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Sample records for diamond films deposited

  1. Dual Ion Beam Deposition Of Diamond Films On Optical Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutchman, Arnold H.; Partyka, Robert J.; Lewis, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    Diamond film deposition processes are of great interest because of their potential use for the formation of both protective as well as anti-reflective coatings on the surfaces of optical elements. Conventional plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition diamond coating processes are not ideal for use on optical components because of the high processing temperatures required, and difficulties faced in nucleating films on most optical substrate materials. A unique dual ion beam deposition technique has been developed which now makes possible deposition of diamond films on a wide variety of optical elements. The new DIOND process operates at temperatures below 150 aegrees Farenheit, and has been used to nucleate and grow both diamondlike carbon and diamond films on a wide variety of optical :taterials including borosilicate glass, quartz glass, plastic, ZnS, ZnSe, Si, and Ge.

  2. Pulsed laser deposition of metallic films on the surface of diamond particles for diamond saw blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Chao [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, WuHan, Hubei 430074 (China); Luo Fei [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, WuHan, HuBei 430074 (China); Long Hua [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Hu Shaoliu [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Li Bo [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Wang Youqing [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)]. E-mail: lchwan@hust.edu.cn

    2005-06-15

    Ti or Ni films have been deposited on the diamond particle surfaces by pulsed laser deposition. Compressive resistance of the uncoated and coated diamond particles was measured, respectively, in the experiments. The compressive resistance of the Ti-coated diamonds particles was found much higher than that of the uncoated ones. It increased by 39%. The surface morphology is observed by the metallography microscope. The surface of the uncoated diamonds particles had many hollows and flaws, while the surface of Ni-coated diamond particles was flat and smooth, and the surface of Ti-coated diamond particles had some metal masses that stood out of the surface of the Ti-coated film. The components of the metallic films of diamond particles were examined by X-ray diffractometry (XRD). TiC was found formed on the Ti-coated diamond surface, which resulted in increased surface bonding strength between the diamond particles and the Ti films. Meanwhile, TiC also favored improving the bonding strength between the coated diamond particles and the binding materials. Moreover, the bending resistance of the diamond saw blade made of Ti-coated diamond was drastically higher than that of other diamond saw blades, which also played an important role in improving the blade's cutting ability and lifetime. Therefore, it was most appropriate that the diamond saw blade was made of Ti-coated diamond particles rather than other materials.

  3. Control of crystallite size in diamond film chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Mark B.; Johnson, Linda F.; Klemm, Karl A.

    1992-12-01

    In depositing an adhering, continuous, polycrystalline diamond film of optical or semiconductor quality on a substrate, as by forming on the substrate a layer of a refractory nitride interlayer and depositing diamond on the interlayer without mechanical treatment or seeding of the substrate or the interlayer, the substrate is heated in a vacuum chamber containing a microwave activated mixture of hydrogen and a gas including carbon, and the size of deposited diamond crystallites and their rate of deposition selectively varied by a bias voltage applied to the substrate.

  4. Low resistance polycrystalline diamond thin films deposited by hot filament chemical vapour deposition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahtab Ullah; Ejaz Ahmed; Abdelbary Elhissi; Waqar Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Polycrystalline diamond thin films with outgrowing diamond (OGD) grains were deposited onto silicon wafers using a hydrocarbon gas (CH4) highly diluted with H2 at low pressure in a hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) reactor with a range of gas flow rates. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and SEM showed polycrystalline diamond structure with a random orientation. Polycrystalline diamond films with various textures were grown and (111) facets were dominant with sharp grain boundaries. Outgrowth was observed in flowerish character at high gas flow rates. Isolated single crystals with little openings appeared at various stages at low gas flow rates. Thus, changing gas flow rates had a beneficial influence on the grain size, growth rate and electrical resistivity. CVD diamond films gave an excellent performance for medium film thickness with relatively low electrical resistivity and making them potentially useful in many industrial applications.

  5. Nanocrystalline Diamond Films Deposited by Electron Assisted Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond films were deposited on polished Si wafer surface with electron assisted hot filament chemical vapor deposition at 1 kPa gas pressure, the deposited films were characterized and observed by Raman spectrum, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and semiconductor characterization system. The results show that when 8 A bias current is applied for 5 h, the surface roughness decreases to 28.5 nm. After 6 and 8 A bias current are applied for 1 h, and the nanocrystalline films deposition continue for 4 h with 0 A bias current at 1 kPa gas pressure. The nanocrystalline diamond films with 0.5×109 and 1×1010 Ω·cm resistivity respectively are obtained. It is demonstrated that electron bombardment plays an important role of nucleation to deposit diamond films with smooth surface and high resistivity.

  6. Plasma deposited diamond-like carbon films for large neutralarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, I.G.; Blakely, E.A.; Bjornstad, K.A.; Galvin, J.E.; Monteiro, O.R.; Sangyuenyongpipat, S.

    2004-07-15

    To understand how large systems of neurons communicate, we need to develop methods for growing patterned networks of large numbers of neurons. We have found that diamond-like carbon thin films formed by energetic deposition from a filtered vacuum arc carbon plasma can serve as ''neuron friendly'' substrates for the growth of large neural arrays. Lithographic masks can be used to form patterns of diamond-like carbon, and regions of selective neuronal attachment can form patterned neural arrays. In the work described here, we used glass microscope slides as substrates on which diamond-like carbon was deposited. PC-12 rat neurons were then cultured on the treated substrates and cell growth monitored. Neuron growth showed excellent contrast, with prolific growth on the treated surfaces and very low growth on the untreated surfaces. Here we describe the vacuum arc plasma deposition technique employed, and summarize results demonstrating that the approach can be used to form large patterns of neurons.

  7. Study of Nanocrystalline Diamond Film Deposited Rapidly by 500 W Excimer Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Hongyan; SHEN Jiajing; YANG Guilong

    2000-01-01

    High quality nanocrystalline diamond film deposited rapidly by an XeCl excimer laser operated at high laser power (500 W) and repetition rate (300~500 Hz) is presented. A high deposition rate, 250 nm/thousand pulses, was obtained. The effects of laser energy fluence and repetition rate on the deposition of diamond film were investigated.

  8. Thin film deposition of diamond using normal paraffins as source of diamond nucleation centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ershova, A., E-mail: ershovaangelina@mail.ru [Nano-Technology Laboratory, Triangle Inc., 01079 (Ukraine); Eizenbraun, A. [Nano-Technology Laboratory, Triangle Inc., 01079 (Ukraine)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ► Paraffin compounds are diamond nucleation sources. ► Thermoconductivity of Cu–DTF device is higher than such conductivity of Cu. ► DTF growth in HFCVD reactor is not linear function of time. -- Abstract: We propose a process for diamond thin film (DTF) deposition using normal paraffins (nP) as source of diamond nucleation centers. We deposited micro-crystalline diamond thin films (MCDTF) on a Cu substrate using Hot Filament CVD (HFCVD) and Passive Pt/Pd Surface Catalysis (PPt/PdSC) methods. Beeswax and a 1:1 mixture of normal paraffins of the general formula CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub n}CH{sub 3} with n = 22 and 26 were tested as nP starting material. The films obtained were characterized by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), Raman scattering temperature dependent spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods, all of which confirmed that the deposited material is MCDTF.

  9. Thermoluminescence characterisation of chemical vapour deposited diamond films

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzocchi, S; Bucciolini, M; Cuttone, G; Pini, S; Sabini, M G; Sciortino, S

    2002-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of a set of six chemical vapour deposited diamond films have been studied with regard to their use as off-line dosimeters in radiotherapy. The structural characterisation has been performed by means of Raman spectroscopy. Their TL responses have been tested with radiotherapy beams ( sup 6 sup 0 Co photons, photons and electrons from a linear accelerator (Linac), 26 MeV protons from a TANDEM accelerator) in the dose range 0.1-7 Gy. The dosimetric characterisation has yielded a very good reproducibility, a very low dependence of the TL response on the type of particle and independence of the radiation energy. The TL signal is not influenced by the dose rate and exhibits a very low thermal fading. Moreover, the sensitivity of the diamond samples compares favourably with that of standard TLD100 dosimeters.

  10. Deposition of ZnO Films on Freestanding CVD Thick Diamond Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jian; BAI Yi-Zhen; YANG Tian-Peng; XU Yi-Bin; WANG Xin-Sheng; DU Guo-Tong; WU Han-Hua

    2006-01-01

    @@ For ZnO/diamond structured surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters, performance is sensitively dependent on the quality of the ZnO films. In this paper, we prepare highly-oriented and fine grained polycrystalline ZnO thin films with excellent surface smoothness on the smooth nucleation surfaces of freestanding CVD diamond films by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The properties of the ZnO films are characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. The influences of the deposition conditions on the quality of ZnO films are discussed briefly. ZnO/freestanding thick-diamond-film layered SAW devices with high response frequencies are expected to be developed.

  11. Mechanism and prediction of failure of diamond films deposited on various substrates by HFCVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ling-ping; SUN Xin-yuan; LI Shao-lu; LI De-yi; CHEN Xiao-hua

    2004-01-01

    Diamond films were deposited on the WC-Co cemented carbide and Si3N4 ceramic cutting tool substrates by hot-filament-assisted chemical vapour deposition. The adherence property of diamond films was estimated using the critical load (Pcr) in the indentation test. The adhesive strength of diamond films is related to the intermediate layer between the film and the substrate. Poor adhesion of diamond films to polished cemented carbide substrate is owing to the formation of graphite phase in the interface. The adhesion of diamond films deposited on acid etched cemented carbide substrate is improved, and the peeling-off of the films often happens in the loosen layer of WC particles where the cobalt element is nearly removed. The diamond films' adhesion to cemented carbide substrate whose surface layer is decarbonizated is strengthened dramatically because WC phase forms by reaction between the deposited carbon and tungsten in the surface layer of substrates during the deposition of diamond, which results in chemical combination in the film-substrate interface. The adhesion of diamond films to silicon nitride substrate is the firmest due to the formation of chemical combination of the SiC intermediate layer in the interfaces. In the piston-turning application, the diamond-coated Si3N4 ceramic and the cemented carbide cutting tools usually fail in the form of collapsing of edge and cracking or flaking respectively. They have no built-up edge(BUE) as long as coating is intact.As it wears through, BUE develops and the cutting force on it increases 1 - 3 times than that prior to failure. This can predict the failure of diamond-coated cutting tools.

  12. Diamond films: Historical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messier, R. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This section is a compilation of notes and published international articles about the development of methods of depositing diamond films. Vapor deposition articles are included from American, Russian, and Japanese publications. The international competition to develop new deposition methodologies is stressed. The current status of chemical vapor deposition of diamond is assessed.

  13. Surface chemical studies of chemical vapour deposited diamond thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Proffitt, S

    2001-01-01

    could not easily be correlated to the bulk film properties. It is suggested that electron emission arises from the graphite component of graphite- diamond grain boundaries that are present in the nanocrystalline films. species. The adsorbed O and Cl species are more strongly bound to the K layer than they are to the diamond substrate, so thermal desorption of K from the K/CI/diamond or K/O/diamond surface results also in the simultaneous loss ofO and Cl. The phosphorus precursor trisdimethylaminophosphine (TDMAP) has a negligible reactive sticking probability on the clean diamond surface. This can be increased by thermal cracking of the gas phase precursor by a heated filament, resulting in non-activated adsorption to produce an adlayer containing a mixture of surface-bound ligands and phosphorus containing species. The ligands were readily lost upon heating, leaving P, some of which was lost from the surface at higher temperatures. Pre-hydrogenation of the diamond surface inhibited the uptake of cracked TDMA...

  14. Laser diagnostics of chemical vapour deposition of diamond films

    CERN Document Server

    Wills, J B

    2002-01-01

    Cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) has been used to make diagnostic measurements of chemically activated CH sub 4 / H sub 2 gas mixtures during the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of thin diamond films. Absolute absorbances, concentrations and temperatures are presented for CH sub 3 , NH and C sub 2 H sub 2 in a hot filament (HF) activated gas mixture and CH, C sub 2 and C sub 2 H sub 2 in a DC arc plasma jet activated mixture. Measurements of the radical species were made using a pulsed dye laser system to generate tuneable visible and UV wavelengths. These species have greatest concentration in the hottest, activated regions of the reactors. Spatial profiling of the number densities of CH sub 3 and NH radicals have been used as stringent tests of predictions of radical absorbance and number densities made by 3-D numerical simulations, with near quantitative agreement. O sub 2 has been shown to reside in the activated region of the Bristol DC arc jet at concentrations (approx 10 sup 1 sup 3 molecules / cm...

  15. New insights into selected-area deposition of diamond films by means of selective seeding

    CERN Document Server

    LiuHongWu; Gao Chun Xi; Han Yong; Luo Ji Feng; Zou Guang Tian; Wen Chao

    2002-01-01

    Polycrystalline diamond films have been patterned on a polished Si substrate by means of selective seeding via hot-filament chemical vapour deposition. In addition to the process of selective seeding, the CH sub 4 /H sub 2 concentration and the sizes of the patterns have effects on the selectivity. The mechanism of selective growth of diamond is also discussed in this paper.

  16. Effect of surface treatment on hot-filament chemical vapour deposition grown diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.; Atta, M. A.

    2012-02-01

    Diamond film growth without seeding treatment has been the subject of numerous studies. In this study, diamond films with/without seeding treatment were grown on silicon using hot-filament chemical vapour deposition. An inexpensive and simple approach, namely ‘dry ultrasonic treatment’, was introduced in which full coverage of the diamond film was achieved over the substrate having no prior seeding treatment. For comparison purposes, two substrates were seeded with different sizes of diamond particles, 5 µm by hand and 30-40 µm by ultrasonic agitation, prior to deposition. The produced diamond films were examined through standard characterization tools and distinct features were observed in each film. The diamond film grown without the seeding treatment shows slightly lower growth rate (1 µm h-1) but bigger grain size up to 8 µm compared with seeded films. Here we show the growth of uniform and high-purity diamond films free from nano-sized grains, which are grown without any seeding treatment.

  17. Simultaneous growth of diamond and nanostructured graphite thin films by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Diamond and graphite films on silicon wafer were simultaneously synthesized at 850 °C without any additional catalyst. The synthesis was achieved in hot-filament chemical vapor deposition reactor by changing distance among filaments in traditional gas mixture. The inter-wire distance for diamond and graphite deposition was kept 5 and 15 mm, whereas kept constant from the substrate. The Raman spectroscopic analyses show that film deposited at 5 mm is good quality diamond and at 15 mm is nanostructured graphite and respective growths confirm by scanning auger electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscope results exhibit that black soot graphite is composed of needle-like nanostructures, whereas diamond with pyramidal featured structure. Transformation of diamond into graphite mainly attributes lacking in atomic hydrogen. The present study develops new trend in the field of carbon based coatings, where single substrate incorporate dual application can be utilized.

  18. Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond Films on Silicon From Ethanol and Hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马志斌; 汪建华; 王传新; 满卫东

    2003-01-01

    Diamond films with very smooth surface and good optical quality have been deposited onto silicon substrate using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) from a gas mixture of ethanol and hydrogen at a low substrate temperature of 450 ℃. The effects of the substrate temperature on the diamond nucleation and the morphology of the diamond film have been investigated and observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The microstructure and the phase of the film have been characterized using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The diamond nucleation density significantly decreases with the increasing of the substrate temperature. There are only sparse nuclei when the substrate temperature is higher than 800 ℃ although the ethanol concentration in hydrogen is very high. That the characteristic diamond peak in the Raman spectrum of a diamond film prepared at a low substrate temperature of 450 ℃ extends into broadband indicates that the film is of nanophase. No graphite peak appeared in the XRD pattern confirms that the film is mainly composed of SP3 carbon. The diamond peak in the XRD pattern also broadens due to the nanocrystalline of the film.

  19. Diagnostic Techniques Used to Study Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2000-01-01

    The advantages and utility of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond as an industrial ceramic can only be realized if the price and quality are right. Until recently, this technology was of interest only to the academic and basic research community. However, interest has grown because of advances made by leading CVD diamond suppliers: 1) Reduction of the cost of CVD polycrystalline diamond deposition below $5/carat ($8/sq cm); 2) Installation of production capacity; 3) Epitaxial growth of CVD single-crystal diamond. Thus, CVD diamond applications and business are an industrial reality. At present, CVD diamond is produced in the form of coatings or wafers. CVD diamond film technology offers a broader technological potential than do natural and high-pressure synthetic diamonds because size, geometry, and eventually cost will not be as limiting. Now that they are cost effective, diamond coatings - with their extreme properties - can be used in a variety of applications. Diamond coatings can improve many of the surface properties of engineering substrate materials, including erosion, corrosion, and wear resistance. Examples of actual and potential applications, from microelectromechanical systems to the wear parts of diamond coatings and related superhard coatings are described. For example, diamond coatings can be used as a chemical and mechanical barrier for the space shuttles check valves, particularly on the guide pins and seat assemblies.

  20. Low-temperature deposition of transparent diamond films with a microwave cavity plasma reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulczynski, Michael J.

    1998-10-01

    Low-temperature diamond deposition with Microwave Cavity Plasma Reactor (MCPR) technology was investigated for application to temperature sensitive substrates. The substrate temperature during most CVD diamond deposition processes is typically greater then 600 C; however, there are some applications where temperature sensitive materials are used and the deposition temperature must be maintained below 550 C. These applications include materials like boro-silicate glass, which has a relatively low strain-point temperature, and integrated circuits that contain low melting point components. Experiments were conducted in three areas. The first area was MCPR development, the second was benchmark deposition and characterization of diamond films on silicon substrates and the third was deposition and characterization of diamond films on boro-silicate glass substrates. MCPR development included an investigation of various MCPR configurations that were designed and adapted for uniform, low-temperature diamond deposition over areas as large as 80-cm2. Reactors were investigated with end-feed microwave excitation and side-feed microwave excitation for maximum deposition area and uniformity. Various substrate receptor configurations were also investigated including a substrate heater and cooler. From these investigations, deposition parameters such as substrate temperature, deposition rate, deposition area and deposition uniformity were characterized. The benchmark silicon diamond deposition experiments were conducted for comparison to previous high temperature, >550 C, MCPR research and growth models. Here deposition results such as deposition rate and film quality were compared with applications of diamond growth models by Harris-Goodwin and Bachmann. Additionally, characterization experiments were conducted to investigate film attributes that are critical to optical applications, such as film surface roughness and deposition uniformity. Included as variables in these

  1. Nanostructured diamond film deposition on curved surfaces of metallic temporomandibular joint implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, Marc D; Vohra, Yogesh K [Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2002-10-21

    Microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition of nanostructured diamond films was carried out on curved surfaces of Ti-6Al-4V alloy machined to simulate the shape of a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dental implant. Raman spectroscopy shows that the deposited films are uniform in chemical composition along the radius of curvature of the TMJ condyle. Thin film x-ray diffraction reveals an interfacial carbide layer and nanocrystalline diamond grains in this coating. Nanoindentation hardness measurements show an ultra-hard coating with a hardness value of 60{+-}5 GPa averaged over three samples. (rapid communication)

  2. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Nanostructured diamond film deposition on curved surfaces of metallic temporomandibular joint implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Marc D.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2002-10-01

    Microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition of nanostructured diamond films was carried out on curved surfaces of Ti-6Al-4V alloy machined to simulate the shape of a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dental implant. Raman spectroscopy shows that the deposited films are uniform in chemical composition along the radius of curvature of the TMJ condyle. Thin film x-ray diffraction reveals an interfacial carbide layer and nanocrystalline diamond grains in this coating. Nanoindentation hardness measurements show an ultra-hard coating with a hardness value of 60+/-5 GPa averaged over three samples.

  3. Microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon films deposited on hydrogenated rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal, J.P. van der; Martinez Martinez, Diego; Pei, Y.T.; Rudolf, P.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films prepared by plasma chemical vapor deposition on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubbers (HNBR) are studied. Different negative variations of temperature during film growth were selected by proper changes

  4. Study on the Microstructure and Electrical Properties of Boron and Sulfur Codoped Diamond Films Deposited Using Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The atomic-scale microstructure and electron emission properties of boron and sulfur (denoted as B-S codoped diamond films grown on high-temperature and high-pressure (HTHP diamond and Si substrates were investigated using atom force microscopy (AFM, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS, and current imaging tunneling spectroscopy (CITS measurement techniques. The films grown on Si consisted of large grains with secondary nucleation, whereas those on HTHP diamond are composed of well-developed polycrystalline facets with an average size of 10–50 nm. SIMS analyses confirmed that sulfur was successfully introduced into diamond films, and a small amount of boron facilitated sulfur incorporation into diamond. Large tunneling currents were observed at some grain boundaries, and the emission character was better at the grain boundaries than that at the center of the crystal. The films grown on HTHP diamond substrates were much more perfect with higher quality than the films deposited on Si substrates. The local I-V characteristics for films deposited on Si or HTHP diamond substrates indicate n-type conduction.

  5. Nanostructured Diamond-Like Carbon Films Grown by Off-Axis Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Shan Yap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured diamond-like carbon (DLC films instead of the ultrasmooth film were obtained by pulsed laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite. Deposition was performed at room temperature in vacuum with substrates placed at off-axis position. The configuration utilized high density plasma plume arriving at low effective angle for the formation of nanostructured DLC. Nanostructures with maximum size of 50 nm were deposited as compared to the ultrasmooth DLC films obtained in a conventional deposition. The Raman spectra of the films confirmed that the films were diamond-like/amorphous in nature. Although grown at an angle, ion energy of >35 eV was obtained at the off-axis position. This was proposed to be responsible for subplantation growth of sp3 hybridized carbon. The condensation of energetic clusters and oblique angle deposition correspondingly gave rise to the formation of nanostructured DLC in this study.

  6. Deposition and characterization of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films on rubber seals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Bui, X.L.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2010-01-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) for reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals. The wax removal and pre-deposition plasma treatment of HNBR substrates are proven to be cruci

  7. Optical and Electrical Properties Evolution of Diamond-Like Carbon Thin Films with Deposition Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Xu-Li; LI Qing-Shan; KONG Xiang-He

    2009-01-01

    Optical and electrical properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited by pulsed laser ablation of graphite target at different substrate temperatures are reported. By varying the deposition temperature from 400 to 25℃, the film optical transparency and electrical resistivity increase severely. Most importantly, the transparency and resistivity properties of the DLC films can be tailored to approaching diamond by adjusting the deposition temperature, which is critical to many applications. DLC films deposited at low temperatures show excellent optical transmittance and high resistivity. Over the same temperature regime an increase of the spa bonded C content is observed using visible Raman spectroscopy, which is responsible for the enhanced transparency and resistivity properties.

  8. Nanodiamond films deposited at moderate temperature on pure titanium substrate pretreated by ultrasonic scratching in diamond powder suspension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Syed Jawid Askari; Fanxiu Lv; Akhtar Farid; Fengying Wang; Qi He; Zuyuan Zhou

    2006-01-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) film deposition on pure titanium and Ti alloys is extraordinarily difficult because of the high diffusion coefficient of carbon in Ti, the large mismatch in their thermal expansion coefficients, the complex nature of the interlayer formed during diamond deposition, and the difficulty to achieve very high nucleation density. In this investigation, NCD films were successfully deposited on pure Ti substrate by using a novel substrate pretreatment of ultrasonic scratching in a diamond powder-ethanol suspension and by a two-step process at moderate temperature. It was shown that by scratching with a 30-μm diamond suspension for 1 h, followed by a 10-h diamond deposition, a continuous NCD film was obtained with an average grain size of about 200 nm. Detailed experimental results on the preparation, characterization, and successful deposition of the NCD films on Ti were discussed.

  9. Effects of Implant Copper Layer on Diamond Film Deposition on Cemented Carbides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The deposition of high-quality diamond films and their adhesion on cemented carbides are strongly influenced by the catalytic effect of cobalt under typical deposition conditions.Decreasing Co content on the surface of the cemented carbide is often used for the diamond filmdeposition. But the leaching of Co from the WC-Co substrate leading to a mechanical weak surface often causes a poor adhesion. In this paper we adopted an implant copper layer preparedby vaporization to improve the mechanical properties of the Co-leached substrate. The diamondfilms were grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from CH4 :H2 gas mixture. Thecross section and the morphology of the diamond film were characterized by scanning electronmicroscopy (SEM). The non-diamond content in the film was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy.The effects of pretreatment on the concentrations of Co and Cu near the interfacial region wereexamined by energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) equipped with SEM. The adhesion of the diamondon the substrate was evaluated with a Rockwell-type hardness tester. The results indicate that thediamond films prepared with implant copper layer have a good adhesion to the cemented carbidesubstrate due to the recovery of the mechanical properties of the Co-depleted substrate after thecopper implantation and the formation of less amorphous carbon between the substrate and thediamond film.

  10. Dual-ion-beam deposition of carbon films with diamond-like properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamond like films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  11. Deposition of diamond like carbon films by using a single ion gun with varying beam source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jin-qiu; Chen Zhu-ping

    2001-01-01

    Diamond like carbon films have been successfully deposited on the steel substrate, by using a single ion gun with varying beam source. The films may appear blue, yellow and transparent in color, which was found related to contaminants from the sample holder and could be avoided. The thickness of the films ranges from tens up to 200 nanometers, and the hardness is in the range 20 to 30 GPa. Raman analytical results reveal the films are in amorphous structure. The effects of different beam source on the films structure are further discussed.

  12. Cytotoxicity of Boron-Doped Nanocrystalline Diamond Films Prepared by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Gou, Li; Ran, Junguo; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) exhibits extraordinary mechanical properties and chemical stability, making it highly suitable for biomedical applications. For implant materials, the impact of boron-doped NCD films on the character of cell growth (i.e., adhesion, proliferation) is very important. Boron-doped NCD films with resistivity of 10-2 Ω·cm were grown on Si substrates by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) process with H2 bubbled B2O3. The crystal structure, diamond character, surface morphology, and surface roughness of the boron-doped NCD films were analyzed using different characterization methods, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The contact potential difference and possible boron distribution within the film were studied with a scanning kelvin force microscope (SKFM). The cytotoxicity of films was studied by in vitro tests, including fluorescence microscopy, SEM and MTT assay. Results indicated that the surface roughness value of NCD films was 56.6 nm and boron was probably accumulated at the boundaries between diamond agglomerates. MG-63 cells adhered well and exhibited a significant growth on the surface of films, suggesting that the boron-doped NCD films were non-toxic to cells. supported by the Open Foundation of State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices (University of Electronic Science and Technology of China) (No. KFJJ201313)

  13. Plasma environment during hot cathode direct current discharge plasma chemical vapor deposition of diamond films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱晓东; 詹如娟; 周海洋; 胡敏; 温晓辉; 周贵恩; 李凡庆

    1999-01-01

    The plasma characteristics have been investigated in situ by using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and the Langmuir probe during hot cathode direct current discharge plasma chemical vapor deposition of diamond films. The changes of atomic H and CH radical in the ground state have been calculated quantitatively according to the results of OES and the Langmuir probe measurement as discharge current density varied. It is shown that atomic H and CH radicals both in the ground state and in the excited state increase with the enhancement of the discharge current density in the plasma. The electron density and CH emission intensity increase linearly with the enhancement of discharge current densities. The generation of different carbon-containing radicals is related to the elevation of electron temperature. Combining the growth process of diamond films and the diagnostic results, it is shown that atomic H in the excited state may improve the diamond growth efficiently, and the increase of electron temperat

  14. Microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of ultra-nanocrystalline diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Shin

    Microwave plasma assisted ultra-nanocrystalline diamond film deposition was investigated using hydrogen deficient, carbon containing argon plasma chemistries with MSU-developed microwave plasma reactors. Ultra-nanocrystalline diamond film deposition on mechanically scratched silicon wafers was experimentally explored over the following input variables: (1) pressure: 60--240Torr, (2) total gas flow rate: 101--642 sccm, (3) input microwave power 732--1518W, (4) substrate temperature: 500°C--770°C, (5) deposition time: 2--48 hours, and (6) N2 impurities 5--2500 ppm. H2 concentrations were less than 9%, while CH 4 concentration was 0.17--1.85%. It was desired to grow films uniformly over 3″ diameter substrates and to minimize the grain size. Large, uniform, intense, and greenish-white discharges were sustained in contact with three inch silicon substrates over a 60--240 Torr pressure regime. At a given operating pressure, film uniformity was controlled by adjusting substrate holder geometry, substrate position, input microwave power, gas chemistries, and total gas flow rates. Film ultra-nanocrystallinity and smoothness required high purity deposition conditions. Uniform ultra-nanocrystalline films were synthesized in low leak-rate system with crystal sizes ranging from 3--30 nm. Films with 11--50 nm RMS roughness and respective thickness values of 1--23 mum were synthesized over 3″ wafers under a wide range of different deposition conditions. Film RMS roughness 7 nm was synthesized with thickness of 430 nm. Film uniformities of almost 100% were achieved over three inch silicon wafers. UV Raman and XRD characterization results indicated the presence of diamond in the synthesized films. Optical Emission Spectroscopy measurements showed that the discharge gas temperature was in excess of 2000 K. The synthesized films are uniformly smooth and the as grown ultra-nanocrystalline diamond can be used for a high frequency SAW device substrate material. IR measurements

  15. Kinetics of diamond-like film growth using filament-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorsuch, G.; Jin, Y.; Ingle, N.K.; Mountziaris, T.J.; Yu, W.Y.; Petrou, A. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1995-08-01

    A detailed kinetic model of diamond-like film growth from methane diluted in hydrogen using low-pressure, filament-assisted chemical vapor deposition (FACVD) has been developed. The model includes both gas-phase and surface reactions. The surface kinetics include adsorption of CH{sub 3}{center_dot} and H{center_dot}, abstraction reactions by gas phase radicals, desorption, and two pathways for diamond (sp{sup 3}) and graphitic carbon (sp{sup 2}) growth. It is postulated that adsorbed CH{sub 2}{center_dot} species are the major film precursors. The proposed kinetic model was incorporated into a transport model describing flow, heat and mass transfer in stagnation flow FACVD reactors. Diamond-like films were deposited on preceded Si substrates in such a reactor as a pressure of 26 Torr, inlet gas composition ranging from 0.5% to 1.5% methane in hydrogen and substrate temperatures ranging from 600 to 950 C. The best films were obtained at low methane concentrations and substrate temperature of 700 C. The films were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. Observations from their experiments and growth rates, compositions and stable species distributions in the gas phase. It is the first complete model of FACVD that includes gas-phase and surface kinetics coupled with transport phenomena.

  16. Synthesis of thick diamond films by direct current hot-cathode plasma chemical vapour deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Jin Zeng Sun; Bai Yi Zhen; Lu Xian Yi

    2002-01-01

    The method of direct current hot-cathode plasma chemical vapour deposition has been established. A long-time stable glow discharge at large discharge current and high gas pressure has been achieved by using a hot cathode in the temperature range from 1100 degree C to 1500 degree C and non-symmetrical configuration of the poles, in which the diameter of the cathode is larger than that of anode. High-quality thick diamond films, with a diameter of 40-50 mm and thickness of 0.5-4.2 mm, have been synthesized by this method. Transparent thick diamond films were grown over a range of growth rates between 5-10 mu m/h. Most of the thick diamond films have thermal conductivities of 10-12 W/K centre dot cm. The thick diamond films with high thermal conductivity can be used as a heat sink of semiconducting laser diode array and as a heat spreading and isolation substrate of multichip modules. The performance can be obviously improved

  17. High Resistive ZnO/Diamond/Si Films Grown via Metal-organic Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hong-jun; ZHAO Bai-jun; FANG Xiu-jun; DU Guo-tong; LIU Da-li; GAO Chun-xiao; LIU Xi-zhe

    2005-01-01

    Piezoelectric ZnO layers with high resistivity for surface acoustic wave applications were prepared on polycrystalline diamond/Si substrates with (111) orientation via metal-organic chemical vapour deposition.The characteristics of the films were optimized through different growth methods. The comparative study of the X-ray diffraction spectra and scanning electron microscopic images showed that the final-prepared ZnO films were dominantly c-axis oriented. Zn and O elements in the final prepared ZnO films were investigated through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. According to the statistical results, the n(Zn)/n(O) ratio is near 1. The Raman scattering was also performed in back scattering configuration. E2 mode was observed for the final films, which indicated that the better quality ZnO films had been obtained. The resistivity of the films was also enhanced via the modification of the growth methods.

  18. Optical and mechanical properties of diamond like carbon films deposited by microwave ECR plasma CVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S B Singh; M Pandey; N Chand; A Biswas; D Bhattacharya; S Dash; A K Tyagi; R M Dey; S K Kulkarni; D S Patil

    2008-10-01

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on Si (111) substrates by microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process using plasma of argon and methane gases. During deposition, a d.c. self-bias was applied to the substrates by application of 13.56 MHz rf power. DLC films deposited at three different bias voltages (–60 V, –100 V and –150 V) were characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry to study the variation in the bonding and optical properties of the deposited coatings with process parameters. The mechanical properties such as hardness and elastic modulus were measured by load depth sensing indentation technique. The DLC film deposited at –100 V bias exhibit high hardness (∼ 19 GPa), high elastic modulus (∼ 160 GPa) and high refractive index (∼ 2.16–2.26) as compared to films deposited at –60 V and –150 V substrate bias. This study clearly shows the significance of substrate bias in controlling the optical and mechanical properties of DLC films.

  19. Friction Behaviors of the Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamond Film under Ambient Air and Water Lubricating Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Bin; SUN Fanghong

    2009-01-01

    The friction behavior of the hot filament chemical vapor deposition(HFCVD) diamond film plays a critical role on its applications in mechanical fields and largely depends on the environment. Studies on the tribological properties of HFCVD diamond films coated on Co-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrates are rarely reported in available literatures, especially in the water lubricating conditions. In this paper, conventional microcrystalline diamond(MCD) and fine-grained diamond(FGD) films are deposited on WC-Co substrates and their friction properties are evaluated on a reciprocating ball-on-plate tribometer, where they are brought to slide against ball-bearing steel and copper balls in dry and water lubricating conditions. Scanning electron microscopy(SEM), atomic force microscopy(AFM), surface profilometer and Raman spectroscopy are adopted to characterize as-deposited diamond films;SEM and energy dispersive X-ray(EDX) are used to investigate the worn region on the surfaces of both counterface balls and diamond films. The research results show that the friction coefficient of HFCVD diamond films always starts with a high initial value, and then gradually transits to a relative stable state. For a given counterface and a sliding condition, the FGD film presents lower stable friction coefficients by 0.02-0.03 than MCD film. The transferred materials adhered on sliding interface are supposed to have predominate effect on the friction behaviors of HFCVD diamond films. Furthermore, the effect of water lubricating on reducing friction coefficient is significant. For a given counterpart, the stable friction coefficients of MCD or FGD films reduce by about 0.07-0.08 while sliding in the water lubricating condition, relative to in dry sliding condition. This study is beneficial for widespread applications of HFCVD diamond coated mechanical components and adopting water lubricating system, replacing of oil lubricating, in a variety of mechanical processing fields to

  20. Method to grow pure nanocrystalline diamond films at low temperatures and high deposition rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, John A.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Auciello, Orlando; Xiao, Xingcheng

    2009-07-07

    A method of depositing nanocrystalline diamond film on a substrate at a rate of not less than about 0.2 microns/hour at a substrate temperature less than about 500.degree. C. The method includes seeding the substrate surface with nanocrystalline diamond powder to an areal density of not less than about 10.sup.10sites/cm.sup.2, and contacting the seeded substrate surface with a gas of about 99% by volume of an inert gas other than helium and about 1% by volume of methane or hydrogen and one or more of acetylene, fullerene and anthracene in the presence of a microwave induced plasma while maintaining the substrate temperature less than about 500.degree. C. to deposit nanocrystalline diamond on the seeded substrate surface at a rate not less than about 0.2 microns/hour. Coatings of nanocrystalline diamond with average particle diameters of less than about 20 nanometers can be deposited with thermal budgets of 500.degree. C.-4 hours or less onto a variety of substrates such as MEMS devices.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of the deposition process of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG YuJun; DONG GuangNeng; MAO JunHong; XIE YouBai

    2008-01-01

    The deposition process of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) film greatly affects its frictional properties. In this study, CH3 radicals are selected as source species to deposit hydrogenated DLC films for molecular dynamics simulation. The growth and structural properties of hydrogenated DLC films are investigated and elucidated in detail. By comparison and statistical analysis, the authors find that the ratio of carbon to hydrogen in the films generally shows a monotonously increasing trend with the increase of impact energy. Carbon atoms are more reactive during deposition and more liable to bond with substrate atoms than hydrogen atoms. In addition, there exists a peak value of the number of hydrogen atoms deposited in hydrogenated DLC films. The trends of the variation are opposite on the two sides of this peak point, and itbecomes stable when impact energy is greater than 80 eV. The average relative density also indicates a rising trend along with the increment of impact energy, while it does not reach the saturation value until impact energy comes to 50 eV. The hydrogen content in source species is a key factor to determine the hydrogen content in hydrogenated DLC films. When the hydrogen content in source species is high, the hydrogen content in hydrogenated DLC films is accordingly high.

  2. Preparation of Diamond-like Carbon Films on the Surface of Ti Alloy by Electro-deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fenglei SHEN; Hongwei WANG; Dijiang WEN

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, diamond-like carbon (DLC) fi[ms were deposited on Ti alloy by electro-deposition. DLC films were brown and composed of the compact grains whose diameter was about 400 nm. Examined by XPS, the main composition of the films was carbon. In the Raman spectrum, there were a broad peak at 1350 cm-1 and a broad peak at 1600 cm-1, which indicated that the films were DLC films.

  3. Influences of H+ Implantation on the Boron-Doped Synthesized by Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamond Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shuang-Bao

    2000-01-01

    Diamond films (DF) were preliminarily B doped in situ during chemical vapor deposition. Subsequently, the films were implanted with 120keV H+ to dose of 5 × 1014 ~ 5 × 1016cm-2. After the implantation, the B doped DF become insulating and Raman measurements indicate that the implantation has amorphous carbon and graphite etched. It is known that the formation of H-B pairs plays an important pole in property changes. However, for larger dose cases, the electrical resistance of DF is influenced by radiation damage and/or non-diamond phases. In addition to them, annealing makes the specimens conducting again. This phenomenon maybe has potential for application in designing DF device.

  4. Silicon solar cell performance deposited by diamond like carbon thin film ;Atomic oxygen effects;

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Abbas Ail; Eshaghi, Akbar; Karami, Esmaeil

    2017-09-01

    In this research, a diamond-like carbon thin film was deposited on p-type polycrystalline silicon solar cell via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method by using methane and hydrogen gases. The effect of atomic oxygen on the functioning of silicon coated DLC thin film and silicon was investigated. Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the DLC thin film. Photocurrent-voltage characteristics of the silicon solar cell were carried out using a solar simulator. The results showed that atomic oxygen exposure induced the including oxidation, structural changes, cross-linking reactions and bond breaking of the DLC film; thus reducing the optical properties. The photocurrent-voltage characteristics showed that although the properties of the fabricated thin film were decreased after being exposed to destructive rays, when compared with solar cell without any coating, it could protect it in atomic oxygen condition enhancing solar cell efficiency up to 12%. Thus, it can be said that diamond-like carbon thin layer protect the solar cell against atomic oxygen exposure.

  5. Adhesion improvement of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films by pre-deposition plasma treatment of rubber substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Bui, X. L.; Pei, Y.T.; Mulder, E.D.G.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2009-01-01

    For reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals, thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) via magnetron-enhanced plasma chemical vapor deposition (ME-PCVD). Pre-deposition plasma treatment of HNBR substrate is proved to be crucial for the improvement of film performance due to enhanced interfacial adhesion. The columnar structure and the crack network formed during deposition e...

  6. Adhesion improvement of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films by pre-deposition plasma treatment of rubber substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, X.L.; Pei, Y.T.; Mulder, E.D.G.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2009-01-01

    For reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals, thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) via magnetron-enhanced plasma chemical vapor deposition (ME-PCVD). Pre-deposition plasma trea

  7. Tailoring nanocrystalline diamond film properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Dieter M.; McCauley, Thomas G.; Zhou, Dan; Krauss, Alan R.

    2003-07-15

    A method for controlling the crystallite size and growth rate of plasma-deposited diamond films. A plasma is established at a pressure in excess of about 55 Torr with controlled concentrations of hydrogen up to about 98% by volume, of unsubstituted hydrocarbons up to about 3% by volume and an inert gas of one or more of the noble gases and nitrogen up to about 98% by volume. The volume ratio of inert gas to hydrogen is preferably maintained at greater than about 4, to deposit a diamond film on a suitable substrate. The diamond film is deposited with a predetermined crystallite size and at a predetermined growth rate.

  8. Simulations of the Dependence of Gas Physical Parameters on Deposition Variables during HFCVD Diamond Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aiying WANG; Kwangryeol Lee; Chao SUN; Lishi WEN

    2006-01-01

    During the growth of the hot filament chemical vapor deposition(HFCVD)diamond films, numerical simulations in a 2-D mathematical model were employed to investigate the influence of various deposition parameters on the gas physical parameters, including the temperature, velocity and volume density of gas. It was found that, even in the case of optimized deposition parameters, the space distributions of gas parameters were heterogeneous due primarily to the thermal blockage come from the hot filaments and cryogenic pump effect arisen from the cold reactor wall. The distribution of volume density agreed well with the thermal round-flow phenomenon, one of the key obstacles to obtaining high growth rate in HFCVD process. In virtue of isothermal boundary with high temperature or adiabatic boundary condition of reactor wall, however, the thermal roundflow was profoundly reduced and as a consequence, the uniformity of gas physical parameters was considerably improved, as identified by the experimental films growth.

  9. Structural and optical characterization of thick and thin polycrystalline diamond films deposited by microwave plasma activated CVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Pradhan; B Satpati; B P Bag; T Sharda

    2012-02-01

    Preliminary results of growth of thin diamond film in a recently installed 3 kW capacity microwave plasma activated CVD (MW-PACVD) system are being reported. The films were deposited on Si (100) substrate at 850°C using methane and hydrogen mixture at 1.5 kW MW power. The grown polycrystalline films were characterized by micro-Raman, transmission electron microscope (TEM), spectrophotometer and atomic force microscope (AFM). The results were compared with that of a thicker diamond film grown elsewhere in a same make MWPACVD system at relatively higher power densities. The presence of a sharp Raman peak at 1332 cm-1 confirmed the growth of diamond, and transmission spectra showed typical diamond film characteristics in both the samples. Typical twin bands and also a quintuplet twinned crystal were observed in TEM, further it was found that the twinned region in thin sample composed of very fine platelet like structure.

  10. Synthesis and Characteristics of Diamond-like Carbon Films Deposited on Quartz Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄卫东; 丁鼎; 詹如娟

    2004-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are deposited on quartz substrate using pure CH4 in the surface wave plasma equipment. A direct current negative bias up to -90 V is applied to the substrate to investigate the bias effect on the film characteristics. Deposited films are characterized by Raman spectroscopy, infrared (IR) and ultraviolet-visible absorption techniques.There are two broad Raman peaks around 1340 cm-1 and 1600 cm-1 and the first one has a greater sp3 component with an increased bias. Infrared spectroscopy has three sp3 C-H modes at 2852 cm-1, 2926 cm- 1 and 2962 cm-1, respectively and also shows an intensity increase with the negative bias. Optical band gap is calculated from the ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy and the increased values with negative bias and deposition time are obtained. After a thermal anneal at about 500 ℃ for an hour to the film deposited under the bias of-90 V, we get an almost unchanged Raman spectrum and a peak intensity-reduced IR signal, which indicates a reduced H-content in the film. Meanwhile the optical band gap changed from 0.85 eV to 1.5 eV.

  11. Characterization of diamond-like nanocomposite thin films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, T. S.; Liu, C. H.; Bhattacharyya, T. K.; Patel, P.; Barik, T. K.

    2010-06-01

    Diamond-like nanocomposite (DLN) thin films, comprising the networks of a-C:H and a-Si:O were deposited on pyrex glass or silicon substrate using gas precursors (e.g., hexamethyldisilane, hexamethyldisiloxane, hexamethyldisilazane, or their different combinations) mixed with argon gas, by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Surface morphology of DLN films was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopic result shows that the films contain nanoparticles within the amorphous structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the structural change within the DLN films. The hardness and friction coefficient of the films were measured by nanoindentation and scratch test techniques, respectively. FTIR and XPS studies show the presence of CC, CH, SiC, and SiH bonds in the a-C:H and a-Si:O networks. Using Raman spectroscopy, we also found that the hardness of the DLN films varies with the intensity ratio ID/IG. Finally, we observed that the DLN films has a better performance compared to DLC, when it comes to properties like high hardness, high modulus of elasticity, low surface roughness and low friction coefficient. These characteristics are the critical components in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and emerging nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).

  12. Diamond-Like Carbon Film Deposition Using DC Ion Source with Cold Hollow Cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Shevchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon diamond-like thin films on a silicon substrate were deposited by direct reactive ion beam method with an ion source based on Penning direct-current discharge system with cold hollow cathode. Deposition was performed under various conditions. The pressure (12–200 mPa and the plasma-forming gas composition consisting of different organic compounds and hydrogen (C3H8, CH4, Si(CH32Cl2, H2, the voltage of accelerating gap in the range 0.5–5 kV, and the substrate temperature in the range 20–850°C were varied. Synthesized films were researched using nanoindentation, Raman, and FTIR spectroscopy methods. Analysis of the experimental results was made in accordance with a developed model describing processes of growth of the amorphous and crystalline carbon materials.

  13. Microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon films deposited on hydrogenated rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, J.P. van der [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Martinez-Martinez, D., E-mail: d.martinez.martinez@rug.nl [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Pei, Y.T., E-mail: y.pei@rug.nl [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Rudolf, P. [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); De Hosson, J.Th.M. [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, the microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films prepared by plasma chemical vapor deposition on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubbers (HNBR) are studied. Different negative variations of temperature during film growth were selected by proper changes of the bias voltage. Raman measurements show a similar bonding regardless of the voltages used. A columnar growth and a tile-like microstructure of the DLC films were identified by scanning electron microscopy. Patch sizes can be correlated with the deposition conditions. The coefficient of friction (CoF) of DLC film coated HNBR was found to be much lower than that of the unprotected rubber, and more reduced for the DLC films with smaller patch sizes, which is explained by a better flexibility and conformity of the film during testing. In one of the samples, unexpected low CoF was observed, which was attributed to a modification of the mechanical properties of the rubber during the plasma treatment at high voltage. This issue was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which indicated a modification of the cross linking in the rubber. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bias voltage does not vary the chemical bonding and surface morphology of films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Film structure is patched, whose size depends on the etching and deposition voltages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The frictional behavior can be correlated with the patch size of the films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface analysis showed that rubber x-linking is modified by etching at high voltage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modification of rubber x-linking leads to a different frictional behavior.

  14. Deodorisation effect of diamond-like carbon/titanium dioxide multilayer thin films deposited onto polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozeki, K., E-mail: ozeki@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Frontier Research Center for Applied Atomic Sciences, 162-1 Shirakata, Toukai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Hirakuri, K.K. [Applied Systems Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, Ishizaka, Hatoyama, Hiki, Saitama 350-0394 (Japan); Masuzawa, T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Many types of plastic containers have been used for the storage of food. In the present study, diamond-like carbon (DLC)/titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) multilayer thin films were deposited on polypropylene (PP) to prevent flavour retention and to remove flavour in plastic containers. For the flavour removal test, two types of multilayer films were prepared, DLC/TiO{sub 2} films and DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC films. The residual gas concentration of acetaldehyde, ethylene, and turmeric compounds in bottle including the DLC/TiO{sub 2}-coated and the DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC-coated PP plates were measured after UV radiation, and the amount of adsorbed compounds to the plates was determined. The percentages of residual gas for acetaldehyde, ethylene, and turmeric with the DLC/TiO{sub 2} coated plates were 0.8%, 65.2% and 75.0% after 40 h of UV radiation, respectively. For the DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC film, the percentages of residual gas for acetaldehyde, ethylene and turmeric decreased to 34.9%, 76.0% and 85.3% after 40 h of UV radiation, respectively. The DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC film had a photocatalytic effect even though the TiO{sub 2} film was covered with the DLC film.

  15. Near-surface hydrogen depletion of diamond-like carbon films produced by direct ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwitz, Andreas, E-mail: A.Markwitz@gns.cri.nz [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Gupta, Prasanth [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Mohr, Berit [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Hübner, René [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Leveneur, Jerome; Zondervan, Albert [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Becker, Hans-Werner [RUBION, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Amorphous atomically flat diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were produced by direct ion deposition using a system based on a Penning ion source, butane precursor gas and post acceleration. Hydrogen depth profiles of the DLC coatings were measured with the 15N R-NRA method using the resonant nuclear reaction {sup 1}H({sup 15}N, αγ){sup 12}C (E{sub res} = 6.385 MeV). The films produced at 3.0–10.5 kV acceleration voltage show two main effects. First, compared to average elemental composition of the film, the near-surface region is hydrogen depleted. The increase of the hydrogen concentration by 3% from the near-surface region towards the bulk is attributed to a growth model which favours the formation of sp{sup 2} hybridised carbon rich films in the film formation zone. Secondly, the depth at which the maximum hydrogen concentration is measured increases with acceleration voltage and is proportional to the penetration depth of protons produced by the ion source from the precursor gas. The observed effects are explained by a deposition process that takes into account the contributions of ion species, hydrogen effusion and preferential displacement of atoms during direct ion deposition.

  16. Selective deposition of polycrystalline diamond films using photolithography with addition of nanodiamonds as nucleation centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhotnikov, V. V.; Linnik, S. A.; Gaidaichuk, A. V.; Shashev, D. V.; Nazarova, G. Yu; Yurchenko, V. I.

    2016-02-01

    A new method of selective deposition of polycrystalline diamond has been developed and studied. The diamond coatings with a complex, predetermined geometry and resolution up to 5 μm were obtained. A high density of polycrystallites in the coating area was reached (up to 32·107 pcs/cm2). The uniformity of the film reached 100%, and the degree of the surface contamination by parasitic crystals did not exceed 2%. The technology was based on the application of the standard photolithography with an addition of nanodiamond suspension into the photoresist that provided the creation of the centers of further nucleation in the areas which require further overgrowth. The films were deposited onto monocrystalline silicon substrates using the method of “hot filaments” in the CVD reactor. The properties of the coating and the impact of the nanodiamond suspension concentration in the photoresist were also studied. The potential use of the given method includes a high resolution, technological efficiency, and low labor costs compared to the standard methods (laser treatment, chemical etching in aggressive environments,).

  17. Fabrication of ZnO nanoparticles-embedded hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films by electrochemical deposition technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Pei-Zeng; Li Rui-Shan; Pan Xiao-Jun; Xie Er-Qing

    2013-01-01

    ZnO nanoparticles-embedded hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (ZnO-DLC) films have been prepared by electrochemical deposition in ambient conditions.The morphology,composition,and microstructure of the films have been investigated.The results show that the resultant films are hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films embedded with ZnO nanoparticles in wurtzite structure,and the content and size of the ZnO nanoparticles increase with increasing deposition voltage,which are confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),Raman,and transmission electron microscope (TEM).Furthermore,a possible mechanism used to describe the growth process of ZnO-DLC films by electrochemical deposition is also discussed.

  18. INFLUENCE OF THE SILICON INTERLAYER ON DIAMOND-LIKE CARBON FILMS DEPOSITED ON GLASS SUBSTRATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deiler Antonio Lima Oliveira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-like carbon (DLC films as a hard protective coating have achieved great success in a diversity of technological applications. However, adhesion of DLC films to substrates can restrict their applications. The influence of a silicon interlayer in order to improve DLC adhesion on glass substrates was investigated. Amorphous silicon interlayer and DLC films were deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from silane and methane, respectively. The bonding structure, transmittance, refraction index, and adherence of the films were also evaluated regarding the thickness of the silicon interlayer. Raman scattering spectroscopy did not show any substantial difference in DLC structure due to the interlayer thickness of the silicon. Optical measurements showed a sharp decrease of transmittance in the ultra-violet region caused by the fundamental absorption of the light. In addition, the absorption edge of transmittance shifted toward longer wavelength side in the ultra-violet region as the thickness of the silicon interlayer increased. The tribological results showed an increase of DLC adherence as the silicon interlayer increased, which was characterized by less cracks around the grooves.

  19. Structural and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon films deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broitman, E.; Hellgren, N.; Czigány, Zs.; Twesten, R. D.; Luning, J.; Petrov, I.; Hultman, L.; Holloway, B. C.

    2003-07-01

    The microstructure, morphology, and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering were investigated for microelectromechanical systems applications. Film properties were found to vary markedly with the ion energy (Eion) and ion-to-carbon flux ratio (Jion/JC). Cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed an amorphous microstructure. However, the presence of nanometer-sized domains at Eion~85 eV was detected. Film stresses, σ, which were compressive in all cases, ranged from 0.5 to 3.5 GPa and depended on the flux ratio as well as ion energy. The hardness (H), Young's moduli (ɛ), and elastic recovery (R) increased with Eion to maximum values of H=27 GPa, ɛ=250 GPa, and R=68% at Eion=85 eV and Jion/JC=4.4. However, near edge x-ray absorption fine structure and electron energy-loss spectrum analysis showed that the sp2/sp3 content of the films does not change with Eion or Jion/JC. The measured change in mechanical properties without a corresponding change in sp2/sp3 ratio is not consistent with any previously published models. We suggest that, in the ranges 5 eV <=Eion<=85 eV and 1.1 <=Jion/JC<=6.8, the presence of defective graphite formed by subplanted C and Ar atoms has the dominant influence on the mechanical properties of DLC films.

  20. Intertwisted fibrillar diamond-like carbon films prepared by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨武保; 王久丽; 张谷令; 范松华; 刘赤子; 杨思泽

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the structures, optical and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon films are studied, which are prepared by a self-fabricated electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition method at room temperature in the ambient gases of mixed acetylene and nitrogen. The morphology and microstructure of the processed film are characterized by the atomic force microscope image, Raman spectra and middle Fourier transform infrared transmittance spectra, which reveal that there is an intertwisted fibrillar diamond-like structure in the film and the film is mainly composed of sp3 CH, sp3 C-C, sp2 C=C, C=N and C60. The film micro-hardness and bulk modulus are measured by a nano-indenter and the refractive constant and deposition rate are also calculated.

  1. Effect of working pressure and temperature on ZnO film deposited on free-standing diamond substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ping; XIA Yi-ben; WANG Lin-jun; LIU Jian-min; XU Run; PENG Hong-yan; SHI Wei-min

    2006-01-01

    The structure characteristic and electric performance of ZnO film deposited on nucleation side of free-standing diamond substrates under different heating temperatures (Th) of substrate and working pressures (p) were studied. The structure of the ZnO films tested by X-ray diffraction shows that ZnO film of high c-axis orientation is deposited on the nucleation side of free-standing diamond substrate which is extremely smooth when Th=250 ℃ and p=0.4 Pa. After annealing at 480 ℃ in N2 atmosphere,the SEM and the AFM analyses demonstrate that the c-axis orientation of ZnO film is obviously enhanced. The resistivity of ZnO films also increases up to 8×105 Ω·cm which is observed by I-V test.

  2. Increased charge storage capacity of titanium nitride electrodes by deposition of boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meijs, Suzan; McDonald, Matthew; Sørensen, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of depositing a thin layer of boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (B-NCD) on titanium nitride (TiN) coated electrodes and the effect this has on charge injection properties. The charge storage capacity increased by applying the B-NCD film...

  3. Effects of deposition parameters on microstructure and thermal conductivity of diamond films deposited by DC arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Quan-yan; QIU Wan-qi; ZENG De-chang; LIU Zhong-wu; DAI Ming-jiang; ZHOU Ke-song

    2009-01-01

    The uniform diamond films with 60 mm in diameter were deposited by improved DC arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition technique. The structure of the film was characterized by scanning electronic microcopy(SEM) and laser Raman spectrometry. The thermal conductivity was measured by a photo thermal deflection technique. The effects of main deposition parameters on microstructure and thermal conductivity of the films were investigated. The results show that high thermal conductivity, 10.0 W/(K-cm), can be obtained at a CH4 concentration of 1.5% (volume fraction) and the substrate temperatures of 880-920 ℃ due to the high density and high purity of the film. A low pressure difference between nozzle and vacuum chamber is also beneficial to the high thermal conductivity.

  4. Ultra-Smooth Nanostructured Diamond Films Deposited from He/H2/CH4/N2 Microwave Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Konovalov, Valery V.; Melo, Andrew; Catledge, Shane A.; Chowdhury, Shafiul; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2006-01-01

    Addition of He to a high CH4 content (10.7 vol%) H2/CH4/N2 feedgas mixture for microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition produced hard (56–72 GPa), ultra-smooth nanostructured diamond films on Ti-6Al-4V alloy substrates. Upon increase in He content up to 71 vol%, root mean squared (RMS) surface roughness of the film decreased to 9–10 nm and average diamond grain size to 5–6 nm. Our studies show that increased nanocrystallinity with He addition in plasma is related to plasma dilution, enhance...

  5. Diamond-like carbon films deposited on three-dimensional shape substrate model by liquid electrochemical technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Y.Y. [Institute of Nano-photonics, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, 116600 Dalian (China); Zhang, G.F. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, 116024, Dalian China (China); Zhao, Y.; Liu, D.D. [Institute of Nano-photonics, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, 116600 Dalian (China); Cong, Y., E-mail: congyan@ciomp.ac.cn [Institute of Nano-photonics, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, 116600 Dalian (China); Buck, V. [Thin Film Technology Group, Faculty of Physics, University Duisburg-Essen and CeNIDE, 47057 Duisburg (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on three-dimensional (3D) shape substrate model by electrolysis of 2-propanol solution at low temperature (60 °C). This 3D shape model was composed of a horizontally aligned stainless steel wafer and vertically aligned stainless steel rods. Morphology and microstructure of the films were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The results suggested there were only differences in film uniformity and thickness for two kinds of samples. The hydrogenated amorphous carbon films deposited on horizontally aligned substrate were smooth and homogeneous. And the film thickness of DLC films gained on the vertical substrates decreased along vertical direction. It is believed that bubble formation could enhance nucleation on the wetted capillary area. This experiment shows that deposition of DLC films by liquid phase deposition on 3D shape conductive substrates is possible. - Highlights: • DLC film is expected to be deposited on complex surface/shape substrate. • DLC film is deposited on 3D shape substrate by liquid electrochemical method. • Horizontal substrate is covered by smooth and homogeneous DLC films. • Film thickness decreases along vertical direction due to boiling effect.

  6. Diamond film deposition on WC-Co and steel substrates with a CrN interlayer for tribological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Maneesh; Hoffman, Alon

    2016-06-01

    The most renowned property of diamond is its exceptional hardness. By depositing diamond films on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) and steel substrates, the hardness of diamond can be combined with the toughness of these materials, resulting in an excellent wear resistance material for tribological applications. However, poor adhesion of diamond coating on these substrates leads to a lesser lifetime for the diamond coated tools than expected. The prime reasons for the lack of proper adhesion are the preferential formation of graphitic layer at the interface due to the catalytic activities of cobalt/iron and the interfacial residual stresses due to the mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients of diamond (1.5  ×  10-6 K-1) and WC-Co (5.2  ×  10-6 K-1) or steel (12  ×  10-6 K-1). In this review, we discuss the possibility of using a Cr-N interlayer as a diffusion barrier to prevent the catalytic activities of cobalt/iron and also to relax the interfacial residual stresses to some extent to enhance the adhesion of diamond coatings on these substrates. An overview of the most pertinent results of the last two decades, including the recent progress is introduced. We describe in detail how the Cr-N interlayer with the desired properties is fabricated. We give a concise overview of diamond deposition process, including the methods to vary the grain size from microcrystalline to nanocrystalline, which are suitable for some tribological applications. We describe in detail on surface and interface analysis, residual stress measurements, assessment adhesion strength and tribological performance of diamond coated WC-Co and steel substrates using various characterization techniques. We conclude by highlighting the current progress and future perspectives of diamond coatings on these substrates for tribological applications.

  7. Diamond-like carbon films synthesized on bearing steel surface by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-xi; TANG Bao-yin; WANG Lang-ping; WANG Xiao-feng; YU Yong-hao; SUN Tao; HU Li-guo

    2004-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were synthesized by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID) on 9Cr18 bearing steel surface. Influences of working gas pressure and pulse width of the bias voltage on properties of the thin film were investigated. The chemical compositions of the as-deposited films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The micro-hardness, friction and wear behavior, corrosion resistance of the samples were evaluated, respectively. Compared with uncoated substrates, micro-hardness results reveal that the maximum is increased by 88.7%. In addition, the friction coefficient decreases to about 0.1, and the corrosion resistance of treated coupons surface are improved significantly.

  8. Optical and electrical properties of boron doped diamond thin conductive films deposited on fused silica glass substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ficek, M.; Sobaszek, M.; Gnyba, M. [Department of Metrology and Optoelectronics, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12G. Narutowicza St., 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Ryl, J. [Department of Electrochemistry, Corrosion and Material Engineering, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12 Narutowicza St., 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Gołuński, Ł. [Department of Metrology and Optoelectronics, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12G. Narutowicza St., 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Smietana, M.; Jasiński, J. [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, 75 Koszykowa St., 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Caban, P. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, 133 Wolczynska St., 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Bogdanowicz, R., E-mail: rbogdan@eti.pg.gda.pl [Department of Metrology and Optoelectronics, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12G. Narutowicza St., 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Materials and Process Simulation Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Growth of 60% of transmittance diamond films with resistivity as low as 48 Ω cm. • Two step seeding process of fused silica: plasma hydrogenation and wet seeding. • Nanodiamond seeding density of 2 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} at fused silica substrates. • High refractive index (2.4 @550 nm) was achieved for BDD films deposited at 500 °C. - Abstract: This paper presents boron-doped diamond (BDD) film as a conductive coating for optical and electronic purposes. Seeding and growth processes of thin diamond films on fused silica have been investigated. Growth processes of thin diamond films on fused silica were investigated at various boron doping level and methane admixture. Two step pre-treatment procedure of fused silica substrate was applied to achieve high seeding density. First, the substrates undergo the hydrogen plasma treatment then spin-coating seeding using a dispersion consisting of detonation nanodiamond in dimethyl sulfoxide with polyvinyl alcohol was applied. Such an approach results in seeding density of 2 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}. The scanning electron microscopy images showed homogenous, continuous and polycrystalline surface morphology with minimal grain size of 200 nm for highly boron doped films. The sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} ratio was calculated using Raman spectra deconvolution method. A high refractive index (range of 2.0–2.4 @550 nm) was achieved for BDD films deposited at 500 °C. The values of extinction coefficient were below 0.1 at λ = 550 nm, indicating low absorption of the film. The fabricated BDD thin films displayed resistivity below 48 Ohm cm and transmittance over 60% in the visible wavelength range.

  9. Structure and properties of diamond and diamond-like films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausing, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This section is broken into four parts: (1) introduction, (2) natural IIa diamond, (3) importance of structure and composition, and (4) control of structure and properties. Conclusions of this discussion are that properties of chemical vapor deposited diamond films can compare favorably with natural diamond, that properties are anisotropic and are a strong function of structure and crystal perfection, that crystal perfection and morphology are functions of growth conditions and can be controlled, and that the manipulation of texture and thereby surface morphology and internal crystal perfection is an important step in optimizing chemically deposited diamond films for applications.

  10. a Design of Experiment Study of the Nucleation of Chemical Vapor Deposited Diamond Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chi

    1995-01-01

    Because of its property, diamond has a unique role in the semiconductor and tool industry. As diamond synthesis technology advances, more and more applications are emerging. However, in order to take advantage of its exceptional property, reliable control of nucleation and growth must be accomplished. In this study, the author systematically studies the nucleation process in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamonds. Among many important intricacies concerning diamond nucleation on foreign surfaces, this study addresses the following issues: the role of ultrasonic pre-treatment in CVD; the correlation between hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) and microwave assisted chemical vapor deposition (MACVD) control parameters and the nucleation processes; the role of biasing substrates on the nucleation density in MACVD; the correlation between parameters of biasing substrates and the nucleation density; the reliable control of nucleation in CVD diamond synthesis. To achieve the goal of this research, a multi -purpose deposition system was built enabling the author to eliminate unnecessary variables in the deposition process. To ensure the accuracy of the nucleation effects of parameters investigated, great effort was made to calibrate measurement instruments so that noise or fluctuations in the experiments were minimized. The implementation of design of experiments (DOE), a systematic investigating technique, vastly improved the efficiency of this study over the less sophisticated empirical approach. In addition, DOE allowed the author to quantitatively estimate the effects of control parameters. Finally, diamond deposition was confirmed by Scanning Electron microscope, Micro Raman Scattering and Rutherford Backscattering. This research has successfully implemented DOE in estimating the effects of diamond nucleation quantitatively. The mechanism of ultrasonic pre-treatment is explained, and its effects are ascribed to seeding. The effects of primary CVD

  11. Characterization of diamond thin films deposited by a CO{sub 2} laser-assisted combustion-flame method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKindra, Travis, E-mail: mckindra@mst.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); O' Keefe, Matthew J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Xie Zhiqiang; Lu Yongfeng [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Diamond thin films were deposited by a CO{sub 2} laser-assisted O{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 4} combustion-flame process. The effect of the deposition parameters, in particular the laser wavelength and power, on the film surface morphology, microstructure and phases present was the primary focus of the work. The laser power was set at 100, 400 and 800 W while the wavelength was varied and set at 10.591 {mu}m in the untuned condition and set at 10.532 {mu}m to resonantly match the CH{sub 2}-wagging vibrational mode of the C{sub 2}H{sub 4} molecule when in the tuned condition. When the laser was coupled to the combustion flame during deposition the diamond film growth was enhanced as the lateral grain size increased from 1 {mu}m to greater than 5 {mu}m. The greatest increase in grain size occurred when the wavelength was in the tuned condition. Scanning transmission electron microscopy images from focused-ion beam cross-sectioned samples revealed a sub-layer of smaller grains less than 1 {mu}m in size near the substrate surface at the lower laser powers and untuned wavelength. X-ray diffraction results showed a more intense Diamond (111) peak as the laser power increased from 100 to 800 W for the films deposited with the tuned laser wavelength. Micro-Raman spectra showed a diamond peak nearly twice as intense from the films with the tuned laser wavelength.

  12. Optical and electrical properties of boron doped diamond thin conductive films deposited on fused silica glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficek, M.; Sobaszek, M.; Gnyba, M.; Ryl, J.; Gołuński, Ł.; Smietana, M.; Jasiński, J.; Caban, P.; Bogdanowicz, R.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents boron-doped diamond (BDD) film as a conductive coating for optical and electronic purposes. Seeding and growth processes of thin diamond films on fused silica have been investigated. Growth processes of thin diamond films on fused silica were investigated at various boron doping level and methane admixture. Two step pre-treatment procedure of fused silica substrate was applied to achieve high seeding density. First, the substrates undergo the hydrogen plasma treatment then spin-coating seeding using a dispersion consisting of detonation nanodiamond in dimethyl sulfoxide with polyvinyl alcohol was applied. Such an approach results in seeding density of 2 × 1010 cm-2. The scanning electron microscopy images showed homogenous, continuous and polycrystalline surface morphology with minimal grain size of 200 nm for highly boron doped films. The sp3/sp2 ratio was calculated using Raman spectra deconvolution method. A high refractive index (range of 2.0-2.4 @550 nm) was achieved for BDD films deposited at 500 °C. The values of extinction coefficient were below 0.1 at λ = 550 nm, indicating low absorption of the film. The fabricated BDD thin films displayed resistivity below 48 Ohm cm and transmittance over 60% in the visible wavelength range.

  13. Morphology and Structure Properties of Boron-doped Diamond Films Prepared by Hot Cathode Direct Current Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmei PAN

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Boron-doped diamond (BDD films were deposited by hot cathode direct current plasma chemical vapor deposition (HCDC-PCVD according to various mixture ratios of CH4/H2/B(OCH33 gas. The Raman performances and surface morphologies of the BDD films were then characterized by Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results indicated that the flow rate of B(OCH33 had marked effects on the growth characteristics of the produced boron-doped diamond films. The presence and concentration of the doped boron atoms significantly altered both the surface morphologies and structures of the diamond films. With increasing flow rate of B(OCH33, the crystal grain surfaces became smooth as visible under SEM. The B-doping levels in these films increased from 1.75×1019cm-3 to a maximum of 2.4×1021cm-3, estimated from the Raman spectra. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.2.12923

  14. Optical and morphological properties of porous diamond-like-carbon films deposited by magnetron sputtering

    OpenAIRE

    Baroni, M. P. M. A.; Conceição, M. Ventura; Rosa, R. R.; Persson, C.; Arwin, H.; Silva Jr., E.F. da; Roman, L.S.; Nakamura, O.; I. Pepe; Silva, A. Ferreira da

    2006-01-01

    RESTRITO Porous diamond-like-carbon (PDLC) thin films obtained on silicon substrate by DC low energy magnetron sputtering have been investigated by photoluminescence, transmission and reflection spectroscopy, photoacoustic and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The absorption features observed for these films show similarities with those of porous silicon (PS) as well as in the performed gradient structural pattern classification of the SFM porosity, by means of the computational GPA-flyby enviro...

  15. Simulation optimization of filament parameters for uniform depositions of diamond films on surfaces of ultra-large circular holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinchang; Shen, Xiaotian; Sun, Fanghong; Shen, Bin

    2016-12-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have been widely applied as protective coatings on varieties of anti-frictional and wear-resistant components, owing to their excellent mechanical and tribological properties close to the natural diamond. In applications of some components, the inner hole surface will serve as the working surface that suffers severe frictional or erosive wear. It is difficult to realize uniform depositions of diamond films on surfaces of inner holes, especially ultra-large inner holes. Adopting a SiC compact die with an aperture of V80 mm as an example, a novel filament arrangement with a certain number of filaments evenly distributed on a circle is designed, and specific effects of filament parameters, including the filament number, arrangement direction, filament temperature, filament diameter, circumradius and the downward translation, on the substrate temperature distribution are studied by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations based on the finite volume method (FVM), adopting a modified computational model well consistent with the actual deposition environment. Corresponding temperature measurement experiments are also conducted to verify the rationality of the computational model. From the aspect of depositing uniform boron-doped micro-crystalline, undoped micro-crystalline and undoped fine-grained composite diamond (BDM-UMC-UFGCD) film on such the inner hole surface, filament parameters as mentioned above are accurately optimized and compensated by orthogonal simulations. Moreover, deposition experiments adopting compensated optimized parameters and some typical contrastive parameters are also accomplished for further verifying the rationality of the computational model and the correctness of the compensation coefficient 0.7 defined for the downward translation determined by simulations. More importantly, on the basis of more simulations and verification tests, a general filament arrangement model suitable for V50-120 mm

  16. Deposition of hard and adherent diamond-like carbon films inside steel tubes using a pulsed-DC discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trava-Airoldi, Vladimir Jesus; Capote, Gil; Bonetti, Luís Francisco; Fernandes, Jesum; Blando, Eduardo; Hübler, Roberto; Radi, Polyana Alves; Santos, Lúcia Vieira; Corat, Evaldo José

    2009-06-01

    A new, low cost, pulsed-DC plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system that uses a bipolar, pulsed power supply was designed and tested to evaluate its capacity to produce quality diamond-like carbon films on the inner surface of steel tubes. The main focus of the study was to attain films with low friction coefficients, low total stress, a high degree of hardness, and very good adherence to the inner surface of long metallic tubes at a reasonable growth rate. In order to enhance the diamond-like carbon coating adhesion to metallic surfaces, four steps were used: (1) argon ion sputtering; (2) plasma nitriding; (3) a thin amorphous silicon interlayer deposition, using silane as the precursor gas; and (4) diamond-like carbon film deposition using methane atmosphere. This paper presents various test results as functions of the methane gas pressure and of the coaxial metal anode diameter, where the pulsed-DC voltage constant is kept constant. The influence of the coaxial metal anode diameter and of the methane gas pressure is also demonstrated. The results obtained showed the possibilities of using these DLC coatings for reduced friction and to harden inner surface of the steel tubes.

  17. Deposition and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Diamond Films on Mirror-Polished Si Substrate by Biased Enhanced Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, T.; Sharda, T.; Jimbo, T.; Umeno, M.

    Hard and smooth nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films were deposited on polished silicon substrates by biased enhanced growth in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition. The films deposited with varying the methane concentration and biasing voltage were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, nano-indenter, x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Stress in the films increases with decreasing methane concentration in the gas-phase and with increasing biasing. The adhesion between NCD film and Si substrate is very strong sustaining the compressive stress as high as high as 85 GPa. It was hypothesized that hydrogen content of the films and graphitic content of the films are responsible in generating stress. The hardness is well correlated with the Raman peak intensity ratio of NCD peak to G peak.

  18. Low-temperature synthesis of diamond films by photoemission-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawata, Mayuri, E-mail: kawata@mail.tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Ojiro, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Shuichi; Takakuwa, Yuji [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Masuzawa, Tomoaki; Okano, Ken [International Christian University, 3-10-2 Osawa, Mitaka 181-8585 (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    Photoemission-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PA-PECVD), a process in which photoelectrons emitted from a substrate irradiated with ultraviolet light are utilized as a trigger for DC discharge, was investigated in this study; specifically, the DC discharge characteristics of PA-PECVD were examined for an Si substrate deposited in advance through hot-filament chemical vapor deposition with a nitrogen-doped diamond layer of thickness ∼1 μm. Using a commercially available Xe excimer lamp (hν = 7.2 eV) to illuminate the diamond surface with and without hydrogen termination, the photocurrents were found to be 3.17 × 10{sup 12} and 2.11 × 10{sup 11} electrons/cm{sup 2}/s, respectively. The 15-fold increase in photocurrent was ascribed to negative electron affinity (NEA) caused by hydrogen termination on the diamond surfaces. The DC discharge characteristics revealed that a transition bias voltage from a Townsend-to-glow discharge was considerably decreased because of NEA (from 490 to 373 V for H{sub 2} gas and from 330 to 200 V for Ar gas), enabling a reduction in electric power consumption needed to synthesize diamond films through PA-PECVD. In fact, the authors have succeeded in growing high-quality diamond films of area 2.0 cm{sup 2} at 540 °C with a discharge power of only 1.8 W, plasma voltage of 156.4 V, and discharge current of 11.7 mA under the glow discharge of CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar mixed gases. In addition to having only negligible amounts of graphite and amorphous carbon, the diamond films exhibit a relatively high diamond growth rate of 0.5 μm/h at temperatures as low as 540 °C, which is attributed to Ar{sup +} ions impinging on the diamond surface, and causing the removal of hydrogen atoms from the surface through sputtering. This process leads to enhanced CH{sub x} radical adsorption, because the sample was applied with a negative potential to accelerate photoelectrons in PA-PECVD.

  19. Continuous production of carbon nanotubes and diamond films by swirled floating catalyst chemical vapour deposition method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E. Iyuke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various techniques for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are being developed to meet an increasing demand as a result of their versatile applications. Swirled floating catalyst chemical vapour deposition (SFCCVD is one of these techniques. This method was used to synthesise CNTs on a continuous basis using acetylene gas as a carbon source, ferrocene dissolved in xylene as a catalyst precursor, and both hydrogen and argon as carrier gases. Transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that a mixture of single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes and other carbon nanomaterials were produced within the pyrolytic temperature range of 900–1 100°C and acetylene flow rate range of 118–370 ml min–1. Image comparison of raw and purified products showed that low contents of iron particles and amorphous carbon were contained in the synthesised carbon nanotubes. Diamond films were produced at high ferrocene concentration, hydrogen flow rate and pyrolysis temperatures, while carbon nanoballs were formed and attached to the surface of theCNTs at low ferrocene content and low pyrolysis temperature.

  20. Diamond films grown on seeded substrates by hot-filament chemical vapour deposition with H sub 2 as the only feeding gas

    CERN Document Server

    LiuHongWu; Gao Chun Xi; Han Yong; Luo Ji Feng; Zou Guang Tian; Wen Chao

    2002-01-01

    Diamond films have been grown on polished Si substrates seeded with nanocrystalline diamond powder colloid using hot-filament chemical vapour deposition. Instead of using the conventional gaseous carbon source, a carbonized W filament was used as the carbon source. The only feeding gas was hydrogen. Compared with those produced by traditional methods, the polycrystalline diamond grown by this new method has smaller grain size. The growth mechanism is also discussed.

  1. Investigation of superfast deposition of metal oxide and Diamond-Like Carbon thin films by nanosecond Ytterbium (Yb+) fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbezov, V.; Sotirov, S.; Benkhouja, K.; Zawadzka, A.; Sahraoui, B.

    2013-11-01

    Metal oxide (MOx, M: titanium, magnesium) and Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) thin films were synthesized by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) at room temperature and low vacuum of 2 Pa for MOx and vacuum of 4 × 10-3 Pa for DLC films. A fiber based Ytterbium (Yb+) laser operating in the nanosecond regime at a repetition rate of 20 kHz was used as an ablation source. Dense and smooth thin films with a thickness from 120 to 360 nm and an area of up to 10 cm2 were deposited on glass and stainless steel substrates at high growth rates up to 2 nm/s for a laser intensity of 10-12 J/cm2. The thin films synthesis was compared for two fiber laser modes of operation, at a repetition rate of 20 kHz and with an additional modulation at 1 kHz. The morphology, chemical composition and structure of the obtained thin films were evaluated using optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and Raman spectroscopy. The morphology of the MOx thin films and the deposition rate strongly depend on the fiber laser mode of operation. Very smooth surfaces were obtained for the metal oxide thin films deposited at lower deposition rates in the modulation mode at 1 kHz. The effect of the substrate on the DLC film structure was studied. The films deposited on dielectric substrates were identified as typical tetrahedral (ta-C) DLC with high sp3 content. DLC films on metal substrates were found typical a-C amorphous carbon films with mixing sp2/sp3 bonds.

  2. Thermal effects on structure and photoluminescence properties of diamond-like carbon films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Da; LI Qing-shan; WANG Jing-jing; ZHENG Xue-gang

    2006-01-01

    Un-hydrogenated Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition technique at different substrate temperature.The Raman spectra,the absorption and the photoluminescence spectra were measured.The dependence of structure and photoluminescence properties on deposition temperature were studied in detail.The experimental results indicate that the sp2 sites form small clusters that consist of both olefinic chains and aromatic ring groups within the sp3 matrix.With raising deposition temperature,the optical band gaps increase from 1.87 to 2.85 eV.The main band of photoluminescence centered at around 700nm shifts to short wavelength,and the intensity of this band increases.The photoluminescence can be attributed to carrier localization within an increasing sp2 clusters.It was clarified that the DLC films are ordered with increasing deposition temperature.

  3. Deposition of Diamond-Like carbon Films by High-Intensity Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation at Various Substrate Temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅显秀; 刘振民; 马腾才; 董闯

    2003-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been deposited on to Si substrates at substrate temperatures from 25℃to 400 ℃ by a high-intensity pulsed-ion-beam (HIPIB) ablation deposition technique. The formation of DLC is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. According to an x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, the concentration of spa carbon in the films is about 40% when the substrate temperature is below 300 ℃. With increasing substrate temperature from 25 ℃ to 400 ℃, the concentration of sp3 carbon decreases from 43% to 8%. In other words,sp3 carbon is graphitized into sp2 carbon when the substrate temperature is above 300 ℃. The results of xray diffraction and atomic force microscopy show that, with increasing the substrate temperature, the surface roughness and the friction coefficient increase, and the microhardness and the residual stress of the films decrease.

  4. Structural and optical properties of gold-incorporated diamond-like carbon thin films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Shahbaz; Siraj, K.; Naseem, S.; Khan, Muhammad F.; Irshad, M.; Faiz, H.; Mahmood, A.

    2017-07-01

    Pure and gold-doped diamond-like carbon (Au-DLC) thin films are deposited at room temperature by using RF magnetron sputtering in an argon gas-filled chamber with a constant flow rate of 100 sccm and sputtering time of 30 min for all DLC thin films. Single-crystal silicon (1 0 0) substrates are used for the deposition of pristine and Au-DLC thin films. Graphite (99.99%) and gold (99.99%) are used as co-sputtering targets in the sputtering chamber. The optical properties and structure of Au-DLC thin films are studied with the variation of gold concentration from 1%-5%. Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), Vickers hardness measurement (VHM), and spectroscopic ellipsometry are used to analyze these thin films. Raman spectroscopy indicates increased graphitic behavior and reduction in the internal stresses of Au-DLC thin films as the function of increasing gold doping. AFM is used for surface topography, which shows that spherical-like particles are formed on the surface, which agglomerate and form larger clusters on the surface by increasing the gold content. Spectroscopy ellipsometry analysis elucidates that the refractive index and extinction coefficient are inversely related and the optical bandgap energy is decreased with increasing gold content. VHM shows that gold doping reduces the hardness of thin films, which is attributed to the increase in sp2-hybridization.

  5. Characteristics of diamond – like carbon(DLC film deposited by PACVD process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Lukaszkowicz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Diamond – like carbon (DLC film is promising materials for many technical and engineering applications. DLC films are used in many different industries for example: in medicine, in electronics, in optics and the automotive industry. They have excellent tribological properties (low friction coefficient, chemical inertness and high mechanical hardness. This paper provides an analysis of the microstructure, mechanical and tribological properties of DLC films. In the study of the coating used several surface sensitive techniques and methods, i.e. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Raman spectroscopy and tribological tests like ball-on-disc. HRTEM investigation shows an amorphous character of DLC layer. In sliding dry friction conditions the friction coefficient for the investigated elements is set in the range between 0.02-0.03. The investigated coating reveals high wear resistance. The coating demonstrated a good adhesion to the substrate.

  6. Atomic-Scale Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of {100}-Oriented Diamond Film Growth in C-H and C-H-Cl Systems by Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安希忠; 张禹; 刘国权; 秦湘阁; 王辅忠; 刘胜新

    2002-01-01

    We simulate the { 100}-oriented diamond film growth of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) under different modelsin C-H and C-H-CI systems in an atomic scale by using the revised kinetic Monte Carlo method. The sirnulationresults show that: (1) the CVD diamond flm growth in the C-H system is suitable for high substrate temperature,and the flm surface roughness is very coarse; (2) the CVD diamond film can grow in the C-H-C1 system eitherat high temperature or at low temperature, and the film quality is outstanding; (3) atomic CI takes ala activerole for the growth of diamond film, especially at low temperatures. The concentration of atomic C1 should becontrolled in a proper range.

  7. Fluorine and boron co-doped diamond-like carbon films deposited by pulsed glow discharge plasma immersion ion processing

    CERN Document Server

    He, X M; Peters, A M; Taylor, B; Nastasi, M

    2002-01-01

    Fluorine (F) and boron (B) co-doped diamond-like carbon (FB-DLC) films were prepared on different substrates by the plasma immersion ion processing (PIIP) technique. A pulse glow discharge plasma was used for the PIIP deposition and was produced at a pressure of 1.33 Pa from acetylene (C sub 2 H sub 2), diborane (B sub 2 H sub 6), and hexafluoroethane (C sub 2 F sub 6) gas. Films of FB-DLC were deposited with different chemical compositions by varying the flow ratios of the C sub 2 H sub 2 , B sub 2 H sub 6 , and C sub 2 F sub 6 source gases. The incorporation of B sub 2 H sub 6 and C sub 2 F sub 6 into PIIP deposited DLC resulted in the formation of F-C and B-C hybridized bonding structures. The levels of the F and B concentrations effected the chemical bonding and the physical properties as was evident from the changes observed in density, hardness, stress, friction coefficient, and contact angle of water on films. Compared to B-doped or F-doped DLC films, the F and B co-doping of DLC during PIIP deposition...

  8. The effect of substrate holder size on the electric field and discharge plasma on diamond-film formation at high deposition rates during MPCVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Kang; Chen, Liangxian; Liu, Jinlong; Zhao, Yun; Yan, Xiongbo; Hua, Chenyi; Guo, Jianchao; Wei, Junjun; Hei, Lifu; Li, Chengming; Lu, Fanxiu

    2017-09-01

    The effect of the substrate holder feature dimensions on plasma density (n e), power density (Q mw) and gas temperature (T) of a discharge marginal plasma (a plasma caused by marginal discharge) and homogeneous plasma were investigated for the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process. Our simulations show that decreasing the dimensions of the substrate holder in a radical direction and increasing its dimension in the direction of the axis helps to produce marginally inhomogeneous plasma. When the marginal discharge appears, the maximum plasma density and power density appear at the edge of the substrate. The gas temperature increases until a marginally inhomogeneous plasma develops. The marginally inhomogeneous plasma can be avoided using a movable substrate holder that can tune the plasma density, power density and gas temperature. It can also ensure that the power density and electron density are as high as possible with uniform distribution of plasma. Moreover, both inhomogeneous and homogeneous diamond films were prepared using a new substrate holder with a diameter of 30 mm. The observation of inhomogeneous diamond films indicates that the marginal discharge can limit the deposition rate in the central part of the diamond film. The successfully produced homogeneous diamond films show that by using a substrate holder it is possible to deposit diamond film at 7.2 μm h-1 at 2.5 kW microwave power.

  9. Studies of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited on stainless steel substrate with Si/SiC intermediate layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; Liu Gui-Chang; Wang Li-Da; Deng Xin-Lü; Xu Jun

    2008-01-01

    In this work, diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on stainless steel substrates with Si/SiC intermediate layers by combining plasma enhanced sputtering physical vapour deposition (PEUMS-PVD) and microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (MW-ECRPECVD) techniques. The influence of substrate negative self-bias voltage and Si target power on the structure and nano-mechanical behaviour of the DLC films were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, nano-indentation, and the film structural morphology by atomic force microscopy (AFM). With the increase of deposition bias voltage, the G band shifted to higher wave-number and the integrated intensity ratio ID/IG increased. We considered these as evidences for the development of graphitization in the films. As the substrate negative self-bias voltage increased, particle bombardment function was enhanced and thesp3-bond carbon density reducing, resulted in the peak values of hardness (H) and elastic modulus (E). Silicon addition promoted the formation of sp3 bonding and reduced the hardness. The incorporated Si atoms substituted sp2- bond carbon atoms in ring structures, which promoted the formation of sp3-bond. The structural transition from C-C to C-Si bonds resulted in relaxation of the residual stress which led to the decrease of internal stress and hardness. The results of AFM indicated that the films was dense and homogeneous, the roughness of the films was decreased due to the increase of substrate negative self-bias voltage and the Si target power.

  10. Effect of characteristics of plasma plume on the diamond-like film deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚东升; 刘晶儒; 俞昌旋; 王丽戈; 詹如娟

    2000-01-01

    Pulsed KrF lasers of two different durations (30 ns, 500 fs) are used to deposit DLCfilms. By optical emission spectroscopy and ion probe, the composite species of laser generated plas-ma plume are identified, the average kinetic energy of ions, the plume flux and their variation with laserenergy density, and the distance from the target are investigated. The relation of the properties of de-posited films with the plasma characteristics is studied.

  11. Enhanced Transverse Magnetoresistive Effect in Semiconducting Diamond Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wan-Lu; LIAO Ke-Jun; WANG Bi-Ben

    2000-01-01

    A very large magnetoresistive effect in both homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial semiconducting diamond films by chemical vapor deposition has been observed. The changes in the resistance of the films strongly depend on both magnetic field intensity and geometric form of the samples. The effect of disk structure is greater than that of stripe type samples, also variation in the resistance of homoepitaxial diamond films is greater than that of eteroepitaxial diamond films. The resistance of homoepitaxial diamond films with the disk structure is increased y a factor of 2.1 at room temperature under magnetic field intensity of 5 T, but only 0.80 for heteroepitaxial diamond films.

  12. Effect of nitrogen on deposition and field emission properties of boron-doped micro-and nano-crystalline diamond films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.A. Li; S.H. Cheng; H.D. Li; Q. Yu; J.W. Liu; X.Y. Lv

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we report the effect of nitrogen on the deposition and properties of boron doped diamond films synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The diamond films consisting of micro-grains (nano-grains) were realized with low (high) boron source flow rate during the growth processes. The transition of micro-grains to nano-grains is speculated to be strongly (weekly) related with the boron (nitrogen) flow rate. The grain size and Raman spectral feature vary insignificantly as a function of the nitrogen introduction at a certain boron flow rate. The variation of electron field emission characteristics dependent on nitrogen is different between microcrystalline and nanocrystalline boron doped diamond samples, which are related to the combined phase composition, boron doping level and texture structure. There is an optimum nitrogen proportion to improve the field emission properties of the boron-doped films.

  13. Ultrathin diamond-like carbon films deposited by filtered carbon vacuum arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre; Fong, Walton; Kulkarni, Ashok; Ryan, Francis W.; Bhatia, C. Singh

    2001-07-13

    Ultrathin (< 5 nm) hard carbon films are of great interest to the magnetic storage industry as the areal density approaches 100 Gbit/in{sup 2}. These films are used as overcoats to protect the magnetic layers on disk media and the active elements of the read-write slider. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon films can be produced by filtered cathodic arc deposition, but the films will only be accepted by the storage industry only if the ''macroparticle'' issue has been solved. Better plasma filters have been developed over recent years. Emphasis is put on the promising twist filter system - a compact, open structure that operates with pulsed arcs and high magnetic field. Based on corrosion tests it is shown that the macroparticle reduction by the twist filter is satisfactory for this demanding application, while plasma throughput is very high. Ultrathin hard carbon films have been synthesized using S-filter and twist filter systems. Film properties such as hardness, elastic modulus, wear, and corrosion resistance have been tested.

  14. Ultrathin diamond-like carbon films deposited by filtered carbon vacuum arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre; Fong, Walton; Kulkarni, Ashok; Ryan, Francis W.; Bhatia, C. Singh

    2001-07-13

    Ultrathin (< 5 nm) hard carbon films are of great interest to the magnetic storage industry as the areal density approaches 100 Gbit/in{sup 2}. These films are used as overcoats to protect the magnetic layers on disk media and the active elements of the read-write slider. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon films can be produced by filtered cathodic arc deposition, but the films will only be accepted by the storage industry only if the ''macroparticle'' issue has been solved. Better plasma filters have been developed over recent years. Emphasis is put on the promising twist filter system - a compact, open structure that operates with pulsed arcs and high magnetic field. Based on corrosion tests it is shown that the macroparticle reduction by the twist filter is satisfactory for this demanding application, while plasma throughput is very high. Ultrathin hard carbon films have been synthesized using S-filter and twist filter systems. Film properties such as hardness, elastic modulus, wear, and corrosion resistance have been tested.

  15. Debris reduction for copper and diamond-like carbon thin films produced by magnetically guided pulsed laser deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Tsui, Y Y; Vick, D; Fedosejevs, R

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of debris reduction using magnetically guided pulsed laser deposition (MGPLD) is reported here. KrF laser pulses (248 nm) of 100 mJ energy were focused to intensities of 6x10 sup 9 W/cm sup 2 onto the surface of a copper or a carbon source target and a magnetic field of 0.3 T as used to steer the plasma around a curved arc of 0.5 m length to the deposition substrate. Debris counts were compared for films produced by the MGPLD and conventional PLD (nonguided) techniques. A significant reduction in particulates of size greater than 0.1 mu m was achieved using MGPLD. For the copper films, particulate count was reduced from 150 000 particles/cm sup 2 /nm to 50 particulates/cm sup 2 /nm and for diamond-like carbon thin films particulate count was reduced from 25 000 particles/cm sup 2 /nm to 1200 particles/cm sup 2 /nm.

  16. Plasma enhanced diamond deposition on steel and Si substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.S. Li; Y. Tang; W. Chen; Q. Yang; C. Xiao; A. Hirose

    2009-01-01

    Diamond growth on Fe-Cr-Al-Si steel and Si substrates was comparatively investigated in microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor with different deposition parameters. Adherent nanocrystalline diamond films were directly deposited on this steel substrate under a typical deposition condition, whereas microcrystalline diamond films were produced on Si wafer. With increasing CH4 concentration, reaction pressure, or the total gas flow rate, the quality of nanocrystalline diamond films formed on Fe-Cr-Al-Si substrates is gradually deteriorated in terms of density and adhesion. This impaired diamond quality on steels is primarily associated with a combined effect by the substrate composition and the specific process conditions that favor excessive nucleation of diamond.

  17. Structural properties and surface wettability of Cu-containing diamond-like carbon films prepared by a hybrid linear ion beam deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Peng; Sun, Lili; Li, Xiaowei [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Xu, Sheng [Gao Hong Coating Technology Co., Ltd, Huzhou 313000 (China); Ke, Peiling [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Wang, Aiying, E-mail: aywang@nimte.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2015-06-01

    Cu-containing diamond-like carbon (Cu-DLC) films were deposited on Si/glass substrate by a hybrid ion beam deposition system. The Cu concentration (0.1–39.7 at.%) in the film was controlled by varying the sputtering current. The microstructure and composition of Cu-DLC films were investigated systematically. The surface topography, roughness and surface wettability of the films were also studied. Results indicated that with increasing the Cu concentration, the water contact angle of the films changed from 66.8° for pure carbon film to more than 104.4° for Cu-DLC films with Cu concentration larger than 24.4 at.%. In the hydrophilic region, the polar surface energy decreased from 30.54 mJ/m{sup 2} for pure carbon film to 2.48 mJ/m{sup 2} for the film with Cu 7.0 at.%. - Highlights: • Cu-containing diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited by a hybrid ion beam system. • Cu-containing DLC films exhibited a wide range of water contact angle. • The water contact angles vary with the surface energies and surface roughness.

  18. Method of porous diamond deposition on porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranauskas, Vitor; Peterlevitz, Alfredo C.; Chang, Dahge C.; Durrant, Steven F.

    2001-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss the experimental results of the fabrication of porous diamond/porous silicon and porous diamond structures by chemical vapor deposition of diamond over a skeleton of porous silicon, replicating the porous surface geometry around the Si pores and also creating new porous diamond structures. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the diamond nuclei are deposited on the top of the porous silicon skeleton, forming isolated grains in the first nucleation stages, and then growing like the usual structure of most ceramic materials, making a self-sustained porous diamond structure. Raman spectroscopy revealed that the diamond films are of good quality, close to that of diamond films grown on crystalline silicon.

  19. EXELFS analysis of natural diamond and diamond films on Si substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moller, A.D. [Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada (Mexico); Araiza, L.C.; Borja, M.A. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ensenada (Mexico)

    1996-12-31

    In this work, we report the EXELFS results obtained from a polycrystalline diamond film grown on smooth silicon substrates using the Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (HF-CVD) technique in a two-step deposition process published elsewhere. In order to evaluate the quality of the thin film obtained, these results were compared with results obtained from natural diamond.

  20. Structural evolution of Ti destroyable interlayer in large-size diamond film deposition by DC arc plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianchao; Li, Chengming; Liu, Jinlong; Wei, Junjun; Chen, Liangxian; Hua, Chenyi; Yan, Xiongbo

    2016-05-01

    The addition of titanium (Ti) interlayer was verified to reduce the residual stress of diamond films by self-fracturing and facilitate the harvest of a crack-free free-standing diamond film prepared by direct current (DC) arc plasma jet. In this study, the evolution of the Ti interlayer between large-area diamond film and substrate was studied and modeled in detail. The evolution of the interlayer was found to be relevant to the distribution of the DC arc plasma, which can be divided into three areas (arc center, arc main, and arc edge). The formation rate of titanium carbide (TiC) in the arc main was faster than in the other two areas and resulted in the preferred generation of crack in the diamond film in the arc main during cooling. Sandwich structures were formed along with the growth of TiC until the complete transformation of the Ti interlayer. The interlayer released stress via self-fracture. Avoiding uneven fragile regions that formed locally in the interlayer and achieving cooperatively released stress are crucial for the preparation of large crack-free diamond films.

  1. Nucleation and Oriented Textured Growth of Diamond Films on Si(100) via Electron Emission in Ho.t Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Oriented textured diamond films were obtained on Si(100) substrate via electron emission in hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD). A dc bias voltage relative to the filament was applied to the tungsten electrode between the substrate and the filament. The nucleation and subsequent growth of diamond films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that the electron emission from the diamond coating on the electrode played a critical role during the nucleation.The maximum value of nucleation density was up to 1011 cm-2 on pristine Si surface at emission current of 250 mA. The effect of the electron emission on the reactive gas composition was analyzed by in situ infrared absorption, indicating that the concentration of CH3 and C2H2 near the substrate surface was extremely increased. This may be responsible for the enhanced nucleation by electron emission.

  2. Time-Resolved Observation of Deposition Process of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Composite Films in Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Hanada

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical emission spectroscopy was used to study pulsed laser ablation of graphite in a hydrogen atmosphere wherein ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H composite films were grown on heated substrates. Time-resolved photographs of a plume that expanded from a laser-irradiation spot toward a substrate were taken using a high-speed ICCD camera equipped with narrow-bandpass filters. While the emissions from C atoms and C2 dimers lasted above the laser-irradiation spot on the target, the emission from C+ ions lasted above the substrate surface for approximately 7 microseconds, although the emission lifetime of species is generally approximately 10 nanoseconds. This implies that C+ ions actively collided with each other above the substrate surface for such a long time. We believe that the keys to UNCD growth in PLD are the supply of highly energetic carbon species at a high density to the substrate and existence of atomic hydrogen during the growth.

  3. Tribological properties and thermal stability of hydrogenated, silicon/nitrogen-coincorporated diamond-like carbon films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Hideki; Okuno, Saori; Magara, Kohei; Nakamura, Kazuki; Miura, Soushi; Enta, Yoshiharu

    2016-12-01

    We have deposited hydrogenated, silicon/nitrogen-incorporated diamond-like carbon (Si-N-DLC) films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using hexamethyldisilazane [((CH3)3Si)2NH; HMDS] as the Si and N source, and compared the tribological performance and thermal stability of the Si-N-DLC films with those of hydrogenated, Si-incorporated DLC (Si-DLC) films prepared using dimethylsilane [SiH2(CH3)2] as the Si source. The deposited films were annealed at 723-873 K in air atmosphere. The friction coefficients of hydrogenated DLC films after annealing significantly increased at the initial stages of friction tests. On the other hand, the friction coefficients of the Si-N-DLC films deposited at an HMDS flow ratio [HMDS/(HMDS+CH4)] of 2.27% remained low after the annealing even at 873 K. We found that the wear rate of the Si-N-DLC film deposited at 2.27% and -1000 V remained almost unchanged after the annealing at 873 K, whereas that of the Si-DLC film with a similar Si fraction deposited at -1000 V significantly increased after the annealing at 773 K.

  4. STRUCTURING OF DIAMOND FILMS USING MICROSPHERE LITHOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Domonkos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the structuring of micro- and nanocrystalline diamond thin films is demonstrated. The structuring of the diamond films is performed using the technique of microsphere lithography followed by reactive ion etching. Specifically, this paper presents a four-step fabrication process: diamond deposition (microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition, mask preparation (by the standard Langmuir-Blodgett method, mask modification and diamond etching. A self-assembled monolayer of monodisperse polystyrene (PS microspheres with close-packed ordering is used as the primary template. Then the PS microspheres and the diamond films are processed in capacitively coupled radiofrequency plasma  using different plasma chemistries. This fabrication method illustrates the preparation of large arrays of periodic and homogeneous hillock-like structures. The surface morphology of processed diamond films is characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscope. The potential applications of such diamond structures in various fields of nanotechnology are also briefly discussed.

  5. Si/Nanocrystalline Diamond Film Heterojunction Diodes Preparation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    With electron assisted hot filament chemical vapor deposition technology, nanocrystalline diamond films were deposited on polished n-(100)Si wafer surface. The deposited films were characterized and observed by Raman spectrum, X-ray diffraction, semiconductor characterization system and Hall effective measurement system. The results show that with EA-HFCVD, not only an undoped nanocrystalline diamond films with high-conductivity (p-type semiconducting) but also a p-n heterojunction diode between the nanocrystalline diamond films and n-Si substrate is fabricated successfully. The p-n heterojunction has smaller forward resistance and bigger positive resistance. The p-n junction effective is evident.

  6. Biocompatibility and Surface Studies of Microwave CVD Diamond Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brian; Garguilo, J. M.; Koeck, F. A. M.; Nemanich, R. J.; Price, K. J.

    2002-03-01

    The structure and surface properties of a variety of diamond and diamond like carbon films were studied at the nano-scale, in an attempt to assess the biocompatibility of these surfaces. The process of microwave chemical vapor deposition was used to deposit undoped diamond, nitrogen doped diamond, diamond with a titanium monolayer, and diamond-like carbon samples. The contact angles of de-ionized water droplets on the surface of the samples were measured to analyze the surface energy of each film. The rms roughness values of the diamond films measured by atomic force microscopy were also used in determining surface characteristics. Surface treatments of hydrogen passivation, and oxidization were applied to the surface of each film. Hydrogen passivation of the undoped diamond, and nitrogen doped diamond surfaces increases the contact angle on average 30 degrees. Oxidation of the surface decreases the contact angle on average 20 degrees. The surface treatments did not significantly change the contact angle of the diamond like carbon films. Protein adsorption is the first event to take place at a tissue/material interface of an implant into the body, and fibrinogen is the major surface protein, which initiates coagulation and inflammation in the body. The adsorption of fibrinogen was used as an indicator of the biocompatibility of these diamond materials. Fibrinogen was applied to the diamond, and diamond like carbon films. A correlation between contact angle/surface energy, roughness, and the fibrinogen adsorption of these diamond surfaces is reported. There was no significant change in the contact angles following the application of fibrinogen to the surface of the films. This could indicate the biocompatibility of the diamond films. This work supported by the NSF REU program at NCSU and a Physical Sciences Student Research grant from MSU.

  7. Freestanding single crystal chemical vapor deposited diamond films produced using a lift-off method: Response to {alpha}-particles from {sup 241}Am and crystallinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsubouchi, Nobuteru, E-mail: nobu-tsubouchi@aist.go.jp [Diamond Research Laboratory, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Mokuno, Y. [Diamond Research Laboratory, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Kakimoto, A.; Fujita, F.; Kaneko, J.H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Yamada, H.; Chayahara, A.; Shikata, S. [Diamond Research Laboratory, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan)

    2012-09-01

    Thick ({approx}100 {mu}m) undoped diamond films were grown homoepitaxially on single crystal (SC) diamond substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD). To form a freestanding SC diamond film (plate), the substrate was pre-ion-implanted with high-energy ion beams before the film growth, and after the thick-film deposition, the substrate was eliminated using a lift-off method, resulting in fabrication of a SC CVD diamond plate. Two samples were prepared; sample 1 was grown on a (0 0 1) oriented, nitrogen doped CVD SC diamond at {approx}900 Degree-Sign C with the input microwave power of 1.7 kW, while sample 2 was grown on a (0 0 1) oriented, high-pressure high-temperature synthesized type-Ib SC diamond at {approx}900 Degree-Sign C with the input microwave power of 1.25 kW. The formed SC plates have high optical transparencies, indicating no remarkable optical absorptions seen in the wavelength from ultraviolet to near infrared. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of both samples show strong free exciton FE peaks, while in sample 2 relatively strong optical emissions corresponding to nitrogen related centers were observed in the visible region. After the metal electrodes were formed on both faces of the SC diamond plate to fabricate a sandwich-type diamond particle detector, the energy spectra of 5.486 MeV {alpha}-particles from {sup 241}Am were measured. The charge collection efficiencies (CCEs) of sample 1 were CCE = 98% for a hole transport and CCE = 89% for an electron transport, respectively, while CCEs of sample 2 were CCE = 80% for a hole transport and CCE = 78% for an electron transport, respectively. These results indicate that both holes and electrons in sample 2 were trapped much more than those in sample 1. Possible candidates of carrier capture centers are nitrogen and/or nitrogen-vacancy centers observed in PL, nonradiative defect (complex) centers, extended defects such as threading dislocations observed in micrographs taken with

  8. A Comparative Study of Three Different Chemical Vapor Deposition Techniques of Carbon Nanotube Growth on Diamond Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty T. Quinton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares between the methods of growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs on diamond substrates and evaluates the quality of the CNTs and the interfacial strength. One potential application for these materials is a heat sink/spreader for high-power electronic devices. The CNTs and diamond substrates have a significantly higher specific thermal conductivity than traditional heat sink/spreader materials making them good replacement candidates. Only limited research has been performed on these CNT/diamond structures and their suitability of different growth methods. This study investigates three potential chemical vapor deposition (CVD techniques for growing CNTs on diamond: thermal CVD (T-CVD, microwave plasma-enhanced CVD (MPE-CVD, and floating catalyst thermal CVD (FCT-CVD. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to analyze the morphology and topology of the CNTs. Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the quality of the CNTs by determining the ID/IG peak intensity ratios. Additionally, the CNT/diamond samples were sonicated for qualitative comparisons of the durability of the CNT forests. T-CVD provided the largest diameter tubes, with catalysts residing mainly at the CNT/diamond interface. The MPE-CVD process yielded non uniform defective CNTs, and FCT-CVD resulted in the smallest diameter CNTs with catalyst particles imbedded throughout the length of the nanotubes.

  9. Luminescent Properties of Porous Si Passivated by Diamond Film and DLC Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linjun WANG; Yiben XIA; Weili ZHANG; Minglong ZHANG; Weimin SHI

    2004-01-01

    Surface passivation methods for porous Si (PS) surfaces, I.e., depositing diamond film or diamond-like carbon (DLC)film on PS surfaces, were attempted. Two emission bands, weak blue band and strong red band existed in the PL spectrum of diamond film coated on PS, were discovered by the photoluminescence measurements. The luminescent mechanism and stability were discussed. The results indicated that diamond film may stabilize the PL wavelength and intensity of PS, and therefore could become a promising passivation film of porous Si. The PL properties of PS coated by DLC films, including hydrogenated diamond like carbon (DLC:H) film and nitrogen doped DLC film (DLC:N) were also studied in this paper. The DLC films may stabilize the PL of PS, but the photoluminescent intensity was obviously weaker than that of diamond film coated PS.

  10. Nanocrystalline diamond films for biomedical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pennisi, Cristian Pablo; Alcaide, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond films, which comprise the so called nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) and ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD), represent a class of biomaterials possessing outstanding mechanical, tribological, and electrical properties, which include high surface smoothness, high corrosion re...

  11. Effect of argon during diamond deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, D.C.; Mengui, U.A.; Contin, A.; Trava-Airoldi, V.J.; Baldan, M.R.; Corat, E.J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais

    2014-07-01

    The effect of argon content upon the growth rate and the properties of diamond thin films grown with different grains sizes is explored. An argon-free and argon-rich gas mixture of methane and hydrogen is used in a hot filament chemical vapor deposition reactor. Characterization of the films is accomplished by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution x-ray diffraction. An extensive comparison of the growth rate values obtained in this study with those found in the literature suggests that there are distinct common trends for microcrystalline and nanocrystalline diamond growth, despite a large variation in the gas mixture composition. Included is a discussion of the possible reasons for these observations. (author)

  12. Synthesis of Diamond Films with Pulsed Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    Diamond and Diamond-Like Films, The Electrochemical Society , Los Angeles, California, Volume 89-12, 114, May 1989. M. Aklufi and D. Brock, "Synthesis Of...Diamond Films By Microwave Generated Pulsed Plasmas," Proceedings of The Second International Symposium On Diamond Materials, The Electrochemical Society , Washington, DC, Volume 91-8, ’ 39, May 1991.

  13. Electrochemically assisted deposition of hydroxyapatite on Ti6Al4V substrates covered by CVD diamond films — Coating characterization and first cell biological results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strąkowska, Paulina [Gdańsk University of Technology, Mechanical Engineering Faculty (Poland); Gdańsk University of Technology, Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunications, and Informatics (Poland); Beutner, René [Max Bergmann Center, Technische Universität Dresden (Germany); Gnyba, Marcin [Gdańsk University of Technology, Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunications, and Informatics (Poland); Zielinski, Andrzej [Gdańsk University of Technology, Mechanical Engineering Faculty (Poland); Scharnweber, Dieter, E-mail: Dieter.Scharnweber@tu-dresden.de [Max Bergmann Center, Technische Universität Dresden (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    Although titanium and its alloys are widely used as implant material for orthopedic and dental applications they show only limited corrosion stability and osseointegration in different cases. The aim of the presented research was to develop and characterize a novel surface modification system from a thin diamond base layer and a hydroxyapatite (HAp) top coating deposited on the alloy Ti6Al4V widely used for implants in contact with bone. This coating system is expected to improve both the long-term corrosion behavior and the biocompatibility and bioactivity of respective surfaces. The diamond base films were obtained by Microwave Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (MW-PACVD); the HAp coatings were formed in aqueous solutions by electrochemically assisted deposition (ECAD) at varying polarization parameters. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman microscopy, and electrical conductivity measurements were applied to characterize the generated surface states; the calcium phosphate coatings were additionally chemically analyzed for their composition. The biological properties of the coating system were assessed using hMSC cells analyzing for cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation. Varying MW-PACVD process conditions resulted in composite coatings containing microcrystalline diamond (MCD/Ti-C), nanocrystalline diamond (NCD), and boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (B-NCD) with the NCD coatings being dense and homogeneous and the B-NCD coatings showing increased electrical conductivity. The ECAD process resulted in calcium phosphate coatings from stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric HAp. The deposition of HAp on the B-NCD films run at lower cathodic potentials and resulted both in the highest coating mass and the most homogenous appearance. Initial cell biological investigations showed an improved cell adhesion in the order B-NCD > HAp/B-NCD > uncoated substrate. Cell proliferation was improved for both investigated coatings whereas ALP

  14. Improvement of radiation stability of semi-insulating gallium arsenide crystals by deposition of diamond-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyui, N. I.; Lozinskii, V. B.; Liptuga, A. I.; Izotov, V. Yu.; Han, Wei; Liu, Bingbing

    2016-12-01

    We studied the properties of optical elements for the IR spectral range based on semi-insulating gallium arsenide (SI-GaAs) and antireflecting diamond-like carbon films (DLCF). Particular attention has been paid to the effect of penetrating γ-radiation on transmission of the developed optical elements. A Co60 source and step-by-step gaining of γ-irradiation dose were used for treatment of both an initial SI-GaAs crystal and DLCF/SI-GaAs structures. It was shown that DLCF deposition essentially increases degradation resistance of the SI-GaAs-based optical elements to γ-radiation. Particularly, the transmittance of the DLCF/SI-GaAs structure after γ-irradiation with a dose 9ṡ104 Gy even exceeds that of initial structures. The possible mechanism that explains the effect of γ-radiation on the SI-GaAs crystals and the DLCF/SI-GaAs structures at different irradiation doses was proposed. The effect of small doses is responsible for non-monotonic transmission changes in both SI-GaAs crystals and DLCF/SI-GaAs structures. At further increasing the γ-irradiation dose, the variation of properties of both DLCF and SI-GaAs crystal influences on the transmission of DLCF/SI-GaAs system. At high γ-irradiation dose 1.4ṡ105 Gy, passivation of radiation defects in the SI-GaAs bulk by hydrogen diffused from DLCF leads to increasing the degradation resistance of the SI-GaAs crystals coated with DLCF as compared with the crystals without DLCF.

  15. Single-layer nano-carbon film, diamond film, and diamond/nano-carbon composite film field emission performance comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Wang, Jinye; Wang, Lijun

    2016-05-01

    A series of single-layer nano-carbon (SNC) films, diamond films, and diamond/nano-carbon (D/NC) composite films have been prepared on the highly doped silicon substrate by using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition techniques. The films were characterised by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and field emission I-V measurements. The experimental results indicated that the field emission maximum current density of D/NC composite films is 11.8-17.8 times that of diamond films. And the field emission current density of D/NC composite films is 2.9-5 times that of SNC films at an electric field of 3.0 V/μm. At the same time, the D/NC composite film exhibits the advantage of improved reproducibility and long term stability (both of the nano-carbon film within the D/NC composite cathode and the SNC cathode were prepared under the same experimental conditions). And for the D/NC composite sample, a high current density of 10 mA/cm2 at an electric field of 3.0 V/μm was obtained. Diamond layer can effectively improve the field emission characteristics of nano-carbon film. The reason may be due to the diamond film acts as the electron acceleration layer.

  16. Electroluminescence Spectrum Shift with Switching Behaviour of Diamond Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王小平; 王丽军; 张启仁; 姚宁; 张兵临

    2003-01-01

    We report a special phenomenon on switching behaviour and the electroluminescence (EL) spectrum shift of doped diamond thin films. Nitrogen and cerium doped diamond thin films were deposited on a silicon substrate by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapour deposition system and other special techniques. An EL device with a three-layer structure of nitrogen doped diamond/cerium doped diamond/SiO2 thin films was made. The EL device was driven by a direct-current power supply. Its EL character has been investigated, and a switching behaviour was observed. The EL light emission colour of diamond films changes from yellow (590nm) to blue (454 nm) while the switching behaviour appears.

  17. Effect of boron incorporation on the structure and electrical properties of diamond-like carbon films deposited by femtosecond and nanosecond pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, A. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR 5516 CNRS, Universite Jean Monnet, 18 Rue Pr. Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Bourgeois, O. [Institut Neel, UPR 2940 CNRS, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Sanchez-Lopez, J.C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Avda. Americo Vespucio, 49 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Rouzaud, J.-N. [Laboratoire de Geologie, UMR 8538 CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure, 45 Rue d' Ulm, 75230 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Rojas, T.C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Avda. Americo Vespucio, 49 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Loir, A.-S. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR 5516 CNRS, Universite Jean Monnet, 18 Rue Pr. Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Garden, J.-L. [Institut Neel, UPR 2940 CNRS, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Garrelie, F. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR 5516 CNRS, Universite Jean Monnet, 18 Rue Pr. Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Donnet, C., E-mail: christophe.donnet@univ-st-etienne.f [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR 5516 CNRS, Universite Jean Monnet, 18 Rue Pr. Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2009-12-31

    The influence of the incorporation of boron in diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on the microstructure of the coatings has been investigated. The boron-containing DLC films (a-C:B) have been deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at room temperature in high vacuum conditions, by ablating graphite and boron targets either with a femtosecond pulsed laser (800 nm, 150 fs, fs-DLC) or with a nanosecond pulsed laser (248 nm, 20 ns, ns-DLC). Alternative ablation of the graphite and boron targets has been carried out to deposit the a-C:B films. The film structure and composition have been highlighted by coupling Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. Using the B K-edge, EELS characterization reveals the boron effect on the carbon bonding. Moreover, the plasmon energy reveals a tendency of graphitization associated to the boron doping. Pure boron particles have been characterized by HRTEM and reveal that those particles are amorphous or crystallized. The nanostructures of the boron-doped ns-DLC and the boron-doped fs-DLC are thus compared. In particular, the incorporation of boron in the DLC matrix is highlighted, depending on the laser used for deposition. Electrical measurements show that some of these films have potentialities to be used in low temperature thermometry, considering their conductivity and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) estimated within the temperature range 160-300 K.

  18. Study of Fluorine Addition Influence in the Dielectric Constant of Diamond-Like Carbon Thin Film Deposited by Reactive Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippe, S. C.; Mansano, R. D.

    The hydrogenated amorphous carbon films (a-C:H) or DLC (Diamond-Like Carbon) films are well known for exhibiting high electrical resistivity, low dielectric constant, high mechanical hardness, low friction coefficient, low superficial roughness and also for being inert. In this paper, we produced fluorinated DLC films (a-C:F), and studied the effect of adding CF4 on the above-mentioned properties of DLC films. These films were produced by a reactive RF magnetron sputtering system using a target of pure carbon in stable graphite allotrope. We performed measurements of electrical characteristic curves of capacitance as a function of applied tension (C-V) and current as a function of the applied tension (I-V). We showed the dielectric constant (k) and the resistivity (ρ) as functions of the CF4 concentration. On films with 65% CF4, we found that k = 2.7, and on films with 70% CF4, ρ = 12.3 × 1011 Ω cm. The value of the electrical breakdown field to films with 70% CF4 is 5.3 × 106 V/cm.

  19. Near-Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Films Prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Ohmagari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The atomic bonding configuration of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H films prepared by pulsed laser ablation of graphite in a hydrogen atmosphere was examined by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The measured spectra were decomposed with simple component spectra, and they were analyzed in detail. As compared to the a-C:H films deposited at room substrate-temperature, the UNCD/a-C:H and nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C films deposited at a substrate-temperature of 550∘C exhibited enhanced ∗ and ∗C≡C peaks. At the elevated substrate-temperature, the ∗ and ∗C≡C bonds formation is enhanced while the ∗C–H and ∗C–C bonds formation is suppressed. The UNCD/a-C:H film showed a larger ∗C–C peak than the a-C film deposited at the same elevated substrate-temperature in vacuum. We believe that the intense ∗C–C peak is evidently responsible for UNCD crystallites existence in the film.

  20. Chemical bonding structural analysis of nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films prepared by coaxial arc plasma deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gima, Hiroki; Zkria, Abdelrahman; Katamune, Yūki; Ohtani, Ryota; Koizumi, Satoshi; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped ultra-nanocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films prepared in hydrogen and nitrogen mixed-gas atmospheres by coaxial arc plasma deposition with graphite targets were studied electrically and chemical-bonding-structurally. The electrical conductivity was increased by nitrogen doping, accompanied by the production of n-type conduction. From X-ray photoemission, near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure, hydrogen forward-scattering, and Fourier transform infrared spectral results, it is expected that hydrogen atoms that terminate diamond grain boundaries will be partially replaced by nitrogen atoms and, consequently, π C–N and C=N bonds that easily generate free electrons will be formed at grain boundaries.

  1. Structural and Physical Characteristics of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Composite Films Deposited Using a Coaxial Arc Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi; Nakagawa, You; Nagano, Akira; Ohtani, Ryota; Setoyama, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Eiichi; Sumitani, Kazushi; Agawa, Yoshiaki; Nagayama, Kunihito

    2010-01-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were formed without initial nucleation using a coaxial arc plasma gun. The UNCD crystallite diameters estimated from the X-ray diffraction peaks were approximately 2 nm. The Fourier transform infrared absorption spectrum exhibited an intense sp3-CH peak that might originate from the grain boundaries between UNCD crystallites whose dangling bonds are terminated with hydrogen atoms. A narrow sp3 peak in the photoemission spectrum implied that the film comprises a large number of UNCD crystallites. Large optical absorption coefficients at photon energies larger than 3 eV that might be due to the grain boundaries are specific to the UNCD/a-C:H films.

  2. Nanocrystalline diamond thin films on titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium alloy temporomandibular joint prosthesis simulants by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Marc Douglas

    A course of research has been performed to assess the suitability of nanocrystal-line diamond (NCD) films on Ti-6Al-4V alloy as wear-resistant coatings in biomedical implant use. A series of temporomandibular (TMJ) joint condyle simulants were polished and acid-passivated as per ASTM F86 standard for surface preparation of implants. A 3-mum-thick coating of NCD film was deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) over the hemispherical articulation surfaces of the simulants. Plasma chemistry conditions were measured and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), using hydrogen as a relative standard. The films consist of diamond grains around 20 nm in diameter embedded in an amorphous carbon matrix, free of any detectable film stress gradient. Hardness averages 65 GPa and modulus measures 600 GPa at a depth of 250 nm into the film surface. A diffuse film/substrate boundary produces a minimal film adhesion toughness (GammaC) of 158 J/m2. The mean RMS roughness is 14.6 +/- 4.2 nm, with an average peak roughness of 82.6 +/- 65.9 nm. Examination of the surface morphology reveals a porous, dendritic surface. Wear testing resulted in two failed condylar coatings out of three tests. No macroscopic delamination was found on any sample, but micron-scale film pieces broke away, exposing the substrate. Electrochemical corrosion testing shows a seven-fold reduction in corrosion rate with the application of an NCD coating as opposed to polished, passivated Ti-6Al-4V, producing a corrosion rate comparable to wrought Co-Cr-Mo. In vivo biocompatibility testing indicates that implanted NCD films did not elicit an immune response in the rabbit model, and osteointegration was apparent for both compact and trabecular bone on both NCD film and bare Ti-6Al-4V. Overall, NCD thin film material is reasonably smooth, biocompatible, and very well adhered. Wear testing indicates that this material is unacceptable for use in demanding TMJ applications without

  3. Flexible protective diamond-like carbon film on rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Bui, X.L.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we report an experimental approach to deposit flexible diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on rubber via self-segmentation. By making use of the substantial thermal mismatch between the DLC film and rubber substrate a dense network of cracks forms in the DLC film, contributing to its flexi

  4. Preparation and Thermal Characterization of Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Su-Yuan; TANG Zhen-An; HUANG Zheng-Xing; Yu Jun; WANG Jing; LIU Gui-Chang

    2009-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are prepared on silicon substrates by microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the films have an amorphous structure and typical characteristics. The topographies of the films are presented by AFM images. Effective thermal conductivities of the films are measured using a nanosecond pulsed photothermal reflectance method. The results show that thermal conductivity is dominated by the microstructure of the films.

  5. Field emission from Si tips coated with nanocrystalline diamond films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wanlu; LIAO Kejun; LIU Gaobin; MA Yong

    2003-01-01

    The electron field emission from Si tips coated with nanocrystalline diamond films was investigated. The Si tips were formed by plasma etching, and nano-diamond films were deposited on the Si tips by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The radius of curvature for the Si tips was averagely about 50 nm. The microstructure of the diamond films was examined by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The field emission properties of the samples were measured in an ionpumped vacuum chamber at a pressure of 10-6 Pa. The experimental results showed that the nanostructured films on Si tips exhibited a lower value of the turn-on electric field than those on flat Si substrates. It was found that the tip shape and nondiamond phase in the films had a significant effect on the field emission properties of the films.

  6. AC Impedance Behaviour of Black Diamond Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haitao YE; Olivier GAUDIN; Richard B.JACKMAN

    2005-01-01

    The first measurement of impedance on free-standing diamond films from 0.1 Hz to 10 MHz up to 300℃ were reported. A wide range of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) materials were investigated, but here we concentrate are well fitted to a RC parallel circuit model and the equivalent resistance and capacitance for the diamond films have been estimated using the Zview curve fitting. The results show only one single semicircle response at each temperature measured. It was found that the resistance decreases from 62 MΩ at room temperature to 4 kΩ at300℃, with an activation energy around 0.51 eV. The equivalent capacitance is maintained at the level of 100 pF up to 300℃ suggesting that the diamond grain boundaries are dominating the conduction. At 400℃, the impedance at low frequencies shows a linear tail, which can be explained that the AC polarization of diamond/Au interface occurs.

  7. Tensile test of a silicon microstructure fully coated with submicrometer-thick diamond like carbon film using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenlei; Uesugi, Akio; Hirai, Yoshikazu; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; Tabata, Osamu

    2017-06-01

    This paper reports the tensile properties of single-crystal silicon (SCS) microstructures fully coated with sub-micrometer thick diamond like carbon (DLC) film using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). To minimize the deformations or damages caused by non-uniform coating of DLC, which has high compression residual stress, released SCS specimens with the dimensions of 120 µm long, 4 µm wide, and 5 µm thick were coated from the top and bottom side simultaneously. The thickness of DLC coating is around 150 nm and three different bias voltages were used for deposition. The tensile strength improved from 13.4 to 53.5% with the increasing of negative bias voltage. In addition, the deviation in strength also reduced significantly compared to bare SCS sample.

  8. Nanocrystalline diamond films for biomedical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pennisi, Cristian Pablo; Alcaide, Maria

    2014-01-01

    performance of nanocrystalline diamond films is reviewed from an application-specific perspective, covering topics such as enhancement of cellular adhesion, anti-fouling coatings, non-thrombogenic surfaces, micropatterning of cells and proteins, and immobilization of biomolecules for bioassays. In order......Nanocrystalline diamond films, which comprise the so called nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) and ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD), represent a class of biomaterials possessing outstanding mechanical, tribological, and electrical properties, which include high surface smoothness, high corrosion...... resistance, chemical inertness, superior electrochemical behavior, biocompatibility, and nontoxicity. These properties have positioned the nanocrystalline diamond films as an attractive class of materials for a range of therapeutic and diagnostic applications in the biomedical field. Consequently...

  9. YBa2Cu3O7 thin films on nanocrystalline diamond films for HTSC bolometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, G.; Beetz, C. P., Jr.; Boerstler, R.; Steinbeck, J.

    1993-03-01

    Superconducting YBa2Cu3O(7-x) films on nanocrystalline diamond thin films have been fabricated. A composite buffer layer system consisting of diamond/Si3N4/YSZ/YBCO was explored for this purpose. The as-deposited YBCO films were superconducting with Tc of about 84 K and a relatively narrow transition width of about 8 K. SEM cross sections of the films showed very sharp interfaces between diamond/Si3N4 and between Si3N4/YSZ. The deposited YBCO film had a surface roughness of about 1000 A, which is suitable for high-temperature superconductive (HTSC) bolometer fabrication. It was also found that preannealing of the nanocrystalline diamond thin films at high temperature was very important for obtaining high-quality YBCO films.

  10. Regular growth combined with lateral etching in diamond deposited over silicon substrate by using hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.

    2013-05-01

    Hot filament chemical vapor deposition has proved to be an attractive method for growing diamond films with good quality and higher growth rate. Diamond films were produced at deposition parameters under which, it is possible to have regular growth combined with lateral etching (RGCLE). Fracture cross-section SEM images showed that RGCLE initiated over polycrystalline diamond film and proceeded by the growth of consecutive steps in each crystallite, which terminated with square/rectangle shaped facets. All the diamond films exhibit RGCLE but with different type of growth behavior. Present work discusses the cyclic formation of the steps in diamond crystallites and RGCLE modes. RGCLE in diamond film may find important applications where heat absorption and dissipation are key issues.

  11. STUDY ON COATING MECHANISM OF DIAMOND FILM ON CUTTING TOOL AND ITS APPLICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The deposition mechanism of diamond film on cutting tools and the state of the interface between film and substrate are studied theoretically and experimentally. Methods for controlling diamond crystalline state and improving adhesion of diamond films to substrates are proposed to improve the quality of diamond-coated tools.Experiments are performed by cutting Al-Sil8% alloy and SiCp/Al composite with diamond coated tool. The results indicate that the life of coated tools is 90 times higher than that of non-coated tools. Wear mechanism of diamond-coated tools is also studied.

  12. Monte Carlo Simulation of Diamond Deposition at Low Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董丽芳; 张玉红

    2001-01-01

    Diamond deposition at low temperatures is investigated and the relationship between substrate temperature for diamond growth and the energy of the carbonaceous species is given. The electron energy distribution and velocity distribution during the electron assisted chemical vapour deposition have been obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation. The main results obtained are as follows. (1) The substrate temperature for diamond growth will be lower than 800 C when the carbonaceous species on the substrate have mobility energy. For example, if the energy of the carbonaceous species is 0. 75 eV, the substrate temperature will be 380℃-600℃. (2) The greatnumber of atomic H on the substrate is of importance to the growth of diamond films.

  13. Effect of Magnetic Field on the Deposition of Transparent Diamond-Like Carbon ( DLC ) Films by RF-PCVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Hui-jun; ZhU Xia-gao; LIN Song-sheng; YUAN Zhen-hai; DAI Da-huang

    2004-01-01

    In order to deposit transparent and hard DLC films, magnetic field was introduced to enhance the plasma density of radiofrequency plasma chemical vapor deposition (RF-PCVD). In this paper, the configuration and computation of external magnetic field B are introduced. The restriction effect of magnetic field B on the charged particles and the effect of magnetic field B on the primary parameters-nonindependent power Pf and self-bias Uz were also studied. The mechanism of how magnetic field B affects self-bias Uz was analyzed.

  14. Residual stress distribution in thin diamond films and its effects on preparation of thick freestanding diamond films using DC arc plasma jet operated at gas recycling mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Cheng-ming; LI Hui-qing; CHEN Guan-chao; L(U) Fan-xiu; TONG Yu-mei; TANG Wei-zhong

    2004-01-01

    Diamond films produced by chemical vapor deposition show excellent properties. The residual stress distribution of diamond thin films deposited by DC arc plasma jet at recycling mode was analyzed by line shifts of micro Raman spectroscopy. The results show that the compressive residual stress concentrates at the film's edge. The experimental observations show that cracks initiate at the edge of the diamond thick wafer and then propagate towards the center. The residual stress of diamond films increases with the increase of methane concentration and deposition temperature. The difference of adhesion in close area causes more shear stress and brings about the two sides of crack being not at same level. To suppress crack probability, it is favourable for increasing the film thickness and selecting a substrate with lower coefficient of thermal expansion and lower adhesion. The effects of the residual stress distribution on thick diamond films detachment were discussed.

  15. Selective growth of diamond by hot filament CVD using patterned carbon film as mask

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Zhoutong; YANG Shumin; LI Qintao; ZHU Dezhang; GONG Jinlong

    2008-01-01

    Selected-area deposition (SAD) of diamond films was achieved on silicon substrates with carbon film mask by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. Needle tip scraped lines were used to grow diamond films. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigation demonstrates that highly selective and sharp edged diamond films were produced. The results also demonstrate that the proper substrate temperature is very important for diamond selective growth in this deposition process. Since the enhancement of diamond growth was not observed on the needle tip scraped area of Si wafer with diamond powder scratching, the selective growth was considered to be closely correlated to silicon carbide formed during carbon film deposition and the residual carbon in the scraped area.

  16. Microwave plasma deposition of diamond like carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, D. S.; Ramachandran, K.; Venkataramani, N.; Pandey, M.; D'Cunha, R.

    2000-11-01

    he promising applications of the microwave plasmas have been appearing in the fields of chemical processes and semiconductor manufacturing. Applications include surface deposition of all types including diamond/diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings, etching of semiconductors, promotion of organic reactions, etching of polymers to improve bonding of the other materials etc. With a 2.45 GHz, 700 W, microwave induced plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system set up in our laboratory we have deposited diamond like carbon coatings. The microwave plasma generation was effected using a wave guide single mode applicator. We have deposited DLC coatings on the substrates like stainless steel, Cu--Be, Cu and Si. The deposited coatings have been characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and ellipsometric techniques. The results show that we have achieved depositing ~ 95% sp3 bonded carbon in the films. The films are uniform with golden yellow color. The films are found to be excellent insulators. The ellipsometric measurements of optical constant on silicon substrates indicate that the films are transparent above 900 nm.

  17. Raman spectral research on MPCVD diamond film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Yan; ZHANG Shulin; ZHAO Xinsheng; HAN Yisong; HOU Li

    2003-01-01

    Raman spectra of MPCVD diamond film have been studied. Based on the resonance size selection effect, we think that there is no nano-crystalline diamond in the sample and the Raman peak at 1145 cm-1 can not be considered as the characteristic peak of nano-crystalline diamond though it has been used as the characteristic peak of nano-crystalline diamond widely for many years.

  18. Time-Resolved Spectroscopic Observation of Deposition Processes of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Amorphous Carbon Composite Films by Using a Coaxial Arc Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Kenji; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito

    2010-08-01

    The deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/amorphous carbon composite films using a coaxial arc plasma gun in vacuum and, for comparison, in a 53.3 Pa hydrogen atmosphere was spectroscopically observed using a high-speed camera equipped with narrow-band-pass filters. UNCD crystallites with diameters of approximately 1.6 nm were formed even in vacuum. These extremely small crystallites imply that the formation is predominantly due to nucleation without the subsequent growth. Even in vacuum, emissions from C+ ions, C atoms, and C2 dimers lasted for approximately 100 µs, although the emission lifetimes of these species are generally 10 ns. We consider that the nucleation is due to the supersaturated environment containing excited carbon species with large number densities.

  19. Ion-Implanted Diamond Films and Their Tribological Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Richard L. C.; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Korenyi-Both, Andras L.; Garscadden, Alan; Barnes, Paul N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the physical characterization and tribological evaluation of ion-implanted diamond films. Diamond films were produced by microwave plasma, chemical vapor deposition technique. Diamond films with various grain sizes (0.3 and 3 microns) and roughness (9.1 and 92.1 nm r.m.s. respectively) were implanted with C(+) (m/e = 12) at an ion energy of 160 eV and a fluence of 6.72 x 10(exp 17) ions/sq cm. Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted in ultrahigh vacuum (6.6 x 10(exp -7)Pa), dry nitrogen and humid air (40% RH) environments. The effects of C(+) ion bombardment on fine and coarse-grained diamond films are as follows: the surface morphology of the diamond films did not change; the surface roughness increased (16.3 and 135.3 nm r.m.s.); the diamond structures were damaged and formed a thin layer of amorphous non-diamond carbon; the friction coefficients dramatically decreased in the ultrahigh vacuum (0.1 and 0.4); the friction coefficients decreased slightly in the dry nitrogen and humid air environments.

  20. High-rate diamond deposition by microwave plasma CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianglin

    In this dissertation, the growth of CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond thin films is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The goal of this research is to deposit high quality HOD (Highly Oriented Diamond) films with a growth rate greater than 1 mum/hr. For the (100)-oriented HOD films, the growth rate achieved by the traditional process is only 0.3 mum/hr while the theoretical limit is ˜0.45 mum/hr. This research increases the growth rate up to 5.3 mum/hr (with a theoretical limit of ˜7 mum/hr) while preserving the crystal quality. This work builds a connection between the theoretical study of the CVD process and the experimental research. The study is extended from the growth of regular polycrystalline diamond to highly oriented diamond (HOD) films. For the increase of the growth rate of regular polycrystalline diamond thin films, a scaling growth model developed by Goodwin is introduced in details to assist in the understanding of the MPCVD (Microwave Plasma CVD) process. Within the Goodwin's scaling model, there are only four important sub-processes for the growth of diamond: surface modification, adsorption, desorption, and incorporation. The factors determining the diamond growth rate and film quality are discussed following the description of the experimental setup and process parameters. Growth rate and crystal quality models are reviewed to predict and understand the experimental results. It is shown that the growth rate of diamond can be increased with methane input concentration and the amount of atomic hydrogen (by changing the total pressure). It is crucial to provide enough atomic hydrogen to conserve crystal quality of the deposited diamond film. The experimental results demonstrate that for a fixed methane concentration, there is a minimum pressure for growth of good diamond. Similarly, for a fixed total pressure, there is a maximum methane concentration for growth of good diamond, and this maximum methane concentration increases

  1. Films Composed Of Diamond And Diamondlike Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shing, Yuh-Han

    1995-01-01

    Proposed films composed of diamond and diamondlike carbon useful as wear-resistant and self-lubricating protective and tribological coats at extreme temperatures and in corrosive and oxidizing environments. Films have wide variety of industrial applications.

  2. Phenomenological effets of tantalum incorporation into diamond films: Experimental and first principle studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullah, Mahtab, E-mail: mahtabullah@bzu.edu.pk [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University Multan (Pakistan); Rana, Anwar Manzoor; Ahmad, E. [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University Multan (Pakistan); Raza, Rizwan [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore-54000 (Pakistan); Hussain, Fayyaz [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University Multan (Pakistan); Hussain, Akhtar; Iqbal, Muhammad [Theoretical Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2016-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fabrication of tantalum incorporated diamonds films using HFCVD technique. • Decrease in resistivity by increasing tantalum content in diamond thin films. • Electronic structure calculations of tantalum incorporated diamonds films through VASP code. • A rise of bond length and bond angles by addition of tantalum in the diamond lattice. • Confirmation of decrease of resistivity by adding tantalum due to creation of impurity states in the bandgap. - Abstract: Tantalum (Ta) incorporated diamond films are synthesized on silicon substrate by chemical vapor deposition under gas mixture of CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2}. Characterizations of the resulting films indicate that morphology and resistivity of as-grown diamond films are significantly influenced by the process parameters and the amount of tantalum incorporated in the diamond films. XRD plots reveal that diamond films are composed of TaC along with diamond for higher concentration of tantalum and Ta{sub 2}C phases for lower concentration of tantalum. EDS spectra confirms the existence of tantalum in the diamond films. Resistivity measurements illustrate a sudden fall of about two orders of magnitude by the addition of tantalum in the diamond films. Band structure of Ta-incorporated diamond has been investigated based on density functional theory (DFT) using VASP code. Band structure calculations lead to the semiconducting behavior of Ta-incorporated diamond films because of the creation of defects states inside the band gap extending towards conduction band minimum. Present DFT results support experimental trend of resistivity that with the incorporation of tantalum into diamond lattice causes a decrease in the resistivity of diamond films so that tantalum-incorporated diamond films behave like a good semiconductor.

  3. Optical properties of bias-induced CH sub 4 -H sub 2 plasma for diamond film deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, X D; Zhou, H Y; Wen, X H; Li, D

    2002-01-01

    Methane (CH sub 4) and hydrogen (H sub 2) reactive gas mixture has been in situ investigated in a hot filament diamond chemical vapor deposition reactor with a negatively variable biasing voltage applied to the hot filament with respect to the substrate using infrared absorption spectroscopy and optical emission spectroscopy. It is found that CH sub 4 converts increasingly to C sub 2 H sub 2 upon raising the filament temperature in a pure thermal activation state, no optical emission of species is observed. Upon bias application, both CH sub 4 and C sub 2 H sub 2 in infrared (IR) absorption intensity decrease with increasing bias current, even the IR absorption intensity of C sub 2 H sub 2 decreases more rapidly than that of CH sub 4. Meanwhile, the clear emission lines indexed to H, CH, and CH sup + appear in the optical emission spectrum obtained, showing that a large amount of excited radicals are produced in the gas phase after applying bias. It is believed that the further generation of activated radical...

  4. FABRICATION OF DIAMOND TUBES IN BIAS-ENHANCED HOT-FILAMENT CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ming; MA Yuping; XIANG Daohui; SUN Fanghong

    2007-01-01

    Deposition of diamond thin films on tungsten wire Substrate with the gas mixture of acetone and hydrogen by using bias-enhanced hol filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with the tantalum wires being optimized arranged is investigated. The self-supported diamond tubes are obtained by etching away the tungsten Substrates. The quality of the diamond film before and after the removal of Substrates is observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectrum. The results show that the cylindrical diamond tubes with good quality and uniform thickness are obtained on tungsten wires by using bias enhanced hot filament CVD. The compressive stress in diamond film formed during the deposition is released after the Substrate etches away by mixture of H202 and NH4OH. There is no residual stress in diamond tube after Substrate removal.

  5. Influence of intermittently etching on quality of CVD diamond thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Kan-cheng; XIA Yi-ben; WANG Lin-jun; LIU Jian-min; SU Qing-feng; XU Run; PENG Hong-yan; SHI Wei-min

    2006-01-01

    A new method,called growing-etching repetitional process based on hot filament chemical vapor deposition,was proposed to improve the quality of diamond film. During the deposition carbon source was intermittently closed letting hydrogen etch the surface of the diamond film from time to time. In order to find whether it is helpful to the films' quality,a series of experiments were done. The results show that the new method can enhance the orientation of the chemical vapor deposition diamond films,reduce the graphite phase and increase the film's surface resistivity.

  6. The use of thin diamond films in fiber-optic low-coherence interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewska, D.; Karpienko, K.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the use of thin diamond films in fiber-optic low-coherence interferometers. Two kinds of diamond surfaces were used: undoped diamond film and boron- doped diamond film. They were deposited on glass plates as well as silicon layers. A conventionally used mirror was used as a reference layer. Diamond films were deposited using Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (μPE CVD) system. Measurements were performed using two superluminescent diodes (SLD) with wavelengths of 1300 mm and 1550 mm. The optimal conditions for each layers were examined: the required wavelength of the light source and the length of Fabry-Perot interferometer cavity. Metrological parameters of Fabry-Perot interferometer with different mirrors were compared. The presented thin diamond films may be an interesting alternative to the commonly used reflective surfaces.

  7. Growth and tribological properties of diamond films on silicon and tungsten carbide substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhika, R.; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2016-11-01

    Hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique was used to deposit microcrystalline diamond (MCD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films on silicon (Si) and tungsten carbide (WC-6Co) substrates. Friction coefficient of larger diamond grains deposited on WC-6Co substrate shows less value approximately 0.2 while this differs marginally on films grown on Si substrate. The study claims that for a less friction coefficient, the grain size is not necessarily smaller. However, the less friction coefficient (less than 0.1 saturated value) in MCD and NCD deposited on Si is explained by the formation of graphitized tribolayer. This layer easily forms when diamond phase is thermodynamically unstable.

  8. A Review on the Low-Dimensional and Hybridized Nanostructured Diamond Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongdong Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, besides the breakthrough of high-rate growth of chemical vapor deposited single-crystal diamonds, numerous nanostructured diamond films have been rapidly developed in the research fields of the diamond-based sciences and industrial applications. The low-dimensional diamonds of two-dimensional atomic-thick nanofilms and nanostructural diamond on the surface of bulk diamond films have been theoretically and experimentally investigated. In addition, the diamond-related hybrid nanostructures of n-type oxide/p-type diamond and n-type nitride/p-type diamond, having high performance physical and chemical properties, are proposed for further applications. In this review, we first briefly introduce the three categories of diamond nanostructures and then outline the current advances in these topics, including their design, fabrication, characterization, and properties. Finally, we address the remaining challenges in the research field and the future activities.

  9. Diamond films grown without seeding treatment and bias by hot-filament CVD system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.

    2012-04-01

    Diamond film growth without seeding treatment has been the subject of numerous studies. In the present study, diamond films with/without seeding treatment were grown on silicon using hot-filament chemical vapour deposition. An inexpensive and simple approach, namely, "dry ultrasonic treatment", was introduced in which full coverage of diamond film was achieved on unseeded substrate. For comparison, one substrate was seeded with 5 μm diamond particles, prior to deposition. The resulting diamond films were examined through standard characterization tools and distinct features were observed in each film. Here we present the results of uniform and high purity diamond film, free from nano-sized grains, which is grown without seeding treatment and is expected to be potential candidate for electro-optical applications, particularly as heat sinks.

  10. Junction like behavior in polycrystalline diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskaran, Shivakumar, E-mail: sbhaskar@mail.uh.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cullen College of Engineering, University of Houston, TX 77004 (United States); Charlson, Earl Joe; Litvinov, Dmitri [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cullen College of Engineering, University of Houston, TX 77004 (United States); Makarenko, Boris [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, TX 77004 (United States)

    2012-01-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The result that we obtained are compared with single crystalline diamond devices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The barrier height of 4.4 eV matches the ideal pn-junction barrier height of diamond thin film. - Abstract: We have successfully fabricated polycrystalline diamond rectifying junction devices on n-type (1 0 0) silicon substrates by Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (HFCVD) using methane/hydrogen process gas and trimethyl borate and trimethyl phosphite dissolved in acetone as p- and n-type dopants, respectively. Impedance spectroscopy and current-voltage analysis indicates that the conduction is vertical down the grains and facets and not due to surface effects. Electrical characteristics were analyzed with In and Ti/Au top metal contacts with Al as the substrate contact. Current-voltage characteristics as a function of temperature showed barrier potentials of 1.1 eV and 0.77 eV for the In and Ti/Au contacts, respectively. Barrier heights of 4.8 eV (In) and 4.4 eV (Ti/Au) were obtained from capacitance-voltage measurements.

  11. Bottom-up diamond nanorod growth in HFCVD from nanocrystalline diamond film as a template-free method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motahari, Hamid; Malekfar, Rasoul

    2017-07-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films are being used in a large number of applications. Also, diamond nanorods (DNRs) exhibit distinctive features that are not present in diamond films, because of the tunable large surface-to-volume ratio and tubular configuration. In this work, we report on the synthesis of DNRs by means of the bottom-up and template-free method from NCD films by the hot filament chemical vapor deposition system. The substrate materials used for diamond deposition were stainless steel (AISI 316) and chromium nitride-coated stainless steel. On both substrates, NCD films and then DNRs have been synthesized. The micro-Raman confirms that the synthesized structure is NCD. In addition, the grazing incident x-ray diffraction pattern confirms the presence of cubic diamond and rhombohedral diamond as a film on the CrN and Cr2N interlayer. Also, the DNRs are encased in an amorphous carbon (a-C) shell. The DNRs are grown on the NCD grains by a bottom-up technology and template-free method. Their orientations are almost random in the diamond thin-film surface. In addition, the density of DNRs on the NCD film for the CrN interlayer is more than for the stainless-steel substrate. The NCD/DNR films are dense, adhesive, continuous, and almost uniform on the CrN-coated stainless-steel substrate.

  12. The theoretical studies of piezoresistive effect in diamond films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG; Chunyang

    2002-01-01

    [1]Jiang, X., Schiffmann, K., Klages, C. P., Nucleation and initial growth phase of diamond thin films on(100)silicon, Phys. Rev., 1994, B50(12): 8402-8410.[2]Jiang, X., Klages, C. P., Zachai, R. et al., Epitaxial diamond thin films on(100)silicon substrate, Appl. Phys. Lett., 1993, 62(26): 3438-3440.[3]Deguchi, M., Kitabatake, M., Hirao, T. et al., PR properties of chemical-vapor-deposited p-type diamond strain-gauges fabricared on diaphragm structure, Diamond Relat. Mater., 1996,5: 728-731.[4]Wang, W. L., Liao, K. J., Feng, B. et al., PR of p-type heteroepitaxial diamond films on Si(100), Diamond Relat. Matet., 1998, 7: 528-532.[5]Wang, W. L., Jiang, X., Taube, K. et al., PR of polycrystalline p-type diamond films of various doping levels at different temperatures, J. Appl. Phys., 1997, 82(2): 729-732.[6]Fang, L., Wang, W. L., Ding, P. D. et al., Study on the PR effect of crystalline and polycrystalline diamond under uniaxial strains, J. Appl. Phys., 1999, 86(9): 5185-5193.[7]Fang, L., Wang, W. L., Ding, P. D. et al., Study on the PR effect in p-type polycrystalline diamond, Science in China, 1999, 42(7): 769-778.[8]Aslam, M., Taher, I., Masood, A., Piezoresistivity invapor deposited diamond films, Appl. Phys. Lett., 1992, 60: 2923-2925.[9]Sondheimer, E. H., The mean free path of electrons in metals, Advan. Phys., 1952, 1: 1-42.[10]Fuchs, K., The conductivity of thin metallic films according to the electron theory of metals, Proc. Cambridge Phil. Soc., 1938, 34: 100-108.[11]Xue, Z. Q., Wu, Q. D., Li, J., Physics of Thin Films(in Chinese), 2nd ed., Beijing: Publishing House of Electronics Industry, 1991, 282-284.[12]Beer, A. C., Willardson, R. K., Hall and transverse magnetoresistance effects for warped bands and mixed scattering, Phys. Rev., 1958, 110: 1286-1294.[13]Kenneth, J. R., William, J. L., High-field magnetoresistance of semiconducting diamond, Phys. Rev., 1972, B6: 4588-4592.

  13. Electrical conditioning of diamond-like carbon films for the formation of coated field emission cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenenko, M.; Okrepka, G.; Yilmazoglu, O.; Hartnagel, H. L.; Pavlidis, D.

    2010-11-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited on different substrates by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition were investigated. Bonding states and film quality were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy. The influence of the power of plasma and the deposition time on the sp2/sp3 ratio as well as the concentration of CHn bonds was studied. The influence of sp2/sp3 ratio on the formation process of conducting channels in diamond-like carbon films as a result of electrical breakdown was determined. Reproducible increase of diamond-like carbon film conductivity, with initial sp2/sp3 ratio larger than 0.16, was observed after electrical breakdown.

  14. Growth of Free-standing Diamond Films on Graphite Substrates with Ti Interlayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui-qing; LI Cheng-ming; CHEN Guang-chao; LU Fan-xiu; TANG Wei-zhong; TONG Yu-mei

    2004-01-01

    Free-standing diamond films, deposited using Dc Arc Plasma Jet CVD method onto graphite substrates with titanium interlayers, have been investigated. The Ti interlayers were deposited by arc ion plating equipments. The thickness,morphology and composite phase of Ti interlayers were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The titanium carbide (TiC) was detected in both sides of the interlayers, which played an important role with respect to reasonable adhesion with film and diamond nucleation. The semi-translucent diamond films were characterized by SEM and Raman spectrum. The sharp diamond peak with low intensity of amorphous carbon shows that diamond films have very high quality. The overall results suggest that plating Ti interlayer on graphite substrate is an effective way to obtain optical grade free-standing diamond films.

  15. Growth of Free-standing Diamond Films on Graphite Substrates with Ti Interlayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIHui-qing; LICheng-ming; CHENGuang-chao; LUFan-xiu; TANGWei-zhong; TONGYu-mei

    2004-01-01

    Free-standing diamond films, deposited using De Arc Plasma Jet CVD method onto graphite substrates with titanium interlayers, have been investigated. The Ti interlayers were deposited by arc ion plating equipments. The thickness, morphology and composite phase of Ti interlayers were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The titanium carbide (TIC) was detected in both sides of the interlayers, which played an important role with respect to reasonable adhesion with film and diamond nucleation. The semi-translucent diamond films were characterized by SEM and Raman spectrum. The sharp diamond peak with low intensity of amorphous carbon shows that diamond films have very high quality. The overall results suggest that plating Ti interlayer on graphite substrate is an effective way to obtain optical grade free-standing diamond films.

  16. Tribological performances of diamond film and graphite/diamond composite film with paraffin oil lubrication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the tribological performances of diamond film and graphite/diamond com-posite film were compared on an SRV wear testing machine with paraffin oil lubrication. The sur-face morphologies of specimens and wear tracks were observed by SEM. The wear volumes ofwear tracks were measured by profilometer. The influence of load on the tribological performancesof different specimens was studied. The wear mechanism under paraffin oil lubrication was ana-lyzed. The results showed that with paraffin oil lubrication, the friction coefficient and wear volumeof graphite/diamond composite film specimen are lower than diamond film. Under paraffin oil lu-brication, the wear mechanisms of both diamond film and graphite/diamond composite film weremainly sub-micro-fracture.

  17. Initial damage processes for diamond film exposure to hydrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deslandes, A., E-mail: acd@ansto.gov.au [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Guenette, M.C. [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Samuell, C.M. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Karatchevtseva, I. [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Ionescu, M.; Cohen, D.D. [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Blackwell, B. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Corr, C., E-mail: cormac.corr@anu.edu.au [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Riley, D.P., E-mail: dry@ansto.gov.au [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: • Exposing chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond films in a recently constructed device, MAGPIE, specially commissioned to simulate fusion plasma conditions. • Non-diamond material is etched from the diamond. • There is no hydrogen retention observed, which suggests diamond is an excellent candidate for plasma facing materials. • Final structure of the surface is dependent on synergistic effects of etching and ion-induced structural change. -- Abstract: Diamond is considered to be a possible alternative to other carbon based materials as a plasma facing material in nuclear fusion devices due to its high thermal conductivity and resistance to chemical erosion. In this work CVD diamond films were exposed to hydrogen plasma in the MAGnetized Plasma Interaction Experiment (MAGPIE): a linear plasma device at the Australian National University which simulates plasma conditions relevant to nuclear fusion. Various negative sample stage biases of magnitude less than 500 V were applied to control the energies of impinging ions. Characterisation results from SEM, Raman spectroscopy and ERDA are presented. No measureable quantity of hydrogen retention was observed, this is either due to no incorporation of hydrogen into the diamond structure or due to initial incorporation as a hydrocarbon followed by subsequent etching back into the plasma. A model is presented for the initial stages of diamond erosion in fusion relevant hydrogen plasma that involves chemical erosion of non-diamond material from the surface by hydrogen radicals and damage to the subsurface region from energetic hydrogen ions. These results show that the initial damage processes in this plasma regime are comparable to previous studies of the fundamental processes as reported for less extreme plasma such as in the development of diamond films.

  18. On the nature of the coefficient of friction of diamond-like carbon films deposited on rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Martinez, D.; van der Pal, J. P.; Schenkel, M.; Shaha, K. P.; Pei, Y. T.; De Hosson, J. Th M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the nature of the coefficient of friction (CoF) of diamond-like carbon (DLC)-protected rubbers is studied. The relative importance of the viscoelastic and adhesive contributions to the overall friction is evaluated experimentally by modifying the contact load and the adhesive strength

  19. Hydrogen termination of CVD diamond films by high-temperature annealing at atmospheric pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seshan, V.; Ullien, D.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Sachdeva, S.; Murthy, D.H.K.; Savenije, T.J.; Ahmad, H.A.; Nunney, T.S.; Janssens, S.D.; Haenen, K.; Nesládek, M.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; De Smet, L.C.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    A high-temperature procedure to hydrogenate diamond films using molecular hydrogen at atmospheric pressure was explored. Undoped and doped chemical vapour deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films were treated according to our annealing method using a H2 gas flow down to ∼50 ml/min (STP) at ∼850

  20. Diamond Deposition on WC/Co Alloy with a Molybdenum Intermediate Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sha; Yu, Zhi-Ming; Yi, Dan-Qing

    It is known that in the condition of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond process, molybdenum is capable of forming carbide known as the "glue" which promotes growth of the CVD diamond, and aids its adhesion by (partial) relief of stresses at the interface. Furthermore, the WC grains are reaction bonded to the Mo2C phase. Therefore, molybdenum is a good candidate material for the intermediate layer between WC-Co substrates and diamond coatings. A molybdenum intermediate layer of 1-3 μm thickness was magnetron sputter-deposited on WC/Co alloy prior to the deposition of diamond coatings. Diamond films were deposited by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD). The chemical quality, morphology, and crystal structure of the molybdenum intermediate layer and the diamond coatings were characterized by means of SEM, EDX, XRD and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that the continuous Mo intermediate layer emerged in spherical shapes and had grain sizes of 0.5-1.5 μm after 30 min sputter deposition. The diamond grain growth rate was slightly slower as compared with that of uncoated Mo layer on the WC-Co substrate. The morphologies of the diamond films on the WC-Co substrate varied with the amount of Mo and Co on the substrate. The Mo intermediate layer was effective to act as a buffer layer for both Co diffusion and diamond growth.

  1. Diamond thin films: giving biomedical applications a new shine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nistor, P A; May, P W

    2017-09-01

    Progress made in the last two decades in chemical vapour deposition technology has enabled the production of inexpensive, high-quality coatings made from diamond to become a scientific and commercial reality. Two properties of diamond make it a highly desirable candidate material for biomedical applications: first, it is bioinert, meaning that there is minimal immune response when diamond is implanted into the body, and second, its electrical conductivity can be altered in a controlled manner, from insulating to near-metallic. In vitro, diamond can be used as a substrate upon which a range of biological cells can be cultured. In vivo, diamond thin films have been proposed as coatings for implants and prostheses. Here, we review a large body of data regarding the use of diamond substrates for in vitro cell culture. We also detail more recent work exploring diamond-coated implants with the main targets being bone and neural tissue. We conclude that diamond emerges as one of the major new biomaterials of the twenty-first century that could shape the way medical treatment will be performed, especially when invasive procedures are required. © 2017 The Authors.

  2. The Abrasion Resistance and Adhesion of Hfcvd Boron and Silicon-Doped Diamond Films on WC-Co Drawing Dies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Liu, Jinfei; Tang, Tang; Sun, Fanghong; Xie, Nan

    Diamond films have been deposited on the interior hole surface of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) drawing dies from acetone, trimethyl borate (C3H9BO3), tetraethoxysilane (C8H20O4Si, TEOS) and hydrogen mixture by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) method. The structures and quality of as-deposited diamond films are characterized with field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The abrasion ratio and the adhesive strength of as-deposited diamond films are evaluated by copper wire drawing tests and ultrasonic lapping tests, respectively. The results suggest that diamond films with small grain size and high growth rate can be obtained due to the mutual effects of boron and silicon impurities in the gas phases. The results of ultrasonic lapping tests show that diamond films doped with boron and/or silicon can bear the severe erosion of the large diamond powder. Diamond films peeling off within the reduction zone of the drawing dies cannot be observed after testing of 2h. The abrasion ratio of boron and silicon-added diamond films is five times that of diamond films without any addition. Adding boron and/or silicon in the diamond films is proved to be an efficient way to obtain high-adhesive-strength and high-abrasion-resistance diamond-coated drawing dies.

  3. Combined effect of nitrogen doping and nanosteps on microcrystalline diamond films for improvement of field emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengui, U.A., E-mail: ursulamengui@gmail.com [INPE – Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais Laboratório Associado de Sensores e Materiais – LAS, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, CP 515, CEP 12.245-970, São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Campos, R.A.; Alves, K.A.; Antunes, E.F. [INPE – Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais Laboratório Associado de Sensores e Materiais – LAS, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, CP 515, CEP 12.245-970, São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Hamanaka, M.H.M.O. [Centro de Tecnologia da Informação Renato Archer, Divisão de Superfícies de Interação e Displays, Rodovia D. Pedro I (SP 65) km 143.6, CP 6162, CEP 13089-500, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Corat, E.J.; Baldan, M.R. [INPE – Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais Laboratório Associado de Sensores e Materiais – LAS, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, CP 515, CEP 12.245-970, São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Hot filament chemical vapor deposition using methane, hydrogen and a solution of urea in methanol produced nitrogen-doped diamond films. • Diamonds had the grain morphology changed for long growth time (28 h), and the nitrogen doping were evaluated by Raman spectroscopy. • Field emission characterization shows a decrease up to 70% in threshold field, related to reference diamond layer. - Abstract: Nitrogen-doped microcrystalline diamond (N-MCD) films were grown on Si substrates using a hot filament reactor with methanol solution of urea as N source. Electrostatic self-assembly seeding of nanocrystalline diamond were used to obtain continuous and uniform films. Simultaneous changes in grains morphology and work function of diamond by nitrogen doping decreased the threshold field and the angular coefficient of Fowler–Nordhein plots. The field emission properties of our N-MCD films are comparable to carbon nanotube films.

  4. Functionalization of nanocrystalline diamond films with phthalocyanines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petkov, Christo [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics (INA), Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology (CINSaT), University of Kassel (Germany); Reintanz, Philipp M. [Institute of Chemistry, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology (CINSaT), University of Kassel (Germany); Kulisch, Wilhelm [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics (INA), Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology (CINSaT), University of Kassel (Germany); Degenhardt, Anna Katharina [Institute of Chemistry, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology (CINSaT), University of Kassel (Germany); Weidner, Tobias [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz (Germany); Baio, Joe E. [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Merz, Rolf; Kopnarski, Michael [Institut für Oberflächen- und Schichtanalytik (IFOS), Kaiserslautern (Germany); Siemeling, Ulrich [Institute of Chemistry, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology (CINSaT), University of Kassel (Germany); Reithmaier, Johann Peter [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics (INA), Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology (CINSaT), University of Kassel (Germany); Popov, Cyril, E-mail: popov@ina.uni-kassel.de [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics (INA), Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology (CINSaT), University of Kassel (Germany)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Grafting of phthalocyanines on nanocrystalline diamond films with different terminations. • Pc with different central atoms and side chains synthesized and characterized. • Attachment of Pc on H- and O-terminated NCD studied by XPS and NEXAFS spectroscopy. • Orientation order of phthalocyanine molecules on NCD surface. - Abstract: Phthalocyanine (Pc) derivatives containing different central metal atoms (Mn, Cu, Ti) and different peripheral chains were synthesized and comprehensively characterized. Their interaction with nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films, as-grown by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition or after their modification with oxygen plasma to exchange the hydrogen termination with oxygen-containing groups, was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The elemental composition as determined by XPS showed that the Pc were grafted on both as-grown and O-terminated NCD. Mn, Cu and Ti were detected together with N stemming from the Pc ring and S in case of the Ti-Pc from the peripheral ligands. The results for the elemental surface composition and the detailed study of the N 1s, S 2p and O 1s core spectra revealed that Ti-Pc grafted better on as-grown NCD but Cu-Pc and Mn-Pc on O-terminated films. Samples of Mn-Pc on as-grown and O-terminated NCD were further investigated by NEXAFS spectroscopy. The results showed ordering of the grafted molecules, laying flat on the H-terminated NCD surface while only the macrocycles were oriented parallel to the O-terminated surface with the peripheral chains perpendicular to it.

  5. Strong adhesion in nanocrystalline diamond films on silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharda, T.; Umeno, M.; Soga, T.; Jimbo, T.

    2001-05-01

    Strong adhesion is shown to be achieved in the growth of smooth nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films on silicon substrates at 600 °C using biased enhanced growth in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition. The strong adhesion is evident from the films sustaining compressive stress, which may be as high as 85 GPa. The substrates are bent spherically after deposition, however, films are not peeled off, in spite of having enormous in-plane stress. The strong adhesion may be a result of implanted carbon below the substrate surface with an optimized ion flux density in the initial stages of growth. The compressive stress in the films is shown to be generating from the graphitic and other nondiamond carbon impurities in the films. It was observed that the NCD grain size decreases with biasing hence increasing grain boundary area in the films accommodating more graphitic impurities, which in turn results in an increase in compressive stress in the films.

  6. The study and the realization of radiation detectors made from polycrystalline diamond films grown by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique; Etude et realisation de detecteurs de rayonnements a base de films de diamant polycristallin elabores par depot chimique en phase vapeur assiste par plasma micro-onde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jany, Ch

    1998-10-29

    The aim of this work was to develop radiation detectors made from polycrystalline diamond films grown by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique. The influence of surface treatments, contact technology and diamond growth parameters on the diamond detectors characteristics was investigated in order to optimise the detector response to alpha particles. The first part of the study focused on the electrical behaviour of as-deposited diamond surface, showing a p type conduction and its influence on the leakage current of the device. A surface preparation process was established in order to reduce the leakage current of the device by surface dehydrogenation using an oxidising step. Several methods to form and treat electrical contacts were also investigated showing that the collection efficiency of the device decreases after contact annealing. In the second part, we reported the influence of the diamond deposition parameters on the characteristics of the detectors. The increase of the deposition temperature and/or methane concentration was shown to lead {eta} to decrease. In contrast, {eta} was found to increase with the micro-wave power. The evolution of the diamond detector characteristics results from the variation in sp{sup 2} phases incorporation and in the crystallography quality of the films. These defects increase the leakage current and reduce the carrier mobility and lifetime. Measurements carried out on detectors with different thicknesses showed that the physical properties varies along the growth direction, improving with the film thickness. Finally, the addition of nitrogen (> 10 ppm) in the gas mixture during diamond deposition was found to strongly reduce the collection efficiency of the detectors. To conclude the study, we fabricated and characterised diamond devices which were used for thermal neutron detection and for the intensity and shape measurement of VUV and soft X-ray pulses. (author)

  7. Formation of nanostructured iridium and polycluster diamond films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pashchenko P. V.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Iridium films and layered structures "iridium — diamond" were formed on Al2O3, MgO and SrTiO3 substrates. Iridium films were obtained by magnetron sputtering, and polycluster diamond films — by microwave discharge method. Structure of iridium and diamond films was studied depending on formation conditions. Application of polycluster diamond films as heatsink for hybrid microcircuit and control grid of electronic devices was considered.

  8. Superconductivity in CVD diamond films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yoshihiko

    2009-06-24

    A beautiful jewel of diamond is insulator. However, boron doping can induce semiconductive, metallic and superconducting properties in diamond. When the boron concentration is tuned over 3 × 10(20) cm(-3), diamonds enter the metallic region and show superconductivity at low temperatures. The metal-insulator transition and superconductivity are analyzed using ARPES, XAS, NMR, IXS, transport and magnetic measurements and so on. This review elucidates the physical properties and mechanism of diamond superconductor as a special superconductivity that occurs in semiconductors.

  9. X-ray sensitivity measurements on CVD diamond film detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foulon, F.; Pochet, T. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Electronique et d`Instrumentation Nucleaire; Gheeraert, E. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1993-12-31

    Microwave chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond films have been used to fabricate radiation detectors. The polycrystalline diamond films have a resistivity of 10{sup 12} ohm.cm and carrier mobility and lifetime of about 280 cm{sup 2}/V.s and 530 ps. The detector response to laser pulses (355, 532 and 1064 nm), X-ray flux (15-50 keV) and alpha particles ({sup 241}Am, 5.49 MeV) has been investigated. The response speed of the detector is in the 100 ps range. A sensitivity of about 3 x 10{sup -10} A/V.Gy.s was measured under 50 keV X-ray flux. The detector current response to X-ray flux is almost linear. It is also shown that CVD diamond detectors can be used for alpha particle counting. (authors). 9 figs., 25 refs.

  10. Review: Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of nanocrystalline diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuyuki Okada

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline diamond films have attracted considerable attention because they have a low coefficient of friction and a low electron emission threshold voltage. In this paper, the author reviews the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD of nanocrystalline diamond and mainly focuses on the growth of nanocrystalline diamond by low-pressure PE-CVD. Nanocrystalline diamond particles of 200–700 nm diameter have been prepared in a 13.56 MHz low-pressure inductively coupled CH4/CO/H2 plasma. The bonding state of carbon atoms was investigated by ultraviolet-excited Raman spectroscopy. Electron energy loss spectroscopy identified sp2-bonded carbons around the 20–50 nm subgrains of nanocrystalline diamond particles. Plasma diagnostics using a Langmuir probe and the comparison with plasma simulation are also reviewed. The electron energy distribution functions are discussed by considering different inelastic interaction channels between electrons and heavy particles in a molecular CH4/H2 plasma.

  11. New route to the fabrication of nanocrystalline diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Deepak; Palomino, Javier; Gil, Jennifer; Resto, Oscar; Weiner, Brad R.; Morell, Gerardo

    2014-02-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films offer applications in various fields, but the existing synthetic approaches are cumbersome and destructive. A major breakthrough has been achieved by our group in the direction of a non-destructive, scalable, and economic process of NCD thin-film fabrication. Here, we report a cheap precursor for the growth of nanocrystalline diamond in the form of paraffin wax. We show that NCD thin films can be fabricated on a copper support by using simple, commonplace paraffin wax under reaction conditions of Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (HFCVD). Surprisingly, even the presence of any catalyst or seeding that has been conventionally used in the state-of-the-art is not required. The structure of the obtained films was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy recorded at the carbon K-edge region confirm the presence of nanocrystalline diamond. The process is a significant step towards cost-effective and non-cumbersome fabrication of nanocrystalline diamond thin films for commercial production.

  12. New route to the fabrication of nanocrystalline diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varshney, Deepak, E-mail: deepvar20@gmail.com; Morell, Gerardo [Institute of Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00931, Puerto Rico (United States); Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PO Box 70377, Puerto Rico 00936, Puerto Rico (United States); Palomino, Javier; Resto, Oscar [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PO Box 70377, Puerto Rico 00936, Puerto Rico (United States); Gil, Jennifer [Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936, Puerto Rico (United States); Weiner, Brad R. [Institute of Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00931, Puerto Rico (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936, Puerto Rico (United States)

    2014-02-07

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films offer applications in various fields, but the existing synthetic approaches are cumbersome and destructive. A major breakthrough has been achieved by our group in the direction of a non-destructive, scalable, and economic process of NCD thin-film fabrication. Here, we report a cheap precursor for the growth of nanocrystalline diamond in the form of paraffin wax. We show that NCD thin films can be fabricated on a copper support by using simple, commonplace paraffin wax under reaction conditions of Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (HFCVD). Surprisingly, even the presence of any catalyst or seeding that has been conventionally used in the state-of-the-art is not required. The structure of the obtained films was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy recorded at the carbon K-edge region confirm the presence of nanocrystalline diamond. The process is a significant step towards cost-effective and non-cumbersome fabrication of nanocrystalline diamond thin films for commercial production.

  13. High collection efficiency thin film diamond particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergonzo, P.; Foulon, F.; Marshall, R.D.; Jany, C.; Brambilla, A. [CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); McKeag, R.D.; Jackman, R.B. [University College, London (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    Diamond is a resilient material with rather extreme electronic properties. As such it is an interesting candidate for the fabrication of high performance solid state particle detectors. However, the commercially accessible form of diamond, grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods, is polycrystalline in nature and often displays rather poor electrical characteristics. This paper considers ways in which this material may be used to form alpha particle detectors with useful performance levels. One approach adopted has been to reduce the impurity levels within the feed-stock gases that are used to grow the diamond films. This has enabled significant improvements to be achieved in the mean carrier drift distance within the films leading to alpha detectors with up to 40% collection efficiencies. An alternative approach explored is the use of planar device geometries whereby charge collection is limited to the top surface of the diamond which comprises higher quality material than the bulk of the film. This has lead to collection efficiencies of 70%, the highest yet reported for polycrystalline CVD diamond based detectors. Techniques for improving the characteristics of these devices further are discussed.

  14. Regression Analysis of the Effect of Bias Voltage on Nano- and Macrotribological Properties of Diamond-Like Carbon Films Deposited by a Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc Ion-Plating Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shojiro Miyake

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-like carbon (DLC films are deposited by bend filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA technique with DC and pulsed bias voltage. The effects of varying bias voltage on nanoindentation and nanowear properties were evaluated by atomic force microscopy. DLC films deposited with DC bias voltage of −50 V exhibited the greatest hardness at approximately 50 GPa, a low modulus of dissipation, low elastic modulus to nanoindentation hardness ratio, and high nanowear resistance. Nanoindentation hardness was positively correlated with the Raman peak ratio Id/Ig, whereas wear depth was negatively correlated with this ratio. These nanotribological properties highly depend on the films’ nanostructures. The tribological properties of the FCVA-DLC films were also investigated using a ball-on-disk test. The average friction coefficient of DLC films deposited with DC bias voltage was lower than that of DLC films deposited with pulse bias voltage. The friction coefficient calculated from the ball-on-disk test was correlated with the nanoindentation hardness in dry conditions. However, under boundary lubrication conditions, the friction coefficient and specific wear rate had little correlation with nanoindentation hardness, and wear behavior seemed to be influenced by other factors such as adhesion strength between the film and substrate.

  15. Antimicrobial Properties of Diamond-Like Carbon/Silver Nanocomposite Thin Films Deposited on Textiles: Towards Smart Bandages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas Juknius

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the current work, a new antibacterial bandage was proposed where diamond-like carbon with silver nanoparticle (DLC:Ag-coated synthetic silk tissue was used as a building block. The DLC:Ag structure, the dimensions of nanoparticles, the silver concentration and the silver ion release were studied systematically employing scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic absorption spectroscopy, respectively. Antimicrobial properties were investigated using microbiological tests (disk diffusion method and spread-plate technique. The DLC:Ag layer was stabilized on the surface of the bandage using a thin layer of medical grade gelatin and cellulose. Four different strains of Staphylococcus aureus extracted from humans’ and animals’ infected wounds were used. It is demonstrated that the efficiency of the Ag+ ion release to the aqueous media can be increased by further RF oxygen plasma etching of the nanocomposite. It was obtained that the best antibacterial properties were demonstrated by the plasma-processed DLC:Ag layer having a 3.12 at % Ag surface concentration with the dominating linear dimensions of nanoparticles being 23.7 nm. An extra protective layer made from cellulose and gelatin with agar contributed to the accumulation and efficient release of silver ions to the aqueous media, increasing bandage antimicrobial efficiency up to 50% as compared to the single DLC:Ag layer on textile.

  16. Characterization of (100)-orientated diamond film grown by HFCVD method with a positive DC bias voltage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ying; WANG Lin-jun; LIU Jian-min; SU Qing-feng; XU Run; PENG Hong-yan; SHI Wei-min; XIA Yi-ben

    2006-01-01

    The (100)-orientated diamond film was deposited by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technology with a positive DC bias voltage. The morphology,X-ray diffraction (XRD),RAMAN spectrum and dark current versus applied voltage characteristics analysis show that the positive dc bias can increase the nucleation density and (100)-orientated growth,making the growth of the high quality diamond film easier and cheaper than using other methods.

  17. Friction Properties of Polished Cvd Diamond Films Sliding against Different Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zichao; Sun, Fanghong; Shen, Bin

    2016-11-01

    Owing to their excellent mechanical and tribological properties, like the well-known extreme hardness, low coefficient of friction and high chemical inertness, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have found applications as a hard coating for drawing dies. The surface roughness of the diamond films is one of the most important attributes to the drawing dies. In this paper, the effects of different surface roughnesses on the friction properties of diamond films have been experimentally studied. Diamond films were fabricated using hot filament CVD. The WC-Co (Co 6wt.%) drawing dies were used as substrates. A gas mixture of acetone and hydrogen gas was used as the feedstock gas. The CVD diamond films were polished using mechanical polishing. Polished diamond films with three different surface roughnesses, as well as the unpolished diamond film, were fabricated in order to study the tribological performance between the CVD diamond films and different metals with oil lubrication. The unpolished and polished CVD diamond films are characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), surface profilometer, Raman spectrum and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The friction examinations were carried out by using a ball-on-plate type reciprocating friction tester. Low carbide steel, stainless steel, copper and aluminum materials were used as counterpart balls. Based on this study, the results presented the friction coefficients between the polished CVD films and different metals. The friction tests demonstrate that the smooth surface finish of CVD diamond films is beneficial for reducing their friction coefficients. The diamond films exhibit low friction coefficients when slid against the stainless steel balls and low carbide steel ball, lower than that slid against copper ball and aluminum ball, attributed to the higher ductility of copper and aluminum causing larger amount of wear debris adhering to the sliding interface and higher adhesive

  18. Functionalization of nanocrystalline diamond films with phthalocyanines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkov, Christo; Reintanz, Philipp M.; Kulisch, Wilhelm; Degenhardt, Anna Katharina; Weidner, Tobias; Baio, Joe E.; Merz, Rolf; Kopnarski, Michael; Siemeling, Ulrich; Reithmaier, Johann Peter; Popov, Cyril

    2016-08-01

    Phthalocyanine (Pc) derivatives containing different central metal atoms (Mn, Cu, Ti) and different peripheral chains were synthesized and comprehensively characterized. Their interaction with nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films, as-grown by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition or after their modification with oxygen plasma to exchange the hydrogen termination with oxygen-containing groups, was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The elemental composition as determined by XPS showed that the Pc were grafted on both as-grown and O-terminated NCD. Mn, Cu and Ti were detected together with N stemming from the Pc ring and S in case of the Ti-Pc from the peripheral ligands. The results for the elemental surface composition and the detailed study of the N 1s, S 2p and O 1s core spectra revealed that Ti-Pc grafted better on as-grown NCD but Cu-Pc and Mn-Pc on O-terminated films. Samples of Mn-Pc on as-grown and O-terminated NCD were further investigated by NEXAFS spectroscopy. The results showed ordering of the grafted molecules, laying flat on the H-terminated NCD surface while only the macrocycles were oriented parallel to the O-terminated surface with the peripheral chains perpendicular to it.

  19. Graphene diamond-like carbon films heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang; Afandi, Abdulkareem; Jackman, Richard B.

    2015-03-01

    A limitation to the potential use of graphene as an electronic material is the lack of control over the 2D materials properties once it is deposited on a supporting substrate. Here, the use of Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) interlayers between the substrate and the graphene is shown to offer the prospect of overcoming this problem. The DLC films used here, more properly known as a-C:H with ˜25% hydrogen content, have been terminated with N or F moieties prior to graphene deposition. It is found that nitrogen terminations lead to an optical band gap shrinkage in the DLC, whilst fluorine groups reduce the DLC's surface energy. CVD monolayer graphene subsequently transferred to DLC, N terminated DLC, and F terminated DLC has then been studied with AFM, Raman and XPS analysis, and correlated with Hall effect measurements that give an insight into the heterostructures electrical properties. The results show that different terminations strongly affect the electronic properties of the graphene heterostructures. G-F-DLC samples were p-type and displayed considerably higher mobility than the other heterostructures, whilst G-N-DLC samples supported higher carrier densities, being almost metallic in character. Since it would be possible to locally pattern the distribution of these differing surface terminations, this work offers the prospect for 2D lateral control of the electronic properties of graphene layers for device applications.

  20. Graphene diamond-like carbon films heterostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Fang; Afandi, Abdulkareem; Jackman, Richard B., E-mail: r.jackman@ucl.ac.uk [London Centre for Nanotechnology, Electronic and Electrical Engineering Department, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-09

    A limitation to the potential use of graphene as an electronic material is the lack of control over the 2D materials properties once it is deposited on a supporting substrate. Here, the use of Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) interlayers between the substrate and the graphene is shown to offer the prospect of overcoming this problem. The DLC films used here, more properly known as a-C:H with ∼25% hydrogen content, have been terminated with N or F moieties prior to graphene deposition. It is found that nitrogen terminations lead to an optical band gap shrinkage in the DLC, whilst fluorine groups reduce the DLC's surface energy. CVD monolayer graphene subsequently transferred to DLC, N terminated DLC, and F terminated DLC has then been studied with AFM, Raman and XPS analysis, and correlated with Hall effect measurements that give an insight into the heterostructures electrical properties. The results show that different terminations strongly affect the electronic properties of the graphene heterostructures. G-F-DLC samples were p-type and displayed considerably higher mobility than the other heterostructures, whilst G-N-DLC samples supported higher carrier densities, being almost metallic in character. Since it would be possible to locally pattern the distribution of these differing surface terminations, this work offers the prospect for 2D lateral control of the electronic properties of graphene layers for device applications.

  1. Deposition of polycrystalline and nanocrystalline diamond on graphite: effects of surface pre-treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalpando, I.; John, P.; Porro, S.; Wilson, J. I. B.

    2017-03-01

    The growth of hydrogenated sp3-phase of diamond on the sp2-phase of graphite by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (MPECVD) is a challenge, primarily because hydrogen etches graphite much faster than the growth rate of diamond. To enhance nucleation of diamond on graphite, we used a plethora of techniques such as plasma etching, ion bombardment, manual scratching, and scratching by ultrasonic agitation. Nanocrystalline and polycrystalline diamond thin-films were grown by MPECVD on the surface of pre-treated or pristine graphite using 1.5, 3.0, and 3.6 kW microwave power. Samples were characterised by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Species in the gas phase during film deposition were monitored by Optical Emission Spectroscopy. We have found that the surface area covered and the morphology of the diamond films are dependent on the surface pre-treatment. The crystallite size of the films depends on the microwave power used during MPECVD growth. The results of this study establish the protocols for diamond deposition by MPECVD on graphite substrates with a desired crystalline quality based on the pre-treatment of the substrate and the microwave power used during MPECVD. These results are important to modern applications, such as plasma facing materials, in which diamond has shown outstanding performance in contrast to that of graphite.

  2. Hard Carbon Films Deposited under Various Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, M.-K.; Chen, S.-C.; Wu, T. C.; Lee, Sanboh

    1998-03-01

    Using a carbon target ablated with an XeCl-excimer laser under various gas atmospheres at different pressures, hard carbon was deposited on silicon, iron and tungsten carbide substrates. The hardness, friction coefficient, and wear rate of the film against steel are better than pure substrate material, respectively, so that it has potential to be used as a protective coating for micromechanical elements. The influences of gas pressure, gas atmosphere, and power density of laser irradiation on the thermal stability of film were analyzed by means of Raman-spectroscope, time-of-flight method, and optical emission spectrum. It was found that the film deposited under higher pressure has less diamond-like character. The film deposited under rest gas or argon atmosphere was very unstable and looked like a little graphite-like character. The film deposited at high vacuum (10-5 mbar rest gas) was the most stable and looked like the most diamond-like character. The film deposited at higher power density was more diamond-like than that at lower power density.

  3. Flexible diamond-like carbon films on rubber : On the origin of self-acting segmentation and film flexibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Bui, X.L.; Pal, J.P. van der; Martinez-Martinez, D.; Zhou, X.B.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental approach to deposit flexible diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) with plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition and an analytical model to describe the self-segmentation mechanism of the DLC films. By making use of the su

  4. Isotope analysis of diamond-surface passivation effect of high-temperature H{sub 2}O-grown atomic layer deposition-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraiwa, Atsushi, E-mail: hiraiwa@aoni.waseda.jp, E-mail: qs4a-hriw@asahi-net.or.jp [Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Waseda University, 513 Waseda-tsurumaki, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-0041 (Japan); Saito, Tatsuya; Matsumura, Daisuke; Kawarada, Hiroshi, E-mail: kawarada@waseda.jp [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2015-06-07

    The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film formed using an atomic layer deposition (ALD) method with trimethylaluminum as Al precursor and H{sub 2}O as oxidant at a high temperature (450 °C) effectively passivates the p-type surface conduction (SC) layer specific to a hydrogen-terminated diamond surface, leading to a successful operation of diamond SC field-effect transistors at 400 °C. In order to investigate this excellent passivation effect, we carried out an isotope analysis using D{sub 2}O instead of H{sub 2}O in the ALD and found that the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film formed at a conventional temperature (100 °C) incorporates 50 times more CH{sub 3} groups than the high-temperature film. This CH{sub 3} is supposed to dissociate from the film when heated afterwards at a higher temperature (550 °C) and causes peeling patterns on the H-terminated surface. The high-temperature film is free from this problem and has the largest mass density and dielectric constant among those investigated in this study. The isotope analysis also unveiled a relatively active H-exchange reaction between the diamond H-termination and H{sub 2}O oxidant during the high-temperature ALD, the SC still being kept intact. This dynamic and yet steady H termination is realized by the suppressed oxidation due to the endothermic reaction with H{sub 2}O. Additionally, we not only observed the kinetic isotope effect in the form of reduced growth rate of D{sub 2}O-oxidant ALD but found that the mass density and dielectric constant of D{sub 2}O-grown Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films are smaller than those of H{sub 2}O-grown films. This is a new type of isotope effect, which is not caused by the presence of isotopes in the films unlike the traditional isotope effects that originate from the presence of isotopes itself. Hence, the high-temperature ALD is very effective in forming Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films as a passivation and/or gate-insulation layer of high-temperature-operation diamond SC devices, and the knowledge of

  5. Field electron emission of diamond films on nanocrystalline diamond coating by CVD method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Rangqi; CHEN Guanghua; SONG Xuemei; XING Guangjian; FENG Zhenjian; HE Deyan

    2003-01-01

    The preparation process, structure feature and field electron emission characteristic of diamond films on nanocyrstalline diamond coating by the CVD method were studied. The field electron emission measurements on the samples showed that the diamond films have lower turn-on voltage and higher field emission current density. A further detailed theory explanation to the results was given.

  6. Novel Diamond Films Synthesis Strategy: Methanol and Argon Atmosphere by Microwave Plasma CVD Method Without Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Jiang, Caiyi; Guo, Shenghui; Zhang, Libo; Gao, Jiyun; Peng, Jinhui; Hu, Tu; Wang, Liang

    2016-09-01

    Diamond thin films are grown on silicon substrates by only using methanol and argon mixtures in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor. It is worth mentioning that the novel strategy makes the synthesis reaction works smoothly without hydrogen atmosphere, and the substrates temperature is only 500 °C. The evidence of surface morphology and thickness under different time is obtained by characterizing the samples using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffractometer (XRD) spectrum reveals that the preferential orientation of (111) plane sample is obtained. The Raman spectra indicate that the dominant component of all the samples is a diamond. Moreover, the diamond phase content of the targeted films was quantitatively analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method, and the surface roughness of diamond films was investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM). Meanwhile, the possible synthesis mechanism of the diamond films in methanol- and argon-mixed atmosphere was discussed.

  7. Fabrication of UV Photodetector on TiO2/Diamond Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhangcheng; Li, Fengnan; Li, Shuoye; Hu, Chao; Wang, Wei; Wang, Fei; Lin, Fang; Wang, Hongxing

    2015-09-24

    The properties of ultraviolet (UV) photodetector fabricated on TiO2/diamond film were investigated. Single crystal diamond layer was grown on high-pressure-high-temperature Ib-type diamond substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition method, upon which TiO2 film was prepared directly using radio frequency magnetron sputtering technique in Ar and O2 mixing atmosphere. Tungsten was used as electrode material to fabricate metal-semiconductor-metal UV photodetector. The dark current is measured to be 1.12 pA at 30 V. The photo response of the device displays an obvious selectivity between UV and visible light, and the UV-to-visible rejection ratio can reach 2 orders of magnitude. Compared with that directly on diamond film, photodetector on TiO2/diamond film shows higher responsivity.

  8. Diagnosis of gas phase near the substrate surface in diamond film deposition by high-power DC arc plasma jet CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuyuan Zhou; Guangchao Chen; Bin Li; Weizhong Tang; Fanxiu Lv

    2007-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was used to study the gas phase composition near the substrate surface during diamond deposition by high-power DC arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition (CVD). C2 radical was determined as the main carbon radical in this plasma atmosphere. The deposition parameters, such as substrate temperature, anode-substrate distance, methane concentration, and gas flow rate, were inspected to find out the influence on the gas phase. A strong dependence of the concentrations and distribution of radicals on substrate temperature was confirmed by the design of experiments (DOE). An explanation for this dependence could be that radicals near the substrate surface may have additional ionization or dissociation and also have recombination,or are consumed on the substrate surface where chemical reactions occur.

  9. Effective stress reduction in diamond films on alumina by carbon ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Fang Zhi Jun; Wang Li; Zhang Wei; Ma Zhe Guo; Zhang Ming

    2002-01-01

    The authors show the effective stress reduction in diamond films by implanting carbon ions into alumina substrates prior to the diamond deposition. Residual stresses in the films are evaluated by Raman spectroscopy and a more reliable method for stress determination is presented for the quantitative measurement of stress evolution. It is found that compressive stresses in the diamond films can be partly offset by the compressive stresses in the alumina substrates, which are caused by the ion pre-implantation. At the same time, the difference between the offset by the pre-stressed substrates and the total stress reduction indicates that some other mechanisms are also active

  10. Effective Stress Reduction in Diamond Films on Alumina by Carbon Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方志军; 夏义本; 王林军; 张伟丽; 马哲国; 张明龙

    2002-01-01

    We show the effective stress reduction in diamond films by implanting carbon ions into alumina substrates prior to the diamond deposition. Residual stresses in the films are evaluated by Raman spectroscopy and a more reliable method for stress determination is presented for the quantitative measurement of stress evolution. It is found that compressive stresses in the diamond films can be partly offset by the compressive stresses in the alumina substrates, which are caused by the ion pre-implantation. At the same time, the difference between the offset by the pre-stressed substrates and the total stress reduction indicates that some other mechanisms are also active.

  11. Study of nitrogen doping behavior in diamond film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming-ji; YANG Bao-he; SUN Da-zhi; JIN Zeng-sun

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped diamond films have been synthesized by EA-CVD (electron assisted chemical vapor deposition) technique.The quality and nitrogen impurity states of the diamond films are characterized by SEM, raman spectroscopy, XPS and EPRspectroscopy, respectively. The results show that the morphology changes from well-defined facets to cauliflower-like structures,the content of amorphous carbon increases and the quality drops with increasing the nitrogen flow rate. Furthermore, in thefilms, it can be observed that nitrogen impurity exists in the forms of Ns0, [N-V]0 and [N-V]-1. The contents of [N-V]0 and[N-V]-1 are lower when the nitrogen flow rate is relatively high, and the concentration of Ns0 varies from 15 ppm to 483 ppm.

  12. The Role of Ambient Gas and Pressure on the Structuring of Hard Diamond-Like Carbon Films Synthesized by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei C. Popescu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hard carbon thin films were synthesized on Si (100 and quartz substrates by the Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD technique in vacuum or methane ambient to study their suitability for applications requiring high mechanical resistance. The deposited films’ surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, crystalline status by X-ray diffraction, packing and density by X-ray reflectivity, chemical bonding by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, adherence by “pull-out” measurements and mechanical properties by nanoindentation tests. Films synthesized in vacuum were a-C DLC type, while films synthesized in methane were categorized as a-C:H. The majority of PLD films consisted of two layers: one low density layer towards the surface and a higher density layer in contact with the substrate. The deposition gas pressure played a crucial role on films thickness, component layers thickness ratio, structure and mechanical properties. The films were smooth, amorphous and composed of a mixture of sp3-sp2 carbon, with sp3 content ranging between 50% and 90%. The thickness and density of the two constituent layers of a film directly determined its mechanical properties.

  13. Biomimetic thin film deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, P. C.; Campbell, A. A.; Tarasevich, B. J.; Fryxell, G. E.; Bentjen, S. B.

    1991-04-01

    Surfaces derivatized with organic functional groups were used to promote the deposition of thin films of inorganic minerals. These derivatized surfaces were designed to mimic the nucleation proteins that control mineral deposition during formation of bone, shell, and other hard tissues in living organisms. By the use of derivatized substrates control was obtained over the phase of mineral deposited, the orientation of the crystal lattice and the location of deposition. These features are of considerable importance in many technically important thin films, coatings, and composite materials. Methods of derivatizing surfaces are considered and examples of controlled mineral deposition are presented.

  14. Adhesion analysis of polycrystalline diamond films on molybdenum by means of scratch, indentation and sand abrasion testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijnsters, J.G.; Shankar, P.; Enckevort, W.J.P. van; Schermer, J.J.; Meulen, J.J. ter

    2005-01-01

    Diamond films have been grown by hot-filament chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on molybdenum substrates under different growth conditions. The films grown with increasing substrate temperatures show a higher interconnection of diamond grains, whereas increasing methane concentrations in the 0.5-4.0%

  15. Adhesion analysis of polycrystalline diamond films on molybdenum by means of scratch, indentation and sand abrasion testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijnsters, J.G.; Shankar, P.; Enckevort, W.J.P. van; Schermer, J.J.; Meulen, J.J. ter

    2005-01-01

    Diamond films have been grown by hot-filament chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on molybdenum substrates under different growth conditions. The films grown with increasing substrate temperatures show a higher interconnection of diamond grains, whereas increasing methane concentrations in the 0.5-4.0%

  16. Charge multiplication effect in thin diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skukan, N., E-mail: nskukan@irb.hr; Grilj, V.; Sudić, I.; Jakšić, M. [Division of Experimental Physics, Ruđer Bošković Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Pomorski, M. [CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France); Kada, W.; Kambayashi, Y.; Andoh, Y. [Division of Electronics and Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Makino, T.; Onoda, S.; Sato, S.; Ohshima, T.; Kamiya, T. [National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2016-07-25

    Herein, we report on the enhanced sensitivity for the detection of charged particles in single crystal chemical vapour deposition (scCVD) diamond radiation detectors. The experimental results demonstrate charge multiplication in thin planar diamond membrane detectors, upon impact of 18 MeV O ions, under high electric field conditions. Avalanche multiplication is widely exploited in devices such as avalanche photo diodes, but has never before been reproducibly observed in intrinsic CVD diamond. Because enhanced sensitivity for charged particle detection is obtained for short charge drift lengths without dark counts, this effect could be further exploited in the development of sensors based on avalanche multiplication and radiation detectors with extreme radiation hardness.

  17. Study of relationship between structure and transmittance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the transparent hard diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on glass substrate by magnetic confined radio-frequency plasma chemical vapor deposition. The structure of films was studied by Raman spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), the transmittance of films by Spectrophotometer. The mechanism of the influence of films structure on transmittance of the films was discussed. The results show that the thickness of films was lower than 100nm, and the transmittance was over 90% in 380-780 nm region. Discussion in theory on the influence of film structure on transmittance was correspondence to experiment results.

  18. Rhenium Alloys as Ductile Substrates for Diamond Thin-Film Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Jeffrey M; Martin, Heidi B

    2014-02-01

    Molybdenum-rhenium (Mo/Re) and tungsten-rhenium (W/Re) alloys were investigated as substrates for thin-film, polycrystalline boron-doped diamond electrodes. Traditional, carbide-forming metal substrates adhere strongly to diamond but lose their ductility during exposure to the high-temperature (1000°C) diamond, chemical vapor deposition environment. Boron-doped semi-metallic diamond was selectively deposited for up to 20 hours on one end of Mo/Re (47.5/52.5 wt.%) and W/Re (75/25 wt.%) alloy wires. Conformal diamond films on the alloys displayed grain sizes and Raman signatures similar to films grown on tungsten; in all cases, the morphology and Raman spectra were consistent with well-faceted, microcrystalline diamond with minimal sp(2) carbon content. Cyclic voltammograms of dopamine in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) showed the wide window and low baseline current of high-quality diamond electrodes. In addition, the films showed consistently well-defined, dopamine electrochemical redox activity. The Mo/Re substrate regions that were uncoated but still exposed to the diamond-growth environment remained substantially more flexible than tungsten in a bend-to-fracture rotation test, bending to the test maximum of 90° and not fracturing. The W/Re substrates fractured after a 27° bend, and the tungsten fractured after a 21° bend. Brittle, transgranular cleavage fracture surfaces were observed for tungsten and W/Re. A tension-induced fracture of the Mo/Re after the prior bend test showed a dimple fracture with a visible ductile core. Overall, the Mo/Re and W/Re alloys were suitable substrates for diamond growth. The Mo/Re alloy remained significantly more ductile than traditional tungsten substrates after diamond growth, and thus may be an attractive metal substrate for more ductile, thin-film diamond electrodes.

  19. Induced Nucleation of Diamond Films on ZnS Substrates Precoated with Ceramic Interlayer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xu-Hui; YANG Hai; LU Fan-Xiu; TONG Yu-Mei; GUO Hui-Bin; TANG Wei-Zhong; LI Cheng-Ming; CHEN Guang-Chao; YU Huai-Zhi; CHENG Hong-Fan

    2004-01-01

    @@ We attempt to coat a multi-spectrum chemical-vapour-deposition ZnS substrate with smooth crystalline diamond films on the top of properly designed ceramic interlayer, which provides protection for ZnS against corrosion by the H2-CH4 microwave plasma and mitigates the thermal expansion coefficient mismatching between diamond and ZnS. However, difficulties in the homogeneous diamond nucleation on a ceramic interlayer were encountered.It was found that high rate nucleation of diamond could be induced by a metal or semiconductor mask placed on the top of ZnS.

  20. STUDY OF RAY IRRADIATION ON DIAMOND-LIKE CARBON FILMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.A.Liu; T.M.Wang; E.Q.Xie

    2002-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been deposited on glass substrates using radio-frequency (rf) plasma deposition method, γ-ray, ultraviolet (UV) ray were used toirradiate the DLC films. Raman spectroscopy and infrared (IR) spectroscopy were usedto characterize the changing characteristics of SP3 C-H bond and hydrogen content inthe films due to the irradiations. The results show that, the damage degrees induced bythe UV ray on the SP3 C-H bonds are much stronger than that by the γ-ray. When theirradiation dose of γ-ray reaches 10× 104Gy, the SP3 C-H bond reduces about 50% innumber. The square electrical resistance of the films is reduced due to the irradiationof UV ray and this is caused by severe oxidation of the films. By using the results onoptical gap of the films and the fully constrained network theory, the hydrogen contentin the as-deposited films is estimated to be 10-25at.%.

  1. Nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond and multi-layer-graphene-like hybrid carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Yonhua; Yeh, Shoupu; Fang, Wei Cheng; Chu, Yuehchieh

    2014-03-01

    Nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD) and multi-layer-graphene-like hybrid carbon films have been synthesized by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) on oxidized silicon which is pre-seeded with diamond nanoparticles. MPECVD of N-UNCD on nanodiamond seeds produces a base layer, from which carbon structures nucleate and grow perpendicularly to form standing carbon platelets. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering measurements reveal that these carbon platelets are comprised of ultrananocrystalline diamond embedded in multilayer-graphene-like carbon structures. The hybrid carbon films are of low electrical resistivity. UNCD grains in the N-UNCD base layer and the hybrid carbon platelets serve as high-density diamond nuclei for the deposition of an electrically insulating UNCD film on it. Biocompatible carbon-based heaters made of low-resistivity hybrid carbon heaters encapsulated by insulating UNCD for possible electrosurgical applications have been demonstrated.

  2. Properties of Diamond Film/Alumina Composites for Integrated Circuits with Ultra-High Speed and High Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lin-Jun; XIA Yi-Ben; FANG Zhi-Jun; ZHANG Ming-Long; SHEN Hu-Jiang

    2004-01-01

    @@ We report the properties of the diamond film/alumina composites which were thought of as promising substrate materials for integrated circuits with ultra-high speed and high power. The measurement results of dielectric properties of diamond film/alumina composites show that the coating of CVD diamond films could effectively reduce the dielectric constant of the composite. Carbon ion implantation into alumina substrates prior to the diamond deposition can reduce the dielectric loss of the composite from 5 × 10-3 to 2 × 10-3, and can give the composite better frequency stability. The thermal conductivity of composites could be obviously increased by coating CVD diamond film. The composite has a dielectric constant of 6.5 and a thermal conductivity of 3.98 W/(cmK) when the thickness of diamond film is up to 100 μm.

  3. Advanced laser diagnostics for diamond deposition research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, C.H.; Owano, T.G.; Wahl, E.H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) using thermal plasmas is attractive for diamond synthesis applications due to the inherently high reactant densities and throughput, but the associated high gas-phase collision rates in the boundary layer above the substrate produce steep thermal and species gradients which can drive the complex plasma chemistry away from optimal conditions. To understand and control these environments, accurate measurements of temperature and species concentrations within the reacting boundary layer are needed. This is challenging in atmospheric pressure reactors due to the highly luminous environment, steep thermal and species gradients, and small spatial scales. The applicability of degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) as a spectroscopic probe of atmospheric pressure reacting plasmas has been investigated. This powerful, nonlinear technique has been applied to the measurement of temperature and radical species concentrations in the boundary layer of a diamond growth substrate immersed in a flowing atmospheric pressure plasma. In-situ measurements of CH and C{sub 2} radicals have been performed to determine spatially resolved profiles of vibrational temperature, rotational temperature, and species concentration. Results of these measurements are compared with the predictions of a detailed numerical simulation.

  4. The influence of boron doping level on quality and stability of diamond film on Ti substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, J.J., E-mail: weijun81@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Ch.M., E-mail: chengmli@mater.ustb.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Gao, X.H.; Hei, L.F.; Lvun, F.X. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2012-07-01

    In this study, we investigate the influence of boron doping level on film quality and stability of boron doped diamond (BDD) film deposited on titanium substrate (Ti/BDD) using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system. The results demonstrate that high boron concentration will improve the film conductivity, whereas the diamond film quality and adhesion are deteriorated obviously. The increase of total internal stress in the film and the variation of components within the interlayer will weaken the coating adhesion. According to the analysis of electrode inactivation mechanism, high boron doping level will be harmful to the electrode stability in the view of diamond quality and adhesion deterioration. In this study, 5000 ppm B/C ratio in the reaction gas is optimized for Ti/BDD electrode preparation.

  5. Sputtered tungsten-based ternary and quaternary layers for nanocrystalline diamond deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walock, Michael J; Rahil, Issam; Zou, Yujiao; Imhoff, Luc; Catledge, Shane A; Nouveau, Corinne; Stanishevsky, Andrei V

    2012-06-01

    Many of today's demanding applications require thin-film coatings with high hardness, toughness, and thermal stability. In many cases, coating thickness in the range 2-20 microm and low surface roughness are required. Diamond films meet many of the stated requirements, but their crystalline nature leads to a high surface roughness. Nanocrystalline diamond offers a smoother surface, but significant surface modification of the substrate is necessary for successful nanocrystalline diamond deposition and adhesion. A hybrid hard and tough material may be required for either the desired applications, or as a basis for nanocrystalline diamond film growth. One possibility is a composite system based on carbides or nitrides. Many binary carbides and nitrides offer one or more mentioned properties. By combining these binary compounds in a ternary or quaternary nanocrystalline system, we can tailor the material for a desired combination of properties. Here, we describe the results on the structural and mechanical properties of the coating systems composed of tungsten-chromium-carbide and/or nitride. These WC-Cr-(N) coatings are deposited using magnetron sputtering. The growth of adherent nanocrystalline diamond films by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition has been demonstrated on these coatings. The WC-Cr-(N) and WC-Cr-(N)-NCD coatings are characterized with atomic force microscopy and SEM, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation.

  6. Microstructure and property of diamond-like carbon films with Al and Cr co-doping deposited using a hybrid beams system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wei; Liu, Jingmao; Geng, Dongsen; Guo, Peng; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Qimin

    2016-12-01

    DLC films with weak carbide former Al and carbide former Cr co-doping (Al:Cr-DLC) were deposited by a hybrid beams system comprising an anode-layer linear ion beam source (LIS) and high power impulse magnetron sputtering using a gas mixture of C2H2 and Ar as the precursor. The doped Al and Cr contents were controlled via adjusting the C2H2 fraction in the gas mixture. The composition, microstructure, compressive stress, mechanical properties and tribological behaviors of the Al:Cr-DLC films were researched carefully using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, stress-tester, nanoindentation and ball-on-plate tribometer as function of the C2H2 fraction. The results show that the Al and Cr contents in the films increased continuously as the C2H2 fraction decreased. The doped Cr atoms preferred to bond with the carbon while the Al atoms mainly existed in metallic state. Structure modulation with alternate multilayer consisted of Al-poor DLC layer and Al-rich DLC layer was found in the films. Those periodic Al-rich DLC layers can effectively release the residual stress of the films. On the other hand, the formation of the carbide component due to Cr incorporation can help to increase the film hardness. Accordingly, the residual stress of the DLC films can be reduced without sacrificing the film hardness though co-doping Al and Cr atoms. Furthermore, it was found that the periodic Al-rich layer can greatly improve the elastic resilience of the DLC films and thus decreases the film friction coefficient and wear rate significantly. However, the existence of the carbide component would cause abrasive wear and thus deteriorate the wear performance of the films.

  7. Diamond Synthesis Employing Nanoparticle Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppireddi, Kishore (Inventor); Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Weiner, Brad R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Iron nanoparticles were employed to induce the synthesis of diamond on molybdenum, silicon, and quartz substrates. Diamond films were grown using conventional conditions for diamond synthesis by hot filament chemical vapor deposition, except that dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles replaced the seeding. This approach to diamond induction can be combined with dip pen nanolithography for the selective deposition of diamond and diamond patterning while avoiding surface damage associated to diamond-seeding methods.

  8. The irradiation studies on diamond-like carbon films

    CERN Document Server

    LiuGuIang; Xie Er Qin

    2002-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been deposited on glass substrates using radio-frequency (r.f.) plasma deposition method. gamma-ray, ultraviolet (UV) ray and neutron beam were used to irradiate the DLC films. Raman spectroscopy and infrared (IR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the changing characteristics of SP sup 3 C-H bond and hydrogen content in the films due to the irradiations. It showed that, the damage degrees of the gamma-ray, UV ray and neutron beam on the SP sup 3 C-H bonds are different. Among them, the damage of gamma-ray on the SP sup 3 C-H bond is the weakest. When the irradiation dose of gamma-ray reaches 10x10 sup 4 Gy, the SP sup 3 C-H bond reduces about 50% in number. The square resistance of the films is reduced due to the irradiation of UV ray and this is caused by severe oxidation of the films. Compared with that of the as-deposited one, the IR transmittance of the films irradiated by both gamma-ray and neutron beam is increased to some extent. By using the results on optical...

  9. Relationship between texture and residual macro-strain in CVD diamond films based on phenomenological analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weimin Mao; Hongxi Zhu; Leng Chen; Huiping Feng

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between texture and elastic properties of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films was analyzed based on the phenomenological theory, which reveals the influence of crystalline orientation and texture on the residual macro-strain and macro-stress. The phenomenological calculations indicated that the difference in Young's modulus could be 15% in single dia- mond crystals and 5% in diamond films with homogeneously distributed strong fiber texture. The experimentally measured residual strains of free-standing CVD diamond films were in good agreement with the correspondingly calculated Young's modulus in con- nection with the multi-fiber textures in the fills, though the difference in Young's modulus induced by texture was only around 1%. It is believed that texture should be one of the important factors influencing the residual stress and strain of CVD diamond films.

  10. Preparation of free-standing diamond films for high frequency SAW devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-min; XIA Yi-ben; WANG Lin-jun; SU Qing-feng; ZHAO Ping; XU Run; PENG Hong-yan; SHI Wei-min

    2006-01-01

    Free-standing diamond films were prepared by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) method under different conditions. Inter-digital transducers (IDTs) were formed on the nucleation sides of free-standing diamond films by photolithography technique. Then piezoelectric ZnO films were deposited by radio-frequency(RF) reactive magnetron sputtering to obtain the ZnO/diamond film structures. Surface morphologies of the nucleation sides and the IDTs were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM),atomic force microscope (AFM) and optical microscopy. The results indicate that the surfaces of nucleation sides are very smooth and the IDTs are of high quality without discontinuity and short circuit phenomenon. Raman spectra show the sharp diamond feature peak at about 1 334 cm-1 and the small amount of non-diamond carbon in the nucleation side. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the structure of ZnO/diamond films show a strong diffraction peak of ZnO (002),which indicates that as-sputtered ZnO films are highly c-axis oriented.

  11. Enhancement of the nucleation of smooth and dense nanocrystalline diamond films by using molybdenum seed layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijnsters, J. G.; Vázquez, L.; van Dreumel, G. W. G.; ter Meulen, J. J.; van Enckevort, W. J. P.; Celis, J. P.

    2010-11-01

    A method for the nucleation enhancement of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films on silicon substrates at low temperature is discussed. A sputter deposition of a Mo seed layer with thickness 50 nm on Si substrates was applied followed by an ultrasonic seeding step with nanosized detonation diamond powders. Hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) was used to nucleate and grow NCD films on substrates heated up at 550 °C. The nucleation of diamond and the early stages of NCD film formation were investigated at different methane percentages in methane/hydrogen gas mixtures by atomic force microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and grazing incidence x-ray analyses in order to gain specific insight in the nucleation process of NCD films. The nucleation kinetics of diamond on the Mo-coated Si substrates was found to be up to ten times higher than on blank Si substrates. The enhancement of the nucleation of diamond on thin Mo interlayers results from two effects, namely, (a) the nanometer rough Mo surface shows an improved embedding of ultrasonically introduced nanosized diamond seeds that act as starting points for the diamond nucleation during HF-CVD and (b) the rapid carbonization of the Mo surface causes the formation of Mo2C onto which diamond easily nucleates. The diamond nucleation density progressively increases at increasing methane percentages and is about 5×1010 cm-2 at 4.0% methane. The improved nucleation kinetics of diamond on Mo interlayers facilitates the rapid formation of NCD films possessing a very low surface roughness down to ˜6 nm, and allows a submicron thickness control.

  12. Hydrogen distribution in CVD diamond films prepared by DC arcjet operating at gas recycling mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogen distribution and content in diamond films deposited by DC arcjet under gas recycling mode was evaluated by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). The films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrometry. The NRA results show that the hydrogen content in diamond films was approximately 0.6% (substrate temperature 770℃), and strongly depended on the substrate temperature. It was that the hydrogen content increased with the increase of the substrate temperature. The possibility of hydrogen trapping in the films was also discussed.

  13. A novel Mo-W interlayer approach for CVD diamond deposition on steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kundrát

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Steel is the most widely used material in engineering for its cost/performance ratio and coatings are routinely applied on its surface to further improve its properties. Diamond coated steel parts are an option for many demanding industrial applications through prolonging the lifetime of steel parts, enhancement of tool performance as well as the reduction of wear rates. Direct deposition of diamond on steel using conventional chemical vapour deposition (CVD processes is known to give poor results due to the preferential formation of amorphous carbon on iron, nickel and other elements as well as stresses induced from the significant difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of those materials. This article reports a novel approach of deposition of nanocrystalline diamond coatings on high-speed steel (M42 substrates using a multi-structured molybdenum (Mo – tungsten (W interlayer to form steel/Mo/Mo-W/W/diamond sandwich structures which overcome the adhesion problem related to direct magnetron sputtering deposition of pure tungsten. Surface, interface and tribology properties were evaluated to understand the role of such an interlayer structure. The multi-structured Mo-W interlayer has been proven to improve the adhesion between diamond films and steel substrates by acting as an effective diffusion barrier during the CVD diamond deposition.

  14. A novel Mo-W interlayer approach for CVD diamond deposition on steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundrát, Vojtěch; Sullivan, John; Ye, Haitao, E-mail: h.ye@aston.ac.uk [School of Engineering and Applied Science, Aston University, Birmingham, B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Zhang, Xiaoling; Cooke, Kevin; Sun, Hailin [Miba Coating Group: Teer Coatings Ltd, West-Stone-House, West-Stone, Berry-Hill-Industrial-Estate, WR9 9AS, Droitwich (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    Steel is the most widely used material in engineering for its cost/performance ratio and coatings are routinely applied on its surface to further improve its properties. Diamond coated steel parts are an option for many demanding industrial applications through prolonging the lifetime of steel parts, enhancement of tool performance as well as the reduction of wear rates. Direct deposition of diamond on steel using conventional chemical vapour deposition (CVD) processes is known to give poor results due to the preferential formation of amorphous carbon on iron, nickel and other elements as well as stresses induced from the significant difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of those materials. This article reports a novel approach of deposition of nanocrystalline diamond coatings on high-speed steel (M42) substrates using a multi-structured molybdenum (Mo) – tungsten (W) interlayer to form steel/Mo/Mo-W/W/diamond sandwich structures which overcome the adhesion problem related to direct magnetron sputtering deposition of pure tungsten. Surface, interface and tribology properties were evaluated to understand the role of such an interlayer structure. The multi-structured Mo-W interlayer has been proven to improve the adhesion between diamond films and steel substrates by acting as an effective diffusion barrier during the CVD diamond deposition.

  15. Role of Duty Ratio in Diamond Growth by Pulsed DC-Bias Enhanced Hot Filament Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Liang; ZHOU Haiyang; ZHU Xiaodong

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the role of the pulse duty ratio was investigated during the deposition of diamond films in a hot filament chemical vapour deposition reactor with a pulsed-dc biased substrate positively relative to the hot filaments. The voltage-current characteristics showed that the discharge current rose with the increase of biasing voltage, which was modified by the duty ratio. Before deposition, two approaches were adopted for the pre-treatment of the silicon substrates, respectively, and the substrates were scratched by diamond paste or seeded by diamond powders using the so-called 'soft dry polished' technique. Diamond films were deposited under a fixed discharge power by changing the duty ratios. In the first group with scratched substrates, it was found that under a high duty ratio the diamond grew slowly with quite poor nucleation, while in the second case a high duty ratio induced a high deposition rate and good diamond quality. Reactive hydrocarbon species with high energy are essential for the initial nucleation process, which is more effectively achieved at a high biasing voltage in the condition of a low duty ratio. In the film growth process, the large discharge current at a high duty ratio represents an increased concentration of electrons and reactive species as well, promoting the growth of diamond films.

  16. Modification of rubber surface with hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y. T.; Bui, X. L.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Laudon, M; Romanowicz, B

    2009-01-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) for reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals, by sputtering graphite targets in C(2)H(2)/Ar plasma. The wax removal and pre-deposition plas

  17. TSC response of irradiated CVD diamond films

    CERN Document Server

    Borchi, E; Bucciolini, M; Guasti, A; Mazzocchi, S; Pirollo, S; Sciortino, S

    1999-01-01

    CVD diamond films have been irradiated with electrons, sup 6 sup 0 Co photons and protons in order to study the dose response to exposure to different particles and energies and to investigate linearity with dose. The Thermally Stimulated Current (TSC) has been studied as a function of the dose delivered to polymethilmetacrilate (PMMA) in the range from 1 to 12 Gy with 20 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator. The TSC spectrum has revealed the presence of two components with peak temperatures of about 470 and 520 K, corresponding to levels lying in the diamond band gap with activation energies of the order of 0.7 - 1 eV. After the subtraction of the exponential background the charge emitted during the heating scan has been evaluated and has been found to depend linearly on the dose. The thermally emitted charge of the CVD diamond films has also been studied using different particles. The samples have been irradiated with the same PMMA dose of about 2 Gy with 6 and 20 MeV electrons from a Linac, sup 6 sup 0 ...

  18. Preparation of diamond/Cu microchannel heat sink by chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘学璋; 罗浩; 苏栩; 余志明

    2015-01-01

    A Ti interlayer with thickness about 300 nm was sputtered on Cu microchannels, followed by an ultrasonic seeding with nanodiamond powders. Adherent diamond film with crystalline grains close to thermal equilibrium shape was tightly deposited by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD). The nucleation and growth of diamond were investigated with micro-Raman spectroscope and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDX). Results show that the nucleation density is found to be up to 1010 cm−2. The enhancement of the nucleation kinetics can be attributed to the nanometer rough Ti interlayer surface. An improved absorption of nanodiamond particles is found, which act as starting points for the diamond nucleation during HF-CVD process. Furthermore, finite element simulation was conducted to understand the thermal management properties of prepared diamond/Cu microchannel heat sink.

  19. Ion beam induced luminescence characterisation of CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Gonon, P.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The characterisation of the band structure properties of materials and devices by ion microprobe techniques has been made possible at the Melbourne MeV ion microprobe facility with the development of Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL). A number of diamond films grown by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition (MPCVD) on silicon substrates are analysed. A preliminary study of the luminescence properties of these samples has revealed information not previously obtainable via traditional microprobe techniques. The optical effects of incorporating dopants during the deposition process is determined using IBIL. The presence of trace element impurities introduced during growth is examined by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), and a measurement of the film thickness is made using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Biomimetic thin film deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieke, P.R.; Graff, G.E.; Campbell, A.A.; Bunker, B.C.; Baskaran, S.; Song, L.; Tarasevich, B.J.; Fryxell, G.E.

    1995-09-01

    Biological mineral deposition for the formation of bone, mollusk shell and other hard tissues provides materials scientists with illustrative materials processing strategies. This presentation will review the key features of biomineralization and how these features can be of technical importance. We have adapted existing knowledge of biomineralization to develop a unique method of depositing inorganic thin films and coating. Our approach to thin film deposition is to modify substrate surfaces to imitate the proteins found in nature that are responsible for controlling mineral deposition. These biomimetic surfaces control the nucleation and growth of the mineral from a supersaturated aqueous solution. This has many processing advantages including simple processing equipment, environmentally benign reagents, uniform coating of highly complex shapes, and enhanced adherence of coating. Many different types of metal oxide, hydroxide, sulfide and phosphate materials with useful mechanical, optical, electronic and biomedical properties can be deposited.

  1. Hot-filament chemical vapour deposition of diamond onto steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijnsters, Ivan

    2003-01-01

    The main goal of this project was to establish the feasibility of depositing well adhering polycrystalline diamond coatings on steel substrates. It is well known that the growth and adhesion of diamond layers directly onto steels is complicated by the high carbon solubility and the high thermal expa

  2. Atmospheric Plasma Deposition of Diamond-like Carbon Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladwig, Angela

    2008-01-23

    material that may be treated. The deposition of DLC at atmospheric pressure has been demonstrated by several researchers. Izake, et al [53] and Novikov and Dymont [54] have demonstrated an electrochemical process that is carried out with organic compounds such as methanol and acetylene dissolved in ammonia. This process requires that the substrates be immersed in the liquid [53-54]. The atmospheric pressure deposition of DLC was also demonstrated by Kulik, et al. utilizing a plasma torch. However, this process requires operating temperatures in excess of 800 oC [55]. In this report, we investigate the deposition of diamond-like carbon films using a low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The films were characterized by solid-state carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) and found to have a ratio of sp2 to sp3 carbon of 43 to 57%. The films were also tested for adhesion, coefficient of friction, and dielectric strength.

  3. Morphology Analysis of Nickel-boron/ diamond Electroless Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lin; ZHU Xuanmin; ZHOU Jian; OUYANG Shixi

    2008-01-01

    The influences of mass concentration of nickel chloride hexahydrate, sodium borohydride,ethylenediamine, pH value, bath temperature on deposition rate were studied with orthogonal experiments by a series of pre-treatments on micro-diamond particle, and the optimized parameters were obtained. Both the morphology and the composition of original diamond and the diamond with Ni-B coating were analyzed by SEM and XRD respectively. The SEM image shows that the spherical Ni-B particle is coated upon diamond.XRD pattern shows that the coating compositions are Ni and Ni2B.

  4. A 3D tomographic EBSD analysis of a CVD diamond thin film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu, Dierk Raabe and Stefan Zaefferer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the nucleation and growth processes in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD diamond film using a tomographic electron backscattering diffraction method (3D EBSD. The approach is based on the combination of a focused ion beam (FIB unit for serial sectioning in conjunction with high-resolution EBSD. Individual diamond grains were investigated in 3-dimensions particularly with regard to the role of twinning.

  5. Cell adhesion and growth on ultrananocrystalline diamond and diamond-like carbon films after different surface modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miksovsky, J. [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel (Germany); Institute of Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Kladno (Czech Republic); Voss, A. [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel (Germany); Kozarova, R. [Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Kocourek, T.; Pisarik, P. [Institute of Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Kladno (Czech Republic); Ceccone, G. [Unit Nanobiosciences, European Commission Joint Research Centre, Ispra (Italy); Kulisch, W. [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel (Germany); Jelinek, M. [Institute of Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Kladno (Czech Republic); Apostolova, M.D. [Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Reithmaier, J.P. [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel (Germany); Popov, C., E-mail: popov@ina.uni-kassel.de [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • UNCD and DLC films were modified by UV/O{sub 3} treatments, O{sub 2} or NH{sub 3}-containing plasmas. • Surface composition, wettability and surface energy change upon modifications. • Higher efficiency of UNCD modifications was observed. • Cell attachment and growth were influenced by the surface termination and roughness. - Abstract: Diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) films possess a set of excellent physical and chemical properties which together with a high biocompatibility make them attractive candidates for a number of medical and biotechnological applications. In the current work thin ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) and DLC films were comparatively investigated with respect to cell attachment and proliferation after different surface modifications. The UNCD films were prepared by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, the DLC films by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The films were comprehensively characterized with respect to their basic properties, e.g. crystallinity, morphology, chemical bonding nature, etc. Afterwards the UNCD and DLC films were modified applying O{sub 2} or NH{sub 3}/N{sub 2} plasmas and UV/O{sub 3} treatments to alter their surface termination. The surface composition of as-grown and modified samples was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Furthermore the films were characterized by contact angle measurements with water, formamide, 1-decanol and diiodomethane; from the results obtained the surface energy with its dispersive and polar components was calculated. The adhesion and proliferation of MG63 osteosarcoma cells on the different UNCD and DLC samples were assessed by measurement of the cell attachment efficiency and MTT assays. The determined cell densities were compared and correlated with the surface properties of as-deposited and modified UNCD and DLC films.

  6. Nucleation, growth and acoustic properties of thin film diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Whitfield, M D

    1999-01-01

    emission spectroscopy has been used to study the influence of substrate bias on the microwave plasma during diamond nucleation. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have recently emerged as promising near term applications for currently available CVD diamond however little is known about the propagation of acoustic waves in this material; a detailed study of the influence of film characteristics on acoustic propagation in free standing CVD diamond films has been undertaken using the techniques of laser ultrasonic analysis. The unusual combination of extreme properties possessed by diamond could benefit a wide range of applications. Thus far practical utilisation of this material has remained difficult and consequently limited; natural and synthetic crystals are unsuitable forms for many uses; particularly electronic applications which ideally require large area, single crystal substrates. Emerging CVD methods for the growth of thin film diamond offer a practical alternative; although nucleation on non-diamond ...

  7. Selective-Area Growth of Thick Diamond Films Using Chemically Stable Masks of Ru/Au and Mo/Au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, Masanori; Watanabe, Katsumi; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Shikata, Shinichi

    2012-07-01

    Selective-area growth of diamond films in microwave-plasma chemical vapor deposition was performed using newly developed masks. By forming chemically stable masks made of Ru/Au or Mo/Au, which have high melting points, good adhesion to diamond, and difficulty in forming carbide compounds, patterned diamond films with a large thickness of 50 µm, a large area of 5 mm2, and a high orientation in the [001] direction were successfully grown on (001) diamond substrates without degradation of the crystal quality of masked areas.

  8. Plasma-enhanced Deposition of Nano-Structured Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Qiaoqin (杨巧勤); Xiao Chijin (肖持进); A. Hirose

    2005-01-01

    By pre-treating substrate with different methods and patterning the catalyst, selective and patterned growth of diamond and graphitic nano-structured carbon films have been realized through DC Plasma-Enhanced Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (PE-HFCVD).Through two-step processing in an HFCVD reactor, novel nano-structured composite diamond films containing a nanocrystalline diamond layer on the top of a nanocone diamond layer have been synthesized. Well-aligned carbon nanotubes, diamond and graphitic carbon nanocones with controllable alignment orientations have been synthesized by using PE-HFCVD. The orientation of the nanostructures can be controlled by adjusting the working pressure. In a Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MW-PECVD) reactor, high-quality diamond films have been synthesized at low temperatures (310 ℃~550 ℃) without adding oxygen or halogen gas in a newly developed processing technique. In this process, carbon source originates from graphite etching, instead of hydrocarbon. The lowest growth temperature for the growth of nanocrystalline diamond films with a reasonable growth rate without addition of oxygen or halogen is 260 ℃.

  9. Deposition of boron doped diamond and carbon nanomaterials on graphite foam electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, Marian, E-mail: marian.marton@stuba.sk; Vojs, Marian; Kotlár, Mário; Michniak, Pavol; Vančo, Ľubomír; Veselý, Marian; Redhammer, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Highlights: • The possibility of boron doped diamond deposition on porous carbon foam by HFCVD method was demonstrated. • Various carbon forms were synthesized including BDD, thin films of graphite nanosheets, carbon nanowalls, graphite nanotips and its composites. • Carbon nanowalls were overgrown by BDD nanocrystals, thus creating a new type of carbon nanomaterial not published yet, a CNW/BDD composite with a unique Raman spectrum. - Abstract: Boron doped diamond (BDD) has remarkable physical and chemical properties, that makes it an attractive material for electrochemical applications. In this study, deposition process of BDD on porous carbon foam electrodes was performed by HFCVD method. After depositions, the substrates were not homogenously covered by the BDD thin film only. Depending on the deposition temperature, foam porosity and distance from heated filaments, different carbon nanomaterials were synthesized. The boron doped diamond, graphite nanosheets, carbon nanowalls and its composites occurred on the foams outer and inner surfaces. Two new observed types of carbon structures, the carbon nanowalls – boron doped diamond composite and graphite nanotips are analyzed and described. Analyses were made by SEM and Raman spectroscopy. The influence of deposition conditions on the growth process is discussed.

  10. Friction and Wear Performance of Boron Doped, Undoped Microcrystalline and Fine Grained Composite Diamond Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xinchang; WANG Liang; SHEN Bin; SUN Fanghong

    2015-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have attracted more attentions due to their excellent mechanical properties. Whereas as-fabricated traditional diamond films in the previous studies don’t have enough adhesion or surface smoothness, which seriously impact their friction and wear performance, and thus limit their applications under extremely harsh conditions. A boron doped, undoped microcrystalline and fine grained composite diamond (BD-UM-FGCD) film is fabricated by a three-step method adopting hot filament CVD (HFCVD) method in the present study, presenting outstanding comprehensive performance, including the good adhesion between the substrate and the underlying boron doped diamond (BDD) layer, the extremely high hardness of the middle undoped microcrystalline diamond (UMCD) layer, as well as the low surface roughness and favorable polished convenience of the surface fine grained diamond (FGD) layer. The friction and wear behavior of this composite film sliding against low-carbon steel and silicon nitride balls are studied on a ball-on-plate rotational friction tester. Besides, its wear rate is further evaluated under a severer condition using an inner-hole polishing apparatus, with low-carbon steel wire as the counterpart. The test results show that the BD-UM-FGCD film performs very small friction coefficient and great friction behavior owing to its high surface smoothness, and meanwhile it also has excellent wear resistance because of the relatively high hardness of the surface FGD film and the extremely high hardness of the middle UMCD film. Moreover, under the industrial conditions for producing low-carbon steel wires, this composite film can sufficiently prolong the working lifetime of the drawing dies and improve their application effects. This research develops a novel composite diamond films owning great comprehensive properties, which have great potentials as protecting coatings on working surfaces of the wear-resistant and anti

  11. Friction and wear performance of boron doped, undoped microcrystalline and fine grained composite diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinchang; Wang, Liang; Shen, Bin; Sun, Fanghong

    2015-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have attracted more attentions due to their excellent mechanical properties. Whereas as-fabricated traditional diamond films in the previous studies don't have enough adhesion or surface smoothness, which seriously impact their friction and wear performance, and thus limit their applications under extremely harsh conditions. A boron doped, undoped microcrystalline and fine grained composite diamond (BD-UM-FGCD) film is fabricated by a three-step method adopting hot filament CVD (HFCVD) method in the present study, presenting outstanding comprehensive performance, including the good adhesion between the substrate and the underlying boron doped diamond (BDD) layer, the extremely high hardness of the middle undoped microcrystalline diamond (UMCD) layer, as well as the low surface roughness and favorable polished convenience of the surface fine grained diamond (FGD) layer. The friction and wear behavior of this composite film sliding against low-carbon steel and silicon nitride balls are studied on a ball-on-plate rotational friction tester. Besides, its wear rate is further evaluated under a severer condition using an inner-hole polishing apparatus, with low-carbon steel wire as the counterpart. The test results show that the BD-UM-FGCD film performs very small friction coefficient and great friction behavior owing to its high surface smoothness, and meanwhile it also has excellent wear resistance because of the relatively high hardness of the surface FGD film and the extremely high hardness of the middle UMCD film. Moreover, under the industrial conditions for producing low-carbon steel wires, this composite film can sufficiently prolong the working lifetime of the drawing dies and improve their application effects. This research develops a novel composite diamond films owning great comprehensive properties, which have great potentials as protecting coatings on working surfaces of the wear-resistant and anti

  12. Tracing the depositional history of Kalimantan diamonds by zircon provenance and diamond morphology studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueter, Nico; Soesilo, Joko; Fedortchouk, Yana; Nestola, Fabrizio; Belluco, Lorenzo; Troch, Juliana; Wälle, Markus; Guillong, Marcel; Von Quadt, Albrecht; Driesner, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Diamonds in alluvial deposits in Southeast Asia are not accompanied by indicator minerals suggesting primary kimberlite or lamproite sources. The Meratus Mountains in Southeast Borneo (Province Kalimantan Selatan, Indonesia) provide the largest known deposit of these so-called "headless" diamond deposits. Proposals for the origin of Kalimantan diamonds include the adjacent Meratus ophiolite complex, ultra-high pressure (UHP) metamorphic terranes, obducted subcontinental lithospheric mantle and undiscovered kimberlite-type sources. Here we report results from detailed sediment provenance analysis of diamond-bearing Quaternary river channel material and from representative outcrops of the oldest known formations within the Alino Group, including the diamond-bearing Campanian-Maastrichtian Manunggul Formation. Optical examination of surfaces of diamonds collected from artisanal miners in the Meratus area (247 stones) and in West Borneo (Sanggau Area, Province Kalimantan Barat; 85 stones) points toward a classical kimberlite-type source for the majority of these diamonds. Some of the diamonds host mineral inclusions suitable for deep single-crystal X-ray diffraction investigation. We determined the depth of formation of two olivines, one coesite and one peridotitic garnet inclusion. Pressure of formation estimates for the peridotitic garnet at independently derived temperatures of 930-1250 °C are between 4.8 and 6.0 GPa. Sediment provenance analysis includes petrography coupled to analyses of detrital garnet and glaucophane. The compositions of these key minerals do not indicate kimberlite-derived material. By analyzing almost 1400 zircons for trace element concentrations with laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) we tested the mineral's potential as an alternative kimberlite indicator. The screening ultimately resulted in a small subset of ten zircons with a kimberlitic affinity. Subsequent U-Pb dating resulting in Cretaceous ages plus a detailed chemical reflection make

  13. Low temperature growth of diamond films on optical fibers using Linear Antenna CVD system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficek, M.; Drijkoningen, S.; Karczewski, J.; Bogdanowicz, R.; Haenen, K.

    2016-01-01

    It is not trivial to achieve a good quality diamond-coated fibre interface due to a large difference in the properties and composition of the diamond films (or use coating even) and the optical fibre material, i.e. fused silica. One of the biggest problems is the high temperature during the deposition which influences the optical fibre or optical fibre sensor structure (e.g. long-period gratings (LPG)). The greatest advantage of a linear antenna microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system (LA MW CVD) is the fact that it allows to grow the diamond layers at low temperature (below 300°C) [1]. High quality nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films with thicknesses ranging from 70 nm to 150 nm, were deposited on silicon, glass and optical fibre substrates [2]. Substrates pretreatment by dip-coating and spin coating process with a dispersion consisting of detonation nanodiamond (DND) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) has been applied. During the deposition process the continuous mode of operation of the LA MW CVD system was used, which produces a continuous wave at a maximum power of 1.9 kW (in each antenna). Diamond films on optical fibres were obtained at temperatures below 350°C, providing a clear improvement of results compared to our earlier work [3]. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging to investigate the morphology of the nanocrystalline diamond films. The film growth rate, film thickness, and optical properties in the VIS-NIR range, i.e. refractive index and extinction coefficient will be discussed based on measurements on reference quartz plates by using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE).

  14. Nitrogen-Doped Chemical Vapour Deposited Diamond: a New Material for Room-Temperature Solid State Maser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N. A. Poklonski; N. M. Lapchuk; A. V. Khomich; LU Fan-Xiu; TANG Wei-Zhong; V. G. Ralchenko; I. I. Vlasov; M. V. Chukichev; Sambuu Munkhtsetseg

    2007-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) in polycrystalline diamond films grown by dc arc-jet and microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition is studied. The films with nitrogen impurity concentration up to 8 × 1018 cm-3 are also characterized by Raman, cathodoluminescence and optical absorption spectra. The ESR signal from P1 centre with g-factor of 2.0024 (nitrogen impurity atom occupying C site in diamond lattice) is found to exhibit an inversion with increasing the microwave power in an H102 resonator. The spin inversion effect could be of interest for further consideration of N-doped diamonds as a medium for masers operated at room temperature.

  15. Electronic Power System Application of Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Richard L. C.; Kosai, H.; Fries-Carr, S.; Weimer, J.; Freeman, M.; Schwarze, G. E.

    2003-01-01

    A prototype manufacturing technology for producing high volume efficiency and high energy density diamond-like carbon (DLC) capacitors has been developed. Unique dual ion-beam deposition and web-handling systems have been designed and constructed to deposit high quality DLC films simultaneously on both sides of capacitor grade aluminum foil and aluminum-coated polymer films. An optimized process, using inductively coupled RF ion sources, has been used to synthesize electrically robust DLC films. DLC films are amorphous and highly flexible, making them suitable for the production of wound capacitors. DLC capacitors are reliable and stable over a wide range of AC frequencies from 20 Hz to 1 MHz, and over a temperature range from .500 C to 3000 C. The compact DLC capacitors offer at least a 50% decrease in weight and volume and a greater than 50% increase in temperature handling capability over equal value capacitors built with existing technologies. The DLC capacitors will be suitable for high temperature, high voltage, pulsed power and filter applications.

  16. The Textured Growth Characteristics of Diamond Films on CoSi2 (001)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.Z.Gu; X.Jiang

    2000-01-01

    Epitaxial CoSi2 (001) layers, deposited on Si (001) substrate by molecular beam allotaxy (MBA), were used as substrate for diamond deposition in order to realise new applications. The results indicate that, in a microwave plasma chamber, diamond can be nucleated with a higher density on CoSi2 at lower temperatures using a bias enhanced method. High quality, [001]-textured diamond films can be synthesized on CoSi2 (001) using the [001] textured growth conditions. So far an epitaxial growth of diamond on CoSi2 cannot be observed. Statistically, a rotating angle distribution of diamond grains around the [001] axis in an [001]-textured film shows, however, preferred in-plane orientations of 13°, 22°, 45° and 77° relative to the CoSi2 [011]axis. The structural and chemical analyses show that no Co and Si element diffusion from the CoSi2 substrate into the diamond film can be detected.

  17. Ti-doped hydrogenated diamond like carbon coating deposited by hybrid physical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na Rae; Sle Jun, Yee; Moon, Kyoung Il; Sunyong Lee, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    Diamond-like carbon films containing titanium and hydrogen (Ti-doped DLC:H) were synthesized using a hybrid technique based on physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The film was deposited under a mixture of argon (Ar) and acetylene gas (C2H2). The amount of Ti in the Ti-doped DLC:H film was controlled by varying the DC power of the Ti sputtering target ranging from 0 to 240 W. The composition, microstructure, mechanical and chemical properties of Ti-doped DLC:H films with varying Ti concentrations, were investigated using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nano indentation, a ball-on-disk tribometer, a four-point probe system and dynamic anodic testing. As a result, the optimum composition of Ti in Ti-doped DLC:H film using our hybrid method was found to be a Ti content of 18 at. %, having superior electrical conductivity and high corrosion resistance, suitable for bipolar plates. Its hardness value was measured to be 25.6 GPa with a low friction factor.

  18. The effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment on nucleation density of chemical vapor deposition diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chi; Ingram, David C.

    1995-11-01

    Using statistical design of experiments, the effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment on the nucleation density of diamond was studied. The parameters investigated included ultrasonic excitation power, concentration of diamond powder in water, duration of ultrasonic excitation, and duration of cleaning with water after ultrasonic excitation. Diamond films were deposited on silicon (100) substrates using microwave assisted plasma chemical vapor deposition. The nucleation density varied from 106 nuclei/cm2 to 109 nuclei/cm2. The results illustrated that the dominant effect in ultrasonic pre-treatment was seeding. Moreover, scratches caused by the seeds during the treatment enabled more seeds to be retained on the surface. Based on these results, an optimized ultrasonic pretreatment has been developed. The new procedure yields a uniform nucleation density of 109 nuclei/cm2 on silicon (100) substrates.

  19. The adhesion of hot-filament CVD diamond films on AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijnsters, J.G.; Shankar, P.; Enckevort, W.J.P. van; Schermer, J.J.; Meulen, J.J. ter

    2004-01-01

    Steel ball indentation and scratch adhesion testing of hot filament chemical vapour deposited diamond films onto AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steel substrates using two different interlayer systems, namely chromium nitride and borided steel, have been investigated. In order to compare the adhe

  20. Synthesis and characterization of boron incorporated diamond-like carbon thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L.L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada); Yang, Q., E-mail: qiaoqin.yang@usask.ca [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada); Tang, Y.; Yang, L.; Zhang, C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada); Hu, Y.; Cui, X. [Canadian Light Source Inc., 101 Perimeter Road, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada)

    2015-08-31

    Boron incorporated diamond-like carbon (B-DLC) (up to 8 wt.% boron) thin films were synthesized on silicon wafers using biased target ion beam deposition technique, where diamond-like carbon (DLC) was deposited by ion beam deposition and boron (B) was simultaneously incorporated by biased target sputtering of a boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) target under different conditions. Pure DLC films and B–C films were also synthesized by ion beam deposition and biased target sputtering of B{sub 4}C under similar conditions, respectively, as reference samples. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the synthesized films have been characterized by various technologies. It has been found that B exists in different states in B-DLC, including carbon-rich and B-rich boron carbides, boron suboxide and boron oxide, and the oxidation of B probably occurs during the film deposition. The incorporation of B into DLC leads to the increase of sp{sup 3} bonded carbon in the films, the increase of both film hardness and elastic modulus, and the decrease of both surface roughness and friction coefficient. Furthermore, the content of sp{sup 3} bonded carbon, film hardness and elastic modulus increase, and the film surface roughness and friction coefficient decrease with the increase of B-rich carbide in the B-DLC films. - Highlights: • Biased target ion beam deposition technique is promising to produce high quality DLC based thin films; • Boron exists in different states in B-DLC thin films; • The incorporation of B to DLC with different levels leads to improved film properties; • The fraction of sp{sup 3} bonded C in B-DLC thin films increase with the increase of B-rich carbide content in the films.

  1. Electroanalysis of tetracycline using nickel-implanted boron-doped diamond thin film electrode applied to flow injection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treetepvijit, Surudee; Chuanuwatanakul, Suchada; Einaga, Yasuaki; Sato, Rika; Chailapakult, Orawon

    2005-05-01

    The electrochemical analysis of tetracycline was investigated using nickel-implanted boron-doped diamond thin film electrode by cyclic voltammetry and amperometry with a flow injection system. Cyclic voltammetry was used to study the electrochemical oxidation of tetracycline. Comparison experiments were carried out using as-deposited boron-doped diamond thin film electrode (BDD). Nickel-implanted boron-doped diamond thin film electrode (Ni-DIA) provided well-resolved oxidation irreversible cyclic voltammograms. The current signals were higher than those obtained using the as-deposited BDD electrode. Results using nickel-implanted boron-doped diamond thin film electrode in flow injection system coupled with amperometric detection are presented. The optimum potential for tetracycline was 1.55 V versus Ag/AgCl. The linear range of 1.0 to 100 microM and the detection limit of 10 nM were obtained. In addition, the application for drug formulation was also investigated.

  2. Irradiation Effect of γ Rays on Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon films, prepared by RF glow discharge on glasssubstrates, were irradiated by γ rays. The as-deposited and irradiated films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, electrical resistivity, and infrared transmittance. It is shown that the irradiation of the γ rays can lead to the breaking of SP3C-H and SP2C-H bonds, slight increasing of SP3C-C bonds, and induced hydrogen recombination with H2 molecules, subsequently diffusing to the surface of the films. When the γ rays irradiation dose reached 10×104 Gy, the numbers of SP3C-H bonds was decreased by about 50%, the resistivity of irradiated DLC films was increased, and the diamond-like character of the films became more obvious. The structure of DLC films was modified when irradiated by γ rays. The irradiation mechanisms are briefly discussed.

  3. Plasmonic Properties of Nanostructured Diamond Like Carbon/Silver Nanocomposite Films with Nanohole Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šarūnas MEŠKINIS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic properties of the diamond like carbon nanocomposite films with embedded silver nanoparticles with patterned nanohole arrays were analyzed in this study. The films were deposited by unbalanced reactive magnetron sputtering of silver target. Nanopatterning of the films was performed by combining electron beam nanolithography and ion beam etching techniques. Modeling of plasmonic properties was done using the classical Maxwell-Garnett theory. Modeling data and experimental results were in good accordance. Formation of the nanohole pattern in diamond like carbon films doped with silver resulted in decreased intensity of the surface plasmon resonance absorbance peak. No new absorbance or transmittance peaks were observed after the nanopattering. It was explained by extraordinary transmission effect in nanostructured DLC : Ag film films due to plasmon polariton resonance inside of the nanoholes.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.13193

  4. [The change of bacterial adhesion during deposition nitrogen-diamond like carbon coating on pure titanium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lu; Xiao, Yun

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the change of bacterial adhesion on pure titanium coated with nitrogen-diamond like carbon (N-DLC) films and to guide the clinical application. N-DLC was deposited on titanium using ion plating machine, TiN film, anodic oxide film and non-deposition were used as control, then made specimens adhering on the surface of resin denture base for 6 months. The adhesion of Saccharomyces albicans on the titanium surface was observed using scanning electron microscope, and the roughness was tested by roughness detector. The number of Saccharomyces albicans adhering on diamond-like carbon film was significantly less than on the other groups (P < 0.05), and the growth of bacterial cell was inhibited and in a poor state. The largest number of adhesion and cell strains grew well on anodic oxide film group and non-deposition control group. The change of surface roughness of N-DLC film was less than other group (P < 0.05). Pure titanium coated with N-DLC film reduced the adhesion of Saccharomyces albicans after clinical application, thereby reduced the risk of denture stomatitis.

  5. Grating-assisted coupling to nanophotonic circuits in microcrystalline diamond thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Rath

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic diamond films can be prepared on a waferscale by using chemical vapour deposition (CVD on suitable substrates such as silicon or silicon dioxide. While such films find a wealth of applications in thermal management, in X-ray and terahertz window design, and in gyrotron tubes and microwave transmission lines, their use for nanoscale optical components remains largely unexplored. Here we demonstrate that CVD diamond provides a high-quality template for realizing nanophotonic integrated optical circuits. Using efficient grating coupling devices prepared from partially etched diamond thin films, we investigate millimetre-sized optical circuits and achieve single-mode waveguiding at telecoms wavelengths. Our results pave the way towards broadband optical applications for sensing in harsh environments and visible photonic devices.

  6. Diamond and diamond-like films for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This section is a compilation of transparency templates which describe the goals of the Office of Transportation Materials (OTM) Tribology Program. The positions of personnel on the OTM are listed. The role and mission of the OTM is reviewed. The purpose of the Tribology Program is stated to be `to obtain industry input on program(s) in tribology/advanced lubricants areas of interest`. The objective addressed here is to identify opportunities for cost effective application of diamond and diamond-like carbon in transportation systems.

  7. Adhesive strength of CVD diamond thin films quantitatively measured by means of the bulge and blister test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daohui Xiang; Ming Chen; Yuping Ma; Fanghong Sun

    2008-01-01

    Large advancement has been made in understanding the nucleation and growth of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, but the adhesion of CVD diamond to substrates is poor and there is no good method for quantitative evaluation of the adhesive strength. The blister test is a potentially powerful tool for characterizing the mechanical properties of diamond films. In this test, pressure was applied on a thin membrane and the out-of-plane deflection of the membrane center was measured. The Young's modulus, residual stress, and adhesive strength were simultaneously determined using the load-deflection behavior of a membrane. The free-standing window sample of diamond thin films was fabricated by means of photolithography and anisotropic wet etching. The research indicates that the adhesive strength of diamond thin films is 4.28±0.37J/m2. This method uses a simple apparatus, and the fabrication of samples is very easy.

  8. High Energy Radial Deposition of Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Suschke

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-like carbon (DLC coatings were deposited with a new direct ion deposition system using a novel 360 degree ion source operating at acceleration voltage between 4 and 8 kV. Cross-sectional TEM images show that the coatings have a three layered structure which originates from changes in the deposition parameters taking into account ion source condition, ion current density, deposition angles, ion sputtering and ion source movement. Varying structural growth conditions can be achieved by tailoring the deposition parameters. The coatings show good promise for industrial use due to their high hardness, low friction and excellent adhesion to the surface of the samples.

  9. Properties of Diamond-Like Carbon Films Synthesized by Dual-Target Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Cui; LI Guo-Qing; GOU Wei; MU Zong-Xin; ZHANG Cheng-Wu

    2004-01-01

    @@ Smooth, dense and uniform diamond-like carbon films (DLC films) for industrial applications have successfully been prepared by dual-target unbalanced magnetron sputtering and the DLC characteristics of the films are confirmed by Raman spectra. It is found that the sputtering current of target plays an important role in the DLC film deposition. Deposition rate of 3.5μm/h is obtained by using the sputtering current of 30 A. The friction coefficient of the films is 0.2-0.225 measured by using a pin-on-disc microtribometer. The structure of the films tends to have a growth of sp3 bonds content at high sputtering current. The compressive residual stress in the films increases with the increasing sputtering current of the target.

  10. Repulsive effects of hydrophobic diamond thin films on biomolecule detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruslinda, A. Rahim, E-mail: ruslindarahim@gmail.com [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Jln Kgr-Alor Setar, Seriab, 01000 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan); Ishiyama, Y. [Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan); Penmatsa, V. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Ibori, S.; Kawarada, H. [Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We report the effect of fluorine plasma treatment on diamond thin film to resist the nonspecific adsorption of biomolecules. • The diamond thin film were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m. • The repulsive effect shows excellent binding efficiency for both DNA and HIV-1 Tat protein. - Abstract: The repulsive effect of hydrophobic diamond thin film on biomolecule detection, such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 trans-activator of transcription peptide protein detection, was investigated using a mixture of a fluorine-, amine-, and hydrogen-terminated diamond surfaces. These chemical modifications lead to the formation of a surface that effectively resists the nonspecific adsorption of proteins and other biomolecules. The effect of fluorine plasma treatment on elemental composition was also investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS results revealed a fluorocarbon layer on the diamond thin films. The contact angle measurement results indicated that the fluorine-treated diamond thin films were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m.

  11. dc glow discharge modeling applied to diamond film growth plasma reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendra, M.; Graves, David B.; Plano, Linda S.

    Low power dc plasmas have been successfully used to grow diamond films. An unusual aspect of these systems is that diamond will only grow at the anode, although most of the plasma-generated species are formed near the cathode. To understand the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon, and to enhance dc deposition, a model used to describe processes in low neutral gas density dc plasmas has been adapted to diamond-producing dc plasmas. In situ diagnostics were used to supply necessary data for the adaptation and for testing the resulting model. A mechanism for hydrogen dissociation near the anode has been developed. Near the cathode, the most common inelastic process was shown in the model to be ionization. Positive ions are driven by local fields to the cathode and away from the anode. As a result, the cathode is bombarded by ions, which may be responsible for the disruption of diamond growth on this electrode.

  12. Direct coating adherent diamond films on Fe-based alloy substrate: the roles of Al, Cr in enhancing interfacial adhesion and promoting diamond growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X J; He, L L; Li, Y S; Yang, Q; Hirose, A

    2013-08-14

    Direct CVD deposition of dense, continuous, and adherent diamond films on conventional Fe-based alloys has long been considered impossible. The current study demonstrates that such a deposition can be realized on Al, Cr-modified Fe-based alloy substrate (FeAl or FeCrAl). To clarify the fundamental mechanism of Al, Cr in promoting diamond growth and enhancing interfacial adhesion, fine structure and chemical analysis around the diamond film-substrate interface have been comprehensively characterized by transmission electron microscopy. An intermediate graphite layer forms on those Al-free substrates such as pure Fe and FeCr, which significantly deteriorates the interfacial adhesion of diamond. In contrast, such a graphite layer is absent on the FeAl and FeCrAl substrates, whereas a very thin Al-rich amorphous oxide sublayer is always identified between the diamond film and substrate interface. These comparative results indicate that the Al-rich interfacial oxide layer acts as an effective barrier to prevent the formation of graphite phase and consequently enhance diamond growth and adhesion. The adhesion of diamond film formed on FeCrAl is especially superior to that formed on FeAl substrate. This can be further attributed to a synergetic effect including the reduced fraction of Al and the decreased substrate thermal-expansion coefficient on FeCrAl in comparison with FeAl, and a mechanical interlocking effect due to the formation of interfacial chromium carbides. Accordingly, a mechanism model is proposed to account for the different interfacial adhesion of diamond grown on the various Fe-based substrates.

  13. Interaction of carbon nanotubes and diamonds under hot-filament chemical vapor deposition conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Nagraj

    A composite of CNTs and diamond can be expected to have unique mechanical, electrical and thermal properties due to the synergetic combination of the excellent properties of these two allotropes of carbon. The composite may find applications in various fields that require a combination of good mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties such as, wear-resistant coatings, thermal management of integrated chips (ICs), and field emission devices. This research is devoted to the experimental studies of phase stability of diamond and CNTs under chemical vapor deposition conditions to investigate the possibility of combining these materials to produce a hybrid composite. Growth of the hybrid material is investigated by starting with a pre-existing film of CNTs and subsequently growing diamond on it. The diamond growth phase space is systematically scanned to determine optimal conditions where diamond nucleates on the CNT without destroying it. Various techniques including SEM, TEM, and Micro Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the hybrid material. A selective window where the diamond directly nucleates on the CNT without destroying the underlying CNT network is identified. Based on the material characterization, a growth mechanism based on etching of CNT at the defective sites to produce sp3 dangling bonds onto which diamond nucleates is proposed. Though a hybrid material is synthesized, the nucleation density of diamond on the CNTs is low and highly non-homogenous. Improvements to the CNT dispersion in the hybrid material are investigated in order to produce a homogenous material with predictable CNT loading fractions and to probe the low nucleation density of diamond on the CNT. The effect of several dispersion techniques and solvents on CNT surface homogeneity is studied using SEM, and a novel, vacuum drying based approach using CNT/dichlorobenzene dispersions is suggested. SEM and Raman analysis of the early stage nucleation are used to develop a

  14. Polydopamine-modified nanocrystalline diamond thin films as a platform for bio-sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pop-Georgievski, Ognen, E-mail: georgievski@imc.cas.cz [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovsky sq. 2, 16206 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Neykova, Neda, E-mail: neykova@fzu.cz [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16253 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering Trojanova 13, 120 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Proks, Vladimir [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovsky sq. 2, 16206 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Houdkova, Jana; Ukraintsev, Egor; Zemek, Josef; Kromka, Alexander [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16253 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Rypaček, František [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovsky sq. 2, 16206 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2013-09-30

    Diamond exhibits good biocompatibility and a large electrochemical potential window, and thus, it is particularly suitable for bio-functionalization and bio-sensing. Modification of the diamond surface can be achieved through mussel-inspired surface chemistry based on polydopamine (PDA) while maintaining the intrinsic properties of the surface. We present a comparative study on the polymerization/deposition of PDA from an aqueous solution of dopamine on hydrogen- (H) and oxygen- (O) terminated nanocrystalline diamond films (NCD). The dopamine polymerization/deposition was performed under mild conditions, which resulted in a confluent PDA layer. A detailed investigation of the growth kinetics of the PDA film on H- and O-terminated NCD substrates was performed using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The chemical composition, the functional group distribution, the surface topography and the wetting properties of the adherent PDA films were evaluated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and water contact angle goniometry, respectively. According to the results, a PDA layer can be used as a platform for future bio-functionalization and/or optical bio-sensing applications. - Highlights: ► Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) was modified through polydopamine (PDA) chemistry. ► PDA's growth kinetics on H- and O-terminated NCD films were investigated. ► The growth kinetics and composition of PDA were independent of the NCD termination.

  15. Nano- and microcrystalline diamond deposition on pretreated WC-Co substrates: structural properties and adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, M. A.; Contin, A.; Rodríguez, L. A. A.; Vieira, J.; Campos, R. A.; Corat, E. J.; Trava Airoldi, V. J.

    2016-02-01

    Many developments have been made to improve the quality and adherence of CVD diamond films onto WC-Co hard metal tools by the removing the cobalt from the substrate surface through substrate pretreatments. Here we compare the efficiency of three chemical pretreatments of WC-Co substrates for this purpose. First, the work was focused on a detailed study of the composition and structure of as-polished and pretreated substrate surfaces to characterize the effects of the substrate preparation. Considering this objective, a set of WC-9% Co substrates, before and after pretreatment, was analyzed by FEG-SEM, EDS and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The second stage of the work was devoted to the evaluation of the influence of seeding process, using 4 nm diamond nanoparticles, on the morphology and roughness of the pretreated substrates. The last and most important stage was to deposit diamond coatings with different crystallite sizes (nano and micro) by hot-filament CVD to understand fully the mechanism of growth and adhesion of CVD diamond films on pretreated WC-Co substrates. The transition from nano to microcrystalline diamond was achieved by controlling the CH4/H2 gas ratio. The nano and microcrystalline samples were grown under same time at different substrate temperatures 600 °C and 800 °C, respectively. The different substrate temperatures allowed the analysis of the cobalt diffusion from the bulk to the substrate surface during CVD film growth. Furthermore, it was possible to evaluate how the coating adhesion is affected by the diffusion. The diamond coatings were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, XRD, EDS, FEG-SEM, atomic force microscope and 1500 N Rockwell indentation to evaluate the adhesion.

  16. Plasma Processes : Microwave plasma deposition of diamond like carbon coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D S Patil; K Ramachandran; N Venkatramani; M Pandey; R D'Cunha

    2000-11-01

    The promising applications of the microwave plasmas have been appearing in the fields of chemical processes and semiconductor manufacturing. Applications include surface deposition of all types including diamond/diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings, etching of semiconductors, promotion of organic reactions, etching of polymers to improve bonding of the other materials etc. With a 2.45 GHz, 700 W, microwave induced plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system set up in our laboratory we have deposited diamond like carbon coatings. The microwave plasma generation was effected using a wave guide single mode applicator. We have deposited DLC coatings on the substrates like stainless steel, Cu–Be, Cu and Si. The deposited coatings have been characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and ellipsometric techniques. The results show that we have achieved depositing ∼ 95% sp3 bonded carbon in the films. The films are uniform with golden yellow color. The films are found to be excellent insulators. The ellipsometric measurements of optical constant on silicon substrates indicate that the films are transparent above 900 nm.

  17. X-ray beam monitor made by thin-film CVD single-crystal diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E; Prestopino, G; Verona, C; Verona-Rinati, G; Angelone, M; Pillon, M; Kachkanov, V; Tartoni, N; Benetti, M; Cannatà, D; Di Pietrantonio, F

    2012-11-01

    A novel beam position monitor, operated at zero bias voltage, based on high-quality chemical-vapor-deposition single-crystal Schottky diamond for use under intense synchrotron X-ray beams was fabricated and tested. The total thickness of the diamond thin-film beam monitor is about 60 µm. The diamond beam monitor was inserted in the B16 beamline of the Diamond Light Source synchrotron in Harwell (UK). The device was characterized under monochromatic high-flux X-ray beams from 6 to 20 keV and a micro-focused 10 keV beam with a spot size of approximately 2 µm × 3 µm square. Time response, linearity and position sensitivity were investigated. Device response uniformity was measured by a raster scan of the diamond surface with the micro-focused beam. Transmissivity and spectral responsivity versus beam energy were also measured, showing excellent performance of the new thin-film single-crystal diamond beam monitor.

  18. Atomic scale KMC simulation of {100} oriented CVD diamond film growth under low substrate temperature-Part II Simulation of CVD diamond film growth in C-H system and in Cl-containing systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The growth of {100}-oriented CVD diamond film under two modifications of J-B-H model at low substrate temperatures was simulated by using a revised KMC method at atomic scale. The results were compared both in Cl-containing systems and in C-H system as follows: (1) Substrate temperature can produce an important effect both on film deposition rate and on surface roughness; (2) Aomic Cl takes an active role for the growth of diamond film at low temperatures; (3) {100}-oriented diamond film cannot deposit under single carbon insertion mechanism, which disagrees with the predictions before; (4) The explanation of the exact role of atomic Cl is not provided in the simulation results.

  19. Soft X-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of heavily boron-doped superconducting diamond films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yokoya, T. Nakamura, T. Matushita, T. Muro, H. Okazaki, M. Arita, K. Shimada, H. Namatame, M. Taniguchi, Y. Takano, M. Nagao, T. Takenouchi, H. Kawarada and T. Oguchi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We have performed soft X-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SXARPES of microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition diamond films with different B concentrations in order to study the origin of the metallic behavior of superconducting diamond. SXARPES results clearly show valence band dispersions with a bandwidth of ~23 eV and with a top of the valence band at gamma point in the Brillouin zone, which are consistent with the calculated valence band dispersions of pure diamond. Boron concentration-dependent band dispersions near the Fermi level (EF exhibit a systematic shift of EF, indicating depopulation of electrons due to hole doping. These SXARPES results indicate that diamond bands retain for heavy boron doping and holes in the diamond band are responsible for the metallic states leading to superconductivity at low temperature. A high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy spectrum near EF of a heavily boron-doped diamond superconductor is also presented.

  20. Chemical vapour deposited diamonds for dosimetry of radiotherapeutical beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucciolini, M.; Mazzocchi, S. [Firenze Univ., Firenze (Italy). Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica; INFN, Firenze (Italy); Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Pini, S.; Sciortino, S. [Firenze Univ., Firenze (Italy). Dipartimento di Energetica; INFN, Firenze (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Guttone, G.; Raffaele, L.; Sabini, M.G. [INFN, Catania (Italy). Laboratori Nazionali del Sud

    2002-07-01

    This paper deals with the application of synthetic diamond detectors to the clinical dosimetry of photon and electron beams. It has been developed in the frame of INFN CANDIDO project and MURST Cofin. Diamonds grown with CVD (Chemical Vapour Deposition) technique have been studied; some of them are commercial samples while others have been locally synthesised. Experiments have been formed using both on-line and off-line approaches. For the off-line measurements, TL (thermoluminescent) and TSC (thermally stimulated current) techniques have been used.

  1. Carbon film deposition from high velocity rarefied flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebrov, A.K., E-mail: rebrov@itp.nsc.ru; Emelyanov, A.A.; Yudin, I.B.

    2015-01-30

    The presented study is based on the idea of the activation of a gas-precursor high velocity flow by hot wire. The wire forms the channel for flow before expansion to substrate. The construction allows change of the specific flow rate, velocity, composition and temperature of a gas mixture by studying the film synthesis in conditions from free molecular to continuum flow at velocities from hundreds to thousands of m/s. At a high pressure, the film has typical and unusual hexagonal incorporations for diamond tetragonal particles. Raman spectrum with the pronounced diamond peak is typical for diamond-like film. X-ray diffraction points in the presence of lonsdaleite. Conditions of deposition were simulated by Monte Carlo method. Collisions with hot surfaces and chemical transformations were taken into consideration as well.

  2. Thin Film Deposition Techniques (PVD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeiss, E.

    The most interesting materials for spin electronic devices are thin films of magnetic transition metals and magnetic perovskites, mainly the doped La-manganites [1] as well as several oxides and metals for passivating and contacting the magnetic films. The most suitable methods for the preparation of such films are the physical vapor deposition methods (PVD). Therefore this report will be restricted to these deposition methods.

  3. Iron, nitrogen and silicon doped diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Sekhar C., E-mail: Raysc@unisa.ac.za [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Private Bag X6, Florida, 1710, Science Campus, Christiaan de Wet and Pioneer Avenue, Florida Park, Johannesburg (South Africa); Pong, W.F. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Papakonstantinou, P. [Nanotechnology and Integrated Bio-Engineering Centre, University of Ulster, Shore Road, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-01

    The X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), valence band photoemission (VB-PES) and Raman spectroscopy results show that the incorporation of nitrogen in pulsed laser deposited diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films, reverts the sp{sup 3} network to sp{sup 2} as evidenced by an increase of the sp{sup 2} cluster and I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio in C K-edge XANES and Raman spectra respectively which reduces the hardness/Young's modulus into the film network. Si-doped DLC film deposited in a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition process reduces the sp{sup 2} cluster and I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio that causes the decrease of hardness/Young's modulus of the film structure. The Fe-doped DLC films deposited by dip coating technique increase the hardness/Young's modulus with an increase of sp{sup 3}-content in DLC film structure. - Highlights: • Fe, N and Si doped DLC films deposited by dip, PLD and PECVD methods respectively • DLC:Fe thin films have higher hardness/Young's modulus than DLC:N(:Si) thin films. • sp{sup 3} and sp{sup 2} contents are estimated from C K-edge XANES and VB-PES measurements.

  4. Coaxial carbon plasma gun deposition of amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sater, D. M.; Gulino, D. A.; Rutledge, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    A unique plasma gun employing coaxial carbon electrodes was used in an attempt to deposit thin films of amorphous diamond-like carbon. A number of different structural, compositional, and electrical characterization techniques were used to characterize these films. These included scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X ray diffraction and absorption, spectrographic analysis, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Optical absorption and electrical resistivity measurements were also performed. The films were determined to be primarily amorphous, with poor adhesion to fused silica substrates. Many inclusions of particulates were found to be present as well. Analysis of these particulates revealed the presence of trace impurities, such as Fe and Cu, which were also found in the graphite electrode material. The electrodes were the source of these impurities. No evidence of diamond-like crystallite structure was found in any of the film samples. Details of the apparatus, experimental procedure, and film characteristics are presented.

  5. Homo-epitaxial diamond film growth on ion implanted diamond substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiser, P.S.; Prawer, S.; Nugent, K.W.; Bettiol, A.A.; Kostidis, L.I.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The nucleation of CVD diamond is a complicated process, governed by many interrelated parameters. In the present work we attempt to elucidate the effect of strain on the growth of a homo-epitaxial CVD diamond. We have employed laterally confined high dose (MeV) Helium ion implantation to produce surface swelling of the substrate. The strain is enhanced by the lateral confinement of the implanted region to squares of 100 x 100 {mu}m{sup 2}. After ion implantation, micro-Raman spectroscopy was employed to map the surface strain. The substrates were then inserted into a CVD reactor and a CVD diamond film was grown upon them. Since the strained regions were laterally confined, it was then possible to monitor the effect of strain on diamond nucleation. The substrates were also analysed using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), Proton induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Ion Beam induced Luminescence (IBIL). 7 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Mechanisms of suppressing secondary nucleation for low-power and low-temperature microwave plasma self-bias-enhanced growth of diamond films in argon diluted methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-heng Jiang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on mechanisms for suppressing diamond secondary nucleation in microwave plasma self-bias-enhanced growth (SBEG of diamond films in methane diluted by argon. High-density plasma at a small distance from the substrate induces a floating potential which promotes high-flux, low-energy ion bombardment on diamond growing surfaces along with an equal flux of electrons. Increased atomic hydrogen generated by electron impact dissociation of methane and low-energy ion bombardment help remove hydrocarbon coatings on diamond grains in favor of continuous grain growth and, therefore, the suppression of secondary diamond nucleation. Energetic meta-stable excited argon, abundant C2 dimers, and enhanced effective surface temperature due to low-energy ion bombardment further promote the diamond grain growth resulting in the deposition of a diamond film with columnar diamond grains of much larger grain sizes and a much lower density of grain boundaries than ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD films grown under similar conditions without optimized plasma-substrate interactions. SEM, XRD, PL, and Raman scattering help confirm the deposition of diamond films with columnar grains.

  7. Workshop on diamond and diamond-like-carbon films for the transportation industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, F.A.; Moores, D.K. [eds.

    1993-01-01

    Applications exist in advanced transportation systems as well as in manufacturing processes that would benefit from superior tribological properties of diamond, diamond-like-carbon and cubic boron nitride coatings. Their superior hardness make them ideal candidates as protective coatings to reduce adhesive, abrasive and erosive wear in advanced diesel engines, gas turbines and spark-ignited engines and in machining and manufacturing tools as well. The high thermal conductivity of diamond also makes it desirable for thermal management not only in tribological applications but also in high-power electronic devices and possibly large braking systems. A workshop has been recently held at Argonne National Laboratory entitled ``Diamond and Diamond-Like-Carbon Films for Transportation Applications`` which was attended by 85 scientists and engineers including top people involved in the basic technology of these films and also representatives from many US industrial companies. A working group on applications endorsed 18 different applications for these films in the transportation area alone. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  8. Ferromagnetism appears in nitrogen implanted nanocrystalline diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remes, Zdenek [Institute of Physics ASCR v.v.i., Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 00 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Sun, Shih-Jye, E-mail: sjs@nuk.edu.tw [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Varga, Marian [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Chou, Hsiung [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Hua-Shu [Department of Applied Physics, National Pingtung University of Education, Pingtung 900, Taiwan (China); Kromka, Alexander [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Horak, Pavel [Nuclear Physics Institute, 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic)

    2015-11-15

    The nanocrystalline diamond films turn to be ferromagnetic after implanting various nitrogen doses on them. Through this research, we confirm that the room-temperature ferromagnetism of the implanted samples is derived from the measurements of magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Samples with larger crystalline grains as well as higher implanted doses present more robust ferromagnetic signals at room temperature. Raman spectra indicate that the small grain-sized samples are much more disordered than the large grain-sized ones. We propose that a slightly large saturated ferromagnetism could be observed at low temperature, because the increased localization effects have a significant impact on more disordered structure. - Highlights: • Nitrogen implanted nanocrystalline diamond films exhibit ferromagnetism at room temperature. • Nitrogen implants made a Raman deviation from the typical nanocrystalline diamond films. • The ferromagnetism induced from the structure distortion is dominant at low temperature.

  9. Optimization of black diamond films for solar energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellucci, Alessandro; Calvani, Paolo; Girolami, Marco [CNR-ISM—Montelibretti Sect., Via Salaria km 29.300, Monterotondo Scalo, 00015 Roma (Italy); Orlando, Stefano [CNR-ISM—Tito Scalo Sect., Zona Industriale, 85050 Tito Scalo, PZ (Italy); Polini, Riccardo [CNR-ISM—Montelibretti Sect., Via Salaria km 29.300, Monterotondo Scalo, 00015 Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Trucchi, Daniele M., E-mail: daniele.trucchi@ism.cnr.it [CNR-ISM—Montelibretti Sect., Via Salaria km 29.300, Monterotondo Scalo, 00015 Roma (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    Highlights: • Black diamond films were developed by fs-laser subwavelength surface texturing. • Black diamond films can be used as photon-enhanced thermionic emission devices. • A simple method for developing a 2D periodic surface texturing is proposed. • Although not perfectly regular, the 2D texturing induced a 98% solar absorptance. • The 2D texturing enhances the photoelectronic capability of black diamond films. - Abstract: Black diamond, namely a surface textured diamond film able to absorb efficiently the sunlight, is developed by the use of ultrashort pulse laser treatments. With the aim of fabricating a 2D periodic surface structure, a double-step texturing process is implemented and compared to the single-step one, able to induce the formation of 1D periodic structures. Although the obtained sub-microstructure does not show a regular 2D periodicity, a solar absorptance of about 98% is achieved as well as a quantum efficiency enhanced of one order of magnitude with respect to the 1D periodic surface texturing.

  10. Diamond like carbon coatings deposited by microwave plasma CVD: XPS and ellipsometric studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R M Dey; M Pandey; D Bhattacharyya; D S Patil; S K Kulkarni

    2007-12-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited by microwave assisted chemical vapour deposition system using d.c. bias voltage ranging from –100 V to –300 V. These films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry techniques for estimating 3/2 ratio. The 3/2 ratio obtained by XPS is found to have an opposite trend to that obtained by spectroscopic ellipsometry. These results are explained using sub-plantation picture of DLC growth. Our results clearly indicate that the film is composed of two different layers, having entirely different properties in terms of void percentage and 3/2 ratio. The upper layer is relatively thinner as compared to the bottom layer.

  11. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaonan; Sheldon, Peter

    1998-01-01

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  12. Surface morphology, growth rate and quality of diamond films synthesized in hot filament CVD system under various methane concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.

    2011-08-01

    Hot filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique has been used to deposit diamond films on silicon substrate. In the present study, diamond films were grown at various vol.% CH 4 in H 2 from 0.5% to 3.5%, at substrate temperature and pressure of 850 °C and 80 torr, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were employed to analyze the properties of deposited films. The formation of methyl radicals as a function of vol.% CH 4 not only changes film morphology but also increase film growth rate. At low, intermediate and high vol.% CH 4, cluster, faceted cubes and pyramidal features growth, were dominant. By increasing vol.% CH 4 from 0.5% to 3.5%, as the growth rate improved from ˜0.25 μm/h to ˜2.0 μm/h. Raman studies features revealed high purity diamond films at intermediate range of vol.% CH 4 and grain density increased by increasing CH 4 concentration. The present study represents experimentally surface morphology, growth rate and quality of diamond films grown in hot filament CVD system at various CH 4 concentrations.

  13. Systematic studies of the nucleation and growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond films on silicon substrates coated with a tungsten layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Yueh-Chieh; Jiang, Gerald [Institute of Microelectronics, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tu, Chia-Hao [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chang Chi [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chuan-pu; Ting, Jyh-Ming [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lee, Hsin-Li [Industrial Technology Research Institute - South, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Yonhua [Institute of Microelectronics, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronics Technology Center, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Auciello, Orlando [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    We report on effects of a tungsten layer deposited on silicon surface on the effectiveness for diamond nanoparticles to be seeded for the deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD). Rough tungsten surface and electrostatic forces between nanodiamond seeds and the tungsten surface layer help to improve the adhesion of nanodiamond seeds on the tungsten surface. The seeding density on tungsten coated silicon thus increases. Tungsten carbide is formed by reactions of the tungsten layer with carbon containing plasma species. It provides favorable (001) crystal planes for the nucleation of (111) crystal planes by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD) in argon diluted methane plasma and further improves the density of diamond seeds/nuclei. UNCD films grown at different gas pressures on tungsten coated silicon which is pre-seeded by nanodiamond along with heteroepitaxially nucleated diamond nuclei were characterized by Raman scattering, field emission-scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy.

  14. Development of High-Performance UV Detector Using Nanocrystalline Diamond Thin Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD films are promising materials for wide-spread applications due to their outstanding characteristics of chemical, physical, and highly smooth surface. Our present work aimed at the fabrication of high performance diamond-based UV detector. NCD films were prepared by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process, and then Au interdigital electrodes were deposited onto the surface of the as-grown NCD film by sputtering technique. Annealing procedures were conducted at various temperatures to obtain Ohmic contact of NCD/Au structure. The surface morphology, microstructure, and wettablity of the NCD films were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic forced microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and water contact angle measurement, respectively. The electrical property and photoconductivity of the fabricated devices were tested for UV detection application. It was found that the NCD films possessed high sp3 fraction of 68.6%, low surface roughness of 9.6 nm, and good hydrophobicity, as deposited under working pressure of 40 Torr. Also, the NCD/Au structure annealed at 500°C exhibited a good Ohmic contact characteristic, high detection efficiency, and fast response to UV irradiation in air ambient. The proposed study indeed demonstrates prospective applications of NCD films in UV detector, photocatalyst, solar cell, and so on.

  15. Characterisation of sputter deposited niobium and boron interlayer in the copper-diamond system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, J; Chirtoc, M; Eisenmenger-Sittner, C; Hutter, H; Kornfeind, N; Kijamnajsuk, P; Kitzmantel, M; Neubauer, E; Zellhofer, K

    2012-09-15

    In most metal matrix composites (MMCs) interfaces are decisive but hard to manipulate. Especially copper-carbon composites can exhibit excellent mechanical and thermal properties only if the Cu/C interface is modified by an optimised interlayer. Due to the excellent thermal conductivity and mechanical stability of diamond this form of carbon is preferred as reinforcement in heat sink materials (copper-diamond composite) which are often subjected to severe thermal and mechanical loads. In the present case niobium and boron interlayers of various thicknesses were deposited on diamond and vitreous carbon substrates by magnetron sputter deposition. After the coverage of all samples by a copper film, a part of the samples was subjected to heat treatment for 30 min at 800 °C under high vacuum (HV) to simulate the thermal conditions during the production of the composite material by uniaxial hot pressing. De-wetting during heat treatment leads to the formation of holes or humps in the Cu coating. This effect was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A comparison of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF SIMS) profiles of heat treated samples with those of as deposited ones showed the influence of interdiffusion during the heating process. Diffusion behaviour and chemical composition of the interface were also studied by cross sectional transmission electron microscopy (X-TEM) investigations using focused ion beam (FIB) cut samples. The thermal contact resistance (TCR) of the interface was calculated from results obtained from modulated infrared radiometry (IR). Thin interlayers suppressed de-wetting most effectively and consequently the TCR at the Cu-diamond interface was found to decrease. Therefore they are promising candidates for optimising the Cu-diamond interface.

  16. Anisotropic and inhomogeneous thermal conduction in suspended thin-film polycrystalline diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Aditya; Cho, Jungwan; Hobart, Karl D.; Feygelson, Tatyana I.; Pate, Bradford B.; Asheghi, Mehdi; Cahill, David G.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2016-05-01

    While there is a great wealth of data for thermal transport in synthetic diamond, there remains much to be learned about the impacts of grain structure and associated defects and impurities within a few microns of the nucleation region in films grown using chemical vapor deposition. Measurements of the inhomogeneous and anisotropic thermal conductivity in films thinner than 10 μm have previously been complicated by the presence of the substrate thermal boundary resistance. Here, we study thermal conduction in suspended films of polycrystalline diamond, with thicknesses ranging between 0.5 and 5.6 μm, using time-domain thermoreflectance. Measurements on both sides of the films facilitate extraction of the thickness-dependent in-plane ( κ r ) and through-plane ( κ z ) thermal conductivities in the vicinity of the coalescence and high-quality regions. The columnar grain structure makes the conductivity highly anisotropic, with κ z being nearly three to five times as large as κ r , a contrast higher than that reported previously for thicker films. In the vicinity of the high-quality region, κ r and κ z range from 77 ± 10 W/m-K and 210 ± 50 W/m-K for the 1 μm thick film to 130 ± 20 W/m-K and 710 ± 120 W/m-K for the 5.6 μm thick film, respectively. The data are interpreted using a model relating the anisotropy to the scattering on the boundaries of columnar grains and the evolution of the grain size considering their nucleation density and spatial rate of growth. This study aids in the reduction in the near-interfacial resistance of diamond films and efforts to fabricate diamond composites with silicon and GaN for power electronics.

  17. Dual ion beam deposition of carbon films with diamondlike properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamondlike films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  18. Thermal effect mechanism of magnetoresistance in p-type diamond films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Guo-Ping; Kong Chun-Yang; Ruan Hai-Bo; Huang Gui-Juan; Cui Yu-Ting; Fang Liang

    2010-01-01

    Based on the analysis and the discussion of the influence of thermal ionization energy and various scatterings on magnetoresistance(MR) of p-type diamond films, a revised model of valence band split-off over temperature is put forward, and a corresponding calculation formula is given for the MR of p-type diamond films (Corbino discs). It is shown that the theoretical calculation that the MR of diamond films changes with temperature is consistent with the experiment. The influence of Fermi energy level on MR of diamond films is discussed. Additionally, the thermal effect mechanism of MR in p-type diamond films is also explored.

  19. Swift heavy ion effects on DLC-nanotube-diamond thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Djurabekova, Flyura; Nordlund, Kai

    2017-09-01

    The composites based on a mixture of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and diamond-like-carbon (DLC)-CNT are of great interest due to the potential to achieve unique electronic and optical properties with enhanced mechanical wear resistance. Swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation of such carbon nanostucture composites suggest a way to tune the material’s properties via localized structural modifications. We use classical molecular dynamics simulations combined with an inelastic thermal spike model to study the mechanisms of track formation by SHI in DLC-CNT-diamond thin films. We observe a clear increase of content of atoms with sp2 hybridization compared to the initial structure. When the system reached an equilibrium state after the energy deposition, the track was structurally expanded outwards from the most underdense core. In addition, we found that the track radii are different in different composites, with smaller track radii in pure diamond and larger radii in DLC. Sputtering occurred predominantly from the track center.

  20. Fabrication of Diamond-like Carbon Films by Ion Assisted Middle Frequency Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi-chen; SUN Shao-ni; ZHOU Yi; MA Sheng-ge; BA De-chun

    2006-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are deposited by the Hall ion source assisted by the mid-frequency unbalanced magnetron sputtering technique. The effects of the substrate voltage bias, the substrate temperature, the Hall discharging current and the argon/nitrogen ratio on the DLC film's performance were studied. The experimental results show that the film's surface roughness, the hardness and the Young's modulus increase firstly and then decrease with the bias voltage incrementally increases. Also when the substrate temperature rises, the surface roughness of the film varies slightly, but its hardness and Young's modulus firstly increase followed by a sharp decrease when the temperature surpassing 120 ℃. With the Hall discharging current incrementally rising, the hardness and Young's modulus of the film decrease and the surface roughness of the film on 316L stainless steel firstly decreased and then remains constant.

  1. films using atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervinskii, Semen; Matikainen, Antti; Dergachev, Alexey; Lipovskii, Andrey A.; Honkanen, Seppo

    2014-08-01

    We fabricated self-assembled silver nanoisland films using a recently developed technique based on out-diffusion of silver from an ion-exchanged glass substrate in reducing atmosphere. We demonstrate that the position of the surface plasmon resonance of the films depends on the conditions of the film growth. The resonance can be gradually shifted up to 100 nm towards longer wavelengths by using atomic layer deposition of titania, from 3 to 100 nm in thickness, upon the film. Examination of the nanoisland films in surface-enhanced Raman spectrometry showed that, in spite of a drop of the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) signal after the titania spacer deposition, the Raman signal can be observed with spacers up to 7 nm in thickness. Denser nanoisland films show slower decay of the SERS signal with the increase in spacer thickness.

  2. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemawan, Kadek W.; Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J. [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2015-11-02

    Polycrystalline diamond has been synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure, using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH{sub 4}/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H{sub 2} into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C{sub 2}, Ar, N{sub 2}, CH, H{sub β}, and H{sub α} were observed in the emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T{sub 2g} phonon at 1333 cm{sup −1} peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images reveal that, depending on the growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit “coral” and “cauliflower-like” morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.

  3. Panel 2 - properties of diamond and diamond-like-carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.J.; Clausing, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ajayi, O.O.; Liu, Y.Y.; Purohit, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bartelt, P.F. [Deere & Co., Moline, IL (United States); Baughman, R.H. [Allied Signal, Morristown, NJ (United States); Bhushan, B. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States); Cooper, C.V. [United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States); Dugger, M.T. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Freedman, A. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Larsen-Basse, J. [National Science Foundation, Washington, DC (United States); McGuire, N.R. [Caterpillar, Peoria, IL (United States); Messier, R.F. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States); Noble, G.L.; Ostrowki, M.H. [John Crane, Inc., Morton Grove, IL (United States); Sartwell, B.D. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Wei, R. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This panel attempted to identify and prioritize research and development needs in determining the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of diamond and diamond-like-carbon films (D/DLCF). Three specific goals were established. They were: (1) To identify problem areas which produce concern and require a better knowledge of D/DLCF properties. (2) To identify and prioritize key properties of D/DLCF to promote transportation applications. (3) To identify needs for improvement in properties-measurement methods. Each of these goals is addressed subsequently.

  4. Flexible diamond-like carbon film coated on rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Bui, X.L.; Pal, J.P. van der; Martinez-Martinez, D.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic rubber seals are major sources of friction of lubrication systems and bearings, which may take up to 70% of the total friction. The solution we present is to coat rubbers with diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films by which the coefficient of friction is reduced to less than one tenth. Coating

  5. Experimental studies of N~+ implantation into CVD diamond thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛火平; 林成鲁; 王建新; 邹世昌; 石晓红; 林梓鑫; 周祖尧; 刘祖刚

    1997-01-01

    The effects of N+ implantation under various conditions on CVD diamond films were analyzed with Raman spectroscopy, four-point probe method, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Rutherford backseattering spectroscopy (RBS), ultraviolet photoluminescence spectroscopy (UV-PL), Fourier transformation infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results show that the N+ implantation doping without any graphitization has been successfully realized when 100 keV N+ ions at a dosage of 2 × 1016 cm-2 were implanted into diamond films at 550℃ . UV-PL spectra indicate that the implanted N+ ions formed an electrically inactive deep-level impurity in diamond films. So the sheet resistance of the sample after N+ implantation changed little. Carbon nitride containing C≡N covalent bond has been successfully synthesized by 100 keV, 1.2×1018 N/cm2 N+ implantation into diamond films. Most of the implanted N+ ions formed C≡N covalent bonds with C atoms. The others were free state nitroge

  6. Influence of diamond and graphite bonds on mechanical properties of DLC thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Písařík, Petr; Jelínek, Miroslav; Kocourek, Tomáš; Remsa, Jan; Zemek, Josef; Lukeš, Jaroslav; Šepitka, Josef

    2015-03-01

    Mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon thin films with various ratios of sp3/sp2 bonds were studied. The films were prepared in argon atmosphere (0.25 Pa) by laser deposition method for laser energy densities from 4 J·cm-2 to 14 J·cm-2. The sp2 and sp3 bonds were calculated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Films contained sp3 bonds up to 70 %. Surface properties as roughness and atomic force microscopy topology were measured. Hardness (and reduced Young's modulus) were determined by nanoindentation and reached of 30 GPa (203 GPa). Films adhesion was studied using scratch test and was up to 12 N for biomedical alloy (titanium substrates - Ti-6Al-4V). Relations among deposition conditions and measured properties are presented.

  7. Tribological Properties of DLC Film Prepared by C + Ion Beam-assisted Deposition (IBAD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    C + ion beam-assisted deposition was utilized to prepare deposit diamond-like carbon (DLC) film.With the help of a series of experiments such as Raman spectroscopy, FT- IR spectroscopy, AFM and nanoindentation, the DLC film has been recognized as hydrogenated DLC film and its tribological properties have been evaluated.The ball-on-disc testing results show that the hardness and the tribological properties of the DLC film produced by C + ion beam-assisted deposition are improved significandy.DLC film produced by C+ ion beam-assisted deposition is positive to have a prosperous tribological application in the near future.

  8. Influence of thermal heating on diamond-like carbon film properties prepared by filtered cathodic arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khamnualthong, N., E-mail: nattapornkh@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); Western Digital Thailand Co. Ltd, Ayutthaya, 13160 (Thailand); Siangchaew, K. [Western Digital Thailand Co. Ltd, Ayutthaya, 13160 (Thailand); Limsuwan, P. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Ministry of Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2013-10-01

    Tetrahedral amorphous diamond-like carbon (ta-DLC) films were deposited on magnetic recording heads using the filtered cathodic arc method. The deposited film thickness was on the order of several nanometers. The DLC films were then annealed to 100 °C–300 °C for 30 and 60 min, and the structure of the ta-DLC films was investigated using Raman spectroscopy, where the gross changes were observed in the Raman D and G peaks. Detailed interpretation concluded that there was sp{sup 2} clustering as a function of temperature, and there was no sp{sup 3}-to-sp{sup 2} conversion after heating up to 300 °C. Furthermore, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggested that oxidation of both the ta-DLC film and the adhesion layer occurs at 300 °C. Additionally, more film wear was observed with heating as measured by a nanoindenter. - Highlights: • Tetrahedral-amorphous diamond-like carbon (ta-DLC) by filtered cathodic arc • ta-DLC used in magnetic recording head as head overcoat • ta-DLC thickness range of less than 2 nm • ta-DLC property dependence on heating • Temperature effect range of up to 300 °C.

  9. Gas Permeation, Mechanical Behavior and Cytocompatibility of Ultrathin Pure and Doped Diamond-Like Carbon and Silicon Oxide Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juergen M. Lackner

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Protective ultra-thin barrier films gather increasing economic interest for controlling permeation and diffusion from the biological surrounding in implanted sensor and electronic devices in future medicine. Thus, the aim of this work was a benchmarking of the mechanical oxygen permeation barrier, cytocompatibility, and microbiological properties of inorganic ~25 nm thin films, deposited by vacuum deposition techniques on 50 µm thin polyetheretherketone (PEEK foils. Plasma-activated chemical vapor deposition (direct deposition from an ion source was applied to deposit pure and nitrogen doped diamond-like carbon films, while physical vapor deposition (magnetron sputtering in pulsed DC mode was used for the formation of silicon as well as titanium doped diamond-like carbon films. Silicon oxide films were deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The results indicate a strong influence of nanoporosity on the oxygen transmission rate for all coating types, while the low content of microporosity (particulates, etc. is shown to be of lesser importance. Due to the low thickness of the foil substrates, being easily bent, the toughness as a measure of tendency to film fracture together with the elasticity index of the thin films influence the oxygen barrier. All investigated coatings are non-pyrogenic, cause no cytotoxic effects and do not influence bacterial growth.

  10. Preparation and Characteristics of Nanoscale Diamond-Like Carbon Films for Resistive Memory Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Di; XIE Dan; ZHANG Chen-Hui; ZHANG Di; NIU Jie-Bin; QIAN He; LIU Li-Tian

    2010-01-01

    @@ We propose diamond-like carbon(DLC)as the resistance change material for nonvolatile memory applications.Nanoscale DLC films are prepared by filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique and integrated to W/DLC/W structure devices.The deposited DLC film has a thickness of about 2O nm and high sp3 fraction content.Reversible bistable resistive switching from a high resistance state to a low resistance state,and vice versa,is observed under appropriate unipolar stimulation pulses.

  11. Carbon nanoscrolls on the surface of nanocrystalline graphite and diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skovorodnikov, N. O., E-mail: ismagil@polly.phys.msu.ru; Malykhin, S. A. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation); Tuyakova, F. T. [Moscow State Technical University of Radio Engineering, Electronics, and Automation (Russian Federation); Ismagilov, R. R.; Obraztsov, A. N. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    Nanocrystalline graphite and diamond films with needlelike nanostructures on their surface have been obtained by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. According to the experimental data, these aggregates have the same nature for films of both types: they are tubular carbon nanoscrolls with a polygonal cross section. Nanoscrolls are formed by a helically folded graphene sheet; they look like twisted prisms. The needlelike prismatic structures have an average diameter in the range of 50‒500 nm, and their length reaches several micrometers. Possible mechanisms of formation of carbon nanostructures are discussed.

  12. Nanofriction properties of molecular deposition films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王强斌; 高芒来; 张嗣伟

    2000-01-01

    The nanofriction properties of Au substrate and monolayer molecular deposition film and multilayer molecular deposition films on Au substrate and the molecular deposition films modified with alkyl-terminal molecule have been investigated by using an atomic force microscope. It is concluded that ( i ) the deposition of molecular deposition films on Au substrate and the modification of alkyl-terminal molecule to the molecular deposition films can reduce the frictional force; (ii) the molecular deposition films with the same terminal exhibit similar nanofriction properties, which has nothing to do with the molecular chain-length and the layer number; (iii) the unstable nanofriction properties of molecular deposition films are contributed to the active terminal of the molecular deposition film, which can be eliminated by decorating the active molecular deposition film with alkyl-terminal molecule, moreover, the decoration of alkyl-terminal molecule can lower the frictional force conspicuously; (iv) the relat

  13. Hollow cathode sustained plasma microjets: Characterization and application to diamond deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, R. Mohan; Giapis, Konstantinos P.

    2002-09-01

    Extending the principle of operation of hollow cathode microdischarges to a tube geometry has allowed the formation of stable, high-pressure plasma microjets in a variety of gases including Ar, He, and H2. Direct current discharges are ignited between stainless steel capillary tubes (d=178 mum) which are operated as the cathode and a metal grid or plate that serves as the anode. Argon plasma microjets can be sustained in ambient air with plasma voltages as low as 260 V for cathode-anode gaps of 0.5 mm. At larger operating voltage, this gap can be extended up to several millimeters. Using a heated molybdenum substrate as the anode, plasma microjets in CH4/H2 mixtures have been used to deposit diamond crystals and polycrystalline films. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of these films shows mainly sp3 carbon content with slight shifting of the diamond peak due to internal stresses. Optical emission spectroscopy of the discharges used in the diamond growth experiments confirms the presence of atomic hydrogen and CH radicals.

  14. Atomic scale KMC simulation of {100} oriented CVD diamond film growth under low substrate temperature—Part Ⅰ Simulation of CVD diamond film growth under Joe-Badgwell-Hauge model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The growth of {100} oriented CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition)diamond film under Joe-Badgwell-Hauge (J-B-H) model is simulated at atomic scale by using revised KMC (Kinetic Monte Carlo) method. The results show that: (1) under Joe's model, the growth mechanism from single carbon species is suitable for the growth of {100} oriented CVD diamond film in low temperature; (2) the deposition rate and surface roughness () under Joe's model are influenced intensively by temperature ()and not evident bymass fraction of atom chlorine; (3)the surface roughness increases with the deposition rate, i.e. the film quality becomes worse with elevated temperature, in agreement with Grujicic's prediction; (4) the simulation results cannot make sure the role of single carbon insertion.

  15. Atomic scale KMC simulation of {100} oriented CVD diamond film growth under low substrate temperature—Part I simulation of CVD diamond film growth under Joe—Badgwell—Hauge model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xizhong; YuZhang; 等

    2002-01-01

    The growth of {100} oriented CVD( Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond film under Joe-Badgwell-Hauge(J-B-H) model is simulated at atomic scale by using revised KMC(Kinetic Monte Carlo)method.The results show that:(1) under Joe's model,the growth mechanism from single carbon species is suitable for the growth of {100} oriented CVD diamond film in low temperature;(2) the deposition rate and surface roughness(Rq) under Joe's model are influenced intensively by temperature(Ts) and not evident bymass fraction Wc1 of atom chlorine;(3) the surface roughness increases with the deposition rate.i.e.the film quality becomes worse with elevated temperature,in agreement with Grujicic's prediction;(4) the simulation results cannot make sure the role of single carbon insertion.

  16. High-Rate Growth and Nitrogen Distribution in Homoepitaxial Chemical Vapour Deposited Single-crystal Diamond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-Dong; ZOU Guang-Tian; WANG Qi-Liang; CHENG Shao-Heng; LI Bo; L(U) Jian-Nan; L(U) Xian-Yi; JIN Zeng-Sun

    2008-01-01

    High rate (> 50 μm/h) growth of homoepitaxial single-crystal diamond (SCD) is carried out by microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition (MPCVD) with added nitrogen in the reactant gases of methane and hydrogen,using a polycrystalline-CVD-diamond-film-made seed holder. Photoluminescence results indicate that the nitrogen concentration is spatially inhomogeneous in a large scale,either on the top surface or in the bulk of those as-grown SCDs.The presence of N-distribution is attributed to the facts: (I) a difference in N-incorporation efficiency and (ii) N-diffusion,resulting from the local growth temperatures changed during the high-rate deposition process.In addition,the formed nitrogen-vacancy centres play a crucial role in N-diffusion through the growing crystal.Based on the N-distribution observed in the as-grown crystals,we propose a simple method to distinguish natural diamonds and man-made CVD SCDs.Finally,the disappearance of void defect on the top surface of SCDs is discussed to be related to a filling-in mechanism.

  17. DLC Films Deposited by the DC PACVD Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Palamarchuk

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DLC (Diamond-Like Carbon coatings have been suggested as protective surface layers against wear. However hard DLC coatings, especially those of greater thickness, have poor adhesion to substrates. We have used several ways to increase the adhesion of DLC coatings prepared by the PACVD (Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition method on steel substrates. One of these is the DC PACVD method for preparing DLC films.

  18. DLC Films Deposited by the DC PACVD Method

    OpenAIRE

    D. Palamarchuk; M. Zoriy; J. Gurovič; F. Černý; S. Konvičková; I. Hüttel

    2003-01-01

    DLC (Diamond-Like Carbon) coatings have been suggested as protective surface layers against wear. However hard DLC coatings, especially those of greater thickness, have poor adhesion to substrates. We have used several ways to increase the adhesion of DLC coatings prepared by the PACVD (Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition) method on steel substrates. One of these is the DC PACVD method for preparing DLC films.

  19. Rapid Growth of Nanostructured Diamond Film on Silicon and Ti–6Al–4V Alloy Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopi K. Samudrala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured diamond (NSD films were grown on silicon and Ti–6Al–4V alloy substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD. NSD Growth rates of 5 µm/h on silicon, and 4 µm/h on Ti–6Al–4V were achieved. In a chemistry of H2/CH4/N2, varying ratios of CH4/H2 and N2/CH4 were employed in this research and their effect on the resulting diamond films were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. As a result of modifying the stock cooling stage of CVD system, we were able to utilize plasma with high power densities in our NSD growth experiments, enabling us to achieve high growth rates. Substrate temperature and N2/CH4 ratio have been found to be key factors in determining the diamond film quality. NSD films grown as part of this study were shown to contain 85% to 90% sp3 bonded carbon.

  20. Thermoluminescent characteristic of MWCVD diamond films exposed to gamma dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastelum, S.; Chernov, V.; Melendrez, R.; Barboza F, M. [Centro de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, A.P. 5-088, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Cruz Z, E. [ICN-UNAM, A.P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    The thermoluminescence measurements of microwave plasma assisted CVD diamond of 6 and 12 {mu}m thick films grown on (100) silicon substrates indicated the existence of a suitable thermoluminescence dosimetric peak around 310 C. The range of linearity of the 6 {mu}m diamond sample exposed to 0.67 Gy/min {sup 60} Co gamma radiation is observed up to 125 Gy being non -linear for higher doses. The 12 {mu} m displayed lower thermoluminescence efficiency as compared to the 6 {mu}m specimen. The discrepancy was attributed to the non uniform distribution- of nucleated diamond on the substrate as revealed by SEM micrograph of the samples. The thermoluminescence behaviour of the samples exhibited very low thermal fading and show a good reproducibity of the thermoluminescence signal. The kinetics parameters were calculated by Initial Rise and Chen methods. (Author)

  1. Spectroscopic study of low pressure, low temperature H2-CH4-CO2 microwave plasmas used for large area deposition of nanocrystalline diamond films. Part II: on plasma chemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nave, A. S. C.; Baudrillart, B.; Hamann, S.; Bénédic, F.; Lombardi, G.; Gicquel, A.; van Helden, J. H.; Röpcke, J.

    2016-12-01

    In a distributed antenna array (DAA) reactor, microwave H2 plasmas with admixtures of 2.5% CH4 and 1% CO2 used for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond films have been studied by infrared laser absorption and optical emission spectroscopy (OES) techniques. The experiments were carried out in order to analyze the dependence of plasma chemical phenomena on power and pressure at relatively low pressures, up to 0.55 mbar, and power values, up to 3 kW. The evolution of the concentration of the methyl radical, CH3, of five stable molecules, CH4, CO2, CO, C2H2 and C2H6, and of vibrationally excited CO in the first and second hot band was monitored in the plasma processes by in situ infrared laser absorption spectroscopy using tunable lead salt diode lasers (TDL) and an external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) as radiation sources. OES was applied simultaneously to obtain complementary information about the degree of dissociation of the H2 precursor and of its gas temperature. The experimental results are presented in two separate parts. In Part I, the first paper in a two-part series, the measurement of the gas (T gas), rotational (T rot) and vibrational (T vib) temperatures of the various species in the complex plasma was the main focus of interest. Depending on the different plasma zones the gas temperature was found to range between about 360 and 1000 K inside the DAA reactor (Nave et al 2016 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 25 065002). In Part II, the present paper, taking into account the temperatures determined in the first paper, the concentrations of the various species, which were found to be in a range between 1011 and 1015 cm-3, are the focus of interest. The influence of the discharge parameters power and pressure on the molecular concentrations has been studied. To achieve further insight into general plasma chemical aspects the dissociation of the carbon precursor gases including their fragmentation and conversion to the reaction products has been

  2. Spectroscopic study of low pressure, low temperature H2-CH4-CO2 microwave plasmas used for large area deposition of nanocrystalline diamond films. Part I: on temperature determination and energetic aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nave, A. S. C.; Baudrillart, B.; Hamann, S.; Bénédic, F.; Lombardi, G.; Gicquel, A.; van Helden, J. H.; Röpcke, J.

    2016-12-01

    In a distributed antenna array (DAA) reactor, microwave H2 plasmas with admixtures of 2.5% CH4 and 1% CO2 used for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond films have been studied by infrared absorption and optical emission spectroscopy (OES) techniques. The experiments were carried out in order to analyze the dependence of plasma chemical phenomena on power and pressure at relatively low pressures, up to 0.55 mbar, and power values, up to 3 kW. The evolution of the concentration of the methyl radical, CH3, and of five stable molecules, CH4, CO2, CO, C2H2 and C2H6, was monitored in the plasma processes by in situ infrared laser absorption spectroscopy using lead salt diode lasers (TDL) and external-cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL) as radiation sources. OES was applied simultaneously to obtain complementary information about the degree of dissociation of the H2 precursor gas and of its gas temperature. The experimental results are presented in two separate parts. In Part I, the present paper, the measurement of the gas (T gas), rotational (T rot) and vibrational (T vib) temperatures of the various species in the complex plasma was the main focus of interest. To achieve reliable values for the gas temperature inside and outside the plasma bulk as well as for the rotational and vibrational temperatures in the plasma hot zones, which are of great importance for calculation of species concentrations, five different methods based on the emission and absorption spectroscopy data of H2, CH4, CH3 and CO have been used. In these, line profile analysis has been combined with Boltzmann plot methods. Based on the wide tuning range of the EC-QCL, a variety of CO lines in the ground and three excited states was measured enabling extensive temperature analysis providing new insight into the energetic aspects of this multi-component plasma. Depending on the different plasma zones the gas temperature was found to range between about 360 and 1000 K inside the DAA reactor

  3. AFM Study on Interface of HTHP As-grown Diamond Single Crystal and Metallic Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The study for the interface of as-grown diamond and metallic film surrounding diamond is an attractive way for understanding diamond growth mechanism at high temperature and high pressure (HTHP), because it is that through the interface carbon atom groups from the molten film are transported to growing diamond surface. It is of great interest to perform atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiment, which provides a unique technique different from that of normal optical and electron microscopy studies, to observe the interface morphology. In the present paper,we report first that the morphologies obtained by AFM on the film are similar to those of corresponding diamond surface, and they are the remaining traces after the carbon groups moving from the film to growing diamond. The fine particles and a terrace structure with homogeneous average step height are respectively found on the diamond (100) and (111) surface. Diamond growth conditions show that its growth rates and the temperature gradients in the boundary layer of the molten film at HTHP result in the differences of surface morphologies on diamond planes,being rough on (100) plane and even on the (111) plane. The diamond growth on the (100) surface at HPHT could be considered as a process of unification of these diamond fine particles or of carbon atom groups recombination on the growing diamond crystal surface. Successive growth layer steps directly suggest the layer growth mechanism of the diamond (111) plane. The sources of the layer steps might be two-dimensional nuclei and dislocations.

  4. Thick Nano-Crystalline Diamond films for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawedeit, Christoph [Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany)

    2010-06-30

    This Diplomarbeit deals with the characterization of 9 differently grown diamond samples. Several techniques were used to determine the quality of these specimens for inertial confinement fusion targets. The quality of chemical vapor deposition diamond is usually considered in terms of the proportion of sp3-bonded carbon to sp2-bonded carbon in the sample. For fusion targets smoothness, Hydrogen content and density of the diamonds are further important characteristics. These characteristics are analyzed in this thesis. The research for thesis was done at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in collaboration with the Fraunhofer Institut für angewandte Festkörperphysik Freiburg, Germany. Additionally the Lehrstuhl fuer Nukleartechnik at Technical University of Germany supported the work.

  5. Oxygen plasma etching of silver-incorporated diamond-like carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marciano, F.R., E-mail: fernanda@las.inpe.b [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais (LAS), Av. dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12227-010, SP (Brazil); Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA), Pca. Marechal Eduardo Gomes, 50-Sao Jose dos Campos, 12228-900, SP (Brazil); Bonetti, L.F. [Clorovale Diamantes Industria e Comercio Ltda, Estr. do Torrao de Ouro, 500-Sao Jose dos Campos, 12229-390, SP (Brazil); Pessoa, R.S.; Massi, M. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA), Pca. Marechal Eduardo Gomes, 50-Sao Jose dos Campos, 12228-900, SP (Brazil); Santos, L.V.; Trava-Airoldi, V.J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais (LAS), Av. dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12227-010, SP (Brazil)

    2009-08-03

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) film as a solid lubricant coating represents an important area of investigation related to space devices. The environment for such devices involves high vacuum and high concentration of atomic oxygen. The purpose of this paper is to study the behavior of silver-incorporated DLC thin films against oxygen plasma etching. Silver nanoparticles were produced through an electrochemical process and incorporated into DLC bulk during the deposition process using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. The presence of silver does not affect significantly DLC quality and reduces by more than 50% the oxygen plasma etching. Our results demonstrated that silver nanoparticles protect DLC films against etching process, which may increase their lifetime in low earth orbit environment.

  6. Smoothness improvement of micrometer- and submicrometer-thick nanocrystalline diamond films produced by MWPECVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicala, G.; Magaletti, V.; Senesi, G. S.; Tamborra, M.

    2013-04-01

    Thick (around 3 μm) and thin (48-310 nm) nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films have been produced from Ar-rich CH4/Ar/H2 (1/89/10 %) and H2-rich CH4/H2 (1/99 %) microwave plasmas, respectively. The deposition rate and the nucleation enhancement have been monitored in situ and in real time by pyrometric and laser reflectance interferometry for micrometer- and nanometer-thick films. For thick films, an improvement of the NCD films' smoothness has been obtained by a buffer layer between the films and the treated Si substrate. For thin films, a combinatorial approach, i.e., a treatment of the Si substrate in a suspension of mixed diamond powders of 250 nm and 40-60 μm, has been utilized. The present experimental results show that the buffer layer procedure allows good preservation of the surface of the treated Si substrate and the combinatorial approach promotes effectively the seeding of the Si surface.

  7. Formation of conducting nanochannels in diamond-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evtukh, A.; Litovchenko, V.; Semenenko, M.; Yilmazoglu, O.; Mutamba, K.; Hartnagel, H. L.; Pavlidis, D.

    2006-09-01

    A sharp increase of the emission current at high electric fields and a decrease of the threshold voltage after pre-breakdown conditioning of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been measured. This effect was observed for DLC-coated silicon tips and GaAs wedges. During electron field emission (EFE) at high electric fields the energy barriers caused by an sp3 phase between sp2 inclusions can be broken, resulting in the formation of conducting nanochannels between the semiconductor-DLC interface and the surface of the DLC film. At high current densities and the resulting local heating, the diamond-like sp3 phase transforms into a conducting graphite-like sp2 phase. As a result an electrical conducting nanostructured channel is formed in the DLC film. The diameter of the conducting nanochannel was estimated from the reduced threshold voltage after pre-breakdown conditioning to be in the range of 5-25 nm. The presence of this nanochannel in an insulating matrix leads to a local enhancement of the electric field and a reduced threshold voltage for EFE. Based on the observed features an efficient method of conducting nanochannel matrix formation in flat DLC films for improved EFE efficiency is proposed. It mainly uses a silicon tip array as an upper electrode in contact with the DLC film. The formation of nanochannels starts at the interface between the tips and the DLC film. This opens new possibilities of aligned and high-density conducting channel formation.

  8. Solid Lubrication of Laser Grown Fluorinated Diamond Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-21

    irradiation of laser beam on the substrate surface 2 Schematic diagram showing laser CVD experimental set- up . 27 A single laser beam (YAG or Excimer) was only...0.05 to 0.2 depending upon temperature, environment, load, speed and presence of foreign material. Todate , ultra-low coefficients of friction (0.02...Laser technology for diamond film fabrication is very new and todate only a handful number of publications are available that address directly on the

  9. Diamond films from combustion of methyl acetylene and propadiene

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Stephen J.; Shin, Ho Seon; Goodwin, David G.

    1995-01-01

    To date diamond films grown with the combustion technique have used either acetylene or, rarely, ethylene as the fuel. However, there are barriers to large scale commercialization of the combustion technique using either fuel. For example, acetylene is relatively expensive and difficult to handle, while the use of ethylene gives relatively low growth rates. In this letter we propose replacing acetylene with MAPPTM gas, a commercial mixture of methyl acetylene and propadiene in liquefied petro...

  10. N-Type Conductive Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Films Grown by Hot Filament CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mertens

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the synthesis of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD films by application of hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD. We furthermore studied the different morphological, structural, and electrical properties. The grown films are fine grained with grain sizes between 4 and 7 nm. The UNCD films exhibit different electrical conductivities, dependent on grain boundary structure. We present different contact metallizations exhibiting ohmic contact behavior and good adhesion to the UNCD surface. The temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity is presented between −200 and 900°C. We furthermore present spectroscopic investigations of the films, supporting that the origin of the conductivity is the structure and volume of the grain boundary.

  11. 基于非晶SiO2过渡层在硬质合金刀具基体上沉积金刚石涂层%Amorphous SiO2 interlayers for deposition of adherent diamond films onto WC?Co inserts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔雨潇; 赵天奇; 孙方宏; 沈彬

    2015-01-01

    Amorphous SiO2 (a-SiO2) films were synthesized on WC?Co substrates with H2 and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) via pyrolysis of molecular precursor. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern shows that silicon?cobalt compounds form at the interface between a-SiO2 films and WC?Co substrates. Moreover, it is observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) that the a-SiO2 films are composed of hollow mirco-spheroid a-SiO2 particles. Subsequently,the a-SiO2 films are used as intermediate films and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films are deposited on them. Indentation tests were performed to evaluate the adhesion of bi-layer (a-SiO2 + diamond) films on cemented carbide substrates. And the cutting performance of bi-layer (a-SiO2 + diamond) coated inserts was evaluated by machining the glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP). The results show that a-SiO2 interlayers can greatly improve the adhesive strength of diamond films on cemented carbide inserts; furthermore, thickness of the a-SiO2 interlayers plays a significant role in their effectiveness on adhesion enhancement of diamond films.%以氢气和正硅酸乙酯为反应源,采用前驱体裂解的方法在硬质合金基体上制备非晶SiO2(a-SiO2)薄膜.X射线衍射(XRD)分析表明,非晶薄膜与基体发生反应,并在界面上形成硅钴化合物.此外,透射电镜(TEM)表征表明,该薄膜由微米级的空心球团状的非晶 SiO2颗粒构成.随后,将非晶 SiO2薄膜作为过渡层,采用热丝化学气相沉积技术在过渡层上沉积金刚石涂层.通过压痕试验表征制备获得的金刚石?非晶SiO2复合涂层对硬质合金基体的附着力.通过加工玻璃丝纤维增强塑料(GFRP)表征该复合涂层的切削性能.结果表明,非晶 SiO2过渡层可以有效地改善金刚石涂层对硬质合金基体的附着力.此外,非晶SiO2过渡层的厚度对金刚石涂层附着力的提升效果有很大影响.

  12. Dose rate effects on the thermoluminescence kinetics properties of MWCVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastelum, S.; Chernov, V.; Melendrez, R.; Soto-Puebla, D.; Pedroza-Montero, M.; Barboza-Flores, M. [Centro de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, AP 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora 83190 (Mexico); Cruz-Zaragoza, E. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-543 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Favalli, A. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for the Protection and the Security of the Citizen, TP800,Via E. Fermi, 21020 Ispra (Italy)

    2007-09-15

    Dose rate effects are important in thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeter applications because a certain absorbed dose given at different dose rates may result in a different TL yield. The present work reports about the dose rate effects on TL glow curves and kinetics properties of microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (MWCVD) diamond films grown on (100) silicon. The diamond films were exposed to {gamma} radiation at 20.67, 43.4 and 81.11 Gy min{sup -1} dose rates in the range of 0.05-10 kGy. The films showed a linear dose behavior up to 2 kGy and reached saturation for higher doses. The TL intensity varied as a function of dose rate and the samples had a maximum TL response for relatively lower dose rates. A single first order kinetics TL peak was typical for low doses while at higher doses two first order kinetics peaks were necessary to fit the glow curves. The results indicate that dose rate effects may be significant in dosimetric applications of MWCVD diamond. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Electronic structures of phosphorus-doped diamond films and impacts of their vacancies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In order to better understand the bonding mechanisms of the phosphorus-doped diamond films and the influences of the phosphorus-doped concentration on the diamond lattice integrity and conductivity,we calculate the electronic structures of the phosphorus-doped diamond with different phosphorus concentrations and the density of states in the phosphorus--doped diamond films with a vacant lattice site by the first principle method.The calculation results show the phosphorus atom only affects the bonds of a few atoms in its vicinity,and the conductivity increases as the doped concentration increases.Also in the diamond lattice with a total number of 64 atoms and introducing a vacancy into the non-nearest neighbor lattice site of a phosphorus atom,we have found that both the injuries of the phosphorus-doped diamond films and the N-type electron conductivity of diamond films could be improved.

  14. Surface properties of diamond-like carbon films prepared by CVD and PVD methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Dong-Ping; Liu Yan-Hong; Chen Bao-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been deposited using three different techniques: (a) electron cyclotron resonance-plasma source ion implantation, (b) low-pressure dielectric barrier discharge, (c) filtered-pulsed cathodic arc discharge. The surface and mechanical properties of these films are compared using atomic force microscopebased tests. The experimental results show that hydrogenated DLC films are covered with soft surface layers enriched with hydrogen and sp3 hybridized carbon while the soft surface layers of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films have graphite-like structure. The formation of soft surface layers can be associated with the surface diffusion and growth induced by the low-energy deposition process. For typical CVD methods, the atomic hydrogen in the plasmas can contribute to the formation of hydrogen and sp3 hybridized carbon enriched surface layers. The high-energy ion implantation causes the rearrangement of atoms beneath the surface layer and leads to an increase in film density. The ta-C films can be deposited using the medium energy carbon ions in the highly-ionized plasma.

  15. Modification of diamond-like carbon films by nitrogen incorporation via plasma immersion ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flege, S., E-mail: flege@ca.tu-darmstadt.de [Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Hatada, R.; Hoefling, M.; Hanauer, A.; Abel, A. [Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Baba, K. [Industrial Technology Center of Nagasaki, Applied Technology Division, Omura, Nagasaki 856-0026 (Japan); Ensinger, W. [Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Nitrogen containing diamond-like carbon films were prepared by a plasma ignited by a high voltage. • Variation of preparation method (N{sub 2} implantation, N{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} co-deposition). • Maximum nitrogen content similar for co-deposition and implantation. • Electrical resistivity decreases for small nitrogen contents, increases again for higher contents. - Abstract: The addition of nitrogen to diamond-like carbon films affects properties such as the inner stress of the film, the conductivity, biocompatibility and wettability. The nitrogen content is limited, though, and the maximum concentration depends on the preparation method. Here, plasma immersion ion implantation was used for the deposition of the films, without the use of a separate plasma source, i.e. the plasma was generated by a high voltage applied to the samples. The plasma gas consisted of a mixture of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and N{sub 2}, the substrates were silicon and glass. By changing the experimental parameters (high voltage, pulse length and repetition rate and gas flow ratio) layers with different N content were prepared. Additionally, some samples were prepared using a DC voltage. The nitrogen content and bonding was investigated with SIMS, AES, XPS, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. Their influence on the electrical resistivity of the films was investigated. Depending on the preparation conditions different nitrogen contents were realized with maximum contents around 11 at.%. Those values were compared with the nitrogen concentration that can be achieved by implantation of nitrogen into a DLC film.

  16. Characteristics of ZnO/diamond thin films prepared by RF magnetron sputtering

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Y W; Lee, J G; Baik, Y J; Kim, H J; Jung, H J; Choi, W K; Cho, B H; Park, C Y

    1999-01-01

    Due to its high Young's modulus, diamond has the highest acoustic wave velocity among all materials and is expected to be a candidate substrate for high-frequency surface acoustic wave(SAW) devices. In this study, the deposition of ZnO, as a piezoelectric layer, on a diamond substrate is investigated. ZnO has been fabricated by using RF magnetron sputtering with a ZnO target and various Ar/O sub 2 gas ratios, RF powers, and substrate temperatures at a vacuum of 10 sup - sup 5 Torr. The sputtered ZnO films are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and I-V characteristics. All the films show only a (002) orientation. The atomic concentration of the sputtered ZnO films is changed by the oxygen gas ratio, and the ZnO films are grown with a homogeneous composition over their entire thickness. The electrical resistivity of the films varied from 4x10 sup 3 to 7x10 sup 8 OMEGA cm, depending on the Ar/O sub 2 gas ratio. The phase...

  17. Enhanced nucleation and post-growth investigations on HFCVD diamond films grown on silicon single crystals pretreated with Zr:diamond mixed slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dua, A.K.; Roy, M.; Nuwad, J.; George, V.C.; Sawant, S.N

    2004-05-15

    Two sets, one deposited for {approx}20 min and other for {approx}1 h of diamond thin film samples are prepared following pretreatment of silicon substrates using mixed slurry containing different weight ratio of zirconium and diamond particles. The films are characterized ex situ using XRD, Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL), FTIR and atomic force microscopy (AFM). As evidenced from AFM topography, nucleation density as high as 2.5x10{sup 9} particles/cm{sup 2} could be achieved in spite of posttreatment cleaning of the substrates with methanol. It has been found that the nucleation density increases, while particle size and RMS surface roughness subsides with increasing metal concentration in the mixed slurry. Raman and PL spectra of both the 20 min and 1 h samples have been recorded to check the quality of the deposits. Although a significant amount non-diamond carbon impurities is found to be present mostly at the grain boundaries of the films, the concentration of defects due to [Si-V]{sup 0} complex reduces substantially for full-grown samples and also for 20 min samples pretreated with metal-rich slurries. The plausible role of the intermediate layers behind these effects has been explored.

  18. Electrodeposition of diamond-like carbon films on titanium alloy using organic liquids: Corrosion and wear resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcade, Tiago, E-mail: tiago.falcade@ufrgs.br [Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 9500 Bento Goncalves Ave. Sector 4, Building 75, 2nd floor, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Shmitzhaus, Tobias Eduardo, E-mail: tobiasschmitzhaus@gmail.com [Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Gomes dos Reis, Otavio, E-mail: otavio_gomes214@hotmail.com [Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vargas, Andre Luis Marin; Huebler, Roberto [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Mueller, Iduvirges Lourdes, E-mail: ilmuller@ufrgs.br [Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Fraga Malfatti, Celia de, E-mail: celia.malfatti@ufrgs.br [Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrodeposition may be conducted at room temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The DLC films have good resistance to corrosion in saline environments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The films have lower coefficient of friction than the uncoated substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The abrasive wear protection is evident in coated systems. - Abstract: Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been studied as coatings for corrosion protection and wear resistance because they have excellent chemical inertness in traditional corrosive environments, besides presenting a significant reduction in coefficient of friction. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films obtained by electrochemical deposition techniques have attracted a lot of interest, regarding their potential in relation to the vapor phase deposition techniques. The electrochemical deposition techniques are carried out at room temperature and do not need vacuum system, making easier this way the technological transfer. At high electric fields, the organic molecules polarize and react on the electrode surface, forming carbon films. The aim of this work was to obtain DLC films onto Ti6Al4V substrate using as electrolyte: acetonitrile (ACN) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). The films were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization and wear tests. The results show that these films can improve, significantly, the corrosion resistance of titanium and its alloys and their wear resistance.

  19. Osteogenic cell differentiation on H-terminated and O-terminated nanocrystalline diamond films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liskova J

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jana Liskova,1 Oleg Babchenko,2 Marian Varga,2 Alexander Kromka,2 Daniel Hadraba,1 Zdenek Svindrych,1 Zuzana Burdikova,1 Lucie Bacakova1 1Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic; 2Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic Abstract: Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD films are promising materials for bone implant coatings because of their biocompatibility, chemical resistance, and mechanical hardness. Moreover, NCD wettability can be tailored by grafting specific atoms. The NCD films used in this study were grown on silicon substrates by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and grafted by hydrogen atoms (H-termination or oxygen atoms (O-termination. Human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells were used for biological studies on H-terminated and O-terminated NCD films. The adhesion, growth, and subsequent differentiation of the osteoblasts on NCD films were examined, and the extracellular matrix production and composition were quantified. The osteoblasts that had been cultivated on the O-terminated NCD films exhibited a higher growth rate than those grown on the H-terminated NCD films. The mature collagen fibers were detected in Saos-2 cells on both the H-terminated and O-terminated NCD films; however, the quantity of total collagen in the extracellular matrix was higher on the O-terminated NCD films, as were the amounts of calcium deposition and alkaline phosphatase activity. Nevertheless, the expression of genes for osteogenic markers – type I collagen, alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin – was either comparable on the H-terminated and O-terminated films or even lower on the O-terminated films. In conclusion, the higher wettability of the O-terminated NCD films is promising for adhesion and growth of osteoblasts. In addition, the O-terminated surface also seems to support the deposition of extracellular matrix proteins and extracellular matrix

  20. The effectiveness of Ti implants as barriers to carbon diffusion in Ti implanted steel under CVD diamond deposition conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiser, P.S.; Prawer, S. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Hoffman, A. [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Dept. of Chemistry; Evan, P.J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Paterson, P.J.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    The growth of chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond onto iron based substrates complicated by preferential soot formation and carbon diffusion into the substrate [1], leading to poor quality films and poor adhesion. In the initial stages of exposure to a microwave plasma, a layer of graphite is rapidly formed on an untreated Fe based substrate. Once this graphite layer reaches a certain thickness, reasonable quality diamond nucleates and grows upon it. However, the diamond film easily delaminates from the substrate, the weak link being the graphitic layer. Following an initial success in using a TiN barrier layer to inhibit the formation of such a graphitic layer the authors report on attempts to use an implanted Ti layer for the same purpose. This work was prompted by observation that, although the TiN proved to be an extremely effective diffusion barrier, adhesion may be further enhanced by the formation of a TiC interface layer between the diamond film and the Fe substrate. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Internal stress in MPCVD diamond films on the Si substrate based on XRD line shape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-wei; LI Cui-ping; GAO Cheng-yao; HUANG Meng-xue; YANG Bao-he

    2009-01-01

    The diamond films adherent to Si substrate are deposited with the microwave plasma CVD (MPCVD) at microwave powers of 6000 W and 4000 W from 6 h to 10 h, respectively, the internal stresses of the films are measured by XRD. Spectral peak shift and widening are applied to calculate the magnitudes of macro and micro stresses. The results show that the macro stress is tensile. The internal stress can be controlled by the microwave power. With the microwave power increasing,the intrinsic and macro stresses decrease, and the micro stress increases significantly. Also, it can be found that the macro and micro stresses increase with deposited time when the other conditions are the same.

  2. OSL and TL dosimeter characterization of boron doped CVD diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, J. A. N.; Sandonato, G. M.; Meléndrez, R.; Chernov, V.; Pedroza-Montero, M.; De la Rosa, E.; Rodríguez, R. A.; Salas, P.; Barboza-Flores, M.

    2005-04-01

    Natural diamond is an exceptional prospect for clinical radiation dosimetry due to its tissue-equivalence properties and being chemically inert. The use of diamond in radiation dosimetry has been halted by the high market price; although recently the capability of growing high quality CVD diamond has renewed the interest in using diamond films as radiation dosimeters. In the present work we have characterized the dosimetric properties of diamond films synthesized by the HFCVD method. The thermoluminescence and the optically stimulated luminescence of beta exposed diamond sample containing a B/C 4000 ppm doping presents excellent properties suitable for dosimetric applications with β-ray doses up to 3.0 kGy. The observed OSL and TL performance is reasonable appropriate to justify further investigation of diamond films as dosimeters for ionizing radiation, specially in the radiotherapy field where very well localized and in vivo and real time radiation dose applications are essential.

  3. Investigation of Physical Properties and Electrochemical Behavior of Nitrogen-Doped Diamond-Like Carbon Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattanakorn Saensak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This work reports characterizations of diamond-like carbon (DLC films used as electrodes for electrochemical applications. DLC thin films are prepared on glass slides and silicon substrates by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD using a gas mixture of methane and hydrogen. In addition, the DLC films are doped with nitrogen in order to reduce electrical resistivity. Compared to the undoped DLC films, the electrical resistivity of nitrogen-doped (N-doped DLC films is decreased by three orders of magnitude. Raman spectroscopy and UV/Vis spectroscopy analyses show the structural transformation in N-doped DLC films that causes the reduction of band gap energy. Contact angle measurement at N-doped DLC films indicates increased hydrophobicity. The results obtained from the cyclic voltammetry measurements with Fe(CN63-/Fe(CN64- redox species exhibit the correlation between the physical properties and electrochemical behavior of DLC films.

  4. Laser transfer of diamond nanopowder induced by metal film blistering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononenko, T. V.; Alloncle, P.; Konov, V. I.; Sentis, M.

    2009-03-01

    Blister-based laser induced forward transfer (BB-LIFT) is a promising technique to produce surface microstructures of various advanced materials including inorganic and organic micro/nanopowders, suspensions and biological micro-objects embedded in life sustaining medium. The transferred material is spread over a thin metal film irradiated from the far side by single laser pulses through a transparent support. Interaction of the laser pulse with the metal-support interface under optimized conditions causes formation of a quickly expanding blister. Fast movement of the free metal surface provides efficient material transfer, which has been investigated for the case of diamond nanopowder and diamond-containing suspension. The unique features of the given technique are universality, simplicity and efficient isolation of the transferred material from the ablation products and laser heating.

  5. Structure and wettability property of the growth and nucleation surfaces of thermally treated freestanding CVD diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xiaoqiang; Cheng, Shaoheng; Ma, Yibo; Wu, Danfeng; Liu, Junsong; Wang, Qiliang; Yang, Yizhou; Li, Hongdong

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports the surface features and wettability properties of the (1 0 0)-textured freestanding chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond films after thermal exposure in air at high temperature. Thermal oxidation at proper conditions eliminates selectively nanodiamonds and non-diamond carbons in the films. The growth side of the films contains (1 0 0)-oriented micrometer-sized columns, while its nucleation side is formed of nano-sized tips. The examined wettability properties of the as-treated diamond films reveal a hydrophilicity and superhydrophilicity on the growth surface and nucleation surface, respectively, which is determined by oxygen termination and geometry structure of the surface. When the surface termination is hydrogenated, the wettability of nucleation side converted from superhydrophilicity to high hydrophobicity, while the hydrophilicity of the growth side does not change significantly. The findings open a possibility for realizing freestanding diamond films having not only novel surface structures but also multifunction applications, especially proposed on the selected growth side or nucleation side in one product.

  6. Aspects of thin film deposition on granulates by physical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Andreas; Schmid, Gerwin H. S.; Mahr, Harald; Eisenmenger-Sittner, Christoph

    2016-11-01

    Thin film and coating technology has entered fields which may show significant deviations from classical coating applications where films are deposited on plane, sometimes large substrates. Often surfaces of small and irregularly shaped bodies have to be improved in respect to electrical, thermal or mechanical properties. Film deposition and characterization on such small substrates is not a trivial task. This specially holds for methods based on Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) processes such as sputter deposition and its ion- and plasma assisted varieties. Due to their line of sight nature a key issue for homogenous films is efficient intermixing. If this problem is mastered, another task is the prediction and determination of the film thickness on single particles as well as on large scale ensembles thereof. In this work a mechanism capable of uniformly coating up to 1000 cm3 of granulate with particle sizes ranging from approx. 10 μm to 150 μm by magnetron sputtering is thoroughly described. A method for predicting the average film thickness on the particles is presented and tested for several differently shaped objects like microspheres, irregular grains of sinter powder or micro diamonds. For assessing the film thickness on single particles as well as on particle ensembles several complementary methods based on optics, X-ray analysis and gravimetry are employed. Their respective merits and limitations are discussed. Finally an outlook on adapting the described technology for surface modification by plasma based reactive and non-reactive processes is given.

  7. Novel aspect in grain size control of nanocrystalline diamond film for thin film waveguide mode resonance sensor application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hak-Joo; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Cho, Jung-Min; Lee, Taek-Sung; Kim, Inho; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Wook-Seong

    2013-11-27

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin film growth was systematically investigated for application for the thin film waveguide mode resonance sensor. The NCD thin film was grown on the Si wafer or on the SiO2-coated sapphire substrate using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD). The structural/optical properties of the samples were characterized by the high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy. The waveguide modes of the NCD layer were studied by prism coupler technique using laser (wavelength: 632.8 nm) with varying incident angle. A novel aspect was disclosed in the grain size dependence on the growth temperature at the relatively low methane concentration in the precursor gas, which was important for optical property: the grain size increased with decreasing growth temperature, which was contrary to the conventional knowledge prevailing in the microcrystalline diamond (MCD) domain. We have provided discussions to reconcile such observation. An optical waveguide mode resonance was demonstrated in the visible region using the microstructure-controlled transparent NCD thin film waveguide, which provided a strong potential for the waveguide mode resonance sensor applications.

  8. Study of filament performance in heat transfer and hydrogen dissociation in diamond chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) is a promising method for commercial production of diamond films.Filament performance in heat transfer and hydrogen decomposition in reactive environment was investigated. Power consumption by the filament in vacuum, helium and 2% CH4/H2 was experimentally determined in temperature range 1300℃-2200℃. Filament heat transfer mechanism in C-H reactive environment was calculated and analyzed. The result shows that due to surface carburization and slight carbon deposition, radiation in stead of hydrogen dissociation, becomes the largest contributor to power consumption. Filament-surface dissociation of H2 was observed at temperatures below 1873K, demonstrating the feasibility of diamond growth at low filament temperatures. The effective activation energies of hydrogen dissociation on several clean refractory filaments were derived from power consumption data in literatures. They are all lower than that of thermal dissociation of hydrogen, revealing the nature of catalytic dissociation of hydrogen on filament surface. Observation of substrate temperature suggested a weakerrole of atomic hydrogen recombination in heating substrates in C-H environment than in pure hydrogen.

  9. Annealing effect and irradiation properties of HFCVD diamond films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Ling; WANG Lin-jun; SU Qing-feng; LIU Jian-min; XU Run; PENG Hong-yan; SHI Wei-min; XIA Yi-ben

    2006-01-01

    The post-growth treatment of a [100]-oriented diamond film was performed to improve the film quality. The characteristic of post-growth film was investigated by using the RAMAN spectrum and the capacitance-frequency curve. The results show that the resistivities and frequency response enhance after the post-treatments in solution of H2SO4 and H2O2 and an annealing under N2 atmosphere at 500 ℃ for 60 min. Under a bias voltage of 100 V,the net photocurrent is obtained under 55Fe(5.9 keV) X-rays and 241Am (5.5 MeV) α particles radiation,respectively. The photocurrent increases rapidly at first and becomes stable for the "pumping" effect with the radiation time.

  10. The theoretical studies of piezoresistive effect in diamond films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the Fuchs and Sondheimer thin film theory (F-S film theory) and a revised valence band split-off model, considering a mixed scattering by lattice vibrations, ionized impurities and surfaces, a theoretical description of the piezoresistive effect (PR effect) in p-type heteroepitaxial diamond films was presented by solving the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation and using the parallel connection resistance model. A calculating expression of the PR effect was given. The main characteristics that were identical with the experiment were obtained by theoretical calculation. Giving out a model to show that the energy level interval between the split-off band and the heavy-hole band was changed by strain, a reasonable explanation was presented for the error between experimental results and theoretical values of saturated PR effect under big strain.

  11. Characterization of boron doped diamond-like carbon film by HRTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.J., E-mail: lixj@alum.imr.ac.cn [College of Material Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Advanced Structural Materials, Ministry of Education, Changchun University of Technology, Changchun 130012 (China); He, L.L., E-mail: llhe@imr.ac.cn [Shenyang National Lab of Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Y.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada); Plasma Physics Laboratory, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E2 (Canada); Yang, Q. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada); Hirose, A. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E2 (Canada)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The microstructure of B-DLC film is studied by HRTEM in cross-sectional observation. • Many crystalline nanoparticles dispersed in the amorphous matrix film are observed. • Through composition and structure analysis, the nanoparticles are identified as B{sub 2}O. • The work implies the doped B element exists as oxide state in the B-DLC film. - Abstract: Boron doped diamond-like carbon (B-DLC) film was synthesized on silicon (1 0 0) wafer by biased target ion beam deposition. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is employed to investigate the microstructure of the B-DLC thin film in cross-sectional observation. Many crystalline nanoparticles randomly dispersed and embedded in the amorphous matrix film are observed. Through chemical compositional analysis of the B-DLC film, some amount of O element is confirmed to be contained. And also, some nanoparticles with near zone axes are indexed, which are accordance with B{sub 2}O phase. Therefore, the contained O element causing the B element oxidized is proposed, resulting in the formation of the nanoparticles. Our work indicates that in the B-DLC film a significant amount of the doped B element exists as boron suboxide nanoparticles.

  12. X-ray reflectivity study of bias graded diamond like carbon film synthesized by ECR plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R M Dey; S K Deshpande; S B Singh; N Chand; D S Patil; S K Kulkarni

    2013-02-01

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings were deposited on silicon substrates by microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma CVD process using plasma of Ar and CH4 gases under the influence of negative d.c. self bias generated on the substrates by application of RF (13.56 MHz) power. The negative bias voltage was varied from −60 V to −150 V during deposition of DLC films on Si substrate. Detailed X-ray reflectivity (XRR) study was carried out to find out film properties like surface roughness, thickness and density of the films as a function of variation of negative bias voltage. The study shows that the DLC films constituted of composite layer i.e. the upper sub surface layer followed by denser bottom layer representing the bulk of the film. The upper layer is relatively thinner as compared to the bottom layer. The XRR study was an attempt to substantiate the sub-plantation model for DLC film growth.

  13. Thermal Conduction Inhomogeneity of Nanocrystalline Diamond Films by Dual-Side Thermoreflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Applications International Corporation, McLean, VA, 22102 4Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, 20375 Abstract Thin diamond films of thickness...nucleate film growth on a foreign substrate. In this work, the seeds are nanodiamonds (typically 5-10 nm diamond particles) spread at roughly 10 12...performance of integrated nanocrystalline diamond thermal spreaders for high-power transistor applications . ACKNOWLEDGMENT Special thanks are due

  14. Development of Diamond-Coated Drills

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Compared with the sintered polycrystalline diamond, the deposited thin film diamond has the great advantage on the fabrication of cutting tools with complex geometries such as drills. Because of their low costs for fabrication equipment and high performance on high speed machining non-ferrous metals and alloys, metal-compound materials, and hard brittle non-metals, diamond-coated drills find great potentialities in the commercial application. However, the poor adhesion of the diamond film on the substrate...

  15. Flame deposition of diamond : gas phase diagnostics and the effects of nitrogen addition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, Robert Leendert

    2002-01-01

    This thesis presents research on oxyacetylene flame deposition of diamond. Two main topics are addressed, namely the development and application of laser spectroscopic techniques for flame diagnostics, and the influence of nitrogen addition on the flame and diamond layer properties. Flame diagnostic

  16. Hydrophobic and high transparent honeycomb diamond-like carbon thin film fabricated by facile self-assembled nanosphere lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Kai-Yu; Wei, Da-Hua; Lin, Chii-Ruey; Yu, Yueh-Chung; Yao, Yeong-Der; Lin, Hong-Ming

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we take advantage of a facile fabrication technique called self-assembled nanosphere lithography (SANSL) combining with proper two-step reactive ion etching (RIE) method and radio frequency (RF) sputtering deposition process for manufacturing honeycomb diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin film structures with hydrophobic and high transparent properties. It is found that the DLC thin films deposited on clean glass substrates at the RF power of 100 W with the surface roughness (Ra) of 2.08 nm and the ID/IG ratio of 1.96 are realized. With a fill-factor of 0.691, the honeycomb DLC patterned thin film shows the best transmittance performance of 87% in the wavelength of visible light, and the optimized contact angle measurement is ˜108°. Compared with the pure DLC thin film and original glass substrate, the hydrophobic property of the patterned DLC films is significantly improved by 80 and 160%, respectively.

  17. Investigation of Chemical-Vapour-Deposition Diamond Alpha-Particle Detectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Bei-Bei; WANG Lin-Jun; ZHANG Ming-Long; XIA Yi-Ben

    2004-01-01

    Diamond films with [100] texture were prepared by a hot-filament chemical vapour deposition technique to fabricate particle detectors. The response of detectors to 5.5 MeV 241 Am particles is studied. The photocurrent increases linearly and then levels off with voltage, and 7hA is obtained at bias voltage of 100 V. The timedependent photocurrent initially increases rapidly and then tends to reach saturation. Furthermore, a little increase of the dark-current after irradiation can be accounted for by the release of the charges captured by the trapping centres at low energy levels during irradiation. An obvious peak of the pulse height distribution can be observed, associated with the energy of 5.5 MeV.

  18. Influence of microwave plasma parameters on light emission from SiV color centers in nanocrystalline diamond films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himics László

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Zero phonon line (ZPL shape, position and integral intensity of SiV defect center in diamond is presented for nanocrystalline diamond (NCD films grown at different conditions, NCD films of average grain sizes from ~50 nm up to ~180 nm have been deposited onto c-Si wafer at substrate temperature of 700 and 850oC from mixture with different CH4 and H2 ratios using MWCVD process. Light emission of SiV defect center and Raman scattering properties of NCD samples were measured on a Renishaw micro-Raman spectrometer with 488 nm excitation. Scanning electron microscopy images were used for monitoring surface morphology and for the analysis of the average grain sizes. Sample thickness was determined by in situ laser reflection interferometry. Characteristics of SiV ZPL are discussed in light of the morphology, bonding structure and average grain size of NCD films.

  19. Dry And Ringer Solution Lubricated Tribology Of Thin Osseoconductive Metal Oxides And Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldhauser W.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Achieving fast and strong adhesion to jawbone is essential for dental implants. Thin deposited films may improve osseointegration, but they are prone to cohesive and adhesive fracture due to high stresses while screwing the implant into the bone, leading to bared, less osteoconductive substrate surfaces and nano- and micro-particles in the bone. Aim of this work is the investigation of the cohesion and adhesion failure stresses of osteoconductive tantalum, titanium, silicon, zirconium and aluminium oxide and diamond-like carbon films. The tribological behaviour under dry and lubricated conditions (Ringer solution reveals best results for diamond-like carbon, while cohesion and adhesion of zirconium oxide films is highest.

  20. High performance diamond-like carbon layers obtained by pulsed laser deposition for conductive electrode applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, F.; Antoni, F.; Le Normand, F.; Muller, D.; Abdesselam, M.; Boubiche, N.; Komissarov, I.

    2017-09-01

    For the future, one of the biggest challenge faced to the technologies of flat panel display and various optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices is to find an alternative to the use of transparent conducting oxides like ITO. In this new approach, the objective is to grow high conductive thin-layer graphene (TLG) on the top of diamond-like carbon (DLC) layers presenting high performance. DLC prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) have attracted special interest due to a unique combination of their properties, close to those of monocrystalline diamond, like its transparency, hardness and chemical inertia, very low roughness, hydrogen-free and thus high thermal stability up to 1000 K. In our future work, we plane to explore the synthesis of conductive TLG on top of insulating DLC thin films. The feasibility and obtained performances of the multi-layered structure will be explored in great details in the short future to develop an alternative to ITO with comparable performance (conductivity of transparency). To select the best DLC candidate for this purpose, we focus this work on the physicochemical properties of the DLC thin films deposited by PLD from a pure graphite target at two wavelengths (193 and 248 nm) at various laser fluences. A surface graphenization process, as well as the required efficiency of the complete structure (TLG/DLC) will clearly be related to the DLC properties, especially to the initial sp3/sp2 hybridization ratio. Thus, an exhaustive description of the physicochemical properties of the DLC layers is a fundamental step in the research of comparable performance to ITO.

  1. Cathodoluminescence measurements on heavily boron doped homoepitaxial diamond films and their interfaces with their Ib substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, C.; Deneuville, A.; Wade, M.; Jomard, F.; Chevallier, J.

    2006-02-01

    Heavily boron doped 1.8 to 2.4 μm thick homoepitaxial diamond films with 1.5 × 1021 cm-3 [B] 1.75 × 1021 cm-3 have been deposited directly on their (100) Ib substrates at 830 °C. Their cathodoluminescence spectra probe the controlled thicknesses from 0.28 to 2.8 μm, therefore the bulk of the films as well as their interfaces with their substrates. The bulk of these films exhibit a band with shoulders ascribed to BETO (5.036 eV), FETO (5.094 eV) and BENP (5.184 eV) excitons whose energies are downward shifted by about 180 meV in comparison with monocrystalline diamond with low [B] FETO and BENP from interfacial layers with low [B]. From their BETO to FETO ratio, their concentration of boron on isolated substitutional sites is significantly lower than their total low [B] content measured by SIMS. A tentative model is proposed to explain the characteristics of these 40 to 160 quasihomogeneous interfacial layers.

  2. Formation of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Amorphous Carbon Composite Films in Vacuum Using Coaxial Arc Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Kenji; Yoshida, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, You; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2010-12-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C) composite films were grown in vacuum using a coaxial arc plasma gun. From the X-ray diffraction measurement, the UNCD crystallite size was estimated to be 1.6 nm. This size is dramatically reduced from that (2.3 nm) of UNCD/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) composite films grown in a hydrogen atmosphere. The sp3/(sp3 + sp2) value, which was estimated from the X-ray photoemission spectrum, was also reduced to be 41%. A reason for it might be the reduction in the UNCD crystallite size. From the near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectrum, it was found that the π*C=C and π*C≡C bonds are preferentially formed instead of the σ*C-H bonds in the UNCD/a-C:H films. Since the extremely small UNCD crystallites (1.6 nm) correspond to the nuclei of diamond, we consider that UNCD crystallite formation should be due predominantly to nucleation. The supersaturated condition required for nucleation is expected to be realized in the deposition using the coaxial arc plasma gun.

  3. All diamond self-aligned thin film transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbi, Jennifer [Champaign, IL

    2008-07-01

    A substantially all diamond transistor with an electrically insulating substrate, an electrically conductive diamond layer on the substrate, and a source and a drain contact on the electrically conductive diamond layer. An electrically insulating diamond layer is in contact with the electrically conductive diamond layer, and a gate contact is on the electrically insulating diamond layer. The diamond layers may be homoepitaxial, polycrystalline, nanocrystalline or ultrananocrystalline in various combinations.A method of making a substantially all diamond self-aligned gate transistor is disclosed in which seeding and patterning can be avoided or minimized, if desired.

  4. Characterization of Optical and Electrical Properties of Transparent Conductive Boron-Doped Diamond thin Films Grown on Fused Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanowicz Robert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A conductive boron-doped diamond (BDD grown on a fused silica/quartz has been investigated. Diamond thin films were deposited by the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW PECVD. The main parameters of the BDD synthesis, i.e. the methane admixture and the substrate temperature were investigated in detail. Preliminary studies of optical properties were performed to qualify an optimal CVD synthesis and film parameters for optical sensing applications. The SEM micro-images showed the homogenous, continuous and polycrystalline surface morphology; the mean grain size was within the range of 100-250 nm. The fabricated conductive boron-doped diamond thin films displayed the resistivity below 500 mOhm cm-1 and the transmittance over 50% in the VIS-NIR wavelength range. The studies of optical constants were performed using the spectroscopic ellipsometry for the wavelength range between 260 and 820 nm. A detailed error analysis of the ellipsometric system and optical modelling estimation has been provided. The refractive index values at the 550 nm wavelength were high and varied between 2.24 and 2.35 depending on the percentage content of methane and the temperature of deposition.

  5. Resonant vibrational excitation of ethylene molecules in laser-assisted diamond deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, L. S.; Zhou, Y. S.; Wang, M. X.; Gao, Y.; Liu, L.; Silvain, J. F.; Lu, Y. F.

    2014-07-01

    The influence of resonant vibrational excitation of ethylene molecules in combustion chemical vapor deposition of diamond was investigated. Resonant vibrational excitation of the CH2-wagging mode (a type c fundamental band, υ7, at 949.3 cm-1) in ethylene molecules was achieved by using a wavelength-tunable CO2 laser with a matching wavelength at 10.532 µm. By comparing to laser irradiation at off-resonance wavelengths, an on-resonance vibrational excitation is more efficient in energy coupling, increasing flame temperatures, accelerating the combustion reactions, and promoting diamond deposition. An enhanced rate of 5.7 was achieved in terms of the diamond growth rate with an improved diamond quality index at a high flame temperature under a resonant excitation of the CH2-wagging mode. This study demonstrates that a resonant vibrational excitation is an effective route for coupling energy into the gas phase reactions and promoting the diamond synthesis process.

  6. Free standing diamond-like carbon thin films by PLD for laser based electrons/protons acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thema, F.T.; Beukes, P.; Ngom, B.D. [UNESCO Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West, 7129, PO Box722, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Manikandan, E., E-mail: mani@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West, 7129, PO Box722, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Central Research Laboratory, Sree Balaji Medical College & Hospital (SBMCH), Chrompet, Bharath University, Chennai, 600044 (India); Maaza, M., E-mail: maaza@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West, 7129, PO Box722, Western Cape Province (South Africa)

    2015-11-05

    This study we reports for the first time on the synthesis and optical characteristics of free standing diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) onto graphene buffer layers for ultrahigh intensity laser based electron/proton acceleration applications. The fingerprint techniques of micro-Raman, UV–VIS–NIR and the IR spectroscopic investigations indicate that the suitability of such free standing DLC thin-films within the laser window and long wave infrared (LWIR) spectral range and hence their appropriateness for the targeted applications. - Highlights: • We report for the first time synthesis of free standing diamond-like carbon. • Pulsed laser deposition onto graphene buffer layers. • Fingerprint techniques of micro-Raman, UV–VIS–NIR and the IR spectroscopic investigations. • Ultrahigh intensity laser based electron/proton acceleration applications. • This material's suitable for the laser window and long wave infrared (LWIR) spectral range.

  7. Surface graphitization analysis of cerium-polished HFCVD diamond films with micro-raman spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shubin; SUN Yujing; TIAN Shi

    2008-01-01

    The etching technique using Ce is a convenient and fast method for polishing and shaping diamond films. In this study, the influence of polishing parameters such as polishing temperature and time on the surface crystallinity and phase composition of diamond films was thoroughly investigated via the analysis of Raman spectra such as FWHM and ID/IG. Moreover, the issue on the graphitization of diamond after polishing with Ce was further researched through the detailed study of the depth distribution of Raman data including FWHM and ID/IG, and a result completely different from the hot-iron metal polished ones was obtained. The results showed that polished diamond films had considerably higher diamond content than those before polishing, and not a bit of graphitization was found in the polished ones, owing to a higher solubility of carbon in rare earth metal Ce than that in transition metals, and the original crystallinity of the films polished with Ce did not deteriorate.

  8. Temperature admittance spectroscopy of boron doped chemical vapor deposition diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubkov, V. I., E-mail: VZubkovspb@mail.ru; Kucherova, O. V.; Zubkova, A. V.; Ilyin, V. A.; Afanas' ev, A. V. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University (LETI), Professor Popov Street 5, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bogdanov, S. A.; Vikharev, A. L. [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ul' yanov Street 46, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Butler, J. E. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University (LETI), Professor Popov Street 5, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ul' yanov Street 46, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), P.O. Box 37012 Smithsonian Inst., Washington, D.C. 20013-7012 (United States)

    2015-10-14

    Precision admittance spectroscopy measurements over wide temperature and frequency ranges were carried out for chemical vapor deposition epitaxial diamond samples doped with various concentrations of boron. It was found that the experimentally detected boron activation energy in the samples decreased from 314 meV down to 101 meV with an increase of B/C ratio from 600 to 18000 ppm in the gas reactants. For the heavily doped samples, a transition from thermally activated valence band conduction to hopping within the impurity band (with apparent activation energy 20 meV) was detected at temperatures 120–150 K. Numerical simulation was used to estimate the impurity DOS broadening. Accurate determination of continuously altering activation energy, which takes place during the transformation of conduction mechanisms, was proposed by numerical differentiation of the Arrhenius plot. With increase of boron doping level the gradual decreasing of capture cross section from 3 × 10{sup −13} down to 2 × 10{sup −17} cm{sup 2} was noticed. Moreover, for the hopping conduction the capture cross section becomes 4 orders of magnitude less (∼2 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2}). At T > T{sub room} in doped samples the birth of the second conductance peak was observed. We attribute it to a defect, related to the boron doping of the material.

  9. Investigating the role of hydrogen in ultra-nanocrystalline diamond thin film growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birrell, James; Gerbi, J. E.; Auciello, O. A.; Carlisle, J. A.

    2006-08-01

    Hydrogen has long been known to be critical for the growth of high-quality microcrystalline diamond thin films as well as homoepitaxial single-crystal diamond. A hydrogen-poor growth process that results in ultra-nanocrystalline diamond thin films has also been developed, and it has been theorized that diamond growth with this gas chemistry can occur in the absence of hydrogen. This study investigates the role of hydrogen in the growth of ultra-nanocrystalline diamond thin films in two different regimes. First, we add hydrogen to the gas phase during growth, and observe that there seems to be a competitive growth process occurring between microcrystalline diamond and ultra-nanocrystalline diamond, rather than a simple increase in the grain size of ultra-nanocrystalline diamond. Second, we remove hydrogen from the plasma by changing the hydrocarbon precursor from methane to acetylene and observe that there does seem to be some sort of lower limit to the amount of hydrogen that can sustain ultra-nanocrystalline diamond growth. We speculate that this is due to the amount of hydrogen needed to stabilize the surface of the growing diamond nanocrystals.

  10. Annealing Effects on Structure and Optical Properties of Diamond-Like Carbon Films Containing Silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meškinis, Šarūnas; Čiegis, Arvydas; Vasiliauskas, Andrius; Šlapikas, Kęstutis; Gudaitis, Rimantas; Yaremchuk, Iryna; Fitio, Volodymyr; Bobitski, Yaroslav; Tamulevičius, Sigitas

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, diamond-like carbon films with embedded Ag nanoparticles (DLC:Ag) were deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering. Structure of the films was investigated by Raman scattering spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopy was used to define thickness of DLC:Ag films as well as to study the surface morphology and size distribution of Ag nanoparticles. Optical absorbance and reflectance spectra of the films were studied in the 180-1100-nm range. Air annealing effects on structure and optical properties of the DLC:Ag were investigated. Annealing temperatures were varied in the 180-400 °C range. Changes of size and shape of the Ag nanoclusters took place due to agglomeration. It was found that air annealing of DLC:Ag films can result in graphitization following destruction of the DLC matrix. Additional activation of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect in DLC:Ag films can be achieved by properly selecting annealing conditions. Annealing resulted in blueshift as well as significant narrowing of the plasmonic absorbance and reflectance peaks. Moreover, quadrupole surface plasmon resonance peaks appeared. Modeling of absorption spectra of the nanoclusters depending on the shape and surrounding media has been carried out.

  11. Pulsed laser deposition: Prospects for commercial deposition of epitaxial films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenchausen, R.E.

    1999-03-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique for the deposition of thin films. The vapor source is induced by the flash evaporation that occurs when a laser pulse of sufficient intensity (about 100 MW/cm{sup 2}) is absorbed by a target. In this paper the author briefly defines pulsed laser deposition, current applications, research directed at gaining a better understanding of the pulsed laser deposition process, and suggests some future directions to enable commercial applications.

  12. Effect of Fe ion implantation on tribological properties and Raman spectra characteristics of diamond-like carbon film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Wen-Bao; SUN Zhuo

    2004-01-01

    Fe ions in the fluence range of 2 × 1015 to 1×1017 cm -2 were implanted into diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin film of 100 nm thick, which were deposited on silicon substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.Effects of Fe ion implantation on microstructure and friction coefficient of the DLC were studied. With increasing Fe ion fluence, friction coefficient of the DLC film increased as compared with that of DLC without implantation, and then decreased. The Raman spectra characteristics also show a dependence on the Fe ion fluence. With increasing the ion fluence, the sp2 bonding increased in the DLC film, resulting in the decrease of friction coefficient of the film after implantation. Substantial surface roughness was also measured.

  13. Strength and Fracture Resistance of Amorphous Diamond-Like Carbon Films for MEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. Jonnalagadda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical strength and mixed mode I/II fracture toughness of hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous diamond-like carbon (ta-C films, grown by pulsed laser deposition, are discussed in connection to material flaws and its microstructure. The failure properties of ta-C were obtained from films with thicknesses 0.5–3 μm and specimen widths 10–20 μm. The smallest test samples with 10 μm gage section averaged a strength of 7.3 ± 1.2 GPa, while the strength of 20-μm specimens with thicknesses 0.5–3 μm varied between 2.2–5.7 GPa. The scaling of the mechanical strength with specimen thickness and dimensions was owed to deposition-induced surface flaws, and, only in the smallest specimens, RIE patterning generated specimen sidewall flaws. The mode I fracture toughness of ta-C films is KIc=4.4±0.4 MPam, while the results from mixed mode I/II fracture experiments with cracks arbitrarily oriented in the plane of the film compared very well with theoretical predictions.

  14. Investigations of high mobility single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromson, D.; Descamps, C.; Tranchant, N.; Bergonzo, P.; Nesladek, M.; Isambert, A.

    2008-03-01

    The intrinsic properties of diamond make this material theoretically very suitable for applications in medical physics. Until now ionization chambers have been fabricated from natural stones and are commercialized by PTW, but their fairly high costs and long delivery times have often limited their use in hospital. The properties of commercialized intrinsic polycrystalline diamond were investigated in the past by many groups. The results were not completely satisfactory due to the nature of the polycrystalline material itself. In contrast, the recent progresses in the growth of high mobility single crystal synthetic diamonds prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique offer new alternatives. In the framework of the MAESTRO project (Methods and Advanced Treatments and Simulations for Radio Oncology), the CEA-LIST is studying the potentialities of synthetic diamond for new techniques of irradiation such as intensity modulated radiation therapy. In this paper, we present the growth and characteristics of single crystal diamond prepared at CEA-LIST in the framework of the NoRHDia project (Novel Radiation Hard CVD Diamond Detector for Hadrons Physics), as well as the investigations of high mobility single crystal CVD diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring: dosimetric analysis performed with the single crystal diamond detector in terms of stability and repeatability of the response signal, signal to noise ratio, response speed, linearity of the signal versus the absorbed dose, and dose rate. The measurements performed with photon beams using radiotherapy facilities demonstrate that single crystal CVD diamond is a good alternative for air ionization chambers for beam quality control.

  15. 99.996 %{sup 12}C films isotopically enriched and deposited in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, K. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8423 (United States); Pomeroy, J. M.; Simons, D. S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8423 (United States)

    2013-06-24

    Ionizing natural abundance carbon dioxide gas, we extract and mass select the ions, depositing thin films isotopically enriched to 99.9961(4) %{sup 12}C as measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). In solid state quantum information, coherence times of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in {sup 12}C enriched diamond exceeding milliseconds demonstrate the viability of NV centers as qubits, motivating improved isotopic enrichment. NV centers in diamond are particularly attractive qubit candidates due to the optical accessibility of the spin states. We present SIMS analysis and cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy of {sup 12}C enriched thin film samples grown with this method.

  16. Energetic deposition of thin metal films

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Busaidy, M S K

    2001-01-01

    deposited films. The primary aim of this thesis was to study the physical effect of energetic deposition metal thin films. The secondary aim is to enhance the quality of the films produced to a desired quality. Grazing incidence X-ray reflectivity (GIXR) measurements from a high-energy synchrotron radiation source were carried out to study and characterise the samples. Optical Profilers Interferometery, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Medium energy ion spectroscopy (MEIS), and the Electron microscope studies were the other main structural characterisation tools used. AI/Fe trilayers, as well as multilayers were deposited using a Nordico planar D.C. magnetron deposition system at different voltage biases and pressures. The films were calibrated and investigated. The relation between energetic deposition variation and structural properties was intensely researched. Energetic deposition refers to the method in which the deposited species possess higher kinetic energy and impact ...

  17. Filmes de diamante CVD dopado com boro. Parte I . Histórico, produção e caracterização Boron-doped CVD diamond films. Part I. History, production and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Mendes de Barros

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a brief account concerning the production, characterization and evolution of the knowledge in the area of diamond and boron-doped diamond films. The most important methods used for the growth of these films, such as chemical vapor deposition and high pressure/high temperature systems, as well as the several kinds of reactors which can be employed are reviewed. However, larger emphasis is given to the CVD method. Morphological, structural and electric properties of these films, as well as their role in the performance of voltammetric electrodes for electrochemistry and electroanalytical chemistry are also discussed.

  18. Chemical Mechanical Polishing of Ruthenium, Cobalt, and Black Diamond Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peethala, Brown Cornelius

    Ta/TaN bilayer serves as the diffusion barrier as well as the adhesion promoter between Cu and the dielectric in 32 nm technology devices. A key concern of future technology devices (sustain the diffusion barrier performance without forming voids and meeting the requirements of low resistivity. These are very challenging requirements for the Ta/TaN bilayer at a thickness of 50 nm/min) Ru removal rates (RRs) are required and as a stop layer in magnetic recording head fabrication where low (Diamond (BD) is a SiCOH type material with a dielectric constant of ˜2.9 and here, polishing of BD was investigated in order to understand the polishing behavior of SiCOH-based materials using the barrier slurries. The slurries that were developed for polishing Co and Ru in this work and Ta/TaN (earlier) were investigated for polishing the Black Diamond (BD) films. Here, it was found that ionic salts play a major role in enhancing the BD RRs to ˜65 nm/min compared to no removal rates in the absence of additives. A removal mechanism in the presence of ionic salts is proposed.

  19. PLD deposition of tungsten carbide contact for diamond photodiodes. Influence of process conditions on electronic and chemical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, E.; Bellucci, A.; Orlando, S.; Trucchi, D. M.; Mezzi, A.; Valentini, V.

    2013-08-01

    Tungsten carbide, WC, contacts behave as very reliable Schottky contacts for opto-electronic diamond devices. Diamond is characterized by superior properties in high-power, high frequency and high-temperature applications, provided that thermally stable electrode contacts will be realized. Ohmic contacts can be easily achieved by using carbide-forming metals, while is difficult to get stable Schottky contacts at elevated temperatures, due to the interface reaction and/or inter-diffusion between metals and diamond. Novel type of contacts, made of tungsten carbide, WC, seem to be the best solution, for their excellent thermal stability, high melting point, oxidation and radiation resistance and good electrical conductivity. Our research was aimed at using pulsed laser deposition for WC thin film deposition, optimizing experimental parameters, to obtain a final device characterized by excellent electronic properties, as a detector for radiation in deep UV or as X-ray dosimeter. We deposited our films by laser ablation from a target of pure WC, using different reaction conditions (i.e., substrate heating, vacuum or reactive atmosphere (CH4/Ar), RF plasma activated), to optimize both the stoichiometry of the film and its structure. Trying to obtain a material with the best electronic response, we used also two sources of laser radiation for target ablation, i.e., nano-second pulsed excimer laser ArF, and ultra-short fs Ti:Sapphire laser. The structure and chemical aspects have been evaluated by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), while the dosimeter photodiode response has been tested by the I-V measurements, under soft X-ray irradiation.

  20. PLD deposition of tungsten carbide contact for diamond photodiodes. Influence of process conditions on electronic and chemical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappelli, E., E-mail: emilia.cappelli@imip.cnr.it [CNR-IMIP, Montelibretti, via Salaria Km 29.3, P.O.B. 10, 00016 Rome (Italy); Bellucci, A. [CNR-IMIP, Montelibretti, via Salaria Km 29.3, P.O.B. 10, 00016 Rome (Italy); Orlando, S. [CNR-IMIP sez. Potenza, 85050 Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy); Trucchi, D.M. [CNR-IMIP, Montelibretti, via Salaria Km 29.3, P.O.B. 10, 00016 Rome (Italy); Mezzi, A. [CNR-ISMN, Montelibretti, via Salaria Km 29.3, P.O.B. 10, 00016 Rome (Italy); Valentini, V. [CNR-IMIP, Montelibretti, via Salaria Km 29.3, P.O.B. 10, 00016 Rome (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Tungsten carbide, WC, contacts behave as very reliable Schottky contacts for opto-electronic diamond devices. Diamond is characterized by superior properties in high-power, high frequency and high-temperature applications, provided that thermally stable electrode contacts will be realized. Ohmic contacts can be easily achieved by using carbide-forming metals, while is difficult to get stable Schottky contacts at elevated temperatures, due to the interface reaction and/or inter-diffusion between metals and diamond. Novel type of contacts, made of tungsten carbide, WC, seem to be the best solution, for their excellent thermal stability, high melting point, oxidation and radiation resistance and good electrical conductivity. Our research was aimed at using pulsed laser deposition for WC thin film deposition, optimizing experimental parameters, to obtain a final device characterized by excellent electronic properties, as a detector for radiation in deep UV or as X-ray dosimeter. We deposited our films by laser ablation from a target of pure WC, using different reaction conditions (i.e., substrate heating, vacuum or reactive atmosphere (CH{sub 4}/Ar), RF plasma activated), to optimize both the stoichiometry of the film and its structure. Trying to obtain a material with the best electronic response, we used also two sources of laser radiation for target ablation, i.e., nano-second pulsed excimer laser ArF, and ultra-short fs Ti:Sapphire laser. The structure and chemical aspects have been evaluated by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), while the dosimeter photodiode response has been tested by the I–V measurements, under soft X-ray irradiation.

  1. AFM Study on Reliability of Nanoscale DLC Films Deposited by ECR-MPCVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shou-xing; ZHU Shi-gen; DING Jian-ning

    2004-01-01

    Nanoindentation, scratch and wear tests based on an atomic force microscope (AFM) were carried out to study the reliability of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films, deposited by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (ECR-MPCVD). The predictors for film reliability were given to investigate the resistance of DLC films to indent, scratch, and wear. Experimental results showed that the films at 64.9nm and 12.07nm exhibited better reliability than thin one at 2.78nm, 4.48nm. In addition, the reliability strength of films above 12.07nm went stable, and the films showed good performance of anti-indentation, anti-scratch and anti-wear. Finally, size effect of nanoscale monolayer film was introduced to explain the reliability of nanoscale DLC films.

  2. Interface between metallic film from Fe-Ni-C system and HPHT as-grown diamond single crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许斌; 李木森; 尹龙卫; 刘玉先; 崔建军; 宫建红

    2003-01-01

    Microstructures of surface layer (near diamond) of the metallic film from Fe-Ni-C system are composed of (Fe,Ni)3C, (Fe,Ni)23C6 and γ-(Fe,Ni), from which it can be assumed that graphite isn't directly catalyzed into diamond through the film and there exists a transition phase (Fe,Ni)3C that can decompose into diamond structure. AFM morphologies on the film/diamond interface are traces preserved after carbon groups moving from the film to diamond. The morphologies on the as-grown diamond are similar to those on corresponding films, being spherical on (100) face and sawtooth-like steps on (111) face. Diamond growth rates and temperature gradients in boundary layer of the molten film at HPHT result in morphology differences.

  3. Application of nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films for ultraviolet detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zkria, Abdelrahman; Gima, Hiroki; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    Nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (UNCD/a-C:H) films were grown by coaxial arc plasma deposition in the ambient of nitrogen and hydrogen mixed gases. Synthesized films were structurally investigated by X-ray photoemission and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies. A heterojunction with p-type Si substrate was fabricated to study the ultraviolet photodetection properties of the film. Capacitance-voltage measurements assure the expansion of a depletion region into the film side. Current-voltage curves in the dark showed a good rectifying behaviour in the bias voltages range between ±5 V. Under 254 nm monochromatic light, the heterojunction shows a capability of deep ultraviolet light detection, which can be attribute to the existence of UNCD grains. As the diode was cooled from 300 K down to 150 K, the detectivity has a notable enhancement from 1.94 × 105 cm Hz1/2 W-1 at 300 K to 5.11 × 1010 cm Hz1/2 W-1 at 150 K, which is mainly due to a remarkable reduction in the leakage current at low temperatures. It was experimentally demonstrated that nitrogen-doped UNCD/a-C:H film works as ultraviolet-range photovoltaic material.

  4. Magnetic and cytotoxic properties of hot-filament chemical vapour deposited diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanin, Hudson, E-mail: hudsonzanin@gmail.com [Faculdade de Engenharia Eletrica e Computacao, Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotonica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein N.400, CEP 13 083-852 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Peterlevitz, Alfredo Carlos; Ceragioli, Helder Jose [Faculdade de Engenharia Eletrica e Computacao, Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotonica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein N.400, CEP 13 083-852 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rodrigues, Ana Amelia; Belangero, William Dias [Laboratorio de Biomateriais em Ortopedia, Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Rua Cinco de Junho 350 CEP 13083970, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Baranauskas, Vitor [Faculdade de Engenharia Eletrica e Computacao, Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotonica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein N.400, CEP 13 083-852 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-12-01

    Microcrystalline (MCD) and nanocrystalline (NCD) magnetic diamond samples were produced by hot-filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) on AISI 316 substrates. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) measurements indicated the presence of Fe, Cr and Ni in the MCD and NCD samples, and all samples showed similar magnetisation properties. Cell viability tests were realised using Vero cells, a type of fibroblastic cell line. Polystyrene was used as a negative control for toxicity (NCT). The cells were cultured under standard cell culture conditions. The proliferation indicated that these magnetic diamond samples were not cytotoxic. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polycrystalline diamonds doped with Fe, Cr and Ni acquire ferromagnetic properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CVD diamonds have been prepared with magnetic and semiconductor properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Micro/nanocrystalline diamonds show good cell viability with fibroblast proliferation.

  5. Electrochemical Behaviour of Sputtering Deposited DLC Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Erjia; ZENG A,LIU L X

    2003-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were deposited via magnetron sputtering process. The energetic ion bombardment on the surface of growing film is one of the major parameters that control the atom mobility on the film surface and further the physical and chemical characteristics of the films. In this study, the energy of carbon ions was monitored by changing sputtering power density, and its effect on the electrochemical performance of the films was investigated. For the deposition at a higher sputtering power density, a higher sp3 content in the DLC films was achieved with denser structure and increased film-substrate adhesion. The impedance at the interface of Si substrate/sulfuric acid solution was significantly enhanced, and at the same time higher film resistance, lower capacitance, higher breakdown potential and longer breakdown time were observed, which were related to the significant sp3 content of the DLC films.

  6. Characteristics of Nitrogen Doped Diamond-Like Carbon Films Prepared by Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering for Electronic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaehyeong; Choi, Byung Hui; Yun, Jung-Hyun; Park, Yong Seob

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic diamond-like carbon (DLC) is a carbon-based material used mainly in cutting tool coatings and as an abrasive material. The market for DLC has expanded into electronics, optics, and acoustics because of its distinct electrical and optical properties. In this work, n-doped DLC (N:DLC) films were deposited on p-type silicon substrates using an unbalanced magnetron sputtering (UBMS) method. We investigated the effect of the working pressure on the microstructure and electrical properties of n-doped DLC films. The structural properties of N:DLC films were investigated by Raman spectroscopy and SEM-EDX, and the electrical properties of films were investigated by observing the changes in the resistivity and current-voltage (I-V) properties. The N:DLC films prepared by UBMS in this study demonstrated good conducting and physical properties with n-doping.

  7. Preparation of grain size controlled boron-doped diamond thin films and their applications in selective detection of glucose in basic solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Boron-doped diamond (BDD) thin films with different crystal grain sizes were prepared by controlling the reacting gas pressure using hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD).The morphologies and structures of the prepared diamond thin films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy.The electrochemical responses of K4Fe(CN)6 on different BDD electrodes were investigated.The results suggested that electron transfer was faster at the boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (BDND) thin film electrodes in comparison with that at other BDD thin film electrodes.The prepared BDD thin film electrodes without any modification were used to directly detect glucose in the basic solution.The results showed that the as-prepared BDD thin film electrodes exhibited good selectivity for detecting glucose in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA).The higher sensitivity was observed on the BDND thin film grown on the boron-doped microcrystalline diamond (BDMD) thin film surface,and the linear response range,sensitivity and the low detection limit were 0.25–10 mM,189.1 μA mmol-1 cm-2 and 25 μM (S/N=3) for glucose in the presence of AA and UA,respectively.

  8. Diamond heteroepitaxial lateral overgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yung-Hsiu

    This dissertation describes improvements in the growth of single crystal diamond by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Heteroepitaxial (001) diamond was grown on 1 cm. 2 a-plane sapphiresubstrates using an epitaxial (001) Ir thin-film as a buffer layer. Low-energy ion bombardment of the Ir layer, a process known as bias-enhanced nucleation, is a key step in achieving a high density of diamond nuclei. Bias conditions were optimized to form uniformly-high nucleation densities across the substrates, which led to well-coalesced diamond thin films after short growth times. Epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) was used as a means of decreasing diamond internal stress by impeding the propagation of threading dislocations into the growing material. Its use in diamond growth requires adaptation to the aggressive chemical and thermal environment of the hydrogen plasma in a CVD reactor. Three ELO variants were developed. The most successful utilized a gold (Au) mask prepared by vacuum evaporation onto the surface of a thin heteroepitaxial diamond layer. The Au mask pattern, a series of parallel stripes on the micrometer scale, was produced by standard lift-off photolithography. When diamond overgrows the mask, dislocations are largely confined to the substrate. Differing degrees of confinement were studied by varying the stripe geometry and orientation. Significant improvement in diamond quality was found in the overgrown regions, as evidenced by reduction of the Raman scattering linewidth. The Au layer was found to remain intact during diamond overgrowth and did not chemically bond with the diamond surface. Besides impeding the propagation of threading dislocations, it was discovered that the thermally-induced stress in the CVD diamond was significantly reduced as a result of the ductile Au layer. Cracking and delamination of the diamond from the substrate was mostly eliminated. When diamond was grown to thicknesses above 0.1 mm it was found that

  9. STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND THERMAL STABILITY OF DIAMOND-LIKE CARBON FILMS PREPARED BY ARC ION PLATING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.S. Zou; J.D. Zheng; J. Gong; C. Sun; R.F. Huang; L.S. Wen

    2005-01-01

    Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) films have been prepared on Si(100) substrates by arc ion plating in conjunction with pulse bias voltage under H2 atmosphere. The deposited films have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results show that the surface of the film is smooth and dense without any cracks, and the surface roughness is low. The bonding characteristic of the films has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. It shows the sp3 bond content of the film deposited at -200V is 26.7%. The hardness and elastic modulus of the film determined by nanoindentation technique are 30.8 and 250.1GPa, respectively. The tribological characteristic of the films reveals that they have low friction coefficient and good wear-resistance. After deposition, the films have been annealed in the range of 350-700℃ for 1h in vacuum to investigate the thermal stability. Raman spectra indicate that the ID/IG ratio and G peak position have few detectable changes below 500℃. Further increasing the annealing temperature, the hydrogen can be released, the structure rearranges, and the phase transition of sp3 configured carbon to sp2 configured carbon appears.

  10. 等离子体刻蚀并沉积类金刚石膜制备超疏水木材%Fabrication of superhydrophobic wood by plasma etching and deposition of diamond-like carbon films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解林坤; 王洪艳; 代沁伶; 杜官本

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the fabrication of superhydrophobic wood of Acer saccharum Marsh. using a combination of O2 plasma etching and plasma deposition of a thin hydrophilic diamond⁃like carbon ( DLC) coating in order to impart wood with controlled wetting properties. The effect of O2 plasma etching on roughness was investigated using the scanning electron microscopy ( SEM) and laser scanning confocal microscope ( LSCM) profilometry. The wetting behavior was de⁃termined by the static water contact angle measurement. Furthermore, the morphology, thickness of deposited films, ele⁃ment composition and their chemical bonding information of the wood surfaces before and after the treatment were also examined with SEM, the ellipsometer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ( XPS) . The results showed that the wood surfaces of the average roughness, root mean square roughness and peak⁃to⁃valley roughness increased with longer etching time within 30 min. However, the wood surface roughness decreased slightly after the prolonged etching time of 45 min. The static water contact angles of the wood surface increased firstly and then decreased with the increase of etch⁃ing time and attained a maximum value for 157�2° with 30 min etching and after depositing DLC film for 1�5 min, but the static water contact angle of the wood surface etched for 45 min and after depositing DLC film for the same time was 152�3° . The static water contact angles decreased gradually with an increase in deposition times if the wood surfaces were subjected to the same time etching. From the data of the deposition thickness, the deposition rate of DLC films was calculated, which was constant (51�7±4�5) nm/min over the deposition times investigated. The content of oxygen ele⁃ment reduced obviously and the diamond⁃like characteristic peaks of sp2-C and sp3-C presented after the wood surfaces deposited with the DLC film coating.%为使木材表面具备疏水性能,采用等离

  11. Chemical and mechanical properties of silica hybrid films from NaOH catalyzed sols for micromachining with diamond cutting tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prenzel, T., E-mail: tprenzel@uni-bremen.de [Stiftung Institut für Werkstofftechnik, Badgasteiner Str. 3, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Mehner, A. [Stiftung Institut für Werkstofftechnik, Badgasteiner Str. 3, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Lucca, D.A.; Qi, Y.; Harriman, T.A. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 218 Engineering North, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Mutlugünes, Y. [Labor für Mikrozerspanung — LFM, Badgasteiner Str. 2, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Shojaee, S.A. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 218 Engineering North, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Wang, Y.Q.; Williams, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Nastasi, M. [Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research, University of Nebraska, 230 Whittier Research Center, 2200 Vine Street Lincoln, NE 68583-0857 (United States); Zoch, H.-W. [Stiftung Institut für Werkstofftechnik, Badgasteiner Str. 3, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Swiderek, P. [Institute of Applied and Physical Chemistry, University of Bremen, Leobener Straße, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2013-03-01

    Manufacturing of microstructured mold surfaces was realized by the micromachining of thick sol–gel silica hybrid coatings. The films were deposited onto pre-machined steel molds by spin coating using NaOH-catalyzed sols from organosilicate precursors. The effect of the sol synthesis and the heat treatment on the mechanical and chemical properties of these films was studied in order to develop thick and crack-free films with appropriate properties for micromachining with diamond cutting tools. The hardness was measured by nanoindentation as a function of the heat treatment temperature. The transition from soft organic gel films to hard glass-like films due to the thermal treatment was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection, and Raman and infrared spectroscopies. The films from NaOH catalyzed sols showed a complex transition from aliphatic carbon originating from hydrocarbon groups to carbonates, carboxylates and disordered carbon clusters. - Highlights: ► Thick silica hybrid films were micromachined with diamond cutting tools. ► The nanoindentation hardness increased with the heat treatment temperature. ► The role of sodium hydroxide in base catalyzed silica sols was studied. ► Formation of carbonates, carboxylates and disordered carbon was observed.

  12. High-temperature Infrared Transmission of Free-standing Diamond Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HEI Li-fu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The combination of low absorption and extreme mechanical and thermal properties make diamond a compelling choice for some more extreme far infrared (8-12 μm window applications. The optical properties of CVD diamond at elevated temperatures are critical to many of these extreme applications. The infrared transmission of free-standing diamond films prepared by DC arc plasma jet were studied at temperature varied conditions. The surface morphology, structure feature and infrared optical properties of diamond films were tested by optical microscope, X-ray diffraction, laser Raman and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results show that the average transmittance for 8-12μm is decreased from 65.95% at 27℃ to 52.5% at 500℃,and the transmittance drop is in three stages. Corresponding to the drop of transmittance with the temperature, diamond film absorption coefficient increases with the rise of temperature. The influence of the change of surface state of diamond films on the optical properties of diamond films is significantly greater than the influence on the internal structure.

  13. Thin Film & Deposition Systems (Windows)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Coating Lab: Contains chambers for growing thin film window coatings. Plasma Applications Coating Lab: Contains chambers for growing thin film window coatings. Solar...

  14. Thin Film & Deposition Systems (Windows)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Coating Lab: Contains chambers for growing thin film window coatings. Plasma Applications Coating Lab: Contains chambers for growing thin film window coatings. Solar...

  15. Synthesis of Diamond Films on Molybdenum Substrate Surface by Combustion Flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mamoru; Kamiya, Osamu; Ohyoshi, Tadashi

    Diamond films were synthesized on a Mo substrate using combustion flame. During the cooling process, most diamond films delaminated. From previous work it was shown that diamond films delaminated at a synthesis temperature less than 1300K (low temperature), and films did not delaminate at synthesis temperature more than 1400K (high temperature). In this study, to clarify the influences on the delamination of the interface, films synthesized at high temperature and low temperature were investigated by SEM and X-ray diffraction. The results show that in the case of low temperature, diamond films were synthesized on the Mo substrate, case of high temperature, Mo2C and diamond phases were synthesized on the Mo substrate. Thermally induced interfacial stress occurs due to the thermal expansion mismatch between the synthesized film and the Mo substrate. The interfacial stress by high temperature and low temperature was determined as the cause of the delamination. Thus, the interfacial stress of each synthesized temperature was calculated by a finite element method. The results show that the interfacial stress in the film synthesized by high temperature was smaller than that by the low temperature. As the buffer phases prevent the delamination, synthesized films by high temperature will be useful as hardcoating layer for a metal surface.

  16. Electrochemical Behaviour of Sputtering Deposited DLC Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUErjia; ZENGA; LIULX

    2003-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were deposited via magnetron sputtering process. The energetic ion hombardment on the surface of growing film is one of the major parameters that control the atom mobility on the flirt1 surface and further the physical and chemical characteristics of the films. In this study, the energy of carbon ions was monitored by changing sputtering powerdensity, and its effect on the electrochemical performance of the films was investigated. For the deposition at a higher sputtering power density, a higher sp3 content in the DLC films was achieved with denser structure and increased film-substrate adhesion. The impedance at the interface of Si substrate/sulfufic acid solution was significantly enhanced, and at the same time higher film resistance, lower capacitance, higher breakdown potential and longer breakdown time were observed, which were related to the significant sp3 content of the DLC films.

  17. Optical and structural properties of polycrystalline CVD diamond films grown on fused silica optical fibres pre-treated by high-power sonication seeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanowicz, R.; Śmietana, M.; Gnyba, M.; Gołunski, Ł.; Ryl, J.; Gardas, M.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the growth of polycrystalline chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond thin films on fused silica optical fibres has been investigated. The research results show that the effective substrate seeding process can lower defect nucleation, and it simultaneously increases surface encapsulation. However, the growth process on glass requires high seeding density. The effects of suspension type and ultrasonic power were the specific objects of investigation. In order to increase the diamond density, glass substrates were seeded using a high-power sonication process. The highest applied power of sonotrode reached 72 W during the performed experiments. The two, most common diamond seeding suspensions were used, i.e. detonation nanodiamond dispersed in (a) dimethyl sulfoxide and (b) deionised water. The CVD diamond nucleation and growth processes were performed using microwave plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition system. Next, the seeding efficiency was determined and compared using the numerical analysis of scanning electron microscopy images. The molecular composition of nucleated diamond was examined with micro-Raman spectroscopy. The sp3/sp2 band ratio was calculated using Raman spectra deconvolution method. Thickness, roughness, and optical properties of the nanodiamond films in UV-vis wavelength range were investigated by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry. It has been demonstrated that the high-power sonication process can improve the seeding efficiency on glass substrates. However, it can also cause significant erosion defects at the fibre surface. We believe that the proposed growth method can be effectively applied to manufacture the novel optical fibre sensors. Due to high chemical and mechanical resistance of CVD diamond films, deposition of such films on the sensors is highly desirable. This method enables omitting the deposition of an additional adhesion interlayer at the glass-nanocrystalline interface, and thus potentially increases

  18. Deposition of TiO2/Al2O3 bilayer on hydrogenated diamond for electronic devices: Capacitors, field-effect transistors, and logic inverters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. W.; Liao, M. Y.; Imura, M.; Banal, R. G.; Koide, Y.

    2017-06-01

    The wide bandgap semiconductor diamond has been studied to develop high-power and high-frequency electronic devices. Here, high dielectric constant (high-k) TiO2/Al2O3 bilayers are deposited on hydrogenated diamond (H-diamond) channel layers using sputter deposition (SD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) techniques. Thin ALD-Al2O3 films are employed as buffer layers for the SD-TiO2 and ALD-TiO2 on H-diamond to suppress plasma discharge effect and to decrease leakage current density (J), respectively. The electrical properties of the resulting TiO2/Al2O3/H-diamond metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors, MOS field-effect transistors (MOSFETs), and MOSFET logic inverters are investigated. With the same thickness (4.0 nm) for ALD-Al2O3 buffer layer, the ALD-TiO2/ALD-Al2O3/H-diamond MOS capacitor shows a lower J and better capacitance-voltage characteristics than the SD-TiO2/ALD-Al2O3/H-diamond capacitor. The maximum capacitance of the ALD-TiO2/ALD-Al2O3/H-diamond capacitor and the k value of the ALD-TiO2/ALD-Al2O3 bilayer are 0.83 μF cm-2 and 27.2, respectively. Valence band offset between ALD-TiO2 and H-diamond is calculated to be 2.3 ± 0.2 eV based on the element binding energies measured using an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique. Both the SD-TiO2/ALD-Al2O3/H-diamond and ALD-TiO2/ALD-Al2O3/H-diamond MOSFETs show p-type, pinch-off, and enhancement mode characteristics with on/off current ratios around 109. The subthreshold swings of them are 115 and as low as 79 mV dec-1, respectively. The ALD-TiO2/ALD-Al2O3/H-diamond MOSFET logic inverters, when coupled with load resistors, show distinct inversion characteristics with gains of 6.2-12.7.

  19. Recent Advances in the Deposition of Diamond Coatings on Co-Cemented Tungsten Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Polini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-cemented tungsten carbides, namely, hard metals are largely used to manufacture high wear resistant components in several manufacturing segments. Coating hard metals with superhard materials like diamond is of utmost interest as it can further extend their useful lifespan. The deposition of diamond coatings onto WC-Co can be extremely complicated as a result of poor adhesion. This can be essentially ascribed to (i the mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients between diamond and WC-Co, at the typical high temperatures inside the chemical vapour deposition (CVD chamber, generates large residual stresses at the interface; (ii the role of surface Co inside the WC-Co matrix during diamond CVD, which promotes carbon dissolution and diffusion. The present investigation reviews the techniques by which Co-cemented tungsten carbides can be treated to make them prone to receive diamond coatings by CVD. Further, it proposes interesting ecofriendly and sustainable alternatives to further improve the diamond deposition process as well as the overall performance of the coated hard metals.

  20. The Formation of Nanocrystalline Diamond Coating on WC Deposited by Microwave Assisted Plasma CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toff, M. R. M.; Hamzah, E.; Purniawan, A.

    2010-03-01

    Diamond is one form of carbon structure. The extreme hardness and high chemical resistant of diamond coatings determined that many works on this area relate to coated materials for tribological applications in biomedicine, as mechanical seals or cutting tools for hard machining operations. In the work, nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coated tungsten carbide (WC) have been deposited by microwave assisted plasma chemical vapor deposition (MAPCVD) from CH4/H2 mixtures. Morphology of NCD was investigated by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The quality of NCD is defined as ratio between diamond and non diamond and also full width at half maximum (FWHM) was determined using Raman spectra. The result found that the NCD structure can be deposited on WC surface using CH4/H2 gas mixture with grain size ˜20 nm to 100 nm. Increase %CH4 concentration due to increase the nucleation of NCD whereas decrease the quality of diamond. Based on Raman spectra, the quality of NCD is in the range ˜98.82-99.01% and 99.56-99.75% for NCD and microcrystalline (MCD), respectively. In addition, FWHM of NCD is high than MCD in the range of 8.664-62.24 cm-1 and 4.24-5.05 cm-1 for NCD and MCD respectively that indicate the crystallineity of NCD is smaller than MCD.

  1. The retunable SHF-range signal delay line based on ferroelectrics and diamond films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afanasyev M. S.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the principles of creation of a broadband miniature SHF-range signal delay line based on ferroelectrics and diamond films. The parameters of obtained ferroelectrics and diamond films have been given. The possible design of the delay line, executed as a micro strip transfer line of SHF-range signal with the concentrated planar variable capacity condensers is shown.

  2. Effect of temperature on the stability of diamond particles and continuous thin films by Raman imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaran, C. R.; Tiwari, Brajesh; Chandran, Maneesh; Bhattacharya, S. S.; Ramachandra Rao, M. S., E-mail: msrrao@iitm.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Nano Functional Materials Technology Centre (India)

    2013-03-15

    The stability of diamond thin films grown by hot filament CVD (HFCVD) upon thermal treatment was studied using Raman imaging. By adapting two different surface pretreatments, continuous microcrystalline diamond (MCD) thin films (grain size: 100-400 nm; cross-sectional thickness: {approx}300 nm) as well as thin film with isolated and coalesced diamond particles (particle size: 400-600 nm; cross-sectional thickness: {approx}200-300 nm) were grown. The thermal stability of isolated diamond particles and continuous MCD films annealed in air at atmospheric pressure was analyzed by Raman imaging. For Raman imaging, Raman spectra were collected over an area of 85 Multiplication-Sign 85 {mu}m using 532 nm laser (Nd:YAG) before and after thermal treatment. It was observed that the isolated diamond particles were stable for 1 h at {approx}750 Degree-Sign C, whereas for the same annealing duration, continuous MCD films grown under the same HFCVD condition were completely oxidized at 700 Degree-Sign C. From these results and analysis, the reason for the higher oxidation rates in the case of MCD and nanocrystalline diamond films is discussed.

  3. Raman spectra of amorphous carbon films deposited by SWP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junqi; Liu, Weiguo; Hang, Lingxia; Su, Junhong; Fan, Huiqing

    2010-10-01

    Amorphous carbon film is one of the most important anti-reflection protective films coated on infrared optical components. In this paper, hydrogen-free amorphous carbon films were deposited by new type surface-wave-sustained plasma (SWP) source with a graphite target at various experiment parameters. The laser Raman spectroscopy at wavelength of 514 nm was used to investigate the structure and bonding of these carbon films. The results showed consanguineous correlations between the intensity ratio ID/IG and the experiment parameters such as microwave power, target voltage and gas pressure applied to the SWP source. Raman spectra proved the structure of these carbon films prepared by SWP technique is typical diamond-like carbon (DLC). The analysis on G peak position and intensity ratio ID/IG indicated that Raman shifts moves to low wavenumber and ID/IG decreases with the increasing of microwave power from 150 W to 330 W. These results means the formation of sp3 bond prefers higher microwave power. DLC films prepared at target voltage of -200 V have higher sp3 content than that of -350 V, moreover, an increase of gas pressure during experiments yields higher sp3 content at the microwave power below 270 W, whereas the change of sp3 content is slight with the various conditions when microwave power exceeds 270 W.

  4. Resistance to protein adsorption and adhesion of fibroblasts on nanocrystalline diamond films: the role of topography and boron doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaide, María; Papaioannou, Stavros; Taylor, Andrew; Fekete, Ladislav; Gurevich, Leonid; Zachar, Vladimir; Pennisi, Cristian Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (BNCD) films exhibit outstanding electrochemical properties that make them very attractive for the fabrication of electrodes for novel neural interfaces and prosthetics. In these devices, the physicochemical properties of the electrode materials are critical to ensure an efficient long-term performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the relative contribution of topography and doping to the biological performance of BNCD films. For this purpose, undoped and boron-doped NCD films were deposited on low roughness (LR) and high roughness (HR) substrates, which were studied in vitro by means of protein adsorption and fibroblast growth assays. Our results show that BNCD films significantly reduce the adsorption of serum proteins, mostly on the LR substrates. As compared to fibroblasts cultured on LR BNCD films, cells grown on the HR BNCD films showed significantly reduced adhesion and lower growth rates. The mean length of fibronectin fibrils deposited by the cells was significantly increased in the BNCD coated substrates, mainly in the LR surfaces. Overall, the largest influence on protein adsorption, cell adhesion, proliferation, and fibronectin deposition was due to the underlying sub-micron topography, with little or no influence of boron doping. In perspective, BNCD films displaying surface roughness in the submicron range may be used as a strategy to reduce the fibroblast growth on the surface of neural electrodes.

  5. Deposition and Tribological Properties of Sulfur-Doped DLC Films Deposited by PBII Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nutthanun Moolsradoo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur-doped diamond-like carbon films (S-DLC fabricated from C2H2 and SF6 mixtures were used to study the effects of sulfur content and negative pulse bias voltage on the deposition and tribological properties of films prepared by plasma-based ion implantation (PBII. The structure and relative concentration of the films were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. Hardness and elastic modulus of films were measured by nanoindentation hardness testing. Tribological characteristics of films were performed using a ball-on-disk friction tester. The results indicate that with the increasing sulfur content, the hardness and elastic modulus decrease. Additionally, by changing the negative pulse bias voltage from 0 kV to −5 kV, the hardness and elastic modulus increase, while the friction coefficient and specific wear rate tends to decrease. Moreover, at a negative pulse bias voltage of −5 kV and flow-rate ratio of 1 : 2, there is considerable improvement in friction coefficient of 0.05 under ambient air is due to the formation of a transfer films on the interface. The decrease in the friction coefficient of films doped with 4.9 at.% sulfur is greater under high vacuum (0.03 than under ambient air (>0.1.

  6. Impact of nitrogen doping on growth and hydrogen impurity incorporation of thick nanocrystalline diamond films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gu Li-Ping; Tang Chun-Jiu; Jiang Xue-Fan; J.L.Pintob

    2011-01-01

    A much larger amount of bonded hydrogen was found in thick nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films produced by only adding 0.24% N2 into 4% CH4/H2 plasma, as compared to the high quality transparent microcrystalline diamond (MCD) films, grown using the same growth parameters except for nitrogen. These experimental results clearly evidence that defect formation and impurity incorporation (for example, N and H) impeding diamond grain growth is the main formation mechanism of NCD upon nitrogen doping and strongly support the model proposed in the literature that nitrogen competes with CHX (x = 1,2,3) growth species for adsorption sites.

  7. Microstructures of metallic film and diamond growth from Fe-Ni-C system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The microstructures of metallic film surrounding diamond have been systemically studied using the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the atom force microscopy (AFM). The film can be divided into three layers (inner layer near diamond, external layer near graphite and middle layer). The graphite cannot be directly transformed into diamond in the film at HTHP; there exists a parallel relationship between (111) of γ-(Fe,Ni) and (110) of Fe3C in the inner layer; the sawtooth-like step morphology found by AFM on the film is similar to that of corresponding diamond surface. A new model for diamond growth at HPHT is proposed from the parallel relationship and sawtooth-like step morphology. It is believed that Fe3C may be a transitional phase in the course of diamond growth, γ-(Fe,Ni) in the inner layer can absorb carbon atom groups with lamella structure from Fe3C, and then the carbon groups stack on growing diamond.

  8. Diamond Integrated Optomechanical Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Rath, Patrik; Nebel, Christoph; Wild, Christoph; Pernice, Wolfram H P

    2013-01-01

    Diamond offers unique material advantages for the realization of micro- and nanomechanical resonators due to its high Young's modulus, compatibility with harsh environments and superior thermal properties. At the same time, the wide electronic bandgap of 5.45eV makes diamond a suitable material for integrated optics because of broadband transparency and the absence of free-carrier absorption commonly encountered in silicon photonics. Here we take advantage of both to engineer full-scale optomechanical circuits in diamond thin films. We show that polycrystalline diamond films fabricated by chemical vapour deposition provide a convenient waferscale substrate for the realization of high quality nanophotonic devices. Using free-standing nanomechanical resonators embedded in on-chip Mach-Zehnder interferometers, we demonstrate efficient optomechanical transduction via gradient optical forces. Fabricated diamond resonators reproducibly show high mechanical quality factors up to 11,200. Our low cost, wideband, carri...

  9. 11B-NMR study in boron-doped diamond films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mukuda, T. Tsuchida, A. Harada, Y. Kitaoka, T. Takenouchi, Y. Takano, M. Nagao, I. Sakaguchi and H. Kawarada

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated an origin of the superconductivity discovered in boron (B-doped diamonds by means of 11B-NMR on heteroepitaxially grown (1 1 1 and (1 0 0 films and polycrystalline film. The characteristic difference of B-NMR spectral shape for the (1 1 1 and (1 0 0 thin films is demonstrated as arising from the difference in the concentration (nB(1 of boron substituted for carbon. It is revealed from a scaling between a superconducting transition temperature Tc and nB(1 that the holes doped into diamond via the substitution of boron for carbon are responsible for the onset of superconductivity. The result suggests that the superconductivity in boron-doped diamond is mediated by the electron–phonon interaction brought about a high Debye temperature ~1860 K characteristic for the diamond structure.

  10. Multi-Length Scale Tribology of Electrophoretically Deposited Nickel-Diamond Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Shikha; Goel, Sneha; Pandey, Chandra Prabha; Balani, Kantesh

    2017-02-01

    Electrophoretically deposited (EPD) nickel and its composite coatings are widely used to enhance the life span of continuous ingot casting molds in the steel, aerospace and automotive industries. This article reports the effect of different concentrations of diamond particles (2.5-10 g/L) on the wear mechanism of EPD Ni. The distribution of diamond particles in the Ni matrix was observed using Voronoi tessellation. Variation in COF was observed by a fretting wear test to be 0.51 ± 0.07 for Ni, which decreases to 0.35 ± 0.03 for the Ni-diamond coatings. The wear volume of the coatings with 7.5 g/L concentration of diamond was observed to be a minimum (0.051 ± 0.02 × 10-3 mm3) compared with other composite coatings. Further, the micro-scratch testing of the coatings also exhibited a reduced COF (0.03-0.12) for 7.5 g/L diamond concentration compared with Ni (0.08-0.13). Higher wear resistance of the diamond-added coatings (optimum 7.5 g/L concentration) is due to the balance between the dispersion strengthening mechanism and the enhancement of the load-bearing capacity due to the incorporation of diamond particles. Thus, these composites can be used for applications in automotive and aerospace industries.

  11. Production and testing of a synthetic diamond film radiation dosimeter for radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Fidanzio, A; Venanzi, C; Pinzari, F; Piermattei, A

    2002-01-01

    A detector, constituted by a polycrystalline chemical vapor deposited diamond film, has been made for on-line radiotherapy beam analysis in terms of dose distributions in water equivalent material. Preliminary results are reported which evidence that the leakage current can be a limiting parameter for an efficient collection of the charge carriers produced by the ionizing radiation. A signal to noise ratio near to 100 has been obtained. A priming effect similar to that found in natural diamond devices has also been evidenced, and a stable detector response was obtained after an accumulated dose of 5 Gy. The linearity has been achieved between the detector reading and the dose. The detector sensitivity resulted was equal to 77 nC/Gy per mm sup 3 of detector sensitive volume. A power law with exponent DELTA less than one has been found between detector reading and dose rate. However, when the dose rate dependence was corrected, the percentage depth doses, along an X-ray beam central axis, was in agreement with ...

  12. Diamond Ablators for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biener, J; Mirkarimi, P B; Tringe, J W; Baker, S L; Wang, Y M; Kucheyev, S O; Teslich, N E; Wu, K J; Hamza, A V; Wild, C; Woerner, E; Koidl, P; Bruehne, K; Fecht, H

    2005-06-21

    Diamond has a unique combination of physical properties for the inertial confinement fusion ablator application, such as appropriate optical properties, high atomic density, high yield strength, and high thermal conductivity. Here, we present a feasible concept to fabricate diamond ablator shells. The fabrication of diamond capsules is a multi-step process, which involves diamond chemical vapor deposition on silicon mandrels followed by polishing, microfabrication of holes, and removing of the silicon mandrel by an etch process. We also discuss the pros and cons of coarse-grained optical quality and nanocrystalline chemical vapor deposition diamond films for the ablator application.

  13. Liquid phase deposition of electrochromic thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Thomas J.; Rubin, Michael D.

    2000-08-18

    Thin films of titanium, zirconium and nickel oxides were deposited on conductive SnO2:F glass substrates by immersion in aqueous solutions. The films are transparent, conformal, of uniform thickness and appearance, and adhere strongly to the substrates. On electrochemical cycling, TiO2, mixed TiO2-ZrO2, and NiOx films exhibited stable electrochromism with high coloration efficiencies. These nickel oxide films were particularly stable compared with films prepared by other non-vacuum techniques. The method is simple, inexpensive, energy efficient, and readily scalable to larger substrates.

  14. Perovskite Thin Films via Atomic Layer Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Sutherland, Brandon R.

    2014-10-30

    © 2014 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. (Graph Presented) A new method to deposit perovskite thin films that benefit from the thickness control and conformality of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is detailed. A seed layer of ALD PbS is place-exchanged with PbI2 and subsequently CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite. These films show promising optical properties, with gain coefficients of 3200 ± 830 cm-1.

  15. Perovskite thin films via atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Brandon R; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Adachi, Michael M; Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Wong, Chris T O; McDowell, Jeffrey J; Xu, Jixian; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Ning, Zhijun; Houtepen, Arjan J; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-01-01

    A new method to deposit perovskite thin films that benefit from the thickness control and conformality of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is detailed. A seed layer of ALD PbS is place-exchanged with PbI2 and subsequently CH3 NH3 PbI3 perovskite. These films show promising optical properties, with gain coefficients of 3200 ± 830 cm(-1) .

  16. Fission reactor flux monitors based on single-crystal CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almaviva, S.; Marinelli, M.; Prestopino, G.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); INFN - Sezione Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' (Italy); Milani, E. [INFN - Sezione Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' (Italy); Angelone, M.; Lattanzi, D.; Pillon, M. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via E. Fermi 45, 00144 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Rosa, R. [Dipartimento Fusione e Presidio Nucleare ENEA C.R. Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Roma (Italy)

    2007-09-15

    Diamond based thermal neutron flux monitors have been fabricated using single crystal diamond films, grown by chemical vapour deposition. A 3 {mu}m thick {sup 6}LiF layer was thermally evaporated on the detector surface as a converting material for thermal neutron monitoring via the {sup 6}Li(n, {alpha}) T nuclear reaction. The detectors were tested in a fission nuclear reactor. One of them was positioned 80 cm above the core mid-plane, where the neutron flux is 2.2 x 10{sup 9} neutrons/cm{sup 2}s at 1 MW resulting in a device count rate of about 150000 cps. Good stability and reproducibility of the device output were proved over the whole reactor power range (up to 1 MW). During the irradiation, several pulse height spectra were recorded, in which both products of the {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha})T reaction, e.g. 2.73 MeV tritium and the 2.06 MeV {alpha}, were clearly identified, thus excluding a degradation of the detector response. A comparison with a reference fission chamber monitor pointed out a limitation of the adopted readout electronics at high count rates, due to multiple pile-up processes. However, once this effect is properly accounted for, a good linearity of the diamond flux monitor response is observed as a function of the fission chamber one, as well as an excellent agreement between the temporal behaviour of the two detector response. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Thermoluminescent dosimetry and of optically stimulated luminescence of diamond films grown up by the chemical vapor deposition technique exposed to beta radiation; Dosimetria termoluminiscente y de luminiscencia opticamente estimulada de peliculas de diamante crecidas por la tecnica de DVQ expuestas a radiacion beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendrez A, R.; Barboza F, M. [Centro de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, A.P. 5-88, Hermosillo, Sonora, 83190 (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    A study of the dosimetric properties through the thermoluminescence (Tl) and Optically stimulated luminescence (Lobe) in diamond films grown up by the chemical vapor deposition (Dq) techniques was realized.The films under study have thickness of 6, 12, 180 and 500 microns. The dose range was from 0 to 1.5 KGy, observing for the case of the thermoluminescent dosimetry a linear behavior in the range 0-300 Gy and a supra linearity effect in the range from 300-1500 Gy. For the case of the dosimetry by means of LOE a linear behavior in the range (0-300 Gy) without be enough for the saturation was observed, although some samples exhibit a linear behavior until 1500 Gy (6 microns). The irradiation was realized with a source of Strontium 90 of (40 mCi) and the photoestimulation for realizing the measures of LOE was realized using diodes emitting of laser light (470 nm) which generate until 50 MW/cm{sup 2}. The Tl peak which was used to realize the dosimetry such Tl as LOE was that located around 340 C degrees in the brilliance curve which presents another peaks centered around of 110, 190, and 340 C degrees, depending on the film. It was realized a study of the Tl signal drop and it was observed that after 3 hours the signal was stable reaching a decay of 15 %. the analysis of the drop in the Tl signal, immediately after to irradiate and after to photoestimulate with the blue light laser for observing the LOE, indicated that exists a fall in all the Tl peaks, decaying in greater proportion those of more low temperature. (Author)

  18. Collision cascades enhanced hydrogen redistribution in cobalt implanted hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, P.; Becker, H.-W.; Williams, G. V. M.; Hübner, R.; Heinig, K.-H.; Markwitz, A.

    2017-03-01

    Hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films produced by C3H6 deposition at 5 kV and implanted at room temperature with 30 keV Co atoms to 12 at.% show not only a bimodal distribution of Co atoms but also a massive redistribution of hydrogen in the films. Resonant nuclear reaction analysis was used to measure the hydrogen depth profiles (15N-method). Depletion of hydrogen near the surface was measured to be as low as 7 at.% followed by hydrogen accumulation from 27 to 35 at.%. A model is proposed considering the thermal energy deposited by collision cascade for thermal insulators. In this model, sufficient energy is provided for dissociated hydrogen to diffuse out of the sample from the surface and diffuse into the sample towards the interface which is however limited by the range of the incoming Co ions. At a hydrogen concentration of ∼35 at.%, the concentration gradient of the mobile unbounded hydrogen atoms is neutralised effectively stopping diffusion towards the interface. The results point towards new routes of controlling the composition and distribution of elements at the nanoscale within a base matrix without using any heat treatment methods. Exploring these opportunities can lead to a new horizon of materials and device engineering needed for enabling advanced technologies and applications.

  19. Field electron emission from undoped, continuous, submicron-thick diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternyak, O.; Akhvlediani, R.; Hoffman, A.; Wong, W. K.; Lee, S. T.; Lifshitz, Y.; Daren, S.; Cheifetz, E.

    2005-12-01

    The present work shows that the field electron emission (FEE) properties of polycrystalline diamond films can be enhanced by control over the film thickness. The FEE properties of undoped, continuous, and smooth submicron-thick diamond films with initial nucleation densities of ˜5×1010particles/cm2 were investigated as a function of diamond film thickness. A set of films with thickness ranging from 70-100to830nm yielded turn-on field values of 6-8V/μm and threshold field values of 8.5-17.5V/μm (for 0.3μA/cm2), respectively, without any conditioning. It was found that the films of thickness up to ˜370nm can sustain stable current density as high as 0.1A/cm2 without morphological modification. The thicker films, however, suffer from a strong degradation of the film and breakdown. The best FEE (lower turn-on and threshold fields and morphological stability) was obtained for a thin (100nm) continuous diamond film. This result is suggested to be attributed mainly to the efficient electron conduction from the back contact to the surface.

  20. Effect of interface layers on electron field emission properties of amorphous diamond films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    茅东升[1; 赵俊[2; 李炜[3; 王曦[4; 柳襄怀[5; 诸玉坤[6; 范忠[7; 周江云[8; 李琼[9; 徐静芳[10

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen-free high sp~3 content amorphous diamond (AD) films are deposited on three different substrates——Au-coated Si (Au/Si), Ti-coated Si (Ti/Si) and Si wafers. Electron field emission properties and fluorescent displays of the above AD films are studied by using a sample diode structure. The compositional profile of the interfaces of AD/Ti/Si and AD/Si is examined by using secondary ions mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Because of the reaction and interdiffusion between Ti and C, the formation of a thin TiC intermediate layer is possible between AD film and Ti/Si substrate. The field emission properties of AD/Ti/Si are sufficiently improved, especially its uniformity. A field emission density of 0.352 mA/cm~2 is obtained under an electric field of 19.7 V/μm. The value is much more than that of AD/Au/Si and AD/Si under the same electric field.

  1. Antithrombogenicity of Fluorinated Diamond-Like Carbon Films Coated Nano Porous Polyethersulfone (PES Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihisa Miki

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A nano porous polyethersulfone (PES membrane is widely used for aspects of nanofiltration, such as purification, fractionation and dialysis. However, the low-blood-compatibility characteristic of PES membrane causes platelets and blood cells to stick to the surface of the membrane and degrades ions diffusion through membrane, which further limits its application for dialysis systems. In this study, we deposited the fluorinated-diamond-like-carbon (F-DLC onto the finger like structure layer of the PES membrane. By doing this, we have the F-DLC films coating the membrane surface without sacrificing the membrane permeability. In addition, we examined antithrombogenicity of the F-DLC/PES membranes using a microfluidic device, and experimentally found that F-DLC drastically reduced the amount of blood cells attached to the surface. We have also conducted long-term experiments for 24 days and the diffusion characteristics were found to be deteriorated due to fouling without any surface modification. On the other hand, the membranes coated by F-DLC film gave a consistent diffusion coefficient of ions transfer through a membrane porous. Therefore, F-DLC films can be a great candidate to improve the antithrombogenic characteristics of the membrane surfaces in hemodialysis systems.

  2. Local impedance imaging of boron-doped polycrystalline diamond thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zieliński, A.; Ryl, J.; Burczyk, L.; Darowicki, K. [Department of Electrochemistry, Corrosion and Material Engineering, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12 Narutowicza St., 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Bogdanowicz, R., E-mail: rbogdan@eti.pg.gda.pl [Department of Metrology and Optoelectronics, Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunications and Informatics, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12 G. Narutowicza St., 80-233 Gdansk (Poland)

    2014-09-29

    Local impedance imaging (LII) was used to visualise surficial deviations of AC impedances in polycrystalline boron-doped diamond (BDD). The BDD thin film electrodes were deposited onto the highly doped silicon substrates via microwave plasma-enhanced CVD. The studied boron dopant concentrations, controlled by the [B]/[C] ratio in plasma, ranged from 1 × 10{sup 16} to 2 × 10{sup 21} atoms cm{sup −3}. The BDD films displayed microcrystalline structure, while the average size of crystallites decreased from 1 to 0.7 μm with increasing [B]/[C] ratios. The application of LII enabled a direct and high-resolution investigation of local distribution of impedance characteristics within the individual grains of BDD. Such an approach resulted in greater understanding of the microstructural control of properties at the grain level. We propose that the obtained surficial variation of impedance is correlated to the areas of high conductance which have been observed at the grain boundaries by using LII. We also postulate that the origin of high conductivity is due to either preferential boron accumulation, the presence of defects, or sp{sup 2} regions in the intragrain regions. The impedance modulus recorded by LII was in full agreement with the bulk impedance measurements. Both variables showed a decreasing trend with increasing [B]/[C] ratios, which is consistent with higher boron incorporation into BDD film.

  3. On the quantification of unbound hydrogen in diamond-like carbon-based thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Chechenin, N.G.; Chernykh, P.N.; Turkin, A; Vainchtein, David; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new and straightforward approach to quantify the content of unbound hydrogen in diamond-like carbon-based films. In the case of TiC/a-C:H nanocomposite films it is shown that the content of unbound and bound hydrogen can be deconvoluted via thermal release and elastic recoil de

  4. On the quantification of unbound hydrogen in diamond-like carbon-based thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Chechenin, N.G.; Chernykh, P.N.; Turkin, A; Vainchtein, David; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new and straightforward approach to quantify the content of unbound hydrogen in diamond-like carbon-based films. In the case of TiC/a-C:H nanocomposite films it is shown that the content of unbound and bound hydrogen can be deconvoluted via thermal release and elastic recoil de

  5. Substrate heating measurements in pulsed ion beam film deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Rej, D.J.; Waganaar, W.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Tallant, D.R. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Materials Science and Engineering Dept.; Thompson, M.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) films have been deposited at Los Alamos National Laboratory by pulsed ion beam ablation of graphite targets. The targets were illuminated by an intense beam of hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen ions at a fluence of 15-45 J/cm{sup 2}. Ion energies were on the order of 350 keV, with beam current rising to 35 kA over a 400 ns ion current pulse. Raman spectra of the deposited films indicate an increasing ratio of sp{sup 3} to sp{sup 2} bonding as the substrate is moved further away from the target and further off the target normal. Using a thin film platinum resistor at varying positions, we have measured the heating of the substrate surface due to the kinetic energy and heat of condensation of the ablated material. This information is used to determine if substrate heating is responsible for the lack of DLC in positions close to the target and near the target normal. Latest data and analysis will be presented.

  6. Large improvement of phosphorus incorporation efficiency in n-type chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Ryota; Yamamoto, Takashi; Janssens, Stoffel D.; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Koizumi, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is a promising way to generate n-type, e.g., phosphorus-doped, diamond layers for the fabrication of electronic components, which can operate at extreme conditions. However, a deeper understanding of the doping process is lacking and low phosphorus incorporation efficiencies are generally observed. In this work, it is shown that systematically changing the internal design of a non-commercial chemical vapor deposition chamber, used to grow diamond layers, leads to a large increase of the phosphorus doping efficiency in diamond, produced in this device, without compromising its electronic properties. Compared to the initial reactor design, the doping efficiency is about 100 times higher, reaching 10%, and for a very broad doping range, the doping efficiency remains highly constant. It is hypothesized that redesigning the deposition chamber generates a higher flow of active phosphorus species towards the substrate, thereby increasing phosphorus incorporation in diamond and reducing deposition of phosphorus species at reactor walls, which additionally reduces undesirable memory effects.

  7. Evaluation of the adhesion strength of diamond films brazed on K-10 type hard metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Sérgio Ivan dos

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The coating of cutting tools with diamond films considerably increases the tool performance due to the combination of the unique tribological properties of diamond with the bulk properties of the substrate (toughness. The tool performance, however, is strongly related to the adhesion strength between the film and the substrate. In this work our main goal was to propose and to test a procedure, based on a tensile strength test, to evaluate the adhesion strength of a diamond wafer brazed on a hard metal substrate, taking into account the effect of the brazing temperature and time. The temperature range studied was from 800 to 980 °C and the brazing time ranged from 3 to 40 min. The obtained results could be used to optimize the costs and time required to the production of high performance cutting tools with brazed diamond wafers.

  8. Electrical and magnetic properties of electrodeposited nickel incorporated diamond-like carbon thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, B., E-mail: pandey.beauty@yahoo.com [Department of Applied Physics, Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad 826004 (India); Das, D. [UGC-DAE CSR, Sector III/LB-8, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700098 (India); Kar, A.K. [Department of Applied Physics, Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad 826004 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Electrical and magnetic properties of DLC and Ni-DLC thin films are studied. • The ohmicity and conductivity of DLC films rise with nickel addition. • The ohmicity of Ni-DLC is enhanced with increase in dilution of electrolyte. • Dielectric loss is high for Ni-DLC and decreases with frequency till 100 kHz. • (m–H) and (m–T) curves of Ni-DLC indicate superparamagnetic behavior. - Abstract: Nanocomposite diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films have been synthesized by incorporating nickel (Ni) nanoparticles in DLC matrix with varying concentration of nickel. DLC and Ni-DLC thin films have been deposited on ITO coated glass substrates employing low voltage electrodeposition method. Electrical properties of the samples were studied by measuring current–voltage characteristics and dielectric properties. The current approaches toward an ohmic behavior with metal addition. This tendency of increasing ohmicity is enhanced with increase in dilution of the electrolyte. The conductivity increases with Ni addition and interestingly it continues to increase with dilution of Ni concentration in the electrolyte in the range of our study. Magnetic properties for DLC and Ni-DLC thin film samples were examined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements and Super Conducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) measurements. g-Value for DLC is 2.074, whereas it decreases to 2.055 with Ni addition in the electrolyte. This decrement arises from the increased sp{sup 2} content in DLC matrix. The magnetic moment vs. magnetic field (m–H) curves of Ni-DLC indicate superparamagnetic behavior which may be due to ferromagnetic contribution from the incorporated nickel nanoparticles in the DLC matrix. The ZFC curve of Ni-DLC after the blocking temperature shows a combined contribution of ferromagnetic, superparamagnetic and paramagnetic nature of the materials persisting up to 300 K.

  9. Enhanced selectivity of boron doped diamond electrodes for the detection of dopamine and ascorbic acid by increasing the film thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yao; Long, Hangyu; Ma, Li; Wei, Quiping; Li, Site; Yu, Zhiming; Hu, Jingyuan; Liu, Peizhi; Wang, Yijia; Meng, Lingcong

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, boron doped diamond (BDD) with different thickness were prepared by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The performance of BDD electrodes for detecting dopamine (DA) and ascorbic acid (AA) were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectra reveal the grain size increases and the film quality improves with the increase of film thickness. Electrochemical test show that the transfer coefficient in [Fe3 (CN) 6]3-/4- redox system increases with the increase of the film thickness. The results of selectivity and sensitivity for DA mixed with AA detection show that 8h-BDD and 12h-BDD electrodes possess well selective separated oxidation peaks of DA and AA, and the 12h-BDD electrode exhibits optimal sensitivity until the DA concentration drops to 1 μ M.

  10. Characterization of Diamond Like Carbon Film%DLC膜的表征方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙艳明

    2012-01-01

    DLC(Diamond like carbon)薄膜的表征方法很多,发展的很快,在实验中我们经常采用多种性能测试方法,综合分析,得到较可靠的信息。%Diamond like carbon film has many characterization,growing fast.In the experiment,we often use a variety of performance test,comprehensive analysis,to obtain more reliable information.

  11. Plasma deposition of diamond-like carbon and fluorinated amorphous carbon and the resultant properties and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glew, Alexander David

    Researchers first created diamondlike carbon (DLC) 50 years ago, but it has only been the subject of intense research for the last decade. DLC is a highly stressed thin film that exists as a mixture of diamond like sp 3 and graphite like sp2 bonded carbon, with 0--50% H. Many believe that high intrinsic stress states are necessary to stabilize the carbon spa content responsible for the high hardness of DLC. This author's goals include fabricating high quality fluorinated amorphous carbon (FLAC) films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), exploring the relationships between the processing parameters and the dielectric value, as well as the related material properties which limit the useful application of FLAC. An improved understanding of the fundamentals behind FLAC processing may allow workers to improve upon the properties limiting its use, such as intrinsic stress, thermal stability, and thermal conductivity. DLC and FLAC film hardness ranged from 14--16 GP and 16--18 GPa respectively. Their film stress ranged from 800 MPa to a 10 GPa. A study of the thickness dependent properties showed that only films thicker than 200 nm were able to achieve stresses greater than approximately 1.6 GPa, the room temperature transition pressure of graphite to diamond. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements also yielded different C sp3 contents for films of varying thickness deposited under the same conditions, helping to confirm a thickness dependence of film properties greater than 200 nm. Observation of the stress in real time during annealing of the films on Si wafers yielded activation energy values for the stress relief of DLC and FLAC as 0.11 and 0.24 eV respectively, and the CTE of DLC as 10.6 x 10-6 C-1. The stress relief mechanism consists of kinetically limited network arrangements that occur in highly stressed zones due heating, which are also the cause of the reduction in dielectric constant that occurs during rapid thermal annealing. Thermal

  12. Interlayer utilization (including metal borides) for subsequent deposition of NSD films via microwave plasma CVD on 316 and 440C stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, Jared

    Diamond thin films have promising applications in numerous fields due to the extreme properties of diamonds in conjunction with the surface enhancement of thin films. Biomedical applications are numerous including temporary implants and various dental and surgical instruments. The unique combination of properties offered by nanostructured diamond films that make it such an attractive surface coating include extreme hardness, low obtainable surface roughness, excellent thermal conductivity, and chemical inertness. Regrettably, numerous problems exist when attempting to coat stainless steel with diamond generating a readily delaminated film: outward diffusion of iron to the surface, inward diffusion of carbon limiting necessary surface carbon precursor, and the mismatch between the coefficients of thermal expansion yielding substantial residual stress. While some exotic methods have been attempted to overcome these hindrances, the most common approach is the use of an intermediate layer between the stainless steel substrate and the diamond thin film. In this research, both 316 stainless steel disks and 440C stainless steel ball bearings were tested with interlayers including discrete coatings and graded, diffusion-based surface enhancements. Titanium nitride and thermochemical diffusion boride interlayers were both examined for their effectiveness at allowing for the growth of continuous and adherent diamond films. Titanium nitride interlayers were deposited by cathodic arc vacuum deposition on 440C bearings. Lower temperature diamond processing resulted in improved surface coverage after cooling, but ultimately, both continuity and adhesion of the nanostructured diamond films were unacceptable. The ability to grow quality diamond films on TiN interlayers is in agreement with previous work on iron and low alloy steel substrates, and the similarly seen inadequate adhesion strength is partially a consequence of the lacking establishment of an interfacial carbide phase

  13. Fabrication of High Transparency Diamond-Like Carbon Film Coating on D263T Glass at Room Temperature as an Antireflection Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chii-Ruey Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to deposit high transmittance diamond-like carbon (DLC thin films on D263T glass substrate at room temperature via a diamond powder target using the radio frequency (RF magnetron sputtering technique. Moreover, various process parameters were used to tune the properties of the thin films by using the Taguchi method. Experimental results show that the content of sp3 bonded carbon decreases in accordance with the effect of the substrate temperature. In addition, the hardness of all as-deposited single-layer DLC films ranges from 13.2 to 22.5 GPa, and the RMS surface roughness was improved significantly with the decrease in sputtering pressure. The water repellent of the deposited DLC films improved significantly with the increase of the sp3 content, and its contact angle was larger than that of the noncoated one by 1.45 times. Furthermore, the refraction index (n of all as-deposited DLC films ranges from 1.95 to 2.1 at λ = 600 nm. These results demonstrate that the thickness increased as the reflectance increased. DLC film under an RF power of 150 W possesses high transmissive ability (>81% and low average reflectance ability (<9.5% in the visible wavelengths (at λ = 400–700 nm.

  14. UV-laser treatment of nanodiamond seeds—a valuable tool for modification of nanocrystalline diamond films properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlček, J.; Fitl, P.; Vrňata, M.; Fekete, L.; Taylor, A.; Fendrych, F.

    2013-01-01

    This work aimed to study the UV-laser treatment of precursor (i.e. nanodiamond (ND) seeds on silicon substrates) and its influence on the properties of grown nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films. Pulsed Nd : YAG laser operating at the fourth harmonic frequency (laser fluence EL = 250 mJ cm-2, pulse duration 5 ns) was used as a source, equipped with an optical system for focusing laser beam onto the sample, allowing exposure of a local spot and horizontal patterning. The variable parameters were: number of pulses (from 5 to 400) and the working atmosphere (He, Ar and O2). Ablation and/or graphitization of seeded nanodiamond particles were observed. Further the microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition was employed to grow NCD films on exposed and non-exposed areas of silicon substrates. The size, shape and density distribution of laser-treated nanodiamond seeds were observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and their chemical composition by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The resulting NCD films (uniform thickness of 400 nm) were characterized by: Raman spectroscopy to analyse occurrence of graphitic phase, and AFM to observe morphology and surface roughness. The highest RMS roughness (˜85 nm) was achieved when treating the precursor in He atmosphere. Horizontal microstructures of diamond films were fabricated.

  15. Effects of nitrogen content on structure and electrical properties of nitrogen-doped fluorinated diamond-like carbon films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jian-rong; LI Xin-hai; WANG Zhi-xing

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped fluorinated diamond-like carbon (FN-DLC) films were prepared on single crystal silicon substrate by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) under different deposited conditions with CF4,CH4 and nitrogen as source gases.The influence of nitrogen content on the structure and electrical properties of the films was studied.The films were investigated in terms of surface morphology,microstructure,chemical composition and electrical properties.Atomic force microscopy (AFM) results revealed that the surface morphology of the films became smooth due to doping nitrogen.Fourier transform infrared absorption spectrometry (FTIR) results showed that amouts of C=N and C≡N bonds increased gradually with increasing nitrogen partial pressure r (r=p(N_2)/p(N_2+CF_4+CH_4)).Gaussian fit results of C 1s and N 1s in X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) showed that the incorporation of nitrogen presented mainly in the forms of β-C_3N_4 and a-CN_x (x=1,2,3) in the films.The current-voltage (I-V) measurement results showed that the electrical conductivity of the films increased with increasing nitrogen content.

  16. Pulsed laser deposition of tantalum pentoxide film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.-Y.; Boyd, I. W.

    We report thin tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) films grown on quartz and silicon substrates by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique employing a Nd:YAG laser (wavelength λ=532 nm) in various O2 gas environments. The effect of oxygen pressure, substrate temperature, and annealing under UV irradiation using a 172-nm excimer lamp on the properties of the grown films has been studied. The optical properties determined by UV spectrophotometry were also found to be a sensitive function of oxygen pressure in the chamber. At an O2 pressure of 0.2 mbar and deposition temperatures between 400 and 500 °C, the refractive index of the films was around 2.18 which is very close to the bulk Ta2O5 value of 2.2, and an optical transmittance around 90% in the visible region of the spectrum was obtained. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the as-deposited films were amorphous at temperatures below 500 °C and possessed an orthorhombic (β-Ta2O5) crystal structure at temperatures above 600 °C. The most significant result of the present study was that oxygen pressure could be used to control the composition and modulate optical band gap of the films. It was also found that UV annealing can significantly improve the optical and electrical properties of the films deposited at low oxygen pressures (<0.1 mbar).

  17. A methodological toolkit for field assessments of artisanally mined alluvial diamond deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirico, Peter G.; Malpeli, Katherine C.

    2014-01-01

    This toolkit provides a standardized checklist of critical issues relevant to artisanal mining-related field research. An integrated sociophysical geographic approach to collecting data at artisanal mine sites is outlined. The implementation and results of a multistakeholder approach to data collection, carried out in the assessment of Guinea’s artisanally mined diamond deposits, also are summarized. This toolkit, based on recent and successful field campaigns in West Africa, has been developed as a reference document to assist other government agencies or organizations in collecting the data necessary for artisanal diamond mining or similar natural resource assessments.

  18. Deposition and Characterization of Zinc Oxide Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seniye KARAKAYA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide (ZnO is suitable for optoelectronic applications due to its electrical and optical properties. The present work deals with the preparation and characterization of ZnO films deposited by the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis method. The starting solution was zinc acetate. Effects of substrate temperature on films properties have been investigated. Optical properties of the films have been characterized by investigating transmittance, absorbance and photoluminescence (PL spectra. Optical transmission spectrum shows that ZnO films have high transmission (about 80% in visible region for substrate temperatures at 350oC. Surface morphology of the films has also been analyzed by atomic force microscope (AFM. Four probes conductivity measurements have been used for electrical characterization. The resistivity of ZnO films increases with increasing substrate temperatures

  19. Diamond-like Carbon Thin Films Deposited on Ti6Al4V Alloy Surface by Plasma Gun at Atmospheric Pressure%钛合金表面大气压等离子体枪制备类金刚石薄膜

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈飞; 周海; 张跃飞; 吕反修

    2012-01-01

    在大气下,采用大气压介质阻挡放电(DBD)等离子体枪在低温下<350℃),以甲烷为单体,氩气为工作气体,在Ti6Al4V钛合金表面制备一层类金刚石薄膜(DLC),以期改善钛合金表面摩擦学性能.利用激光拉曼(Raman)光谱和X射线光电子能谱(XPS)分析了所制备DLC薄膜的结构;利用扫描电子显微镜(SEM)观察DLC薄膜的表面形貌;利用划痕仪测量了DLC薄膜与基体的结合力;利用球-盘摩擦磨损实验仪对DLC薄膜的耐磨性能进行了研究.结果表明:在本实验工艺条件下沉积的类金刚石薄膜厚度约为1.0 μm,薄膜均匀且致密,表面粗糙度Ra为13.23 nm.类金刚石薄膜与基体结合力的临界载荷达到31.0N.DLC薄膜具有优良的减摩性,Ti6Al4V表面沉积DLC薄膜后摩擦系数为0.15,较Ti6Al4V基体的摩擦系数0.50明显减小,耐磨性能得到提高.%At atmospheric pressure, diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films were deposited on the T16A14V alloy surface by a DBD plasma gun at low temperature (<350℃), with CH4 as a precursor and Ar as dilution gas. The structure of the DLC thin film was analyzed by Laser Raman spectroscope and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The surface morphology was observed through scanning electron microscopy. The adhesion between the DLC thin film and the substrate was investigated with the scribe testing. The friction and wear behavior of the DLC thin films under dry sliding against GCrlS steel was evaluated on a ball-on-disc test rig. The results show that it is feasible to prepare a DLC thin film of 1.0 um thickness by a plasma gun. The film is uniform and dense and the surface roughness R. Is about 13.23 nm. The critical load of adhesion force between the DLC thin film and the substrate is 31.0 N. It has been found that the DLC thin film has excellent friction- and wear-resistant behavior. The friction coefficient of the Ti6A14V substrate is about 0.50 under dry sliding against steel, while the DLC thin

  20. Preparation of Ag-containing diamond-like carbon films on the interior surface of tubes by a combined method of plasma source ion implantation and DC sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatada, R., E-mail: hatada@ca.tu-darmstadt.de [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Department of Materials Science, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Flege, S.; Bobrich, A.; Ensinger, W.; Dietz, C. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Department of Materials Science, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Baba, K. [Industrial Technology Center of Nagasaki, Applied Technology Division, Omura, Nagasaki 856-0026 (Japan); Sawase, T.; Watamoto, T. [Nagasaki University, Department of Applied Prosthodontics, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Matsutani, T. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Department of Materials Science, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Kinki University, Department of Electric and Electronic Engineering, Higashi-osaka 577-2332 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Deposition of Ag-containing diamond-like carbon films inside of tubes. • Combination of plasma source ion implantation and DC sputtering. • Antibacterial effect against S. aureus bacteria. - Abstract: Adhesive diamond-like carbon (DLC) films can be prepared by plasma source ion implantation (PSII), which is also suitable for the treatment of the inner surface of a tube. Incorporation of a metal into the DLC film provides a possibility to change the characteristics of the DLC film. One source for the metal is DC sputtering. In this study PSII and DC sputtering were combined to prepare DLC films containing low concentrations of Ag on the interior surfaces of stainless steel tubes. A DLC film was deposited using a C{sub 2}H{sub 4} plasma with the help of an auxiliary electrode inside of the tube. This electrode was then used as a target for the DC sputtering. A mixture of the gases Ar and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} was used to sputter the silver. By changing the gas flow ratios and process time, the resulting Ag content of the films could be varied. Sample characterizations were performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Additionally, a ball-on-disk test was performed to investigate the tribological properties of the films. The antibacterial activity was determined using Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.

  1. Iron films deposited on porous alumina substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Kenichi; Nishida, Naoki; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2016-12-01

    Iron films were deposited on porous alumina substrates using an arc plasma gun. The pore sizes (120 - 250 nm) of the substrates were controlled by changing the temperature during the anodic oxidation of aluminum plates. Iron atoms penetrated into pores with diameters of less than 160 nm, and were stabilized by forming γ-Fe, whereas α-Fe was produced as a flat plane covering the pores. For porous alumina substrates with pore sizes larger than 200 nm, the deposited iron films contained many defects and the resulting α-Fe had smaller hyperfine magnetic fields. In addition, only a very small amount of γ-Fe was obtained. It was demonstrated that the composition and structure of an iron film can be affected by the surface morphology of the porous alumina substrate on which the film is grown.

  2. Time Dependent DD Neutrons Measurement Using a Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamond Detector on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Tengfei; Peng, Xingyu; Chen, Zhongjing; Hu, Zhimeng; Ge, Lijian; Hu, Liqun; Zhong, Guoqiang; Pu, Neng; Chen, Jinxiang; Fan, Tieshuan

    2016-09-01

    A single crystal chemical vapor deposition (scCVD) diamond detector has been successfully employed for neutron measurements in the EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) plasmas. The scCVD diamond detector coated with a 5 μm 6LiF (95% 6Li enriched) layer was placed inside a polyethylene moderator to enhance the detection efficiency. The time-dependent neutron emission from deuteron plasmas during neutral beam injection (NBI) heating was obtained. The measured results are compared with that of fission chamber detectors, which always act as standard neutron flux monitors. The scCVD diamond detector exhibits good reliability, stability and the capability to withstand harsh radiation environments despite its low detection efficiency due to the small active volume. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB106004 and 2012GB101003) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 91226102)

  3. Synthesis of Diamond Film on Molybdenum Substrate Surface by Combustion Flame Considering the Delamination of the Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mamoru; Ito, Shunichi; Kamiya, Osamu; Ohyoshi, Tadashi

    Diamond films were synthesized on a Mo substrate using combustion flame. During cooling process, the most diamond films delaminated from the Mo substrate because of their thermal expansion mismatch. To prevent the delamination, a three-step synthesis method was proposed. The first step was synthesis of the Mo2C and the diamond phases on the Mo substrate, and the second and the third steps were synthesis of the diamond phase. The interfacial stress between the film and substrate was calculated by a finite element method. According to the results, the stress in the film made by the method was smaller than that by an one-step synthesis method. The three-step method is useful for synthesizing the diamond film.

  4. Effects of diamond-like carbon thin film in organic light emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Seong-Shan; Yong, Thian-Khok [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Cyberjaya, 63100 Selangor (Malaysia); Tou, Teck-Yong, E-mail: tytou@mmu.edu.m [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Cyberjaya, 63100 Selangor (Malaysia)

    2009-07-01

    Ultrathin diamond-like carbon (DLC) was deposited by pulsed Nd:YAG laserablation of graphite target on the indium tin oxide (ITO) surface that functioned as the buffered anode for single-layer organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). Deposited by 355 nm Nd:YAG laser, DLC films were characterized by the Raman spectroscopy and the bulk resistivity measurement. Insertion of DLC in the hole-transport ITO/DLC/TPD/Al device slightly increased the injection current density and reduced the turn-on voltage. But DLC insertion in the electron-transport ITO/DLC/Alq{sub 3}/Al device greatly decreased the injection current density and increased the turn-on voltage. For the ITO/DLC/(TPD + Alq{sub 3} + PVK)/Al device, that was doped with Alq{sub 3} and TPD, improved performance with a higher current density and brightness were consistently obtained. Possible mechanisms for the DLC effect in these single-layer devices were discussed.

  5. [Influence of deposition time on chromatics during nitrogen-doped diamond like carbon coating on pure titanium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lu; Yao, Jiang-wu; Xu, De-wen

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to observed the influence of deposition time on chromatics during nitrogen-doped diamond like carbon coating (N-DLC) on pure titanium by multi impulse are plasma plating machine. Applying multi impulse are plasma plating machine to produce TiN coatings on pure titanium in nitrogen atmosphere, then filming with nitrogen-doped DLC on TiN in methane (10-80 min in every 5 min). The colors of N-DLC were evaluated in the CIE1976 L*a*b* uniform color scale and Mussell notation. The surface morphology of every specimen was analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). When changing the time of N-DLC coating deposition, N-DLC surface showed different color. Golden yellow was presented when deposition time was 30 min. SEM showed that crystallization was found in N-DLC coatings, the structure changed from stable to clutter by varying the deposition time. The chromatics of N-DLC coatings on pure titanium could get golden yellow when deposition time was 30 min, then the crystallized structure was stable.

  6. Laser deposition of bimetallic island films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherik, A. O.; Arakelyan, S. M.; Kutrovskaya, S. V.; Osipov, A. V.; Istratov, A. V.; Vartanyan, T. A.; Itina, T. E.

    2016-08-01

    In this work the results of a bimetallic Au-Ag structure deposition from the colloidal system by nanosecond laser radiation are presented. The formation of the extended arrays of gold and silver nanoparticles with controlled morphology is examined. We report the results of formation bimetallic islands films with various electrical and optical properties. The changes in the optical properties of the obtained thin films are found to depend on their morphology.

  7. Physical Vapor Deposition of Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A unified treatment of the theories, data, and technologies underlying physical vapor deposition methods With electronic, optical, and magnetic coating technologies increasingly dominating manufacturing in the high-tech industries, there is a growing need for expertise in physical vapor deposition of thin films. This important new work provides researchers and engineers in this field with the information they need to tackle thin film processes in the real world. Presenting a cohesive, thoroughly developed treatment of both fundamental and applied topics, Physical Vapor Deposition of Thin Films incorporates many critical results from across the literature as it imparts a working knowledge of a variety of present-day techniques. Numerous worked examples, extensive references, and more than 100 illustrations and photographs accompany coverage of: * Thermal evaporation, sputtering, and pulsed laser deposition techniques * Key theories and phenomena, including the kinetic theory of gases, adsorption and condensation, high-vacuum pumping dynamics, and sputtering discharges * Trends in sputter yield data and a new simplified collisional model of sputter yield for pure element targets * Quantitative models for film deposition rate, thickness profiles, and thermalization of the sputtered beam

  8. Study of depth profile of hydrogen in hydrogenated diamond like carbon thin film using ion beam analysis techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, J. [Analytical Chemistry Division, BARC, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Biswas, H.S. [Dept. of Chemistry, Surendranath College, Kolkata 700009 (India); Rao, P.; Reddy, G.L.N.; Kumar, S. [National Centre for Compositional Characterization of Materials, BARC, ECIL Post, Hyderabad 500062 (India); Ray, N.R. [Surface Physics Material Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Chowdhury, D.P. [Analytical Chemistry Division, BARC, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Reddy, A.V.R. [Analytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-06-01

    The Hydrogenated Diamond Like Carbon (HDLC) thin films are deposited on Silicon substrate at room temperature using asymmetric capacitively coupled RF plasma with varying flow rates of methane. These films are undergone annealing at high vacuum (∼10{sup −7} torr) and high temperature (750 and 1050 °C) furnace. The as-prepared and annealed HDLC films have been depth profiled for hydrogen using the resonance at 6.44 MeV in {sup 1}H({sup 19}F,αγ){sup 16}O nuclear reaction. The as prepared films exhibit non-uniform depth distribution of hydrogen: it decreases with depth. Annealing in vacuum brings about is a significant desorption of hydrogen from the films. Loss of hydrogen, albeit in much lower proportions, is also induced by the bombarding beam. The films also experience a mild loss of carbon, as shown by proton backscattering spectrometry, during high vacuum annealing. The depth profiles of hydrogen in the annealed films are indicative of the prevalence of graphitic carbon near film–substrate interface.

  9. Fabrication of diamond shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamza, Alex V.; Biener, Juergen; Wild, Christoph; Woerner, Eckhard

    2016-11-01

    A novel method for fabricating diamond shells is introduced. The fabrication of such shells is a multi-step process, which involves diamond chemical vapor deposition on predetermined mandrels followed by polishing, microfabrication of holes, and removal of the mandrel by an etch process. The resultant shells of the present invention can be configured with a surface roughness at the nanometer level (e.g., on the order of down to about 10 nm RMS) on a mm length scale, and exhibit excellent hardness/strength, and good transparency in the both the infra-red and visible. Specifically, a novel process is disclosed herein, which allows coating of spherical substrates with optical-quality diamond films or nanocrystalline diamond films.

  10. High-frequency SAW filters based on diamond films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Satoshi; Jian, Chunyun

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a diamond SAW resonator capable of operating at frequencies over 3 GHz using a SiO(2)/ interdigital transducer (IDT)/AlN/diamond structure. This structure is expected to have a high Q value and a zero temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) over 3 GHz, based on the high acoustic velocity of AlN. The SAW characteristics of various layered structures composed of SiO(2)/IDT/AlN/diamond substrates were studied both theoretically and experimentally. The SiO(2)/IDT/AlN/diamond substrate structure allows for a thicker IDT metal layer compared with other SAW device designs, such as the SiO(2)/IDT/ZnO/diamond structure. The thicker metal IDT in the present design leads to a lower series resistance and, in turn, a low insertion loss for SAW devices over 3 GHz. Using a second-mode (Sezawa-mode) SAW, the phase velocity and electromechanical coupling coefficient of the SiO(2)/IDT/AlN/diamond substrate reached the larger values of 11 150 m/s and 0.5%, respectively, and a zero TCF characteristic at 25°C was achieved. One-port SAW resonators fabricated from diamond substrates showed a high Q of 660 at 5.4 GHz. The frequency drift over a temperature range of -25°C to 80°C was about 90 ppm, even less than that for ST-quartz SAW substrates. A two-port resonator showed a low insertion loss of 8 dB at 5.4 GHz. Finally, we designed a 5-GHz band-stop SAW filter. A 30-MHz-wide stopband at a -6-dB rejection level was achieved while keeping the passband insertion loss to 0.76 dB. These characteristics of these filters show good potential for SHF-band filters.

  11. Composition and morphology of metal-containing diamond-like carbon films obtained by reactive magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbella, C. [FEMAN Group, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, E08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: corbella@ub.edu; Pascual, E. [FEMAN Group, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, E08028 Barcelona (Spain); Oncins, G. [Serveis Cientificotecnics, Universitat de Barcelona, PCB, c/ Josep Samitier 1-5, E08028 Barcelona (Spain); Canal, C. [Departamento de Tecnologia de Tensioactivos IQAB-CSIC, c/ Jordi Girona 18-26, E08034 Barcelona (Spain); Andujar, J.L. [FEMAN Group, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, E08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bertran, E. [FEMAN Group, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, E08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-06-22

    The addition of metal atoms within the matrix of diamond-like carbon films leads to the improvement of their mechanical properties. The present paper discusses the relationship between the composition and morphology of metal-containing (W, Nb, Mo, Ti) diamond-like carbon thin films deposited at room temperature by reactive magnetron sputtering from a metal target in an argon and methane atmosphere. Composition was measured either by electron microprobe technique or by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and shows a smooth variation with relative methane flow. High relative methane flows lead to a bulk saturation of carbon atoms, which leads to a lack of homogeneity in the films as confirmed by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Cross-section micrographs were observed by transmission electron microscopy and revealed a structure strongly influenced by the metal inserted and its abundance. The surface pattern obtained by scanning electrochemical potential microscopy provided the metallicity distribution. These measurements were completed with atomic force microscopy of the surface. Selected area electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction measurements provided data of the crystalline structure along with nano-crystallite size. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy provided images of these crystallites.

  12. Influence of nitrogen in diamond films on plasma etching∗%CVD金刚石中的氮对等离子体刻蚀的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴俊; 马志斌†; 沈武林; 严垒; 潘鑫; 汪建华

    2013-01-01

      采用非对称磁镜场电子回旋共振等离子体分别对沉积过程中掺氮和未掺氮的化学气相沉积金刚石膜进行了刻蚀研究,结果表明:掺氮制备的金刚石膜的刻蚀主要集中在晶棱处,经过4h刻蚀后其表面粗糙度由刻蚀前的4.761µm下降至3.701µm,刻蚀对金刚石膜的表面粗糙度的影响较小;而未掺氮制备的金刚石膜的刻蚀表现为晶面的均匀刻蚀,晶粒坍塌,刻蚀4h后其表面粗糙度由刻蚀前的3.061µm下降至1.083µm.刻蚀导致表面粗糙度显著降低.上述差别的主要原因在于金刚石膜沉积过程中掺氮导致氮缺陷在金刚石晶棱处富集,晶棱处电子发射加强,引导离子向晶棱运动并产生刻蚀,从而加剧晶棱的刻蚀.而未掺氮金刚石膜,其缺陷相对较少且分布较均匀,刻蚀时整体呈现为(111)晶面被均匀刻蚀继而晶粒坍塌的现象.%Nitrogen-doped and undoped diamond films grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were etched by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma with asymmetric magnetic mirror field. The influences of nitrogen doping on the etching characteristic of CVD diamond films are studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS), and surface roughness measuring instrument; and the etching mechanism is explicated in detail by etching models. It is found that the crystal edges are dramatically etched for the nitrogen-doped diamond film, while the (111) facets are etched and crystalline grains collapse for the undoped diamond film. And after etching by ECR plasma for 4 h, the nitrogen-doped diamond film surface roughness decreases from 4.761 µm to 3.701 µm, while the surface roughness of the undoped film decreases from 3.061 µm to 1.083 µm. The results indicate that nitrogen doping has great influence on the etching characteristic of the CVD diamond films. Nitrogen-doping deteriorates the film quality and increases the defect

  13. Field emission from carbon films deposited by VHF CVD on difference substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramov, A A; Andronov, A N; Felter, T E; Ioffe, A F; Kosarev, A I; Shotov, M V; Vinogradov, A J

    1999-04-01

    As previously demonstrated, non-diamond carbon (NDC) films deposited at low temperatures 200-300 C on silicon tips reduced the threshold of field emission. In this paper we will present the results of the study of field emission from flat NDC films prepared by VHF CVD. Emission measurements were performed in a diode configuration at approximately 10{sup {minus}10} Torr. NDC films were deposited on ceramic and on c-Si substrates sputter coated with layers of Ti, Cu, Ni and Pt. The back contact material influences the emission characteristics but not as a direct correlation to work function. A model of field emission from metal-NDC film structures will be discussed.

  14. Effects of hydrogen atoms on surface conductivity of diamond film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengbin Liu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of surface chemisorbed hydrogen atoms and hydrogen atoms in the subsurface region of diamond on surface conductivity, models of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on diamond with (100 orientation and various concentrations of hydrogen atoms in the subsurface layer of the diamond were built. By using the first-principles method based on density functional theory, the equilibrium geometries and densities of states of the models were studied. The results showed that the surface chemisorbed hydrogen alone could not induce high surface conductivity. In addition, isolated hydrogen atoms in the subsurface layer of the diamond prefer to exist at the bond centre site of the C-C bond. However, such a structure would induce deep localized states, which could not improve the surface conductivity. When the hydrogen concentration increases, the C-H-C-H structure and C-3Hbc-C structure in the subsurface region are more stable than other configurations. The former is not beneficial to the increase of the surface conductivity. However, the latter would induce strong surface states near the Fermi level, which would give rise to high surface conductivity. Thus, a high concentration of subsurface hydrogen atoms in diamond would make significant contributions to surface conductivity.

  15. Synthesis of SiV-diamond particulates via the microwave plasma chemical deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond on soda-lime glass fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunuku, Srinivasu; Chen, Yen-Chun; Yeh, Chien-Jui; Chang, Wen-Hao; Manoharan, Divinah; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I.-Nan

    2016-10-01

    We report the synthesis of silicon-vacancy (SiV) incorporated spherical shaped ultrananocrystalline diamond (SiV-UNCD) particulates (size ∼1 μm) with bright luminescence at 738 nm. For this purpose, different granular structured polycrystalline diamond films and particulates were synthesized by using three different kinds of growth plasma conditions on the three types of substrate materials in the microwave plasma enhanced CVD process. The grain size dependent photoluminescence properties of nitrogen vacancy (NV) and SiV color centers have been investigated for different granular structured diamond samples. The luminescence of NV center and the associated phonon sidebands, which are usually observed in microcrystalline diamond and nanocrystalline diamond films, were effectively suppressed in UNCD films and UNCD particulates. Micron sized SiV-UNCD particulates with bright SiV emission has been attained by transfer of SiV-UNCD clusters on soda-lime glass fibers to inverted pyramidal cavities fabricated on Si substrates by the simple crushing of UNCD/soda-lime glass fibers in deionized water and ultrasonication. Such a plasma enhanced CVD process for synthesizing SiV-UNCD particulates with suppressed NV emission is simple and robust to attain the bright SiV-UNCD particulates to employ in practical applications.

  16. Diamonds from the Machado River alluvial deposit, Rondônia, Brazil, derived from both lithospheric and sublithospheric mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, A. D.; Bulanova, G. P.; Smith, C. B.; Whitehead, S. C.; Kohn, S. C.; Gobbo, L.; Walter, M. J.

    2016-11-01

    Diamonds from the Machado River alluvial deposit have been characterised on the basis of external morphology, internal textures, carbon isotopic composition, nitrogen concentration and aggregation state and mineral inclusion chemistry. Variations in morphology and features of abrasion suggest some diamonds have been derived directly from local kimberlites, whereas others have been through extensive sedimentary recycling. On the basis of mineral inclusion compositions, both lithospheric and sublithospheric diamonds are present at the deposit. The lithospheric diamonds have clear layer-by-layer octahedral and/or cuboid internal growth zonation, contain measurable nitrogen and indicate a heterogeneous lithospheric mantle beneath the region. The sublithospheric diamonds show a lack of regular sharp zonation, do not contain detectable nitrogen, are isotopically heavy (δ13CPDB predominantly - 0.7 to - 5.5) and contain inclusions of ferropericlase, former bridgmanite, majoritic garnet and former CaSiO3-perovskite. This suggests source lithologies that are Mg- and Ca-rich, probably including carbonates and serpentinites, subducted to lower mantle depths. The studied suite of sublithospheric diamonds has many similarities to the alluvial diamonds from Kankan, Guinea, but has more extreme variations in mineral inclusion chemistry. Of all superdeep diamond suites yet discovered, Machado River represents an end-member in terms of either the compositional range of materials being subducted to Transition Zone and lower mantle or the process by which materials are transferred from the subducted slab to the diamond-forming region.

  17. Deposition of biopolymer films on micromechanical sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Gammelgaard, Lene; Jensen, Marie P.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of various parameters on the spray-coating of thin films of poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) was investigated. The optimized processing conditions were used for deposition of the biodegradable polymer on arrays of SU-8 microcantilevers. The resonance frequency of the cantilevers before and af...

  18. P掺杂类金刚石薄膜的制备及生物学行为研究%Phosphorus doped diamond-like carbon films fabricated by plasma immersion ion implantation - deposition and study of biological behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王进; 杨萍; 陈俊英; 冷永祥; 万国江; 孙鸿; 赵安莎; 黄楠

    2004-01-01

    应用等离子体浸没离子注入与沉积方法合成了磷掺杂的类金刚石(diamond like carbon,DLC)薄膜.结构分析表明磷以微米级岛状结构分散于DLC薄膜表层,P的掺杂增加了DLC薄膜的无序性,俄歇能谱表明岛型区域是由P、C、O三种元素形成的化合物.掺杂表面表现出强烈的亲水性(水接触角为16.9°),体外血小板粘附实验结果显示,P掺杂DLC薄膜表面粘附的血小板少且变形小,表现出的血液相容性优于热解碳和未改性DLC.

  19. Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg M. Swain, PI

    2009-03-10

    The DOE-funded research conducted by the Swain group was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder. (Note: All potentials are reported versus Ag/AgCl (sat'd KCl) and cm{sup 2} refers to the electrode geometric area, unless otherwise stated).

  20. High-Q optomechanical circuits made from polished nanocrystalline diamond thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Ummethala, S; Lewes-Malandrakis, G; Brink, D; Nebel, C; Pernice, W H P

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate integrated optomechanical circuits with high mechanical quality factors prepared from nanocrystalline diamond thin films. Using chemomechanical polishing, the RMS surface roughness of as grown polycrystalline diamond films is reduced below 3nm to allow for the fabrication of high-quality nanophotonic circuits. By integrating free-standing nanomechanical resonators into integrated optical devices, efficient read-out of the thermomechanical motion of diamond resonators is achieved with on-chip Mach-Zehnder interferometers. Mechanical quality factors up to 28,800 are measured for four-fold clamped optomechanical resonators coupled to the evanescent near-field of nanophotonic waveguides. Our platform holds promise for large-scale integration of optomechanical circuits for on-chip metrology and sensing applications.

  1. Pulsed laser deposition of nanostructured Ag films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, Tony [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Doggett, Brendan [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Lunney, James G. [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)]. E-mail: jlunney@tcd.ie

    2006-04-30

    Ultra-thin (0.5-5 nm) films of Ag have been prepared by pulsed laser deposition in vacuum using a 26 ns KrF excimer laser at 1 J cm{sup -2}. The deposition was controlled using a Langmuir ion probe and a quartz crystal thickness monitor. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the films are not continuous, but are structured on nanometer size scales. Optical absorption spectra showed the expected surface plasmon resonance feature, which shifted to longer wavelength and increased in strength as the equivalent film thickness was increased. It is shown that Maxwell Garnett effective medium theory can be used to calculate the main features of optical absorption spectra.

  2. Optical properties of diamond like carbon films containing copper, grown by high power pulsed magnetron sputtering and direct current magnetron sputtering: Structure and composition effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meškinis, Š., E-mail: sarunas.meskinis@ktu.lt; Čiegis, A.; Vasiliauskas, A.; Šlapikas, K.; Tamulevičius, T.; Tamulevičienė, A.; Tamulevičius, S.

    2015-04-30

    In the present study chemical composition, structure and optical properties of hydrogenated diamond like carbon films containing copper (DLC:Cu films) deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering were studied. Different modes of deposition — direct current (DC) sputtering and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) as well as two configurations of the magnetron magnetic field (balanced and unbalanced) were applied. X-ray diffractometry, Raman scattering spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to study the structure and composition of the films. It was shown that by using HIPIMS mode contamination of the cathode during the deposition of DLC:Cu films can be suppressed. In all cases oxygen atomic concentration in the films was in 5–10 at.% range and it increased with the copper atomic concentration. The highest oxygen content was observed in the films deposited employing low ion/neutral ratio balanced DC magnetron sputtering process. According to the analysis of the parameters of Raman scattering spectra, sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} bond ratio decreased with the increase of Cu atomic concentration in the DLC films. Clear dependence of the extinction, absorbance and reflectance spectra on copper atomic concentration in the films was observed independently of the method of deposition. Surface plasmon resonance effect was observed only when Cu atomic concentration in DLC:Cu film was at least 15 at.%. The maximum of the surface plasmon resonance peak of the absorbance spectra of DLC:Cu films was in 600–700 nm range and redshifted with the increase of Cu amount. The ratio between the intensities of the plasmonic peak and hydrogenated amorphous carbon related peak at ~ 220 nm both in the extinction and absorbance spectra as well as peak to background ratio of DLC:Cu films increased linearly with Cu amount in the investigated 0–40 at.% range. Reflectance of the plasmonic DLC:Cu films was in 30–50% range that could be

  3. Preparation and Properties of Ag-Containing Diamond-Like Carbon Films by Magnetron Plasma Source Ion Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Baba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The doping effect of silver on the structure and properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC films was investigated. The samples were prepared by a process combining acetylene plasma source ion implantation (high-voltage pulses of −10 kV with reactive magnetron sputtering of an Ag disc. A mixture of two gases, argon, and acetylene was introduced into the discharge chamber as working gas for plasma formation. A negative high-voltage pulse was applied to the substrate holder, thus, accelerating ions towards the substrate. The chemical composition of the deposited films was modified by the respective gas flows and determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The silver concentration within the DLC films influenced the structure and the tribological properties. The surface roughness, as observed by scanning electron microscopy, increased with silver concentration. The film structure was characterized by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry (XRD. The DLC films were mainly amorphous, containing crystalline silver, with the amount of silver depending on the process conditions. The tribological properties of the films were improved by the silver doping. The lowest friction coefficient of around 0.06 was derived at a low silver content.

  4. Role of atomic transverse migration in growth of diamond-like carbon films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Tian-Bao; Hu Yuan-Zhong; Wang Hui

    2007-01-01

    The growth of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The effect of impact angle on film structure is carefully studied, which shows that the transverse migration of the incident atoms is the main channel of film relaxation. A transverse-migration-induced film relaxation model is presented to elucidate the process of film relaxation which advances the original model of subplantation. The process of DLC film growth on a rough surface is also investigated, as well as the evolution of microstructure and surface morphology of the film. A preferential-to-homogeneous growth mode and a smoothing of the film are observed, which are due to the transverse migration of the incident atoms.

  5. Influence of flow rate on different properties of diamond-like nanocomposite thin films grown by PECVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Santra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-like nanocomposite (DLN thin films were deposited on pyrex glass substrate using different flow rate of haxamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO based liquid precursor with nitrogen gas as a glow discharged decomposition by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD technique. The significant influence of different precursor flow rates on refractive index and thickness of the DLN films was measured by using spectroscopic filmatrics and DEKTAK profilometer. Optical transparency of the DLN thin films was analyzed by UV-VIS-NIR spectrometer. FTIR spectroscopy, provides the information about shifted bonds like SiC2, Si-C, Si-O, C-C, Si-H, C-H, N-H, and O-H with different precursor flow rate. We have estimated the hardness of the DLN films from Raman spectroscopy using Gaussian deconvolution method and tried to investigate the correlation between hardness, refractive index and thickness of the films with different precursor flow rates. The composition and surface morphology of the DLN films were investigated by X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS and atomic force microscopy (AFM respectively. We have analyzed the hardness by intensity ratio (ID/IG of D and G peaks and correlates with hardness measurement by nanoindentation test where hardness increases from 27.8 μl/min to 80.6μl/min and then decreases with increase of flow rate from 80.6μl/min to 149.5μl/min. Finally, we correlates different parameters of structural, optical and tribological properties like film-thickness, refractive index, light transmission, hardness, surface roughness, modulus of elasticity, contact angle etc. with different precursor flow rates of DLN films.

  6. Influence of flow rate on different properties of diamond-like nanocomposite thin films grown by PECVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, T. S.; Bhattacharyya, T. K.; Tseng, F. G.; Barik, T. K.

    2012-06-01

    Diamond-like nanocomposite (DLN) thin films were deposited on pyrex glass substrate using different flow rate of haxamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) based liquid precursor with nitrogen gas as a glow discharged decomposition by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique. The significant influence of different precursor flow rates on refractive index and thickness of the DLN films was measured by using spectroscopic filmatrics and DEKTAK profilometer. Optical transparency of the DLN thin films was analyzed by UV-VIS-NIR spectrometer. FTIR spectroscopy, provides the information about shifted bonds like SiC2, Si-C, Si-O, C-C, Si-H, C-H, N-H, and O-H with different precursor flow rate. We have estimated the hardness of the DLN films from Raman spectroscopy using Gaussian deconvolution method and tried to investigate the correlation between hardness, refractive index and thickness of the films with different precursor flow rates. The composition and surface morphology of the DLN films were investigated by X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) respectively. We have analyzed the hardness by intensity ratio (ID/IG) of D and G peaks and correlates with hardness measurement by nanoindentation test where hardness increases from 27.8 μl/min to 80.6μl/min and then decreases with increase of flow rate from 80.6μl/min to 149.5μl/min. Finally, we correlates different parameters of structural, optical and tribological properties like film-thickness, refractive index, light transmission, hardness, surface roughness, modulus of elasticity, contact angle etc. with different precursor flow rates of DLN films.

  7. Characterization of diamond film and bare metal photocathodes as a function of temperature and surface preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurter, R.P.; Moir, D.C.; Devlin, D.J.

    1996-07-01

    High current photocathodes using bare metal and polycrystalline diamond films illuminated by ultraviolet lasers are being developed at Los Alamos for use in a new generation of linear induction accelerators. These photocathodes must be able to produce multiple 60 ns pulses separated by several to tens of nanoseconds. The vacuum environment in which the photocathodes must operate is 10{sup -5} torr.

  8. Flexible diamond-like carbon thin film coated rubbers: fundamentals and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic rubber seals are major sources of friction of lubrication systems and bearings, which may take up to 75% of the total friction. The solution we present is to coat rubbers with diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin film, by which the coefficient of friction is reduced to less than one tenth. Coating

  9. Flexible diamond-like carbon thin film coated on rubbers: fundamentals and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Yutao

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic rubber seals are the major source of friction in lubrication systems and bearings, which may take up to 70% of the total friction. Our solution is to coat rubbers with flexible diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin film by which the coefficient of friction is reduced from above 1.5 to below 0.15. C

  10. A New Empirical Model for Estimation of sp3 Fraction in Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Hai-Yang; WANG Li-Wu; JIANG Hui; HUANG Ning-Kang

    2007-01-01

    A new empirical model to estimate the content of sp3 in diamond-like carbon (DLC) films is presented, based on the conventional Raman spectra excited by 488nm or 514nm visible light for different carbons. It is found that bandwidth of the G peak is related to the sp3 fraction. A wider bandwidth of the G peak shows a higher sp3 fraction in DLC films.

  11. MBMS studies of gas-phase kinetics in diamond chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, C.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); McMaster, M.C. [IBM San Jose, CA (United States); Tung, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    A molecular beam mass spectrometer system (MBMS) has been used to determine the near-surface gaseous composition involved in the low pressure chemical vapor deposition of diamond. With this system, radical and stable species can be detected with a sensitivity better than 10 ppm. Threshold ionization techniques have been employed to distinguish between radical species in the deposition environment from radical species generated by parent molecule cracking. An extensive calibration procedure was used to enable the quantitative determination of H-atom and CH{sub 3} radical mole fractions. Using the MBMS system, the gaseous composition involved in LPCVD of diamond has been measured for a wide variety of deposition conditions, including hot-filament gas activation, microwave-plasma gas activation, and a variety of precursor feed mixtures (ex: CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}). For microwave-plasma activation (MPCVD), the radical concentrations (H-atom and CH{sub 3} radicals) are independent of the identity of the precursor feed gas provided the input carbon mole fraction is constant. However, in hot-filament diamond deposition (HFCVD), the atomic hydrogen concentration decreased by an order of magnitude as the mole fraction of carbon in the precursor mixture is increased to .07; this sharp reduction has been attributed to filament poisoning of the catalytic tungsten surface via hydrocarbon deposition. Additionally, the authors find that the H-atom concentration is independent of the substrate temperature for both hot-filament and microwave plasma deposition; radial H-atom diffusion is invoked to explain this observation.

  12. Effects of high energy Au-ion irradiation on the microstructure of diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shih-Show [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, New-Taipei 251, Taiwan (China); Department of Information Technology and Mobile Communication, Taipei College of Maritime Technology, Tamsui, New-Taipei 251, Taiwan (China); Chen, Huang-Chin [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, New-Taipei 251, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Wang, Wei-Cheng; Lin, I-Nan; Chang, Ching-Lin [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, New-Taipei 251, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chi-Young [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Guo Jinghua [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2013-03-21

    The effects of 2.245 GeV Au-ion irradiation and subsequent annealing processes on the evolution of microstructure of diamond films with microcrystalline (MCD) or ultra-nanocrystalline (UNCD) granular structure were investigated, using near edge x-ray absorption fine structure and electron energy loss spectroscopy in transmission electron microscopy. For MCD films, the Au-ion irradiation disintegrated some of the diamond grains, resulting in the formation of nano-sized carbon clusters embedded in a matrix of amorphous carbon (a-C). The annealing process recrystallized the diamond grains and converted the a-C into nano-sized graphite particulates and, at the same time, induced the formation of nano-sized i-carbon clusters, the bcc structured carbon with a{sub 0} = 0.432 nm. In contrast, for UNCD films, the Au-ion irradiation transformed the grain boundary phase into nano-sized graphite, but insignificantly altered the crystallinity of the grains of the UNCD films. The annealing process recrystallized the materials. In some of the regions, the residual a-C phases were transformed into nano-sized graphites, whereas in other regions i-carbon nanoclusters were formed. The difference in irradiation-induced microstructural transformation behavior between the MCD and the UNCD films is ascribed to the different granular structures of the two types of films.

  13. The roles of hydrogen in the diamond/amorphous carbon phase transitions of oxygen ion implanted ultrananocrystalline diamond films at different annealing temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. J. Hu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report that the diffusion and desorption of hydrogen (H play a key role in the diamond/amorphous carbon phase transitions of O+-implanted UNCD films at different annealing temperatures (Ta by using high resolution transmission electronic microscopy (HRTEM, vis-uv Raman, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy measurements. The results of HRTEM and uv Raman spectroscopy measurements show that with Ta increasing from 500 to 900 °C, the amorphous carbon in grain boundaries (GBs transits to diamond phase. Visible Raman spectroscopy measurements show that the amount of H bonded to trans-polyacetylene (TPA chains in GBs reduces with Ta increasing to 900 °C, while that of H terminating to the surfaces of diamond grains increases confirmed by FTIR measurements. It reveals that H diffuses from GBs to the surfaces of diamond grains. In this process, the active H extracts H which terminates the diamond surface, leaving a reactive surface site. This gives a chance for the neighbored amorphous carbon clusters to attach to the surface site, so that diamond grains become larger. After 1000 °C annealing, the amount of diamond phase dramatically decreases and diamond transits to amorphous carbon by HRTEM and uv Raman spectroscopy. It is observed that the amount of H bonded to TPA chains in GBs and that of H terminating to the surfaces of diamond grains dramatically decreases from visible Raman spectroscopy and FTIR measurements. It is revealed that H is desorbed from both surfaces of diamond grains and GBs, which forces diamond grains to collapse to amorphous carbon.

  14. Potentiostatic Deposition and Characterization of Cuprous Oxide Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Electrodeposition technique was employed to deposit cuprous oxide Cu2O thin films. In this work, Cu2O thin films have been grown on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) transparent conducting glass as a substrate by potentiostatic deposition of cupric acetate. The effect of deposition time on the morphologies, crystalline, and optical quality of Cu2O thin films was investigated.

  15. Effects of Surface Modification of Nanodiamond Particles for Nucleation Enhancement during Its Film Growth by Microwave Plasma Jet Chemical Vapour Deposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chii-Ruey Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The seedings of the substrate with a suspension of nanodiamond particles (NDPs were widely used as nucleation seeds to enhance the growth of nanostructured diamond films. The formation of agglomerates in the suspension of NDPs, however, may have adverse impact on the initial growth period. Therefore, this paper was aimed at the surface modification of the NDPs to enhance the diamond nucleation for the growth of nanocrystalline diamond films which could be used in photovoltaic applications. Hydrogen plasma, thermal, and surfactant treatment techniques were employed to improve the dispersion characteristics of detonation nanodiamond particles in aqueous media. The seeding of silicon substrate was then carried out with an optimized spin-coating method. The results of both Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering measurements demonstrated that plasma treated diamond nanoparticles possessed polar surface functional groups and attained high dispersion in methanol. The nanocrystalline diamond films deposited by microwave plasma jet chemical vapour deposition exhibited extremely fine grain and high smooth surfaces (~6.4 nm rms on the whole film. These results indeed open up a prospect of nanocrystalline diamond films in solar cell applications.

  16. Diamond-like carbon and ceramic materials as protective coatings grown by pulsed laser deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Perera Mercado, Yibran Argenis

    2004-01-01

    A rather large number of nitride, carbide, and oxide thin films are used as hard and wear-resistant coatings, for optical, corrosive, and refractory applications that are of crucial importance. Additional requirements place even more stringent conditions on the deposition processes. The properties of coatings deposited by pulsed laser deposition are determined by the deposition parameters, the composition of the PLD plasma and its ionization states, the substrate conditions, etc.. In this way...

  17. Silicon carbide and other films and method of deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  18. Synthesis of thin films in boron-carbon-nitrogen ternary system by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukreja, Ratandeep Singh

    The Boron Carbon Nitorgen (B-C-N) ternary system includes materials with exceptional properties such as wide band gap, excellent thermal conductivity, high bulk modulus, extreme hardness and transparency in the optical and UV range that find application in most fields ranging from micro-electronics, bio-sensors, and cutting tools to materials for space age technology. Interesting materials that belong to the B-C-N ternary system include Carbon nano-tubes, Boron Carbide, Boron Carbon Nitride (B-CN), hexagonal Boron Nitride ( h-BN), cubic Boron Nitride (c-BN), Diamond and beta Carbon Nitride (beta-C3N4). Synthesis of these materials requires precisely controlled and energetically favorable conditions. Chemical vapor deposition is widely used technique for deposition of thin films of ceramics, metals and metal-organic compounds. Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) is especially interesting because of its ability to deposit materials that are meta-stable under the deposition conditions, for e.g. diamond. In the present study, attempt has been made to synthesize beta-carbon nitride (beta-C3N4) and cubic-Boron Nitride (c-BN) thin films by MPECVD. Also included is the investigation of dependence of residual stress and thermal conductivity of the diamond thin films, deposited by MPECVD, on substrate pre-treatment and deposition temperature. Si incorporated CNx thin films are synthesized and characterized while attempting to deposit beta-C3N4 thin films on Si substrates using Methane (CH4), Nitrogen (N2), and Hydrogen (H2). It is shown that the composition and morphology of Si incorporated CNx thin film can be tailored by controlling the sequence of introduction of the precursor gases in the plasma chamber. Greater than 100mum size hexagonal crystals of N-Si-C are deposited when Nitrogen precursor is introduced first while agglomerates of nano-meter range graphitic needles of C-Si-N are deposited when Carbon precursor is introduced first in the

  19. Pulsed laser deposition of ferroelectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Somnath; McKnight, Steven H.; Sengupta, Louise C.

    1997-05-01

    It has been shown that in bulk ceramic form, the barium to strontium ratio in barium strontium titanium oxide (Ba1- xSrxTiO3, BSTO) affects the voltage tunability and electronic dissipation factor in an inverse fashion; increasing the strontium content reduces the dissipation factor at the expense of lower voltage tunability. However, the oxide composites of BSTO developed at the Army Research Laboratory still maintain low electronic loss factors for all compositions examined. The intent of this study is to determine whether such effects can be observed in the thin film form of the oxide composites. The pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method has been used to deposit the thin films. The different compositions of the compound (with 1 wt% of the oxide additive) chosen were: Ba0.3Sr0.7TiO3, Ba0.4Sr0.6TiO3, Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3, Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3, and Ba0.7Sr0.3TiO3. The electronic properties investigated in this study were the dielectric constant and the voltage tunability. The morphology of the thin films were examined using the atomic force microscopy. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy was also utilized for optical characterization of the thin films. The electronic and optical properties of the thin films and the bulk ceramics were compared. The results of these investigations are discussed.

  20. VUV-light-induced deposited silica films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Christopher K.; Pedraza, Anthony J.; Benson, Roberto S.; Park, Jae-Won

    1998-05-01

    A novel technique to deposit dielectric films at room temperature is described. The deposition of the silica takes place inside a cylindrical glass chamber where a silent discharge is generated between two electrodes connected to a high voltage, high frequency AC source. The chamber contains two parallel glass tubes where the electrodes are located and is filled with argon or xenon at a pressure of 100 mbar. Under these conditions, it has been shown that high intensity VUV light is generated peaking at 126 nm for argon and at 172 nm for xenon. This VUV radiation seems to produce photoablation of the glass tubes that surround the electrodes. Upon operation of the lamp, polyimide, polypropylene and silicon wafer substrates lying at the bottom of the vessel became coated with silica. The films, identified using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), revealed that the silica is oxygen-deficient with a composition of SiO x where x is between 1.7 and 1.8. The deposition rate on silicon wafers was measured by ellipsometry. When Xe gas is used the deposition rate is much lower than when Ar is used. This result is consistent with a photoablation process since the energy of the photons generated in Ar peaks at 10 eV while those generated in Xe peaks at 7 eV. These energy values should be compared with the O-Si bond strength energy that is 8.3 eV. The morphology and structure of the films were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Deposition of carbonaceous films occurred when the glass tubes containing the electrodes were coated with carbon.

  1. Influence of titanium-substrate roughness on Ca–P–O thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ananda Sagari, A.R., E-mail: arsagari@gmail.com [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Malm, Jari [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Laitinen, Mikko [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Rahkila, Paavo [Department of Biology of Physical Activity, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Hongqiang, Ma [Department of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 35 (L), FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Putkonen, Matti [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Beneq Oy, P.O. Box 262, FI-01511 Vantaa (Finland); Karppinen, Maarit [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Whitlow, Harry J.; Sajavaara, Timo [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2013-03-01

    Amorphous Ca–P–O films were deposited on titanium substrates using atomic layer deposition, while maintaining a uniform Ca/P pulsing ratio of 6/1 with varying number of atomic layer deposition cycles starting from 10 up to 208. Prior to film deposition the titanium substrates were mechanically abraded using SiC abrasive paper of 600, 1200, 2000 grit size and polished with 3 μm diamond paste to obtain surface roughness R{sub rms} values of 0.31 μm, 0.26 μm, 0.16 μm, and 0.10 μm, respectively. The composition and film thickness of as-deposited amorphous films were studied using Time-Of-Flight Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis. The results showed that uniform films could be deposited on rough metal surfaces with a clear dependence of substrate roughness on the Ca/P atomic ratio of thin films. The in vitro cell-culture studies using MC3T3 mouse osteoblast showed a greater coverage of cells on the surface polished with diamond paste in comparison to rougher surfaces after 24 h culture. No statistically significant difference was observed between Ca–P–O coated and un-coated Ti surfaces for the measured roughness value. The deposited 50 nm thick films did not dissolve during the cell culture experiment. - Highlights: ► Atomic layer deposition of Ca–P–O films on abraded Ti substrate ► Surface analysis using Time-Of-Flight Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis ► Dependence of substrate roughness on the Ca/P atomic ratio of thin films ► An increase in Ca/P atomic ratio with decreasing roughness ► Mouse osteoblast showed greater coverage of cells in polished surface.

  2. Effect of Metallic Film in Diamond Growth from an Fe-Ni-C System at High Temperature and High Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许斌; 李木森; 尹龙卫; 崔建军; 宫建红

    2003-01-01

    The metallic film surrounding a diamond single crystal, which plays an important role in the diamond growth from an Fe-Ni-C system, has been successfully investigated by using transmission-electron microscopy (TEM),Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS). Diamond and graphite were not found in surface layer (near diamond) of the film by TEM and Raman spectroscopy, but a parallel relationship exists between the (111) plane of γ-(Fe,Ni) and the (100) plane of (Fe, Ni)3C in this region. Compared with that of solvent metal (catalyst) near diamond, the binding energy in the valence bands of iron, nickel and carbon atoms of the film has an increase of 0.9 eV. According to the microstructures on the film obtained by the TEM, Raman spectra, and XPS, the catalytic mechanism of the film may be assumed as follows. In the surface layer of the film,iron and nickel atoms in the γ-(Fe, Ni) lattice can absorb carbon atoms in the (Fe, Ni)3C lattice and make them transform to an sp3-like state. Then carbon atoms with the sp3-like structure are separated from the (Fe,Ni)3C and stack on the growing diamond crystal. This study provides a direct evidence for the diamond growth from a metallic catalyst-graphite system under high temperature and high pressure.

  3. Diamond-like carbon formation for various positions by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Seong-Shan [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)]. E-mail: ssyap@mmu.edu.my; Tou, Teck-Yong [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2005-07-30

    Pulsed laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite target was carried out by an Nd-YAG laser with {lambda} = 1064 nm and fluence in the range of 1-10 J/cm{sup 2}. The plume was produced by focusing the laser beam and rastering over a 6.5 mm x 6.5 mm area on the graphite target. The substrates were placed at two positions: on-axis position facing the target and off-axis position in the target plane with 2 mm offset from the ablation site. Diamond-like carbon was formed on the substrates at both positions and on the ablated area as detected by Raman spectroscopy. Rough and granular surface was observed for the samples placed in the target plane and smooth diamond-like carbon films for the samples placed facing the target as observed by SEM and optical microscopy.

  4. Pulsed laser deposition of pepsin thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kecskemeti, G. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary)]. E-mail: kega@physx.u-szeged.hu; Kresz, N. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Smausz, T. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences and University of Szeged, Research Group on Laser Physics, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Hopp, B. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences and University of Szeged, Research Group on Laser Physics, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Nogradi, A. [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Szeged, H-6720, Szeged, Koranyi fasor 10-11 (Hungary)

    2005-07-15

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of organic and biological thin films has been extensively studied due to its importance in medical applications among others. Our investigations and results on PLD of a digestion catalyzing enzyme, pepsin, are presented. Targets pressed from pepsin powder were ablated with pulses of an ArF excimer laser ({lambda} = 193 nm, FWHM = 30 ns), the applied fluence was varied between 0.24 and 5.1 J/cm{sup 2}. The pressure in the PLD chamber was 2.7 x 10{sup -3} Pa. The thin layers were deposited onto glass and KBr substrates. Our IR spectroscopic measurements proved that the chemical composition of deposited thin films is similar to that of the target material deposited at 0.5 and 1.3 J/cm{sup 2}. The protein digesting capacity of the transferred pepsin was tested by adapting a modified 'protein cube' method. Dissolution of the ovalbumin sections proved that the deposited layers consisted of catalytically active pepsin.

  5. Optical Characterization of Diamond Synthesis Using CH3OH-H2 Gas Mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Man Weidong; Wang Jianhua; Li Lei; Zhang Baohua; Bai Yuming

    2005-01-01

    Diamond films with high infrared transmittance have been successfully deposited using CH3OH-H2 gas mixtures through microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MWCVD). The primary purpose of this study is to determine the effect of the deposition conditions on the optical properties of MWCVD diamond films using CH3OH-H2 gas mixtures. Room temperature optical properties of freestanding diamond films were studied by Fourier transform IR spectroscopy. Experimental results indicated that under appropriate deposition temperature (620 ℃) and methanol concentration (5.7%), the refractive index of CVD diamond films (2.33)was comparable with that of natural diamond (2.417). The average infrared transmittance was above 65% in the middle infrared region (500 cm-1 ~ 4000 cm-1), approaching to the theoretical value of diamond (71.4%). The mechanism of growing high IR transmittance diamond films by utilizing CH3OH-H2 gas system is that the high methanol concentration used in this study makes the surface roughness of diamond films decreased by increasing the secondary nucleation density and the high O/C ratio in CH3OH-H2 gas system, improved the quality of diamond films and therefore decreased the absorption of non-diamond carbon in the films.

  6. Deposition and characterization of CuInS2 thin films deposited over copper thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Titu; Kumar, K. Rajeev; Kartha, C. Sudha; Vijayakumar, K. P.

    2015-06-01

    Simple, cost effective and versatile spray pyrolysis method is effectively combined with vacuum evaporation for the deposition of CuIns2 thin films for photovoltaic applications. In the present study In2s3 was spray deposited over vacuum evaporated Cu thin films and Cu was allowed to diffuse in to the In2S3 layer to form CuInS2. To analyse the dependence of precursor volume on the formation of CuInS2 films structural, electrical and morphological analzes are carried out. Successful deposition of CuInS2thin films with good crystallinity and morphology with considerably low resistivity is reported in this paper.

  7. Dep osition and thermal conductivity of diamond-like carb on film on a silicon substrate%类金刚石薄膜在硅基底上的沉积及其热导率∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    艾立强; 张相雄; 陈民; 熊大曦

    2016-01-01

    Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) is thought to be a potential material in solving heat dissipation problems in light emitting diode module packages. It is of vital importance in evaluating the thermal conductivity of DLC film deposited on a silicon substrate. In this paper, the molecular dynamics method is used to simulate the formation of a DLC film by the deposition of carbon atoms on a isilicon substrate. Tersoff potential is adopted to reproduce the structures and densities of silicon, carbon, and SiC. A silicon substrate consisting of 544 atoms is located at the bottom of the simulation domain. The substrate is kept at a temperature of 600 K through a Noose-Hover thermostat. Carbon atoms are injected into the substrate individually every 0.5 ps at an energy of 1 eV. After a 7.5 ns deposition process, a 4 nm amorphous film containing 15000 carbon atoms is formed. Injected carbon atoms and substrate silicon atoms are intermixed at the bottom layer of the deposited film while the rest of the film contains only carbon atoms. The density of the film decreases slightly with the increase of the height of the deposited film and the average density is 2.8 g/cm3. Analysis of the coordination number shows that the sp3 fraction of carbon atoms in the film also decreases with the increase of the height of the deposited film, with a maximum value of 22%. It might be caused by the continuous impacts of the subsequently injected carbon atoms on the previously formed DLC film. The thermal conductivities of the DLC film in the planar and normal directions are calculated by the Green-Kubo method. The thermal conductivity of pure diamond film is also calculated for comparison. The results show that the planar thermal conductivity of the deposited DLC film is approximately half of that of the pure diamond film with the same size. It is higher than the normal thermal conductivity of the deposited film. The thermal conductivities of the DLC film in both planar and normal directions

  8. Growth of GaN epitaxial films on polycrystalline diamond by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Quanzhong; Allsopp, Duncan W. E.; Bowen, Chris R.

    2017-04-01

    Heat extraction is often essential in ensuring efficient performance of semiconductor devices and requires minimising the thermal resistance between the functional semiconductor layers and any heat sink. This paper reports the epitaxial growth of N-polar GaN films on polycrystalline diamond substrates of high thermal conductivity with metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy, by using a Si x C layer formed during deposition of polycrystalline diamond on a silicon substrate. The Si x C layer acts to provide the necessary structure ordering information for the formation of a single crystal GaN film at the wafer scale. It is shown that a three-dimensional island (3D) growth process removes hexagonal defects that are induced by the non-single crystal nature of the Si x C layer. It is also shown that intensive 3D growth and the introduction of a convex curvature of the substrate can be deployed to reduce tensile stress in the GaN epitaxy to enable the growth of a crack-free layer up to a thickness of 1.1µm. The twist and tilt can be as low as 0.65° and 0.39° respectively, values broadly comparable with GaN grown on Si substrates with a similar structure.

  9. A comparative study of the field emission properties of aligned carbon nanostructures films, from carbon nanotubes to diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Normand, F.; Cojocaru, C. S.; Fleaca, C.; Li, J. Q.; Vincent, P.; Pirio, G.; Gangloff, L.; Nedellec, Y.; Legagneux, P.

    2007-05-01

    The electron field emission properties of different graphitic and diamond-like nanostructures films are compared. They are prepared in the same CVD chamber on SiO{2}/Si(100) and Si(100) flat surfaces, respectively. These nanostructures are thoroughly characterized by scanning electron emission (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Films of dense aligned carbon nanotubes by far display the lowest threshold fields around few V/μ m and the largest emission currents. Carbon nanofibers, with platelet arrangement of the graphitic planes parallel to the substrate, exhibit higher emission thresholds around 10 V/μ m. Diamond nanostructures, either modified through ammonia incorporation within the gas phase or not, exhibit the largest emission threshold around 25 V/μ m. The high enhancement factors, deduced from the Fowler-Nordheim plots, can explain the low emission thresholds whereas limitations to the electron transport ever occur through different processes (i) surface modifications of the surface, as the transformation of the SiO{2} barrier layer into SiN{x} in the presence of ammonia evidenced by XPS; (ii) different orientation of the graphitic basal planes relative to the direction of electron transport (carbon nanofiber) and (iii) presence of a graphitic nest at the interface of the carbon nanostructure and the substrate, observed when catalyst is deposited through mild evaporation.

  10. DC current and AC impedance measurements on boron-doped single crystalline diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Haitao; Gaudin, O.; Jackman, R.B. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Muret, P.; Gheeraert, E. [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Proprietes Electroniques des Solides, BP166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2003-09-01

    In this paper, we report the first measurement of impedance on boron-doped single crystalline diamond films from 0.1 Hz to 10 MHz with the temperature ranging from -100 C up to 300 C. The Cole-Cole (Z' via Z{sup ''}) plots are well fitted to a RC parallel circuit model and the equivalent Resistance and Capacitance for the diamond films have been estimated using the Zview curve fitting. The results show only one single semicircle response at each temperature measured. It was found that the resistance decreases from 70 G{omega} at -100 C to 5 k{omega} at 300 C. The linear curve fitting from -100 C to 150 C shows the sample has an activation energy of 0.37 eV, which is consistent with the theoretical value published of this kind of material. The equivalent capacitance is maintained at the level of pF up to 300 C suggesting that no grain boundaries are being involved, as expected from a single crystal diamond. The activation energy from the dc current-temperature curves is 0.36 eV, which is consistent with the value from ac impedance. The potential of this under-used technique for diamond film analysis will be discussed. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Modelling and optimization of film thickness variation for plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Ewan; Gibson, Des; Lin, Li; Fu, Xiuhua

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes a method for modelling film thickness variation across the deposition area within plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) processes. The model enables identification and optimization of film thickness uniformity sensitivities to electrode configuration, temperature, deposition system design and gas flow distribution. PECVD deposition utilizes a co-planar 300mm diameter electrodes with separate RF power matching to each electrode. The system has capability to adjust electrode separation and electrode temperature as parameters to optimize uniformity. Vacuum is achieved using dry pumping with real time control of butterfly valve position for active pressure control. Comparison between theory and experiment is provided for PECVD of diamond-like-carbon (DLC) deposition onto flat and curved substrate geometries. The process utilizes butane reactive feedstock with an argon carrier gas. Radiofrequency plasma is used. Deposited film thickness sensitivities to electrode geometry, plasma power density, pressure and gas flow distribution are demonstrated. Use of modelling to optimise film thickness uniformity is demonstrated. Results show DLC uniformity of 0.30% over a 200 mm flat zone diameter within overall electrode diameter of 300mm. Thickness uniformity of 0.75% is demonstrated over a 200mm diameter for a non-conformal substrate geometry. Use of the modelling method for PECVD using metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) feedstock is demonstrated, specifically for deposition of silica films using metal-organic tetraethoxy-silane. Excellent agreement between experimental and theory is demonstrated for conformal and non-conformal geometries. The model is used to explore scalability of PECVD processes and trade-off against film thickness uniformity. Application to MEMS, optical coatings and thin film photovoltaics is discussed.

  12. Growth and characterization of piezoelectric AlN thin films for diamond-based surface acoustic wave devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benetti, M. [C.N.R. Istituto di Acustica ' O. M. Corbino' , Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Cannata, D. [C.N.R. Istituto di Acustica ' O. M. Corbino' , Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Di Pietrantonio, F. [C.N.R. Istituto di Acustica ' O. M. Corbino' , Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Verona, E. [C.N.R. Istituto di Acustica ' O. M. Corbino' , Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: enrico.verona@idac.rm.cnr.it; Generosi, A. [C.N.R. Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Paci, B. [C.N.R. Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Rossi Albertini, V. [C.N.R. Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2006-02-21

    We report on the preparation and structural characterization of piezoelectric films of aluminium nitride onto diamond substrates. The samples were fabricated by sequential radio frequency reactive diode sputtering processes, carried out at various temperatures, in a head vacuum system starting from stechiometric targets. The structural characterization of the films was performed by energy dispersive X-ray diffraction analysis. The deposition temperature was found to play a relevant role to obtain highly textured films with the c-axis perpendicular to the substrate surface, as required by surface-acoustic-wave applications. In particular, a minimum substrate temperature of 300 deg. C was needed in order to obtain any internal order along the c-axis while, increasing the temperature, the AlN <002> orientation becomes preferential. The rocking curve analysis revealed a good crystalline quality of the AlN films whose degree of epitaxy can be well described by a linearly increasing function of the temperature at which the films are grown.

  13. Electroless Deposition of Composite Nickel-Phosphorous Coatings with Diamond Dispersoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrova M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The composite Ni-P coating with diamond particles (D deposited on the flexible substrates of pressed polyethylene terephthalate material (PET was obtained, to be used in the development of efficient, flexible grinding and polishing tools. The optimal conditions of the hydrodynamic regime, deposition time and temperature were found. The influence of the concentration and size of the D particles (3/7 ÷ 225/300 μm on the coating thickness and number of co-deposited particles were studied. By Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM images were defined the morphology of dispersion coatings and number of co-deposited particles in them, and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS/INCA was used to determine the elemental chemical composition of the composite coatings.

  14. Structural characteristics of single crystalline GaN films grown on (111) diamond with AlN buffer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécz, Béla; Tóth, Lajos; Barna, Árpád;

    2013-01-01

    Hexagonal GaN films with the [0001] direction parallel to the surface normal were grown on (111) oriented single crystalline diamond substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Pre-treatments of the diamond surface with the nitrogen plasma beam, prior the nucleation of a thin AlN layer,...

  15. Nanocomposite tantalum-carbon-based films deposited by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benchikh, N. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Garrelie, F. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Wolski, K. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, Centre SMS - URA CNRS 5146, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne, Cedex 02 (France); Donnet, C. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France)]. E-mail: Christophe.Donnet@univ-st-etienne.fr; Fillit, R.Y. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, Centre SMS - URA CNRS 5146, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne, Cedex 02 (France); Rogemond, F. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Subtil, J.L. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Rouzaud, J.N. [Laboratoire de Geologie de l' Ecole Normale Superieure de Paris 24, rue Lhomond 75231-Paris Cedex 5 (France); Laval, J.Y. [Laboratoire de Physique du Solide, UPR5 CNRS-ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin 75231-Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2006-01-03

    Nanostructured coatings of metal (tantalum) containing diamond-like carbon (a-C:Ta) have been prepared by femtosecond pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The films, containing 15 at.% tantalum, have been deposited by ablating sequentially graphite and metallic tantalum in vacuum conditions with an amplified Ti:sapphire laser. The coatings have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, grazing angle X-ray diffraction, energy filtered transmission electron microscopy, scanning and high resolution transmission electron microscopies. Evidence of metallic {alpha}-Ta and {beta}-Ta particles (diameter in the 100 nm range) and smaller quasi-amorphous tantalum clusters embedded in the carbonaceous matrix have been shown. A thin tantalum carbide interface between the carbon matrix and the top surface of the tantalum nodules has also been identified. The ability of femtosecond pulsed laser deposition to synthetize nanocomposite carbon-based films and to control their nanostructure is discussed.

  16. Origin of graphitic filaments on improving the electron field emission properties of negative bias-enhanced grown ultrananocrystalline diamond films in CH4/Ar plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, K. J.; Huang, B. R.; Saravanan, A.; Tai, N. H.; Lin, I. N.

    2014-10-01

    Microstructural evolution of bias-enhanced grown (BEG) ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films has been investigated using microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition in gas mixtures of CH4 and Ar under different negative bias voltages ranging from -50 to -200 V. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the morphology, growth rate, and chemical bonding of the synthesized films. Transmission electron microscopic investigation reveals that the application of bias voltage induced the formation of the nanographitic filaments in the grain boundaries of the films, in addition to the reduction of the size of diamond grains to ultra-nanosized granular structured grains. For BEG-UNCD films under -200 V, the electron field emission (EFE) process can be turned on at a field as small as 4.08 V/μm, attaining a EFE current density as large as 3.19 mA/cm2 at an applied field of 8.64 V/μm. But the films grown without bias (0 V) have mostly amorphous carbon phases in the grain boundaries, possessing poorer EFE than those of the films grown using bias. Consequently, the induction of nanographitic filaments in grain boundaries of UNCD films grown in CH4/Ar plasma due to large applied bias voltage of -200 V is the prime factor, which possibly forms interconnected paths for facilitating the transport of electrons that markedly enhance the EFE properties.

  17. Nano-Impact (Fatigue Characterization of As-Deposited Amorphous Nitinol Thin Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehan Ahmed

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents nano-impact (low cycle fatigue behavior of as-deposited amorphous nitinol (TiNi thin film deposited on Si wafer. The nitinol film was 3.5 µm thick and was deposited by the sputtering process. Nano-impact tests were conducted to comprehend the localized fatigue performance and failure modes of thin film using a calibrated nano-indenter NanoTest™, equipped with standard diamond Berkovich and conical indenter in the load range of 0.5 mN to 100 mN. Each nano-impact test was conducted for a total of 1000 fatigue cycles. Depth sensing approach was adapted to understand the mechanisms of film failure. Based on the depth-time data and surface observations of films using atomic force microscope, it is concluded that the shape of the indenter test probe is critical in inducing the localized indentation stress and film failure. The measurement technique proposed in this paper can be used to optimize the design of nitinol thin films.

  18. Microstructural evolution of diamond films from CH4/H2/N2 plasma and their enhanced electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, K. J.; Tai, N. H.; Lin, I. N.

    2015-02-01

    The influence of N2 concentration in CH4/H2/N2 plasma on microstructural evolution and electrical properties of diamond films is systematically investigated. While the diamond films grown in CH4/H2 plasma contain large diamond grains, for the diamond films grown using CH4/H2/(4%)N2 plasma, the microstructure drastically changed, resulting in ultra-nanosized diamond grains with Fd3m structure and a0 = 0.356 nm, along with the formation of n-diamond (n-D), a metastable form of diamond with space group Fm3m and a0 = 0.356 nm, and i-carbon (i-C) clusters, the bcc structured carbon with a0 = 0.432 nm. In addition, these films contain wide grain boundaries containing amorphous carbon (a-C). The electron field emission (EFE) studies show the best EFE behavior for 4% N2 films among the CH4/H2/N2 grown diamond films. They possess the lowest turn-on field value of 14.3 V/μm and the highest EFE current density value of 0.37 mA/cm2 at an applied field of 25.4 V/μm. The optical emission spectroscopy studies confirm that CN species are the major criterion to judge the changes in the microstructure of the films. It seems that the grain boundaries can provide electron conduction networks to transport efficiently the electrons to emission sites for field emission, as long as they have sufficient thickness. Whether the matrix nano-sized grains are 3C-diamond, n-D or i-C is immaterial.

  19. Preliminary viability studies of fibroblastic cells cultured on microcrystalline and nanocrystalline diamonds produced by chemical vapour depo