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  1. Prediction of coronary heart disease risk in a general, pre-diabetic, and diabetic population during 10 years of follow-up: Accuracy of the Framingham, SCORE, and UKPDS risk functions - The Hoorn Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.W.A. van der Heijden (Amber A. W.); M.M. Ortegon (Monica); L.W. Niessen (Louis Wilhelmus); M.G.A.A.M. Nijpels (Giel); J.M. Dekker (Jacqueline)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE - To test the validity of the Framingham, Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE), and UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) risk function in the prediction of risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in populations with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), intermediate

  2. Comparison of the Framingham risk score, UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) Risk Engine, Japanese Atherosclerosis Longitudinal Study-Existing Cohorts Combine (JALS-ECC) and maximum carotid intima-media thickness for predicting coronary artery stenosis in patients with asymptomatic type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Kazuya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Sato, Akira; Ishizu, Tomoko; Kodama, Satoru; Heianza, Yoriko; Saito, Kazumi; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yatoh, Shigeru; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Yahagi, Naoya; Sone, Hirohito; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of Framingham Risk Score (FRS), UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) risk engine, a risk score based on the Japanese Atherosclerosis Longitudinal Study-Existing Cohorts Combine (JALS-ECC), the maximum intima-media thickness (max-IMT) determined on coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and their combination in asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes. A total of 116 Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes underwent CCTA. The risk of coronary heart disease was calculated according to the FRS, UKPDS and JALS-ECC. We evaluated the reclassification of coronary artery stenosis (CAS) based on the risk score categories after adding each IMT related variable. Sixty-eight patients had CAS. The areas under the curves (AUCs) in the receiver operating characteristic curve analyses of FRS, UKPDS and JALS-ECC were 0.763 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.674-0.853), 0.785 (95% CI: 0.703-0.868) and 0.767 (95% CI: 0.681-0.853), respectively. The AUCs for FRS, UKPDS and JALS-ECC combined with the max-IMT were 0.788 (95% CI: 0.705-0.872), 0.800 (95% CI: 0.720-0.879) and 0.786 (95% CI: 0.703-0.869), respectively. Combining the max-IMT with the risk scores improved the identification of subjects with stenotic lesions, in particular, those in the first, second and third tertiles of the FRS, first and second tertiles of the UKPDS and first and second tertiles of the JALS-ECC (P=0.054, P=0.056, P=0.015, P=0.082, P=0.060, P=0.007, and P=0.080, respectively). The net reclassification improvement increased following the addition of a max-IMT of ≥ 1.9 mm (32.4% in FRS, 19.9% in UKPDS and 51.7% in JALS-ECC). These data suggest that combining a risk score with the max-IMT improves the prediction of CAS in comparison with the risk score alone.

  3. Predicting Changes in Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes in the Post-UKPDS Era: Longitudinal Analysis of the Swedish National Diabetes Register

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasghar Ahmad Kiadaliri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study was to provide updated time-path equations for risk factors of type-2-diabetes-related cardiovascular complications for application in risk calculators and health economic models. Observational data from the Swedish National Diabetes Register were analysed using Generalized Method of Moments estimation for dynamic panel models (N=5,043, aged 25–70 years at diagnosis in 2001–2004. Validation was performed using persons diagnosed in 2005 (n=414. Results were compared with the UKPDS outcome model. The value of the risk factor in the previous year was the main predictor of the current value of the risk factor. People with high (low values of risk factor in the year of diagnosis experienced a decreasing (increasing trend over time. BMI was associated with elevations in all risk factors, while older age at diagnosis and being female generally corresponded to lower levels of risk factors. Updated time-path equations predicted risk factors more precisely than UKPDS outcome model equations in a Swedish population. Findings indicate new time paths for cardiovascular risk factors in the post-UKPDS era. The validation analysis confirmed the importance of updating the equations as new data become available; otherwise, the results of health economic analyses may be biased.

  4. Cardiovascular Risk Assessment with Vascular Function, Carotid Atherosclerosis and the UKPDS Risk Engine in Korean Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon Sik Seon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPatients with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Few studies have evaluated the cardiovascular disease (CVD risk simultaneously using the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS risk engine and non-invasive vascular tests in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes.MethodsParticipants (n=380; aged 20 to 81 years with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes were free of clinical evidence of CVD. The 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke risks were calculated for each patient using the UKPDS risk engine. Carotid intima media thickness (CIMT, flow mediated dilation (FMD, pulse wave velocity (PWV and augmentation index (AI were measured. The correlations between the UKPDS risk engine and the non-invasive vascular tests were assessed using partial correlation analysis, after adjusting for age, and multiple regression analysis.ResultsThe mean 10-year CHD and 10-year stroke risks were 14.92±11.53% and 4.03±3.95%, respectively. The 10-year CHD risk correlated with CIMT (P<0.001, FMD (P=0.017, and PWV (P=0.35 after adjusting for age. The 10-year stroke risk correlated only with the mean CIMT (P<0.001 after adjusting for age. FMD correlated with age (P<0.01 and systolic blood pressure (P=0.09. CIMT correlated with age (P<0.01, HbA1c (P=0.05, and gender (P<0.01.ConclusionThe CVD risk is increased at the onset of type 2 diabetes. CIMT, FMD, and PWV along with the UKPDS risk engine should be considered to evaluate cardiovascular disease risk in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes.

  5. Estimated incidence of cardiovascular complications related to type 2 diabetes in Mexico using the UKPDS outcome model and a population-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynoso-Noverón, Nancy; Mehta, Roopa; Almeda-Valdes, Paloma; Rojas-Martinez, Rosalba; Villalpando, Salvador; Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A

    2011-01-07

    To estimate the incidence of complications, life expectancy and diabetes related mortality in the Mexican diabetic population over the next two decades using data from a nation-wide, population based survey and the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) outcome model. The cohort included all patients with type 2 diabetes evaluated during the National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANut) 2006. ENSANut is a probabilistic multistage stratified survey whose aim was to measure the prevalence of chronic diseases. A total of 47,152 households were visited. Results are shown stratified by gender, time since diagnosis (> or ≤ to 10 years) and age at the time of diagnosis (> or ≤ 40 years). The prevalence of diabetes in our cohort was 14.4%. The predicted 20 year-incidence for chronic complications per 1000 individuals are: ischemic heart disease 112, myocardial infarction 260, heart failure 113, stroke 101, and amputation 62. Furthermore, 539 per 1000 patients will have a diabetes-related premature death. The average life expectancy for the diabetic population is 10.9 years (95%CI 10.7-11.2); this decreases to 8.3 years after adjusting for quality of life (CI95% 8.1-8.5). Male sex and cases diagnosed after age 40 have the highest risk for developing at least one major complication during the next 20 years. Based on the current clinical profile of Mexican patients with diabetes, the burden of disease related complications will be tremendous over the next two decades.

  6. Estimated incidence of cardiovascular complications related to type 2 diabetes in Mexico using the UKPDS outcome model and a population-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguilar-Salinas Carlos A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To estimate the incidence of complications, life expectancy and diabetes related mortality in the Mexican diabetic population over the next two decades using data from a nation-wide, population based survey and the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS outcome model Methods The cohort included all patients with type 2 diabetes evaluated during the National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANut 2006. ENSANut is a probabilistic multistage stratified survey whose aim was to measure the prevalence of chronic diseases. A total of 47,152 households were visited. Results are shown stratified by gender, time since diagnosis (> or ≤ to 10 years and age at the time of diagnosis (> or ≤ 40 years. Results The prevalence of diabetes in our cohort was 14.4%. The predicted 20 year-incidence for chronic complications per 1000 individuals are: ischemic heart disease 112, myocardial infarction 260, heart failure 113, stroke 101, and amputation 62. Furthermore, 539 per 1000 patients will have a diabetes-related premature death. The average life expectancy for the diabetic population is 10.9 years (95%CI 10.7-11.2; this decreases to 8.3 years after adjusting for quality of life (CI95% 8.1-8.5. Male sex and cases diagnosed after age 40 have the highest risk for developing at least one major complication during the next 20 years. Conclusions Based on the current clinical profile of Mexican patients with diabetes, the burden of disease related complications will be tremendous over the next two decades.

  7. Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease: Is intensive glucose control beneficial or deadly? Lessons from ACCORD, ADVANCE, VADT, UKPDS, PROactive, and NICE-SUGAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schernthaner, Guntram

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a rather complex metabolic disorder still associated with a 2-fold increased cardiovascular (CV) mortality despite a dramatic improvement in CV risk reduction by multifactorial intervention strategies. Intensive glucose control can also reduce CV morbidity, but this effect seems to be limited to younger patients with shorter duration of disease and no CV disease. Intensive glucose control--in particular when complex insulin strategies are used--is associated with a 5-fold increased risk for severe hypoglycemia, which could induce harm in some patients. In contrast to blood pressure and lipid-lowering interventions a reduction of CV mortality cannot be seen before 10-20 years after the start of the glucose-lowering intervention (metabolic memory, legacy effect). Future ongoing outcome studies in more than 50,000 patients will clarify whether new antidiabetic drugs--not inducing hypoglycemia or weight gain--will further improve the prognosis of T2DM patients.

  8. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cull CA, et al. Association of systolic blood pressure with macrovascular and microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes (UKPDS 36): Prospective observational study. BMJ. 2000;321:412‑9. 25. Fuchsjäger‑Mayrl G, Polak K, Luksch A, Polska E, Dorner GT,. Rainer G, et al. Retinal blood flow and systemic blood pressure.

  9. Development of a new diabetes risk prediction tool for incident coronary heart disease events: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and the Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboah, Joseph; Erbel, Raimund; Delaney, Joseph Chris; Nance, Robin; Guo, Mengye; Bertoni, Alain G; Budoff, Matthew; Moebus, Susanne; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Burke, Gregory L; Wong, Nathan D; Lehmann, Nils; Herrington, David M; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Greenland, Philip

    2014-10-01

    We develop a new diabetes CHD risk estimator using traditional risk factors plus coronary artery calcium (CAC), ankle-brachial index (ABI), high sensitivity C-reactive protein, family history of CHD, and carotid intima-media thickness and compared it with United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes study (UKPDS), Framingham risk and the NCEP/ATP III risk scores in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We combined data from T2DM without clinical CVD in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) and the Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study (N = 1343). After a mean follow-up of 8.5 years, 85 (6.3%) participants had incident CHD. Among the novel risk markers, CAC best predicted CHD independent of the FRS [hazard ratio: HR (95% CI): log (CAC +25):1.69 (1.45-1.97), p 25 and ≤125:2.29 (0.87-5.95), >125 and ≤400: 3.87 (1.57-9.57), >400: 5.97 (2.57-13.84), respectively). The MESA-HNR diabetes CHD risk score has better accuracy for the main outcome versus the FRS or UKPDS [area under curve (AUC) of 0.76 vs. 0.70 and 0.69, respectively; all p III guidelines, the MESA-HNR score has an NRI of 0.74 for the main outcome. This new CHD risk estimator has better discriminative ability for incident CHD than the FRS, UKPDS, and the ATP III/NCEP recommendations in a multi-ethnic cohort with T2DM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Validation of the IMS CORE Diabetes Model.

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    McEwan, Phil; Foos, Volker; Palmer, James L; Lamotte, Mark; Lloyd, Adam; Grant, David

    2014-09-01

    The IMS CORE Diabetes Model (CDM) is a widely published and validated simulation model applied in both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) analyses. Validation to external studies is an important part of demonstrating model credibility. Because the CDM is widely used to estimate long-term clinical outcomes in diabetes patients, the objective of this analysis was to validate the CDM to contemporary outcomes studies, including those with long-term follow-up periods. A total of 112 validation simulations were performed, stratified by study follow-up duration. For long-term results (≥15-year follow-up), simulation cohorts representing baseline Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) and United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) cohorts were generated and intensive and conventional treatment arms were defined in the CDM. Predicted versus observed macrovascular and microvascular complications and all-cause mortality were assessed using the coefficient of determination (R(2)) goodness-of-fit measure. Across all validation studies, the CDM simulations produced an R(2) statistic of 0.90. For validation studies with a follow-up duration of less than 15 years, R(2) values of 0.90 and 0.88 were achieved for T1DM and T2DM respectively. In T1DM, validating against 30-year outcomes data (DCCT) resulted in an R(2) of 0.72. In T2DM, validating against 20-year outcomes data (UKPDS) resulted in an R(2) of 0.92. This analysis supports the CDM as a credible tool for predicting the absolute number of clinical events in DCCT- and UKPDS-like populations. With increasing incidence of diabetes worldwide, the CDM is particularly important for health care decision makers, for whom the robust evaluation of health care policies is essential. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A cost effectiveness study of integrated care in health services delivery: a diabetes program in Australia

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    Snow Jill

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 diabetes is rapidly growing as a proportion of the disease burden in Australia as elsewhere. This study addresses the cost effectiveness of an integrated approach to assisting general practitioners (GPs with diabetes management. This approach uses a centralized database of clinical data of an Australian Division of General Practice (a network of GPs to co-ordinate care according to national guidelines. Methods Long term outcomes for patients in the program were derived using clinical parameters after 5 years of program participation, and the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS Outcomes Model, to project outcomes for 40 years from the time of diagnosis and from 5 years post-diagnosis. Cost information was obtained from a range of sources. While program costs are directly available, and costs of complications can be estimated from the UKPDS model, other costs are estimated by comparing costs in the Division with average costs across the state or the nation. The outcome and cost measures are used derive incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Results The clinical data show that the program is effective in the short term, with improvement or no statistical difference in most clinical measures over 5 years. Average HbA1c levels increased by less than expected over the 5 year period. While the program is estimated to generate treatment cost savings, overall net costs are positive. However, the program led to projected improvements in expected life years and Quality Adjusted Life Expectancy (QALE, with incremental cost effectiveness ratios of $A8,106 per life-year saved and $A9,730 per year of QALE gained. Conclusions The combination of an established model of diabetes progression and generally available data has provided an opportunity to establish robust methods of testing the cost effectiveness of a program for which a formal control group was not available. Based on this methodology, integrated health care

  12. Realization of a service for the long-term risk assessment of diabetes-related complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagani, Vincenzo; Chiarugi, Franco; Manousos, Dimitris; Verma, Vivek; Fursse, Joanna; Marias, Kostas; Tsamardinos, Ioannis

    2015-07-01

    We present a computerized system for the assessment of the long-term risk of developing diabetes-related complications. The core of the system consists of a set of predictive models, developed through a data-mining/machine-learning approach, which are able to evaluate individual patient profiles and provide personalized risk assessments. Missing data is a common issue in (electronic) patient records, thus the models are paired with a module for the intelligent management of missing information. The system has been deployed and made publicly available as Web service, and it has been fully integrated within the diabetes-management platform developed by the European project REACTION. Preliminary usability tests showed that the clinicians judged the models useful for risk assessment and for communicating the risk to the patient. Furthermore, the system performs as well as the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) Risk Engine when both systems are tested on an independent cohort of UK diabetes patients. Our work provides a working example of risk-stratification tool that is (a) specific for diabetes patients, (b) able to handle several different diabetes related complications, (c) performing as well as the widely known UKPDS Risk Engine on an external validation cohort. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative performance of diabetes-specific and general population-based cardiovascular risk assessment models in people with diabetes mellitus.

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    Echouffo-Tcheugui, J-B; Kengne, A P

    2013-10-01

    Multivariable models for estimating cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in people with diabetes comprise general population-based models and those from diabetic cohorts. Whether one set of models should receive preference is unclear. We evaluated the evidence on direct comparisons of the performance of general population vs diabetes-specific CVD risk models in people with diabetes. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched up to March 2013. Two reviewers independently identified studies that compared the performance of general CVD models vs diabetes-specific ones in the same group of people with diabetes. Independent, dual data extraction on study design, risk models, outcomes; and measures of performance was conducted. Eleven articles reporting on 22 pair wise comparisons of a diabetes-specific model (UKPDS, ADVANCE and DCS risk models) to a general population model (three variants of the Framingham model, Prospective Cardiovascular Münster [PROCAM] score, CardioRisk Manager [CRM], Joint British Societies Coronary Risk Chart [JBSRC], Progetto Cuore algorithm and the CHD-Riskard algorithm) were eligible. Absolute differences in C-statistic of diabetes-specific vs general population-based models varied from -0.13 to 0.09. Comparisons for other performance measures were unusual. Outcomes definitions were congruent with those applied during model development. In 14 comparisons, the UKPDS, ADVANCE or DCS diabetes-specific models were superior to the general population CVD risk models. Authors reported better C-statistic for models they developed. The limited existing evidence suggests a possible discriminatory advantage of diabetes-specific over general population-based models for CVD risk stratification in diabetes. More robust head-to-head comparisons are needed to confirm this trend and strengthen recommendations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Adding pharmacists to primary care teams reduces predicted long-term risk of cardiovascular events in type 2 diabetic patients without established cardiovascular disease: results from a randomized trial.

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    Ladhani, N N; Majumdar, S R; Johnson, J A; Tsuyuki, R T; Lewanczuk, R Z; Spooner, R; Simpson, S H

    2012-11-01

    To determine the impact of adding pharmacists to primary care teams on predicted 10-year risk of cardiovascular events in patients with Type 2 diabetes without established cardiovascular disease. This was a pre-specified secondary analysis of randomized trial data. The main study found that, compared with usual care, addition of a pharmacist resulted in improvements in blood pressure, dyslipidaemia, and hyperglycaemia for primary care patients with Type 2 diabetes. In this sub-study, predicted 10-year risk of cardiovascular events at baseline and 1 year were calculated for patients free of cardiovascular disease at enrolment. The primary outcome was change in UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) risk score; change in Framingham risk score was a secondary outcome. Baseline characteristics were similar between the 102 intervention patients and 93 control subjects: 59% women, median (interquartile range) age 57 (50-64) years, diabetes duration 3 (1-6.5) years, systolic blood pressure 128 (120-140) mmHg, total cholesterol 4.34 (3.75-5.04) mmol/l and HbA(1c) 54 mmol/mol (48-64 mmol/mol) [7.1% (6.5-8.0%)]. Median baseline UKPDS risk score was 10.2% (6.0-16.7%) for intervention patients and 9.5% (5.8-15.1%) for control subjects (P = 0.80). One-year post-randomization, the median absolute reduction in UKPDS risk score was 1.0% greater for intervention patients compared with control subjects (P = 0.032). Similar changes were seen with the Framingham risk score (median reduction 1.2% greater for intervention patients compared with control subjects, P = 0.048). The two risk scores were highly correlated (rho = 0.83; P risk of cardiovascular events for patients with Type 2 diabetes without established cardiovascular disease. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  15. Refining Long-Term Prediction of Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes - The VILDIA Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goliasch, Georg; Silbernagel, Günther; Kleber, Marcus E; Grammer, Tanja B; Pilz, Stefan; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Bartko, Philipp E; Maurer, Gerald; Koenig, Wolfgang; Niessner, Alexander; März, Winfried

    2017-07-05

    Cardiovascular risk assessment in patients with diabetes relies on traditional risk factors. However, numerous novel biomarkers have been found to be independent predictors of cardiovascular disease, which might significantly improve risk prediction in diabetic patients. We aimed to improve prediction of cardiovascular risk in diabetic patients by investigating 135 evolving biomarkers. Based on selected biomarkers a clinically applicable prediction algorithm for long-term cardiovascular mortality was designed. We prospectively enrolled 864 diabetic patients of the LUdwigshafen RIsk and Cardiovascular health (LURIC) study with a median follow-up of 9.6 years. Independent risk factors were selected using bootstrapping based on a Cox regression analysis. The following seven variables were selected for the final multivariate model: NT-proBNP, age, male sex, renin, diabetes duration, Lp-PLA2 and 25-OH vitamin D3. The risk score based on the aforementioned variables demonstrated an excellent discriminatory power for 10-year cardiovascular survival with a C-statistic of 0.76 (P < 0.001), which was significantly better than the established UKPDS risk engine (C-statistic = 0.64, P < 0.001). Net reclassification confirmed a significant improvement of individual risk prediction by 22% (95% confidence interval: 14-30%) compared to the UKPDS risk engine (P < 0.001). The VILDIA score based on traditional cardiovascular risk factors and reinforced with novel biomarkers outperforms previous risk algorithms.

  16. Update on type 2 diabetes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-02-23

    Feb 23, 2009 ... the incretins and DPPIV inhibitors) and the role of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG). Legacy effec t and macrovascular disease. Ten years ago, the UKPDS, a randomised trial of newly diagnosed people with type 2 diabetes allocated to either intensive. (sulphonylurea-insulin group) or conventional ...

  17. DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS MICROBIOLOGICAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    P. Rajagopal; S. Senthilvel; N. Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Infections of all types are more common in patients with diabetes, on the basis of outcome of retrospective study in Canada. Many types of infections are very common in diabetic than non-diabetic patients. Foot is the most common site. Diabetic foot infections range from mild infections to limb threatening conditions. Most require emergency medical attention. Diabetic foot infection is a global burden and projected to increase from 246 million people to o...

  18. Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD study: baseline characteristics and short-term effects of fenofibrate [ISRCTN64783481

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    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD Study is examining the effects of long-term fibrate therapy on coronary heart disease (CHD event rates in patients with diabetes mellitus. This article describes the trial's run-in phase and patients' baseline characteristics. Research design and methods FIELD is a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 63 centres in 3 countries evaluating the effects of fenofibrate versus placebo on CHD morbidity and mortality in 9795 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients were to have no indication for lipid-lowering therapy on randomization, but could start these or other drugs at any time after randomization. Follow-up in the study was to be for a median duration of not less than 5 years and until 500 major coronary events (fatal coronary heart disease plus nonfatal myocardial infarction had occurred. Results About 2100 patients (22% had some manifestation of cardiovascular disease (CVD at baseline and thus high risk status. Less than 25% of patients without CVD had a (UKPDS determined calculated 5-year CHD risk of 30, most were men, two-thirds were aged over 60 years, and substantial proportions had NCEP ATP III features of the metabolic syndrome independent of their diabetes, including low HDL (60%, high blood pressure measurement or treatment for hypertension (84%, high waist measurement (68%, and raised triglycerides (52%. After a 6-week run-in period before randomisation with all participants receiving 200 mg comicronized fenofibrate, there were declines in total and LDL cholesterol (10% and triglycerides (26% and an increase in HDL cholesterol (6.5%. Conclusion The study will show the effect of PPAR-alpha agonist action on CHD and other vascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes including substantial numbers with low to moderate CVD risk but with the various components of the metabolic syndrome. The main results of the study will be reported in

  19. Cardiovascular disease and intensive glucose control in type 2 diabetes mellitus: moving practice toward evidence-based strategies

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    Matthias Meier

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Matthias Meier,1,2 Michael Hummel3,41Clinic for Hypertension and Nephrology, Hannover, Germany; 2Department of Nephrology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 3Academic Hospital Schwabing, Munich, Germany; 4Diabetes Research Institute, Munich, GermanyAbstract: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is associated with a high risk of complications, essentially macrovascular events. Surprisingly, the effect of improved glucose control on coronary and cerebrovascular complications and the target level of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c in this population remains questionable. We here report the results of 4 recently published randomized controlled trials (ACCORD, ADVANCE, VADT, UKPDS post-trial, which did not demonstrate a significant reduction of cardiovascular events in the intensive group compared to the standard group. On the contrary, in ACCORD, the study with the most ambitious goal (HbA1c < 6%, the overall and cardiovascular mortality was greater in the intensive group, although the risk of microangiopathic complications, especially nephropathy, was significantly decreased. VADT suggests that one possibility for the lack of observed effect of intensive therapy could be that the cardiovascular benefit is delayed. This contrasts strongly with the long-term postintervention outcomes of UKPDS, which show a persistent benefit of glycemic control during 10 years of post-trial follow-up (‘legacy effect’. Therefore, the best way to protect patients with T2DM against coronary and cerebrovascular disease is to target all cardiovascular risk factors as early as possible by an individualized approach.Keywords: glycemic control, cardiovascular, ACCORD, ADVANCE, VADT, UKPDS post-trial

  20. DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS MICROBIOLOGICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rajagopal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Infections of all types are more common in patients with diabetes, on the basis of outcome of retrospective study in Canada. Many types of infections are very common in diabetic than non-diabetic patients. Foot is the most common site. Diabetic foot infections range from mild infections to limb threatening conditions. Most require emergency medical attention. Diabetic foot infection is a global burden and projected to increase from 246 million people to over 380 million people by the year 2025. Many people with diabetes develop complications that seriously affect their quality and length of life. Lower limb complications are common, particularly foot ulcers and gangrene. Development of these complications is attributed to individual risk factors, poverty, racial and ethnic differences, and quality of local and national health care systems. The wide variations noted suggest that best practices in low incidence areas could easily be adapted in high incidence areas to reduce the burden of complications. Almost every infection begins in a wound, often as neuropathic ulceration or a traumatic break in the skin. Infections that begin as a small problem may progress to involve soft tissue, bones and joints. Because of these morbidity and occasional mortality by these foot infections several authoritative groups have recently developed guidelines for assessing and treating diabetic foot. METHODOLOGY 100 Diabetic patients with foot ulcers were admitted and wounds were classified using wagner’s classification. Pus was sent for culture and sensitivity and treated accordingly. RESULTS In our study the most common organism cultured from the wound with diabetes mellitus was staphylococcus. The most sensitive drug for these organisms was found to be chloramphenicol on most occasions. CONCLUSION The rationale of pus culture and sensitivity is not only to definitively treat the diabetic wound after the culture sensitivity report is

  1. Estimating the risk of cardio vascular diseases among pakistani diabetics using uk pds risk engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moazzam, A.; Amer, J.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of risk estimation of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is helpful for clinician to identifying high risk populations for their effective treatment. Latest studies recommended only initiating cardio-protective treatment in diabetic patients based on personalized CHD risk estimates so as to reduce undue harm from overly aggressive risk factor modification. The United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UK PDS) Risk Engine is a widely used tool to assess the risk of Cardio Vascular diseases (CVD) in diabetics. The literature search so far did not reveal any study of risk assessment among Pakistani Diabetics. Methods: This descriptive study is based on the data of 470 type-2 diabetics seen in Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore during 2011. The data of these 470 patients was analyzed through UKPDS Risk Engine. CHD risk was calculated. Results: The 10 years risk of CHD, fatal CHD, stroke and fatal stroke was 9.4%, 4.4%, 1.7% and 0.2% respectively. Conclusions: The present study show a lower risk of CVD occurring among Pakistani diabetics as compared to studies from western countries. (author)

  2. Health and diabetes self-efficacy: a study of diabetic and non-diabetic free clinic patients and family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Akiko; Christensen, Nancy; Myers, Kyl; Nourian, Maziar M; Ashby, Jeanie; Greenwood, Jessica L J; Reel, Justine J

    2014-08-01

    Free clinics across the country provide free or reduced fee healthcare to individuals who lack access to primary care and are socio-economically disadvantaged. This study examined perceived health status among diabetic and non-diabetic free clinic patients and family members of the patients. Diabetes self-efficacy among diabetic free clinic patients was also investigated with the goal of developing appropriate diabetes health education programs to promote diabetes self-management. English or Spanish speaking patients and family members (N = 365) aged 18 years or older completed a self-administered survey. Physical and mental health and diabetes self-efficacy were measured using standardized instruments. Diabetic free clinic patients reported poorer physical and mental health and higher levels of dysfunction compared to non-diabetic free clinic patients and family members. Having a family history of diabetes and using emergency room or urgent care services were significant factors that affected health and dysfunction among diabetic and non-diabetes free clinic patients and family members. Diabetic free clinic patients need to receive services not only for diabetes, but also for overall health and dysfunction issues. Diabetes educational programs for free clinic patients should include a component to increase diabetes empowerment as well as the knowledge of treatment and management of diabetes. Non-diabetic patients and family members who have a family history of diabetes should also participate in diabetes education. Family members of free clinic patients need help to support a diabetic family member or with diabetes prevention.

  3. CLINICOMICROBIOLOGICAL STUDY OF DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Kumar Palaniappan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease caused by a combination of lifestyle and genetic factors affecting all organs in the body. Foot ulcers are one of the common and serious long-term complications of diabetes leads to recurrent and chronic infections, which results in limb loss when treatment is delayed. The aim of this study is to find out the clinical outcome and microbiological profile in patients admitted with diabetic foot ulcers. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study conducted between November 2008 to November 2009 over 50 patients with history of foot ulceration and diabetes. 50 patients were admitted with diabetic foot ulcer over a period of one year between November 2008-2009. They were studied after getting written consent. A predesigned pro forma was used to get the parameters comprising age, gender, duration, type of diabetes mellitus, presence of neuropathy, nephropathy (serum creatinine, urine albumin, retinopathy (screening funduscopy by ophthalmologist. RESULTS Among 50 patients admitted and treated for diabetic foot ulcers with mean stay of 18 days, 29 (58% had complete healing on conservative management, 18 (36% underwent minor amputation (toes, 3 (6% had major amputation (below knee/above knee. No mortality among the study groups encountered. Gram-negative aerobes E. coli (36%, Pseudomonas (52%, Klebsiella (28%, Proteus vulgaris (20% and Acinetobacter (16% were most frequently isolated followed by gram-positive aerobes MRSA (14%, Enterococcus (6%, Strep pyogenes (4% and no anaerobic growth. CONCLUSION Diabetic foot infections are frequently polymicrobial and predominantly gram-negative aerobic bacteria at presentation. Multidrug resistance pseudomonas aeruginosa and MRSA in diabetic foot ulcer is at its emergence and life threatening. Initial aggressive multimodal approach with surgical intervention, culture specific and sensitive targeted combined broad-spectrum antibiotics decreases the morbidity and mortality

  4. Clinical study of diabetic dermoangiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MPS Sawhney

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and twenty three diabetic patients and 100 non- diabetic controls were examined for lesions of diabetic dermoangiopathy. Twenty two (17.9% lesions, while simildr lesions were found in only 2 (2% controls. Age of the patients with opathy was sipifirandy higher than those derm without dermopathy, and it was more common in the fifth to the seventh decade. No statistically siicant relationship could be established with the sex, type, serverity control or duration of diabetes, diatetic neuropathy, larize vessel disease like CAD, PVD or CVA or with metabolic complications of diabetes. However, a higher percentage (59.1% of patients with dermopathy were found to have a poor control of their diabetes as compared to those without microangiopathy (50.7%. Dermopathy was also more common (23% 9 the duration of diabetes was more than 5 years, than if it was less than 5 years (14.1%. The percentage (33.3% of patients with retinopathy having dermopathy. Rubeosis was seen in 4 (3.2% patients.

  5. Epidemiological studies of exercise in diabetes prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Gang; Lakka, Timo A; Oskari Kilpeläinen, Tuomas

    2007-01-01

    for more than 70% of total mortality among patients with type 2 diabetes. The associations of physical activity, physical fitness, and changes in the lifestyle with the risk of type 2 diabetes have been assessed by a number of prospective studies and clinical trials in the past decade. Several studies have...... also evaluated the joint associations of physical activity, body mass index, and glucose levels with the risk of type 2 diabetes. Prospective studies and clinical trials have shown that moderate or high levels of physical activity or physical fitness and changes in the lifestyle (dietary modification...... and increase in physical activity) can prevent type 2 diabetes. Our review of the scientific evidence confirms that 30 min/d of moderate- or high-level physical activity is an effective and safe way to prevent type 2 diabetes in all populations....

  6. Regulation of glucose control in people with type 2 diabetes: a review and consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jeong-Taek; Park, Kyung Soo; Byun, Dong-Won; Ko, Kyung Soo; Chung, Yoon-Sok; Kim, Doo Man; Park, Tae Sun; Cha, Bong Soo; Lee, In Kyu; Park, Joong Yeol; Son, Hyun Shik; Lee, Moon-Kyu; Kim, Kwang Won; Son, Ho Young

    2010-02-01

    A conference was convened by the Korean Diabetes Association and the Korean Endocrine Society on September 7, 2009 to discuss and organize the results of research on intensive glucose control for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. Professor Kyung Soo Park led the conference, and Professors Kwang Won Kim and Ho Young Son acted as chairmen. Professors Doo Man Kim, Tae Sun Park, and Bong Soo Cha reported on intensive glucose control and diabetic complications, including the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS), Diabetes Control and Complication Trial (DCCT) research results, the recently published Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD), Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron Modified Release Controlled Evaluation (ADVANCE), and Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial (VADT) research, as well as meta-analyses. Professor Jeong-Taek Woo reported on the manuscript written by the committee for the Korean Diabetes Association which dealt with the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Professors Kyung Soo Ko, Joong Yeol Park, Hyun Shik Son, Moon-Kyu Lee, Dong-Won Byun, and Yoon-Sok Chung participated in the discussion and collected information for the manuscript from all of the participants. The aim of the debate was to determine how to establish target goals for intensive glucose control and how to individualize those goals. The participants concluded that there was no need to modify the recommendation of maintaining an HbA1c under 6.5%, the current blood glucose treatment goal that is recommended by the Korean Diabetes Association. In addition, individual target goals for glucose control were recommended depending on the situation of each patient. We report on the consensus statement from the meeting.

  7. [Hypertension and insulin treatment in type 2 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salem Hachmi, L; Bouguerra, R; Maatki, O; Smadhi, H; Turki, Z; Hraoui, S; Ben Slama, C

    2007-08-01

    Insulin resistance and endogenous hyperinsulinemia are associated with blood hypertension. The aim of this analysis is to estimate the prevalence of blood hypertension one year after insulin treatment in type 2 diabetic patients. and methods: This is a retrospective clinical study of 178 type 2 diabetic patients (57 men and 121 women) insulin treated since at least one year. Mean age is 62 +/- 10 years and mean duration of diabetes is ten years. All patients had a clinical and biological control before treatment with insulin and at least three controls during the first year of insulin treatment (anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1C). WHO definition of hypertension is used (blood pressure >or=140 / 90 mmHg). At baseline, 48% of patients have hypertension. After insulin treatment, the prevalence of hypertension significantly increase to 53% (94 / 178) three months later (p=0.008), to 54.5% (98 / 178) six months later (p=0.001) and to 55.6% (99 / 178) twelve months later. This increase in hypertension frequency is associated with a significant weight gain and a better blood glucose control. Insulin therapy may contribute to the development of blood hypertension. It promotes renal sodium retention and increases sympathetic nervous system activity. In the UKPDS intensive blood glucose control with insulin is not associated with an increase of macro vascular complications. These observational data suggest the need for further study of the relationship between exogenous insulin and hypertension.

  8. A Narrative Review of Diabetes Intervention Studies to Explore Diabetes Care Opportunities for Pharmacists

    OpenAIRE

    Shamala Ayadurai; H. Laetitia Hattingh; Lisa B. G. Tee; Siti Norlina Md Said

    2016-01-01

    Background. We conducted a review of current diabetes intervention studies in type 2 diabetes and identified opportunities for pharmacists to deliver quality diabetes care. Methods. A search on randomised controlled trials (RCT) on diabetes management by healthcare professionals including pharmacists published between 2010 and 2015 was conducted. Results and Discussion. Diabetes management includes multifactorial intervention which includes seven factors as outlined in diabetes guidelines, na...

  9. Cost effectiveness of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) for patients with type 2 diabetes and not on insulin: impact of modelling assumptions on recent Canadian findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunis, Sandra L

    2011-11-01

    Canadian patients, healthcare providers and payers share interest in assessing the value of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) for individuals with type 2 diabetes but not on insulin. Using the UKPDS (UK Prospective Diabetes Study) model, the Canadian Optimal Prescribing and Utilization Service (COMPUS) conducted an SMBG cost-effectiveness analysis. Based on the results, COMPUS does not recommend routine strip use for most adults with type 2 diabetes who are not on insulin. Cost-effectiveness studies require many assumptions regarding cohort, clinical effect, complication costs, etc. The COMPUS evaluation included several conservative assumptions that negatively impacted SMBG cost effectiveness. Current objectives were to (i) review key, impactful COMPUS assumptions; (ii) illustrate how alternative inputs can lead to more favourable results for SMBG cost effectiveness; and (iii) provide recommendations for assessing its long-term value. A summary of COMPUS methods and results was followed by a review of assumptions (for trial-based glycosylated haemoglobin [HbA(1c)] effect, patient characteristics, costs, simulation pathway) and their potential impact. The UKPDS model was used for a 40-year cost-effectiveness analysis of SMBG (1.29 strips per day) versus no SMBG in the Canadian payer setting. COMPUS assumptions for patient characteristics (e.g. HbA(1c) 8.4%), SMBG HbA(1c) advantage (-0.25%) and costs were retained. As with the COMPUS analysis, UKPDS HbA(1c) decay curves were incorporated into SMBG and no-SMBG pathways. An important difference was that SMBG HbA(1c) benefits in the current study could extend beyond the initial simulation period. Sensitivity analyses examined SMBG HbA(1c) advantage, adherence, complication history and cost inputs. Outcomes (discounted at 5%) included QALYs, complication rates, total costs (year 2008 values) and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). The base-case ICER was $Can63 664 per QALY gained; approximately 56% of

  10. [Diabetic retinopathy complications--12-year retrospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignat, Florica; Davidescu, Livia

    2002-01-01

    It is analyzed, on a retrospective study on 12 years, the incidence of diabetus melitus cases, hospitalized in the Ophthalmologic Clinic from Craiova with special mention to the frequency of the diabetic retinopathy, of it's complications and in an accordance to other general diseases, especially cardiovascular's, which contributes to the aggravation of the diabetic ocular in juries evolution. The study underlines the high incidence of the new founded cases with diabetus melitus in complicated diabetes retinopathy stage; the high frequency of ocular complications is explained, according to our statistic facts and through an insufficient treatment, sometimes incorrect and many other cases total neglected by the patients.

  11. Assessing the relationship between computational speed and precision: a case study comparing an interpreted versus compiled programming language using a stochastic simulation model in diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Phil; Bergenheim, Klas; Yuan, Yong; Tetlow, Anthony P; Gordon, Jason P

    2010-01-01

    Simulation techniques are well suited to modelling diseases yet can be computationally intensive. This study explores the relationship between modelled effect size, statistical precision, and efficiency gains achieved using variance reduction and an executable programming language. A published simulation model designed to model a population with type 2 diabetes mellitus based on the UKPDS 68 outcomes equations was coded in both Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) and C++. Efficiency gains due to the programming language were evaluated, as was the impact of antithetic variates to reduce variance, using predicted QALYs over a 40-year time horizon. The use of C++ provided a 75- and 90-fold reduction in simulation run time when using mean and sampled input values, respectively. For a series of 50 one-way sensitivity analyses, this would yield a total run time of 2 minutes when using C++, compared with 155 minutes for VBA when using mean input values. The use of antithetic variates typically resulted in a 53% reduction in the number of simulation replications and run time required. When drawing all input values to the model from distributions, the use of C++ and variance reduction resulted in a 246-fold improvement in computation time compared with VBA - for which the evaluation of 50 scenarios would correspondingly require 3.8 hours (C++) and approximately 14.5 days (VBA). The choice of programming language used in an economic model, as well as the methods for improving precision of model output can have profound effects on computation time. When constructing complex models, more computationally efficient approaches such as C++ and variance reduction should be considered; concerns regarding model transparency using compiled languages are best addressed via thorough documentation and model validation.

  12. Quality of Diabetes Care in Germany Improved from 2000 to 2007 to 2014, but Improvements Diminished since 2007. Evidence from the Population-Based KORA Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Laxy

    Full Text Available Little is known about the development of the quality of diabetes care in Germany. The aim of this study is to analyze time trends in patient self-management, physician-delivered care, medication, risk factor control, complications and quality of life from 2000 to 2014.Analyses are based on data from individuals with type 2 diabetes of the population-based KORA S4 (1999-2001, n = 150, F4 (2006-2008, n = 203, FF4 (2013/14, n = 212 cohort study. Information on patient self-management, physician-delivered care, medication, risk factor control and quality of life were assessed in standardized questionnaires and examinations. The 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD risk was calculated using the UKPDS risk engine. Time trends were analyzed using multivariable linear and logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, education, diabetes duration, and history of cardiovascular disease.From 2000 to 2014 the proportion of participants with type 2 diabetes receiving oral antidiabetic/cardio-protective medication and of those reaching treatment goals for glycemic control (HbA1c<7%, 60% to 71%, p = 0.09, blood pressure (<140/80 mmHg, 25% to 69%, p<0.001 and LDL cholesterol (<2.6 mmol/l, 13% to 27%, p<0.001 increased significantly. However, improvements were generally smaller from 2007 to 2014 than from 2000 to 2007. Modeled 10-year CHD risk decreased from 30% in 2000 to 24% in 2007 to 19% in 2014 (p<0.01. From 2007 to 2014, the prevalence of microvascular complications decreased and quality of life increased, but no improvements were observed for the majority of indicators of self-management.Despite improvements, medication and risk factor control has remained suboptimal. The flattening of improvements and deteriorations in quality of (self- care since 2007 indicate that more effort is needed to improve quality of care and patient self-management. Due to selection or lead time bias an overestimation of quality of care improvements cannot be ruled out.

  13. A importância da determinação da hemoglobina glicada no monitoramento das complicações crônicas do diabetes mellitus The importance of glycated hemoglobin determination in the management of chronic complications associated with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreza Fabro de Bem

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available O diabetes é uma situação clínica muito freqüente que envolve cerca de 7% da população mundial. Por essa razão muitos esforços têm sido empregados na implementação de métodos de monitoramento e no desenvolvimento de terapias efetivas para o seu controle. A hemoglobina glicada (HbA1c é o teste mais indicado na quantificação do risco de complicações crônicas em pacientes diabéticos. O Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT e o United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS concluíram que o risco de complicações em pacientes diabéticos é diretamente proporcional ao controle glicêmico, determinado através dos níveis de HbA1c. A medida exata e precisa da HbA1c é uma questão importante para os laboratórios clínicos, sendo que vários fatores podem afetar as determinações, levando a resultados equivocados. O objetivo deste estudo é demonstrar os diferentes métodos para a quantificação da HbA1c, bem como discutir os problemas mais freqüentes de padronização dessa determinação.Diabetes is a widespread disease, involving about 7% of the entire world population. For this reason, many efforts have been devoted to the wide application of valid monitoring procedures and to the development of effective therapeutic approaches. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c is the pre-eminent factor for quantifying the risk of chronic complications in patients with diabetes. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT and United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS, demonstrated conclusively that risks for complications in patients with diabetes are directly related to glycemic control, as measured by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c. Accurate determination of HbA1c is an important issue for clinical laboratories and several factors may affect and lead to erroneous results. The main objective of this study is to show the different methods for glycated hemoglobin quantification and to discuss the most frequent problems of

  14. Epidemiological studies on type 2 diabetes: assessment of diabetes risk factors and study participation

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Anna-Karin

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a disease with increasing prevalence. Better knowledge of risk factors may form the bases for specific interventions and preventive measures. The aim of this thesis was to contribute to the knowledge on type 2 diabetes, by examining family history of diabetes and other risk factors with emphasis on psychological exposures. The studies are based on the cohort of the Stockholm Diabetes Prevention Program (SDPP) in which 12,952 men and 19,416 women 35-56 years old were s...

  15. Fasting with diabetes: a prospective observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noon, Muhammad Jawad; Khawaja, Haseeb Ahmad; Ishtiaq, Osama; Khawaja, Quratulain; Minhas, Sana; Niazi, Asfandyar Khan; Minhas, Abdul Mannan Khan; Malhi, Umar Rasool

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the proportion of diabetic patients who develop adverse glycaemic events when fasting regularly. Design Prospective observational study conducted at a tertiary care hospital in South Asia. Five hundred and twenty-three patients were assessed for eligibility, and 150 were included in the final analysis. Diabetic patients over 18 years of age who were willing to fast regularly and make a chart of their daily blood sugar levels were included in the study. The main outcome measures were hypoglycaemic and hyperglycaemic events. Frequencies and percentages were calculated for quantitative variables, while mean±SD were documented for qualitative variables. Relative risk was calculated as a measure of association. Results Of a total of 150 individuals, 10% experienced hypoglycaemia, while 3.3% reported hyperglycaemic episodes. Only 8.7% of the participants discontinued one or more fasts; however, none of them required hospitalisation. There is a negative association between a visit to a physician by diabetic patients before they begin to fast regularly and the risk of developing hypoglycaemia (relative risk 0.73). Conclusions Many diabetic patients who fast regularly are at high risk of adverse glycaemic events. Most diabetics do not consult their physicians before fasting to adjust medications and lifestyle. Various strategies should be planned and implemented for the awareness and education of such patients to avoid adverse glycaemic events and subsequent complications. PMID:28588932

  16. Decreased Cardiovascular Risk after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery in Chinese Diabetic Patients with Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue; Duan, Wenyan; Sun, Chenglin; Li, Zhuo; Liu, Yujia; Xiao, Xianchao; Wang, Gang; Gang, Xiaokun; Wang, Guixia

    2017-01-01

    The influence of bariatric surgery on cardiovascular risks in Chinese diabetic patients remains unclear. Here, we aimed to explore the impact of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) on cardiovascular risks in Chinese diabetic patients with obesity. Twenty Chinese patients with T2DM and obesity undergoing RYGB surgery were included in this study. Cardiovascular risk factors were measured before and 18 months after surgery. A 10-year cardiovascular risk was calculated by the UKPDS risk engine. Linear regression analysis was performed on CHD risk, stroke risk, and baseline metabolic parameters. The complete remission rate of diabetes was 90% after RYGB surgery, with significant improvements in blood pressure, BMI, glucose, and lipid metabolism ( P women,  5 years, using noninsulin therapy presented more obvious improvements in the 10-year cardiovascular risk after RYGB surgery. WHR, age, LDL-C, and HbA1c were the most important factors influencing CHD or stroke risk after RYGB surgery ( P treatment to reduce cardiovascular risk in Chinese diabetic patients with obesity.

  17. Atlantic DIP: Diabetes in Pregnancy: a comparative study of stress and wellbeing in women with established diabetes, gestational diabetes, and those without diabetes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lydon, K

    2011-09-15

    Background and aims: Diabetes in pregnancy increases the risk of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. The experience of diabetes during pregnancy may be a significant source of stress, both because of the impact of the illness and associated treatments on the expectant mother and because of concern about the impact on the unborn child. In order to examine stress associated with diabetes during pregnancy, we carried out a prospective study in women with pre-existing (Type 1 or Type 2) Diabetes (PDM), Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM), and non-diabetic pregnant controls (NDM).\\r\

  18. Cost-effectiveness of continuous glucose monitoring and intensive insulin therapy for type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Kavita V

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our objective was to determine the cost-effectiveness of Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM technology with intensive insulin therapy compared to self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG in adults with type 1 diabetes in the United States. Methods A Markov cohort analysis was used to model the long-term disease progression of 12 different diabetes disease states, using a cycle length of 1 year with a 33-year time horizon. The analysis uses a societal perspective to model a population with a 20-year history of diabetes with mean age of 40. Costs are expressed in $US 2007, effectiveness in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs. Parameter estimates and their ranges were derived from the literature. Utility estimates were drawn from the EQ-5D catalogue. Probabilities were derived from the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT, the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS, and the Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy. Costs and QALYs were discounted at 3% per year. Univariate and Multivariate probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted using 10,000 Monte Carlo simulations. Results Compared to SMBG, use of CGM with intensive insulin treatment resulted in an expected improvement in effectiveness of 0.52 QALYs, and an expected increase in cost of $23,552, resulting in an ICER of approximately $45,033/QALY. For a willingness-to-pay (WTP of $100,000/QALY, CGM with intensive insulin therapy was cost-effective in 70% of the Monte Carlo simulations. Conclusions CGM with intensive insulin therapy appears to be cost-effective relative to SMBG and other societal health interventions.

  19. A Descriptive Study Of Foot Complications In Diabetic Patients With ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Symptomatic peripheral neuropathy in a diabetic patient may be associated with the presence of other foot complications, which may otherwise be overlooked. Objective We conducted this study to determine the prevalence of symptomatic peripheral neuropathy among diabetic patients attending the diabetes ...

  20. Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs second study (DAWN2™)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Richard I G; Nicolucci, Antonio; Kovacs Burns, K

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: The second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study sought cross-national comparisons of perceptions on healthcare provision for benchmarking and sharing of clinical practices to improve diabetes care. METHODS: In total, 4785 healthcare professionals caring for people with diabetes...

  1. Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs second study (DAWN2™)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs Burns, K; Nicolucci, Antonio; Holt, Richard I G

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: The second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study examined the experiences of family members of people with diabetes for benchmarking and identifying unmet needs or areas for improvement to assist family members and those with diabetes to effectively self-manage. METHODS: In total...

  2. Association of diabetes mellitus and dementia : The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ott, A; Stolk, RP; Hofman, A; vanHarskamp, F; Grobbee, DE; Breteler, MMB

    1996-01-01

    Dementia and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) are highly prevalent disorders in the elderly. Diabetes has repeatedly been reported to affect cognition, but its relation with dementia is uncertain. We therefore studied the association between diabetes and dementia in the Rotterdam

  3. Ende Diabetes Study: diabetes and its characteristics in rural area of East Nusa Tenggara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwono Waspadji

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are only few studies about diabetes in rural area in Indonesia. Epidemiological study are needed to formulate health policy of disease management in specific area. The aim of this study was to find the prevalence of diabetes and knowledge of diabetes among the community in Nangapanda Village, Ende District, East Nusa Tenggara.Methods: A cross-sectional study “Ende Diabetes Study” was conducted in Nangapanda Village. This study use cluster random sampling method to a total number of 19756 residents in Nangapanda village. From the sampling frame of 1800 adult subjects who underwent screening with glucometer in 2008 and 2009, 125 subjects have been diagnosed as diabetes or impaired fasting glucose (IFG. All of the subjects who were diagnosed as diabetes or IFG from the previous screening and 218 subjects from control (normal subjects in the 2008 and 2009 screening were included in the present study. Each subject underwent general anamnesis, nutritional interview, complete physical examinations, and laboratory test (blood and urine. The data were analyzed using SPSS 13.0.Ressult: There were 343 subjects in this study. The prevalence of diabetes in Nangapanda using blood glucose criteria (using fasting and post-glucose load values was 2%; using post glucose load criteria, the prevalence of DM was 1.56%; while with HbA1c criteria, the prevalence was 2.83%. The prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT was 2.2%, and IFG was 6.2%. A number of 71.1% Nangapanda residents have sufficient knowledge about diabetes.Conclusion: Prevalence of diabetes in Nangapanda (using fasting and post-glucose load criteria was 2% and 1.56% (using post-glucose load values. As much as 71.1% of Nangapanda residents have sufficient knowledge about diabetes. (Med J Indones. 2013;22:30-8Keywords: Diabetes mellitus, Ende Diabetes Study, prevalence, rural Indonesia

  4. Low thiamine levels in children with type 1 diabetes and diabetic ketoacidosis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Elizabeth A; Strezlecki, Kenneth D; Clark, Jeff A; Lieh-Lai, Mary

    2015-02-01

    Thiamine deficiency has been documented in adults with diabetes and in a single report of reversible encephalopathy in a child with diabetic ketoacidosis. In children who present with severe diabetic ketoacidosis, one of the most serious complications is cerebral edema of which the primary symptom may be encephalopathy. Thiamine deficiency in other disease states has been clearly linked with acute encephalopathy, but there are no data on thiamine status in children with diabetic ketoacidosis. This study describes the prevalence of thiamine deficiency in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus who present with diabetic ketoacidosis and are admitted to the ICU. A prospective observational pilot study. PICU in a tertiary care children's hospital. Children 2-18 years admitted to the ICU for treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Twenty-two patients were enrolled. The mean age was 13.7 ± 3.6 years. Five of 21 patients (23.8%) had thiamine deficiency prior to insulin administration. After 8 hours of insulin therapy, seven of 20 patients (35%) had thiamine deficiency, and four of these seven patients also had thiamine deficiency at presentation. Sixty-eight percent of patients had a decrease in thiamine levels after 8 hours of insulin therapy, with a mean fall of 20 ± 31.4 nmol/L. Thiamine deficiency is common in children with diabetic ketoacidosis, and this deficiency may be worsened by treatment. When metabolic acidosis persists despite appropriate treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis, other factors such as thiamine deficiency should be considered.

  5. [Superficial mycoses: comparative study between type 2 diabetic patients and a non-diabetic control group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Humbría, Leila; Richard-Yegres, Nicole; Pérez-Blanco, Maigualida; Yegres, Francisco; Mendoza, Mireya; Acosta, Arnaldo; Hernández, Rosaura; Zárraga, Eluz

    2005-03-01

    Superficial mycoses are considered to affect more frequently patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2), specially onychomycosis and Tinea pedis. The purpose of this study was to compare the dermatophytoses, candidiasis and Pitiriasis versicolor frequency between 40 patients with DM-2 and 40 healthy persons of either sex, 40 years old or more. Clinical, metabolic, mycologic and inmunologic studies against Candida albicans, were carried out. Both diabetics 75% (30/40) and controls 65% (26/40) presented a high frequency of superficial mycoses (no significant difference p = 0.329). Pitiriasis versicolor was not detected in diabetic patients. They presented Tinea unguium, concomitant with Tinea pedis, with a higher frequency. The predominant dermatophyte was Trichophyton rubrum 18/23 (78%) in diabetics and 8/16 (50%) in non diabetics. Candida was isolated as commensal from oral mucous: 23/40 (58%) in diabetics and 21/40 (52%) in non diabetics (serotipo A was the more frequent), and from onychomycosis: 11/40 (28%) in diabetics and 12/40 (30%) in non diabetics. The immunological response was the same in both groups: celular 100%, humoral 20%. No statistical correlation among superficial mycoses, blood glucose level, glycosylated hemoglobin values or the time suffering the disease was observed. The high susceptibility to dermatophytes and Candida sp. infection showed to be associated with age and no with the diabetic type 2 condition in those patients.

  6. Potential risk factors for diabetic neuropathy: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nooraei Mahdi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus type II afflicts at least 2 million people in Iran. Neuropathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes and lowers the patient's quality of life. Since neuropathy often leads to ulceration and amputation, we have tried to elucidate the factors that can affect its progression. Methods In this case-control study, 110 diabetic patients were selected from the Shariati Hospital diabetes clinic. Michigan Neuropathic Diabetic Scoring (MNDS was used to differentiate cases from controls. The diagnosis of neuropathy was confirmed by nerve conduction studies (nerve conduction velocity and electromyography. The multiple factors compared between the two groups included consumption of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI, blood pressure, serum lipid level, sex, smoking, method of diabetes control and its quality. Results Statistically significant relationships were found between neuropathy and age, gender, quality of diabetes control and duration of disease (P values in the order: 0.04, 0.04, Conclusion In this study, hyperglycemia was the only modifiable risk factor for diabetic neuropathy. Glycemic control reduces the incidence of neuropathy, slows its progression and improves the diabetic patient's quality of life. More attention must be paid to elderly male diabetic patients with poor diabetes control with regard to regular foot examinations and more practical education.

  7. Dermatomycoses In Diabetics - A Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthiban K

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred diabetics including 153 non- insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and 47 insulin dependent diabetes mellitus patients, were screened for mycoses. Candidiasis was the commonest mycoses, followed by dermatophtoses and pityriasis versicolor. The fasting blood glucose level was observed to be higher in candidialsis compared to other mycoses.

  8. Advanced study on dry eye in diabetics

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Cui; Guo-Xing Xu

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic syndrome characterized by hyperglycemia, and is caused by complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Diabetes mellitus can lead to various ocular surface disorders, including dry eye, superficial punctuatekeratitis, corneal epithelial defects, and recurrent corneal erosion et al. This review focuses on the domestic and overseas research progress on dry eye in diabetics.

  9. Serum cystatin C in youth with diabetes: The SEARCH for diabetes in youth study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakatti Shankar, Roopa; Dolan, Lawrence M; Isom, Scott; Saydah, Sharon; Maahs, David M; Dabelea, Dana; Reynolds, Kristi; Hirsch, Irl B; Rodriguez, Beatriz L; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J; Marcovina, Santica; D'Agostino, Ralph; Mauer, Michael; Mottl, Amy K

    2017-08-01

    We compared cystatin C in youth with versus without diabetes and determined factors associated with cystatin C in youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Youth (ages 12-19years) without diabetes (N=544) were ascertained from the NHANES Study 2000-2002 and those with T1D (N=977) and T2D (N=168) from the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study. Adjusted means of cystatin C concentrations were compared amongst the 3 groups. Next, we performed multivariable analyses within the T1D and T2D SEARCH samples to determine the association between cystatin C and race, sex, age, diabetes duration, HbA1c, fasting glucose, and BMI. Adjusted cystatin C concentrations were statistically higher in NHANES (0.85mg/L) than in either the T1D (0.75mg/L) or T2D (0.70mg/L) SEARCH groups (Pyouth without diabetes compared to T1D or T2D, however the clinical relevance of this difference is quite small, especially in T1D. In youth with diabetes, cystatin C varies with BMI and acute and chronic glycemic control, however their effects may be different according to diabetes type. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. REFRACTOMETRY AS A TOOL IN DIABETIC STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, S.; Murthy, V.R.

    2006-01-01

    The refractive index as well as molar refraction, is the true index of purity of substance and plays a vital role in solution chemistry. A small addition of a foreign substance either in solid state of liquid form is going to effect the refractive index. As such the variation of refractive indices in pure glucose solution as a function of concentration is studied in detail and this principle is extended to the study of the refractive indices of urine solution of diabetic patients. The refractive indices are measured by spectrometry and abbe refractometry. A detailed study of variation of refractive indices of urine samples containing different sugar concentrations, of patients of different age groups revealed that the increase in refractive index follows a linear scale and can be explained by the equation, n=no [l+0.00251og (a s)1/4] [l+0.031og0.011C]. These study provided an opportunity to project refractometry as an effective tool in diagnosing the diabetic level of a patient by making use of a simple calibration curve of increment in refractive index ‘Δn, as a function of level of the disease. PMID:22557211

  11. Study protocol for the Cities Changing Diabetes programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Napier, A David; Nolan, John J; Bagger, Malene

    2017-01-01

    . The majority of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, a subset linked to overweight and obesity, decreased physical activity and unhealthy diets. Diabetes has significant consequences for those living with the condition as well as their families, relationships and wider society. Although care......INTRODUCTION: Urban living has been shown to affect health in various ways. As the world is becoming more urbanised and almost two-thirds of people with diabetes now live in cities, research into the relationship between urban living, health and diabetes is key to improving the lives of many...... Assessment explores the urban context in vulnerability to type 2 diabetes and identifies social factors and cultural determinants relevant to health, well-being and diabetes. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The protocol steers the collection of primary and secondary data across the study sites. Research ethics...

  12. Diabetes risk in women with gestational diabetes mellitus and a history of polycystic ovary syndrome: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, R; Pace, R; Rahme, E; Dasgupta, K

    2017-12-01

    To investigate whether polycystic ovary syndrome further increases postpartum diabetes risk in women with gestational diabetes mellitus and to explore relationships between polycystic ovary syndrome and incident diabetes in women who do not develop gestational diabetes. This retrospective cohort study (Quebec Physician Services Claims; Hospitalization Discharge Databases; Birth and Death registries) included 34 686 women with gestational diabetes during pregnancy (live birth), matched 1:1 to women without gestational diabetes by age group, year of delivery and health region. Diagnostic codes were used to define polycystic ovary syndrome and incident diabetes. Cox regression models were used to examine associations between polycystic ovary syndrome and incident diabetes. Polycystic ovary syndrome was present in 1.5% of women with gestational diabetes and 1.2% of women without gestational diabetes. There were more younger mothers and mothers who were not of white European ancestry among those with polycystic ovary syndrome. Those with polycystic ovary syndrome more often had a comorbidity and a lower proportion had a previous pregnancy. Polycystic ovary syndrome was associated with incident diabetes (hazard ratio 1.52; 95% CI 1.27, 1.82) among women with gestational diabetes. No conclusive associations between polycystic ovary syndrome and diabetes were identified (hazard ratio 0.94; 95% CI 0.39, 2.27) in women without gestational diabetes. In women with gestational diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome confers additional risk for incident diabetes postpartum. In women without gestational diabetes, an association between PCOS and incident diabetes was not observed. Given the already elevated risk of diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes, a history of both polycystic ovary syndrome and gestational diabetes signal a critical need for diabetes surveillance and prevention. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  13. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in screening-detected diabetes mellitus: results from the Gutenberg Health Study (GHS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponto, Katharina A; Koenig, Jochem; Peto, Tunde; Lamparter, Julia; Raum, Philipp; Wild, Philipp S; Lackner, Karl J; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Mirshahi, Alireza

    2016-09-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus may experience an asymptomatic period of hyperglycaemia, and complications may already be present at the time of diagnosis. We aimed to determine the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in patients with newly diagnosed (screening-detected) type 2 diabetes. The Gutenberg Health Study is a population-based study with 15,010 participants aged between 35 and 74 years. We determined the weighted prevalence of diabetic retinopathy by assessing fundus photographs. Screening-detected type 2 diabetes was defined as an HbA1c concentration of 6.5% (47.5 mmol/mol) or more, no medical diagnosis of diabetes and no intake of insulin or oral glucose-lowering agents. Of 14,948 participants, 1377 (9.2%) had diabetes mellitus. Of these, 347 (25.2%) had newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes detected by the screening. Overall, the weighted prevalence of screening-detected type 2 diabetes was 2.1%. Fundus photos were evaluable for 285 (82.1%) participants with newly diagnosed diabetes. The weighted prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in screening-detected type 2 diabetes was 13.0%; 12% of participants had a mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 0.6% had a moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy was proliferative in 0.3%. No cases of severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy or diabetic maculopathy were found. Thirty (14.9%) of 202 and six (7.2%) of 83 individuals with and without concomitant arterial hypertension, respectively, had diabetic retinopathy (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.06, 7.14). Visual acuity did not differ between individuals with and without diabetic retinopathy . In this large European study, the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in screening-detected type 2 diabetes was 13%. Only a very small proportion of participants with detected diabetic retinopathy needed treatment.

  14. Adiposity markers and risk of coronary heart disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonding, Simone F; Silva, Flávia M; Antonio, Juliana P; Azevedo, Mirela J; Canani, Luis Henrique S; Almeida, Jussara C

    2014-12-23

    This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluating the association between body adiposity markers and high-risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients with type 2 diabetes. Recent adiposity markers [waist-to-height ratio, conicity index (C-index) and body adiposity index] and traditional markers [BMI, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR)] were measured. The 10-year risk of fatal CHD was estimated according to UKPDS risk engine scores. Patients were divided into high (CHD risk ≥20%; n = 99) or low-moderate (CHD risk markers. A total of 420 patients with type 2 diabetes (61.9 ± 9.5 years; 53.5% females; HbA1c 7.6 ± 1.6%) were evaluated. The high risk group had greater proportions of elevated C-index and BMI values than patients with low-moderate risk. No between-group differences in other adiposity markers were observed. In multiple logistic regression models, only C-index values ≥1.35 were associated with CHD risk >20% (OR = 1.69; 95% CI 1.03-2.78; P = 0.039) after adjusting for confounders (sedentary lifestyle, diabetic nephropathy, serum creatinine, and diabetes duration). The association between WHR and CHD risk did not hold in this sample. The C-index was the body adiposity marker best associated with high risk of fatal CHD in these patients with type 2 diabetes.

  15. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Diabetic Kidney Disease in Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Zuydam, Natalie R; Ahlqvist, Emma; Sandholm, Niina

    2018-01-01

    Identification of sequence variants robustly associated with predisposition to diabetic kidney disease (DKD) has the potential to provide insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms responsible. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of DKD in type 2 diabetes (T2D) using eight...

  16. Metformin for diabetes prevention: insights gained from the Diabetes Prevention Program/Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroda, Vanita R; Knowler, William C; Crandall, Jill P; Perreault, Leigh; Edelstein, Sharon L; Jeffries, Susan L; Molitch, Mark E; Pi-Sunyer, Xavier; Darwin, Christine; Heckman-Stoddard, Brandy M; Temprosa, Marinella; Kahn, Steven E; Nathan, David M

    2017-09-01

    The largest and longest clinical trial of metformin for the prevention of diabetes is the Diabetes Prevention Program/Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DPP/DPPOS). In this review, we summarise data from the DPP/DPPOS, focusing on metformin for diabetes prevention, as well as its long-term glycaemic and cardiometabolic effects and safety in people at high-risk of developing diabetes. The DPP (1996-2001) was a RCT of 3234 adults who, at baseline, were at high-risk of developing diabetes. Participants were assigned to masked placebo (n = 1082) or metformin (n = 1073) 850 mg twice daily, or intensive lifestyle intervention (n = 1079). The masked metformin/placebo intervention phase ended approximately 1 year ahead of schedule because of demonstrated efficacy. Primary outcome was reported at 2.8 years. At the end of the DPP, all participants were offered lifestyle education and 88% (n = 2776) of the surviving DPP cohort continued follow-up in the DPPOS. Participants originally assigned to metformin continued to receive metformin, unmasked. The DPP/DPPOS cohort has now been followed for over 15 years with prospective assessment of glycaemic, cardiometabolic, health economic and safety outcomes. After an average follow-up of 2.8 years, metformin reduced the incidence of diabetes by 31% compared with placebo, with a greater effect in those who were more obese, had a higher fasting glucose or a history of gestational diabetes. The DPPOS addressed the longer-term effects of metformin, showing a risk reduction of 18% over 10 and 15 years post-randomisation. Metformin treatment for diabetes prevention was estimated to be cost-saving. At 15 years, lack of progression to diabetes was associated with a 28% lower risk of microvascular complications across treatment arms, a reduction that was no different among treatment groups. Recent findings suggest metformin may reduce atherosclerosis development in men. Originally used for the treatment of type 2

  17. A Narrative Review of Diabetes Intervention Studies to Explore Diabetes Care Opportunities for Pharmacists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamala Ayadurai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We conducted a review of current diabetes intervention studies in type 2 diabetes and identified opportunities for pharmacists to deliver quality diabetes care. Methods. A search on randomised controlled trials (RCT on diabetes management by healthcare professionals including pharmacists published between 2010 and 2015 was conducted. Results and Discussion. Diabetes management includes multifactorial intervention which includes seven factors as outlined in diabetes guidelines, namely, glycaemic, cholesterol and blood pressure control, medication, lifestyle, education, and cardiovascular risk factors. Most studies do not provide evidence that the intervention methods used included all seven factors with exception of three RCT which indicated HbA1c (glycated hemoglobin reduction range of 0.5% to 1.8%. The varied HbA1C reduction suggests a lack of standardised and consistent approach to diabetes care. Furthermore, the duration of most studies was from one month to two years; therefore long term outcomes could not be established. Conclusion. Although pharmacists’ contribution towards improving clinical outcomes of diabetes patients was well documented, the methods used to deliver structured, consistent evidence-based care were not clearly stipulated. Therefore, approaches to achieving long term continuity of care are uncertain. An intervention strategy that encompass all seven evidence-based factors will be useful.

  18. Sexual dysfunctions in patients with diabetes: a study from Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Montazeri Ali; Vahdaninia Mariam; Ziaei-Rad Marzieh

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that causes short and long-term complications. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of sexual dysfunctions (SD) among diabetic patients in Iran and to examine whether glycemic control has a role in SD. Methods A consecutive sample of diabetic women and men who were registered in the Isfahan Endocrine and Metabolism Center, Iran were studied. Sexual dysfunction was evaluated using the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) in wo...

  19. A STUDY OF SPECTRUM OF PULMONARY INFECTIONS IN DIABETICS AND NON DIABETICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammarao Gurulingappa Patil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AIMS AND OBJECTIVES Diabetes mellitus is an immunosuppressed state. Immunosuppressed state is known to affect the clinical course of a disease. This study is carried out to study the clinical course of pulmonary infections in diabetics and comparing the clinical profile with the non-diabetics with pulmonary infections. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was carried out in SSIMS & RC, Davangere over a period of 2 years from October 2012 to October 2014. 120 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus meeting the inclusion criteria were included and were compared with 80 age and sex matched healthy controls, fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria. A detailed proforma was filled up for each patient, which included age, sex, IP number, detailed history, past and personal history. A detailed clinical examination was done. Laboratory parameters including fasting and postprandial blood glucose, HbA1C, renal function tests, ECG and routine urine examination were done. Patient is investigated for chest x-ray, sputum for gram stain, culture and sensitivity pattern, AFB, fungal culture methods, BAL along with routine haematology and basic chemistry tests. Diagnosis of diabetes is done based on FBS/PPBS, oral glucose tolerance and HbA1c criteria i.e. FBS>126 mg/dl, OGT>200 mg/dl. When needed tests like 24 hour urine protein excretion, ECG, ophthalmoscopy, echocardiography The proposed study is conducted over a sample size of 150-200 cases fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria. RESULTS Diabetics with pulmonary infections were found to have a more severe form of clinical illness compared to non-diabetics. Extensive involvement of lung parenchyma was noted in diabetics. Diabetics were associated with more complications. Outcome of the illness was worse in the form of increased mortality in diabetics compared to non-diabetics. CONCLUSION There appear to be certain types of pulmonary infections that may be more common in diabetics than in

  20. Diabetes mellitus during pregnancy: a study of fifty cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randhawa, M. S.; Moin, S.; Shoaib, F.

    2003-01-01

    To review and critically evaluated the incidence, epidemiology, clinical pattern, diagnosis, management, complications and outcome of diabetes mellitus during pregnancy in hospital based study. Results: Total number of women delivered were 11271. Fifty cases of diabetes mellitus during pregnancy were studied. Mostly the patients were more than 30 years of age, multiparous ladies with gestational diabetes in 80% of cases, Type-II diabetes in 16% and only in 4% Type-I diabetes was reported. Insulin was required in 40% of patients. Eight women out of 50 had spontaneous miscarriage, 5 underwent preterm delivery while 36 reached term with one intrauterine death. Total number of babies delivered alive were 41. There was one stillbirth and 3 neonatal deaths. Conclusion: Management of diabetes mellitus in pregnancy involves teamwork of obstetricians, physicians and neonatologists. (author)

  1. Illness perception, diabetes knowledge and self-care practices among type-2 diabetes patients: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Kugbey, Nuworza; Oppong Asante, Kwaku; Adulai, Korkor

    2017-01-01

    Background Self-care practices among persons living with type-2 diabetes are very crucial in diabetes manages as poor self-care results in complications. However, little research exists within the Ghanaian context. This study examined whether type-2 diabetes patients? illness perception and diabetes knowledge significantly predict diabetes self-care practices. Methods A cross-sectional survey design was employed and a total of 160 participants (45 males and 115 females) were sampled from a ge...

  2. Prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and diabetes among Mexican adults: findings from the Mexican Health and Aging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Wong, Rebeca; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Al Snih, Soham

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the prevalence and determinants of prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and diabetes among Mexican adults from a subsample of the Mexican Health and Aging Study. We examined 2012 participants from a subsample of the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Measures included sociodemographic characteristics, body mass index, central obesity, medical conditions, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hemoglobin A1c, and vitamin D. Logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and self-reported diabetes. Prevalence of prediabetes, undiagnosed, and self-reported diabetes in this cohort was 44.2%, 18.0%, and 21.4%, respectively. Participants with high waist-hip ratio (1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-2.45) and high cholesterol (1.85, 95% CI = 1.36-2.51) had higher odds of prediabetes. Overweight (1.68, 95% CI = 1.07-2.64), obesity (2.38, 95% CI = 1.41-4.02), and high waist circumference (1.60, 95% CI = 1.06-2.40) were significantly associated with higher odds of having undiagnosed diabetes. Those residing in a Mexican state with high U.S. migration had lower odds of prediabetes (0.61, 95% CI = 0.45-0.82) and undiagnosed diabetes (0.53, 95% CI = 0.41-0.70). Those engaged in regular physical activity had lower odds of undiagnosed diabetes (0.74, 95% CI = 0.57-0.97). There is a high prevalence of prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes among Mexican adults in this subsample. Findings suggest the need for resources to prevent, identify, and treat persons with prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cluster randomized controlled trial of a peer support program for people with diabetes: study protocol for the Australasian peers for progress study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riddell Michaela A

    2012-10-01

    measures are collected on all participants at baseline, 6 and 12 months. The primary outcome is change in cardiovascular disease risk using the UKPDS risk equation. Secondary outcomes include biomedical, quality of life, psychosocial functioning, and other lifestyle measures. An economic evaluation will determine whether the program is cost effective. Discussion This manuscript presents the protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial of group-based peer support for people with type 2 diabetes in a community setting. Results from this trial will contribute evidence about the effectiveness of peer support in achieving effective self-management of diabetes. Trial registration number Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR; ACTRN12609000469213

  4. Diabetes and Cognitive Deficits in Chronic Schizophrenia: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mei; Huang, Xu-Feng; Chen, Da Chun; Xiu, Meihong; Kosten, Thomas R.; Zhang, Xiang Yang

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairment occurs in both schizophrenia and diabetes. There is currently limited understanding whether schizophrenia with diabetes has more serious cognitive deficits than schizophrenia without diabetes or diabetes only. This study assessed cognitive performance in 190 healthy controls, 106 diabetes only, 127 schizophrenia without diabetes and 55 schizophrenia with diabetes. This study was conducted from January 2008 to December 2010. Compared to healthy controls, all patient groups had significantly decreased total and five index RBANS scores (all pSchizophrenia with diabetes performed worse than schizophrenia without diabetes in immediate memory (pSchizophrenia with diabetes performed worse than diabetes only in immediate memory (pschizophrenia’ PANSS scores, their duration of current antipsychotic treatment, and diagnosis of diabetes. Schizophrenia with co-morbid diabetes showed more cognitive impairment than schizophrenia without diabetes and diabetes only, especially in immediate memory and attention. PMID:23840437

  5. A study on the association of diabetic dermopathy with nephropathy and retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhoseini, Mahmoud; Saleh, Nasrin; Momeni, Ali; Deris, Fatemeh; Asadi-Samani, Majid

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic dermopathy is one of the most prevalent skin complications in diabetes patients. Some studies have pointed to association of diabetic dermopathy with retinopathy and nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes as microangiopathy presentations, but no rigorous study has been conducted to confirm this association. This study investigated association of diabetic dermopathy with nephropathy and retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes referring specialty clinic of Shahrekord. This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted on 102 type 2 diabetes patients with dermopathy referring clinic constantly or as outpatient. Dermatological and ophthalmological examinations and examination for nephropathy were done for all patients. Demographic data and results of examinations and patients history, and biochemical tests were gathered and recorded by researcher developed checklists. Mean age of patients was 83.8 2.60 years, of whom 64 (63.7%) were female and 37.3% were male. Prevalence of retinopathy in patients was 4.31% and nephropathy 3.33%. In this study, significant associations of diabetic dermopathy with diabetic nephropathy ( P = 0.001), with retinopathy ( P diabetes (P = 0.001), and also with glycosylated hemoglobin ( P diabetic dermopathy and other studied variables was seen ( P > 0.05). Results of this study confirm the association of diabetic dermopathy with retinopathy and nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes. Since dermopathy is usually developed before retinopathy and nephropathy, dermopathy could be used as a clinical finding in early diagnosis and prevention of retinopathy and nephropathy in diabetes patients.

  6. Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs second study (DAWN2™)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolucci, Antonio; Kovacs Burns, K; Holt, Richard I G

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: The second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study aimed to assess psychosocial outcomes in people with diabetes across countries for benchmarking. METHODS: Surveys included new and adapted questions from validated questionnaires that assess health-related quality of life, self......-management, attitudes/beliefs, social support and priorities for improving diabetes care. Questionnaires were conducted online, by telephone or in person. RESULTS: Participants were 8596 adults with diabetes across 17 countries. There were significant between-country differences for all benchmarking indicators; no one...... country's outcomes were consistently better or worse than others. The proportion with likely depression [WHO-5 Well-Being Index (WHO-5) score ≤ 28] was 13.8% (country range 6.5-24.1%). Diabetes-related distress [Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale 5 (PAID-5) score ≥ 40] was reported by 44.6% of participants...

  7. Moessbauer study of hemoglobin of diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Aiguo; Ni Xinbo; Cai Yingwen; Zhang Guilin; Zhang Hongde; Ge Yongxin

    2000-01-01

    The hemoglobins from normal adults (Gly-Hb 5%), people infected with diabetes (Gly-Hb 10%) and serious diabetics (Gly-Hb 15%) were investigated by Moessbauer spectroscopy at liquid nitrogen temperature. All the experimental spectra of hemoglobin are composed of three doublets corresponding to oxy-hemoglobin (Oxy-Hb), deoxy-hemoglobin (Deoxy-Hb) and low-spin hemo-chrome (Ls-Hemo) respectively. It is found that Oxy-Hb is decreasing but Deoxy-hb increasing for diabetes. Experimental results also indicate that the line-width of Moessbauer spectra of Oxy-Hb for diabetics is narrower than that for normal adults, showing that while Fe on Oxy-Hb exists in pile-up of some similar states for normal adults, but it becomes in single state for serious diabetes

  8. Study methodology and diabetes control in patients from the non-English diabetes management project (NEDMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirani, Mohamed; Dang, Trung M; Xie, Jing; Gnanasekaran, Sivashanth; Nicolaou, Theona; Rees, Gwyneth; Fenwick, Eva; Lamoureux, Ecosse L

    2017-03-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics of non-English speaking patients from the Diabetes Management Project (NEDMP), and compare their diabetes management and severity of diabetic retinopathy (DR) with the English-speaking DMP sample (EDMP). A prospective study was conducted on non-English speaking adults with diabetes who attended the Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital. 136 (90.1%) non-English speaking adults were assessed, with a mean age of 72.2 years (range: 50-88 years); 74 (54.4%) were male. Participants completed interviewer-administered questionnaires and underwent visual acuity, fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, biochemistry and anthropometric measurements. The EDMP assessed 609 patients in 2009 using a similar protocol. Type and duration of diabetes, diabetes control and diabetic retinopathy. A total of 127 (93.4%) and 8 (5.9%) participants reported having type 2 and type 1 diabetes, respectively, with a median (IQR) duration of 17 (14) years. The proportion of patients with poor diabetes control (HbA1c ≥ 7%) in the NEDMP was similar to the EDMP (64.0% and 68.2%, respectively; P = 0.411). A significantly higher proportion of patients with DR in the NEDMP were found to have poor diabetes control (HbA1c ≥ 7%) compared to those without DR (80.9% vs. 50.0%, P = 0.003). Almost two-thirds of NEDMP patients (74/118) had DR and 23% (27/115) had diabetic macular edema. The prevalence of DR was similar between the NEDMP and EDMP studies, ranging from 25-30% and 28-29%. The clinical characteristics, diabetes control, and DR severity of English and non-English-speaking patients were similar. The high proportion of poor diabetes management in non-English speaking patients with DR suggests educational and behavioural interventions to improve glycaemic control are warranted. © 2016 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  9. Illness perception, diabetes knowledge and self-care practices among type-2 diabetes patients: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugbey, Nuworza; Oppong Asante, Kwaku; Adulai, Korkor

    2017-08-10

    Self-care practices among persons living with type-2 diabetes are very crucial in diabetes manages as poor self-care results in complications. However, little research exists within the Ghanaian context. This study examined whether type-2 diabetes patients' illness perception and diabetes knowledge significantly predict diabetes self-care practices. A cross-sectional survey design was employed and a total of 160 participants (45 males and 115 females) were sampled from a general hospital in Accra. A self-administered questionnaire measuring illness perception, diabetes knowledge and diabetes self-care practices as well as demographic checklist were used collect data. Results showed that illness perception and diabetes knowledge significantly predicted overall diabetes self-care practices. Analysis of domain specific self-care practices showed that patients' diet was significantly predicted by illness perception and diabetes knowledge. Exercise was significantly predicted by only illness perception while blood sugar testing and diabetes foot-care were significantly predicted by diabetes knowledge. Cognitive and emotional representation of diabetes and diabetes knowledge are key determinants of patients' diabetes self-care practices. It is therefore important that appropriate psychosocial interventions are developed to help patients' adherence to recommended self-care practices.

  10. Delivering Diabetes Education through Nurse-Led Telecoaching. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Odnoletkova

    Full Text Available People with diabetes have a high risk of developing micro- and macrovascular complications associated with diminished life expectancy and elevated treatment costs. Patient education programs can improve diabetes control in the short term, but their cost-effectiveness is uncertain. Our study aimed to analyze the lifelong cost-effectiveness of a nurse-led telecoaching program compared to usual care in people with type 2 diabetes from the perspective of the Belgian healthcare system.The UKPDS Outcomes Model was populated with patient-level data from an 18-month randomized clinical trial in the Belgian primary care sector involving 574 participants; trial data were extrapolated to 40 years; Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs, treatment costs and Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio (ICER were calculated for the entire cohort and the subgroup with poor glycemic control at baseline ("elevated HbA1c subgroup" and the associated uncertainty was explored.The cumulative mean QALY (95% CI gain was 0.21 (0.13; 0.28 overall and 0.56 (0.43; 0.68 in elevated HbA1c subgroup; the respective incremental costs were €1,147 (188; 2,107 and €2,565 (654; 4,474 and the respective ICERs €5,569 (€677; €15,679 and €4,615 (1,207; 9,969 per QALY. In the scenario analysis, repeating the intervention for lifetime had the greatest impact on the cost-effectiveness and resulted in the mean ICERs of €13,034 in the entire cohort and €7,858 in the elevated HbA1c subgroup.Taking into account reimbursement thresholds applied in West-European countries, nurse-led telecoaching of people with type 2 diabetes may be considered highly cost-effective within the Belgian healthcare system.NCT01612520.

  11. The North Jutland County Diabetic Retinopathy Study (NCDRS). Population characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, L.L.; Lervang, H.H.; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    Abstract Purpose: Several population based studies have reported blood glucose levels and blood pressure to be risk factors for the development of proliferativ retinopathy and diabetic maculopathy. Despite their importance, these studies were initiated more than two decades ago and may therefore...... reflect the treatment and population composition of a previous era. Studies of the present diabetic population are therefore in demand. Methods: The present cross–section study included 656 type 1 and 328 type 2 diabetic subjects undergoing diabetic retinopathy screening. Crude prevalence rates...... for proliferative diabetic retinopathy, maculopathy, several specific lesions and non–ophthalmic findings were assessed together with their association to a simplified and internationally approved retinal grading. Results: The crude prevalence of proliferative retinopathy was found to be 5.6 % and 0.9 % for type 1...

  12. Yogurt and Diabetes: Overview of Recent Observational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Díaz-López, Andrés; Babio, Nancy

    2017-07-01

    The effects of dairy consumption on the prevention of type 2 diabetes remain controversial and depend on the dairy subtype. Yogurt intake has received special attention because its association with health benefits is more consistent than that of other types of dairy products. In the present article, we review those observational studies that evaluated the association between yogurt consumption and type 2 diabetes. We also discuss the possible mechanisms involved in these associations. We found that 13 prospective studies evaluated the association between yogurt intake and type 2 diabetes, most of which showed an inverse association between the frequency of yogurt consumption and the risk of diabetes. In addition to the scientific evidence accumulated from individual prospective studies, several meta-analyses have shown that yogurt consumption has a potential role in diabetes prevention. The most recent analysis shows a 14% lower risk of type 2 diabetes when yogurt consumption was 80-125 g/d compared with no yogurt consumption. The intake of fermented dairy products, especially yogurt, has been inversely associated with variables of glucose metabolism. Yogurt may have probiotic effects that could modulate glucose metabolism. We conclude that yogurt consumption, in the context of a healthy dietary pattern, may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in healthy and older adults at high cardiovascular risk. Large-scale intervention studies and randomized clinical trials are warranted to determine if yogurt consumption has beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity and reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. STUDIES ON DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS IN PATIENTS AT JOS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An epidemiologcal and microbiological studies of diabetic foot ulcers were carried out in our hospital, with a view to reducing the amputation and mortality rate associated with the disease. Wound swabs from 38 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) foot ulcer patients were investigated using culture methods for both strict aerobes and ...

  14. Comparative study on calcium, magnesium and cobalt in diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative study on calcium, magnesium and cobalt in diabetic and non diabetic patients (males) in Punjab, Pakistan. A Anjum, M Yousaf, M Zuber, HB Ahmad, AF Zahoor, ZI Khan, K Ahmad, S Naheed, KG Ali, A Jabbar, TH Bukhari, S Hina, S Ahmad, MK Mukhtar, M Arshad, A Hussain ...

  15. Diabetes, pulse pressure and cardiovascular mortality : the Hoorn Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schram, Miranda T; Kostense, Pieter J; Van Dijk, Robert A; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Nijpels, Giel; Bouter, Lex M; Heine, Robert J; Stehouwer, Coen D

    OBJECTIVE: Type 2 diabetic patients have an increased arterial stiffness and a very high risk of cardiovascular death. The present study investigated the relationship between pulse pressure, an indicator of vascular stiffness, and risk of cardiovascular mortality among type 2 diabetic and

  16. Diabetes, pulse pressure and cardiovascular mortality: the Hoorn Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schram, M.T.; Kostense, P.J.; van Dijk, R.A.J.M.; Dekker, J.M.; Nijpels, G.; Bouter, L.M.; Heine, R.J.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Type 2 diabetic patients have an increased arterial stiffness and a very high risk of cardiovascular death. The present study investigated the relationship between pulse pressure, an indicator of vascular stiffness, and risk of cardiovascular mortality among type 2 diabetic and

  17. The Belgrade childhood diabetes study - comparison of children with type 1 diabetes with their siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlajinac, Hristina; Sipetić, Sandra; Marinković, Jelena; Bjekić, Milan; Kocev, Nikola; Sajić, Silvija

    2006-05-01

    A case-control study was conducted in Belgrade (about 320,000 inhabitants 0-16 years old) during the period 1994-97, comprising 68 diabetic children (cases) and 68 controls chosen from the siblings of the cases. Analysis using multivariable logistic regression analysis indicated the following independent risk factors for Type 1 diabetes: higher birth order, infections during the 6 months preceding the onset of the disease and stressful events. Out of individual stressful and psychological factors, 'other' stressful events (severe accident or hospitalisation or death of a close friend, conflict with a teacher, death of a pet, failure in competition, quarrel between parents, punishment, physical attack, war in republics of former Yugoslavia and near drowning in the pool) and learning problems were independent risk factor for Type 1 diabetes. The results obtained in this study of siblings supports the hypothesis that environmental factors play a role in the development of Type 1 diabetes.

  18. Evaluation of traditional plant treatments for diabetes: studies in streptozotocin diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanston-Flatt, S K; Day, C; Bailey, C J; Flatt, P R

    1989-01-01

    Seven plants and a herbal mixture used for traditional treatment of diabetes were studied in streptozotocin diabetic mice. The treatments were supplied as 6.25% by weight of the diet for 9 days. Consumption of diets containing bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi), golden seal (Hydrastis canadensis), mistletoe (Viscum album) and tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus) significantly reduced the hyperphagia and polydipsia associated with streptozotocin diabetes, but bayberry (Cinnamomum tamala), meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria), senna (Cassia occidentalis) and the herbal mixture did not alter these parameters. Bearberry, mistletoe and tarragon retarded the body weight loss but none of the eight treatments significantly altered plasma glucose or insulin concentrations. These studies suggest that bearberry, golden seal, mistletoe and tarragon may counter some of the symptoms of streptozotocin diabetes without, however, affecting glycemic control.

  19. Vaccination studies in type 1 diabetes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buschard, K.; Funda, David P.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 360, - (2002), s. 488-489 ISSN 0140-6736 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : vaccination * diabetes Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 15.397, year: 2002

  20. A STUDY OF OXIDATIVE STRESS IN DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Rao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Non - enzymatic free radical mediated oxidation of biological molecules, membranes and tissues is associated with a variety of pathological events such as cancer, aging and diabetes mellitus . [1] Increased oxidative stress is seen in both types of diabetes me llitus namely type 1 and type 2, irrespective of duration, complications and treatment. In diabetes mellitus, oxidative stress seems primarily due to both an increased plasma free radical concentration and a sharp decline in antioxidant defences . [1] Among the causes of enhanced free radical production, hyperglycemia and hyper insulinemia seem to play a major role , [2,3] Hyperglycemia is the more easily modifiable factor among the two and good glycemic control can reduce the oxidative stress. Controversy pers ists regarding the other possible mechanisms of increased oxidative stress in diabetes and whether oxidative stress normalizes with adequate metabolic control alone. The role of oxidative stress and diabetic complications has been extensively investigated. Oxidative stress has been suggested to be involved in the genesis of both macro and micro angiopathy [4,5] Prospective trials are now underway addressing the controversial issues of possible role of pharmacological antioxidants in preventing or at least de laying the onset of diabetic complications.

  1. Sexual dysfunctions in patients with diabetes: a study from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montazeri Ali

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that causes short and long-term complications. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of sexual dysfunctions (SD among diabetic patients in Iran and to examine whether glycemic control has a role in SD. Methods A consecutive sample of diabetic women and men who were registered in the Isfahan Endocrine and Metabolism Center, Iran were studied. Sexual dysfunction was evaluated using the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI in women and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF in men. In addition the level of glycosylated hemoglobin was assessed to classify the diabetes status in patients. Results In all 200 patients (100 male and 100 female were entered into the study. The mean age of patients was 48.6 (SD = 7.3 years and most had type 2 diabetes (91.0%. The results showed that sexual dysfunctions were widespread in both gender and 165 (82.5% patients reported that experienced at least one sexual dysfunction. There were significant associations between sexual dysfunctions and gender and type of diabetes (P = 0.04. Women and patients with type 1 diabetes had higher rates of SD. No major differences were found between SD and age, diabetes status, duration of diabetes and hypertension. In addition, glycemic control did not show a significant association with SD in both genders. Conclusion The findings of this study showed that SD prevalence was high in diabetic patients of both genders and the glycemic control did not correlate with the frequency of SD in the study population. It is recommended that SD should be addressed more precisely in health care practice in Iran.

  2. Sexual dysfunctions in patients with diabetes: a study from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei-Rad, Marzieh; Vahdaninia, Mariam; Montazeri, Ali

    2010-05-18

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that causes short and long-term complications. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of sexual dysfunctions (SD) among diabetic patients in Iran and to examine whether glycemic control has a role in SD. A consecutive sample of diabetic women and men who were registered in the Isfahan Endocrine and Metabolism Center, Iran were studied. Sexual dysfunction was evaluated using the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) in women and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) in men. In addition the level of glycosylated hemoglobin was assessed to classify the diabetes status in patients. In all 200 patients (100 male and 100 female) were entered into the study. The mean age of patients was 48.6 (SD = 7.3) years and most had type 2 diabetes (91.0%). The results showed that sexual dysfunctions were widespread in both gender and 165 (82.5%) patients reported that experienced at least one sexual dysfunction. There were significant associations between sexual dysfunctions and gender and type of diabetes (P = 0.04). Women and patients with type 1 diabetes had higher rates of SD. No major differences were found between SD and age, diabetes status, duration of diabetes and hypertension. In addition, glycemic control did not show a significant association with SD in both genders. The findings of this study showed that SD prevalence was high in diabetic patients of both genders and the glycemic control did not correlate with the frequency of SD in the study population. It is recommended that SD should be addressed more precisely in health care practice in Iran.

  3. A study of dynamic foot pressure measurement in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka D Madhale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetic foot ulcer is a major source of morbidity and a leading cause of hospitalization. It is estimated that approximately 20% of hospital admissions among patients with diabetes mellitus are due to diabetic foot ulcer. It can lead to infection, gangrene, amputation, and even death if appropriate care is not provided. Overall, the lower limb amputation in diabetic patients is 15 times higher than in non-diabetics. In the majority of cases, the cause for the foot ulcer is the altered architecture of the foot due to neuropathy resulting in abnormal pressure points on the soles. Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop low cost, lightweight foot pressure scanner and check its reliability and validity which can help to prevent foot ulceration. Design/Methodology/Approach: In the present study, a low cost, lightweight foot pressure scanner is developed, and dynamic plantar pressures in a group of 110 Indian patients with diabetes with or without neuropathy and foot ulcers are measured. Practical Implications: If these pressure points can be detected, ulcers can be prevented by providing offloading footwear. Originality/Value: Differences are found in dynamic foot pressures in different study groups, namely, diabetic patients, patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, patients with foot ulcers, and nondiabetics. The differences are significant (P < 0.01, which showed the validity of the tool. Reliability and consistency of the tool was checked by test–retest method. Paper Type: Original Research work. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, it is concluded that the scanner is successfully developed and it can measure foot pressures. It is a novel device to proactively monitor foot health in diabetics in an effort to prevent and reduce diabetic foot complications.

  4. Impact of diabetes duration and cardiovascular risk factors on mortality in type 2 diabetes: the Hoorn Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijkerman, A.M.W.; Dekker, J.M.; Nijpels, G.; Jager, A.; Kostense, P.J.; van Hinsbergh, V.W.M.; Bouter, L.M.; Heine, R.J.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Background. Several studies have reported differences in the mortality risk between diabetic subjects detected by screening and known diabetic patients. We studied mortality in relation to diabetes duration, and the contribution of other cardiovascular risk factors to the elevated risk. Materials

  5. Impact of diabetes duration and cardiovascular risk factors on mortality in type 2 diabetes : the Hoorn Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijkerman, A M W; Dekker, J M; Nijpels, G; Jager, A; Kostense, P J; van Hinsbergh, V W M; Bouter, L M; Heine, R J; Stehouwer, C D A

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have reported differences in the mortality risk between diabetic subjects detected by screening and known diabetic patients. We studied mortality in relation to diabetes duration, and the contribution of other cardiovascular risk factors to the elevated risk. MATERIALS

  6. Vejle Diabetes Biobank - a resource for studies of the etiologies of diabetes and its comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Eva Rabing Brix; Nielsen, Aneta Aleksandra; Christensen, Henry; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Christensen, Cramer Kjeldahl; Brandslund, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Carefully designed and established biobanks are considered one of the most essential resources to foster biomedical research as they provide cost-effective and rapid access to a vast variety of biological materials and related anthropometrics allowing for testing of various biomarkers as well as numerous original and pertinent bioclinical hypotheses related to human disease etiology and prognosis. The objective of the present study was to present the baseline data, design, and methods used for the establishment of the Vejle Diabetes Biobank. Further aims included assessment of the prevalence of diabetes and quality of diabetes treatment in a specified Danish region. The Vejle Diabetes Biobank was established from 2007 to 2010 as a regional Biobank containing blood, DNA, and urine samples from patients with diabetes and a gender- and age-matched control population aged 25-75 years. Anthropometrics were obtained by physical examination, questionnaires, and interviews at the time of inclusion into the Biobank. The cohort was linked to the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Patient Registry, and the Danish National Prescription Registry. In total, 4,255 nondiabetic individuals and 3,320 patients with diabetes were included. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients had a higher body mass index (30 kg/m 2 ) than type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients (25 and 26 kg/m 2 in women and men, respectively) and control subjects (25 and 27 kg/m 2 in women and men, respectively). Fasting levels of plasma triglycerides and blood pressure were higher in T2D patients (1.5 mmol/L and 148/85 mmHg, respectively) compared with T1D patients (0.9 mmol/L and 139/81 mmHg, respectively), whereas glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), plasma high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol were lower in T2D patients (51 mmol/mol, 1.2 mmol/L, 2.2 mmol/L, and 4.2 mmol/L, respectively) compared with findings in T1D patients (61 mmol/mol, 1.6 mmol/L, 2.3 mmol/L, and 4.4 mmol

  7. Correlates of Dietary Intake in Youth with Diabetes: Results from the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortsov, Andrey; Liese, Angela D.; Bell, Ronny A.; Dabelea, Dana; D'Agostino, Ralph B., Jr.; Hamman, Richard F.; Klingensmith, Georgeanna J.; Lawrence, Jean M.; Maahs, David M.; McKeown, Robert; Marcovina, Santica M.; Thomas, Joan; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore demographic, socioeconomic, diabetes-related, and behavioral correlates of dietary intake of dairy, fruit, vegetables, sweetened soda, fiber, calcium, and saturated fat in youth with diabetes. Methods: Cross-sectional study of youth 10-22 years old with type 1 (T1DM, n = 2,176) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM, n = 365). Association…

  8. The Changing Epidemiology of Renal Replacement Therapy in Diabetes. Results from the Diabetes Impact Study 2013, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, A.; Sortso, C.; Jensen, P. B.

    Aims : We present an investigation of first-time renal replacement therapy in patients with diabetes in Denmark 2000 through 2011. Methods: The Diabetes Impact Study 2013 is based on all registrants in the Danish National Diabetes Register as of July 3rd 2013 (n=497,232). Record linkage with the ...

  9. Hypertension and type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional study in Morocco (EPIDIAM Study)

    OpenAIRE

    Berraho, Mohamed; El Achhab, Youness; Benslimane, Abdelilah; EL Rhazi, Karima; Chikri, Mohamed; Nejjari, Chakib

    2012-01-01

    Background In Morocco, there are no studies that focused on the hypertension and its associated risk factors through patients with type 2 diabetes. Different findings show that the frequency of type 2 diabetes has risen rapidly in Morocco. The main objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of hypertension and its associated risk factors among a group of patients with type 2 diabetes and to examine the level of control of hypertension among type 2 diabetic patients with hypertension...

  10. Sense of coherence and diabetes: A prospective occupational cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koskinen Aki

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sense of coherence (SOC is an individual characteristic related to a positive life orientation leading to effective coping. A weak SOC has been associated with indicators of general morbidity and mortality. However, the relationship between SOC and diabetes has not been studied in prospective design. The present study prospectively examined the relationship between a weak SOC and the incidence of diabetes. Methods The relationship between a weak SOC and the incidence of diabetes was investigated among 5827 Finnish male employees aged 18–65 at baseline (1986. SOC was measured by questionnaire survey at baseline. Data on prescription diabetes drugs from 1987 to 2004 were obtained from the Drug Imbursement Register held by the Social Insurance Institution. Results During the follow-up, 313 cases of diabetes were recorded. A weak SOC was associated with a 46% higher risk of diabetes in participants who had been = Conclusion The results suggest that besides focusing on well-known risk factors for diabetes, strengthening SOC in employees of =

  11. Best herbs for managing diabetes: a review of clinical studies

    OpenAIRE

    Ghorbani, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a public health problem which leads to serious complications over time. Experimentally, many herbs have been recommended for treating diabetes. In most cases, however, the recommendations are based on animal studies and limited pieces of evidence exist about their clinical usefulness. This review focused on the herbs, the hypoglycemic actions of which have been supported by three or more clinical studies. The search was done in Google Scholar, Medline and Science Direct d...

  12. THE ANALYSIS OF THE DIABETIC FOOT OSTEOMYELITIS AT A TERTIARY CARE CENTER - A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Mithun N; Pattanashetty; Reshmina; Sharath Babu; Harikrishna; Sreedhar Reddy; Ramakrishna J

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION : India is considered as the diabetic capital of the world. Diabetic foot osteomyelitis is considered as one of the severe complications of diabetes mellitus. Diabetic foot osteomyelitis tends to complicate around one third of diabetic foot infections. In v iew of this we conducted a prospective study on the bacteriological analysis of diabetic foot osteomyelitis at a tertiary care center. MATERIALS AND METHODS : A prospective study was perform...

  13. Diabetic retinopathy in pregnancy: a population-based study of women with pregestational diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Egan, Aoife M

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this observational study was to evaluate screening and progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with pregestational diabetes attending five antenatal centres along the Irish Atlantic seaboard. An adequate frequency of screening was defined as at least two retinal evaluations in separate trimesters. Progression was defined as at least one stage of deterioration of diabetic retinopathy and\\/or development of diabetic macular edema on at least one eye. Women with pregestational diabetes who delivered after 22 gestational weeks (n = 307) were included. In total, 185 (60.3%) had an adequate number of retinal examinations. Attendance at prepregnancy care was associated with receiving adequate screening (odds ratio 6.23; CI 3.39-11.46 (P < 0.001)). Among those who received adequate evaluations (n = 185), 48 (25.9%) had retinopathy progression. Increasing booking systolic blood pressure (OR 1.03, CI 1.01-1.06, P = 0.02) and greater drop in HbA1c between first and third trimesters of pregnancy (OR 2.05, CI 1.09-3.87, P = 0.03) significantly increased the odds of progression. A significant proportion of women continue to demonstrate retinopathy progression during pregnancy. This study highlights the role of prepregnancy care and the importance of close monitoring during pregnancy and identifies those patients at the highest risk for retinopathy progression.

  14. Standards of specialized diabetes care. Edited by Dedov I.I., Shestakova M.V. (7th edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanovich Dedov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We are glad to present the 7th Edition of Standards of Diabetes Care. These evidence-based guidelines were designed to standardize and facilitate diabetes care in all regions of the Russian Federation. The Standards are updated on the regular basis to incorporate new data and relevant recommendations from national and international clinical societies, including World Health Organization Guidelines (WHO, 2011, 2013, International Diabetes Federation (IDF, 2011, 2012, 2013, American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2012, 2015, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE, 2013, International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2014 and Russian Association of Endocrinologists (RAE, 2011, 2012. Current edition of the “Standards” also integrates results of completed randomized clinical trials (ADVANCE, ACCORD, VADT, UKPDS, etc., as well as findings from the national studies of diabetes mellitus (DM, conducted in close partnership with a number of Russian hospitals.Latest data indicates that prevalence of DM increased during the last decade more than two-fold, reaching some 387 million patients by the end of 2014. According to the current estimation by the International Diabetes Federation, 592 million patients will be suffering from DM by 2035. These observations resulted in the UN Resolution 61/225 passed on 20.12.2006 that encouraged all Member States “to develop national policies for the prevention, treatment and care of diabetes”.Like many other countries, Russian Federation experiences a sharp rise in the prevalence of DM. According to Russian State Diabetes Register, there are at least 4.1 million patients with DM in this country. However, the epidemiological survey conducted by the Federal Endocrinology Research Centre during 2002-2010 suggests that actual prevalence is 3 to 4 times greater than the officially recognized and, by this estimate, amounts to 9-10 million persons, comprising 7% of the national

  15. Diabetic Nephropathy and Its Risk Factors in a Society with a Type 2 Diabetes Epidemic: A Saudi National Diabetes Registry-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid; Youssef, Amira M.; Subhani, Shazia N.; Ahmad, Najlaa A.; Al-Sharqawi, Ahmad H.; Al-Mutlaq, Hind M.; David, Satish K.; AlNaqeb, Dhekra

    2014-01-01

    Aims The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy and its risk factors have not been studied in a society known to have diabetes epidemic like Saudi Arabia. Using a large data base registry will provide a better understanding and accurate assessment of this chronic complication and its related risk factors. Methodology A total of 54,670 patients with type 2 diabetes aged ≥25 years were selected from the Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR) and analyzed for the presence of diabetic nephropathy. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) criterion was used to identify cases with microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria and end stage renal disease (ESRD) for prevalence estimation and risk factor assessment. Results The overall prevalence of diabetic nephropathy was 10.8%, divided into 1.2% microalbuminuria, 8.1%macroalbuninuria and 1.5% ESRD. Age and diabetes duration as important risk factors have a strong impact on the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy, ranging from 3.7% in patients aged 25–44 years and a duration of >5 years, to 21.8% in patients ≥65 years with a diabetes duration of ≥15 years. Diabetes duration, retinopathy, neuropathy, hypertension, age >45 years, hyperlipidemia, male gender, smoking, and chronologically, poor glycemic control has a significantly high risk for diabetic nephropathy. Conclusion The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy is underestimated as a result of a shortage of screening programs. Risk factors related to diabetic nephropathy in this society are similar to other societies. There is thus an urgent need for screening and prevention programs for diabetic nephropathy among the Saudi population. PMID:24586457

  16. Diabetic nephropathy and its risk factors in a society with a type 2 diabetes epidemic: a Saudi National Diabetes Registry-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Al-Rubeaan

    Full Text Available The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy and its risk factors have not been studied in a society known to have diabetes epidemic like Saudi Arabia. Using a large data base registry will provide a better understanding and accurate assessment of this chronic complication and its related risk factors.A total of 54,670 patients with type 2 diabetes aged ≥ 25 years were selected from the Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR and analyzed for the presence of diabetic nephropathy. The American Diabetes Association (ADA criterion was used to identify cases with microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria and end stage renal disease (ESRD for prevalence estimation and risk factor assessment.The overall prevalence of diabetic nephropathy was 10.8%, divided into 1.2% microalbuminuria, 8.1%macroalbuninuria and 1.5% ESRD. Age and diabetes duration as important risk factors have a strong impact on the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy, ranging from 3.7% in patients aged 25-44 years and a duration of >5 years, to 21.8% in patients ≥ 65 years with a diabetes duration of ≥ 15 years. Diabetes duration, retinopathy, neuropathy, hypertension, age >45 years, hyperlipidemia, male gender, smoking, and chronologically, poor glycemic control has a significantly high risk for diabetic nephropathy.The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy is underestimated as a result of a shortage of screening programs. Risk factors related to diabetic nephropathy in this society are similar to other societies. There is thus an urgent need for screening and prevention programs for diabetic nephropathy among the Saudi population.

  17. An exploratory qualitative interview study about collaboration between medicine and dentistry in relation to diabetes management

    OpenAIRE

    Bissett, Susan M; Stone, Kerry Marie; Rapley, Tim; Preshaw, Philip M

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore knowledge and attitudes regarding the links between diabetes and periodontitis of medical and dental healthcare professionals as well as those of people with diabetes. Design Qualitative interview study. Participants 4 people with diabetes, four dental professionals, three general practitioners (GPs) with a specialist interest in diabetes, one GP without a specialist interest in diabetes, three diabetic nurse specialists and two consultant diabetologists. Setting Primary ...

  18. The Diabetic Retinopathy Barometer Study: Global perspectives on access to and experiences of diabetic retinopathy screening and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavan, D; Makaroff, L; da Rocha Fernandes, J; Sylvanowicz, M; Ackland, P; Conlon, J; Chaney, D; Malhi, A; Barratt, J

    2017-07-01

    To assess the level of awareness, prevention and treatment of Diabetic Eye Disease (DED) comprising Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) and Diabetic Macula Edema (DME) retinopathy among adults with diabetes and health professionals. The Diabetic Retinopathy Barometer Study consisted of a qualitative study, which consisted of semi-structured interviews, and a quantitative study using online surveys for adults with diabetes and for health professionals. A total of 4340 adults with diabetes and 2329 health professionals participated in the surveys. Diabetic eye disease (DED) without macular edema (DME) was reported by 19.5% of adults with diabetes and a further 7.6% reported that they had DME. Although 94% of adults with diabetes saw a health care professional for their diabetes, only 79% had ever had an eye examination for DED, and 23% had not had an eye examination in the last year. Moreover, 65% of the ophthalmologists surveyed reported that most patients presented when visual problems had already occurred. Overall, 62% of people with DED had received treatment. Of these, 74% had laser therapy, 29% surgery and 24% anti-VEGF therapy. Strategic investment is required to enhance patient education and professional training on the importance of regular eye examinations; and in providing accessible DR screening programmes and proactive treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in patients with screen-detected type 2 diabetes in Denmark: the ADDITION study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bek, Toke; Lund-Andersen, Henrik; Hansen, Anja Bech

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing, but the exact prevalence of the disease and its accompanying late complications are unknown. In the Anglo-Danish-Dutch study of Intensive Treatment in People with Screen-detected Diabetes in Primary Care (ADDITION study), patients...... a low prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and no vision-threatening lesions. Screening for diabetic retinopathy should be focused on those patients who have already been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes during routine clinical practice....... with hitherto undiagnosed type 2 diabetes are identified using a stepwise screening strategy in selected general practices. This article reports the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy in this population. METHODS: In Arhus and Copenhagen counties, a total of 12,708 of the persons invited by mail were screened...

  20. Best herbs for managing diabetes: a review of clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ghorbani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a public health problem which leads to serious complications over time. Experimentally, many herbs have been recommended for treating diabetes. In most cases, however, the recommendations are based on animal studies and limited pieces of evidence exist about their clinical usefulness. This review focused on the herbs, the hypoglycemic actions of which have been supported by three or more clinical studies. The search was done in Google Scholar, Medline and Science Direct databases using the key terms diabetes, plants, herbs, glucose and patients. According to the clinical studies, Aegle marmelos, Allium cepa, Gymnema sylvestre, Momordica charantia, Ocimum sanctum, Nigella sativa, Ocimum sanctum, Panax quinquefolius, Salacia reticulate, Silybum marianum and Trigonella foenum-graecum have shown hypoglycemic and, in some cases, hypolipidemic activities in diabetic patients. Among them, Gymnema sylvestre, Momordica charantia, Silybum marianum and Trigonella foenum-graecum have acquired enough reputation for managing diabetes. Thus, it seems that physicians can rely on these herbs and advise for the patients to improve management of diabetes.

  1. Cardiovascular biomarkers in clinical studies of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldassarre, M P A; Andersen, A; Consoli, A

    2018-01-01

    When planning cardiovascular studies in type 2 diabetes, selection of cardiovascular biomarkers is a complex issue. Since the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes is multifactorial, ideally, the selected cardiovascular biomarkers should cover all aspects of the known...... biomarkers and 3) novel biomarkers (oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction biomarkers). Within each category we present the currently best validated biomarkers with special focus on the population of interest (type 2 diabetes). For each individual biomarker, the physiological role, the validation...... in the general population and in type 2 diabetes, analytical methodology, the modifying factors, the effects of glucose-lowering drugs, and the interpretation are discussed. This approach will provide clinical researchers with all information necessary for planning, conducting and interpreting results from...

  2. Height Growth Velocity, Islet Autoimmunity and Type 1 Diabetes Development: the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, MM; Yin, X; Zerbe, GO; Klingensmith, GJ; Dabelea, D; Fingerlin, TE; Rewers, M; Norris, JM

    2010-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Larger childhood body size and rapid growth have been associated with increased type 1 diabetes risk. We analyzed height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and velocities of growth in height, weight, and BMI, for association with development of islet autoimmunity (IA) and type 1 diabetes. Methods Since 1993, the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) has followed children at increased type 1 diabetes risk, based on HLA DR,DQ genotype or family history, for development of IA and type 1 diabetes. IA was defined as presence of autoantibodies to insulin, GAD or IA2 twice in succession, or autoantibody positive on one visit and diabetic at the next consecutive visit within one year. Type 1 diabetes was diagnosed by a physician. Height and weight were collected starting at age 2 years. Of 1,714 DAISY children children developed IA, and 21 progressed to type 1 diabetes. We conducted Cox proportional hazards analysis to explore growth velocities and size measures for association with IA and type 1 diabetes development. Results Higher height growth velocity was associated with IA development (HR: 1.63, CI: 1.31-2.05) and type 1 diabetes development (HR: 3.34, CI: 1.73-6.42) for a 1 standard deviation difference in velocity. Conclusions/interpretation Our study suggests that greater height growth velocity may be involved in the progression from genetic susceptibility to autoimmunity and then to type 1 diabetes in pre-pubertal children. PMID:19547949

  3. Serum Lipids and Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy and Macular Edema in Persons With Long-term Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: The Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Barbara E K; Myers, Chelsea E; Howard, Kerri P; Klein, Ronald

    2015-05-01

    Total serum and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol have been considered risk factors for severe vascular outcomes in persons with type 1 diabetes mellitus. To examine the long-term relationships between these 2 serum lipids and the incidence and prevalence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy and macular edema. Nine-hundred three persons with younger-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus who participated in the Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy. Serum total and high-density cholesterol and history of statin use during the course of 5 visits spanning approximately 30 years (April 10, 1984, to February 13, 2014). Prevalence and incidence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy and macular edema. A modest association was found for higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and decreased prevalence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (odds ratio per 10 mg/dL, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.82-0.93), adjusting for duration of diabetes mellitus, glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, statin use, and end-stage renal disease. While adjusting for covariates, no associations of serum total or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and incident proliferative diabetic retinopathy or macular edema, nor of statin use with decreased incidence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy or macular edema, were identified. In the course of long-duration diabetes mellitus during a time of changing medical care, there appeared to be little effect of serum lipids or statins on the incidence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy and macular edema.

  4. Sexual dysfunction in type II diabetic females: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Bulent; Tefekli, Ahmet; Ozbey, Isa; Salman, Fatih; Dincag, Nevin; Kadioglu, Ates; Tellaloglu, Sedat

    2002-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is considered to play a principle role in the etiopathogenesis of sexual dysfunction both in men and women. The aim of this study is to evaluate sexual function in Type II diabetic women. A total of 72 young diabetic women (mean age: 38.8 years) with no other systemic diseases and 60 age-matched healthy women were enrolled in our study. We sought from them a detailed medical and sexual history and used the Index of Female Sexual function (IFSF) questionnaire (Kaplan et al., 1999). The mean IFSF score of diabetic women was 29.3 +/- 6.4 and was 37.7 +/- 3.5 in normal cases (p diabetics and was observed in 77% of the women. Diminished clitoral sensation was observed in 62.5% of the women, 37.5% complained of vaginal dryness and 41.6% had vaginal discomfort. Orgasmic dysfunction was found in 49% of the women. The incidence of all these related symptoms were significantly higher when compared to controls. We concluded that significant percentage of diabetic women that we observed experience sexual dysfunction of varying degrees that diminishes their quality of life.

  5. STUDY ON KAP OF OCULAR COMPLICATIONS DUE TO DIABETES AMONG TYPE II DIABETICS VISITING A TERTIARY TEACHING HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Koshy

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a major public health problem worldwide. Diabetic patients are at risk of developing blindness from diabetic retinopathy. While occurrence of diabetic retinopathy cannot be prevented, its complications can be minimized. This requires awareness of the sight-threatening potential of diabetes and the need for regular eye examinations. Aim: To study the knowledge of ocular complications of diabetes, among type II diabetics visiting a tertiary level hospital. Settings and Design: This was a prospective study in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Methods and Material: This was a questionnaire based study on 350 type II diabetics. All patients were interviewed by the same investigator. Statistical analysis used: The data was analysed using chi square test. Results: With increase in the duration of illness, the awareness about diabetic retinopathy is more. Even though the awareness of the disease increased with increasing duration of the disease, 51.4% of the diabetics did not know how diabetes can affect the eye, 49.7% of diabetics did not know if diabetic retinopathy can be treated and 67.4% had not heard of any treatment modality for diabetic retinopathy. This shows that lack of knowledge about the disease was significant. Conclusions: Prevention of non-communicable disease through increased awareness needs to be the thrust of the effort in resource poor contexts, where the treatment can be prohibitively costly. These measures would help to bring about more awareness and understanding about the disease among the patients and therefore prevent sight-threatening complications by timely intervention and management.

  6. Study of serum soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 levels in type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fangdu; Chu Qiaomei

    2002-01-01

    To study the change and the correlation of serum soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sV-CAM-1) levels with diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetic patients, serum sVCAM-1 levels were measured in duplicate by ELISA in 85 type 2 diabetic patients; fundus examination was performed by an ophthalmologist using ophthalmoscope or fundus fluorescein angiography, and the findings were graded as: no signs of diabetic retinopathy (NDR), background diabetic retinopathy (BDR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Serum sVCAM-1 levels were significantly higher in the PDR and BDR groups than those in the control and NDR groups respectively (P<0.01). NDR group showed significantly increased serum sVCAM-levels compared with control group (P<0.01). In contrast, serum sVCAM-1 levels were not related to the presence of blood glucose, serum insulin levels or known diabetic duration. Authors' results suggest that serum sVCAM-1 might be implicated in the development of the diabetic retinopathy, and could assess the severity of diabetic retinopathy. The measurement of serum sVCAM-1 levels in 2 type diabetic patients may be clinically useful for early diagnosis or treatment of diabetic retinopathy

  7. Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2015-01-01

    For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women with gestat......For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women...... with gestational diabetes mellitus is highly relevant....

  8. Quality of Life in People with Diabetic Retinopathy: Indian Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Datson Marian; Shah, Amish; D'Souza, May; Simon, Paul; George, Thomas; D'Souza, Nameeth; Suresh, Sucharitha; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath

    2017-04-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is a well-known consequence of long standing and poorly controlled Diabetes Mellitus (DM). Several studies have demonstrated both a qualitative and quantitative reduction in health related quality of life in persons with DR. But no such study has been done in the Indian population. To assess health related and vision related quality of life in people with DR. The present study included two groups of patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Cases included 97 patients with DR. The control group (n=26) consisted of diabetic cases with no clinically detectable DR changes. After taking informed consent, health and vision related quality of life was assessed using National Eye Institute 25-Item Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ-25). Demographic information, social history and diabetic history were also obtained from all patients. DR was graded using the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) classification. Of the 97 cases with DR, 42.3% were females. Of the 26 controls, 53.8% were females. The mean±SD age in years of the cases was 55.09±9.56 and controls were 54.12±13.01. The mean±SD of DM in years for the cases was 10.98±5.62 and for controls was 6.69±2.29. There were statistically significant (pQuality of life was significantly lower in diabetics with DR when compared with those without DR with maximum effect seen on general health, general vision and mental health. Quality of life decreased as the duration of retinopathy and severity of retinopathy increased.

  9. Associations of changes in psychosocial factors and their interactions with diabetes distress in patients with type 2 diabetes: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruey-Hsia; Hsu, Hui-Chun; Kao, Chia-Chan; Yang, Yung-Mei; Lee, Yau-Jiunn; Shin, Shyi-Jang

    2017-05-01

    To assess the associations of changes in self-management behaviours, diabetes self-efficacy, resilience, social support, patient empowerment and their interactions with changes in diabetes distress in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Many patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus experience diabetes distress. Few longitudinal studies have investigated the associations of changes in various psychosocial factors with changes in diabetes distress in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study adopted a longitudinal design. Data were collected at baseline and 12 months later. Overall, 304 patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from four hospitals in southern Taiwan by convenience sampling. A self-report questionnaire and medical record were used to collect demographic data, clinical indicators, self-management behaviours, diabetes self-efficacy, resilience, social support, patient empowerment, and diabetes distress. Data were collected from February 2014-March 2015. An increase in resilience or diabetes self-efficacy significantly associated with a decrease in diabetes distress, whereas an increase in patient empowerment significantly associated with an increase in diabetes distress. The interactions between increase in patient empowerment and increase in self-management behaviours significantly associated with decrease in diabetes distress. Nurses could endeavour to improve the diabetes self-efficacy and resilience to reducing diabetes distress. Arbitrarily empowering patients may increase diabetes distress. Increasing self-care management behaviours and patient empowerment might need to be simultaneously addressed to reduce the diabetes distress in patients with type 2 diabetes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Prevalence of type-II diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy: the Gaddap study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahar, P S; Awan, M Zahid; Manzar, Nabeel; Memon, M Saleh

    2010-08-01

    To determine the frequency of type-II Diabetes mellitus (DM) in the endogenous population of Gaddap town and also to evaluate the status of Diabetic retinopathy (DR) in this group. Descriptive study. Isra Postgraduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Al-Ibrahim Eye Hospital, Karachi, from January 2006 till December 2008. This community based study of subjects of either gender was carried out in the Gaddap town. Three primary eye care centres were established in the existing primary health care (PHC) facilities, to screen the target Population aged 30 years and above, and who met other inclusion criteria for DM and DR respectively. Patients requiring intervention were managed accordingly. Data was entered and analyzed using Microsoft Visual Basic 6 and Microsoft Access. Out of the cohort of 19211 subjects, 1677 patients were found Diabetic, giving the prevalence of DM in Gaddap town at 8.73%, with 1258 (6.55%) known and 419 (2.18%) newly diagnosed cases. DR was seen in 460 (27.43%) of the Diabetic cases with 126 (7.51%) patients requiring urgent intervention for vision threatening complications. The result validates the importance of early screening of DR in people suffering from DM for possible management and prevention of sight threatening complications in the early stage of the disease and advocates the inclusion of primary eye care as a part of PHC system.

  11. A Comprehensive Study of Chronic Diabetes Complications in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan MA Al-Mahmood

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to provide a reference of chronic diabetes complications by investigating the prolonged hyperglycemia effects on hematological, biochemical and histopathological changes (liver, kidney, spleen, cardiac muscle, adrenal gland, and endocrine pancreas in diabetic rats induced by streptozotocin. Methods: Ten adult female Sprague-Dawley of uniform age were divided into two Groups. Group 1 was made diabetic by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg/bw whereas Group 2 served as control. After six months, the rats were anesthetized using pentobarbital. Cardiac puncture was performed to get 3 ml of the blood sample; following 12 hours of an overnight fast. Serum chemistry test and complete blood analysis for lipid profile and blood glucose test; liver and renal functions were performed. Tissue specimens of liver, kidney, spleen, cardiac muscle, adrenal gland, and endocrine pancreas were fixed in 10% formal saline and processed for histological study. Results: There were severe histopathological changes in the affected organs; and the presence of a significant abnormality of lipid profile, liver, and renal functions. Conclusions: The presence of histopathological changes with abnormal biochemical changes is related to the chronic absence of insulin production in the destroyed β -cells which reflect the diabetic complications in a human being.

  12. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including: Blurry vision Excess thirst Fatigue Frequent urination Hunger Weight loss Because type 2 diabetes develops slowly, ... must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  13. Diabetes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — These datasets provide de-identified insurance data for diabetes. The data is provided by three managed care organizations in Allegheny County (Gateway Health Plan,...

  14. Nutritional determinants of worldwide diabetes: an econometric study of food markets and diabetes prevalence in 173 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; McKee, Martin; Galea, Gauden

    2013-01-01

    Ageing and urbanization leading to sedentary lifestyles have been the major explanations proposed for a dramatic rise in diabetes worldwide and have been the variables used to predict future diabetes rates. However, a transition to Western diets has been suggested as an alternative driver. We sought to determine what socio-economic and dietary factors are the most significant population-level contributors to diabetes prevalence rates internationally. Multivariate regression models were used to study how market sizes of major food products (sugars, cereals, vegetable oils, meats, total joules) corresponded to diabetes prevalence, incorporating lagged and cumulative effects. The underlying social determinants of food market sizes and diabetes prevalence rates were also studied, including ageing, income, urbanization, overweight prevalence and imports of foodstuffs. Data were obtained from 173 countries. Population-based survey recipients were the basis for diabetes prevalence and food market data. We found that increased income tends to increase overall food market size among low- and middle-income countries, but the level of food importation significantly shifts the content of markets such that a greater proportion of available joules is composed of sugar and related sweeteners. Sugar exposure statistically explained why urbanization and income have been correlated with diabetes rates. Current diabetes projection methods may estimate future diabetes rates poorly if they fail to incorporate the impact of nutritional factors. Imported sugars deserve further investigation as a potential population-level driver of global diabetes.

  15. Cost-effectiveness analysis of adding pharmacists to primary care teams to reduce cardiovascular risk in patients with Type 2 diabetes: results from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, S H; Lier, D A; Majumdar, S R; Tsuyuki, R T; Lewanczuk, R Z; Spooner, R; Johnson, J A

    2015-07-01

    Adding pharmacists to primary care teams significantly improved blood pressure control and reduced predicted 10-year cardiovascular risk in patients with Type 2 diabetes. This pre-specified sub-study evaluated the economic implications of this cardiovascular risk reduction strategy. One-year outcomes and healthcare utilization data from the trial were used to determine cost-effectiveness from the public payer perspective. Costs were expressed in 2014 Canadian dollars and effectiveness was based on annualized risk of cardiovascular events derived from the UKPDS Risk Engine. The 123 evaluable trial patients included in this analysis had a mean age of 62 ( ± 11) years, 38% were men, and mean diabetes duration was 6 ( ± 7) years. Pharmacists provided 3.0 ( ± 1.9) hours of additional service to each intervention patient, which cost $226 ( ± $1143) per patient. The overall one-year per-patient costs for healthcare utilization were $190 lower in the intervention group compared with usual care [95% confidence interval (CI): -$1040, $668). Intervention patients had a significant 0.3% greater reduction in the annualized risk of a cardiovascular event (95% CI: 0.08%, 0.6%) compared with usual care. In the cost-effectiveness analysis, the intervention dominated usual care in 66% of 10,000 bootstrap replications. At a societal willingness-to-pay of $4000 per 1% reduction in annual cardiovascular risk, the probability that the intervention was cost-effective compared with usual care reached 95%. A sensitivity analysis using multiple imputation to replace missing data produced similar results. Within a randomized trial, adding pharmacists to primary care teams was a cost-effective strategy for reducing cardiovascular risk in patients with Type 2 diabetes. In most circumstances, this intervention may also be cost saving. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  16. A study of vitiligo in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Raveendra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Diabetes mellitus is associated with many skin manifestations including vitiligo. Vitiligo occurs more commonly in Type 1 diabetes mellitus. A few recent studies have shown its increased occurrence in Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Aims: This study aims to study the prevalence of vitiligo in Type 2 diabetic patients and to compare the prevalence of vitiligo in age- and sex-matched group of nondiabetic population. Settings and Design: The present study was a hospital-based cross-sectional study conducted in the Department of Dermatology in a tertiary care hospital. Subjects and Methods: Six hundred consecutive consenting patients of Type 2 diabetes were included in the study group and age- and sex-matched controls were healthy nondiabetic adult volunteers attending the Department of Dermatology. Fasting and postprandial blood sugar levels were done. A complete history, physical examination, and wood's lamp examination to detect vitiligo were conducted. In all those with vitiligo, the type of vitiligo was noted. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 20.0. Comparison between the presence of vitiligo in cases and controls was done using Chi-square test with P = 0.05 for significance. Results: Vitiligo was seen in 12% of cases and 6% of control group which was statistically significant (P < 0.01. There was no significant difference between cases and controls with respect to type of vitiligo. Conclusions: Vitiligo can occur in Type 2 diabetics as seen in our study and few other recent studies. The exact pathogenesis is not very clear and needs further consideration.

  17. Knowledge attitude and practice regarding diabetes mellitus among Nondiabetic and diabetic study participants in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaniz Fatema

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased awareness amongst large population groups is a major determinant for the prevention of diabetes and its complications as well as related metabolic disorders. Knowledge and attitude are the principal markers of awareness that need to be studied in various population groups in specific racial and cultural contexts. The present study was undertaken to explore knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP regarding -diabetes mellitus (DM among nondiabetic (nonDM and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients in Bangladesh. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 18,697 adults (aged 18 years and above; 7796 male and 10,901 female; 6780 nonDM and 11,917 T2DM selected purposively from the OPD of 19 healthcare centres in and around Dhaka and in northern parts of Bangladesh. KAP were assessed by a pre-structured, interviewer-administered questionnaire and categorised using predefined scores of poor (mean + 1 SD. Univariate and bivariate statistical analysis were done as appropriate. Multivariate linear regression was done to examine the association between diabetes related KAP and other covariates. Results The mean (±SD age (years of all the study participants was 46 ± 14, mean BMI 24.4 ± 4.1 and mean waist-hip ratio (WHR was 0.93 ± 0.07. The proportion of poor, average and good knowledge scores among T2DM subjects were 17%, 68% and 15% respectively. The corresponding values for attitude score were 23%, 67% and 10% respectively. The KAP regarding diabetes was found to be better among people who were living with diabetes compared to their counterparts. DM males showed better knowledge and practice regarding diabetes, compared to nonDM counterparts (M ± SD; 44.18 ± 16.13 vs 40.88 ± 15.62, p = <0.001; 66.00 ± 29.68 vs 64.21 ± 31.79, p < 0.001, respectively. Females showed better attitude score compared to males. Overall KAP were found to be significantly higher (p < 0.001 in middle aged (31

  18. Glycemic Control for Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Our Evolving Faith in the Face of Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René; Montori, Victor M

    2016-09-01

    We sought to determine the concordance between the accumulating evidence about the impact of tight versus less tight glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus since the publication of UKPDS (UK Prospective Diabetes Study) in 1998 until 2015 with the views about that evidence published in journal articles and practice guidelines. We searched in top general medicine and specialty journals for articles referring to glycemic control appearing between 2006 and 2015 and identified the latest practice guidelines. To summarize the evidence, we included all published systematic reviews and meta-analyses of contemporary randomized trials of glycemic control measuring patient-important microvascular and macrovascular outcomes, and completed a meta-analysis of their follow-up extensions. We identified 16 guidelines and 328 statements. The body of evidence produced estimates warranting moderate confidence. This evidence reported no significant impact of tight glycemic control on the risk of dialysis/transplantation/renal death, blindness, or neuropathy. In the past decade, however, most published statements (77%-100%) and guidelines (95%) unequivocally endorsed benefit. There is also no significant effect on all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, or stroke; however, there is a consistent 15% relative-risk reduction of nonfatal myocardial infarction. Between 2006 and 2008, most statements (47%-83%) endorsed the benefit; after 2008 (ACCORD), only a minority (21%-36%) did. Discordance exists between the research evidence and academic and clinical policy statements about the value of tight glycemic control to reduce micro- and macrovascular complications. This discordance may distort priorities in the research and practice agendas designed to improve the lives of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Prevalence of type-II diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy: the gaddap study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahar, P.S.; Awan, Z.; Manzar, N.; Memon, S.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the frequency of type-II Diabetes mellitus (DM) in the endogenous population of Gaddap town and also to evaluate the status of Diabetic retinopathy (DR) in this group. This community based study of subjects of either gender was carried out in the Gaddap town. Three primary eye care centres were established in the existing primary health care (PHC) facilities, to screen the target Population aged 30 years and above, and who met other inclusion criteria for DM and DR respectively. Patients requiring intervention were managed accordingly. Data was entered and analyzed using Microsoft Visual Basic 6 and Microsoft Access. Out of the cohort of 19211 subjects, 1677 patients were found Diabetic, giving the prevalence of DM in Gaddap town at 8.73%, with 1258 (6.55%) known and 419 (2.18%) newly diagnosed cases. DR was seen in 460 (27.43%) of the Diabetic cases with 126 (7.51%) patients requiring urgent intervention for vision threatening complications. The result validates the importance of early screening of DR in people suffering from DM for possible management and prevention of sight threatening complications in the early stage of the disease and advocates the inclusion of primary eye care as a part of PHC system. (author)

  20. Ramadan Perspective Epidemiology and Education in Diabetes (RAPEED) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, N I; Kamrul-Hasan, M; Hossain, M A; Chanda, P K; Bakar, M A; Rahman, M; Kader, M A

    2017-04-01

    Ramadan fasting is one of the five pillars of Islam and is obligatory for all healthy adult and adolescent Muslims. A significant number of patients with diabetes observe fasting during Ramadan. The objectives of this Ramadan Perspective Epidemiology and Education in Diabetes (RAPEED) study were to find out the current knowledge, attitude, and practices about Ramadan fasting among people with diabetes in Bangladesh. This retrospective cross-sectional study recruited 648 subjects with diabetes mellitus attending the Endocrinology outpatient department of a tertiary level hospital of Bangladesh within two months of the end of Ramadan in 2016. Socio-demographic data, data related to diabetes treatment, complications and co-morbidities; changes in lifestyle and diabetes treatment during Ramadan and frequency of hypoglycemia were collected from all. The mean age of the study population was 50.32±12.1 years and the majority (98.6%) had type 2 diabetes and 63.9% were overweight or obese. The majority (89.35%) of the patients fasted in Ramadan and among them, more than half of the fasters received physicians' advice for Ramadan fasting (60.6%) and changed diabetes medication (69.90%) during Ramadan. Although the amount of total food consumption was unchanged in more than one half (60.6%) of the fasters, majority of them reduced sugar-sweet intake (75.5%), increased fluid drinking (75.8%) and decreased physical activity (75.8%) during the month. A large portion (37.48%) of them did not check blood glucose and more than half (54.06%) of fasters failed to visit their physicians during Ramadan. Among them 14.85% experienced mild to moderate episodes of hypoglycemia and none had severe hypoglycemia and the most (61.6%) episodes of hypoglycemia occurred in the late evening. Hypoglycemic episodes were more frequent among insulin users, patients who had received fasting advice from physicians and in those who had adjusted diabetes drugs before Ramadan fasting. Safe Ramadan

  1. A clinical study of the relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rajhans, Neelima S.; Kohad, Ramesh M.; Chaudhari, Viren G.; Mhaske, Nilkanth H.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease is not clear, even though studied intensively. From the available data, it seemed reasonable to believe that diabetics were more susceptible to periodontal disease than non-diabetics. Aim: The present study was to clinically evaluate the relationship of diabetes mellitus with periodontal disease along with various parameters. Materials and Methods: Fifteen hundred patients with diabetes mellitus were examined. A thorough oral ...

  2. Lessons from the Look Action for Health in Diabetes Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary T Korytkowski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Look Action for Health in Diabetes AHEAD Study was designed as a long-term randomized controlled clinical trial and powered to detect differences in cardiovascular outcomes, the primary cause of early morbidity and mortality in type 2 diabetes, among subjects randomized to receive an intensive lifestyle intervention or a control group of diabetes support and education. The study was terminated early due to the absence of any difference in the primary outcome, defined as a composite of the first postrandomization occurrence of fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction and stroke, or angina requiring hospitalization. However, important secondary favorable outcomes were observed in those receiving the intensive lifestyle intervention. This included more weight loss, greater fitness, less disability, less depression, reductions in sleep apnea and urinary incontinence, better glycemic control, and more subjects experiencing diabetes remission. These results underscore the importance of lifestyle interventions as a component of diabetes therapy. Long-term follow-up of Look AHEAD participants is planned, despite discontinuation of the intensive lifestyle program.

  3. DEFINE (Diabetes Exercise and Fitness Needs): a study investigating physical activity and exercise in adults with diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Kime, NH; Rivett, M; Robinson, P

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Physical activity is a key component in the management of diabetes. Physical activity improves metabolic control which tackles cardiovascular risk factors and other associated co-morbidities. Most people with diabetes do not engage in recommended levels of physical activity due to a range of modifiable factors. This study (i) explored the unique perspectives of adults with diabetes in terms of barriers, facilitators and explicit needs and preferences in relation to physical activity and...

  4. Diabetes Education Needs of Chinese Australians: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Tammie S. T.; Walker, Karen Z.; Ralston, Robin A.; Palermo, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate a type 2 diabetes education programme for Chinese Australians, based on the experience of participants and by exploring the unique needs of Chinese patients, their health beliefs and their cultural behaviours. Design and setting: A qualitative ethnographic study was undertaken in a community health…

  5. The North Jutland County Diabetic Retinopathy Study (NCDRS): population characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lars Loumann; Lervang, Hans-Henrik; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    2006-01-01

    Background: Several population-based studies have reported blood glucose levels and blood pressure to be risk factors for the development of diabetic retinopathy. These studies were initiated more than two decades ago and may therefore reflect the treatment and population composition of a previous...... for clinically significant macular oedema. These data suggest different risk factors for these clinical entities....

  6. Community based yoga classes for type 2 diabetes: an exploratory randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drincevic Desanka

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yoga is a popular therapy for diabetes but its efficacy is contested. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of researching community based yoga classes in Type 2 diabetes with a view to informing the design of a definitive, multi-centre trial Methods The study design was an exploratory randomised controlled trial with in-depth process evaluation. The setting was two multi-ethnic boroughs in London, UK; one with average and one with low mean socio-economic deprivation score. Classes were held at a sports centre or GP surgery. Participants were 59 people with Type 2 diabetes not taking insulin, recruited from general practice lists or opportunistically by general practice staff. The intervention group were offered 12 weeks of a twice-weekly 90-minute yoga class; the control group was a waiting list for the yoga classes. Both groups received advice and leaflets on healthy lifestyle and were encouraged to exercise. Primary outcome measure was HbA1c. Secondary outcome measures included attendance, weight, waist circumference, lipid levels, blood pressure, UKPDS cardiovascular risk score, diabetes-related quality of life (ADDQoL, and self-efficacy. Process measures were attendance at yoga sessions, self-reported frequency of practice between taught sessions, and qualitative data (interviews with patients and therapists, ethnographic observation of the yoga classes, and analysis of documents including minutes of meetings, correspondence, and exercise plans. Results Despite broad inclusion criteria, around two-thirds of the patients on GP diabetic registers proved ineligible, and 90% of the remainder declined to participate. Mean age of participants was 60 +/- 10 years. Attendance at yoga classes was around 50%. Nobody did the exercises regularly at home. Yoga teachers felt that most participants were unsuitable for 'standard' yoga exercises because of limited flexibility, lack of basic fitness, co-morbidity, and lack

  7. Gender Differences in Risks of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Their Association with Metabolic Syndrome in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Fang Yao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke are common complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. We aimed to explore the differences in the risks of CHD and stroke between Chinese women and men with T2DM and their association with metabolic syndrome (MS. This study included 1514 patients with T2DM. The Asian Guidelines of ATPIII (2005 were used for MS diagnosis, and the UKPDS risk engine was used to evaluate the 10-year CHD and stroke risks. Women had lower CHD risk (15.3% versus 26.3%, fatal CHD risk (11.8% versus 19.0%, stroke risk (8.4% versus 10.3%, and fatal stroke risk (1.4% versus 1.6% compared with men with T2DM (p<0.05–0.001. The CHD risk (28.4% versus 22.6%, p<0.001 was significantly higher in men with MS than in those without MS. The CHD (16.2% versus 11.0%, p<0.001 and stroke risks (8.9% versus 5.8%, p<0.001 were higher in women with MS than in those without MS. In conclusion, our findings indicated that Chinese women with T2DM are less susceptible to CHD and stroke than men. Further, MS increases the risk of both these events, highlighting the need for comprehensive metabolic control in T2DM.

  8. Dairy product consumption is associated with pre-diabetes and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes in the Lifelines Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, E.M.; Sluik, D.; Singh-Povel, C.M.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies show associations between dairy product consumption and type 2 diabetes, but only a few studies conducted detailed analyses for a variety of dairy subgroups. Therefore, we examined cross-sectional associations of a broad variety of dairy subgroups with pre-diabetes and newly

  9. A case study of type 2 diabetes self-management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Hsin-i

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been established that careful diabetes self-management is essential in avoiding chronic complications that compromise health. Disciplined diet control and regular exercise are the keys for the type 2 diabetes self-management. An ability to maintain one's blood glucose at a relatively flat level, not fluctuating wildly with meals and hypoglycemic medical intervention, would be the goal for self-management. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c or simply A1c is a measure of a long-term blood plasma glucose average, a reliable index to reflect one's diabetic condition. A simple regimen that could reduce the elevated A1c levels without altering much of type 2 diabetic patients' daily routine denotes a successful self-management strategy. Methods A relatively simple model that relates the food impact on blood glucose excursions for type 2 diabetes was studied. Meal is treated as a bolus injection of glucose. Medical intervention of hypoglycaemic drug or injection, if any, is lumped with secreted insulin as a damping factor. Lunch was used for test meals. The recovery period of a blood glucose excursion returning to the pre-prandial level, the maximal reach, and the area under the excursion curve were used to characterize one's ability to regulate glucose metabolism. A case study is presented here to illustrate the possibility of devising an individual-based self-management regimen. Results Results of the lunch study for a type 2 diabetic subject indicate that the recovery time of the post-prandial blood glucose level can be adjusted to 4 hours, which is comparable to the typical time interval for non-diabetics: 3 to 4 hours. A moderate lifestyle adjustment of light supper coupled with morning swimming of 20 laps in a 25 m pool for 40 minutes enabled the subject to reduce his A1c level from 6.7 to 6.0 in six months and to maintain this level for the subsequent six months. Conclusions The preliminary result of this case study is encouraging

  10. Clinical impact of the temporal relationship between depression and type 2 diabetes: the Fremantle diabetes study phase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Bruce

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The clinical features of type 2 diabetes may differ depending on whether first depression episode precedes or follows the diagnosis of diabetes. METHODS: Type 2 patients from the observational community-based Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase II underwent assessment of lifetime depression using the Brief Lifetime Depression Scale (developed and validated for this study supplemented by information on current depression symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire, 9-item version and use of antidepressants. Patients were categorized as never depressed (Group 1, having had depression before diabetes diagnosis (Group 2, diagnosed with depression and diabetes within 2 years of each other (Group 3 and having depression after diabetes diagnosis (Group 4. RESULTS: Of 1391 patients, 20.8% were assigned to Group 2, 6.0% to Group 3 and 14.5% to Group 4. In Group 2, depression occurred a median 15.6 years before diabetes onset at age 37.2±14.7 years. These patients had similar clinical characteristics to never depressed patients except for reduced self-care behaviours and having more symptomatic peripheral arterial disease. In Group 4, depression occurred a median 9.9 years after diabetes onset at age 59.8±13.0 years. These patients had long duration diabetes, poor glycaemic control, more intensive management and more diabetic complications. Group 4 patients had more current depression than Group 2 but were less likely to be receiving antidepressants. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The clinical features of depression and type 2 diabetes are heterogeneous depending on their temporal relationship. There may be corresponding differences in the pathogenesis of depression in diabetes that have implications for diagnosis and management.

  11. A preliminary study of levels of selected nutrients for neonates born to diabetic and non-diabetic mothers in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, A.M.S.; Chhowdhury, S.A.; Rahman, M.A.; Ali, S.M.K.; Huda, A.S.N.

    2006-01-01

    To investigate some selected nutrients status in the neonates born to diabetic and non-diabetic mothers a prospective study was carried out. From the Obstetric Unit of Bangladesh Institute of Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic disorder (BIRDEM) Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh, 236 newborns were recruited; 74 from diabetic, 59 from gestational diabetic and 103 from non-diabetic mothers group for this study. Cord-serum levels of Cu, Zn, Fe, Mg, Ca and ascorbic acid were investigated, and some anthropometric measurements were recorded to correlate with the nutrient levels. Fe was found significantly higher (p<0.05) whereas, ascorbic acid was found significantly lower (p<0.05) in diabetic group compared with other two groups. However, Mg and Ca levels were found significantly higher (p<0.05) in non-diabetic group. There was no significant difference observed in Cu, Zn levels for the 3 groups. Ca level was significantly correlated with birth weight and length of the neonates. These data suggests that diabetes has some effects on fetal growth and its nutritional status that also reflect the socio-economical status of the families of the neonates. (author)

  12. H. pylori seroprevalence and risk of diabetes: An ancillary case-control study nested in the diabetes prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Saud; Nelson, Jason; Moss, Steven F; Paulus, Jessica K; Knowler, William C; Pittas, Anastassios G

    2017-10-01

    To determine the association between H. pylori infection and risk of incident diabetes in adults at high risk for diabetes who participated in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) study. In a nested case-control study conducted among 421 adults with newly diagnosed diabetes and 421 matched controls, we examined the association between serological status of H. pylori at baseline and risk of incident diabetes over a mean follow-up period of 2.6years. Using data from the baseline visit of the DPP, we also examined the cross-sectional association between presence of H. pylori antibodies and insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion and the disposition index-like measure after a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). At baseline, H. pylori antibodies were present in 40% of participants who developed diabetes and 39% of controls. After adjusting for matching factors, there was no association between exposure to H. pylori and incident diabetes (odds ratio [OR] of 1.04 (95% CI, 0.77 to 1.40). In cross-sectional analyses, H. pylori status was not significantly associated with insulin sensitivity and disposition index-like measure from OGTT. In adults at high risk for diabetes, H. pylori seropositivity was not associated with risk of developing diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A dietary intervention for chronic diabetic neuropathy pain: a randomized controlled pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Bunner, A E; Wells, C L; Gonzales, J; Agarwal, U; Bayat, E; Barnard, N D

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetic neuropathy is a common and often debilitating condition for which available treatments are limited. Because a low-fat plant-based diet has been shown to improve glycemic control in individuals with type 2 diabetes, we hypothesized that such a diet would reduce painful symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. Methods: In this 20-week pilot study, individuals with type 2 diabetes and painful diabetic neuropathy were randomly assigned to two groups. The intervention group was asked ...

  14. DIABETIC FOOT DISEASE IN KING GEORGE HOSPITAL, VISHAKAPATNAM: A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY ON 100 PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Babu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot as the leading cause of lower limb amputation is one of the most important complications of diabetes mellitus. Effective treatment and formulation of prevention guidelines for diabetic foot require a thorough understanding of characteristics of diabetic foot patients and their ulcers, so we conducted this study to investigate these characteristics . INTRODUCTION : Necessary data was collected from case sheets of 100 diabetic foot patients admitted in King Goerge Hospital, Vishakapatnam in the year 2014

  15. Cardiovascular disease predicts diabetic peripheral polyneuropathy in subjects with type 2 diabetes: A 10-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybarra-Muñoz, Juan; Jurado-Campos, Jeronimo; Garcia-Gil, Maria; Zabaleta-Del-Olmo, Edurne; Mir-Coll, Teresa; Zabalegui, Adelaida; Vidal, Josep; Romeo, June H

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between cardiovascular disease and diabetic peripheral neuropathy is mainly sustained by data retrieved from cross-sectional studies focused on cardiovascular risk factors. We aimed to assess the presence of cardiovascular disease as a risk factor for developing diabetic peripheral neuropathy in a type 2 diabetes mellitus population. A 10-year prospective, primary care, multicentre study in a randomly selected cohort. Cardiovascular disease presence included stroke, coronary artery disease and/or peripheral ischaemia. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy diagnosis was based on clinical neurological examination as well as the neuropathy symptoms score and nerve conduction studies. Three hundred and ten (N=310) patients were initially recruited. Two-hundred and sixty seven (N=267) patients were included in the study. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy cumulative incidence was 18.3% (95% confidence intervals 14.1-23.4; N=49). Diabetic peripheral neuropathy development was significantly more frequent in participants presenting with cardiovascular disease at baseline (P=0.01). In the final logistic regression analysis, the presence of cardiovascular disease remained associated with an increased risk for diabetic peripheral neuropathy (odds ratio 2.32, 95% confidence intervals 1.03-5.22) in addition to diabetes duration and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels. In our series, type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with cardiovascular disease at baseline present with an increased risk of developing diabetic peripheral neuropathy at 10 years of follow-up. Our results suggest that measures aimed at the prevention, control and treatment of cardiovascular disease can also help prevent diabetic peripheral neuropathy development. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  16. Clinical Profile of Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Prospective Study in a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Pankaj; Kaur, Harpreet; Kaur, Maneet

    2015-06-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis, a well-known and major acute metabolic complication classically occurs in young patients with type 1 diabetes. However, it may occur in patients with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus too. Aim of this study was to look into the clinical profile, precipitating factors and clinical outcome in the patients presenting with Diabetic ketoacidosis in the Emergency of a Tertiary care hospital. The study was a prospective study conducted over a period of two years in Kasturba Medical College, Manipal Karnataka, India. Clinical profile of 60 diabetic patients admitted in the Emergency with the diagnosis of Diabetic ketoacidosis were analysed. Out of 60 patients, 12 were of Type 1 and 48 were Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Mean duration of diabetes was 8.65 years. Only 14 (23.3%) patients were taking regular treatment for Diabetes Mellitus whereas 32 (53.33%) patients were on irregular treatment and eight (13.33%) were not on any treatment at all. Among 12 Type 1 Diabetic patients, six patients were freshly diagnosed to be diabetic when they presented with Diabetic ketoacidosis complication. Nausea and vomiting (63.33%) were the most common symptoms of these patients. Infections (73.33%) were the most common precipitating factor for Diabetic ketoacidosis. Mean fluid requirement on first day of therapy was 3.51 liters. Mortality of 10% was seen. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a fatal acute metabolic complication of Diabetes Mellitus with heterogeneous clinical presentation. Early diagnosis and treatment can avoid morbidity & mortality.

  17. A comparative study of group versus individual diabetes education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A comparative study consisting of two hundred consenting type 2 diabetics receiving care at the general outpatient department of Bingham University Teaching Hospital was done. Subjects were recruited by systematic random sampling and randomly allocated into intervention (group education) and control (one- ...

  18. Serum YKL-40 and gestational diabetes - an observational cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gybel-Brask, Dorte; Johansen, Julia S; Christiansen, Ib J

    2016-01-01

    To examine serum YKL-40 in women developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). In the present large observational cohort study of 1179 pregnant women, we determined serum YKL-40 four times during pregnancy (at gestational age 12, 20, 25, and 32 weeks). Pregnancy outcome was obtained from medical...

  19. STUDIES ON BACTERIAL INFECTIONS OF DIABETIC FOOT ULCER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    ABSTRACT. Microbial study for aerobic organisms from 100 cases of diabetic foot ulcers was carried out to determine the etiological agents and their antibiogram. Polymicrobial infection was observed in all the cases. The most frequently isolated aerobic organisms were Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas ...

  20. Mendelian randomization studies of biomarkers and type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Many biomarkers are associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk in epidemiological observations. The aim of this study was to identify and summarize current evidence for causal effects of biomarkers on T2D. A systematic literature search in PubMed and EMBASE (until April 2015) was done to identify

  1. The 'polypill' to reduce cardiovascular risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patel, Vinod; Pedersen, Oluf; Morrissey, John

    2004-01-01

    This article considers data from the Steno-2 multifactorial intervention study in type 2 diabetes to which are applied the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) risk engine. Mathematical analyses support the use of a 'polypill' to reduce cardiovascular risk in type 2 diabetes. It is s......This article considers data from the Steno-2 multifactorial intervention study in type 2 diabetes to which are applied the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) risk engine. Mathematical analyses support the use of a 'polypill' to reduce cardiovascular risk in type 2 diabetes...

  2. Clinical profile of diabetic ketoacidosis in tertiary hospitals in China: a multicentre, clinic-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y; Bai, J; Wang, G; Zhong, S; Su, X; Huang, Z; Chen, G; Zhang, J; Hou, X; Yu, X; Lu, B; Wang, Y; Li, X; Hu, H; Zhang, C; Liang, Y; Shaw, J; Wu, X

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical profile of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis in tertiary hospitals in China. A retrospective study of patients hospitalized with diabetic ketoacidosis between 2010 and 2012 was carried out in 15 tertiary hospitals around China. Clinical and laboratory data were collected. Patients were classified based on clinical diagnosis and treatment history. Groups were compared for differences in vital statistics and biochemical profiles at presentation. The study comprised 643 patients with diabetic ketoacidosis: 308 patients (47.9%) with Type 1 diabetes, 294 patients (45.7%) with Type 2 diabetes and 41 patients (6.4%) with atypical diabetes. Three hundred and eighty-eight diabetic ketoacidosis episodes (60.3%) were in patients with known diabetes. The most common precipitating factor was infection (40.1%), followed by unknown causes (36.9%) and non-compliance with anti-diabetes treatment (16.8%). At presentation, gastrointestinal symptoms and dehydration were more common in the Type 1 diabetes group. For new-onset diabetes, only 74.4% and 55.9% of patients were evaluated for β-cell function and autoantibodies for classification. Only 67% of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis received appropriate fluid therapy and 56% patients with severe acidosis received bicarbonate therapy. The length of hospital stay was 10.0 (7.0-14.0) days. The mortality rate was 1.7%, and was much higher in Type 2 diabetes than that in Type 1 diabetes (3.2% vs. 0.4%, P diabetes contribute to a similar proportion of cases presenting with diabetic ketoacidosis in China. Admissions with diabetic ketoacidosis are still associated with significant mortality and prolonged hospitalization. The efficiency of diabetic ketoacidosis management needs to be improved by implementing the updated guidelines. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  3. Effect of a polyherbal formulation cream on diabetic neuropathic pain among patients with type 2 diabetes - A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vijay; Rajsekar, Seena; Selvaraj, Bamila; Kumpatla, Satyavani

    2016-08-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes and can severely limit patients' daily functions. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the safety and effect of using a polyherbal formulation in reducing the symptoms of diabetic neuropathic pain in comparison with placebo among patients with type 2 diabetes. A total of 50 (M:F = 33:17) consecutive type 2 diabetes patients with painful diabetic neuropathy were enrolled in this study. All these patients had either two or more symptoms of diabetic neuropathy such as pain, burning and pricking sensations and numbness in their feet. They were randomly assigned to two groups: group 1 (n = 26) patients were treated with polyherbal formulation cream and group 2 (n = 24) patients were administered placebo. The patients were followed up for six months. Changes in the symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy of each patient were recorded at baseline, third and sixth month using the Diabetic Neuropathic Score. The mean age of the patients, duration of diabetes and glycated haemoglobin (HbA 1c ) were similar in both groups at baseline. During follow up visits, there was a decrease in the HbA 1c levels in the study and control groups. The symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy were also similar in both groups at baseline. A significant decrease in symptoms of neuropathic pain was observed among the group of patients treated with polyherbal formulation cream (76.9 per cent) compared to the placebo-treated group (12.5 per cent) (Pdiabetic neuropathy. However, its long term use needs to be evaluated for any further effectiveness and side effects.

  4. Prevalence of overweight and obesity in youth with diabetes in USA: the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lenna L; Lawrence, Jean M; Davis, Cralen; Liese, Angela D; Pettitt, David J; Pihoker, Catherine; Dabelea, Dana; Hamman, Richard; Waitzfelder, Beth; Kahn, Henry S

    2010-02-01

    Obesity's association with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is well established, but is less clear with type 1 diabetes (T1DM). We calculated the prevalence of overweight and obesity among diabetic youth in the USA from a six-center, population-based study of racially and ethnically diverse youth with diabetes, and we compared these rates with estimates among nondiabetic youth. Diabetic participants were examined in 2001-2004 for the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study (SEARCH) and nondiabetic participants were examined during the same years of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). 3953 diabetic youth and 7666 nondiabetic youth aged 3-19 yr. Overweight was defined as body mass index (BMI) from the 85th to obesity defined as > or = 95th percentile. Diabetes type was categorized as T1DM or T2DM based on physician diagnosis. Among youth with T2DM, the prevalence of overweight was 10.4% and obesity was 79.4%. Among youth with T1DM, 22.1% were overweight. The prevalence of overweight among youth with T1DM was higher than among those without diabetes overall (22.1% vs. 16.1%) (P obesity rate for T1DM was 12.6% overall (range Non-Hispanic White 10.7%-African-American 20.1%). As expected, most of the youth with T2DM were obese. Youth with T1DM had a higher prevalence of overweight, but not of obesity, than nondiabetic youth. Future studies of obesity among youth with diabetes of all types will further our understanding of the impact of obesity on diabetes both as a risk factor and a comorbidity.

  5. Diabetic retinopathy in a remote Indigenous primary healthcare population: a Central Australian diabetic retinopathy screening study in the Telehealth Eye and Associated Medical Services Network project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazionis, L; Jenkins, A; Keech, A; Ryan, C; Brown, A; Boffa, J; Bursell, S

    2018-02-06

    To determine diabetic retinopathy prevalence and severity among remote Indigenous Australians. A cross-sectional diabetic retinopathy screening study of Indigenous adults with Type 2 diabetes was conducted by locally trained non-ophthalmic retinal imagers in a remote Aboriginal community-controlled primary healthcare clinic in Central Australia and certified non-ophthalmic graders in a retinal grading centre in Melbourne, Australia. The main outcome measure was prevalence of any diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. Among 301 participants (33% male), gradable image rates were 78.7% (n = 237) for diabetic retinopathy and 83.1% (n = 250) for diabetic macular oedema, and 77.7% (n = 234) were gradable for both diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular oedema. For the gradable subset, the median (range) age was 48 (19-86) years and known diabetes duration 9.0 (0-24) years. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 47% (n = 110) and for diabetic macular oedema it was 14.4% (n = 36). In the fully gradable imaging studies, sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy prevalence was 16.2% (n = 38): 14.1% (n = 33) for clinically significant macular oedema, 1.3% (n = 3) for proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 0.9% (n = 2) for both. Sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy had been treated in 78% of detected cases. A novel telemedicine diabetic retinopathy screening service detected a higher prevalence of 'any' diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy in a remote primary care setting than reported in earlier surveys among Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations. Whether the observed high prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was attributable to greater detection, increasing diabetic retinopathy prevalence, local factors, or a combination of these requires further investigation and, potentially, specific primary care guidelines for diabetic retinopathy management in remote Australia. Clinical Trials registration number: Australia and

  6. Adherence to anti-diabetic drugs among patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania- A cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Rwegerera, Godfrey Mutashambara

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to diabetes mellitus treatment regimens among Type 2 diabetes patients in Tanzania has not been well documented. This study sought to assess adherence to antidiabetic drugs and associated factors among patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who were attending the Diabetic clinic of Muhimbili National hospital between May 2009 and February 2010. Assement ofadherence to antidiabetic med...

  7. Comparative study between the Phramongkutklao's diabetic blenderized diets and commercial diabetic diets on glycemic variability in continuous tube fed patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiyapanjanit, Teeranun; Boonyavarakul, Apussanee

    2014-11-01

    Rapid glucose fluctuations over daily period play an important role on diabetic complications. To compare glycemic variability, mean plasma glucose, number ofcapillary blood glucose tests, and cost between the Phramongkutklao's diabetic formula and commercial diabetic formula in continuous tube fed patients with stable condition in type 2 diabetes. A cross-over design study was performed between October 2010 and February 2011 in the medical department in Phramongkutklao Hospital. The researchers enrolled type 2 diabetic patients with stable condition who were on continuous tube fed. Seventy-two-hour continuous subcutaneous glucose monitoring was performed in all patients. Comparison ofmean amplitude ofglycemic excursions (MAGE), mean plasma glucose, cost, and number of capillary blood glucose tests were analyzed by using non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Significance was defined as pDiabetic Formula resulted in significantly lower mean plasma glucose (122±26.25 vs. 144.68±36.91 mg/dL, p = 0.022), cost (550.1±33.57 vs. 797.81±42.29 baht, p = 0.004), and number of capillary blood glucose tests (5±0.94 vs. 5.3±0.82 times, p = 0.083) when compared with commercial diabetic formula, but no significant difference in MAGE level (5.86±2.78 vs. 7.71±4.34 mg/dL, p = 0.333). The Phramongkutklao's diabetic formula has significantly lower mean plasma glucose, less number of capillary blood glucose tests, and is less expensive than commercial diabetic formula. The glucose variability (MAGE) of the Phramongkutklao diabetic formula has also less than commercial diabetic formula, but does not reach statistical significance. The level ofplasma glucose was lower than 180 mg/dL in both formulas.

  8. Predictors of Diabetes Fatalism Among Arabs: A Cross-Sectional Study of Lebanese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukkarieh-Haraty, Ola; Egede, Leonard E; Abi Kharma, Joelle; Bassil, Maya

    2017-06-08

    Fatalism is a grounded cultural belief that is common among Arabs and is known to hinder self-care in chronic diseases including diabetes (Nabolsi and Carson in Scand J Caring Sci 25(4):716-724, 2011). The purpose of this study is to identify predictors of diabetes fatalism in this population. Data on 280 Lebanese patients with type 2 diabetes (mean age 58.24 ± 13.48 years; mean HbA1c 7.90 ± 1.90%; 53.76% females) recruited from one hospital in greater Beirut, Lebanon, and from the community using snowballing technique were examined. Multiple linear regression was used to assess the independent association between diabetes fatalism and demographic and patient characteristics. Age (β = -.14, 95% CI -.27, -.002), BMI (β = .35, 95% CI .15; .54), level of education (β = -3.98, 95% CI -7.64; -.32) and number of diabetes problems (β = -5.03, 95% CI -9.89; -.18) were significantly associated with diabetes fatalism in the regression model. The combination of demographic and patient characteristics accounted for 14.5% of the variance in diabetes fatalism scores' change. Patients with type 2 diabetes who exhibited more fatalistic attitudes were younger, of lower education levels, had higher BMI and had fewer diabetes comorbidities. Such findings are crucial for healthcare practitioners to identify fatalistic patients and to tailor culturally appropriate strategies in diabetes management. Further studies are warranted to explore other potential determinants of diabetes fatalism with larger sample and non-Lebanese Arabic population.

  9. Diabetic by HbA1c, Normal by OGTT: A Frequent Finding in the Mexico City Diabetes Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López López, Rubén; Fuentes García, Ruth; González-Villalpando, Maria-Elena; González-Villalpando, Clicerio

    2017-10-01

    The agreement between glucose-based and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c)-based American Diabetes Association criteria in the diagnosis of normal glucose tolerance, prediabetes, or diabetes is under scrutiny. A need to explore the issue among different populations exists. Examine the results obtained with both methods in the diagnosis of the glycemic status. The Mexico City Diabetes Study is a population-based, prospective investigation. Low-income elder urban community. All 854 participants without known diabetes had both oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and HbA1c measurements on the same day of the 2008 phase. Standardized protocol: questionnaires, anthropometry, and biomarkers. Diagnostic classification of American Diabetes Association criteria. We found by OGTT normal glucose tolerance (NGT) in 512 (59.9%) participants, prediabetes [impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT)] in 261 (30.5%), and diabetes in 81 (9.4%). In total, 232 in the NGT group (45.3%) and 158 in the prediabetes group (60.5%) had HbA1c ≥6.5%. Body mass index, waist circumference, and blood pressure were significantly different among OGTT-defined diabetic status groups but not in the HbA1c-diagnosed group. We identified 404 participants in the NGT group with confirmed NGT throughout all phases of the Mexico City Diabetes Study. Of these, 184 (45.5%) had HbA1c ≥6.5%. In a vital/diabetes status follow-up performed subsequently, we found that, of these, 133 remained nondiabetic, 3 had prediabetes, 7 had diabetes, and 13 had died without diabetes; we were unable to ascertain the glycemic status in 5 and vital status in 23. Normal OGTT coexisting with elevated HbA1c is a common finding in this cohort. It is possible that this finding is not mediated by hyperglycemia. This might occur in similar populations.

  10. Outcomes in type 1 diabetic pregnancies: a nationwide, population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte; Damm, Peter; Moelsted-Pedersen, Lars

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare pregnancy outcomes in type 1 diabetic pregnancies with the background population.......The aim of this study was to compare pregnancy outcomes in type 1 diabetic pregnancies with the background population....

  11. Postpartum Diabetes Testing Rates after Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Canadian Women: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butalia, Sonia; Donovan, Lois; Savu, Anamaria; Johnson, Jeffrey; Edwards, Alun; Kaul, Padma

    2017-12-01

    We assessed the rate and type of postpartum glycemic testing in women with impaired glucose tolerance of pregnancy (IGTp) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We examined whether the likelihood of testing was modulated by patients' characteristics and pregnancy outcomes. Our population-level cohort study included data from 132,905 pregnancies between October 1, 2008, and December 31, 2011, in Alberta, Canada. Laboratory data within 270 days before and 1 year after delivery were used to identify pregnancies involving IGTp/GDM and postpartum glycemic testing, respectively. Logistic regression was used to identify maternal and pregnancy factors associated with postpartum testing. A total of 8,703 pregnancies were affected by IGTp (n=3669) or GDM (n=5034) as defined by the prevailing Canadian Diabetes Association 2008 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada. By 1 year postpartum, 55.1% had undergone glycemic assessments. Of those, 59.7% had had 75 g oral glucose tolerance tests, 17.4% had had glycated hemoglobin tests without oral glucose tolerance tests and 22.9% had had only fasting or random glucose tests. Women with IGTp or GDM, respectively, who were younger, smokers and residing in rural areas and whose labours were not induced were less likely to be tested postpartum. Having large for gestational age infants was also associated with a lower likelihood of postpartum testing in women with GDM. Despite a universal health-care system in Canada, many women with IGTp or GDM do not undergo postpartum glucose testing. Maternal and pregnancy characteristics influence postpartum testing and provide valuable information for creating targeted strategies to improve postpartum testing in this group of high-risk women. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Is Diabetes Associated with Lower Vitamin C Status in Pregnant Women? A Prospective Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, B.; Lauszus, Finn; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Abstract.Few studies have examined how vitamin C status is affected in diabetic pregnancy and no comparison between normal and diabetic pregnancies has been found. This study evaluated vitamin C status prospectively during pregnancy in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus (n=76), in non......-diabetic women (n=60), and in their respective neonates. Vitamin C was lower in diabetic women throughout all trimesters compared to controls (p...-diabetic women, vitamin C levels were lower in 3rd trimester compared to 1st and 2nd trimester (both pvitamin C status - defined as a plasma concentration vitamin C...

  13. The pre-diabetic epidemiological study in Depok, West Java.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunir, Em; Waspadji, Sarwono; Rahajeng, Ekowati

    2009-10-01

    To recognize the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose level (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in general population of Depok Area, West Java. the study was conducted in a population with age > or = 25 years, in Depok Area, West Java, which was selected by using two stage random sampling. Data were collected by using the Step Wise Approach of WHO. Subjects without previous diabetes history were categorized as diabetes if their fasting blood glucose level > or = 126 mg/dL, and or the 2-hour-after 75 gram glucose load > or = 200 mg/dL. While pre-diabetes was defined as IFG when the fasting blood glucose > or = 100 mg/dL to or = 200 mg/dL (ADA 2003). of 1200 participants, there were 975 participants who fulfilled the invitation and there were 969 eligible participants to be evaluated. Among the participants aged > or = 25 years, there were 40 (4.13%) subjects with isolated IFG and 234 (24.25%) subjects with isolated IGT, 55 subjects (5.68%) with mixed IFG/IGT. the prevalence of isolated impaired fasting blood glucose in population with age > or = 25 years is 4.13%; while the prevalence of isolated impaired glucose tolerance is 24.25%. Mixed IFG/IGT is 5.68%. The total prevalence of pre-diabetic patients is 33.96%.

  14. Association between diabetes and tuberculosis: case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Martins Pereira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To test the association between diabetes and tuberculosis. METHODS It is a case-control study, matched by age and sex. We included 323 new cases of tuberculosis with positive results for bacilloscopy. The controls were 323 respiratory symptomatic patients with negative bacilloscopy, from the same health services, such as: ambulatory cases from three referral hospitals and six basic health units responsible for the notifications of new cases of tuberculosis in Salvador, Bahia. Data collection occurred between 2008 and 2010. The instruments used were structured interview, including clinical data, capillary blood glucose (during fasting or postprandial, and the CAGE questionnaire for screening of abusive consumption of alcohol. Descriptive, exploratory, and multivariate analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS The average age of the cases was 38.5 (SD = 14.2 years and of the controls, 38.5 (SD = 14.3 years. Among cases and controls, most subjects (61% were male. In univariate analysis we found association between the occurrence of diabetes and tuberculosis (OR = 2.37; 95%CI 1.04–5.42, which remained statistically significant after adjustment for potential confounders (OR = 3.12; 95%CI 1.12–7.94. CONCLUSIONS The association between diabetes and tuberculosis can hinder the control of tuberculosis, contributing to the maintainance of the disease burden. The situation demands increasing early detection of diabetes among people with tuberculosis, in an attempt to improve disease control strategies.

  15. A STUDY OF RHEUMATOLOGICAL MANIFESTATIONS OF DIABETES MELLITUS IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE OF SOUTHERN INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Halesha; Krishnamurthy

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diabetic mellitus (DM) is a major public health problem worldwide. Musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders are common in diabetic subjects. The pathophysiology of these disorders in diabetic patients is not obvious. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The present study was carried out to find the prevalence of musculoskeletal conditions in Indian patients with diabetes mellitus. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective, descriptive and record based study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four hundred known...

  16. A CLINICAL STUDY OF RHEUMATOLOGICAL MANIFESTATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

    OpenAIRE

    Vineetha Kolar; Anand Sorikunte

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with various rheumatological manifestations that are debilitating and affect the quality of life. The present study is about prevalence of rheumatological manifestations in type 2 diabetics. METHODS The current study is a cross sectional study with 100 patients of type 2 diabetics and 50 patients of age and sex matched non diabetics were examined for rheumatological manifestations during the period July 2008 to July 20...

  17. Radionuclide study of the liver macrophage system in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavnov, V.M.; Savich, O.A.; Markov, V.V.

    2002-01-01

    The functional state of the liver macrophage system (MS) in diabetes mellitus (DM) and to analyze the functional disturbances depending of the type of DM, presence of complications, duration of the disease and the age of the patients was studied. The obtained data suggest the necessity of radionuclide study of the liver MS with the purpose to reveal pre-clinical disturbances and administer timely treatment

  18. A STUDY ON CUTANEOUS FUNGAL DISORDERS IN DIABETES MELLITUS

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    Sampath Kumar G

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Skin problems are usually not considered and never attended in diabetics. They are usually neglected and they are only taken note of when they pose problems. Many of these skin problems that go undiagnosed diabetic patients later complicate diabetes and its treatment. The common skin infections that can cause major problems and are associated with increased blood glucose levels and Advanced Glycation Products (AGPs. Skin disorders in diabetics are usually consistent as in the medical literature, but the data is limited with respect to early stage skin disorders in diabetic patients. Awareness is needed for better understanding the importance of skin disorders in diabetes patients for prevention and management. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was done in the Department of Dermatology, Travancore Medical College, Kollam. The study was done from June 2015 to December 2015. Sixty patients were identified and the study was conducted. INCLUSION CRITERIA The patients were known diabetic for at least five years. EXCLUSION CRITERIA Patients who were treated with immune suppressant drugs were not included in the present study. Skin scrapings were taken and were subjected to KOH preparation. The result that was available was taken for statistical analysis. The statistical analysis was done using the latest SPSS software 2015 (California. RESULTS In the present study, maximum number of fungal infections was seen in male sex, which amounted to forty one cases and was as in the female sex the number was nineteen. Out of the forty one male cases, maximum number of cases belonged to age group of forty to sixty years, which amounted to sixteen cases followed by age group sixty to eighty years, which amounted to fourteen cases followed by twenty to forty years, which amounted to seven cases. Age group zero to twenty years and age group of more than eighty years amounted to two cases each. In cases of females, age group forty to sixty years had maximum

  19. CONSTITUTIONAL STUDY OF PATIENTS OF DIABETES MELLITUS VIS-À-VIS MADHUMEHA

    OpenAIRE

    Bharti,; Singh, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    With the changing life style and sedentary habits of the modern era, incidence of diabetes mellitus is increasing throughout the world. The present study was launched to investigate the constitutional and socioeconomic features of diabetic patients and their clinical significance.

  20. Review of research grant allocation to psychosocial studies in diabetes research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, A; Vallis, Michael; Cooke, Debbie

    2016-01-01

    several factors may account for this finding, the observation that 90% of funded studies are biomedical may be partly attributable to the methodological orthodoxy of applying biomedical reductionism to understand and treat disease. A more comprehensive and systemic whole-person approach in diabetes......AIMS: To estimate and discuss the allocation of diabetes research funds to studies with a psychosocial focus. METHODS: Annual reports and funded-research databases from approximately the last 5 years (if available) were reviewed from the following representative funding organizations, the American...... Diabetes Association, the Canadian Diabetes Association, Diabetes Australia, Diabetes UK, the Dutch Diabetes Research Foundation and the European Foundation for the Study of Diabetes, in order to estimate the overall proportion of studies allocated research funding that had a psychosocial focus. RESULTS...

  1. Barriers to postpartum screening for type 2 diabetes: a qualitative study of women with previous gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Forough; Rahimparvar, Seyedeh Fatemeh Vasegh; Mehrdad, Neda; Keramat, Afsaneh

    2017-01-01

    Risk of developing type 2 diabetes is increased in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Postpartum glycemic screening is recommended in women with recent GDM. But this screening rate is low and the reasons are unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of Iranian women with recent GDM on barriers of postpartum screening for diabetes. This qualitative study was conducted in Tehran, Iran in 2016. Semi-structured interview was used for data collection. 22 women with recent GDM were interviewed. These women gave birth in Tehran hospitals at a minimum of 6 months before interview. The missed screening defined as not attending to laboratory for Fasting Blood Sugar and/or Oral Glucose Tolerance Test, 6 week to 6 month after their child birthing. The data was analyzed by content analysis method. Themes and sub-themes that illustrated the barriers to postpartum diabetes screening were: inadequate education (about developing diabetes in the future, implementation of the screening, and glucometer validity in diagnosis of diabetes), perceiving the screening as difficult (feeling comfortable with the glucometer, poor laboratory conditions, issues related to the baby/babies, and financial problems), improper attitudes toward the screening (unwilling to get diagnosed, not giving priority to oneself, having false beliefs) and procrastination (gap to intention and action, self-deception and self-regulation failure). Women with recent GDM reported several barriers for postpartum diabetes screening. This study help to develop the evidence-based interventions for improving this screening rate.

  2. Sugar intake is associated with progression from islet autoimmunity to type 1 diabetes: the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Molly M.; Frederiksen, Brittni; Seifert, Jennifer A.; Kroehl, Miranda; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Dietary sugar intake may increase insulin production, stress the beta cells and increase the risk for islet autoimmunity (IA) and subsequent type 1 diabetes. Methods Since 1993, the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) has followed children at increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes for the development of IA (autoantibodies to insulin, GAD or protein tyrosine phosphatase-like protein [IA2] twice or more in succession) and progression to type 1 diabetes. Information on intake of fructose, sucrose, total sugars, sugar-sweetened beverages, beverages with non-nutritive sweetener and juice was collected prospectively throughout childhood via food frequency questionnaires (FFQs). We examined diet records for 1,893 children (mean age at last follow-up 10.2 years); 142 developed IA and 42 progressed to type 1 diabetes. HLA genotype was dichotomised as high risk (HLA-DR3/4,DQB1*0302) or not. All Cox regression models were adjusted for total energy, FFQ type, type 1 diabetes family history, HLA genotype and ethnicity. Results In children with IA, progression to type 1 diabetes was significantly associated with intake of total sugars (HR 1.75, 95% CI 1.07–2.85). Progression to type 1 diabetes was also associated with increased intake of sugar-sweetened beverages in those with the high-risk HLA genotype (HR 1.84, 95% CI 1.25–2.71), but not in children without it (interaction p value = 0.02). No sugar variables were associated with IA risk. Conclusions/interpretation Sugar intake may exacerbate the later stage of type 1 diabetes development; sugar-sweetened beverages may be especially detrimental to children with the highest genetic risk of developing type 1 diabetes. PMID:26048237

  3. Pre-diabetes and well-controlled diabetes are not associated with periodontal disease: the SHIP Trend Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowall, Bernd; Holtfreter, Birte; Völzke, Henry; Schipf, Sabine; Mundt, Torsten; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Kocher, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    To examine associations of pre-diabetes and well-controlled diabetes with periodontitis. The Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP)-Trend is a cross-sectional survey in North-Eastern Germany including 3086 participants (49.4% men; age 20-82 years). Clinical attachment loss (CAL) and periodontal probing depth (PPD) were assessed applying a random half-mouth protocol. The number of teeth was determined. Pre-diabetes comprised impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance. Previously known diabetes was defined as well controlled if glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was diabetes, newly detected type 2 diabetes (T2DM), known T2DM with HbA1cdiabetes was neither associated with mean CAL and PPD in multivariable adjusted linear regression models nor with edentulism (OR = 1.09 (95%-CI: 0.69-1.71)) and number of teeth (OR = 0.96 (95%-CI: 0.75-1.22), lowest quartile versus higher quartiles) in logistic regression models. Associations with mean CAL and edentulism were stronger in poorly controlled previously known diabetes than in well-controlled previously known diabetes (for edentulism: OR = 2.19 (95%-CI: 1.18-4.05), and OR = 1.40 (95%-CI: 0.82-2.38), respectively, for comparison with NGT). Periodontitis and edentulism were associated with poorly controlled T2DM, but not with pre-diabetes and well-controlled diabetes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Sugar intake is associated with progression from islet autoimmunity to type 1 diabetes: the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Molly M; Frederiksen, Brittni; Seifert, Jennifer A; Kroehl, Miranda; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M

    2015-09-01

    Dietary sugar intake may increase insulin production, stress the beta cells and increase the risk for islet autoimmunity (IA) and subsequent type 1 diabetes. Since 1993, the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) has followed children at increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes for the development of IA (autoantibodies to insulin, GAD or protein tyrosine phosphatase-like protein [IA2] twice or more in succession) and progression to type 1 diabetes. Information on intake of fructose, sucrose, total sugars, sugar-sweetened beverages, beverages with non-nutritive sweetener and juice was collected prospectively throughout childhood via food frequency questionnaires (FFQs). We examined diet records for 1,893 children (mean age at last follow-up 10.2 years); 142 developed IA and 42 progressed to type 1 diabetes. HLA genotype was dichotomised as high risk (HLA-DR3/4,DQB1*0302) or not. All Cox regression models were adjusted for total energy, FFQ type, type 1 diabetes family history, HLA genotype and ethnicity. In children with IA, progression to type 1 diabetes was significantly associated with intake of total sugars (HR 1.75, 95% CI 1.07-2.85). Progression to type 1 diabetes was also associated with increased intake of sugar-sweetened beverages in those with the high-risk HLA genotype (HR 1.84, 95% CI 1.25-2.71), but not in children without it (interaction p value = 0.02). No sugar variables were associated with IA risk. Sugar intake may exacerbate the later stage of type 1 diabetes development; sugar-sweetened beverages may be especially detrimental to children with the highest genetic risk of developing type 1 diabetes.

  5. Prevalence of retinopathy among adults with self-reported diabetes mellitus: the Sri Lanka diabetes and Cardiovascular Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katulanda, Prasad; Ranasinghe, Priyanga; Jayawardena, Ranil

    2014-08-20

    At present there are no large scale nationally-representative studies from Sri Lanka on the prevalence and associations of Diabetic Retinopathy (DR). The present study aims to evaluate the prevalence and risk factors for DR in a community-based nationally-representative sample of adults with self-reported diabetes mellitus from Sri Lanka. A cross-sectional community-based national study among 5,000 adults (≥18 years) was conducted in Sri Lanka, using a multi-stage stratified cluster sampling technique. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Ophthalmological evaluation of patients with 'known' diabetes (previously diagnosed at a government hospital or by a registered medical practitioner) was done using indirect ophthalmoscopy. A binary-logistic regression analysis was performed with 'presence of DR' as the dichotomous dependent variable and other independent covariates. Crude prevalence of diabetes was 12.0% (n = 536), of which 344 were patients with 'known' diabetes. Mean age was 56.4 ± 10.9 years and 37.3% were males. Prevalence of any degree of DR was 27.4% (Males-30.5%, Females-25.6%; p = 0.41). In patients with DR, majority had NPDR (93.4%), while 5.3% had maculopathy. Patients with DR had a significantly longer duration of diabetes than those without. In the binary-logistic regression analysis in all adults duration of diabetes (OR:1.07), current smoking (OR:1.67) and peripheral neuropathy (OR:1.72) all were significantly associated with DR. Nearly 1/3rd of Sri Lankan adults with self-reported diabetes are having retinopathy. DR was associated with diabetes duration, cigarette smoking and peripheral neuropathy. However, further prospective follow up studies are required to establish causality for identified risk factors.

  6. DERMATOGLYPHICS STUDY OF PARAMETERS LIKE TOTAL RIDGE COUNT AND A-D DISTANCE IN DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bichitrananda Roul

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND It is widely accepted that the dermal ridges develop during early foetal life and are constant (stable throughout life, unique to the individual and therefore significant as a means of identification. It is proved that dermatoglyphics is of polygenic inheritance and like many other hereditary characters show racial and social variations. An attempt has been made to create a database of the dermatoglyphic pattern among the diabetics of Southern Orissa, which may become helpful for the early prediction of the disease and thus prevents its complications. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty male diabetic patients diagnosed as cases of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type 1 of age ranging from 25 to 40 years and fifty cases of normal controls of similar age group were included in this study. Similarly, fifty patients diagnosed as cases of non-insulin-dependent type of diabetes mellitus (type 2 of age more than 40 years and fifty cases of normal controls of similar age group without family history of diabetes of either type 1 or type 2 up to two previous generations were studied and analysed in this study. Fifty female diabetic patients diagnosed as IDDM cases of age ranging from 25 to 40 years and fifty cases of normal controls of similar age group and fifty female diabetic patients of type 2 variety (NIDDM and fifty female controls of age group more than 40 years were included in this study. The finger prints and palm prints of the control and patients were taken and studied for different parameters like total ridge count, a-d distance. In type 1 diabetes, the total finger ridge count in male diabetics is more than that in the male controls of similar age group with a level of significant difference being 0.001%. The female diabetics of type 1 variety showed a higher ridge count value in comparison to type 2 male diabetics while the type 1 female diabetics and type 2 female diabetics did not have any significant difference between them in

  7. Effective population management practices in diabetes care - an observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Anne; Bellows, Jim; Nielsen, Bo Friis

    2010-01-01

    Of fifteen diabetes care management practices, our data indicate that high performance is most associated with provider alerts and more weakly associated with action plans and with guideline distribution and training. Lack of convergence in the literature on effective care management practices su...... suggests that factors contributing to high performance may be highly context-dependent or that the factors involved may be too numerous or their implementation too nuanced to be reliably identified in observational studies....

  8. Correlates of diabetes-related distress in type 2 diabetes: Findings from the benchmarking network for clinical and humanistic outcomes in diabetes (BENCH-D) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintaudi, Basilio; Lucisano, Giuseppe; Gentile, Sandro; Bulotta, Angela; Skovlund, Soren E; Vespasiani, Giacomo; Rossi, Maria C; Nicolucci, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate correlates of high diabetes-related distress (HD) among individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The study involved a sample of patients with T2DM who filled in the Problem Areas in Diabetes questionnaire (PAID-5); a score ≥ 40 indicates HD. Additional instruments included: SF12 health survey (SF12), Well-Being Index (WHO-5), Diabetes Empowerment Scale-Short Form (DES-SF), Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care-Short Form (PACIC-SF), Health Care Climate-Short Form (HCC-SF), Global Satisfaction with Diabetes Treatment (GSDT), Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA-6); Barriers to Medications (BM), Perceived Social Support (PSS). Clinical data were extracted from computerized medical records. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to identify correlates of HD. Of 2374 patients (mean age 65.0±10.2 years, diabetes duration 14.0±15.3 years, 59.9% males), 1429 (60.2%) had HD. Compared to patients with a PAID-5 scorepsychological well-being. Conclusion HD is extremely common among people with T2DM, affecting almost two-thirds of patients. High levels of distress are associated with worse clinical and psychosocial outcomes and should be considered as a key patient-centered indicator. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of demographics, treatment strategies, and evidence-based medicine use among diabetic and non-diabetic patients with acute coronary syndrome: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Bhavik S; Deshpande, Shrikalp S

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate and compare clinical and epidemiological characteristics, treatment strategies, and utilization of evidence-based medicine (EBM) among coronary artery disease (CAD) patients with or without diabetes. Prospective observational cohort study from a tertiary care hospital in India among patients with CAD (myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or chronic stable angina). Data included demographic information, vital signs, personal particulars, risk factors for CAD, treatment strategies, and discharge medications. We evaluated epidemiologic characteristics and treatment strategies for diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Of 1,073 patients who underwent angiography, 960 patients (30% diabetic) had CAD. Proportion of hypertensive patients was higher among diabetic patients (58 vs 35% non-diabetic, P patients received medical management in diabetic vs non-diabetic CAD patients (35 vs 34%, P = 0.091); in diabetics the use of surgical procedure was higher (22 vs 17%, P = 0.0230) than interventional strategy (percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, 43 vs 49%, P = 0.0445). Key medications (antiplatelet agents, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI)/angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), beta-blockers, and ahtihyperlipidemic agents) were prescribed in 95, 53/12, 67, and 91% diabetic (n = 252) and 96, 51/8, 67, and 94% non-diabetic (n = 673) patients, respectively on discharge. Clustering of several risk factors at presentation, typically diabetes and hypertension, is common in CAD patients. Though diabetic patients are managed more conservatively, utilization of EBM for diabetic and non-diabetic patients is consistent with the recommendations.

  10. Resveratrol and diabetes: A critical review of clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Ebru; Arslan, Ayşe Kübra Karaboğa; Yerer, Mükerrem Betül; Bishayee, Anupam

    2017-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease characterized by hyperglycemia. The disease results from the defects of insulin secretion and/or action. Resveratrol is a non-flavonoid polyphenol that naturally occurs as phytoalexin. The shell and stem of Vitis vinifera L. (Vitaceae) are the richest source of this compound. In addition to various in vitro and in vivo studies revealing the effectiveness of resveratrol in DM, there are many clinical trials indicating that resveratrol has the potential to benefit in DM patients. The therapeutic action of this compound in relation to diabetes is complex and involves in several beneficial roles. In view of this, clinical studies are necessary to elucidate these roles. In the near future, the use of resveratrol, alone or in combination with current anti-diabetic therapies, might be a conventional approach to effectively manage DM or its complications. This mini-review provides a critical overview of currently available clinical studies examining the effects of resveratrol in DM last decade. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Serum uric acid as a predictor for development of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes: an inception cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovind, Peter; Rossing, Peter; Tarnow, Lise

    2009-01-01

    as a predictor of persistent micro- and macroalbuminuria. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This prospective observational follow-up study consisted of an inception cohort of 277 patients followed from onset of type 1 diabetes. Of these, 270 patients had blood samples taken at baseline. In seven cases, uric acid...... level; P = 0.04). Adjustment for confounders did not change the estimate significantly. CONCLUSIONS: Uric acid level soon after onset of type 1 diabetes is independently associated with risk for later development of diabetic nephropathy....

  12. Parental diabetes and birthweight in 236 030 individuals in the UK biobank study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrrell, Jessica S; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Freathy, Rachel M; Hattersley, Andrew T; Frayling, Timothy M

    2013-12-01

    The UK Biobank study provides a unique opportunity to study the causes and consequences of disease. We aimed to use the UK Biobank data to study the well-established, but poorly understood, association between low birthweight and type 2 diabetes. We used logistic regression to calculate the odds ratio for participants' risk of type 2 diabetes given a one standard deviation increase in birthweight. To test for an association between parental diabetes and birthweight, we performed linear regression of self-reported parental diabetes status against birthweight. We performed path and mediation analyses to test the hypothesis that birthweight partly mediates the association between parental diabetes and participant type 2 diabetes status. Of the UK Biobank participants, 277 261 reported their birthweight. Of 257 715 individuals of White ethnicity and singleton pregnancies, 6576 had type 2 diabetes, 19 478 reported maternal diabetes (but not paternal), 20 057 reported paternal diabetes (but not maternal) and 2754 participants reported both parents as having diabetes. Lower birthweight was associated with type 2 diabetes in the UK Biobank participants. A one kilogram increase in birthweight was associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.71, 0.76; P = 2 × 10(-57)). Paternal diabetes was associated with lower birthweight (45 g lower; 95% CI: 36, 54; P = 2 × 10(-23)) relative to individuals with no parental diabetes. Maternal diabetes was associated with higher birthweight (59 g increase; 95% CI: 50, 68; P = 3 × 10(-37)). Participants' lower birthweight was a mediator of the association between reported paternal diabetes and participants' type 2 diabetes status, explaining 1.1% of the association, and participants' higher birthweight was a mediator of the association between reported maternal diabetes and participants' type 2 diabetes status, explaining 1.2% of the association. Data from the UK Biobank provides the strongest evidence by

  13. Comparing the mortality risks of nursing professionals with diabetes and general patients with diabetes: a nationwide matched cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Ling Huang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nursing professionals have received comprehensive medical education and training. However, whether these medical professionals exhibit positive patient care attitudes and behaviors and thus reduce mortality risks when they themselves are diagnosed with chronic diseases is worth exploring. This study compared the mortality risks of female nurses and general patients with diabetes and elucidated factors that caused this difference. Methods A total of 510,058 female patients newly diagnosed with diabetes between 1998 and 2006 as recorded in the National Health Insurance Research Database were the participants in this study. Nurses with diabetes and general population with diabetes were matched with propensity score method in a 1:10 ratio. The participants were tracked from the date of diagnosis to 2009. The Cox proportional hazards model was utilized to compare the mortality risks in the two groups. Results Nurses were newly diagnosed with diabetes at a younger age compared with the general public (42.01 ± 12.03 y vs. 59.29 ± 13.11 y. Nevertheless, the matching results showed that nurses had lower mortality risks (HR: 0.53, 95 % CI: 0.38–0.74 and nurses with diabetes in the < 35 and 35–44 age groups exhibited significantly lower mortality risks compared with general patients (HR: 0.23 and 0.36. A further analysis indicated that the factors that influenced the mortality risks of nurses with diabetes included age, catastrophic illnesses, and the severity of diabetes complications. Conclusion Nurses with diabetes exhibited lower mortality risks possibly because they had received comprehensive medical education and training, may had more knowledge regarding chronic disease control and change their lifestyles. The results can serve as a reference for developing heath education, and for preventing occupational hazards in nurses.

  14. Autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase in diabetic patients from a multi-ethnic Australian community: the Fremantle Diabetes Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T M; Zimmet, P; Davis, W A; Bruce, D G; Fida, S; Mackay, I R

    2000-09-01

    To investigate ethnic/racial differences in the prevalence of serum antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA) and ICA512/IA-2 in diabetic patients from a large, urban community. A cross-sectional sample of 1,381 diabetic patients aged 11-98 years, representing 61% of those identified in a postcode-defined population base of 120,097 people were studied. Diabetes was classified on clinical grounds. Serum GADA and anti-ICA512/IA-2 were measured by radioimmunoprecipitation assay. Anglo-Celts formed 62% of the sample, southern Europeans 18%, other Europeans 8% and Asians 3%. GADA prevalence in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes mellitus was 46.0% and 4.2%, respectively, amongst Anglo-Celts and 22.2% and 1.7% in southern Europeans. The prevalence of anti-ICA512/IA-2 in Type 1 diabetes was 17.4% and, in a sample of 233 patients with Type 2 diabetes, 0.8%. GADA-positive Type 2 patients had a lower body mass index and greater glycosylated haemoglobin, and were more likely to be taking insulin, than GADA-negative Type 2 diabetic subjects (P ethnicity has implications for clinical management and healthcare planning.

  15. Methodology and early findings of the Diabetes Management Project: a cohort study investigating the barriers to optimal diabetes care in diabetic patients with and without diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoureux, Ecosse Luc; Fenwick, Eva; Xie, Jing; Mcauley, Annie; Nicolaou, Theona; Larizza, Melanie; Rees, Gwyn; Qureshi, Salmaan; Wong, Tien Yin; Benarous, Rehab; Dirani, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    The Diabetes Management Project is investigating the clinical, behavioural and psychosocial barriers to optimal diabetes care in individuals with and without diabetic retinopathy. Prospective cohort. Two hundred and twenty-three and 374 patients without and with diabetic retinopathy, respectively. All individuals underwent a comprehensive dilated eye test, anthropometric measurements, blood and urine samples, and psychosocial questionnaires. Good glycaemic control was defined as glycosylated haemoglobin Management Project, developed to assess factors associated with suboptimal diabetes care. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2011 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  16. Intentional Weight Loss and Dose Reductions of Anti-Diabetic Medications – A Retrospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Anita Ashok; Palamaner Subash Shantha, Ghanshyam; Kahan, Scott; Samson, Rohit Joshua; Boddu, Nelson David; Cheskin, Lawrence Jay

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Intentional weight loss, primarily by improving insulin resistance, is known to decrease the need for anti-diabetic medications. In this study, we assess the magnitude of weight loss that resulted in dose reductions or discontinuation of anti-diabetic medications in overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes (DM) undergoing weight loss treatment. METHODS: Case records of 50 overweight or obese patients with DM who successfully decreased dosage or discontinued diabet...

  17. Prevalence of posterior vitreous detachment in the population with type II diabetes mellitus and its effect on diabetic retinopathy: Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular Genetic Study SN-DREAMS report no. 23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gella, Laxmi; Raman, Rajiv; Kulothungan, Vaitheeswaran; Sharma, Tarun

    2012-05-01

    To report the prevalence of posterior vitreous detachment (PVD), and predisposing factors to PVD and their effect on diabetic retinopathy. Population-based study. The study included subjects with type II diabetes mellitus enrolled from a cross-sectional study. Participants underwent a biochemical examination, and a comprehensive ocular examination which included stereo fundus photography. Diabetic retinopathy was graded by use of Klein's classification and diabetic maculopathy was graded by use of the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) criteria. The status of the posterior vitreous was assessed by use of B-scan ultrasonography. The prevalence of PVD was 63.3 %. The risk factors for PVD included age, gender, sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy, and axial length. It was observed that incomplete PVD could lead to sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. We report the prevalence and risk factors of PVD in subjects with diabetes mellitus. Incomplete PVD is a major risk factor for sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy.

  18. Diabetes-related distress over the course of illness: results from the Diacourse study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasteleyn, M.J.; Vries, L. de; Puffelen, A.L. van; Schellevis, F.G.; Rijken, M.; Vos, R.C.; Rutten, G.E.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To investigate the relationship between diabetes duration and diabetes-related distress and to examine the impact of micro- and macrovascular complications and blood glucose-lowering treatment on this relationship. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in people with Type 2 diabetes who

  19. Sexual functioning among women with and without diabetes in the Boston Area Community Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Lauren P; Sarma, Aruna V; Kim, Catherine

    2010-02-01

    To examine sexual dysfunction among women with and without diabetes in a community-based sample of women aged 30-79 years. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of survey responses of female participants in the Boston Area Community Health Study, a community-based random sample, who answered questions regarding sexual functioning and diabetes status and also reported sexual activity (n = 1,291). Associations between diabetes and overall sexual function as well as domain of sexual function were examined in multivariable linear regression models. Women with type 2 diabetes (n = 75) were older, less often white, and more likely to have decreased physical activity levels, elevated body mass index, and cardiovascular disease than women without diabetes (n = 1,190). Women with type 1 diabetes (n = 26) were similar to women without diabetes except for higher depression scores and lower levels of activity. Age, marital status, and depressive symptoms were correlated with overall sexual function. After adjustment for age and race, women with and without diabetes had similar arousal, lubrication, orgasm, dyspareunia, satisfaction, and desire. After further adjustment for other factors, including age, depression, and marital status, women with type 1 diabetes had increased dyspareunia compared with women without diabetes, and women with type 2 diabetes had similar functioning to women without diabetes. Women with type 2 diabetes may have similar sexual functioning to women without diabetes, although women with type 1 diabetes may more often have dyspareunia. Factors such as depression, which are common in women with diabetes, are more strongly related to sexual dysfunction than diabetes status.

  20. Does First Nations ancestry modify the association between gestational diabetes and subsequent diabetes: a historical prospective cohort study among women in Manitoba, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, G X; Shafer, L A; Martens, P J; Sellers, E; Torshizi, A A; Ludwig, S; Phillips-Beck, W; Heaman, M; Prior, H J; McGavock, J; Morris, M; Dart, A B; Campbell, R; Dean, H J

    2016-09-01

    Over the past 30 years, the prevalence of diabetes has steadily increased among Canadians, and is particularly evident among First Nations (FN) women. The interplay between FN ancestry, gestational diabetes and the development of subsequent diabetes among mothers remains unclear. After excluding known pre-existing diabetes, we explored whether FN ancestry may modify the association between gestational diabetes and post-partum diabetes among women in Manitoba (1981-2011) via a historical prospective cohort database study. We analysed administrative data in the Population Health Research Data Repository using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression. Gestational diabetes was diagnosed in 11 906 of 404 736 deliveries (2.9%), 6.7% of FN and 2.2% of non-FN pregnant women (P women than among non-FN women (P women with gestational diabetes within the follow-up period. The hazard ratio of gestational diabetes for post-partum diabetes was 10.6 among non-FN women and 5.4 among FN women. Other factors associated with a higher risk of diabetes included lower family income among FN and non-FN women and rural/remote residences among FN women. Among non-FN women, urban residence was associated with a higher risk of diabetes. Gestational diabetes increases post-partum diabetes in FN and non-FN women. FN women had substantially more gestational diabetes or post-partum diabetes than non-FN women, partially due to socio-economic and environmental barriers. Reductions in gestational diabetes and socio-economic inequalities are required to prevent diabetes in women, particularly in FN population. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  1. The effects of medical management on the progression of diabetic retinopathy in persons with type 2 diabetes: the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Emily Y; Davis, Matthew D; Danis, Ronald P; Lovato, James F; Perdue, Letitia H; Greven, Craig; Genuth, Saul; Goff, David C; Leiter, Lawrence A; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Ambrosius, Walter T

    2014-12-01

    To report additional ocular outcomes of intensive treatment of hyperglycemia, blood pressure, and dyslipidemia in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) study. Double 2×2 factorial, multicenter, randomized clinical trials in people with type 2 diabetes who had cardiovascular disease or cardiovascular risk factors. In the glycemia trial, targets of intensive and standard treatment were: hemoglobin A1c Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) methods. Three or more steps of progression on the ETDRS person scale or treatment of retinopathy with photocoagulation or vitrectomy. As previously reported, there were significant reductions in the primary outcome in the glycemia and dyslipidemia trials, but no significant effect in the blood pressure trial. Results were similar for retinopathy progression by 1, 2, and 4 or more steps on the person scale and for ≥ 2 steps on the eye scale. In the subgroup of patients with mild retinopathy at baseline, effect estimates were large (odds ratios, ∼0.30; P diabetes duration were 62 and 10 years, respectively, and who had cardiovascular disease or cardiovascular risk factors. The effect seemed stronger in patients with mild retinopathy. Similar slowing of progression was observed in patients treated with fenofibrate, with no effect observed with intensive blood pressure treatment. This is the second study to confirm the benefits of fenofibrate in reducing diabetic retinopathy progression, and fenofibrate should be considered for treatment of diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of the Diabetic Condition on Grafted Fat Survival: An Experimental Study Using Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

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    Jae A Jung

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Autologous fat grafts have been widely used for cosmetic purposes and for soft tissue contour reconstruction. Because diabetes mellitus is one of the major chronic diseases in nearly every country, the requirement for fat grafts in diabetes patients is expected to increase continuously. However, the circulation complications of diabetes are serious and have been shown to involve microvascular problems, impairing ischemia-driven neovascularization in particular. After injection, revascularization is vital to the survival of the grafted fat. In this study, the authors attempted to determine whether the diabetic condition inhibits the survival of injected fat due to impaired neovascularization. Methods The rat scalp was used for testing fat graft survival. Forty-four seven-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to a diabetic group or a control group. 1.0 mL of processed fat was injected subcutaneously into the scalp of each rat. The effect of diabetes was evaluated by calculating the volume and the weight of the grafted fat and by histologically analyzing the fat sections. Results The surviving fat graft volume and weight were considerably smaller in the diabetic group than in the control group (P<0.05, and histological evaluations showed less vascularity, and more cysts, vacuoles, and fibrosis in the diabetic group (P<0.05. Cellular integrity and inflammation were not considerably different in the two groups. Conclusions As the final outcome, we found that the presence of diabetes might impair the survival and the quality of fat grafts, as evidenced by lower fat graft weights and volumes and poor histologic graft quality.

  3. Does knowledge on diabetes management influence glycemic control? A nationwide study in patients with type 1 diabetes in Brazil

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    Gomes MB

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Marilia Brito Gomes,1 Deborah Conte Santos,1 Marcela H Pizarro,1 Bianca Senger V Barros,1 Laura G Nunes de Melo,2 Carlos A Negrato3 1Department of Internal Medicine, Diabetes Unit, State University Hospital of Rio de Janeiro, 2Department of Ophthalmology, State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Bauru’s Diabetics Association, Bauru, São Paulo, Brazil Objective: The purpose of this study is to establish demographic and clinical data associated with the knowledge on diabetes management and its influence on glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes.Methods: This was a retrospective, observational, multicenter study conducted with 1,760 patients between August 2011 and August 2014 in 10 cities of Brazil.Results: Overall, 1,190 (67.6% patients knew what glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c means. These patients were older, had longer disease duration, longer follow-up in each center, reported lower frequency of self-reported hypoglycemia, and were more frequently Caucasians and at glycemic goal. Multivariate analysis showed that knowledge on what HbA1c means was related to more years of school attendance, self-reported ethnicity (Caucasians, severe hypoglycemia, economic status, follow-up time in each center, and participation on diabetes educational programs. Good glycemic control was related to older age, more years of school attendance, higher frequency of daily self-monitoring of blood glucose, higher adherence to diet, and knowledge on what HbA1c means.Conclusion: Patients with a knowledge on what HbA1c means had a better chance of reaching an adequate glycemic control that was not found in the majority of our patients. Diabetes care teams should rethink the approaches to patients and change them to more proactive schedules, reinforcing education, patients’ skills, and empowerment to have positive attitudes toward reaching and maintaining a better glycemic control. Finally, the glucocentric

  4. Clinical studies of cerebral arteriosclerosis in diabetic subjects. Analysis with brain MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Makoto; Tanahashi, Hideo; Nomura, Makoto; Yamada, Yoshio; Abe, Hiroshi.

    1994-01-01

    In order to investigate the clinical characteristics of cerebral arteriosclerosis in diabetic subjects, brain MRI studies were conducted in diabetic patients and healthy subjects. The subjects were 93 diabetic patients without symptoms and signs of cerebral infarction (49 males and 44 females) with a mean age of 59 years and 73 healthy subjects (43 males and 30 females) with a mean age of 57 years. The MRI studies were performed on a General Electric 1.5-T signa system. The spin-echo technique (T2-weighted image) was used with a pulse repetition time (TR) of 2,500 msec and echo time (TE) of 80 msec. The quantitative evaluation of cerebral infarction was assessed using personal computer and image-scanner. By MRI, the incidence of cerebral infarction in diabetic patients was significantly higher than that in healthy subjects (30.1% vs. 13.7%, respectively, p<0.05). The mean age of the diabetic patients with cerebral infarctions was higher than that of those without cerebral infarctions. Hypertension and diabetic nephropathy were present more frequently in the subjects with cerebral infarctions. These data suggest that it is important to delay the onset and slow the progression of cerebral infarction in diabetic patients by strict blood glucose control and management of blood pressure. (author)

  5. Study the Prevalence of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in Women with Type 2 Diabetes Referring to Kerman Diabetes Clinic

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    Fatemeh Mirzaie

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a heterogeneous disorder that affects 5-10% of women of reproductive age patients with this syndrome one of the high risk groups for type 2 diabetes mellitus in future. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of PCOS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials & Methods: One hundred women under 45 years with type 2 diabetes treating with diet or hypoglycemic drugs, referred to Kerman diabetic center in 2005 were identified. Women with galactorrhea or history of thyroid dysfunction were excluded from the study. Data were collected through interview and then data of 92 women were analyzed using t-test and x2. Results: Ninety two women enrolled in the study and 18 cases (19.5% had clinical symptoms of PCOS. The mean of age was 38 years (38.76±5.92 years. The mean age of women with PCOS was 34.89±3.96 and that of normal women was 39.7±5.96 years (P0.05. Conclusion: This study indicated women with type 2 diabetes mellitus had a higher prevalence of polycystic syndrome. Android obesity is associated with the increased risk of type 2 diabetes in women with PCOS.

  6. Study the Prevalence of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in Women with Type 2 Diabetes Referring to Kerman Diabetes Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mirzaie

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a heterogeneous disorder that affects 5-10% of women of reproductive age patients with this syndrome one of the high risk groups for type 2 diabetes mellitus in future. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of PCOS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials & Methods: One hundred women under 45 years with type 2 diabetes treating with diet or hypoglycemic drugs, referred to Kerman diabetic center in 2005 were identified. Women with galactorrhea or history of thyroid dysfunction were excluded from the study. Data were collected through interview and then data of 92 women were analyzed using t-test and x2. Results: Ninety two women enrolled in the study and 18 cases (19.5% had clinical symptoms of PCOS. The mean of age was 38 years (38.76±5.92 years. The mean age of women with PCOS was 34 and that of normal women was 39 years (P0.05. Conclusion: This study indicated women with type 2 diabetes mellitus had a higher prevalence of polycystic syndrome. Android obesity is associated with the increased risk of type 2 diabetes in women with PCOS.

  7. Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Using Telemedicine Tools: Pilot Study in Hungary

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    Dóra J. Eszes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a sight-threatening complication of diabetes. Telemedicine tools can prevent blindness. We aimed to investigate the patients’ satisfaction when using such tools (fundus camera examination and the effect of demographic and socioeconomic factors on participation in screening. Methods. Pilot study involving fundus camera screening and self-administered questionnaire on participants’ experience during fundus examination (comfort, reliability, and future interest in participation, as well as demographic and socioeconomic factors was performed on 89 patients with known diabetes in Csongrád County, a southeastern region of Hungary. Results. Thirty percent of the patients had never participated in any ophthalmological screening, while 25.7% had DR of some grade based upon a standard fundus camera examination and UK-based DR grading protocol (Spectra™ software. Large majority of the patients were satisfied with the screening and found it reliable and acceptable to undertake examination under pupil dilation; 67.3% were willing to undergo nonmydriatic fundus camera examination again. There was a statistically significant relationship between economic activity, education and marital status, and future interest in participation. Discussion. Participants found digital retinal screening to be reliable and satisfactory. Telemedicine can be a strong tool, supporting eye care professionals and allowing for faster and more comfortable DR screening.

  8. Diabetes and Oral Health: A Case-control Study

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    J V Bharateesh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus, according to World Health Organization (WHO is a silent epidemic which affects large number of people around the world and is directly related to the oral health status of the patients. Objectives: To know the prevalence of common dental diseases such as dental caries, periodontal diseases (pyorrhea, and treatment needs in a group of adult diabetic patients in private medical establishments of Tumkur city, south India, in comparison with non-diabetic patients. To create awareness among general medical practitioners about the common oral manifestations of diabetes and the importance of periodical dental check up for diabetics. Methods: A group of 300 diabetic patients (males = 186, females = 114 and a control group of 300 non-diabetics (males = 180, females = 120 matched by age and sex were examined according to WHO criteria, for a period of eight months. Results: The prevalence of dental caries was comparatively more in non-diabetics (32.3% than in diabetics (13.6%. However, the prevalence of periodontal diseases (pyorrhea was more in diabetics (92.6% when compared to non-diabetics (83%. Conclusions: Oral health is an integral part of general health. Though dental caries was comparatively low in diabetics, periodontal status was compromised. Complex treatment needs was more in the diabetics (58% when compared to controls (41%. Regular follow-up of dental problems of the diabetics and oral health education is much required.

  9. Actos Now for the prevention of diabetes (ACT NOW study

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    Reaven Peter D

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT is a prediabetic state. If IGT can be prevented from progressing to overt diabetes, hyperglycemia-related complications can be avoided. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether pioglitazone (ACTOS® can prevent progression of IGT to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in a prospective randomized, double blind, placebo controlled trial. Methods/Design 602 IGT subjects were identified with OGTT (2-hour plasma glucose = 140–199 mg/dl. In addition, IGT subjects were required to have FPG = 95–125 mg/dl and at least one other high risk characteristic. Prior to randomization all subjects had measurement of ankle-arm blood pressure, systolic/diastolic blood pressure, HbA1C, lipid profile and a subset had frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIVGTT, DEXA, and ultrasound determination of carotid intima-media thickness (IMT. Following this, subjects were randomized to receive pioglitazone (45 mg/day or placebo, and returned every 2–3 months for FPG determination and annually for OGTT. Repeat carotid IMT measurement was performed at 18 months and study end. Recruitment took place over 24 months, and subjects were followed for an additional 24 months. At study end (48 months or at time of diagnosis of diabetes the OGTT, FSIVGTT, DEXA, carotid IMT, and all other measurements were repeated. Primary endpoint is conversion of IGT to T2DM based upon FPG ≥ 126 or 2-hour PG ≥ 200 mg/dl. Secondary endpoints include whether pioglitazone can: (i improve glycemic control (ii enhance insulin sensitivity, (iii augment beta cell function, (iv improve risk factors for cardiovascular disease, (v cause regression/slow progression of carotid IMT, (vi revert newly diagnosed diabetes to normal glucose tolerance. Conclusion ACT NOW is designed to determine if pioglitazone can prevent/delay progression to diabetes in high risk IGT subjects, and to define the mechanisms (improved insulin

  10. Endothelial dysfunction and inflammation predict development of diabetic nephropathy in the Irbesartan in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Microalbuminuria (IRMA 2) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Frederik; Rossing, Peter; Hovind, Peter

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate risk factors for progression from persistent microalbuminuria to diabetic nephropathy in the Irbesartan in Patients with Type 2 diabetes and Microalbuminuria (IRMA 2) study, including biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction, chronic low-grade inflammation, growth factors...

  11. Association between diabetes and tuberculosis: case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Susan Martins; Araújo, Gleide Santos de; Santos, Carlos Antônio de Souza Teles; Oliveira, Maeli Gomes de; Barreto, Maurício Lima

    2016-12-22

    To test the association between diabetes and tuberculosis. It is a case-control study, matched by age and sex. We included 323 new cases of tuberculosis with positive results for bacilloscopy. The controls were 323 respiratory symptomatic patients with negative bacilloscopy, from the same health services, such as: ambulatory cases from three referral hospitals and six basic health units responsible for the notifications of new cases of tuberculosis in Salvador, Bahia. Data collection occurred between 2008 and 2010. The instruments used were structured interview, including clinical data, capillary blood glucose (during fasting or postprandial), and the CAGE questionnaire for screening of abusive consumption of alcohol. Descriptive, exploratory, and multivariate analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression. The average age of the cases was 38.5 (SD = 14.2) years and of the controls, 38.5 (SD = 14.3) years. Among cases and controls, most subjects (61%) were male. In univariate analysis we found association between the occurrence of diabetes and tuberculosis (OR = 2.37; 95%CI 1.04-5.42), which remained statistically significant after adjustment for potential confounders (OR = 3.12; 95%CI 1.12-7.94). The association between diabetes and tuberculosis can hinder the control of tuberculosis, contributing to the maintainance of the disease burden. The situation demands increasing early detection of diabetes among people with tuberculosis, in an attempt to improve disease control strategies. Testar a associação entre diabetes e tuberculose. Trata-se de estudo caso-controle, pareado por idade e sexo. Foram incluídos 323 casos novos de tuberculose com resultados positivos à baciloscopia. Os controles foram 323 sintomáticos respiratórios com baciloscopia negativa, oriundos dos mesmos serviços de saúde dos casos: ambulatórios de três hospitais de referência e seis unidades básicas de saúde responsáveis pelas notificações dos casos novos de

  12. Comparison of Cardiovascular Risk Factors Between Subjects With and Without Diabetes Mellitus: An Analytical Study

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    Mousavi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Cardiovascular Disease (CVD is developing treacherously along industrialization and development of urbanization Objectives The aim of this study was to compare cardiovascular risk factors between subjects with and without diabetes mellitus in the Minoodar district of Qazvin. Patients and Methods This analytical study was conducted on 100 subjects with diabetes and 140 subjects without diabetes in Qazvin from September 2010 to April 2011. Standardized measurements were available for waist circumference (WC, blood pressure (BP, fasting serum cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL, and triglycerides (TGs. Cardiovascular risk factors were defined according to the diagnostic criteria proposed by the national cholesterol education program. Data were analyzed using the t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Chi-square test. Results Overall, 12% of subjects with diabetes and 17.9% of subjects without diabetes were smokers (P = 0.277. The WC, TGs, systolic and diastolic BP were significantly higher in subjects with diabetes compared to subjects without diabetes. The prevalence of high WC, high BP, low HDL, and high TGs were significantly higher in subjects with diabetes compared to subjects without diabetes. Conclusions Cardiovascular risk factors were higher in subjects with diabetes compared to subjects without diabetes. Lifestyle intervention programs should be focused on community education about reduction of CVD risk factors in patients with diabetes.

  13. A clinical study of dermatoses in diabetes to establish its markers

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    Dependra Kumar Timshina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cutaneous manifestations of diabetes mellitus generally appear subsequent to the development of the disease, but they may be the first presenting signs and in some cases they may precede the primary disease manifestation by many years. Aims : T0 he aim of our study was to study the spectrum of dermatoses in diabetics, to know the frequency of dermatoses specific to diabetes mellitus (DM, and to establish the mucocutaneous markers of DM. Material and Methods: The study was conducted at a diabetic clinic and our department between September 2008 and June 2010. Two hundred and twenty-four diabetic patients were included in the study group and those with gestational diabetes were excluded. Healthy age- and sex-matched individuals were taken as controls. Results: The male to female ratio was 1 : 1.21. Type 2 DM was seen in 89.7% and type 1 DM in 10.3% of the patients. Dermatoses were seen in 88.3% of the diabetics compared to 36% in non-diabetic controls (P<0.05. Cutaneous infections were the most common dermatoses followed by acanthosis nigricans and xerosis in diabetics. Type 2 DM was found to have an increased risk of complications than type 1 DM. Complications of diabetes were seen in 43.7% of the diabetic cases. Diabetic dermopathy, loss of hair over the legs, diabetic foot ulcer, and so on, were found to be the cutaneous markers of DM in our group of cases. Conclusion: Dermatoses were more common in diabetics than non-diabetics. Cutaneous infections formed the largest group of dermatoses in DM.

  14. Periodontal health of children with type 1 diabetes mellitus in Kuwait: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khabbaz, Areej K; Al-Shammari, Khalaf F; Hasan, Abdulaziz; Abdul-Rasoul, Majedah

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate periodontal health in children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Periodontal health was clinically examined and compared in 95 children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and 61 healthy control subjects (4-14 years old). Plaque index, gingival index, clinical attachment loss and bleeding on probing were assessed on the 6 Ramfjord index teeth. Diabetes history was recorded based on information provided by the physician from the medical record of each diabetic child. Diabetes history included date of diagnosis, diabetes duration, age at diagnosis, latest reading for glycosylated hemoglobin and any existing diabetes complications. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Science software, version 18. 'Periodontitis' was defined as at least one site with clinical attachment loss >2 mm on at least 2 teeth. Sixty-two of the diabetic children (65%) had poor compliance with dental care, and 42 of them (44%) had never visited the dentist before. The children with type 1 diabetes mellitus had a significantly higher plaque index and gingival index and more bleeding on probing than control subjects (p diabetic group, periodontitis was significantly associated with longer duration of diabetes (odds ratio 2.230, confidence interval 1.308-3.801; p = 0.003) and older age at diagnosis of diabetes (odds ratio 1.838, confidence interval 1.091-3.096; p = 0.022). Periodontal disease in young patients with type 1 diabetes was more evident than in those without diabetes. These data showed that diabetes duration may play a significant role in the progression of periodontal disease in diabetic children. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Mathematical Contributions to the Study of Diabetes Mellitus

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    A. G. Shannon

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the studies outlined in this paper is to describe some indicative and non-standard, but not exhaustive, quantitative contributions to the collection of diseases within the Diabetes Mellitus (DM spectrum. While the paper has implications for bioinformatics related to DM, the paper is broader than that; it is more about DM-related bioprocesses illuminated by bioinformatics than about the bioinformatics per se. In effect it is an argument against being locked into one particular paradigm in the laudable study of this complicated set of diseases which increasingly dominate public health budgets, not to mention the lives of the patients with DM and their families.

  16. Albuminuria and Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology And Molecular Genetic Study (SN-DREAMS, report 12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Padmaja K

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The concordance of microalbuminuria and diabetic retinopathy (DR has been well reported in persons with type 1 diabetes; however, for type 2 diabetes, there is paucity of data especially from population-based studies. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of albuminuria (micro - and macroalbuminuria among persons with type 2 diabetes and determine its role as a risk factor for presence and severity of DR. Methods A population-based cross sectional study was conducted in cohort of 1414 subjects with type 2 diabetes from Chennai metropolis. All the subjects underwent comprehensive eye examination including 45 degrees four-field stereoscopic digital photography. DR was clinically graded using Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study scales. A morning urine sample was tested for albuminuria. Subjects were considered to have microalbuminuria, if the urinary albumin excretion was between 30 and 300 mg/24 hours, and macroalbuminuria at more than 300 mg/24 hours. The statistical software used was SPSS for Windows, Chicago, IL. Student t-test for comparing continuous variables, and χ2 test, to compare proportions amongst groups were used. Results The prevalence of microalbuminuria in the study subjects was 15.9% (226/1414, and that of macroalbuminuria, 2.7% (38/1414. Individuals with macroalbuminuria in comparison to micro- or normoalbuminuria showed a greater prevalence of DR (60.5% vs. 31.0% vs. 14.1%, p Conclusions Every 6th individual in the population of type 2 diabetes is likely to have albuminuria. Subjects with microalbuminuria were around 2 times as likely to have DR as those without microalbuminuria, and this risk became almost 6 times in the presence of macroalbuminuria.

  17. Transfer from paediatric to adult care for young adults with Type 2 diabetes: the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, S; Raymond, J K; Isom, S; Lawrence, J M; Klingensmith, G; Pihoker, C; Corathers, S; Saydah, S; D'Agostino, R B; Dabelea, D

    2018-04-01

    To describe factors associated with transfer from paediatric to adult care and poor glycaemic control among young adults with Type 2 diabetes, using the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study. Young adults with Type 2 diabetes were included if they had a baseline SEARCH visit while in paediatric care at young adults with Type 2 diabetes (36% male, 75% minority, 87% with obesity) were included. Most (n = 102, 56%) reported transfer to adult care at follow-up; a substantial proportion (n = 28, 15%) reported no care and 29% did not transfer. Duration of diabetes [odds ratio (OR) 1.4, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.1, 1.8] and age at diagnosis (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.4, 2.4) predicted leaving paediatric care. Transfer to adult or no care was associated with a higher likelihood of poor glycaemic control at follow-up (adult: OR 4.5, 95% CI 1.8, 11.2; none: OR 4.6, 95% CI 1.4, 14.6), independent of sex, age, race/ethnicity or baseline HbA 1c level. Young adults with Type 2 diabetes exhibit worsening glycaemic control and loss to follow-up during the transfer from paediatric to adult care. Our study highlights the need for development of tailored clinical programmes and healthcare system policies to support the growing population of young adults with youth-onset Type 2 diabetes. © 2018 Diabetes UK.

  18. Profile of Nigerians with diabetes mellitus - Diabcare Nigeria study group (2008: Results of a multicenter study

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    Sunday Chinenye

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes Mellitus is the commonest endocrine-metabolic disorder in Nigeria similar to the experience in other parts of the world. The aim was to assess the clinical and laboratory profile, and evaluate the quality of care of Nigerian diabetics with a view to planning improved diabetes care. Materials and Methods: In a multicenter study across seven tertiary health centers in Nigeria, the clinical and laboratory parameters of diabetic out-patients were evaluated. Clinical parameters studied include type of diabetes, anthropometry, and blood pressure (BP status, chronic complications of diabetes, and treatment types. Laboratory data assessed included fasting plasma glucose (FPG, 2-h post-prandial (2-HrPP glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, urinalysis, serum lipids, electrolytes, urea, and creatinine. Results: A total of 531 patients, 209 (39.4% males and 322 (60.6% females enrolled. The mean age of the patients was 57.1 ± 12.3 years with the mean duration of diabetes of 8.8 ± 6.6 years. Majority (95.4% had type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM compared to type 1 DM (4.6%, with P < 0.001. The mean FPG, 2-HrPP glucose, and HbA1c were 8.1 ± 3.9 mmol/L, 10.6 ± 4.6 mmol/L, and 8.3 ± 2.2%, respectively. Only 170 (32.4% and 100 (20.4% patients achieved the ADA and IDF glycemic targets, respectively. Most patients (72.8% did not practice self-monitoring of blood glucose. Hypertension was found in 322 (60.9%, with mean systolic BP 142.0 ± 23.7 mmHg, and mean diastolic BP 80.7 ± 12.7 mmHg. Diabetic complications found were peripheral neuropathy (59.2%, retinopathy (35.5%, cataracts (25.2%, cerebrovascular disease (4.7%, diabetic foot ulcers (16.0%, and nephropathy (3.2%. Conclusion: Most Nigerian diabetics have suboptimal glycemic control, are hypertensives, and have chronic complications of DM. Improved quality of care and treatment to target is recommended to reduce diabetes-related morbidity and mortality.

  19. Social and economic impact of diabetics in Bangladesh: protocol for a case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes affects both individuals and their families and has an impact on economic and social development of a country. Information on the availability, cost, and quality of medical care for diabetes is mostly not available for many low- and middle-income countries including Bangladesh. Complications from diabetes, which can be devastating, could largely be prevented by wider use of several inexpensive generic medicines, simple tests and monitoring and can be a cost saving intervention. This study will provide an in-depth and comprehensive picture of social and economic impacts of diabetes in Bangladesh and propose clear recommendations for improving prevention and management of diabetes. The objectives of the study are: 1) To study the association between diabetes and other health problems and its social impacts 2) To estimate the economic impact of diabetes including total direct and indirect costs 3) To measure the impact of diabetes on quality of life among diabetes patients in Bangladesh 4) To study the impact of diabetes on the health care system Methods This is a case–control study comparing cases with type 2 diabetes to controls without diabetes matched on age, sex and place of residence. 564 cases and 564 controls will be selected from the outpatient department of a tertiary hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Data on socioeconomic status, health utility index, direct and indirect costs for diabetes, medication adherence, quality of life, treatment satisfaction, diet, physical activity, mental state examination, weight, height, hip and waist circumference, blood pressure, pulse, medication history, laboratory data and physical examination will be conducted. Outcome measures: The primary outcome measures will be association between diabetes and other health problems, cost of diabetes, impact of diabetes on quality of life and secondary outcome measures are impact of diabetes on healthcare systems in Bangladesh. Discussion This study will provide an

  20. Social and economic impact of diabetics in Bangladesh: protocol for a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariful Islam, Sheikh Mohammed; Lechner, Andreas; Ferrari, Uta; Froeschl, Guenter; Niessen, Louis W; Seissler, Jochen; Alam, Dewan Shamsul

    2013-12-21

    Diabetes affects both individuals and their families and has an impact on economic and social development of a country. Information on the availability, cost, and quality of medical care for diabetes is mostly not available for many low- and middle-income countries including Bangladesh. Complications from diabetes, which can be devastating, could largely be prevented by wider use of several inexpensive generic medicines, simple tests and monitoring and can be a cost saving intervention. This study will provide an in-depth and comprehensive picture of social and economic impacts of diabetes in Bangladesh and propose clear recommendations for improving prevention and management of diabetes. The objectives of the study are: 1) To study the association between diabetes and other health problems and its social impacts. 2) To estimate the economic impact of diabetes including total direct and indirect costs. 3) To measure the impact of diabetes on quality of life among diabetes patients in Bangladesh. 4) To study the impact of diabetes on the health care system This is a case-control study comparing cases with type 2 diabetes to controls without diabetes matched on age, sex and place of residence. 564 cases and 564 controls will be selected from the outpatient department of a tertiary hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Data on socioeconomic status, health utility index, direct and indirect costs for diabetes, medication adherence, quality of life, treatment satisfaction, diet, physical activity, mental state examination, weight, height, hip and waist circumference, blood pressure, pulse, medication history, laboratory data and physical examination will be conducted. The primary outcome measures will be association between diabetes and other health problems, cost of diabetes, impact of diabetes on quality of life and secondary outcome measures are impact of diabetes on healthcare systems in Bangladesh. This study will provide an in-depth and comprehensive picture of social

  1. A study of a couple with type 2 diabetes: dyadic adjustment and psychological morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Graça Pereira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: this study assessed dyadic adjustment and psychological morbidity in type 2 diabetic patients and their partners, focusing on the role of gender. Methods: 214 diabetic patients and their partners participated in the cross-sectional study and were assessed on psychological morbidity (HADS and marital adjustment (RDAS. Data was analyzed using dyadic analysis, a statistical process that studies the patient/partner dyads simultaneously. Results: results revealed that the negative relationship between dyadic adjustment and psychological morbidity in female patients was stronger than in male diabetic patients or in partners of male diabetic patients. On the other hand, the relationship between dyadic adjustment and psychological morbidity in partners of diabetic men was stronger than the same relationship in partners of diabetic women. Conclusion: since gender is a moderator, it is important to attend to the different needs of female and male patients and the education of diabetic patients should be centered on the patient/partner dyad.

  2. Study on female sexual dysfunction in type 2 diabetic Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yao Fang; Shao, Xin Yu; Lou, Qing Qing; Chen, Ya Juan; Zhou, Hui Juan; Zou, Jian Ying

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the female sexual dysfunction (FSD) in type 2 diabetes patients, by comparing the sexual function between type 2 diabetic women and non-diabetic women with Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). 115 type 2 diabetic women and 107 age-matched non-diabetes women were enrolled with similar backgrounds. Their sexual functions were evaluated with FSFI. Metabolic parameters such as body mass index, blood lipid profile, hemoglobin A1C, plasma glucose were also collected. Total score of FSFI of the type 2 diabetic women were significantly lower than that of the non-diabetic controls (18.27±8.96 vs. 23.02±5.78, P=0.000). Scores of the FSFI domains (desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, pain) of the type 2 diabetic group were also lower than those of the control group. According to the FSD criterion (FSFI25) available in China, the percentage of FSD in the type 2 diabetic group was significantly higher than that of the control group (79.2%vs. 55.0%, Pdiabetes were independent risk factors of FSD. Body Mass Index (BMI) also had influence in the diabetes group. Findings from this study showed that there are more FDS in Chinese type 2 diabetic women than in their non-diabetic counterparts, especially in pre-menopause participants. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Case Study: Evidence-Based Interventions Enhancing Diabetic Foot Care Behaviors among Hospitalized DM Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titis Kurniawan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improving diabetic patients’ foot care behaviors is one of the most effective strategies in minimizing diabetic foot ulceration and its further negative impacts, either in diabetic hospitalized patients or outpatients.Purpose: To describe foot care knowledge and behaviors among hospitalized diabetic patients, to apply selected foot care knowledge and behaviors improvement evidence, and to evaluate its effectiveness.Method: Four diabetic patients who were under our care for at least three days and could communicate in Thai language were selected from a surgical ward in a university hospital. The authors applied educational program based on patients’ learning needs, provided diabetic foot care leaflet, and assisted patients to set their goal and action plans. In the third day of treatment, we evaluated patients’ foot care knowledge and their goal and action plan statements in improving foot care behaviors.Result: Based on the data collected among four hospitalized diabetic patients, it was shown that all patients needed foot care behaviors improvement and the educational program improved hospitalized patients’ foot care knowledge and their perceived foot care behaviors. The educational program that combined with goal setting and action plans method was easy, safe, and seemed feasibly applicable for diabetic hospitalized patients.Conclusion: The results of this study provide valuable information for improvement of hospitalized diabetic patients’ foot care knowledge and behaviors. The authors recommend nurses to use this evidence-based practice to contribute in improving the quality of diabetic care.Keywords: Intervention, diabetic foot care, hospitalized diabetic patients

  4. Diabetes, eating disorders and body image in young adults: an exploratory study about "diabulimia".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcão, Maria Ana; Francisco, Rita

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare disordered eating (DE) and body image dissatisfaction (BID) among young adults with type 1 diabetes and their peers without diabetes, to investigate the consequences of diabetes for food, body image and weight in individuals with diabetes and to identify the behavior of insulin omission as a weight loss strategy. Fifty-five young adults with diabetes and 73 without diabetes (ages 18-30) completed self-report questionnaires to evaluate their behaviors, attitudes and feelings related to eating disorders and their perceptions about body image. The participants with diabetes were asked to answer a questionnaire with open and closed questions developed specifically for this study. No significant differences between participants with and without diabetes in relation to BID and DE were found. The results demonstrated several changes resulting from diabetes in terms of food, body image and weight that interfere with the day-to-day life of individuals with diabetes; 7.3% of these participants reported insulin omission as a weight loss strategy. This study emphasizes the importance of research on DE in the population with diabetes and their prevention, screening and treatment. In particular, it is essential to give more attention to insulin omission as a compensatory behavior that is inappropriate and harmful to health. Level III, case-control analytic study.

  5. Treatment of type 2 diabetes with saxagliptin: a pharmacoeconomic evaluation in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgart, Jorge F; Caporale, Joaquin E; Gonzalez, Lorena; Aiello, Eleonora; Waschbusch, Maximiliano; Gagliardino, Juan J

    2013-04-27

    The increasing prevalence of diabetes and its inadequate management results in a heavy burden of the disease for the patients, the health and the productive system and the overall community. Consequently, it is necessary to have new effective drugs to treat people with diabetes to decrease such burden. DPP-4 inhibitors can help to cope with this demand, but its usage is challenged by its apparent high cost. The aim of the current study was to compare a simulated cost-effectiveness ratio of metformin (MET) plus one drug of the DPP-4 inhibitors family, saxagliptin (SAXA) or sulfonylurea (SU) treatment during a 20-year period, from the perspective of the social security system, in a cohort of people with Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) who did not attain glycosylated hemoglobin treatment target values only with MET. A discrete event simulation model (Cardiff diabetes model) based on UKPDS 68 was used to simulate disease progression and to estimate the economic and health treatment consequences in people with T2DM. The clinical efficacy parameters for SAXA administration were obtained from the literature; local standard costs were considered for drug acquisition, adverse events (AEs), and micro/macrovascular complications. Costs were expressed in US dollars (2009) with an annual 3.5% discount and a 20-year time horizon. The SAXA + MET treated group had a lower number of non-fatal events than the SU + MET treated group. The model also predicted a lower number of fatal macrovascular events for the SAXA + MET group (149.6 vs. 152.8). The total cost of the SAXA + MET cohort was 15% higher than that of the SU + MET cohort. Treatment with SAXA + MET resulted in a higher number of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) (9.54 vs. 9.32) and life-years gained (LYGs) (20.84 vs. 20.76) compared to those treated with SU + MET. The incremental cost per QALY and LYG gained was $7,374 and $20,490, respectively. According to the criteria proposed by the Commission on Macroeconomics and Health, the

  6. Increasing incidence of diabetes after gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Jeannet; Hansen, Torben; Jensen, Dorte Møller

    2004-01-01

    To study the incidence of diabetes among women with previous diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the light of the general increasing incidence of overweight and diabetes and to identify risk factors for the development of diabetes....

  7. Diabetic skin microangiopathy : Studies on pathogenesis and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Kalani, Majid

    2003-01-01

    Background: Most of late diabetic complications have their basis in a disturbed microcirculation, i.e. diabetic microangiopathy. This along with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and neuropathy contribute to the development of chronic diabetic foot ulcers, a severe and expensive complication often leading to lower-limb amputations and an increased death rate. Hypercoagulation and impaired fibrinolysis associated with diabetes mellitus might contribute to the patho...

  8. Periodontitis and Incident Type 2 Diabetes: a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Winning, Lewis; Patterson, Christopher C; Neville, Charlotte E; Kee, Frank; Linden, Gerard J

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate periodontitis as a risk factor for incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a group of men aged 58-72 years.METHODS: 1331 dentate, diabetes-free males in Northern Ireland underwent a detailed periodontal examination during 2001-2003. Follow-up was by bi-annual questionnaire and for those reporting diabetes their general medical practitioner was contacted to validate diabetes type, treatment and diagnosis date. Cox's proportional hazard models were used to estimat...

  9. Risk Factors For Diabetic Foot In Tetouan, Morocco - A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham AOUFI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction  Diabetes is a globally major public health problem. Its evolution is insidious and silent before the appearance of serious complications as a consequence in terms of morbidity than of mortality.  Complications in the feet are among the most frequent and feared. This study helps identify factors associated with diabetic foot in diabetic patients in the province of Tetouan in public and private sector.Methods This is a case-control study in which 136 diabetic patients monitored in the public and private sector in the province of Tetouan were chosen. 68 patients had diabetic foot and 68 were diabetic patients without this complication. Data were collected from patients’ records and supplemented by interviews. The factors compared between the two groups were socio-demographic, biological and related to diabetes and lifestyle. These risk factors were determined by bivariate and multivariate analyses.Results Statistically significant associations were found between diabetic foot and several factors including: the irregular monitoring of patients: ORadjusted = 7.7 [1.9-23], the rate of glycated hemoglobin: ORadjusted = 1.7 [1.2-2.3], diabetes duration: ORadjusted = 1.2 [1.03-1.26], and physical activity ORadjusted = 1.1 [0.02-0.9]. However, no association was found between diabetic foot and the level of education or occupation.Conclusion To prevent the development of diabetic foot, more attention should be given to diabetic patients whose diabetes duration is long, patient monitoring should be regular and diabetes control should be optimal. In addition, physical activity is recommended for diabetic patients as part of promoting healthy lifestyles

  10. Mammography use among women with and without diabetes: Results from the Southern Community Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen Sanderson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown an increased risk of breast cancer associated with diabetes which may be due to differences in mammography use among women who have diabetes compared with women who do not have diabetes. Baseline data was used from the Southern Community Cohort Study – a prospective cohort study conducted primarily among low-income persons in the southeastern United States – to examine the association between diabetes and mammography use. In-person interviews collected information on diabetes and mammography use from 14,665 white and 30,846 black women aged 40–79 years between 2002 and 2009. After adjustment for potential confounding, white women with diabetes were no more likely (odds ratio [OR] 0.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.85–1.06 to undergo mammography within the past 12 months than white women without diabetes. Nor was there an association between diabetes and mammography use among black women (OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.93–1.07. An increase in mammography use was seen within one year following diabetes diagnosis, more so among white than black women, but this was offset by decreases thereafter. Although there was some evidence of an increase in mammography use within one year of diabetes diagnosis, these results suggest that mammography use is not related to diabetes.

  11. Hypertension and type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional study in Morocco (EPIDIAM Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berraho, Mohamed; El Achhab, Youness; Benslimane, Abdelilah; El Rhazi, Karima; Chikri, Mohamed; Nejjari, Chakib

    2012-01-01

    In Morocco, there are no studies that focused on the hypertension and its associated risk factors through patients with type 2 diabetes. Different findings show that the frequency of type 2 diabetes has risen rapidly in Morocco. The main objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of hypertension and its associated risk factors among a group of patients with type 2 diabetes and to examine the level of control of hypertension among type 2 diabetic patients with hypertension. A cross-sectional study was carried out on 525 type 2 diabetics in three Moroccan regions. The structured questionnaire was used to gather information on sociodemographic variables, history of hypertension, use of anti-hypertensive medications and duration of diabetes. Anthropometric measurements including weight and height were measured by trained staff. Blood pressure was measured using standardized sphygmomanometers. The prevalence of hypertension was 70.4%. The logistic regression indicated that hypertension was positively associated with age (peducation, counseling and behavioral interventions designed to modify lifestyle such as increasing physical activity and adopting recommended dietary changes, as well as compliance with medications.

  12. A study of cardiovascular function in Tsumura Suzuki obese diabetes, a new model mouse of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Tomie; Miyata, Shigeo; Shimada, Tsutomu; Sanzen, Yoshiki; Ito, Minami; Hemmi, Chieko; Iizuka, Seiichi; Suzuki, Wataru; Mihara, Kiyoshi; Aburada, Masaki; Nakazawa, Mikio

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a well known and important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, including heart failure. A new model of Type 2 diabetes, Tsumura Suzuki Obese Diabetes (TSOD) mice, was introduced recently into the research field of diabetes. The cardiac functions of TSOD mice were studied in comparison with Tsumura Suzuki Non Obesity (TSNO, non-diabetic control) mice, for the first time. In vivo cardiovascular functions were measured by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization at 7, 12 and 18 months old. TSOD mice had no deterioration of cardiac function despite the long-term persistence of severe obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and hyperlipidemia, including high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol. No histopathological abnormalities were observed in the heart of TSOD mice, while several histological abnormalities were observed in the pancreas and kidney of TSOD mice. To investigate vascular endothelium function at 7 months old, intravenous injection of acetylcholine (ACh; 1, 3, 10 microg/kg)- and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 50 mg/kg)-induced mean blood pressure (BP) changes were used. ACh decreased whereas L-NAME increased BP, and no significant differences in BP changes were observed between TSOD and TSNO mice. Moreover, ACh-induced relaxation of the thoracic aortae isolated from TSOD and TSNO mice with intact endothelium were not significantly different. These findings suggest that vascular endothelial cells in TSOD mice are not impaired. It was clearly demonstrated that despite obvious diabetes, cardiac functions of TSOD mice were not impaired even at 18 months old.

  13. A clinical study of the relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajhans, Neelima S; Kohad, Ramesh M; Chaudhari, Viren G; Mhaske, Nilkanth H

    2011-10-01

    The relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease is not clear, even though studied intensively. From the available data, it seemed reasonable to believe that diabetics were more susceptible to periodontal disease than non.diabetics. The present study was to clinically evaluate the relationship of diabetes mellitus with periodontal disease along with various parameters. Fifteen hundred patients with diabetes mellitus were examined. A thorough oral examination was carried out and relevant history was recorded for all the patients. Results indicated that the prevalence of periodontal disease in diabetic patients was 86.8%. It can be concluded that poorer the glycemic control, and longer the duration of diabetes, the greater will be the prevalence and severity of periodontal disease.

  14. Medication adherence in type 2 diabetes patients: study of patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the advances in the treatment of diabetes mellitus over the years, diabetes places an immense burden on the individuals living with the condition, their families and the overall health care system. Objective: Evaluation of the impact of medication adherence on the clinical outcomes of type 2 diabetes patients at ...

  15. Medication adherence in type 2 diabetes patients: study of patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the advances in the treatment of diabetes mellitus over ... assessed the prevalence of medication non-adherence leading to poor glycemic control. .... level of adherence to therapy and patients knowledge about diabetes. Inclusion criteria. • Patients 18 years and above diagnosed with Type 2. Diabetes. • Presence of ...

  16. Diabetic foot disease in Ethiopian patients: A hospital based study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Ulcers of the foot are one of the most feared and common complications of diabetes. It is a major cause of disability, morbidity and mortality among diabetic patients and about 15% develop foot ulcers in their lifetime. So far, there are few published data in relation to the high-risk diabetic foot in Ethiopian ...

  17. Diabetic foot disease in Ethiopian patients: A hospital based study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjørn

    Abstract. Background: Ulcers of the foot are one of the most feared and common complications of diabetes. It is a major cause of disability, morbidity and mortality among diabetic patients and about 15% develop foot ulcers in their lifetime. So far, there are few published data in relation to the high-risk diabetic foot in ...

  18. Comparison between Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study 7-field retinal photos and non-mydriatic, mydriatic and mydriatic steered widefield scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for assessment of diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Malin Lundberg; Broe, Rebecca; Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To compare non-mydriatic, mydriatic and steered mydriatic widefield retinal images with mydriatic 7-field Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS)-standards in grading diabetic retinopathy (DR). METHODS: We examined 95 patients (190 eyes) with type 1 diabetes. A non-mydriatic, a m...

  19. Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs second study (DAWN2™) : Cross-national benchmarking indicators for family members living with people with diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovacs Burns, K.; Nicolucci, A.; Holt, R.I.G.; Willaing, I.; Hermanns, N.; Kalra, S.; Wens, J.; Pouwer, F.; Skovlund, S.E.; Peyrot, M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims The second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study examined the experiences of family members of people with diabetes for benchmarking and identifying unmet needs or areas for improvement to assist family members and those with diabetes to effectively self-manage. Methods In total,

  20. “Silent” Diabetes and Clinical Outcome After Treatment With Contemporary Drug-Eluting Stents : The BIO-RESORT Silent Diabetes Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Birgelen, Clemens; Kok, Marlies M.; Sattar, Naveed; Zocca, Paolo; Doelman, Cees; Kant, Gert D.; Löwik, Marije M.; van der Heijden, Liefke C.; Sen, Hanim; van Houwelingen, Gert K.; Stoel, Martin G.; Louwerenburg, J. (Hans) W.; Hartmann, Marc; de Man, Frits H.A.F.; Linssen, Gerard C.M.; Doggen, Carine J.M.; Tandjung, Kenneth

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: This study sought to assess the prevalence and clinical impact of silent diabetes and pre-diabetes in “nondiabetic” percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) all-comers. Background: Patients with undetected and thus untreated (silent) diabetes may have higher event risks after PCI with

  1. Clinical questionnaire study of oral health care and symptoms in diabetic vs. non-diabetic predialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesterinen, Maarit; Ruokonen, Hellevi; Furuholm, Jussi; Honkanen, Eero; Meurman, Jukka H

    2012-04-01

    This paper aims to study oral symptoms (burning mouth sensation, xerostomia, dysphagia, and dysgeusia) and background characteristics among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. The hypothesis was that patients experience oral discomfort and show interest towards dental care differently depending on the origin of their kidney disease. One hundred thirty-eight CKD patients at predialysis stage (94 men, 44 women, mean age 54 years) at the Helsinki University Central Hospital participated in the study. The patients were divided into a diabetic nephropathy group and a group of patients with other kidney diseases. The patients had a clinical oral examination and filled in a structured questionnaire. The data were analyzed and compared between the groups (SPSS for Windows version 15.0). T test was used for parameters normally distributed while binomial data were analyzed with cross-tabulations and chi-square test. Contrary to our study hypothesis, no statistically significant differences were seen in the questionnaire study between the diabetic vs. non-diabetic CKD patients in any other study parameter except in the use of medication (10 ± 2.3 vs. 8 ± 3.1 drugs daily, p patients investigated (41.7% in diabetic, 48.2% in non-diabetic patients). No difference was seen in the frequency of oral discomfort among the different groups of predialysis patients investigated. Clinicians should be aware of nephropathy patients who frequently suffer from oral discomfort, particularly xerostomia.

  2. Increasing incidence of diabetes after gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Jeannet; Hansen, Torben; Jensen, Dorte Møller

    2004-01-01

    To study the incidence of diabetes among women with previous diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the light of the general increasing incidence of overweight and diabetes and to identify risk factors for the development of diabetes.......To study the incidence of diabetes among women with previous diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the light of the general increasing incidence of overweight and diabetes and to identify risk factors for the development of diabetes....

  3. Diabetic retinopathy and microalbuminuria can predict macroalbuminuria and renal function decline in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients: Japan Diabetes Complications Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Tatsumi; Tanaka, Shiro; Kawasaki, Ryo; Ohashi, Yasuo; Akanuma, Yasuo; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Sone, Hirohito; Yamashita, Hidetoshi; Katayama, Shigehiro

    2013-09-01

    To examine the interactive relationship between diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic nephropathy (DN) in type 2 diabetic patients and to elucidate the role of DR and microalbuminuria on the onset of macroalbuminuria and renal function decline. We explored the effects of DR and microalbuminuria on the progression of DN from normoalbuminuria and low microalbuminuria (Diabetes Complications Study (JDCS), which is a nationwide randomized controlled study of type 2 diabetic patients focusing on lifestyle modification. Patients were divided into four groups according to presence or absence of DR and MA: normoalbuminuria without DR [NA(DR-)] (n = 773), normoalbuminuria with DR [NA(DR+)] (n = 279), microalbuminuria without DR [MA(DR-)] (n = 277), and microalbuminuria with DR [MA(DR+)] (n = 146). Basal urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio and DR status were determined at baseline and followed for a median of 8.0 years. Annual incidence rates of macroalbuminuria were 1.6/1,000 person-years (9 incidences), 3.9/1,000 person-years (8 incidences), 18.4/1,000 person-years (34 incidences), and 22.1/1,000 person-years (22 incidences) in the four groups, respectively. Multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios of the progression to macroalbuminuria were 2.48 (95% CI 0.94-6.50; P = 0.07), 10.40 (4.91-22.03; P diabetic patients, presence of microalbuminuria at baseline was associated with higher risk of macroalbuminuria in 8 years. Patients with microalbuminuria and DR showed the fastest GFR decline. Albuminuria and DR should be considered as risk factors of renal prognosis in type 2 diabetic patients. An open sharing of information will benefit both ophthalmologists and diabetologists.

  4. Study of fatigue, depression, and associated factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus in industrial workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a significant health problem and imposes great physical, financial and psychological burden among the affected population. Among people with diabetes, fatigue is a pervasive and distressing complaint, which is further accentuated by presence of depression. Objective: To assess the prevalence of fatigue and depression and associated clinical and socio demographic correlates in type 2diabetes. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study included 100 patients of diabetes type 2 and equal number of healthy controls between the ages of 18 to 70 years . A detailed evaluation of socio demographic and clinical parameters was made. Participants were also assessed for presence of depression and fatigue using PHQ-9 and Fatigue Severity Scale(FSSrespectively. Results: Fatigue and depression was found in 68 % and 53 % of diabetic participants. Diabetic patients were 10.37 times and 4.80 times more likely to suffer from fatigue and depression respectively. Both fatigue and depression were found to be significantly associated with duration of illness, fasting and post prandial blood glucose level ,diabetic complications and Body Mass Index (BMI. Fatigue was also strongly correlated with depression in study sample. Conclusions: Fatigue and depression are reasonably correlated with type 2 diabetes. Various clinical parameters of diabetes are strongly associated with both fatigue and depression. Fatigue itself has significant correlation with depression in type 2 diabetes. Regular monitoring of biochemical parameters are paramount to predict the development of fatigue and depression in type 2 diabetes.

  5. Strategies to optimize participation in diabetes prevention programs following gestational diabetes: a focus group study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaberi Dasgupta

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We performed a qualitative study among women within 5 years of Gestational Diabetes (GDM diagnosis. Our aim was to identify the key elements that would enhance participation in a type 2 diabetes (DM2 prevention program. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Potential participants received up to three invitation letters from their GDM physician. Four focus groups were held. Discussants were invited to comment on potential facilitators/barriers to participation and were probed on attitudes towards meal replacement and Internet/social media tools. Recurring themes were identified through qualitative content analysis of discussion transcripts. RESULTS: Among the 1,201 contacted and 79 eligible/interested, 29 women attended a focus group discussion. More than half of discussants were overweight/obese, and less than half were physically active. For DM2 prevention, a strong need for social support to achieve changes in dietary and physical activity habits was expressed. In this regard, face-to-face interactions with peers and professionals were preferred, with adjunctive roles for Internet/social media. Further, direct participation of partners/spouses in a DM2 prevention program was viewed as important to enhance support for behavioural change at home. Discussants highlighted work and child-related responsibilities as potential barriers to participation, and emphasized the importance of childcare support to allow attendance. Meal replacements were viewed with little interest, with concerns that their use would provide a poor example of eating behaviour to children. CONCLUSIONS: Among women within 5 years of a GDM diagnosis who participated in a focus group discussion, participation in a DM2 prevention program would be enhanced by face-to-face interactions with professionals and peers, provision of childcare support, and inclusion of spouses/partners.

  6. Strategies to optimize participation in diabetes prevention programs following gestational diabetes: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Kaberi; Da Costa, Deborah; Pillay, Sabrina; De Civita, Mirella; Gougeon, Réjeanne; Leong, Aaron; Bacon, Simon; Stotland, Stephen; Chetty, V Tony; Garfield, Natasha; Majdan, Agnieszka; Meltzer, Sara

    2013-01-01

    We performed a qualitative study among women within 5 years of Gestational Diabetes (GDM) diagnosis. Our aim was to identify the key elements that would enhance participation in a type 2 diabetes (DM2) prevention program. Potential participants received up to three invitation letters from their GDM physician. Four focus groups were held. Discussants were invited to comment on potential facilitators/barriers to participation and were probed on attitudes towards meal replacement and Internet/social media tools. Recurring themes were identified through qualitative content analysis of discussion transcripts. Among the 1,201 contacted and 79 eligible/interested, 29 women attended a focus group discussion. More than half of discussants were overweight/obese, and less than half were physically active. For DM2 prevention, a strong need for social support to achieve changes in dietary and physical activity habits was expressed. In this regard, face-to-face interactions with peers and professionals were preferred, with adjunctive roles for Internet/social media. Further, direct participation of partners/spouses in a DM2 prevention program was viewed as important to enhance support for behavioural change at home. Discussants highlighted work and child-related responsibilities as potential barriers to participation, and emphasized the importance of childcare support to allow attendance. Meal replacements were viewed with little interest, with concerns that their use would provide a poor example of eating behaviour to children. Among women within 5 years of a GDM diagnosis who participated in a focus group discussion, participation in a DM2 prevention program would be enhanced by face-to-face interactions with professionals and peers, provision of childcare support, and inclusion of spouses/partners.

  7. Dairy product consumption is associated with pre-diabetes and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes in the Lifelines Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer-Brolsma, Elske M; Sluik, Diewertje; Singh-Povel, Cecile M; Feskens, Edith J M

    2018-02-01

    Previous studies show associations between dairy product consumption and type 2 diabetes, but only a few studies conducted detailed analyses for a variety of dairy subgroups. Therefore, we examined cross-sectional associations of a broad variety of dairy subgroups with pre-diabetes and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (ND-T2DM) among Dutch adults. In total, 112 086 adults without diabetes completed a semi-quantitative FFQ and donated blood. Pre-diabetes was defined as fasting plasma glucose (FPG) between 5·6 and 6·9 mmol/l or HbA1c% of 5·7-6·4 %. ND-T2DM was defined as FPG ≥7·0 mmol/l or HbA1c ≥6·5 %. Logistic regression analyses were conducted by 100 g or serving increase and dairy tertiles (T1ref), while adjusting for demographic, lifestyle and dietary covariates. Median dairy product intake was 324 (interquartile range 227) g/d; 25 549 (23 %) participants had pre-diabetes; and 1305 (1 %) had ND-T2DM. After full adjustment, inverse associations were observed of skimmed dairy (OR100 g 0·98; 95 % CI 0·97, 1·00), fermented dairy (OR100 g 0·98; 95 % CI 0·97, 0·99) and buttermilk (OR150 g 0·97; 95 % CI 0·94, 1·00) with pre-diabetes. Positive associations were observed for full-fat dairy (OR100 g 1·003; 95 % CI 1·01, 1·06), non-fermented dairy products (OR100 g 1·01; 95 % CI 1·00, 1·02) and custard (ORserving/150 g 1·13; 95 % CI 1·03, 1·24) with pre-diabetes. Moreover, full-fat dairy products (ORT3 1·16; 95 % CI 0·99, 1·35), non-fermented dairy products (OR100 g 1·05; 95 % CI 1·01, 1·09) and milk (ORserving/150 g 1·08; 95 % CI 1·02, 1·15) were positively associated with ND-T2DM. In conclusion, our data showed inverse associations of skimmed and fermented dairy products with pre-diabetes. Positive associations were observed for full-fat and non-fermented dairy products with pre-diabetes and ND-T2DM.

  8. Diabetes Mellitus Among Adults in Herat, Afghanistan: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam Saeed, Khwaja Mir

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes is reaching epidemic levels in Afghanistan. This study identifies the risk factors associated with diabetes in Herat City, Afghanistan, and explores the prevalence of previously undiagnosed diabetes. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using multistage cluster sampling by adopting the World Health Organization’s (WHO) STEPwise approach to Surveillance (STEPS). We enrolled 1129 participants aged 25–70 years between May and June of 2015 (47.4% males, 52.6% females). A structured questionnaire was used for data collection of demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioral factors. Investigators collected anthropometric measurements and blood samples from study participants. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with diabetes prevalence. Results: We found that the prevalence of diabetes in Herat City was 9.9% (9.8% in males and 10.1% in females). Of the 1129 respondents, only 3.3% were previously diagnosed with diabetes or were under treatment, whereas 6.6% of respondents were previously undiagnosed. The multivariable analyses showed that age, frequency of rice consumption, type of cooking oil, and systolic blood pressure were associated with diabetes. Conclusions: This is one of the first studies to discuss the high prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes in Herat, Afghanistan. This study found several modifiable factors that were associated with diabetes in Herat, Afghanistan. Future reduction of disease burden should focus on these factors in the development of the most optimal diabetes prevention programs. PMID:29138737

  9. Study protocol for the Cities Changing Diabetes programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Napier, A David; Nolan, John J; Bagger, Malene

    2017-01-01

    . The majority of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, a subset linked to overweight and obesity, decreased physical activity and unhealthy diets. Diabetes has significant consequences for those living with the condition as well as their families, relationships and wider society. Although care......INTRODUCTION: Urban living has been shown to affect health in various ways. As the world is becoming more urbanised and almost two-thirds of people with diabetes now live in cities, research into the relationship between urban living, health and diabetes is key to improving the lives of many...... and management are improving, complications remain common, and diabetes is among the leading causes of vision loss, amputation, neuropathy and renal and cardiovascular disease worldwide. We present a research protocol for exploring the drivers of type 2 diabetes and its complications in urban settings through...

  10. Dietary sodium intake and incidence of diabetes complications in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes: analysis of the Japan Diabetes Complications Study (JDCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Chika; Yoshimura, Yukio; Kamada, Chiemi; Tanaka, Shiro; Tanaka, Sachiko; Hanyu, Osamu; Araki, Atsushi; Ito, Hideki; Tanaka, Akira; Ohashi, Yasuo; Akanuma, Yasuo; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Sone, Hirohito

    2014-10-01

    Many guidelines recommend that patients with type 2 diabetes should reduce their dietary sodium intake. However, the relationship between dietary sodium intake and incidence of diabetic complications in patients with type 2 diabetes has not been explored. Our objective was to investigate the relationship between dietary sodium intake and incidence of diabetes complications. The study was of a nationwide cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes aged 40 to 70 years with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ≥6.5%. After excluding nonresponders to a dietary survey, 1588 patients were analyzed. Baseline dietary intake was assessed by the Food Frequency Questionnaire based on food groups. Primary outcomes were times to cardiovascular disease (CVD), overt nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy, and all-cause mortality. Mean daily dietary sodium intake in quartiles ranged from 2.8 to 5.9 g. After adjustment for confounders, hazard ratios for CVD in patients in the second, third, and fourth quartiles of sodium intake compared with the first quartile were 1.70 (95% confidence interval, 0.98-2.94), 1.47 (0.82-2.62), and 2.07 (1.21-3.90), respectively (trend P sodium intake was dramatically elevated compared with patients with HbA1c sodium intake. Findings suggested that high dietary sodium intake is associated with elevated incidence of CVD in patients with type 2 diabetes and that there is a synergistic effect between HbA1c values and dietary sodium intake for the development of CVD.

  11. A Study on Depression among Patient with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in North-Eastcoast Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Roshana Mohamed; Azidah Abdul Kadir; Lili Husniati Yaacob

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes Mellitus is becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide and is often associated with depression due to a multiple factors.Aim and Objectives: The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of depression and the factors associated with it among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.Methods / Study Designs: This is a cross sectional study involving a total of 260 respondents from Diabetic Centre (DMC), Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM) in North-Eastcoast Ma...

  12. A study of preclinical myocardial damage in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Sumio

    1986-01-01

    The scintigrams were evaluated by visual and circumferential profile analysis. In addition, mechanocardiography (MCG) and functional tests of the autonomic nerves were done. Coronary angiography and left ventriculography (LVG) were performed in 22 patients having cardiac symptoms. Of 61 patients, 20 (32, 8 %) showed perfusion defects in the scintigram (positive cases), consisting of 5 with stress-induced defect and 15 with fixed defect. The scintigrams in 41 patients showed normal perfusion of thallium (negative cases). The positive cases had more severe diabetic complications and longer duration of diabetes compared with the negative cases. The positive cases were incident to the treatment with insulin or oral drugs. Both systolic time intervals (STIs) in MCG and coefficients of variation of heart rate (CV) decreased in the diabetics, particularly in the positive cases. However, the decrement of STIs and CV was not significantly different in quantity between positive and negative cases; results therefore suggest that these two parameters may not correlate directly with the perfusion defects on Tl-201 scintigraphy. Twenty-two patients, 9 positive and 13 negative cases, had undergone cardiac catheterization, and showed normal coronary angiograms. On hemodynamic study, an ejection fraction decreased more in the positive cases than in the negative cases. The 13 negative cases showed normal wall motion in the LVG. Seven of the 9 positive cases, however, showed local hypokinetic wall motion. Abnormalities of the LVG corresponded to findings of the scintigram, i. e., perfusion defects or decrement of washout rate. On circumferential profile analysis, the mean washout rate of the whole heart decreased only in the positive cases. (J.P.N.)

  13. Eating disorders in adolescent females with and without type 1 diabetes: cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J M; Lawson, M L; Daneman, D; Olmsted, M P; Rodin, G

    2000-06-10

    To determine the prevalence of eating disorders in adolescent females with type 1 diabetes mellitus compared with that in their non-diabetic peers. Cross sectional case-control led study. Diabetes clinics and schools in three Canadian cities. 356 females aged 12-19 with type 1 diabetes and 1098 age matched non-diabetic controls. Eating disorders meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria. Eating disorders that met DSM-IV criteria were more prevalent in diabetic subjects (36, 10%) than in non-diabetic controls (49, 4%) (odds ratio 2.4, 95% confidence interval 1.5 to 3.7; Peating disorders were also more common in those with diabetes (49, 14%) than in controls (84, 8%) (odds ratio 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.3 to 2.8; Peating disorder (9.4% (1.8)) than in those without (8.6% (1.6)), P=0.04). DSM-IV and subthreshold eating disorders are almost twice as common in adolescent females with type 1 diabetes as in their non-diabetic peers. In diabetic subjects, eating disorders are associated with insulin omission for weight loss and impaired metabolic control.

  14. Personality and risk of diabetes in adults: pooled analysis of 5 cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokela, Markus; Elovainio, Marko; Nyberg, Solja T; Tabák, Adam G; Hintsa, Taina; Batty, G David; Kivimäki, Mika

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes is an increasingly important public health concern, but little is known about the contribution of psychological factors on diabetes risk. We examined whether personality is associated with risk of incident diabetes and diabetes-related mortality. An individual-participant meta-analysis of 34,913 adults free of diabetes at baseline (average age 53.7 years, 57% women) from 5 prospective cohort studies from the United States and United Kingdom. Personality dimensions included extraversion, neuroticism, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness to experience based on the Five Factor Model. During an average follow-up of 5.7 years, 1845 participants became diabetic. Of the 5 personality dimensions, only low conscientiousness was associated with an elevated diabetes risk (OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.82-0.91 per 1 standard deviation increment in conscientiousness). This association attenuated by 60% after adjustment for obesity and by 25% after adjustment for physical inactivity. Low conscientiousness was also associated with elevated risk of diabetes mortality (HR = 0.72, CI = 0.53-0.98 per 1 standard deviation increment in conscientiousness). Other personality traits were not consistently associated with diabetes incidence or mortality. Low conscientiousness-a cognitive-behavioral disposition reflecting careless behavior and a lack of self-control and planning-is associated with elevated risk of diabetes and diabetes-related mortality. The underlying mechanisms are likely to involve health behaviors, such as poor weight management, physical inactivity, and adherence to medical management recommendations.

  15. Study of change of sex hormone receptors in diabetic impotent patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Chen Weizhen; Zhang Zikang; Hu Xiaoke

    2002-01-01

    To study the relationship between diabetic impotence and sex hormones as well as sex hormone receptors. 32 diabetic impotent patients, 32 diabetic patients with normal sex function, 32 impotent patients without diabetes, and 40 healthy men were enrolled. The plasma sex hormone levels were examined by radioimmunoassay, and sex hormone receptors in white blood cells by radioreceptor assay. Compared with healthy men and impotent patients without diabetes, PRL levels in both diabetic impotent patients and diabetic patients with normal sex function increased markedly, T and AR levels decreased, and the ratio of E 2 /T and ER/AR increased. Compared with diabetic patients with normal sex function, while there was no significant difference in PRL, T and E 2 /T ratio, the AR level of diabetic impotent patients further decreased, and the ER/AR ratio further increased. Negative correlation was found between age and AR as well as T. The decline of AR and the increase of ER/AR ratio might be one main cause of diabetic impotence. And the decline of T and AR might be an important cause of the increase of diabetic impotence incidence with age

  16. Psychometric Properties of Diabetes Management Self-Efficacy in Thai Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients: A Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangruangake, Monthida; Jirapornkul, Chananya; Hurst, Cameron

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to translate and psychometrically evaluate the Thai version of diabetes management self-efficacy scale (T-DMSES) and to examine its association with HbA1c control in diabetic individuals. This study recruited patients from outpatient diabetes clinics of both community and university hospitals. The first phases of this study involved translation of the existing DMSES into Thai, and in the second phase, we evaluated its psychometric properties. The construct validity was evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis. Criterion validity of DMSES was subsequently evaluated by examining DMSES's association with HbA1c control. The T-DMSES contains 20 items across four factors. Confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated the construct validity of T-DMSES ( χ 2 = 645.142, df = 164, p diabetes management self-efficacy and may also prove useful in evaluating interventions for raising diabetes management self-efficacy, which in turn, improve both patient self-management and blood sugar control.

  17. Standards of specialized diabetes care. Edited by Dedov II, Shestakova MV (6th edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanovich Dedov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dear Colleagues!We are glad to present the 6th Edition of Standards of Diabetes Care. These evidence-based guidelines were designed to standardize and facilitate diabetes care in all regions of the Russian Federation. The Standards are updated on the regular basis to incorporate new data and relevant recommendations from national and international clinical societies, including World Health Organization Guidelines (WHO, 2011, International Diabetes Federation (IDF, 2011, American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2013, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE, 2009, International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2009 and Russian Association of Endocrinologists (RAE, 2011, 2012. Current edition of the “Standards” also integrates results of completed randomized clinical trials (ADVANCE, ACCORD, VADT, UKPDS, etc., as well as findings from the national studies of diabetes mellitus (DM, conducted in close partnership with a number of Russian hospitals.Latest data indicates that prevalence of DM increased during the last decade more than two-fold, reaching some 371 million patients by 2013. According to the current estimation by the International Diabetes Federation, every tenth inhabitant of the planet will be suffering from DM by 2030. These observations resulted in the UN Resolution 61/225 passed on 20.12.2006 that encouraged all Member States “to develop national policies for the prevention, treatment and care of diabetes”.Like many other countries, Russian Federation experiences a sharp rise in the prevalence of DM. According to Russian State Diabetes Register, there are at least 3.799 million patients with DM in this country. However, the epidemiological survey conducted by the Federal Endocrinology Research Centre during 2002-2010 suggests that actual prevalence is 3 to 4 times greater than the officially recognized and, by this estimate, amounts to 9-10 million persons, comprising 7% of the

  18. A STUDY ON PLACENTAL MORPHOLOGY IN GESTATIONAL DIABETES

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    Katadi Venkata Sudha Madhuri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM refers to any degree of glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. Maternal diabetes constitutes an unfavourable environment for embryonic and foetoplacental development. The histomorphological changes in the placenta are associated with increased perinatal morbidity, increased risk of diabetes in the offspring and the mother in the ensuing years of life. Present study aims to study the morphological changes in the placenta along with maternal and foetal outcomes in pregnancies complicated by GDM. MATERIALS AND METHODS A descriptive observational case-controlled study was conducted from January 2013 to November 2016 in King George Hospital, Visakhapatnam. Hundred and sixty four women diagnosed with GDM and hundred women with normal gestation were enrolled in the study. Foetal surveillance was done by Doppler ultrasound and kick count technique during the gestation. Foetal and maternal outcome was evaluated and compared to the outcome of normal gestation. Placental specimens from term gestations (38-42 weeks diagnosed with GDM and normal full-term gestations were studied to assess the morphological parameters. Statistical analysis was done using descriptive statistical measures. RESULTS In the present study, 62.19% of the GDM cases terminated as normal gestations. Recurrent UTI was the most common complication (14.02% during the antenatal period. 17.68% of the foetuses from GDM mothers presented with macrosomia, however, there were no cases of congenital anomalies or shoulder dystocia. Placental tissue from the GDM cases was larger, heavier and more cotyledonous as compared to placenta from normal subjects. The umbilical cord showed eccentric and central attachment in all the controls and most of the cases and 5.48% of the cases showed marginal attachment of the umbilical cord. CONCLUSION The study describes the various maternal, foetal and placental outcomes in pregnancies

  19. Diabetes that impacts on routine activities predicts slower recovery after total knee arthroplasty: an observational study

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    Nurudeen Amusat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Question: In the 6 months after total knee arthroplasty (TKA, what is the pattern of pain resolution and functional recovery in people without diabetes, with diabetes that does not impact on routine activities, and with diabetes that does impact on routine activities? Is diabetes that impacts on routine activities an independent predictor of slower resolution of pain and functional recovery after TKA? Design: Community-based prospective observational study. Participants: A consecutive cohort of 405 people undergoing primary TKA, of whom 60 (15% had diabetes. Participants with diabetes were also asked preoperatively whether diabetes impacted on their routine activities. Participants were categorised into three groups: no diabetes (n = 345, diabetes with no impact on activities (n = 41, and diabetes that impacted activities (n = 19. Outcome measures: Pain and function were measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index within the month before surgery and 1, 3 and 6 months after surgery. Demographic, medical and surgical factors were also measured, along with depression, social support and health-related quality of life. Results: No baseline differences in pain and function were seen among the three groups (p > 0.05. Adjusting for age, gender and contralateral joint involvement across the 6 postoperative months, participants with diabetes that impacted on routine activities had pain scores that were 8.3 points higher (indicating greater pain and function scores that were 5.4 points higher (indicating lower function than participants without diabetes. Participants with diabetes that doesn’t impact on routine activities had similar recovery to those without diabetes. Conclusion: People undergoing TKA who report preoperatively that diabetes impacts on their routine activities have less recovery over 6 months than those without diabetes or those with diabetes that does not impact on routine activities

  20. Mendelian randomization studies of biomarkers and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Ali

    2015-12-01

    Many biomarkers are associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk in epidemiological observations. The aim of this study was to identify and summarize current evidence for causal effects of biomarkers on T2D. A systematic literature search in PubMed and EMBASE (until April 2015) was done to identify Mendelian randomization studies that examined potential causal effects of biomarkers on T2D. To replicate the findings of identified studies, data from two large-scale, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were used: DIAbetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis (DIAGRAMv3) for T2D and the Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium (MAGIC) for glycaemic traits. GWAS summary statistics were extracted for the same genetic variants (or proxy variants), which were used in the original Mendelian randomization studies. Of the 21 biomarkers (from 28 studies), ten have been reported to be causally associated with T2D in Mendelian randomization. Most biomarkers were investigated in a single cohort study or population. Of the ten biomarkers that were identified, nominally significant associations with T2D or glycaemic traits were reached for those genetic variants related to bilirubin, pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, delta-6 desaturase and dimethylglycine based on the summary data from DIAGRAMv3 or MAGIC. Several Mendelian randomization studies investigated the nature of associations of biomarkers with T2D. However, there were only a few biomarkers that may have causal effects on T2D. Further research is needed to broadly evaluate the causal effects of multiple biomarkers on T2D and glycaemic traits using data from large-scale cohorts or GWAS including many different genetic variants. © 2015 The authors.

  1. Tinea pedis and onychomycosis frequency in diabetes mellitus patients and diabetic foot ulcers. A cross sectional - observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkus, Gamze; Evran, Mehtap; Gungor, Dilek; Karakas, Mehmet; Sert, Murat; Tetiker, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    Impaired cellular immunity and reduced phagocytic function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes facilitate the development of skin fungal and bacterial infections due to uncontrolled hyperglycemia in diabetic patients. In our study, we aimed to assess onychomycosis and/or tinea pedis frequency in diabetic patients, and effects on the development of chronic complications, particularly foot ulcer. We included 227 diabetic patients in the study. Forty-three patients had diabetic foot ulcer. We screened and recorded demographic characteristics, HbA1c levels of patients, and presence of complications We examined patients dermatologically, and collected samples by scalpel from skin between toes, and from sole, toe nail, and area surrounding nails from suspected to have fungal infection. Native positivity between toes was higher in men compared to women (pdiabetic foot ulcer compared to patients without diabetic foot ulcer (pdiabetic foot ulcer correlated with presence of fungal infection examination findings (pdiabetic patients in compliance with the literature, and the presence of fungal infection may also responsible for the development of foot ulcers.

  2. Association between Serum Cystatin C and Diabetic Foot Ulceration in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum cystatin C (CysC has been identified as a possible potential biomarker in a variety of diabetic complications, including diabetic peripheral neuropathy and peripheral artery disease. We aimed to examine the association between CysC and diabetic foot ulceration (DFU in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D. 411 patients with T2D were enrolled in this cross-sectional study at a university hospital. Clinical manifestations and biochemical parameters were compared between DFU group and non-DFU group. The association between serum CysC and DFU was explored by binary logistic regression analysis. The cut point of CysC for DFU was also evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. The prevalence of coronary artery disease, diabetic nephropathy (DN, and DFU dramatically increased with CysC (P<0.01 in CysC quartiles. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that the significant risk factors for DFU were serum CysC, coronary artery disease, hypertension, insulin use, the differences between supine and sitting TcPO2, and hypertension. ROC curve analysis revealed that the cut point of CysC for DFU was 0.735 mg/L. Serum CysC levels correlated with DFU and severity of tissue loss. Our study results indicated that serum CysC was associated with a high prevalence of DFU in Chinese T2D subjects.

  3. Association between obesity and depression in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2; a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Cruz-Cano, Eduardo; Tovilla-Zarate, Carlos Alfonso; Reyes-Ramos, Emilio; Gonzalez-Castro, Thelma Beatriz; Juarez-Castro, Isela; López-Narváez, Maria Lilia; Fresan, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus and depression are highly prevalent conditions throughout the world and have significant impact on health outcomes. It has been estimated that diabetes mellitus type 2 affects about 246 million people in the world; nevertheless, incidence varies among countries. There is evidence that depression is associated with a poor metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus that present other health problems (such as hypertension and obesity). The aim of this study protocol is to determine if obesity increases the risk for depression in patient with diabetes type 2. The analysis will be reported following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA).The studies suitable for inclusion will be assessed by the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) to determine their methodological quality. To identify the studies of interest, we will search on PubMed and EBSCO databases. We will use the following keyword combinations: "Diabetes Mellitus type 2 AND obesity AND depression", "depression AND Diabetes Mellitus type 2", "Diabetes Mellitus type 2 AND body mass index cross sectional study", "depression AND obesity cross-sectional study". Causes for exclusion will be publications that studied patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus type 1; articles that focused on the treatment and complications of diabetes mellitus type 2; publications that have studied other clinical or psychiatric conditions (for instance, seizure disorder or history of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, psychotic symptoms or dementia). The results of this study will form the basis for a better understanding of the association between obesity and depression in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2, and will allow development of prediction tools and better interventions. It is evident that several modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes among population. Currently, evidence for the deleterious effects

  4. Frequency of diabetic retinopathy in karachi, pakistan: a hospital based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkhairy, S.; Rasheed, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in diabetes patients presenting to the National Institute of Diabetes and Eye out patient department of Dow University Hospital (Ohja campus), Dow University of Health Sciences. Materials and Methods: This was a cross sectional study in which known diabetics were recruited between the period of 1st July 2011 till 31st July 2012.They were then referred to the Ophthalmology unit for eye examination. Subjective refraction was done with Snellens chart, anterior segment examination and fundus examined was done using a TopCon PS-61E Slit lamp BioMicroscope. All patients were dilated with eye drop tropicamide 1% instilled every ten minutes for thirty minutes and the fundus was examined with Volk 90D lens. Classification of diabetic retinopathy was done using the International clinical diabetic retinopathy disease severity scale study. The data was analyzed using Statistical package for social Science (SPSS version 20) and a p value of < 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results: There were a total number of 570 patients included in this study. Amongst them 325 were males and 245 were females. Out of these patients those that who were found to have diabetic retinopathy were 315 (55.3%).The age range was between 25 and 75 years and the mean age was 52.30 ± 9.333.Patients that were found to have mild non proliferative diabetic retinopathy were 231(40.5% ) while 33 (5.8%) had moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy,11(1.9%) had severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 40 (7.0)% had proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic Maculopathy was seen in a total number of 72(12.6%) of patients. Conclusions: Diabetic retinopathy is highly prevalent in Karachi, Pakistan thus it is vital to detect as well as manage the disease early so as to prevent the onset of blindness in relation to it. (author)

  5. An Electerophisioligic Study Of Autonomic Nervous System In Diabetic Patients

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    Noorolahi Moghaddam H

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic nervous system dysfunction in diabetics can occur apart from peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy and sometimes leads to complaints which may be diagnosed by electrodiagnostic methods. Moreover glycemic control of these patients may prevent such a complications."nMaterials and Methods: 30 diabetic patients were compared to the same number of age and sex-matched controls regarding to electrophysiologic findings of autonomic nervous system. Symptoms referable to autonomic disorder including nightly diarrhea, dizziness, urinary incontinence, constipation, nausea, and mouth dryness were recorded in all diabetic patients. Palmar and plantar SSR and expiration to inspiration ratio (E: I and Valsalva ratio were recorded in all diabetics and control individuals by electromyography device. In addition NCS was performed on two sensory and two motor nerves in diabetic patients."nResults: There was no relation between age of diabetics and abnormal D: I ratio, Valsalva ratio and degree of electrophysiologic autonomic impairment. Also no relation between peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy and electrophysiologic autonomic impairment was found. Plantar SSR was absent in 80% of diabetics with orthostatic hypotension (p~ 0.019. Palmar and plantar SSR were absent in many diabetics in comparison to control group (for palmar SSR p~ 0.00 and for plantar SSR p< 0.015. There was no relation between diabetes duration since diagnosis and electrophysiologic autonomic impairment."nConclusion: According to the above mentioned findings diabetic autonomic neuropathy develops apart from peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy and probably with different mechanisms. Remarkable absence of palmar SSR in diabetics with orthostatic hypotension can be due to its sympathetic origin. Absence of any relation between diabetes duration and electrophysiologic autonomic impairment can be due to late diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or no pathophysiologic relation between chronic

  6. Pilot study using mobile health to coordinate the diabetic patient, diabetologist, and ophthalmologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Irena; Drexler, Andrew; Stanton, Annette L; Kageyama, Jennie; Ngo, Elaine; Straatsma, Bradley R

    2014-07-01

    In the United States, more than 25 million adults have diabetes, 40% of diabetics have diabetic retinopathy, and diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in people 20 to 74 years of age. Clinical trials have shown that strict control of blood glucose level and other risk factors delays diabetic retinopathy onset, progression, and vision loss. Patients with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes mellitus, access to an Apple iPhone or iPad, and no psychological or medical condition that would interfere with the study participated in a nonrandomized clinical trial using SightBook™, a free mobile app that enables self-measurement of visual function and creates a password-protected web account for each patient. Sixty patients enrolled in the clinical trial over a 6 month period. Twenty-six participants were men and 34 were women, with ages from 23 to 72 years (mean 45 ± 15) and diabetes duration of 1.5 to 50 years (mean 15.5 ± 11.5). Thirty-nine (65%) patients reported Type 1 diabetes and 21 (35%) patients reported Type 2 diabetes. Every patient established a personal web account on SightBook and invited participation of treating physicians; 51 (85%) patients completed the validated self-reported outcome assessments. Diabetologist examinations of 49 (82%) patients demonstrated systolic hypertension (≥140 mgHg) in 20% and hemoglobin A1c ≥ 7.0% in 56%. Ophthalmology examinations of 45 patients showed visual acuity in the worse-seeing eye of mobile health app to incorporate diabetic patient self-measurement of vision and coordinate the diabetic patient, diabetologist, and ophthalmologist for control of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy risk factors. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  7. Associations of sex hormone-binding globulin and testosterone with diabetes among men and women (the Saku Diabetes study: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goto Atsushi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG levels and sex hormones have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. As fatty liver has been suggested to be a major determinant of SHBG levels, we examined whether the associations of SHBG and testosterone with diabetes were independent of fatty liver. Methods We conducted a case–control study that included 300 diabetes cases (215 men and 85 women and 300 matched controls from the Saku cohort study. Diabetes was defined by either fasting plasma glucose levels ≥126 mg/dL, 2-h post-load glucose levels ≥200 mg/dL after a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test, or diabetes diagnosed by physicians. We fitted conditional logistic regression models to examine the associations between SHBG and total testosterone levels with diabetes by sex. To evaluate the impact of fatty liver, we used the fatty liver index (FLI, a validated measure derived from serum triglyceride levels, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, and γ-glutamyltransferase levels. Results After adjusting for age, family history of diabetes, smoking, physical activity, BMI, and FLI, SHBG levels were inversely associated with diabetes among women (odds ratio [OR] comparing the highest with the lowest quartiles, 0.13 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.02–0.96], but not among men. Similar patterns were observed in a subgroup analysis restricted to postmenopausal women"(OR, 0.12 [95% CI, 0.01–1.17]. In contrast, testosterone levels were inversely associated with diabetes among men (OR, 0.45 [95% CI, 0.23–0.89], but not among women. Conclusions Our findings suggest that SHBG in women and testosterone in men may be inversely associated with diabetes.

  8. Studi Keterkaitan Kualitas Hidup Dengan Karakteristik Penderita Diabetes Melitus Tipe 2 di Puskesmas Helvetia Kota Medan

    OpenAIRE

    Simbolon, Rany Camelya

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus can occured complication that threaten life and affect the quality oflife. Diabetes mellituswill accompany the surferer’s lifetimeand severely affects the quality of life decline if not handled properly.This study aimed to identify the assosiation of patients characteristic with quality of life. This study applied descriptive cross sectional, examined data from questionnaires filled out by Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (n = 50) admitted to Helvetia prim...

  9. Diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy: study of the Wolfram syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Gómez, Bernardette; Reza-Albarrán, Alfredo Adolfo

    2017-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS), also known by the acronym DIDMOAD, is a rare and progresive hereditary disease of autosomal recessive inheritance which minimum ascertainment diagnostic criteria are the occurrence together of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy before 15 years of age. To describe the clinical, biochemical and molecular profile of WS in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico. We reviewed patients records who fulfill the minimum ascertainment diagnostic criteria of WS presenting between January 1987 and May 2015 in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico. Five patients fulfill the inclusion criteria (three male and two female). Diabetes mellitus was the first manifestation of the syndrome in all of them, with a mean age at diagnosis of 5.8 ± 2.71 years, while the WS diagnosis was established at a mean age of 15.8 ± 8.37 years. All the patients had optic atrophy and two of them presented with the complete DIDMOAD spectrum. We found new associations with autoimmune hepatitis and testicular cancer. This study shows the variability of clinical presentation of WS, as well as two new associations. Copyright: © 2017 SecretarÍa de Salud

  10. Shifting accountability: a longitudinal qualitative study of diabetes causation accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Julia; Peel, Elizabeth; Parry, Odette; Douglas, Margaret

    2008-07-01

    We undertook a longitudinal qualitative study involving of 20 patients from Scotland who had type 2 diabetes. We looked at their perceptions and understandings of why they had developed diabetes and how, and why, their causation accounts had changed or remained stable over time. Respondents, all of whom were white, were interviewed four times over a 4-year period (at baseline, 6, 12 and 48 months). Their causation accounts often shifted, sometimes subtly, sometimes radically, over the 4 years. The experiential dimensions of living with, observing, and managing their disease over time were central to understanding the continuities and changes we observed. We also highlight how, through a process of removing, adding and/or de-emphasising explanatory factors, causation accounts could be used as "resources" to justify or enable present treatment choices. We use our work to support critiques of social cognition theories, with their emphasis upon beliefs being antecedent to behaviours. We also provide reflections upon the implications of our findings for qualitative research designs and sampling strategies.

  11. A study of bladder dysfunction in women with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Karoli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus has been associated with an earlier onset and increased severity of urologic diseases that often result in debilitating urologic complications. Diabetic bladder dysfunction refers to a group of bladder symptoms occurring in patients with diabetes mellitus ranging from bladder over activity to impaired bladder contractility. Aim: Bladder dysfunction is an under evaluated issue in women with diabetes. Aim of our study was to investigate prevalence of bladder dysfunction and its relation with other chronic complications of diabetes in women with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: In a hospital-based cross sectional study, a cohort of women with type 2 diabetes mellitus who had lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS were enrolled. We used the American Urological Association Symptom Index (AUA-SI to assess the severity of LUTS and the Indevus Urgency Severity Scale (IUSS to assess presence of overactive bladder (OAB. Age-BMI- matched controls that did not have diabetes but had lower urinary tract symptoms were also studied and compared with women with type 2 diabetes. Urodynamic evaluation was done in willing patients. Results: LUTS attributable to bladder dysfunction were reported in 67% of women with type 2 diabetes after exclusion of other causes. Out of them, 36% had moderate to severe LUTS (total AUA-SI score >7. Prevalence of OAB was 53%. Urodynamic evaluation revealed presence of stress urinary incontinence in 48% patients and changes of detrusor over activity and detrusor under activity in 23% and 11% patients, respectively. Among the chronic complications of diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, nephropathy, and presence of metabolic syndrome were significantly associated with moderate to severe LUTS and OAB. Conclusion: Bladder dysfunction is a highly prevalent complication in women with diabetes. Chronic complications of diabetes especially neuropathy, nephropathy, and presence of metabolic syndrome are

  12. The risk of tuberculosis disease among persons with diabetes mellitus: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Meghan A; Lin, Hsien-Ho; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Murray, Megan B

    2012-03-01

    Evidence suggests a causal link between diabetes mellitus and tuberculosis risk. However, to date, few studies have used a prospective design to estimate the impact of diabetes on tuberculosis in a general population. In this study, we prospectively investigated the risk of tuberculosis among persons with diabetes stratified by severity. A cohort study was performed that involved 17,715 Taiwanese persons on whom baseline data were collected during Taiwan's 2001 National Health Interview Survey. Participants' subsequent medical care until December 2004 was captured from the National Health Insurance database. The diagnosis and severity of diabetes were established using self-report, International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes, and pharmacy records; incident tuberculosis disease was identified using these codes and pharmacy records. Covariates were obtained through in-person interviews. We used Cox proportional hazards regression analyses to measure the association between tuberculosis and both diabetes and diabetes severity. Diabetes in general and treated diabetes were significantly associated with tuberculosis (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.09 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.10-3.95] and 2.60 [95% CI, 1.34-5.03], respectively). Compared with persons without treated diabetes, participants' risk of tuberculosis increased as the number of complications of diabetes mellitus increased (P = .0016), with >3-fold risk among those with ≥ 2 diabetes-related complications (odds ratio, 3.45; 95% CI, 1.59-7.50). Similarly, the risk increased among those with higher Diabetes Complications Severity Index scores (P = .0002). The risk of developing tuberculosis increased among those with increasing diabetes severity.

  13. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in Tehran province: a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaseri Mehdi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the prevalence and characteristics of diabetic retinopathy (DR among Iranian patients with diabetes. Methods Design: population-based cross-sectional study. Participants: patients with diabetes aged 25 to 64 years in Tehran province, Iran. This survey was conducted from April to October 2007. The study sample was derived from the first national survey of risk factors for non-communicable disease. Diabetes mellitus was defined as a fasting plasma glucose of ≥ 7.0 mmol/l (126 mg/dl or more, use of diabetic medications, or a physician's diagnosis of diabetes. All patients known to have diabetes underwent an eye examination by bio-microscope and indirect ophthalmoscope to check for any signs of DR through dilated pupils by + 78 lens. Participants were also interviewed and examined to determine their demographic characteristics, medical conditions and the regularity of their eye visits. Results Among 7989 screened patients, 759 (9.5% had diabetes. Of them, 639 patients (84.2% underwent eye examination. Five patients (0.7% with media opacity were excluded. Of 634 examined patients with diabetes, 240 had some degree of diabetic retinopathy, and the overall standardized prevalence of any retinopathy was 37.0% (95% CI: 33.2-40.8, including 27.3% (95% CI: 23.7-30.8 (n = 175 with non-proliferative and 9.6% (95% CI: 7.3-11.9 (n = 65 with proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Clinically significant macular edema and vision-threatening retinopathy were detected in 5.8% (95% CI: 4.0-7.7 (n = 38 and 14.0% (95% CI: 11.3-16.7 (n = 95 of patients, respectively. Only 143 patients (22.6% with diabetes had a history of regular eye examination. Conclusion This study demonstrated a high prevalence and poor control of DR in Tehran province. This suggests the need for adequate prevention and treatment in patients with diabetes.

  14. Anxiety and risk of type 2 diabetes: evidence from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lauren E; Mezuk, Briana

    2012-12-01

    Depression is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and is also commonly comorbid with anxiety. However, few studies have examined whether anxiety is predictive of diabetes risk. The objectives of this study are to examine the prospective relationship between anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, and agoraphobia) and risk of type 2 diabetes over an 11-year period, and to investigate the association between anxiety and risk of diabetes-related complications among those with prevalent type 2 diabetes. Data come from the 1993/6 and 2004/5 waves of the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study (N=1920), a population-based prospective cohort. Anxiety disorders were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule. The prospective association between anxiety and incident type 2 diabetes was evaluated using a series of nested multivariable logistic regression models. At baseline, 315 participants (21.8%) had an anxiety disorder. The relationship between anxiety and risk of developing type 2 diabetes was not statistically significant after controlling for demographic characteristics (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.28, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.75, 2.18). There was no relationship between anxiety and diabetes risk after controlling for health behaviors and depression status (OR: 1.00, 95% CI: 0.53, 1.89). There was no significant relationship between anxiety and development of diabetes-related complications among those with prevalent type 2 diabetes (OR: 2.02, 95% CI: 0.61, 6.74). Anxiety disorders are not associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes or risk of diabetes complications among those who have diabetes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prevalence and severity of periodontal disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus (non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients in Bangalore city: An epidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M Apoorva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Our objective was to study the prevalence and severity of periodontal disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM patients in Bangalore city. Materials and Methods : Four hundred and eight type 2 DM patients (Study Group and 100 non-diabetic patients (Control Group among the age group of 35-75 years were included in the study. The study group was divided based on Glycated hemoglobin levels into well, moderately and poorly controlled. Relevant information regarding age, oral hygiene habits and personal habits was obtained from the patients. Diabetic status and mode of anti-diabetic therapy of the study group was obtained from the hospital records with consent from the patient. Community periodontal index (CPI was used to assess the periodontal status. The results were statistically evaluated. Results : The mean CPI score and the number of missing teeth was higher in diabetics compared with non-diabetics, and was statistically significant ( P=0.000, indicating that prevalence and extent of periodontal disease was more frequent and more severe in diabetic patients. The risk factors like Glycated hemoglobin, duration of diabetes, fasting blood sugar, personal habits and oral hygiene habits showed a positive correlation with periodontal destruction, whereas mode of anti-diabetic therapy showed a negative correlation according to the multiple regression analysis. The odds ratio of a diabetic showing periodontal destruction in comparison with a non-diabetic was 1.97, 2.10 and 2.42 in well, moderately and poorly controlled diabetics, respectively. Conclusion : Our study has made an attempt to determine the association between type 2 DM (NIDDM and periodontal disease in Bangalore city. It was found that type 2 DM (non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus [NIDDM] subjects manifested relatively higher prevalence and severity of periodontal disease as compared with non-diabetics.

  16. Prevalence and severity of periodontal disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus (non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus) patients in Bangalore city: An epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apoorva, S M; Sridhar, N; Suchetha, A

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to study the prevalence and severity of periodontal disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients in Bangalore city. Four hundred and eight type 2 DM patients (Study Group) and 100 non-diabetic patients (Control Group) among the age group of 35-75 years were included in the study. The study group was divided based on Glycated hemoglobin levels into well, moderately and poorly controlled. Relevant information regarding age, oral hygiene habits and personal habits was obtained from the patients. Diabetic status and mode of anti-diabetic therapy of the study group was obtained from the hospital records with consent from the patient. Community periodontal index (CPI) was used to assess the periodontal status. The results were statistically evaluated. The mean CPI score and the number of missing teeth was higher in diabetics compared with non-diabetics, and was statistically significant (P=0.000), indicating that prevalence and extent of periodontal disease was more frequent and more severe in diabetic patients. The risk factors like Glycated hemoglobin, duration of diabetes, fasting blood sugar, personal habits and oral hygiene habits showed a positive correlation with periodontal destruction, whereas mode of anti-diabetic therapy showed a negative correlation according to the multiple regression analysis. The odds ratio of a diabetic showing periodontal destruction in comparison with a non-diabetic was 1.97, 2.10 and 2.42 in well, moderately and poorly controlled diabetics, respectively. Our study has made an attempt to determine the association between type 2 DM (NIDDM) and periodontal disease in Bangalore city. It was found that type 2 DM (non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus [NIDDM]) subjects manifested relatively higher prevalence and severity of periodontal disease as compared with non-diabetics.

  17. Depression, anxiety and quality of life among diabetic patients: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosaku, Kolawole; Kolawole, Babatope; Mume, Celestine; Ikem, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare psychiatric morbidity among diabetic patients, asthmatics and healthy individuals and also to assess the association of psychiatric morbidity and other variables with quality of life among diabetes patients. For each respondent, the questionnaire on sociodemographic and clinical variables was completed. They also completed the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI 1). Diabetic patients also completed the Diabetic Well-Being Questionnaire. A total of 180 subjects were used for this study-80 diabetics (males=37, females=43) were compared with 50 asthmatics (males=22, females=28) and 50 healthy individuals (males=23, females=27). Depression was more prevalent among diabetic patients (20%) compared with asthmatics (12%) and healthy individuals (4%), while anxiety was more prevalent among asthmatics (34%) compared with diabetics (20%) and healthy individuals (8%). Predictors of depression include age of the patient, poor glycemic control and duration of diabetes mellitus. Factors that correlated significantly with diabetic general well-being include depression, anxiety and fasting blood glucose level. Depression and the presence of comorbid medical conditions significantly predicted a low quality of life. Psychiatric morbidity has significant effects on diabetic patients' quality of life.

  18. Thyroid Diseases in Omani Type 2 Diabetics: A Retrospective Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa Al-Sumry

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Diabetes mellitus and thyroid diseases are common endocrine disorders in the general population and found to exist simultaneously. This study aimed to establish the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction among Omani type 2 diabetics and its association with glycemic control. Methodology. A retrospective cross-sectional randomized primary and secondary care based study of 285 Omani type 2 diabetics, ≥ 30 years of age with known thyroid function. The following parameters were examined: age, sex, duration of diabetes, duration of thyroid disease, thyroid morphology, thyroid function, thyroid antibodies, and the mean glycated hemoglobin (mean HbA1C. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction was compared to an independent control group of randomly selected healthy individuals with known thyroid function. Results. Thyroid dysfunction was found in 12.6% of the diabetic patients compared to 4.9% in the control group. The prevalence was higher among the diabetic females (86% compared to diabetic males (14%. The commonest thyroid dysfunction among diabetics was overt hypothyroidism (4.6%. Subclinical hypothyroidism was the commonest thyroid dysfunction seen in less controlled diabetics at a mean HbA1c of 7.8 (± 0.7. Conclusion. Screening for thyroid dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus should be routinely performed considering the higher prevalence of thyroid diseases in this group compared to the general population.

  19. 24-hour central aortic systolic pressure and 24-hour central pulse pressure are related to diabetic complications in type 1 diabetes - a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, Simone; Lajer, Maria Stenkil; Hansen, Tine Willum

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-invasive measurements of 24 hour ambulatory central aortic systolic pressure (24 h-CASP) and central pulse pressure (24 h-CPP) are now feasible. We evaluate the relationship between 24 h central blood pressure and diabetes-related complications in patients with type 1 diabetes....... METHODS: The study was cross-sectional, including 715 subjects: 86 controls (C), 69 patients with short diabetes duration (treatment (SN), 211 with longstanding diabetes (≥ 10 years) and normoalbuminuria (LN), 163...... ± 13, 121 ± 13, 119 ± 16 and 121 ± 13 mmHg (p diabetes, albuminuria degree, previous...

  20. Timing of access to secondary healthcare services for diabetes management and lower extremity amputation in people with diabetes: a protocol of a case-control study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Buckley, Claire M

    2013-09-03

    Lower extremity amputation (LEA) is a complication of diabetes and a marker of the quality of diabetes care. Clinical and sociodemographic determinants of LEA in people with diabetes are well known. However, the role of service-related factors has been less well explored. Early referral to secondary healthcare is assumed to prevent the occurrence of LEA. The objective of this study is to investigate a possible association between the timing of patient access to secondary healthcare services for diabetes management, as a key marker of service-related factors, and LEA in patients with diabetes.

  1. Associations between physical activity, sedentary behavior, and glycemic control in a large cohort of adolescents with type 1 diabetes: the Hvidoere Study Group on Childhood Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aman, J; Skinner, T C; de Beaufort, C E

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Hvidoere Study Group on Childhood Diabetes has demonstrated persistent differences in metabolic outcomes between pediatric diabetes centers. These differences cannot be accounted for by differences in demographic, medical, or treatment variables. Therefore, we sought to explore......A1c) levels were assayed in one central laboratory. All individuals with diabetes aged 11-18 yr (49.4% female), with duration of diabetes of at least 1 yr, were invited to participate. Individuals completed a self-reported measure of quality of life (Diabetes Quality of Life - Short Form [DQOL...... in reported physical activity (p psychological well-being but has weak associations with metabolic control. Leisure time...

  2. Prevalence and correlates of diagnosed and undiagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus and pre-diabetes in older adults: Findings from the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, S; O' Halloran, A M; O' Leary, N; Healy, M; McCormack, M; Kenny, R A; O' Connell, J

    2015-12-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes has increased rapidly in recent decades and this trend will continue as the global population ages. This study investigates the prevalence of, and factors associated with, diagnosed and undiagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus and pre-diabetes in older adults in Ireland. Cross-sectional data from 5377 men and women aged 50 and over from Wave 1 of the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) was analysed. Diagnosed diabetes was defined using self-reported doctors' diagnosis and medications data. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) analysis was used to identify undiagnosed and pre-diabetes. Age and sex-specific prevalence estimates were generated. Logistic regression was used to investigate the association between diabetes classification and the demographic, health and lifestyle characteristics of the population. The prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed type 2 diabetes was 8.6% (95% confidence interval (CI): 7.6-9.5%) and 0.9% (95% CI: 0.6-1.1%) respectively. Diabetes was more prevalent in men than women and increased with age. The prevalence of pre-diabetes was 5.5% (95% CI: 4.8-6.3%) and increased with age. Diabetes and pre-diabetes were independently associated with male sex, central obesity and a history of hypertension, while undiagnosed diabetes was associated with geographic location and medical costs cover. Despite high rates of obesity and other undiagnosed health conditions, the prevalence of undiagnosed and pre-diabetes is relatively low in community-dwelling older adults in Ireland. Addressing lifestyle factors in this population may help to further reduce the prevalence of pre-diabetes and improve outcomes for those with a previous diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A clinicopathological study on diabetic mastopathy in 12 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneyama, Kimiyasu; Ooyama, Renpei

    2006-01-01

    Diabetic mastopathy is a fibrous disease that presents in patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes mellitus. Clinically, differentiating from breast cancer is difficult. We report 12 cases of diabetic mastopathy in women aged 35 to 82 years old. They noticed breast mass and visited our hospital. Size of the breast mass ranged from 1.5 to 6 cm. Seven had noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and 5 had insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. And they had been treated for 1 to 30 years. Mammography showed high-density mass shadow without calcification and spiculation. Ultrasonography showed irregular hypoechoic lesions with marked attenuation of the posterior shadow. In 8 cases, surgical excisions were performed for confirmation of pathological diagnosis. Microscopic findings revealed stromal fibrosis and lymphocytic mastitis. Core needle biopsy is recommended for the tumors suspected to be diabetic mastopathy to avoid unnecessary operations. (author)

  4. Incidence of chronic kidney disease among people with diabetes: a systematic review of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koye, D N; Shaw, J E; Reid, C M; Atkins, R C; Reutens, A T; Magliano, D J

    2017-07-01

    The aim was to systematically review published articles that reported the incidence of chronic kidney disease among people with diabetes. A systematic literature search was performed using MEDLINE, Embase and CINAHL databases. The titles and abstracts of all publications identified by the search were reviewed and 10 047 studies were retrieved. A total of 71 studies from 30 different countries with sample sizes ranging from 505 to 211 132 met the inclusion criteria. The annual incidence of microalbuminuria and albuminuria ranged from 1.3% to 3.8% for Type 1 diabetes. For Type 2 diabetes and studies combining both diabetes types, the range was from 3.8% to 12.7%, with four of six studies reporting annual rates between 7.4% and 8.6%. In studies reporting the incidence of eGFR Disease (MDRD) equation, apart from one study which reported an annual incidence of 8.9%, the annual incidence ranged from 1.9% to 4.3%. The annual incidence of end-stage renal disease ranged from 0.04% to 1.8%. The annual incidence of microalbuminuria and albuminuria is ~ 2-3% in Type 1 diabetes, and ~ 8% in Type 2 diabetes or mixed diabetes type. The incidence of developing eGFR kidney disease, there was only modest variation in incidence rates. These findings may be useful in clinical settings to help understand the risk of developing kidney disease among those with diabetes. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  5. Arsenic Exposure, Arsenic Metabolism, and Incident Diabetes in the Strong Heart Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Barbara V.; Umans, Jason G.; Gribble, Matthew O.; Best, Lyle G.; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Goessler, Walter; Lee, Elisa; Guallar, Eliseo; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Little is known about arsenic metabolism in diabetes development. We investigated the prospective associations of low-moderate arsenic exposure and arsenic metabolism with diabetes incidence in the Strong Heart Study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 1,694 diabetes-free participants aged 45–75 years were recruited in 1989–1991 and followed through 1998–1999. We used the proportions of urine inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylarsonate (MMA), and dimethylarsinate (DMA) over their sum (expressed as iAs%, MMA%, and DMA%) as the biomarkers of arsenic metabolism. Diabetes was defined as fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dL, 2-h glucose ≥200 mg/dL, self-reported diabetes history, or self-reported use of antidiabetic medications. RESULTS Over 11,263.2 person-years of follow-up, 396 participants developed diabetes. Using the leave-one-out approach to model the dynamics of arsenic metabolism, we found that lower MMA% was associated with higher diabetes incidence. The hazard ratios (95% CI) of diabetes incidence for a 5% increase in MMA% were 0.77 (0.63–0.93) and 0.82 (0.73–0.92) when iAs% and DMA%, respectively, were left out of the model. DMA% was associated with higher diabetes incidence only when MMA% decreased (left out of the model) but not when iAs% decreased. iAs% was also associated with higher diabetes incidence when MMA% decreased. The association between MMA% and diabetes incidence was similar by age, sex, study site, obesity, and urine iAs concentrations. CONCLUSIONS Arsenic metabolism, particularly lower MMA%, was prospectively associated with increased incidence of diabetes. Research is needed to evaluate whether arsenic metabolism is related to diabetes incidence per se or through its close connections with one-carbon metabolism. PMID:25583752

  6. Glucocorticoid treatment and impaired mood, memory and metabolism in people with diabetes: the Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Rebecca M; Labad, Javier; Sears, Alison V; Williamson, Rachel M; Strachan, Mark W J; Deary, Ian J; Lowe, Gordon D O; Price, Jackie F; Walker, Brian R

    2012-01-01

    Objective Both type 2 diabetes and glucocorticoid therapy are highly prevalent. Although people with type 2 diabetes may be more susceptible to adverse effects of glucocorticoids, and it is recommended that glucocorticoid therapy is avoided for fear of worsening glycaemic control, the extent to which this advice is followed and the consequences when glucocorticoids are prescribed are poorly documented. The aim was to assess the characteristics of people with type 2 diabetes prescribed glucocorticoids in a real-world setting and to quantify resulting adverse effects. Design Cross-sectional cohort study. Methods Cardiometabolic variables, body fat distribution, cognitive function and mood were studied in the 1066 participants of the Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes Study, of whom 162 (15%) were taking systemic, topical or inhaled glucocorticoids. Results Glucocorticoid therapy was more common in women and in smokers but was not avoided in patients with diabetic complications or cardiovascular risk factors. People taking glucocorticoids were more centrally obese with slightly higher HbA1c and total serum cholesterol but were no more likely to have hepatic steatosis or hypertension. Glucocorticoid treatment was associated with substantially lower mood and greater anxiety. Women taking glucocorticoid therapy were twice as likely to report depressive symptoms compared with those not taking treatment. Glucocorticoid therapy was also associated with poorer cognitive function among those with subclinical atherosclerosis, as indicated by low ankle–brachial pressure index. Conclusions Glucocorticoids are prescribed commonly for people with type 2 diabetes despite being associated with adverse indices of glycaemic control, cardiovascular risk factors, mood and cognitive function. PMID:22408122

  7. Study on the exchangeable body sodium in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Chatel, Rudolf; Barna, Istvan; Krasznai, Istvan

    1985-01-01

    Ten patients with diabetes mellitus, apperently free of any complications of diabetes and of hypertension, had a significantly (p<0.01) increased exchangeable body sodium compared to 10 sex-matched control subjects of comparable age, body weight and height, and blood pressure. Exchangeable sodium correlated significantly (p<0.01) with supine mean blood pressure in the diabetic patients (r=0.822) but not in the control subjects (r=0.276). It is suggested that the early increase of exchangeable body sodium in diabetes mellitus might play a part in the high incidence of hypertension in such patients. (author)

  8. A clinical study of serum phosphate and magnesium in type II diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revathi.R, Julius Amaldas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To assess serum phosphate and magnesium level in type-2 diabetic patients in comparison with those of control subjects. Methodology: There were 100 diabetic patients and 100 age matched non-diabetic (control subjects included in this study. Serum phosphate, serum magnesium and fasting and postprandial blood sugar measured among the diabetic and control groups using SPSS version 16.0 for analysis. Results: Serum phosphate level was significantly lower in diabetic patients (2.92 ± 0.75 as compared to control subjects (3.38 ± 0.49. Serum magnesium levels were significantly lower in diabetic patients (0.9 ± 0.15 compared to controls (2.75 ± 0.46 Conclusion: The study reveals that hyperglycemia may reduce serum levels of magnesium and phosphorus.

  9. Probing community nurses' professional basis: a situational case study in diabetic foot ulcer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaarup, Clara; Pape-Haugaard, Louise; Jensen, Merete Hartun; Laursen, Anders Christian; Bermark, Susan; Hejlesen, Ole Kristian

    2017-03-01

    Complicated and long-lasting wound care of diabetic foot ulcers are moving from specialists in wound care at hospitals towards community nurses without specialist diabetic foot ulcer wound care knowledge. The aim of the study is to elucidate community nurses' professional basis for treating diabetic foot ulcers. A situational case study design was adopted in an archetypical Danish community nursing setting. Experience is a crucial component in the community nurses' professional basis for treating diabetic foot ulcers. Peer-to-peer training is the prevailing way to learn about diabetic foot ulcer, however, this contributes to the risk of low evidence-based practice. Finally, a frequent behaviour among the community nurses is to consult colleagues before treating the diabetic foot ulcers.

  10. Study protocol for the Cities Changing Diabetes programme: a global mixed-methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, A David; Nolan, John J; Bagger, Malene; Hesseldal, Louise; Volkmann, Anna-Maria

    2017-11-08

    Urban living has been shown to affect health in various ways. As the world is becoming more urbanised and almost two-thirds of people with diabetes now live in cities, research into the relationship between urban living, health and diabetes is key to improving the lives of many. The majority of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, a subset linked to overweight and obesity, decreased physical activity and unhealthy diets. Diabetes has significant consequences for those living with the condition as well as their families, relationships and wider society. Although care and management are improving, complications remain common, and diabetes is among the leading causes of vision loss, amputation, neuropathy and renal and cardiovascular disease worldwide. We present a research protocol for exploring the drivers of type 2 diabetes and its complications in urban settings through the Cities Changing Diabetes (CCD) partnership programme. A global study protocol is implemented in eight collaborating CCD partner cities. In each city, academic institutions, municipal representatives and local stakeholders collaborate to set research priorities and plan implementation of findings. Local academic teams execute the study following the global study protocol presented here. A quantitative Rule of Halves analysis obtains measures of the magnitude of the diabetes burden, the diagnosis rates in each city and the outcomes of care. A qualitative Diabetes Vulnerability Assessment explores the urban context in vulnerability to type 2 diabetes and identifies social factors and cultural determinants relevant to health, well-being and diabetes. The protocol steers the collection of primary and secondary data across the study sites. Research ethics board approval has been sought and obtained in each site. Findings from each of the local studies as well as the result from combined multisite (global) analyses will be reported in a series of core scientific journal papers. © Article author

  11. Diabetes and cardiometabolic risk factors in Cambodia: Results from two screening studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Julie; Naranjo, Diana; Khun, Touch; Seng, Serey; Horn, Ien S; Suttiratana, Sakinah C; Keuky, Lim

    2018-02-01

    Despite growing attention to diabetes throughout Asia, data from Southeast Asia are limited. This article reports rates of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity in Cambodia. Two studies were conducted across different regions of Cambodia: (i) a 2012 screening study across urban, semi-urban, and rural areas that used point-of-care capillary glucose for determination of diabetes (n = 13 997); and (ii) a 2005 epidemiological study with random selection from two main urban areas that used oral glucose tolerance tests for determination of diabetes (n = 1863). Blood pressure and anthropometrics were also measured. In the screening study, rates of diabetes were significantly higher in urban than rural sites, with intermediate rates in semi-urban areas. There was a significant dose-response effect for urbanicity on overweight, obesity, and waist:hip ratio, with higher rates for urban versus semi-urban and for semi-urban versus rural locales. Rural sites had the lowest rates of hypertension, followed by urban and semi-urban sites. Among people who screened positive for diabetes, there was a dose-response effect for urbanicity on undiagnosed diabetes; rates of previously undiagnosed diabetes were lowest in urban (51%), followed by semi-urban (55%) and rural (67%) locales. Rural participants reported the highest rates of smoking and alcohol use. In the urban epidemiological study, prevalence rates of diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance were approximately 10%, indicating a prevalence of total glucose intolerance of approximately 20%. In Cambodia, diabetes rates are high among urban residents and undiagnosed diabetes is highest among rural residents. A country-wide public health response is urgently needed; as development continues, rates of diabetes are expected to rise. © 2017 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Sociocultural Influences on African Americans' Representations of Type 2 Diabetes: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiyanbola, Olayinka O; Ward, Earlise; Brown, Carolyn

    2018-01-01

    Illness representations, known as patients' beliefs and expectations about an illness, may be influenced by cultural beliefs and personal experiences. This study explored African Americans' perceptions of the sociocultural factors that influence their representations of diabetes. Six semi-structured focus groups. Private space at a convenient site. Forty African Americans, aged 45-60 years with type 2 diabetes for at least one year prior. Participants perceived that there was a race-mediated effect of how they developed diabetes because of poverty due to past slavery, racial discrimination by health care providers, and the stigma associated with diabetes within the African American community. Participants perceived that poverty influenced African Americans' unhealthy eating habits, which led to diabetes diagnosis among their ancestors and their development of the disease since it was hereditary. Participants also perceived that there was provider ill intention, ie, providers were purposefully making people sick, and their lack of education on diabetes from providers was done on purpose, as information on diabetes was withheld and not shared due to racial discrimination. Perceived stigma by the community led to African Americans' avoidance and denial of the disease, and subsequently the development of diabetes. To enhance disease management for African Americans with diabetes, it is important to focus on the sociocultural context of how African Americans view their world that may be influenced by their knowledge of negative historical circumstances and their current provider relationship, which, in turn, may be reflected in their perceptions of diabetes.

  13. Zimbabwean diabetics' beliefs about health and illness: an interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mufunda Esther

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus (DM is increasing globally, with the greatest increase in Africa and Asia. In Zimbabwe a threefold increase was shown in the 1990s. Health-related behaviour is important in maintaining health and is determined by individual beliefs about health and illness but has seen little study. The purpose of the study was to explore beliefs about health and illness that might affect self-care practice and health care seeking behaviour in persons diagnosed with DM, living in Zimbabwe. Methods Exploratory study. Consecutive sample from a diabetes clinic at a central hospital. Semi-structured interviews were held with 21 persons aged 19-65 years. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results Health was described as freedom from disease and well-being, and individual factors such as compliance with advice received and drugs were considered important to promote health. A mixture of causes of DM, predominantly individual factors such as heredity, overweight and wrong diet in combination with supernatural factors such as fate, punishment from God and witchcraft were mentioned. Most respondents did not recognize the symptoms of DM when falling ill but related the problems to other diseases, e.g. HIV, malaria etc. Limited knowledge about DM and the body was indicated. Poor economy was mentioned as harmful to health and a consequence of DM because the need to buy expensive drugs, food and attend check-ups. Self-care was used to a limited extent but if used, a combination of individual measures, household remedies or herbs and religious acts such as prayers and holy water were frequently used, and in some cases health care professionals were consulted. Conclusions Limited knowledge about DM, based on beliefs about health and illness including biomedical and traditional explanations related to the influence of supernatural forces, e.g. fate, God etc., were found, which affected patients' self-care and care

  14. The prevalence and incidence of frailty in Pre-diabetic and diabetic community-dwelling older population: results from Beijing longitudinal study of aging II (BLSA-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhetri, Jagadish Kumar; Zheng, Zheng; Xu, Xitong; Ma, Cuihong; Chan, Piu

    2017-02-08

    Various factors including cardio-metabolic disorders are found to be correlated with frailty. With the increase in age, older adults are likely to have elevated blood glucose level. In this study we intend to investigate the prevalence and incidence of frailty in the pre-diabetic and diabetic community dwelling elderly population and the associated risk factors. At baseline total of 10,039 subjects with a mean age of 70.51 (±7.82) were included. A total of 6,293 older adults were followed up at 12 months. A Frailty index (FI) with 32 items was developed using Rockwood's cumulative deficits method. Frailty index ≥0.25 was used as cut-off criteria for the diagnosis of frailty. Diagnosis of pre-diabetes and diabetes was set according to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level. Chi-square tests were performed to compare percentages by 3 major groups (non-diabetes, pre-diabetes, diabetes), ANOVA and student's t-tests was used to compare means of group for continuous variables. Multiple logistic regression models were performed to estimate the risk factors for frailty in non-diabetic, pre-diabetic and diabetic elderly populations using baseline and longitudinal data. Diabetic population had a much higher prevalence (19.32%) and incidence (12.32%) of frailty, compared to that of non-diabetic older adults (prevalence of 11.92% and incidence of 7.04%). And pre-diabetics had somewhat similar prevalence of 11.43% and slightly higher incidence of 8.73% for frailty than non-diabetic older adults. Diabetics were at 1.36 (95% CI = 1.18,1.56) and 1.56 (95%CI = 1.32,1.85) fold increase in risk of frailty compared to non-diabetic population for prevalence and incidence, respectively. Being female, urban living, high waist circumference, less house work and need regular anti-diabetic medications were independent risk factors only in pre-diabetic and diabetic older adults. This study confirms that diabetes is an independent

  15. Effect of diabetes on caregiver burden in an observational study of individuals with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrec, Jeremie; Ascher-Svanum, Haya; Chen, Yun-Fei; Reed, Catherine; Kahle-Wrobleski, Kristin; Hake, Ann Marie; Raskin, Joel; Naderali, Ebrahim; Schuster, Dara; Heine, Robert J; Kendall, David M

    2016-05-03

    The burden on caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with the patient's functional status and may also be influenced by chronic comorbid medical conditions, such as diabetes. This post-hoc exploratory analysis assessed whether comorbid diabetes in patients with AD affects caregiver burden, and whether caregivers with diabetes experience greater burden than caregivers without diabetes. Caregiver and patient healthcare resource use (HCRU) were also assessed. Baseline data from the GERAS observational study of patients with AD and their caregivers (both n = 1495) in France, Germany and the UK were analyzed. Caregiver burden was assessed using the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI). Caregiver time on activities of daily living (ADL: basic ADL; instrumental ADL, iADL) and supervision (hours/month), and caregiver and patient HCRU (outpatient visits, emergency room visits, nights hospitalized) were assessed using the Resource Utilization in Dementia instrument for the month before the baseline visit. Regression analyses were adjusted for relevant covariates. Time on supervision and basic ADL was analyzed using zero-inflated negative binomial regression. Caregivers of patients with diabetes (n = 188) were younger and more likely to be female (both p caregivers of patients without diabetes (n = 1307). Analyses showed caregivers of patients with diabetes spent significantly more time on iADL (+16 %; p = 0.03; increases were also observed for basic ADL and total caregiver time but did not reach statistical significance) and had a trend towards increased ZBI score. Patients with diabetes had a 63 % increase in the odds of requiring supervision versus those without diabetes (p = 0.01). Caregiver and patient HCRU did not differ according to patient diabetes. Caregivers with diabetes (n = 127) did not differ from those without diabetes (n = 1367) regarding burden/time, but caregivers with diabetes had a 91 % increase in the odds of having outpatient visits

  16. Factors associated with numbers of remaining teeth among type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jui-Chu; Peng, Yun-Shing; Fan, Jun-Yu; Jane, Sui-Whi; Tu, Liang-Tse; Chang, Chang-Cheng; Chen, Mei-Yen

    2013-07-01

    To explore the factors associated with the numbers of remaining teeth among type 2 diabetes community residents. Promoting oral health is an important nursing role for patients with diabetes, especially in disadvantaged areas. However, limited research has been carried out on the relationship between numbers of remaining teeth, diabetes-related biomarkers and personal oral hygiene among diabetic rural residents. A cross-sectional, descriptive design with a simple random sample was used. This study was part of a longitudinal cohort study of health promotion for preventing diabetic foot among rural community diabetic residents. It was carried out in 18 western coastal and inland districts of Chiayi County in central Taiwan. In total, 703 participants were enrolled in this study. The findings indicated that a high percentage of the participants (26%) had no remaining natural teeth. Nearly three quarters (74%) had fewer than 20 natural teeth. After controlling for the potential confounding factors, multivariate analysis demonstrated that the factors determining numbers of remaining teeth were age (p teeth were less tooth-brushing with dental floss, abnormal ankle brachial pressure and poor glycemic control. This study highlights the importance of nursing intervention in oral hygiene for patients with type 2 diabetes. It is necessary to initiate oral health promotion activities when diabetes is first diagnosed, especially for older diabetic residents of rural or coastal areas who are poorly educated. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Diabetes mellitus defined by hemoglobin A1c value: Risk characterization for incidence among Japanese subjects in the JPHC Diabetes Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Masayuki; Takahashi, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Yumi; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Inoue, Manami; Kadowaki, Takashi; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2011-10-07

    Aims/Introduction:  Although several risk factors for type 2 diabetes have been identified, most of them have been identified in studies on Western populations, and they should be evaluated in a Japanese population. In 2010, new diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus using hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) were released and its use in epidemiological studies has many advantages. The aim of the present study was to evaluate risk factors for type 2 diabetes defined based on HbA1c values in a Japanese population.   A total of 9223 subjects (3076 men and 6147 women) were followed up for 5 years. Diabetes was defined based on self-report or HbA1c value. Risk factors for diabetes were evaluated as odds ratios adjusted for potential confounding factors by logistic regression.   During the 5-year follow-up period, we documented 518 incident cases of diabetes (232 men and 286 women). Of the 518 incident cases, 310 cases were diagnosed by HbA1c alone. Among the men, age, smoking (both past smoking and current smoking) and family history of diabetes significantly increased the risk of diabetes. Among the women, body mass index, family history of diabetes and hypertension significantly increased the risk of diabetes. These results did not change markedly after adjustment for the baseline HbA1c values, and the baseline HbA1c value itself was a significant risk factor for diabetes mellitus.   Known risk factors for diabetes established in Western populations also increased the risk of diabetes in a Japanese population defined on the basis of HbA1c values. (J Diabetes Invest, doi: 10.1111/j.2040-1124.2011.00119.x, 2011).

  18. Erectile dysfunction among diabetic patients in Saudi Arabia: A hospital-based primary care study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef A Al-Turki

    2007-01-01

    Conclusions: Complete (severe and partial erectile dysfunction was quite common among adult diabetic patients in a hospital-based primary care setting in Saudi Arabia. It is important for primary care physicians to diagnose erectile dysfunction in diabetic patients, and to counsel them early, as most patients are hesitant to discuss their concern during a consultation. Further studies are recommended to evaluate the effect of other risk factors on erectile dysfunction in diabetic patients.

  19. Hyperglycemia in poor controlled diabetes from crude tamarind herbal pill: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2011-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is an important finding in the diabetic patient with poor glycemic control. There are several possible causes of hyperglycemic. Here, the author presents an interesting case study on a female diabetic patient presenting with hyperglycemic due to intake of crude tamarind herbal pill. General practitioner should realize that the use of alternative medicine can be a cause of unexplained hyperglycemic episode in diabetic patient.

  20. Perceptions on diabetes care provision among health providers in rural Tanzania: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwangome, Mary; Geubbels, Eveline; Klatser, Paul; Dieleman, Marjolein

    2017-04-01

    Diabetes prevalence in Tanzania was estimated at 9.1% in 2012 among adults aged 24-65 years - higher than the HIV prevalence in the general population at that time. Health systems in lower- and middle-income countries are not designed for chronic health care, yet the rising burden of non-communicable diseases such as diabetes demands chronic care services. To inform policies on diabetes care, we conducted a study on the health services in place to diagnose, treat and care for diabetes patients in rural Tanzania. The study was an exploratory and descriptive study involving qualitative methods (in-depth interviews, observations and document reviews) and was conducted in a rural district in Tanzania. Fifteen health providers in four health facilities at different levels of the health care system were interviewed. The health care organization elements of the Innovative Care for Chronic Conditions (ICCC) framework were used to guide assessment of the diabetes services in the district. We found that diabetes care in this district was centralized at the referral and district facilities, with unreliable supply of necessary commodities for diabetes care and health providers who had some knowledge of what was expected of them but felt ill-prepared for diabetes care. Facility and district level guidance was lacking and the continuity of care was broken within and between facilities. The HMIS could not produce reliable data on diabetes. Support for self-management to patients and their families was weak at all levels. In conclusion, the rural district we studied did not provide diabetes care close to the patients. Guidance on diabetes service provision and human resource management need strengthening and policies related to task-shifting need adjustment to improve quality of service provision for diabetes patients in rural settings. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

  1. Serum adipokine concentrations in dogs with diabetes mellitus: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ah Young; Kim, Hye-Sun; Kang, Ji-Houn; Yang, Mhan-Pyo

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether serum adipokine concentrations differed between healthy dogs and dogs with diabetes mellitus (DM). To accomplish this, 19 dogs with newly diagnosed DM were compared to 20 otherwise healthy dogs. The serum concentrations of visfatin, leptin, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18, and TNF-α were significantly higher in diabetic dogs than in healthy dogs, whereas the serum adiponectin concentrations were lower in diabetic dogs. However, there were no significant differ...

  2. Diabetes and modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease: the prospective Million Women Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, Elizabeth A.; Pirie, Kirstin L.; Stevens, Richard J.; Beral, Valerie; Brown, Anna; Liu, Bette; Green, Jane; Reeves, Gillian K.

    2008-01-01

    To compare the effect of potentially modifiable lifestyle factors on the incidence of vascular disease in women with and without diabetes. In 1996-2001 over one million middle-aged women in the UK joined a prospective study, providing medical history, lifestyle and socio-demographic information. All participants were followed for hospital admissions and deaths using electronic record-linkage. Adjusted relative risks (RRs) and incidence rates were calculated to compare the incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke in women with and without diabetes and by lifestyle factors. At recruitment 25,915 women (2.1% of 1,242,338) reported current treatment for diabetes. During a mean follow-up of 6.1 years per woman, 21,928 had a first hospital admission or death from coronary heart disease (RR for women with versus without diabetes = 3.30, 95% CI 3.14-3.47) and 7,087 had a first stroke (RR = 2.47, 95% CI 2.24-2.74). Adjusted incidence rates of these conditions in women with diabetes increased with duration of diabetes, obesity, inactivity and smoking. The 5-year adjusted incidence rates for cardiovascular disease were 4.6 (95% CI 4.4-4.9) per 100 women aged 50-69 in non-smokers with diabetes, 5.9 (95% CI 4.6-7.6) in smokers with diabetes not using insulin and 11.0 (95% CI 8.3-14.7) in smokers with diabetes using insulin. Non-smoking women with diabetes who were not overweight or inactive still had threefold increased rate for coronary disease or stroke compared with women without diabetes. Of the modifiable factors examined in middle aged women with diabetes, smoking causes the greatest increase in cardiovascular disease, especially in those with insulin treated diabetes

  3. Diabetic retinopathy and its risk factors in a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Masil; Harper, Richard; Balamurugan, Appathurai; Kilmer, Greta; Bynum, Latonya

    2011-04-01

    To assess the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and its risk factors among people with diabetes using a population-based survey and discuss strategies that can be used to both prevent and manage diabetes-related complications in a primary care setting. The prevalence of self-reported doctor-diagnosed diabetic retinopathy and its risk factors were estimated using data from the Arkansas Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, 2003-2007. Five years of survey data were combined and weighted to the population to assess the risk factors that predict the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy. The study involved 2477 people who reported that they have been diagnosed with diabetes. Twenty-two percent of survey respondents with diabetes had been diagnosed with diabetic retinopathy. Using a multivariate adjusted model, blacks (odds ratio [OR] = 1.76, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26, 2.45), those with some high school education (OR = 2.78, 95% CI, 1.80, 4.28), people with diabetes for more than 10 years (OR = 2.14, 95% CI 1.61, 2.85), people on insulin treatment (OR = 2.35, 95% CI 1.78, 3.08), those who had taken a course to manage their diabetes (OR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.20, 1.99), and those with chronic foot ulcers (OR = 2.24, 95% CI 1.62, 3.09) were more likely to have been diagnosed with diabetic retinopathy. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and its risk factors are evident. Novel approaches to increase the screening and treatment of these frequent complications are key to optimize diabetes care.

  4. Extending Metformin Use in Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Pharmacokinetic Study in Stage 4 Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajith Munasinghe Dissanayake

    2017-07-01

    Discussion: In our patient cohorts with diabetes and stage 4 chronic kidney disease, treatment with 4 weeks of low-dose metformin was not associated with adverse safety outcomes and revealed stable pharmacokinetics. Our study supports the liberalization of metformin use in this population and supports the use of metformin assays for more individualized dosing.

  5. Exploring staff diabetes medication knowledge and practices in regional residential care: triangulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellard, Sally Jane; Rasmussen, Bodil; Savage, Sally; Dunning, Trisha

    2013-07-01

    This study is drawn from a larger project that aimed to identify the staffing and organisational factors influencing the quality of diabetes care for older people living in residential care in regional Victoria, Australia. The focus of the current study is on medication management for residents with diabetes. With a continuous rise in diabetes in the population, there is an associated increase in the prevalence of diabetes in aged care residential settings. However, there is little specific guidance on how to manage diabetes in older people living in institutional settings who experience multiple concurrent chronic conditions. A triangulation strategy consisting of three phases. A one-shot cross-sectional survey (n = 68) focus group interviews and a case file audit (n = 20). Data were collected between May 2009-January 2010. Staff knowledge of diabetes and its contemporary medication management was found to be suboptimal. Challenges to managing residents with diabetes included limited time, resident characteristics and communication systems. Additionally, the variability in medical support available to residents and a high level of polypharmacy added to the complexity of medication management of resident. The current study suggests administering medicine to residents in aged care settings is difficult and has potentially serious medical, professional and economic consequences. Limitations to staff knowledge of contemporary diabetes care and medications potentially place residents with diabetes at risk of receiving less than optimal diabetes care. Providing evidence-based guidelines about diabetes care in residential care settings is essential to achieve acceptable outcomes and increase the quality of life for residents in public aged care. Continuing education programs in diabetes care specifically related to medication must be provided to all health professionals and encompass scope of practice. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Periodontal status among type II diabetic and nondiabetic individuals in Chennai, India: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Kesavan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periodontitis is referred to as the sixth complication of diabetes mellitus. If left untreated, periodontitis can lead to tooth loss, thereby compromising a patient's ability to maintain a proper diet and affecting the quality of life. Aim: To assess the periodontal status among type II diabetic and nondiabetic individuals in Chennai city. Materials and Methods: A hospital based cross-sectional comparative study was conducted among diabetics and nondiabetic population attending a government hospital in Chennai city. The WHO Oral Health Assessment Form (1997 was used to assess the periodontal status. The final sample size of the study was 1000 which included 500 diabetics and 500 nondiabetics. Results: This study showed a significant association between the diabetic status and periodontal disease. The severity of periodontal disease was high among diabetics when compared to nondiabetics. The mean number of sextants with shallow pockets was 0.76 ± 1.20 among diabetics and 0.49 ± 0.86 among nondiabetics (P < 0.0001. The mean number of sextants with Loss of Attachment score of 1 (4–5 mm was 0.67 ± 1.05 among diabetics and 0.32 ± 0.70 among nondiabetics. Conclusion: Periodontal disease was more frequent and severe in diabetic patients as compared to nondiabetics although there are a number of questions need to be answered in future research.

  7. A longitudinal study of plasma insulin and glucagon in women with previous gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, P; Kühl, C; Hornnes, P

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether plasma insulin or glucagon predicts later development of diabetes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The subjects studied were 91 women with diet-treated GDM and 33 healthy women. Plasma insulin and glucagon during a 50...... at follow-up (2 had insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, 13 had non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and 12 had impaired glucose tolerance). Compared with the control subjects, women with previous GDM had relatively impaired insulin secretion (decreased insulinogenic index and delayed peak insulin...... for subsequent development of overt diabetes (logistic regression analysis). CONCLUSIONS: Women who develop GDM have a relative insulin secretion deficiency, the severity of which is predictive for later development of diabetes. Furthermore, our data indicate that their relatively reduced beta-cell function may...

  8. Serum adipokine concentrations in dogs with diabetes mellitus: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ah Young; Kim, Hye-Sun; Kang, Ji-Houn; Yang, Mhan-Pyo

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether serum adipokine concentrations differed between healthy dogs and dogs with diabetes mellitus (DM). To accomplish this, 19 dogs with newly diagnosed DM were compared to 20 otherwise healthy dogs. The serum concentrations of visfatin, leptin, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18, and TNF-α were significantly higher in diabetic dogs than in healthy dogs, whereas the serum adiponectin concentrations were lower in diabetic dogs. However, there were no significant differences in the IL-10 and resistin levels between groups. The serum leptin concentrations in diabetic dogs with and without concurrent disorders differed significantly. Treatment with insulin induced a significant decrease in IL-6 in diabetic dogs without concurrent disorders. These results show that the clinical diabetic state of dogs could modulate the circulating visfatin and adiponectin concentrations directly, while upregulation of leptin was probably a result of concurrent disorders rather than an effect of persistent hyperglycemia as a result of DM.

  9. Kidney disease and related findings in the diabetes control and complications trial/epidemiology of diabetes interventions and complications study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Ian H

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Kidney disease manifests clinically as elevated albumin excretion rate (AER), impaired glomerular filtration rate (GFR), or both, and is a cause of substantial morbidity and mortality in type 1 diabetes (T1D). The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC) study tested whether intensive diabetes therapy (INT) aimed at lowering glucose concentrations as close as safely possible to the normal range reduces the risks of kidney disease and other diabetes complications. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In the DCCT, 1,441 participants with T1D were randomly assigned to INT or conventional diabetes therapy (CON) for a mean duration of 6.5 years. Subsequently, participants have been followed for 18 years in the ongoing observational EDIC. Standardized longitudinal measurements of AER, estimated GFR, and blood pressure were made throughout the DCCT/EDIC. RESULTS During the DCCT, INT reduced the risks of incident microalbuminuria (AER ≥40 mg/24 h) and macroalbuminuria (AER ≥300 mg/24 h) by 39% (95% CI 21-52%) and 54% (29-74%), respectively. During EDIC years 1-8, participants previously assigned to DCCT INT continued to experience lower rates of incident microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria, with risk reductions of 59% (39-73%) and 84% (67-92%), respectively. Beneficial effects of INT on the development of impaired GFR (sustained estimated GFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and hypertension became evident during combined DCCT/EDIC follow-up, with risk reductions of 50% (18-69%) and 20% (6-21%), respectively, compared with CON. CONCLUSIONS In the DCCT/EDIC, INT resulted in clinically important, durable reductions in the risks of microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria, impaired GFR, and hypertension.

  10. Associations among health literacy, diabetes knowledge, and self-management behavior in adults with diabetes: results of a dutch cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heide, Iris; Uiters, Ellen; Rademakers, Jany; Struijs, Jeroen N; Schuit, A Jantine; Baan, Caroline A

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have examined the association between health literacy and self-management behavior, but few have explored ways through which this occurs. The present study examines to what extent health literacy is associated with diabetes self-management behavior and to what extent diabetes knowledge is a mechanism in this association. The study was based on cross-sectional data retrieved from patient registrations and questionnaires completed in 2010. The sample included 1,714 predominantly type 2 diabetes patients, with a mean age of 67 years. Diabetes self-management was indicated by HbA1c level, glucose self-control and self-reported monitoring of glucose levels, physical activity, and smoking. Multilevel analyses were applied based on multiple imputed data. Lower health literacy was significantly associated with less diabetes knowledge, higher HbA1c level, less self-control of glucose level, and less physical activity. Participants with more diabetes knowledge were less likely to smoke and more likely to control glucose levels. Diabetes knowledge was a mediator in the association between health literacy and glucose self-control and between health literacy and smoking. This study indicates that higher health literacy may contribute to participation in certain self-management activities, in some cases through diabetes knowledge. Diabetes knowledge and health literacy skills may be important targets for interventions promoting diabetes self-management.

  11. Study of diabetes mellitus among patients with hepatitis C virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Abdel Raouf

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion We can concluded that diabetic HCV patients had intermediate clinical phenotype lower BMI and LDL than control and development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in HCV patients was significantly higher in nontreated patients than treated patients. Antiviral therapy and clearance of HCV improves IR, β-cell function, the blood glucose abnormalities.

  12. Association between urbanisation and type 2 diabetes: an ecological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassasse, Zakariah; Smith, Dianna; Finer, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have explored the effect of urbanisation on the prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) at regional/national level. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between urbanisation and T2D at country level, worldwide, and to explore the role of intermediate variables (physical inactivity, sugar consumption and obesity). The potential effect modification of gross domestic product (GDP) was also assessed. Methods Data for 207 countries were collected from accessible datasets. Direct acyclic graphs were used to describe the association between urbanisation, T2D and their intermediate variables (physical inactivity, sugar consumption and obesity). Urbanisation was measured as urban percentage (UP) and as agglomeration index (AI). Crude and multivariate linear regression analyses were conducted to explore selected associations. The interaction between urbanisation and T2D across levels of GDP per capita was investigated. Results The association between urbanisation and T2D diverged by exposure: AI was positively associated, while UP negatively associated with T2D prevalence. Physical inactivity and obesity were statistically significantly associated with increased prevalence of T2D. In middle-income countries (MIC) UP, AI and GDP were significantly associated with T2D prevalence, while in high-income countries (HIC), physical inactivity and obesity were the main determinant of T2D prevalence. Conclusions The type of urban growth, not urbanisation per se, predicted T2D prevalence at country level. In MIC, population density and GDP were the main determinant of diabetes, while in HIC. these were physical inactivity and obesity. Globalisation is playing an important role in the rise of T2D worldwide. PMID:29104770

  13. Pregnancy outcomes in youth with type 2 diabetes: The TODAY Study experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated pregnancy outcomes, maternal and fetal/neonatal, during the Treatment Options for type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) study. The TODAY study was a randomized controlled trial comparing three treatment options for youth with type 2 diabetes. Informed consent included the req...

  14. Study Circles at the Pharmacy--A New Model for Diabetes Education in Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkadi, Anna; Rosenqvist, Urban

    1999-01-01

    Tests the feasibility of a one-year group education model for patients with type 2 diabetes in Sweden. Within study circles led by pharmacists, participants learned to self-monitor glucose, to interpret the results and to act upon them. Results show that study circles held at pharmacies are a feasible way of education persons with type 2 diabetes.…

  15. Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus by a model based on risk indicators: a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte; Mølsted-Pedersen, Lars; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed to prospectively evaluate a screening model for gestational diabetes mellitus on the basis of clinical risk indicators.......This study was performed to prospectively evaluate a screening model for gestational diabetes mellitus on the basis of clinical risk indicators....

  16. Diabetes incidence and long-term exposure to air pollution: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Ketzel, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Animal and cross-sectional epidemiological studies suggest a link between air pollution and diabetes, whereas the limited prospective data show mixed results. We studied the association between long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution and incidence of diabetes....

  17. Oral health awareness and care preferences in patients with diabetes : a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Lindenmeyer, Antje; Bowyer, V.; Roscoe, J.; Dale, Jeremy; Sutcliffe, P. (Paul)

    2013-01-01

    Background\\ud People with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of oral health problems; however, oral health is currently not included in structured diabetes reviews and education in the UK. \\ud \\ud Aim and Objectives\\ud This study explores the patient experience related to oral health and diabetes, especially in relation to:\\ud • Awareness of the link between oral health and diabetes and oral self care needs\\ud • Interaction with health professionals in dental and general practice\\ud • Pre...

  18. Glycaemic control in Sudanese individuals with type 2 diabetes: Population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Sufian K; Elmadhoun, Wadie M; Bushara, Sarra O; Almobarak, Ahmed O; Salim, Reham S; Forawi, Sittana A; Awadallah, Heitham; Elwali, Einas S; Ahmed, Mohamed H

    2017-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major health problem in Sudan and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of glycaemic control among individuals with type 2 diabetes across different cities in Sudan. Individuals with type 2 diabetes attending selected diabetes centres in Sudan, who had been on treatment for DM for at least one year and volunteered to participate were included. Participants were interviewed using standardized pretested questionnaire to record medical history, sociodemographic and life style characteristics. Lipid profile and glycosylated hemoglobin were tested by calibrated laboratory methods. Blood pressure, Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference were measured. Chi squared and logistic regression were used as statistical methods. A total of 387 individuals with T2DM were included in this study (50.4% males and 49.6% females). The glycemic control indicator (HbAIc>7) was poor in 85% of patients. Factors associated with poor glycemic control were prolonged duration of diabetes (p=0.03), high plasma triglyceride (p=0.02), low high density lipoprotein (HDL) level (p=0.04) and low glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (P=0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that low GFR is independent factor with poor diabetes control. High prevalence of uncontrolled diabetes (85%) is noted in Sudanese individuals with type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Association of HCV with diabetes mellitus: an Egyptian case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmat Gamal G

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highest Hepatitis C Virus (HCV prevalence in the world occurs in Egypt. Several studies from different parts of the world have found that 13% to 33% of patients with chronic HCV have associated diabetes, mostly type II Diabetes Mellitus (DM. In Egypt the prevalence of DM is 25.4% among HCV patients. Therefore, it is important to identify the magnitude of the problem of diabetes in order to optimize the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Methods The objective of this case-control study was to evaluate the prevalence of DM and other extrahepatic (EH manifestations among patients with different HCV morbidity stages including asymptomatic, chronic hepatic and cirrhotic patients. In this study, 289 HCV patients older than 18 were selected as cases. Also, 289 healthy controls were included. Laboratory investigations including Liver Function tests (LFT and blood glucose level were done. Also serological assays including cryoglobulin profile, rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibody, HCV-PCR were performed. Results Out of 289 HCV cases, 40 (13.84% were diabetic. Out of 289 healthy controls, 12 (4.15% were diabetic. It was found that the diabetic HCV group mean age was [48.1 (± 9.2]. Males and urbanians represented 72.5% and 85% respectively. Lower level of education was manifested in 52.5% and 87.5% were married. In the nondiabetic HCV group mean age was [40.7 (± 10.4]. Males and urbanians represented 71.5% and 655% respectively. secondary and higher level of education was attained in 55.4% and 76.7% were married. Comparing between the diabetic HCV group and the non diabetic HCV group, age, residence and alcohol drinking were the only significant factors affecting the incidence of diabetes between the two groups. There was no significant difference regarding sonar findings although cirrhosis was more prevalent among diabetic HCV cases and the fibrosis score was higher in diabetic HCV patients than among the non diabetic HCV cases

  20. Black Men's Perceptions and Knowledge of Diabetes: A Church-Affiliated Barbershop Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balls-Berry, Joyce; Watson, Christopher; Kadimpati, Sandeep; Crockett, Andre; Mohamed, Essa A; Brown, Italo; Soto, Miguel Valdez; Sanford, Becky; Halyard, Michele; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Dacy, Lea; Davis, Olga Idriss

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States and disproportionately affects racial and ethnic minorities. These disparities persist despite educational efforts to reduce the prevalence of diabetes. Receptiveness of educational efforts for Black men needs to be studied. This study assesses Black men's receptiveness to a barbershop-based program focused on diabetes prevention and awareness in a church-affiliated barbershop in Rochester, Minnesota. The pastor and barber of a church-affiliated barbershop and academic medical researchers designed a community-engaged research study to determine Black men's perception of diabetes. Recruitment for the 90-minute focus group included flyers (n=60), email, and in-person. Units of analysis included focus-group audio recording, transcripts, and field notes. Using traditional content analysis, we categorized data into themes and sub-themes. Thirteen Black men participated (Group 1, n=6; Group 2, n=7) having a mean age of 40.3 years (range 19 to 65), and employed full-time (77%). Themes included diabetes prevention, treatment, prevalence, risks, and health education. Participants identified diet and exercise as essential components of diabetes prevention. Additionally, participants mentioned that family history contributes to diabetes. Participants agreed that barbershops are an appropriate setting for data collection and health education on diabetes for Black men. Findings indicate that Black men are generally aware of diabetes. The community-engaged research process allowed for development of a culturally appropriate research study on diabetes. This study is the foundation for developing a culturally appropriate health education program on diabetes for Black men.

  1. Relationships between diabetes and medical and dental care costs: findings from a worksite cohort study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Reiko; Hoshuyama, Tsutomu; Wilson, Donald John; Takahashi, Ken; Higashi, Toshiaki

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationships between diabetes and medical and dental care costs from a 5-yr prospective observation of Japanese workers. The data were derived from health and dental examinations and health insurance claims of 4,086 workers aged 40-54 yr. At baseline, the subjects were assigned to four categories: known diabetes; undiagnosed diabetes; impaired fasting glucose (IFG); and non-diabetic. The differences in health care costs among the non-diabetics, IFG and undiagnosed diabetes groups were not seen at baseline, but the costs incurred by the subjects with undiagnosed diabetes substantially increased thereafter. Over 5 yr of the study period, compared with the non-diabetic group, subjects with known diabetes incurred 3.9- and 2.9-fold higher annual inpatient and outpatient costs, respectively, while subjects in the undiagnosed diabetes group incurred 3.0- and 1.6-fold higher costs, respectively. There were no significant associations between annual dental care costs and diabetic status. The excess costs of medical care among subjects with diabetes were attributable to diabetes itself, heart disease and cerebrovascular disease, but not cancer. Among middle-aged workers, diabetics incurred significantly greater medical care costs than non-diabetics, whereas IFG was not associated with higher costs.

  2. Serum homocysteine level in gestational diabetes: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davari Tanha F

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Increased total plasma homocysteine (Hcy is an accepted risk factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD, stroke, preclampsia, recurrent abortion and diabetes type I and II. The aim of the current study was to assess serum homocysteine and its relation with serum folat, vitamine B12 and lipid profile in gestational diabetes mellitus and to compare these with those of pregnant women."n"n Methods: In a prospective controlled survey 80 pregnant women (24-28 weeks with uncomplicated pregnancies were evaluated. They were assigned to one of two groups according to the results of 100g-OGTT. In the case group there were pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus according to the OGTT and in the control group women who had normal OGTT results were put. Levels of fasting glucose, homocysteine, vit B12, and folic acid, uric acid, total cholesterol, triglyceride, Low Density Lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL and High Density Lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL were measured in both groups."n"nResults: The mean level of homocysteine in GDM group was significantly higher than control group (p=0.000. The mean level of folic acid and vit B12 was significantly lower than the level in control group (p=0.001, p=0.004 respectively. Body

  3. A Cross-sectional Study of Depressive Symptoms and Diabetes Self-Care in African Americans and Hispanics/Latinos with Diabetes: The Role of Self-efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Rosalba; Ruggiero, Laurie; Prohaska, Thomas R.; Chavez, Noel; Boughton, Seth W.; Peacock, Nadine; Zhao, Weihan; Nouwen, Arie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between depressive symptoms and diabetes self-care in African American and Hispanic/Latino patients with type 2 diabetes and whether the association (if any) is mediated by diabetes-related self-efficacy. Methods The sample included self-report baseline data of African American and Hispanic/Latino patients with type 2 diabetes aged ≥18 years enrolled in a diabetes self-management intervention study. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire. The Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities measured engagement in healthy eating, physical activity, blood glucose checking, foot care, and smoking. The Diabetes Empowerment Scale-Short Form assessed diabetes-related psychosocial self-efficacy. Indirect effects were examined using the Baron and Kenny regression technique and Sobel testing. Results Sample characteristics (n=250) were: Mean age of 53 years; 68% female; 54% African American; 74% with income Self-efficacy served a significant mediational role in the relation between depression and foot care among African Americans. Conclusions Self-efficacy mediated the relationship between depression and foot care in the African American group, but was not found to be a mediator of any self-care areas within the Hispanic/Latino group. In clinical practice, alleviation of depressive symptoms may improve self-care behavior adherence. Diabetes education may consider inclusion of components to build self-efficacy related to diabetes self-care, especially among African American patients. PMID:27324747

  4. Undiagnosed Diabetes Mellitus in Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard; Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Egelund, Gertrud Baunbæk; Andersen, Stine Bang; Petersen, Pelle Trier; Benfield, Thomas; Witzenrath, Martin; Rohde, Gernot; Ravn, Pernille

    2017-11-29

    Diabetes mellitus is an important risk factor for community-acquired pneumonia, whereas the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and prediabetes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia is largely unknown. We aimed to determine the prevalence of prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes mellitus, and risk factors associated with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus in a large European community-acquired pneumonia cohort. This was a multicenter prospective cohort study of hospitals and private practices in Germany and Austria encompassing 1961 adults with community-acquired pneumonia included in the German Community-Acquired Pneumonia Competence Network (CAPNETZ) study between 2007 and 2014. The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and prediabetes was estimated based on hemoglobin A1c measurements. Logistic regression was used to assess risk factors for undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. Fifteen percent of patients had known diabetes mellitus. Among patients without known diabetes mellitus, 5.0% had undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and 37.5% had prediabetes. Male sex (odds ratio [OR], 2.45 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.35-4.45]), body mass index ≥25 kg/m2 (OR, 2.64 [95% CI, 1.48-4.72]), and hyperglycemia at admission (6-11 mM: OR, 2.93 [95% CI, 1.54-5.60] and ≥11 mM: OR, 44.76 [95% CI, 17.58-113.98]) were associated with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. Patients with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus had a higher 180-day mortality rate compared to patients without diabetes mellitus (12.1% vs 3.8%, respectively; P = .001). Undiagnosed diabetes mellitus was prevalent among community-acquired pneumonia. Male sex, overweight, and hyperglycemia at admission were associated with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. The long-term mortality among patients with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus was high compared to patients without diabetes mellitus. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For

  5. Type 2 diabetes in grandparents and birth weight in offspring and grandchildren in the ALSPAC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, P; Davey Smith, G; Hattersley, A T

    2004-06-01

    To examine the association between a history of type 2 diabetes and birth weight of offspring and grandchildren. Prospective observational study. Diabetic status, as reported by mothers (F1 generation) was collected on grandparents (F0) of babies (F2) born to mothers (F1) who participated in a study of maternal and child health. Associations between risk of grandparental diabetes and birth weight in mothers (F1) and grandchildren (F2) were analysed using linear and logistic regression. Avon: comprising of the city of Bristol and surrounding areas. 12 076 singleton babies (F2), their parents (F1) and maternal and paternal grandparents (F0). Women (F1) who had no parents with type 2 diabetes had lower birth weights than women with one or two diabetic parents, after controlling for the age of both parents. There was a U shaped association between maternal birth weight and grandmaternal diabetes, but no evidence of an association with grandpaternal diabetes. The grandchildren of maternal grandparents with type 2 diabetes were more likely to be in the top tertile of birth weight than grandchildren of non-diabetics. There was evidence for an inverted U shaped association between birth weight of grandchildren and diabetes in paternal grandmothers. This is the first study to show intergenerational associations between type 2 diabetes in one generation and birth weight in the subsequent two generations. While the study has limitations mainly because of missing data, the findings nevertheless provide some support for the role of developmental intrauterine effects and genetically determined insulin resistance in impaired insulin mediated growth in the fetus.

  6. The DISC (Diabetes in Social Context) Study-evaluation of a culturally sensitive social network intervention for diabetic patients in lower socioeconomic groups: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissenberg, Charlotte; Nierkens, Vera; Uitewaal, Paul J M; Geraci, Diana; Middelkoop, Barend J C; Nijpels, Giel; Stronks, Karien

    2012-03-19

    Compared to those in higher socioeconomic groups, diabetic patients in lower socioeconomic groups have less favourable metabolic control and experience more diabetes-related complications. They encounter specific barriers that hinder optimal diabetes self-management, including a lack of social support and other psychosocial mechanisms in their immediate social environments. Powerful Together with Diabetes is a culturally sensitive social network intervention specifically targeted to ethnic Dutch, Moroccan, Turkish, and Surinamese diabetic patients in lower socioeconomic groups. For ten months, patients will participate in peer support groups in which they will share experiences, support each other in maintaining healthy lifestyles, and learn skills to resist social pressure. At the same time, their significant others will also receive an intervention, aimed at maximizing support for and minimizing the negative social influences on diabetes self-management. This study aims to test the effectiveness of Powerful Together with Diabetes. We will use a quasi-experimental design with an intervention group (Group 1) and two comparison groups (Groups 2 and 3), N = 128 in each group. Group 1 will receive Powerful Together with Diabetes. Group 2 will receive Know your Sugar, a six-week group intervention that does not focus on the participants' social environments. Group 3 receives standard care only. Participants in Groups 1 and 2 will be interviewed and physically examined at baseline, 3, 10, and 16 months. We will compare their haemoglobin A1C levels with the haemoglobin A1C levels of Group 3. Main outcome measures are haemoglobin A1C, diabetes-related quality of life, diabetes self-management, health-related, and intermediate outcome measures. We will conduct a process evaluation and a qualitative study to gain more insights into the intervention fidelity, feasibility, and changes in the psychosocial mechanism in the participants' immediate social environments. With this

  7. The DISC (Diabetes in Social Context Study-evaluation of a culturally sensitive social network intervention for diabetic patients in lower socioeconomic groups: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vissenberg Charlotte

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compared to those in higher socioeconomic groups, diabetic patients in lower socioeconomic groups have less favourable metabolic control and experience more diabetes-related complications. They encounter specific barriers that hinder optimal diabetes self-management, including a lack of social support and other psychosocial mechanisms in their immediate social environments. Powerful Together with Diabetes is a culturally sensitive social network intervention specifically targeted to ethnic Dutch, Moroccan, Turkish, and Surinamese diabetic patients in lower socioeconomic groups. For ten months, patients will participate in peer support groups in which they will share experiences, support each other in maintaining healthy lifestyles, and learn skills to resist social pressure. At the same time, their significant others will also receive an intervention, aimed at maximizing support for and minimizing the negative social influences on diabetes self-management. This study aims to test the effectiveness of Powerful Together with Diabetes. Methods/Design We will use a quasi-experimental design with an intervention group (Group 1 and two comparison groups (Groups 2 and 3, N = 128 in each group. Group 1 will receive Powerful Together with Diabetes. Group 2 will receive Know your Sugar, a six-week group intervention that does not focus on the participants' social environments. Group 3 receives standard care only. Participants in Groups 1 and 2 will be interviewed and physically examined at baseline, 3, 10, and 16 months. We will compare their haemoglobin A1C levels with the haemoglobin A1C levels of Group 3. Main outcome measures are haemoglobin A1C, diabetes-related quality of life, diabetes self-management, health-related, and intermediate outcome measures. We will conduct a process evaluation and a qualitative study to gain more insights into the intervention fidelity, feasibility, and changes in the psychosocial mechanism in the

  8. Study of the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes mellitus through animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito-Casillas, Yeray; Melián, Carlos; Wägner, Ana María

    2016-01-01

    Most research in diabetes mellitus (DM) has been conducted in animals, and their replacement is currently a chimera. As compared to when they started to be used by modern science in the 17th century, a very high number of animal models of diabetes is now available, and they provide new insights into almost every aspect of diabetes. Approaches combining human, in vitro, and animal studies are probably the best strategy to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of diabetes, and the choice of the best model to achieve such objective is crucial. Traditionally classified based on pathogenesis as spontaneous or induced models, each has its own advantages and disadvantages. The most common animal models of diabetes are described, and in addition to non-obese diabetic mice, biobreeding diabetes-prone (BB-DP) rats, streptozotocin-induced models, or high-fat diet-induced diabetic C57Bl/6J mice, new valuable models, such as dogs and cats with spontaneous diabetes, are described. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Type II diabetes mellitus and menopause: a multinational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterrosa-Castro, A; Blümel, J E; Portela-Buelvas, K; Mezones-Holguín, E; Barón, G; Bencosme, A; Benítez, Z; Bravo, L M; Calle, A; Chedraui, P; Flores, D; Espinoza, M T; Gómez, G; Hernández-Bueno, J A; Laribezcoa, F; Lima, S; Martino, M; Mostajo, D; Ojeda, E; Onatra, W; Sánchez, H; Navarro, D; Tserotas, K; Vallejo, M S; Witis, S; Zuñiga, M C

    2013-12-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus causes metabolic changes that may lead to early menopause and worsen climacteric symptoms. To determine the risk factors for type II diabetes mellitus and assess the impact of this disease on the age of menopause and on climacteric symptoms. A total of 6079 women aged between 40 and 59 years from 11 Latin American countries were requested to answer the Menopause Rating Scale and Goldberg Anxiety-Depression Scale. The prevalence of diabetes was 6.7%. Diabetes mellitus was associated with arterial hypertension (odds ratio (OR) 4.49; 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.47-5.31), the use of psychotropic drugs (OR 1.54; 95% CI 1.22-1.94), hormonal therapy (OR 1.46; 95% CI 1.11-1.92), ≥ 50 years of age (OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.17-1.86), overweight or obese (OR 1.47; 95% CI 1.15-1.89), and waist circumference ≥ 88 cm (OR 1.32; 95% CI 1.06-1.65). Factors associated with lower risk of diabetes were the use of hormonal contraceptives (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.35-0.87), alcohol (OR 0.73; 95% CI 0.54-0.98) and living in cities > 2500 meters above sea level (OR 0.70; 95% CI 0.53-0.91) or with high temperatures (OR 0.67; 95% CI 0.51-0.88). In turn, diabetes tripled the risk of menopause in women under 45 years of age. Diabetes did not increase the risk of deterioration of quality of life due to climacteric symptoms. Menopause does not increase the risk of type II diabetes mellitus. Diabetes is associated with early menopause in women under 45 years of age.

  10. Diabetic Driving Studies-Part 1: Brake Response Time in Diabetic Drivers With Lower Extremity Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyr, Andrew J; Spiess, Kerianne E

    Although the effect of lower extremity pathology and surgical intervention on automobile driving function has been a topic of contemporary interest, we are unaware of any analysis of the effect of lower extremity diabetic sensorimotor neuropathy on driving performance. The objective of the present case-control investigation was to assess the mean brake response time in diabetic drivers with lower extremity neuropathy compared with that of a control group and a brake response safety threshold. The driving performances of participants were evaluated using a computerized driving simulator with specific measurement of the mean brake response time and frequency of abnormally delayed brake responses. We analyzed a control group of 25 active drivers with neither diabetes nor lower extremity neuropathy and an experimental group of 25 active drivers with type 2 diabetes and lower extremity neuropathy. The experimental group demonstrated a 37.89% slower mean brake response time (0.757 ± 0.180 versus 0.549 ± 0.076 second; p < .001), with abnormally delayed responses occurring at a greater frequency (57.5% versus 3.5%; p < .001). Independent of a comparative statistical analysis, the observed mean brake response time in the experimental group was slower than the reported safety brake response threshold of 0.70 second. The results of the present investigation provide original data with respect to abnormally delayed brake responses in diabetic patients with lower extremity neuropathy and might raise the potential for impaired driving function in this population. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sexual dysfunction in women with type 1 diabetes: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzlin, Paul; Mathieu, Chantal; Van den Bruel, Annick; Bosteels, Jan; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Demyttenaere, Koen

    2002-04-01

    This study aimed to 1) examine the prevalence of sexual problems in women with type 1 diabetes, 2) compare this prevalence rate with that of an age-matched control group, 3) study the influence of diabetes-related somatic factors on female sexuality, and 4) study the influence of psychological variables on the sexual functioning of both groups. A total of 120 women with diabetes visiting the outpatient diabetes clinic completed questionnaires evaluating psychological adjustment to diabetes, marital satisfaction, depression, and sexual functioning. Medical records were used to obtain data on HbA(1c), use of medication, BMI, and early-onset microvascular complications. An age-matched control group of 180 healthy women attending an outpatient gynecological clinic for preventive routine gynecological assessment also completed the non-diabetes-related questionnaires. More women with diabetes than control subjects reported sexual dysfunction (27 vs. 15%; P = 0.04), but a significant difference was found only for decreased lubrication. No association was found between sexual dysfunction and age, BMI, duration of diabetes, HbA(1c), use of medication, menopausal status, or complications. Women with more complications, however, reported significantly more sexual dysfunctions, and the presence of complications altered treatment satisfaction. Both diabetic and control women with sexual dysfunction mentioned lower overall quality of the marital relation and more depressive symptoms than their respective counterparts without sexual problems. Depression was a significant predictor for sexual dysfunction in both women with diabetes and control subjects. Sexual problems are frequent in women with diabetes. They affect the overall quality of life and deserve more attention in clinical practice and research.

  12. Prevalence and Cardiovascular Associations of Diabetic Retinopathy and Maculopathy: Results from the Gutenberg Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raum, Philipp; Lamparter, Julia; Ponto, Katharina A; Peto, Tunde; Hoehn, René; Schulz, Andreas; Schneider, Astrid; Wild, Philipp S; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Mirshahi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in people of working age. The purpose of this paper is to report the prevalence and cardiovascular associations of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy (DMac) in Germany. The Gutenberg Health Study (GHS) is a population-based study with 15,010 participants aged between 35 at 74 years from the city of Mainz and the district of Mainz-Bingen. We determined the weighted prevalence of DR and DMac by assessing fundus photographs of persons with diabetes from the GHS data base. Diabetes was defined as HbA1c ≥ 6.5%, known diagnosis diabetes mellitus or known diabetes medication. Furthermore, we analysed the association between DR and cardiovascular risk factors and diseases. Overall, 7.5% (1,124/15,010) of the GHS cohort had diabetes. Of these, 27.7% were unaware of their disease and thus were newly diagnosed by their participation in the GHS. The prevalence of DR and DMac was 21.7% and 2.3%, respectively among patients with diabetes. Vision-threatening disease was present in 5% of the diabetic cohort. In the multivariable analysis DR (all types) was associated with age (Odds Ratio [95% confidence interval]: 0.97 [0.955-0.992]; p = 0.006) arterial hypertension (1.90 [1.190-3.044]; p = 0.0072) and vision-threatening DR with obesity (3.29 [1.504-7.206]; p = 0.0029). DR (all stages) and vision-threatening DR were associated with duration of diabetes (1.09 [1.068-1.114]; pdiabetic retinal disease in Germany [corrected].Prevalence of DR was lower in the GHS compared to East-Asian studies. Associations were found with age, arterial hypertension, obesity, and duration of diabetes mellitus.

  13. Age at menopause in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus : the OVADIA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yarde, F.; van der Schouw, Y. T.; de Valk, H. W.; Franx, A.; Eijkemans, M. J. C.; Spierings, W.; Fauser, Bart; Broekmans, F. J. M.

    STUDY QUESTION: Is type 1 diabetes a determinant of advanced ovarian ageing, resulting in an early age at natural menopause? SUMMARY ANSWER: No clear evidence was provided that type 1 diabetes is a determinant of accelerated ovarian ageing resulting in an early menopause. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: The

  14. Genome-wide association study of retinopathy in individuals without diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Richard A.; Sim, Xueling; Li, Xiaohui; Cotch, Mary Frances; Ikram, M. Kamran; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Harris, Tamara B.; Jonasson, Fridbert; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Launer, Lenore J.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Boerwinkle, Eric; Cheung, Ning; Hewitt, Alex W.; Liew, Gerald; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Attia, John; Scott, Rodney; Glazer, Nicole L.; Lumley, Thomas; McKnight, Barbara; Psaty, Bruce M.; Taylor, Kent; Hofman, Albert; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Tay, Wan-Ting; teo, Yik Ying; Seielstad, Mark; Liu, Jianjun; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Saw, Seang-Mei; Aung, Tin; Ganesh, Santhi K.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Nalls, Mike A.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Kuo, Jane Z.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Klein, Ronald; Siscovick, David S.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Tai, E. Shong; Vingerling, Johannes; Wong, Tien Y.; Mitchel, Paul; Rochtchina, Elena; Baird, Paul; Xie, Sophia; Viswanathan, Ananth; Inouye, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Mild retinopathy (microaneurysms or dot-blot hemorrhages) is observed in persons without diabetes or hypertension and may reflect microvascular disease in other organs. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of mild retinopathy in persons without diabetes. A working group agreed on

  15. Podiatric care for diabetic patients with foot problems: an observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, P.M.; Dekker, J.; Lankhorst, G.J.; Dekker, E.; Bakker, K.; Dooren, J.; Rauwerda, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe podiatric care for diabetic patients with foot problems and to explore the changes in knowledge, self-care behaviour and physical functioning after podiatric care. the treatment characteristics of 26 diabetic patients referred to podiatry were assessed. Prior

  16. Cross-sectional pilot study about the health status of diabetic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Background: Being a leading cause of death worldwide, epidemiological studies about diabetes mellitus have encouraged ... treated with insulin while 35.4% were treated with oral hypoglycemics. Meanwhile 32.6% of type 2 diabetic patients were treated with insulin. Only 9.2% of all patients had fasting blood sugar below ...

  17. An ethnobotanical study of plants used for the treatment of diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the commonest diseases affecting the citizens of both developed and poor countries. In South Africa, the number of people suffering from diabetes is believed to be rising steadily. An ethnobotanical study of plants used by the traditional healers, herbalists and rural dwellers for the treatment of ...

  18. Frequency of diabetic retinopathy and associated risk factors in Khartoum, Sudan: population based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einas S Elwali

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To assess the frequency and associated risk factors of diabetic retinopathy among Sudanese individuals with diabetes attending Makka Eye complex in Khartoum, Sudan. METHODS: The cross sectional hospital based study recruited 316 individuals with diabetes from Makkah Eye Complex Retina Clinic. Standard questionnaire was used to collect demographic data, medical history and life style characteristics. Blood samples were taken to measure HbA1c and lipid profile. Fundus and slit lamp examination were performed for screening of diabetic retinopathy. RESULTS: Among 316 participants, 187 (59.2% were males and 129 (40.8% were females. The mean age of participants was 58.7±10.5y. The overall frequency of retinopathy was 261 (82.6%. The percentages of the total participants with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR were 126 (39.9% and non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR were 135 (42.7%. Importantly, duration of diabetes mellitus (DM (72.2% of more than 10y, being on oral hypoglycaemic drugs (versus insulin, and hypertension were all significant risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (P=0.00, 0.01 and 0.00 respectively. Complications of diabetes like diabetic foot (17.7%, history of amputation (6.7% and clinically significant macular edema (CSME (47.4% of the eyes were all significant risk factors (P<0.05. Logistic regression analysis showed that duration of diabetes, hypertension and CSME were found to be absolute risk factors (P=0.007, 0.003 and 0.000 respectively. Duration of DM of more than 10y have more than double risk (OR=2.8, while having hypertension triples the risk of retinopathy (OR=3.1. CONCLUSION: High rates of diabetic retinopathy are noted among individuals with diabetes attending Makkah Eye hospital in capital Khartoum. Urgent strategies are needed to monitor and treat hypertension and optimize diabetes control in individuals with diabetes. More investment in diabetes services is urgently needed.

  19. Assessment of Knowledge of Self Blood Glucose Monitoring and Extent of Self Titration of Anti-Diabetic Drugs among Diabetes Mellitus Patients - A Cross Sectional, Community Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, V; Thirunavukkarasu, J

    2016-03-01

    Self blood glucose monitoring is an important context of self care in the management of diabetes mellitus. All the guidelines must be followed while performing self blood glucose monitoring and tracking of values is essential to facilitate the physician while titrating the drugs and /or doses of anti diabetes medication. Self titration by patients following self monitoring must be discouraged. To assess the knowledge and practice of self blood glucose monitoring among diabetes patients and extent of self titration of anti diabetes medicines among diabetes patients based on self blood glucose monitoring. This pilot, cross-sectional, observational study was conducted using a validated questionnaire among adult male and female diabetes patients performing self blood glucose monitoring at home. Diabetes patients with complications and juvenile diabetes patients were excluded. Out of 153 patients surveyed, only 37 (24.1%) (20 males, 17 females) patients were aware and have been following self blood glucose monitoring appropriately. About 116 (75.8%) (64 males, 52 females) of patients were devoid of adequate knowledge and did not practice self blood glucose monitoring in a proper way. Ninety eight (64.05%) accepted that they self titrate their anti diabetic medicines based on self monitoring. Self monitoring of blood glucose should be encouraged and patients should be taught importance of following correct steps and tracking of self monitoring by physician or diabetes educator.

  20. Frequency of blood glucose monitoring in relation to glycaemic control: observational study with diabetes database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Josie M M; Newton, Ray W; Ruta, Danny A; MacDonald, Thomas M; Stevenson, Richard J; Morris, Andrew D

    1999-01-01

    Objectives To investigate patterns of self monitoring of blood glucose concentration in diabetic patients who use insulin and to determine whether frequency of self monitoring is related to glycaemic control. Setting Diabetes database, Tayside, Scotland. Subjects Patients resident in Tayside in 1993-5 who were using insulin and were registered on the database and diagnosed with insulin dependent (type 1) or non-insulin dependent (type 2) diabetes before 1993. Main outcome measures Number of glucose monitoring reagent strips dispensed (reagent strip uptake) derived from records of prescriptions. First recorded haemoglobin A1c concentration in the study period, and reagent strips dispensed in the previous 6 months. Results Among 807 patients with type 1 diabetes, 128 (16%) did not redeem any prescriptions for glucose monitoring reagent strips in the 3 year study period. Only 161 (20%) redeemed prescriptions for enough reagent strips to test glucose daily. The corresponding figures for the 790 patients with type 2 diabetes who used insulin were 162 (21%; no strips) and 131 (17%; daily tests). Reagent strip uptake was influenced both by age and by deprivation category. There was a direct relation between uptake and glycaemic control for 258 patients (with recorded haemoglobin A1c concentrations) with type 1 diabetes. In a linear regression model the decrease in haemoglobin A1c concentration for every extra 180 reagent strips dispensed was 0.7%. For the 290 patients with type 2 diabetes who used insulin there was no such relation. Conclusions Self monitoring of blood glucose concentration is associated with improved glycaemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes. Regular self monitoring in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes is uncommon. Key messagesSeveral studies have indicated the importance of self monitoring of blood glucose concentration for prevention of complications in patients with diabetesUptake of reagent strips for self monitoring of blood glucose

  1. Risk factors for periodontal diseases among Yemeni type II diabetic patients. A case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Shamala

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic periodontal diseases are one of diabetes mellitus complications. The present study aims to compare the periodontal status of type II diabetic patients to a control group and assess the role of risk factors in both groups. Materials and methods: A case-control study was conducted of 270 individuals (132 type II diabetics and 138 non-diabetics. Full mouth periodontal examination including plaque index, gingival bleeding, gingival recession, clinical attachment loss (CAL, tooth mobility, furcation involvement and the number of missing teeth. The case group was subdivided according to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c status (poorly controlled HbA1c >8 and well controlled HbA1c≤8 Likewise, the duration of diabetes mellitus as short or long duration (DM≤10 or >10. The diabetic group was also subdivided according to smoking and Khat chewing habits. Result: The severity of periodontal disease among type II diabetic patients were significantly higher compared to the control group regarding the plaque index 2.6 (1.6-4.3, bleeding on probing 3.5 (2.3-13.0, gingival recession 2.0 (1.2-3.4, furcation involvement 4.0 (2.3-6.7, clinical attachment loss 5.7 (3.1-10.5, tooth mobility 2.0 (1.2-3.4, and number of missing teeth 4.4 (2.3-8.5. In addition, poorly controlled type II DM and long duration had higher CAL and number of missing teeth than well-controlled DM and short duration. No significant differences were found between smokers/nonsmokers and Khat chewers/non-chewers among the diabetic group. Conclusion: Type II diabetic patients have severe periodontal destruction and tooth loss compared to non-diabetic people and there were no differences within the diabetic group in regards to smoking and Khat chewing habits.

  2. Study on The Effect of Royal Jelly on Reproductive Parameters in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Ghanbari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus has a variety of structural and functional effects on the male reproductive system. Diabetes results in reduced sperm parameters and libido. The present study aims to investigate the effects of royal jelly (RJ on reproductive parameters of testosterone and malondialdehyde (MDA production in diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was conducted on adult male Wistar rats. The animals were divided into four groups (n=8 per group: control, RJ, diabetic and diabetic treated with RJ. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 60 mg/kg body weight (BW of streptozotocin (STZ. RJ, at a dose of 100 mg/kg BW was given by gavage. The duration of treatment was six weeks. After the treatment period the rats were sacrificed. The testes were weighed and changes in sperm count, motility, viability, deformity, DNA integrity and chromatin quality were analyzed. Serum testosterone and MDA concentrations of testicular tissue were determined. Data were analyzed by oneway ANOVA with p<0.05 as the significant level. Results: STZ-induced diabetes decreased numerous reproductive parameters in rats. Testicular weight, sperm count, motility, viability and serum testosterone levels increased in the diabetic group treated with RJ. There was a significant decrease observed in sperm deformity, DNA integrity, chromatin quality, and tissue MDA levels in diabetic rats treated with RJ compared to the diabetic group (p<0.05. Conclusion: RJ improved reproductive parameters such as testicular weight, sperm count, viability, motility, deformity, DNA integrity, chromatin quality, serum testosterone and testicular tissue MDA levels in diabetic rats.

  3. Association between periodontitis needing surgical treatment and subsequent diabetes risk: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liu, Jiung-Hsiun; Wang, I-Kuan; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chen, Chao-Jung; Ting, I-Wen; Wu, I-Ting; Sung, Fung-Chang; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Chang, Yen-Jung

    2014-06-01

    It is well known that patients with diabetes have higher extent and severity of periodontitis, but the backward relationship is little investigated. The relationship between periodontitis needing dental surgery and subsequent type 2 diabetes mellitus (DMT2) in those individuals without diabetes was assessed. This is a retrospective cohort study using data from the national health insurance system of Taiwan. The periodontitis cohort involved 22,299 patients, excluding those with diabetes already or those diagnosed with diabetes within 1 year from baseline. Each study participant was randomly frequency matched by age, sex, and index year with one individual from the general population without periodontitis. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate the influence of periodontitis on the risk of diabetes. The mean follow-up period is 5.47 ± 3.54 years. Overall, the subsequent incidence of DMT2 was 1.24-fold higher in the periodontitis cohort than in the control cohort, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.19 (95% confidence interval = 1.10 to 1.29) after controlling for sex, age, and comorbidities. This is the largest nation-based study examining the risk of diabetes in Asian patients with periodontitis. Those patients with periodontitis needing dental surgery have increased risk of future diabetes within 2 years compared with those participants with periodontitis not requiring dental surgery.

  4. New insights on diabetes in Turner syndrome: results from an observational study in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra-Gasparini, Daniela; Altieri, Paola; Scarano, Emanuela; Perri, Annamaria; Morselli-Labate, Antonio M; Pagotto, Uberto; Mazzanti, Laura; Pasquali, Renato; Gambineri, Alessandra

    2018-03-01

    To explore the characteristics of diabetes mellitus in adults with Turner syndrome. Observational study consisting of a prospective phase after the access of adults with Turner syndrome to the Endocrinology Unit (median period of follow-up 15.6, interquartile range: 12.0-24.5 months) and a retrospective collection of data from the diagnosis of Turner syndrome until the time of access to the Endocrinology Unit. A total of 113 Italian Turner syndrome patients were included in the study. During the prospective phase of the study, each patient underwent physical examination, fasting blood sampling, and an oral glucose tolerance test on a yearly basis. Oral glucose tolerance test was used to perform the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. Before access to the Endocrinology Unit, diabetes mellitus was diagnosed in two Turner syndrome patients. Another five cases of diabetes mellitus were diagnosed at the first access to the Endocrinology Unit, whereas seven new cases of diabetes mellitus were diagnosed during the prospective phase of the study. At the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, only one patient had fasting glucose above 126 mg/dL, and only two had an HbA1c value >6.5% (48 mmol/mol). When compared to normo-glucose tolerant patients, the diabetic patients had a significantly lower insulin-to-glucose ratio at 30 and 60 min of the oral glucose tolerance test. In the regression analyses, only age was associated with the development of diabetes mellitus. This study confirms that diabetes mellitus is frequent in Turner syndrome and suggests that it is specific to the syndrome. In addition, this study demonstrates that oral glucose tolerance test is a more sensitive test than HbA1c for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in Turner syndrome.

  5. Prospective study on microangiopathy in type 2 diabetic foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiordaliso, Fabio; Clerici, Giacomo; Maggioni, Serena; Caminiti, Maurizio; Bisighini, Cinzia; Novelli, Deborah; Minnella, Daniela; Corbelli, Alessandro; Morisi, Riccardo; De Iaco, Alberto; Faglia, Ezio

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the significance of microangiopathy in the development of foot ulcer, which is still disputed. We assessed microangiopathy by histological analysis of the capillary ultrastructure using transmission electron microscopy and capillary density and arteriolar morphology in paraffin-embedded sections from the skin of type 2 diabetic patients: 30 neuroischaemic patients (Isc) revascularised with peripheral angioplasty and 30 neuropathic patients (Neu) with foot ulcer, compared with ten non-diabetic volunteers. In the diabetic patients, capillaries in the dermal papillary layer were fewer (-22.2%, 159 ± 43 vs 205 ± 52 mm(2) in non-diabetic volunteers, p foot skin. The predominance of arteriolar occlusions with neuroischaemia indicated the existence of an additional 'small vessel disease' that did not affect an effective revascularisation and did not worsen the prognosis of major amputations but slowed the healing process of the neuroischaemic foot ulcer. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02610036.

  6. Comparative Effectiveness of a Mindful Eating Intervention to a Diabetes Self-Management Intervention among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Carla K.; Kristeller, Jean L.; Headings, Amy; Nagaraja, Haikady; Miser, W. Fred

    2012-01-01

    Mindful eating offers promise as an effective approach for weight management and glycemic control in people with diabetes. Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is an essential component of effective self-care. Yet, little research has compared the effect of mindful eating to DSME-based treatment. This study compared the impact of these two interventions in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A prospective randomized controlled trial with two parallel interventions was employed. ...

  7. A Modified Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System to Assess Diabetes Self-management Behaviors and Diabetes Care in Monterrey Mexico: A Cross-sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    McEwen, Marylyn Morris; Elizondo-Pereo, Rogelio Andr?s; Pasvogel, Alice E.; Meester, Irene; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Gonz?lez-Salazar, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the leading causes of death from worldwide non-communicable diseases. The prevalence of diabetes in the Mexico (MX)–United States border states exceeds the national rate in both countries. The economic burden of diabetes, due to decreased productivity, disability, and medical costs, is staggering and increases significantly when T2DM-related complications occur. The purpose of this study was to use a modified behavioral risk factor surveillance system...

  8. Diabetes in an emergency context: the Malian case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besançon, Stéphane; Fall, Ibrahima-Soce; Doré, Mathieu; Sidibé, Assa; Hagon, Olivier; Chappuis, François; Beran, David

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization proposes 6 building blocks for health systems. These are vulnerable to challenges in many contexts. Findings from a 2004 assessment of the health system in Mali for diabetes care found many barriers were present for the management and care of this condition. Following this assessment different projects to strengthen the healthcare system for people living with diabetes were undertaken by a local NGO, Santé Diabète. In March 2012, following a Coup in Bamako, the northern part of Mali was occupied and cut-off from the rest of the country. This had a major impact on the health system throughout the country. Due to the lack of response by humanitarian actors, Santé Diabète in close collaboration with other local stakeholders developed a humanitarian response for patients with diabetes. This response included evacuation of children with Type 1 diabetes from northern regions to Bamako; supplies of medicines and tools for management of diabetes; and support to people with diabetes who moved from the north to the south of the country. It has been argued that diabetes is a good tracer for health systems and based on Santé Diabète's experience in Mali, diabetes could also be used as a tracer in the context of emergencies. One lesson from this experience is that although people with diabetes should be included as a vulnerable part of the population they are not considered as such. Also within a complex emergency different "diabetes populations" may exist with different needs requiring tailored responses, such as internally displaced people versus those still in conflict areas. From Santé Diabète's perspective, the challenge was changing the ways it operated from a development NGO to an emergency NGO. In this role it could rely on its knowledge of the local situation and its function as part of the post-conflict situation. The lessons learnt from this experience by Santé Diabète in Mali may be useful for other NGOs and the humanitarian

  9. Diabetes in an emergency context: the Malian case study

    OpenAIRE

    Besan?on, St?phane; Fall, Ibrahima-Soce; Dor?, Mathieu; Sidib?, Assa; Hagon, Olivier; Chappuis, Fran?ois; Beran, David

    2015-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization proposes 6 building blocks for health systems. These are vulnerable to challenges in many contexts. Findings from a 2004 assessment of the health system in Mali for diabetes care found many barriers were present for the management and care of this condition. Following this assessment different projects to strengthen the healthcare system for people living with diabetes were undertaken by a local NGO, Sant? Diab?te. Case description In March 2012, follo...

  10. Regional differences in clinical care among patients with type 1 diabetes in Brazil: Brazilian Type 1 Diabetes Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Marília B; Cobas, Roberta A; Matheus, Alessandra S; Tannus, Lucianne R; Negrato, Carlos Antonio; Rodacki, Melanie; Braga, Neuza; Cordeiro, Marilena M; Luescher, Jorge L; Berardo, Renata S; Nery, Marcia; Arruda-Marques, Maria do Carmo A; Calliari, Luiz E; Noronha, Renata M; Manna, Thais D; Zajdenverg, Lenita; Salvodelli, Roberta; Penha, Fernanda G; Foss, Milton C; Foss-Freitas, Maria C; Pires, Antonio C; Robles, Fernando C; Guedes, Mariadefátimas; Dib, Sergio A; Dualib, Patricia; Silva, Saulo C; Sepulvida, Janice; Almeida, Henriqueta G; Sampaio, Emerson; Rea, Rosangela; Faria, Ana Cristina R; Tschiedel, Balduino; Lavigne, Suzana; Cardozo, Gustavo A; Azevedo, Mirela J; Canani, Luis Henrique; Zucatti, Alessandra T; Coral, Marisa Helena C; Pereira, Daniela Aline; Araujo, Luiz Antonio; Tolentino, Monica; Pedrosa, Hermelinda C; Prado, Flaviane A; Rassi, Nelson; Araujo, Leticia B; Fonseca, Reine Marie C; Guedes, Alexis D; Matos, Odelissa S; Faria, Manuel; Azulay, Rossana; Forti, Adriana C; Façanha, Cristina; Montenegro, Ana Paula; Montenegro, Renan; Melo, Naira H; Rezende, Karla F; Ramos, Alberto; Felicio, João Sooares; Santos, Flavia M; Jezini, Deborah L; Cordeiro, Marilena M

    2012-10-29

    To determine the characteristics of clinical care offered to type 1 diabetic patients across the four distinct regions of Brazil, with geographic and contrasting socioeconomic differences. Glycemic control, prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, screening for chronic complications and the frequency that the recommended treatment goals were met using the American Diabetes Association guidelines were evaluated. This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study conducted from December 2008 to December 2010 in 28 secondary and tertiary care public clinics in 20 Brazilian cities in north/northeast, mid-west, southeast and south regions. The data were obtained from 3,591 patients (56.0% females and 57.1% Caucasians) aged 21.2 ± 11.7 years with a disease duration of 9.6 ± 8.1 years (region. Hypertension was more frequent in the mid-west (32%) and north/northeast (25%) than in the southeast (19%) and south (17%) regions (psoutheast region achieved LDL cholesterol goals and were treated with statins (pregions were screened for retinopathy and nephropathy, compared with patients from the south and southeast. Patients from the south/southeast regions had more intensive insulin regimens than patients from the north/northeast and mid-west regions (pregion (pregion (pregion were younger, non-Caucasian, from lower economic status, used less continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, performed less SBGM and were less overweight/obese (pregions, did not meet metabolic control goals and were not screened for diabetes-related chronic complications. These results should guide governmental health policy decisions, specific to each geographic region, to improve diabetes care and decrease the negative impact diabetes has on the public health system.

  11. A study of diabetes mellitus within a large sample of Australian twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Condon, Julianne; Shaw, Joanne E; Luciano, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Twin studies of diabetes mellitus can help elucidate genetic and environmental factors in etiology and can provide valuable biological samples for testing functional hypotheses, for example using expression and methylation studies of discordant pairs. We searched the volunteer Australian Twin...... Registry (19,387 pairs) for twins with diabetes using disease checklists from nine different surveys conducted from 1980-2000. After follow-up questionnaires to the twins and their doctors to confirm diagnoses, we eventually identified 46 pairs where one or both had type 1 diabetes (T1D), 113 pairs...... with type 2 diabetes (T2D), 41 female pairs with gestational diabetes (GD), 5 pairs with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and one pair with MODY. Heritabilities of T1D, T2D and GD were all high, but our samples did not have the power to detect effects of shared environment unless they were very large...

  12. Oral health status of children with type 1 diabetes: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ahmad Faisal; McGrath, Colman Patrick; Yiu, Cynthia K Y

    2017-10-26

    The aim of this study was to compare the oral health status of children with type 1 diabetes and healthy controls. This comparative study involved 64 children, 32 children with type 1 diabetes and 32 age- and gender-matched controls. Oral health examination was conducted using WHO criteria. Dental caries experience was recorded using DMFT/dmft index and periodontal parameters were assessed using plaque, gingivitis, gingival bleeding and calculus indexes. Dental caries and periodontal parameters between the two groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Children with diabetes exhibited significantly greater plaque deposits (p=0.01) and a higher mean plaque index (pgingival index was found between the two groups. Children with type 1 diabetes had a poor oral health status with greater plaque accumulation than children without diabetes.

  13. Determinants of Intravascular Resistance in Indian Diabetic Nephropathy Patients: A Hospital-Based Study

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    Anubhav Thukral

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives. Metabolic dysregulation has failed to explain clinical variability of patients with diabetic nephropathy and hence a renewed interest emerged in haemodynamic factors as determinant of progression and development of diabetic nephropathy. We therefore studied for various factors which can correlate with raised renal vascular resistance in diabetic nephropathy. Material and Methods. Renal vascular resistance was measured in patients with established and incipient diabetic nephropathy and compared with controls using noninvasive color Doppler examinations of intrarenal vasculature. Results. Renal vascular resistance correlated with age, duration of disease, GFR, serum creatinine, and stage of retinopathy. Renal vascular resistance was significantly reduced in patients on treatment with RAAS inhibitors and insulin, than those on OHA and antihypertensives other than RAAS inhibitors. Conclusion. The study implies that renal vascular resistance may help identify diabetics at high risk of developing nephropathy, and these set of patients could be candidates for RAAS inhibition and early insulin therapy even in patients without albuminuria.

  14. Abnormal sleep patterns in subjects with type II diabetes mellitus and its effect on diabetic microangiopathies: Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular Genetic Study (SN-DREAMS, report 20).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Rajiv; Gupta, Aditi; Venkatesh, Kadri; Kulothungan, Vaitheeswaran; Sharma, Tarun

    2012-08-01

    To study the prevalence of Abnormal Sleep Patterns (ASPs), gender-wise, in subjects with type II diabetes mellitus and its influence on diabetic microangiopathies. A population-based cross-sectional survey was conducted among 1,414 patients having type II diabetes mellitus. Diabetic retinopathy was graded using stereoscopic digital fundus photography. Neuropathy was assessed by measuring vibration perception threshold using a sensitometer. Nephropathy was diagnosed by the presence of microalbuminuria in the first morning urine sample. ASPs were defined as either short (less than 5 h) or long (more than 9 h) duration of sleep with excessive daytime sleepiness. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score was assessed to note excessive daytime sleepiness; a score of more than 10 was considered as abnormal. The prevalence of ASPs was more in subjects with diabetes than with those without diabetes (14.8 vs. 6.6%) (P = 0.009), especially in women (15.7 vs. 5.6%) (P = 0.021). Likewise, the prevalence of short duration of sleep was higher in subjects with diabetes compared to those without diabetes (6.6 vs. 2.2%) (P = 0.040). The mean age of women subjects with diabetes, having ASPs, was higher than those without diabetes (56.4 ± 8.9 years vs. 47.2 ± 5.9 years, P = 0.033). Women subjects with ASPs had a higher risk of diabetic neuropathy on both univariate and multivariate analysis. ASPs are not only related to diabetes but can also influence the microvascular complications arising due to diabetes, particularly diabetic neuropathy. Diabetology and sleep medicine specialists need to work together to prevent the negative interactions between these two groups.

  15. Medication adherence in type 2 diabetes: the ENTRED study 2007, a French Population-Based Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Tiv

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adherence to prescribed medications is a key dimension of healthcare quality. The aim of this large population-based study was to evaluate self-reported medication adherence and to identify factors linked with poor adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes in France. METHODOLOGY: The ENTRED study 2007, a French national survey of people treated for diabetes, was based on a representative sample of patients who claimed reimbursement for oral hypoglycaemic agents and/or insulin at least three times between August 2006 and July 2007, and who were randomly selected from the database of the two main National Health Insurance Systems. Medication adherence was determined using a six-item self-administered questionnaire. A multinomial polychotomous logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with medication adherence in the 3,637 persons with type 2 diabetes. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty nine percent of patients reported good medication adherence, 49% medium adherence and 12% poor adherence. The factors significantly associated with poor adherence in multivariate analysis were socio-demographic factors: age 8% and existing diabetes complications; and health care-related factors: difficulties for taking medication alone, decision making by the patient only, poor acceptability of medical recommendations, lack of family or social support, need for information on treatment, reporting no confidence in the future, need for medical support and follow-up by a specialist physician. CONCLUSIONS: In a country with a high level of access to healthcare, our study demonstrated a substantial low level of medication adherence in type 2 diabetic patients. Better identification of those with poor adherence and individualised suitable recommendations remain essential for better healthcare management.

  16. Wolfram syndrome (diabetes insipidus, diabetes, optic atrophy, and deafness): clinical and genetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Annunzio, Giuseppe; Minuto, Nicola; D'Amato, Elena; de Toni, Teresa; Lombardo, Fortunato; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Lorini, Renata

    2008-09-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by diabetes insipidus, diabetes (nonautoimmune), optic atrophy, and deafness (a set of conditions referred to as DIDMOAD). The WFS1 gene is located on the short arm of chromosome 4. Wolfram syndrome prevalence is 1 in 770,000 live births, with a 1 in 354 carrier frequency. We evaluated six Italian children from five unrelated families. Genetic analysis for Wolfram syndrome was performed by PCR amplification and direct sequencing. Mutation screening revealed five distinct variants, one novel mutation (c.1346C>T; p.T449I) and four previously described, all located in exon 8. Phenotype-genotype correlation is difficult, and the same mutation gives very different phenotypes. Severely inactivating mutations result in a more severe phenotype than mildly inactivating ones. Clinical follow-up showed the progressive syndrome's seriousness.

  17. Multimodal optical measurement for study of lower limb tissue viability in patients with diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dremin, Viktor V.; Zherebtsov, Evgeny A.; Sidorov, Victor V.; Krupatkin, Alexander I.; Makovik, Irina N.; Zherebtsova, Angelina I.; Zharkikh, Elena V.; Potapova, Elena V.; Dunaev, Andrey V.; Doronin, Alexander A.; Bykov, Alexander V.; Rafailov, Ilya E.; Litvinova, Karina S.; Sokolovski, Sergei G.; Rafailov, Edik U.

    2017-08-01

    According to the International Diabetes Federation, the challenge of early stage diagnosis and treatment effectiveness monitoring in diabetes is currently one of the highest priorities in modern healthcare. The potential of combined measurements of skin fluorescence and blood perfusion by the laser Doppler flowmetry method in diagnostics of low limb diabetes complications was evaluated. Using Monte Carlo probabilistic modeling, the diagnostic volume and depth of the diagnosis were evaluated. The experimental study involved 76 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. These patients were divided into two groups depending on the degree of complications. The control group consisted of 48 healthy volunteers. The local thermal stimulation was selected as a stimulus on the blood microcirculation system. The experimental studies have shown that diabetic patients have elevated values of normalized fluorescence amplitudes, as well as a lower perfusion response to local heating. In the group of people with diabetes with trophic ulcers, these parameters also significantly differ from the control and diabetes only groups. Thus, the intensity of skin fluorescence and level of tissue blood perfusion can act as markers for various degrees of complications from the beginning of diabetes to the formation of trophic ulcers.

  18. Older Adult Self-Efficacy Study of Mobile Phone Diabetes Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, Bilal; Weed, Kelly; Barr, Erik; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate participant self-efficacy and use of a mobile phone diabetes health intervention for older adults during a 4-week period. Participants included seven adults (mean age, 70.3 years) with type 2 diabetes cared for by community-based primary care physicians. Participants entered blood glucose data into a mobile phone and personalized patient Internet Web portal. Based on blood glucose values, participants received automatic messages and educational information to self-manage their diabetes. Study measures included prior mobile phone/Internet use, the Stanford Self-Efficacy for Diabetes Scale, the Stanford Energy/Fatigue Scale, the Short Form-36, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (depression), the Patient Reported Diabetes Symptom Scale, the Diabetes Stages of Change measure, and a summary of mobile system use. Participants had high self-efficacy and high readiness and confidence in their ability to monitor changes to control their diabetes. Participants demonstrated ability to use the mobile intervention and communicate with diabetes educators. PMID:25692373

  19. Older Adult Self-Efficacy Study of Mobile Phone Diabetes Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Charlene C; Khokhar, Bilal; Weed, Kelly; Barr, Erik; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate participant self-efficacy and use of a mobile phone diabetes health intervention for older adults during a 4-week period. Participants included seven adults (mean age, 70.3 years) with type 2 diabetes cared for by community-based primary care physicians. Participants entered blood glucose data into a mobile phone and personalized patient Internet Web portal. Based on blood glucose values, participants received automatic messages and educational information to self-manage their diabetes. Study measures included prior mobile phone/Internet use, the Stanford Self-Efficacy for Diabetes Scale, the Stanford Energy/Fatigue Scale, the Short Form-36, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (depression), the Patient Reported Diabetes Symptom Scale, the Diabetes Stages of Change measure, and a summary of mobile system use. Participants had high self-efficacy and high readiness and confidence in their ability to monitor changes to control their diabetes. Participants demonstrated ability to use the mobile intervention and communicate with diabetes educators.

  20. Persistent Albuminuria in Children with Type 2 Diabetes: A Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Elizabeth A C; Hadjiyannakis, Stasia; Amed, Shazhan; Dart, Allison B; Dyck, Roland F; Hamilton, Jill; Langlois, Valerie; Panagiotopoulos, Constadina; Dean, Heather J

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and the clinical features associated with persistent albuminuria in Canadian children aged albuminuria in children with type 2 diabetes were reported during a 24-month period from 2010 to 2012. Persistent albuminuria was defined as an elevated albumin-to-creatinine ratio in a minimum of 2 out of 3 urine samples obtained at least 1 month apart over 3-6 months and confirmed with a first morning sample. Descriptive statistics were used to illustrate demographic and clinical features of the population. The prevalence of persistent albumuria was estimated using data from a previous national surveillence study of type 2 diabetes in children. Fifty cases were reported over the 24-month study period. The estimated prevalence of persistent albuminuria in children with type 2 diabetes in Canada was 5.1%. The median duration of diabetes at the time of diagnosis of albuminuria was 21 days (IQR, 0-241 days). Almost two-thirds (64%) were female, 80% were of Canadian First Nations heritage, and 76% were from Manitoba. Exposure to gestational or pregestational diabetes in utero occurred in 65%, and 48% had a family history of diabetes-related renal disease. Structural anomalies of the kidney were found in 37%. Persistent albuminuria occurs in youths with type 2 diabetes in the first year after diagnosis, demonstrates regional variation, and is associated with First Nations heritage and exposure to maternal diabetes during pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment and Control of Diabetes Mellitus-A Population Based Study in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuchen; Wang, Rui; Ma, Xiuqiang; Zhao, Yanfang; Lu, Jian; Wu, Cheng; He, Jia

    2016-05-19

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of diabetes in Shanghai, China. A sample of 3600 residents aged from 18 to 80 years selected by a randomized stratified multiple-stage sampling method in Shanghai was investigated, with blood samples collected. Diabetes was defined as fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥ 7.0 mmol/L, or glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥ 6.5% (48 mmol/mol), or previous diagnosis by a physician. Adequate control of diabetes was taken as a level of HbA1c diabetes. Multivariable regression analysis was used to explore associated factors for diabetes and prediabetes. In the 3136 participants suitable for analysis, the prevalences of diabetes, prediabetes, and previously diagnosed diabetes were 15.91%, 37.37%, and 4.46%, respectively. Among those with diabetes, only 28.06% were aware of their condition, 25.85% were currently undergoing medication treatment, and 12.42% achieved glycaemic control. Logistic regression showed that old age, preobesity, obesity, elevated triglyceride (TG), elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), and lower education level were associated with an increased risk of diabetes; old age, obesity, elevated TG, and elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) were associated with an increased risk of prediabetes, while male sex and rural residence were associated with a decreased risk of prediabetes. In summary, the state of diabetes in China is alarming; the rates of awareness, treatment, and control were relatively low. More efforts should be made to promote the prevention and control of diabetes in china.

  2. Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment and Control of Diabetes Mellitus—A Population Based Study in Shanghai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchen Qin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to investigate the prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of diabetes in Shanghai, China. A sample of 3600 residents aged from 18 to 80 years selected by a randomized stratified multiple-stage sampling method in Shanghai was investigated, with blood samples collected. Diabetes was defined as fasting plasma glucose (FPG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L, or glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c ≥ 6.5% (48 mmol/mol, or previous diagnosis by a physician. Adequate control of diabetes was taken as a level of HbA1c < 7.0% (53 mmol/mol among people with treated diabetes. Multivariable regression analysis was used to explore associated factors for diabetes and prediabetes. In the 3136 participants suitable for analysis, the prevalences of diabetes, prediabetes, and previously diagnosed diabetes were 15.91%, 37.37%, and 4.46%, respectively. Among those with diabetes, only 28.06% were aware of their condition, 25.85% were currently undergoing medication treatment, and 12.42% achieved glycaemic control. Logistic regression showed that old age, preobesity, obesity, elevated triglyceride (TG, elevated C-reactive protein (CRP, and lower education level were associated with an increased risk of diabetes; old age, obesity, elevated TG, and elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL were associated with an increased risk of prediabetes, while male sex and rural residence were associated with a decreased risk of prediabetes. In summary, the state of diabetes in China is alarming; the rates of awareness, treatment, and control were relatively low. More efforts should be made to promote the prevention and control of diabetes in china.

  3. A population-based observational study of diabetes during pregnancy in Victoria, Australia, 1999–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouzeid, Marian; Versace, Vincent L; Janus, Edward D; Davey, Mary-Ann; Philpot, Benjamin; Oats, Jeremy; Dunbar, James A

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This paper reports secular trends in diabetes in pregnancy in Victoria, Australia and examines the effect of including or excluding women with pre-existing diabetes on gestational diabetes (GDM) prevalence estimates. Design Population-based observational study. Setting All births in Victoria, Australia between 1999 and 2008 Participants 634 932 pregnancies resulting in a birth registered with the Victorian Perinatal Data Collection Outcome measures Crude and age-standardised secular trends in pre-existing diabetes and GDM prevalence; secular GDM trends by maternal birthplace; effects on GDM prevalence of including and excluding pre-existing diabetes from the denominator. Results Of the 634 932 pregnancies, 2954 (0.5%) occurred in women with pre-existing diabetes and 29 147 (4.6%) were complicated by GDM. Mean maternal age increased from 29.7 years in 1999 to 30.8 years in 2008. GDM prevalence increased in most maternal age groups. In 2008, age-standardised GDM prevalence was 31% higher than in 1999; secular increases were greater for Australian-born non-Indigenous (29% increase) than immigrant women (12.3% increase). The annual number of pregnancies in women with pre-existing diabetes almost doubled from 1999 to 2008 and prevalence increased from 0.4% to 0.6%. However, including or excluding pre-existing diabetes had little effect on GDM prevalence estimates. Conclusions Pre-existing diabetes and GDM prevalence increased in Victoria between 1999 and 2008 and rising maternal age does not fully explain these trends. These findings have important implications for preventive initiatives. Including or excluding small numbers of women with pre-existing diabetes resulted in minimal changes in GDM estimates. As pre-existing diabetes in young women increases, this methodological issue will likely become important. PMID:25398676

  4. Study on risk factors associated with diabetic retinopathy among the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in South India

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    Senthilvel Vasudevan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To find the severities status of diabetic retinopathy(DRamong the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and to determine the association of the severities of diabetic retinopathy with duration of DR, HbA1C levels, history of hypertension, age and gender in the study population.METHODS:Hospital based cross-sectional studies with sample of 100 patients with DR were selected by using simple random sampling technique with a structured questionnaire was conducted in May to June 2012. The study participants those who with DR aged ≥35 years were included in this study and an oral consent was also collected from the study participants. Descriptive statistics, univariate and multivariate ordinal logistic regression analysis were performed. MS Excel spread sheet was used for data entry and data analysis was done by using SPSS 21.0 version. Statistical significance was taken as PRESULTS:Out of 100 patients, mean age of the patient was found as 53.16±10.81(range 35-78y. By univariate analysis, there was a positive relationship between diabetic retinopathy severity and age(PPPPP>0.05 by Mann Whitney u-test. All these factors were found as independent risk factors with the severity of DR except the factor age.CONCLUSION:This study was concluded that the duration of DM, HbA1C levels, family history of DM, History of hypertension and gender were independently associated with severity of DR. However, the factors like age and HDL weren't significant with severity of DR in multivariate analysis. Therefore, by using the availability of the existing treatments and controlling in time, which can prevent and free from the vision threatening diseases or delay the occurrence of DR in their life.

  5. Associations among health literacy, diabetes knowledge, and self-management behavior in adults with diabetes: results of a Dutch cross-sectional study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, I. van der; Uiters, E.; Rademakers, J.; Struijs, J.N.; Schuit, A.J.; Baan, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have examined the association between health literacy and self-management behavior, but few have explored ways through which this occurs. The present study examines to what extent health literacy is associated with diabetes self-management behavior and to what extent diabetes

  6. Associations among health literacy, diabetes knowledge, and self-management behavior in adults with diabetes : Results of a dutch cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, Iris; Uiters, Ellen; Rademakers, Jany; Struijs, Jeroen N; Schuit, A.J.; Baan, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have examined the association between health literacy and self-management behavior, but few have explored ways through which this occurs. The present study examines to what extent health literacy is associated with diabetes self-management behavior and to what extent diabetes

  7. Associations among health literacy, diabetes knowledge, and self-management behavior in adults with diabetes: results of a dutch cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, I.; Uiters, E.; Rademakers, J.; Struijs, J.N.; Schuit, A.J.; Baan, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have examined the association between health literacy and self-management behavior, but few have explored ways through which this occurs. The present study examines to what extent health literacy is associated with diabetes self-management behavior and to what extent diabetes

  8. A comparative study of risk factors for corneal infection in diabetic and non-diabetic patients

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    Bin Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the clinical characteristics of infectious keratopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and non-diabetes mellitus (NDM and to investigate risk factors for infectious keratopathy in T2DM patients. METHODS: Totally 230 patients with T2DM and 168 with NDM diagnosed as infectious keratopathy were hospitalized at Qingdao Eye Hospital from 2001 to 2015. Data including sex, age, occupation, season, smoking and alcohol consumption habits, duration between onset and treatments, duration of hospitalization were collected. Initially identified indicators were analyzed with a multivariate logistic regression. Glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c in patients with T2DM was analyzed. The infectious keratopathies in the two groups were categorized and compared. RESULTS: The diabetic group consisted of 146 (63.5% males and 84 (36.5% females. The NDM group consisted of 111 (66.1% males and 57 (33.9% females. There was no signigicantly difference in sex distribution between the two groups (P>0.05. There were significant differences in age, occupation of patients, season of the onset of diseases, duration between onset and treatment, and durations of hospitalization between the two groups (P0.05. CONCLUSION: Advanced age and the summer and winter seasons are identified as risk factors for infectious keratopathy in T2DM patients, and T2DM patients are more prone to bacterial keratitis.

  9. Type 2 diabetes genes – Present status and data from Norwegian studies

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    Jens K. Hertel Hertel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide rise in prevalence of type 2 diabetes has led to an intense search for the genetic risk factors of this disease. In type 2 diabetes and other complex disorders, multiple genetic and environmental factors, as well as the interaction between these factors, determine the phenotype. In this review, we summarize present knowledge, generated by more than two decades of efforts to dissect the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes. Initial studies were either based on a candidate gene approach or attempted to fine-map signals generated from linkage analysis. Despite the detection of multiple genomic regions proposed to be linked to type 2 diabetes, subsequent positional fine-mapping of candidates were mostly inconclusive. However, the introduction of genome-wide association studies (GWAS, applied on thousands of patients and controls, completely changed the field. To date, more than 50 susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes have been detected through the establishment of large research consortia, the application of GWAS on intermediary diabetes phenotypes and the use of study samples of different ethnicities. Still, the common variants identified in the GWAS era only explain some of the heritability seen for type 2 diabetes. Thus, focus is now shifting towards searching also for rare variants using new high-throughput sequencing technologies. For genes involved in the genetic predisposition to type 2 diabetes the emerging picture is that there are hundreds of different gene variants working in a complex interplay influencing pancreatic beta cell function/mass and, only to a lesser extent, insulin action. Several Norwegian studies have contributed to the field, extending our understanding of genetic risk factors in type 2 diabetes and in diabetes-related phenotypes like obesity and cardiovascular disease.

  10. DreamTel; Diabetes risk evaluation and management tele-monitoring study protocol

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    Kiss Alex

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes underlines the importance of secondary strategies for the prevention of target organ damage. While access to diabetes education centers and diabetes intensification management has been shown to improve blood glucose control, these services are not available to all that require them, particularly in rural and northern areas. The provision of these services through the Home Care team is an advance that can overcome these barriers. Transfer of blood glucose data electronically from the home to the health care provider may improve diabetes management. Methods and design The study population will consist of patients with type 2 diabetes with uncontrolled A1c levels living on reserve in the Battlefords region of Saskatchewan, Canada. This pilot study will take place over three phases. In the first phase over three months the impact of the introduction of the Bluetooth enabled glucose monitor will be assessed. In the second phase over three months, the development of guidelines based treatment algorithms for diabetes intensification will be completed. In the third phase lasting 18 months, study subjects will have diabetes intensification according to the algorithms developed. Discussion The first phase will determine if the use of the Bluetooth enabled blood glucose devices which can transmit results electronically will lead to changes in A1c levels. It will also determine the feasibility of recruiting subjects to use this technology. The rest of the Diabetes Risk Evaluation and Management Tele-monitoring (DreamTel study will determine if the delivery of a diabetes intensification management program by the Home Care team supported by the Bluetooth enabled glucose meters leads to improvements in diabetes management. Trial Registration Protocol NCT00325624

  11. DreamTel; Diabetes risk evaluation and management tele-monitoring study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobe, Sheldon W; Wentworth, Joan; Ironstand, Laurie; Hartman, Susan; Hoppe, Jackie; Whiting, Judi; Kennedy, Janice; McAllister, Colin; Kiss, Alex; Perkins, Nancy; Vincent, Lloyd; Pylypchuk, George; Lewanczuk, Richard Z

    2009-05-09

    The rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes underlines the importance of secondary strategies for the prevention of target organ damage. While access to diabetes education centers and diabetes intensification management has been shown to improve blood glucose control, these services are not available to all that require them, particularly in rural and northern areas. The provision of these services through the Home Care team is an advance that can overcome these barriers. Transfer of blood glucose data electronically from the home to the health care provider may improve diabetes management. The study population will consist of patients with type 2 diabetes with uncontrolled A1c levels living on reserve in the Battlefords region of Saskatchewan, Canada. This pilot study will take place over three phases. In the first phase over three months the impact of the introduction of the Bluetooth enabled glucose monitor will be assessed. In the second phase over three months, the development of guidelines based treatment algorithms for diabetes intensification will be completed. In the third phase lasting 18 months, study subjects will have diabetes intensification according to the algorithms developed. The first phase will determine if the use of the Bluetooth enabled blood glucose devices which can transmit results electronically will lead to changes in A1c levels. It will also determine the feasibility of recruiting subjects to use this technology. The rest of the Diabetes Risk Evaluation and Management Tele-monitoring (DreamTel) study will determine if the delivery of a diabetes intensification management program by the Home Care team supported by the Bluetooth enabled glucose meters leads to improvements in diabetes management. Protocol NCT00325624.

  12. A 4-year prospective study on long-term complications of type 2 diabetic patients: the Thai DMS diabetes complications (DD.Comp.) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potisat, Somkiat; Krairittichai, Udom; Jongsareejit, Amporn; Sattaputh, Charnvate; Arunratanachote, Woranut

    2013-06-01

    To assess the clinical course of long-term diabetic complications; diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, and foot problems in Thai patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients with type 2 diabetes were followed for four years between March 2006 and September 2010. Seven hospitals in all levels of care under the Ministry of Public Health Thailand were included in the present study. A physical examination and a diabetic complications assessment were performed each year during the study period, by physician specialists in the related areas. Among 1,120 patients who participated in the present study, 705 (62.95%) patients completed the 4-year follow-up time. There were 88 (7.86%) patients reported deaths during the present study period. The mean age was 59.14 +/- 10.12 years. The average duration of diabetes was 7.30 +/- 6.14 years. Approximately 57.32% of patients had a family history of diabetes. The average plasma glucose level and HbA1C were 153 to 160 mg/dl and 8.25 to 8.75%. Moreover less than one-fourth of patients had HbA1C below 7%. The prevalence for diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy were approximately 23.7% and 38.3%. In addition, more than 15% of patients had diabetic foot problems, loss of protective sensation and pedal pulse deficit. Finally, the incidence rates were 80.1 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI 69.7, 91.8) for diabetic retinopathy, and 91.1 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI 78.8, 105.1) for diabetic nephropathy Problems regarding poor diabetes control exist in Thai diabetes patients. It results in high prevalence and incidence of diabetic complications. As such, it is crucial to establish the country's diabetes management plan as well as evaluate the long-term complications in diabetic patients annually, in order for patients to receive the benefits of early treatment and prevent further complications.

  13. Strategies for glucose control in a study population with diabetes, renal disease and anemia (Treat study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrauch, Larry A; D'Elia, John A; Finn, Peter; Lewis, Eldrin F; Desai, Akshay S; Claggett, Brian L; Cooper, Mark E; McGill, Janet B

    2016-03-01

    Glucose lowering medication use among patients with type 2 diabetes and advanced renal disease (eGFRrenal disease advances, most of the oral anti-diabetic agents requiring renal clearance must be reduced or discontinued. The potential for prolonged hypoglycemia, fluid/volume overload and congestive heart failure may complicate medication choices. In order to evaluate patterns of glycemia management we describe glucose lowering medication use among patients with advanced renal disease and type 2 diabetes in a large multinational outcome trial designed to focus on patients with eGFRrenal function when compared with standard populations with normal kidney function. The use of multiple oral agents, or oral agents plus insulin was quite common. While gender did not appear to play a role in medication choices, there were significant regional variations. For example, oral agents were used more in North America compared with other regions (Latin America, Australia/Western Europe, Russia/Eastern Europe). Patients enrolled at more advanced ages were less likely to be on a regimen of rapid-acting insulin alone consistent with recommendations that suggest a preference for longer-acting preparations in the geriatric population (1). Higher degrees of obesity were associated more complex treatment regimens. Despite this population being at high risk for cardiovascular events, the use of beta blockers (50%), statins (64%) and aspirin (48%) were relatively low, especially in the group that did not require medications to achieve adequate glycemic control. Current attempts to compare strategies for diabetes therapy must control for baseline demographic group differences influencing treatment choice. Future recommendations for glycemic control in patients with Grade 3 or higher chronic kidney disease require additional studies, with matched populations. We suggest that evaluation of studies similar to TREAT will assist in determining the optimal therapeutic regimens for populations

  14. Adherence to anti-diabetic drugs among patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania- A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rwegerera, Godfrey Mutashambara

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to diabetes mellitus treatment regimens among Type 2 diabetes patients in Tanzania has not been well documented. This study sought to assess adherence to antidiabetic drugs and associated factors among patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. A cross-sectional study was conducted among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who were attending the Diabetic clinic of Muhimbili National hospital between May 2009 and February 2010. Assement of adherence to antidiabetic medications was based on patients' self-reported recall of skipped days without taking medications, over the past one week and three months. Data were entered and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Inc. Chicago, Illinois version 16). The crude and adjusted odds ratio (COR/ AOR) and 95% Confidence Interval (CI) were performed to determine factors associated with anti-diabetic medications adherence and a p-value of 0.05 or less was considered statistically significant. Adherence rates to antidiabetic drugs were found to be 60.2% and 71.2% at one week and three months respectively. High cost of medication was significantly associated with anti-diabetic non-adherence. Adherence to anti-diabetic drugs significantly increased with an increase in number of non-diabetic medications. Adherence to antidiabetic drugs was found to be suboptimal. Patients with other medical conditions in addition to diabetes mellitus are more likely to adhere to anti-diabetic medications. There is a need for the responsible authorities to set policies that subsidize cost of anti-diabetic drugs to improve adherence and reduce associated complications.

  15. The relationship between hypomagnesemia, metformin therapy and cardiovascular disease complicating type 2 diabetes: the Fremantle Diabetes Study.

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    Kirsten E Peters

    Full Text Available Low serum magnesium concentrations have been associated with cardiovascular disease risk and outcomes in some general population studies but there are no equivalent studies in diabetes. Metformin may have cardiovascular benefits beyond blood glucose lowering in type 2 diabetes but its association with hypomagnesemia appears paradoxical. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between metformin therapy, magnesium homoeostasis and cardiovascular disease in well-characterized type 2 patients from the community.We studied 940 non-insulin-treated patients (mean ± SD age 63.4 ± 11.6 years, 49.0% males from the longitudinal observational Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase I (FDS1 who were followed for 12.3 ± 5.3 years. Baseline serum magnesium was measured using stored sera. Multivariate methods were used to determine associates of prevalent and incident coronary heart disease (CHD and cerebrovascular disease (CVD as ascertained from self-report and linked morbidity/mortality databases. 19% of patients were hypomagnesemic (serum magnesium <0.70 mmol/L. Patients on metformin, alone or combined with a sulfonylurea, had lower serum magnesium concentrations than those on diet alone (P<0.05. There were no independent associations between serum magnesium or metformin therapy and either CHD or CVD at baseline. Incident CVD, but not CHD, was independently and inversely associated with serum magnesium (hazard ratio (95% CI 0.28 (0.11-0.74; P=0.010, but metformin therapy was not a significant variable in these models.Since hypomagnesemia appears to be an independent risk factor for CVD complicating type 2 diabetes, the value of replacement therapy should be investigated further, especially in patients at high CVD risk.

  16. Which diet for prevention of type 2 diabetes? A meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Katherine; Chiodini, Paolo; Maiorino, Maria Ida; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes; Giugliano, Dario

    2014-09-01

    No specific diet is recommended to prevent type 2 diabetes. We did a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to assess the association between different diets and prevention of type 2 diabetes. We did a comprehensive search of multiple electronic databases (Medline, Scopus, EMBASE, and ISI web of knowledge) until August 2013 using predefined criteria. We included prospective cohort studies that evaluated the role of different diets in type 2 diabetes prevention. Studies were selected by 2 independent reviewers. We did random-effects meta-analyses to determine the relative risk (RR) of incident diabetes associated with healthful dietary patterns. A total of 21,372 cases of incident diabetes, from 18 prospective studies, with 20 cohorts, in 4 world regions were identified. In the random-effect meta-analysis of the 20 cohorts, RR was 0.80 (95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.74-0.86, P diabetes did not appreciably change considering the geography (USA, Europe, and Asia), the duration of follow-up (≤10 and >10 years), and type of diets (Mediterranean and DASH, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, diets). There was a difference between at risk and general population (P = 0.0487), but the evidence was limited to two studies only. The results of our study demonstrate that several healthy diets are equally and consistently associated with a 20 % reduced risk of future type 2 diabetes.

  17. How Adolescents with Diabetes Experience Social Support from Friends: Two Qualitative Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louk W. H. Peters

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-management of diabetes is challenging, especially for adolescents who face multiple changes, including closer peer relationships. Few studies have explored how friends can provide constructive support in this effort. The present research investigated, in two qualitative studies, the perceptions of adolescents with diabetes and their friends with respect to the positive social support that friends can offer. In study 1, 28 adolescents aged 12–15 with type 1 diabetes participated in online focus groups. In study 2, 11 of these adolescents were interviewed in person together with their best friends. The data were analysed by means of content analysis. In study 1, the adolescents with diabetes identified various supportive behaviours of friends, particularly concerning emotional support: treating them normally, showing interest, having fun, providing a distraction, and taking their diabetes into account. They differed in their attitude towards support, and this influenced which behaviours they perceived as supportive. Study 2 showed that the adolescents with diabetes and their friends often had similar opinions on the desired degree of support. Fear of stigmatization and sense of autonomy withheld some adolescents with diabetes from soliciting more support. These insights can be useful in patient education aiming to promote social support.

  18. [Dental health and dental care according diabetic status; results from 2008 ESPS study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azogui-Lévy, S; Rochereau, T

    2014-12-01

    Poorly controlled diabetes leads to serious complications including periodontal disease, oral disease leading to tooth loss. Diabetics benefit from care facilitated follow-up. Social inequalities are observed in oral health and diabetes. The objective of this study was to estimate the effect of the social factors on oral health and use of dental care for people with diabetes from the Health and Social Protection Survey 2008 (ESPS) and to compare it with that observed among non-diabetic people. The ESPS is a representative survey of the French population. In 2008, data were derived from a self-administered health questionnaire given to all household members aged 16 or older. The scope of this study was restricted to persons aged 35 and over (12.082) having filled out their health survey (8961). Diabetes was defined from self-reports of disease or use of anti-diabetic medication. Oral health was estimated from perceived oral health and the number of missing teeth not replaced. Use of dental care was measured by self-report of a visit within the last two years. Socio-demographic and social coverage indicators were collected. The participation rate was 74.1% and prevalence of diabetes was 7.2% (648). People with diabetes had a poorer dental status (42.7% vs 26.5% - OR=1.22, 95% CI [1.01-1.47]), related to social characteristics. The effect of level of precariousness on dental health was equivalent in diabetic and non-diabetic populations. The use of dental care (73.4% of participants) was associated with social factors. Diabetics were less likely to consult dentists than non-diabetics (61.5% vs 74.4%), but this difference was not statistically significant (OR=0.86, 95%CI [0.72-1.04]). The effect of the level of precariousness on use of dental care was the same in both populations. This study raises the question of the impact of recommendations on monitoring dental health among diabetics especially for vulnerable populations despite better management and coverage

  19. Transition from specialist to primary diabetes care: A qualitative study of perspectives of primary care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liddy Clare

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growing prevalence of diabetes and heightened awareness of the benefits of early and intensive disease management have increased service demands and expectations not only of primary care physicians but also of diabetes specialists. While research has addressed issues related to referral into specialist care, much less has been published about the transition from diabetes specialists back to primary care. Understanding the concerns of family physicians related to discharge of diabetes care from specialist centers can support the development of strategies that facilitate this transition and result in broader access to limited specialist services. This study was undertaken to explore primary care physician (PCP perspectives and concerns related to reassuming responsibility for diabetes care after referral to a specialized diabetes center. Methods Qualitative data were collected through three focus groups. Sessions were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data were coded and sorted with themes identified using a constant comparison method. The study was undertaken through the regional academic referral center for adult diabetes care in Ottawa, Canada. Participants included 22 primary care physicians representing a variety of referral frequencies, practice types and settings. Results Participants described facilitators and barriers to successful transition of diabetes care at the provider, patient and systems level. Major facilitators included clear communication of a detailed, structured plan of care, ongoing access to specialist services for advice or re-referral, continuing education and mentoring for PCPs. Identified provider barriers were gaps in PCP knowledge and confidence related to diabetes treatment, excessive workload and competing time demands. Systems deterrents included reimbursement policies for health professionals and inadequate funding for diabetes medications and supplies. At the PCP-patient interface

  20. Infant exposures and development of type 1 diabetes mellitus: The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Brittni; Kroehl, Miranda; Lamb, Molly M; Seifert, Jennifer; Barriga, Katherine; Eisenbarth, George S; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M

    2013-09-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is increasing worldwide, with the most rapid increase among children younger than 5 years of age. To examine the associations between perinatal and infant exposures, especially early infant diet, and the development of T1DM. The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) is a longitudinal, observational study. Newborn screening for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) was done at St. Joseph's Hospital in Denver, Colorado. First-degree relatives of individuals with T1DM were recruited from the Denver metropolitan area. A total of 1835 children at increased genetic risk for T1DM followed up from birth with complete prospective assessment of infant diet. Fifty-three children developed T1DM. Early (children at increased genetic risk for T1DM is between 4 and 5 months of age. Breastfeeding while introducing new foods may reduce T1DM risk.

  1. The incidence risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in female nurses: a nationwide matched cohort study

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    Hsiu-Ling Huang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is one of the most common chronic illnesses worldwide. This study was to assess whether the incidence risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus between female nurses and female non-nurses. Methods Study data were obtained from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Research Database, and nurses were sampled from the Registry for medical personnel. Nurses and non-nurses with similar traits and health conditions were selected via 1:1 propensity score matching. A total of 111,670 subjects were selected (55,835 nurses and 55,835 non-nurses. Stages of diabetes development were monitored until December 31, 2009. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to discuss risks and influencing factors related to diabetes. Poisson distribution methods were used to examine the incidence rate of diabetes per 1,000 person-years. Results The propensity matching results show that on average, female nurses who were diagnosed with diabetes were younger compared with the non-nurses (46.98 ± 10.80 vs. 48.31 ± 10.43, p <0.05. However, the results of the Cox proportional hazards model show that the nurses showed a lower risk of developing diabetes compared with the non-nurses (Adj. HR = 0.84, 95 % CI: 0.79–0.90. Factors influencing diabetes development risks among the nurses include advanced age and high Charlson Comorbidity Index levels. Conclusion The low degree of diabetes development among the nurses may be attributable to the fact that nurses possess substantial knowledge on health care and on healthy behaviors. The results of this study can be used as a reference to assess occupational risks facing nursing staff, to prevent diabetes development, and to promote health education.

  2. Literacy and health outcomes: a cross-sectional study in 1002 adults with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacLean Charles D

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inconsistent findings reported in the literature contribute to the lack of complete understanding of the association of literacy with health outcomes. We evaluated the association between literacy, physiologic control and diabetes complications among adults with diabetes. Methods A cross-sectional study of 1,002 English speaking adults with diabetes, randomly selected from the Vermont Diabetes Information System, a cluster-randomized trial of a diabetes decision support system in a region-wide sample of primary care practices was conducted between July 2003 and March 2005. Literacy was assessed by the Short-Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Outcome measures included glycated hemoglobin, low density lipoprotein, blood pressure and self-reported complications. Results After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, duration of diabetes, diabetes education, depression, alcohol use, and medication use we did not find a significant association between literacy and glycemic control (beta coefficent,+ 0.001; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.01 to +0.01; P = .88, systolic blood pressure (beta coefficent, +0.08; 95% CI, -0.10 to +0.26; P = .39, diastolic blood pressure (beta coefficent, -0.03; 95% CI, -0.12 to +0.07, P = .59, or low density lipoprotein (beta coefficent, +0.04; 95% CI, -0.27 to +0.36, P = .77. We found no association between literacy and report of diabetes complications. Conclusion These findings suggest that literacy, as measured by the S-TOFHLA, is not associated with glycated hemoglobin, blood pressure, lipid levels or self-reported diabetes complications in a cross-sectional study of older adults with diabetes under relatively good glycemic control. Additional studies to examine the optimal measurement of health literacy and its relationship to health outcomes over time are needed.

  3. Study of 123I-IMP SPECT on diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Ikuo; Takeo, Goh; Iwanaga, Keisuke; Uotani, Shigeo; Nakamura, Minoru; Sohda, Masanori; Ohe, Haruto; Toshimitsu, Takashi; Ohe, Nobuharu

    1991-01-01

    The involvement of peripheral nerves and nerve roots often leads to neurological manifestations which have frequently been described in association with diabetes mellitus. Whether there is any specific involvement of the central nervous system in this process has yet to be determined. Recently, many reports have suggested that significant neurophysiologic abnormalities in the central nervous system can sometimes be found in diabetic patients. In order to accurately examine the existence of central nervous system involvement in patients with diabetes mellitus, comparisons of 123 I-IMP (IMP) washout rates were made between normal adults (n=19, average age 43.3 years) and diabetic patients (n=23, average age 43.3 years), and these results were graphically demonstrated by color images. Early images were obtained 30 minutes after intravenous injection, while delayed images were made 4 hours after injection. The IMP washout rate was obtained by subtracting the values of the delayed image with the early image. The standard deviation (SD) of the IMP washout rate for each patient was compared to the averaged SD obtained from healthy adults. After calculating the deviation from SD levels of healthy adults, we made an image of the patient's IMP washout rates. These images were divided into seven degrees (I, II: normal, III, IV: borderline, V∼VII: abnormal) and the ratio of each degree was expressed by a histogram in each cerebral hemisphere as the washout rate index. In 23 diabetic subjects, seven patients were found to be borderline while sixteen patients were abnormal. These impairments were not related either to the presence of diabetic triopathy or the duration of disease. By utilising such a noninvasive method, we were able to accurately evaluate the extent of diabetic central neuropathy. Therefore this subtraction method, which uses the specificity of IMP SPECT, is thus considered to be highly useful for broad clinical application. (author)

  4. Effects of telemedicine in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes – a study protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Caroline Raun; Perrild, Hans; Koefoed, Birgitte Gade

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Despite rehabilitation programmes offered to all patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes in Denmark, a number of patients either never accomplish good diabetes regulation or the regulation deteriorates with time. Therefore, new approaches are needed. The aim of the present study...... is to examine whether telemedicine conferences with a nurse can contribute to achieving good diabetes control among patients with poorly regulated type 2 diabetes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 165 patients with type 2 diabetes who have formerly undergone a rehabilitation programme are randomized to either...... telemedicine intervention or usual care. The intervention lasts for 32 weeks and consists of monthly videoconferences with a nurse from a health-care centre as an add-on to usual care. Blood sugar, blood pressure and weight are regularly self-monitored and measurements are automatically transferred...

  5. Zebrafish as a Model for the Study of Microvascular Complications of Diabetes and Their Mechanisms

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    Karl Heckler

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a crucial metabolic disease that leads to severe disorders. These include macrovascular complications such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral artery disease and microvascular complications including diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Diabetes mellitus, along with its associated organ pathologies, is one of the key problems in today’s medicine. Zebrafish is an upcoming disease model organism in diabetes research. Its glucose metabolism and the pathways of reactive metabolite formation are very similar to those of humans. Moreover, several physiological and pathophysiological pathways that also exist in humans and other mammals have been identified in this species or are currently under intense investigation. Zebrafish offer sophisticated imaging techniques and allow simple and fast genetic and pharmacological approaches with a high throughput. In this review, we highlight achievements and mechanisms concerning microvascular complications discovered in zebrafish, and we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of zebrafish as a model for studying diabetic complications.

  6. Improving diabetes care for young people with type 1 diabetes through visual learning on mobile phones: mixed-methods study.

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    Frøisland, Dag Helge; Arsand, Eirik; Skårderud, Finn

    2012-08-06

    Only 17% of Norwegian children and adolescents with diabetes achieve international treatment goals measured by glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)). Classic patient-physician consultations seem to be poorly adapted to young children. New strategies that are better attuned to young people to improve support of adolescents' self-management of diabetes need to be tested and evaluated. (1) To explore how applications for mobile phones can be used in follow-up of adolescents with type 1 diabetes, and (2) to use the findings to guide further development of the applications and as a basis for future studies. We pilot tested two mobile phone applications: (1) an application that contained a picture-based diabetes diary to record physical activity and photos taken with the phone camera of food eaten, where the phone also communicated with the glucometer by Bluetooth technology to capture blood glucose values, and (2) a Web-based, password-secured and encrypted short message service (SMS), based on access using login passwords received via SMS to be used by participants to send messages to their providers when they faced obstacles in everyday life, and to send educational messages to the participants. At the end of the 3-month pilot study, 12 participants (7 girls and 5 boys ) aged 13-19 years completed semistructured interviews. The participants had a mean HbA(1c )value of 8.3 (SD 0.3), mean age of 16.2 (SD 1.7) years, mean body mass index of 23.3 (SD 3.2) kg/m(2), and mean diabetes duration of 7.5 (SD 4.6) years. We applied three additional measurements: change in metabolic control as measured by HbA(1c), the System Usability Scale, and diabetes knowledge. From the interviews, three main categories emerged: visualization, access, and software changes. Participants appreciated the picture-based diary more than the SMS solution. Visualization of cornerstones in diabetes self-care (ie, diet, insulin dosage, physical activity, and pre- and postprandial glucose measurements all

  7. Preliminary study on overproduction of reactive oxygen species by neutrophils in diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridzuan, Noridzzaida; John, Cini Mathew; Sandrasaigaran, Pratheep; Maqbool, Maryam; Liew, Lee Chuen; Lim, Jonathan; Ramasamy, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the amount and pattern of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in diabetic patient-derived neutrophils. METHODS: Blood samples from type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients and volunteers (controls) were subjected to neutrophil isolation and the assessment of neutrophil oxidative burst using chemiluminescence assay. Neutrophils were activated by using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and neutrophils without activation were kept as a negative control. The chemiluminescence readings were obtained by transferring cell suspension into a 1.5 mL Eppendorf tube, with PMA and luminol. Reaction mixtures were gently vortexed and placed inside luminometer for a duration of 5 min. RESULTS: Our results showed that in the resting condition, the secretion of ROS in normal non-diabetic individuals was relatively low compared to diabetic patients. However, the time scale observation revealed that the secreted ROS declined accordingly with time in non-diabetic individuals, yet such a reduction was not detected in diabetic patients where at all the time points, the secretion of ROS was maintained at similar magnitudes. This preliminary study demonstrated that ROS production was significantly higher in patients with DM compared to non-diabetic subjects in both resting and activated conditions. CONCLUSION: The respiratory burst activity of neutrophils could be affected by DM and the elevation of ROS production might be an aggravating factor in diabetic-related complications. PMID:27433296

  8. Quality of life in pregnancy and post-partum: a study in diabetic patients.

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    Dalfrà, M G; Nicolucci, A; Bisson, T; Bonsembiante, B; Lapolla, A

    2012-03-01

    We evaluated quality of life in pregnant women with diabetes followed up at Italian diabetes clinics. A total of 245 pregnant women (30 type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), 176 gestational diabetes (GDM) and 39 controls) were asked to fill in a questionnaire including the SF-36 Health Survey and the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) Scale in third trimester of pregnancy and after delivery. GDM and T1DM also completed two diabetes-specific questionnaires (Diabetes-related stress and Diabetes health distress). Quality of life scores were compared between the groups with the Mann-Whitney U-test, mean changes in scores (after delivery to 3rd trimester) were compared between groups by ANCOVA. Regarding the SF-36 scores in the third trimester of pregnancy, T1DM and GDM women had a better Standardised Physical Component score than controls (P diabetic groups, but not in controls (P < 0.0001). Scores improved in all SF-36 areas in healthy and GDM women, while they all became worse in the T1DM group. Pregnancy is associated with a perception of poor general health in women with both T1DM and GDM. After delivery, significantly worse depressive symptoms were documented in both groups, while a generally worse physical and psychological well-being was only identified in women with T1DM. These findings have important implications for pregnancy follow-up.

  9. Diabetes and neurodegeneration in Wolfram syndrome: a multicenter study of phenotype and genotype.

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    Rohayem, Julia; Ehlers, Christian; Wiedemann, Bärbel; Holl, Reinhard; Oexle, Konrad; Kordonouri, Olga; Salzano, Giuseppina; Meissner, Thomas; Burger, Walter; Schober, Edith; Huebner, Angela; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae

    2011-07-01

    To describe the diabetes phenotype in Wolfram syndrome compared with type 1 diabetes, to investigate the effect of glycemic control on the neurodegenerative process, and to assess the genotype-phenotype correlation. The clinical data of 50 patients with Wolfram syndrome-related diabetes (WSD) were reviewed and compared with the data of 24,164 patients with type 1 diabetes. Patients with a mean HbA1c during childhood and adolescence of ≤7.5 and >7.5% were compared with respect to the occurrence of additional Wolfram syndrome symptoms. The wolframin (WFS1) gene was screened for mutations in 39 patients. WFS1 genotypes were examined for correlation with age at onset of diabetes. WSD was diagnosed earlier than type 1 diabetes (5.4±3.8 vs. 7.9±4.2 years; P7.5% (P=0.031). Thirteen novel WSF1 mutations were identified. Predicted functional consequence of WFS1 mutations correlated with age at WSD onset (P=0.028). Endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated decline of β-cells in WSD occurs earlier in life than autoimmune-mediated β-cell destruction in type 1 diabetes. This study establishes a role for WFS1 in determining the age at onset of diabetes in Wolfram syndrome and identifies glucose toxicity as an accelerating feature in the progression of disease.

  10. Television viewing time and risk of incident diabetes mellitus: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

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    Smith, L; Hamer, M

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the longitudinal association between television viewing time and risk of incident diabetes mellitus in an elderly sample of adults in England. Analyses of data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. At baseline (2008), participants reported their television viewing time and physical activity level. Diabetes mellitus was recorded from self-reported physician diagnosis at 2-year follow-up. Associations between television viewing time and combined television viewing time and physical activity level with risk of incident diabetes mellitus at follow-up were examined using adjusted logistic regression models. A total of 5964 participants (mean ± sd age 65 ± 9 years at baseline, 44% male) were included in the analyses. There was an association between baseline television viewing time and risk of incident diabetes mellitus at 2-year follow-up (≥ 6 h/day compared with television viewing time at baseline were almost twice as likely to have diabetes mellitus at 2-year follow-up than those who were active/had low television viewing time (fully adjusted odds ratio 1.94, 95% CI 1.02, 3.68), although active participants reporting high television viewing were not at risk. Interventions to reduce the incidence of diabetes in the elderly that focus on both increasing physical activity and reducing television viewing time might prove useful. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  11. Diabetes mellitus and cancer of the digestive organs: An Italian population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valent, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The association between diabetes mellitus and the occurrence of digestive organs cancers was investigated in the Italian region Friuli Venezia Giulia. The risk of cancer associated with oral antidiabetic drugs among subjects with type 2 diabetes was also assessed. This was a retrospective population-based cohort study based on the 2002-2014 regional administrative health data. Incident digestive cancers were identified through the hospital discharge diagnoses. The incidence rates of cancer at different sites were calculated for type 1 and 2 diabetics and for non-diabetics. Proportional hazard models were built to assess the risk of cancer associated with diabetes and antidiabetic drugs. Diabetes was associated with increased risk of digestive cancers. Liver and pancreatic cancers were associated with the highest hazard ratios. Among type 2 diabetics, total number of metformin prescriptions was associated with reduced risk of most types of digestive cancers; sulfonylureas with reduced risk of stomach and pancreatic cancer. In this Italian population the excess risk of digestive cancers for diabetic patients was confirmed. Further research is needed to clarify the role of antidiabetic drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Bacterial meningitis in diabetes patients: a population-based prospective study

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    van Veen, Kiril E. B.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased infection rates. We studied clinical features and outcome of community-acquired bacterial meningitis in diabetes patients. Patients were selected from a nationwide, prospective cohort on community-acquired bacterial meningitis performed from March 2006 to October 2014. Data on patient history, symptoms and signs on admission, treatment, and outcome were prospectively collected. A total of 183 of 1447 episodes (13%) occurred in diabetes patients. The incidence of bacterial meningitis in diabetes patients was 3.15 per 100,000 patients per year and the risk of acquiring bacterial meningitis was 2.2-fold higher for diabetes patients. S. pneumoniae was the causative organism in 139 of 183 episodes (76%) and L. monocytogenes in 11 of 183 episodes (6%). Outcome was unfavourable in 82 of 183 episodes (45%) and in 43 of 183 episodes (23%) the patient died. Diabetes was associated with death with an odds ratio of 1.63 (95% CI 1.12–2.37, P = 0.011), which remained after adjusting for known predictors of death in a multivariable analysis (OR 1.98 [95% CI 1.13–3.48], P = 0.017). In conclusion, diabetes is associated with a 2-fold higher risk of acquiring bacterial meningitis. Diabetes is a strong independent risk factor for death in community-acquired adult bacterial meningitis. PMID:27845429

  13. Diabetes Mellitus, a New Risk Factor for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Case–Control Study

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    Leila Asadian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study aimed to determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in patients with spinal stenosis and lumbar vertebral disk degeneration, and the correlation of diabetes with these diseases. Study Design This is a cross-sectional study. Methods This case–control study was performed during 2012–2014 with 110 patients suffering from lumbar spinal stenosis and 110 patients with lumbar disk herniation, who were diagnosed using clinical and radiological evidences. Additionally, 110 participants who were referred to the clinic and did not show clinical signs of degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine entered the study as a control group. Demographic data and medical histories of the patients were collected using checklists. Results A total of 50 patients (15.2% were diagnosed with diabetes, which comprised 32 (29.1% in the stenosis group, 7 (6.4% in the lumbar disk herniation group, and 11 (10% in the control group. The prevalence of diabetes in women with spinal stenosis and women with lumbar disk herniation was 35.9% and 10.3%, respectively, whereas prevalence of diabetes in women was 10.9% in the control group. This difference was statistically significant in the spinal stenosis group in comparison with the controls ( P < 0.0001. Conversely, no significant difference was found in men. Conclusions There is an association between diabetes and lumbar spinal stenosis. Diabetes mellitus may be a predisposing factor for the development of lumbar spinal stenosis.

  14. Automated diabetic retinopathy imaging in Indian eyes: A pilot study

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    Rupak Roy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of an automated retinal image grading system in diabetic retinopathy (DR screening. Materials and Methods: Color fundus images of patients of a DR screening project were analyzed for the purpose of the study. For each eye two set of images were acquired, one centerd on the disk and the other centerd on the macula. All images were processed by automated DR screening software (Retmarker. The results were compared to ophthalmologist grading of the same set of photographs. Results: 5780 images of 1445 patients were analyzed. Patients were screened into two categories DR or no DR. Image quality was high, medium and low in 71 (4.91%, 1117 (77.30% and 257 (17.78% patients respectively. Specificity and sensitivity for detecting DR in the high, medium and low group were (0.59, 0.91; (0.11, 0.95 and (0.93, 0.14. Conclusion: Automated retinal image screening system for DR had a high sensitivity in high and medium quality images. Automated DR grading software′s hold promise in future screening programs.

  15. Yearly evolution of organ damage markers in diabetes or metabolic syndrome: data from the LOD-DIABETES study

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    Rodriguez-Sanchez Emiliano

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease morbidity-mortality is greater in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the yearly evolution of organ damage markers in diabetes or metabolic syndrome, and to analyze the associated factors. Methods An observational prospective study was carried out in the primary care setting, involving 112 patients: 68 diabetics and 44 subjects with metabolic syndrome, subjected to 12 months of follow-up. Measurements: traditional cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, blood glucose, lipids, smoking, body mass index (BMI and and non-traditional risk factors (waist circumference, hsC Reactive Protein and fibrinogen; subclinical vascular (carotid intima-media thickness, pulse wave velocity and ankle/brachial index, cardiac (Cornell voltage-duration product, renal organ damage (creatinine, glomerular filtration and albumin/creatinine index, and antihypertensive and lipid-lowering drugs. Results At baseline, the diabetics presented a mean age of 59.9 years, versus 55.2 years in the subjects with metabolic syndrome (p = 0.03. Diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol were lower among the patients with diabetes, while blood glucose and HbA1c, as well as antihypertensive and lipid-lowering drug use, were greater. At evaluation after one year, the diabetics showed a decrease in BMI (-0.39, diastolic blood pressure (-3.59, and an increase in fibrinogen (30.23 mg/dL, ankle/brachial index (0.07 and the number of patients with ankle/brachial index pathologic decreased in 6. In turn, the patients with metabolic syndrome showed an increase in HDL-cholesterol (1-91 mg/dL, fibrinogen (25.54 mg/dL, Cornell voltage-duration product (184.22 mm/ms, ankle/brachial index (0.05 and the use of antihypertensive and lipid-lowering drugs, and a reduction in serum glucose (3.74 mg/dL, HOMA, systolic (-6.76 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure (-3.29 mmHg, and

  16. Educational disparities in health behaviors among patients with diabetes: the Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karter, Andrew J; Stevens, Mark R; Brown, Arleen F; Duru, O Kenrik; Gregg, Edward W; Gary, Tiffany L; Beckles, Gloria L; Tseng, Chien-Wen; Marrero, David G; Waitzfelder, Beth; Herman, William H; Piette, John D; Safford, Monika M; Ettner, Susan L

    2007-10-29

    Our understanding of social disparities in diabetes-related health behaviors is incomplete. The purpose of this study was to determine if having less education is associated with poorer diabetes-related health behaviors. This observational study was based on a cohort of 8,763 survey respondents drawn from ~180,000 patients with diabetes receiving care from 68 provider groups in ten managed care health plans across the United States. Self-reported survey data included individual educational attainment ("education") and five diabetes self-care behaviors among individuals for whom the behavior would clearly be indicated: foot exams (among those with symptoms of peripheral neuropathy or a history of foot ulcers); self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG; among insulin users only); smoking; exercise; and certain diabetes-related health seeking behaviors (use of diabetes health education, website, or support group in last 12 months). Predicted probabilities were modeled at each level of self-reported educational attainment using hierarchical logistic regression models with random effects for clustering within health plans. Patients with less education had significantly lower predicted probabilities of being a non-smoker and engaging in regular exercise and health-seeking behaviors, while SMBG and foot self-examination did not vary by education. Extensive adjustment for patient factors revealed no discernable confounding effect on the estimates or their significance, and most education-behavior relationships were similar across sex, race and other patient characteristics. The relationship between education and smoking varied significantly across age, with a strong inverse relationship in those aged 25-44, modest for those ages 45-64, but non-evident for those over 65. Intensity of disease management by the health plan and provider communication did not alter the examined education-behavior relationships. Other measures of socioeconomic position yielded similar findings. The

  17. Evaluation of Overactive Bladder in Type 2 Diabetes Patients with a Questionaire-Based Study

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    Levent Verim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Overactive bladder (OAB is a common and well-known urologic condition. OAB occurs in both women and men. Diabetes mellitus (DM is one of the most common metabolic disorders in the world and the prevalence of DM in adults has been increasing. Diabetic neuropathy can induce functional disease of multiple organs, including diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD. DBD occurs commonly as a late complication and DBD is mainly characterized by poor bladder emptying, urinary retention and overflow incontinence. However, storage symptoms, as those suggestive for OAB may also affect people with DM. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of OAB in people with DM compared to healthy control subjects. Methods: We analyzed records of 212 diabetic case and 229 control subjects using the 8-item symptom bother scale of the OAB questionnaire (OAB-q (OAB-V8. Results: Diabetic bladder overactivity was seen in 20.3% of patients with DM (n=43 and 10.5% of non-diabetic control group (n=24. The OAB prevalence in patients with DM was approximately two-fold higher than in control subjects. OAB increased with the duration of diabetes, glycosylated hemoglobin level and age. There was no significant difference in sex distribution between the groups. There is an increase in the prevalence type 2 diabetes in Turkey. DM is a common cause of reduced bladder sensation in both men and women. In this study, OAB syndrome in diabetic patients was searched. DBD is characterized by underactive (flaccid bladder, voiding difficulty, infrequent voiding and reduced bladder sensation during urinary storage; bladder underactivity and urinary retention during urination. OAB in diabetic patients is characterized by urgency (a compelling and sudden desire to void, with or without incontinence, usually with urinary frequency and nocturia. Conclusion: OAB symptoms are more prevalent in diabetic people than in healthy people. OAB symptoms in DM may be considered as a predictor of the

  18. [Salvation of the diabetic foot through a comprehensive individualized treatment of the patient with type 2 diabetes: case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanderová, Ivana

    This is a case of men with type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic foot. The patient was in danger of limb amputation. After improvement of diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia therapies a comprehensive treatment of diabetic foot including angioplasty, antibiotics and local maggot therapy was used for diabetic foot management. Therapy result was very satisfying for the patient. Despite of amputation of the 2nd digit due to advanced gangrene, the whole foot function was saved.Key words: diabetes foot - maggot therapies - type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  19. Self-reported dietary intake of youth with recent onset of type 2 diabetes: Results from the TODAY study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite the widely recognized importance of diet in managing diabetes, few studies have documented usual dietary intake in young people with type 2 diabetes. The objective of our study were to assess dietary intake among a large, ethnically diverse cohort of young people with type 2 diabetes and com...

  20. Infant feeding patterns in families with a diabetes history - observations from The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Sandra; Vehik, Kendra; Uusitalo, Ulla; McLeod, Wendy; Aronsson, Carin Andrén; Frank, Nicole; Gesualdo, Patricia; Yang, Jimin; Norris, Jill M; Virtanen, Suvi M

    2014-12-01

    To assess the association between diabetes family history and infant feeding patterns. Data on breast-feeding duration and age at first introduction of cow's milk and gluten-containing cereals were collected in 3-month intervals during the first 24 months of life. Data from the multicentre TEDDY (The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young) study, including centres in the USA, Sweden, Finland and Germany. A total of 7026 children, including children with a mother with type 1 diabetes (T1D; n 292), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM; n 404) or without diabetes but with a father and/or sibling with T1D (n 464) and children without diabetes family history (n 5866). While exclusive breast-feeding ended earlier and cow's milk was introduced earlier in offspring of mothers with T1D and GDM, offspring of non-diabetic mothers but a father and/or sibling with T1D were exclusively breast-fed longer and introduced to cow's milk later compared with infants without diabetes family history. The association between maternal diabetes and shorter exclusive breast-feeding duration was attenuated after adjusting for clinical variables (delivery mode, gestational age, Apgar score and birth weight). Country-specific analyses revealed differences in these associations, with Sweden showing the strongest and Finland showing no association between maternal diabetes and breast-feeding duration. Family history of diabetes is associated with infant feeding patterns; however, the associations clearly differ by country, indicating that cultural differences are important determinants of infant feeding behaviour. These findings need to be considered when developing strategies to improve feeding patterns in infants with a diabetes family history.

  1. Sexual function in young women with type 1 diabetes: the METRO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorino, M I; Bellastella, G; Castaldo, F; Petrizzo, M; Giugliano, D; Esposito, K

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and risk factors associated with female sexual dysfunction (FSD) in young women with type 1 diabetes treated with different intensive insulin regimens. Type 1 diabetic women aged 18-35 years were included in this study if they had stable couple relationship and no oral contraceptive use. All women were asked to complete the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and other validated multiple-choice questionnaires assessing sexual-related distress (Female Sexual Distress Scale, FSDS), quality of life (SF-36 Health Survey), physical activity (International Physical Activity Questionnaire), depressive symptoms (Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, SRDS) and diabetes-related problems (Diabetes Integration Scale ATT-19). FSD was diagnosed according to a FSFI score higher than 26.55 and a FSDS score lower than 15. The overall prevalence of FSD in diabetic and control women was 20 and 15 %, respectively (P = 0.446). Compared with the continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion group and control women, diabetic women on multiple daily injections (MDI) had lower global FSFI score (P = 0.007), FSDS score (P = 0.045) and domains such as arousal (P = 0.006), lubrication and satisfaction scores (P 2) were independent predictors of FSFI score in the overall diabetic women. Young women with type 1 diabetes wearing an insulin pump show a prevalence of sexual dysfunction similar to that of healthy age-matched women, but sexual function was significantly impaired in diabetic women on MDI therapy. Depression and the mental health status were independent predictors for FSD in diabetic women.

  2. [Dyslipemia in diabetics treated with statins. Results of the DYSIS study in Spian].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, Jesús; Alegría, Eduardo; Guijarro, Carlos; Lozano, Jose V; Vitale, Gustavo C; González-Timón, Belén; González-Juanatey, José R

    2013-11-16

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) is characterized by carrying a high cardiovascular risk. This situation underscores the importance of intensively treating the risk factors present in diabetic patients, notably dyslipemia. The treatment with cholesterol-lowering drugs may be especially effective to reduce the cardiovascular risk in diabetic patients. Therefore, LDL-cholesterol is a priority target in the lipid management of these patients. This study analyzes the alterations in the lipid profile of diabetic patients receiving treatment with statins, which therefore may contribute to persistent cardiovascular risk in such individuals. The DYSIS (Dyslipidemia International Study) is an international, observational trial analyzing the lipid profile of patients treated with statins and followed-up on in outpatient clinics by primary care physicians and specialists. This study is referred to the data on the diabetic patients. Of the total patients enrolled in the DYSIS, the present study included 3703 patients, 39% being diabetics. A total of 59.2% of diabetics showed LDL-C out of goal; triglyceride elevation was observed in 43.6% and 36.4% showed low HDL-C. In diabetics patients with coronary heart disease, 31% had uncontrolled levels of all three lipid parameters. The prevalence of out of goal LDL-C in diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome was close to 60%; 39.8% had low levels of HDL-C and 46,6% high levels of triglycerides. In addition, 57% of diabetic patients with obesity showed LDL-C out of control, despite statins treatment. Cardiovascular diseases remain the main cause of morbidity-mortality in patients with DM2. The results of the present study show that in diabetic patients the degree of control is very limited with regard to LDL-cholesterol. More than half of diabetic patients treated with statins had LDL-cholesterol out of goal. The level of dyslipidemia control was low, despite statins treatment. Therefore, the detection of atherogenic dyslipidemia may

  3. Prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes among hypertensive patients attending Kiambu district Hospital, Kenya: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meme, Nkatha; Amwayi, Samuel; Nganga, Ziporrah; Buregyeya, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension (HTN) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are two common non-communicable diseases (NCDs) that are closely linked: one cannot be properly managed without attention to the other. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetic and pre-diabetic states that is abnormal glucose regulation (AGR) and factors associated with it among hypertensive patients in Kiambu Hospital, Kenya. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study from February 2014 to April 2014. Hypertensive patients aged ≥18 attending the out-patient medical clinic were included in the study. Pregnant and known diabetic patients were excluded. Data was collected on socio-demographics, behavior, and anthropometrics. Diabetes status was based on a Glycated Haemoglobin (HbA1C) classification of ≥6.5% for diabetes, 6.0-6.4% for pre-diabetes and ≤6.0% for normal. AGR was the dependable variable and included two diabetic categories; diabetes and pre-diabetes. Results We enrolled 334 patients into the study: the mean age was 59 years (Standard deviation= 14.3). Of these patients 254 (76%) were women. Thirty two percent (107/334; 32%) were found to have AGR, with 14% (46) having un-diagnosed DM and 18%(61) with pre-diabetes. Factors associated with AGR were age ≥45 (OR = 3.23; 95% CI 1.37 ≥ 7.62), basal metabolic index (BMI) ≥ 25 Kg/m2 (OR= 3.13; 95% CI 1.53 - 6.41), low formal education (primary/none)(OR= 2; 95%CI 1.08 - 3.56) and family history of DM (OR = 2.19; 95%CI 1.16 - 4.15). Conclusion There was a high prevalence of undiagnosed AGR among hypertensive patients. This highlights the need to regularly screen for AGR among hypertensive patients as recommended by WHO. PMID:26966482

  4. Temporal Relationship Between Uric Acid Concentration and Risk of Diabetes in a Community-based Study Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juraschek, Stephen P.; McAdams-Demarco, Mara; Miller, Edgar R.; Gelber, Allan C.; Maynard, Janet W.; Pankow, James S.; Young, Hunter; Coresh, Josef; Selvin, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Some observational studies have identified elevated uric acid concentration as a risk factor for diabetes, while others have found an inverse relationship. We examined both the association of uric acid level with incident diabetes and the change in uric acid concentration after a diabetes diagnosis. We analyzed data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study and quantified the independent association between uric acid level and incident diabetes via Cox proportional hazards models. The association between duration of diabetes and change in uric acid level was examined via linear regression. Among 11,134 participants without diagnosed diabetes at baseline (1987–1989), there were 1,294 incident cases of diabetes during a median of 9 years of follow-up (1987–1998). Uric acid level was associated with diabetes even after adjustment for risk factors (per 1 mg/dL, hazard ratio = 1.18, 95% confidence interval: 1.13, 1.23), and the association remained significant after adjustment for fasting glucose and insulin levels. Among participants with diabetes (n = 1,510), every additional 5 years’ duration of diabetes was associated with a 0.10-mg/dL (95% confidence interval: 0.04, 0.15) lower uric acid level after adjustment. We conclude that uric acid concentration rises prior to diagnosis of diabetes and then declines with diabetes duration. Future studies investigating uric acid as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease should adequately account for the impact and timing of diabetes development. PMID:24418684

  5. The Relation of Diabetes Type 2 with Sexual Function among Reproductive Age Women in Iran, a Case-Control Study

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    Poorandokht Afshari; Shiva Yazdizadeh; Parvin Abedi; Homayra Rashidi

    2017-01-01

    Background. Diabetic patients are at the greater risk of retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, and sexual dysfunction compared to the general population. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sexual dysfunction in type 2 diabetes reproductive age women in Iran. Method. This was a case-control study carried out on 130 women with type 2 diabetes and 130 healthy women. The type 2 diabetes diagnosis was confirmed with abnormal fasting blood sugar, abnormal random blood sugar test, ...

  6. Predictors of Sustained Walking among Diabetes Patients in Managed Care: The Translating Research into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerzoff, Robert B.; Brown, Arleen F.; Karter, Andrew J.; Kim, Catherine; Kountz, David; Narayan, K. M. Venkat; Schneider, Stephen H.; Tseng, Chien-Wen; Waitzfelder, Beth; Mangione, Carol M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although patients with diabetes may benefit from physical activity, few studies have examined sustained walking in this population. OBJECTIVE To examine the factors associated with sustained walking among managed care patients with diabetes. DESIGN Longitudinal, observational cohort study with questionnaires administered 2.5 years apart. PARTICIPANTS Five thousand nine hundred thirty-five patients with diabetes walking at least 20 minutes/day at baseline. MEASUREMENTS The primary outcome was the likelihood of sustained walking, defined as walking at least 20 minutes/day at follow-up. We evaluated a logistic regression model that included demographic, clinical, and neighborhood variables as independent predictors of sustained walking, and expressed the results as predicted percentages. RESULTS The absence of pain was linked to walking behavior, as 62% of patients with new pain, 67% with ongoing pain, and 70% without pain were still walking at follow-up (p = .03). Obese patients were less likely (65%) to sustain walking than overweight (71%) or normal weight (70%) patients (p = .03). Patients ≥65 years (63%) were less likely to sustain walking than patients between 45 and 64 (70%) or ≤44 (73%) years (p = .04). Only 62% of patients with a new comorbidity sustained walking compared with 68% of those who did not (p walking in this cohort of active walkers. CONCLUSIONS Pain, obesity, and new comorbidities were moderately associated with decreases in sustained walking. Whereas controlled intervention studies are needed, prevention, or treatment of these adverse conditions may help patients with diabetes sustain walking behavior. PMID:18452046

  7. Perceptions of diabetes, barriers to disease management, and service needs: a focus group study of working adults with diabetes in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Landry L; Uehara, Denise L; Tom, Tammy

    2011-03-01

    Research about the support needs for and barriers to successful disease management of working adults with diabetes is limited. Our objective was to gain an in-depth understanding of how working adults in Hawaii perceive diabetes, barriers to disease management, and the services needed to keep people healthy and working. From November 2008 through March 2009, we conducted focus group interviews with 74 employed adults with diabetes enrolled in the Hawaii Demonstration to Maintain Independence and Employment project. Responses to questions were analyzed within and across groups to identify recurring themes. A third layer of analysis examined themes across responses to all questions, specifically, how barriers related to identified service needs. Employed participants with diabetes experienced pervasive effects on their lives as a result of the disease, although they interpreted these effects positively or negatively. Barriers to disease management, such as additional health issues, social prejudice, and lack of social support, indicated a need to educate the general public about the disease. Participants identified needing social support from other people with diabetes, psychological support to address the emotional side of diabetes, and coordinated teams of specialists to address medication side effects and other health-related barriers to disease management. Many participants discussed the challenge of integrating diabetes management with work and family responsibilities and the need for monetary support. This study provides insight into how employed adults perceived their disease and what they perceived as challenges to successfully managing diabetes. The findings provide future directions for community and workplace diabetes initiatives.

  8. Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Diabetic Patients - A Cross Sectional Study in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mysore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, M Suresh; Gowdappa, H Basavana; Kalpana, T; Vidyalaxmi, K; Nikhil, B; Chakravarthy, T

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence rates of diabetes are rising rapidly both in urban and rural India with the present prevalence in urban India being 12-19% and in rural India 4 - 10% in different published Indian studies.1 All involved in diabetes care agree that patients play a major role in the successful management of diabetes. There is an increasing amount of evidence that patient education is the most effective way to lessen the diabetic complications and its management.2 Education is likely to be effective if we know the characteristics of the patients in terms of knowledge, attitude and practices about diabetes. This study was conducted in Mysore to know the knowledge, attitude and practices of diabetic patients attending JSS Hospital. A total of 900 patients were included in the study. Five hundred sixteen (57.3%) patients were males, while 384 (42.7%) patients were females. Four hundred twenty-three (47%) patients were from urban area, while 477 (53%) were from rural area. Five hundred sixty-five (62.5%) diabetic patients were unaware of the diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus, 661 (73.4%) patients about cause of diabetes, 264 (29.3%) patients about common symptoms of diabetes, 256 (28.4%) patients about symptoms of hypoglycemia. Diabetes is a chronic disease which can affect many systems in the body like the heart, eyes, kidneys and nerves contributing to increased morbidity and mortality. 29%, 30.7%, 31.2% and 35.7% of diabetic patients were not aware of the diabetic complications to heart, eyes, kidneys and nerves respectively. Even patients with diabetes for more than 10 years, 18.8% were not aware of the heart complications while 21.5% were not aware of the diabetes complications to eyes, kidneys and nerves. 834 (92.6%) diabetic patients were not aware of HbA1C. 790 (87.7%) diabetic patients did not know that fruits can be eaten by diabetics. Eight hundred seventeen (90.8%) diabetic patients had not attended a formal diabetic education class. This possibly is a

  9. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in type 2 Iranian diabetic women: a cross sectional study

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    Salarifar Mojtaba

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The risk of developing infection in diabetic patients is higher and urinary tract is the most common site for infection. Serious complications of urinary infection occur more commonly in diabetic patients. To study the prevalence and associates of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB in women with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Iranian population, this study was conducted. Methods Between February 10, 2004 and October 15, 2004; 202 nonpregnant diabetic (type 2 women (range: 31 to 78 years old with no abnormalities of the urinary tract system were included in this clinic based study. We defined ASB as the presence of at least 105 colony-forming units/ml of 1 or 2 bacterial species, in two separated cultures of clean-voided midstream urine. All the participants were free from any symptoms of urinary tract infection (UTI. Associates for developing bacteriuria was assessed and compared in participants with and without bacteriuria. Results In this study, the prevalence of ASB was 10.9% among diabetic women. E. coli was the most prevalent microorganism responsible for positive urine culture. Most of the isolated microorganisms were resistant to Co-trimoxazole, Nalidixic acid and Ciprofloxacin. Pyuria (P 1c level (P Conclusion The prevalence of ASB is higher in women with type 2 diabetes, for which pyuria and glucosuria can be considered as associates. Routine urine culture can be recommended for diabetic women even when there is no urinary symptom.

  10. [Diabetes and fasting during Ramadan. A observational study among Turkish immigrants in Belgium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, B; Mehuys, E; Van Tongelen, I; Van Bever, E; Bultereys, L; Avonts, D; Yildiz, G; Remon, J P; Boussery, K

    2013-03-01

    To investigate (i) Ramadan participation, (ii) provision of Ramadan related advice by healthcare providers (iii) medication use during Ramadan fasting among Turkish migrants with diabetes in Belgium. This pilot observational study was conducted among a convenience sample of 52 Turkish migrants with diabetes in Belgium. Two questionnaires collected information on socio-demographic characteristics, diabetes related characteristics, current hypoglycaemic medication with dosing regimen, participation in the past Ramadan, reasons for (non)participation, use of hypoglycaemic medication during the past Ramadan, advice from their healthcare providers about fasting during Ramadan and follow up of this advice. Sixteen patients (31%) had fasted during the past Ramadan. Main reason for Ramadan participation was reinforcement of faith (12/15), while the main reason for non participation was having diabetes (34/36). About 56% of the study population had received recommendations from their healthcare provider(s) about fasting and diabetes during Ramadan. The most commonly provided advice was not to participate in Ramadan, followed by modification of drug therapy. Only 3 patients ignored the advice of their healthcare professionals. In addition, only 60% of those who actually fasted received recommendations about intake of diabetes medication during the ramadan. Most fasters continued their medication dose unchanged (87% of OHA users and 80% of the insulin users). This pilot study found a low prevalence of Ramadan fasting among Turkish migrants with diabetes in Belgium. We also found that provision of advice by healthcare providers could be improved. Larger scale studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  11. Fruit and vegetable intake and pre-diabetes: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safabakhsh, Maryam; Koohdani, Fariba; Bagheri, Fariba; Siassi, Fereydoun; Khajehnasiri, Farahnaz; Sotoudeh, Gity

    2017-12-04

    Few studies have evaluated the association of fruit and vegetable (FV) intake and pre-diabetes. However, these studies are very limited and incomplete. Therefore, the aim of our study was to compare FV consumption and their subgroups between pre-diabetic and control subjects. This case-control study included 300 individuals, 150 subjects with normal fasting blood glucose (FBG), and 150 pre-diabetic subjects who were matched for sex and age. We collected the participants' anthropometric and physical activity data and measured their blood glucose level. A 168 items semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was used for estimating the FV intake. After adjustment for confounding variables, participants in the lower quartiles of FV and total fruit intake were more likely to experience pre-diabetes compared with those in the higher quartiles (p trend < 0.007). In addition, cruciferous vegetables, other vegetables, and berries were inversely associated with pre-diabetes (p < 0.05), although a distinct dose-response relationship was not found. Unexpectedly, higher intake of dark yellow vegetables was significantly associated with a higher chance of pre-diabetes (p trend = 0.006). Other vegetable and fruit subgroups did not show any significant relationship with this disorder. Our findings suggest that higher intake of total FV and total fruits might be associated with lower odds ratio of pre-diabetes.

  12. Momordica charantia and type 2 diabetes: from in vitro to human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habicht, Sandra D; Ludwig, Christine; Yang, Ray-yu; Krawinkel, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a growing health problem worldwide that is particularly severe in India and China. In these areas, bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) is a popular vegetable which is traditionally known to have health beneficial effects not only, but mainly, on diabetes. Bitter gourd could be a cheap possibility to help the poor in these and other countries to control their blood glucose levels. This review describes anti-diabetic effects of bitter gourd reported in the literature and discusses what still needs to be clarified for developing an evidence-based and safe use of the bitter gourd for diabetes. Analyses of bioactive compounds have shown that bitter gourd is rich in nutrients and phytochemicals of which some have anti-diabetic effects. Juices, powders, extracts, and isolated compounds have been tested in vitro and in vivo. Bitter gourd increases insulin secretion of the pancreas, decreases intestinal glucose uptake, and increases uptake and utilization of glucose in peripheral tissues. Although human studies with type 2 diabetics are weak in their design and/or results, some of the studies do indicate anti-diabetic effects in patients and safety for bitter gourd treatment in humans. In the future, well designed studies with rodents will help to understand what kind of bitter gourd variety, dosage, preparation, and duration of administration is optimal. Such results will help to design human studies which are necessary to prove the effectiveness of bitter gourd in patients.

  13. Disturbed eating behavior in Iranian adolescent and young females with type-1 diabetes compared to non diabetic peers: A cross-sectional study

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    Hamid Reza Roohafza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: An association of eating disorder with diabetes mellitus may lead to a serious lack of metabolic control, higher mortality and morbidity. There is no recent study conducted in the Iranian population about eating disorder and its variants. The aim of the present study is investigation of frequency of disturbed eating behaviors in adolescent girls with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM compared to non-diabetics. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, disturbed eating behavior were evaluated and compared in two groups of 12-22 year old adolescent and young females (126 with diabetes and 325 without diabetes. A self-report questionnaire including demographic data, Children′s Depression Inventory (CDI, and Eating Attitude Test (EAT-26 was used for data gathering. Independent t-test, Chi-square test, and logistic regression [odds ratio (OR] were used for data analyses in SPSS 15. Results: Findings revealed that higher percentage of diabetic girls are likely to have eating disturbances (67.9% vs. 53.8%, P = 0.01. Diabetic group obtained higher scores in both dieting (14.95 ± 6.28 vs. 11.79 ± 5.62, P < 0.001 and bulimia scales (4.9 ± 3.13 vs. 4.12 ± 2.89, P = 0.017, which supports a role for T1DM in inducing the symptoms. Diabetic girls were at more than double the risk of developing eating disturbance. Conclusions: The results indicate that a significantly higher percentage of diabetic girls are likely to have eating disturbances. Also, diabetic subjects had an increased probability of getting higher scores in all three EAT-26 subscales. Therefore, healthcare professionals, especially diabetic nurses, should be aware of the potential effects of the subclinical and clinical eating behaviors on adolescents with T1DM and evaluate them for these disturbances.

  14. Disturbed eating behavior in Iranian adolescent and young females with type-1 diabetes compared to non diabetic peers: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohafza, Hamid Reza; Abdeyazdan, Zahra; Amini, Parvaneh; Pahlavanzadeh, Saied; Shokouh, Pedram

    2016-01-01

    An association of eating disorder with diabetes mellitus may lead to a serious lack of metabolic control, higher mortality and morbidity. There is no recent study conducted in the Iranian population about eating disorder and its variants. The aim of the present study is investigation of frequency of disturbed eating behaviors in adolescent girls with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) compared to non-diabetics. In this cross-sectional study, disturbed eating behavior were evaluated and compared in two groups of 12-22 year old adolescent and young females (126 with diabetes and 325 without diabetes). A self-report questionnaire including demographic data, Children's Depression Inventory (CDI), and Eating Attitude Test (EAT-26) was used for data gathering. Independent t -test, Chi-square test, and logistic regression [odds ratio (OR)] were used for data analyses in SPSS 15. Findings revealed that higher percentage of diabetic girls are likely to have eating disturbances (67.9% vs. 53.8%, P = 0.01). Diabetic group obtained higher scores in both dieting (14.95 ± 6.28 vs. 11.79 ± 5.62, P Diabetic girls were at more than double the risk of developing eating disturbance. The results indicate that a significantly higher percentage of diabetic girls are likely to have eating disturbances. Also, diabetic subjects had an increased probability of getting higher scores in all three EAT-26 subscales. Therefore, healthcare professionals, especially diabetic nurses, should be aware of the potential effects of the subclinical and clinical eating behaviors on adolescents with T1DM and evaluate them for these disturbances.

  15. Menarcheal Age and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: A Community-Based Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Farahmand, Maryam; Tehrani, Fahimeh Ramezani; Dovom, Marzieh Rostami; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2017-01-01

    Objective: It has been reported that early menarche is associated with higher risk for type 2 diabetes. We aimed to explore the association between age at menarche and risk of type 2 diabetes in a population-based cohort study. Methods: For the purpose of the present study, 5191 subjects of reproductive age who were participants of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study and also met the eligibility criteria were selected. Demographic, lifestyle, reproductive, and anthropometric data as well as ri...

  16. The role of insulin resistance in diabetic neuropathy in Koreans with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a 6-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yu Na; Lee, Kee Ook; Jeong, Julie; Park, Hyung Jun; Kim, Seung-Min; Shin, Ha Young; Hong, Ji-Man; Ahn, Chul Woo; Choi, Young-Chul

    2014-05-01

    We previously reported that insulin resistance, low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and glycaemic exposure Index are independently associated with peripheral neuropathy in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We followed the patients who participated in that study in 2006 for another 6 years to determine the relationship between insulin resistance and neuropathy. This study involved 48 of the original 86 Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were referred to the Neurology clinic for the assessment of diabetic neuropathy from January 2006 to December 2006. These 48 patients received management for glycaemic control and prevention of diabetic complications in the outpatient clinic up to 2012. We reviewed blood test results and the nerve conduction study findings of these patients, taken over a 6-year period. Low HDL cholesterol and high triglycerides significantly influenced the development of diabetic neuropathy. Kitt value (1/insulin resistance) in the previous study affected the occurrence of neuropathy, despite adequate glycaemic control with HbA1c resistance affected the development of diabetic neuropathy after 6 years: insulin resistance in 2006 showed a positive correlation with a change in sural sensory nerve action potential in 2012. Diabetic neuropathy can be affected by previous insulin resistance despite regular glycaemic control. Dyslipidaemia should be controlled in patients who show high insulin resistance because HDL cholesterol and triglycerides are strongly correlated with later development of diabetic neuropathy.

  17. Associations between physical activity, sedentary behavior, and glycemic control in a large cohort of adolescents with type 1 diabetes : the Hvidoere Study Group on Childhood Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aman, J.; Skinner, T. C.; de Beaufort, C. E.; Swift, P. G. F.; Aanstoot, H-J; Cameron, F.

    angstrom man J, Skinner TC, de Beaufort CE, Swift PGF, Aanstoot H-J, Cameron F, for and on behalf of the Hvidoere Study Group on Childhood Diabetes. Associations between physical activity, sedentary behavior, and glycemic control in a large cohort of adolescents with type 1 diabetes: the Hvidoere

  18. Glykemische regulatie en behandeling van hypertensie essentieel bij personen met diabetes mellitus type 2; de 'United Kingdom prospective diabetes study' naar diabetische complicaties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolffenbuttel, B H; Heine, R J

    1999-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus often develop micro- and macrovascular complications. In 25% of them, complications are already present at the time of diagnosis. The principal objective of the United Kingdom prospective diabetes study was to determine if good blood glucose control and

  19. Prevalence of Diabetic Retinopathy in Urban Slums: The Aditya Jyot Diabetic Retinopathy in Urban Mumbai Slums Study-Report 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunita, Mohan; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Rogye, Ashwini; Sonawane, Manish; Gaonkar, Ravina; Srinivasan, Radhika; Natarajan, Sundaram; Stevens, Fred C J; Scherpbier, A J J A; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy; McCarty, Catherine

    2017-10-01

    The aims of the study were to estimate the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and enumerate history-based risk factors in the urban slums of Western India. The population-based study was conducted in seven wards of Mumbai urban slums, where we screened 6569 subjects of ≥ 40 years age, with a response rate of 98.4%, for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) based on American Diabetes Association criteria. All subjects with T2DM underwent dilated 30° seven-field stereo-fundus-photography for DR severity grading based on modified Airlie House classification. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess the correlation of DR with the history-based risk factors. The prevalence of DR in the general population of Mumbai urban slums was 1.41% (95% CI 0.59-2.23) and in the T2DM population it was 15.37% (95% CI 8.87-21.87). The positive associations with DR were the longer duration of DM (≥ 11 years: OR, 12.77; 95% CI 2.93-55.61) and male gender (OR, 2.05; 95% CI 1.08-3.89); increasing severity of retinopathy was also significantly associated with longer duration of DM (p Mumbai urban slums. Duration of DM and male gender were significantly associated with DR. The slums in Western India show the trends of urban lifestyle influences similar to the rest of urban India.

  20. Relationship of retinal vascular calibre and diabetic retinopathy in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Desheng Diabetic Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiufen; Deng, Yu; Gu, Hong; Ren, Xuetao; Lim, Apiradee; Snellingen, Torkel; Liu, Xipu; Wang, Ningli; Won Pak, Jeong; Liu, Ningpu; Danis, Ronald P

    2016-10-01

    To describe the relationship of retinal arteriolar and venular calibre with diabetic retinopathy (DR) and related risk factors, including glucose levels and other biomarkers in a Chinese population with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A cross-sectional study. Patients with T2DM were recruited from a local community in urban Beijing. Seven fields 30° colour fundus photographs were taken and examined for the presence and severity of DR using a standardised grading system. Retinal vascular calibres were measured and expressed as average central retinal arteriolar and venular equivalent using a computer-based program. A total of 1340 patients with T2DM were included for analysis. Of these, 472 (35.22%) had DR. Wider retinal venular calibre, but not arteriolar calibre, was associated with increasing glucose and glycosylated haemoglobin A1c levels (pretinopathy to 231.21 μm in those with mild, 241.01 μm in those with moderate and 235.65 μm in those with severe retinopathy (p for trend diabetic population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Depression among patients with diabetes: A community-based study in South India

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    Abdullahi S Aminu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression is one of the more common mental health conditions found among people suffering from chronic diseases. Its presence in patients with type 2 diabetes could hinder the adherence to and effectiveness of treatment. Most studies on depression among patients with diabetes are hospital-based suggesting the need for a community-based study to assess the correlates of depression among patients with diabetes. Aim: This study aimed to estimate the prevalence and to identify the factors influencing depression among patients with type 2 diabetes in Udupi taluk situated in southern India. Subjects and Methods: This study recruited 200 patients with type 2 diabetes from both rural and urban areas. Demographic, clinical, and diabetes-related information were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire. Depression was assessed using Patient Health Questionnaire-9; a standardized questionnaire developed in the United States of America and validated in the Indian population. Results: The prevalence of depression among patients with diabetes in the community was found to be 37.5%. Most frequently, depression was mild (42, 21% in nature with severe depression (9, 4.5% seen the least. Several factors were found to be positively associated with depression including female gender, rural residence, unemployment, and the status of being unmarried. The presence of diabetic complications and other chronic diseases such as hypertension and obesity also were found to be associated with depression. Conclusion: Depression was found to be particularly high among the study population. Since depression could significantly hinder patient's adherence to treatment, there is an urgent need for early diagnosis and treatment. This calls for the integration of mental health care into the management of diabetes.

  2. People with diabetes foot complications do not recall their foot education: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuncken, Julia; Williams, Cylie M; Stolwyk, Rene; Haines, Terry P

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to document what and how diabetes specific foot health information was provided during a podiatry consultation, and what information was retained at 1 month post consultation. This project was embedded within a prospective cohort study with two groups, podiatrists and people with diabetes. Data collection included the Problem Areas in Diabetes Questionnaire (PAID), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), information covered during the consultation, method of delivery and perceived key educational message from both participant perspectives at the time of the appointment and 1 month post appointment. There were three podiatrists and 24 people with diabetes who provided information at the two time points. Diabetes education provided by the podiatrists was mostly verbal. The key educational message recalled by both groups differed at the time of the appointment (14 out of 24 of responses) and at 1 month post the appointment time (11 out of 24 of responses). Education is a vital component to the treatment regime of people with diabetes. It appears current approaches are ineffective in enhancing understanding of diabetes impact on foot health. This study highlights the need for research investigating better ways to deliver key pieces of information to this population.

  3. The Effect of Diabetes Medication on Cognitive Function: Evidence from the PATH Through Life Study

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    Pushpani M. Herath

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine the effect of diabetes treatment on change of measures of specific cognitive domains over 4 years. Research Design and Methods. The sample was drawn from a population-based cohort study in Australia (the PATH Through Life Study and comprised 1814 individuals aged 65–69 years at first measurement, of whom 211 were diagnosed with diabetes. Cognitive function was measured using 10 neuropsychological tests. The effect of type of diabetes treatment (diet, oral hypoglycemic agents, and insulin on measures of specific cognitive domains was assessed using Generalized Linear Models adjusted for age, sex, education, smoking, physical activity level, BMI, and hypertension. Results. Comparison of cognitive function between diabetes treatment groups showed no significant effect of type of pharmacological treatment on cognitive function compared to diet only group or no diabetes group. Of those on oral hypoglycaemic treatment only, participants who used metformin alone had better cognitive function at baseline for the domains of verbal learning, working memory, and executive function compared to participants on other forms of diabetic treatment. Conclusion. This study did not observe significant effect from type of pharmacological treatment for diabetes on cognitive function except that participants who only used metformin showed significant protective effect from metformin on domain of verbal learning, working memory, and executive function.

  4. A comparative analysis of odontogenic maxillofacial infections in diabetic and nondiabetic patients: an institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Rahul D; Dhupar, Vikas; Akkara, Francis; Shetye, Omkar

    2015-08-01

    The increased prevalence of antibiotic resistance is an outcome of evolution. Most patients presenting with odontogenic space infections also have associated systemic co-morbidities such as diabetes mellitus resulting in impaired host defense. The present study aims to compare the odontogenic spaces involved, antibiotic susceptibility of microorganisms, length of hospital stay, and the infl uence of systemic comorbidities on treatment outcome in diabetic patients. A 2-year prospective study from January 2012 to January 2014 was conducted on patients with odontogenic maxillofacial space infections. The patients were divided into two groups based on their glycemic levels. The data were compiled and statistically analyzed. A total of 188 patients were included in the study that underwent surgical incision and drainage, removal of infection source, specimen collection for culture-sensitivity, and evaluation of diabetic status. Sixty-one out of 188 patients were found to be diabetic. The submandibular space was the most commonly involved space, and the most prevalent microorganism was Klebsiella pneumoniae in diabetics and group D Streptococcus in the nondiabetic group. The submandibular space was found to be the most commonly involved space, irrespective of glycemic control. Empiric antibiotic therapy with amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid combined with metronidazole with optimal glycemic control and surgical drainage of infection led to resolution of infection in diabetic as well as nondiabetic patients. The average length of hospital stay was found to be relatively longer in diabetic individuals.

  5. The db/db mouse: a useful model for the study of diabetic retinal neurodegeneration.

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    Patricia Bogdanov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To characterize the sequential events that are taking place in retinal neurodegeneration in a murine model of spontaneous type 2 diabetes (db/db mouse. METHODS: C57BLKsJ-db/db mice were used as spontaneous type 2 diabetic animal model, and C57BLKsJ-db/+ mice served as the control group. To assess the chronological sequence of the abnormalities the analysis was performed at different ages (8, 16 and 24 weeks. The retinas were evaluated in terms of morphological and functional abnormalities [electroretinography (ERG]. Histological markers of neurodegeneration (glial activation and apoptosis were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. In addition glutamate levels and glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST expression were assessed. Furthermore, to define gene expression changes associated with early diabetic retinopathy a transcriptome analyses was performed at 8 week. Furthermore, an additional interventional study to lower blood glucose levels was performed. RESULTS: Glial activation was higher in diabetic than in non diabetic mice in all the stages (p<0.01. In addition, a progressive loss of ganglion cells and a significant reduction of neuroretinal thickness were also observed in diabetic mice. All these histological hallmarks of neurodegeneration were less pronounced at week 8 than at week 16 and 24. Significant ERG abnormalities were present in diabetic mice at weeks 16 and 24 but not at week 8. Moreover, we observed a progressive accumulation of glutamate in diabetic mice associated with an early downregulation of GLAST. Morphological and ERG abnormalities were abrogated by lowering blood glucose levels. Finally, a dysregulation of several genes related to neurotransmission and oxidative stress such as UCP2 were found at week 8. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that db/db mouse reproduce the features of the neurodegenerative process that occurs in the human diabetic eye. Therefore, it seems an appropriate model for investigating the

  6. Diabetes but not insulin increases the risk of lung cancer: a Taiwanese population-based study.

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    Chin-Hsiao Tseng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The trend of lung cancer incidence in Taiwan is unknown, and the association between type 2 diabetes/insulin use and lung cancer is rarely studied. METHODS: The trends of lung cancer incidence in 1979-2007 in the Taiwanese general population were calculated. A random sample of 1,000,000 subjects covered by the National Health Insurance in 2005 was recruited. A total of 494,002 men and 502,948 women and without lung cancer were followed for the annual cumulative incidence of lung cancer in 2005, with calculation of the risk ratios between diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. Logistic regression estimated the adjusted odds ratios for risk factors. RESULTS: The trends increased significantly in both sexes (P<0.0001. The sex-specific annual cumulative incidence increased with age in either the diabetic or non-diabetic subjects, but the risk ratios attenuated with age. In logistic regressions, diabetes was associated with a significantly higher risk, with odds ratios (95% confidence interval for diabetes duration <1, 1-3, 3-5 and ≥5 years versus non-diabetes of 2.189 (1.498-3.200, 1.420 (1.014-1.988, 1.545 (1.132-2.109, and 1.329 (1.063-1.660, respectively. Such an association was not related to a higher detection with chest X-ray examination. Insulin use and medications including oral anti-diabetic drugs, statin, fibrate, and anti-hypertensive agents were not significantly associated with lung cancer. Age, male sex, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were positively; but dyslipidemia, stroke and higher socioeconomic status were negatively associated with lung cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Diabetes is significantly associated with a higher risk of lung cancer, but insulin use does not increase the risk.

  7. Study of Knowledge and Practice of Patient Self directed Care among Diabetics Patients

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    Z. Abedini

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and ObjectivesDiabetic patients play the main role in the management of their disease. Adequate knowledge of this disease state and self directed patient care will improve the health of these patients. Some studies have indicated a high prevalence of diabetes complication are due to the lack of knowledge of self directed patient care and practice in diabetic patient group. The objective of this study is to measure the knowledge level of self directed patient care and practice in order to evaluate their effects on improvement of diabetic patients' health in the city of Qom, Iran.MethodsIn this cross sectional study 1004 patients with diabetes participated (During year 2006. Data were collected from patients of General Hospital metabolism and endocrine research center.An interviewing method was used to asses the demographics data, history of disease, and knowledge of self directed patient care in these patients. Data were analyzed using a descriptive statistic, chi-square, and Pearson correlation coefficient, and SPSS software.ResultsOut of 1004 observed case, 154 patients were with Diabetes type I and 850 patients with Diabetes type II. The knowledge of self directed patient care and practice level of with both types of diabetes were determined to be mostly at an intermediate level. In type I diabetic patients there was a significant relation between knowledge level of self directed patient care and gender of the patients (P=0.01. Also, there was a significant correlation between practice and age (P=0.03(, and economical status (P=0.06 of the patients. In type II diabetic patients there was a significant relation between knowledge level of self directed patient care and educational level (P=0.00(, and economical status (P=0.01 of the patients. The practice level of self directed patient care was significantly related to economical status (p=0.03 in this group of patients. ConclusionThese results indicate that an increase in knowledge

  8. Severe and long-lasting diarrhea not recognized as adverse effect of metformin : A description of three elderly patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefeber, G.; Jansen, P.; Van Puijenbroek, E.

    Background.- As a result of the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS), metformin became the first choice drug for patients with diabetes. In 2009 three patients were admitted to our geriatric department for analysis of disabling long-lasting diarrhea. Metformin as causative agent was

  9. Efficacy and tolerance of a diabetes specific formula in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: An open label, randomized, crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Seema; Misra, Anoop; Nanda, Kriti; Pandey, Ravindra M; Garg, Vivek; Ganguly, Sanjeev; Cheung, Lorena

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of a diabetes specific formula on acute glucose, insulin, and triglyceride responses in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This open-label, randomized, crossover, pilot single center study had two phases (pre-treatment and treatment). After screening, the patients entered run-in period and were counseled on diet and exercise regime. They were then randomly allocated to receive either diabetes specific formula (Nutren Diabetes, Nestlé Health Science, Switzerland; Group A) or isocaloric meal (Cornflakes and milk; Group B). Blood samples were collected to estimate blood glucose, insulin and triglyceride levels (Baseline at 0 min and post-meal at 30, 60, 120, and 180 min). Area under curve for blood glucose post-meal at 30 min, 60 min, 120 min, and 180 min was significantly lower for Group A as compared with Group B (p=0.003, 0.0001, 0.0001, 0.0001, respectively). Increase in serum insulin levels from baseline was also lower for Group A post-meal at 120 and 180 min, respectively, as compared to Group B (p=0.0001 and 0.0002, respectively). The Diabetes specific formula tested in this study showed lower post-meal blood glucose and insulin levels as compared with isocaloric meal. Thus, diabetes specific formula may be an option for diabetic and hyperglycemic patients in need of nutritional support. Copyright © 2014 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ethnic difference in the prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus in regions with Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway - the SAMINOR1 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseribafrouei, Ali; Eliassen, Bent-Martin; Melhus, Marita; Broderstad, Ann Ragnhild

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus in rural populations of Norway, as well as to explore potential ethnic disparities with respect to dysglycaemia in Sami and non-Sami populations. Cross-sectional population-based study. The SAMINOR1 study was performed in 2003-2004. The study took place in regions with both Sami and non-Sami populations and had a response rate of 60.9%. Information in the SAMINOR1 study was collected using two self-administered questionnaires, clinical examination and laboratory tests. The present analysis included 15,208 men and women aged 36-79 years from the SAMINOR1 study. Age-standardised prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus among Sami men was 3.4 and 5.5%, respectively. Corresponding values for non-Sami men were 3.3 and 4.6%. Age-standardised prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus for Sami women was 2.7 and 4.8%, respectively, while corresponding values for non-Sami women were 2.3 and 4.5%. Relative risk ratios for dysglycaemia among Sami participants compared with non-Sami participants were significantly different in different geographical regions, with the southern region having the highest prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus among Sami participants. We observed a heterogeneity in the prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus in different geographical regions both within and between different ethnic groups.

  11. A STUDY ON ASYMPTOMATIC CARDIAC CHANGES IN TYPE 2 DIABETES PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramchandra Rao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Majority of the time the patient of Diabetes presents with complications like Myocardial infarction, heart failure, being end stages of cardiovascular 2 disease associated with other macro and microvascular complications. If patients are screened at an early stage of Diabetes before the onset of symptoms the cardiovascular complications can be delayed and mortality can be reduced . There are only few studies in India done to screen asymptomatic diabetic individuals for cardiovascular compli cations. This study is done in view of screening the asymptomatic individuals in our area to prevent complications. With the available infrastructure, ECG, 2D ECHO were done in 50 patients who met inclusion, exclusion criterias, the changes were noted and the cardiac status was evaluated. AIM AND OBJECTIVES : “To study the asymptomatic cardiac changes in type2 Diabetes patients”. To observe the ECG changes in patients of type2 Diabetes without any symptoms of cardiac disease. To evaluate the ECG changes along with 2DECHO findings in asymptomatic cardiac patients of type 2 Diabetes. To study the correlation between these two investigations and evaluate the cardiac status of the individual. CONCLUSIONS : M ost of the patients in study group belong to 5 th decade , Males with Diabetes were almost double that of females , Most of the patients had duration of Diabetes as 5yrs , Less than half of patients had family history of Diabetes , Half of the group had alcohol, smoking habits , More than half of patients were overweight , Only 20% had good control of Diabetes , Total cholesterol is above normal in almost all of the patients, LDL is elevated in half of the patients, triglycerides in most of them, there is significant dyslipidemia in patients of Diabetes , Only 6 had normal ECG. Rest of them have LVH, ischemia , 18 patients had changes in echo including LVD, regional and global hypokinesias , t hus the present study shows patients with type 2

  12. Circulating cellular adhesion molecules and risk of diabetes: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankow, J S; Decker, P A; Berardi, C; Hanson, N Q; Sale, M; Tang, W; Kanaya, A M; Larson, N B; Tsai, M Y; Wassel, C L; Bielinski, S J

    2016-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that soluble cellular adhesion molecules would be positively and independently associated with risk of diabetes. Soluble levels of six cellular adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, E-selectin, VCAM-1, E-cadherin, L-selectin and P-selectin) were measured in participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, a prospective cohort study. Participants were then followed for up to 10 years to ascertain incident diabetes. Sample sizes ranged from 826 to 2185. After adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, BMI and fasting glucose or HbA1c , four cellular adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, E-selectin, VCAM-1 and E-cadherin) were positively associated with incident diabetes and there was a statistically significant trend across quartiles. Comparing the incidence of diabetes in the highest and lowest quartiles of each cellular adhesion molecule, the magnitude of association was largest for E-selectin (hazard ratio 2.49; 95% CI 1.26-4.93) and ICAM-1 (hazard ratio 1.76; 95% CI 1.22-2.55) in fully adjusted models. Tests of effect modification by racial/ethnic group and sex were not statistically significant for any of the cellular adhesion molecules (P > 0.05). The finding of significant associations between multiple cellular adhesion molecules and incident diabetes may lend further support to the hypothesis that microvascular endothelial dysfunction contributes to risk of diabetes. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  13. Social well-being of young adults with type 1 diabetes since childhood. The Oulu cohort study of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannula, Virva; Hautala, Nina M; Tossavainen, Päivi; Falck, Aura A K

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the social performance of young adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) since childhood with particular interest in its relation to the severity of diabetic retinopathy (DR). The prevalence of DR was evaluated in a population-based Finnish cohort of children with T1D during 1989-1990. The subjects were contacted 18 years later for evaluation of DR, education, employment, and family relations. 136 of 216 subjects participated in the study in 2007 (mean age 30 ± 3 years, mean diabetes duration 23 ± 4 years, 78 men). There were 42 subjects (31%) with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). A university degree was held by 9%, a degree from a university of applied sciences by 33%, and 45% had a vocational school education; 7% were full-time students while 4% had received no education after comprehensive school. PDR was associated with lower education. Sixty percent of the subjects with PDR and 68% of those with non-PDR held full-time jobs. Four percent of the non-PDR group were unemployed while 26% of subjects with PDR were outside working life because of either unemployment or retirement. Seventy-one percent of the subjects had a spouse, and 60 subjects had a total of 119 children. PDR did not compromise the likelihood of having a spouse and children. The majority of young adults with T1D take active roles in society by working and raising families. However, patients with PDR lacked secondary education significantly more often and were less likely to work than those with non-PDR. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  14. Association between Albuminuria and Different Body Constitution in Type 2 Diabetes Patients: Taichung Diabetic Body Constitution Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hung Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Albuminuria in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients increases the risk of diabetic nephropathy, the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Because albuminuria is modifiable, identifying relevant risk factors could facilitate prevention and/or management. This cross-sectional study investigated whether body constitution (BC independently predicts albuminuria. Method. Patients with T2DM (n=846 received urinalysis, a blood test, and diabetic retinopathy examination. Albuminuria was defined by an elevated urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (≥30 μg/mg. BC type (Yang deficiency, Yin deficiency, and Phlegm stasis was assessed using a body constitution questionnaire (BCQ. Traditional risk factors for albuminuria were also recorded. Odds ratios (ORs of albuminuria for BC were estimated using multivariate logistic regression. Results. Albuminuria was more prevalent in patients with Yang deficiency or Phlegm stasis (both P<0.01. After adjustment, patients with both Yang deficiency and Phlegm stasis exhibited a significantly higher risk of albuminuria (OR = 3.037; 95% confidence interval = 1.572–5.867, and P<0.001. Conclusion. BC is strongly associated with albuminuria in T2DM patients. Using a BCQ to assess BC is noninvasive, convenient, and inexpensive and can provide information for health care professionals to identify T2DM patients who are at a high risk of albuminuria.

  15. Diabetes and Cognitive Decline in Older Adults: The Ginkgo Evaluation of Memory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Priya; Carlson, Michelle C; Crum, Rosa M; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Sharrett, A Richey; Yasar, Sevil; Nahin, Richard L; DeKosky, Steven T; Snitz, Beth; Lopez, Oscar; Williamson, Jeff D; Furberg, Curt D; Rapp, Stephen R; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2017-12-12

    Previous studies have shown that individuals with diabetes exhibit accelerated cognitive decline. However, methodological limitations have limited the quality of this evidence. Heterogeneity in study design, cognitive test administration, and methods of analysis of cognitive data have made it difficult to synthesize and translate findings to practice. We analyzed longitudinal data from the Ginkgo Evaluation of Memory Study to test our hypothesis that older adults with diabetes have greater test-specific and domain-specific cognitive declines compared to older adults without diabetes. Tests of memory, visuo-spatial construction, language, psychomotor speed, and executive function were administered. Test scores were standardized to z-scores and averaged to yield domain scores. Linear random effects models were used to compare baseline differences and changes over time in test and domain scores among individuals with and without diabetes. Among the 3,069 adults, aged 72-96 years, 9.3% reported diabetes. Over a median follow-up of 6.1 years, participants with diabetes exhibited greater baseline differences in a test of executive function (trail making test, Part B) and greater declines in a test of language (phonemic verbal fluency). For the composite cognitive domain scores, participants with diabetes exhibited lower baseline executive function and global cognition domain scores, but no significant differences in the rate of decline. Identifying cognitive domains most affected by diabetes can lead to targeted risk modification, possibly in the form of lifestyle interventions such as diet and physical activity, which we know to be beneficial for improving vascular risk factors, such as diabetes, and therefore may reduce the risk of executive dysfunction and possible dementia. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Evaluation of Salivary Glucose, IgA and Flow Rate in Diabetic Patients: A Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    P. Bakianian Vaziri; M. Vahedi; H. Mortazavi; Sh. Abdollahzadeh; M. Hajilooi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: An association between diabetes mellitus and alterations in the oral cavity has been noted. In this study, we evaluated differences between salivary IgA, glucose and flow rate in diabetic patients compared with healthy controls. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with type 1 diabetes, 40 patients with type 2 diabetes and 40 healthy controls were selected. Whole unstimulated saliva samples were collected by the standard method and the salivary flow rate was determined. Nephelomet...

  17. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by patients with diabetes mellitus in Bahrain: a cross-sectional study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khalaf, Abeer J

    2010-01-01

    CAM use is widespread, especially among patients with diabetes. The Gulf States have a high prevalence of diabetes, alongside a long tradition of CAM use. The aim of this study is to establish the prevalence of CAM use among patients with diabetes mellitus in Bahrain and to examine the characteristics of the CAM users.

  18. Case Finding and Medical Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes among Different Ethnic Minority Groups: The HELIUS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, Marieke B.; Agyemang, Charles; Peters, Ron J.; Stronks, Karien; Ujcic-Voortman, Joanna K.; van Valkengoed, Irene G. M.

    2017-01-01

    Aims. Prevention of diabetes complications depends on the level of case finding and successful treatment of diabetes, which may differ between ethnicities. Therefore, we studied the prevalence by age, awareness, treatment, and control of type 2 diabetes, among a multiethnic population. Methods. We

  19. An assessment of patient education and self-management in diabetes disease management--two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzner, Karen; Greenwood, Deborah; Payne, Hildegarde; Thomson, John; Vukovljak, Lana; McCulloch, Amber; Specker, James E

    2008-12-01

    Diabetes affects 7.8% of Americans, nearly 24 million people, and costs $174 billion yearly. People with diabetes benefit from self-management; disease management (DM) programs are effective in managing populations with diabetes. Little has been published on the intersection of diabetes education and DM. Our hypothesis was that diabetes educators and their interventions integrate well with DM and effectively support providers' care delivery. A literature review was conducted for papers published within the past 3 years and identified using the search terms "diabetes educator" and "disease management." Those that primarily addressed community health workers or the primary care/community setting were excluded. Two case studies were conducted to augment the literature. Ten of 30 manuscripts identified in the literature review were applicable and indicate that techniques and interventions based on cognitive theories and behavioral change can be effective when coupled with diabetes DM. Better diabetes self-management through diabetes education encourages participation in DM programs and adherence to recommended care in programs offered by DM organizations or those that are provider based. Improved health outcomes and reduced cost can be achieved by blending diabetes education and DM. Diabetes educators are a critical part of the management team and, with their arsenal of goal setting and behavior change techniques, are an essential component for the success of diabetes DM programs. Additional research needs to be undertaken to identify effective ways to integrate diabetes educators and education into DM and to assess clinical, behavioral, and economic outcomes arising from such programs.

  20. Online diabetes self-management program: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorig, Kate; Ritter, Philip L; Laurent, Diana D; Plant, Kathryn; Green, Maurice; Jernigan, Valarie Blue Bird; Case, Siobhan

    2010-06-01

    We hypothesized that people with type 2 diabetes in an online diabetes self-management program, compared with usual-care control subjects, would 1) demonstrate reduced A1C at 6 and 18 months, 2) have fewer symptoms, 3) demonstrate increased exercise, and 4) have improved self-efficacy and patient activation. In addition, participants randomized to listserve reinforcement would have better 18-month outcomes than participants receiving no reinforcement. A total of 761 participants were randomized to 1) the program, 2) the program with e-mail reinforcement, or 3) were usual-care control subjects (no treatment). This sample included 110 American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). Analyses of covariance models were used at the 6- and 18-month follow-up to compare groups. At 6 months, A1C, patient activation, and self-efficacy were improved for program participants compared with usual care control subjects (P 7% demonstrated stronger improvement in A1C (P = 0.01). At 18 months, self-efficacy and patient activation were improved for program participants. A1C was not measured. Reinforcement showed no improvement. An online diabetes self-management program is acceptable for people with type 2 diabetes. Although the results were mixed they suggest 1) that the program may have beneficial effects in reducing A1C, 2) AI/AN populations can be engaged in and benefit from online interventions, and 3) our follow-up reinforcement appeared to have no value.

  1. Change in DASH diet score and cardiovascular risk factors in youth with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus: The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, T L; Crandell, J L; Bell, R A; Mayer-Davis, E J; Dabelea, D; Liese, A D

    2013-10-14

    Youth with diabetes are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet has been shown to improve CVD risk. In this study, we evaluated whether changes in diet quality as characterized by DASH are associated with changes in CVD risk factors in youth with diabetes over time. Longitudinal mixed models were applied to data from 797 participants in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study representing three time points: baseline, 12- and 60-month follow-up. Data were restricted to youth whose diabetes was first diagnosed in 2002-2005. DASH-related adherence was poor and changed very little over time. However, an increase in DASH diet score was significantly associated with a decrease in HbA1c levels in youth with type 1 diabetes (β=-0.20, P-value=0.0063) and a decrease in systolic blood pressure among youth with type 2 diabetes (β=-2.02, P-value=0.0406). Improvements in dietary quality may be beneficial in youth with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. However, further work in larger groups of youth with type 1 and 2 diabetes is desirable.

  2. The association between dairy food intake and the incidence of diabetes in Australia: the Australian Diabetes Obesity and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantham, Narelle M; Magliano, Dianna J; Hodge, Allison; Jowett, Jeremy; Meikle, Peter; Shaw, Jonathan E

    2013-02-01

    Several studies have suggested that dairy food may reduce the risk of obesity and metabolic abnormalities but few have been able to conclusively demonstrate that it reduces the risk of diabetes. The aim of the present analysis was to investigate if dairy food intake independently reduces the risk of diabetes. The Australian Diabetes Obesity and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab) is a national, population-based, prospective survey conducted over 5 years. Baseline measurements included a 121-item FFQ, anthropometrics and an oral glucose tolerance test. Forty-two randomly selected clusters across Australia. Adults aged ≥25 years who participated in the baseline survey and returned to follow-up 5 years later. A total of 5582 participants with complete data were eligible for analysis, 209 of whom had incident diabetes. Compared with men in the first tertile of dairy food intake, men in the third tertile had a significantly reduced risk of developing diabetes after adjustment for age, sex, total energy intake, family history of diabetes, education, physical activity, smoking status, fasting serum TAG and HDL cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, waist circumference and hip circumference (OR = 0·53, 95 % CI 0·29, 0·96; P = 0·033). A similar non-significant association was observed in women. Dietary patterns that incorporate high intakes of dairy food may reduce the risk of diabetes among men. Further investigation into the relationship between dairy food intake and diabetes needs to be undertaken to fully understand the potential mechanism of this observation.

  3. Expression study of GLUT4 translocation-related genes in a porcine pre-diabetic model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thea; Fredholm, Merete; Cirera Salicio, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a world-wide exponentially growing health problem that increases the risk of co-morbidities including metabolic syndrome, pre-diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), and cancer. These co-morbidities are all complex conditions constituting a big challenge when searching...... this phenotype might provide knowledge on relevant genes implicated in molecular mechanisms underlying pre-diabetes, and contributing to the development of T2DM. In the present study, two groups of pigs with high (HGG, N = 6) and low (NGG, N = 6) fasting plasma glucose level respectively were selected from...

  4. Birth order and childhood type 1 diabetes risk: a pooled analysis of 31 observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardwell, Chris R; Stene, Lars C; Joner, Geir

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence rates of childhood onset type 1 diabetes are almost universally increasing across the globe but the aetiology of the disease remains largely unknown. We investigated whether birth order is associated with the risk of childhood diabetes by performing a pooled analysis...... at birth and other confounders, a reduction in the risk of diabetes in second- or later born children became apparent [fully adjusted OR¿=¿0.90 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.83-0.98; P¿=¿0.02] but this association varied markedly between studies (I(2)¿=¿67%). An a priori subgroup analysis showed...

  5. Use of Commonly Available Technologies for Diabetes Information and Self-Management Among Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes and Their Parents: A Web-Based Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaala, Sarah E; Hood, Korey K; Laffel, Lori; Kumah-Crystal, Yaa A; Lybarger, Cindy K; Mulvaney, Shelagh A

    2015-12-29

    For individuals with Type 1 diabetes (T1D), following a complicated daily medical regimen is critical to maintaining optimal health. Adolescents in particular struggle with regimen adherence. Commonly available technologies (eg, diabetes websites, apps) can provide diabetes-related support, yet little is known about how many adolescents with T1D use them, why they are used, or relationships between use and self-management. This study examined adolescent and parent use of 5 commonly available technologies for diabetes, including proportions who use each technology, frequency of use, and number of different technologies used for diabetes. Analyses also investigated the reasons adolescents reported for using or not using technologies for diabetes, and factors correlated with adolescents' technology use. Finally, this study examined relationships between the type and number of technologies adolescents use for diabetes and their self-management and glycemic control. Adolescents (12-17 years) and their parents (N=174 pairs), recruited from a pediatric diabetes clinic (n=134) and the Children with Diabetes community website (n=40), participated in this Web-based survey study. Glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C) values were obtained from medical records for pediatric clinic patients. Adolescents reported their use of 5 commonly available technologies for diabetes (ie, social networking, diabetes websites, mobile diabetes apps, text messaging, and glucometer/insulin pump software), reasons for use, and self-management behavior (Self-Care Inventory-Revised, SCI-R). Most adolescents and parents used at least one of the 5 technologies for diabetes. Among adolescents, the most commonly used technology for diabetes was text messaging (53%), and the least commonly used was diabetes websites (25%). Most adolescents who used diabetes apps, text messaging, or pump/glucometer software did so more frequently (≥2 times per week), compared to social networking and website use (≤1 time per

  6. Pupil cycle time and contrast sensitivity in type II diabetes mellitus patients: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoyoung Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Pupil cycle time (PCT has been widely used for examination of ocular diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN. Aims: The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the difference of contrast sensitivity according to PCT results, and the secondary aim was to determine the factors associated with PCT difference for type II diabetes patients. Settings and Design: A clinical pilot study that included a total of 60 eyes of 60 type II diabetes patients. Materials and Methods: We divided all patients into three groups according to PCT results. Group A and Group C were composed of patients who had upper one third PCT and lower one third PCT, respectively. We analyzed difference of age, diabetes duration, hypertension duration, mean best corrected visual acuity (BCVA, mean spherical equivalent (SE, HbA1C, glomerular filtration rate (GFR, stage of diabetic retinopathy, and Cardiac Autonomic Function Score (CAFS. Contrast sensitivity and decrease of visual acuity by glare were also estimated and analyzed for 28 eyes of 28 non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR patients. Group [NPDR] A and Group [NPDR] C were defined as those who had lower one third PCT and upper one third PCT, respectively. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 17.0 software. Results and Conclusions: Each group contained 20 eyes. Significant differences between Group A and Group C were observed in duration of diabetes and CAFS (P ≤ 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively. Contrast sensitivity in Group [NPDR] A was significantly more than in Group [NPDR] C at all cpds (all P ≤ 0.001. We found that PCT can influence contrast sensitivity or glare in diabetes patients and also confirmed a significant correlation of PCT with CAFS and duration of diabetes.

  7. Effect of Urtica dioica on morphometric indices of kidney in streptozotocin diabetic rats--a stereological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golalipour, Mohammad Jafar; Gharravi, Anneh Mohammad; Ghafari, Sorya; Afshar, Mohammad

    2007-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Urtica dioica on Morphometric indices of kidney in diabetic rats. Thirty male adult albino wistar rats of 125-175 g divided into control, diabetic and Urtica dioica treatment groups. In treatment Group, diabetic rats received 100 mg kg(-1) daily hydroalcoholic extract of U. dioica intraperitoneally for 4 weeks. After the animals had been sacrified, the kidneys were removed and fixed by formaldehyde, cut horizontally into 1 mm slices and processed, Stained with H and E. Stereological study performed using light microscope and the image projected on a table of olysa software. Cavalieri principle was used to estimate the volume of cortex, medulla and whole kidney. All the grouped data statistically evaluated using Student's t-test, expressed as the Mean +/- SE. Ration of kidney weight/body weight in diabetes (0.51) and diabetes-extract group (0.67) were higher then control group (0.42). Ratio of kidney volume/body weight in diabetes (350) and diabetes-extract group (348) were higher then control group (323). Volume Ratio of cortex/medulla in diabetes-extract group (1.65) was higher then control (1.34) and diabetes group (1.33). Glomerular area and diameter and proximal tubule diameter in diabetes-Extract group was higher than control and diabetes groups. This study revealed that Urtica dioica has no effect on renal morphometric indices in induced diabetic rats.

  8. Trends in cardiovascular disease risk factors in people with and without diabetes mellitus: a Middle Eastern cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri-Noudeh, Younes; Akbarpour, Samaneh; Lotfaliany, Mojtaba; Zafari, Neda; Khalili, Davood; Tohidi, Maryam; Mansournia, Mohammad Ali; Azizi, Fereidoun; Hadaegh, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    To investigate secular trends in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors during a decade of follow-up in a Middle Eastern cohort, and to compare observed trends between diabetic and non-diabetic populations. In a population of 6181 participants (2622 males and 3559 females), diabetes status and CVD risk factors were evaluated in 4 study phases from 1999-2011. 1045 subjects had type 2 diabetes mellitus at baseline and 5136 participants were diabetes-free. To examine the trends of CVD risk factors, generalized estimation equation models were constructed. The interaction between the diabetes status and each phase of the study was checked in a separate model. During the follow-up period diabetic females significantly gained better control of their blood pressure, serum low density lipoprotein cholesterol and general and central obesity measures compared to non-diabetic counterparts, although 60% of them had high BP and 64% had high serum LDL-C levels till the end of the study. Diabetic males however, experienced significantly better control on their serum LDL-C and general and central obesity measures compared to their non-diabetic controls; but 24% of them were still smoker, 63% had high BP and 60% had high serum LDL-C levels at the end of the follow-up (all Ps interaction risk factors have been controlled to some extent among diabetic population in Iran, still high numbers of people with diabetes have uncontrolled CVD risk factors that prompt more attention.

  9. Variation in NCB5OR: studies of relationships to type 2 diabetes, maturity-onset diabetes of the young, and gestational diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Gitte; Wegner, Lise; Rose, Christian Schack

    2004-01-01

    candidate gene and examined the coding region of NCB5OR in 120 type 2 diabetic patients and 63 patients with maturity-onset diabetes of the young using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography. We identified a total of 22 novel nucleotide variants. Three variants [IVS5+7del(CT), Gln187Arg, and His......223Arg] were genotyped in a case-control design comprising 1,246 subjects (717 type 2 diabetic patients and 529 subjects with normal glucose tolerance). In addition, four rare variants were investigated for cosegregation with diabetes in multiplex type 2 diabetic families. The IVS5+7del(CT) variant...... was associated with common late-onset type 2 diabetes; however, we failed to relate this variant to any diabetes-related quantitative traits among the 529 control subjects. Thus, variation in the coding region of NCB5OR is not a major contributor in the pathogenesis of nonautoimmune diabetes....

  10. Food intake patterns associated with incident type 2 diabetes: the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Angela D; Weis, Kristina E; Schulz, Mandy; Tooze, Janet A

    2009-02-01

    Markers of hemostasis and inflammation such as plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and fibrinogen have been associated with risk of type 2 diabetes. We aimed to identify food intake patterns influencing this pathway and evaluate their association with incident diabetes. The Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study cohort included 880 middle-aged adults initially free of diabetes. At the 5-year follow-up, 144 individuals had developed diabetes. Usual dietary intake was ascertained with a 114-item food frequency questionnaire. Using reduced rank regression, we identified a food pattern maximizing the explained variation in PAI-1 and fibrinogen. Subsequently, the food pattern-diabetes association was evaluated using logistic regression. High intake of the food groups red meat, low-fiber bread and cereal, dried beans, fried potatoes, tomato vegetables, eggs, cheese, and cottage cheese and low intake of wine characterized the pattern, which was positively associated with both biomarkers. With increasing pattern score, the odds of diabetes increased significantly (Ptrend < 0.01). After multivariate adjustment, the odds ratio comparing extreme quartiles was 4.3 (95% CI 1.7-10.8). Adjustment for insulin sensitivity and secretion and other metabolic factors had little impact (4.9, 1.8-13.7). Our findings provide support for potential behavioral prevention strategies, as we identified a food intake pattern that was strongly related to PAI-1 and fibrinogen and independently predicted type 2 diabetes.

  11. Brain Activation during Memory Encoding in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Discordant Twin Pair Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda G. Wood

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus increases the risk of dementia and neuronal dysfunction may occur years before perceptible cognitive decline. We aimed to study the impact of type 2 diabetes on brain activation during memory encoding in middle-aged people, controlling for age, sex, genes, and early-shared environment. Twenty-two twin pairs discordant for type 2 diabetes mellitus (mean age 60.9 years without neurological disease were recruited from the Australian Twin Registry (ATR and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during a memory encoding task, cognitive tests, and structural MRI. Type 2 diabetes was associated with significantly reduced activation in left hemisphere temporoparietal regions including angular gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and middle temporal gyrus and significantly increased activation in bilateral posteriorly distributed regions. These findings were present in the absence of within-pair differences in standard cognitive test scores, brain volumes, or vascular lesion load. Differences in activation were more pronounced among monozygotic (MZ pairs, with MZ individuals with diabetes also displaying greater frontal activation. These results provide evidence for preclinical memory-related neuronal dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. They support the search for modifiable later-life environmental factors or epigenetic mechanisms linking type 2 diabetes and cognitive decline.

  12. Inflammatory reaction in chronic periodontopathies in patients with diabetes mellitus. Histological and immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camen, Georgiana Cristiana; Caraivan, O; Olteanu, Mădălina; Camen, A; Bunget, Adina; Popescu, Florina Carmen; Predescu, Anca

    2012-01-01

    Chronic periodontopathies and diabetes mellitus are two clinical entities, which reciprocally condition one another. The periodontal disease is considered a major complication, which induces an unfavorable evolution of diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus is an endocrine disease which favors the occurrence of periodontopathy through gum's microvascular disorders, the selection and development of an aggressive bacterial plaque and through an exaggerate inflammatory response to the microflora within the oral cavity. Both diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease have an increasing incidence in the whole world. Development of periodontopathy is related to the aggression of bacterial flora in dental plaque, flora that is influenced on its turn by the evolution of diabetes mellitus. In our study, we have evaluated the inflammatory reaction in periodontium in patients with slowly and progressive periodontitis in patients with diabetes mellitus who had diabetes longer than five years. It has been found that all patients presented a chronic inflammatory infiltrate, abundant, with round mononuclear cells of lymphocyte, plasma cells and macrophage type, with non-homogenous arrangement, more intensely where the covering epithelium presented erosions or necrotic areas. Out of the immunity system cells, the most numerous where of T-lymphocytes type.

  13. Impact of Ellagic Acid in Bone Formation after Tooth Extraction: An Experimental Study on Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen M. Jamil Al-Obaidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To estimate the impact of ellagic acid (EA towards healing tooth socket in diabetic animals, after tooth extraction. Methods. Twenty-four Sprague Dawley male rats weighing 250–300 g were selected for this study. All animals were intraperitoneally injected with 45 mg/kg (b.w. of freshly prepared streptozotocin (STZ, to induce diabetic mellitus. Then, the animals were anesthetized, and the upper left central incisor was extracted and the whole extracted sockets were filled with Rosuvastatin (RSV. The rats were separated into three groups, comprising 8 rats each. The first group was considered as normal control group and orally treated with normal saline. The second group was regarded as diabetic control group and orally treated with normal saline, whereas the third group comprised diabetic rats, administrated with EA (50 mg/kg orally. The maxilla tissue stained by eosin and hematoxylin (H&E was used for histological examinations and immunohistochemical technique. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2 and alkaline phosphatase (ALP were used to evaluate the healing process in the extracted tooth socket by immunohistochemistry test. Results. The reactions of immunohistochemistry for FGF-2 and ALP presented stronger expression, predominantly in EA treated diabetic rat, than the untreated diabetic rat. Conclusion. These findings suggest that the administration of EA combined with RSV may have accelerated the healing process of the tooth socket of diabetic rats, after tooth extraction.

  14. Prevalence and prediction of silent ischaemia in diabetes mellitus: a population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, O; Arildsen, H; Damsgaard, E M

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of silent ischaemia in diabetic subjects in the population, to compare the prevalence of silent ischaemia in diabetics and non-diabetics and to attempt to predict the presence of silent ischaemia in diabetic subjects. METHODS: A random...... was registered simultaneously with ECG evidence of ischaemia. Individuals with ischaemia, but without angina pectoris, were defined as persons with silent ischaemia. RESULTS: Seventy-four percent of the invited group were included. The observed prevalence of silent ischaemia in diabetics was 13.5% (95% CI = 8.......5-19.8%). No association was found between silent ischaemia and gender (P = 0.83) or diabetes type (P = 0.67). In the group of diabetics who had controls, the prevalence was 11.4%, and among the controls the prevalence was 6.4% (OR = 1.87, one-sided P = 0.079). Systolic blood pressure was highly predictive of silent...

  15. Intimacy and women with type 2 diabetes: an exploratory study using focus group interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkadi, Anna; Rosenqvist, Urban

    2003-01-01

    This study explored if and how women perceived diabetes as affecting their social and sexual intimacy and if they wished to receive professional attention for any sexual disturbances that they experience. A series of five focus group interviews were conducted with 33 women with type 2 diabetes, ages 44 to 80 years, who also completed a questionnaire on sexual functioning: Two thirds were married and one third were sexually active. Categories resulting from the qualitative analysis were guilt and embarrassment in diabetes; female intimacy and shame; sexual dysfunction, an invisible problem; and the female patient. Asking women about intimacy revealed self-blame and embarrassment regarding their diabetes and sexual functioning. Several women who had experienced sexual dysfunction described barriers that made it difficult to obtain optimal care and/or self-care measures to cope with vaginal dryness, pain during intercourse, and decreased desire. Many of the women had the social and emotional resources to cope with their disease. Nonetheless, they experienced guilt, shame, and embarrassment, which are potentially oppressive features of having type 2 diabetes. Asking women with type 2 diabetes about intimacy in a contextually adequate way at routine follow-up visits could give them a chance to discuss both sexual and social intimacy concerns related to their diabetes.

  16. Non-invasive cardiac study in diabetic Nigerians using systolic time intervals.

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    Famuyiwa, O O; Odia, O J; Osotimehin, B O; Adenle, A D; Falase, A O

    1985-06-01

    Non-invasive cardiac studies using systolic time intervals were performed on 89 diabetic Nigerians and 45 non-diabetic controls, to investigate possible preclinical abnormality of left ventricular function. There was no significant difference in the pre-ejection period to left ventricular ejection time ratio (PEP/LVET) between the patients and controls: 0.373 +/- 0.011 vs 0.365 +/- 0.013 (P = 0.688). Patients at higher risk for developing significant vascular disease i.e. those with peripheral vascular insufficiency, those in higher socio-economic class and those with disease duration of 10 or more years had the highest mean values of PEP/LVET (0.403, 0.403 and 0.412 respectively). However, these values did not reach a level of significance. There was no correlation between PEP/LVET and age, body mass index, duration of diabetes, total or HDL cholesterol and the HDL to total cholesterol ratio. Because recent reports have related diabetic cardiomyopathy to angiopathic disease in diabetes, these results suggest that Nigerian patients, who like most other black African diabetics show little susceptibility to severe vascular complications of diabetes may enjoy some protection from a preclinical abnormality of left ventricular function as well.

  17. Diabetes, insulin use and Helicobacter pylori eradication: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tseng Chin-Hsiao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic patients may have a higher risk of gastric cancer. However, whether they have a higher incidence of Helicobacter pylori (HP eradication is not known. Furthermore, whether insulin use in patients with type 2 diabetes may be associated with a higher incidence of HP eradication has not been investigated. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study. The reimbursement databases from 1996 to 2005 of 1 million insurants of the National Health Insurance in Taiwan were retrieved. After excluding those aged Results In 2005, there were 10,051 incident cases receiving HP eradication. HP eradication was significantly increased with age, male sex, diabetes status, insulin use, use of calcium channel blocker, panendoscopic examination, hypertension, dyslipidemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, stroke, nephropathy, ischemic heart disease and peripheral arterial disease. Significant differences were also seen for occupation and living region. Medications including statin, fibrate, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker and oral anti-diabetic agents were not associated with HP eradication. The adjusted odds ratios for diabetes, insulin use and use of calcium channel blocker was 1.133 (1.074, 1.195, 1.414 (1.228, 1.629 and 1.147 (1.074, 1.225, respectively. Conclusions Type 2 diabetes and insulin use in the diabetic patients are significantly associated with a higher incidence of HP eradication. Additionally, use of calcium channel blocker also shows a significant association with HP eradication.

  18. Prevalence and Cardiovascular Associations of Diabetic Retinopathy and Maculopathy: Results from the Gutenberg Health Study.

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    Philipp Raum

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is the leading cause of blindness in people of working age. The purpose of this paper is to report the prevalence and cardiovascular associations of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy (DMac in Germany.The Gutenberg Health Study (GHS is a population-based study with 15,010 participants aged between 35 at 74 years from the city of Mainz and the district of Mainz-Bingen. We determined the weighted prevalence of DR and DMac by assessing fundus photographs of persons with diabetes from the GHS data base. Diabetes was defined as HbA1c ≥ 6.5%, known diagnosis diabetes mellitus or known diabetes medication. Furthermore, we analysed the association between DR and cardiovascular risk factors and diseases.Overall, 7.5% (1,124/15,010 of the GHS cohort had diabetes. Of these, 27.7% were unaware of their disease and thus were newly diagnosed by their participation in the GHS. The prevalence of DR and DMac was 21.7% and 2.3%, respectively among patients with diabetes. Vision-threatening disease was present in 5% of the diabetic cohort. In the multivariable analysis DR (all types was associated with age (Odds Ratio [95% confidence interval]: 0.97 [0.955-0.992]; p = 0.006 arterial hypertension (1.90 [1.190-3.044]; p = 0.0072 and vision-threatening DR with obesity (3.29 [1.504-7.206]; p = 0.0029. DR (all stages and vision-threatening DR were associated with duration of diabetes (1.09 [1.068-1.114]; p<0.0001 and 1.18 [1.137-1.222]; p<0.0001, respectively.Our calculations suggest that approximately 142 000 persons aged between 35 and 74 years have vision threatening diabetic retinal disease in Germany [corrected].Prevalence of DR was lower in the GHS compared to East-Asian studies. Associations were found with age, arterial hypertension, obesity, and duration of diabetes mellitus.

  19. Prevalence and Cardiovascular Associations of Diabetic Retinopathy and Maculopathy: Results from the Gutenberg Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raum, Philipp; Lamparter, Julia; Ponto, Katharina A.; Peto, Tunde; Hoehn, René; Schulz, Andreas; Schneider, Astrid; Wild, Philipp S.; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Mirshahi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in people of working age. The purpose of this paper is to report the prevalence and cardiovascular associations of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy (DMac) in Germany. Research Design and Methods The Gutenberg Health Study (GHS) is a population-based study with 15,010 participants aged between 35 at 74 years from the city of Mainz and the district of Mainz-Bingen. We determined the weighted prevalence of DR and DMac by assessing fundus photographs of persons with diabetes from the GHS data base. Diabetes was defined as HbA1c ≥ 6.5%, known diagnosis diabetes mellitus or known diabetes medication. Furthermore, we analysed the association between DR and cardiovascular risk factors and diseases. Results Overall, 7.5% (1,124/15,010) of the GHS cohort had diabetes. Of these, 27.7% were unaware of their disease and thus were newly diagnosed by their participation in the GHS. The prevalence of DR and DMac was 21.7% and 2.3%, respectively among patients with diabetes. Vision-threatening disease was present in 5% of the diabetic cohort. In the multivariable analysis DR (all types) was associated with age (Odds Ratio [95% confidence interval]: 0.97 [0.955–0.992]; p = 0.006) arterial hypertension (1.90 [1.190–3.044]; p = 0.0072) and vision-threatening DR with obesity (3.29 [1.504–7.206]; p = 0.0029). DR (all stages) and vision-threatening DR were associated with duration of diabetes (1.09 [1.068–1.114]; p<0.0001 and 1.18 [1.137–1.222]; p<0.0001, respectively). Conclusions Our calculations suggest that more than a quarter-million persons have vision-threatening diabetic retinal disease in Germany. Prevalence of DR was lower in the GHS compared to East-Asian studies. Associations were found with age, arterial hypertension, obesity, and duration of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26075604

  20. Technology-Intensified Diabetes Education Study (TIDES) in African Americans with type 2 diabetes: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joni S; Lynch, Cheryl P; Knapp, Rebecca G; Egede, Leonard E

    2014-11-25

    Compared to American Whites, African Americans have a higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), experiencing poorer metabolic control and greater risks for complications and death. Patient-level factors, such as diabetes knowledge, self-management skills, empowerment, and perceived control, account for >90% of the variance observed in outcomes between these racial groups. There is strong evidence that self-management interventions that include telephone-delivered diabetes education and skills training are effective at improving metabolic control in diabetes. Web-based home telemonitoring systems in conjunction with active care management are also effective ways to lower glycosylated hemoglobin A1c values when compared to standard care, and provide feedback to patients; however, there are no studies in African Americans with poorly controlled T2DM that examine the use of technology-based feedback to tailor or augment diabetes education and skills training. This study provides a unique opportunity to address this gap in the literature. We describe an ongoing 4-year randomized clinical trial, which will test the efficacy of a technology-intensified diabetes education and skills training (TIDES) intervention in African Americans with poorly controlled T2DM. Two hundred male and female AfricanAmerican participants, 21 years of age or older and with a glycosylated hemoglobin A1c level ≥ 8%, will be randomized into one of two groups for 12 weeks of telephone interventions: (1) TIDES intervention group or (2) a usual-care group. Participants will be followed for 12 months to ascertain the effect of the interventions on glycemic control. Our primary hypothesis is that, among African Americans with poorly controlled T2DM, patients randomized to the TIDES intervention will have significantly greater reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin A1c at 12 months of follow-up compared to the usual-care group. Results from this study will add to the current literature