP direction, and 12–25 mm in the SI dimension for both kidneys. In children older than 9 years, the same confidence interval reveals a widening range of motion that was 5–16 mm in the ML direction, 6–17 mm in the AP direction, and 21–52 mm in the SI direction. Although not statistically significant, renal motion correlated with diaphragm motion in older patients. The correlation between diaphragm motion and body mass index was borderline (r = 0.52, p = 0.0816) in younger patients. Conclusions: Renal motion is age and height dependent. Measuring diaphragmatic motion alone does not reliably quantify pediatric renal motion. Renal motion in young children ranges from 5 to 25 mm in orientation-specific directions. The vectors of motion range from 5 to 52 mm in older children. These preliminary data represent novel analyses of pediatric intra-abdominal organ motion.

  2. Novel Assessment of Renal Motion in Children as Measured via Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S., E-mail: atmaram.pai-panandiker@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Sharma, Shelly; Naik, Mihir H. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Wu, Shengjie [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Hua, Chiaho; Beltran, Chris; Krasin, Matthew J.; Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Objectives: Abdominal intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy require quantification of target and organ motion to optimize localization and treatment. Although addressed in adults, there is no available literature on this issue in pediatric patients. We assessed physiologic renal motion in pediatric patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty free-breathing pediatric patients at a median age of 8 years (range, 2-18 years) with intra-abdominal tumors underwent computed tomography simulation and four-dimensional computed tomography acquisition (slice thickness, 3 mm). Kidneys and diaphragms were contoured during eight phases of respiration to estimate center-of-mass motion. We quantified center of kidney mass mobility vectors in three dimensions: anteroposterior (AP), mediolateral (ML), and superoinferior (SI). Results: Kidney motion decreases linearly with decreasing age and height. The 95% confidence interval for the averaged minima and maxima of renal motion in children younger than 9 years was 5-9 mm in the ML direction, 4-11 mm in the AP direction, and 12-25 mm in the SI dimension for both kidneys. In children older than 9 years, the same confidence interval reveals a widening range of motion that was 5-16 mm in the ML direction, 6-17 mm in the AP direction, and 21-52 mm in the SI direction. Although not statistically significant, renal motion correlated with diaphragm motion in older patients. The correlation between diaphragm motion and body mass index was borderline (r = 0.52, p = 0.0816) in younger patients. Conclusions: Renal motion is age and height dependent. Measuring diaphragmatic motion alone does not reliably quantify pediatric renal motion. Renal motion in young children ranges from 5 to 25 mm in orientation-specific directions. The vectors of motion range from 5 to 52 mm in older children. These preliminary data represent novel analyses of pediatric intra-abdominal organ motion.

  3. Artifact in Pediatric Oculomotor Findings during Videonystagmography: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doettl, Steven M; Plyler, Patrick N; McCaslin, Devin L

    2017-04-01

    Accurate measurement of oculomotor function using videonystagmography (VNG) is imperative for diagnosis and management of patients with reported dizziness. The oculomotor evaluation during VNG utilizes video-oculography providing valuable information regarding the central structures and pathways that control eye movements. Artifact may have an effect on the overall validity and reliability of VNG oculomotor tracings and can result from patient and/or recording errors. It is postulated that artifact could occur more frequently in the pediatric population due to both patient and equipment factors. The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate the occurrence and impact of artifact on saccades, smooth pursuit, and optokinetic (OPK) testing in normal pediatric and adult subjects using commercially available clinical VNG equipment and standard clinical protocols for oculomotor testing. The present study utilized a retrospective analysis of a repeated measures design. Oculomotor results from a total of 62 participants were analyzed. Portions of these data have been presented in a previous research study. Group 1 consisted of twenty-nine 4- to 6-yr-olds with an average age of 4.86 (SD = 0.88) yr. Group 2 consisted of thirty-three 22- to 44-yr-olds with an average age of 25.2 (SD = 5.34) yr. Raw oculomotor recordings were analyzed "offline" by a single masked, trained investigator. Each tracing was evaluated for instances of artifact including eye blinks, eye closure, eyes moving in opposite direction of the target, eye tracking software problems, and overall poor morphology. The number of instances of artifact were noted and recorded for each participant in both groups. Individual eye movements not affected by artifact were included for final analysis. Artifact rejection techniques were also compared. The results indicated increased artifact for the pediatric group for saccade and smooth pursuit testing. Additionally, a significant decrease in instances of

  4. Applications of Phase-Based Motion Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Nicholas A.; Stewart, Eric C.

    2018-01-01

    Image pyramids provide useful information in determining structural response at low cost using commercially available cameras. The current effort applies previous work on the complex steerable pyramid to analyze and identify imperceptible linear motions in video. Instead of implicitly computing motion spectra through phase analysis of the complex steerable pyramid and magnifying the associated motions, instead present a visual technique and the necessary software to display the phase changes of high frequency signals within video. The present technique quickly identifies regions of largest motion within a video with a single phase visualization and without the artifacts of motion magnification, but requires use of the computationally intensive Fourier transform. While Riesz pyramids present an alternative to the computationally intensive complex steerable pyramid for motion magnification, the Riesz formulation contains significant noise, and motion magnification still presents large amounts of data that cannot be quickly assessed by the human eye. Thus, user-friendly software is presented for quickly identifying structural response through optical flow and phase visualization in both Python and MATLAB.

  5. Implications of CT noise and artifacts for quantitative 99mTc SPECT/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulme, K. W.; Kappadath, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This paper evaluates the effects of computed tomography (CT) image noise and artifacts on quantitative single-photon emission computed-tomography (SPECT) imaging, with the aim of establishing an appropriate range of CT acquisition parameters for low-dose protocols with respect to accurate SPECT attenuation correction (AC). Methods: SPECT images of two geometric and one anthropomorphic phantom were reconstructed iteratively using CT scans acquired at a range of dose levels (CTDI vol = 0.4 to 46 mGy). Resultant SPECT image quality was evaluated by comparing mean signal, background noise, and artifacts to SPECT images reconstructed using the highest dose CT for AC. Noise injection was performed on linear-attenuation (μ) maps to determine the CT noise threshold for accurate AC. Results: High levels of CT noise (σ ∼ 200–400 HU) resulted in low μ-maps noise (σ ∼ 1%–3%). Noise levels greater than ∼10% in 140 keV μ-maps were required to produce visibly perceptible increases of ∼15% in 99m Tc SPECT images. These noise levels would be achieved at low CT dose levels (CTDI vol = 4 μGy) that are over 2 orders of magnitude lower than the minimum dose for diagnostic CT scanners. CT noise could also lower (bias) the expected μ values. The relative error in reconstructed SPECT signal trended linearly with the relative shift in μ. SPECT signal was, on average, underestimated in regions corresponding with beam-hardening artifacts in CT images. Any process that has the potential to change the CT number of a region by ∼100 HU (e.g., misregistration between CT images and SPECT images due to motion, the presence of contrast in CT images) could introduce errors in μ 140 keV on the order of 10%, that in turn, could introduce errors on the order of ∼10% into the reconstructed 99m Tc SPECT image. Conclusions: The impact of CT noise on SPECT noise was demonstrated to be negligible for clinically achievable CT parameters. Because CT dose levels that affect

  6. Feasibility of Stereo-Infrared Tracking to Monitor Patient Motion During Cardiac SPECT Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Beach, Richard D.; Pretorius, P. Hendrik; Boening, Guido; Bruyant, Philippe P.; Feng, Bing; Fulton, Roger R.; Gennert, Michael A.; Nadella, Suman; King, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Patient motion during cardiac SPECT imaging can cause diagnostic imaging artifacts. We investigated the feasibility of monitoring patient motion using the Polaris motion-tracking system. This system uses passive infrared reflection from small spheres to provide real-time position data with vendor stated 0.35 mm accuracy and 0.2 mm repeatability. In our configuration, the Polaris system views through the SPECT gantry toward the patient's head. List-mode event data was temporally synchronized w...

  7. Timing and related artifacts in multidimensional NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marion, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    The information content of multidimensional NMR spectra is limited by the presence of several kinds of artifacts that originate from incorrect timing of evolution periods. The objective of this review is to provide tools for successful implementation of published pulse sequences, in which timing and pulse compensations are often implicit. We will analyze the constraints set by the use of Fourier transformation, the spin precession during rectangular or shaped pulses, the Bloch-Siegert effects due to pulse on other spins and the delay introduced by the filters for the acquisition dimension. A frequency dependent phase correction or an incorrect scaling of the first data point leads to baseline offsets or curvature due to the properties of the Fourier transform. Because any r.f. pulse has a finite length, chemical shift is always active during excitation, flip-back, inversion, and refocusing pulses. Rectangular or selective shaped pulses can be split into three periods: an ideal rotation surrounded by two chemical shift evolution periods, which should be subtracted from the adjacent delays to avoid linear phase correction. Bloch-Siegert effects originate from irradiation at frequencies near those observed in the spectrum and can lead to phase or frequency shifts. They can be minimized by simultaneous irradiation on both sides of the observed spins. In terms of timing, the very end of the pulse sequence the acquisition behaves differently since the data are filtered by either analog or digital means. This additional delay is filter and spectrometer specific and should be tuned to minimize the required phase correction. Combined together, all these adjustments lead to perfectly phased spectra with flat baseline and no peak shifts or distortion. (author)

  8. Detection of gastroesophageal reflux in survivors of congenital diaphragmatic hernia: A radionuclide scintigraphic study in 26 children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, E.J.; Bharathi Dasan, J.; Chandrasekhar, N.; Tripathi, M.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, A.; Gupta, D.K.; Mitra, D.K.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: Anatomical and functional esophageal abnormalities in survivors with CDH are well known. Gastro-esophageal Reflux (GER) is a common cause of long-term morbidity in survivors of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. The incidence of GER in these patients varies from 20-70% using various modalities. Aims: The present retrospective analysis was undertaken to find out the incidence of GER detected by radionuclide scintigraphy in survivors of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Materials and Methods: Radionuclide scintigraphy for GER detection were performed in 26 survivors of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (17 male and 9 female) with a mean age of 19 months; age range 10 days to 56 months. Seven of the children had symptoms suggestive of GER. Of these 7, 3 had recurrent respiratory tract infection, 2 had regurgitation, 1 had vomiting and 1 had epigastric pain. The remaining 19 children were referred as part of routine follow up. All the children underwent radionuclide scintigraphy with 100-200 micro curie (3.7 -7.4MBq) of Tc99m-Sulphur Colloid. Results: The radionuclide scintigraphy detected GER in 11 out of 26(42.3%) children. Among the 7 symptomatic children, 4 (57%) had positive scintigraphic studies for reflux. Of these 4, 3(75%) had proximal reflux and 1 had distal reflux. Of the 19 asymptomatic patients, 7 (37%) were positive for GER on scintigraphy. Of these 7, 4 (57%) had proximal reflux and 3 (43%) had distal reflux. Conclusions: There is high incidence of GER in survivors of congenital diaphragmatic hernia irrespective of the presence or absence of symptoms suggestive of GER. Scintiscanning being a simple, noninvasive test can be used for initial evaluation of survivors of CDH for GER

  9. Cultural Artifact Detection in Long Wave Infrared Imagery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Dylan Zachary [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Craven, Julia M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ramon, Eric [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Detection of cultural artifacts from airborne remotely sensed data is an important task in the context of on-site inspections. Airborne artifact detection can reduce the size of the search area the ground based inspection team must visit, thereby improving the efficiency of the inspection process. This report details two algorithms for detection of cultural artifacts in aerial long wave infrared imagery. The first algorithm creates an explicit model for cultural artifacts, and finds data that fits the model. The second algorithm creates a model of the background and finds data that does not fit the model. Both algorithms are applied to orthomosaic imagery generated as part of the MSFE13 data collection campaign under the spectral technology evaluation project.

  10. Ring artifact correction for high-resolution micro CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyriakou, Yiannis; Prell, Daniel; Kalender, Willi A

    2009-01-01

    In high-resolution micro CT using flat detectors (FD), imperfect or defect detector elements may cause concentric-ring artifacts due to their continuous over- or underestimation of attenuation values, which often disturb image quality. We here present a dedicated image-based ring artifact correction method for high-resolution micro CT, based on median filtering of the reconstructed image and working on a transformed version of the reconstructed images in polar coordinates. This post-processing method reduced ring artifacts in the reconstructed images and improved image quality for phantom and in in vivo scans. Noise and artifacts were reduced both in transversal and in multi-planar reformations along the longitudinal axis. (note)

  11. Adaptive noise canceling of electrocardiogram artifacts in single channel electroencephalogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung Pil; Song, Mi Hye; Park, Young Cheol; Choi, Ho Seon; Lee, Kyoung Joung

    2007-01-01

    A new method for estimating and eliminating electrocardiogram (ECG) artifacts from single channel scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) is proposed. The proposed method consists of emphasis of QRS complex from EEG using least squares acceleration (LSA) filter, generation of synchronized pulse with R-peak and ECG artifacts estimation and elimination using adaptive filter. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated using simulated and real EEG recordings, we found that the ECG artifacts were successfully estimated and eliminated in comparison with the conventional multi-channel techniques, which are independent component analysis (ICA) and ensemble average (EA) method. From this we can conclude that the proposed method is useful for the detecting and eliminating the ECG artifacts from single channel EEG and simple to use for ambulatory/portable EEG monitoring system.

  12. quantification of rain quantification of rain induced artifacts on digital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    DSTV) ... satellite television, rain attenuation, digital artifacts, pixelation, rainfall rate. 1. ... screen and blocking are commonly observed in .... The precipitation data was collected using a self- ..... Networks: Comparison at Equatorial and Subtropical.

  13. Syndromes and Disorders Associated with Omphalocele (III: Single Gene Disorders, Neural Tube Defects, Diaphragmatic Defects and Others

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Omphalocele can be associated with single gene disorders, neural tube defects, diaphragmatic defects, fetal valproate syndrome, and syndromes of unknown etiology. This article provides a comprehensive review of omphalocele-related disorders: otopalatodigital syndrome type II; Melnick–Needles syndrome; Rieger syndrome; neural tube defects; Meckel syndrome; Shprintzen–Goldberg omphalocele syndrome; lethal omphalocele-cleft palate syndrome; cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome; fetal valproate syndrome; Marshall–Smith syndrome; fibrochondrogenesis; hydrolethalus syndrome; Fryns syndrome; omphalocele, diaphragmatic defects, radial anomalies and various internal malformations; diaphragmatic defects, limb deficiencies and ossification defects of skull; Donnai–Barrow syndrome; CHARGE syndrome; Goltz syndrome; Carpenter syndrome; Toriello–Carey syndrome; familial omphalocele; Cornelia de Lange syndrome; C syndrome; Elejalde syndrome; Malpuech syndrome; cervical ribs, Sprengel anomaly, anal atresia and urethral obstruction; hydrocephalus with associated malformations; Kennerknecht syndrome; lymphedema, atrial septal defect and facial changes; and craniosynostosis- mental retardation syndrome of Lin and Gettig. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert one to the possibility of omphalocele-related disorders and familial inheritance and prompt a thorough genetic counseling for these disorders.

  14. Traumatic Pulmonary Herniation at the Diaphragmatic Junction in a Pediatric Patient: A Rare Complication of Blunt Chest Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlik, Kseniya; Simon, Erin Leslie; Hemmer, Carrie; Ramundo, Maria

    2016-07-01

    We present a case of traumatic intercostal pulmonary herniation in an 11-year-old boy after blunt trauma to the chest, without associated chest wall disruption or pneumothorax. This condition is especially uncommon in children, with only 5 previously reported cases and most occurring after penetrating chest trauma. To date, there are no reports in literature describing traumatic intercostal lung herniation at the diaphragmatic junction with a closed chest cavity in a child. The number of traumatic lung herniation diagnoses may be expanded by a more liberal use of computed tomography when serious injury is suspected. Computed tomography and advanced imaging should be considered in pediatric trauma patients presenting with concern for intrathoracic injury that may not be seen on plain film. Traumatic blunt intrathoracic and intra-abdominal injuries in the pediatric population that are within proximity of diaphragmatic insertion should be thoroughly evaluated to rule out diaphragmatic injury. As in our case, invasive surgical intervention such as thoracoscopy may be necessary.

  15. Mitigation of artifacts in rtm with migration kernel decomposition

    KAUST Repository

    Zhan, Ge

    2012-01-01

    The migration kernel for reverse-time migration (RTM) can be decomposed into four component kernels using Born scattering and migration theory. Each component kernel has a unique physical interpretation and can be interpreted differently. In this paper, we present a generalized diffraction-stack migration approach for reducing RTM artifacts via decomposition of migration kernel. The decomposition leads to an improved understanding of migration artifacts and, therefore, presents us with opportunities for improving the quality of RTM images.

  16. Reduction of metal artifacts: beam hardening and photon starvation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadava, Girijesh K.; Pal, Debashish; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    The presence of metal-artifacts in CT imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and interfere with disease diagnosis. The cause and occurrence of metal-artifacts are primarily due to beam hardening, scatter, partial volume and photon starvation; however, the contribution to the artifacts from each of them depends on the type of hardware. A comparison of CT images obtained with different metallic hardware in various applications, along with acquisition and reconstruction parameters, helps understand methods for reducing or overcoming such artifacts. In this work, a metal beam hardening correction (BHC) and a projection-completion based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms were developed, and applied on phantom and clinical CT scans with various metallic implants. Stainless-steel and Titanium were used to model and correct for metal beam hardening effect. In the MAR algorithm, the corrupted projection samples are replaced by the combination of original projections and in-painted data obtained by forward projecting a prior image. The data included spine fixation screws, hip-implants, dental-filling, and body extremity fixations, covering range of clinically used metal implants. Comparison of BHC and MAR on different metallic implants was used to characterize dominant source of the artifacts, and conceivable methods to overcome those. Results of the study indicate that beam hardening could be a dominant source of artifact in many spine and extremity fixations, whereas dental and hip implants could be dominant source of photon starvation. The BHC algorithm could significantly improve image quality in CT scans with metallic screws, whereas MAR algorithm could alleviate artifacts in hip-implants and dentalfillings.

  17. Preliminary experimental insights into differential heat impact among lithic artifacts

    OpenAIRE

    Guillermo Bustos-Pérez; Javier Baena Preysler

    2016-01-01

    The presence of thermally altered and broken flint artifacts is common at archaeological sites. Most studies focus their attention on the effects of heat treatment on flint to improve knapping qualities, disregarding the effects of fire over flint under uncontrolled conditions. This paper aims to show how under uncontrolled heating processes flint artifacts develop different heat alterations (such as levels of breakage, presence of scales, etc.) as a result of vertical distribution, volume or...

  18. Cyber Event Artifact Investigation Training in a Virtual Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    information was desired in the logs as well as best practices provided by Microsoft: 1. Every Success or Failure for: Account Logon Events, Account ...use this artifact in conjunction with information discovered through investigation of other artifacts, such as logs and accounts . For instance, the...when coupled with logs, accounts , and process data, this information may provide enough evidence for transition into the reporting and Preliminary

  19. Evaluation of motion and its effect on brain magnetic resonance image quality in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afacan, Onur; Erem, Burak; Roby, Diona P.; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Warfield, Simon K. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Roth, Noam; Roth, Amir [Robin Medical Inc., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Motion artifacts pose significant problems for the acquisition of MR images in pediatric populations. To evaluate temporal motion metrics in MRI scanners and their effect on image quality in pediatric populations in neuroimaging studies. We report results from a large pediatric brain imaging study that shows the effect of motion on MRI quality. We measured motion metrics in 82 pediatric patients, mean age 13.4 years, in a T1-weighted brain MRI scan. As a result of technical difficulties, 5 scans were not included in the subsequent analyses. A radiologist graded the images using a 4-point scale ranging from clinically non-diagnostic because of motion artifacts to no motion artifacts. We used these grades to correlate motion parameters such as maximum motion, mean displacement from a reference point, and motion-free time with image quality. Our results show that both motion-free time (as a ratio of total scan time) and average displacement from a position at a fixed time (when the center of k-space was acquired) were highly correlated with image quality, whereas maximum displacement was not as good a predictor. Among the 77 patients whose motion was measured successfully, 17 had average displacements of greater than 0.5 mm, and 11 of those (14.3%) resulted in non-diagnostic images. Similarly, 14 patients (18.2%) had less than 90% motion-free time, which also resulted in non-diagnostic images. We report results from a large pediatric study to show how children and young adults move in the MRI scanner and the effect that this motion has on image quality. The results will help the motion-correction community in better understanding motion patterns in pediatric populations and how these patterns affect MR image quality. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of motion and its effect on brain magnetic resonance image quality in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afacan, Onur; Erem, Burak; Roby, Diona P.; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Warfield, Simon K.; Roth, Noam; Roth, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Motion artifacts pose significant problems for the acquisition of MR images in pediatric populations. To evaluate temporal motion metrics in MRI scanners and their effect on image quality in pediatric populations in neuroimaging studies. We report results from a large pediatric brain imaging study that shows the effect of motion on MRI quality. We measured motion metrics in 82 pediatric patients, mean age 13.4 years, in a T1-weighted brain MRI scan. As a result of technical difficulties, 5 scans were not included in the subsequent analyses. A radiologist graded the images using a 4-point scale ranging from clinically non-diagnostic because of motion artifacts to no motion artifacts. We used these grades to correlate motion parameters such as maximum motion, mean displacement from a reference point, and motion-free time with image quality. Our results show that both motion-free time (as a ratio of total scan time) and average displacement from a position at a fixed time (when the center of k-space was acquired) were highly correlated with image quality, whereas maximum displacement was not as good a predictor. Among the 77 patients whose motion was measured successfully, 17 had average displacements of greater than 0.5 mm, and 11 of those (14.3%) resulted in non-diagnostic images. Similarly, 14 patients (18.2%) had less than 90% motion-free time, which also resulted in non-diagnostic images. We report results from a large pediatric study to show how children and young adults move in the MRI scanner and the effect that this motion has on image quality. The results will help the motion-correction community in better understanding motion patterns in pediatric populations and how these patterns affect MR image quality. (orig.)

  1. Artifact removal from EEG signals using adaptive filters in cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés Correa, A.; Laciar, E.; Patiño, H. D.; Valentinuzzi, M. E.

    2007-11-01

    Artifacts in EEG (electroencephalogram) records are caused by various factors, like line interference, EOG (electro-oculogram) and ECG (electrocardiogram). These noise sources increase the difficulty in analyzing the EEG and to obtaining clinical information. For this reason, it is necessary to design specific filters to decrease such artifacts in EEG records. In this paper, a cascade of three adaptive filters based on a least mean squares (LMS) algorithm is proposed. The first one eliminates line interference, the second adaptive filter removes the ECG artifacts and the last one cancels EOG spikes. Each stage uses a finite impulse response (FIR) filter, which adjusts its coefficients to produce an output similar to the artifacts present in the EEG. The proposed cascade adaptive filter was tested in five real EEG records acquired in polysomnographic studies. In all cases, line-frequency, ECG and EOG artifacts were attenuated. It is concluded that the proposed filter reduces the common artifacts present in EEG signals without removing significant information embedded in these records.

  2. Artifact removal from EEG signals using adaptive filters in cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garces Correa, A; Laciar, E; Patino, H D; Valentinuzzi, M E

    2007-01-01

    Artifacts in EEG (electroencephalogram) records are caused by various factors, like line interference, EOG (electro-oculogram) and ECG (electrocardiogram). These noise sources increase the difficulty in analyzing the EEG and to obtaining clinical information. For this reason, it is necessary to design specific filters to decrease such artifacts in EEG records. In this paper, a cascade of three adaptive filters based on a least mean squares (LMS) algorithm is proposed. The first one eliminates line interference, the second adaptive filter removes the ECG artifacts and the last one cancels EOG spikes. Each stage uses a finite impulse response (FIR) filter, which adjusts its coefficients to produce an output similar to the artifacts present in the EEG. The proposed cascade adaptive filter was tested in five real EEG records acquired in polysomnographic studies. In all cases, line-frequency, ECG and EOG artifacts were attenuated. It is concluded that the proposed filter reduces the common artifacts present in EEG signals without removing significant information embedded in these records

  3. Artifact removal from EEG signals using adaptive filters in cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garces Correa, A [Gabinete de TecnologIa Medica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de San Juan (Argentina); Laciar, E [Gabinete de TecnologIa Medica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de San Juan (Argentina); Patino, H D [Instituto de Automatica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de San Juan (Argentina); Valentinuzzi, M E [Instituto Superior de Investigaciones Biologicas (INSIBIO), UNT-CONICET, Tucuman (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Artifacts in EEG (electroencephalogram) records are caused by various factors, like line interference, EOG (electro-oculogram) and ECG (electrocardiogram). These noise sources increase the difficulty in analyzing the EEG and to obtaining clinical information. For this reason, it is necessary to design specific filters to decrease such artifacts in EEG records. In this paper, a cascade of three adaptive filters based on a least mean squares (LMS) algorithm is proposed. The first one eliminates line interference, the second adaptive filter removes the ECG artifacts and the last one cancels EOG spikes. Each stage uses a finite impulse response (FIR) filter, which adjusts its coefficients to produce an output similar to the artifacts present in the EEG. The proposed cascade adaptive filter was tested in five real EEG records acquired in polysomnographic studies. In all cases, line-frequency, ECG and EOG artifacts were attenuated. It is concluded that the proposed filter reduces the common artifacts present in EEG signals without removing significant information embedded in these records.

  4. Data-driven motion correction in brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyme, A.Z.; Hutton, B.F.; Hatton, R.L.; Skerrett, D.W.

    2002-01-01

    Patient motion can cause image artifacts in SPECT despite restraining measures. Data-driven detection and correction of motion can be achieved by comparison of acquired data with the forward-projections. By optimising the orientation of the reconstruction, parameters can be obtained for each misaligned projection and applied to update this volume using a 3D reconstruction algorithm. Digital and physical phantom validation was performed to investigate this approach. Noisy projection data simulating at least one fully 3D patient head movement during acquisition were constructed by projecting the digital Huffman brain phantom at various orientations. Motion correction was applied to the reconstructed studies. The importance of including attenuation effects in the estimation of motion and the need for implementing an iterated correction were assessed in the process. Correction success was assessed visually for artifact reduction, and quantitatively using a mean square difference (MSD) measure. Physical Huffman phantom studies with deliberate movements introduced during the acquisition were also acquired and motion corrected. Effective artifact reduction in the simulated corrupt studies was achieved by motion correction. Typically the MSD ratio between the corrected and reference studies compared to the corrupted and reference studies was > 2. Motion correction could be achieved without inclusion of attenuation effects in the motion estimation stage, providing simpler implementation and greater efficiency. Moreover the additional improvement with multiple iterations of the approach was small. Improvement was also observed in the physical phantom data, though the technique appeared limited here by an object symmetry. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  5. SU-F-J-115: Target Volume and Artifact Evaluation of a New Device-Less 4D CT Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R; Pan, T [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: 4DCT is often used in radiation therapy treatment planning to define the extent of motion of the visible tumor (IGTV). Recent available software allows 4DCT images to be created without the use of an external motion surrogate. This study aims to compare this device-less algorithm to a standard device-driven technique (RPM) in regards to artifacts and the creation of treatment volumes. Methods: 34 lung cancer patients who had previously received a cine 4DCT scan on a GE scanner with an RPM determined respiratory signal were selected. Cine images were sorted into 10 phases based on both the RPM signal and the device-less algorithm. Contours were created on standard and device-less maximum intensity projection (MIP) images using a region growing algorithm and manual adjustment to remove other structures. Variations in measurements due to intra-observer differences in contouring were assessed by repeating a subset of 6 patients 2 additional times. Artifacts in each phase image were assessed using normalized cross correlation at each bed position transition. A score between +1 (artifacts “better” in all phases for device-less) and −1 (RPM similarly better) was assigned for each patient based on these results. Results: Device-less IGTV contours were 2.1 ± 1.0% smaller than standard IGTV contours (not significant, p = 0.15). The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) was 0.950 ± 0.006 indicating good similarity between the contours. Intra-observer variation resulted in standard deviations of 1.2 percentage points in percent volume difference and 0.005 in DSC measurements. Only two patients had improved artifacts with RPM, and the average artifact score (0.40) was significantly greater than zero. Conclusion: Device-less 4DCT can be used in place of the standard method for target definition due to no observed difference between standard and device-less IGTVs. Phase image artifacts were significantly reduced with the device-less method.

  6. A systematic review with meta-analysis of the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux in congenital diaphragmatic hernia pediatric survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcos-Machancoses, J V; Ruiz Hernández, C; Martin de Carpi, J; Pinillos Pisón, S

    2018-02-09

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia survivors are a well-known group at risk for developing gastroesophageal reflux disease that may be particularly long-term severe. The aim of this study is to provide a systematic review of the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux in infant and children survivors treated for congenital diaphragmatic hernia.Electronic and manual searches were performed with keywords related to congenital diaphragmatic hernia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and epidemiology terms. Summary estimates of the prevalence were calculated. Effect model was chosen depending on heterogeneity (I2). Factors potentially related with the prevalence, including study quality or the diagnostic strategy followed, were assessed by subgroup and meta-regression analyses. Risk of publication bias was studied by funnel plot analysis and the Egger test.The search yielded 140 articles, 26 of which were included in the analyses and provided 34 estimates of prevalence: 21 in patients aged 12 months or younger, and 13 in older children. The overall prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in infants was 52.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 43.2% to 62.1%, I2 = 88.7%) and, in children over 1 year old, 35.1% (95% CI: 25.4% to 45.3%, I2 = 73.5%). Significant clinical and statistical heterogeneity was found. The strategy chosen for gastroesophageal reflux diagnosis influenced the reported prevalence. The only estimate obtained with a systematic use of multichannel intraluminal impedance provided a higher prevalence in both age groups: 83.3% (95% CI: 67.2% to 93.6%) and 61.1% (95% CI: 43.5% to 76.9%) respectively. This last prevalence did not significantly differ from that obtained using only low risk of bias estimates.As a conclusion, gastroesophageal reflux disease is commonly observed after congenital diaphragmatic hernia repair and is almost constantly present in the first months of life. It may be underdiagnosed if systematically esophageal monitoring is not

  7. Measurement of Diaphragmatic Blood Flow and Oxygen Consumption in the Dog by the Kety-Schmidt Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochester, Dudley F.

    1974-01-01

    To assess energy expenditure of the diaphragm directly, a method was devised for percutaneous catheterization of the left inferior phrenic vein in dogs. Necropsy studies, including retrograde injection of india ink and measurement of radioactivity in diaphragmatic muscle strips, suggested that the territory drained by the inferior phrenic vein was uniformly perfused, and that there were no major anastomoses between this bed and adjacent ones. Diaphragmatic blood flow (˙Q di) was calculated from the integrated diaphragmatic arteriovenous difference of 85Kr by the Kety-Schmidt technique. Diaphragmatic oxygen consumption (˙Vo2 di) was determined as the product of ˙Q di and the diaphragmatic arteriovenous oxygen content difference [(A-V)O2 di]. When lightly anesthetized dogs breathed quietly, ˙Q di was 22±SD 6 ml/min/100 g, (A-V)O2 di was 6.1±SD 2.5 ml/100 ml, and ˙VO2 di averaged 1.2±SD 0.3 ml/min/100 g. This represented 1.0±SD 0.2% of total body oxygen consumption. ˙VO2 di remained relatively constant during quiet breathing, whereas ˙Q di varied directly with cardiac output and reciprocally with (A-V)O2 di. The oxygen consumption of the noncontracting diaphragm was 60±SD 20% of the level measured during quiet breathing. The energy expended by the diaphragm to support simple hyperventilation was small. A 100% increase in minute ventilation, induced by inhalation of 5% CO2 in 21% or 14% O2, increased ˙Q di 13%, (A-V)O2 di 19%, and ˙VO2 di 40%. The diaphragm consumed 0.13±SD 0.09 ml O2 for each additional liter of ventilation. In four dogs, pneumonia appeared to increase ˙VO2 both by increasing minute ventilation and by increasing the energy cost per liter of ventilation. PMID:4825221

  8. Historical Artifact Collection at the East Tennessee Technology Park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodpasture, S.T.; Wood, S.K.

    2009-01-01

    The East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) was originally built during World War II as part of the Manhattan Project. Known as the K-25 Site, its primary mission was to enrich uranium for use in atomic weapons. During the Cold War, the site's mission was changed to include the enrichment of uranium for nuclear reactor fuel elements and to recycle spent fuel. In the 1980's, a reduction in the demand for nuclear fuel resulted in the shutdown of the enrichment process and production ceased. The emphasis of the mission for the ETTP was then changed to environmental management and restoration operation. Beginning in the 1990's, re-industrialization (conversion of under-utilized government facilities for use by the private sector) became a major mission at the ETTP. These activities involve cleaning and demolishing facilities. Decommission and demolition (D and D) of facilities at the ETTP or Manhattan Project K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) presented significant challenges complying with the requirements of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) that was negotiated with the stakeholders. Development of a process to identify, record and preserve the artifacts and the cooperation of several agencies and contractors were critical to completing the collection of the artifacts without impacting the D and D project schedule. Additional challenges included contaminated and classified artifacts, entry to facilities with hazardous conditions, schedule pressures and funding for collection and permanent storage. A process was developed to achieve compliance with the requirements of the NHPA. The NHPA requirements and implementing instruments at the ETTP as well as the process developed to preserve significant Manhattan Project era artifacts at the ETTP will be discussed. Implementation of the artifact collection process is also summarized. The challenge of complying with the

  9. Management of respiratory motion in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedam, Subrahmanya Sastry

    2003-01-01

    images obtained during simulation by reducing the motion artifacts typically seen during CT imaging. An analysis of several patient breathing patterns with (audio instructions and visual feedback) and without training, indicated that breathing training improved the reproducibility of amplitude and/or frequency of patient breathing cycles. A phantom based study by superposition of sinusoidal motion of a 'simulated' tumor onto the initial beam aperture as formed by the multileaf collimator revealed that target dose measurements obtained with such a motion synchronized setup were equivalent to those delivered to a static target by a static beam. An attempt to acquire respiration synchronized (4D) CT images of a motion phantom and a patient also yielded a 4D CT data set with reduced motion artifacts. Respiratory gated and respiration synchronized radiotherapy are both viable approaches to account for respiratory motion during radiotherapy. While respiratory gated radiotherapy has been successfully implemented in some centers, several technical advances are required for clinical implementation of respiration synchronized radiotherapy. Future applicability of either of the above approaches as routine treatment procedures will be determined by their potential clinical gains over currently available methods

  10. Motion compensation in digital subtraction angiography using graphics hardware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Lell, Michael; Galant, Adam; Hornegger, Joachim

    2006-07-01

    An inherent disadvantage of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is its sensitivity to patient motion which causes artifacts in the subtraction images. These artifacts could often reduce the diagnostic value of this technique. Automated, fast and accurate motion compensation is therefore required. To cope with this requirement, we first examine a method explicitly designed to detect local motions in DSA. Then, we implement a motion compensation algorithm by means of block matching on modern graphics hardware. Both methods search for maximal local similarity by evaluating a histogram-based measure. In this context, we are the first who have mapped an optimizing search strategy on graphics hardware while paralleling block matching. Moreover, we provide an innovative method for creating histograms on graphics hardware with vertex texturing and frame buffer blending. It turns out that both methods can effectively correct the artifacts in most case, as the hardware implementation of block matching performs much faster: the displacements of two 1024 x 1024 images can be calculated at 3 frames/s with integer precision or 2 frames/s with sub-pixel precision. Preliminary clinical evaluation indicates that the computation with integer precision could already be sufficient.

  11. Reproducible simulation of respiratory motion in porcine lung explants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biederer, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany); Dept. of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Plathow, C. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Univ. Tuebingen (Germany); Dept. of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Schoebinger, M.; Meinzer, H.P. [Dept. of Medical and Biological Informatics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Tetzlaff, R.; Puderbach, M.; Zaporozhan, J.; Kauczor, H.U. [Dept. of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Bolte, H.; Heller, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a model for exactly reproducible respiration motion simulations of animal lung explants inside an MR-compatible chest phantom. Materials and Methods: The materials included a piston pump and a flexible silicone reconstruction of a porcine diaphragm and were used in combination with an established MR-compatible chest phantom for porcine heart-lung preparations. The rhythmic inflation and deflation of the diaphragm at the bottom of the artificial thorax with water (1-1.5 L) induced lung tissue displacement resembling diaphragmatic breathing. This system was tested on five porcine heart-lung preparations using 1.5T MRI with transverse and coronal 3D-GRE (TR/TE=3.63/1.58, 256 x 256 matrix, 350 mm FOV, 4 mm slices) and half Fourier T2-FSE (TR/TE=545/29, 256 x 192, 350 mm, 6 mm) as well as multiple row detector CT (16 x 1 mm collimation, pitch 1.5, FOV 400 mm, 120 mAs) acquired at five fixed inspiration levels. Dynamic CT scans and coronal MRI with dynamic 2D-GRE and 2D-SS-GRE sequences (image frequencies of 10/sec and 3/sec, respectively) were acquired during continuous 'breathing' (7/minute). The position of the piston pump was visually correlated with the respiratory motion visible through the transparent wall of the phantom and with dynamic displays of CT and MR images. An elastic body splines analysis of the respiratory motion was performed using CT data. Results: Visual evaluation of MRI and CT showed three-dimensional movement of the lung tissue throughout the respiration cycle. Local tissue displacement inside the lung explants was documented with motion maps calculated from CT. The maximum displacement at the top of the diaphragm (mean 26.26 [SD 1.9] mm on CT and 27.16 [SD 1.5] mm on MRI, respectively [p=0.25; Wilcoxon test]) was in the range of tidal breathing in human patients. Conclusion: The chest phantom with a diaphragmatic pump is a promising platform for multi-modality imaging studies of the effects of respiratory lung

  12. Reproducible simulation of respiratory motion in porcine lung explants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biederer, J.; Plathow, C.; Schoebinger, M.; Meinzer, H.P.; Tetzlaff, R.; Puderbach, M.; Zaporozhan, J.; Kauczor, H.U.; Bolte, H.; Heller, M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a model for exactly reproducible respiration motion simulations of animal lung explants inside an MR-compatible chest phantom. Materials and Methods: The materials included a piston pump and a flexible silicone reconstruction of a porcine diaphragm and were used in combination with an established MR-compatible chest phantom for porcine heart-lung preparations. The rhythmic inflation and deflation of the diaphragm at the bottom of the artificial thorax with water (1-1.5 L) induced lung tissue displacement resembling diaphragmatic breathing. This system was tested on five porcine heart-lung preparations using 1.5T MRI with transverse and coronal 3D-GRE (TR/TE=3.63/1.58, 256 x 256 matrix, 350 mm FOV, 4 mm slices) and half Fourier T2-FSE (TR/TE=545/29, 256 x 192, 350 mm, 6 mm) as well as multiple row detector CT (16 x 1 mm collimation, pitch 1.5, FOV 400 mm, 120 mAs) acquired at five fixed inspiration levels. Dynamic CT scans and coronal MRI with dynamic 2D-GRE and 2D-SS-GRE sequences (image frequencies of 10/sec and 3/sec, respectively) were acquired during continuous 'breathing' (7/minute). The position of the piston pump was visually correlated with the respiratory motion visible through the transparent wall of the phantom and with dynamic displays of CT and MR images. An elastic body splines analysis of the respiratory motion was performed using CT data. Results: Visual evaluation of MRI and CT showed three-dimensional movement of the lung tissue throughout the respiration cycle. Local tissue displacement inside the lung explants was documented with motion maps calculated from CT. The maximum displacement at the top of the diaphragm (mean 26.26 [SD 1.9] mm on CT and 27.16 [SD 1.5] mm on MRI, respectively [p=0.25; Wilcoxon test]) was in the range of tidal breathing in human patients. Conclusion: The chest phantom with a diaphragmatic pump is a promising platform for multi-modality imaging studies of the effects of respiratory lung motion. (orig.)

  13. List mode reconstructions for PET with motion compensation: A simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Jinyi; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2002-01-01

    Motion artifacts can be a significant factor that limits the image quality in high-resolution PET. Surveillance systems have been developed to track the movements of the subject during a scan. Development of reconstruction algorithms that are able to compensate for the subject motion will increase the potential of PET. In this paper we present a list mode likelihood reconstruction algorithm with the ability of motion compensation. The subject motion is explicitly modeled in the likelihood function. The detections of each detector pair are modeled as a Poisson process with time-varying rate function. The proposed method has several advantages over the existing methods. It uses all detected events and does not introduce any interpolation error. Computer simulations show that the proposed method can compensate simulated subject movements and that the reconstructed images have no visible motion artifacts

  14. Diaphragmatic reinnervation in ventilator-dependent patients with cervical spinal cord injury and concomitant phrenic nerve lesions using simultaneous nerve transfers and implantable neurostimulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Matthew R; Elkwood, Andrew I; Aboharb, Farid; Cece, John; Brown, David; Rezzadeh, Kameron; Jarrahy, Reza

    2015-06-01

    Patients who are ventilator dependent as a result of combined cervical spinal cord injury and phrenic nerve lesions are generally considered to be unsuitable candidates for diaphragmatic pacing due to loss of phrenic nerve integrity and denervation of the diaphragm. There is limited data regarding efficacy of simultaneous nerve transfers and diaphragmatic pacemakers in the treatment of this patient population. A retrospective review was conducted of 14 consecutive patients with combined lesions of the cervical spinal cord and phrenic nerves, and with complete ventilator dependence, who were treated with simultaneous microsurgical nerve transfer and implantation of diaphragmatic pacemakers. Parameters of interest included time to recovery of diaphragm electromyographic activity, average time pacing without the ventilator, and percent reduction in ventilator dependence. Recovery of diaphragm electromyographic activity was demonstrated in 13 of 14 (93%) patients. Eight of these 13 (62%) patients achieved sustainable periods (> 1 h/d) of ventilator weaning (mean = 10 h/d [n = 8]). Two patients recovered voluntary control of diaphragmatic activity and regained the capacity for spontaneous respiration. The one patient who did not exhibit diaphragmatic reinnervation remains within 12 months of initial treatment. Surgical intervention resulted in a 25% reduction (p nerve transfers and pacemaker implantation can result in reinnervation of the diaphragm and lead to successful ventilator weaning. Our favorable outcomes support consideration of this surgical method for appropriate patients who would otherwise have no alternative therapy to achieve sustained periods of ventilator independence. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Combined electrocardiography- and respiratory-triggered CT of the lung to reduce respiratory misregistration artifacts between imagining slabs in free-breathing children: Initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Allmendinger, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare, GmbH, Computed Tomography Division, Forchheim (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    Cardiac and respiratory motion artifacts degrade the image quality of lung CT in free-breathing children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combined electrocardiography (ECG) and respiratory triggering on respiratory misregistration artifacts on lung CT in free-breathing children. In total, 15 children (median age 19 months, range 6 months–8 years; 7 boys), who underwent free-breathing ECG-triggered lung CT with and without respiratory-triggering were included. A pressure-sensing belt of a respiratory gating system was used to obtain the respiratory signal. The degree of respiratory misregistration artifacts between imaging slabs was graded on a 4-point scale (1, excellent image quality) on coronal and sagittal images and compared between ECG-triggered lung CT studies with and without respiratory triggering. A p value < 0.05 was considered significant. Lung CT with combined ECG and respiratory triggering showed significantly less respiratory misregistration artifacts than lung CT with ECG triggering only (1.1 ± 0.4 vs. 2.2 ± 1.0, p = 0.003). Additional respiratory-triggering reduces respiratory misregistration artifacts on ECG-triggered lung CT in free-breathing children.

  16. Combined electrocardiography- and respiratory-triggered CT of the lung to reduce respiratory misregistration artifacts between imagining slabs in free-breathing children: Initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Allmendinger, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac and respiratory motion artifacts degrade the image quality of lung CT in free-breathing children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combined electrocardiography (ECG) and respiratory triggering on respiratory misregistration artifacts on lung CT in free-breathing children. In total, 15 children (median age 19 months, range 6 months–8 years; 7 boys), who underwent free-breathing ECG-triggered lung CT with and without respiratory-triggering were included. A pressure-sensing belt of a respiratory gating system was used to obtain the respiratory signal. The degree of respiratory misregistration artifacts between imaging slabs was graded on a 4-point scale (1, excellent image quality) on coronal and sagittal images and compared between ECG-triggered lung CT studies with and without respiratory triggering. A p value < 0.05 was considered significant. Lung CT with combined ECG and respiratory triggering showed significantly less respiratory misregistration artifacts than lung CT with ECG triggering only (1.1 ± 0.4 vs. 2.2 ± 1.0, p = 0.003). Additional respiratory-triggering reduces respiratory misregistration artifacts on ECG-triggered lung CT in free-breathing children

  17. Preliminary study on helical CT algorithms for patient motion estimation and compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, G.; Vannier, M.W.

    1995-01-01

    Helical computed tomography (helical/spiral CT) has replaced conventional CT in many clinical applications. In current helical CT, a patient is assumed to be rigid and motionless during scanning and planar projection sets are produced from raw data via longitudinal interpolation. However, rigid patient motion is a problem in some cases (such as in the skull base and temporal bone imaging). Motion artifacts thus generated in reconstructed images can prevent accurate diagnosis. Modeling a uniform translational movement, the authors address how patient motion is ascertained and how it may be compensated. First, mismatch between adjacent fan-beam projections of the same orientation is determined via classical correlation, which is approximately proportional to the patient displacement projected onto an axis orthogonal to the central ray of the involved fan-beam. Then, the patient motion vector (the patient displacement per gantry rotation) is estimated from its projections using a least-square-root method. To suppress motion artifacts, adaptive interpolation algorithms are developed that synthesize full-scan and half-scan planar projection data sets, respectively. In the adaptive scheme, the interpolation is performed along inclined paths dependent upon the patient motion vector. The simulation results show that the patient motion vector can be accurately and reliably estimated using their correlation and least-square-root algorithm, patient motion artifacts can be effectively suppressed via adaptive interpolation, and adaptive half-scan interpolation is advantageous compared with its full-scale counterpart in terms of high contrast image resolution

  18. A Case of Fatal Pulmonary Hypoplasia with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia, Thoracic Myelomeningocele, and Thoracic Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Ai; Fujinaga, Hideshi; Matsui, Sachiko; Tago, Kumiko; Iwasaki, Yuka; Fujino, Shuhei; Nagasawa, Junko; Amari, Shoichiro; Kaneshige, Masao; Wada, Yuka; Takahashi, Shigehiro; Tsukamoto, Keiko; Miyazaki, Osamu; Yoshioka, Takako; Ishiguro, Akira; Ito, Yushi

    2017-10-01

    Background  Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is fatal in severe cases of pulmonary hypoplasia. We experienced a fatal case of pulmonary hypoplasia due to CDH, thoracic myelomeningocele (MMC), and thoracic dysplasia. This constellation of anomalies has not been previously reported. Case Report  A male infant with a prenatal diagnosis of thoracic MMC with severe hydrocephalus and scoliosis was born at 36 weeks of gestation. CDH was found after birth and the patient died of respiratory failure due to pulmonary hypoplasia and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn at 30 hours of age despite neonatal intensive care. An autopsy revealed a left CDH without herniation of the liver or stomach into the thoracic cavity, severe hydrocephalus, Chiari malformation type II, MMC with spina bifida from Th4 to Th12, hemivertebrae, fused ribs, deformities of the thoracic cage and legs, short trunk, and agenesis of the left kidney. Conclusion  We speculate that two factors may be associated with the severe pulmonary hypoplasia: decreased thoracic space due to the herniation of visceral organs caused by CDH and thoracic dysplasia due to skeletal deformity and severe scoliosis.

  19. Making meaning of pumping for mothers of infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froh, Elizabeth B; Deatrick, Janet A; Curley, Martha A Q; Spatz, Diane L

    2015-01-01

    To describe the process of initiation and maintenance of milk supply and potential transition to direct breastfeeding among mother/infant dyads with infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). A Level-III neonatal intensive care unit. Eleven mother/infant dyads with infants with CDH. Prospective, longitudinal qualitative descriptive design. Semistructured interviews were conducted over the course of the NICU stay. Conventional content analysis was used. Human milk oral care emerged from the interview data as a strong facilitating factor to encouraging mothers to continue pumping during hospitalization. Four main themes emerged regarding the importance and value of human milk oral care for the mothers in relation to pumping and maintenance of milk supply: (a) It motivates me; (b) I'm a part of my baby getting better; (c) We do it together, and (d) We're getting somewhere. The findings of this study reflect the importance and value of human milk oral care as a driving factor to motivate mothers to maintain milk supply during the critical time when the infant with CDH is not able to take in enteral nutrition and throughout the hospital stay. © 2015 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  20. Tracheomegaly: a complication of fetal endoscopic tracheal occlusion in the treatment of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, Kieran; Afaq, Asim; Roebuck, Derek J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); Broderick, Nigel [Nottingham University Hospitals, Radiology Department, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Gabra, Hany O.; Elliott, Martin J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    Fetal endoscopic tracheal occlusion (FETO) is a promising treatment for severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia, a condition that carries significant morbidity and mortality. It is hypothesised that balloon occlusion of the fetal trachea leads to an improvement in lung growth and development. The major documented complications of FETO to date are related to preterm delivery. To report a series of five infants who developed tracheomegaly following FETO. Review of all children referred with tracheomegaly to the paediatric intensive care and tracheal service at two referral centres. Five neonates presented with features of respiratory distress shortly after birth and were subsequently found to have marked tracheomegaly. Two neonates had tracheomalacia in addition. There are no previous reports in the literature describing tracheomalacia, or more specifically, tracheomegaly, as a consequence of FETO. We propose that the particularly compliant fetal airway is at risk of mechanical damage from in utero balloon occlusion. This observation of a new problem in this cohort suggests a thorough evaluation of the trachea should be performed in children who have had FETO in utero. It may be that balloon occlusion of the trachea earlier in utero (before 26 weeks' gestation) predisposes to this condition. (orig.)

  1. Interest of Monitoring Diaphragmatic Electrical Activity in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Ducharme-Crevier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of electrical activity of the diaphragm (EAdi is a new minimally invasive bedside technology that was developed for the neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA mode of ventilation. In addition to its role in NAVA ventilation, this technology provides the clinician with previously unavailable and essential information on diaphragm activity. In this paper, we review the clinical interests of EAdi in the pediatric intensive care setting. Firstly, the monitoring of EAdi allows the clinician to tailor the ventilatory settings on an individual basis, avoiding frequent overassistance leading potentially to diaphragmatic atrophy. Increased inspiratory EAdi levels can also suggest insufficient support, while a strong tonic activity may reflect the patient efforts to increase its lung volume. EAdi monitoring also allows detection of patient-ventilator asynchrony. It can play a role in evaluation of extubation readiness. Finally, EAdi monitoring provides the clinician with better understanding of the ventilatory capacity of patients with acute neuromuscular disease. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the clinical impact of these potential benefits.

  2. Tracheomegaly: a complication of fetal endoscopic tracheal occlusion in the treatment of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, Kieran; Afaq, Asim; Roebuck, Derek J.; Broderick, Nigel; Gabra, Hany O.; Elliott, Martin J.

    2010-01-01

    Fetal endoscopic tracheal occlusion (FETO) is a promising treatment for severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia, a condition that carries significant morbidity and mortality. It is hypothesised that balloon occlusion of the fetal trachea leads to an improvement in lung growth and development. The major documented complications of FETO to date are related to preterm delivery. To report a series of five infants who developed tracheomegaly following FETO. Review of all children referred with tracheomegaly to the paediatric intensive care and tracheal service at two referral centres. Five neonates presented with features of respiratory distress shortly after birth and were subsequently found to have marked tracheomegaly. Two neonates had tracheomalacia in addition. There are no previous reports in the literature describing tracheomalacia, or more specifically, tracheomegaly, as a consequence of FETO. We propose that the particularly compliant fetal airway is at risk of mechanical damage from in utero balloon occlusion. This observation of a new problem in this cohort suggests a thorough evaluation of the trachea should be performed in children who have had FETO in utero. It may be that balloon occlusion of the trachea earlier in utero (before 26 weeks' gestation) predisposes to this condition. (orig.)

  3. Tracheomegaly: a complication of fetal endoscopic tracheal occlusion in the treatment of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, Kieran; Afaq, Asim; Roebuck, Derek J [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); Broderick, Nigel [Nottingham University Hospitals, Radiology Department, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Gabra, Hany O; Elliott, Martin J [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    Fetal endoscopic tracheal occlusion (FETO) is a promising treatment for severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia, a condition that carries significant morbidity and mortality. It is hypothesised that balloon occlusion of the fetal trachea leads to an improvement in lung growth and development. The major documented complications of FETO to date are related to preterm delivery. To report a series of five infants who developed tracheomegaly following FETO. Review of all children referred with tracheomegaly to the paediatric intensive care and tracheal service at two referral centres. Five neonates presented with features of respiratory distress shortly after birth and were subsequently found to have marked tracheomegaly. Two neonates had tracheomalacia in addition. There are no previous reports in the literature describing tracheomalacia, or more specifically, tracheomegaly, as a consequence of FETO. We propose that the particularly compliant fetal airway is at risk of mechanical damage from in utero balloon occlusion. This observation of a new problem in this cohort suggests a thorough evaluation of the trachea should be performed in children who have had FETO in utero. It may be that balloon occlusion of the trachea earlier in utero (before 26 weeks' gestation) predisposes to this condition. (orig.)

  4. Histogram based analysis of lung perfusion of children after congenital diaphragmatic hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassner, Nora; Weis, Meike; Zahn, Katrin; Schaible, Thomas; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Schad, Lothar R; Zöllner, Frank G

    2018-05-01

    To investigate a histogram based approach to characterize the distribution of perfusion in the whole left and right lung by descriptive statistics and to show how histograms could be used to visually explore perfusion defects in two year old children after Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) repair. 28 children (age of 24.2±1.7months; all left sided hernia; 9 after extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy) underwent quantitative DCE-MRI of the lung. Segmentations of left and right lung were manually drawn to mask the calculated pulmonary blood flow maps and then to derive histograms for each lung side. Individual and group wise analysis of histograms of left and right lung was performed. Ipsilateral and contralateral lung show significant difference in shape and descriptive statistics derived from the histogram (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, phistogram derived parameters. Histogram analysis can be a valuable tool to characterize and visualize whole lung perfusion of children after CDH repair. It allows for several possibilities to analyze the data, either describing the perfusion differences between the right and left lung but also to explore and visualize localized perfusion patterns in the 3D lung volume. Subgroup analysis will be possible given sufficient sample sizes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Aerobic Bacteria in the Diaphragmatic Portion of Stethoscope of Medical Professionals of Tertiary Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bham, G; Bhandari, J; Neupane, M R; Dawadi, R; Pradhan, P

    2015-01-01

    Hospital environment is a reservoir of wide varieties of microorganisms which are frequently reported colonizing in medical equipment. Stethoscopes are essential tools and of universal use in the medical profession, which might be a source of spreading nosocomial infections. This research project was conducted with an aim to assess the presence of aerobic bacteria in the stethoscope of the medical doctors working at Patan Hospital and students of Patan Academy of Health Sciences. It is a cross sectional study based on structured questionnaire and sample assessment from the stethoscope of doctors and students of Patan Hospital and Patan Academy of Health Sciences. The stethescopes used by the doctors of five major departments of Patan Hospital and students of clinical years were included in this study. Total of 99 stethoscope owned by different level of professionals (positions) and different departments were examined for bacterial contamination. Out of them, 36 were found to be considerably contaminated. Single strain of bacteria was grown from a single stethoscope. Among them 34 were Gram positive and remaining were Gram negative. Out of 34 gram postive bacteria, 29 were identified as Staphylococcus aureus, six were identified as Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus and remaining were Gram positive bacilli. There is presence of aerobic bacteria in diaphragmatic portion of stethoscope of medical professional of which the gram positives were the commonest.

  6. Long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes of congenital diaphragmatic hernia survivors not treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisk, Virginia; Jakobson, Lorna S; Unger, Sharon; Trachsel, Daniel; O'Brien, Karel

    2011-07-01

    Although there has been a marked improvement in the survival of children with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) in the past 2 decades, there are few reports of long-term neurodevelopmental outcome in this population. The present study examined neurodevelopmental outcomes in 10- to 16-year-old CDH survivors not treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Parents of 27 CDH survivors completed questionnaires assessing medical problems, daily living skills, educational outcomes, behavioral problems, and executive functioning. Fifteen CDH survivors and matched full-term controls completed standardized intelligence, academic achievement, phonological processing, and working memory tests. Non-ECMO-treated CDH survivors demonstrated high rates of clinically significant difficulties on standardized academic achievement measures, and 14 of the 27 survivors had a formal diagnosis of specific learning disability, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or developmental disability. Specific problems with executive function, cognitive and attentional weaknesses, and social difficulties were more common in CDH patients than controls. Perioperative hypocapnia was linked to executive dysfunction, behavioral problems, lowered intelligence, and poor achievement in mathematics. Non-ECMO-treated CDH survivors are at substantial risk for neurodevelopmental problems in late childhood and adolescence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Incidence and factors associated with sensorineural and conductive hearing loss among survivors of congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Emily A; Bridge, Christina; Donaher, Joseph G; Herkert, Lisa M; Grill, Elena; Danzer, Enrico; Gerdes, Marsha; Hoffman, Casey H; D'Agostino, Jo Ann; Bernbaum, Judy C; Rintoul, Natalie E; Peranteau, William H; Flake, Alan W; Adzick, N Scott; Hedrick, Holly L

    2014-06-01

    The reported incidence of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in long-term survivors of congenital diaphragmatic hernia varies widely in the literature. Conductive hearing loss (CHL) is also known to occur in CDH patients, but has been less widely studied. We sought to characterize the incidence and risk factors associated with SNHL and CHL in a large cohort of CDH patients who underwent standardized treatment and follow-up at a single institution. We retrospectively reviewed charts of all CDH patients in our pulmonary hypoplasia program from January 2004 through December 2012. Categorical variables were analyzed by Fisher's exact test and continuous variables by Mann-Whitney t-test (p≤0.05). A total of 112 patients met study inclusion criteria, with 3 (2.7%) patients diagnosed with SNHL and 38 (34.0%) diagnosed with CHL. SNHL was significantly associated with requirement for ECMO (p=0.0130), prolonged course of hospitalization (p=0.0011), duration of mechanical ventilation (p=0.0046), requirement for tracheostomy (p=0.0013), and duration of loop diuretic (p=0.0005) and aminoglycoside therapy (p=0.0003). We have identified hearing anomalies in over 30% of long-term CDH survivors. These findings illustrate the need for routine serial audiologic evaluations throughout childhood for all survivors of CDH and stress the importance of targeted interventions to optimize long-term developmental outcomes pertaining to speech and language. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiographic findings in late-presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernia: helpful imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muzzafar, Sofia; Swischuk, Leonard E.; Jadhav, Siddharth P.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging findings in delayed presentation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia can be confusing and misleading, resulting in a delay in diagnosis. To evaluate the often puzzling plain film findings of late-presenting CDH in an effort to determine whether any of the findings could be helpful in arriving at an early diagnosis. We reviewed and documented the plain film findings and clinical data in eight patients seen during the last 20 years with late-presenting CDH. IRB exempt status was obtained in this study. There were five boys and three girls. The age range was 4 months to 12 years with a mean of 2.4 years. Five children presented with acute respiratory problems while three presented with acute abdominal pain. Two children presented with both respiratory and abdominal findings and one also presented with hematemesis. Two children had radiographic findings that were not difficult to analyze while the remaining six had findings that posed initial diagnostic problems. Although not common, late-presenting CDH can result in confusing plain film radiographic findings and a delay in diagnosis. We found that the most important finding in analyzing these radiographs is in evaluating the location and position of the gastric bubble with the more common left-side hernias. (orig.)

  9. Radiographic findings in late-presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernia: helpful imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzzafar, Sofia; Swischuk, Leonard E.; Jadhav, Siddharth P. [University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Galveston, TX (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Imaging findings in delayed presentation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia can be confusing and misleading, resulting in a delay in diagnosis. To evaluate the often puzzling plain film findings of late-presenting CDH in an effort to determine whether any of the findings could be helpful in arriving at an early diagnosis. We reviewed and documented the plain film findings and clinical data in eight patients seen during the last 20 years with late-presenting CDH. IRB exempt status was obtained in this study. There were five boys and three girls. The age range was 4 months to 12 years with a mean of 2.4 years. Five children presented with acute respiratory problems while three presented with acute abdominal pain. Two children presented with both respiratory and abdominal findings and one also presented with hematemesis. Two children had radiographic findings that were not difficult to analyze while the remaining six had findings that posed initial diagnostic problems. Although not common, late-presenting CDH can result in confusing plain film radiographic findings and a delay in diagnosis. We found that the most important finding in analyzing these radiographs is in evaluating the location and position of the gastric bubble with the more common left-side hernias. (orig.)

  10. Abnormal platelet-derived growth factor signaling accounting for lung hypoplasia in experimental congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemann, Jens; Doi, Takashi; Ruttenstock, Elke; Puri, Prem

    2010-10-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypoplasia in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is not fully understood. Platelet-derived growth factor A (PDGFA) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) play a crucial role in lung development. It has been reported that PDGF induces H(2)O(2)-production and that oxidative stress may be an important mechanism for the impaired lung development in the nitrofen rat model. We hypothesized that pulmonary expression of PDGFA and PDGFRα is altered in the nitrofen induced CDH model. Pregnant rats received 100 mg nitrofen or vehicle on gestational day 9 (D9) and were sacrificed on D15, D18 or D21. RNA was extracted from fetal left lungs and mRNA levels of PDGFA and PDGFRα were determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemistry for protein expression of PDGFA and PDGFRα was performed. Pulmonary H(2)O(2) was measured colorimetrically. mRNA levels of PDGFRα at D15 (4.50 ± 0.87) and PDGFA at D18 (2.90 ± 1.38) were increased in the nitrofen group (P stress during lung development. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Standardization of pulmonary ventilation technique using volume-controlled ventilators in rats with congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Melo Gallindo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To standardize a technique for ventilating rat fetuses with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH using a volume-controlled ventilator. METHODS: Pregnant rats were divided into the following groups: a control (C; b exposed to nitrofen with CDH (CDH; and c exposed to nitrofen without CDH (N-. Fetuses of the three groups were randomly divided into the subgroups ventilated (V and non-ventilated (N-V. Fetuses were collected on day 21.5 of gestation, weighed and ventilated for 30 minutes using a volume-controlled ventilator. Then the lungs were collected for histological study. We evaluated: body weight (BW, total lung weight (TLW, left lung weight (LLW, ratios TLW / BW and LLW / BW, morphological histology of the airways and causes of failures of ventilation. RESULTS: BW, TLW, LLW, TLW / BW and LLW / BW were higher in C compared with N- (p 0.05. The morphology of the pulmonary airways showed hypoplasia in groups N- and CDH, with no difference between V and N-V (p <0.05. The C and N- groups could be successfully ventilated using a tidal volume of 75 ìl, but the failure of ventilation in the CDH group decreased only when ventilated with 50 ìl. CONCLUSION: Volume ventilation is possible in rats with CDH for a short period and does not alter fetal or lung morphology.

  12. Radiographic findings in late-presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernia: helpful imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzafar, Sofia; Swischuk, Leonard E; Jadhav, Siddharth P

    2012-03-01

    Imaging findings in delayed presentation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia can be confusing and misleading, resulting in a delay in diagnosis. To evaluate the often puzzling plain film findings of late-presenting CDH in an effort to determine whether any of the findings could be helpful in arriving at an early diagnosis. We reviewed and documented the plain film findings and clinical data in eight patients seen during the last 20 years with late-presenting CDH. IRB exempt status was obtained in this study. There were five boys and three girls. The age range was 4 months to 12 years with a mean of 2.4 years. Five children presented with acute respiratory problems while three presented with acute abdominal pain. Two children presented with both respiratory and abdominal findings and one also presented with hematemesis. Two children had radiographic findings that were not difficult to analyze while the remaining six had findings that posed initial diagnostic problems. Although not common, late-presenting CDH can result in confusing plain film radiographic findings and a delay in diagnosis. We found that the most important finding in analyzing these radiographs is in evaluating the location and position of the gastric bubble with the more common left-side hernias.

  13. Phrenic nerve decompression for the management of unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis - preoperative evaluation and operative technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshide, Reid; Brown, Justin

    2017-01-01

    Unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis (UDP) can be a very disabling, typically causing shortness of breath and reduced exercise tolerance. We present a case of a surgical decompression of the phrenic nerve of a patient who presented with UDP, which occurred following cervical spine surgery. The workup for the etiology of UDP demonstrated paradoxical movement on "sniff test" and notably impaired pulmonary function tests. Seven months following the onset of the UDP, he underwent a surgical decompression of the phrenic nerve at the level of the anterior scalene. He noted rapid symptomatic improvement following surgery and reversal of the above noted objective findings was documented. At his 4-year follow-up, he had complete resolution of his clinical symptoms. Repeated physiologic testing of his respiratory function had shown a complete reversal of his UDP. Anatomical compression of the phrenic nerve by redundant neck vasculature should be considered in the differential diagnosis of UDP. Here we demonstrated the techniques in workup and surgical management, with both subjective and objective evidence of success.

  14. Phrenic nerve decompression for the management of unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis – preoperative evaluation and operative technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshide, Reid; Brown, Justin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis (UDP) can be a very disabling, typically causing shortness of breath and reduced exercise tolerance. We present a case of a surgical decompression of the phrenic nerve of a patient who presented with UDP, which occurred following cervical spine surgery. Methods: The workup for the etiology of UDP demonstrated paradoxical movement on “sniff test” and notably impaired pulmonary function tests. Seven months following the onset of the UDP, he underwent a surgical decompression of the phrenic nerve at the level of the anterior scalene. Results: He noted rapid symptomatic improvement following surgery and reversal of the above noted objective findings was documented. At his 4-year follow-up, he had complete resolution of his clinical symptoms. Repeated physiologic testing of his respiratory function had shown a complete reversal of his UDP. Conclusions: Anatomical compression of the phrenic nerve by redundant neck vasculature should be considered in the differential diagnosis of UDP. Here we demonstrated the techniques in workup and surgical management, with both subjective and objective evidence of success. PMID:29184705

  15. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia may be associated with 17q12 microdeletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goumy, Carole; Laffargue, Fanny; Eymard-Pierre, Eléonore; Kemeny, Stéphen; Gay-Bellile, Mathilde; Gouas, Laetiti; Gallot, Denis; Francannet, Christine; Tchirkov, Andrei; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Vago, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Microdeletions of 17q12 encompassing TCF2 are associated with maturity-onset of diabetes of the young type 5, cystic renal disease, pancreatic atrophy, Mullerian aplasia in females and variable cognitive impairment. We report on a patient with a de novo 17q12 microdeletion, 1.8 Mb in size, associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). The 5-year-old male patient presented multicystic renal dysplasia kidneys, minor facial dysmorphic features and skeletal anomalies, but neither developmental delay nor behavioral abnormalities. CDH has been previously associated with the 17q12 microdeletion syndrome only in one prenatal case. The present study reinforces the hypothesis that CDH is part of the phenotype for 17q12 microdeletion and that 17q12 encompasses candidate(s) gene(s) involved in diaphragm development. We suggest that PIGW, a gene involved in an early step of GPI biosynthesis, could be a strong candidate gene for CDH. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Prenatally diagnosed 17q12 microdeletion syndrome with a novel association with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Nancy W; Clemens, Michele; Canavan, Timothy P; Surti, Urvashi; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    We describe the first reported case of a prenatally diagnosed and recently described 17q12 microdeletion syndrome. The fetus was noted to have a congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), echogenic kidneys and cystic left lung on prenatal ultrasound. The patient underwent amniocentesis which resulted in a normal fluorescence in-situ hybridization and karyotype. An oligonucleotide microarray was then performed which demonstrated a 1.4-Mb deletion within the 17q12 region. The deletion caused haploinsufficiency for 17 genes, including AATF, ACACA, DDX52, DUSP14, GGNBP2, HNF-1B, LHX1, PIGW, SYNRG, TADA2A, and ZNHIT3. The deleted region on 17q12 is similar in size and gene content to previously reported 17q12 microdeletion syndromes, which have a minimal critical region of 1.52 Mb. The newly described 17q12 microdeletion syndrome has been associated with MODY5 (maturity-onset of diabetes of the young type 5), cystic renal disease, pancreatic atrophy, liver abnormalities, cognitive impairment and structural brain abnormalities. CDH has not been previously described with the 17q12 microdeletion syndrome. We hypothesize that CDH is part of the spectrum of this syndrome and likely not detected postnatally due to high prenatal mortality. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Identifying injuries and motor vehicle collision characteristics that together are suggestive of diaphragmatic rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiff, Donald A; McGwin, Gerald; Metzger, Jesse; Windham, Samuel T; Doss, Marilyn; Rue, Loring W

    2002-12-01

    Diaphragmatic rupture (DR) remains a diagnostic challenge because of the lack of an accurate test demonstrating the injury. Our purpose was to identify motor vehicle collision (MVC) characteristics and patient injuries that collectively could identify the presence of a DR. The National Automotive Sampling System was used to identify occupants involved in MVCs from 1995 to 1999 who sustained abdominal (Abbreviated Injury Scale score >or= 2) and/or thoracic injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale score >or= 2). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to quantify the association between patient injuries, vehicle collision characteristics, and DR. Sensitivity and specificity were also calculated to determine the ability of organ injury and MVC characteristics to correctly classify patients with and without DR. Overall, occupants sustaining a DR had a significantly higher delta-V (DeltaV) (49.8 kilometers per hour [kph] vs. 33.8 kph, por= 30 cm or DeltaV >or= 40 kph with specific organ injuries generated a sensitivity for indicating the likelihood of diaphragm injury ranging from 68% to 89%. Patients with any of the following characteristics had a sensitivity for detecting DR of 91%: splenic injury, pelvic fracture, DeltaV >or= 40 kph, or occupant compartment intrusion from any direction >or= 30 cm. Specific MVC characteristics combined with patient injuries have been identified that are highly suggestive of DR. For this subpopulation, additional invasive procedures including exploratory laparotomy, laparoscopy, or thoracoscopy may be warranted to exclude DR.

  18. Artifacts by dental materials on magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Choi, Deuk Lin; Kim, Ki Jung; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved to be a valuable method for evaluation of the head and neck. Unfortunately, metallic devices associated with certain dental fillings and appliances often cause variable artifacts that can obscure normal or pathologic conditions on MR and computed tomography. In this work, we assessed the MR appearance of dental prosthetic materials in vitro and in vivo including precious alloys, nonprecions alloys, resin, amalgam and titanium alloy. For in vivo studies, these materials were placed in healthy volunteer's mouths and then images were assessed. Analysis of the appearance of shape and extent of artifact, and observed influence of these artifacts on the image interpretation at 0.2 Tesla permanent type MR scanner were valuated. Material used as temporary or permanent filling of crowns such as amalgam, precious alloy and, microfilled resin did not cause artifact on the image. The size of the artifact produced by the nonprecious alloys was influenced by the ferromagnetism of the object and the volume prosthesis, and was related to the scanning sequence. Nonprecious alloys produced minimal local signal distortion, where precious alloys, and dental resin had no effect on the MR images in vivo. These results were mainly from a low field strength MR scanner used in this study

  19. Ensemble Artifact Design For Context Sensitive Decision Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah J Miah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although an improvement of design knowledge is an essential goal of design research, current design research predominantly focuses on knowledge concerning the IT artifact (tool design process, rather than a more holistic understanding encompassing the dynamic usage contexts of a technological artifact. Conceptualising a design in context as an “ensemble artifact” (Sein et al., 2011 provides the basis for a more rigorous treatment. This paper describes an IS artifact design framework that has been generated from the development of several practitioner-oriented decision support systems (DSS in which contextual aspects relevant to practitioners’ decision making are considered as integral design themes. We describe five key dimensions of an ensemble artifact design and show their value in designing practitioner-oriented DSS. The features are user centredness, knowledge sharing, situation-specific customisation, reduced model orientation, and practice based secondary design abilities. It is argued that this understanding can contribute to design research knowledge more effectively both to develop dynamic DSS, and by its extensibility to other artifact designs.

  20. Metal artifact reduction method using metal streaks image subtraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pua, Rizza D.; Cho, Seung Ryong

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have been dedicated for metal artifact reduction (MAR); however, the methods are successful to varying degrees depending on situations. Sinogram in-painting, filtering, iterative method are some of the major categories of MAR. Each has its own merits and weaknesses. A combination of these methods or hybrid methods have also been developed to make use of the different benefits of two techniques and minimize the unfavorable results. Our method focuses on the in-paitning approach and a hybrid MAR described by Xia et al. Although in-painting scheme is an effective technique in reducing the primary metal artifacts, a major drawback is the reintroduction of new artifacts that can be caused by an inaccurate interpolation process. Furthermore, combining the segmented metal image to the corrected nonmetal image in the final step of a conventional inpainting approach causes an issue of incorrect metal pixel values. Our proposed method begins with a sinogram in-painting approach and ends with an image-based metal artifact reduction scheme. This work provides a simple, yet effective solution for reducing metal artifacts and acquiring the original metal pixel information. The proposed method demonstrated its effectiveness in a simulation setting. The proposed method showed image quality that is comparable to the standard MAR; however, quantitatively more accurate than the standard MAR

  1. Preliminary experimental insights into differential heat impact among lithic artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Bustos-Pérez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of thermally altered and broken flint artifacts is common at archaeological sites. Most studies focus their attention on the effects of heat treatment on flint to improve knapping qualities, disregarding the effects of fire over flint under uncontrolled conditions. This paper aims to show how under uncontrolled heating processes flint artifacts develop different heat alterations (such as levels of breakage, presence of scales, etc. as a result of vertical distribution, volume or raw material and to establish a gradient of rock changes and behavior. Artifacts where macroscopically analyzed and a series of uncontrolled heating experiments through the distribution of flint blanks under two hearths were carried out, allowing a comparison of the before and after of the blanks. Preliminary results show how levels of breakage, surface alteration or development of heat alteration features can be differentiated according to artifact volume, vertical distribution and level of surface alteration. Results also show how two different raw materials react differently to similar thermal impact, and how surface alteration reacts at different rhythm in the case of recycled artifacts. We conclude that levels of thermal alteration can be differentiated through macroscopic analysis of flint surface.

  2. Automated filtering of intrinsic movement artifacts during two-photon intravital microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Soulet

    Full Text Available In vivo imaging using two-photon microscopy is an essential tool to explore the dynamic of physiological events deep within biological tissues for short or extended periods of time. The new capabilities offered by this technology (e.g. high tissue penetrance, low toxicity have opened a whole new era of investigations in modern biomedical research. However, the potential of using this promising technique in tissues of living animals is greatly limited by the intrinsic irregular movements that are caused by cardiac and respiratory cycles and muscular and vascular tone. Here, we show real-time imaging of the brain, spinal cord, sciatic nerve and myenteric plexus of living mice using a new automated program, named Intravital_Microscopy_Toolbox, that removes frames corrupted with motion artifacts from time-lapse videos. Our approach involves generating a dissimilarity score against precalculated reference frames in a specific reference channel, thus allowing the gating of distorted, out-of-focus or translated frames. Since the algorithm detects the uneven peaks of image distortion caused by irregular animal movements, the macro allows a fast and efficient filtering of the image sequence. In addition, extra features have been implemented in the macro, such as XY registration, channel subtraction, extended field of view with maximum intensity projection, noise reduction with average intensity projections, and automated timestamp and scale bar overlay. Thus, the Intravital_Microscopy_Toolbox macro for ImageJ provides convenient tools for biologists who are performing in vivo two-photon imaging in tissues prone to motion artifacts.

  3. Structuring Design and Evaluation of an Interactive Installation Through Swarms of Light Rays with Human-Artifact Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erkut, Cumhur; Fehr, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    We present the design and evaluation of an interactive installation to be explored by movement and sound under Human-Activity Model. In the installation, movement qualities that are extracted from the motion tracking data excite a dynamical system (a synthetic flock of agents), which responds...... out a questionnaire afterwards. In this paper, we report our preliminary work on the analysis of the tensions of interaction with the installation under the Human-Artifact Model. Our results indicate exploration and discovery as the main motives of the interaction. This is different than utilitarian...

  4. PROMO – Real-time Prospective Motion Correction in MRI using Image-based Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nathan; Roddey, Cooper; Shankaranarayanan, Ajit; Han, Eric; Rettmann, Dan; Santos, Juan; Kuperman, Josh; Dale, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Artifacts caused by patient motion during scanning remain a serious problem in most MRI applications. The prospective motion correction technique attempts to address this problem at its source by keeping the measurement coordinate system fixed with respect to the patient throughout the entire scan process. In this study, a new image-based approach for prospective motion correction is described, which utilizes three orthogonal 2D spiral navigator acquisitions (SP-Navs) along with a flexible image-based tracking method based on the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) algorithm for online motion measurement. The SP-Nav/EKF framework offers the advantages of image-domain tracking within patient-specific regions-of-interest and reduced sensitivity to off-resonance-induced corruption of rigid-body motion estimates. The performance of the method was tested using offline computer simulations and online in vivo head motion experiments. In vivo validation results covering a broad range of staged head motions indicate a steady-state error of the SP-Nav/EKF motion estimates of less than 10 % of the motion magnitude, even for large compound motions that included rotations over 15 degrees. A preliminary in vivo application in 3D inversion recovery spoiled gradient echo (IR-SPGR) and 3D fast spin echo (FSE) sequences demonstrates the effectiveness of the SP-Nav/EKF framework for correcting 3D rigid-body head motion artifacts prospectively in high-resolution 3D MRI scans. PMID:20027635

  5. Distinction of Fly Artifacts from Human Blood using Immunodetection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, David B; Acca, Gillian; Fink, Marc; Brogan, Rebecca; Chen, Dorothy; Schoeffield, Andrew

    2018-02-21

    Insect stains produced by necrophagous flies are indistinguishable morphologically from human bloodstains. At present, no diagnostic tests exist to overcome this deficiency. As the first step toward developing a chemical test to recognize fly artifacts, polyclonal antisera were generated in rats against three distinct antigenic sequences of fly cathepsin D-like proteinase, an enzyme that is structurally distinct in cyclorrhaphous Diptera from other animals. The resulting rat antisera bound to artifacts produced by Protophormia terraenovae and synthetic peptides used to generate the polyclonal antisera, but not with any type of mammalian blood tested in immunoassays. Among the three antisera, anti-md3 serum displayed the highest reactivity for fly stains, demonstrated cross-reactivity for all synthetic peptides representing antigenic sequences of the mature fly enzyme, and bound artifacts originating from the fly digestive tract. Further work is needed to determine whether the antisera are suitable for non-laboratory conditions. © 2018 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  6. Streak artifacts on Kidney CT: Ionic vs nonionic contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Eun Ok; Kim, Won Hong; Jung, Myung Suk; Kim, Yong Hoon; Hur, Gham

    1993-01-01

    The authors reviewed findings of enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans to know the difference between a higher dose of conventional ionic contrast media(iothalamate meglumine) and a lower dose of a new, nonionic contrast material(ioversol). One hundred adult patients were divided into two groups. Each group consisted of 50 patients. Iothalamate meglumine and ioversol were intravenously administered in each group. The radio of the male to female in the former was 28:22, and the latter 29:21. We examine the degree of renal streak artifact and measure the Hounsfield number of urine in renal collecting system. There were significant differences of the degree of the streak artifact depending upon the osmolality of contrast media used and that was related with urine CT number(P value<0.005). We authors conclude that nonionic low osmolar contrast media is prone to cause streak artifacts and distortions of renal image than conventional ionic high osmolar contrast media

  7. Correction of ring artifacts in X-ray tomographic images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckegaard, Allan; Johnson, G.; Tafforeau, P.

    2011-01-01

    Ring artifacts are systematic intensity distortions located on concentric circles in reconstructed tomographic X-ray images. When using X-ray tomography to study for instance low-contrast grain boundaries in metals it is crucial to correct for the ring artifacts in the images as they may have...... the same intensity level as the grain boundaries and thus make it impossible to perform grain segmentation. This paper describes an implementation of a method for correcting the ring artifacts in tomographic X-ray images of simple objects such as metal samples where the object and the background...... are separable. The method is implemented in Matlab, it works with very little user interaction and may run in parallel on a cluster if applied to a whole stack of images. The strength and robustness of the method implemented will be demonstrated on three tomographic X-ray data sets: a mono-phase β...

  8. Medical image of the week: DBS polysomnogram artifact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shetty S,

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A 79-year-old man with known Parkinson’s disease and status post deep brain stimulator (DBS implantation underwent an overnight polysomnogram for clinical suspicion of obstructive sleep apnea. Artifact was seen on the polysomnogram recording (Figures 1 & 2. Patient-related electrical artifacts may be seen from devices such as pacemakers, deep brain stimulators and vagal nerve simulators. Abrupt discontinuation of DBS is associated with a high likelihood of worsening of symptoms in patients with Parkinson’s disease (1. Patients with DBS are most commonly programmed in monopolar mode. Bipolar configuration, forms a short electrical dipole that affects a relatively smaller volume of tissue and generates far less artifact, suggesting that this may be an effective option in a Parkinsonian patient with indications for polysomnography (2.

  9. Motion Detection in Ultrasound Image-Sequences Using Tensor Voting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inba, Masafumi; Yanagida, Hirotaka; Tamura, Yasutaka

    2008-05-01

    Motion detection in ultrasound image sequences using tensor voting is described. We have been developing an ultrasound imaging system adopting a combination of coded excitation and synthetic aperture focusing techniques. In our method, frame rate of the system at distance of 150 mm reaches 5000 frame/s. Sparse array and short duration coded ultrasound signals are used for high-speed data acquisition. However, many artifacts appear in the reconstructed image sequences because of the incompleteness of the transmitted code. To reduce the artifacts, we have examined the application of tensor voting to the imaging method which adopts both coded excitation and synthetic aperture techniques. In this study, the basis of applying tensor voting and the motion detection method to ultrasound images is derived. It was confirmed that velocity detection and feature enhancement are possible using tensor voting in the time and space of simulated ultrasound three-dimensional image sequences.

  10. Ring artifacts removal from synchrotron CT image slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Zhouping; Chapman, Dean; Wiebe, Sheldon

    2013-01-01

    Ring artifacts can occur in reconstructed images from x-ray Computerized Tomography (CT) as full or partial concentric rings superimposed on the scanned structures. Due to the data corruption by those ring artifacts in CT images, qualitative and quantitative analysis of these images are compromised. In this paper, we propose to correct the ring artifacts on the reconstructed synchrotron radiation (SR) CT image slices. The proposed correction procedure includes the following steps: (1). transform the reconstructed CT images into polar coordinates; (2) apply discrete two-dimensional (2D) wavelet transform to the polar image to decompose it into four image components: low pass band image component, as well as the components from horizontal, vertical and diagonal details bands; (3). apply 2D Fourier transform to the vertical details band image component only, since the ring artifacts become vertical lines in the polar coordinates; (4). apply Gaussian filtering in Fourier domain along the abscissa direction to suppress the vertical lines, since the information of the vertical lines in Fourier domain is completely condensed to that direction; (5). perform inverse Fourier transform to get the corrected vertical details band image component; (6). perform inverse wavelet transform to get the corrected polar image; (7). transform the corrected polar image back to Cartesian coordinates to get the CT image slice with reduced ring artifacts. This approach has been successfully used on CT data acquired from the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) beamline in Canadian Light Source (CLS), and the results show that the ring artifacts in original SR CT images have been effectively suppressed with all the structure information in the image preserved.

  11. Simulation-based artifact correction (SBAC) for metrological computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Joscha; Leinweber, Carsten; Sawall, Stefan; Stoschus, Henning; Ballach, Frederic; Müller, Tobias; Hammer, Michael; Christoph, Ralf; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2017-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a valuable tool for the metrolocical assessment of industrial components. However, the application of CT to the investigation of highly attenuating objects or multi-material components is often restricted by the presence of CT artifacts caused by beam hardening, x-ray scatter, off-focal radiation, partial volume effects or the cone-beam reconstruction itself. In order to overcome this limitation, this paper proposes an approach to calculate a correction term that compensates for the contribution of artifacts and thus enables an appropriate assessment of these components using CT. Therefore, we make use of computer simulations of the CT measurement process. Based on an appropriate model of the object, e.g. an initial reconstruction or a CAD model, two simulations are carried out. One simulation considers all physical effects that cause artifacts using dedicated analytic methods as well as Monte Carlo-based models. The other one represents an ideal CT measurement i.e. a measurement in parallel beam geometry with a monochromatic, point-like x-ray source and no x-ray scattering. Thus, the difference between these simulations is an estimate for the present artifacts and can be used to correct the acquired projection data or the corresponding CT reconstruction, respectively. The performance of the proposed approach is evaluated using simulated as well as measured data of single and multi-material components. Our approach yields CT reconstructions that are nearly free of artifacts and thereby clearly outperforms commonly used artifact reduction algorithms in terms of image quality. A comparison against tactile reference measurements demonstrates the ability of the proposed approach to increase the accuracy of the metrological assessment significantly.

  12. Auditory Motion Elicits a Visual Motion Aftereffect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C. Berger

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The visual motion aftereffect is a visual illusion in which exposure to continuous motion in one direction leads to a subsequent illusion of visual motion in the opposite direction. Previous findings have been mixed with regard to whether this visual illusion can be induced cross-modally by auditory stimuli. Based on research on multisensory perception demonstrating the profound influence auditory perception can have on the interpretation and perceived motion of visual stimuli, we hypothesized that exposure to auditory stimuli with strong directional motion cues should induce a visual motion aftereffect. Here, we demonstrate that horizontally moving auditory stimuli induced a significant visual motion aftereffect—an effect that was driven primarily by a change in visual motion perception following exposure to leftward moving auditory stimuli. This finding is consistent with the notion that visual and auditory motion perception rely on at least partially overlapping neural substrates.

  13. Auditory Motion Elicits a Visual Motion Aftereffect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Christopher C; Ehrsson, H Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The visual motion aftereffect is a visual illusion in which exposure to continuous motion in one direction leads to a subsequent illusion of visual motion in the opposite direction. Previous findings have been mixed with regard to whether this visual illusion can be induced cross-modally by auditory stimuli. Based on research on multisensory perception demonstrating the profound influence auditory perception can have on the interpretation and perceived motion of visual stimuli, we hypothesized that exposure to auditory stimuli with strong directional motion cues should induce a visual motion aftereffect. Here, we demonstrate that horizontally moving auditory stimuli induced a significant visual motion aftereffect-an effect that was driven primarily by a change in visual motion perception following exposure to leftward moving auditory stimuli. This finding is consistent with the notion that