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Sample records for determining reaction rate

  1. Enzymatic spectrophotometric reaction rate determination of aspartame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifković Kata T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspartame is an artificial sweetener of low caloric value (approximately 200 times sweeter than sucrose. Aspartame is currently permitted for use in food and beverage production in more than 90 countries. The application of aspartame in food products requires development of rapid, inexpensive and accurate method for its determination. The new assay for determination of aspartame was based on set of reactions that are catalyzed by three different enzymes: α-chymotrypsin, alcohol oxidase and horseradish peroxidase. Optimization of the proposed method was carried out for: (i α-chymotrypsin activity; (ii time allowed for α-chymotrypsin action, (iii temperature. Evaluation of the developed method was done by determining aspartame content in “diet” drinks, as well as in artificial sweetener pills. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III46010

  2. New determination of 12C(α,γ)16O reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulebsir, N.

    2015-12-01

    The reaction 12C(α,γ)16O was investigated through the direct α-transfer reaction (7Li,t) at 28 and 34 MeV incident energies. We determined the reduced α-widths of the sub-threshold 2+ and 1- states of 16O from the DWBA analysis of the transfer reaction 12C(7Li,t)16O performed at two incident energies. The obtained result for the 2+ and 1- sub-threshold resonances as introduced in the R-matrix fitting of radiative capture and elastic-scattering data to determine the E2 and E1 S-factor from 0.01MeV to 4.2MeV in the center-of-mass energy. After determining the astrophysic factor of 12C(α,γ)16O S(E) with Pierre Descouvement code, I determined numerically the new reaction rate of this reaction at a different stellar temperature (0.06 Gk-2 GK). The 12C(α,γ)16O reaction rate at T9 = 0.2 is [7.21-2.25+2.15] × 10-15 cm3 s-1 mol-1. Some comparisons and discussions about our new 12C(α,γ)16O reaction rate are presented. The agreements of the reaction rate below T9 = 2 between our results and with those proposed by NACRE indicate that our results are reliable, and they could be included in the astrophysical reaction rate network.

  3. Determining astrophysical three-body radiative capture reaction rates from inclusive Coulomb break-up measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Casal, J; Arias, J M; Gómez-Camacho, J

    2016-01-01

    A relationship between the Coulomb inclusive break-up probability and the radiative capture reaction rate for weakly-bound three-body systems is established. This direct link provides a robust procedure to estimate the reaction rate for nuclei of astrophysical interest by measuring inclusive break-up processes at different energies and angles. This might be an advantageous alternative to the determination of reaction rates from the measurement of $B(E1)$ distributions through exclusive Coulomb break-up experiments. In addition, it provides a reference to assess the validity of different theoretical approaches that have been used to calculate reaction rates. The procedure is applied to $^{11}$Li ($^{9}$Li+n+n) and $^6$He ($^{4}$He+n+n) three-body systems for which some data exist.

  4. Determining astrophysical three-body radiative capture reaction rates from inclusive Coulomb break-up measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, J.; Rodríguez-Gallardo, M.; Arias, J. M.; Gómez-Camacho, J.

    2016-04-01

    A relationship between the Coulomb inclusive break-up probability and the radiative capture reaction rate for weakly bound three-body systems is established. This direct link provides a robust procedure to estimate the reaction rate for nuclei of astrophysical interest by measuring inclusive break-up processes at different energies and angles. This might be an advantageous alternative to the determination of reaction rates from the measurement of B (E 1 ) distributions through exclusive Coulomb break-up experiments. In addition, it provides a reference to assess the validity of different theoretical approaches that have been used to calculate reaction rates. The procedure is applied to 11Li (9Li+n +n ) and 6He (4He+n +n ) three-body systems for which some data exist.

  5. Calorimetric determination of rate constants and enthalpy changes for zero-order reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida e Sousa, Luis; Beezer, Anthony E; Hansen, Lee D; Clapham, David; Connor, Joseph A; Gaisford, Simon

    2012-06-07

    Calorimetry is a general method for determination of the rates of zero-order processes, but analysis of the data for the rate constant and reaction enthalpy is difficult because these occur as a product in the rate equation so evaluation of one requires knowledge of the other. Three methods for evaluation of both parameters, without prior knowledge, are illustrated with examples and compared with literature data. Method 1 requires the reaction to be studied in two buffers with different enthalpies of ionization. Method 2 is based on calculation of reaction enthalpy from group additivity functions. Method 3 applies when reaction progresses to completion. The methods are applied to the enzymatic hydrolysis of urea, the hydrolysis of acetylsalicylic acid, and the photodegradation of nifedipine, respectively.

  6. Probing the Rate-Determining Step of the Claisen-Schmidt Condensation by Competition Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Kendrew K. W.; Chan, Wing-Fat; Lung, Ka-Ying; Lam, Wai-Yee; Ng, Weng-Cheong; Lee, Siu-Fung

    2007-01-01

    Competition experiments are a useful tool for preliminary study of the linear free energy relationship of organic reactions. This article describes a physical organic experiment for upper-level undergraduates to identify the rate-determining step of the Claisen-Schmidt condensation of benzaldehyde and acetophenone by studying the linear free…

  7. Determination of the enzyme reaction rate in a differential fixed-bed reactor: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baruque Filho E.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The reaction rate of starch hydrolysis catalyzed by a glucoamylase covalently bound to chitin particles was measured in a Differential Fixed-Bed Reactor (DFBR. Under selected test conditions the initial reaction rate may represent biocatalyst activity. Some aspects which influence measurement of the initial reaction rate of an immobilized enzyme were studied: the amount of desorbed enzyme and its hydrolytic activity, the extent of pore blockage of the biocatalyst caused by substrate solution impurities and the internal and external diffusional mass transfer effects. The results showed that the enzyme glucoamylase was firmly bound to the support, as indicated by the very low amount of desorbed protein found in the recirculating liquid. Although this protein was very active, its contribution to the overall reaction rate was negligible. It was observed that the biocatalyst pores were susceptible to being blocked by the impurities of the starch solution. This latter effect was accumulative, increasing with the number of sequential experiments carried out. When the substrate solution was filtered before use, very reliable determinations of immobilized enzyme reaction rates could be performed in the DFBR. External and internal diffusional resistences usually play a significant role in fixed-bed reactors. However, for the experimental system studied, internal mass transfer effects were not significant, and it was possible to select an operational condition (recirculation flow rate value that minimized the external diffusional limitations.

  8. Determination of the Astrophysical S(E) Factors or Rates for Radiative Capture Reaction with One Nucleon Transfer Reaction%Determination of the Astrophysical S(E) Factors or Rates for Radiative Capture Reaction with One Nucleon Transfer Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志宏; 郭冰; 李云居; 苏俊; 李二涛; 白希祥; 王友宝; 曾晟; 王宝祥; 颜胜权; 李志常; 刘建成; 连钢; 金孙均; 刘鑫; 柳卫平

    2012-01-01

    The radiative capture reaction plays an important role in nuclear astrophysics. We have indirectly measured the astrophysical S(E) factors for some proton capture reactions and reaction rates for several neutron capture reactions with one nucleon transfer reactions at HI-13 tandem accelerator in recent years. Some of them are compiled into IAEA EXFOR database and JINA REACLIB project, and used in the network calculations of Big Bang nucleosynthesis and type-I X-ray bursts.

  9. Probing the interplay between factors determining reaction rates on silica gel using termolecular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Iain; Worrall, David R; Williams, Siân L; Buck, Craig J T; Meseguer, Rafael G

    2012-10-01

    In this study we have compared energy and electron transfer reactions in termolecular systems using a nanosecond diffuse reflectance laser flash photolysis technique. We have previously investigated these processes on silica gel surfaces for bimolecular systems and electron transfer in termolecular systems. The latter systems involved electron transfer between three arene molecules with azulene acting as a molecular shuttle. In this study we present an alternative electron transfer system using trans β-carotene as an electron donor in order to effectively immobilise all species except the shuttle, providing the first unambiguous evidence for radical ion mobility. In the energy transfer system we use naphthalene, a structural isomer of azulene, as the shuttle, facilitating energy transfer from a selectively excited benzophenone sensitiser to 9-cyanoanthracene. Bimolecular rate constants for all of these processes have been measured and new insights into the factors determining the rates of these reactions on silica gel have been obtained.

  10. Two Optimization Methods to Determine the Rate Constants of a Complex Chemical Reaction Using FORTRAN and MATLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Latif A. Seoud

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: For chemical reactions, the determination of the rate constants is both very difficult and a time consuming process. The aim of this research was to develop computer programs for determining the rate constants for the general form of any complex reaction at a certain temperature. The development of such program can be very helpful in the control of industrial processes as well as in the study of the reaction mechanisms. Determination of the accurate values of the rate constants would help in establishing the optimum conditions of reactor design including pressure, temperature and other parameters of the chemical reaction. Approach: From the experimental concentration-time data, initial values of rate constants were calculated. Experimental data encountered several types of errors, including temperature variation, impurities in the reactants and human errors. Simulations of a second order consecutive irreversible chemical reaction of the saponification of diethyl ester were presented as an example of the complex reactions. The rate equations (system of simultaneous differential equations of the reaction were solved to get the analytical concentration versus time profiles. The simulation results were compared with experimental results at each measured point. All deviations between experimental and calculated values were squared and summed up to form a new function. This function was fed into a minimizer routine that gave the optimal rate constants. Two optimization techniques were developed using FORTRAN and MATLAB for accurately determining the rate constants of the reaction at certain temperature from the experimental data. Results: Results showed that the two proposed programs were very efficient, fast and accurate tools to determine the true rate constants of the reaction with less 1% error. The use of the MATLAB embedded subroutines for simultaneously solving the differential equations and minimization of the error function

  11. Determination of 8B(p,gamma)9C reaction rate from 9C breakup

    CERN Document Server

    Fukui, Tokuro; Minomo, Kosho; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2012-01-01

    The astrophysical factor of the 8B(p,gamma)9C at zero energy, S18(0), is determined from three-body model analysis of 9C breakup processes. The elastic breakup 208Pb(9C,p8B)208Pb at 65 MeV/nucleon and the one-proton removal reaction of 9C at 285 MeV/nucleon on C and Al targets are calculated with the continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC) and the eikonal reaction theory (ERT), respectively. The asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) of 9C in the p-8B configuration extracted from the two reactions show good consistency, in contrast to in the previous studies. As a result of the present analysis, S18(0) = 66 \\pm 10 eVb is obtained.

  12. Determination of the reaction rate coefficient of sulphide mine tailings deposited under water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awoh, Akué Sylvette; Mbonimpa, Mamert; Bussière, Bruno

    2013-10-15

    The efficiency of a water cover to limit dissolved oxygen (DO) availability to underlying acid-generating mine tailings can be assessed by calculating the DO flux at the tailings-water interface. Fick's equations, which are generally used to calculate this flux, require knowing the effective DO diffusion coefficient (Dw) and the reaction (consumption) rate coefficient (Kr) of the tailings, or the DO concentration profile. Whereas Dw can be accurately estimated, few studies have measured the parameter Kr for submerged sulphide tailings. The objective of this study was to determine Kr for underwater sulphide tailings in a laboratory experiment. Samples of sulphide mine tailings (an approximately 6 cm layer) were placed in a cell under a water cover (approximately 2 cm) maintained at constant DO concentration. Two tailings were studied: TA1 with high sulphide content (83% pyrite) and TA2 with low sulphide content (2.8% pyrite). DO concentration was measured with a microelectrode at various depths above and below the tailings-water interface at 1 mm intervals. Results indicate that steady-state condition was rapidly attained. As expected, a diffusive boundary layer (DBL) was observed in all cases. An iterative back-calculation process using the numerical code POLLUTEv6 and taking the DBL into account provided the Kr values used to match calculated and experimental concentration profiles. Kr obtained for tailings TA1 and TA2 was about 80 d(-1) and 6.5 d(-1), respectively. For comparison purposes, Kr obtained from cell tests on tailings TA1 was lower than Kr calculated from the sulphate production rate obtained from shake-flask tests. Steady-state DO flux at the water-tailings interface was then calculated with POLLUTEv6 using tailings characteristics Dw and Kr. For the tested conditions, DO flux ranged from 608 to 758 mg O2/m(2)/d for tailings TA1 and from 177 to 221 mg O2/m(2)/d for tailings TA2. The impact of placing a protective layer of inert material over

  13. Size dependence of surface thermodynamic properties of nanoparticles and its determination method by reaction rate constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wenjiao; Xue, Yongqiang, E-mail: xyqlw@126.com; Cui, Zixiang

    2016-08-15

    Surface thermodynamic properties are the fundamental properties of nanomaterials, and these properties depend on the size of nanoparticles. In this paper, relations of molar surface thermodynamic properties and surface heat capacity at constant pressure of nanoparticles with particle size were derived theoretically, and the method of obtaining the surface thermodynamic properties by reaction rate constant was put forward. The reaction of nano-MgO with sodium bisulfate solution was taken as a research system. The influence regularities of the particle size on the surface thermodynamic properties were discussed theoretically and experimentally, which show that the experimental regularities are in accordance with the corresponding theoretical relations. With the decreasing of nanoparticle size, the molar surface thermodynamic properties increase, while the surface heat capacity decreases (the absolute value increases). In addition, the surface thermodynamic properties are linearly related to the reciprocal of nanoparticle diameter, respectively.

  14. High-precision (p,t) reaction measurement to determine Ne-18(alpha,p)Na-21 reaction rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matic, A.; van den Berg, A. M.; Harakeh, M. N.; Wörtche, H. J.; Berg, G. P. A.; Couder, M.; Fisker, J. L.; Goerres, J.; LeBlanc, P.; O'Brien, S.; Wiescher, M.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Fujita, H.; Wakasa, T.; Hess, P. O.; Brown, B. A.; Schatz, H.

    2009-01-01

    x-ray bursts are identified as thermonuclear explosions in the outer atmosphere of accreting neutron stars. The thermonuclear runaway is fueled by the alpha p process that describes a sequence of (alpha,p) reactions triggered by the Ne-18(alpha,p)Na-21 breakout reaction from the hot CNO cycles. We

  15. Determination of the 36Mg(n ,γ )37Mg reaction rate from Coulomb dissociation of 37Mg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubhchintak; Chatterjee, R.; Shyam, R.

    2017-08-01

    We use the Coulomb dissociation (CD) method to calculate the rate of the 36Mg(n ,γ )37Mg radiative capture reaction. The CD cross sections of the 37Mg nucleus on a 208Pb target at the beam energy of 244 MeV/nucleon, for which new experimental data have recently become available, were calculated within the framework of a finite-range distorted-wave Born approximation theory that is extended to include the projectile deformation effects. Invoking the principle of detailed balance, these cross sections are used to determine the excitation function and subsequently the rate of the 36Mg(n ,γ )37Mg reaction. We compare these rates to those of the 36Mg(α ,n )39Si reaction calculated within a Hauser-Feshbach model. We find that for T9 as large as up to 1.0 (in units of 109 K) the 36Mg(n ,γ )37Mg reaction is much faster than the 36Mg(α ,n )39Si one. The inclusion of the effects of 37Mg projectile deformation in the breakup calculations enhances the (n ,γ ) reaction rate even further. Therefore, it is highly unlikely that the (n ,γ )β -decay r -process flow will be broken at the 36Mg isotope by the α process.

  16. I. Determination of chemical reaction rate constants by numerical nonlinear analysis: differential methods

    CERN Document Server

    Jesudason, Christopher G

    2011-01-01

    The primary emphasis of this work on kinetics is to illustrate the a posteriori approach to applications, where focus on data leads to novel outcomes, rather than the a priori tendencies of applied analysis which imposes constructs on the nature of the observable. The secondary intention is the development of appropriate methods consonant with experimental definitions. By focusing on gradients, it is possible to determine both the average and instantaneous rate constants that can monitor changes in the rate constant with concentration changes as suggested by this theory. Here, methods are developed and discussed utilizing nonlinear analysis which does not require exact knowledge of initial concentrations. These methods are compared with those derived from standard methodology. These gradient methods are shown to be consistent with the ones from standard methods and could readily serve as alternatives for studies where there are limits or unknowns in the initial conditions, such as in the burgeoning fields of ...

  17. An Interactive Classroom Activity Demonstrating Reaction Mechanisms and Rate-Determining Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Laura D.; Keller, Steven W.

    2005-01-01

    An interactive classroom activity that includes two-step reaction of unwrapping and eating chocolate candies is described which brings not only the reaction intermediate, but also the reactants and products into macroscopic view. The qualitative activation barriers of both steps can be adjusted independently.

  18. Standard Test Method for Determining Thermal Neutron Reaction Rates and Thermal Neutron Fluence Rates by Radioactivation Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 The purpose of this test method is to define a general procedure for determining an unknown thermal-neutron fluence rate by neutron activation techniques. It is not practicable to describe completely a technique applicable to the large number of experimental situations that require the measurement of a thermal-neutron fluence rate. Therefore, this method is presented so that the user may adapt to his particular situation the fundamental procedures of the following techniques. 1.1.1 Radiometric counting technique using pure cobalt, pure gold, pure indium, cobalt-aluminum, alloy, gold-aluminum alloy, or indium-aluminum alloy. 1.1.2 Standard comparison technique using pure gold, or gold-aluminum alloy, and 1.1.3 Secondary standard comparison techniques using pure indium, indium-aluminum alloy, pure dysprosium, or dysprosium-aluminum alloy. 1.2 The techniques presented are limited to measurements at room temperatures. However, special problems when making thermal-neutron fluence rate measurements in high-...

  19. [Determination of rate constants of gas-phase reactions of alpha-pinene and beta-pinene with ozone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z R; Hu, D

    2001-10-01

    alpha-pinene and beta-pinene are the most dominating species among natural terpenes. Terpenes are mainly emitted from forest trees, flowers and grass. In the lower troposphere terpenes can react fast with OH radical, ozone, NO3 radical and ground state oxygen atom. These reactions may contribute to the occurring of aerosols, peroxides (hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxide), carbon cycle (mainly CO), acid rain (organic acids, NO3- and SO4(2-), ozone and active radicals such as OH radical. Reactions with ozone occur both in the daytime and in the night. The study in this field in China began in the late 1980. The main work focus on the source emission and the experimental simulation has just started. It is most of our group's work. In this paper preliminary experimental simulation of the gas-phase reactions of alpha-pinene and beta-pinene with ozone were carried out in the quartz chamber. The rate constants of these reactions were measured using long-path Fourier transform infra-red combined with relative rate constant method. And the rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of alpha-pinene, beta-pinene with ozone were determined as 2.83 x 10(17) cm3.molecule-1.s-1 and 1.48 x 10(17) cm3.molecule-1.s-1 at 1.0 x 10(5) Pa and 296 +/- 3 K. The results are quite similar to the data from Atkinson group. No cyclohexane was added to the reaction system during the measurement to restrain the formation of OH radical. The formation of OH radical could not be quantified, so that the effect of subsidiary reactions induced by OH radical has not been calculated. In the later simulation study and model this effect should be considered.

  20. Reaction mechanism for cocaine esterase-catalyzed hydrolyses of (+)- and (-)-cocaine: unexpected common rate-determining step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junjun; Zhao, Xinyun; Yang, Wenchao; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2011-05-05

    First-principles quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical free energy calculations have been performed to examine the catalytic mechanism for cocaine esterase (CocE)-catalyzed hydrolysis of (+)-cocaine in comparison with CocE-catalyzed hydrolysis of (-)-cocaine. It has been shown that the acylation of (+)-cocaine consists of nucleophilic attack of the hydroxyl group of Ser117 on the carbonyl carbon of (+)-cocaine benzoyl ester and the dissociation of (+)-cocaine benzoyl ester. The first reaction step of deacylation of (+)-cocaine, which is identical to that of (-)-cocaine, is rate-determining, indicating that CocE-catalyzed hydrolyses of (+)- and (-)-cocaine have a common rate-determining step. The computational results predict that the catalytic rate constant of CocE against (+)-cocaine should be the same as that of CocE against (-)-cocaine, in contrast with the remarkable difference between human butyrylcholinesterase-catalyzed hydrolyses of (+)- and (-)-cocaine. The prediction has been confirmed by experimental kinetic analysis on CocE-catalyzed hydrolysis of (+)-cocaine in comparison with CocE-catalyzed hydrolysis of (-)-cocaine. The determined common rate-determining step indicates that rational design of a high-activity mutant of CocE should be focused on the first reaction step of the deacylation. Furthermore, the obtained mechanistic insights into the detailed differences in the acylation between the (+)- and (-)-cocaine hydrolyses provide indirect clues for rational design of amino acid mutations that could more favorably stabilize the rate-determining transition state in the deacylation and, thus, improve the catalytic activity of CocE. This study provides a valuable mechanistic base for rational design of an improved esterase for therapeutic treatment of cocaine abuse.

  1. Atmospheric reactions of methylcyclohexanes with Cl atoms and OH radicals: determination of rate coefficients and degradation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Bernabé; Ceacero-Vega, Antonio A; Jiménez, Elena; Albaladejo, José

    2015-04-01

    As the result of biogenic and anthropogenic activities, large quantities of chemical compounds are emitted into the troposphere. Alkanes, in general, and cycloalkanes are an important chemical class of hydrocarbons found in diesel, jet and gasoline, vehicle exhaust emissions, and ambient air in urban areas. In general, the primary atmospheric fate of organic compounds in the gas phase is the reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH). The oxidation by Cl atoms has gained importance in the study of atmospheric reactions because they may exert some influence in the boundary layer, particularly in marine and coastal environments, and in the Arctic troposphere. The aim of this paper is to study of the atmospheric reactivity of methylcylohexanes with Cl atoms and OH radicals under atmospheric conditions (in air at room temperature and pressure). Relative kinetic techniques have been used to determine the rate coefficients for the reaction of Cl atoms and OH radicals with methylcyclohexane, cis-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, and 1,3,5-trimethylcyclohexane at 298 ± 2 K and 720 ± 5 Torr of air by Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in two atmospheric simulation chambers. The products formed in the reaction under atmospheric conditions were investigated using a 200-L Teflon bag and employing the technique of solid-phase microextraction coupled to a GC-MS. The rate coefficients obtained for the reaction of Cl atoms with the studied compounds are the following ones (in units of 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (3.11 ± 0.16), (2.89 ± 0.16), (2.89 ± 0.26), and (2.61 ± 0.42), respectively. For the reactions with OH radicals the determined rate coefficients are (in units of 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (1.18 ± 0.12), (1.49 ± 0.16), (1.41 ± 0.15), and (1.77 ± 0.23), respectively. The reported error is twice the standard deviation. A detailed

  2. Transition state trajectory stability determines barrier crossing rates in chemical reactions induced by time-dependent oscillating fields

    CERN Document Server

    Craven, Galen T; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2015-01-01

    When a chemical reaction is driven by an external field, the transition state that the system must pass through as it changes from reactant to product -for example, an energy barrier- becomes time-dependent. We show that for periodic forcing the rate of barrier crossing can be determined through stability analysis of the non-autonomous transition state. Specifically, strong agreement is observed between the difference in the Floquet exponents describing stability of the transition state trajectory, which defines a recrossing-free dividing surface [G. T. Craven, T. Bartsch, and R. Hernandez, Phys. Rev. E 89, 040801(R) (2014)], and the rates calculated by simulation of ensembles of trajectories. This result opens the possibility to extract rates directly from the intrinsic stability of the transition state, even when it is time-dependent, without requiring a numerically-expensive simulation of the long-time dynamics of a large ensemble of trajectories.

  3. Communication: Transition state trajectory stability determines barrier crossing rates in chemical reactions induced by time-dependent oscillating fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Galen T; Bartsch, Thomas; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2014-07-28

    When a chemical reaction is driven by an external field, the transition state that the system must pass through as it changes from reactant to product--for example, an energy barrier--becomes time-dependent. We show that for periodic forcing the rate of barrier crossing can be determined through stability analysis of the non-autonomous transition state. Specifically, strong agreement is observed between the difference in the Floquet exponents describing stability of the transition state trajectory, which defines a recrossing-free dividing surface [G. T. Craven, T. Bartsch, and R. Hernandez, "Persistence of transition state structure in chemical reactions driven by fields oscillating in time," Phys. Rev. E 89, 040801(R) (2014)], and the rates calculated by simulation of ensembles of trajectories. This result opens the possibility to extract rates directly from the intrinsic stability of the transition state, even when it is time-dependent, without requiring a numerically expensive simulation of the long-time dynamics of a large ensemble of trajectories.

  4. ATP binding and hydrolysis-driven rate-determining events in the RFC-catalyzed PCNA clamp loading reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakato, Miho; Zhou, Yayan; Hingorani, Manju M

    2012-02-17

    The multi-subunit replication factor C (RFC) complex loads circular proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) clamps onto DNA where they serve as mobile tethers for polymerases and coordinate the functions of many other DNA metabolic proteins. The clamp loading reaction is complex, involving multiple components (RFC, PCNA, DNA, and ATP) and events (minimally: PCNA opening/closing, DNA binding/release, and ATP binding/hydrolysis) that yield a topologically linked clamp·DNA product in less than a second. Here, we report pre-steady-state measurements of several steps in the reaction catalyzed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae RFC and present a comprehensive kinetic model based on global analysis of the data. Highlights of the reaction mechanism are that ATP binding to RFC initiates slow activation of the clamp loader, enabling it to open PCNA (at ~2 s(-1)) and bind primer-template DNA (ptDNA). Rapid binding of ptDNA leads to formation of the RFC·ATP·PCNA(open)·ptDNA complex, which catalyzes a burst of ATP hydrolysis. Another slow step in the reaction follows ATP hydrolysis and is associated with PCNA closure around ptDNA (8 s(-1)). Dissociation of PCNA·ptDNA from RFC leads to catalytic turnover. We propose that these early and late rate-determining events are intramolecular conformational changes in RFC and PCNA that control clamp opening and closure, and that ATP binding and hydrolysis switch RFC between conformations with high and low affinities, respectively, for open PCNA and ptDNA, and thus bookend the clamp loading reaction.

  5. Equilibration kinetics in isolated and membrane-bound photosynthetic reaction centers upon illumination: a method to determine the photoexcitation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Anthony J; Goushcha, Alexander O; Barabash, Yuri M; Kharkyanen, Valery N; Scott, Gary W

    2009-07-01

    Kinetics of electron transfer, following variation of actinic light intensity, for photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) of purple bacteria (isolated and membrane-bound) were analyzed by measuring absorbance changes in the primary photoelectron donor absorption band at 865 nm. The bleaching of the primary photoelectron donor absorption band in RCs, following a sudden increase of illumination from the dark to an actinic light intensity of I(exp), obeys a simple exponential law with the rate constant alphaI(exp) + k(rec), in which alpha is a parameter relating the light intensity, measured in mW/cm(2), to a corresponding theoretical rate in units of reciprocal seconds, and k(rec) is the effective rate constant of the charge recombination in the photosynthetic RCs. In this work, a method for determining the alpha parameter value is developed and experimentally verified for isolated and membrane-bound RCs, allowing for rigorous modeling of RC macromolecule dynamics under varied photoexcitation conditions. Such modeling is necessary for RCs due to alterations of the forward photoexcitation rates and relaxation rates caused by illumination history and intramolecular structural dynamics effects. It is demonstrated that the classical Bouguer-Lambert-Beer formalism can be applied for the samples with relatively low scattering, which is not necessarily the case with strongly scattering media or high light intensity excitation.

  6. Reaction Order Ambiguity in Integrated Rate Plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Integrated rate plots are frequently used in reaction kinetics to determine orders of reactions. It is often emphasised, when using this methodology in practice, that it is necessary to monitor the reaction to a substantial fraction of completion for these plots to yield unambiguous orders. The present article gives a theoretical and statistical…

  7. Direct Determination of the Rate Coefficient for the Reaction of OH Radicals with Monoethanol Amine (MEA) from 296 to 510 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onel, L; Blitz, M A; Seakins, P W

    2012-04-05

    Monoethanol amine (H2NCH2CH2OH, MEA) has been proposed for large-scale use in carbon capture and storage. We present the first absolute, temperature-dependent determination of the rate coefficient for the reaction of OH with MEA using laser flash photolysis for OH generation, monitoring OH removal by laser-induced fluorescence. The room-temperature rate coefficient is determined to be (7.61 ± 0.76) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), and the rate coefficient decreases by about 40% by 510 K. The temperature dependence of the rate coefficient is given by k1= (7.73 ± 0.24) × 10(-11)(T/295)(-(0.79±0.11)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The high rate coefficient shows that gas-phase processing in the atmosphere will be competitive with uptake onto aerosols.

  8. Hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from tertiary amines by benzyloxyl and cumyloxyl radicals: influence of structure on the rate-determining formation of a hydrogen-bonded prereaction complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; DiLabio, Gino A; Bietti, Massimo

    2011-08-05

    A time-resolved kinetic study on the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from a series of tertiary amines by the cumyloxyl (CumO(•)) and benzyloxyl (BnO(•)) radicals was carried out. With the sterically hindered triisobutylamine, comparable hydrogen atom abstraction rate constants (k(H)) were measured for the two radicals (k(H)(BnO(•))/k(H)(CumO(•)) = 2.8), and the reactions were described as direct hydrogen atom abstractions. With the other amines, increases in k(H)(BnO(•))/k(H)(CumO(•)) ratios of 13 to 2027 times were observed. k(H) approaches the diffusion limit in the reactions between BnO(•) and unhindered cyclic and bicyiclic amines, whereas a decrease in reactivity is observed with acyclic amines and with the hindered cyclic amine 1,2,2,6,6-pentamethylpiperidine. These results provide additional support to our hypothesis that the reaction proceeds through the rate-determining formation of a C-H/N hydrogen-bonded prereaction complex between the benzyloxyl α-C-H and the nitrogen lone pair wherein hydrogen atom abstraction occurs, and demonstrate the important role of amine structure on the overall reaction mechanism. Additional mechanistic information in support of this picture is obtained from the study of the reactions of the amines with a deuterated benzyloxyl radical (PhCD(2)O(•), BnO(•)-d(2)) and the 3,5-di-tert-butylbenzyloxyl radical.

  9. Enzymatic Spectrophotometric Reaction Rate Determination of Glucose in Fruit Drinks and Carbonated Beverages. An Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment for Food Science-Oriented Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilarou, Argyro-Maria G.; Georgiou, Constantinos A.

    2000-10-01

    The glucose oxidase-horseradish peroxidase coupled reaction using phenol and 4-aminoantipyrine is used for the kinetic determination of glucose in drinks and beverages. This laboratory experiment demonstrates the implementation of reaction rate kinetic methods of analysis, the use of enzymes as selective analytical reagents for the determination of substrates, the kinetic masking of ascorbic acid interference, and the analysis of glucose in drinks and beverages. The method is optimized for student use in the temperature range of 18-28 °C and can be used in low-budget laboratories equipped with an inexpensive visible photometer. The mixed enzyme-chromogen solution that is used is stable for two months. Precision ranged from 5.1 to 12% RSD for analyses conducted during a period of two months by 48 students.

  10. New Determination of the 2H(d,p)3H and 2H(d,n)3He Reaction Rates at Astrophysical Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumino, A.; Spartà, R.; Spitaleri, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Typel, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Tognelli, E.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Burjan, V.; Kroha, V.; Hons, Z.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Mrazek, J.; Piskor, S.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.

    2014-04-01

    The cross sections of the 2H(d,p)3H and 2H(d,n)3He reactions have been measured via the Trojan Horse method applied to the quasi-free 2H(3He,p 3H)1H and 2H(3He,n 3He)1H processes at 18 MeV off the proton in 3He. For the first time, the bare nucleus S(E) factors have been determined from 1.5 MeV, across the relevant region for standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis, down to the thermal energies of deuterium burning in the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase of stellar evolution, as well as of future fusion reactors. Both the energy dependence and the absolute value of the S(E) factors deviate by more than 15% from the available direct data and existing fitting curves, with substantial variations in the electron screening by more than 50%. As a consequence, the reaction rates for astrophysics experience relevant changes, with a maximum increase of up to 20% at the temperatures of the PMS phase. From a recent primordial abundance sensitivity study, it turns out that the 2H(d,n)3He reaction is quite influential on 7Li, and the present change in the reaction rate leads to a decrease in its abundance by up to 10%. The present reaction rates have also been included in an updated version of the FRANEC evolutionary code to analyze their influence on the central deuterium abundance in PMS stars with different masses. The largest variation of about 10%-15% pertains to young stars (=1 M ⊙.

  11. Determination of astrophysical 12N(p,g)13O reaction rate from the 2H(12N, 13O)n reaction and its astrophysical implications

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, B; Li, Zhihong; Wang, Y B; Yan, S Q; Li, Y J; Shu, N C; Han, Y L; Bai, X X; Chen, Y S; Liu, W P; Yamaguchi, H; Binh, D N; Hashimoto, T; Hayakawa, S; Kahl, D; Kubono, S; He, J J; Hu, J; Xu, S W; Iwasa, N; Kume, N; Li, Zhihuan

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of massive stars with very low-metallicities depends critically on the amount of CNO nuclides which they produce. The $^{12}$N($p$,\\,$\\gamma$)$^{13}$O reaction is an important branching point in the rap-processes, which are believed to be alternative paths to the slow 3$\\alpha$ process for producing CNO seed nuclei and thus could change the fate of massive stars. In the present work, the angular distribution of the $^2$H($^{12}$N,\\,$^{13}$O)$n$ proton transfer reaction at $E_{\\mathrm{c.m.}}$ = 8.4 MeV has been measured for the first time. Based on the Johnson-Soper approach, the square of the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) for the virtual decay of $^{13}$O$_\\mathrm{g.s.}$ $\\rightarrow$ $^{12}$N + $p$ was extracted to be 3.92 $\\pm$ 1.47 fm$^{-1}$ from the measured angular distribution and utilized to compute the direct component in the $^{12}$N($p$,\\,$\\gamma$)$^{13}$O reaction. The direct astrophysical S-factor at zero energy was then found to be 0.39 $\\pm$ 0.15 keV b. By considering ...

  12. Virtual Instrument for Determining Rate Constant of Second-Order Reaction by pX Based on LabVIEW 8.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hu; Li, Jiang-Yuan; Tang, Yong-Huai

    2009-01-01

    The virtual instrument system based on LabVIEW 8.0 for ion analyzer which can measure and analyze ion concentrations in solution is developed and comprises homemade conditioning circuit, data acquiring board, and computer. It can calibrate slope, temperature, and positioning automatically. When applied to determine the reaction rate constant by pX, it achieved live acquiring, real-time displaying, automatical processing of testing data, generating the report of results; and other functions. This method simplifies the experimental operation greatly, avoids complicated procedures of manual processing data and personal error, and improves veracity and repeatability of the experiment results.

  13. Reaction rates for mesoscopic reaction-diffusion kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellander, Stefan; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda

    2015-02-01

    The mesoscopic reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a popular modeling framework frequently applied to stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics in systems biology. The RDME is derived from assumptions about the underlying physical properties of the system, and it may produce unphysical results for models where those assumptions fail. In that case, other more comprehensive models are better suited, such as hard-sphere Brownian dynamics (BD). Although the RDME is a model in its own right, and not inferred from any specific microscale model, it proves useful to attempt to approximate a microscale model by a specific choice of mesoscopic reaction rates. In this paper we derive mesoscopic scale-dependent reaction rates by matching certain statistics of the RDME solution to statistics of the solution of a widely used microscopic BD model: the Smoluchowski model with a Robin boundary condition at the reaction radius of two molecules. We also establish fundamental limits on the range of mesh resolutions for which this approach yields accurate results and show both theoretically and in numerical examples that as we approach the lower fundamental limit, the mesoscopic dynamics approach the microscopic dynamics. We show that for mesh sizes below the fundamental lower limit, results are less accurate. Thus, the lower limit determines the mesh size for which we obtain the most accurate results.

  14. Reaction rates for mesoscopic reaction-diffusion kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellander, Stefan; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda

    2015-02-01

    The mesoscopic reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a popular modeling framework frequently applied to stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics in systems biology. The RDME is derived from assumptions about the underlying physical properties of the system, and it may produce unphysical results for models where those assumptions fail. In that case, other more comprehensive models are better suited, such as hard-sphere Brownian dynamics (BD). Although the RDME is a model in its own right, and not inferred from any specific microscale model, it proves useful to attempt to approximate a microscale model by a specific choice of mesoscopic reaction rates. In this paper we derive mesoscopic scale-dependent reaction rates by matching certain statistics of the RDME solution to statistics of the solution of a widely used microscopic BD model: the Smoluchowski model with a Robin boundary condition at the reaction radius of two molecules. We also establish fundamental limits on the range of mesh resolutions for which this approach yields accurate results and show both theoretically and in numerical examples that as we approach the lower fundamental limit, the mesoscopic dynamics approach the microscopic dynamics. We show that for mesh sizes below the fundamental lower limit, results are less accurate. Thus, the lower limit determines the mesh size for which we obtain the most accurate results.

  15. The use of digital simulation to improve the cyclic voltammetric determination of rate constants for homogeneous chemical reactions following charge transfers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozo, J.D.; Carbajo, J. [Applied Electrochemistry Laboratory, Dep. of Chemical Enginery, Physical Chemistry and Organic Chemistry, Experimental Sciences Faculty, University of Huelva, Av. 3 de Marzo, s/n (Campus El Carmen), ES-21071 Huelva (Spain); Sturm, J.C.; Nunez-Vergara, L.J.; Moscoso, R. [Bioelectrochemistry Laboratory, Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences Faculty, University of Chile, 838492 Santiago (Chile); Squella, J.A., E-mail: asquella@ciq.uchile.cl [Bioelectrochemistry Laboratory, Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences Faculty, University of Chile, 838492 Santiago (Chile)

    2011-08-05

    Cyclic voltammetry (CV) is a very useful electrochemical tool used to study reaction systems that include chemical steps that are coupled to electron transfers. This type of system generally involves the chemical reaction of an electrochemically generated free radical. Published methods exist that are used to determine the kinetics of electrochemically initiated chemical reactions from the measurements of the peak current ratio (i{sub pa}/i{sub pc}) of a cyclic voltammogram. The published method requires working curves to relate a kinetic parameter to the peak current ratio. In the presented work, a digital simulation package was used to obtain improved working curves for specific working conditions. The curves were compared with the published results for the first- and second-order chemical reactions following the charge transfer step mechanisms. According to the presented results, the previously published working curve is reliable for a mechanism with a first-order chemical reaction; however, a change in the switching potential requires a recalculation of the curve. In the case of mechanisms with a second-order step (dimerisation and disproportionation), several different views exist on how the second-order chemical term should be expressed so that different values of the constant are obtained. Parameters such as electrode type, electrode area, electroactive species concentration, switching potential, scan rate and method for peak current ratio calculation modify the working curves and must always be specified. We propose a standardised method to obtain the most reliable kinetic constant values. The results of this work will permit researchers who handle simulation software to construct their own working curves. Additionally, those who do not have the simulation software could use the working curves described here. The revelations of the presented experiments may be useful to a broad chemistry audience because this study presents a simple and low-cost procedure

  16. The use of digital simulation to improve the cyclic voltammetric determination of rate constants for homogeneous chemical reactions following charge transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozo, J D; Carbajo, J; Sturm, J C; Núñez-Vergara, L J; Moscoso, R; Squella, J A

    2011-08-05

    Cyclic voltammetry (CV) is a very useful electrochemical tool used to study reaction systems that include chemical steps that are coupled to electron transfers. This type of system generally involves the chemical reaction of an electrochemically generated free radical. Published methods exist that are used to determine the kinetics of electrochemically initiated chemical reactions from the measurements of the peak current ratio (i(pa)/i(pc)) of a cyclic voltammogram. The published method requires working curves to relate a kinetic parameter to the peak current ratio. In the presented work, a digital simulation package was used to obtain improved working curves for specific working conditions. The curves were compared with the published results for the first- and second-order chemical reactions following the charge transfer step mechanisms. According to the presented results, the previously published working curve is reliable for a mechanism with a first-order chemical reaction; however, a change in the switching potential requires a recalculation of the curve. In the case of mechanisms with a second-order step (dimerisation and disproportionation), several different views exist on how the second-order chemical term should be expressed so that different values of the constant are obtained. Parameters such as electrode type, electrode area, electroactive species concentration, switching potential, scan rate and method for peak current ratio calculation modify the working curves and must always be specified. We propose a standardised method to obtain the most reliable kinetic constant values. The results of this work will permit researchers who handle simulation software to construct their own working curves. Additionally, those who do not have the simulation software could use the working curves described here. The revelations of the presented experiments may be useful to a broad chemistry audience because this study presents a simple and low-cost procedure for the

  17. Interbank overnight rate determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kožul Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reserve requirement is a regulation of most world's central banks, whereby commercial banks must hold a certain fraction of customer deposits in reserves, either deposited at the central bank or in the bank vaults. While these reserves are calculated periodically, banks usually manage their books daily, which may result in reserve shortfall or surplus. This phenomenon has led to the emergence of the interbank market where banks transact with one another, trading interest rate instruments of various maturities. This paper focuses on the overnight interest rate, as it is assumed to be an indicator of the central bank's policy. Moreover, as the overnight rate is included in the yield curve construction, it implicitly influences the rates for all longer maturities. Finally, as an equilibrium in the reserve supply and demand, movements in the overnight interest rate reflect the dynamics in the interbank market. Here, the main interbank indices are described, before discussing some important features of the overnight rate, and the factors underlying its movements.

  18. Reaction rates for reaction-diffusion kinetics on unstructured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2017-02-01

    The reaction-diffusion master equation is a stochastic model often utilized in the study of biochemical reaction networks in living cells. It is applied when the spatial distribution of molecules is important to the dynamics of the system. A viable approach to resolve the complex geometry of cells accurately is to discretize space with an unstructured mesh. Diffusion is modeled as discrete jumps between nodes on the mesh, and the diffusion jump rates can be obtained through a discretization of the diffusion equation on the mesh. Reactions can occur when molecules occupy the same voxel. In this paper, we develop a method for computing accurate reaction rates between molecules occupying the same voxel in an unstructured mesh. For large voxels, these rates are known to be well approximated by the reaction rates derived by Collins and Kimball, but as the mesh is refined, no analytical expression for the rates exists. We reduce the problem of computing accurate reaction rates to a pure preprocessing step, depending only on the mesh and not on the model parameters, and we devise an efficient numerical scheme to estimate them to high accuracy. We show in several numerical examples that as we refine the mesh, the results obtained with the reaction-diffusion master equation approach those of a more fine-grained Smoluchowski particle-tracking model.

  19. Resonances and the thermonuclear reaction rate

    CERN Document Server

    Hussein, M S; Sargeant, A J; Pato, M P

    2003-01-01

    We present an approximate analytic expression for thermonuclear reaction rate of charged particles when the cross section contains a single narrow or wide resonance described by a Breit-Wigner shape. The resulting expression is uniformly valid as the effective energy and resonance energy coalesce. We use our expressions to calculate the reaction rate for $^{12}$C(p,$\\gamma$)$^{13}$N.

  20. A Study on the Reaction Rate Determination Experiment of College Chemistry%大学化学反应级数测定实验的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟靖华

    2011-01-01

    Through the Fe^3+ reaction rate determination experi- ment,this paper introduces an idea of college chemistry experiment teaching:before the class,students prepare and think about some problems in the experimental process,in the experiment, the teacher mainly guides students to experiment themselves and finally, the teacher comments on the results of all the groups. This method can arouse students' enthusiasm, train their ability to find and solve the problems and arouse their sense of innovation%本文通过Fe^3+反应级数测定的实验.介绍大学化学实验教学方法的一种思路:在课前安排学生预习并思考一些问题,实验过程中以学生自己动手为主.教师适当加以引导.最后对每组的情况进行点评.此方法可调动学生的积极性,培养学生发现问题和分析解决问题的能力.激发学生曲创新音犋

  1. Technical note: Monte Carlo genetic algorithm (MCGA for model analysis of multiphase chemical kinetics to determine transport and reaction rate coefficients using multiple experimental data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Berkemeier

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a Monte Carlo genetic algorithm (MCGA for efficient, automated, and unbiased global optimization of model input parameters by simultaneous fitting to multiple experimental data sets. The algorithm was developed to address the inverse modelling problems associated with fitting large sets of model input parameters encountered in state-of-the-art kinetic models for heterogeneous and multiphase atmospheric chemistry. The MCGA approach utilizes a sequence of optimization methods to find and characterize the solution of an optimization problem. It addresses an issue inherent to complex models whose extensive input parameter sets may not be uniquely determined from limited input data. Such ambiguity in the derived parameter values can be reliably detected using this new set of tools, allowing users to design experiments that should be particularly useful for constraining model parameters. We show that the MCGA has been used successfully to constrain parameters such as chemical reaction rate coefficients, diffusion coefficients, and Henry's law solubility coefficients in kinetic models of gas uptake and chemical transformation of aerosol particles as well as multiphase chemistry at the atmosphere–biosphere interface. While this study focuses on the processes outlined above, the MCGA approach should be portable to any numerical process model with similar computational expense and extent of the fitting parameter space.

  2. Technical note: Monte Carlo genetic algorithm (MCGA) for model analysis of multiphase chemical kinetics to determine transport and reaction rate coefficients using multiple experimental data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Ammann, Markus; Krieger, Ulrich K.; Peter, Thomas; Spichtinger, Peter; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Huisman, Andrew J.

    2017-06-01

    We present a Monte Carlo genetic algorithm (MCGA) for efficient, automated, and unbiased global optimization of model input parameters by simultaneous fitting to multiple experimental data sets. The algorithm was developed to address the inverse modelling problems associated with fitting large sets of model input parameters encountered in state-of-the-art kinetic models for heterogeneous and multiphase atmospheric chemistry. The MCGA approach utilizes a sequence of optimization methods to find and characterize the solution of an optimization problem. It addresses an issue inherent to complex models whose extensive input parameter sets may not be uniquely determined from limited input data. Such ambiguity in the derived parameter values can be reliably detected using this new set of tools, allowing users to design experiments that should be particularly useful for constraining model parameters. We show that the MCGA has been used successfully to constrain parameters such as chemical reaction rate coefficients, diffusion coefficients, and Henry's law solubility coefficients in kinetic models of gas uptake and chemical transformation of aerosol particles as well as multiphase chemistry at the atmosphere-biosphere interface. While this study focuses on the processes outlined above, the MCGA approach should be portable to any numerical process model with similar computational expense and extent of the fitting parameter space.

  3. Screened Thermonuclear Reaction Rates on Magnetar Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-Lin; LUO Zhi-Quan; LIU Jing-Jing; LAI Xiang-Jun

    2008-01-01

    Improving Salpeter's method, we discuss the effect of superstrong magnetic fields (such as those of magnetars) on thermonuclear reaction rates. These most interesting reactions, including the hydrogen burning by the CNO cycle and the helium burning by the triple alpha reaction, are investigated as examples on the magnetar surfaces. The obtained result shows that the superstrong magnetic fields can increase the thermonuclear reaction rates by many orders of magnitude. The enhancement may have significant influence for further study research of the magnetars, especially for the x-ray luminosity observation and the evolution of magnetars.

  4. How is entropy production rate related to chemical reaction rate?

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Kinshuk

    2013-01-01

    The entropy production rate is a key quantity in irreversible thermodynamics. In this work, we concentrate on the realization of entropy production rate in chemical reaction systems in terms of the experimentally measurable reaction rate. Both triangular and linear networks have been studied. They attain either thermodynamic equilibrium or a non-equilibrium steady state, under suitable external constraints. We have shown that the entropy production rate is proportional to the square of the reaction velocity only around equilibrium and not any arbitrary non-equilibrium steady state. This feature can act as a guide in revealing the nature of a steady state, very much like the minimum entropy production principle. A discussion on this point has also been presented.

  5. Rate-determining electron-transfer reactions in highly aqueous alcohol-water mixtures. A quantitative analysis of solvent effects on the oxidation of 4-methoxyphenylacetate by potassium 12-tungstocobaltate(III)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bietti, M.; Baciocchi, E.; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    1996-01-01

    Kinetic solvent effects on the rate-determining outer-sphere electron-transfer reaction between 4-methoxy-phenylacetate and potassium 12-tungstocobaltate(III) in highly aqueous alcohol-water mixtures are quantitatively analysed in terms of pairwise Gibbs energy parameters for interaction of the init

  6. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach, in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is of the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules.

  7. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach, in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is of the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules.

  8. Quantum Mechanics Rate Constant for the N+ND Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-jie Zhang; Guo-zhong He

    2011-01-01

    We present nonadiabatic quantum dynamical calculations on the two coupled potential energy surfaces (12A' and 22A') [J.Theor.Comput.Chem.8,849 (2009)] for the reaction.Initial state-resolved reaction probabilities and cross sections for the N+ND→N2+D reaction and N'+ND→N+N'D reaction for collision energies of 5 meV to 1.0 eV are determined,respectively.It is found that the N+ND→N2+D reaction is dominated in the N+ND reaction.In addition,we obtained the rate constants for the N+ND→N2+D reaction which demand further experimental investigations.

  9. Thermonuclear Reaction Rate Parameterization for Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Jacob; Kozub, Raymond L.; Smith, Michael S.; Scott, Jason; Lingerfelt, Eric

    2004-10-01

    The knowledge of thermonuclear reaction rates is vital to simulate novae, supernovae, X-ray bursts, and other astrophysical events. To facilitate dissemination of this knowledge, a set of tools has been created for managing reaction rates, located at www.nucastrodata.org. One tool is a rate parameterizer, which provides a parameterization for nuclear reaction rate vs. temperature values in the most widely used functional form. Currently, the parameterizer uses the Levenberg-Marquardt method (LMM), which requires an initial estimate of the best-fit parameters. The initial estimate is currently provided randomly from a preselected pool. To improve the quality of fits, a new, active method of selecting parameters has been developed. The parameters of each set in the pool are altered for a few iterations to replicate the input data as closely as possible. Then, the set which most nearly matches the input data (based on chi squared) is used in the LMM as the initial estimate for the final fitting procedure. A description of the new, active algorithm and its performance will be presented. Supported by the U. S. Department of Energy.

  10. Development of a chemical kinetic measurement apparatus and the determination of the reaction rate constants for lithium-lead/water interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biney, P.O.

    1993-04-01

    An experimental set-up for accurate measurement of hydrogen generation rate in Lithium-Lead (Li[sub 17]Pb[sub 83]) Steam or water interactions has been designed. The most important features of the design include a pneumatic actuated quick opening and closing high temperature all stainless steel valve used to control the reaction time and the placement of most measuring devices below a water line to minimize leakage of the hydrogen collected. A PC based data acquisition and control system provides remote process sequencing, acquisition and control of all major components of the set-up. Initial tests indicate that the first design objective of maintaining leakproof gas collection chamber has been achieved. Initial pressure tests indicated that the pressure drop over a time span of 30 minutes was within the tolerance of the pressure transducer used to measure the pressure (within 0.690 kPa) at a nominal system pressure of 685 kPa. The experimental system hardware, data acquisition and control programs and data analysis program have been completed, tested and are currently functional.

  11. Two-temperature reaction and relaxation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnichenko, E.; Gorbachev, Yu.

    2016-09-01

    Within the method of solving the kinetic equations for gas mixtures with internal degrees of freedom developed by the authors and based on the approximate summational invariants (ASI) concept, gas-dynamic equations for a multi-temperature model for the spatially inhomogeneous case are derived. For the two-temperature case, the expressions for the non-equilibrium reaction and relaxation rates are obtained. Special attention is drawn to corresponding thermodynamic equations. Different possibilities of introducing the gas-dynamic variables related to the internal degrees of freedom are considered. One is based on the choice of quantum numbers as the ASI, while the other is based on the choice of internal (vibrational) energy as the ASI. Limits to a one-temperature situation are considered in all the cases. For the cutoff harmonic oscillator model, explicit expressions for the reaction and relaxation rates are derived.

  12. Quantum theory of chemical reaction rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

    1994-10-01

    If one wishes to describe a chemical reaction at the most detailed level possible, i.e., its state-to-state differential scattering cross section, then it is necessary to solve the Schroedinger equation to obtain the S-matrix as a function of total energy E and total angular momentum J, in terms of which the cross sections can be calculated as given by equation (1) in the paper. All other physically observable attributes of the reaction can be derived from the cross sections. Often, in fact, one is primarily interested in the least detailed quantity which characterizes the reaction, namely its thermal rate constant, which is obtained by integrating Eq. (1) over all scattering angles, summing over all product quantum states, and Boltzmann-averaging over all initial quantum states of reactants. With the proper weighting factors, all of these averages are conveniently contained in the cumulative reaction probability (CRP), which is defined by equation (2) and in terms of which the thermal rate constant is given by equation (3). Thus, having carried out a full state-to-state scattering calculation to obtain the S-matrix, one can obtain the CRP from Eq. (2), and then rate constant from Eq. (3), but this seems like ``overkill``; i.e., if one only wants the rate constant, it would clearly be desirable to have a theory that allows one to calculate it, or the CRP, more directly than via Eq. (2), yet also correctly, i.e., without inherent approximations. Such a theory is the subject of this paper.

  13. Reaction Rate Parameterization for Nuclear Astrophysics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J. P.; Lingerfelt, E. J.; Smith, M. S.; Hix, W. R.; Bardayan, D. W.; Sharp, J. E.; Kozub, R. L.; Meyer, R. A.

    2004-11-01

    Libraries of thermonuclear reaction rates are used in element synthesis models of a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena, such as exploding stars and the inner workings of our sun. These computationally demanding models are more efficient when libraries, which may contain over 60000 rates and vary by 20 orders of magnitude, have a uniform parameterization for all rates. We have developed an on-line tool, hosted at www.nucastrodata.org, to obtain REACLIB parameters (F.-K. Thielemann et al., Adv. Nucl. Astrophysics 525, 1 (1987)) that represent reaction rates as a function of temperature. This helps to rapidly incorporate the latest nuclear physics results in astrophysics models. The tool uses numerous techniques and algorithms in a modular fashion to improve the quality of the fits to the rates. Features, modules, and additional applications of this tool will be discussed. * Managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. D.O.E. under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 + Supported by U.S. D.O.E. under Grant No. DE-FG02-96ER40955

  14. On the 14C(alpha,gamma) reaction rate

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, E D; Mitchell, J; Miller, L; Kemper, K W

    2009-01-01

    The 14C(alpha,gamma) reaction rate at temperatures below 0.3 GK depends on the properties of two near threshold resonances in 18O, the 1- at 6.198 MeV and the 3- at 6.404 MeV. The alpha+14C Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients (ANCs) for these resonances were determined using the alpha-transfer reactions 14C(7Li,t) and 14C(6Li,d) at sub-Coulomb energies. The 14C(alpha,gamma) reaction rate at low temperatures has been evaluated. Implications of the new reaction rate on the evolution of accreting helium white dwarfs and on the nucleosynthesis of low mass stars during the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase are discussed.

  15. Bayesian Estimation of Thermonuclear Reaction Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Iliadis, Christian; Coc, Alain; Timmes, Frank; Starrfield, Sumner

    2016-01-01

    The problem of estimating non-resonant astrophysical S-factors and thermonuclear reaction rates, based on measured nuclear cross sections, is of major interest for nuclear energy generation, neutrino physics, and element synthesis. Many different methods have been applied in the past to this problem, all of them based on traditional statistics. Bayesian methods, on the other hand, are now in widespread use in the physical sciences. In astronomy, for example, Bayesian statistics is applied to the observation of extra-solar planets, gravitational waves, and type Ia supernovae. However, nuclear physics, in particular, has been slow to adopt Bayesian methods. We present the first astrophysical S-factors and reaction rates based on Bayesian statistics. We develop a framework that incorporates robust parameter estimation, systematic effects, and non-Gaussian uncertainties in a consistent manner. The method is applied to the d(p,$\\gamma$)$^3$He, $^3$He($^3$He,2p)$^4$He, and $^3$He($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^7$Be reactions,...

  16. Bayesian Estimation of Thermonuclear Reaction Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliadis, C.; Anderson, K. S.; Coc, A.; Timmes, F. X.; Starrfield, S.

    2016-11-01

    The problem of estimating non-resonant astrophysical S-factors and thermonuclear reaction rates, based on measured nuclear cross sections, is of major interest for nuclear energy generation, neutrino physics, and element synthesis. Many different methods have been applied to this problem in the past, almost all of them based on traditional statistics. Bayesian methods, on the other hand, are now in widespread use in the physical sciences. In astronomy, for example, Bayesian statistics is applied to the observation of extrasolar planets, gravitational waves, and Type Ia supernovae. However, nuclear physics, in particular, has been slow to adopt Bayesian methods. We present astrophysical S-factors and reaction rates based on Bayesian statistics. We develop a framework that incorporates robust parameter estimation, systematic effects, and non-Gaussian uncertainties in a consistent manner. The method is applied to the reactions d(p,γ)3He, 3He(3He,2p)4He, and 3He(α,γ)7Be, important for deuterium burning, solar neutrinos, and Big Bang nucleosynthesis.

  17. CHLORINATION OF AMINO ACIDS: REACTION PATHWAYS AND REACTION RATES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Zuo Tong; Linge, Kathryn; Busetti, Francesco; Joll, Cynthia A

    2017-03-15

    Chlorination of amino acids can result in the formation of organic monochloramines or organic dichloramines, depending on the chlorine to amino acid ratio (Cl:AA). After formation, organic chloramines degrade into aldehydes, nitriles and N-chloraldimines. In this paper, the formation of organic chloramines from chlorination of lysine, tyrosine and valine were investigated. Chlorination of tyrosine and lysine demonstrated that the presence of a reactive secondary group can increase the Cl:AA ratio required for the formation of N,N-dichloramines, and potentially alter the reaction pathways between chlorine and amino acids, resulting in the formation of unexpected by-products. In a detailed investigation, we report rate constants for all reactions in the chlorination of valine, for the first time, using experimental results and modelling. At Cl:AA = 2.8, the chlorine was found to first react quickly with valine (5.4x104 M-1 s-1) to form N-monochlorovaline, with a slower subsequent reaction with N-monochlorovaline to form N,N-dichlorovaline (4.9x102 M-1 s-1), although some N-monochlorovaline degraded into isobutyraldehyde (1.0x10-4 s-1). The N,N-dichlorovaline then competitively degraded into isobutyronitrile (1.3x10-4 s-1) and N-chloroisobutyraldimine (1.2x10-4 s-1). In conventional drinking water disinfection, N-chloroisobutyraldimine can potentially be formed in concentrations higher than its odour threshold concentration, resulting in aesthetic challenges and an unknown health risk.

  18. Combined online spectroscopic, calorimetric, and chemometric analysis: reaction enthalpy determinations in single and parallel reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjahjono, Martin; Widjaja, Effendi; Garland, Marc

    2009-06-02

    Calorimetry and signal processing: Vibrational spectroscopies, heat-flow microcalorimetry, and multivariate analysis are combined to decouple the reaction enthalpies of parallel reactions [picture: see text]. This methodology allows the evaluation of reaction enthalpy from complex systems without recourse to conventional kinetic modeling. Simultaneous in situ/online spectroscopy and heat-flow measurements as well as multivariate analyses are performed, apparently for the first time, to determine heats of reaction for single and parallel reactions. Two different vibrational spectroscopy techniques, namely Raman and FTIR spectroscopy, are used in conjunction with flow-through TAM III microcalorimetry. With respect to the spectroscopic analysis, the reaction spectra are first analyzed to determine the pure-component spectra and the corresponding concentrations without recourse to external calibration. With respect to the calorimetric analysis, a soft modeling approach is employed to determine the heats of reaction without recourse to any conventional kinetic models. This combined approach is implemented to determine the extents of reaction as well as the corresponding heats of reaction at 298.15 K and 0.1 MPa for a) the hydrolysis of acetic anhydride (single reaction) and b) the hydrolysis of methyl paraben and ethyl paraben in alkaline solution (both single and parallel reactions). In the latter case, the heat-flow contributions from the two simultaneous reactions are successfully decoupled. Taken together, these results demonstrate proof of concept for the present approach. The newly developed methodology appears to be quite general and particularly useful for investigating complex reaction systems. This is particularly true for multiple simultaneous reactions and reactions where the detailed kinetic expressions are not available, or cannot be easily determined. The use of extents of reaction is also very helpful where there is high variability in reaction rates

  19. THM determination of the 65 keV resonance strength intervening in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S. [Università di Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Burjan, S. V.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR Rez near Prague (Czech Republic); Coc, A. [CSNSM, UMR 8609, CNRS/IN2P3 and Universitè Paris Sud 11, Bâtiment 104, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Gulino, M.; Tumino, A. [Università di Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, Italy and Universitá Kore di Enna, Enna (Italy); Hammache, F. [IPN, IN2P3-CNRS et Université de Paris-Sud 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Irgaziev, B. [GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology Topi District Swabi NWFP (Pakistan); Kiss, G. G.; Somorjai, E. [ATOMKI, Debrecen (Hungary); Lamia, L. [Università di Catania, Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A. [Cyclotron Institute,Texas A and M University College Station (United States); and others

    2015-02-24

    The {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction is of paramount importance for the nucleosynthesis in a number of stellar sites, including red giants (RG), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, massive stars and classical novae. We report on the indirect study of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach recently developed for extracting the resonance strength of the narrow resonance at E{sub c.m.}{sup R} = 65 keV (E{sub X} =5.673 MeV). The strength of the 65 keV resonance in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the {sup 17}O+p radiative capture channel.

  20. The development of a chemical kinetic measurement apparatus and the determination of the reaction rate constants for lithium-lead/steam interaction. Final report 9-21-90--3-31-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biney, P.O.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this research to experimentally determine the hydrogen generation rate during the beginning and subsequent stages of liquid metal (Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83}) and water reaction. The experimental set-up has been built. It includes a metal sample preparation apparatus, a reaction system, a measurement system and a PC based data acquisition and control system. The most important feature of the reaction system is a pneumatic actuated quick opening and closing high temperature, all stainless steel valve used the system for reaction time control. The PC system provides remote process sequencing, acquisition and control of all the systems except the metal preparation apparatus. Due to the reactivity of the lithium, all the metal sampling, preparation and loading procedures are executed in a glove box under argon protection. The metal temperature was varied between 350{degrees}C-650{degrees}C and water temperature fixed at 60{degrees}C during the experiments. A set of experimental procedures and two analyses methods: (1) thermodynamics method and (2) heat transfer method are discussed. All the measurements and data collections are executed under the PC system control. A data analysis program is used to calculate both the partial pressure of hydrogen and the hydrogen generation rate. The experiment results indicate that the amount of hydrogen generated is relate to the initial liquid metal temperature when the reaction surface is fixed. The mass of hydrogen generated as a function of initial liquid metal temperature and time of reaction is presented, The hydrogen generation over a time period of 240 seconds and the calculated errors are summarized in Table 1.

  1. Reaction rates between water and the Karl Fischer reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergren, A

    1974-04-01

    Reaction rates between water and the Karl Fischer reagent have been determined by potentiometric measurement for various compositions of the Karl Fischer reagent. The study has been made with an iodine complex concentration of 0.3-1.2 mM and sulphur dioxide complex at 0.01-0.5M. The concentration of excess of pyridine had no measurable effect on the rate of the main reaction. The reaction was found to be first-order with respect to iodine complex, to sulphur dioxide complex, and to water. The rate constant was (1.2+/-0.2) x 10(3) 1(2). mole(-2). sec(-1). In an ordinary titration it is therefore essential to keep the sulphur dioxide concentration high for the reaction to go to completion within a reasonable time. The extent of side-reactions was found to be independent of the iodine concentration at low concentrations. The side-reactions increased somewhat with increasing sulphur dioxide pyridine concentrations and decreased to about 60% when the temperature was lowered from 24 degrees to 7 degrees.

  2. Reaction weakening and emplacement of crystalline thrusts: Diffusion control on reaction rate and strain rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Kieran

    2007-08-01

    In the southern Appalachians, the Blue Ridge-Piedmont crystalline thrust sheet was emplaced onto low-grade Late Precambrian and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in the footwall along a basal detachment consisting of phyllosilicate-rich mylonites (phyllonites). The phyllonites developed first by mechanical breakdown of feldspar followed by chemical breakdown to white mica in the presence of a pore fluid. Diffusion of solute in the pore fluid is the rate limiting step in controlling reaction rate and also the strain rate. Assuming solute diffusion follows the Stokes-Einstein equation, the shear strain rate is given by ⅆγ/ⅆt=2ωkT/5ηrx for shear stress ≥20 MPa, where n is a constant, ω is a geometric factor, k is Boltzmann's constant, T is absolute temperature, η is water viscosity, r is the atomic radius of the diffusing species, and x is the diffusion distance. A bulk diffusion coefficient in the range of ˜10 -10 to 10 -12 m 2/s over distances of 10-100 m results in strain rates of 10 -14 to 10 -13 s -1 in the temperature range 200-400 °C. It is concluded that greenschist grade crystalline thrust sheets develop on pre-existing basement faults that become weak during reaction softening and localize into high strain phyllonite zones in which pore fluid diffusion controls reaction rate and strain rate.

  3. Nuclear reaction rates and opacity in massive star evolution calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahena, D [Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences, BocnI II 1401, 14131 Praha 4 (Czech Republic); Klapp, J [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Km. 36.5 Carr. Mexico-Toluca, 52750 Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Dehnen, H, E-mail: jaime.klapp@inin.gob.m [Universitaet Konstanz, Fachbereich Physik, Fach M568, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear reaction rates and opacity are important parameters in stellar evolution. The input physics in a stellar evolution code determines the main theoretical characteristics of the stellar structure, evolution and nucleosynthesis of a star. For different input physics, in this work we calculate stellar evolution models of very massive first stars during the hydrogen and helium burning phases. We have considered 100 and 200M{sub s}un galactic and pregalactic stars with metallicity Z = 10{sup -6} and 10{sup 9}, respectively. The results show important differences from old to new formulations for the opacity and nuclear reaction rates, in particular the evolutionary tracks are significantly affected, that indicates the importance of using up to date and reliable input physics. The triple alpha reaction activates sooner for pregalactic than for galactic stars.

  4. Helium Burning Reaction Rate Uncertainties and Consequences for Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tur, C.; Heger, A.; Austin, S. M.

    2007-10-01

    The triple alpha and ^12C(,)^16O reaction rates determine the carbon to oxygen ratio at the completion of core helium burning in stars, which, in turn, influences the later stellar burning stages. We explored the dependence of massive star evolution and nucleosynthesis yields on the experimental uncertainties in the triple alpha rate (10 to 12%) and the ^12C(,)^16O rate (25 to 35%) using full stellar models followed to core collapse and including supernova explosion. The production factors of medium-weight elements obtained by using the Lodders (2003) solar abundances for the initial star composition, rather than the abundances of Anders & Grevesse (1989), provide a less stringent constraint on the ^12C(,)^16O rate. Variations within the current uncertainties in both reaction rates, however, induce significant changes in the central carbon abundance at core carbon ignition and in the mass of the supernova remnant. An experiment is being carried out by an NSCL/WMU collaboration to improve the accuracy of the triple alpha reaction rate.

  5. Title: Elucidation of Environmental Fate of Artificial Sweeteners (Aspartame, Acesulfame K and Saccharin) by Determining Bimolecular Rate Constants with Hydroxyl Radical at Various pH and Temperature Conditions and Possible Reaction By-Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraji, T.; Arakaki, T.; Suzuka, T.

    2012-12-01

    Use of artificial sweeteners in beverages and food has been rapidly increasing because of their non-calorie nature. In Japan, aspartame, acesulfame K and sucralose are among the most widely used artificial sweeteners. Because the artificial sweeteners are not metabolized in human bodies, they are directly excreted into the environment without chemical transformations. We initiated a study to better understand the fate of artificial sweeteners in the marine environment. The hydroxyl radical (OH), the most potent reactive oxygen species, reacts with various compounds and determines the environmental oxidation capacity and the life-time of many compounds. The steady-state OH concentration and the reaction rate constants between the compound and OH are used to estimate the life-time of the compound. In this study, we determine the bimolecular rate constants between aspartame, acefulfame K and saccharin and OH at various pH and temperature conditions using a competition kinetics technique. We use hydrogen peroxide as a photochemical source of OH. Bimolecular rate constant we obtained so far for aspartame was (2.6±1.2)×109 M-1 s-1 at pH = 3.0 and (4.9±2.3)×109 M-1 s-1 at pH = 5.5. Little effect was seen by changing the temperatures between 15 and 40 oC. Activation energy (Ea) was calculated to be -1.0 kJ mol-1 at pH = 3.0, +8.5 kJ mol-1 at pH = 5.5, which could be regarded as zero. We will report bimolecular rate constants at different pHs and temperatures for acesulfame K and saccharin, as well. Possible reaction by-products for aspartame will be also reported. We will further discuss the fate of aspartame in the coastal environment.

  6. The AGB star nucleosynthesis in the light of the recent {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N and {sup 18}O(p,α){sup 15}N reaction rate determinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universitá degli Studi di Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, Italy and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universitá degli Studi di Catania (Italy)

    2015-02-24

    Presolar grains form in the cold and dusty envelopes of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. These solides, once that have been ejected by stellar winds, come to us as inclusions in meteorites providing invaluable benchmarks and constraints for our knowledge of low temeperature H-burning in stars. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N and {sup 18}O(p,α){sup 15}N reactions. Moreover, the strength of the 65 keV resonance in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the {sup 17}O+p radiative capture channel. The new estimates of the reaction rates have been introduced into calculations of AGB star nucleosynthesis and the results have been compared with geochemical analysis of 'presolar' grains to determine their impact on astrophysical environments.

  7. Tropospheric oxidation of cyclic unsaturated ethers in the day-time: Comparison of the reactions with Cl, OH and O3 based on the determination of their rate coefficients at 298 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwe, H. D.; Walavalkar, M. P.; Sharma, A.; Dhanya, S.; Naik, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    The rate coefficients of the reactions of three unsaturated cyclic ethers, 2,5-dihydrofuran (2,5-DHF), 2,3-dihydrofuran (2,3-DHF), and 3,4-dihydropyran (3,4-DHP), with the major day-time tropospheric oxidants - OH (kOH) and O3(kO3), and that of 3,4-DHP with Cl atom (kCl) are determined using relative rate method, at 298 K. The values of kOH are (6.45 ± 1.69), (11.95 ± 2.79) and (11.38 ± 2.64) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for 2,5-DHF, 2,3-DHF and 3,4-DHP, respectively and kO3 are (1.65 ± 0.31), (443.20 ± 79.0) and (31.36 ± 5.80) × 10-17 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for 2,5-DHF, 2,3-DHF and 3,4-DHP, respectively. The value of kCl for 3,4-DHP is (6.15 ± 0.84) × 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The dominant pathway of tropospheric degradation of 2,5-DHF is the reaction with OH, whereas that of 2,3-DHF is the reaction with O3. Reaction with both OH and O3 are equally important in the case of 3,4-DHP. Under the conditions of marine boundary layer, the reaction with Cl atom is important in the tropospheric degradation of 2,5-DHF and 3,4-DHP, but insignificant in the case of 2,3-DHF (only 1.8%). The estimated tropospheric lifetimes in the day-time are 2.0, 0.08 and 0.62 h for 2,5-DHF, 2,3-DHF and 3,4-DHP respectively. The presence of O atom, unsaturation, conjugation etc. influences the rate coefficients in a complex manner. However, there is a good correlation of kOH with HOMO energy, which further improves by treating the molecules separately, either as ethers and hydrocarbons, or as cyclic and acyclic molecules. The values of kO3 of these ethers fit very well with the straight line regression derived for simple alkenes with their HOMO energy, except 2,3-DHF, which has a high strain enthalpy. The values of kCl also show a similar trend of increase with HOMO energy, but the correlation is not as good as that of kOH.

  8. Evaluation of antioxidants using oxidation reaction rate constants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Yan; ZHAN Xiancheng; MA Lie; LI Linli; LI Chengrong

    2007-01-01

    An evaluation method for the capacity of antioxidants to protect drugs against oxidation is presented.As a new viewpoint,to determine the priority of the competitive oxidations between the antioxidant and the protected drug,and to compare the drug-protection capacity of antioxidants,it is important to determine their oxidation rate constants using chemical kinetics instead of standard oxidation (or reduction) potentials.Sodium sulfite,sodium bisulfite and sodium pyrosulfite were used as models for the determination of oxidation reaction rate constants in aqueous solutions.In the experiments,sufficient air was continually infused into the solution to keep the concentration of dissolved oxygen constant.The residual concentrations of the antioxidants were determined by iodimetry,and the concentration of dissolved oxygen by oxygen electrode.The data were fitted by linear regressions to obtain the reaction rate constants.It was found that the degradation of sodium sulfite,sodium bisulfite or sodium pyrosulfite obeyed pseudo zero-order kinetics in the buffer solutions.Because of the ionization equilibrium,these three antioxidants have the same ion form in solutions at a definite pH value and therefore their apparent rate constants were essentially the same.The average apparent rate constants of the three antioxidants at 25~C are (1.34±0.03)×10-3 at pH 6.8,(1.20±0.02) x 10-3 at pH 4.0 and (6.58±0.02)×10-3 mol.L-1.h-1 at pH 9.2,respectively.

  9. Statistical Methods for Thermonuclear Reaction Rates and Nucleosynthesis Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Iliadis, Christian; Coc, Alain; Timmes, F X; Champagne, Art E

    2014-01-01

    Rigorous statistical methods for estimating thermonuclear reaction rates and nucleosynthesis are becoming increasingly established in nuclear astrophysics. The main challenge being faced is that experimental reaction rates are highly complex quantities derived from a multitude of different measured nuclear parameters (e.g., astrophysical S-factors, resonance energies and strengths, particle and gamma-ray partial widths). We discuss the application of the Monte Carlo method to two distinct, but related, questions. First, given a set of measured nuclear parameters, how can one best estimate the resulting thermonuclear reaction rates and associated uncertainties? Second, given a set of appropriate reaction rates, how can one best estimate the abundances from nucleosynthesis (i.e., reaction network) calculations? The techniques described here provide probability density functions that can be used to derive statistically meaningful reaction rates and final abundances for any desired coverage probability. Examples ...

  10. Saponification reaction system: a detailed mass transfer coefficient determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pečar, Darja; Goršek, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    The saponification of an aromatic ester with an aqueous sodium hydroxide was studied within a heterogeneous reaction medium in order to determine the overall kinetics of the selected system. The extended thermo-kinetic model was developed compared to the previously used simple one. The reaction rate within a heterogeneous liquid-liquid system incorporates a chemical kinetics term as well as mass transfer between both phases. Chemical rate constant was obtained from experiments within a homogeneous medium, whilst the mass-transfer coefficient was determined separately. The measured thermal profiles were then the bases for determining the overall reaction-rate. This study presents the development of an extended kinetic model for considering mass transfer regarding the saponification of ethyl benzoate with sodium hydroxide within a heterogeneous reaction medium. The time-dependences are presented for the mass transfer coefficient and the interfacial areas at different heterogeneous stages and temperatures. The results indicated an important role of reliable kinetic model, as significant difference in k(L)a product was obtained with extended and simple approach.

  11. What determines the rate of excited-state intramolecular electron-transfer reaction of 4-(N,N'-dimethylamino)benzonitrile in room temperature ionic liquids? A study in [bmim][PF6].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Kotni; Samanta, Anunay

    2012-05-14

    The kinetics of excited-state intramolecular electron-transfer reaction and dynamics of solvation of the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state of 4-(N,N'-dimethylamino)benzonitrile (DMABN) was studied in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazloium hexafluorophosphate, [bmim][PF(6)], by monitoring the dual fluorescence of the system. The picosecond time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) of DMABN exhibit decay of the locally excited (LE) emission intensity and shift of the ICT emission peak position with time, thus capturing the kinetics of evolution of the ICT state from the LE state and solvent relaxation of the ICT state. These results show that the LE→ICT transformation rate is determined not by the slow dynamics of solvation in ionic liquid, but is controlled mainly by the rate of structural reorganization of the molecule, which accompanies the electron-transfer process in this polar viscous medium. Even though both solvent reorganization around photo-excited DMABN and structural rearrangement of the molecule are dependent on the viscosity of the medium, it is the latter process that contributes to the viscosity dependence of the LE→ICT transformation.

  12. Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates: II. Tables and Graphs of Reaction Rates and Probability Density Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Iliadis, Christian; Champagne, Art; Coc, Alain; Fitzgerald, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Numerical values of charged-particle thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei in the A=14 to 40 region are tabulated. The results are obtained using a method, based on Monte Carlo techniques, that has been described in the preceding paper of this series (Paper I). We present a low rate, median rate and high rate which correspond to the 0.16, 0.50 and 0.84 quantiles, respectively, of the cumulative reaction rate distribution. The meaning of these quantities is in general different from the commonly reported, but statistically meaningless expressions, "lower limit", "nominal value" and "upper limit" of the total reaction rate. In addition, we approximate the Monte Carlo probability density function of the total reaction rate by a lognormal distribution and tabulate the lognormal parameters {\\mu} and {\\sigma} at each temperature. We also provide a quantitative measure (Anderson-Darling test statistic) for the reliability of the lognormal approximation. The user can implement the approximate lognormal reaction rat...

  13. Rate constants for the reaction of CF3O radicals with hydrocarbons at 298 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, C.; Treacy, J.; Sidebottom, H.W.;

    1993-01-01

    Rate constant ratios of the reactions of CF3O radicals with a number of hydrocarbons have been determined at 298 +/- 2 K and atmospheric pressure using a relative rate method. Using a previously determined value k(CF30 + C2H6) = 1.2 x 10(-12) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 these rate constant ratios provide......-1. The importance of the reactions of CF3O radicals with hydrocarbons under atmospheric conditions is discussed....

  14. Reaction rates between water and some modified rapidly-reacting Karl Fischer reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergren, A

    1978-04-01

    Rate constants were determined for the reaction between water and various modified Karl Fischer reagents containing formamide, dimethylformamide or N-methylformamide. It was shown that the reaction rate can be increased by a factor of 100 by using a reagent containing 40% v/v formamide in pyridine compared to that obtained by use of the conventional methanolic reagent.

  15. On the ambiguity of the reaction rate constants in multivariate curve resolution for reversible first-order reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Henning; Sawall, Mathias; Kubis, Christoph; Selent, Detlef; Hess, Dieter; Franke, Robert; Börner, Armin; Neymeyr, Klaus

    2016-07-13

    If for a chemical reaction with a known reaction mechanism the concentration profiles are accessible only for certain species, e.g. only for the main product, then often the reaction rate constants cannot uniquely be determined from the concentration data. This is a well-known fact which includes the so-called slow-fast ambiguity. This work combines the question of unique or non-unique reaction rate constants with factor analytic methods of chemometrics. The idea is to reduce the rotational ambiguity of pure component factorizations by considering only those concentration factors which are possible solutions of the kinetic equations for a properly adapted set of reaction rate constants. The resulting set of reaction rate constants corresponds to those solutions of the rate equations which appear as feasible factors in a pure component factorization. The new analysis of the ambiguity of reaction rate constants extends recent research activities on the Area of Feasible Solutions (AFS). The consistency with a given chemical reaction scheme is shown to be a valuable tool in order to reduce the AFS. The new methods are applied to model and experimental data.

  16. Energy diffusion controlled reaction rate in dissipative Hamiltonian systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Mao-Lin; Zhu Wei-Qiu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the energy diffusion controlled reaction rate in dissipative Hamiltonian systems is investigated by using the stochastic averaging method for quasi Hamiltonian systems. The boundary value problem of mean first-passage time (MFPT) of averaged system is formulated and the energy diffusion controlled reaction rate is obtained as the inverse of MFPT. The energy diffusion controlled reaction rate in the classical Kramers bistable potential and in a two-dimensional bistable potential with a heat bath are obtained by using the proposed approach respectively. The obtained results are then compared with those from Monte Carlo simulation of original systems and from the classical Kramers theory. It is shown that the reaction rate obtained by using the proposed approach agrees well with that from Monte Carlo simulation and is more accurate than the classical Kramers rate.

  17. Classical reaction probabilities, cross sections and rate constants for the O( 1D) + H2 → OH + H reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, A. J.; Aoiz, F. J.; Bañares, L.; Brouard, M.; Herrero, V. J.; Simons, J. P.

    1997-10-01

    Reaction probabilitiers total reaction cross sections as a function of collision energy, and rate constants have been calculated using the quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) method for the O( 1D) + H 2 reaction on several ab initio potential energy surfaces (PES), including the recent one by Ho, Hollebeck, Rabitz, Harding and Schatz. Detailed QCT results on the Schinke and Lester PES are compared with recent time-dependent wavepacket calculations on the same PES, showing good agreement. The QCT thermal rate constants calculated on the PES of Ho et al. are in better accord with the experimental determinations than those calculated on the Schinke-Lester PES.

  18. Determination of the asymptotic normalization coefficients for 14C + n <--> 15C, the 14C(n, gamma)15C reaction rate, and evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCleskey, M; Mukhamedzhanov, A M; Trache, L; Tribble, R E; Banu, A; Eremenko, V; Goldberg, V Z; Lui, Y W; McCleskey, E; Roeder, B T; Spiridon, A; Carstoiu, F; Burjan, V; Hons, Z; Thompson, I J

    2014-04-17

    The 14C + n <--> 15C system has been used as a test case in the evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors that uses the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC). The method proved to be unsuccessful for this case. As part of this experimental program, the ANCs for the 15C ground state and first excited state were determined using a heavy-ion neutron transfer reaction as well as the inverse kinematics (d,p) reaction, measured at the Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute. The ANCs were used to evaluate the astrophysical direct neutron capture rate on 14C, which was then compared with the most recent direct measurement and found to be in good agreement. A study of the 15C SF via its mirror nucleus 15F and a new insight into deuteron stripping theory are also presented.

  19. Evolutionary implications of the new triple-alpha nuclear reaction rate for low mass stars

    CERN Document Server

    Dotter, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Context: Ogata et al. (2009; hereafter OKK) presented a theoretical determination of the triple-alpha nuclear reaction rate. Their rate differs from the NACRE rate by many orders of magnitude at temperatures relevant for low mass stars. Aims: We explore the evolutionary implications of adopting the OKK triple-alpha reaction rate in low mass stars and compare the results with those obtained using the NACRE rate. Methods: The triple-alpha reaction rates are compared by following the evolution of stellar models at 1 and 1.5 Msol with Z=0.0002 and Z=0.02. Results: Results show that the OKK rate has severe consequences for the late stages of stellar evolution in low mass stars. Most notable is the shortening--or disappearance--of the red giant phase. Conclusions: The OKK triple-alpha reaction rate is incompatible with observations of extended red giant branches and He burning stars in old stellar systems.

  20. Non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, T.; Tamii, A.; Aoi, N.; Fujita, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Miki, K.; Ogata, K. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Carter, J.; Donaldson, L.; Sideras-Haddad, E. [Schools of Physics, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Furuno, T.; Kawabata, T. [Departments of Physics, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Kamimura, M. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Nemulodi, F.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Swarts, C. [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences Somerset, West, 7129 (South Africa)

    2014-05-02

    Our experimental goal is to study the non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate at low temperture (T < 10{sup 8} K). The {sup 13}C(p,d) reaction at 66 MeV has been used to probe the alpha-unbound continuum state in {sup 12}C just below the 2{sup nd} 0{sup +} state at 7.65 MeV. The transition strength to the continuum state is predicted to be sensitive to the non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate. The experiment has been performed at iThemba LABS. We report the present status of the experiment.

  1. Critical evaluation and rate constants of chemoselective ligation reactions for stoichiometric conjugations in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Fumito; Noda, Hidetoshi; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2015-04-17

    Chemoselective ligation reactions have contributed immensely to the development of organic synthesis and chemical biology. However, the ligation of stoichiometric amounts of large molecules for applications such as protein-protein conjugates is still challenging. Conjugation reactions need to be fast enough to proceed under dilute conditions and chemoselective in the presence of unprotected functional groups; the starting materials and products must be stable under the reaction conditions. To compare known ligation reactions for their suitability under these conditions, we determined the second-order rate constants of ligation reactions using peptide substrates with unprotected functional groups. The reaction conditions, the chemoselectivity of the reactions, and the stability of the starting materials and products were carefully evaluated. In some cases, the stability could be improved by modifying the substrate structure. These data obtained under the ligation conditions provide a useful guide to choose an appropriate ligation reaction for synthesis of large molecules by covalent ligation reactions of unprotected substrates in water.

  2. Dependence of Reaction Rate Constants on Density in Supercritical Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGTao; SHENZhongyao

    2002-01-01

    A new method,which correlates rate constants of chemical reactions and density or pressure in supercritical fluids,was developed.Based on the transition state theory and thermodynamic principles, the rate constant can be reasonably correlated with the density of the supercritical fluid,and a correlation equation was obtained. Coupled with the equation of state (EOS) of a supercritical solvent,the effect of pressure on reaction rate constant could be represented.Two typical systems were used to test this method.The result indicates that this method is suitable for dilute supercritical fluid solutions.

  3. Analysis of reaction rates of single molecules on metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueba, H.

    2017-10-01

    The experimental results of the action spectra i.e., reaction rate R(V) as a function of a bias voltage V are analyzed for rotation of a single CCH (D) molecule on a Cu (100) surface [5] and hopping of a single H(D)2O molecule on Pd(111) surface [6]. In the former system it is identified that rotation occurs if enough energy stored in the C-H (D) in-plane bending (IPB) mode excited by tunneling electron is transferred to the C-H (D) out of plane bending (OPB) mode (reaction coordinate mode) via the anharmonic mode coupling in a single electron process. The calculated R(V) shows an excellent agreement with the experimental results except at the low bias voltages below V ≃ 60 mV where no experimental data is available for the nonlinear current I dependence of R(I). A reproduction of the experimental R(V) at the higher voltage region allows us to determine the vibrational density of states of the C-H IPB mode and its coupling rate to the C-H (D) OPB mode as well as the inelastic tunneling current to excite IPB mode. A change of a conductance upon excitation of the C-H IPB mode enables us to evaluate the electron-vibration coupling strength inducing the rotation motion of CCH molecule. In the latter system investigated at a high temperature of about 40 K, the constant R(V) due to thermal hopping followed by the rapid increase is satisfactory explained by anharmonic inter-mode coupling between the scissor mode excited by tunneling electrons and the frustrated translation mode for H(D)2O molecule on Pd(111).

  4. Extension of a Kinetic-Theory Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates to Reactions with Charged Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction rate information) are extended to include reactions involving charged particles and electronic energy levels. The proposed extensions include ionization reactions, exothermic associative ionization reactions, endothermic and exothermic charge exchange reactions, and other exchange reactions involving ionized species. The extensions are shown to agree favorably with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions.

  5. State Space Path Integrals for Electronically Nonadiabatic Reaction Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Duke, Jessica Ryan

    2016-01-01

    We present a state-space-based path integral method to calculate the rate of electron transfer (ET) in multi-state, multi-electron condensed-phase processes. We employ an exact path integral in discrete electronic states and continuous Cartesian nuclear variables to obtain a transition state theory (TST) estimate to the rate. A dynamic recrossing correction to the TST rate is then obtained from real-time dynamics simulations using mean field ring polymer molecular dynamics. We employ two different reaction coordinates in our simulations and show that, despite the use of mean field dynamics, the use of an accurate dividing surface to compute TST rates allows us to achieve remarkable agreement with Fermi's golden rule rates for nonadiabatic ET in the normal regime of Marcus theory. Further, we show that using a reaction coordinate based on electronic state populations allows us to capture the turnover in rates for ET in the Marcus inverted regime.

  6. Reaction rate in an evanescent random walkers system

    CERN Document Server

    Ré, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion mediated reaction models are particularly ubiquitous in the description of physical, chemical or biological processes. The random walk schema is a useful tool for formulating these models. Recently, evanescent random walk models have received attention in order to include finite lifetime processes. For instance, activated chemical reactions, such as laser photolysis, exhibit a different asymptotic limit when compared with immortal walker models. A diffusion limited reaction model based on a one dimensional continuous time random walk on a lattice with evanescent walkers is presented here. The absorption probability density and the reaction rate are analytically calculated in the Laplace domain. A finite absorption rate is considered, a model usually referred to as imperfect trapping. Short and long time behaviors are analyzed.

  7. Determining Annealing Temperatures for Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Angela R.; Enners, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common technique used in high school and undergraduate science teaching. Students often do not fully comprehend the underlying principles of the technique and how optimization of the protocol affects the outcome and analysis. In this molecular biology laboratory, students learn the steps of PCR with an…

  8. Effects of Surfactants on the Rate of Chemical Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Samiey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are self-assembled compounds that depend on their structure and electric charge can interact as monomer or micelle with other compounds (substrates. These interactions which may catalyze or inhibit the reaction rates are studied with pseudophase, cooperativity, and stoichiometric (classical models. In this review, we discuss applying these models to study surfactant-substrate interactions and their effects on Diels-Alder, redox, photochemical, decomposition, enzymatic, isomerization, ligand exchange, radical, and nucleophilic reactions.

  9. RPMDrate: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Suleimanov, Yu.V.

    2013-03-01

    We present RPMDrate, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett-Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any complexity in their full dimensionality. The program has been tested for the H+H2, H+CH 4, OH+CH4 and H+C2H6 reactions. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Reaction mechanisms and rate constants of waste degradation in landfill bioreactor systems with enzymatic-enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, P A; Hettiaratchi, J P A; Mehrotra, A K; Kumar, S

    2014-06-01

    Augmenting leachate before recirculation with peroxidase enzymes is a novel method to increase the available carbon, and therefore the food supply to microorganisms at the declining phase of the anaerobic landfill bioreactor operation. In order to optimize the enzyme-catalyzed leachate recirculation process, it is necessary to identify the reaction mechanisms and determine rate constants. This paper presents a kinetic model developed to ascertain the reaction mechanisms and determine the rate constants for enzyme catalyzed anaerobic waste degradation. The maximum rate of reaction (Vmax) for MnP enzyme-catalyzed reactors was 0.076 g(TOC)/g(DS).day. The catalytic turnover number (k(cat)) of the MnP enzyme-catalyzed was 506.7 per day while the rate constant (k) of the un-catalyzed reaction was 0.012 per day.

  11. Liquid Film Diffusion on Reaction Rate in Submerged Biofilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Pia; Hollesen, Line; Harremoës, Poul

    1995-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in order to investigate the influence of liquid film diffusion on reaction rate in a submerged biofilter with denitrification and in order to compare with a theoretical study of the mass transfer coefficient. The experiments were carried out with varied flow, identified...... by the empty bed velocity of inflow and recirculation, respectively 1.3, 2.8, 5.6 and 10.9 m/h. The filter material consisted of 3 mm biostyren spheres. The results indicate that the influence of liquid film diffusion on reaction rate can be ignored....

  12. Determination of caffeine using oscillating chemical reaction in a CSTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinzhang; Ren, Jie; Yang, Wu; Liu, XiuHui; Yang, Hua

    2003-07-14

    A new analytical method for the determination of caffeine by the sequential perturbation caused by different amounts of caffeine on the oscillating chemical system involving the manganese(II)-catalyzed reaction between potassium bromate and tyrosine in acidic medium in a CSTR was proposed. The method exposed for the first time in this work. It relies on the relationship between the changes in the oscillation amplitude of the chemical system and the concentration of caffeine. The calibration curve fits a second-order polynomial equation very well when the concentration of caffeine over the range 4.0 x 10(-6) - 1.2 x 10(-4) M (r = 0.9968). The effect of influential variables, such as the concentration of reaction components, injection point, temperature, flow rate and stirring rate were studied. Some aspects of the potential mechanism of action of caffeine on the chemical oscillating system were also discussed. A real sample was determined and the result was satisfactory.

  13. Massive Star Evolution Nucleosynthesis and Nuclear Reaction Rate Uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Heger, A; Rauscher, T; Hoffman, R D; Boyes, M M

    2002-01-01

    We present a nucleosynthesis calculation of a 25 solar mass star of solar composition that includes all relevant isotopes up to polonium. In particular, all stable isotopes and necessary nuclear reaction rates are covered. We follow the stellar evolution from hydrogen burning till iron core collapse and simulate the explosion using a ``piston'' approach. We discuss the influence of two key nuclear reaction rates, C12(a,g) and Ne22(a,n), on stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. The former significantly influences the resulting core sizes (iron, silicon, oxygen) and the overall presupernova structure of the star. It thus has significant consequences for the supernova explosion itself and the compact remnant formed. The later rate considerably affects the s-process in massive stars and we demonstrate the changes that different currently suggested values for this rate cause.

  14. A compilation of charged-particle induced thermonuclear reaction rates

    CERN Document Server

    Angulo, C; Rayet, M; Descouvemont, P; Baye, D; Leclercq-Willain, C; Coc, A; Barhoumi, S; Aguer, P; Rolfs, C; Kunz, R; Hammer, J W; Mayer, A; Paradelis, T; Kossionides, S; Chronidou, C; Spyrou, K; Degl'Innocenti, S; Fiorentini, G; Ricci, B; Zavatarelli, S; Providência, C; Wolters, H; Soares, J; Grama, C; Rahighi, J; Shotter, A; Rachti, M L

    1999-01-01

    Low-energy cross section data for 86 charged-particle induced reactions involving light (1 <= Z <= 14), mostly stable, nuclei are compiled. The corresponding Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates of relevance in astrophysical plasmas at temperatures in the range from 10 sup 6 K to 10 sup 1 sup 0 K are calculated. These evaluations assume either that the target nuclei are in their ground state, or that the target states are thermally populated following a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, except in some cases involving isomeric states. Adopted values complemented with lower and upper limits of the rates are presented in tabular form. Analytical approximations to the adopted rates, as well as to the inverse/direct rate ratios, are provided.

  15. A compilation of charged-particle induced thermonuclear reaction rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angulo, C.; Arnould, M.; Rayet, M.; Descouvemont, P.; Baye, D.; Leclercq-Willain, C.; Coc, A.; Barhoumi, S.; Aguer, P.; Rolfs, C.; Kunz, R.; Hammer, J.W.; Mayer, A.; Paradellis, T.; Kossionides, S.; Chronidou, C.; Spyrou, K.; Degl' Innocenti, S.; Fiorentini, G.; Ricci, B.; Zavatarelli, S.; Providencia, C.; Wolters, H.; Soares, J.; Grama, C.; Rahighi, J.; Shotter, A.; Rachti, M. Lamehi

    1999-08-23

    Low-energy cross section data for 86 charged-particle induced reactions involving light (1 {<=} Z {<=} 14), mostly stable, nuclei are compiled. The corresponding Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates of relevance in astrophysical plasmas at temperatures in the range from 10{sup 6} K to 10{sup 10} K are calculated. These evaluations assume either that the target nuclei are in their ground state, or that the target states are thermally populated following a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, except in some cases involving isomeric states. Adopted values complemented with lower and upper limits of the rates are presented in tabular form. Analytical approximations to the adopted rates, as well as to the inverse/direct rate ratios, are provided.

  16. The determinants of exchange rate in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel BENAZIC

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The dilemma for every country with an independent monetary policy is which kind of exchange rate arrangement should be applied. Through the exchange rate policy, countries can influence their economies, i.e. price stability and export competiveness. Croatia is a new EU member state, it has its own monetary policy and currency but it is on the way to euro introduction. Regarding the experiences from the beginning of the 1990s when Croatia was faced with serious monetary instabilities and hyperinflation, the goal of Croatian National Bank (CNB is to ensure price stability and one way to do so is through exchange rate policy. Croatia, as a small and open economy, has applied a managed floating exchange rate regime. The exchange rate is determined primarily by the foreign exchange supply and demand on the foreign exchange market, with occasional market interventions by the CNB. Therefore, in order to maintain exchange rate stability, policymakers must be able to recognize how changes in these factors affect changes in the exchange rate. This research aims to find a relationship among the main sources of foreign currency inflow and outflow and the level of exchange rate in Croatia. The analysis is carried out by using the bounds testing (ARDL approach for co-integration. The results indicate the existence of a stable co-integration relationship between the observed variables, whereby an increase in the majority of variables leads to an exchange rate appreciation.

  17. Prediction of Rate Constants for Catalytic Reactions with Chemical Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlow, C Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Ex machina: A computational method for predicting rate constants for reactions within microporous zeolite catalysts with chemical accuracy has recently been reported. A key feature of this method is a stepwise QM/MM approach that allows accuracy to be achieved while using realistic models with accessible computer resources.

  18. Noise slows the rate of Michaelis-Menten reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyken, J David

    2017-10-07

    Microscopic randomness and the small volumes of living cells combine to generate random fluctuations in molecule concentrations called "noise". Here I investigate the effect of noise on biochemical reactions obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics, concluding that substrate noise causes these reactions to slow. I derive a general expression for the time evolution of the joint probability density of chemical species in arbitrarily connected networks of non-linear chemical reactions in small volumes. This equation is a generalization of the chemical master equation (CME), a common tool for investigating stochastic chemical kinetics, extended to reaction networks occurring in small volumes, such as living cells. I apply this equation to a generalized Michaelis-Menten reaction in an open system, deriving the following general result: 〈p〉≤p¯ and 〈s〉≥s¯, where s¯ and p¯ denote the deterministic steady-state concentration of reactant and product species, respectively, and 〈s〉 and 〈p〉 denote the steady-state ensemble average over independent realizations of a stochastic reaction. Under biologically realistic conditions, namely when substrate is degraded or diluted by cell division, 〈p〉≤p¯. Consequently, noise slows the rate of in vivo Michaelis-Menten reactions. These predictions are validated by extensive stochastic simulations using Gillespie's exact stochastic simulation algorithm. I specify the conditions under which these effects occur and when they vanish, therefore reconciling discrepancies among previous theoretical investigations of stochastic biochemical reactions. Stochastic slowdown of reaction flux caused by molecular noise in living cells may have functional consequences, which the present theory may be used to quantify. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Control of serpentinisation rate by reaction-induced cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Brantut, Nicolas; Kaczmarek, Mary-Alix

    2017-10-01

    Serpentinisation of mantle rocks requires the generation and maintenance of transport pathways for water. The solid volume increase during serpentinisation can lead to stress build-up and trigger cracking, which ease fluid penetration into the rock. The quantitative effect of this reaction-induced cracking mechanism on reactive surface generation is poorly constrained, thus hampering our ability to predict serpentinisation rate in geological environments. Here we use a combined approach with numerical modelling and observations in natural samples to provide estimates of serpentinisation rate at mid-ocean ridges. We develop a micromechanical model to quantify the propagation of serpentinisation-induced cracks in olivine. The maximum crystallisation pressure deduced from thermodynamic calculations reaches several hundreds of megapascals but does not necessary lead to crack propagation if the olivine grain is subjected to high compressive stresses. The micromechanical model is then coupled to a simple geometrical model to predict reactive surface area formation during grain splitting, and thus bulk reaction rate. Our model reproduces quantitatively experimental kinetic data and the typical mesh texture formed during serpentinisation. We also compare the model results with olivine grain size distribution data obtained on natural serpentinised peridotites from the Marum ophiolite and the Papuan ultramafic belt (Papua New Guinea). The natural serpentinised peridotites show an increase of the number of olivine grains for a decrease of the mean grain size by one order of magnitude as reaction progresses from 5 to 40%. These results are in agreement with our model predictions, suggesting that reaction-induced cracking controls the serpentinisation rate. We use our model to estimate that, at mid-ocean ridges, serpentinisation occurs up to 12 km depth and reaction-induced cracking reduces the characteristic time of serpentinisation by one order of magnitude, down to values

  20. Abundances in Astrophysical Environments: Reaction Network Simulations with Reaction Rates from Many-nucleon Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amason, Charlee; Dreyfuss, Alison; Launey, Kristina; Draayer, Jerry

    2017-01-01

    We use the ab initio (first-principle) symmetry-adapted no-core shell model (SA-NCSM) to calculate reaction rates of significance to type I X-ray burst nucleosynthesis. We consider the 18O(p,γ)19F reaction, which may influence the production of fluorine, as well as the 16O(α,γ)20Ne reaction, which is key to understanding the production of heavier elements in the universe. Results are compared to those obtained in the no-core sympletic shell model (NCSpM) with a schematic interaction. We discuss how these reaction rates affect the relevant elemental abundances. We thank the NSF for supporting this work through the REU Site in Physics & Astronomy (NSF grant #1560212) at Louisiana State University. This work was also supported by the U.S. NSF (OCI-0904874, ACI -1516338) and the U.S. DOE (DE-SC0005248).

  1. Astrophysical reaction rate for $\\alpha(\\alpha n,\\gamma)$

    CERN Document Server

    Sumiyoshi, K; Goko, S; Kajino, T

    2002-01-01

    We study the astrophysical reaction rate for the formation of $^{9}$Be through the three body reaction $\\alpha(\\alpha n,\\gamma)$. This reaction is one of the key reactions which could bridge the mass gap at A = 8 nuclear systems to produce intermediate-to-heavy mass elements in alpha- and neutron-rich environments such as r-process nucleosynthesis in supernova explosions, s-process nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, and primordial nucleosynthesis in baryon inhomogeneous cosmological models. To calculate the thermonuclear reaction rate in a wide range of temperatures, we numerically integrate the thermal average of cross sections assuming a two-steps formation through a metastable $^{8}$Be. Off-resonant and on-resonant contributions from the ground state in $^{8}$Be are taken into account. As input cross section, we adopt the latest experimental data by photodisintegration of $^{9}$Be with laser-electron photon beams, which covers all relevant resonances in $^{9}$Be. We provide the reactio...

  2. Quick and Easy Rate Equations for Multistep Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Phillip E.

    2008-01-01

    Students rarely see closed-form analytical rate equations derived from underlying chemical mechanisms that contain more than a few steps unless restrictive simplifying assumptions (e.g., existence of a rate-determining step) are made. Yet, work published decades ago allows closed-form analytical rate equations to be written quickly and easily for…

  3. The temperature-dependence of elementary reaction rates: beyond Arrhenius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ian W M

    2008-04-01

    The rates of chemical reactions and the dependence of their rate constants on temperature are of central importance in chemistry. Advances in the temperature-range and accuracy of kinetic measurements, principally inspired by the need to provide data for models of combustion, atmospheric, and astrophysical chemistry, show up the inadequacy of the venerable Arrhenius equation--at least, over wide ranges of temperature. This critical review will address the question of how to reach an understanding of the factors that control the rates of 'non-Arrhenius' reactions. It makes use of a number of recent kinetic measurements and shows how developments in advanced forms of transition state theory provide satisfactory explanations of complex kinetic behaviour (72 references).

  4. Sodium Enrichment in Yellow Supergiants: a Perspective from the Uncertainties of Reaction Rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Sodium overabundance in yellow supergiants has stumped people for more than 20 years. The purpose of this paper is to explore this problem from the perspective of nuclear physics. We investigate carefully the CNO and NeNa cycles that are responsible for sodium production. We investigate some key reactions in the appropriate network. We show whether and how the sodium output can be affected by the rate uncertainties in these reactions. In this way, we evaluate if a reaction is important enough to deserve a better determination of its rate in terrestrial laboratories.

  5. Rate Constant Calculation for Thermal Reactions Methods and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    DaCosta, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    Providing an overview of the latest computational approaches to estimate rate constants for thermal reactions, this book addresses the theories behind various first-principle and approximation methods that have emerged in the last twenty years with validation examples. It presents in-depth applications of those theories to a wide range of basic and applied research areas. When doing modeling and simulation of chemical reactions (as in many other cases), one often has to compromise between higher-accuracy/higher-precision approaches (which are usually time-consuming) and approximate/lower-preci

  6. Ion-neutral gas reactions in a collision/reaction cell in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Correlation of ion signal decrease to kinetic rate constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Patrick J. [Trace Element Research Laboratory, School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, 125 S. Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State University, 120 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Olesik, John W., E-mail: olesik.2@osu.edu [Trace Element Research Laboratory, School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, 125 S. Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Reaction gas flow rate dependent Ar{sub 2}{sup +} and Ar{sup +} signals are correlated to fundamental kinetic rate coefficients. A simple calculation, assuming that gas exits the reaction cell due only to effusion, is described to estimate the gas pressure in the reaction cell. The value of the product of the kinetic rate constant and the ion residence time in the reaction cell can be determined from experimental measurement of the decrease in an ion signal as a function of reaction gas flow rate. New kinetic rate constants are determined for the reaction of CH{sub 3}F with Ar{sup +} and Ar{sub 2}{sup +}. - Highlights: • How to determine pressure and the product of the kinetic rate constant times the ion residence time in reaction cell • Relate measured ICP-DRC-MS signals versus gas flow rate to kinetic rate constants measured previously using SIFT-MS • Describe how to determine previously unmeasured kinetic rate constants using ICP-DRC-MS.

  7. Enzyme-catalyzed and binding reaction kinetics determined by titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lee D; Transtrum, Mark K; Quinn, Colette; Demarse, Neil

    2016-05-01

    Isothermal calorimetry allows monitoring of reaction rates via direct measurement of the rate of heat produced by the reaction. Calorimetry is one of very few techniques that can be used to measure rates without taking a derivative of the primary data. Because heat is a universal indicator of chemical reactions, calorimetry can be used to measure kinetics in opaque solutions, suspensions, and multiple phase systems and does not require chemical labeling. The only significant limitation of calorimetry for kinetic measurements is that the time constant of the reaction must be greater than the time constant of the calorimeter which can range from a few seconds to a few minutes. Calorimetry has the unique ability to provide both kinetic and thermodynamic data. This article describes the calorimetric methodology for determining reaction kinetics and reviews examples from recent literature that demonstrate applications of titration calorimetry to determine kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed and ligand binding reactions. A complete model for the temperature dependence of enzyme activity is presented. A previous method commonly used for blank corrections in determinations of equilibrium constants and enthalpy changes for binding reactions is shown to be subject to significant systematic error. Methods for determination of the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions and for simultaneous determination of thermodynamics and kinetics of ligand binding reactions are reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Application of semiclassical methods to reaction rate theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, R.

    1993-11-01

    This work is concerned with the development of approximate methods to describe relatively large chemical systems. This effort has been divided into two primary directions: First, we have extended and applied a semiclassical transition state theory (SCTST) originally proposed by Miller to obtain microcanonical and canonical (thermal) rates for chemical reactions described by a nonseparable Hamiltonian, i.e. most reactions. Second, we have developed a method to describe the fluctuations of decay rates of individual energy states from the average RRKM rate in systems where the direct calculation of individual rates would be impossible. Combined with the semiclassical theory this latter effort has provided a direct comparison to the experimental results of Moore and coworkers. In SCTST, the Hamiltonian is expanded about the barrier and the ``good`` action-angle variables are obtained perturbatively; a WKB analysis of the effectively one-dimensional reactive direction then provides the transmission probabilities. The advantages of this local approximate treatment are that it includes tunneling effects and anharmonicity, and it systematically provides a multi-dimensional dividing surface in phase space. The SCTST thermal rate expression has been reformulated providing increased numerical efficiency (as compared to a naive Boltzmann average), an appealing link to conventional transition state theory (involving a ``prereactive`` partition function depending on the action of the reactive mode), and the ability to go beyond the perturbative approximation.

  9. Estimation of the Polymerization Rate of Liquid Propylene Using Adiabatic Reaction Calorimetry and Reaction Dilatometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-haj Ali, Mohammad; Betlem, Ben; Roffel, Brian; Weickert, Günter

    2007-01-01

    The use of pressure-drop and constant-pressure dilatometry for obtaining rate data for liquid propylene polymerization in filled batch reactors was examined. The first method uses reaction temperature and pressure as well as the compressibility of the reactor contents to calculate the polymerization

  10. Measurement of reaction rates of interest in stellar structure and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrasi, F.; D`Onofrio, A. [Dipt. di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Univ. di Napoli, Caserta (Italy)]|[INFN, Napoli (Italy); Campajola, L.; Imbriani, G. [INFN, Napoli (Italy)]|[Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Gialanella, L. [INFN, Napoli (Italy)]|[Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy)]|[Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Greife, U.; Rolfs, C.; Strieder, F.; Trautvetter, H.P. [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Roca, V.; Romano, M. [INFN, Napoli (Italy)]|[Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Straniero, O. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, Teramo (Italy)

    1998-06-01

    Accurate determinations of reaction rates at astrophysical energies are very important in stellar structure and evolution studies. The cases of two key reactions, namely {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B and {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O are discussed, both from the point of view of their astrophysical interest and of the experimental difficulties in the measurement of their cross section. (orig.)

  11. Comparison of techniques for the determination of conversion during suspension polymerization reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Santos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The determination of conversion during suspension polymerization reactions is not an easy task due to the heterogeneity of the reaction medium and the tendency of particles to agglomerate rapidly when stirring is stopped. Usually, bulk polymerization in ampoules is employed to study the kinetics of suspension polymerization reactions. In this work, a comparison of different techniques for the determination of conversion during suspension polymerization reactions is presented. Results showed a good agreement between the conversion obtained by gravimetry during styrene suspension polymerization and on-line conversion monitoring data using fiber-optic based Raman Spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the polymerization rate of styrene bulk polymerization carried out in ampoules was higher than the real reaction rate of styrene suspension polymerization due to slightly higher reaction temperatures. Simulation results using the experimental temperature data in a mathematical model confirmed these results.

  12. Development of a chemical kinetic measurement apparatus and the determination of the reaction rate constants for lithium-lead/water interaction. Technical status progress report, October 1, 1991--March 15, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biney, P.O.

    1993-04-01

    An experimental set-up for accurate measurement of hydrogen generation rate in Lithium-Lead (Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83}) Steam or water interactions has been designed. The most important features of the design include a pneumatic actuated quick opening and closing high temperature all stainless steel valve used to control the reaction time and the placement of most measuring devices below a water line to minimize leakage of the hydrogen collected. A PC based data acquisition and control system provides remote process sequencing, acquisition and control of all major components of the set-up. Initial tests indicate that the first design objective of maintaining leakproof gas collection chamber has been achieved. Initial pressure tests indicated that the pressure drop over a time span of 30 minutes was within the tolerance of the pressure transducer used to measure the pressure (within 0.690 kPa) at a nominal system pressure of 685 kPa. The experimental system hardware, data acquisition and control programs and data analysis program have been completed, tested and are currently functional.

  13. Determination of Catalytic Coefficient for a First-Order Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, E. R.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate physical chemistry experiment in which the acid catalyzed hydrolysis of sucrose is used to determine the catalytic coefficient of the hydronium ion, the catalyst in this reaction. (MLH)

  14. Optimized reaction mechanism rate rules for ignition of normal alkanes

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Liming

    2016-08-11

    The increasing demand for cleaner combustion and reduced greenhouse gas emissions motivates research on the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels and their surrogates. Accurate detailed chemical kinetic models are an important prerequisite for high fidelity reacting flow simulations capable of improving combustor design and operation. The development of such models for many new fuel components and/or surrogate molecules is greatly facilitated by the application of reaction classes and rate rules. Accurate and versatile rate rules are desirable to improve the predictive accuracy of kinetic models. A major contribution in the literature is the recent work by Bugler et al. (2015), which has significantly improved rate rules and thermochemical parameters used in kinetic modeling of alkanes. In the present study, it is demonstrated that rate rules can be used and consistently optimized for a set of normal alkanes including n-heptane, n-octane, n-nonane, n-decane, and n-undecane, thereby improving the predictive accuracy for all the considered fuels. A Bayesian framework is applied in the calibration of the rate rules. The optimized rate rules are subsequently applied to generate a mechanism for n-dodecane, which was not part of the training set for the optimized rate rules. The developed mechanism shows accurate predictions compared with published well-validated mechanisms for a wide range of conditions.

  15. Toward understanding the rates of reactions at mineral surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, W.H. [Univ. of California Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Land, Air and Water Resources and Dept. of Geology; Ludwig, C. [EAWAG, Swiss Federal Institute for Environmental Science and Technolgy, Dubendorf (Switzerland). Dept. of Resources and Waste management; Holmen, B. [Univ. of California Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Land, Air and Water Resources

    1998-12-31

    Environmental geo chemists are commonly called upon to make predictions over long scales of time and distance. In many cases, these predictions involve disequilibrium reactions, such as the decomposition of ozone-depleting gases or the migration rates of groundwater contaminants. These groundwater contaminants interact with mineral surfaces in a complicated fashion that is not understood quantitatively. However, in a real sense, mineral dissolution studies are to the aqueous geo chemists what Escherichia coli are to microbiologists: an inexpensive model system to map out important kinetic relations that can then be extended qualitatively to other settings. This chapter explains that is enormously useful to draw analogies between reactions at mineral surfaces and at dissolved metal-ligand complexes. In this approach, the reactivities of bond between a metal and a water molecule or ligand in the inner-coordination-sphere of the dissolved complex are proxies for bonds between a metal and oxygen at the mineral surface, which cannot be studied directly.

  16. Comparison of mass loss rate in reaction of silica with carbon from different investigation results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Węgrzyn

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the process of carbothermic reaction of SiO2 + mC, key reactions appear on the surfaces of both SiO2 and C grains. However, the values of these surfaces are not known. Assuming the simplest case, quartzite and carbon grains are spheres, total surfaces of reaction were calculated for grains of carbon and quartzite respectively. This enabled to determine the rate of weight loss referred to the unit area of C and SiO2.

  17. Reaction rate constant for radiative association of CF{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öström, Jonatan, E-mail: jonatan.ostrom@gmail.com; Gustafsson, Magnus, E-mail: magnus.gustafsson@ltu.se [Applied Physics, Division of Materials Science, Department of Engineering Science and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, 97187 Luleå (Sweden); Bezrukov, Dmitry S. [Department of Chemistry, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Nyman, Gunnar [Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-01-28

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations (C{sup +}) and fluorine atoms (F) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition 1{sup 1}Π → X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and rovibrational transitions on the X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and a{sup 3}Π potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit–Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius–Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of <3%. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of 10–250 K, the rate constant is about 10{sup −21} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1}, rising toward 10{sup −16} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1} for a temperature of 30 000 K.

  18. Reaction Rate Constant for Radiative Association of CF$^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Öström, Jonatan; Nyman, Gunnar; Gustafsson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations ($\\text{C}^+$) and fluorine atoms ($\\text{F}$) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition $1^1\\Pi \\rightarrow X^1\\Sigma^+$ and rovibrational transitions on the $X^1\\Sigma^+$ and $a^3\\Pi$ potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit--Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius--Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of $<3\\:\\%$. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of $10$ to $250\\:\\text{K}$, the rate constant is about $10^{-21}\\:\\text{cm}^3\\text{s}^{-1}$, rising toward $10^{-16}\\:\\text{cm}^3\\text{s}^{-1}$ fo...

  19. Computational Medical Apportionment Determination for Impairment Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artz, Jerry; Thompson, Marten; Alchemy, Md, John; Penn, Md, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Unique computational techniques are used to calculate apportionment percentages for Whole Person Impairment (WPI) Ratings for workers with job-related injuries/illnesses. This interdisciplinary project includes collaboration among physicists, engineers, and concerned medical professionals. Medical providers are often asked to medically determine multiple contributing factors to disease states (e.g. diabetes, obesity, arthritis, and prior injury) in the context of personal injury as it pertains to permanent impairment. The process of making this determination is referred to as ``apportionment''. The economic value of apportionment is far reaching and represents a significant impact to all stakeholders in the injury resolution and settlement arena. The process of apportionment is necessary to assign monetary value for the stakeholders when an injury occurs. The ultimate trier-of-fact is the judicial system. The medical provider's role in this capacity is to apply known medical scientific knowledge and present it in a format that is objective and reproducible for the stakeholders. In this presentation the traditional challenges of apportionment will be outlined, and a novel approach creating mathematical bounding and modeling of pathology-weighted data sets will be presented.

  20. Reaction rate theory of radiation exposure: Effects of the dose rate on mutation frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Manabe, Yuichiro; Nakamura, Issei

    2014-01-01

    We develop a kinetic reaction model for the cells having the irradiated DNA molecules due to the ionizing radiation exposure. Our theory simultaneously accounts for the time-dependent reactions of the DNA damage, the DNA mutation, the DNA repair, and the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in a tissue with a minimal set of model parameters. In contrast to the existing theories for the radiation exposition, we do not assume the relationships between the total dose and the induced mutation frequency. We show good agreement between theory and experiment. Importantly, our result shows a new perspective that the key ingredient in the study of the irradiated cells is the rate constants depending on the dose rate. Moreover, we discuss the universal scaling function for mutation frequencies due to the irradiation at low dose rates.

  1. Reaction rate of H atoms with N2O in hot water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Leanne; Sterniczuk, Marcin; Bartels, David M.

    2017-06-01

    The rate constant of H• atoms with N2O in water has been measured by a competition method up to 300 °C. Radiolysis with 2.5 MeV electrons generated H• atoms, and the HD product from their reaction with deuterated tetrahydrofuran (THF-d8) was measured with mass spectroscopy. The concentration of THF-d8 was changed by an order of magnitude in the presence of 25 mM N2O to obtain the ratio of rate constants. To determine the rate constant of H• with THF-d8, a similar competition vs. 0.2 mM OH- ion was also measured. The reaction rate of H• with OH- has been accurately determined vs. temperature in previous work, allowing the two unknown rate constants to be deduced. Rate constant of H• with THF-d8 follows the Arrhenius law ln(k/M-1s-1)=27.33 - (32.30 kJ/mol)/RT. Rate constant of H• with N2O follows the Arrhenius law ln(k/M-1s-1)=24.50 - (30.42 kJ/mol)/RT. In all likelihood, the N2O reaction proceeds via cis-HNNO• radical intermediate as in the gas phase, but with participation of a bridging water molecule in the 1,3 hydrogen shift to form N2 and •OH products.

  2. Investigation of determinism in heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, M. E. D.; Souza, A. V. P.; Guimarães, H. N.; Aguirre, L. A.

    2000-06-01

    The article searches for the possible presence of determinism in heart rate variability (HRV) signals by using a new approach based on NARMA (nonlinear autoregressive moving average) modeling and free-run prediction. Thirty-three 256-point HRV time series obtained from Wistar rats submitted to different autonomic blockade protocols are considered, and a collection of surrogate data sets are generated from each one of them. These surrogate sequences are assumed to be nondeterministic and therefore they may not be predictable. The original HRV time series and related surrogates are submitted to NARMA modeling and prediction. Special attention has been paid to the problem of stationarity. The results consistently show that the surrogate data sets cannot be predicted better than the trivial predictor—the mean—while most of the HRV control sequences are predictable to a certain degree. This suggests that the normal HRV signals have a deterministic signature. The HRV time series derived from the autonomic blockade segments of the experimental protocols do not show the same predictability performance, albeit the physiological interpretation is not obvious. These results have important implications to the methodology of HRV analysis, indicating that techniques from nonlinear dynamics and deterministic chaos may be applied to elicit more information about the autonomic modulation of the cardiovascular activity.

  3. Improved resonance reaction rate calculation for lattice physics subsystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, D.R.

    1974-02-08

    The resonance capture calculations of the HAMMER System and HAMBUR System are derived from a consistent statement of the integral slowing down equation and definitions of the resonance integral. The assumptions made in these treatments are explicitly stated, and and an attempt is made to estimate the possible error in the resonance integral arising from these assumptions. This analysis is made to pin-point those parts of the calculation that can be improved and updated. Based on the analysis of existing calculations a method of calculation is derived which avoids most of the problems encountered in HAMMER and HAMBUR. The chief improvements that result are as follows: Careful attention is paid to calculation of the resonance flux as most errors in existing calculations result from consistently overpredicting fluxes in all regions of a lattice cell. The calculation can be modified to produce as crude or detailed a resonance calculation, at the expense of computer time, as required by the user. Resonances that overlap group boundaries contribute the correct contribution to each group's reaction rates. Overlap between resonances of different isotopes is correctly accounted for. Up-to-date resonance formalisms are used including the Adler-Adler multi-level formulations. Provision is made to easily add new formalisms when required. Streaming effects from neutron leaking into a cell may optionally be included in the calculation of resonance reaction rates. A complete description of the physics contained in this new computational module is provided along with additional information on the numerical techniques employed in the module.

  4. Method and device for determining the knock rating of motor fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjuregyan, S.K.; Kazarian, S.A.; Dovlatov, I.A.

    1996-03-14

    The invention relates to the oil refining and petrochemical industry and concerns in particular techniques for determining the knock rating of motor fuels. The proposed method of determining the knock rating of motor fuels involves the thermostatic control of a reaction vessel of constant volume, feeding the fuel-air mixture into the vessel, atomization of the mixture under excess pressure, and ignition of the mixture. The knock rating is indicated by the intensity of the knocking which in turn is determined from the magnitude of the signal from a knocking sensor in the reaction vessel. The proposed device for determining the knock rating of motor fuels comprises a reaction vessel whith inlet and outlet valves and provided with means of thermostatic control. A spark plug is provided in the reaction vessel and a knock sensor is arranged opposite the spark plug. (author)

  5. Mineral/solution reaction rates in a mixed flow reactor: Wollastonite hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimstidt, J. Donald; Dove, Patricia M.

    1986-11-01

    A newly developed mixed flow reactor was used to measure the rate of hydrolysis of wollastonite over the pH range of 3 to 8. This design avoids abrasion of the solid sample by confining it within a nylon mesh while the reacting solution is circulated over it by a stirrer. The rate of reaction was determined from the difference of the compositions of the input and output solutions following the methods used by chemical engineers for the analysis of mixed flow reactors, also called continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR). This apparatus, constructed from easily obtainable parts, avoids many of the problems inherent in studying mineral/solution reaction kinetics in batch reactors. The hydrolysis of wollastonite CaSiO3 + 2 H+ + H2O = Ca2+ + H4SiO4 can be fit to a rate law of the form: dnH+/ dt = kadKH+mH+/(1.0 + KH+mH+) where kad = 9.80 × 10 -8molm-2sec-1 and KH+ = 2.08 × 10 5. Over the pH range of 4 to 7, the data also may fit a simple linear form: dnH+/ dt = - Ak+( aH+) 0.40 where k+ = 3.80 × 10 -6 sec -1 at 25°C. The presence of calcium ion in the solution at concentrations up to 1.0 mol kg -1 produces only a minor reduction of the reaction rate. The activation energy for this reaction is 79.2 kJ mol -1. Examination of the surfaces of the reacted grains showed no evidence of incongruent reaction leading to a product layer but did show the extensive development of etch pits leading to a rapid increase in the specific surface area. At large extents of reaction at low pH, diffusion of ions into or from these deep etch pits may limit the reaction rate.

  6. The Reaction of Crotonic Anhydride with Scots and Corsican Pine: Investigation of Kinetic Profiles and Determination of Activation Energies

    OpenAIRE

    Özmen, Nilgül; ÇETİN, Nihat Sami

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics of the reaction of crotonic anhydride with Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Corsican pine (Pinus nigra) using pyridine as catalyst/solvent was investigated and activation energies for the initial reaction determined. Activation energies were calculated from the Arrhenius equation using rate data obtained from time-course experiments repeated at several temperatures. In one method, reaction constants (k) were determined experimentally, while in the other method initial rates were...

  7. Development of a group contribution method to predict aqueous phase hydroxyl radical (HO*) reaction rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakata, Daisuke; Li, Ke; Westerhoff, Paul; Crittenden, John

    2009-08-15

    The hydroxyl radical (HO*) is a strong oxidant that reacts with electron-rich sites of organic compounds and initiates complex chain mechanisms. In order to help understand the reaction mechanisms, a rule-based model was previously developed to predict the reaction pathways. For a kinetic model, there is a need to develop a rate constant estimator that predicts the rate constants for a variety of organic compounds. In this study, a group contribution method (GCM) is developed to predict the aqueous phase HO* rate constants for the following reaction mechanisms: (1) H-atom abstraction, (2) HO* addition to alkenes, (3) HO* addition to aromatic compounds, and (4) HO* interaction with sulfur (S)-, nitrogen (N)-, or phosphorus (P)-atom-containing compounds. The GCM hypothesizes that an observed experimental rate constant for a given organic compound is the combined rate of all elementary reactions involving HO*, which can be estimated using the Arrhenius activation energy, E(a), and temperature. Each E(a) for those elementary reactions can be comprised of two parts: (1) a base part that includes a reactive bond in each reaction mechanism and (2) contributions from its neighboring functional groups. The GCM includes 66 group rate constants and 80 group contribution factors, which characterize each HO* reaction mechanism with steric effects of the chemical structure groups and impacts of the neighboring functional groups, respectively. Literature-reported experimental HO* rate constants for 310 and 124 compounds were used for calibration and prediction, respectively. The genetic algorithms were used to determine the group rate constants and group contribution factors. The group contribution factors for H-atom abstraction and HO* addition to the aromatic compounds were found to linearly correlate with the Taft constants, sigma*, and electrophilic substituent parameters, sigma+, respectively. The best calibrations for 83% (257 rate constants) and predictions for 62% (77

  8. Determination of Sialic Acids by Acidic Ninhydrin Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao,Kenzabroh

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available A new acidic ninhydrin method for determining free sialic acids is described. The method is based on the reaction of sialic acids with Gaitonde's acid ninhydrin reagent 2 which yields a stable color with an absorption maximum at 470 nm. The standard curve is linear in the range of 5 to 500 nmol of N-acetylneuraminic acid per 0.9 ml of reaction mixture. The reaction was specific only for sialic acids among the various sugars and sugar derivatives examined. Some interference of this method by cysteine, cystine and tryptophan was noted, although their absorption maxima differed from that of sialic acids. The interference by these amino acids was eliminated with the use of a small column of cation-exchange resin. The acidic ninhydrin method provides a simple and rapid method for the determination of free sialic acids in biological materials.

  9. Manual Choice Reaction Times in the Rate-Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris eHarris

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 150 years, human manual reaction times (RTs have been recorded countless times. Yet, our understanding of them remains remarkably poor. RTs are highly variable with positively skewed frequency distributions, often modelled as an inverse Gaussian distribution reflecting a stochastic rise to threshold (diffusion process. However, latency distribution of saccades are very close to the reciprocal Normal, suggesting that ‘rate’ (reciprocal RT may be the more fundamental variable. We explored whether this phenomenon extends to choice manual RTs. We recorded two-alternative choice RTs from 24 subjects, each with 4 blocks of 200 trials with two task difficulties (easy vs. difficult discrimination and two instruction sets (urgent vs. accurate. We found that rate distributions were, indeed, very close to Normal, shifting to lower rates with increasing difficulty and accuracy, and for some blocks subjects they appeared to become left-truncated, but still close to Normal. Using autoregressive techniques, we found temporal sequential dependencies for lags of at least 3. We identified a transient and steady-state component in each block. Because rates were Normal, we were able to estimate autoregressive weights using the Box-Jenkins technique, and convert to a moving average model using z-transforms to show explicit dependence on stimulus input. We also found a spatial sequential dependence for the previous 3 lags depending on whether the laterality of previous trials was repeated or alternated. This was partially dissociated from temporal dependency as it only occurred in the easy tasks. We conclude that 2-alternative choice manual RT distributions are close to reciprocal Normal and not the inverse Gaussian. This is not consistent with stochastic rise to threshold models, and we propose a simple optimality model in which reward is maximized to yield to an optimal rate, and hence an optimal time to respond. We discuss how it might be

  10. Determination of gender in cetaceans by the polymerase chain reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palsboll, PJ; Vader, A; Bakke, P; El-Gewely, MR

    1992-01-01

    We determined the gender of a variety of cet can species, including both ondotocetes and mysticetes, using the polymerase chain reaction for amplification of the sex chromosome specific regions ZFY/ZFX and SRY. This quick and simple method requires extremely small amounts of tissue, and therefore al

  11. Spectrophotometric method for determination and kinetics of amino acids through their reaction with syringaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medien, H. A. A.

    1998-02-01

    A spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of amino acids. The method is based on the reaction between amino acids and syringaldehyde at pH 9.0, by which a color is developed with maximum absorption at 420 nm in aqueous methyl alcohol. The absorption of the product obeys Beer's law within the concentration range of 0.025-0.5 mM of original amino acid. The kinetics of the reaction follows overall second order kinetics, first order in each of the reactants. The rates of the reaction were investigated as a function of pH of the reaction medium and structure of the amino compounds. Logarithms of the second-order rate constants increased with amino acid anion concentration as the pH was increased. The mechanisms of the reaction have been discussed.

  12. The rate constant for the CO + H2O2 reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Marshall, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction CO + H2O2 -> HOCO + OH (R1) at 713 K is determined based on the batch reactor experiments of Baldwin et al. [ R. R. Baldwin, R. W. Walker, S. J. Webster, Combust. Flame 15 (1970) 167] on decomposition of H2O2 sensitized by CO. The value, k(1) (713 K) = 8.1 x 10...... in combustion. The present analysis reconciles the batch reactor data of Baldwin et al. with recent high-level theoretical work on the CO + HO2 reaction.......(2) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), is consistent with spin-unrestricted density functional theory. Extrapolation to a wider temperature range through ab initio calculations yields the rate constant k(1) = 3.6 x 10(4)T(2.5) exp(-14425[K]/T) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1). The reaction is probably of minor importance...

  13. 31 CFR 359.14 - How are composite rates determined?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... composite interest rates.): Composite rate = {(Fixed rate ÷ 2) + Semiannual inflation rate + } × 2. 2 2 Example for I bonds issued May 2002-October 2002: Fixed rate = 2.00% Inflation rate = 0.28% Composite rate... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are composite rates determined...

  14. System and method for determining an ammonia generation rate in a three-way catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min; Perry, Kevin L; Kim, Chang H

    2014-12-30

    A system according to the principles of the present disclosure includes a rate determination module, a storage level determination module, and an air/fuel ratio control module. The rate determination module determines an ammonia generation rate in a three-way catalyst based on a reaction efficiency and a reactant level. The storage level determination module determines an ammonia storage level in a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst positioned downstream from the three-way catalyst based on the ammonia generation rate. The air/fuel ratio control module controls an air/fuel ratio of an engine based on the ammonia storage level.

  15. Light elements burning reaction rates at stellar temperatures as deduced by the Trojan Horse measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); La Cognata, M.; Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Puglia, S. M. R. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, Italy and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2015-02-24

    Experimental nuclear astrophysics aims at determining the reaction rates for astrophysically relevant reactions at their Gamow energies. For charged-particle induced reactions, the access to these energies is usually hindered, in direct measurements, by the presence of the Coulomb barrier between the interacting particles or by electron screening effects, which make hard the determination of the bare-nucleus S(E)-factor of interest for astrophysical codes. The use of the Trojan Horse Method (THM) appears as one of the most suitable tools for investigating nuclear processes of interest for astrophysics. Here, in view of the recent TH measurements, the main destruction channels for deuterium ({sup 2}H), for the two lithium {sup 6,7}Li isotopes, for the {sup 9}Be and the one for the two boron {sup 10,11}B isotopes will be discussed.

  16. Determination of rate distributions from kinetic experiments.

    OpenAIRE

    Steinbach, P J; Chu, K.; Frauenfelder, H; Johnson, J B; Lamb, D C; Nienhaus, G. U.; Sauke, T B; Young, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    Rate processes in proteins are often not adequately described by simple exponential kinetics. Instead of modeling the kinetics in the time domain, it can be advantageous to perform a numerical inversion leading to a rate distribution function f(lambda). The features observed in f(lambda) (number, positions, and shapes of peaks) can then be interpreted. We discuss different numerical techniques for obtaining rate distribution functions, with special emphasis on the maximum entropy method. Exam...

  17. Rate constant for the reaction SO + BrO yields SO2 + Br

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunning, J.; Stief, L.

    1986-01-01

    The rate of the radical-radical reaction SO + BrO yields SO2 + Br has been determined at 298 K in a discharge flow system near 1 torr pressure with detection of SO and BrO via collision-free sampling mass spectrometry. The rate constant was determined using two different methods: measuring the decay of SO radicals in the presence of an excess of BrO and measuring the decay of BrO radicals in excess SO. The results from the two methods are in reasonable agreement and the simple mean of the two values gives the recommended rate constant at 298 K, k = (5.7 + or - 2.0) x 10 to the -11th cu cm/s. This represents the first determination of this rate constant and it is consistent with a previously derived lower limit based on SO2 formation. Comparison is made with other radical-radical reactions involving SO or BrO. The reaction SO + BrO yields SO2 + Br is of interest for models of the upper atmosphere of the earth and provides a potential coupling between atmospheric sulfur and bromine chemistry.

  18. Automated Prediction of Catalytic Mechanism and Rate Law Using Graph-Based Reaction Path Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habershon, Scott

    2016-04-12

    In a recent article [ J. Chem. Phys. 2015 , 143 , 094106 ], we introduced a novel graph-based sampling scheme which can be used to generate chemical reaction paths in many-atom systems in an efficient and highly automated manner. The main goal of this work is to demonstrate how this approach, when combined with direct kinetic modeling, can be used to determine the mechanism and phenomenological rate law of a complex catalytic cycle, namely cobalt-catalyzed hydroformylation of ethene. Our graph-based sampling scheme generates 31 unique chemical products and 32 unique chemical reaction pathways; these sampled structures and reaction paths enable automated construction of a kinetic network model of the catalytic system when combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations of free energies and resultant transition-state theory rate constants. Direct simulations of this kinetic network across a range of initial reactant concentrations enables determination of both the reaction mechanism and the associated rate law in an automated fashion, without the need for either presupposing a mechanism or making steady-state approximations in kinetic analysis. Most importantly, we find that the reaction mechanism which emerges from these simulations is exactly that originally proposed by Heck and Breslow; furthermore, the simulated rate law is also consistent with previous experimental and computational studies, exhibiting a complex dependence on carbon monoxide pressure. While the inherent errors of using DFT simulations to model chemical reactivity limit the quantitative accuracy of our calculated rates, this work confirms that our automated simulation strategy enables direct analysis of catalytic mechanisms from first principles.

  19. HLA-B27 Determination by Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Kilpatrick

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for determining the presence or absence of HLA-827 by selective amplification of a region in the third exon of the HLA-B27 gene common to B*270 I to B*2705 inclusive, was evaluated. This polymerase chain reaction/sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP method gave perfect correlation with serological typing on 40 individuals of previously determined HLA type and on 50 further clinical samples elaluated blind. It was concluded that HLA-B27 determination by PCR-SSP is simple, reliable. cost-effectile and convient for laboratory staff.

  20. HLA-B27 Determination by Polymerase Chain Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Kilpatrick, D C

    1996-01-01

    A method for determining the presence or absence of HLA-827 by selective amplification of a region in the third exon of the HLA-B27 gene common to B*270 I to B*2705 inclusive, was evaluated. This polymerase chain reaction/sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP) method gave perfect correlation with serological typing on 40 individuals of previously determined HLA type and on 50 further clinical samples elaluated blind. It was concluded that HLA-B27 determination by PCR-SSP is simple, reliable. cost...

  1. Determination of rate distributions from kinetic experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, P J; Chu, K; Frauenfelder, H; Johnson, J B; Lamb, D C; Nienhaus, G U; Sauke, T B; Young, R D

    1992-01-01

    Rate processes in proteins are often not adequately described by simple exponential kinetics. Instead of modeling the kinetics in the time domain, it can be advantageous to perform a numerical inversion leading to a rate distribution function f(lambda). The features observed in f(lambda) (number, positions, and shapes of peaks) can then be interpreted. We discuss different numerical techniques for obtaining rate distribution functions, with special emphasis on the maximum entropy method. Examples are given for the application of these techniques to flash photolysis data of heme proteins.

  2. The influence of SPS heating rates on the synthesis reaction of tantalum diboride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Laszkiewicz-Łukasik

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available TaB2 is a material from the Ultra High Temperature Ceramics group and is rather unexplored because it is difficult to procure the raw materials and to densify TaB2. Using SPS technique to realize reactive sintering processes of powders mixture according to the reaction Ta + 2B → TaB2 makes it possible to achieve TaB2 in one technological step. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of heating rates on the synthesis reaction and on the multistage densification mechanisms during SPS processes. The mixture was sintered at constant parameters of 2200 °C, 48 MPa for 5 min with the usage of heating rates from 50 °C/min up to 400 °C/min. The densification processes were studied through analyzing the shrinkage of powder compacts during SPS (Spark Plasma Sintering processes. The comparison of the densification curves indicates that the reactions do not proceed completely at slow heating rates. Namely, too low heating rates contribute to the sintering of tantalum before the synthesis reaction and demonstrate the presence of boron in liquid state. The best material obtained in this study has Young's modulus 571 GPa, Vickers hardness 20.7 GPa (HV1 and indentation fracture toughness KIC 4.7 MPa m1/2.

  3. Reactivity and reaction rate studies on the fourth loading of ZENITH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, I.R.; Freemantle, R.G.; Reed, D.L.; Wilson, D.J. [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)] (and others)

    1963-08-15

    The determination of the excess reactivity, control rod worths, prompt neutron lifetime, flux fine structure, and reaction rates of various nuclides for the fourth loading of the heated zero energy reactor ZENITH is described. The core contains 7.76 kg of U235, giving a carbon/U235 atom ratio of 7578, and forms the most dilute of the range studied. Comparisons of the experimental results with calculations using multigroup diffusion codes are presented. (author)

  4. Using reactive artificial muscles to determine water exchange during reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, T. F.; Martínez, J. G.; Zaifoglu, B.

    2013-10-01

    Artificial muscles based on films of conducting polymers translate film volume variations, driven by electrochemical reactions (Faradaic motors), into macroscopic movements with generation of mechanical energy. The reaction promotes exchange of counterions (anions here) and solvent molecules with the electrolyte. Attributing here both the film volume variation and the movement originated by these exchanges of ions and solvent, the described angles can be used to quantify the exchanged solvent. Different angles described by bending muscles consuming equal driving charges in electrolytes having the same cation and different anions were measured. The number of exchanged counterions is given by the consumed charge and the ion valence: this is a Faradaic reaction. The described angle fraction due to the exchanged anions is given by the number of anions and the crystallographic radius. Taking as reference the anion giving the shorter angle, whatever the consumed charge, the relative number of solvent molecules exchanged by the polymeric membrane during a reversible reaction was determined. Actuators and artificial muscles can be used as useful tools for, at least, an initial study of the solvent exchange during reactions in reactive gels.

  5. Crowding and eccentricity determine reading rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelli, Denis G; Tillman, Katharine A; Freeman, Jeremy; Su, Michael; Berger, Tracey D; Majaj, Najib J

    2007-10-26

    Bouma's law of crowding predicts an uncrowded central window through which we can read and a crowded periphery through which we cannot. The old discovery that readers make several fixations per second, rather than a continuous sweep across the text, suggests that reading is limited by the number of letters that can be acquired in one fixation, without moving one's eyes. That "visual span" has been measured in various ways, but remains unexplained. Here we show (1) that the visual span is simply the number of characters that are not crowded and (2) that, at each vertical eccentricity, reading rate is proportional to the uncrowded span. We measure rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) reading rate for text, in both original and scrambled word order, as a function of size and spacing at central and peripheral locations. As text size increases, reading rate rises abruptly from zero to maximum rate. This classic reading rate curve consists of a cliff and a plateau, characterized by two parameters, critical print size and maximum reading rate. Joining two ideas from the literature explains the whole curve. These ideas are Bouma's law of crowding and Legge's conjecture that reading rate is proportional to visual span. We show that Legge's visual span is the uncrowded span predicted by Bouma's law. This result joins Bouma and Legge to explain reading rate's dependence on letter size and spacing. Well-corrected fluent observers reading ordinary text with adequate light are limited by letter spacing (crowding), not size (acuity). More generally, it seems that this account holds true, independent of size, contrast, and luminance, provided only that text contrast is at least four times the threshold contrast for an isolated letter. For any given spacing, there is a central uncrowded span through which we read. This uncrowded span model explains the shape of the reading rate curve. We test the model in several ways. We use a "silent substitution" technique to measure the

  6. On the mechanism of effective chemical reactions with turbulent mixing of reactants and finite rate of molecular reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorotilin, V. P.

    2017-01-01

    A generalization of the theory of chemical transformation processes under turbulent mixing of reactants and arbitrary values of the rate of molecular reactions is presented that was previously developed for the variant of an instantaneous reaction [13]. The use of the features of instantaneous reactions when considering the general case, namely, the introduction of the concept of effective reaction for the reactant volumes and writing a closing conservation equation for these volumes, became possible due to the partition of the whole amount of reactants into "active" and "passive" classes; the reactants of the first class are not mixed and react by the mechanism of instantaneous reactions, while the reactants of the second class approach each other only through molecular diffusion, and therefore their contribution to the reaction process can be neglected. The physical mechanism of reaction for the limit regime of an ideal mixing reactor (IMR) is revealed and described. Although formally the reaction rate in this regime depends on the concentration of passive fractions of the reactants, according to the theory presented, the true (hidden) mechanism of the reaction is associated only with the reaction of the active fractions of the reactants with vanishingly small concentration in the volume of the reactor. It is shown that the rate constant of fast chemical reactions can be evaluated when the mixing intensity of reactants is much less than that needed to reach the mixing conditions in an IMR.

  7. Determination of reaction rate constants for phenol oxidation using SnO2/Ti anodes coupled with activated carbon adsorption in the presence of TiO2 as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuemin; Ding, Yi; Wang, Lizhang; Wang, Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Series of experiments for phenol degradation with assistance of TiO2 catalyst at pH of 6.5 and temperature of 25 degrees C were conducted using a lab-scale electrochemical reactor constructed in our laboratory. According to the results, at the presence of the TiO2 catalyst the removal of phenol was increased and first-order kinetics could describe the evolution of phenol concentration. For inspecting the relationship between rate constants and dosage of TiO2, two possible kinetics were proposed in this study. Contrasted to the abundant experimental data, a reasonable kinetics was obtained for the estimation of phenol concentration effluent during continuous flow of raw wastewater, especially when the TiO2 dosage was less than 0.5g L(-1). The model obtained from these experiments could employed for the calculation of rate constants at different TiO2 dosage and the necessary dosage of catalyst when a discharge standard was designed.

  8. Luminosity determination at ANKE with different reference reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsch, Christopher; Goslawski, Paul; Mielke, Malte; Papenbrock, Michael; Schroeer, Daniel; Taeschner, Alexander; Khoukaz, Alfons [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2013-07-01

    A high precision measurement on the mass of the eta meson was the main objective of the COSY proposal Nr. 187. In detail the meson production reaction dp → {sup 3}HeX has been studied with X being the eta meson identified by the missing mass technique. However, parallel to the already very successfully performed eta mass determination, the obtained data also allow for studies on total and differential cross sections for the reaction dp → {sup 3}Heη close to threshold as well as for a study of the ABC-effect in the channel dp → {sup 3}Heπ{sup +}π{sup -}. For this purpose a careful data normalization and luminosity determination is required. While dp-elastic scattering is commonly used as reference reaction for the luminosity determination at ANKE, an independent normalization channel is of high interest as cross reference. Therefore, the {sup 3}Heπ{sup 0} final state is analyzed in parallel and the results are compared to the dp-elastic scattering data. The method and recent results are presented.

  9. Determination of sedimentation rates and absorption coefficient of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MIKE HORSFALL

    showed a decrease in the density of the carbonates and also correlated with the decrease in the mass (and ... Many chemical reactions form separable solid phase ... The precipitates were ... Zn2+ had the highest sedimentation rate constants,.

  10. Music determines heart rate variability of singers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn eVickhoff

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Choir singing is known to promote wellbeing. One reason for this may be that singing demands a slower than normal respiration which may in turn affect heart activity. Coupling of heart rate variability (HRV to respiration is called Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA. This coupling has a subjective as well as a biologically soothing effect, and it is beneficial for cardiovascular function. RSA is seen to be more marked during slow-paced breathing and at lower respiration rates (0.1 Hz and below. In this study, we investigate how singing, which is a form of guided breathing, affects HRV and RSA. The study comprises a group of healthy 18 year olds of mixed gender. The subjects are asked to; (1 hum a single tone and breathe whenever they need to; (2 sing a hymn with free, unguided breathing; and (3 sing a slow mantra and breathe solely between phrases. Heart rate (HR is measured continuously during the study. The study design makes it possible to compare above three levels of song structure. In a separate case study, we examine five individuals performing singing tasks (1-(3. We collect data with more advanced equipment, simultaneously recording HR, respiration, skin conductance and finger temperature. We show how song structure, respiration and heart rate are connected. Unison singing of regular song structures makes the hearts of the singers accelerate and decelerate simultaneously. Implications concerning the effect on wellbeing and health are discussed as well as the question how this inner entrainment may affect perception and behavior.

  11. Posttranscriptional expression regulation: what determines translation rates?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Brockmann

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent analyses indicate that differences in protein concentrations are only 20%-40% attributable to variable mRNA levels, underlining the importance of posttranscriptional regulation. Generally, protein concentrations depend on the translation rate (which is proportional to the translational activity, TA and the degradation rate. By integrating 12 publicly available large-scale datasets and additional database information of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we systematically analyzed five factors contributing to TA: mRNA concentration, ribosome density, ribosome occupancy, the codon adaptation index, and a newly developed "tRNA adaptation index." Our analysis of the functional relationship between the TA and measured protein concentrations suggests that the TA follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The calculated TA, together with measured protein concentrations, allowed us to estimate degradation rates for 4,125 proteins under standard conditions. A significant correlation to recently published degradation rates supports our approach. Moreover, based on a newly developed scoring system, we identified and analyzed genes subjected to the posttranscriptional regulation mechanism, translation on demand. Next we applied these findings to publicly available data of protein and mRNA concentrations under four stress conditions. The integration of these measurements allowed us to compare the condition-specific responses at the posttranscriptional level. Our analysis of all 62 proteins that have been measured under all four conditions revealed proteins with very specific posttranscriptional stress response, in contrast to more generic responders, which were nonspecifically regulated under several conditions. The concept of specific and generic responders is known for transcriptional regulation. Here we show that it also holds true at the posttranscriptional level.

  12. Determination of Carbohydrazide and Kinetics of Condensation reaction of Carbohydrazide with Malachite Green by Spectrophotometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍涛; 张同来; 陈红艳; 张建国

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics of the condensation reaction of malachite green and carbohydrazide was studied by spectrophotometry in aqueous solution in the temperature range of 15.0-22.0℃. The reaction was found to be second-order overall, first-order with respect to each reactant. The effect of ionic strength on the reaction has negative salt effect in the range of 0.2-1.0 mol·L-1. A mechanism of the reaction between malachite green and carbohydrazide was proposed, and the rate equation derived from the mechanism can explain all experimental observations properly. Based on this reaction, a method of determining the content of carbohydrazide in the concentration range of (0.02-0.5) )<10-3 mol·L-1 was proposed.

  13. Molecule-based approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2009-08-01

    This report summarizes the work completed during FY2009 for the LDRD project 09-1332 'Molecule-Based Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates in Upper-Atmosphere Hypersonic Flows'. The goal of this project was to apply a recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary nonequilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological non-equilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, the difference between the two models can exceed 10 orders of magnitude. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates. Extensions of the model to reactions typically found in combustion flows and ionizing reactions are also found to be in very good agreement with available measurements, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

  14. Reevaluation of thermonuclear reaction rate of 50Fe(p,gamma)51Co

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, L P; Chai, W D; Hou, S Q; Zhang, L Y

    2016-01-01

    The thermonuclear rate of the 50Fe(p,gamma)51Co reaction in the Type I X-ray bursts (XRBs) temperature range has been reevaluated based on a recent precise mass measurement at CSRe lanzhou, where the proton separation energy Sp=142+/-77 keV has been determined firstly for the 51Co nucleus. Comparing to the previous theoretical predictions, the experimental Sp value has much smaller uncertainty. Based on the nuclear shell model and mirror nuclear structure information, we have calculated two sets of thermonuclear rates for the 50Fe(p,gamma)51Co reaction by utilizing the experimental Sp value. It shows that the statistical-model calculations are not ideally applicable for this reaction primarily because of the low density of low-lying excited states in 51Co. In this work, we recommend that a set of new reaction rate based on the mirror structure of 51Cr should be incorporated in the future astrophysical network calculations.

  15. New Astrophysical Reaction Rate for the $^{12}\\textrm{C}(\\alpha,\\gamma)^{16}\\textrm{O}$ Reaction

    CERN Document Server

    An, Z D; Fan, G T; Li, Y J; Chen, Z P; Sun, Y Y

    2016-01-01

    A new astrophysical reaction rate for $^{12}$C($\\alpha,\\gamma$)$^{16}$O has been evaluated on the basis of a global R-matrix fitting to the available experimental data. The reaction rates of $^{12}$C($\\alpha,\\gamma$)$^{16}$O for stellar temperatures between 0.04 $\\leq$ $T_9$ $\\leq$ 10 are provided in a tabular form and by an analytical fitting expression. At $T_9$ = 0.2, the reaction rate is (7.83 $\\pm$ 0.35)$\\times10^{15}$ $\\rm{cm^3 mol^{-1} s^{-1}}$, where stellar helium burning occurs.

  16. Reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach: The chemical reaction rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustova, Elena V. [Department of Mathematics and Mechanics, Saint Petersburg State University, 198504 Universitetskiy pr., 28, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kremer, Gilberto M. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Caixa Postal 19044, 81531-980 Curitiba (Brazil)

    2014-12-09

    In this work chemically reacting mixtures of viscous flows are analyzed within the framework of Boltzmann equation. By applying a modified Chapman-Enskog method to the system of Boltzmann equations general expressions for the rates of chemical reactions and vibrational energy transitions are determined as functions of two thermodynamic forces: the velocity divergence and the affinity. As an application chemically reacting mixtures of N{sub 2} across a shock wave are studied, where the first lowest vibrational states are taken into account. Here we consider only the contributions from the first four single quantum vibrational-translational energy transitions. It is shown that the contribution to the chemical reaction rate related to the affinity is much larger than that of the velocity divergence.

  17. Reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach: The chemical reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustova, Elena V.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work chemically reacting mixtures of viscous flows are analyzed within the framework of Boltzmann equation. By applying a modified Chapman-Enskog method to the system of Boltzmann equations general expressions for the rates of chemical reactions and vibrational energy transitions are determined as functions of two thermodynamic forces: the velocity divergence and the affinity. As an application chemically reacting mixtures of N2 across a shock wave are studied, where the first lowest vibrational states are taken into account. Here we consider only the contributions from the first four single quantum vibrational-translational energy transitions. It is shown that the contribution to the chemical reaction rate related to the affinity is much larger than that of the velocity divergence.

  18. The 23Na({\\alpha},p) 26Mg reaction rate at astrophysically relevant energies

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, A M; Fynbo, H O U; Kirsebom, O S; Laursen, K L; Diget, C Aa; Hubbard, N J

    2015-01-01

    The production of 26 Al in massive stars is sensitive to the 23 Na(a,p) 26 Mg cross section. Recent experimental data suggest the currently recommended cross sections are underestimated by a factor of 40. We present here differential cross sections for the 23 Na(a,p) 26 Mg reaction measured in the energy range E c.m. = 1.7 - 2.5 MeV. Concurrent measurements of Rutherford scattering provide absolute normalisations which are independent of variations in target properties. Angular distributions were measured for both p 0 and p 1 permitting the determination of total cross sections. The results show no significant deviation from the statistical model calculations upon which the recommended rates are based. We therefore retain the previous recommendation without the increase in cross section and resulting stellar reaction rates of a factor of 40, impacting on the 26 Al yield from massive stars by more than a factor of three.

  19. Absolute rate constants for the reaction of hypochlorous acid with protein side chains and peptide bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pattison, D I; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    , absolute second-order rate constants for the reactions of HOCl with protein side chains, model compounds, and backbone amide (peptide) bonds have been determined at physiological pH values. The reactivity of HOCl with potential reactive sites in proteins is summarized by the series: Met (3.8 x 10(7) M(-1......) x s(-1)) > backbone amides (10-10(-3) M(-1) x s(-1)) > Gln(0.03 M(-1) x s(-1)) approximately Asn (0.03 M(-1) x s(-1)). The rate constants for reaction of HOCl with backbone amides (peptide bonds) vary by 4 orders of magnitude with uncharged peptide bonds reacting more readily with HOCl than those...

  20. Refit to numerically problematic UMIST reaction rate coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Röllig, M

    2011-01-01

    Aims. Chemical databases such as the UMIST Database for Astrochemistry (UDFA) are indispensable in the numerical modeling of astrochemical networks. Several of the listed reactions in the UDFA have properties that are problematic in numerical computations: Some are parametrized in a way that leads to extremely divergent behavior for low kinetic temperatures. Other reactions possess multiple entries that are each valid in a different temperature regime, but have no smooth transition when switching from one to another. Numerically, this introduces many difficulties.We present corrected parametrizations for these sets of reactions in the UDFA06 database. Methods. From the tabulated parametrization in UDFA, we created artificial data points and used a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm to find a set of improved fit parameters without divergent behavior for low temperatures. For reactions with multiple entries in the database that each possess a different temperature regime, we present one joint parametrization that is...

  1. Formulation of a universal first-order rate constant for enzymatic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, Taiji

    2013-01-01

    It is a common practice to employ k(cat)[E]₀/K(m) as a first-order rate constant for the analysis of an enzymatic reaction, where [E]₀ is the total enzyme concentration. I describe in this report a serious shortcoming in analyzing enzymatic reactions when kcat[E]₀/K(m) is employed and show that k(cat)[E]₀/K(m) can only be applied under very limited conditions. I consequently propose the use of a more universal first-order rate constant, k(cat)[ES](K)/[S]₀, where [ES](K) is the initial equilibrium concentration of the ES-complex derived from [E]₀, [S]₀ and K(m). Employing k(cat)[ES](K)/[S]₀ as the first-order rate constant enables all enzymatic reactions to be reasonably simulated under a wide range of conditions, and the catalytic and binding contributions to the rate constant of any enzyme can be determined under any and all conditions.

  2. Theoretical and Shock Tube Study of the Rate Constants for Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions of Ethyl Formate

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Junjun

    2017-08-03

    We report a systematic chemical kinetics study of the H-atom abstractions from ethyl formate (EF) by H, O(3P), CH3, OH, and HO2 radicals. The geometry optimization and frequency calculation of all the species were conducted using the M06 method and the cc-pVTZ basis set. The one-dimensional hindered rotor treatment of the reactants and transition states and the intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis were also performed at the M06/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The relative electronic energies were calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ (where X = D, T) level of theory and further extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Rate constants for the tittle reactions were calculated over the temperature range of 500‒2500 K by the transition state theory (TST) in conjunction with asymmetric Eckart tunneling effect. In addition, the rate constants of H-abstraction by hydroxyl radical were measured in shock tube experiments at 900‒1321 K and 1.4‒2.0 atm. Our theoretical rate constants of OH + EF → Products agree well with the experimental results within 15% over the experimental temperature range of 900‒1321 K. Branching ratios for the five types of H-abstraction reactions were also determined from their individual site-specific rate constants.

  3. Pop-It Beads to Introduce Catalysis of Reaction Rate and Substrate Depletion Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehret, Austin U.

    2017-01-01

    A kinesthetic classroom activity was designed to help students understand enzyme activity and catalysis of reaction rate. Students served the role of enzymes by manipulating Pop-It Beads as the catalytic event. This activity illuminates the relationship between reaction rate and reaction progress by allowing students to experience first-hand the…

  4. Apparent Rate Constant for Diffusion-Controlled Three molecular (catalytic) reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Burlatsky, S. F.; Moreau, M

    1996-01-01

    We present simple explicit estimates for the apparent reaction rate constant for three molecular reactions, which are important in catalysis. For small concentrations and $d> 1$, the apparent reaction rate constant depends only on the diffusion coefficients and sizes of the particles. For small concentrations and $d\\le 1$, it is also time -- dependent. For large concentrations, it gains the dependence on concentrations.

  5. The Effects of Mixing, Reaction Rates, and Stoichiometry on Yield for Mixing Sensitive Reactions—Part II: Design Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Imran A. Shah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Competitive-consecutive and competitive-parallel reactions are both mixing sensitive reactions where the yield of desired product depends on how fast the reactants are brought together. Recent experimental results have suggested that the magnitude of the mixing effect may depend strongly on the stoichiometry of the reactions. To investigate this, a 1D, dimensionless, reaction-diffusion model was developed at the micromixing scale, yielding a single general Damköhler number. Dimensionless reaction rate ratios were derived for both reaction schemes. A detailed investigation of the effects of initial mixing condition (striation thickness, dimensionless reaction rate ratio, and reaction stoichiometry on the yield of desired product showed that the stoichiometry has a considerable effect on yield. All three variables were found to interact strongly. Model results for 12 stoichiometries are used to determine the mixing scale and relative rate ratio needed to achieve a specified yield for each reaction scheme. The results show that all three variables need to be considered when specifying reactors for mixing sensitive reactions.

  6. Rate parameters for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with dimethyl ether and dimethyl sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Machen, R. C.; Nava, D. F.; Stief, L. J.

    1981-03-01

    Absolute rate constants for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with dimethyl ether (DME) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were obtained using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. Under conditions where secondary reactions are avoided, rate constants for the H+DME reaction over the temperature range 273-426 K are well represented by the Arrhenius expression k1=(4.38±0.59)×10-12 exp(-1956±43/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The corresponding Arrhenius expression for the H+DMS reaction over the temperature range 212-500 K is k2=(1.30±0.43)×10-11exp(-1118±81/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The Arrhenius plot for k2 shows signs of curvature, however, and separate Arrhenius expressions are derived for the data above and below room temperature. These results are discussed and comparisons are made with previous determinations which employed flow discharge and product analysis techniques.

  7. Reaction rate oscillations during catalytic CO oxidation: A brief overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, T. T.; Sane, R. C.

    1987-04-01

    It is not the intent here to present a comprehensive review of the dynamic behavior of the catalytic oxidation of CO. This reaction is one of the most widely studied in the field of catalysis. A review paper by Engel and Ertl has examined the basic kinetic and mechanistic aspects, and a comprehensive paper by Razon and Schmitz was recently devoted to its dynamic behavior. Those interested in further study of the subject should consult these reviews and a number of general review papers on catalytic reaction dynamics. The goal is to present a brief overview of certain interesting aspects of the dynamic behavior of this reaction and to discuss a few questions and issues, which are still the subject of study and debate.

  8. "Depletion": A Game with Natural Rules for Teaching Reaction Rate Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbris, Donald J.; Herzfeld, Judith

    2002-01-01

    Depletion is a game that reinforces central concepts of reaction rate theory through simulation. Presents the game with a set of follow-up questions suitable for either a quiz or discussion. Also describes student reaction to the game. (MM)

  9. The Effect of Screening Factors and Thermonuclear Reaction Rates in the Pre-main Sequence Evolution of Low Mass Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    İ. Küçük; Ş. Çalışkan

    2010-09-01

    In understanding the nucleosynthesis of the elements in stars, one of the most important quantities is the reaction rate and it must be evaluated in terms of the stellar temperature , and its determination involves the knowledge of the excitation function () of the specific nuclear reaction leading to the final nucleus. In this paper, the effect of thermonuclear reaction rates to the pre-main sequence evolution of low mass stars having masses 0.7, 0.8, 0.9 and 1 M⊙ are studied by using our modified Stellar Evolutionary Program.

  10. The form of the rate constant for elementary reactions at equilibrium from MD: framework and proposals for thermokinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Jesudason, C G

    2006-01-01

    The rates or formation and concentration distributions of a dimer reaction showing hysteresis behavior are examined in an ab initio chemical reaction designed as elementary and where the hysteresis structure precludes the formation of transition states (TS) with pre-equilibrium and internal sub-reactions. It was discovered that the the reactivity coefficients, defined as a measure of departure from the zero density rate constant for the forward and backward steps had a ratio that was equal to the activity coefficient ratio for the product and reactant species. From the above observations, a theory is developed with the aid of some proven elementary theorems in thermodynamics, and expressions are derived whereby a feasible experimental and computational method for determining the activity coefficients from the rate constants may be obtained The theory developed is applied to ionic reactions where the standard Bronsted-Bjerrum rate equation and exceptions to this are rationalized, and by viewing ion association...

  11. Influence of changing particle structure on the rate of gas-solid gasification reactions. Final report, July 1981-March 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-04-04

    The objetive of this work is to determine the changes in the particle structure of coal as it undergoes the carbon/carbon dioxide reaction (C + CO/sub 2/ ..-->.. 2CO). Char was produced by heating the coal at a rate of 25/sup 0/C/min to the reaction temperatures of 800/sup 0/C, 900/sup 0/C, 1000/sup 0/C and 1100/sup 0/C. The changes in surface area and effective diffusivity as a result of devolitization were determined. Changes in effective diffusivity and surface area as a function of conversion have been measured for reactions conducted at 800, 900, 1000 and 1100/sup 0/C for Wyodak coal char. The surface areas exhibit a maximum as a function of conversion in all cases. For the reaction at 1000/sup 0/C the maximum in surface area is greater than the maxima determined at all other reaction temperatures. Thermogravimetric rate data were obtained for five coal chars; Wyodak, Wilcox, Cimmeron, Illinois number 6 and Pittsburgh number 6 over the temperature range 800-1100/sup 0/C. All coal chars exhibit a maximum in reaction rate. Five different models for gas-solid reactions were evaluated. The Bhatia/Perlmutter model seems to best represent the data. 129 references, 67 figures, 37 tables.

  12. Rate constants of reactions of {kappa}-carrageenan with hydrated electron and hydroxyl radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abad, L.V. [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering Laboratory, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Commonwealth Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines)], E-mail: lvabad@pnri.dost.gov.ph; Saiki, S.; Kudo, H.; Muroya, Y.; Katsumura, Y. [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering Laboratory, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Rosa, A.M. de la [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Commonwealth Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines)

    2007-12-15

    The rate constants for the reactions of {kappa}-carrageenan with hydrated electron and hydroxyl radical was investigated by pulse radiolysis and laser photolysis. The kinetics of the reaction of hydrated electron indicates no seeming reaction with {kappa}-carrageenan. On the other hand, hydroxyl radical reacts very rapidly with {kappa}-carrageenan at a rate constant of approximately 1.2 x 10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. This rate constant varies with pH.

  13. Rate Constant and Branching Fraction for the NH2 + NO2 Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klippenstein, Stephen J.; Harding, Lawrence B.; Glarborg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The NH2 + NO2 reaction has been studied experimentally and theoretically. On the basis of laser photolysis/LIF experiments, the total rate constant was determined over the temperature range 295–625 K as k1,exp(T) = 9.5 × 10–7(T/K)−2.05 exp(−404 K/T) cm3 molecule–1 s–1. This value is in the upper...... may facilitate a small flux between the adducts. High- and low-pressure limit rate coefficients for the various product channels of NH2 + NO2 are determined from the ab initio TST-based master equation calculations for the temperature range 300–2000 K. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement...

  14. for the inference of Furan combustion reaction rate

    KAUST Repository

    Long, Quan

    2016-01-06

    We carry out the design of experiments for the identification of the reaction parameters in Furan combustion. The lacks of information on the true value of the control parameters, specifically, the initial temperature and the initial TBHP concentration, are considered in the design procedure by errors-invariables models. We use two types of observables. The first is a scaler observable, i.e., half decay time of the [TBHP]. The second is the time history of the concentration.

  15. New method for spectrophotometric determination of quinones and barbituric acid through their reaction. A kinetic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medien, H. A. A.

    1996-11-01

    A new and sensitive spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of p-benzoquinone, p-chloranil and 1.4-naphthoquinone. The method is based on the reaction between quinones and barbituric acid, by which a color is developed with maximum absorption between 485 and 555 nm in 50% methyl alcohol-water mixture. The absorption of the product obeys Beer's law within the concentration range 0.025-05 mM of orginal quinone. The kinetics of the reaction between p-benzoquinone and barbituric acid was studied in a range of methyl alcohol-water mixtures. The reaction follows overall second order kinetics, first order in each of the reactants. The rate increases with increasing dielectric constant. The method was applied for determination of barbituric acid with p-benzoquinone in the concentration range of 0.025-0.345 mM. Other barbiturates do not interfere.

  16. Monetary models and exchange rate determination: The Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Monetary models and exchange rate determination: The Nigerian evidence. ... income levels and real interest rate differentials provide better forecasts of the naira-US dollar ... in this regard is that monetary policy should be positively predicted.

  17. Collective plasma corrections to thermonuclear reactions rates in dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsytovich, V.N. [General Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2002-01-01

    General kinetic equations for nuclear reaction in dense plasmas are obtained. They take into account the first order collective plasma effects. Together with previously known corrections proportional to Z{sub i}Z{sub j}, the product of the charges Z{sub i} and Z{sub j} of two interacting nuclei, it is shown that there exist corrections proportional to the squares Z{sub i}{sup 2} and Z{sub j}{sup 2} of the charges. It is shown that the Salpeter's [1] correction due to the plasma screening of the interaction potential is at least r/d smaller (r is the nuclei size and d is Debye screening length) than previously thought and is zero in the approximation when the terms of the order r/d are neglected. But the correlation effects in the first approximation in the parameter 1/N{sub d} (where N{sub d} is the number of particle in the Debye sphere) give corrections which often coincide with the first order Salpeter's corrections (found by expansion in another small parameter, the ratio of thermal energy to Gamov's energy). The correlation corrections are {proportional_to} Z{sub i}Z{sub j}, have a different physical meaning than the corrections [1], can have a different sign and are present for reactions where the Salpeter's corrections are zero. Previously in astrophysical applications it was widely used the interpolation formulas between weak and strong Salpeter's screening corrections. Since the correlation correction take place the previously known Salpeter's corrections and the strong correlation corrections is difficult to describe analytically, the interpolation formulas between the weak and strong correlations cannot be yet found. A new type of corrections are found here which are proportional to the square of the charges. They are due to collective change in electrostatic self-energy of the plasma system during the nuclear reactions. The latter corrections are found by taking into account the changes of plasma particle fluctuations by

  18. A reaction-diffusion-based coding rate control mechanism for camera sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Hyodo, Katsuya; Wakamiya, Naoki; Murata, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    A wireless camera sensor network is useful for surveillance and monitoring for its visibility and easy deployment. However, it suffers from the limited capacity of wireless communication and a network is easily overflown with a considerable amount of video traffic. In this paper, we propose an autonomous video coding rate control mechanism where each camera sensor node can autonomously determine its coding rate in accordance with the location and velocity of target objects. For this purpose, we adopted a biological model, i.e., reaction-diffusion model, inspired by the similarity of biological spatial patterns and the spatial distribution of video coding rate. Through simulation and practical experiments, we verify the effectiveness of our proposal.

  19. Multi-path variational transition state theory for chemical reaction rates of complex polyatomic species: ethanol + OH reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jingjing; Truhlar, Donald G

    2012-01-01

    Complex molecules often have many structures (conformations) of the reactants and the transition states, and these structures may be connected by coupled-mode torsions and pseudorotations; some but not all structures may have hydrogen bonds in the transition state or reagents. A quantitative theory of the reaction rates of complex molecules must take account of these structures, their coupled-mode nature, their qualitatively different character, and the possibility of merging reaction paths at high temperature. We have recently developed a coupled-mode theory called multi-structural variational transition state theory (MS-VTST) and an extension, called multi-path variational transition state theory (MP-VTST), that includes a treatment of the differences in the multi-dimensional tunneling paths and their contributions to the reaction rate. The MP-VTST method was presented for unimolecular reactions in the original paper and has now been extended to bimolecular reactions. The MS-VTST and MP-VTST formulations of variational transition state theory include multi-faceted configuration-space dividing surfaces to define the variational transition state. They occupy an intermediate position between single-conformation variational transition state theory (VTST), which has been used successfully for small molecules, and ensemble-averaged variational transition state theory (EA-VTST), which has been used successfully for enzyme kinetics. The theories are illustrated and compared here by application to three thermal rate constants for reactions of ethanol with hydroxyl radical--reactions with 4, 6, and 14 saddle points.

  20. THE REAL EXCHANGE RATE DETERMINATION: EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE FROM MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    WONG HOCK TSEN

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the real exchange rate determination in Malaysia. The result of the autoregressive distributed lag approach shows that an increase in the real interest rate differential, productivity differential, the real oil price or reserve differential will lead to an appreciation of the real exchange rate in the long run. The real oil price and reserve differential are important in the real exchange rate determination. The dynamic ordinary least squares (DOLS) estimator shows about t...

  1. Determining equilibrium constants for dimerization reactions from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jong, Djurre H; Schäfer, Lars V; De Vries, Alex H; Marrink, Siewert J; Berendsen, Herman J C; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2011-07-15

    With today's available computer power, free energy calculations from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations "via counting" become feasible for an increasing number of reactions. An example is the dimerization reaction of transmembrane alpha-helices. If an extended simulation of the two helices covers sufficiently many dimerization and dissociation events, their binding free energy is readily derived from the fraction of time during which the two helices are observed in dimeric form. Exactly how the correct value for the free energy is to be calculated, however, is unclear, and indeed several different and contradictory approaches have been used. In particular, results obtained via Boltzmann statistics differ from those determined via the law of mass action. Here, we develop a theory that resolves this discrepancy. We show that for simulation systems containing two molecules, the dimerization free energy is given by a formula of the form ΔG ∝ ln(P(1) /P(0) ). Our theory is also applicable to high concentrations that typically have to be used in molecular dynamics simulations to keep the simulation system small, where the textbook dilute approximations fail. It also covers simulations with an arbitrary number of monomers and dimers and provides rigorous error estimates. Comparison with test simulations of a simple Lennard Jones system with various particle numbers as well as with reference free energy values obtained from radial distribution functions show full agreement for both binding free energies and dimerization statistics.

  2. Nuclear halo effect on nucleon capture reaction rates at stellar energies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zu-Hua; Zhou Hong-Yu

    2005-01-01

    The capture cross sections at stellar energies are very difficult to measure directly. Hence, data are usually evaluated by using indirect methods or extrapolations from the experimental data obtained at the lowest possible energies. The asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) approach of the transfer reactions provides a reliable way for the determination of the capture cross sections at stellar energies. By virtue of its reliability, we have calculated the capture cross sections of the 10Be(n,γ)11Be reaction by using nuclear ANC method. 11Be is a well-known neutron halo nucleus with two weakly bound states. As a typical example, we have shown that the radiative cross sections for a nucleon captured into a halo state are obviously enhanced. The enormous enhancement of the capture cross section is just due to the large overlap of the incident neutron wave with the extended tail of the halo. The 10Be(n,γ)11Be capture reaction is involved in the inhomogeneous big-bang nucleosynthesis. We have evaluated its reaction rates at stellar energies with the nuclear ANC method.

  3. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Iron

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    DESIG: E 263 09 ^TITLE: Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Iron ^SIGNUSE: Refer to Guide E 844 for guidance on the selection, irradiation, and quality control of neutron dosimeters. Refer to Practice E 261 for a general discussion of the determination of fast-neutron fluence rate with threshold detectors. Pure iron in the form of foil or wire is readily available and easily handled. Fig. 1 shows a plot of cross section as a function of neutron energy for the fast-neutron reaction 54Fe(n,p)54Mn (1). This figure is for illustrative purposes only to indicate the range of response of the 54Fe(n,p)54Mn reaction. Refer to Guide E 1018 for descriptions of recommended tabulated dosimetry cross sections. 54Mn has a half-life of 312.13 days (3) (2) and emits a gamma ray with an energy of 834.845 keV (5). (2) Interfering activities generated by neutron activation arising from thermal or fast neutron interactions are 2.57878 (46)-h 56Mn, 44.95-d (8) 59Fe, and 5.27...

  4. Interlaboratory reaction rate program. 12th progress report, November 1976-October 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippincott, E.P.; McElroy, W.N.; Preston, C.C. (comps.)

    1980-09-01

    The Interlaboratory Reaction Rate UILRR) program is establishing the capability to accurately measure neutron-induced reactions and reaction rates for reactor fuels and materials development programs. The goal for the principal fission reactions, /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U and /sup 239/Pu, is an accuracy to within +- 5% at the 95% confidence level. Accurate measurement of other fission and nonfission reactions is also required, but to a lesser accuracy, between +- 5% and 10% at the 95% confidence level. A secondary program objective is improvement in knowledge of the nuclear parameters involved in the standarization of fuels and materials dosimetry measurements of neutron flux, spectra, fluence and burnup.

  5. Shell model based reaction rates for rp-process nuclei in the mass range A=44-63

    CERN Document Server

    Fisker, J L; Görres, J; Langanke, K; Martínez-Pinedo, G; Wiescher, M C

    2001-01-01

    We have used large-scale shell-model diagonalization calculations to determine the level spectra, proton spectroscopic factors, and electromagnetic transition probabilities for proton rich nuclei in the mass range A=44-63. Based on these results and the available experimental data, we calculated the resonances for proton capture reactions on neutron deficient nuclei in this mass range. We also calculated the direct capture processes on these nuclei in the framework of a Woods-Saxon potential model. Taking into account both resonant and direct contributions, we determined the ground-state proton capture reaction rates for these nuclei under hot hydrogen burning conditions for temperatures between 10 sup 8 and 10 sup 1 sup 0 K. The calculated compound-nucleus level properties and the reaction rates are presented here; the rates are also available in computer-readable format from the authors.

  6. Chemical reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure of reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustova, Elena V., E-mail: e.kustova@spbu.ru [Department of Mathematics and Mechanics, Saint Petersburg State University, 198504 Universitetskiy pr. 28, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kremer, Gilberto M., E-mail: kremer@fisica.ufpr.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Caixa Postal 19044, 81531-980 Curitiba (Brazil)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • State-to-state approach for coupled vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions. • Self-consistent model for rates of non-equilibrium reactions and energy transitions. • In viscous flows mass action law is violated. • Cross coupling between reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure in viscous flow. • Results allow implementing the state-to-state approach for viscous flow simulations. - Abstract: Viscous gas flows with vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions in the state-to-state approach are analyzed. A modified Chapman–Enskog method is used for the determination of chemical reaction and vibrational transition rates and non-equilibrium pressure. Constitutive equations depend on the thermodynamic forces: velocity divergence and chemical reaction/transition affinity. As an application, N{sub 2} flow with vibrational relaxation across a shock wave is investigated. Two distinct processes occur behind the shock: for small values of the distance the affinity is large and vibrational relaxation is in its initial stage; for large distances the affinity is small and the chemical reaction is in its final stage. The affinity contributes more to the transition rate than the velocity divergence and the effect of these two contributions are more important for small distances from the shock front. For the non-equilibrium pressure, the term associated with the bulk viscosity increases by a small amount the hydrostatic pressure.

  7. Theoretical reaction rates of the $^{12}$C($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$O reaction from the potential model

    CERN Document Server

    Katsuma, M

    2015-01-01

    The radiative capture cross sections of $^{12}$C($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$O and derived reaction rates are calculated from the direct capture potential model. The resulting $S$-factor at low energies is found to be dominated by $E$2 transition to the $^{16}$O ground state. The $E$1 and $E$2 $S$-factors at $E_{c.m.}=0.3$ MeV are $S_{E1}\\approx3$ keV~b and $S_{E2}=150^{+41}_{-17}$ keV~b, respectively. The sum of the cascade transition through the excited state of $^{16}$O is $S_{\\rm casc}= 18\\pm4.5$ keV~b. The derived reaction rates at low temperatures seem to be concordant with those from the previous evaluation. For astrophysical applications, our reaction rates below $T_9=3$ are provided in an analytic expression.

  8. The role of advanced reactive surface area characterization in improving predictions of mineral reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckingham, L. E.; Zhang, S.; Mitnick, E.; Cole, D. R.; Yang, L.; Anovitz, L. M.; Sheets, J.; Swift, A.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Landrot, G.; Mito, S.; Xue, Z.; Steefel, C. I.; DePaolo, D. J.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2 in deep sedimentary formations is a promising means of mitigating carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants but the long-term fate of injected CO2 is challenging to predict. Reactive transport models are used to gain insight over long times but rely on laboratory determined mineral reaction rates that have been difficult to extrapolate to field systems. This, in part, is due to a lack of understanding of mineral reactive surface area. Many models use an arbitrary approximation of reactive surface area, applying orders of magnitude scaling factors to measured BET or geometric surface areas. Recently, a few more sophisticated approaches have used 2D and 3D image analyses to determine mineral-specific reactive surface areas that account for the accessibility of minerals. However, the ability of these advanced surface area estimates to improve predictions of mineral reaction rates has yet to be determined. In this study, we fuse X-ray microCT, SEM QEMSCAN, XRD, SANS, and SEM-FIB analysis to determine mineral-specific accessible reactive surface areas for a core sample from the Nagaoka pilot CO2 injection site (Japan). This sample is primarily quartz, plagioclase, smectite, K-feldspar, and pyroxene. SEM imaging shows abundant smectite cement and grain coatings that decrease the fluid accessibility of other minerals. However, analysis of FIB-SEM images reveals that smectite nano-pores are well connected such that access to underlying minerals is not occluded by smectite coatings. Mineral-specific accessible surfaces are determined, accounting for the connectivity of the pore space with and without connected smectite nano-pores. The large-scale impact of variations in accessibility and dissolution rates are then determined through continuum scale modeling using grid-cell specific information on accessible surface areas. This approach will be compared with a traditional continuum scale model using mineral abundances and common surface area

  9. Rate of reaction of dimethylmercury with oxygen atoms in the gas phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge

    1986-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen (O(3P)) with dimethylmercury has been measured at room temperature at a pressure of about 1 Torr using a fast flow system with electron paramagnetic resonance and mass spectrometric detection. Some reaction products were identified. The rate...

  10. Inferring the determinants of protein evolutionary rates in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yang; Shao, Xiaojian; Dong, Dong

    2016-06-15

    Understanding the determinants of protein evolutionary rates is one of the most fundamental evolutionary questions. Previous studies have revealed that many biological variables are tightly associated with protein evolutionary rates in mammals. However, the dominant role of these biological variables and their combinatorial effects to evolutionary rates of mammalian proteins are still less understood. In this work, we derived a quantitative model to correlate protein evolutionary rates with the levels of these variables. The result showed that only a small number of variables are necessary to accurately predict protein evolutionary rates, among which miRNA regulation plays the most important role. Our result suggested that biological variables are extensively interrelated and suffer from hidden redundancies in determining protein evolutionary rates. Various variables should be considered in a natural ensemble to comprehensively assess the determinants of protein evolutionary rate.

  11. Determination of Royalty Rates in the International Technology Transfer Contracts

    OpenAIRE

    Kapitsa, Yu.; Aralova, N.

    2015-01-01

    The existing approaches used in determination of the royalty rates for technology transfer contracts and based on the experience of research institutions of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, research organizations and universities in Europe and USA were reviewed. The analysis of the existing rates has been made as well as recommendations on determination of the royalty rates for technology transfer contracts between research institutions and foreign and domestic partners have been ...

  12. Determination of Royalty Rates in the International Technology Transfer Contracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapitsa, Yu.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The existing approaches used in determination of the royalty rates for technology transfer contracts and based on the experience of research institutions of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, research organizations and universities in Europe and USA were reviewed. The analysis of the existing rates has been made as well as recommendations on determination of the royalty rates for technology transfer contracts between research institutions and foreign and domestic partners have been worked out.

  13. Controlling the emotional heart: heart rate biofeedback improves cardiac control during emotional reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peira, Nathalie; Fredrikson, Mats; Pourtois, Gilles

    2014-03-01

    When regulating negative emotional reactions, one goal is to reduce physiological reactions. However, not all regulation strategies succeed in doing that. We tested whether heart rate biofeedback helped participants reduce physiological reactions in response to negative and neutral pictures. When viewing neutral pictures, participants could regulate their heart rate whether the heart rate feedback was real or not. In contrast, when viewing negative pictures, participants could regulate heart rate only when feedback was real. Ratings of task success paralleled heart rate. Participants' general level of anxiety, emotion awareness, or cognitive emotion regulation strategies did not influence the results. Our findings show that accurate online heart rate biofeedback provides an efficient way to down-regulate autonomic physiological reactions when encountering negative stimuli.

  14. BRUSLIB and NETGEN: the Brussels nuclear reaction rate library and nuclear network generator for astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Aikawa, M; Goriely, S; Jorissen, A; Takahashi, K

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear reaction rates are quantities of fundamental importance in astrophysics. Substantial efforts have been devoted in the last decades to measure or calculate them. The present paper presents for the first time a detailed description of the Brussels nuclear reaction rate library BRUSLIB and of the nuclear network generator NETGEN so as to make these nuclear data packages easily accessible to astrophysicists for a large variety of applications. BRUSLIB is made of two parts. The first one contains the 1999 NACRE compilation based on experimental data for 86 reactions with (mainly) stable targets up to Si. The second part of BRUSLIB concerns nuclear reaction rate predictions calculated within a statistical Hauser-Feshbach approximation, which limits the reliability of the rates to reactions producing compound nuclei with a high enough level density. These calculations make use of global and coherent microscopic nuclear models for the quantities entering the rate calculations. The use of such models is utterl...

  15. Rate constants and isotope effects for the reaction of H-atom abstraction from RH substrates by PINO radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opeida, I. A.; Litvinov, Yu. E.; Kushch, O. V.; Kompanets, M. A.; Shendrik, A. N.; Matvienko, A. G.; Novokhatko, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of hydrogen atom abstraction from the C-H bonds of substrates of different structures by phthalimide- N-oxyl radicals is studied. The rate constants of this reaction are measured and the kinetic isotope effects are determined. It is shown that in addition to the thermodynamic factor, Coulomb forces and donor-acceptor interactions affect the reaction between phthalimide- N-oxyl radicals and substrate molecules, altering the shape of the transition state. This favors the tunneling of hydrogen atoms and leads to a substantial reduction in the activation energy of the process.

  16. The Determinants of Exchange Rate Regimes in Emerging Market Economies

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Guclu

    2008-01-01

    The choice of exchange rate regime has become one of the most important issues one more time in many economies after the financial crises in recent years. In the wake of the financial crises, many countries, especially emerging market economies, opted for floating exchange rate regimes by forsaking the pegged regimes. Consequently, an old debate on the choice and determinants of exchange rate regimes has been triggered. Economists have started to debate what appropriate exchange rate regime f...

  17. Metabolic control analysis of biochemical pathways based on a thermokinetic description of reaction rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1997-01-01

    Metabolic control analysis is a powerful technique for the evaluation of flux control within biochemical pathways. Its foundation is the elasticity coefficients and the flux control coefficients (FCCs). On the basis of a thermokinetic description of reaction rates it is here shown...... affinity. This parameter can often be determined from experiments in vitro. The methodology is applicable only to the analysis of simple two-step pathways, but in many cases larger pathways can be lumped into two overall conversions. In cases where this cannot be done it is necessary to apply an extension...... be much more widely applied, although it was originally based on linearized kinetics. The methodology of determining elasticity coefficients directly from pool levels is illustrated with an analysis of the first two steps of the biosynthetic pathway of penicillin. The results compare well with previous...

  18. Determination of thermodynamic parameters for enolization reaction of malonic and metylmalonic acids by using quartz crystal microbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Yoshimoto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the process of a bromination reaction of malonic acid and methylmalonic acid in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction by using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM. The process involves an enolization reaction as a rate-determining step. We found that, in the step, the variation of Br2 concentration induced an exactly quantitative shift of a resonant frequency of the QCM, based on the change of the surface mass on the QCM and the solution viscosity and density. This new finding enabled us to estimate the reaction rate constants and the thermodynamic parameters of the enolization reaction due to a QCM measurement. The values measured by the QCM were in good agreement with those measured by a UV-spectrophotometer. As a result, we succeeded to develop a new measurement method of a nonlinear chemical reaction.

  19. Accessing reaction rate constants in on-column reaction chromatography: an extended unified equation for reaction educts and products with different response factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, Oliver; Bremer, Sabrina; Weber, Sven K

    2009-11-01

    An extension of the unified equation of chromatography to directly access reaction rate constants k(1) of first-order reaction in on-column chromatography is presented. This extended equation reflects different response factors in the detection of the reaction educt and product which arise from structural changes by elimination or addition, e.g., under pseudo-first-order reaction conditions. The reaction rate constants k(1) and Gibbs activation energies DeltaG(double dagger) of first-order reactions taking place in a chromatographic system can be directly calculated from the chromatographic parameters, i.e., retention times of the educt E and product P (t(R)(A) and t(R)(B)), peak widths at half height (w(A) and w(B)), the relative plateau height (h(p)) of the conversion profile, and the individual response factors f(A) and f(B). The evaluation of on-column reaction gas chromatographic experiments is exemplified by the evaluation of elution profiles obtained by ring-closing metathesis reaction of N,N-diallytrifluoroacetamide in presence of Grubbs second-generation catalyst, dissolved in polydimethylsiloxane (GE SE 30).

  20. Simulation of biochemical reactions with time-dependent rates by the rejection-based algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanh, Vo Hong, E-mail: vo@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research - University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology, Piazza Manifattura 1, Rovereto 38068 (Italy); Priami, Corrado, E-mail: priami@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research - University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology, Piazza Manifattura 1, Rovereto 38068 (Italy); Department of Mathematics, University of Trento, Trento (Italy)

    2015-08-07

    We address the problem of simulating biochemical reaction networks with time-dependent rates and propose a new algorithm based on our rejection-based stochastic simulation algorithm (RSSA) [Thanh et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141(13), 134116 (2014)]. The computation for selecting next reaction firings by our time-dependent RSSA (tRSSA) is computationally efficient. Furthermore, the generated trajectory is exact by exploiting the rejection-based mechanism. We benchmark tRSSA on different biological systems with varying forms of reaction rates to demonstrate its applicability and efficiency. We reveal that for nontrivial cases, the selection of reaction firings in existing algorithms introduces approximations because the integration of reaction rates is very computationally demanding and simplifying assumptions are introduced. The selection of the next reaction firing by our approach is easier while preserving the exactness.

  1. Chemical reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure of reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustova, Elena V.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2014-12-01

    Viscous gas flows with vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions in the state-to-state approach are analyzed. A modified Chapman-Enskog method is used for the determination of chemical reaction and vibrational transition rates and non-equilibrium pressure. Constitutive equations depend on the thermodynamic forces: velocity divergence and chemical reaction/transition affinity. As an application, N2 flow with vibrational relaxation across a shock wave is investigated. Two distinct processes occur behind the shock: for small values of the distance the affinity is large and vibrational relaxation is in its initial stage; for large distances the affinity is small and the chemical reaction is in its final stage. The affinity contributes more to the transition rate than the velocity divergence and the effect of these two contributions are more important for small distances from the shock front. For the non-equilibrium pressure, the term associated with the bulk viscosity increases by a small amount the hydrostatic pressure.

  2. A kinetic study of the reactions between H2O2 and Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase; evidence for an electrostatic control of the reaction rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viglino, P; Scarpa, M; Rotilio, G; Rigo, A

    1988-01-04

    H2O2 was shown to reduce the copper ion of native bovine Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) (ECu2+) and to oxidize the reduced enzyme (ECu+). The time-course of these processes was monitored by NMR measurement of the longitudinal relaxation rate of the water protons. A steady-state characterized by the same ratio [ECu2+]/[( EC2+] + [ECu+]) was obtained either by starting from the oxidized or the reduced enzyme. The kinetics of these processes appear to be quite complex, since different reactions between H2O2, or its reaction products, and the enzyme-bound copper control the reaction rate. The solution of the differential equations describing the kinetic processes showed that the oxidation and the reduction of the copper ion by H2O2 are first-order with respect to the copper ion itself only when these processes approach the steady-state. The rate constants of the reduction and oxidation reactions were calculated according to these equations and were found to have comparable values which are in the range 5-80 and 5-45 M-1.min-1, respectively, changing the pH from 5.6 to 7 at 0.21 M ionic strength. This result, together with the dependence of the reaction rates on pH and ionic strength, points to HO2- as the reactive species in both processes, and indicates that the electrostatic control of the access of the peroxide to the active site is the rate-determining step of the two redox reactions.

  3. Shock tube measurements of the rate constant for the reaction ethanol + OH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranic, Ivo; Pang, Genny A; Hanson, Ronald K; Golden, David M; Bowman, Craig T

    2014-02-06

    The overall rate constant for the reaction ethanol + OH → products was determined experimentally from 900 to 1270 K behind reflected shock waves. Ethan(18)ol was utilized for these measurements in order to avoid the recycling of OH radicals following H-atom abstraction at the β-site of ethanol. Similar experiments were also performed with unlabeled ethan(16)ol in order to infer the rate constant that excludes reactivity at the β-site. The two data sets were used to directly infer the branching ratio for the reaction at the β-site. Experimental data in the current study and in previous low-temperature studies for the overall rate constant are best fit by the expression koverall = 5.07 × 10(5) T[K](2.31) exp(608/T[K]) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), valid from 300 to 1300 K. Measurements indicate that the branching ratio of the β-site is between 20 and 25% at the conditions studied. Pseudo-first-order reaction conditions were generated using tert-butylhydroperoxide (TBHP) as a fast source of (16)OH with ethanol in excess. (16)OH mole fraction time-histories were measured using narrow-line width laser absorption near 307 nm. Measurements were performed at the linecenter of the R22(5.5) transition in the A-X(0,0) band of (16)OH that does not overlap with any absorption features of (18)OH, thus producing a measurement of the (16)OH mole fraction that is insensitive to the presence of (18)OH.

  4. Extreme reaction times determine fluctuation scaling in human color vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José M.; Díaz, José A.

    2016-11-01

    In modern mental chronometry, human reaction time defines the time elapsed from stimulus presentation until a response occurs and represents a reference paradigm for investigating stochastic latency mechanisms in color vision. Here we examine the statistical properties of extreme reaction times and whether they support fluctuation scaling in the skewness-kurtosis plane. Reaction times were measured for visual stimuli across the cardinal directions of the color space. For all subjects, the results show that very large reaction times deviate from the right tail of reaction time distributions suggesting the existence of dragon-kings events. The results also indicate that extreme reaction times are correlated and shape fluctuation scaling over a wide range of stimulus conditions. The scaling exponent was higher for achromatic than isoluminant stimuli, suggesting distinct generative mechanisms. Our findings open a new perspective for studying failure modes in sensory-motor communications and in complex networks.

  5. A simple expression for the apparent reaction rate of large wood char gasification with steam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeki, Kentaro; Roh, Seon-Ah; Min, Tai-Jin; Namioka, Tomoaki; Yoshikawa, Kunio

    2010-06-01

    A simple expression for the apparent reaction rate of large wood char gasification with steam is proposed. Large char samples were gasified under steam atmosphere using a thermo-balance reactor. The apparent reaction rate was expressed as the product of the intrinsic rate and the effective factor. The effective factor was modified to include the effect of change in char diameter and intrinsic reaction rate during the reaction. Assuming uniform conversion ratio throughout a particle, the simplified reaction scheme was divided into three stages. In the initial stage, the local conversion ratio increases without particle shrinkage. In the middle stage, the particle shrinks following the shrinking core model without change in the local conversion ratio. In the final stage, the local conversion ratio increases without particle shrinkage. The validity of the modified effective value was confirmed by comparison with experimental results.

  6. Chemical reaction rates of ozone in water infusions of wheat, beech, oak and pine leaves of different ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potier, Elise; Loubet, Benjamin; Durand, Brigitte; Flura, Dominique; Bourdat-Deschamps, Marjolaine; Ciuraru, Raluca; Ogée, Jérôme

    2017-02-01

    In this study we present results from a laboratory experiment designed to evaluate the first-order chemical reaction rate (k) of ozone in water films on plant leaves occurring during dew or rain events. Ozone deposition to wet cuticles is indeed known to be a significant pathway of ozone deposition, but the underlying processes are not yet well understood. Leaf infusions obtained by infusing plant leaves with water at room temperature were introduced into a wet effluent denuder fed with a flux of ozone-rich air. Ozone, water vapour concentrations and temperature were measured in both inlet and outlet airflows in order to compute ozone reaction rates kr using an ozone reaction-diffusion model in the water film. Ascorbate solutions were used to validate the set up and led to kr = 3.6 107 M-1 s-1 consistent with the literature. Ozone reaction rates were determined for wheat, beech, oak and pine leaves infusions at several developmental stages, as well as for rain samples. Leaf infusions reaction rates were between 240 s-1 and 3.4 105 s-1 depending on species and developmental stage, while k for rain water ranged from 130 to 830 s-1. Wheat leaves solutions showed significantly (P ascorbate and VOCs as well as the reaction products of ozone with these compounds.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Brussels nuclear reaction rate library (Aikawa+, 2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, M.; Arnould, M.; Goriely, S.; Jorissen, A.; Takahashi, K.

    2005-07-01

    The present data is part of the Brussels nuclear reaction rate library (BRUSLIB) for astrophysics applications and concerns nuclear reaction rate predictions calculated within the statistical Hauser-Feshbach approximation and making use of global and coherent microscopic nuclear models for the quantities (nuclear masses, nuclear structure properties, nuclear level densities, gamma-ray strength functions, optical potentials) entering the rate calculations. (4 data files).

  8. Determination of kinetics of the karl Fischer reaction based on coulometry and true potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergren, A

    1996-03-01

    A new measurement technique based on a combination of coulometry and zero-current potentiometry is described for determination of the kinetics of rapidly reacting Karl Fischer (KF) reagents. This makes it possible to determine the order as well as the rate constant for large variations in the concentrations of iodine and water present during a titration. It was shown that for imidazole-based methanolic reagents exposed to a large variation in the concentration of water, the KF reaction is first order with respect to iodine, sulfur dioxide, and water only for reagents in which the concentration of nonprotonated imidazole is very low. The rate constant determined for such a reagent (1 M imidazole, 0.8 M sulfur dioxide, 0.1 M iodine) was equal to that reported earlier in the literature. Regions showing first-order kinetics were also found for low concentrations of water when imidazole concentrations up to 2 mol/L were used, provided that these reagents had a quotient [Im](free)/[ImH(+)] around 4. In the interval 2-8 mol/L of imidazole, the order of the reaction with respect to iodine was, in most cases, one-half, while it was changed to between one-half and one with respect to water. The rate of the KF reaction was found to increase by nearly 5 orders of magnitude for a reagent in which the concentration of nonprotonated imidazole was increased from 0 (rate constant equal to 2.6 × 10(3) L(2) mol(-)(2) s(-)(1)) to about 7 mol/L. For most of these reagents, a recovery rate close to 100% was attained. A high concentration of nonprotonated imidazole in combination with a high concentration of sulfur dioxide could, however, lead to a change in stoichiometry of the KF reaction when larger amounts of water were determined (250 μg of water added to 3.4 mL of reagent solution). A reaction scheme is proposed which might explain this change in stoichiometry observed for some reagent compositions. By use of the described most rapidly reacting reagents, it was shown to be

  9. Growth rate determinations from radiocarbon in bamboo corals (genus Keratoisis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jesse R.; Robinson, Laura F.; Hönisch, Bärbel

    2015-11-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements are an important tool for determining growth rates of bamboo corals, a cosmopolitan group of calcitic deep-sea corals. Published growth rate estimates for bamboo corals are highly variable, with potential environmental or ecological drivers of this variability poorly constrained. Here we systematically investigate the application of 14C for growth rate determinations in bamboo corals using 55 14C dates on the calcite and organic fractions of six bamboo corals (identified as Keratoisis sp.) from the western North Atlantic Ocean. Calcite 14C measurements on the distal surface of these corals and five previously published bamboo corals exhibit a strong one-to-one relationship with the 14C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DI14C) in ambient seawater (r2=0.98), confirming the use of Keratoisis sp. calcite 14C as a proxy for seawater 14C activity. Radial growth rates determined from 14C age-depth regressions, 14C plateau tuning and bomb 14C reference chronologies range from 12 to 78 μm y-1, in general agreement with previously published radiometric growth rates. We document potential biases to 14C growth rate determinations resulting from water mass variability, bomb radiocarbon, secondary infilling (ontogeny), and growth rate nonlinearity. Radial growth rates for Keratoisis sp. specimens do not correlate with ambient temperature, suggesting that additional biological and/or environmental factors may influence bamboo coral growth rates.

  10. NATREX AND DETERMINATION OF REAL EXCHANGE RATE OF RMB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Holger van Eden; LIU Bin; Gerbert Romyn; YANG Xiaoguang

    2001-01-01

    ]n this paper, we analyze the movements of the real exchange rate in China.Our empirical evidence shows that the purchasing power parity does not hold in the long run, and the real exchange rate is non-stationary. The decomposition of the movements of the real exchange rate also indicates that real shocks result in permanent changes in the real exchange rate whereas nominal shocks just result in temporary changes.Based on these facts,we apply NATREX approach to analyze the detrmination of real exchange rate in China.The NATREX model successfully explains the evolution of the real exchange rate in China:The real exchange rate in the long run is determined by the real fundamentals including the productivity at home and abroad,and the domestic time preference.In the long run,a rise of the domestic productivity significantly appreciates the real exchange rate whereas a rise of the foreign productivity significantly appreciates the real exchange rate whereas a rise of the fireign productivity or a rise of the domestic time preference significantly depreciates the real exchange rate.We also find that the estimated NATREX rate converges to the steady-state exchange rate in the long run.Although there are short-run fluctuations around the NATREX rate,the real exchange rate will converge to the NATREX rate over time.

  11. Determinants of Commercial banks' interest rate spreads in Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The profit they ... detrimental to financial development and economic growth as credit would not be flowing to ... sectors thus letting interest rates to be market determined. ..... positive relationship was expected as taxes increase costs for banks.

  12. Determining Equilibrium Constants for Dimerization Reactions from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Djurre H.; Schafer, Lars V.; De Vries, Alex H.; Marrink, Siewert J.; Berendsen, Herman J. C.; Grubmueller, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    With today's available computer power, free energy calculations from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations "via counting" become feasible for an increasing number of reactions. An example is the dimerization reaction of transmembrane alpha-helices. If an extended simulation of the two helices c

  13. Shock tube/laser absorption measurements of the reaction rates of OH with ethylene and propene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasu, Subith S; Hong, Zekai; Davidson, David F; Hanson, Ronald K; Golden, David M

    2010-11-04

    Reaction rates of hydroxyl (OH) radicals with ethylene (C₂H₄) and propene (C₃H₆) were studied behind reflected shock waves. OH + ethylene → products (rxn 1) rate measurements were conducted in the temperature range 973-1438 K, for pressures from 2 to 10 atm, and for initial concentrations of ethylene of 500, 751, and 1000 ppm. OH + propene → products (rxn 2) rate measurements spanned temperatures of 890-1366 K, pressures near 2.3 atm, and initial propene concentrations near 300 ppm. OH radicals were produced by shock-heating tert-butyl hydroperoxide, (CH₃)₃-CO-OH, and monitored by laser absorption near 306.7 nm. Rate constants for the reactions of OH with ethylene and propene were extracted by matching modeled and measured OH concentration time-histories in the reflected shock region. Current data are in excellent agreement with previous studies and extend the temperature range of OH + propene data. Transition state theory calculations using recent ab initio results give excellent agreement with our measurements and other data outside our temperature range. Fits (in units of cm³/mol/s) to the abstraction channels of OH + ethylene and OH + propene are k₁ = 2.23 × 10⁴ (T)(2.745) exp(-1115 K/T) for 600-2000 K and k₂ = 1.94 × 10⁶ (T)(2.229) exp(-540 K/T) for 700-1500 K, respectively. A rate constant determination for the reaction TBHP → products (rxn 3) was also obtained in the range 745-1014 K using OH data from behind both incident and reflected shock waves. These high-temperature measurements were fit with previous low-temperature data, and the following rate expression (0.6-2.6 atm), applicable over the temperature range 400-1050 K, was obtained: k₃ (1/s) = 8.13 × 10⁻¹² (T)(7.83) exp(-14598 K/T).

  14. Characterization of shock-dependent reaction rates in an aluminum/perfluoropolyether pyrolant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dennis; Granier, John; Johnson, Richard; Littrell, Donald

    2017-01-01

    Energetic formulations of perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and aluminum are highly non-ideal. They release energy via a fast self-oxidized combustion wave rather than a true self-sustaining detonation. Unlike high explosives, the reactions are shock dependent and can be overdriven to control energy release rate. Reaction rate experiments show that the velocity can vary from 1.25 to 3 km/s. This paper examines the effect of the initial shock conditions upon the reaction rate of the explosive. The following conditions were varied in a series of reaction rate experiments: the high explosive booster mass and geometry; shock attenuation; confinement; and rate stick diameter and length. Several experiments designed to isolate and quantify these dependencies are described and summarized.

  15. Determination of the of rate cross slip of screw dislocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Tejs; Rasmussen, Torben; Leffers, Torben;

    2000-01-01

    The rate for cross slip of screw dislocations during annihilation of screw dipoles in copper is determined by molecular dynamics simulations. The temperature dependence of the rate is seen to obey an Arrhenius behavior in the investigated temperature range: 225-375 K. The activation energy...

  16. Comparing transfusion reaction rates for various plasma types: a systematic review and meta-analysis/regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadah, Nicholas H; van Hout, Fabienne M A; Schipperus, Martin R; le Cessie, Saskia; Middelburg, Rutger A; Wiersum-Osselton, Johanna C; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2017-09-01

    We estimated rates for common plasma-associated transfusion reactions and compared reported rates for various plasma types. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of peer-reviewed articles that reported plasma transfusion reaction rates. Random-effects pooled rates were calculated and compared between plasma types. Meta-regression was used to compare various plasma types with regard to their reported plasma transfusion reaction rates. Forty-eight studies reported transfusion reaction rates for fresh-frozen plasma (FFP; mixed-sex and male-only), amotosalen INTERCEPT FFP, methylene blue-treated FFP, and solvent/detergent-treated pooled plasma. Random-effects pooled average rates for FFP were: allergic reactions, 92/10(5) units transfused (95% confidence interval [CI], 46-184/10(5) units transfused); febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs), 12/10(5) units transfused (95% CI, 7-22/10(5) units transfused); transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), 6/10(5) units transfused (95% CI, 1-30/10(5) units transfused); transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), 1.8/10(5) units transfused (95% CI, 1.2-2.7/10(5) units transfused); and anaphylactic reactions, 0.8/10(5) units transfused (95% CI, 0-45.7/10(5) units transfused). Risk differences between plasma types were not significant for allergic reactions, TACO, or anaphylactic reactions. Methylene blue-treated FFP led to fewer FNHTRs than FFP (risk difference = -15.3 FNHTRs/10(5) units transfused; 95% CI, -24.7 to -7.1 reactions/10(5) units transfused); and male-only FFP led to fewer cases of TRALI than mixed-sex FFP (risk difference = -0.74 TRALI/10(5) units transfused; 95% CI, -2.42 to -0.42 injuries/10(5) units transfused). Meta-regression demonstrates that the rate of FNHTRs is lower for methylene blue-treated compared with FFP, and the rate of TRALI is lower for male-only than for mixed-sex FFP; whereas no significant differences are observed between plasma types for allergic

  17. Alkaline activated slag cements. Determination of reaction degree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Jiménez, A.

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to evaluate the validity of non-calorimetric different methods, used in the determination of reaction degree of alkaline activated slag pastes. The methods used were: (a chemical separation by methanol-salicylic acid; (b determination of the weight loss mass between 100-600°C in TG curves, associated to chemically combined water; (c quantification of the -74 ppm signal in 29Si MAS-NMR spectra. The parameters considered in the process were: nature of the alkaline activator (Waterglass, Na2CO3 and NaOH, activator concentration (4% and 3% Na2O in mass with respect to the slag, curing temperature (25 and 45°C, slag specific surface (460 and 900 m2/kg and time of reaction (from 7 days to 18 months. The results obtained indicate that none of the three methods is definitive but complementary and they provide to follow the reactive evolution of the alkaline activated slag cements. The method based on the quantification of the -74 ppm signal in the 29Si MAS NMR is the most suitable method.

    El objetivo del presente trabajo fue evaluar la validez de diferentes métodos, no calorimétricos, utilizados en la determinación del grado de reacción de pastas de escoria activada alcalinamente. Los métodos utilizados fueron: (a método de separación química por disolución en metanol ácido-salicílico; (b determinación de las pérdidas de masa entre 100-600°C en las curvas de TG, pérdidas asociadas a la cantidad de agua químicamente combinada: (c cuantificación de la señal de -74 ppm de los espectros de 29Si RMN MAS. Las variables consideradas en el proceso fueron: naturaleza del activador alcalino (Waterglass, Na2CO3 y NaOH, concentración del activador (4% y 3% de Na2O en masa respecto a la escoria, temperatura de curado (25 y 45°C, superficie específica de la escoria (460 y 900 m2/kg y

  18. A Determination of the Rate of Change of G

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-02-01

    RATE OF CHANGE OF G Thomas C. Van...TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Determination Of The Rate Of Change Of G 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...related to the rate of change of G. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report (SAR) 18. NUMBER

  19. Determination of rapid chlorination rate constants by a stopped-flow spectrophotometric competition kinetics method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dean; Liu, Huijuan; Qiang, Zhimin; Qu, Jiuhui

    2014-05-15

    Free chlorine is extensively used for water and wastewater disinfection nowadays. However, it still remains a big challenge to determine the rate constants of rapid chlorination reactions although competition kinetics and stopped-flow spectrophotometric (SFS) methods have been employed individually to investigate fast reaction kinetics. In this work, we proposed an SFS competition kinetics method to determine the rapid chlorination rate constants by using a common colorimetric reagent, N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPD), as a reference probe. A kinetic equation was first derived to estimate the reaction rate constant of DPD towards chlorine under a given pH and temperature condition. Then, on that basis, an SFS competition kinetics method was proposed to determine directly the chlorination rate constants of several representative compounds including tetracycline, ammonia, and four α-amino acids. Although Cl2O is more reactive than HOCl, its contribution to the overall chlorination kinetics of the test compounds could be neglected in this study. Finally, the developed method was validated through comparing the experimentally measured chlorination rate constants of the selected compounds with those obtained or calculated from literature and analyzing with Taft's correlation as well. This study demonstrates that the SFS competition kinetics method can measure the chlorination rate constants of a test compound rapidly and accurately.

  20. Astrophysical Reaction Rates of the 8Li(p,γ)9Beg.s. Direct Capture Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Jun; WANG You-Bao; LI Zhi-Hong; GUO Bing; LIU Wei-Ping; BAI Xi-Xiang; ZENG Sheng; LIAN Gang; YAN Sheng-Quan; WANG Bao-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    Based 0n the angular distribution of the 8Li(d,n)9Beg.s. reaction at Ec.m.=8.0 MeV and distorted wave Born approximation analysis,the single particle spectroscopic factor S1,3/2 for the ground state of 9Be=8Li(×)p is derived to be 0.64±0.21.In addition,we deduce the astrophysical S-factors and rates of the 8Li(p,γ)9Beg.s. direct capture reaction at energies of astrophysical interests.

  1. Astrophysical S-Factors and Reaction Rates of Threshold (p, n)-Reactions on 99-102Ru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skakun, Ye.; Rauscher, T.

    2010-08-01

    Astrophysical S-factors of (p, n) reactions on 99Ru, 100Ru, 101Ru, and 102Ru were derived from the sum of experimental isomeric and ground states cross sections measured in the incident proton energy range of 5-9 MeV. They were compared with Hauser-Feshbach statistical model predictions of the NON-SMOKER code. Good agreement was found in the majority of cases. Reaction rates were derived up to 8.7 GK stellar temperature by combining experiment and theory.

  2. Combustion of Bimodal Nano/Micro Aluminum Suspension with New Reaction Rate Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bidabadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study a mathematical model for combustion of bimodal particle in lean flow was developed. The difference between structure of flame in this work and previous ones was that, in those flame was divided by five zones and reaction rate was considered to be constant in reaction zones and also zero in post flame zone. In reality it was obvious with respect to shape and size of different particles in dust, reaction didn't end suddenly. In the present research the heat loss term, which was assumed to be linearly proportional to temperature difference, was added to the energy conservation equation and reaction rate was considered proportional to available amount of fuel, leading to exponentially decreasing of reaction rate. The flame speed and temperature distribution were obtained by solving the energy equation in each zone and matching the temperature and heat flux at the interfacial boundaries. Calculated values of flame speed were in good agreement with experimental data.

  3. Reaction rate estimation of controlled-release antifouling paint binders: Rosin-based systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meseguer Yebra, Diego; Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2005-01-01

    at product optimisation and innovation (e.g. incorporation of natural active agents). This study seeks to attain scientifically founded knowledge of the reaction mechanisms and the rate of reaction with sea water of a Zn-carboxylate of a synthetic rosin compound. The kinetic expression attained can be used...... have shown that mathematical coating models based on a fundamental knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of A/F paints is a promising tool for accelerated product testing at different operational conditions of a sailing ship or a paint rotor. Such models can also be used for generation of ideas aiming...... rather than pointing at a certain diffusion control in the reaction rate experiments. The reverse reaction is found not to affect the hydrolysis rate within the pores, of antifouling paints significantly. It is concluded, from the reaction mechanism proposed, that the observed partial exchange of Zn2...

  4. Development of Theoretical Methods for Predicting Solvent Effects on Reaction Rates in Supercritical Water Oxidation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Tucker, manuscript in preparation. “Examination of Nonequilibrium Solvent Effects on an SN2 Reaction in Supercritical Water,” R. Behera, B...DATES COVERED Final: 7/1/99 - 12/31/02 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of theoretical methods for predicting solvent effects on reactions ...computational methods for predicting how reaction rate constants will vary with thermodynamic condition in supercritical water (SCW). Towards this

  5. The Relation Between Damping and Reaction Rates of Fermions in Hot Gauge Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Ayala, A P; Weber, A; Ayala, Alejandro; Olivo, Juan Carlos D'; Weber, Axel

    1998-01-01

    We examine the relation between the damping rate of a chiral fermion mode propagating in a hot plasma and the rate at which the mode approaches equilibrium. We show that these two quantities, obtained from the imaginary part of the fermion self-energy, are equal provided the reaction rate is defined using the appropriate wave function of the mode in the medium.

  6. Rate of influenza vaccination and its adverse reactions seen in health care personnel in a single tertiary hospital in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Seop; Lee, Kang-Hyu; Jung, Min-Hee; Lee, Heung-Bum

    2008-11-01

    To determine the vaccination rate and its adverse reactions after influenza vaccination, we administered an anonymous questionnaire survey during the last three influenza seasons from 2005-2006 to 2007-2008. In total, the rate of Influenza vaccination was 82.3% in health-care personnel. Dividing the subjects into four groups by work category, the vaccine coverage rates were as follows: physicians 67.9%; nurses and nursing assistants 91.2%; technicians, pharmacists, therapists, and administrative personnel 80.2%; and other personnel not directly involved in patient care but having the potential of being exposed to infectious agents 89%. The most frequent adverse reaction after vaccination was soreness at the injection site in 33.4%, followed by skin redness in 18.1%, myalgia in 17.7%, fatigue in 17%, and febrile sensation in 15.2%. After vaccination, such adverse reactions began within 24 h in 70.6% of subjects. Eighty-nine percent of those adverse reactions persisted for 1-3 days, but 11% persisted more than 4 days. Serious adverse reactions were not noted; the reported adverse reactions were relatively minor and transient. Surprisingly, among those who were vaccinated, the physicians' participation was the lowest. We believe that influenza vaccination is safe and that physicians should be more concerned with influenza vaccination and its impact on the health-care community.

  7. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, K.; Steefel, C. I.; White, A.F.; Stonestrom, D.A.

    2009-02-25

    In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka marine terrace chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized (White et al., 2008, GCA) and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisser and [2006] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [1994], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at the depth and time where the reaction fronts of the primary minerals overlap. The modeling indicates that the argillic horizon at Santa Cruz can be explained almost entirely by weathering of primary minerals and in situ clay precipitation accompanied by undersaturation of kaolinite at the top of the profile. The rate constant for kaolinite precipitation was also determined based on model simulations of mineral abundances and dissolved Al, SiO{sub 2}(aq) and pH in pore waters. Changes in the rate of kaolinite precipitation or the flow rate do not affect the gradient of the primary mineral weathering profiles, but instead control the rate of propagation of the primary mineral weathering fronts and thus total

  8. The Reaction Mechanism and Rate Constants in the Radiolysis of Fe2+-Cu2+ Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbakke, Erling; Sehested, Knud; Rasmussen, O. Lang

    1976-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis and gamma radiolysis have been used to study the reaction mechanism in the radiolysis of aqueous solutions of Fe2+ and Cu2+. A reaction scheme has been developed and confirmed by computation of the corresponding complete set of differential equations. The rate constants for some...

  9. Analysis of transfer reactions: determination of spectroscopic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeley, N. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules de Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee (DSM/DAPNIA/SPhN), 91- Gif sur Yvette (France); The Andrzej So an Institute for Nuclear Studies, Dept. of Nuclear Reactions, Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-07-01

    An overview of the most popular models used for the analysis of direct reaction data is given, concentrating on practical aspects. The 4 following models (in order of increasing sophistication): the distorted wave born approximation (DWBA), the adiabatic model, the coupled channels born approximation, and the coupled reaction channels are briefly described. As a concrete example, the C{sup 12}(d,p)C{sup 13} reaction at an incident deuteron energy of 30 MeV is analysed with progressively more physically sophisticated models. The effect of the choice of the reaction model on the spectroscopic information extracted from the data is investigated and other sources of uncertainty in the derived spectroscopic factors are discussed. We have showed that the choice of the reaction model can significantly influence the nuclear structure information, particularly the spectroscopic factors or amplitudes but occasionally also the spin-parity, that we wish to extract from direct reaction data. We have also demonstrated that the DWBA can fail to give a satisfactory description of transfer data but when the tenets of the theory are fulfilled DWBA can work very well and will yield the same results as most sophisticated models. The use of global rather than fitted optical potentials can also lead to important differences in the extracted spectroscopic factors.

  10. Neutron Scattering in Hydrogenous Moderators, Studied by Time Dependent Reaction Rate Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, L.G.; Moeller, E.; Purohit, S.N.

    1966-03-15

    The moderation and absorption of a neutron burst in water, poisoned with the non-1/v absorbers cadmium and gadolinium, has been followed on the time scale by multigroup calculations, using scattering kernels for the proton gas and the Nelkin model. The time dependent reaction rate curves for each absorber display clear differences for the two models, and the separation between the curves does not depend much on the absorber concentration. An experimental method for the measurement of infinite medium reaction rate curves in a limited geometry has been investigated. This method makes the measurement of the time dependent reaction rate generally useful for thermalization studies in a small geometry of a liquid hydrogenous moderator, provided that the experiment is coupled to programs for the calculation of scattering kernels and time dependent neutron spectra. Good agreement has been found between the reaction rate curve, measured with cadmium in water, and a calculated curve, where the Haywood kernel has been used.

  11. INVESTIGATING THE DETERMINANTS OF LONG-RUN SOVEREIGN RATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilian - Constantin MIRICESCU

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The significance of sovereign rating for local and international investors is essential because in recent period many countries had problems concerning the payment of public loans. In most European Union countries government debt to GDP ratio exceeds the Maastricht ceiling and investors may be cautious at sovereign rating modifying. This paper focuses on long-run sovereign rating assigned by Standard & Poor’s for European Union countries. We will use the regression analysis in order to investigate quantitative and qualitative determinants of long-run sovereign rating.

  12. Determination of erosion rates with cosmogenic 26Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strack, E.; Heisinger, B.; Dockhorn, B.; Hartmann, F. J.; Korschinek, G.; Nolte, E.; Morteani, G.; Petitjean, C.; Neumaier, S.

    1994-06-01

    A preliminary depth profile of the long-lived cosmogenic radioisotope 26Al(5 +) in quartz samples from pre-drill cores of the continental deep drill core (KTB) at Egerer Waldhaeusl, Poppenreuth and Puellersreuth was measured with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). These drill cores are situated in Upper Palatinate (Oberpfalz, Germany) in a region with very low erosion. The cosmogenic production of 26Al in quartz was calculated. The calculation is based on two reactions: spallation reactions on silicon in the first few meters and the capture reaction of slow negative muons Si(μ -, ν μxn, which is the dominant process below a few meters. The branching ratio of the μ - capture reaction in silicon to 26Al(5 +) was determined by irradiating a quartz sample with slow negative muons at PSI in Villigen (Switzerland) and by measuring the produced 26Al by AMS. Calculations of 26Al depth profiles taking erosion into account were performed. The agreement between the depth profile calculated with no erosion and the measured preliminary profile is very satisfactory.

  13. Shell and explosive hydrogen burning. Nuclear reaction rates for hydrogen burning in RGB, AGB and Novae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeltzig, A. [Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Bruno, C.G.; Davinson, T. [University of Edinburgh, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Cavanna, F.; Ferraro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Genova (Italy); INFN, Genova (Italy); Cristallo, S. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, INAF, Teramo (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy); Depalo, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); INFN, Padova (Italy); DeBoer, R.J.; Wiescher, M. [University of Notre Dame, Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Notre Dame, Indiana (United States); Di Leva, A.; Imbriani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy); Marigo, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); Terrasi, F. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica Seconda Universita di Napoli, Caserta (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    The nucleosynthesis of light elements, from helium up to silicon, mainly occurs in Red Giant and Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and Novae. The relative abundances of the synthesized nuclides critically depend on the rates of the nuclear processes involved, often through non-trivial reaction chains, combined with complex mixing mechanisms. In this paper, we summarize the contributions made by LUNA experiments in furthering our understanding of nuclear reaction rates necessary for modeling nucleosynthesis in AGB stars and Novae explosions. (orig.)

  14. The Effect of the Triple-α Reaction Rate on Stellar Evolution at Low-Metallicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Takuma; Hirschi, Raphael; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2010-06-01

    We investigate the effect of the triple-α reaction rates on the evolution of low-mass stars and massive stars. The former is compared with the observations of metal-poor stars known to date. For the latter, we discuss the impact of recent calculation of triple-α reaction rate by Ogata et al. (2009, PTP, 122, 1055) on the evolution until carbon burning.

  15. Rate and mechanism of the reactions of OH and Cl with 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferronato, C.; Orlando, J. J.; Tyndall, G. S.

    1998-10-01

    An environmental chamber/Fourier transform infrared system was used to determine the rate coefficient k1 for the gas-phase reaction of OH with 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO, (CH3)2C(OH)CH=CH2), relative to the rate of its reaction with ethylene (k2) and propylene (k3). Experiments performed at 295±1 K, in 700 torr total pressure of air, gave k1 = (6.9±1.0) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. At 295±1 K, the reaction of OH with MBO yielded, on a per mole basis, (52±5)% acetone, (50±5)% glycolaldehyde, and (35±4)% formaldehyde. The production of acetone from the oxidation of MBO may be of significance globally. The kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of chlorine atoms with MBO (k15) have also been studied at 700 torr total pressure of air and 295±1 K. The rate coefficient was determined using a relative rate technique, with ethane (k16), ethylene (k17), and cyclohexane (k18) as reference compounds. The value of k15 was found to be (3.3±0.4) × 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 at 295 K. The major carbon-containing products obtained in the Cl-atom oxidation of MBO were acetone (47±5)%, chloroacetaldehyde (53±5)%, HCOCl (<11%), and formaldehyde (6 ± 2)%.

  16. Measurements of activation reaction rates in transverse shielding concrete exposed to the secondary particle field produced by intermediate energy heavy ions on an iron target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, T.; Morev, M. N.; Iimoto, T.; Kosako, T.

    2012-01-01

    Reaction rate distributions were measured inside a 60-cm thick concrete pile placed at the lateral position of a thick (stopping length) iron target that was bombarded with heavy ions, 400 MeV/u C and 800 MeV/u Si. Foils of aluminum and gold, as well as gold, tungsten and manganese covered with cadmium were inserted at various locations in the concrete pile to serve as activation detectors. Features of reaction rate distribution, such as the shape of the reaction rate profile, contribution of the neutrons from intra-nuclear cascade and that from evaporation to the activation reactions are determined by the analysis of measured reaction rates. The measured reaction rates were compared with those calculated with radiation transport simulation codes, FLUKA and PHITS, to verify their capability to predict induced activity. The simulated reaction rates agree with the experimental results within a factor of three in general. However, systematic discrepancies between simulated reaction rates and measured reaction rates attributed to the neutron source terms are observed.

  17. STARLIB: A Next-Generation Reaction-Rate Library for Nuclear Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Sallaska, A L; Champagne, A E; Goriely, S; Starrfield, S; Timmes, F X

    2013-01-01

    STARLIB is a next-generation, all-purpose nuclear reaction-rate library. For the first time, this library provides the rate probability density at all temperature grid points for convenient implementation in models of stellar phenomena. The recommended rate and its associated uncertainties are also included. Currently, uncertainties are absent from all other rate libraries, and, although estimates have been attempted in previous evaluations and compilations, these are generally not based on rigorous statistical definitions. A common standard for deriving uncertainties is clearly warranted. STARLIB represents a first step in addressing this deficiency by providing a tabular, up-to-date database that supplies not only the rate and its uncertainty but also its distribution. Because a majority of rates are lognormally distributed, this allows the construction of rate probability densities from the columns of STARLIB. This structure is based on a recently suggested Monte Carlo method to calculate reaction rates, w...

  18. Rate Constants and Activation Energies for Gas‐Phase Reactions of Three Cyclic Volatile Methyl Siloxanes with the Hydroxyl Radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safron, Andreas; Strandell, Michael; Kierkegaard, Amelie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH) is the major pathway for removal of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) from air. We present new measurements of second‐order rate constants for reactions of the cVMS octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) with OH determined at temperatures between 313 and 353 K. Our measurements were made using the method of relative rates with cyclohexane as a reference substance and were conducted in a 140‐mL gas‐phase reaction chamber with online mass spectrometry analysis. When extrapolated to 298 K, our measured reaction rate constants of D4 and D5 with the OH radical are 1.9 × 10−12 (95% confidence interval (CI): (1.7–2.2) × 10−12) and 2.6 × 10−12 (CI: (2.3–2.9) × 10−12) cm3 molecule−1 s−1, respectively, which are 1.9× and 1.7× faster than previous measurements. Our measured rate constant for D6 is 2.8 × 10−12 (CI: (2.5–3.2) × 10−12) cm3 molecule−1 s−1 and to our knowledge there are no comparable laboratory measurements in the literature. Reaction rates for D5 were 33% higher than for D4 (CI: 30–37%), whereas the rates for D6 were only 8% higher than for D5 (CI: 5–10%). The activation energies of the reactions of D4, D5, and D6 with OH were not statistically different and had a value of 4300 ± 2800 J/mol. PMID:27708500

  19. Rate Constants and Activation Energies for Gas-Phase Reactions of Three Cyclic Volatile Methyl Siloxanes with the Hydroxyl Radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safron, Andreas; Strandell, Michael; Kierkegaard, Amelie; Macleod, Matthew

    2015-07-01

    Reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH) is the major pathway for removal of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) from air. We present new measurements of second-order rate constants for reactions of the cVMS octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) with OH determined at temperatures between 313 and 353 K. Our measurements were made using the method of relative rates with cyclohexane as a reference substance and were conducted in a 140-mL gas-phase reaction chamber with online mass spectrometry analysis. When extrapolated to 298 K, our measured reaction rate constants of D4 and D5 with the OH radical are 1.9 × 10(-12) (95% confidence interval (CI): (1.7-2.2) × 10(-12)) and 2.6 × 10(-12) (CI: (2.3-2.9) × 10(-12)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively, which are 1.9× and 1.7× faster than previous measurements. Our measured rate constant for D6 is 2.8 × 10(-12) (CI: (2.5-3.2) × 10(-12)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and to our knowledge there are no comparable laboratory measurements in the literature. Reaction rates for D5 were 33% higher than for D4 (CI: 30-37%), whereas the rates for D6 were only 8% higher than for D5 (CI: 5-10%). The activation energies of the reactions of D4, D5, and D6 with OH were not statistically different and had a value of 4300 ± 2800 J/mol.

  20. Effect of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, and solvent on the rate of the Diels-Alder reaction between 9,10-anthracenedimethanol and maleic anhydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, V. D.; Kornilov, D. A.; Anikin, O. V.; Latypova, L. I.; Konovalov, A. I.

    2017-03-01

    The rate of the reaction between 9,10-anthracenedimethanol and maleic anhydride in 1,4-dioxane, acetonitrile, trichloromethane, and toluene is studied at 25, 35, 45°C in the pressure range of 1-1772 bar. The rate constants, enthalpies, entropies and activation volumes are determined. It is shown that the rate of reaction with 9,10-anthracenedimethanol is approximately one order of magnitude higher than with 9-anthracenemethanol.

  1. Analysis of turbulent free jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sislian, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    The nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of a supersonic axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel coflowing air stream is analyzed. Effective turbulent transport properties are determined using the (K-epsilon) model. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight reactions between six chemical species, H, O, H2O, OH, O2, and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved by an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions are obtained at two downstream locations of variables such as turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent dissipation rate, turbulent scale length, and viscosity. The results show that these variables attain peak values at the axis of symmetry. Computed distributions of velocity, temperature, and mass fraction are also given. A direct analytical approach to account for the effect of species concentration fluctuations on the mean production rate of species (the phenomenon of unmixedness) is also presented. However, the use of the method does not seem justified in view of the excessive computer time required to solve the resulting system of equations.

  2. Venting Design for Di-tert-butyl Peroxide Runaway Reaction Based on Accelerating Rate Calorimeter Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏彤彤; 蒋慧灵

    2012-01-01

    In order to design the relief system size of di-tert-butyl peroxide(DTBP) storage tanks,the runaway re-action of DTBP was simulated by accelerating rate calorimeter(ARC).The results indicated that under adiabatic conditions the initial exothermic temperature was 102.6 ℃,the maximum self-heating rate was 3.095×107 ℃·min-1,the maximum self-heating temperature was 375.9 ℃,and the pressure produced by unit mass was 4.512 MPa·g-1.Judged by ARC test,the emergency relief system for DTBP was a hybrid system.Based on Design Institute for Emergency Relief System(DIERS) method,the releasing mass flow rate W was determined by Leung methods,and the mass velocity G was calculated by two modified Omega methods.The two relief sizes calculated by monograph Omega method and arithmetic Omega method are close,with only 0.63% relative error.The monograph Omega method is more convenient to apply.

  3. Effects of a new triple-$\\alpha$ reaction rate on the helium ignition of accreting white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Saruwatari, Motoaki

    2010-01-01

    Effects of a new triple-alpha reaction rate on the ignition of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs accreting helium in a binary systems have been investigated. The ignition points determine the properties of a thermonuclear explosion of a Type Ia supernova. We examine the cases of different accretion rates of helium and different initial masses of the white dwarf, which was studied in detail by Nomoto. We find that for all cases from slow to intermediate accretion rates, nuclear burnings are ignited at the helium layers. As a consequence, carbon deflagration would be triggered for the lower accretion rate compared to that of $dM/dt\\simeq 4\\times10^{-8} M_{\\odot} \\rm yr^{-1}$ which has been believed to the lower limit of the accretion rate for the deflagration supernova. Furthermore, off-center helium detonation should result for intermediate and slow accretion rates and the region of carbon deflagration for slow accretion rate is disappeared.

  4. Determinants of Sub-Sovereign Government Ratings In Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas JANNONE-BELLOT

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to identify the determinantsof the rating assigned to sub-sovereignentities in Germany, Austria, Belgium, France,Italy and Spain, using a total of 92 territorial entitiesfor the 1989-2012 period. Multinomial orderedprobit estimation models were estimatedfor each specifi cation and agency.We conclude that the country’s rating is oneof the most important determinants of regionalgovernment’s ratings with a positive infl uence(as expected, and that the country debt/GDPratio is a stronger determinant for regions thantheir own indebtedness with a negative sign.Other relevant variables are population growthrate, unemployment rate, elderly people weight,regional public expenditure weight and size. Additionally,economic variables, such as country’srating and population growth are more importantto Fitch; whereas budget variables and size variablesare more relevant to Moody’s. Debt variablesand elderly people ratio are more importantto S&P.

  5. Definition and determination of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, Felipe; Marazzi, Marco; Castaño, Obis; Frutos, Luis Manuel, E-mail: luisma.frutos@uah.es [Departamento de Química Física, Universidad de Alcalá, 28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Acuña, A. Ulises [Instituto de Química Física “Rocasolano”, C.S.I.C., Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-01-21

    A definition of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate within the very weak electronic coupling limit is proposed, and a novel theoretical formalism is developed for its quantitative determination in terms of internal coordinates The present formalism permits (i) the separation of donor and acceptor contributions to the reaction coordinate, (ii) the identification of the intrinsic role of donor and acceptor in the triplet energy transfer process, and (iii) the quantification of the effect of every internal coordinate on the transfer process. This formalism is general and can be applied to classical as well as to nonvertical triplet energy transfer processes. The utility of the novel formalism is demonstrated here by its application to the paradigm of nonvertical triplet-triplet energy transfer involving cis-stilbene as acceptor molecule. In this way the effect of each internal molecular coordinate in promoting the transfer rate, from triplet donors in the low and high-energy limit, could be analyzed in detail.

  6. On the Sensitivity of Massive Star Nucleosynthesis and Evolution to Solar Abundances and to Uncertainties in Helium Burning Reaction Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Tur, Clarisse; Austin, Sam M

    2007-01-01

    We explore the dependence of pre-supernova evolution and supernova nucleosynthesis yields on the uncertainties in helium burning reaction rates. Using the revised solar abundances of Lodders (2003) for the initial stellar composition, instead of those of Anders & Grevesse (1989), changes the supernova yields and limits the constraints that those yields place on the 12C(a,g)16O reaction rate. The production factors of medium-weight elements (A = 16 to 40) were found to be in reasonable agreement with observed solar ratios within the current experimental uncertainties in the triple alpha reaction rate. Simultaneous variations by the same amount in both reaction rates or in either of them separately, however, can induce significant changes in the central 12C abundance at core carbon ignition and in the mass of the supernova remnant. It therefore remains important to have experimental determinations of the helium burning rates so that their ratio and absolute values are known with an accuracy of 10% or better...

  7. Monte carlo simulations of Yttrium reaction rates in Quinta uranium target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchopár M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The international collaboration Energy and Transmutation of Radioactive Waste (E&T RAW performed intensive studies of several simple accelerator-driven system (ADS setups consisting of lead, uranium and graphite which were irradiated by relativistic proton and deuteron beams in the past years at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR in Dubna, Russia. The most recent setup called Quinta, consisting of natural uranium target-blanket and lead shielding, was irradiated by deuteron beams in the energy range between 1 and 8 GeV in three accelerator runs at JINR Nuclotron in 2011 and 2012 with yttrium samples among others inserted inside the setup to measure the neutron flux in various places. Suitable activation detectors serve as one of possible tools for monitoring of proton and deuteron beams and for measurements of neutron field distribution in ADS studies. Yttrium is one of such suitable materials for monitoring of high energy neutrons. Various threshold reactions can be observed in yttrium samples. The yields of isotopes produced in the samples were determined using the activation method. Monte Carlo simulations of the reaction rates leading to production of different isotopes were performed in the MCNPX transport code and compared with the experimental results obtained from the yttrium samples.

  8. Origin of the Non-Arrhenius Behavior of the Rates of Enzymatic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Subhendu; Schopf, Patrick; Warshel, Arieh

    2017-07-13

    The origin of the non-Arrhenius behavior of the rate constant for hydride transfer enzymatic reactions has been a puzzling problem since its initial observation. This effect has been used originally to support the idea that enzymes work by dynamical effects and more recently to suggest an entropy funnel model. Our analysis, however, has advanced the idea that the reason for the non-Arrhenius trend reflects the temperature dependence of the rearrangements of the protein polar groups in response to the change in the charge distribution of the reacting system during the transition from the ground state (GS) to the transition state (TS). Here we examine the validity of our early proposal by simulating the catalytic reaction of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and determine the microscopic origin of the entropic and enthalpic contributions to the activation barrier. The corresponding analysis establishes the origin of the non-Arrhenius behaviors and quantifies our original suggestion that the classical effect is due to the entropic contributions of the environment. We also find that the quantum effects reflect in part the temperature dependence of the donor-acceptor distance.

  9. The methane rating system to determine coal face methane conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, A.P.; van Vuuren, J.J. [Itasca Africa (Pty) Ltd, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2001-07-01

    Methane Rating was developed from a need in South Africa to measure coal seam gas contents, as well as emission rates into the cutting zone for mechanical miners. These are then combined and compared to the average and normal conditions to provide a risk assessment tool for continuous miner operations. The last two years have seen widespread acceptance of Methane Rating as a practical and simple means of identifying seam gas contents and emission rates during mining, and of rating the changing methane conditions. The system uses proven direct methods of methane measurement to quantify the contents and emissions, combined with an innovative rating system. Each new result is compared with the expected average or normal conditions to determine its Methane Rating between 1 and 5. The present South African national database of over 340 individual samples from 31 mines shows methane contents can normally be expected between 0,2 m{sup 3}/t and 1,4 m{sub 3}/t, with emission rates during coal cutting of 20 l/t/min to 80 l/t/min. The highest risk rated mines are presently in the Secunda and eastern Witbank areas, with the lowest risk rated mines to the west of Witbank. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Monte Carlo analysis of uncertainty propagation in a stratospheric model. 2: Uncertainties due to reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarski, R. S.; Butler, D. M.; Rundel, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A concise stratospheric model was used in a Monte-Carlo analysis of the propagation of reaction rate uncertainties through the calculation of an ozone perturbation due to the addition of chlorine. Two thousand Monte-Carlo cases were run with 55 reaction rates being varied. Excellent convergence was obtained in the output distributions because the model is sensitive to the uncertainties in only about 10 reactions. For a 1 ppby chlorine perturbation added to a 1.5 ppby chlorine background, the resultant 1 sigma uncertainty on the ozone perturbation is a factor of 1.69 on the high side and 1.80 on the low side. The corresponding 2 sigma factors are 2.86 and 3.23. Results are also given for the uncertainties, due to reaction rates, in the ambient concentrations of stratospheric species.

  11. The Effects of Thermonuclear Reaction Rate Variations on Nova Nucleosynthesis A Sensitivity Study

    CERN Document Server

    Iliadis, C; José, J; Starrfield, S; Tupper, P; Iliadis, Christian; Champagne, Art; Jose, Jordi; Starrfield, Sumner; Tupper, Paul

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the effects of thermonuclear reaction rate uncertainties on nova nucleosynthesis. One-zone nucleosynthesis calculations have been performed by adopting temperature-density-time profiles of the hottest hydrogen-burning zone (i.e., the region in which most of the nucleosynthesis takes place). We obtain our profiles from 7 different, recently published, hydrodynamic nova simulations covering peak temperatures in the range from Tpeak=0.145-0.418 GK. For each of these profiles, we individually varied the rates of 175 reactions within their associated errors and analyzed the resulting abundance changes of 142 isotopes in the mass range below A=40. In total, we performed 7350 nuclear reaction network calculations. We use the most recent thermonuclear reaction rate evaluations for the mass ranges A=1-20 and A=20-40. For the theoretical astrophysicist, our results indicate the extent to which nova nucleosynthesis calculations depend on presently uncertain nuclear physics input, while for the experimenta...

  12. BRUSLIB and NETGEN: the Brussels nuclear reaction rate library and nuclear network generator for astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, M.; Arnould, M.; Goriely, S.; Jorissen, A.; Takahashi, K.

    2005-10-01

    Nuclear reaction rates are quantities of fundamental importance in astrophysics. Substantial efforts have been devoted in the last decades to measuring or calculating them. This paper presents a detailed description of the Brussels nuclear reaction rate library BRUSLIB and of the nuclear network generator NETGEN. BRUSLIB is made of two parts. The first one contains the 1999 NACRE compilation based on experimental data for 86 reactions with (mainly) stable targets up to Si. BRUSLIB provides an electronic link to the published, as well as to a large body of unpublished, NACRE data containing adopted rates, as well as lower and upper limits. The second part of BRUSLIB concerns nuclear reaction rate predictions to complement the experimentally-based rates. An electronic access is provided to tables of rates calculated within a statistical Hauser-Feshbach approximation, which limits the reliability of the rates to reactions producing compound nuclei with a high enough level density. These calculations make use of global and coherent microscopic nuclear models for the quantities entering the rate calculations. The use of such models makes the BRUSLIB rate library unique. A description of the Nuclear Network Generator NETGEN that complements the BRUSLIB package is also presented. NETGEN is a tool to generate nuclear reaction rates for temperature grids specified by the user. The information it provides can be used for a large variety of applications, including Big Bang nucleosynthesis, the energy generation and nucleosynthesis associated with the non-explosive and explosive hydrogen to silicon burning stages, or the synthesis of the heavy nuclides through the s-, α- and r-, rp- or p-processes.

  13. Oil Prices and Interest Rates: Do They Determine the Exchange Rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, I. A.; Old, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that the relationship between the British pound sterling, interest rates, and oil prices has been overemphasized by economic commentators because they ignored a basic economic theory about the determination of the exchange rate. Provides an example and suggestions for follow up instruction. (Author/JDH)

  14. Proposed test method for determining discharge rates from water closets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, V.; Fjord Jensen, T.

    At present the rates at which discharge takes place from sanitary appliances are mostly known only in the form of estimated average values. SBI has developed a measuring method enabling determination of the exact rate of discharge from a sanitary appliance as function of time. The methods depends...... on the application of a calibrated measuring vessel, the volume of water in the vessel being measured at a given moment by means of a transducer and recorded by an UV recorder which is able to follow very rapid variations. In the article the apparatus is described in detail, and an example is given...... of the measurements of the rate of discharge from a WC....

  15. Using Arrested Solid-Solid Multiphase Reactions in Geological Materials to Deduce the Rate of Crustal Uplift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glassley, W.E.; Meike, A.

    2000-03-13

    The history geological terrains experience can be traced as a series of temperature and pressure changes. Each change drives the system toward a new state of thermodynamic equilibrium. The resultant overprinted rock fabrics, textures and chemical heterogeneities can be difficult to interpret. However, if carefully chosen, features from the scale of kilometers to nanometers can be used to reconstruct the history of mountain systems. Uplift of the Sri Lankan Central Highlands was rapid enough to preserve well-developed symplectite textures, some of which represent arrested solid-state diffusion-controlled reactions of garnet + O{sub 2} to form orthopyroxene + plagioclase + magnetite, as the rocks were exhumed from over 30 km in the earth's crust. Our objective has been to determine the reaction mechanisms responsible for symplectite development, and to establish the time interval over which these reactions occurred, to constrain the rate of mountain uplift. Considering that the most rapid mechanism is solid state grain-boundary diffusion of oxygen, the reaction time can be constrained by bounding the rate of oxygen supply to the reaction site. The solid state grain boundary diffusion rate of oxygen has been inferred to be ca. 10{sup -14}m{sup 2}-sec (Farver and Yund, 1991), but is sensitive to inferred grain boundary width. The range of rates thus determined allows the distinction between rapid uplift similar to that of the Himalayan Mountains, and the slow and progressive erosion of a less dramatic terrain. Further constraints on diffusion control and energetic relationships are determined from crystallographic relationships between the reactant and product phases, and submicron scale microstructure.

  16. REACLIB: A Reaction Rate Library for the Era of Collaborative Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, Zachary

    2008-10-01

    Thermonuclear reaction rates and weak decay rates are of great importance to modern nuclear astrophysics. They are critical in the study of many topics such as Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, X-ray bursts, Supernovae, and S-process element formation, among others. The Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) has been created to increase connectivity amongst nuclear astrophysicists in our modern age of highly collaborative science. Within JINA there has been an effort to create a frequently updated and readily accessible database of thermonuclear reactions and weak decay rates. This database is the REACLIB library, which can be accessed at the web address: http://www.nscl.msu.edu/˜nero/db/. Here I will discuss the JINA REACLIB Project, including a new procedure to fit reaction rates as a function of temperature that takes full advantage of physicality. With these updated reaction rates, astrophysical modelers will no longer have to worry about the adverse effects of using obsolete reaction rate libraries lacking physical behavior.

  17. Rate constant and reaction coordinate of Trp-cage folding in explicit water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juraszek, J.; Bolhuis, P.G.

    2008-01-01

    We report rate constant calculations and a reaction coordinate analysis of the rate-limiting folding and unfolding process of the Trp-cage mini-protein in explicit solvent using transition interface sampling. Previous transition path sampling simulations revealed that in this (un)folding process the

  18. Determination of Heroin Based on Analyte Pulse Perturbation to an Oscillating Chemical Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Jie; GAO Jin-zhang; Suo-nan; ZHAO Guo-hu; YANG Wu; L(U) Dong-yu; SUN Kan-jun; LI Chong-yang

    2004-01-01

    A new analytical method is proposed for the determination of heroin based on a sequential perturbation caused by trace amounts of heroin in the Cu ( Ⅱ )-catalyzed oscillating reaction between hydrogen peroxide and sodium thiocyanate in an alkaline medium with the aid of a continuous-flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The method relies on the linear relationship between the change in oscillation period of the system and the concentration of heroin, with a detecting limit of 4.0× 10-7 mol/L. The calibration curve fits a linear equation very well when the concentration of heroin is in the range of 2. 0 × 10-6- 1.2 × 10-5 mol/L (r = 0. 9971). This method features good precision(RSD= 0. 98%). The influences of temperature, injection point, flow rate and reaction variables on the oscillation period were investigated in detail and a possible mechanism of the performance of heroin in the Cu( Ⅱ )-catalyzed oscillating reaction system is also discussed. The proposed method opens a new avenue for the determination of heroin.

  19. Chemical Reaction Rates from Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics: Theory and Practical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Suleimanov, Yury V; Guo, Hua

    2016-01-01

    This Feature Article presents an overview of the current status of Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics (RPMD) rate theory. We first analyze theory and its connection to quantum transition state theory. We then focus on its practical application to prototypical chemical reactions in the gas phase, which demonstrate how accurate and reliable RPMD is for calculating thermal chemical reaction rates in multifarious cases. This review serves as an important checkpoint in RPMD rate theory development, which shows that RPMD is shifting from being just one of recent novel ideas to a well-established and validated alternative to conventional techniques for calculating thermal chemical rates. We also hope it will motivate further applications of RPMD to various chemical reactions.

  20. Chemical Reaction Rate Coefficients from Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics: Theory and Practical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleimanov, Yury V; Aoiz, F Javier; Guo, Hua

    2016-11-03

    This Feature Article presents an overview of the current status of ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) rate theory. We first analyze the RPMD approach and its connection to quantum transition-state theory. We then focus on its practical applications to prototypical chemical reactions in the gas phase, which demonstrate how accurate and reliable RPMD is for calculating thermal chemical reaction rate coefficients in multifarious cases. This review serves as an important checkpoint in RPMD rate theory development, which shows that RPMD is shifting from being just one of recent novel ideas to a well-established and validated alternative to conventional techniques for calculating thermal chemical rate coefficients. We also hope it will motivate further applications of RPMD to various chemical reactions.

  1. Codon usage determines translation rate in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael Askvad; Kurland, C G; Pedersen, Steen

    1989-01-01

    We wish to determine whether differences in translation rate are correlated with differences in codon usage or with differences in mRNA secondary structure. We therefore inserted a small DNA fragment in the lacZ gene either directly or flanked by a few frame-shifting bases, leaving the reading...

  2. Determining the Spatially Resolved Mass Outflow Rate in Markarian 573

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revalski, Mitchell; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Fischer, Travis C.; Kraemer, Steven B.; Schmitt, Henrique R.

    2017-01-01

    We report on current progress in calculating the narrow line region (NLR) mass outflow rate in the Seyfert 2 galaxy Markarian 573. Our goal is to determine the mass outflow rate as a function of distance from the nucleus in 10 nearby Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) with spatially resolved NLRs. These nearby AGN allow us to study the feeding and feedback of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) that may play an important role in understanding large scale structure, enrichment of the interstellar medium, and coevolution of SMBHs with their host galaxies. Utilizing archival spectra from the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) we measured emission line ratios from a wide range of ionized species. Next we used the line ratios to find a reddening correction and determined the physical conditions in the ionized gas using the photoionization code Cloudy. Specifically, we derived the mass of the ionized gas and then estimate the total mass outside of the spectral slit using HST [O III] images. Combined with kinematic models of the outflows we will determine the mass outflow rate and kinetic luminosity as a function of distance from the central AGN. Ultimately, we aim to determine if NLR outflows are effective in regulating AGN feedback by comparing our observed outflow rates with theoretical models.

  3. A numerical evaluation of prediction accuracy of CO2 absorber model for various reaction rate coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shim S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the CO2 absorber column using mono-ethanolamine (MEA solution as chemical solvent are predicted by a One-Dimensional (1-D rate based model in the present study. 1-D Mass and heat balance equations of vapor and liquid phase are coupled with interfacial mass transfer model and vapor-liquid equilibrium model. The two-film theory is used to estimate the mass transfer between the vapor and liquid film. Chemical reactions in MEA-CO2-H2O system are considered to predict the equilibrium pressure of CO2 in the MEA solution. The mathematical and reaction kinetics models used in this work are calculated by using in-house code. The numerical results are validated in the comparison of simulation results with experimental and simulation data given in the literature. The performance of CO2 absorber column is evaluated by the 1-D rate based model using various reaction rate coefficients suggested by various researchers. When the rate of liquid to gas mass flow rate is about 8.3, 6.6, 4.5 and 3.1, the error of CO2 loading and the CO2 removal efficiency using the reaction rate coefficients of Aboudheir et al. is within about 4.9 % and 5.2 %, respectively. Therefore, the reaction rate coefficient suggested by Aboudheir et al. among the various reaction rate coefficients used in this study is appropriate to predict the performance of CO2 absorber column using MEA solution. [Acknowledgement. This research was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF, funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2011-0017220].

  4. First measurement of the 34S(p ,γ )35Cl reaction rate through indirect methods for presolar nova grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, S. A.; Parikh, A.; Barton, C. J.; Faestermann, T.; José, J.; Hertenberger, R.; Wirth, H.-F.; de Séréville, N.; Riley, J. E.; Williams, M.

    2017-08-01

    Sulphur isotopic ratio measurements may help to establish the astrophysical sites in which certain presolar grains were formed. Nova model predictions of the 34S/32S ratio are, however, unreliable due to the lack of an experimental 34S(p ,γ )35Cl reaction rate. To this end, we have measured the 34S(3He,d )35Cl reaction at 20 MeV using a high resolution quadrupole-dipole-dipole-dipole magnetic spectrograph. Twenty-two levels over 6.2 MeV transfer spectroscopic factors have been measured for the first time over the energy range relevant for novae. With this new spectroscopic information a new 34S(p ,γ )35Cl reaction rate has been determined using a Monte Carlo method. Hydrodynamic nova model calculations have been performed using this new reaction rate. These models show that remaining uncertainties in the 34S(p ,γ ) rate affect nucleosynthesis predictions by less than a factor of 1.4, and predict a 34S/32S isotopic ratio of 0.014-0.017. Since recent type II supernova models predict 34S/32S=0.026 -0.053 , the 34S/32S isotopic ratio may be used, in conjunction with other isotopic signatures, to distinguish presolar grains from oxygen-neon nova and type II supernova origin. Our results address a key nuclear physics uncertainty on which recent considerations discounting the nova origin of several grains depend.

  5. Dependence of X-Ray Burst Models on Nuclear Reaction Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyburt, R. H.; Amthor, A. M.; Heger, A.; Johnson, E.; Keek, L.; Meisel, Z.; Schatz, H.; Smith, K.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray bursts are thermonuclear flashes on the surface of accreting neutron stars, and reliable burst models are needed to interpret observations in terms of properties of the neutron star and the binary system. We investigate the dependence of X-ray burst models on uncertainties in (p, γ), (α, γ), and (α, p) nuclear reaction rates using fully self-consistent burst models that account for the feedbacks between changes in nuclear energy generation and changes in astrophysical conditions. A two-step approach first identified sensitive nuclear reaction rates in a single-zone model with ignition conditions chosen to match calculations with a state-of-the-art 1D multi-zone model based on the Kepler stellar evolution code. All relevant reaction rates on neutron-deficient isotopes up to mass 106 were individually varied by a factor of 100 up and down. Calculations of the 84 changes in reaction rate with the highest impact were then repeated in the 1D multi-zone model. We find a number of uncertain reaction rates that affect predictions of light curves and burst ashes significantly. The results provide insights into the nuclear processes that shape observables from X-ray bursts, and guidance for future nuclear physics work to reduce nuclear uncertainties in X-ray burst models.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Determinations of Structure and Reaction Kinetics of Epoxy/Amine Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-31

    bisphenol A ( DGEBA ), and two model compounds, a secondary amine nitroxide and a tertiary amine nitroxide. The rate constants for both reactions (kl, k2...EPR EXPERIMENTS ON EPOXY RESINS ....................................... 4 2.1 Nitroxide- DGEBA Kinetics ......................................... 4 2.2...dependence of the rate constants for METAMIN and DIMETAMIN reactions with DGEBA ...................................... 14 11. EPR spectra observed at 299

  7. Ab Initio Calculation of Rate Constants for Molecule–Surface Reactions with Chemical Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccini, GiovanniMaria; Alessio, Maristella

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ab initio prediction of reaction rate constants for systems with hundreds of atoms with an accuracy that is comparable to experiment is a challenge for computational quantum chemistry. We present a divide‐and‐conquer strategy that departs from the potential energy surfaces obtained by standard density functional theory with inclusion of dispersion. The energies of the reactant and transition structures are refined by wavefunction‐type calculations for the reaction site. Thermal effects and entropies are calculated from vibrational partition functions, and the anharmonic frequencies are calculated separately for each vibrational mode. This method is applied to a key reaction of an industrially relevant catalytic process, the methylation of small alkenes over zeolites. The calculated reaction rate constants (free energies), pre‐exponential factors (entropies), and enthalpy barriers show that our computational strategy yields results that agree with experiment within chemical accuracy limits (less than one order of magnitude). PMID:27008460

  8. Kinetics of the benzyl + O(3P) reaction: a quantum chemical/statistical reaction rate theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Gabriel; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2012-12-14

    The resonance stabilized benzyl radical is an important intermediate in the combustion of aromatic hydrocarbons and in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation in flames. Despite being a free radical, benzyl is relatively stable in thermal, oxidizing environments, and is predominantly removed through bimolecular reactions with open-shell species other than O(2). In this study the reaction of benzyl with ground-state atomic oxygen, O((3)P), is examined using quantum chemistry and statistical reaction rate theory. C(7)H(7)O energy surfaces are generated at the G3SX level, and include several novel pathways. Transition state theory is used to describe elementary reaction kinetics, with canonical variational transition state theory applied for barrierless O atom association with benzyl. Apparent rate constants and branching ratios to different product sets are obtained as a function of temperature and pressure from solving the time-dependent master equation, with RRKM theory for microcanonical k(E). These simulations indicate that the benzyl + O reaction predominantly forms the phenyl radical (C(6)H(5)) plus formaldehyde (HCHO), with lesser quantities of the C(7)H(6)O products benzaldehyde, ortho-quinone methide, and para-quinone methide (+H), along with minor amounts of the formyl radical (HCO) + benzene. Addition of O((3)P) to the methylene site in benzyl produces a highly vibrationally excited C(7)H(7)O* adduct, the benzoxyl radical, which can β-scission to benzaldehyde + H and phenyl + HCHO. In order to account for the experimental observation of benzene as the major reaction product, a roaming radical mechanism is proposed that converts the nascent products phenyl and HCHO to benzene + HCO. Oxygen atom addition at the ortho and para ring sites in benzyl, which has not been previously considered, is shown to lead to the quinone methides + H; these species are less-stable isomers of benzaldehyde that are proposed as important combustion intermediates, but

  9. Depletion: A Game with Natural Rules for Teaching Reaction Rate Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbris, Donald J.; Herzfeld, Judith

    2002-10-01

    Depletion is a game that reinforces central concepts of reaction rate theory through simulation. Each player buys chemicals and guides them through a series of reactions, thereby earning money to buy more chemicals. The reactions occur when players roll a high enough value on two dice to overcome an activation barrier. The reactions may be accelerated by buying heat (which allows the player to roll three dice instead of two) or catalysts (which lower the activation barrier). The value of acceleration derives from the increasing price of fresh chemicals as resources are depleted and waste products accumulate. The player who nets the most money wins the game. The details of the game are presented, with a set of follow-up questions suitable for either a quiz or discussion. Student reaction to the game is also described.

  10. Analysis of turbulent free-jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sislian, J. P.; Glass, I. I.; Evans, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of the nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of an axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel ambient air stream. The effective turbulent transport properties are determined by means of a two-equation model of turbulence. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight elementary reactions among six chemical species: H, O, H2O, OH, O2 and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations was solved by using an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions were obtained at two downstream locations for some important variables affecting the flow development, such as the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. The results show that these variables attain their peak values on the axis of symmetry. The computed distribution of velocity, temperature, and mass fractions of the chemical species gives a complete description of the flow field. The numerical predictions were compared with two sets of experimental data. Good qualitative agreement was obtained.

  11. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, K.; Steefel, Carl; White, A.F.; Stonestrom, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation, and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka Marine Terrace Chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized [White A. F., Schulz M. S., Vivit D. V., Blum A., Stonestrom D. A. and Anderson S. P. (2008) Chemical weathering of a Marine Terrace Chronosequence, Santa Cruz, California. I: interpreting the long-term controls on chemical weathering based on spatial and temporal element and mineral distributions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 72 (1), 36-68] and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisserand [Hellmann R. and Tisserand D. (2006) Dissolution kinetics as a function of the Gibbs free energy of reaction: An experimental study based on albite feldspar. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 70 (2), 364-383] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [Oelkers E. H., Schott J. and Devidal J. L. (1994) The effect of aluminum, pH, and chemical affinity on the rates of aluminosilicate dissolution reactions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 58 (9), 2011-2024], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Additionally, observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at

  12. Unified equation for access to rate constants of first-order reactions in dynamic and on-column reaction chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, O

    2006-01-01

    A unified equation to evaluate elution profiles of reversible as well as irreversible (pseudo-) first-order reactions in dynamic chromatography and on-column reaction chromatography has been derived. Rate constants k1 and k(-1) and Gibbs activation energies are directly obtained from the chromatographic parameters (retention times tR(A) and tR(B) of the interconverting or reacting species A and B, the peak widths at half-height wA and wB, and the relative plateau height h(p)), the initial amounts A0 and B0 of the reacting species, and the equilibrium constant K(A/B). The calculation of rate constants requires only a few iterative steps without the need of performing a computationally extensive simulation of elution profiles. The unified equation was validated by comparison with a data set of 125,000 simulated elution profiles to confirm the quality of this equation by statistical means and to predict the minimal experimental requirements. Surprisingly, the recovery rate from a defined data set is on average 35% higher using the unified equation compared to the evaluation by iterative computer simulation.

  13. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. I. Quantum Mechanical Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual form activated complex theory assumes a quasi-equilibrium between reactants and activated complex, a separable reaction coordinate, a Cartesian reaction coordinate, and an absence of interaction of rotation with internal motion in the complex. In the present paper a rate expression is derived without introducing the Cartesian assumption. The expression bears a formal resemblance to the usual one and reduces to it when the added assumptions of the latter are introduced.

  14. Program Helps To Determine Chemical-Reaction Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittker, D. A.; Radhakrishnan, K.

    1995-01-01

    General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis (LSENS) computer code developed for use in solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase, chemical-kinetics problems. Provides for efficient and accurate chemical-kinetics computations and provides for sensitivity analysis for variety of problems, including problems involving honisothermal conditions. Incorporates mathematical models for static system, steady one-dimensional inviscid flow, reaction behind incident shock wave (with boundary-layer correction), and perfectly stirred reactor. Computations of equilibrium properties performed for following assigned states: enthalpy and pressure, temperature and pressure, internal energy and volume, and temperature and volume. Written in FORTRAN 77 with exception of NAMELIST extensions used for input.

  15. Perturbation theory in the catalytic rate constant of the Henri-Michaelis-Menten enzymatic reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalis, Evangelos; Kosmas, Marios; Papamichael, Emmanouel M

    2012-11-01

    The Henry-Michaelis-Menten (HMM) mechanism of enzymatic reaction is studied by means of perturbation theory in the reaction rate constant k (2) of product formation. We present analytical solutions that provide the concentrations of the enzyme (E), the substrate (S), as well as those of the enzyme-substrate complex (C), and the product (P) as functions of time. For k (2) small compared to k (-1), we properly describe the entire enzymatic activity from the beginning of the reaction up to longer times without imposing extra conditions on the initial concentrations E ( o ) and S ( o ), which can be comparable or much different.

  16. Considerations Based on Reaction Rate on Char Gasification Behavior in Two-stage Gasifier for Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Miki; Nishiyama, Akio; Sasauchi, Kenichi; Ito, Yusuke; Akamatsu, Fumiteru

    In order to develop a small-scale gasifier in which biomass can be converted to energy with high efficiency, we planned a gasification process that consists of two parts: pyrolysis part (rotary kiln) and gasification part (downdraft gasifier). We performed fundamental experiments on gasification part and discussed the appropriate conditions such as air supply location, air ratio, air temperature and hearth load. We considered the results by calculating reaction rates of representative reactions on char gasification part and found that water gas reaction is dominant in the reduction area and its behavior gives important information to decide the adequate length of the char layer.

  17. Combustion of Bimodal Nano/Micro Aluminum Suspension with New Reaction Rate Model

    OpenAIRE

    M. Bidabadi; N. Moallemi; I. Shafieenejad; M. Jadidi

    2008-01-01

    In this study a mathematical model for combustion of bimodal particle in lean flow was developed. The difference between structure of flame in this work and previous ones was that, in those flame was divided by five zones and reaction rate was considered to be constant in reaction zones and also zero in post flame zone. In reality it was obvious with respect to shape and size of different particles in dust, reaction didn't end suddenly. In the present research the heat loss term, which was as...

  18. Rate constants for chemical reactions in high-temperature nonequilibrium air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    In the nonequilibrium atmospheric chemistry regime that will be encountered by the proposed Aeroassisted Orbital Transfer Vehicle in the upper atmosphere, where air density is too low for thermal and chemical equilibrium to be maintained, the detailed high temperature air chemistry plays a critical role in defining radiative and convective heating loads. Although vibrational and electronic temperatures remain low (less than 15,000 K), rotational and translational temperatures may reach 50,000 K. Attention is presently given to the effects of multiple temperatures on the magnitudes of various chemical reaction rate constants, for the cases of both bimolecular exchange reactions and collisional excitation and dissociation reactions.

  19. The Influence of Reaction Rates on the Final p-Abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Rapp, W; Schatz, H; Käppeler, F K

    2004-01-01

    The astrophysical p-process is responsible for the origin of the proton rich nuclei,which are heavier than iron. A huge network involving thousands of reaction rates is necessary to calculate the final p-abundances. But not all rates included in the network have a strong influence on the p-nuclei abundances. The p-process was investigated using a full nuclear reaction network for a type II supernovae explosion when the shock front passes through the O/Ne layer. Calculations were done with a multi-layer model adopting the seed of a pre-explosion evolution of a 25 mass star. In extensive simulations we investigated the impact of single reaction rates on the final p-abundances. The results are important for the strategy of future experiments in this field.

  20. ANALYSIS OF MACROECONOMIC DETERMINANTS OF EXCHANGE RATE VOLATILITY IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Mirchandani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Foreign Exchange Market in India has undergone substantial changes over last decade. It is imperative by the excessive volatility of Indian Rupee causing its depreciation against major dominating currencies in international market. This research has been carried out in order to investigate various macroeconomic variables leading to acute variations in the exchange rate of a currency. An attempt has been made to review the probable reasons for the depreciation of the Rupee and analyse different macroeconomic determinants that have impact on the volatility of exchange rate and their extent of correlation with the same.

  1. Sensitivity of Type I X-Ray Bursts to rp-Process Reaction Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Amthor, A M; Heger, A; Sakharuk, A; Schatz, H; Smith, K; Galaviz, Daniel; Heger, Alexander; Sakharuk, Alexander; Schatz, Hendrik; Smith, Karl

    2006-01-01

    First steps have been taken in a more comprehensive study of the dependence of observables in Type I X-ray bursts on uncertain (p,gamma) reaction rates along the rp-process path. We use the multizone hydrodynamics code KEPLER which implicitly couples a full nuclear reaction network of more than 1000 isotopes, as needed, to follow structure and evolution of the X-ray burst layer and its ashes. This allows us to incorporate the full rp-process network, including all relevant nuclear reactions, and individually study changes in the X-ray burst light curves when modifying selected key nuclear reaction rates. In this work we considered all possible proton captures to nuclei with 10 < Z < 28 and N <= Z. When varying individual reaction rates within a symmetric full width uncertainty of a factor of 10000, early results for some rates show changes in the burst light curve as large as 10 percent of peak luminosity. This is very large compared to the current sensitivity of X-ray observations. More precise reac...

  2. Ab-Initio Based Computation of Rate Constants for Spin Forbidden Metalloprotein-Substrate Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkanlar, Abdullah; Rodriguez, Jorge H.

    2007-03-01

    Some chemical and biochemical reactions are non-adiabatic processes whereby the total spin angular momentum, before and after the reaction, is not conserved. These are named spin- forbidden reactions. The application of ab-initio methods, such as spin density functional theory (SDFT), to the prediction of rate constants is a challenging task of fundamental and practical importance. We apply non-adiabatic transition state theory (NA-TST) in conjuntion with SDFT to predict the rate constant of the spin- forbidden recombination of carbon monoxide with iron tetracarbonyl. To model the surface hopping probability between singlet and triplet states, the Landau-Zener formalism is used. The lowest energy point for singlet-triplet crossing, known as minimum energy crossing point (MECP), was located and used to compute, in a semi-quantum approach, reaction rate constants at 300 K. The predicted rates are in very good agreement with experiment. In addition, we present results for the spin- forbidden ligand binding reactions of iron-containing heme proteins such as myoglobin.

  3. An accurate analytic representation of the temperature dependence of nonresonant nuclear reaction rate coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizgal, Bernie D.

    2016-12-01

    There has been intense interest for several decades by different research groups to accurately model the temperature dependence of a large number of nuclear reaction rate coefficients for both light and heavy nuclides. The rate coefficient, k(T) , is given by the Maxwellian average of the reactive cross section expressed in terms of the astrophysical factor, S(E) , which for nonresonant reactions is generally written as a power series in the relative energy E. A computationally efficient algorithm for the temperature dependence of nuclear reaction rate coefficients is required for fusion reactor research and for models of nucleosynthesis and stellar evolution. In this paper, an accurate analytical expression for the temperature dependence of nuclear reaction rate coefficients is provided in terms of τ = 3(b / 2) 2/3 or equivalently, T - 1/3 , where b = B /√{kB T }, B is the Gamow factor and kB is the Boltzmann constant. The methodology is appropriate for all nonresonant nuclear reactions for which S(E) can be represented as a power series in E. The explicit expression for the rate coefficient versus temperature is derived with the asymptotic expansions of the moments of w(E) = exp(- E /kB T - B /√{ E }) in terms of τ. The zeroth order moment is the familiar Gaussian approximation to the rate coefficient. Results are reported for the representative reactions D(d, p)T, D(d, n)3He and 7Li(p, α) α and compared with several different fitting procedures reported in the literature.

  4. A model SN2 reaction ‘on water’ does not show rate enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Katherine V.; Benjamin, Ilan

    2011-05-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations of the benchmark nucleophilic substitution reaction (SN2) Cl- + CH3Cl are carried out at the water liquid/vapor interface. The reaction free energy profile and the activation free energy are determined as a function of the reactants' location normal to the surface. The activation free energy remains almost constant relative to that in bulk water, despite the fact that the barrier is expected to significantly decrease as the reaction is carried out near the vapor phase. We show that this is due to the combined effects of a clustering of water molecules around the nucleophile and a relatively weak hydration of the transition state.

  5. Application of an Artificial Neural Network to the Prediction of OH Radical Reaction Rate Constants for Evaluating Global Warming Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Thomas C

    2016-03-03

    Rate constants for reactions of chemical compounds with hydroxyl radical are a key quantity used in evaluating the global warming potential of a substance. Experimental determination of these rate constants is essential, but it can also be difficult and time-consuming to produce. High-level quantum chemistry predictions of the rate constant can suffer from the same issues. Therefore, it is valuable to devise estimation schemes that can give reasonable results on a variety of chemical compounds. In this article, the construction and training of an artificial neural network (ANN) for the prediction of rate constants at 298 K for reactions of hydroxyl radical with a diverse set of molecules is described. Input to the ANN consists of counts of the chemical bonds and bends present in the target molecule. The ANN is trained using 792 (•)OH reaction rate constants taken from the NIST Chemical Kinetics Database. The mean unsigned percent error (MUPE) for the training set is 12%, and the MUPE of the testing set is 51%. It is shown that the present methodology yields rate constants of reasonable accuracy for a diverse set of inputs. The results are compared to high-quality literature values and to another estimation scheme. This ANN methodology is expected to be of use in a wide range of applications for which (•)OH reaction rate constants are required. The model uses only information that can be gathered from a 2D representation of the molecule, making the present approach particularly appealing, especially for screening applications.

  6. Temperature dependence of electrocatalytic and photocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction rates using NiFe oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Nurlaela, Ela

    2016-01-25

    The present work compares oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in electrocatalysis and photocatalysis in aqueous solutions using nanostructured NiFeOx as catalysts. The impacts of pH and reaction temperature on the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic OER kinetics were investigated. For electrocatalysis, a NiFeOx catalyst was hydrothermally decorated on Ni foam. In 1 M KOH solution, the NiFeOx electrocatalyst achieved 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of 260 mV. The same catalyst was decorated on the surface of Ta3N5 photocatalyst powder. The reaction was conducted in the presence of 0.1 M Na2S2O8 as a strong electron scavenger, thus likely leading to the OER being kinetically relevant. When compared with the bare Ta3N5, NiFeOx/Ta3N5 demonstrated a 5-fold improvement in photocatalytic activity in the OER under visible light irradiation, achieving a quantum efficiency of 24 % at 480 nm. Under the conditions investigated, a strong correlation between the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic performances was identified: an improvement in electrocatalysis corresponded with an improvement in photocatalysis without altering the identity of the materials. The rate change at different pH was likely associated with electrocatalytic kinetics that accordingly influenced the photocatalytic rates. The sensitivity of the reaction rates with respective to the reaction temperature resulted in an apparent activation energy of 25 kJ mol-1 in electrocatalysis, whereas that in photocatalysis was 16 kJ mol-1. The origin of the difference in these activation energy values is likely attributed to the possible effects of temperature on the individual thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the reaction process. The work described herein demonstrates a method of “transferring the knowledge of electrocatalysis to photocatalysis” as a strong tool to rationally and quantitatively understand the complex reaction schemes involved in photocatalytic reactions.

  7. Observation of double pygmy resonances in $^{195,196}$Pt and enhanced astrophysical reaction rates

    CERN Document Server

    Giacoppo, F; Eriksen, T K; Görgen, A; Guttormsen, M; Hagen, T W; Larsen, A C; Kheswa, B V; Klintefjord, M; Koehler, P E; Nyhus, H T; Renstr\\om, T; Sahin, E; Siem, S; Tornyi, T G

    2014-01-01

    Our measurements of $^{195,196}$Pt $\\gamma$-strength functions show a double-humped enhancement in the $E_{\\gamma}= 4-8$ MeV region. For the first time, the detailed shape of these resonances is revealed for excitation energies in the quasicontinuum. We demonstrate that the corresponding neutron-capture cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates are increased by up to a factor of 2 when these newly observed pygmy resonances are included. These results lend credence to theoretical predictions of enhanced reaction rates due to such pygmy resonances and hence are important for a better understanding of r-process nucleosynthesis.

  8. Effect of macromolecular crowding on the rate of diffusion-limited enzymatic reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manish Agrawal; S B Santra; Rajat Anand; Rajaram Swaminathan

    2008-08-01

    The cytoplasm of a living cell is crowded with several macromolecules of different shapes and sizes. Molecular diffusion in such a medium becomes anomalous due to the presence of macromolecules and diffusivity is expected to decrease with increase in macromolecular crowding. Moreover, many cellular processes are dependent on molecular diffusion in the cell cytosol. The enzymatic reaction rate has been shown to be affected by the presence of such macromolecules. A simple numerical model is proposed here based on percolation and diffusion in disordered systems to study the effect of macromolecular crowding on the enzymatic reaction rates. The model qualitatively explains some of the experimental observations.

  9. Non-steady state mass action dynamics without rate constants: dynamics of coupled reactions using chemical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, William R.; Baker, Scott E.

    2017-10-01

    Comprehensive and predictive simulation of coupled reaction networks has long been a goal of biology and other fields. Currently, metabolic network models that utilize enzyme mass action kinetics have predictive power but are limited in scope and application by the fact that the determination of enzyme rate constants is laborious and low throughput. We present a statistical thermodynamic formulation of the law of mass action for coupled reactions at both steady states and non-stationary states. The formulation uses chemical potentials instead of rate constants. When used to model deterministic systems, the method corresponds to a rescaling of the time dependent reactions in such a way that steady states can be reached on the same time scale but with significantly fewer computational steps. The relationships between reaction affinities, free energy changes and generalized detailed balance are central to the discussion. The significance for applications in systems biology are discussed as is the concept and assumption of maximum entropy production rate as a biological principle that links thermodynamics to natural selection.

  10. Policy and Current Account Determination under Floating Exchange Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Hans Genberg; Alexander K. Swoboda

    1989-01-01

    The determinants of current account imbalances under floating exchange rates are analyzed. The analysis provides a framework within which the sources of, and the remedies for, the current account imbalances between the United States, Japan, and the Federal Republic of Germany can be discussed. The effects of various government policies are emphasized, in particular the differences between expenditure-changing and expenditure-switching policies. Short-run and long-run considerations are invest...

  11. An Analysis of Romania's short-run sovereign rating determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilian-Constantin Miricescu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available For most European Union countries the government expenditure exceeds government revenue which could lead in the long run to an increase in the government debt to GDP ratio. Considering the distortions generated by the financial and economic crisis, followed by the debt crisis, both local and international investors are more prudent when planning in lending money to sovereigns. The sovereign rating is probably one of the most important aspects which investors carefully analyze before they decide to purchase government bonds or Treasury bills. This paper focuses on Romania’s short-run sovereign rating determinants according to the specific methodology of Romania’s Export-Import Bank (EximBank. The results reveal that rating is Bb – payment difficulties and insignificant losses being possible.

  12. Determination of Tensile Properties of Polymers at High Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Major Z.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the field of high rate testing of polymers the measured properties are highly dependent on the applied methodology. Hence, the test setup as whole but in particular also the geometrical type of specimen plays a decisive role. The widely used standard for the determination of tensile properties of polymers (ISO527-2 was extended by a novel standard (ISO18872:2007, which is targeted on the determination of tensile properties at high strain rates. In this standard also a novel specimen shape is proposed. Hand in hand with the introduction of new specimen geometry the question of comparability arises. To point out the differences in stress-strain response of the ISO18872 specimen and the ISO527-2 multipurpose specimen tensile tests over a wide loading rate range were conducted in this paper. A digital image correlation system in combination with a high speed camera was used to characterize the local material behaviour. Different parameters like nominal stress, true stress, nominal strain, true strain as well as volumetric strain were determined and used to compare the two specimen geometries.

  13. A sensitivity study of s-process: the impact of uncertainties from nuclear reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinyoles, N.; Serenelli, A.

    2016-01-01

    The slow neutron capture process (s-process) is responsible for the production of about half the elements beyond the Fe-peak. The production sites and the conditions under which the different components of s-process occur are relatively well established. A detailed quantitative understanding of s-process nucleosynthesis may yield light in physical processes, e.g. convection and mixing, taking place in the production sites. For this, it is important that the impact of uncertainties in the nuclear physics is well understood. In this work we perform a study of the sensitivity of s-process nucleosynthesis, with particular emphasis in the main component, on the nuclear reaction rates. Our aims are: to quantify the current uncertainties in the production factors of s-process elements originating from nuclear physics and, to identify key nuclear reactions that require more precise experimental determinations. In this work we studied two different production sites in which s-process occurs with very different neutron exposures: 1) a low-mass extremely metal-poor star during the He-core flash (nn reaching up to values of ∼ 1014cm-3); 2) the TP-AGB phase of a M⊙, Z=0.01 model, the typical site of the main s-process component (nn up to 108 — 109cm-3). In the first case, the main variation in the production of s-process elements comes from the neutron poisons and with relative variations around 30%-50%. In the second, the neutron poison are not as important because of the higher metallicity of the star that actually acts as a seed and therefore, the final error of the abundances are much lower around 10%-25%.

  14. A Study on the Kinetics of the Catalytic Reforming Reaction of CH4 with CO2: Determination of the Reaction Order

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunyang Ji; Lihong Gong; Jiawei Zhang; Keying Shi

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of the catalytic reforming reaction of methane with carbon dioxide to produce synthesis gas on a Ni/α-Al2O3 and a HSD-2 type commercial catalyst has been studied. The results indicate that the reaction orders are one and zero for methane and carbon dioxide, respectively, when the carbon dioxide partial pressure was about 12.5-30.0 kPa and the temperature was at 1123-1173 K. However,when the carbon dioxide partial pressure was changed to 30.0-45.0 kPa under the same temperature range of 1123 1173 K, the reaction orders of methane and carbon dioxide are one. Furthermore, average rate constants at different temperatures were determined.

  15. Determinants of Effective Tax Rate of Companies in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Freitas Sant’Ana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify the determining factors of the effective tax rate (ETR of companies of Latin America in the period 2009 to 2013. Descriptive study was conduct through documentary research, with a quantitative approach of the data. The sample was made up of 500 companies, being 45 of Argentina, 171 of Brazil, 108 of Chile, 38 of Colombia, and Mexico's 71 67 of Peru. Whose data were collected in the database of Thompson Reuters ® and analyzed by means of panel data regression through the software STATA ®, having as dependent variable the Effective tax rate (ETR and independent variables size (TAM capital intensity (INTCAP, the intensity of inventory (INTINV, leverage (ALAV and profitability on assets (ROA. The results show that the size of companies positively influence presents significant about the ETR of Colombian companies. Capital intensity (INTCAP and the intensity of inventory (INTINV were not meaningful to determine the influence of the ETR in the countries analyzed. The leverage of the Argentine companies reveals a positive influence on the ETR, while for the Colombian companies this influence was significant not significant and negatively to the other countries. Profitability resulted in a negative influence to the Mexican and Peruvian companies, and not significant for the other countries to determine the influence on ETR. Denotes that there are differences regarding the determinants of tax burden in Latin American countries, which encourages further studies

  16. Experimental and theoretical studies of rate coefficients for the reaction O(3P)+CH3OH at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chih-Wei; Chou, Shen-Long; Lee, Yuan-Pern; Xu, Shucheng; Xu, Z F; Lin, M C

    2005-06-22

    Rate coefficients of the reaction O((3)P) + CH(3)OH in the temperature range of 835-1777 K were determined using a diaphragmless shock tube. O atoms were generated by photolysis of SO(2) with a KrF excimer laser at 248 nm or an ArF excimer laser at 193 nm; their concentrations were monitored via atomic resonance absorption excited by emission from a microwave-discharged mixture of O(2) and He. The rate coefficients determined for the temperature range can be represented by the Arrhenius equation, k(T) = (2.29 +/- 0.18) x 10(-10) exp[-(4210 +/- 100)T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1); unless otherwise noted, all the listed errors represent one standard deviation in fitting. Combination of these and previous data at lower temperature shows a non-Arrhenius behavior described as the three-parameter equation, k(T) = (2.74 +/- 0.07) x 10(-18)T(2.25 +/- 0.13) exp[-(1500 +/- 90)T] cm(3)molecule(-1) s(-1). Theoretical calculations at the Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP)6-311 + G(3df,2p) level locate three transition states. Based on the energies computed with coupled clusters singles, doubles (triples) [CCSD(T)]/6-311 + G(3df,2p)B3LYP6-311 + G(3df,2p), the rate coefficients predicted with canonical variational transition state theory with small curvature tunneling corrections agree satisfactorily with the experimental observations. The branching ratios of two accessible reaction channels forming OH + CH(2)OH (1a) and OH + CH(3)O (1b) are predicted to vary strongly with temperature. At 300 K, reaction (1a) dominates, whereas reaction (1b) becomes more important than reaction (1a) above 1700 K.

  17. Examining the reaction of monetary policy to exchange rate changes: A nonlinear ARDL approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manogaran, Lavaneesvari; Sek, Siok Kun

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies showed the exchange rate changes can have significant impacts on macroeconomic performance. Over fluctuation of exchange rate may lead to economic instability. Hence, monetary policy rule tends to react to exchange rate changes. Especially, in emerging economies where the policy-maker tends to limit the exchange rate movement through interventions. In this study, we seek to investigate how the monetary policy rule reacts to exchange rate changes. The nonlinear autoregressive distributed lag (NARDL) model is applied to capture the asymmetric effect of exchange rate changes on monetary policy reaction function (interest rate). We focus the study in ASEAN5 countries (Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Singapore). The results indicated the existence of asymmetric effect of exchange rates changes on the monetary reaction function for all ASEAN5 countries in the long-run. Where, in majority of the cases the monetary policy is reacting to the appreciation and depreciation of exchange rate by raising the policy rate. This affirms the intervention of policymakers with the `fear of floating' behavior.

  18. Mutational analysis of phenylalanine ammonia lyase to improve reactions rates for various substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Sebastian; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2010-12-01

    Phenylalanine ammonia lyases (PAL) catalyze the reversible, non-reductive amination of trans-cinnamic acid to l-phenylalanine in the presence of high ammonia concentrations. Since neither cofactor recycling nor other additives are needed and by this asymmetric synthesis theoretical yields of 100% can be reached, it is an interesting reaction for industrial processes. In this study we demonstrate the superior properties of p-nitro-cinnamic acid (p-n-CA) in the amination reaction using the PAL from Petroselinum crispum (pcPAL). By focused-directed evolution, three mutants were identified showing increased reaction rates and decreased substrate inhibition. Together, the F137V mutant with p-n-CA showed a 15-fold increased reaction rate compared with the pcPAL WT with the natural cinnamic acid. The high reaction rates were also proven in preparative scale experiments. Activities towards other p-substituted cinnamic acids showing different electronic effects of the substituent were analyzed. Focused-directed evolution around the carboxylic acid- and amine-binding site always decreased PAL activity, due to a sensitive H-bond network.

  19. Rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine at 298 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, L. J.; Payne, W. A.; Nava, D. F.

    1987-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine has been measured at 298 K using flash photolysis combined with time-resolved detection of O(3P) via resonance fluorescence. Atomic oxygen was produced by flash photolysis of N2O or NO highly diluted in argon. The results were shown to be independent of (PH3), (O), total pressure and the source of O(3P). The mean value of all the experiments is k1 = (3.6 + or -0.8) x 10 to the -11th cu cm/s (1 sigma). Two previous measurements of k1 differed by more than an order of magnitude, and the results support the higher value obtained in a discharge flow-mass spectrometry study. A comparison with rate data for other atomic and free radical reactions with phosphine is presented, and the role of these reactions in the aeronomy or photochemistry of Jupiter and Saturn is briefly considered.

  20. Reaction Rates and Kinetic Isotope Effects of H$_2$ + OH $\\rightarrow$ H$_2$O + H

    CERN Document Server

    Meisner, Jan

    2016-01-01

    We calculated reaction rate constants including atom tunneling of the reaction of dihydrogen with the hydroxy radical down to a temperature of 50 K. Instanton theory and canonical variational theory with microcanonical optimized multidimensional tunneling (CVT/$\\mu$OMT) were applied using a fitted potential energy surface [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 154301 (2013)]. All possible protium/deuterium isotopologues were considered. Atom tunneling increases at about 250 K (200 K for deuterium transfer). Even at 50 K the rate constants of all isotopologues remain in the interval $ 4 \\cdot 10^{-20}$ to $4 \\cdot 10^{-17}$ cm$^3$ s$^{-1}$ , demonstrating that even deuterated versions of the title reaction are possibly relevant to astrochemical processes in molecular clouds. The transferred hydrogen atom dominates the kinetic isotope effect at all temperatures.

  1. Investigating rare events with nonequilibrium work measurements. II. Transition and reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Sagui, Celeste; Roland, Christopher

    2014-01-21

    We present a formalism for investigating transition pathways and transition probabilities for rare events in biomolecular systems. The formalism is based on combining Transition Path Theory with the results of nonequilibrium work relations, and shows that the equilibrium and nonequilibrium transition rates are in fact related. Aside from its fundamental importance, this allows for the calculation of relative equilibrium reaction rates with driven nonequilibrium simulations such as Steered Molecular Dynamics. The workings of the formalism are illustrated with a few typical numerical examples.

  2. SENSMG: First-Order Sensitivities of Neutron Reaction Rates, Reaction-Rate Ratios, Leakage, keff, and α Using PARTISN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-21

    SENSMG is a tool for computing first-order sensitivities of neutron reaction rates, reaction-rate ratios, leakage, keff, and α using the PARTISN multigroup discrete-ordinates code. SENSMG computes sensitivities to all of the transport cross sections and data (total, fission, nu, chi, and all scattering moments), two edit cross sections (absorption and capture), and the density for every isotope and energy group. It also computes sensitivities to the mass density for every material and derivatives with respect to all interface locations. The tool can be used for one-dimensional spherical (r) and two-dimensional cylindrical (r-z) geometries. The tool can be used for fixed-source and eigenvalue problems. The tool implements Generalized Perturbation Theory (GPT) as discussed by Williams and Stacey. Section II of this report describes the theory behind adjoint-based sensitivities, gives the equations that SENSMG solves, and defines the sensitivities that are output. Section III describes the user interface, including the input file and command line options. Section IV describes the output. Section V gives some notes about the coding that may be of interest. Section VI discusses verification, which is ongoing. Section VII lists needs and ideas for future work. Appendix A lists all of the input files whose results are presented in Sec. VI.

  3. Net Assimilation Rate Determines the Growth Rates of 14 Species of Subtropical Forest Trees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefei Li

    Full Text Available Growth rates are of fundamental importance for plants, as individual size affects myriad ecological processes. We determined the factors that generate variation in RGR among 14 species of trees and shrubs that are abundant in subtropical Chinese forests. We grew seedlings for two years at four light levels in a shade-house experiment. We monitored the growth of every juvenile plant every two weeks. After one and two years, we destructively harvested individuals and measured their functional traits and gas-exchange rates. After calculating individual biomass trajectories, we estimated relative growth rates using nonlinear growth functions. We decomposed the variance in log(RGR to evaluate the relationships of RGR with its components: specific leaf area (SLA, net assimilation rate (NAR and leaf mass ratio (LMR. We found that variation in NAR was the primary determinant of variation in RGR at all light levels, whereas SLA and LMR made smaller contributions. Furthermore, NAR was strongly and positively associated with area-based photosynthetic rate and leaf nitrogen content. Photosynthetic rate and leaf nitrogen concentration can, therefore, be good predictors of growth in woody species.

  4. Efficient Computation of Transition State Resonances and Reaction Rates from a Quantum Normal Form

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, Roman; Waalkens, Holger; Wiggins, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    A quantum version of a recent formulation of transition state theory in phase space is presented. The theory developed provides an algorithm to compute quantum reaction rates and the associated Gamov-Siegert resonances with very high accuracy. The algorithm is especially efficient for multi-degree-o

  5. Modified landfill gas generation rate model of first-order kinetics and two-stage reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiajun CHEN; Hao WANG; Na ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    This investigation was carried out to establish a new domestic landfill gas (LFG) generation rate model that takes into account the impact ofleachate recirculation. The first-order kinetics and two-stage reaction (FKTSR) model of the LFG generation rate includes mechanisms of the nutrient balance for biochemical reaction in two main stages. In this study, the FKTSR model was modified by the introduction of the outflow function and the organic acid conversion coefficient in order to represent the in-situ condition of nutrient loss through leachate. Laboratory experiments were carried out to simulate the impact of leachate recirculation and verify the modified FKTSR model. The model calibration was then calculated by using the experimental data. The results suggested that the new model was in line with the experimental data. The main parameters of the modified FKTSR model, including the LFG production potential (L0), the reaction rate constant in the first stage (K1), and the reaction rate constant in the second stage (K2) of 64.746 L, 0.202 d-1, and 0.338 d-1,respectively, were comparable to the old ones of 42.069 L,0.231 d-1, and 0.231 d-1. The new model is better able to explain the mechanisms involved in LFG generation.

  6. Should Thermostatted Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics be used to calculate reaction rates?

    CERN Document Server

    Hele, Timothy J H

    2015-01-01

    We apply Thermostatted Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics (TRPMD), a recently-proposed approximate quantum dynamics method, to the computation of thermal reaction rates. Its short-time Transition-State Theory (TST) limit is identical to rigorous Quantum Transition-State Theory, and we find that its long-time limit is independent of the location of the dividing surface. TRPMD rate theory is then applied to one-dimensional model systems, the atom-diatom bimolecular reactions H+H$_2$, D+MuH and F+H$_2$, and the prototypical polyatomic reaction H+CH$_4$. Above the crossover temperature, the TRPMD rate is virtually invariant to the strength of the friction applied to the internal ring-polymer normal modes, and beneath the crossover temperature the TRPMD rate generally decreases with increasing friction, in agreement with the predictions of Kramers theory. We therefore find that TRPMD is less accurate than Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics (RPMD) for symmetric reactions, and in certain asymmetric systems closer to the q...

  7. Dependence of X-Ray Burst Models on Nuclear Reaction Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Cyburt, R H; Heger, A; Johnson, E; Keek, L; Meisel, Z; Schatz, H; Smith, K

    2016-01-01

    X-ray bursts are thermonuclear flashes on the surface of accreting neutron stars and reliable burst models are needed to interpret observations in terms of properties of the neutron star and the binary system. We investigate the dependence of X-ray burst models on uncertainties in (p,$\\gamma$), ($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$), and ($\\alpha$,p) nuclear reaction rates using fully self-consistent burst models that account for the feedbacks between changes in nuclear energy generation and changes in astrophysical conditions. A two-step approach first identified sensitive nuclear reaction rates in a single-zone model with ignition conditions chosen to match calculations with a state-of-the-art 1D multi-zone model based on the {\\Kepler} stellar evolution code. All relevant reaction rates on neutron deficient isotopes up to mass 106 were individually varied by a factor of 100 up and down. Calculations of the 84 highest impact reaction rate changes were then repeated in the 1D multi-zone model. We find a number of uncertain reac...

  8. Should thermostatted ring polymer molecular dynamics be used to calculate thermal reaction rates?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hele, Timothy J. H., E-mail: tjhh2@cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Suleimanov, Yury V. [Computation-based Science and Technology Research Center, Cyprus Institute, 20 Kavafi St., Nicosia 2121 (Cyprus); Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-08-21

    We apply Thermostatted Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics (TRPMD), a recently proposed approximate quantum dynamics method, to the computation of thermal reaction rates. Its short-time transition-state theory limit is identical to rigorous quantum transition-state theory, and we find that its long-time limit is independent of the location of the dividing surface. TRPMD rate theory is then applied to one-dimensional model systems, the atom-diatom bimolecular reactions H + H{sub 2}, D + MuH, and F + H{sub 2}, and the prototypical polyatomic reaction H + CH{sub 4}. Above the crossover temperature, the TRPMD rate is virtually invariant to the strength of the friction applied to the internal ring-polymer normal modes, and beneath the crossover temperature the TRPMD rate generally decreases with increasing friction, in agreement with the predictions of Kramers theory. We therefore find that TRPMD is approximately equal to, or less accurate than, ring polymer molecular dynamics for symmetric reactions, and for certain asymmetric systems and friction parameters closer to the quantum result, providing a basis for further assessment of the accuracy of this method.

  9. Effect of Conceptual Change Approach on Students' Understanding of Reaction Rate Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingir, Sevgi; Geban, Omer

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of conceptual change text oriented instruction compared to traditional instruction on 10th grade students' understanding of reaction rate concepts. 45 students from two classes of the same teacher in a public high school participated in this study. Students in the experimental group…

  10. The Effect of Conceptual Change Pedagogy on Students' Conceptions of Rate of Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calik, Muammer; Kolomuc, Ali; Karagolge, Zafer

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of the effect of conceptual change pedagogy on students' conceptions of "rate of reaction" concepts. The study used a pre-test/post-test non-equivalent comparison group design approach and the sample consisted of 72 Turkish grade-11 students (aged 16-18 years) selected from two intact classrooms.…

  11. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. II. Classical Mechanical Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual classical form activated complex theory assumes a particular expression for the kinetic energy of the reacting system -- one associated with a rectilinear motion along the reaction coordinate. The derivation of the rate expression given in the present paper is based on the general kinetic energy expression.

  12. A continuous GRASP to determine the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Michael J.; Meneses, Claudio N.; Pardalos, Panos M.; Ragle, Michelle; Resende, Mauricio G. C.

    2007-11-01

    Adverse drag reactions (ADRs) are estimated to be one of the leading causes of death. Many national and international agencies have set up databases of ADR reports for the express purpose of determining the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions that they cause. We formulate the drug-reaction relationship problem as a continuous optimization problem and utilize C-GRASP, a new continuous global optimization heuristic, to approximately determine the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions. Our approach is compared against others in the literature and is shown to find better solutions.

  13. OH clock determination by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry at an environmental chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmet, P.; Dommen, J.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Tritscher, T.; Praplan, A. P.; Platt, S. M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Donahue, N. M.; Baltensperger, U.

    2012-03-01

    The hydroxyl free radical (OH) is the major oxidizing species in the lower atmosphere. Measuring the OH concentration is generally difficult and involves elaborate, expensive, custom-made experimental setups. Thus other more economical techniques, capable of determining OH concentrations at environmental chambers, would be valuable. This work is based on an indirect method of OH concentration measurement, by monitoring an appropriate OH tracer by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). 3-pentanol, 3-pentanone and pinonaldehyde (PA) were used as OH tracers in α-pinene (AP) secondary organic aerosol (SOA) aging studies. In addition we tested butanol-d9 as a potential "universal" OH tracer and determined its reaction rate constant with OH: kbutanol-d9 = 3.4(±0.88) × 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. In order to make the chamber studies more comparable among each other as well as to atmospheric measurements we suggest the use of a chemical (time) dimension: the OH clock, which corresponds to the integrated OH concentration over time.

  14. OH clock determination by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry at an environmental chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Barmet

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The hydroxyl free radical (OH is the major oxidizing species in the lower atmosphere. Measuring the OH concentration is generally difficult and involves elaborate, expensive, custom-made experimental setups. Thus other more economical techniques, capable of determining OH concentrations at environmental chambers, would be valuable. This work is based on an indirect method of OH concentration measurement, by monitoring an appropriate OH tracer by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS. 3-pentanol, 3-pentanone and pinonaldehyde (PA were used as OH tracers in α-pinene (AP secondary organic aerosol (SOA aging studies. In addition we tested butanol-d9 as potential "universal" OH tracer and determined its reaction rate constant with OH: kbutanol-d9 = 3.4(±0.88 · 10−12 cm3molecule−1s−1. In order to make the chamber studies more comparable among each other as well as to atmospheric measurements we suggest the use of a chemical (time dimension:~the OH clock, which corresponds to the integrated OH concentration over time.

  15. OH clock determination by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry at an environmental chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Barmet

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The hydroxyl free radical (OH is the major oxidizing species in the lower atmosphere. Measuring the OH concentration is generally difficult and involves elaborate, expensive, custom-made experimental setups. Thus other more economical techniques, capable of determining OH concentrations at environmental chambers, would be valuable. This work is based on an indirect method of OH concentration measurement, by monitoring an appropriate OH tracer by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS. 3-pentanol, 3-pentanone and pinonaldehyde (PA were used as OH tracers in α-pinene (AP secondary organic aerosol (SOA aging studies. In addition we tested butanol-d9 as a potential "universal" OH tracer and determined its reaction rate constant with OH: kbutanol-d9 = 3.4(±0.88 × 10−12 cm3 molecule−1 s−1. In order to make the chamber studies more comparable among each other as well as to atmospheric measurements we suggest the use of a chemical (time dimension: the OH clock, which corresponds to the integrated OH concentration over time.

  16. Type Ia supernovae and the ^{12}C+^{12}C reaction rate

    CERN Document Server

    Bravo, E; Domínguez, I; Straniero, O; Isern, J; Escartín, J A

    2011-01-01

    The experimental determination of the cross-section of the ^{12}C+^{12}C reaction has never been made at astrophysically relevant energies (E<2 MeV). The profusion of resonances throughout the measured energy range has led to speculation that there is an unknown resonance at E\\sim1.5 MeV possibly as strong as the one measured for the resonance at 2.14 MeV. We study the implications that such a resonance would have for the physics of SNIa, paying special attention to the phases that go from the crossing of the ignition curve to the dynamical event. We use one-dimensional hydrostatic and hydrodynamic codes to follow the evolution of accreting white dwarfs until they grow close to the Chandrasekhar mass and explode as SNIa. In our simulations, we account for a low-energy resonance by exploring the parameter space allowed by experimental data. A change in the ^{12}C+^{12}C rate similar to the one explored here would have profound consequences for the physical conditions in the SNIa explosion, namely the centra...

  17. A rating system for determination of hazardous wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talinli, Ilhan; Yamantürk, Rana; Aydin, Egemen; Başakçilardan-Kabakçi, Sibel

    2005-11-11

    Although hazardous waste lists and their classification methodologies are nearly the same in most of the countries, there are some gaps and subjectiveness in determining the waste as hazardous waste. A rating system for the determination of waste as a hazardous waste is presented in this study which aims to overcome the problems resulted from the existing methodologies. Overall rating value (ORV) calculates and quantifies the waste as regular, non-regular or hazardous waste in an "hourglass" scale. "ORV" as a cumulative-linear formulation in proposed model consists of components such as ecological effects of the waste (Ee) in terms of four main hazard criteria: ignitability, reactivity, corrosivity and toxicity; combined potential risk (CPR) including carcinogenic effect, toxic, infectious and persistence characteristics; existing lists and their methodology (L) and decision factor (D) to separate regular and non-regular waste. Physical form (f) and quantity (Q) of the waste are considered as factors of these components. Seventeen waste samples from different sources are evaluated to demonstrate the simulation of the proposed model by using "hourglass" scale. The major benefit of the presented rating system is to ease the works of decision makers in managing the wastes.

  18. Determining drug release rates of hydrophobic compounds from nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addio, Suzanne M; Bukari, Abdallah A; Dawoud, Mohammed; Bunjes, Heike; Rinaldi, Carlos; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2016-07-28

    Obtaining meaningful drug release profiles for drug formulations is essential prior to in vivo testing and for ensuring consistent quality. The release kinetics of hydrophobic drugs from nanocarriers (NCs) are not well understood because the standard protocols for maintaining sink conditions and sampling are not valid owing to mass transfer and solubility limitations. In this work, a new in vitroassay protocol based on 'lipid sinks' and magnetic separation produces release conditions that mimic the concentrations of lipid membranes and lipoproteins in vivo, facilitates separation, and thus allows determination of intrinsic release rates of drugs from NCs. The assay protocol is validated by (i) determining the magnetic separation efficiency, (ii) demonstrating that sink condition requirements are met, and (iii) accounting for drug by completing a mass balance. NCs of itraconazole and cyclosporine A (CsA) were prepared and the drug release profiles were determined. This release protocol has been used to compare the drug release from a polymer stabilized NC of CsA to a solid drug NP of CsA alone. These data have led to the finding that stabilizing block copolymer layers have a retarding effect on drug release from NCs, reducing the rate of CsA release fourfold compared with the nanoparticle without a polymer coating.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'.

  19. Variation in human recombination rates and its genetic determinants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Fledel-Alon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the fundamental role of crossing-over in the pairing and segregation of chromosomes during human meiosis, the rates and placements of events vary markedly among individuals. Characterizing this variation and identifying its determinants are essential steps in our understanding of the human recombination process and its evolution. STUDY DESIGN/RESULTS: Using three large sets of European-American pedigrees, we examined variation in five recombination phenotypes that capture distinct aspects of crossing-over patterns. We found that the mean recombination rate in males and females and the historical hotspot usage are significantly heritable and are uncorrelated with one another. We then conducted a genome-wide association study in order to identify loci that influence them. We replicated associations of RNF212 with the mean rate in males and in females as well as the association of Inversion 17q21.31 with the female mean rate. We also replicated the association of PRDM9 with historical hotspot usage, finding that it explains most of the genetic variance in this phenotype. In addition, we identified a set of new candidate regions for further validation. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that variation at broad and fine scales is largely separable and that, beyond three known loci, there is no evidence for common variation with large effects on recombination phenotypes.

  20. Determination of human muscle protein fractional synthesis rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornø, Andreas; Hulston, Carl J; van Hall, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, different MS methods for the determination of human muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR) using [ring-(13)C6 ]phenylalanine as a tracer were evaluated. Because the turnover rate of human skeletal muscle is slow, only minute quantities of the stable isotopically......-MS/MS) and GC-tandem MS (GC-MS/MS) have made these techniques an option for human muscle FSR measurements. Human muscle biopsies were freeze dried, cleaned, and hydrolyzed, and the amino acids derivatized using either N-acetyl-n-propyl, phenylisothiocyanate, or N.......89 ± 0.01, P muscle FSR, (2) LC-MS/MS comes quite close and is a good alternative when tissue quantities are too small for GC-C-IRMS, and (3) If GC-MS/MS is to be used, then the HFBA derivative should be used instead...

  1. Quantifying plyometric intensity via rate of force development, knee joint, and ground reaction forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Randall L; Ebben, William P

    2007-08-01

    Because the intensity of plyometric exercises usually is based simply upon anecdotal recommendations rather than empirical evidence, this study sought to quantify a variety of these exercises based on forces placed upon the knee. Six National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletes who routinely trained with plyometric exercises performed depth jumps from 46 and 61 cm, a pike jump, tuck jump, single-leg jump, countermovement jump, squat jump, and a squat jump holding dumbbells equal to 30% of 1 repetition maximum (RM). Ground reaction forces obtained via an AMTI force plate and video analysis of markers placed on the left hip, knee, lateral malleolus, and fifth metatarsal were used to estimate rate of eccentric force development (E-RFD), peak ground reaction forces (GRF), ground reaction forces relative to body weight (GRF/BW), knee joint reaction forces (K-JRF), and knee joint reaction forces relative to body weight (K-JRF/BW) for each plyometric exercise. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance indicated that E-RFD, K-JRF, and K-JRF/BW were different across the conditions (p 0.05). Results indicate that there are quantitative differences between plyometric exercises in the rate of force development during landing and the forces placed on the knee, though peak GRF forces associated with landing may not differ.

  2. Astrophysical reaction rate for alpha(alpha n,gamma) sup 9 Be by photodisintegration

    CERN Document Server

    Sumiyoshi, K; Goko, S; Kajino, T

    2002-01-01

    We study the astrophysical reaction rate for the formation of sup 9 Be through the three body reaction alpha(alpha n,gamma). This reaction is one of the key reactions which could bridge the mass gap at A=8 nuclear systems to produce intermediate-to-heavy mass elements in alpha- and neutron-rich environments such as r-process nucleosynthesis in supernova explosions, s-process nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, and primordial nucleosynthesis in baryon inhomogeneous cosmological models. To calculate the thermonuclear reaction rate in a wide range of temperatures, we numerically integrate the thermal average of cross sections assuming a two-steps formation through a metastable sup 8 Be, alpha+alpha[rlhar2] sup 8 Be(n,gamma) sup 9 Be. Off-resonant and on-resonant contributions from the ground state in sup 8 Be are taken into account. As input cross section, we adopt the latest experimental data by photodisintegration of sup 9 Be with laser-electron photon beams, which covers all relevant reson...

  3. A randomised controlled trial of two infusion rates to decrease reactions to antivenom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey K Isbister

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Snake envenoming is a major clinical problem in Sri Lanka, with an estimated 40,000 bites annually. Antivenom is only available from India and there is a high rate of systemic hypersensitivity reactions. This study aimed to investigate whether the rate of infusion of antivenom reduced the frequency of severe systemic hypersensitivity reactions. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This was a randomized comparison trial of two infusion rates of antivenom for treatment of non-pregnant adult patients (>14 y with snake envenoming in Sri Lanka. Snake identification was by patient or hospital examination of dead snakes when available and confirmed by enzyme-immunoassay for Russell's viper envenoming. Patients were blindly allocated in a 11 randomisation schedule to receive antivenom either as a 20 minute infusion (rapid or a two hour infusion (slow. The primary outcome was the proportion with severe systemic hypersensitivity reactions (grade 3 by Brown grading system within 4 hours of commencement of antivenom. Secondary outcomes included the proportion with mild/moderate hypersensitivity reactions and repeat antivenom doses. Of 1004 patients with suspected snakebites, 247 patients received antivenom. 49 patients were excluded or not recruited leaving 104 patients allocated to the rapid antivenom infusion and 94 to the slow antivenom infusion. The median actual duration of antivenom infusion in the rapid group was 20 min (Interquartile range[IQR]:20-25 min versus 120 min (IQR:75-120 min in the slow group. There was no difference in severe systemic hypersensitivity reactions between those given rapid and slow infusions (32% vs. 35%; difference 3%; 95%CI:-10% to +17%;p = 0.65. The frequency of mild/moderate reactions was also similar. Similar numbers of patients in each arm received further doses of antivenom (30/104 vs. 23/94. CONCLUSIONS: A slower infusion rate would not reduce the rate of severe systemic hypersensitivity reactions from current high

  4. α-Terpineol reactions with the nitrate radical: Rate constant and gas-phase products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian T.; Ham, Jason E.

    The bimolecular rate constant of k rad +α-terpineol (16 ± 4) × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 was measured using the relative rate technique for the reaction of the nitrate radical (NO 3rad ) with α-terpineol (2-(4-methyl-1-cyclohex-3-enyl)propan-2-ol) at 297 ± 3 K and 1 atmosphere total pressure. To more clearly define part of α-terpineol's indoor environment degradation mechanism, the products of α-terpineol + NO 3rad reaction were investigated. The identified reaction products were: acetone, glyoxal (HC( dbnd O)C( dbnd O)H), and methylglyoxal (CH 3C( dbnd O)C( dbnd O)H). The use of derivatizing agents O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine (PFBHA) and N, O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) were used to propose the other major reaction products: 6-hydroxyhept-5-en-2-one, 4-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)-1-methyl-2-oxocyclohexyl nitrate, 5-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)-2-oxocyclohexyl nitrate, 1-formyl-5-hydroxy-4-(hydroxymethyl)-1,5-dimethylhexyl nitrate, and 1,4-diformyl-5-hydroxy-1,5-dimethylhexyl nitrate. The elucidation of these products was facilitated by mass spectrometry of the derivatized reaction products coupled with plausible α-terpineol + NO 3rad reaction mechanisms based on previously published volatile organic compound + NO 3rad gas-phase mechanisms. The additional gas-phase products (2,6,6-trimethyltetrahydro-2 H-pyran-2,5-dicarbaldehyde and 2,2-dimethylcyclohexane-1,4-dicarbaldehyde) are proposed to be the result of cyclization through a reaction intermediate.

  5. Helium Ignition on Accreting Neutron Stars with a New Triple-α Reaction Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fang; Ott, Christian D.

    2010-12-01

    We investigate the effect of a new triple-α reaction rate from Ogata et al. on helium ignition conditions on accreting neutron stars and on the properties of the subsequent type I X-ray burst. We find that the new rate leads to significantly lower ignition column density for accreting neutron stars at low accretion rates. We compare the results of our ignition models for a pure helium accretor to observations of bursts in ultracompact X-ray binaries (UCXBs), which are believed to have nearly pure helium donors. For \\dot{m}> 0.001 \\dot{m}_{{Edd}}, the new triple-α reaction rate from Ogata et al. predicts a maximum helium ignition column of ~3 × 109 g cm-2, corresponding to a burst energy of ~4 × 1040 erg. For \\dot{m}˜ 0.01 \\dot{m}_{{Edd}} at which intermediate long bursts occur, the predicted burst energies are at least a factor of 10 too low to explain the observed energies of such bursts in UCXBs. This finding adds to the doubts cast on the triple-α reaction rate of Ogata et al. by the low-mass stellar evolution results of Dotter & Paxton.

  6. Helium Ignition on Accreting Neutron Stars with a New Triple-alpha Reaction Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Fang

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of a new triple-alpha reaction rate from Ogata et al. (2009) on helium ignition conditions on accreting neutron stars and on the properties of the subsequent type I X-ray burst. We find that the new rate leads to significantly lower ignition column density for accreting neutron stars at low accretion rates. We compare the results of our ignition models for a pure helium accretor to observations of bursts in ultra-compact X-ray binary (UCXBs), which are believed to have nearly pure helium donors. For mdot > 0.001 mdot_Edd, the new triple-alpha reaction rate from Ogata et al. (2009) predicts a maximum helium ignition column of ~ 3 x 10^9 g cm^{-2}, corresponding to a burst energy of ~ 4 x 10^{40} ergs. For mdot ~ 0.01 mdot_Edd at which intermediate long bursts occur, the predicted burst energies are at least a factor of 10 too low to explain the observed energies of such bursts in UCXBs. This finding adds to the doubts cast on the triple-alpha reaction rate of Ogata et al. (2009) by th...

  7. On the relationship between structure and reaction rate in olefin ring-closing metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Ian W; Carboni, Davide; Hillier, Ian H; Nelson, David J; Percy, Jonathan M; Rinaudo, Giuseppe; Vincent, Mark A

    2010-10-14

    In the RCM reactions of a series of simple α,ω-dienes, the relative order of reactivity has been unambiguously determined showing that cyclohexene forms faster than cyclopentene or cycloheptene. 1,5-Hexadiene inhibits the RCM of 1,7-octadiene; 1,5-hexadiene cannot progress to the RCM product (cyclobutene) but forms an unexpectedly stable cyclic η(2)-complex.

  8. Quantum three-body calculation of the nonresonant triple-\\alpha reaction rate at low temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Ogata, Kazuyuki; Kamimura, Masayasu

    2009-01-01

    The triple-\\alpha reaction rate is re-evaluated by directly solving the three-body Schroedinger equation. The resonant and nonresonant processes are treated on the same footing using the continuum-discretized coupled-channels method for three-body scattering. Accurate description of the \\alpha-\\alpha nonresonant states significantly quenches the Coulomb barrier between the two-\\alpha's and the third \\alpha particle. Consequently, the \\alpha-\\alpha nonresonant continuum states below the resonance at 92.04 keV, i.e., the ground state of 8Be, give markedly larger contribution at low temperatures than in foregoing studies. We find about 20 orders-of-magnitude enhancement of the triple-\\alpha reaction rate around 10^7 K compared to the rate of the NACRE compilation.

  9. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction Cl + C2H2 from 210-361 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunning, J.; Stief, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been given to the role of chlorine compounds in the catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone. However, while some reactions have been studied extensively, the kinetic data for the reaction of Cl with C2H2 is sparse with only three known determinations of the rate constant k3. The reactions involved are Cl + C2H2 yields reversibly ClC2H2(asterisk) (3a) and ClC2H2(asterisk) + M yields ClC2H2 + M (3b). In the present study, flash photolysis coupled with chlorine atomic resonance fluorescence have been employed to determine the pressure and temperature dependence of k3 with the third body M = Ar. Room temperature values are also reported for M = N2. The pressure dependence observed in the experiments confirms the expectation that the reaction involves addition of Cl to the unsaturated C2H2 molecule followed by collisional stabilization of the resulting adduct radical.

  10. Reaction rates for the s-process neutron source 22Ne+{\\alpha}

    CERN Document Server

    Longland, Richard; Karakas, Amanda I

    2012-01-01

    The 22Ne({\\alpha},n)25Mg reaction is an important source of neutrons for the s-process. In massive stars responsible for the weak component of the s-process, 22Ne({\\alpha},n)25Mg is the dominant source of neutrons, both during core helium burning and in shell carbon burning. For the main s-process component produced in Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars, the 13C({\\alpha},n)16O reaction is the dominant source of neutrons operating during the interpulse period, with the 22Ne+{\\alpha} source affecting mainly the s-process branchings during a thermal pulse. Rate uncertainties in the competing 22Ne({\\alpha},n)25Mg and 22Ne({\\alpha},{\\gamma})26Mg reactions result in large variations of s-process nucleosynthesis. Here, we present up-to-date and statistically rigorous 22Ne+{\\alpha} reaction rates using recent experimental results and Monte Carlo sampling. Our new rates are used in post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations both for massive stars and AGB stars. We demonstrate that the nucleosynthesis uncertainties ...

  11. Theoretical determination of chemical rate constants using novel time-dependent methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dateo, Christopher E.

    1994-01-01

    The work completed within the grant period 10/1/91 through 12/31/93 falls primarily in the area of reaction dynamics using both quantum and classical mechanical methodologies. Essentially four projects have been completed and have been or are in preparation of being published. The majority of time was spent in the determination of reaction rate coefficients in the area of hydrocarbon fuel combustion reactions which are relevant to NASA's High Speed Research Program (HSRP). These reaction coefficients are important in the design of novel jet engines with low NOx emissions, which through a series of catalytic reactions contribute to the deterioration of the earth's ozone layer. A second area of research studied concerned the control of chemical reactivity using ultrashort (femtosecond) laser pulses. Recent advances in pulsed-laser technologies have opened up a vast new field to be investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The photodissociation of molecules adsorbed on surfaces using novel time-independent quantum mechanical methods was a third project. And finally, using state-of-the-art, high level ab initio electronic structure methods in conjunction with accurate quantum dynamical methods, the rovibrational energy levels of a triatomic molecule with two nonhydrogen atoms (HCN) were calculated to unprecedented levels of agreement between theory and experiment.

  12. Quantum Yield Determination Based on Photon Number Measurement, Protocols for Firefly Bioluminescence Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    Quantum yield (QY), which is defined as the probability of photon production by a single bio/chemiluminescence reaction, is an important factor to characterize luminescence light intensity emitted diffusively from the reaction solution mixture. Here, methods to measure number of photons to determine QY according to the techniques of national radiometry standards are described. As an example, experiments using firefly bioluminescence reactions are introduced.

  13. Nuclear Reaction Rates in a Plasma The Effect of Highly Damped Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Opher, M; Opher, Merav; Opher, Reuven

    2000-01-01

    The fluctuation-dissipation theorem is used to evaluate the screening factor of nuclear reactions due to the electromagnetic fluctuations in a plasma. We show that the commonly used Saltpeter factor is obtained if only fluctuations near the plasma eigenfrequency are assumed to be important (\\omega \\sim \\omega_{pe}\\ll T (\\hbar=k_{B}=1)). By taking into account all the fluctuations, the highly damped ones, with \\omega >\\omega_{pe}, as well as those with \\omega\\leq\\omega_{pe}, we find that nuclear reaction rates are higher than those obtained using the Saltpeter factor, for many interesting plasmas.

  14. Determination of reactivity rates of silicate particle-size fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Cristina Fernandes Deus

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of sources used for soil acidity correction depends on reactivity rate (RR and neutralization power (NP, indicated by effective calcium carbonate (ECC. Few studies establish relative efficiency of reactivity (RER for silicate particle-size fractions, therefore, the RER applied for lime are used. This study aimed to evaluate the reactivity of silicate materials affected by particle size throughout incubation periods in comparison to lime, and to calculate the RER for silicate particle-size fractions. Six correction sources were evaluated: three slags from distinct origins, dolomitic and calcitic lime separated into four particle-size fractions (2, 0.84, 0.30 and <0.30-mm sieves, and wollastonite, as an additional treatment. The treatments were applied to three soils with different texture classes. The dose of neutralizing material (calcium and magnesium oxides was applied at equal quantities, and the only variation was the particle-size material. After a 90-day incubation period, the RER was calculated for each particle-size fraction, as well as the RR and ECC of each source. The neutralization of soil acidity of the same particle-size fraction for different sources showed distinct solubility and a distinct reaction between silicates and lime. The RER for slag were higher than the limits established by Brazilian legislation, indicating that the method used for limes should not be used for the slags studied here.

  15. A High-Precision Determination of the Astrophysical Rate for Production of ^9Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, C. W.; Clegg, T. B.; Karwowski, H. J.; Rich, G. C.; Tompkins, J. R.; Howell, C. R.

    2010-11-01

    New cross section measurements of the astrophysically important ^9Be(γ,n) reaction have been made from 1.5 to 5.18 MeV. The measurements were made using the nearly monoenergetic circularly polarized γ-ray beam at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory's High Intensity γ-ray Source. Measurements over narrow resonances employed beams with energy spread dE/E <= 1%. The energy-dependent absolute efficiency of the neutron counter used in this work was measured to ± 3% accuracy. New resonance parameters for the 4 lowest lying states in ^9Be were determined. A new reaction rate for α+ α+ n has been determined to better than ± 5%. The present rate is ˜ 25% larger than two widely accepted rates [1-2] in the temperature range important for r-process nucleosynthesis. The implications of this new rate on r-process and nuclear abundance predictions will be discussed.[4pt] [1] C. Angulo et al. Nuc. Phys. A 656 (1999) 3-183. [0pt] [2] K. Sumiyoshi et al. Nuc. Phys A 709 (2002) 467-486.

  16. Determination by transfer reaction of alpha widths in fluorine for astrophysical interest; Determination par reaction de transfert de largeurs alpha dans le fluor 19. Applications a l'astrophysique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira Santos, F. de

    1995-04-15

    The nucleosynthesis of fluorine is not known. Several astrophysical models predict the alpha radiative capture onto N{sup 15} as the main fluorine production reaction. In the expression of the reaction rate, one parameter is missing: the alpha width of the resonance on the E = 4.377 MeV level in fluorine. A direct measurement is excluded due to the very low cross-section expected. We have determined this alpha width using a transfer reaction followed by analyses with FR-DWBA (Finite Range Distorted Wave Born Approximation) in a simple cluster alpha model. This experiment was carried out with a Li{sup 7} beam with E = 28 MeV onto a N{sup 15} gas target. The 16 first levels were studied. Spectroscopic factors were extracted for most of them. Alpha widths for unbound levels were determined. Many alpha width were compared with known values from direct reaction and the differences lie within the uncertainty range (factor 2). The alpha width for the E = 4.377 MeV level was determined ({gamma}{sub {alpha}} = 1.5*10{sup -15} MeV), its value is about 60 times weaker than the used value. The influence of our new rate was studied in AGB (Asymptotic Giant Branch) stars during thermal pulses. In this model the alteration is sensitive. (author)

  17. The H2 + CO ↔ H2CO Reaction: Rate Constants and Relevance to Hot and Dense Astrophysical Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichietti, R. M.; Spada, R. F. K.; da Silva, A. B. F.; Machado, F. B. C.; Haiduke, R. L. A.

    2016-07-01

    A theoretical thermochemical and kinetic investigation of the thermal H2 + CO ↔ H2CO reaction was performed for a temperature range from 200 to 4000 K. Geometries and vibrational frequencies of reactants, product, and transition state (TS) were obtained at CCSD/cc-pVxZ (x = T and Q) levels and scaling factors were employed to consider anharmonicity effects on vibrational frequencies, zero-point energies, and thermal corrections provided by these methodologies. Enthalpies Gibbs energies, and rate constants for this reaction were determined by including a complete basis set extrapolation correction for the electronic properties calculated at CCSD(T)/cc-pVyZ (y = Q and 5) levels. Our study indicates that enthalpy changes for this reaction are highly dependent on temperature. Moreover, forward and reverse (high-pressure limit) rate constants were obtained from variational TS theory with quantum tunneling corrections. Thus, modified Arrhenius’ equations were fitted by means of the best forward and reverse rate constant values, which provide very reliable estimates for these quantities within the temperature range between 700 and 4000 K. To our knowledge, this is the first kinetic study done for the forward H2 + CO \\to H2CO process in a wide temperature range. Finally, these results can be used to explain the formaldehyde abundance in hot and dense interstellar media, possibly providing data about the physical conditions associated with H2CO masers close to massive star-forming regions.

  18. Two effects relevant for the study of astrophysical reaction rates: gamma transitions in capture reactions and Coulomb suppression of the stellar enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Rauscher, T

    2008-01-01

    Nucleosynthesis processes involve reactions on several thousand nuclei, both close to and far off stability. The preparation of reaction rates to be used in astrophysical investigations requires experimental and theoretical input. In this context, two interesting aspects are discussed: (i) the relevant gamma transition energies in astrophysical capture reactions, and (ii) the newly discovered Coulomb suppression of the stellar enhancement factor. The latter makes a number of reactions with negative Q value more favorable for experimental investigation than their inverse reactions, contrary to common belief.

  19. On the Temperature Dependence of the Rate Constant of the Bimolecular Reaction of two Hydrated Electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Butarbutar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been a longstanding issue in the radiation chemistry of water that, even though H2 is a molecular product, its “escape” yield g(H2 increases with increasing temperature. A main source of H2 is the bimolecular reaction of two hydrated electrons (eaq. The temperature dependence of the rate constant of this reaction (k1, measured under alkaline conditions, reveals that the rate constant drops abruptly above ~150°C. Recently, it has been suggested that this temperature dependence should be regarded as being independent of pH and used in high-temperature modeling of near-neutral water radiolysis. However, when this drop in the eaq self-reaction rate constant is included in low (isolated spurs and high (cylindrical tracks linear energy transfer (LET modeling calculations, g(H2 shows a marked downward discontinuity at ~150°C which is not observed experimentally. The consequences of the presence of this discontinuity in g(H2 for both low and high LET radiation are briefly discussed in this communication. It is concluded that the applicability of the sudden drop in k1 observed at ~150°C in alkaline water to near-neutral water is questionable and that further measurements of the rate constant in pure water are highly desirable.

  20. An efficient Monte Carlo method for calculating ab initio transition state theory reaction rates in solution

    CERN Document Server

    Iftimie, R; Schofield, J P; Iftimie, Radu; Salahub, Dennis; Schofield, Jeremy

    2003-01-01

    In this article, we propose an efficient method for sampling the relevant state space in condensed phase reactions. In the present method, the reaction is described by solving the electronic Schr\\"{o}dinger equation for the solute atoms in the presence of explicit solvent molecules. The sampling algorithm uses a molecular mechanics guiding potential in combination with simulated tempering ideas and allows thorough exploration of the solvent state space in the context of an ab initio calculation even when the dielectric relaxation time of the solvent is long. The method is applied to the study of the double proton transfer reaction that takes place between a molecule of acetic acid and a molecule of methanol in tetrahydrofuran. It is demonstrated that calculations of rates of chemical transformations occurring in solvents of medium polarity can be performed with an increase in the cpu time of factors ranging from 4 to 15 with respect to gas-phase calculations.

  1. Reaction Rate Distributions and Ratios in FR0 Assemblies 1, 2 and 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, T.L.

    1966-06-15

    The spatial distribution of different reaction rates and reaction ratios in Assemblies 1, 2 and 3 of the fast reactor FR0 was measured by fission chamber scans and foil activation technique. Assemblies 1 and 2 had cores of undiluted fuel (uranium metal enriched to 20 % U{sup 235}) while the core of Assembly 3 was diluted with about 30 vol. % graphite. All the systems had a thick copper reflector, The experimental results were compared with calculated values obtained from DSN and TDC multigroup spectra and group cross-section sets for the reactions. Good agreement between experiment and calculations is generally obtained in the core region but in the reflector the neutron spectrum is calculated too hard.

  2. Mathematical Formalism of Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics for Nonlinear Chemical Reaction Systems with General Rate Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hao; Qian, Hong

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies a mathematical formalism of nonequilibrium thermodynamics for chemical reaction models with N species, M reactions, and general rate law. We establish a mathematical basis for J. W. Gibbs' macroscopic chemical thermodynamics under G. N. Lewis' kinetic law of entire equilibrium (detailed balance in nonlinear chemical kinetics). In doing so, the equilibrium thermodynamics is then naturally generalized to nonequilibrium settings without detailed balance. The kinetic models are represented by a Markovian jumping process. A generalized macroscopic chemical free energy function and its associated balance equation with nonnegative source and sink are the major discoveries. The proof is based on the large deviation principle of this type of Markov processes. A general fluctuation dissipation theorem for stochastic reaction kinetics is also proved. The mathematical theory illustrates how a novel macroscopic dynamic law can emerges from the mesoscopic kinetics in a multi-scale system.

  3. Electron capture rates in stars studied with heavy ion charge exchange reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bertulani, C A

    2015-01-01

    Indirect methods using nucleus-nucleus reactions at high energies (here, high energies mean $\\sim$ 50 MeV/nucleon and higher) are now routinely used to extract information of interest for nuclear astrophysics. This is of extreme relevance as many of the nuclei involved in stellar evolution are short-lived. Therefore, indirect methods became the focus of recent studies carried out in major nuclear physics facilities. Among such methods, heavy ion charge exchange is thought to be a useful tool to infer Gamow-Teller matrix elements needed to describe electron capture rates in stars and also double beta-decay experiments. In this short review, I provide a theoretical guidance based on a simple reaction model for charge exchange reactions.

  4. Determination of VOC emission rates and compositions for offset printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadden, R A; Scheff, P A; Franke, J E; Conroy, L M; Keil, C B

    1995-07-01

    The release rates of volatile organic compounds (VOC) as fugitive emissions from offset printing are difficult to quantify, and the compositions are usually not known. Tests were conducted at three offset printing shops that varied in size and by process. In each case, the building shell served as the test "enclosure," and air flow and concentration measurements were made at each air entry and exit point. Emission rates and VOC composition were determined during production for (1) a small shop containing three sheetfed presses and two spirit duplicators (36,700 sheets, 47,240 envelopes and letterheads), (2) a medium-size industrial in-house shop with two webfed and three sheetfed presses, and one spirit duplicator (315,130 total sheets), and (3) one print room of a large commercial concern containing three webfed, heatset operations (1.16 x 10(6) ft) served by catalytic air pollution control devices. Each test consisted of 12 one-hour periods over two days. Air samples were collected simultaneously during each period at 7-14 specified locations within each space. The samples were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) for total VOC and for 13-19 individual organics. Samples of solvents used at each shop were also analyzed by GC. Average VOC emission rates were 4.7-6.1 kg/day for the small sheetfed printing shop, 0.4-0.9 kg/day for the industrial shop, and 79-82 kg/day for the commercial print room. Emission compositions were similar and included benzene, toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, and hexane. Comparison of the emission rates with mass balance estimates based on solvent usage and composition were quite consistent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Learned cardiac control with heart rate biofeedback transfers to emotional reactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Peira

    Full Text Available Emotions involve subjective feelings, action tendencies and physiological reactions. Earlier findings suggest that biofeedback might provide a way to regulate the physiological components of emotions. The present study investigates if learned heart rate regulation with biofeedback transfers to emotional situations without biofeedback. First, participants learned to decrease heart rate using biofeedback. Then, inter-individual differences in the acquired skill predicted how well they could decrease heart rate reactivity when later exposed to negative arousing pictures without biofeedback. These findings suggest that (i short lasting biofeedback training improves heart rate regulation and (ii the learned ability transfers to emotion challenging situations without biofeedback. Thus, heart rate biofeedback training may enable regulation of bodily aspects of emotion also when feedback is not available.

  6. Learned cardiac control with heart rate biofeedback transfers to emotional reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peira, Nathalie; Pourtois, Gilles; Fredrikson, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Emotions involve subjective feelings, action tendencies and physiological reactions. Earlier findings suggest that biofeedback might provide a way to regulate the physiological components of emotions. The present study investigates if learned heart rate regulation with biofeedback transfers to emotional situations without biofeedback. First, participants learned to decrease heart rate using biofeedback. Then, inter-individual differences in the acquired skill predicted how well they could decrease heart rate reactivity when later exposed to negative arousing pictures without biofeedback. These findings suggest that (i) short lasting biofeedback training improves heart rate regulation and (ii) the learned ability transfers to emotion challenging situations without biofeedback. Thus, heart rate biofeedback training may enable regulation of bodily aspects of emotion also when feedback is not available.

  7. Dramatic effects of halogen substitution and solvent on the rates and mechanisms of nucleophilic substitution reactions of aziridines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Harold D

    2008-04-04

    In a previous study we reported that fluorine substitution at the carbon positions of aziridine results in profound enhancements of the rate of reaction with ammonia, a typical nucleophile, in the gas phase. In this study the investigation is extended to include chloro- and bromoaziridines. Because syntheses are largely performed in the condensed phase, the present computational investigation [(MP2(Full)/6-311++G(d,p)//MP2(Full)/6-31+G(d) level] was conducted with three typical solvents that cover a wide range of polarity: THF, CH3CN, and H2O. Nucleophiles can react with haloaziridines 1 by displacing a substituted amide ion by means of an SN2 mechanism (pathway a), producing 1,2-diaminohaloethanes (from the initially formed dipolar species 2). Alternatively, a rearrangement mechanism involving rate-determining departure of a halide ion (pathway b) to form an imidoyl halide, 3, is possible. Transition-state theory was used to compute relative reaction rates of these mechanistic possibilities and to assess the role of the halogen substituents and the reaction solvent. Gas-phase results provided the basis of mechanistic insights that were more apparent in the absence of intermolecular interactions. Fluoroaziridines were found to react at accelerated rates relative to aziridine exclusively by means of the a Menshutkin-type mechanism (SN2) in each solvent tested, while the reactions of the chloro- and bromoaziridines could be directed toward 2 in the highly nonpolar solvent, cyclohexane, or toward 3 in the more polar solvents. An assessment is made of the feasibility of using this chemistry of the haloazirdines in the synthetic laboratory.

  8. The effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on hydro-geochemical transport and effective reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchley, Adam L; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K; Maxwell, Reed M

    2014-09-01

    The role of coupled physical and geochemical heterogeneities in hydro-geochemical transport is investigated by simulating three-dimensional transport in a heterogeneous system with kinetic mineral reactions. Ensembles of 100 physically heterogeneous realizations were simulated for three geochemical conditions: 1) spatially homogeneous reactive mineral surface area, 2) reactive surface area positively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity, and 3) reactive surface area negatively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity. Groundwater chemistry and the corresponding effective reaction rates were calculated at three transverse planes to quantify differences in plume evolution due to heterogeneity in mineral reaction rates and solute residence time (τ). The model is based on a hypothetical CO2 intrusion into groundwater from a carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) operation where CO2 dissolution and formation of carbonic acid created geochemical dis-equilibrium between fluids and the mineral galena that resulted in increased aqueous lead (Pb(2+)) concentrations. Calcite dissolution buffered the pH change and created conditions of galena oversaturation, which then reduced lead concentrations along the flow path. Near the leak kinetic geochemical reactions control the release of solutes into the fluid, but further along the flow path mineral solubility controls solute concentrations. Simulation results demonstrate the impact of heterogeneous distribution of geochemical reactive surface area in coordination with physical heterogeneity on the effective reaction rate (Krxn,eff) and Pb(2+) concentrations within the plume. Dissimilarities between ensemble Pb(2+) concentration and Krxn,eff are attributed to how geochemical heterogeneity affects the time (τeq) and therefore advection distance (Leq) required for the system to re-establish geochemical equilibrium. Only after geochemical equilibrium is re-established, Krxn,eff and Pb(2+) concentrations are the same for all

  9. The type of seeder cells determines the efficiency of germinal center reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer-Hermann, M; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Beyer, Tilo

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the origin of two classes of germinal centers that have been observed during humoral immune responses: Some germinal centers develop very well and give rise to a large number of high affinity antibody producing plasma cells. Other germinal center reaction are very weak and the output production is practically absent. We propose an explanation for this nearly all-or-none behavior of germinal center reactions: The affinity of the seeder B-cells to the antigen is the critical parameter that determines the fate of the germinal center reaction. This hypothesis is verified in the framework of a space-time simulation of germinal center reactions.

  10. Transition path sampling with quantum/classical mechanics for reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräter, Frauke; Li, Wenjin

    2015-01-01

    Predicting rates of biochemical reactions through molecular simulations poses a particular challenge for two reasons. First, the process involves bond formation and/or cleavage and thus requires a quantum mechanical (QM) treatment of the reaction center, which can be combined with a more efficient molecular mechanical (MM) description for the remainder of the system, resulting in a QM/MM approach. Second, reaction time scales are typically many orders of magnitude larger than the (sub-)nanosecond scale accessible by QM/MM simulations. Transition path sampling (TPS) allows to efficiently sample the space of dynamic trajectories from the reactant to the product state without an additional biasing potential. We outline here the application of TPS and QM/MM to calculate rates for biochemical reactions, by means of a simple toy system. In a step-by-step protocol, we specifically refer to our implementation within the MD suite Gromacs, which we have made available to the research community, and include practical advice on the choice of parameters.

  11. Rate constants of chemical reactions from semiclassical transition state theory in full and one dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Samuel M; Shan, Xiao; Clary, David C

    2016-06-28

    Semiclassical Transition State Theory (SCTST), a method for calculating rate constants of chemical reactions, offers gains in computational efficiency relative to more accurate quantum scattering methods. In full-dimensional (FD) SCTST, reaction probabilities are calculated from third and fourth potential derivatives along all vibrational degrees of freedom. However, the computational cost of FD SCTST scales unfavorably with system size, which prohibits its application to larger systems. In this study, the accuracy and efficiency of 1-D SCTST, in which only third and fourth derivatives along the reaction mode are used, are investigated in comparison to those of FD SCTST. Potential derivatives are obtained from numerical ab initio Hessian matrix calculations at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory, and Richardson extrapolation is applied to improve the accuracy of these derivatives. Reaction barriers are calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level. Results from FD SCTST agree with results from previous theoretical and experimental studies when Richardson extrapolation is applied. Results from our implementation of 1-D SCTST, which uses only 4 single-point MP2/cc-pVTZ energy calculations in addition to those for conventional TST, agree with FD results to within a factor of 5 at 250 K. This degree of agreement and the efficiency of the 1-D method suggest its potential as a means of approximating rate constants for systems too large for existing quantum scattering methods.

  12. Reaction rate constants of H-abstraction by OH from large ketones: Measurements and site-specific rate rules

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2014-01-01

    Reaction rate constants of the reaction of four large ketones with hydroxyl (OH) are investigated behind reflected shock waves using OH laser absorption. The studied ketones are isomers of hexanone and include 2-hexanone, 3-hexanone, 3-methyl-2-pentanone, and 4-methl-2-pentanone. Rate constants are measured under pseudo-first-order kinetics at temperatures ranging from 866 K to 1375 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. The reported high-temperature rate constant measurements are the first direct measurements for these ketones under combustion-relevant conditions. The effects of the position of the carbonyl group (CO) and methyl (CH3) branching on the overall rate constant with OH are examined. Using previously published data, rate constant expressions covering, low-to-high temperatures, are developed for acetone, 2-butanone, 3-pentanone, and the hexanone isomers studied here. These Arrhenius expressions are used to devise rate rules for H-abstraction from various sites. Specifically, the current scheme is applied with good success to H-abstraction by OH from a series of n-ketones. Finally, general expressions for primary and secondary site-specific H-abstraction by OH from ketones are proposed as follows (the subscript numbers indicate the number of carbon atoms bonded to the next-nearest-neighbor carbon atom, the subscript CO indicates that the abstraction is from a site next to the carbonyl group (CO), and the prime is used to differentiate different neighboring environments of a methylene group):P1,CO = 7.38 × 10-14 exp(-274 K/T) + 9.17 × 10-12 exp(-2499 K/T) (285-1355 K)S10,CO = 1.20 × 10-11 exp(-2046 K/T) + 2.20 × 10-13 exp(160 K/T) (222-1464 K)S11,CO = 4.50 × 10-11 exp(-3000 K/T) + 8.50 × 10-15 exp(1440 K/T) (248-1302 K)S11′,CO = 3.80 × 10-11 exp(-2500 K/T) + 8.50 × 10-15 exp(1550 K/T) (263-1370 K)S 21,CO = 5.00 × 10-11 exp(-2500 K/T) + 4.00 × 10-13 exp(775 K/T) (297-1376 K) © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  13. Effects of network dissolution changes on pore-to-core upscaled reaction rates for kaolinite and anorthite reactions under acidic conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Daesang

    2013-11-01

    We have extended reactive flow simulation in pore-network models to include geometric changes in the medium from dissolution effects. These effects include changes in pore volume and reactive surface area, as well as topological changes that open new connections. The computed changes were based upon a mineral map from an X-ray computed tomography image of a sandstone core. We studied the effect of these changes on upscaled (pore-scale to core-scale) reaction rates and compared against the predictions of a continuum model. Specifically, we modeled anorthite and kaolinite reactions under acidic flow conditions during which the anorthite reactions remain far from equilibrium (dissolution only), while the kaolinite reactions can be near-equilibrium. Under dissolution changes, core-scale reaction rates continuously and nonlinearly evolved in time. At higher injection rates, agreement with predictions of the continuum model degraded significantly. For the far-from-equilibrium reaction, our results indicate that the ability to correctly capture the heterogeneity in dissolution changes in the reactive mineral surface area is critical to accurately predict upscaled reaction rates. For the near-equilibrium reaction, the ability to correctly capture the heterogeneity in the saturation state remains critical. Inclusion of a Nernst-Planck term to ensure neutral ionic currents under differential diffusion resulted in at most a 9% correction in upscaled rates.

  14. Rate of pozzolanic reaction of two kinds of activated coal gangue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shuang-xi

    2009-01-01

    Two kinds of activated ways are used to prepare activated coal gangue fine powder,one is calcining coal gangue at 800 ℃ (gangue A),and the other is calcining coal gangue with a certain calcite at 800 ℃ (gangue B).The experiment shows that strengths of blended cement mortar with coal gangue B are higher than that of blended cement with coal gangue A.Hydration of cements with the two kinds of activated coal gangue is investigated through a differential thermal analysis.The weight loss due to Ca(OH)2 decomposition of hydration products by differential thermal anaiysis/thermo gravimetric (DTA/TG) can be used to quantify the pozzolanic reaction.A new method based on the composition of hydration cement is proposed to determine the degree of pozzolanic reaction.The results obtained suggest that the degree of pozzolanic reaction of gangue B is faster than that of gangue A.

  15. Solute transport predicts scaling of surface reaction rates in porous media: Applications to silicate weathering

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, Allen G; Ghanbarian, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    We apply our theory of conservative solute transport, based on concepts from percolation theory, directly and without modification to reactive solute transport. This theory has previously been shown to predict the observed range of dispersivity values for conservative solute transport over ten orders of magnitude of length scale. We now show that the temporal dependence derived for the solute velocity accurately predicts the time-dependence for the weathering of silicate minerals over nine orders of magnitude of time scale, while its predicted length dependence agrees with data obtained for reaction rates over five orders of magnitude of length scale. In both cases, it is possible to unify lab and field results. Thus, net reaction rates appear to be limited by solute transport velocities. We suggest the possible relevance of our results to landscape evolution of the earth's terrestrial surface.

  16. Reaction rate distribution measurement and the core performance evaluation in the prototype FBR Monju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usami, S.; Suzuoki, Z.; Deshimaru, T. [Monju Construction Office, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Fukui-ken (Japan); Nakashima, F. [Tsuruga head Office, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Fukui-ken (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Monju is a prototype fast breeder reactor designed to have an output of 280 MW (714 MWt), fueled with mixed oxides of plutonium and uranium and cooled by liquid sodium. The principal data on plant design and performance are shown in Table 1. Monju attained initial criticality in April 1994 and the reactor physics tests were carried out from May through November 1994. The reaction rate distribution measurement by the foil activation method was one of these tests and was carried out in order to verify the core performance and to contribute to the development of the core design methods. On the basis of the reaction rate measurement data, the Monju initial core breeding ratio and the power distribution were evaluated. (author)

  17. Rate of diffusion-limited reactions for a fractal aggregate of reactive spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chin-Yao; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2002-08-01

    We study the reaction rate for a fractal cluster of perfectly absorbing, stationary spherical sinks in a medium containing a mobile reactant. The effectiveness factor eta, which is defined as the ratio of the total reaction rate of the cluster to that without diffusional interactions, is calculated. The scaling behavior of eta is derived for arbitrary fractal dimension based on the Kirkwood-Riseman approximation. The asymptotic as well as the finite size scaling of eta are confirmed numerically by the method of multipole expansion, which has been proven to be an excellent approximation. The fractal assembly is made of N spheres with its dimension varying from D1, eta][approx(ln N)-1 for D=1, and eta][approxN0 for D1 the screening effect of diffusive interactions grows with the size, for Ddecays with decreasing D. The conclusion is also applicable to transport phenomena like dissolution, heat conduction, and sedimentation.

  18. Determination of Rate of Hearing Changes After Spinal Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Omidi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing loss after surgery is reported rarely. Its prevalence rate is different and reported to be between 3-92%. Hearing loss is often subclinical and not diagnosed without audiometry. The aim of this study was to determine rate of hearing changes after spinal anesthesia in patients undergoing surgery with spinal anesthesia. Methods: In this descriptive study, forty male patients scheduled for repair of inguinal hernia under spinal anesthesia were selected by simple sampling method. Before surgery, audiometry was performed for both the ears of the patients. Audiomatery was performed again by the audiometry specialist on day one, five, fifteen and two months after surgery. Results: Hearing loss was observed in 13 (32.5% patients. Hearing loss in 12 patients (92% was in low hearing frequency range and 1 patient (8% was in mid hearing frequency. Hearing loss in 8 patients (61% was ipsilateral and in 5 patients (39% was bilateral. Hearing loss in 9 patients (69% on 5th day and 2 patients (5/15% on 15th day resolved spontaneously. Conclusion: Results of this study conformed that hearing loss after spinal anesthesia is not a serious problem and can resolve spontaneously. It seems that there is relationship between hearing loss and headache.

  19. The effect of learning models and emotional intelligence toward students learning outcomes on reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutiani, Ani; Silitonga, Mei Y.

    2017-08-01

    This research focused on the effect of learning models and emotional intelligence in students' chemistry learning outcomes on reaction rate teaching topic. In order to achieve the objectives of the research, with 2x2 factorial research design was used. There were two factors tested, namely: the learning models (factor A), and emotional intelligence (factor B) factors. Then, two learning models were used; problem-based learning/PBL (A1), and project-based learning/PjBL (A2). While, the emotional intelligence was divided into higher and lower types. The number of population was six classes containing 243 grade X students of SMAN 10 Medan, Indonesia. There were 15 students of each class were chosen as the sample of the research by applying purposive sampling technique. The data were analyzed by applying two-ways analysis of variance (2X2) at the level of significant α = 0.05. Based on hypothesis testing, there was the interaction between learning models and emotional intelligence in students' chemistry learning outcomes. Then, the finding of the research showed that students' learning outcomes in reaction rate taught by using PBL with higher emotional intelligence is higher than those who were taught by using PjBL. There was no significant effect between students with lower emotional intelligence taught by using both PBL and PjBL in reaction rate topic. Based on the finding, the students with lower emotional intelligence were quite hard to get in touch with other students in group discussion.

  20. Experimental results for studies of the 40Ca(α,γ)44Ti reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Daniel; Becker, Hans-Werner; Bowers, Matt; Collon, Philippe; Goerres, Joachim; Lu, Wenting; Schmitt, Chris; Wiescher, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Observational studies of galactic γ emitters such as 44Ti have highlighted their use in nucleosynthesis studies of massive stars in their late stage stellar evolution and final explosive demise in core collapse supernova events. Models used in the simulation of such γ emitters rely heavily upon reliable reaction rates for both the creation and annihilation of these isotopes over large temperature ranges. The production of 44Ti mainly through the 40Ca(α,γ)44Ti reaction is thought to take place primarily in the α-rich freeze out phase of a core collapse supernova. However, current supernova models predict lower 44Ti to 56Ni ratios than observed, creating a need for more information about its production mechanism. A number of previous studies include prompt γ-ray measurements, recoil mass separator experiments and the use of AMS, all giving greatly different reaction rates. Aiding in the refinement of these needed rates, the results of experiments at the DTL, Bochum and NSL, Notre Dame will be presented against the backdrop of these previous measurements. Work supported by grant # 0758100 and # 0822648.

  1. Quantum Tunneling Rates of Gas-Phase Reactions from On-the-Fly Instanton Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Adrian N; Richardson, Jeremy O; Knowles, Peter J; Rommel, Judith; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2016-11-03

    The instanton method obtains approximate tunneling rates from the minimum-action path (known as the instanton) linking reactants to the products at a given temperature. An efficient way to find the instanton is to search for saddle-points on the ring-polymer potential surface, which is obtained by expressing the quantum Boltzmann operator as a discrete path-integral. Here we report a practical implementation of this ring-polymer form of instanton theory into the Molpro electronic-structure package, which allows the rates to be computed on-the-fly, without the need for a fitted analytic potential-energy surface. As a test case, we compute tunneling rates for the benchmark H + CH4 reaction, showing how the efficiency of the instanton method allows the user systematically to converge the tunneling rate with respect to the level of electronic-structure theory.

  2. Determination of Reaction Rate Constant of Lactose and Maltose Hydrolysis by Capillary Electrophoresis with Electrochemical Detection%乳糖和麦芽糖水解反应速率常数的毛细管电泳测定方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张欣; 丁祥欢; 朱雪焱; 叶建农

    2001-01-01

    利用具有高分辩率和高灵敏度的毛细管电泳-电化学检测方法测定乳糖、麦芽糖及其水解产物的浓度随反应时间变化的规律。在H2SO4催化下,对不同温度时乳糖、麦芽糖水解反应速率进行了测定,在85℃、90℃和95℃时乳糖的水解反应速率常数分别为13.3×10-3、30.1×10-3和52.5×10-3min-1;而麦芽糖在85℃、95℃和100℃时的反应速率常数分别为17.7×10-3、84.6×10-3和150×10-3min-1;并据此分别求得反应活化能Ea为161.1kJ/mol、194.7kJ/mol。%The concentration of lactose and maltose and their hydrolysisproducts were monitored by ca-pillary electrophoresis-electrochemical detection due to its high resolution and high sensitivity of detection. The reaction rate constant of lactose and maltose hydrolysis at different temperature in 0.75 mol/L H2SO4 were obtained from the concentration change of lactose and maltose during the process of hydrolysis. At 85 ℃ , 90 ℃ and 95 ℃ , the measured rate constants of lactose hydrolysis were 13.3× 10-3 min-1, 30.1× 10-3 min-1 and 52.5× 10-3 min-1, respectively, from which the activation energy of the reaction(Ea) value of 161.1 kJ/mol was derived. At 85 ℃ , 95 ℃ and 100 ℃ , the measured rate constants of maltose hydrolysis were 17.7× 10-3 min-1, 84.6×10-3 min-1 and 150× 10-3 min-1, respectively, Ea value obtained was 194.7 kJ/mol.

  3. THE METHOD OF POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION FOR SEX DETERMINATION IN HUCHEN (HUCHO HUCHO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Rud

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To analyse the nucleotide sequences of salmonids Y chromosome and to determine the fragment for specific primers selection and also to develop the PCR based method for sex determination in huchen H. hucho. Methodology. Using the ClustalW algorithm in MEGA 5.2, the nucleotide sequences of salmonids Y chromosome were analysed. For developing of method for rapid diagnostic of huchen sex the polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay was used. Tne nucleotide sequences of amplified products were investigated by sequencing. Findings. Using PCR assay the method of sex determination in huchen H. hucho was developed. It was shown that specific PCR products in size of 450 nucleotides were visible in huchen males only. In addition we showed that selected primers can be used in sex determination of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and this fact is proved the high rate of sdY locus similarity and its wide destribution in salmonids. Originality. The nucleotide sequences of salmonids Y chromosome were analysed and highly conservative region of sdY locus for specific primers selection, which covers sex-linked marker, was identified. Practical Value. Rapid sex determination in huchen by the developed method will allow to identify reversal males in process of gormonal sex reversion. At the stage of reversal males screening, this method will allow to identify the genotypic males (XY in experimental group and discard them because only phenotypic males with XX genotype (reversal males must be used in the crosses with native femelas for getting of 100 % all-females stock.

  4. Simultaneous determination of trace iron and aluminum by catalytic spectrophotometry based on a novel oxidation reaction of xylene cyanol FF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Longfei; Xu, Chunxiu

    2008-06-01

    A new, simple, sensitive and selective method for the simultaneous determination of trace iron and aluminum by catalytic spectrophotometry was presented, based on the catalytic effects of iron and aluminum on the discoloring reaction of xylene cyanol FF proceeded by hydrogen peroxide and potassium periodate in weak nitric acid medium. No catalytic effect was obtained in the presence of hydrogen peroxide or potassium periodate only. With the conditional rate constants determined in reaction systems catalyzed by Al or Fe only, the concentrations of Fe and Al in the samples can be calculated. The method was applied to the simultaneous determination of trace Fe and Al in tap water, lake water, river water and tea leaves without separation and preconcentration.

  5. Reaction Rate Theory in Coordination Number Space: An Application to Ion Solvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Santanu; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schenter, Gregory K.

    2016-04-14

    Understanding reaction mechanisms in many chemical and biological processes require application of rare event theories. In these theories, an effective choice of a reaction coordinate to describe a reaction pathway is essential. To this end, we study ion solvation in water using molecular dynamics simulations and explore the utility of coordination number (n = number of water molecules in the first solvation shell) as the reaction coordinate. Here we compute the potential of mean force (W(n)) using umbrella sampling, predicting multiple metastable n-states for both cations and anions. We find with increasing ionic size, these states become more stable and structured for cations when compared to anions. We have extended transition state theory (TST) to calculate transition rates between n-states. TST overestimates the rate constant due to solvent-induced barrier recrossings that are not accounted for. We correct the TST rates by calculating transmission coefficients using the reactive flux method. This approach enables a new way of understanding rare events involving coordination complexes. We gratefully acknowledge Liem Dang and Panos Stinis for useful discussion. This research used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. SR, CJM, and GKS were supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. MDB was supported by MS3 (Materials Synthesis and Simulation Across Scales) Initiative, a Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a multiprogram national laboratory operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  6. DETERMINANTS OF INTEREST RATE SPREAD IN BANKING INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo GHASEMI

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study is done to consider affecting factors on spread rate and define a suitable model of spread rate in banking industry. Spread rate is a difference between two related interest rates. In banking industry, spread rate is the difference between debts rate (especially for deposit and assets rate (Especially for loan. Interest rate spread has always been one of the most important and significant economic issues in different countries of the world. In this study, affecting factors on spread rate are considering in an Iranian bank during the last 19 month. Some variables such as NPL ratio, ratio of demand deposits on deposits, non interest income, and interest assets to assets, capital adequacy ratio, ROA ratio and inflation and exchange rate are analyzed on spread rate and a model is defined for bank according to prior studies and economical issues of Iran.  

  7. A study of the photocatalytic effects of aqueous suspensions of platinized semiconductor materials on the reaction rates of candidate redox reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    The effectiveness of powdered semiconductor materials in photocatalyzing candidate redox reactions was investigated. The rate of the photocatalyzed oxidation of cyanide at platinized TiO2 was studied. The extent of the cyanide reaction was followed directly using an electroanalytical method (i.e. differential pulse polarography). Experiments were performed in natural or artificial light. A comparison was made of kinetic data obtained for photocatalysis at platinized powders with rate data for nonplatinized powders.

  8. Quantification of abiotic reaction rates in mine tailings: evaluation of treatment methods for eliminating iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Roger B; Malmström, Maria; Ebenå, Gustav; Salmon, Ursula; Ferrow, Embaie; Fuchs, Matthias

    2005-02-01

    Effective treatment techniques for eliminating iron-oxidizing (IOB) and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) are required for the comparison of abiotic and microbial sulfide oxidation rates and mechanisms in mine tailings. This study evaluates the effect of autoclaving, repeated heating, ethanol treatment, antibiotic treatment, gamma-radiation, and washing with deionized water on tailings characteristics and concentrations of IOB and SOB. Most probable number enumeration indicates that IOB and SOB were present at very low concentrations or below detection limits following treatment with all methods except rinsing and antibiotics treatment, where higher concentrations of IOB and SOB were present. The physical, chemical, and mineralogical characterization of the tailings indicated no changes in bulk mineralogy or bulk chemical composition as a result of treatment. However, an increase in oxidized sulfur species at the tailings surface, as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, was observed for the heating, autoclaving, and antibiotics treatments. Batch weathering experiments, used to evaluate the effect of treatment on element release rates, indicated that the final element release rates (after >30 d) were similar between treated and untreated control samples. On the basis of the results of this study, experiments over relatively long periods (>30 d) are to be recommended forthe establishment of microbial and abiotic weathering rates in mill tailings samples. For the determination of abiotic reaction rates, treatment by gamma-radiation is suggested to be the most appropriate method for sulfide-rich tailings.

  9. O-16 Coulomb dissociation : towards a new means to determine the C-12+alpha fusion rate in stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleurot, F; van den Berg, AM; Davids, B; Harakeh, MN; Kravchuk, VL; Wilschut, HW; Guillot, J; Laurent, H; Willis, A; Assuncao, M; Kiener, J; Lefebvre, A; de Sereville, N; Tatischeff, [No Value; Assuncao, L.; Lefebvre, L.; Tafischeff, V.

    2005-01-01

    A feasibility study was made of an important aspect of the Coulomb-dissociation method, which has been proposed for the determination of the rate of the astrophysically important C-12(alpha, gamma)160 reaction. A crucial aspect is the disentanglement of nuclear and Coulomb interactions on one hand a

  10. Effect of Solvents on the Product Distribution and Reaction Rate of a Buchwald-Hartwig Amination Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim;

    2006-01-01

    The Buchwald-Hartwig amination reaction between p-bromotoluene and piperazine in the presence of the homogeneous catalytic system Pd(dba)(2)/(+/-)-BINAP and the base NaO-t-Bu was investigated in two different classes of solvents: aprotic, nonpolar and aprotic, polar. The reaction was carried out...... solvent for the Buchwald-Hartwig amination reaction under the conditions applied was m-xylene....

  11. Correlation between discrete probability and reaction front propagation rate in heterogeneous mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naine, Tarun Bharath; Gundawar, Manoj Kumar

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate a very powerful correlation between the discrete probability of distances of neighboring cells and thermal wave propagation rate, for a system of cells spread on a one-dimensional chain. A gamma distribution is employed to model the distances of neighboring cells. In the absence of an analytical solution and the differences in ignition times of adjacent reaction cells following non-Markovian statistics, invariably the solution for thermal wave propagation rate for a one-dimensional system with randomly distributed cells is obtained by numerical simulations. However, such simulations which are based on Monte-Carlo methods require several iterations of calculations for different realizations of distribution of adjacent cells. For several one-dimensional systems, differing in the value of shaping parameter of the gamma distribution, we show that the average reaction front propagation rates obtained by a discrete probability between two limits, shows excellent agreement with those obtained numerically. With the upper limit at 1.3, the lower limit depends on the non-dimensional ignition temperature. Additionally, this approach also facilitates the prediction of burning limits of heterogeneous thermal mixtures. The proposed method completely eliminates the need for laborious, time intensive numerical calculations where the thermal wave propagation rates can now be calculated based only on macroscopic entity of discrete probability.

  12. Astrophysical reaction rates from a symmetry-informed first-principles perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfuss, Alison; Launey, Kristina; Baker, Robert; Draayer, Jerry; Dytrych, Tomas

    2017-01-01

    With a view toward a new unified formalism for studying bound and continuum states in nuclei, to understand stellar nucleosynthesis from a fully ab initio perspective, we studied the nature of surface α-clustering in 20Ne by considering the overlap of symplectic states with cluster-like states. We compute the spectroscopic amplitudes and factors, α-decay width, and absolute resonance strength - characterizing major contributions to the astrophysical reaction rate through a low-lying 1- resonant state in 20Ne. As a next step, we consider a fully microscopic treatment for the n+4 He system, based on the successful first-principles No-Core Shell Model/Resonating Group Method (NCSM/RGM) for light nuclei, but with the capability to reach intermediate-mass nuclei. The new model takes advantage of the symmetry-based concept central to the Symmetry-Adapted No-Core Shell Model (SA-NCSM) to reduce computational complexity in physically-informed and methodical way, with sights toward first-principles calculations of rates for important astrophysical reactions, such as the 23 Al(p , γ) 24 Si reaction, believed to have a strong influence on X-ray burst light curves. Supported by the U.S. NSF (OCI-0904874, ACI -1516338) and the U.S. DOE (DE-SC0005248), and benefitted from computing resources provided by Blue Waters and the LSU Center for Computation & Technology.

  13. Modeling microbial reaction rates in a submarine hydrothermal vent chimney wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRowe, Douglas E.; Dale, Andrew W.; Aguilera, David R.; L'Heureux, Ivan; Amend, Jan P.; Regnier, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The fluids emanating from active submarine hydrothermal vent chimneys provide a window into subseafloor processes and, through mixing with seawater, are responsible for steep thermal and compositional gradients that provide the energetic basis for diverse biological communities. Although several models have been developed to better understand the dynamic interplay of seawater, hydrothermal fluid, minerals and microorganisms inside chimney walls, none provide a fully integrated approach to quantifying the biogeochemistry of these hydrothermal systems. In an effort to remedy this, a fully coupled biogeochemical reaction-transport model of a hydrothermal vent chimney has been developed that explicitly quantifies the rates of microbial catalysis while taking into account geochemical processes such as fluid flow, solute transport and oxidation-reduction reactions associated with fluid mixing as a function of temperature. The metabolisms included in the reaction network are methanogenesis, aerobic oxidation of hydrogen, sulfide and methane and sulfate reduction by hydrogen and methane. Model results indicate that microbial catalysis is generally fastest in the hottest habitable portion of the vent chimney (77-102 °C), and methane and sulfide oxidation peak near the seawater-side of the chimney. The fastest metabolisms are aerobic oxidation of H2 and sulfide and reduction of sulfate by H2 with maximum rates of 140, 900 and 800 pmol cm-3 d-1, respectively. The maximum rate of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis is just under 0.03 pmol cm-3 d-1, the slowest of the metabolisms considered. Due to thermodynamic inhibition, there is no anaerobic oxidation of methane by sulfate (AOM). These simulations are consistent with vent chimney metabolic activity inferred from phylogenetic data reported in the literature. The model developed here provides a quantitative approach to describing the rates of biogeochemical transformations in hydrothermal systems and can be used to constrain the

  14. Quantifying metabolic rates in submarine hydrothermal vent chimneys: A reaction transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRowe, D.; Dale, A.; Aguilera, D.; Amend, J. P.; Regnier, P.

    2012-12-01

    The fluids emanating from active submarine hydrothermal vent chimneys provide a window into subseafloor processes and, through mixing with seawater, are responsible for steep thermal and compositional gradients that provide the energetic basis for diverse biological communities. Although several models have been developed to better understand the dynamic interplay of seawater, hydrothermal fluid, minerals and microorganisms inside chimney walls, none provide a fully integrated approach to quantifying the biogeochemistry of these hydrothermal systems. In an effort to remedy this, a fully coupled biogeochemical reaction transport model of a hydrothermal vent chimney has been developed that explicitly quantifies the rate of microbial catalysis while taking into account geochemical processes such as fluid flow, solute transport and oxidation-reduction reactions associated with fluid mixing as a function of temperature. Methanogenesis, hydrogen oxidation by oxygen and sulfate, sulfide oxidation by oxygen and methane oxidation by oxygen and sulfate are the metabolisms included in the reaction network. Model results indicate that microbial catalysis is fastest in the hottest habitable portion of the vent chimney except for methane oxidation by oxygen, which peaks near the seawater-side of the chimney at 20 nmol /cm^3 yr. The dominant metabolisms in the chimney are hydrogen oxidation by sulfate and oxygen and sulfide oxidation at peak rates 3200 , 300 and 900 nmol /cm^3 yr, respectively. The maximum rate of hydrogenotrophic methanogensis is just under 0.07 nmol /cm^3 yr, the slowest of the metabolisms considered. Due to thermodynamic inhibition, there is no anaerobic oxidation of methane by sulfate (AOM). The model developed here provides a quantitative approach to understanding the rates of biogeochemical transformations in hydrothermal systems and can be used to better understand the role of microbial activity in the deep subsurface.

  15. Rate of Iron Transfer Through the Horse Spleen Ferritin Shell Determined by the Rate of Formation of Prussian Blue and Fe-desferrioxamine Within the Ferritin Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Watt, Richard K.; Galvez, Natividad; Dominquez-Vera, Jose M.; Watt, Gerald D.

    2005-01-01

    Iron (2+ and 3+) is believed to transfer through the three-fold channels in the ferritin shell during iron deposition and release in animal ferritins. However, the rate of iron transit in and out through these channels has not been reported. The recent synthesis of [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-), Prussian Blue (PB) and desferrioxamine (DES) all trapped within the horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) interior makes these measurements feasible. We report the rate of Fe(2+) penetrating into the ferritin interior by adding external Fe(2+) to [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-) encapsulated in the HoSF interior and measuring the rate of formation of the resulting encapsulated PB. The rate at which Fe(2+) reacts with [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-) in the HoSF interior is much slower than the formation of free PB in solution and is proceeded by a lag period. We assume this lag period and the difference in rate represent the transfer of Fe(2+) through the HoSF protein shell. The calculated diffusion coefficient, D approx. 5.8 x 10(exp -20) square meters per second corresponds to the measured lag time of 10-20 s before PB forms within the HoSF interior. The activation energy for Fe(2+) transfer from the outside solution through the protein shell was determined to be 52.9 kJ/mol by conducting the reactions at 10 to approximately 40 C. The reaction of Fe(3+) with encapsulated [Fe(CN)6](4-) also readily forms PB in the HoSF interior, but the rate is faster than the corresponding Fe(2+) reaction. The rate for Fe(3+) transfer through the ferritin shell was confirmed by measuring the rate of the formation of Fe-DES inside HoSF and an activation energy of 58.4 kJ/mol was determined. An attempt was made to determine the rate of iron (2+ and 3+) transit out from the ferritin interior by adding excess bipyridine or DES to PB trapped within the HoSF interior. However, the reactions are slow and occur at almost identical rates for free and HoSF-encapsulated PB, indicating that the transfer of iron from the interior through the

  16. An investigation of the effect of pore scale flow on average geochemical reaction rates using direct numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molins, Sergi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division; Trebotich, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division; Steefel, Carl I. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division; Shen, Chaopeng [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division

    2012-03-30

    The scale-dependence of geochemical reaction rates hinders their use in continuum scale models intended for the interpretation and prediction of chemical fate and transport in subsurface environments such as those considered for geologic sequestration of CO2. Processes that take place at the pore scale, especially those involving mass transport limitations to reactive surfaces, may contribute to the discrepancy commonly observed between laboratory-determined and continuum-scale or field rates. In this study we investigate the dependence of mineral dissolution rates on the pore structure of the porous media by means of pore scale modeling of flow and multicomponent reactive transport. The pore scale model is composed of high-performance simulation tools and algorithms for incompressible flow and conservative transport combined with a general-purpose multicomponent geochemical reaction code. The model performs direct numerical simulation of reactive transport based on an operator-splitting approach to coupling transport and reactions. The approach is validated with a Poiseuille flow single-pore experiment and verified with an equivalent 1-D continuum-scale model of a capillary tube packed with calcite spheres. Using the case of calcite dissolution as an example, the high-resolution model is used to demonstrate that nonuniformity in the flow field at the pore scale has the effect of decreasing the overall reactivity of the system, even when systems with identical reactive surface area are considered. In conclusion, the effect becomes more pronounced as the heterogeneity of the reactive grain packing increases, particularly where the flow slows sufficiently such that the solution approaches equilibrium locally and the average rate becomes transport-limited.

  17. Computational Models to Determine Transport and Hydrolysis Rate Parameters of Contaminants in a Water Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    opposite to the fluoride leaving group through an SN2 -type reaction . Competition exists between a breaking of the P-S bond and a breaking of the P- OEt...model (PCM) in Gaussian03 to predict reaction rates of hydrolysis. 1. INTRODUCTION In previous research, empirical methods showed that uptake of... reaction . Verification that a transi- tion state was obtained in the degradation pathway was ob- tained by carefully tracing the reaction path in both direc

  18. Non-explosive hydrogen and helium burnings: abundance predictions from the NACRE reaction rate compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, M.; Goriely, S.; Jorissen, A.

    1999-07-01

    The abundances of the isotopes of the elements from C to Al produced by the non-explosive CNO, NeNa and MgAl modes of hydrogen burning, as well as by helium burning, are calculated with the thermonuclear rates recommended by the European compilation of reaction rates for astrophysics (NACRE). The impact of nuclear physics uncertainties on the derived abundances is discussed in the framework of a simple parametric astrophysical model. These calculations have the virtue of being a guide in the selection of the nuclear uncertainties that have to be duly analyzed in detailed model stars, particularly in order to perform meaningful confrontations between abundance observations and predictions. They are also hoped to help nuclear astrophysicists pinpointing the rate uncertainties that have to be reduced most urgently. An electronic version of this paper, with colour figures, is available at {\\it http://astro.ulb.ac.be}

  19. Determining cardiac vagal threshold from short term heart rate complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdan Rami Abou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating individual aerobic exercise capacity is fundamental in sports and exercise medicine but associated with organizational and instrumental effort. Here, we extract an index related to common performance markers, the aerobic and anaerobic thresholds enabling the estimation of exercise capacity from a conventional sports watch supporting beatwise heart rate tracking. Therefore, cardiac vagal threshold (CVT was determined in 19 male subjects performing an incremental maximum exercise test. CVT varied around the anaerobic threshold AnT with mean deviation of 7.9 ± 17.7 W. A high correspondence of the two thresholds was indicated by Bland-Altman plots with limits of agreement −27.5 W and 43.4 W. Additionally, CVT was strongly correlated AnT (rp = 0.86, p < 0.001 and reproduced this marker well (rc = 0.81. We conclude, that cardiac vagal threshold derived from compression entropy time course can be useful to assess physical fitness in an uncomplicated way.

  20. Dating of sediments and determination of sedimentation rate. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illus, E. [ed.

    1998-08-01

    The Second NKS (Nordic Nuclear Safety Research)/EKO-1 Seminar was held at the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) on April 2-3, 1997. The work of the NKS is based on 4-year programmes; the current programme having been planned for the years 1994-1997. The programme comprises 3 major fields, one of them being environmental effects (EKO). Under this umbrella there are 4 main projects. The EKO-1 project deals with marine radioecology, in particular bottom sediments and sediment processes. The programme of the second seminar consisted of 8 invited lecturers and 6 other scientific presentations. Dating of sediments and determination of sedimentation rate are important in all types of sedimentological study and model calculations of fluxes of substances in the aquatic environment. In many cases these tasks have been closely related to radioecological studies undertaken in marine and fresh water environments, because they are often based on measured depth profiles of certain natural or artificial radionuclides present in the sediments. During recent decades Pb-210 has proved to be very useful in dating of sediments, but some other radionuclides have also been successfully used, e.g. Pu-239,240, Am-241 and Cs-137. The difficulties existing and problems involved in dating of sediments, as well as solutions for resolving these problems are discussed in the presentations

  1. Determination of neutron-induced fission cross-sections of unstable nuclei via surrogate reaction method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B K Nayak

    2014-11-01

    Heavy ion reaction studies around Coulomb barrier energies have been generally used to investigate the effect of the structure of projectile/target on reaction dynamics. Other than providing an understanding of basic physics of the reaction dynamics, some of these reactions have been used as tools to serve as surrogates of neutron-induced compound nuclear fission cross-sections involving unstable targets. In this paper, we report some of the recent results on the determination of neutron-induced fission cross-sections of unstable actinides present in Th–U and U–Pu fuel cycles by surrogate reaction method by employing transfer-induced fission studies with 6,7Li beams.

  2. Temperature dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction of ozone with dimethyl sulfide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hai-tao; ZHANG Yu-jie; MU Yu-jing

    2007-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for the reaction of ozone with dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were measured in a 200-L Teflon chamber over the temperature range of 283-353 K. Measurements were carried out using DMS in large excess over ozone of 10 to 1 or greater. Over the indicated temperature range,the data could be fit to the simple Arrhenius expression as KDMS = (9.96±3.61)×10-11exp(-(7309.7±1098.2)/T)cm3/(molecule·s). A compared investigation of the reaction between ozone and ethene had a kc2H4 value of(1.35±0.11)×10-18 cm3/(molecule·s) at room temperature.

  3. Measurement of absolute reaction rates in Be,Pb and Fe spherical systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuRong; ChenYuan; 等

    1998-01-01

    The absolute reaction rates in Be,Pb and Fe have been measured by using the activation foil technique with different reaction energy thresholds.Thicknesses of Be,Pb and Fe spheres were 5.3,19.1 and 31.9cm.respectively,Eight kinds of activation folis were used for Fe,and four kinds each for Be and Pb,The total experimental er5ror was about 5-7%.The measured results were compared to the values calculated with the 1-D ANISN code and the ENDF/B-VI library data.The average ratio of the experimental to the calculational is less than 7% for Be and Pb,about 5-30% for Fe.

  4. Accurate quantum thermal rate constants for the three-dimensional H+H2 reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae Jun; Light, J. C.

    1989-07-01

    The rate constants for the three-dimensional H+H2 reaction on the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz (LSTH) surface are calculated using Pack-Parker hyperspherical (APH) coordinates and a C2v symmetry adapted direct product discrete variable representation (DVR). The C2v symmetry decomposition and the parity decoupling on the basis are performed for the internal coordinate χ. The symmetry decomposition results in a block diagonal representation of the flux and Hamiltonian operators. The multisurface flux is introduced to represent the multichannel reactive flux. The eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the J=0 internal Hamiltonian are obtained by sequential diagonalization and truncation. The individual symmetry blocks of the flux operator are propagated by the corresponding blocks of the Hamiltonian, and the J=0 rate constant k0(T) is obtained as a sum of the rate constants calculated for each block. k0(T) is compared with the exact k0(T) obtained from thermal averaging of the J=0 reaction probabilities; the errors are within 5%-20% up to T=1500 K. The sequential diagonalization-truncation method reduces the size of the Hamiltonian greatly, but the resulting Hamiltonian matrix still describes the time evolution very accurately. For the J≠0 rate constant calculations, the truncated internal Hamiltonian eigenvector basis is used to construct reduced (JKJ) blocks of the Hamiltonian. The individual (JKJ) blocks are diagonalized neglecting Coriolis coupling and treating the off-diagonal KJ±2 couplings by second order perturbation theory. The full wave function is parity decoupled. The rate constant is obtained as a sum over J of (2J+1)kJ(T). The time evolution of the flux for J≠0 is again very accurately described to give a well converged rate constant.

  5. Structural and dynamical control of the reaction rate in protein electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabin, Ilya A.

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions in proteins are key steps in many vital bioenergetic processes, and the reaction rate is known to be highly sensitive to the protein structure in some cases. For most bioenergetic reactions, as described by the Fermi Golden rule, the rate is proportional to a product of the average square of the effective electronic donor to acceptor coupling and a Franck-Condon factor, which accounts for the nuclear control of the energy gap. The nuclear factor is reasonably well described in Marcus theory and its modifications, and this work is focused on the mechanisms that control the effective coupling. About ten years ago, the Pathways model described for the first time how protein environment may control the effective coupling. In this work, a novel theoretical approach is developed to explore the mechanisms of structural and dynamical control beyond the qualitative level of the Pathways model. In Chapter 1, the assumptions of the Pathways model, its limitations and effects of the structure and the electronic Hamiltonian are investigated for model chain-like bridges using the Dyson's equations. In Chapter II, the framework to explore the sensitivity of the effective coupling to quality of the electronic Hamiltonian, the interference among the dominant pathways and the bridge dynamics is presented. This analysis employs the Green's function technique and includes combined molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. Finally, in Chapter III, this framework is tested on the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center, and the mechanisms of the structural and dynamical control for different ET steps are discussed.

  6. A kinetic-theory approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper-atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallis, Michael A; Bond, Ryan B; Torczynski, John R

    2009-09-28

    Recently proposed molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction-rate information) are investigated for chemical reactions occurring in upper-atmosphere hypersonic flows. The new models are in good agreement with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions and with both measured rates and other theoretical models for far-from-equilibrium conditions. Additionally, the new models are applied to representative combustion and ionization reactions and are in good agreement with available measurements and theoretical models. Thus, molecular-level chemistry modeling provides an accurate method for predicting equilibrium and nonequilibrium chemical-reaction rates in gases.

  7. [Determination of enthalpy change of coordinating color reaction by UV-Vis absorption spectrum method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D; An, L; Chen, L

    2001-08-01

    In this paper, a simple experimental method for the determination of enthalpy change of coordinating color reaction has been proposed and a relation formula between absorption and temperature has been deduced. Using coordinating color reaction of cobalt(II) thiocyanate in Tween-80 medium, the linear relation of this formula has been validated: r = 0.9957 and delta H = -44.7 kJ.mol-1, which is accordant with the result obtained from Van't Hoff equation.

  8. Density-Functional-Based Determination of the CH3-CH4 Hydrogen Exchange Reaction Barrier

    CERN Document Server

    Pederson, M R

    1994-01-01

    Due to the overbinding that is inherent in existing {\\em local} approximations to the density-functional formalism, certain reaction energies have not been accessible. Since the generalized gradient approximation significantly decreases the overbinding, prospects for density-functional-based reaction dynamics are promising. Results on the generalized-gradient based determination of the CH3-CH4 hydrogen exchange reaction are presented. Including all Born-Oppenheimer effects an energy barrier of 9.5 kcal/Mole is found which is a very significant improvement over the local-density approximation.

  9. Thin-Film Transistor-Based Biosensors for Determining Stoichiometry of Biochemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Wen; Chen, Ting-Yang; Yang, Tsung-Han; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Yang, Tsung-Lin; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme kinetic in a biochemical reaction is critical to scientific research and drug discovery but can hardly be determined experimentally from enzyme assays. In this work, a charge-current transducer (a transistor) is proposed to evaluate the status of biochemical reaction by monitoring the electrical charge changes. Using the malate-aspartate shuttle as an example, a thin-film transistor (TFT)-based biosensor with an extended gold pad is demonstrated to detect the biochemical reaction between NADH and NAD+. The drain current change indicates the status of chemical equilibrium and stoichiometry. PMID:28033412

  10. Measuring Interest Rates as Determined by Thrift and Productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Woon Gyu Choi

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the behavior of real and nominal interest rates by combining consumption- and production-based models into a single general equilibrium framework. Based on the theoretical nonlinear relationships that link interest rates to both the marginal rates of substitution and transformation in a monetary production economy, our study develops an estimation and simulation procedure to predict historical series of interest rates. We find that the model predictions of interest rat...

  11. New reaction rates for improved primordial D /H calculation and the cosmic evolution of deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coc, Alain; Petitjean, Patrick; Uzan, Jean-Philippe; Vangioni, Elisabeth; Descouvemont, Pierre; Iliadis, Christian; Longland, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Primordial or big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is one of the three historically strong evidences for the big bang model. Standard BBN is now a parameter-free theory, since the baryonic density of the Universe has been deduced with an unprecedented precision from observations of the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background radiation. There is a good agreement between the primordial abundances of 4He, D, 3He, and 7Li deduced from observations and from primordial nucleosynthesis calculations. However, the 7Li calculated abundance is significantly higher than the one deduced from spectroscopic observations and remains an open problem. In addition, recent deuterium observations have drastically reduced the uncertainty on D /H , to reach a value of 1.6%. It needs to be matched by BBN predictions whose precision is now limited by thermonuclear reaction rate uncertainties. This is especially important as many attempts to reconcile Li observations with models lead to an increased D prediction. Here, we reevaluate the d (p ,γ )3He, d (d ,n ) 3H3, and d (d ,p ) 3H reaction rates that govern deuterium destruction, incorporating new experimental data and carefully accounting for systematic uncertainties. Contrary to previous evaluations, we use theoretical ab initio models for the energy dependence of the S factors. As a result, these rates increase at BBN temperatures, leading to a reduced value of D /H =(2.45 ±0.10 )×10-5 (2 σ ), in agreement with observations.

  12. Non-explosive hydrogen and helium burnings Abundance predictions from the NACRE reaction rate compilation

    CERN Document Server

    Arnould, M; Jorissen, A

    1999-01-01

    The abundances of the isotopes of the elements from C to Al produced by the non-explosive CNO, NeNa and MgAl modes of hydrogen burning, as well as by helium burning, are calculated with the thermonuclear rates recommended by the European compilation of reaction rates for astrophysics (NACRE: details about NACRE may be found at http://astro.ulb.ac.be. This electronic address provides many data of nuclear astrophysics interest and also offers the possibility of generating interactively tables of reaction rates for networks and temperature grids selected by the user). The impact of nuclear physics uncertainties on the derived abundances is discussed in the framework of a simple parametric astrophysical model. These calculations have the virtue of being a guide in the selection of the nuclear uncertainties that have to be duly analyzed in detailed model stars, particularly in order to perform meaningful confrontations between abundance observations and predictions. They are also hoped to help nuclear astrophysici...

  13. The determination of standard metabolic rate in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot, D; Steffensen, J F; Farrell, A P

    2016-01-01

    This review and data analysis outline how fish biologists should most reliably estimate the minimal amount of oxygen needed by a fish to support its aerobic metabolic rate (termed standard metabolic rate; SMR). By reviewing key literature, it explains the theory, terminology and challenges underlying SMR measurements in fishes, which are almost always made using respirometry (which measures oxygen uptake, ṀO2 ). Then, the practical difficulties of measuring SMR when activity of the fish is not quantitatively evaluated are comprehensively explored using 85 examples of ṀO2 data from different fishes and one crustacean, an analysis that goes well beyond any previous attempt. The main objective was to compare eight methods to estimate SMR. The methods were: average of the lowest 10 values (low10) and average of the 10% lowest ṀO2 values, after removing the five lowest ones as outliers (low10%), mean of the lowest normal distribution (MLND) and quantiles that assign from 10 to 30% of the data below SMR (q0·1 , q0·15 , q0·2 , q0·25 and q0·3 ). The eight methods yielded significantly different SMR estimates, as expected. While the differences were small when the variability was low amongst the ṀO2 values, they were important (>20%) for several cases. The degree of agreement between the methods was related to the c.v. of the observations that were classified into the lowest normal distribution, the c.v. MLND (C.V.MLND ). When this indicator was low (≤5·4), it was advantageous to use the MLND, otherwise, one of the q0·2 or q0·25 should be used. The second objective was to assess if the data recorded during the initial recovery period in the respirometer should be included or excluded, and the recommendation is to exclude them. The final objective was to determine the minimal duration of experiments aiming to estimate SMR. The results show that 12 h is insufficient but 24 h is adequate. A list of basic recommendations for practitioners who use respirometry

  14. Plasticity of Performance Curves Can Buffer Reaction Rates from Body Temperature Variation in Active Endotherms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Seebacher

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Endotherms regulate their core body temperature by adjusting metabolic heat production and insulation. Endothermic body temperatures are therefore relatively stable compared to external temperatures. The thermal sensitivity of biochemical reaction rates is thought to have co-evolved with body temperature regulation so that optimal reaction rates occur at the regulated body temperature. However, recent data show that core body temperatures even of non-torpid endotherms fluctuate considerably. Additionally, peripheral temperatures can be considerably lower and more variable than core body temperatures. Here we discuss whether published data support the hypothesis that thermal performance curves of physiological reaction rates are plastic so that performance is maintained despite variable body temperatures within active (non-torpid endotherms, and we explore mechanisms that confer plasticity. There is evidence that thermal performance curves in tissues that experience thermal fluctuations can be plastic, although this question remains relatively unexplored for endotherms. Mechanisms that alter thermal responses locally at the tissue level include transient potential receptor ion channels (TRPV and TRPM and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK both of which can influence metabolism and energy expenditure. Additionally, the thermal sensitivity of processes that cause post-transcriptional RNA degradation can promote the relative expression of cold-responsive genes. Endotherms can respond to environmental fluctuations similarly to ectotherms, and thermal plasticity complements core body temperature regulation to increase whole-organism performance. Thermal plasticity is ancestral to endothermic thermoregulation, but it has not lost its selective advantage so that modern endotherms are a physiological composite of ancestral ectothermic and derived endothermic traits.

  15. Reaction rate of NaOCl in contact with bovine dentine: effect of activation, exposure time, concentration and pH.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Macedo, R.G.; Wesselink, P.R.; Zaccheo, F.; Fanali, D.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim  To determine the influence of activation method (ultrasound or laser), concentration, pH and exposure time on the reaction rate (RR) of NaOCl when in contact with dentinal walls. Methodology  The walls from standardized root canals in bovine incisors were exposed to a standardized volume of sod

  16. Electromagnetic dissociation of B-8 and the rate of the Be-7(p, gamma)B-8 reaction in the Sun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davids, B; Austin, SM; Bazin, D; Esbensen, H; Sherrill, BM; Thompson, IJ; Tostevin, JA

    2001-01-01

    In an effort to better determine the Be-7(p, gamma)B-8 reaction rate, we have performed inclusive and exclusive measurements of the Coulomb dissociation of B-8. The former was a study of longitudinal momentum distributions of Be-7 fragments emitted in the Coulomb breakup of intermediate energy B-8 b

  17. An absolute- and relative-rate study of the gas-phase reaction of OH radicals and Cl atoms with n-alkyl nitrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.J.; Sidebottom, H.W.; Donlon, M.

    1991-01-01

    Rate constants for the reactions of OH radicals and Cl atoms with CH3ONO2, C2H5ONO2, n-C3H7ONO2, n-C4H9ONO2, and n-C5H11ONO2 have been determined at 298 +/- 2 K and a total pressure of approximately 1 atm. The OH rate data were obtained using both the absolute-rate technique of pulse radiolysis...... combined with kinetic spectroscopy and a conventional photolytic relative-rate method. The Cl rate constants were measured using only the relative-rate method. Evidence is presented from the kinetic studies that reaction of OH radicals with alkyl nitrates may involve both addition and abstraction pathways...

  18. Unimolecular reaction rate constants of NO{sub 2} just above D{sub 0}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezel, I.; Stolyarov, D.; Wittig, C.

    1999-12-09

    Photoinitiated unimolecular decomposition on a barrierless potential energy surface (PES) has been studied for the reaction NO{sub 2} {yields} O({sup 3}P{sub 2}) + NO(X{sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2}, {nu} = 0) for excess energies up to approximately 17 cm{sup {minus}1} above the dissociation threshold (i.e., D{sub 0} for nonrotating molecules) by using expansion-cooled samples and the time-resolved pump-probe technique. To examine the threshold region with enough energy resolution to discern abrupt changes in the rate constant, should they occur, a pump-probe cross-correlation temporal width of {approximately}25 ps and a pump line width {le}2 cm{sup {minus}1} has been used. These are the first direct observations of the reaction rate constants in this energy regime. The rate constant was found to increase by an order of magnitude, varying from {approximately}2 x 10{sup 10} s{sup {minus}1} to {ge}10{sup 11} s{sup {minus}1}, the latter being a rough lower bound imposed by the experimental arrangement. The rate constant does not display the energy dependence predicted by using phase space theory, at least in detail. Rather, it appears to reflect the highly complex nature of the levels and the multiple PESs that are believed to be responsible for the anomalously high vibronic level density which has been observed just below D{sub 0}. These results bridge the gap between spectroscopic studies which have been carried out at energies just above D{sub 0} and ultrafast experiments which have measured rate constants in this energy region with pump laser spectral widths of {approximately}30 cm{sup {minus}1}.

  19. Chemical reaction rates using the semiclassical Van-Vleck initialvalue representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkataraman, Charulatha; Miller, William H.

    2006-11-29

    A semiclassical IVR formulation using the Van-Vleck propagator has been used to calculate the flux correlation function and thereby reaction rate constants. This Van-Vleck formulation of the flux-flux correlation function is computationally as simple as the classical Wigner model. However unlike the latter, it has the ability to capture quantum interference/coherence effects. Classical trajectories are evolved starting from the dividing surface that separates reactants and products, and are evolved negatively in time. This formulation has been tested on model problems ranging from the Eckart barrier, double well to the collinear H + H{sub 2}.

  20. Rates of reaction and process design data for the Hydrocarb Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, M.; Kobayashi, Atsushi [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Tung, Yuanki [Hydrocarb Corp., New York, NY (United States)

    1992-08-01

    In support of studies for developing the coprocessing of fossil fuels with biomass by the Hydrocarb Process, experimental and process design data are reported. The experimental work includes the hydropryolysis of biomass and the thermal decomposition of methane in a tubular reactor. The rates of reaction and conversion were obtained at temperature and pressure conditions pertaining to a Hydrocarb Process design. A Process Simulation Computer Model was used to design the process and obtain complete energy and mass balances. Multiple feedstocks including biomass with natural gas and biomass with coal were evaluated. Additional feedstocks including green waste, sewage sludge and digester gas were also evaluated for a pilot plant unit.

  1. THE ASYMPTOTIC LIMIT FOR A COMBUSTION MODEL IN REGARD TO INFINITE REACTION RATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Longan

    2008-01-01

    The Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring model and the Chapman-Jouguet model for a simplified combustion model-Majda's model is studied. The author proves a uniform maximum norm estimate, then proves that as the rate of chemical reaction tends to infinity the solutions to the Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring model tend to that of the Chapman-Jouguet model. The type of combustion waves is studied. This result is compared with the result of the projection and finite difference method for the same model.

  2. 一维贫铀/聚乙烯交替系统中D-T中子诱发的232Th(n,γ)反应率的测定与分析%Determination of 232Th(n, γ) reaction rate induced by D-T neutrons in one-dimensional alternate depleted uranium/p olyethylene shells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    羊奕伟; 刘荣; 蒋励; 鹿心鑫; 王玫; 严小松

    2014-01-01

    A series of neutron integral fundamental researches of thorium nuclear data in set-ups containing thorium samples is carried out. One-dimensional alternate depleted uranium/polyethylene shells containing thorium samples are constructed by referring to the conceptual design of fusion-fission hybrid reactor, where a D-T neutron source driven by accelerator is used to simulate the fusion core of the reactor. 232Th (n,γ) reaction rates in samples located at different positions in the shells are measured in 5% uncertainty by using activated thorium sample decay γ-ray off-line measurement technique. The results show that the moderation of polyethylene to 14.1 MeV neutron will efficiently increase the capture rate of thorium, and the depleted uranium is also conducible to this increase obviously. The comparison between our measured data and the results available from mainstream nuclear data bank shows that the calculation results from ENDF/B-VI.6 and JENDL-3.3 are around 6% higher than the experimental results, while the newer ENDF/B-VII.0 will achieve better results, around 4% higher than the experimental results. We recommend the ENDF/B-VII.0 to be used in one-dimensional alternate depleted uranium/polyethylene shells related conceptual design when calculating the 232Th (n,γ) reaction rate.%开展了钍样品装置内钍核参数的积分中子学基础研究.参考混合堆概念设计搭建了内部放置了钍样品的一维贫铀/聚乙烯交替系统装置,采用加速器D-T中子源模拟聚变堆芯,利用前期开发的离线伽马测量方法测定了不同位置、不同中子谱情况下的232Th (n,γ)反应率,不确定度约为5%.结果显示,聚乙烯对14.1 MeV中子的慢化作用可有效提升钍俘获率,且贫铀对钍俘获率也有显著提升作用.实验结果与主流核数据库计算结果的对比显示, ENDF/B-VI.6和JENDL-3.3数据库的计算值比实验值平均约大6%,而较新的ENDF/B-VII.0数据库的计

  3. Direct determination of enthalpies of solid phase reactions by immersion method; Determination directe des enthalpies de reaction en phase solide par une methode de plongee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roux, A.; Richard, M.; Eyraud, L.; Stevanovic, M.; Elston, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    It is not generally possible to measure the enthalpy change corresponding to solid phase reactions using the dynamic differential thermal analysis method because these reactions are usually too slow at the temperature of operation of present equipment. A ballistic differential thermal analysis apparatus has been developed which is based on an immersion-compensation method; it overcomes the difficulties previously encountered. This apparatus has been used after calibration for determining the enthalpies of formation of calcium and cadmium titanates. and also the Wigner energies of BeO, MgO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples irradiated at variable dose at a temperature of under 100 deg. C. (authors) [French] Il n'est generalement pas possible de mesurer la variation d'enthalpie correspondant aux reactions en phase solide par la methode d'analyse thermique differentielle dynamique. En effet, ces reactions sont le plus souvent trop lentes aux temperatures d'utilisation des dispositifs actuels. Un appareil d'analyse thermique differentielle balistique, base sur une methode de plongee avec compensation, a ete mis au point et permet de surmonter les difficultes precedentes. Apres etalonnages, cet appareil a ete utilise pour la determination des enthalpies de formation du titanate de calcium et du titanate de cadmium ainsi que pour celle des energies Wigner emmagasinees dans des echantillons de BeO, MgO et Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} irradies a une temperature inferieure a 100 deg. C et a differentes doses. (auteurs)

  4. Temperature dependence of the rate constant for reactions of hydrated electrons with H, OH and H2O2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Sehested, K.; Løgager, T.

    1994-01-01

    (A) = 14.0 kJ mol-1 (3.3 kcal mol-1). For reaction with OH radicals the corresponding values are, k(20-degrees-C) = 3.1 x 10(10) M-1 s-1 and E(A) = 14.7 kJ mol-1 (3.5 kcal mol-1) determined in the temperature range 5-175-degrees-C. For reaction with H2O2 the values are, k(20-degrees-C) = 1.2 x 10(10) M-1 s......-1 and E(A) = 15.6 kJ mol-1 (3.7 kcal mol-1) measured from 5-150-degrees-C. Thus, the activation energy for all three fast reactions is close to that expected for diffusion controlled reactions. As phosphates were used as buffer system, the rate constant and activation energy for the reaction...

  5. Selected specific rates of reactions of transients from water in aqueous solution. Hydrated electron, supplemental data. [Reactions with transients from water, with inorganic solutes, and with solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, A.B.

    1975-06-01

    A compilation of rates of reactions of hydrated electrons with other transients and with organic and inorganic solutes in aqueous solution appeared in NSRDS-NBS 43, and covered the literature up to early 1971. This supplement includes additional rates which have been published through July 1973.

  6. The molybdenum blue reaction for the determination of orthophosphate revisited: Opening the black box

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagul, Edward A. [School of Chemistry, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Centre for Aquatic Pollution Identification and Management (CAPIM), The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); McKelvie, Ian D. [School of Chemistry, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Plymouth University, Plymouth PL48AA (United Kingdom); Worsfold, Paul [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Plymouth University, Plymouth PL48AA (United Kingdom); Kolev, Spas D., E-mail: s.kolev@unimelb.edu.au [School of Chemistry, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Centre for Aquatic Pollution Identification and Management (CAPIM), The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2015-08-26

    The molybdenum blue reaction, used predominantly for the determination of orthophosphate in environmental waters, has been perpetually modified and re-optimised over the years, but this important reaction in analytical chemistry is usually treated as something of a 'black box' in the analytical literature. A large number of papers describe a wide variety of reaction conditions and apparently different products (as determined by UV–visible spectroscopy) but a discussion of the chemistry underlying this behaviour is often addressed superficially or not at all. This review aims to rationalise the findings of the many 'optimised' molybdenum blue methods in the literature, mainly for environmental waters, in terms of the underlying polyoxometallate chemistry and offers suggestions for the further enhancement of this time-honoured analytical reaction. - Highlights: • Molybdenum blue chemistry for orthophosphate determination is discussed. • The choice of reductant determines the blue product(s) obtained. • Mechanisms are described for various additive and subtractive interferents. • The choice of strong mineral acid for the reaction should be considered. • Detailed recommendations are made for method optimisation.

  7. The interplay between transport and reaction rates as controls on nitrate attenuation in permeable, streambed sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdown, K.; Heppell, C. M.; Trimmer, M.; Binley, A.; Heathwaite, A. L.; Byrne, P.; Zhang, H.

    2015-06-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen fixation and subsequent use of this nitrogen as fertilizer have greatly disturbed the global nitrogen cycle. Rivers are recognized hot spots of nitrogen removal in the landscape as interaction between surface water and sediments creates heterogeneous redox environments conducive for nitrogen transformations. Our understanding of riverbed nitrogen dynamics to date comes mainly from shallow sediments or hyporheic exchange flow pathways with comparatively little attention paid to groundwater-fed, gaining reaches. We have used 15N techniques to quantify in situ rates of nitrate removal to 1 m depth within a groundwater-fed riverbed where subsurface hydrology ranged from strong upwelling to predominantly horizontal water fluxes. We combine these rates with detailed hydrologic measurements to investigate the interplay between biogeochemical activity and water transport in controlling nitrogen attenuation along upwelling flow pathways. Nitrate attenuation occurred via denitrification rather than dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium or anammox (range = 12 to >17,000 nmol 15N L-1 h-1). Overall, nitrate removal within the upwelling groundwater was controlled by water flux rather than reaction rate (i.e., Damköhler numbers rates of denitrification and short water residence time close to the riverbed surface balanced by slower rates of denitrification and water flux at depth. Within this permeable riverbed >80% of nitrate removal occurs within sediments not exposed to hyporheic exchange flows under base flow conditions, illustrating the importance of deep sediments as nitrate sinks in upwelling systems.

  8. Elementary reaction rate measurements at high temperatures by tunable-laser flash-absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hessler, J.P. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The major objective of this program is to measure thermal rate coefficients and branching ratios of elementary reactions. To perform these measurements, the authors constructed an ultrahigh-purity shock tube to generate temperatures between 1000 and 5500 K. The tunable-laser flash-absorption technique is used to measure the rate of change of the concentration of species which absorb below 50,000 cm{sup {minus}1} e.g.: OH, CH, and CH{sub 3}. This technique is being extended into the vacuum-ultraviolet spectral region where one can measure atomic species e.g.: H, D, C, O, and N; and diatomic species e.g.: O{sub 2}, CO, and OH.

  9. Noise-induced convergence of the low flow rate chaos in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Minoru; Nakaiwa, Masaru; Akiya, Takaji; Ohmori, Takao; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko

    The effect of noise on the low flow-rate chaos in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction was studied. The chaos was simulated using the three-variable model of Györgyi and Field. Gaussian white noise was imposed on the flow-rate of the reactant solutions fed into CSTR to simulate the so-called type P noise. The range of average noise amplitudes was chosen between 0.01% and 1% related to the inverse residence time. The calculated time series were analyzed on the basis of their Fourier spectra, maximum Lyapunov exponent, Kolmogorov entropies, return maps and invariant density. We found that the noise induces partial order of the period-3-like oscillations in the low flowrate chaos.

  10. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of metallic biomaterials: reaction rate and ion release imaging modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, J L; Smith, S M; Lautenschlager, E P

    1993-11-01

    The Scanning Electrochemical Microscope (SECM) is a nonoptical scanning microscopic instrument capable of imaging highly localized electrical currents associated with charge transfer reactions on metallic biomaterials surfaces. The SECM operates as an aqueous electrochemical cell under bipotentiostatic control with a microelectrode and sample independently biased as working electrodes. Microelectrode current and position is recorded as it is scanned very near a metallurgically polished planar sample surface. To date, the SECM has imaged metallic biomaterials surfaces in oxygen reaction rate imaging (ORRI) and ion release and deposition imaging (IRDI) modes. In ORRI, sample and microelectrode are biased at sufficiently negative potentials to reduce absorbed oxygen. As the microelectrode scans areas of active oxygen reduction, localized diffusion fields with decreased oxygen solution concentrations are encountered and resultant decrements in microelectrode current are observed. In IRDI mode the sample is positively biased and the microelectrode is negatively biased. The microelectrode detects anodic dissolution products with highest currents being observed over the most active areas. Performance of the SECM has been evaluated on Ni minigrids, gamma-1 Hg-Ag dental amalgam crystals, and sintered beads of Co-Cr-Mo alloy which represent significantly different geometries and corrosion processes to help demonstrate the potential of this instrument. The SECM is a valuable tool for imaging microelectrochemical processes on the surfaces of metallurgically polished metallic biomaterials samples and a wide variety of other surfaces of biological interest where charge transfer reactions occur. The SECM allows selective biasing of metallic biomaterials surfaces and Faradaic reactions can be selectively imaged while the surface is in the active, passive, or transpassive state.

  11. Reaction rate uncertainties and 26Al in AGB silicon carbide stardust

    CERN Document Server

    van Raai, M A; Karakas, A I; Iliadis, C

    2007-01-01

    Stardust is a class of presolar grains each of which presents an ideally uncontaminated stellar sample. Mainstream silicon carbide (SiC) stardust formed in the extended envelopes of carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and incorporated the radioactive nucleus 26Al as a trace element. The aim of this paper is to analyse in detail the effect of nuclear uncertainties, in particular the large uncertainties of up to four orders of magnitude related to the 26Al_g+(p,gamma)27Si reaction rate, on the production of 26Al in AGB stars and compare model predictions to data obtained from laboratory analysis of SiC stardust grains. Stellar uncertainties are also briefly discussed. We use a detailed nucleosynthesis postprocessing code to calculate the 26Al/27Al ratios at the surface of AGB stars of different masses (M = 1.75, 3, and 5 M_sun) and metallicities (Z = 0.02, 0.012, and 0.008). For the lower limit and recommended value of the 26Al_g(p,gamma)27Si reaction rate, the predicted 26Al/27Al ratios replicate t...

  12. Deep Mixing in Evolved Stars: I. The Effect of Reaction Rate Revisions from C to Al

    CERN Document Server

    Palmerini, S; Cristallo, S; Busso, M

    2010-01-01

    We present computations of nucleosynthesis in low-mass red-giant-branch and asymptotic-giant-branch stars of Population I experiencing extended mixing. We adopt the updated version of the FRANEC evolutionary model, a new post-process code for non-convective mixing and the most recent revisions for solar abundances. In this framework, we discuss the effects of recent improvements in relevant reaction rates for proton captures on intermediate-mass nuclei (from carbon to aluminum). For each nucleus we briefly discuss the new choices and their motivations. The calculations are then performed on the basis of a parameterized circulation, where the effects of the new nuclear inputs are best compared to previous works. We find that the new rates (and notably the one for the 14N(p,g)15O reaction) imply considerable modifications in the composition of post-main sequence stars. In particular, the slight temperature changes due to the reduced efficiency of proton captures on 14N induce abundance variations at the first d...

  13. Elucidation of Environmental Fate of Artificial Sweetener, Aspartame by Determining Bimolecular Rate Constants with Hydroxyl Radical at Various pH and Temperature Conditions and Reaction By-Products Presentation type:Poster Section:Ocean Sciences Session:General Contribution Authors:Takashi Teraji (1) Takemitsu Arakaki (2) AGU# 10173629 (1) Graduate School of Engineering and Science, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru Nishihara-cho, Okinawa, 903-0123, Japan (a4269bj@yahoo.co.jp), (2) Department of Chemistry, Biology and Marine Science, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru Nishihara-cho, Okinawa, 903-0123, Japan (arakakit@sci.u-ryukyu.ac.jp)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraji, T.; Arakaki, T.

    2011-12-01

    Use of artificial sweeteners in drinks and food has been rapidly increasing because of their non-calorie nature. In Japan, aspartame, acesulfame K and sucralose are among the most widely used artificial sweeteners. Because the artificial sweeteners are not metabolized in human bodies, they are directly excreted into the environment without chemical transformations. We initiated a study to better understand the fate of artificial sweeteners in the marine environment. In particular, we focused on the fate of aspartame by determining its bimolecular rate constants with hydroxyl radicals at various pH and temperature conditions and reaction by-products. The hydroxyl radical (OH), the most potent reactive oxygen species, reacts with various compounds and determines the environmental oxidation capacity and the life-time of many compounds. The steady-state OH concentration and the reaction rate constants between the compound and OH are used to estimate the life-time of the compound. In this study, we determine the bimolecular rate constants between aspartame and OH at various pH and temperature conditions using a competition kinetics technique. We use hydrogen peroxide as a photochemical source of OH. Bimolecular rate constant we obtained so far was (2.6±1.2)×109 M-1 s-1 at pH = 3.0. Little effect was seen by changing the temperatures between 15 and 40 °C. Activation energy (Ea) was calculated to be -1.0 kJ mol-1 at pH = 3.0, which could be regarded as zero. We will report reaction rate constants at different pHs and reaction by-products which will be analyzed by GC-MS. We will further discuss the fate of aspartame in the coastal environment.

  14. Thermal behaviors, nonisothermal decomposition reaction kinetics, thermal safety and burning rates of BTATz-CMDB propellant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jian-Hua; Zhao, Feng-Qi; Wang, Bo-Zhou; Liu, Qian; Zhou, Cheng; Hu, Rong-Zu; Ren, Ying-Hui; Xu, Si-Yu; Xu, Kang-Zhen; Ren, Xiao-Ning

    2010-09-15

    The composite modified double base (CMDB) propellants (nos. RB0601 and RB0602) containing 3,6-bis (1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-yl-amino)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (BTATz) without and with the ballistic modifier were prepared and their thermal behaviors, nonisothermal decomposition reaction kinetics, thermal safety and burning rates were investigated. The results show that there are three mass-loss stages in TG curve and two exothermic peaks in DSC curve for the BTATz-CMDB propellant. The first two mass-loss stages occur in succession and the temperature ranges are near apart, and the decomposition peaks of the two stages overlap each other, inducing only one visible exothermic peak appear in DSC curve during 350-550 K. The reaction mechanisms of the main exothermal decomposition processes of RB0601 and RB0602 are all classified as chemical reaction, the mechanism functions are f(alpha)=(1-alpha)(2), and the kinetic equations are dalpha/dt = 10(19.24)(1-alpha)(2)e(-2.32x10(4)/T) and dalpha/dt = 10(20.32)(1-alpha)(2)e(-2.32x10(4)/T). The thermal safety evaluation on the BTATz-CMDB propellants was obtained. With the substitution of 26% RDX by BTATz and with the help of the ballistic modifier in the CMDB propellant formulation, the burning rate can be improved by 89.0% at 8 MPa and 47.1% at 22 MPa, the pressure exponent can be reduced to 0.353 at 14-20 MPa.

  15. Thermal behaviors, nonisothermal decomposition reaction kinetics, thermal safety and burning rates of BTATz-CMDB propellant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi Jianhua [Xi' an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Xi' an 710065 (China); Zhao Fengqi, E-mail: yiren@nwu.edu.cn [Xi' an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Xi' an 710065 (China); Wang Bozhou; Liu Qian; Zhou Cheng; Hu Rongzu [Xi' an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Xi' an 710065 (China); Ren Yinghui [School of Chemical Engineering, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Xu Siyu [Xi' an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Xi' an 710065 (China); Xu, Kang-Zhen [School of Chemical Engineering, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Ren Xiaoning [Xi' an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Xi' an 710065 (China)

    2010-09-15

    The composite modified double base (CMDB) propellants (nos. RB0601 and RB0602) containing 3,6-bis (1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-yl-amino)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (BTATz) without and with the ballistic modifier were prepared and their thermal behaviors, nonisothermal decomposition reaction kinetics, thermal safety and burning rates were investigated. The results show that there are three mass-loss stages in TG curve and two exothermic peaks in DSC curve for the BTATz-CMDB propellant. The first two mass-loss stages occur in succession and the temperature ranges are near apart, and the decomposition peaks of the two stages overlap each other, inducing only one visible exothermic peak appear in DSC curve during 350-550 K. The reaction mechanisms of the main exothermal decomposition processes of RB0601 and RB0602 are all classified as chemical reaction, the mechanism functions are f({alpha}) = (1 - {alpha}){sup 2}, and the kinetic equations are d{alpha}/dt=10{sup 19.24}(1-{alpha}){sup 2}e{sup -2.32x10{sup 4/T}} and d{alpha}/dt=10{sup 20.32}(1-{alpha}){sup 2}e{sup -2.43x10{sup 4/T}}. The thermal safety evaluation on the BTATz-CMDB propellants was obtained. With the substitution of 26% RDX by BTATz and with the help of the ballistic modifier in the CMDB propellant formulation, the burning rate can be improved by 89.0% at 8 MPa and 47.1% at 22 MPa, the pressure exponent can be reduced to 0.353 at 14-20 MPa.

  16. Estimated Interest Rate Rules: Do they Determine Determinacy Properties?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    I demonstrate that econometric estimations of nominal interest rate rules may tell little, if anything, about an economy's determinacy properties. In particular, correct inference about the interest-rate response to inflation provides no information about determinacy. Instead, it could reveal...

  17. The Determinants of Real Exchange Rate Volatility in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rahel

    of the economy, government expenditures, interest rate movements as well as the lagged ... econometrics, together with the increasing availability of high quality data, ... market, Former U.S. Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greespan once ... Juthathip (2009) results for developing Asia showed that real exchange rate.

  18. Toward an Automatic Determination of Enzymatic Reaction Mechanisms and Their Activation Free Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinovjev, Kirill; Ruiz-Pernía, J Javier; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2013-08-13

    We present a combination of the string method and a path collective variable for the exploration of the free energy surface associated to a chemical reaction in condensed environments. The on-the-fly string method is employed to find the minimum free energy paths on a multidimensional free energy surface defined in terms of interatomic distances, which is a convenient selection to study bond forming/breaking processes. Once the paths have been determined, a reaction coordinate is defined as a measure of the advance of the system along these paths. This reaction coordinate can be then used to trace the reaction Potential of Mean Force from which the activation free energy can be obtained. This combination of methodologies has been here applied to the study, by means of Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics simulations, of the reaction catalyzed by guanidinoacetate methyltransferase. This enzyme catalyzes the methylation of guanidinoacetate by S-adenosyl-l-methionine, a reaction that involves a methyl transfer and a proton transfer and for which different reaction mechanisms have been proposed.

  19. The determination methods of the velocity constant for electrochemical reactions; Les methodes de determination de la constante de vitesse des reactions electrochimiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, R

    1963-07-01

    In a brief introduction are recalled the fundamental mechanisms of the electrochemical reaction and the definition of the intrinsic velocity constant of a such reaction. By the nature of the different parameters which enter in this definition are due some experimental problems which are examined. Then are given the principles of the measurement methods of the velocity constant. These methods are developed with the mathematical expression of the different rates of the mass transfer to an electrode. In each case are given the experimental limits of use of the methods and the size order of the velocity constant that can be reached. A list of fundamental works to be consulted conclude this work. (O.M.) [French] Dans une breve introduction sont rappeles les mecanismes fondamentaux de la reaction electrochimique et la definition de la constante de vitesse intrinseque d'une telle reaction. De la nature des differents parametres qui entrent dans celle definition, decoulent un certain nombre de problemes experimentaux qui sont passes en revue. On donne ensuite les principes des methodes de mesure de la constante de vitesse. L'exposition de ces methodes est developpee a l'aide de l'expression mathematique des differents regimes de transfert de masse a une electrode. On s'attache dans chaque cas, a donner les limitations experimentales d'utilisation des methodes et l'ordre de grandeur de la constante de vitesse qu'elles permettent d'atteindre. Une liste des ouvrages fondamentaux a consulter conclut ce travail. (auteur)

  20. Simplification of determination method for standard materials using post-column reaction GC/FID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takuro; Kato, Kenji; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Maeda, Tsuneaki

    2007-07-31

    For the simple and fast preparation of highly reliable standard materials, a post-column reaction GC/FID system was developed and evaluated on the mixture of oxygen-containing organic compounds. The oxygen-containing organic compounds mixing solution were determined with the post-column reaction GC/FID system using n-dodecane as an internal calibration standard. Required value of relative expanded uncertainty as an original source of SI-traceable standard materials was within 1% and it aimed at this value as accuracy of the quantitative analysis. The results showed good agreement between the prepared concentrations and analytical values using post-column reaction GC/FID system. These results indicated that the post-column reaction GC/FID system would be used for getting SI-traceable values.

  1. Inflammatory Reaction as Determinant of Foreign Body Reaction Is an Early and Susceptible Event after Mesh Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Gerullis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate and relate the ultrashort-term and long-term courses of determinants for foreign body reaction as biocompatibility predictors for meshes in an animal model. Materials and Methods. Three different meshes (TVT, UltraPro, and PVDF were implanted in sheep. Native and plasma coated meshes were placed bilaterally: (a interaperitoneally, (b as fascia onlay, and (c as muscle onlay (fascia sublay. At 5 min, 20 min, 60 min, and 120 min meshes were explanted and histochemically investigated for inflammatory infiltrate, macrophage infiltration, vessel formation, myofibroblast invasion, and connective tissue accumulation. The results were related to long-term values over 24 months. Results. Macrophage invasion reached highest extents with up to 60% in short-term and decreased within 24 months to about 30%. Inflammatory infiltrate increased within the first 2 hours, the reached levels and the different extents and ranking among the investigated meshes remained stable during long-term follow up. For myofibroblasts, connective tissue, and CD31+ cells, no activity was detected during the first 120 min. Conclusion. The local inflammatory reaction is an early and susceptible event after mesh implantation. It cannot be influenced by prior plasma coating and does not depend on the localisation of implantation.

  2. Determinants of Commercial Banks' Interest Rate Spread in Namibia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bank, commercial banks, development financial institutions and the non-banking sector which consists of .... its interest rate spread in order to shield itself against the risk. This suggests that the ..... PSG Wealth Management (Namibia). (2013).

  3. Genetic determination of mortality rate in Danish dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maia, Rafael Pimentel; Ask, Birgitte; Madsen, Per

    2014-01-01

    introduction of genetic material from other populations. The correlations between the sire components for death rate and slaughter rate were negative and small for the 3 populations, suggesting the existence of specific genetic mechanisms for each culling reason and common concurrent genetic mechanisms....... In the Holstein population the effects of the changes in the level of heterozygosity, breed composition and the increasing genetic trend act in the same direction increasing the death rate in the recent years. In the Jersey population, the effects of the level of heterozygosity and the breed proportion were small......, and only the increasing genetic trend can be pointed as a genetic cause to the observed increase in the mortality rate. In the Red Danish population neither the time-development pattern of the genetic trend nor the changes in the level of heterozygosity and breed composition could be causing the observed...

  4. Site-specific reaction rate constant measurements for various secondary and tertiary H-abstraction by OH radicals

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2015-02-01

    Reaction rate constants for nine site-specific hydrogen atom (H) abstraction by hydroxyl radicals (OH) have been determined using experimental measurements of the rate constants of Alkane+OH→Products reactions. Seven secondary (S 20, S 21, S 22, S 30, S 31, S 32, and S 33) and two tertiary (T 100 and T 101) site-specific rate constants, where the subscripts refer to the number of carbon atoms (C) connected to the next-nearest-neighbor (N-N-N) C atom, were obtained for a wide temperature range (250-1450K). This was done by measuring the reaction rate constants for H abstraction by OH from a series of carefully selected large branched alkanes. The rate constant of OH with four different alkanes, namely 2,2-dimethyl-pentane, 2,4-dimethyl-pentane, 2,2,4-trimethyl-pentane (iso-octane), and 2,2,4,4-tetramethyl-pentane were measured at high temperatures (822-1367K) using a shock tube and OH absorption diagnostic. Hydroxyl radicals were detected using the narrow-line-width ring-dye laser absorption of the R1(5) transition of OH spectrum near 306.69nm.Previous low-temperature rate constant measurements are added to the current data to generate three-parameter rate expressions that successfully represent the available direct measurements over a wide temperature range (250-1450. K). Similarly, literature values of the low-temperature rate constants for the reaction of OH with seven normal and branched alkanes are combined with the recently measured high-temperature rate constants from our group [1]. Subsequent to that, site-specific rate constants for abstractions from various types of secondary and tertiary H atoms by OH radicals are derived and have the following modified Arrhenius expressions:. S20=8.49×10-17T1.52exp(73.4K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(250-1450K) S21=1.07×10-15T1.07exp(208.3K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(296-1440K) S22=2.88×10-13T0.41exp(-291.5K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(272-1311K) S30=3.35×10-18T1.97exp(323.1K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(250-1366K) S31=1.60×10-18T2.0exp(500.0K/T)cm3

  5. What determines the rate of growth and technological change?

    OpenAIRE

    ROMER, Paul M.

    1989-01-01

    There is substantial research about cross section and time series correlations between economic growth and various economic, social, demographic and political variables. After analyzing these correlations, the paper makes the following conclusions. Exogenous increases do not seem to cause increases in the rate of technological change, but instead seem to be associated with lower rates of return to capital. Increased openness to international trade speeds up growth and technological change as ...

  6. Steepest-entropy-ascent nonequilibrium quantum thermodynamic framework to model chemical reaction rates at an atomistic level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, G. P.; Al-Abbasi, Omar; von Spakovsky, M. R.

    2017-04-01

    The steepest entropy ascent (SEA) dynamical principle provides a general framework for modeling the dynamics of nonequilibrium (NE) phenomena at any level of description, including the atomistic one. It has recently been shown to provide a precise implementation and meaning to the maximum entropy production principle and to encompass many well-established theories of nonequilibrium thermodynamics into a single unifying geometrical framework. Its original formulation in the framework of quantum thermodynamics (QT) assumes the simplest and most natural Fisher-Rao metric to geometrize from a dynamical standpoint the manifold of density operators, which represent the thermodynamic NE states of the system. This simplest SEAQT formulation is used here to develop a general mathematical framework for modeling the NE time evolution of the quantum state of a chemically reactive mixture at an atomistic level. The method is illustrated for a simple two-reaction kinetic scheme of the overall reaction F +H2⇔HF +F in an isolated tank of fixed volume. However, the general formalism is developed for a reactive system subject to multiple reaction mechanisms. To explicitly implement the SEAQT nonlinear law of evolution for the density operator, both the energy and the particle number eigenvalue problems are set up and solved analytically under the dilute gas approximation. The system-level energy and particle number eigenvalues and eigenstates are used in the SEAQT equation of motion to determine the time evolution of the density operator, thus effectively describing the overall kinetics of the reacting system as it relaxes toward stable chemical equilibrium. The predicted time evolution in the near-equilibrium limit is compared to the reaction rates given by a standard detailed kinetic model so as to extract the single time constant needed by the present SEA model.

  7. Steepest-entropy-ascent nonequilibrium quantum thermodynamic framework to model chemical reaction rates at an atomistic level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, G P; Al-Abbasi, Omar; von Spakovsky, M R

    2017-04-01

    The steepest entropy ascent (SEA) dynamical principle provides a general framework for modeling the dynamics of nonequilibrium (NE) phenomena at any level of description, including the atomistic one. It has recently been shown to provide a precise implementation and meaning to the maximum entropy production principle and to encompass many well-established theories of nonequilibrium thermodynamics into a single unifying geometrical framework. Its original formulation in the framework of quantum thermodynamics (QT) assumes the simplest and most natural Fisher-Rao metric to geometrize from a dynamical standpoint the manifold of density operators, which represent the thermodynamic NE states of the system. This simplest SEAQT formulation is used here to develop a general mathematical framework for modeling the NE time evolution of the quantum state of a chemically reactive mixture at an atomistic level. The method is illustrated for a simple two-reaction kinetic scheme of the overall reaction F+H_{2}⇔HF+F in an isolated tank of fixed volume. However, the general formalism is developed for a reactive system subject to multiple reaction mechanisms. To explicitly implement the SEAQT nonlinear law of evolution for the density operator, both the energy and the particle number eigenvalue problems are set up and solved analytically under the dilute gas approximation. The system-level energy and particle number eigenvalues and eigenstates are used in the SEAQT equation of motion to determine the time evolution of the density operator, thus effectively describing the overall kinetics of the reacting system as it relaxes toward stable chemical equilibrium. The predicted time evolution in the near-equilibrium limit is compared to the reaction rates given by a standard detailed kinetic model so as to extract the single time constant needed by the present SEA model.

  8. Study of nuclear reaction method for the determination of protein content in wheat seeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Xiao-Bing; ZHANG Ruan-Yu; CHEN Shi-Guo; LI Tai-Hua; AN Zhu; CAO Yang-Shu; HE Fu-Qing; PENG Xiu-Feng; PAN Shi-Biao

    2005-01-01

    A 13.4 MeV deuteron beam from the 1.2 meter cyclotron of Sichuan University was used to determine the protein content in wheat seeds on the basis of (d,p) reactions. The influence of the variation of the water content in seeds has been investigated.

  9. A novel reactor for determination of kinetics for solid catalyzed gas reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borman, P.C.; Borman, P.C.; Bos, A.N.R.; Bos, A.N.R.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1994-01-01

    A novel perfectly mixed laboratory reactor for determining kinetics of heterogeneously catalyzed gas-phase reactions has been developed. Perfect mixing is achieved by circulating the gas in the reactor using an axial flow impeller in a well streamlined enclosure. Pellets are fixed in a rectangular

  10. Determination of the thermal neutron induced O-17(n,alpha) C-14 reaction cross section

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagemans, J; Wagemans, C; Bieber, R; Geltenbort, P

    1998-01-01

    The. O-17(n(th),alpha)C-14 reaction cross section was determined at the high flux reactor of the ILL in Grenoble relative to the known N-14(n(th),p)C-14 cross section. For the flux calibration measurements, N-14(2) from the air was used. The O-17(n,alpha) measurements were performed with several hig

  11. A novel reactor for determination of kinetics for solid catalyzed gas reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borman, P.C.; Bos, A.N.R.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1994-01-01

    A novel perfectly mixed laboratory reactor for determining kinetics of heterogeneously catalyzed gas-phase reactions has been developed. Perfect mixing is achieved by circulating the gas in the reactor using an axial flow impeller in a well streamlined enclosure. Pellets are fixed in a rectangular o

  12. Utilization of the Recycle Reactor in Determining Kinetics of Gas-Solid Catalytic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paspek, Stephen C.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a laboratory scale reactor that determines the kinetics of a gas-solid catalytic reaction. The external recycle reactor construction is detailed with accompanying diagrams. Experimental details, application of the reactor to CO oxidation kinetics, interphase gradients, and intraphase gradients are discussed. (CS)

  13. Study of the Reaction Rate of Gold Nanotube Synthesis from Sacrificial Silver Nanorods through the Galvanic Replacement Method

    OpenAIRE

    Sunil Kwon; Hyunbae Dong; Sang-Yup Lee

    2010-01-01

    An investigation was carried out about the gold nanotube synthesis via a galvanic replacement reaction. The progress of the gold nanotube synthesis was investigated using electron microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. In addition, the reaction rates of gold nanotube formation in the early stage of the reaction were studied. The chlorine ion concentration linearly increased with the gold precursor concentration but deviated from the stoichiometric amounts. This deviation was probably due to AgCl...

  14. Hydrothermal decomposition of industrial jarosite in alkaline media: The rate determining step of the process kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Ibarra A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work examines the role of NaOH and Ca(OH2 on the hydrothermal decomposition of industrial jarosite deposited by a Mexican company in a tailings dam. The industrial jarosite is mainly composed by natrojarosite and contains 150 g Ag/t, showing a narrow particle size distribution, as revealed by XRD, fire assay, SEM-EDS and laser-diffraction analysis. The effect of the pH, when using NaOH or Ca(OH2 as alkalinizing agent was studied by carrying out decomposition experiments at different pH values and 60°C in a homogeneous size particle system (pH = 8, 9, 10 and 11 and in a heterogeneous size particle system (pH = 11. Also, the kinetic study of the process and the controlling step of the decomposition reaction when NaOH and Ca(OH2 are used was determined by fitting the data obtained to the shrinking core model for spherical particles of constant size. These results, supported by chemical (EDS, morphological (SEM and mapping of elements (EDS analysis of a partially reacted jarosite particle allowed to conclude that when NaOH is used, the process kinetics is controlled by the chemical reaction and when Ca(OH2 is used, the rate determining step is changed to a diffusion control through a layer of solid products.

  15. Stress-associated cardiovascular reaction masks heart rate dependence on physical load in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev-Andrievskiy, A A; Popova, A S; Borovik, A S; Dolgov, O N; Tsvirkun, D V; Custaud, M; Vinogradova, O L

    2014-06-10

    When tested on the treadmill mice do not display a graded increase of heart rate (HR), but rather a sharp shift of cardiovascular indices to high levels at the onset of locomotion. We hypothesized that under test conditions cardiovascular reaction to physical load in mice is masked with stress-associated HR increase. To test this hypothesis we monitored mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate in C57BL/6 mice after exposure to stressful stimuli, during spontaneous locomotion in the open-field test, treadmill running or running in a wheel installed in the home cage. Mice were treated with β1-adrenoblocker atenolol (2mg/kg ip, A), cholinolytic ipratropium bromide (2mg/kg ip, I), combination of blockers (A+I), anxiolytic diazepam (5mg/kg ip, D) or saline (control trials, SAL). MAP and HR in mice increased sharply after handling, despite 3weeks of habituation to the procedure. Under stressful conditions of open field test cardiovascular parameters in mice were elevated and did not depend on movement speed. HR values did not differ in I and SAL groups and were reduced with A or A+I. HR was lower at rest in D pretreated mice. In the treadmill test HR increase over speeds of 6, 12 and 18m/min was roughly 1/7-1/10 of HR increase observed after placing the mice on the treadmill. HR could not be increased with cholinolytic (I), but was reduced after sympatholytic (A) or A+I treatment. Anxiolytic (D) reduced heart rate at lower speeds of movement and its overall effect was to unmask the dependency of HR on running speed. During voluntary running in non-stressful conditions of the home cage HR in mice linearly increased with increasing running speeds. We conclude that in test situations cardiovascular reactions in mice are governed predominantly by stress-associated sympathetic activation, rendering efforts to evaluate HR and MAP reactions to workload unreliable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pressure-Dependent Rate Rules for Intramolecular H-Migration Reactions of Hydroperoxyalkylperoxy Radicals in Low Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qian; Sun, Xiao-Hui; Li, Ze-Rong; Chen, Fang-Fang; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2017-04-27

    Intramolecular H-migration reaction of hydroperoxyalkylperoxy radicals ((•)O2QOOH) is one of the most important reaction families in the low-temperature oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels. This reaction family is first divided into classes depending upon H atom transfer from -OOH bonded carbon or non-OOH bonded carbon, and then the two classes are further divided depending upon the ring size of the transition states and the types of the carbons from which the H atom is transferred. High pressure limit rate rules and pressure-dependent rate rules for each class are derived from the rate constants of a representative set of reactions within each class using electronic structure calculations performed at the CBS-QB3 level of theory. For the intramolecular H-migration reactions of (•)O2QOOH radicals for abstraction from an -OOH substituted carbon atom (-OOH bonded case), the result shows that it is acceptable to derive the rate rules by taking the average of the rate constants from a representative set of reactions with different sizes of the substitutes. For the abstraction from a non-OOH substituted carbon atom (non-OOH bonded case), rate rules for each class are also derived and it is shown that the difference between the rate constants calculated by CBS-QB3 method and rate constants estimated from the rate rules may be large; therefore, to get more reliable results for the low-temperature combustion modeling of alkanes, it is better to assign each reaction its CBS-QB3 calculated rate constants, instead of assigning the same values for the same reaction class according to rate rules. The intramolecular H-migration reactions of (•)O2QOOH radicals (a thermally equilibrated system) are pressure-dependent, and the pressure-dependent rate constants of these reactions are calculated by using the Rice-Ramsberger-Kassel-Marcus/master-equation theory at pressures varying from 0.01 to 100 atm. The impact of molecular size on the pressure-dependent rate constants of the

  17. A new determination of the solar rotation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Wang, Y.-M.; Nash, A. G.

    1992-01-01

    We use 'stackplot' displays to compare observations of the photospheric magnetic field during sunspot cycle 21 with simulations based on the flux-transport model. Adopting nominal rates of diffusion, differential rotation, and meridional flow, we obtain slanted patterns similar to those of the observed field, even when the sources of flux are assigned random longitudes in the model. At low latitudes, the slopes of the nearly vertical patterns of simulated field are sensitive to the rotation rate used in the calculation, and insensitive to the rates of diffusion and flow during much of the sunspot cycle. Good agreement between the observed and simulated patterns requires a synodic equatorial rotation period of 26.75 +/- 0.05 days.

  18. The reaction rate for dissociative adsorption of N-2 on stepped Ru(0001): Six-dimensional quantum calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Harrevelt, Rob; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical calculations of the reaction rate for dissociative adsorption of N-2 on stepped Ru(0001) are presented. Converged six-dimensional quantum calculations for this heavy-atom reaction have been performed using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method. A potential...

  19. Kinetic method for the determination of traces of thyroxine by its catalytic effect on the Mn(III) metaphosphate-As(III) reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Ferenc T; Milovanović, Gordana A; Todorović, Marija

    2008-02-15

    A new, highly sensitive and simple kinetic method for the determination of thyroxine was proposed. The method was based on the catalytic effect of thyroxine on the oxidation of As(III) by Mn(III) metaphosphate. The kinetics of the reaction was studied in the presence of orthophosphoric acid. The reaction rate was followed spectrophotometrically at 516 nm. It was established that orthophosphoric acid increased the reaction rate and that the extent of the non-catalytic reaction was extremely small. A kinetic equation was postulated and the apparent rate constant was calculated. The dependence of the reaction rate on temperature was investigated and the energy of activation and other kinetic parameters were determined. Thyroxine was determined under the optimal experimental conditions in the range 7.0 x 10(-9) to 3.0 x 10(-8) mol L(-1) with a relative standard deviation up to 6.7% and a detection limit of 2.7 x 10(-9) molL(-1). In the presence of 0.08 mol L(-1) chloride, the detection limit decreased to 6.6 x 10(-10) mol L(-1). The proposed method was applied for the determination of thyroxine in tablets. The accuracy of the method was evaluated by comparison with the HPLC method.

  20. Influence of the excitation light intensity on the rate of fluorescence quenching reactions: pulsed experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Gonzalo; Milkiewicz, Jadwiga; Kattnig, Daniel; Nejbauer, Michał; Stepanenko, Yuriy; Szczepanek, Jan; Radzewicz, Czesław; Wnuk, Paweł; Grampp, Günter

    2017-02-22

    The effect of multiple light excitation events on bimolecular photo-induced electron transfer reactions in liquid solution is studied experimentally. It is found that the decay of fluorescence can be up to 25% faster if a second photon is absorbed after a first cycle of quenching and recombination. A theoretical model is presented which ascribes this effect to the enrichment of the concentration of quenchers in the immediate vicinity of fluorophores that have been previously excited. Despite its simplicity, the model delivers a qualitative agreement with the observed experimental trends. The original theory by Burshtein and Igoshin (J. Chem. Phys., 2000, 112, 10930-10940) was created for continuous light excitation though. A qualitative extrapolation from the here presented pulse experiments to the continuous excitation conditions lead us to conclude that in the latter the order of magnitude of the increase of the quenching efficiency upon increasing the light intensity of excitation, must also be on the order of tens of percent. These results mean that the rate constant for photo-induced bimolecular reactions depends not only on the usual known factors, such as temperature, viscosity and other properties of the medium, but also on the intensity of the excitation light.

  1. Analytical solution of steady-state equations for chemical reaction networks with bilinear rate laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halász, Adám M; Lai, Hong-Jian; McCabe Pryor, Meghan; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Edwards, Jeremy S

    2013-01-01

    True steady states are a rare occurrence in living organisms, yet their knowledge is essential for quasi-steady-state approximations, multistability analysis, and other important tools in the investigation of chemical reaction networks (CRN) used to describe molecular processes on the cellular level. Here, we present an approach that can provide closed form steady-state solutions to complex systems, resulting from CRN with binary reactions and mass-action rate laws. We map the nonlinear algebraic problem of finding steady states onto a linear problem in a higher-dimensional space. We show that the linearized version of the steady-state equations obeys the linear conservation laws of the original CRN. We identify two classes of problems for which complete, minimally parameterized solutions may be obtained using only the machinery of linear systems and a judicious choice of the variables used as free parameters. We exemplify our method, providing explicit formulae, on CRN describing signal initiation of two important types of RTK receptor-ligand systems, VEGF and EGF-ErbB1.

  2. Effectiveness of respiratory rates in determining clinical deterioration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Rikke Rishøj; Larsen, Palle; Håkonsen, Sasa Jul

    2016-01-01

    Review question/objective: The objective of this systematic review is to identify, appraise and synthesize the best available evidence on the effectiveness of manually measuring respiratory rates for 60 s or less in detecting clinical deterioration of inpatients. More specifically, the review...

  3. CORAL: QSPR modeling of rate constants of reactions between organic aromatic pollutants and hydroxyl radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropov, A A; Toropova, A P; Rasulev, B F; Benfenati, E; Gini, G; Leszczynska, D; Leszczynski, J

    2012-09-05

    The rate constants (K(OH)) of reactions between 78 organic aromatic pollutants and hydroxyl radical were examined. Simplified molecular input line entry system was used as representation of the molecular structure of the pollutants. Quantitative structure-property relationships was developed using CORAL software (http://www.insilico.eu/CORAL) for four random splits of the data into the subtraining, calibration, and test sets. The obtained results reveal good predictive potential of the applied approach: correlation coefficients (r(2)) for the test sets of the four random splits are 0.75, 0.91, 0.84, and 0.80. Using the Monte Carlo method CORAL software generated the optimal descriptors for one-variable models. The reproducibility of each model was tested performing three runs of the Monte Carlo optimization. The current data were compared to previous results and discussed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Evaluation of the FBR MONJU core breeding ratio and the power distribution from the reaction rate distribution measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usami, Shin; Suzuki, Takayuki; Sasaki, Kenji; Deshimaru, Takehide [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tsuruga, Fukui (Japan). Monju Construction Office; Nakashima, Fumiaki

    1996-09-01

    In MONJU, reaction rate distribution measurements were made by foil activation methods from May through September 1994. On the basis of the reaction rate measurement data, the MONJU initial core breeding ratio and the power distribution, etc. were evaluated. As a result, the evaluated values and the calculated values showed good agreement, and we confirmed that the core performance of MONJU and the method of core calculations were satisfactory. (author)

  5. Coulometric determination of dithiphosphates with the use of the induced iodine-azide reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Ciesielski, Witold; Jędrzejewski, Włodzimierz

    1993-01-01

    The characteristics of potassium diethyl- and dibuthyldithiophosphates as the inductors of iodine-azide reaction carried out electrolytically have been presented. The influence of the pH and concentrations of azide and iodide ions on the course of reaction was examined. The determinations have been carried out in the range of 1-20 nmol. Przedstawiono charakterystykę dietylo- i dibutyloditiofosforanów jako induktorów reakcji jodo-azydkowej. Zbadano wpływ pH oraz stężeń azy...

  6. Spectrophotometric Method for the Determination of Oxidative IonsWith Decoloring Reaction Using HCPCF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KOU Zongyan; NIU Jiwei; WANG Shuwen; GONG Xiaoming; KOU Mingze

    2001-01-01

    @@ HCPCF is a color reagent for the determination of vanadium, zinc and magnesium, etc. To the best of our knowledge, no work on the decoloring reaction for analytical use of HCPCF for the determination of oxidative anions has been report. In this work, we found that some oxidative anions can oxidize HCPCF in acid medium, forming a colorless product. In addition, surfactant was used in this work, because of the low solubility of HCPCF in aqueous solutions. The purpose of this work is to establish a new, rapid and simple spectrophotometric method for the determination of NO2-, BrO3-,IO3-, IO4-and Cr2O7-based on the reaction between HCPCF and analytes in the presence of emulsion OP.

  7. Spectrophotometric Method for the Determination of Oxidative IonsWith Decoloring Reaction Using HCPCF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KOU; Zongyan

    2001-01-01

    HCPCF is a color reagent for the determination of vanadium, zinc and magnesium, etc. To the best of our knowledge, no work on the decoloring reaction for analytical use of HCPCF for the determination of oxidative anions has been report. In this work, we found that some oxidative anions can oxidize HCPCF in acid medium, forming a colorless product. In addition, surfactant was used in this work, because of the low solubility of HCPCF in aqueous solutions. The purpose of this work is to establish a new, rapid and simple spectrophotometric method for the determination of NO2-, BrO3-,IO3-, IO4-and Cr2O7-based on the reaction between HCPCF and analytes in the presence of emulsion OP.……

  8. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DETERMINING AMALGAM DECOMPOSITION RATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R.W.; Wright, C.C.

    1962-04-24

    A method and apparatus for measuring the rate at which an amalgam decomposes in contact with aqueous solutions are described. The amalgam and an aqueous hydroxide solution are disposed in an electrolytic cell. The amalgam is used as the cathode of the cell, and an electrode and anode are disposed in the aqueous solution. A variable source of plating potential is connected across the cell. The difference in voltage between the amalgam cathode and a calibrated source of reference potential is used to control the variable source to null the difference in voltage and at the same time to maintain the concentration of the amalgam at some predetermined constant value. The value of the current required to maintain this concentration constant is indicative of the decomposition rate of the amalgam. (AEC)

  9. The determination of standard metabolic rate in fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabot, Denis; Steffensen, John Fleng; Farrell, A.P.

    2016-01-01

    This review and data analysis outline how fish biologists should most reliably estimate the minimal amount of oxygen needed by a fish to support its aerobic metabolic rate (termed standard metabolic rate; SMR). By reviewing key literature, it explains the theory, terminology and challenges...... underlying SMR measurements in fishes, which are almost always made using respirometry (which measures oxygen uptake, ṀO2 ). Then, the practical difficulties of measuring SMR when activity of the fish is not quantitatively evaluated are comprehensively explored using 85 examples of ṀO2 data from different...... fishes and one crustacean, an analysis that goes well beyond any previous attempt. The main objective was to compare eight methods to estimate SMR. The methods were: average of the lowest 10 values (low10) and average of the 10% lowest ṀO2 values, after removing the five lowest ones as outliers (low10...

  10. Validity of portfolio assessment: which qualities determine ratings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Erik W; Overeem, Karlijn; van Tartwijk, Jan; van der Vleuten, Cees P M; Muijtjens, Arno M M

    2006-09-01

    The portfolio is becoming increasingly accepted as a valuable tool for learning and assessment. The validity of portfolio assessment, however, may suffer from bias due to irrelevant qualities, such as lay-out and writing style. We examined the possible effects of such qualities in a portfolio programme aimed at stimulating Year 1 medical students to reflect on their professional and personal development. In later curricular years, this portfolio is also used to judge clinical competence. We developed an instrument, the Portfolio Analysis Scoring Inventory, to examine the impact of form and content aspects on portfolio assessment. The Inventory consists of 15 items derived from interviews with experienced mentors, the literature, and the criteria for reflective competence used in the regular portfolio assessment procedure. Forty portfolios, selected from 231 portfolios for which ratings from the regular assessment procedure were available, were rated by 2 researchers, independently, using the Inventory. Regression analysis was used to estimate the correlation between the ratings from the regular assessment and those resulting from the Inventory items. Inter-rater agreement ranged from 0.46 to 0.87. The strongest predictor of the variance in the regular ratings was 'quality of reflection' (R 0.80; R2 66%). No further items accounted for a significant proportion of variance. Irrelevant items, such as writing style and lay-out, had negligible effects. The absence of an impact of irrelevant criteria appears to support the validity of the portfolio assessment procedure. Further studies should examine the portfolio's validity for the assessment of clinical competence.

  11. Determination of reactivity rates of silicate particle-size fractions

    OpenAIRE

    Angélica Cristina Fernandes Deus; Leonardo Theodoro Büll; Juliano Corulli Corrêa; Roberto Lyra Villas Boas

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of sources used for soil acidity correction depends on reactivity rate (RR) and neutralization power (NP), indicated by effective calcium carbonate (ECC). Few studies establish relative efficiency of reactivity (RER) for silicate particle-size fractions, therefore, the RER applied for lime are used. This study aimed to evaluate the reactivity of silicate materials affected by particle size throughout incubation periods in comparison to lime, and to calculate the RER for silicat...

  12. Auctioning Process Innovations when Losers' Bids Determine Royalty Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Cuihong; Jun, Byoung Heon; Elmar G. Wolfstetter

    2009-01-01

    We consider a licensing mechanism for process innovations that combines a license auction with royalty contracts to those who lose the auction. Firms’ bids are dual signals of their cost reductions: the winning bid signals the own cost reduction to rival oligopolists, whereas the losing bid influences the beliefs of the innovator who uses that information to set the royalty rate. We derive conditions for existence of a separating equilibrium, explain why a sufficiently high reserve price is e...

  13. Music structure determines heart rate variability of singers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickhoff, Björn; Malmgren, Helge; Åström, Rickard; Nyberg, Gunnar; Ekström, Seth-Reino; Engwall, Mathias; Snygg, Johan; Nilsson, Michael; Jörnsten, Rebecka

    2013-01-01

    Choir singing is known to promote wellbeing. One reason for this may be that singing demands a slower than normal respiration, which may in turn affect heart activity. Coupling of heart rate variability (HRV) to respiration is called Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). This coupling has a subjective as well as a biologically soothing effect, and it is beneficial for cardiovascular function. RSA is seen to be more marked during slow-paced breathing and at lower respiration rates (0.1 Hz and below). In this study, we investigate how singing, which is a form of guided breathing, affects HRV and RSA. The study comprises a group of healthy 18 year olds of mixed gender. The subjects are asked to; (1) hum a single tone and breathe whenever they need to; (2) sing a hymn with free, unguided breathing; and (3) sing a slow mantra and breathe solely between phrases. Heart rate (HR) is measured continuously during the study. The study design makes it possible to compare above three levels of song structure. In a separate case study, we examine five individuals performing singing tasks (1–3). We collect data with more advanced equipment, simultaneously recording HR, respiration, skin conductance and finger temperature. We show how song structure, respiration and HR are connected. Unison singing of regular song structures makes the hearts of the singers accelerate and decelerate simultaneously. Implications concerning the effect on wellbeing and health are discussed as well as the question how this inner entrainment may affect perception and behavior. PMID:23847555

  14. Determining the Success Rate of a Modified Underlay Myringoplasty Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH Faramarzi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: Chronic otitis media surgery is the most common procedure in the field of otology in developing countries. Subtotal and total tympanic membrane perforation with inadequate anterior remnant is associated with higher rate of graft failure. This study aimed to evaluate the anatomical and functional outcomes of a modified underlay myringoplasty technique. Methods: In the present prospective clinical study, 45 patients with subtotal or total tympanic membrane perforation and inadequate anterior remnant underwent tympanoplasty (+/- mastoidectomy. Anterior tip of the temporalis fascia was secured in a mucosal pocket on the lateral wall of Eustachian tube orifice. Data on graft take rate, preoperative and postoperative hearing status and intraoperative findings were analyzed. The anatomical and functional findings of this procedure were analyzed by paired t-test. Results: A graft success rate of 91.1%, without lateralization, blunting, atelectasia or epithelial pearls was achieved in this study. About 24 % of patients had an air bone gap within 25db before intervention, which increased to 71% postoperatively.(P<0.001. Conclusion: It seems that the current technique could be a convenient and suitable method for cases with subtotal or total tympanic membrane perforation and inadequate anterior remnant. Key words: Tympanic membrane, Perforation, Tympanoplasty, Eustachian tube

  15. Determination of dose rates from natural radionuclides in dental materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronese, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy) and INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: ivan.veronese@unimi.it; Guzzi, G. [AIRMEB - Italian Association for Metal and Biocompatibility Research, Milan (Italy); Giussani, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milan (Italy); Cantone, M.C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milan (Italy); Ripamonti, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Different types of materials used for dental prosthetics restoration, including feldspathic ceramics, glass ceramics, zirconia-based ceramics, alumina-based ceramics, and resin-based materials, were investigated with regard to content of natural radionuclides by means of thermoluminescence beta dosimetry and gamma spectrometry. The gross beta dose rate from feldspathic and glass ceramics was about ten times higher than the background measurement, whereas resin-based materials generated negligible beta dose rate, similarly to natural tooth samples. The specific activity of uranium and thorium was significantly below the levels found in the period when addition of uranium to dental porcelain materials was still permitted. The high-beta dose levels observed in feldspathic porcelains and glass ceramics are thus mainly ascribable to {sup 4}K, naturally present in these specimens. Although the measured values are below the recommended limits, results indicate that patients with prostheses are subject to higher dose levels than other members of the population. Alumina- and zirconia-based ceramics might be a promising alternative, as they have generally lower beta dose rates than the conventional porcelain materials. However, the dosimetry results, which imply the presence of inhomogeneously distributed clusters of radionuclides in the sample matrix, and the still unsuitable structural properties call for further optimization of these materials.

  16. Exchange Rate Determination and Forecasting: Can the Microstructure Approach Rescue Us from the Exchange Rate Disparity?

    OpenAIRE

    Guangfeng Zhang; Qiong Zhang; Muhammad Tariq Majeed

    2013-01-01

    Using two measures of private information and high-frequency transaction data from the leading interdealer electronic broking system Reuters D2000-2, we examine the association between exchange rate return and contemporaneous order flow and the predictability power of lagged order flow on the future exchange rate return. Our empirical analysis demonstrates that at high frequency (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min) there exists strong positive association between exchange rate returns and contempo...

  17. Kinetics of low-temperature transitions and a reaction rate theory from non-equilibrium distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Coutinho, Nayara Dantas; Carvalho-Silva, Valter Henrique

    2017-03-01

    This article surveys the empirical information which originated both by laboratory experiments and by computational simulations, and expands previous understanding of the rates of chemical processes in the low-temperature range, where deviations from linearity of Arrhenius plots were revealed. The phenomenological two-parameter Arrhenius equation requires improvement for applications where interpolation or extrapolations are demanded in various areas of modern science. Based on Tolman's theorem, the dependence of the reciprocal of the apparent activation energy as a function of reciprocal absolute temperature permits the introduction of a deviation parameter d covering uniformly a variety of rate processes, from those where quantum mechanical tunnelling is significant and d 0, corresponding to the Pareto-Tsallis statistical weights: these generalize the Boltzmann-Gibbs weight, which is recovered for d = 0. It is shown here how the weights arise, relaxing the thermodynamic equilibrium limit, either for a binomial distribution if d > 0 or for a negative binomial distribution if d kinetics, where transport phenomena accelerate processes as the temperature increases; (ii) the sub-Arrhenius kinetics, where quantum mechanical tunnelling propitiates low-temperature reactivity; (iii) the anti-Arrhenius kinetics, where processes with no energetic obstacles are rate-limited by molecular reorientation requirements. Particular attention is given for case (i) to the treatment of diffusion and viscosity, for case (ii) to formulation of a transition rate theory for chemical kinetics including quantum mechanical tunnelling, and for case (iii) to the stereodirectional specificity of the dynamics of reactions strongly hindered by the increase of temperature. This article is part of the themed issue 'Theoretical and computational studies of non-equilibrium and non-statistical dynamics in the gas phase, in the condensed phase and at interfaces'.

  18. Helium effects on microstructural change in RAFM steel under irradiation: Reaction rate theory modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Y.; Morishita, K.; Nakasuji, T.; Ando, M.; Tanigawa, H.

    2015-06-01

    Reaction rate theory analysis has been conducted to investigate helium effects on the formation kinetics of interstitial type dislocation loops (I-loops) and helium bubbles in reduced-activation-ferritic/martensitic steel during irradiation, by focusing on the nucleation and growth processes of the defect clusters. The rate theory model employs the size and chemical composition dependence of thermal dissociation of point defects from defect clusters. In the calculations, the temperature and the production rate of Frenkel pairs are fixed to be T = 723 K and PV = 10-6 dpa/s, respectively. And then, only the production rate of helium atoms was changed into the following three cases: PHe = 0, 10-7 and 10-5 appm He/s. The calculation results show that helium effect on I-loop formation quite differs from that on bubble formation. As to I-loops, the loop formation hardly depends on the existence of helium, where the number density of I-loops is almost the same for the three cases of PHe. This is because helium atoms trapped in vacancies are easily emitted into the matrix due to the recombination between the vacancies and SIAs, which induces no pronounced increase or decrease of vacancies and SIAs in the matrix, leading to no remarkable impact on the I-loop nucleation. On the other hand, the bubble formation depends much on the existence of helium, in which the number density of bubbles for PHe = 10-7 and 10-5 appm He/s is much higher than that for PHe = 0. This is because helium atoms trapped in a bubble increase the vacancy binding energy, and suppress the vacancy dissociation from the bubble, resulting in a promotion of the bubble nucleation. And then, the helium effect on the promotion of bubble nucleation is very strong, even the number of helium atoms in a bubble is not so large.

  19. Determination of the optimal exchange rate via control of the domestic interest rate in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Virtue Ekhosuehi; Sunday Ogbonmwan

    2014-01-01

    We consider an economic scenario where the government seeks to achieve a favourable balance-of-payments over a fixed planning horizon through exchange rate policy and control of the domestic interest rate. We view the dynamics of such an economy as a bounded optimal control problem where the exchange rate is the state variable and the domestic interest rate is the control variable. The idea of balance-of-payments is used as a theoretical underpinning to specify the objective function. By assu...

  20. Determination of kinetic parameters for complex transesterification reaction by standard optimisation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almagrbi Abdualnaser Muftah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a methodology for kinetic parameter estimation which is based on standard optimization methods. The parameter estimation procedure is applied to the example of modelling of non-catalytic transesterification reaction, based on laboratory experiments performed under elevated pressure. The kinetic model employed in this study consists of three consecutive and parallel reversible reactions of the second order, with six kinetic constants. The influence of the mass transfer effects was considered as well. The best results were obtained by Genetic Algorithm method. The application of this method resulted in kinetic parameters with improved accuracy in predicting concentrations of important reaction intermediates, i.e. diglycerides and monoglycerides. Activation energies of kinetic parameters obtained by the Genetic Algorithm method are in very good agreement with theoretical values determined by molecular orbital calculations. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III-45019

  1. Evaluation of the reaction rate constants for the gas-phase Al-CH4-air combustion chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharipov, A. S.; Titova, N. S.; Starik, A. M.

    2012-10-01

    The most likely reaction pathways and reaction products in the Al-CH4-O2-N2 system are investigated using density functional theory and ab initio calculations. The B3LYP functional with extended 6-311+G(3df,2p) basis set as well as the CBS-QB3 composite method are mainly utilised. Theoretical analysis of corresponding reaction rate constants is also performed with the use of simple theoretical models. A critical overview of current knowledge on combustion-relevant reactions with aluminium compounds is given. On the basis of critical comparison of available experimental kinetic data with theoretical calculations, the approximations for rate constants for 44 reversible elementary reactions involving Al-containing species are recommended for use in combustion issues.

  2. New Astrophysical Reaction Rates for 18F(p, α)15O and 18F(p, γ)19Ne

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU Neng-Chuan(舒能川); D. W. Bardayan; J. C. Blackmon; CHEN Yong-Shou(陈永寿); R. L. Kozub; P. D. Parker; M. S. Smith

    2003-01-01

    The rates of the thermonuclear 18F(p, α)15O and 18F(p,γ)19Ne reactions in hot astrophysical environments are needed to understand gamma-ray emission from nova explosions. The rates for these reactions have been uncertain due to discrepancies in recent measurements, as well as to a lack of a comprehensive examination of the available structure information in the compound nucleus 19Ne. We have examined the latest experimental measurements with radioactive and stable beams, and made estimates of the unmeasured 19Ne nuclear level parameters, to generate new rates with uncertainties for these reactions. The rates are expressed as numerical values over the temperature range relevant for stellar explosions, as well as analytical expressions as functions of temperature in a format suitable for use in astrophysical simulations. Comparisons with the previous rate calculations are carried out, and the astrophysical implications are briefly discussed.

  3. Reaction mechanism of the acidic hydrolysis of highly twisted amides: Rate acceleration caused by the twist of the amide bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujika, Jon I; Formoso, Elena; Mercero, Jose M; Lopez, Xabier

    2006-08-03

    We present an ab initio study of the acid hydrolysis of a highly twisted amide and a planar amide analogue. The aim of these studies is to investigate the effect that the twist of the amide bond has on the reaction barriers and mechanism of acid hydrolysis. Concerted and stepwise mechanisms were investigated using density functional theory and polarizable continuum model calculations. Remarkable differences were observed between the mechanism of twisted and planar amide, due mainly to the preference for N-protonation of the former and O-protonation of the latter. In addition, we were also able to determine that the hydrolytic mechanism of the twisted amide will be pH dependent. Thus, there is a preference for a stepwise mechanism with formation of an intermediate in the acid hydrolysis, whereas the neutral hydrolysis undergoes a concerted-type mechanism. There is a nice agreement between the characterized intermediate and available X-ray data and a good agreement with the kinetically estimated rate acceleration of hydrolysis with respect to analogous undistorted amide compounds. This work, along with previous ab initio calculations, describes a complex and rich chemistry for the hydrolysis of highly twisted amides as a function of pH. The theoretical data provided will allow for a better understanding of the available kinetic data of the rate acceleration of amides upon twisting and the relation of the observed rate acceleration with intrinsic differential reactivity upon loss of amide bond resonance.

  4. Study of the Reaction Rate of Gold Nanotube Synthesis from Sacrificial Silver Nanorods through the Galvanic Replacement Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was carried out about the gold nanotube synthesis via a galvanic replacement reaction. The progress of the gold nanotube synthesis was investigated using electron microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. In addition, the reaction rates of gold nanotube formation in the early stage of the reaction were studied. The chlorine ion concentration linearly increased with the gold precursor concentration but deviated from the stoichiometric amounts. This deviation was probably due to AgCl precipitates formed by the reaction of chlorine ions with dissolved silver ions. The replacement reaction was promoted with increased temperature and was nonlinearly proportional to the gold ion concentration. The outcomes of this research will enhance the current understanding of the galvanic replacement reaction.

  5. Standard and Nonstandard Neutrino-Nucleus Reactions Cross Sections and Event Rates to Neutrino Detection Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Papoulias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we explore ν-nucleus processes from a nuclear theory point of view and obtain results with high confidence level based on accurate nuclear structure cross sections calculations. Besides cross sections, the present study includes simulated signals expected to be recorded by nuclear detectors and differential event rates as well as total number of events predicted to be measured. Our original cross sections calculations are focused on measurable rates for the standard model process, but we also perform calculations for various channels of the nonstandard neutrino-nucleus reactions and come out with promising results within the current upper limits of the corresponding exotic parameters. We concentrate on the possibility of detecting (i supernova neutrinos by using massive detectors like those of the GERDA and SuperCDMS dark matter experiments and (ii laboratory neutrinos produced near the spallation neutron source facilities (at Oak Ridge National Lab by the COHERENT experiment. Our nuclear calculations take advantage of the relevant experimental sensitivity and employ the severe bounds extracted for the exotic parameters entering the Lagrangians of various particle physics models and specifically those resulting from the charged lepton flavour violating μ-→e- experiments (Mu2e and COMET experiments.

  6. Kinetics of low-temperature transitions and a reaction rate theory from non-equilibrium distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Coutinho, Nayara Dantas; Carvalho-Silva, Valter Henrique

    2017-04-28

    This article surveys the empirical information which originated both by laboratory experiments and by computational simulations, and expands previous understanding of the rates of chemical processes in the low-temperature range, where deviations from linearity of Arrhenius plots were revealed. The phenomenological two-parameter Arrhenius equation requires improvement for applications where interpolation or extrapolations are demanded in various areas of modern science. Based on Tolman's theorem, the dependence of the reciprocal of the apparent activation energy as a function of reciprocal absolute temperature permits the introduction of a deviation parameter d covering uniformly a variety of rate processes, from those where quantum mechanical tunnelling is significant and d  0, corresponding to the Pareto-Tsallis statistical weights: these generalize the Boltzmann-Gibbs weight, which is recovered for d = 0. It is shown here how the weights arise, relaxing the thermodynamic equilibrium limit, either for a binomial distribution if d > 0 or for a negative binomial distribution if d theory for chemical kinetics including quantum mechanical tunnelling, and for case (iii) to the stereodirectional specificity of the dynamics of reactions strongly hindered by the increase of temperature.This article is part of the themed issue 'Theoretical and computational studies of non-equilibrium and non-statistical dynamics in the gas phase, in the condensed phase and at interfaces'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Influence of regulatory measures on the rate of spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motola, Domenico; Vargiu, Antonio; Leone, Roberto; Conforti, Anita; Moretti, Ugo; Vaccheri, Alberto; Velo, Giampaolo; Montanaro, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    The reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is the mainstay of post-marketing surveillance systems. Under-reporting and selective reporting are considered the main limitations of a spontaneous reporting-based pharmacovigilance system. However, excessive reporting induced by external events may also impair signal detection by increasing the noise level. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of regulatory measures and other external factors on the rate of ADR reporting in Italy, focusing on four situations occurring in the last 10 years: ACE inhibitor-induced cough; HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors ('statins') and rhabdomyolysis; nimesulide and hepatic toxicity; and cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 selective inhibitors ('coxibs') and increase in cardiovascular risk. The study was based on data from spontaneous reporting in six Italian regions collected from January 1995 to December 2005. We analysed a 10-year period as a reasonable time interval around the four situations of interest, highlighting the influence of regulatory measures on the rate of ADR reporting (number of reports per million inhabitants). Chi-squared tests were used to assess the statistical significance of any changes in ADR reporting. Drug sales data were also studied to examine possible changes in drug use. Sales data were expressed as daily defined dose per 1000 inhabitants per day. ACE inhibitors: a 5-fold increase in the reporting rate of ACE inhibitor-induced cough was observed in 1998 and 1999 following a restriction on reimbursement for angiotensin receptor blockers introduced in 1998 and removed at the end of 1999. Statins: after the withdrawal of cerivastatin in 2001, the ADR reporting rate increased more than 4-fold, with musculoskeletal ADRs representing about 60% of all the ADRs reported in that year, and progressively decreased in the following years. Nimesulide: an increase in hepatic ADR reporting was observed after withdrawal of the drug from the Finnish and Spanish markets in

  8. The Determination of the Star Formation Rate in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Barbaro, G

    1997-01-01

    A spectrophotometric model able to compute the integrated spectrum of a galaxy, including the contribution both of the stellar populations and of the ionized interstellar gas of the HII regions powered by young hot stars, has been used to study several spectral features and photometric quantities in order to derive calibrations of the star formation history of late type galaxies. Attention has been paid to analyze the emission of the Balmer lines and the [OII]$\\lambda$3727 line to test their attitude at providing estimates of the present star formation rate in galaxies. Other features, like D$_{4000}$ and the equivalent width of the H$_{\\delta}$ line, influenced by the presence of intermediate age stars, have been considered. Several ways of estimating the star formation rates in normal galaxies are discussed and some considerations concerning the applicability of the models are presented. Criteria have been also studied for ascertaining the presence of a burst, current or ended not long ago. Bursts usually h...

  9. Neutron and gamma ray total dose rate determination using anisn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, E.; Ashoub, N.; Elkady, A.

    1994-07-01

    The National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control is in the process of acquiring a computer software library based mainly on internationally widely used computer codes. These codes are to be used as basic tools in safety analysis and radiation control and risk assessment. A complementary part of this activity is to validate the computer codes and set standard procedures with the limits of confidence for the different areas of applications of the one or the other code or set of codes. The present work has been then initiated in order to develop a standard shielding calculating procedure to be applied for the different applications of interest to the center, namely: shielding of nuclear installations, such as the ET-RR-1 reactor, the gamma unit, nuclear accelerator, radiotherapy units; shielding of nuclear sources (mainly neutron and gamma sources); shielding of transportation containers. In developing such a standard method, the sources of error to the final results (i.e. the dose rate and dose rate distribution) have to been identified and the error to be quantified. Through applying the developed procedure to benchmark PWR shielding problems, and to documented results for fission sources in water and concrete, the levels of confidence of the procedure in different application areas have been set.

  10. Neutron and gamma ray total dose rate determination using ANISN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, E.; Elkady, A. [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control; Ashoub, N. [Nuclear Research Center, Cairo (Egypt)

    1994-07-01

    The National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control is in the process of acquiring a computer software library based mainly on internationally widely used computer codes. These codes are to be used as basic tools in safety analysis and radiation control and risk assessment. A complementary part of this activity is to validate the computer codes and set standard procedures with the limits of confidence for the different areas of applications of the one or the other code or set of codes. The present work has been then initiated in order to develop a standard shielding calculating procedure to be applied for the different applications of interest to the center, namely: shielding of nuclear installations, such as the ET-RR-1 reactor, the gamma unit, nuclear accelerator, radiotherapy units; shielding of nuclear sources (mainly neutron and gamma sources); shielding of transportation containers. In developing such a standard method, the sources of error to the final results (i.e. the dose rate and dose rate distribution) have to be identified and the error to be quantified. Through applying the developed procedure to benchmark PWR shielding problems, and to documented results for fission sources in water and concrete, the levels of confidence of the procedure in different application areas have been set. (author).

  11. On the Sensitivity of Massive Star Nucleosynthesis and Evolution to Solar Abundances and to Uncertainties in Helium-Burning Reaction Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tur, Clarisse; Heger, Alexander; Austin, Sam M.

    2007-12-01

    We explore the dependence of presupernova evolution and supernova nucleosynthesis yields on the uncertainties in helium-burning reaction rates. Using the revised solar abundances of Lodders for the initial stellar composition, instead of those of Anders and Grevesse, changes the supernova yields and limits the constraints that those yields place on the 12C(α,γ)16O reaction rate. The production factors of medium-weight elements (A=16-40) were found to be in reasonable agreement with observed solar ratios within the current experimental uncertainties in the triple-α reaction rate. Simultaneous variations by the same amount in both reaction rates or in either of them separately, however, can induce significant changes in the central 12C abundance at core carbon ignition and in the mass of the supernova remnant. It therefore remains important to have experimental determinations of the helium-burning rates so that their ratio and absolute values are known with an accuracy of 10% or better.

  12. Determination of the initial exothermic reaction of shredded tyres with wire content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellasie, Kassahun G; Moo-Young, Horace K; Lloyd, Thomas

    2004-10-01

    This paper presents the cause of exothermic reactions in shredded tyre with exposed wire content in shredded tyre piles. Data indicate that the oxidation of exposed steel wires is the exothermic reaction in shredded tyre embankments. This would lead to spontaneous combustion. Reaction of the steel with the sulphur or the carbon black appears not to be the source of the exothermic. Laboratory tests have been conducted to determine the heat transfer properties of the materials that compose tyres (i.e., tyre rubber and wires) by using a hot-plate apparatus. In addition, one-dimensional heat conduction experiments were conducted to compare the flow of heat through the materials while varying the physical and environmental conditions. The physical conditions were the size of tyre shred, water content, and wire contents. An exothermic reaction occurred when exposed wire was present but not when it was absent. A one-dimensional heat transfer equation was developed, and parametric studies were conducted to verify the laboratory model. Exothermic reaction was found to increase linearly with temperature, size and shape of the shredded tyres, density, amount of wire in shredded tyres, and water content.

  13. Determination of the number of radicals in the initial chain reactions by mathematical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejović Branko B.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the fact that the real mechanism in a chemical equation takes places through a certain number of radicals which participate in simultaneous reactions and initiate chain reactions according to a particular pattern, the aim of this study is to determine their number in the first couple of steps of the reaction. Based on this, the numbers of radicals were determined in the general case, in the form of linear difference equations, which, by certain mathematical transformations, were reduced to one equation that satisfies a particular numeric series, entirely defined if its first members are known. The equation obtained was solved by a common method developed in the theory of numeric series, in which its solutions represent the number of radicals in an arbitrary step of the reaction observed, in the analytical form. In the final part of the study, the method was tested and verified using two characteristic examples from general chemistry. The study also gives a suggestion of a more efficient procedure by reducing the difference equation to a lower order.

  14. Reactions to changes in work control: Implications for self-determined and non-self-determined individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Stacey L; Jimmieson, Nerina L; Amiot, Catherine E

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the extent to which individuals' global motivation (self-determined and non-self-determined types) influences adjustment (anxiety, positive reappraisal) and engagement (intrinsic motivation, task performance) in reaction to changes to the level of work control available during a work simulation. Participants (N = 156) completed 2 trials of an inbox activity under conditions of low or high work control-with the ordering of these levels varied to create an increase, decrease, or no change in work control. In support of the hypotheses, results revealed that for more self-determined individuals, high work control led to the increased use of positive reappraisal. Follow-up moderated mediation analyses revealed that the increases in positive reappraisal observed for self-determined individuals in the conditions in which work control was high by Trial 2 consequently increased their intrinsic motivation toward the task. For more non-self-determined individuals, high work control (as well as changes in work control) led to elevated anxiety. Follow-up moderated mediation analyses revealed that the increases in anxiety observed for non-self-determined individuals in the high-to-high work control condition consequently reduced their task performance. It is concluded that adjustment to a demanding work task depends on a fit between individuals' global motivation and the work control available, which has consequences for engagement with demanding work. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Atmospheric reaction of Cl + methacrolein: a theoretical study on the mechanism, and pressure- and temperature-dependent rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cuihong; Xu, Baoen; Zhang, Shaowen

    2014-05-22

    Methacrolein is a major degradation product of isoprene, the reaction of methacrolein with Cl atoms may play some roles in the degradation of isoprene where these species are relatively abundant. However, the energetics and kinetics of this reaction, which govern the reaction branching, are still not well understood so far. In the present study, two-dimensional potential energy surfaces were constructed to analyze the minimum energy path of the barrierless addition process between Cl and the C═C double bond of methacrolein, which reveals that the terminal addition intermediate is directly formed from the addition reaction. The terminal addition intermediate can further yield different products among which the reaction paths abstracting the aldehyde hydrogen atom and the methyl hydrogen atom are dominant reaction exits. The minimum reaction path for the direct aldehydic hydrogen atom abstraction is also obtained. The reaction kinetics was calculated by the variational transition state theory in conjunction with the master equation method. From the theoretical model we predicted that the overall rate constant of the Cl + methacrolein reaction at 297 K and atmospheric pressure is koverall = 2.3× 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), and the branching ratio of the aldehydic hydrogen abstraction is about 12%. The reaction is pressure dependent at P pressure limit at about 100 Torr. The calculated results could well account for the experimental observations.

  16. Fertilization rate and its determinants in intracytoplasmic sperm injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawed, Shireen; Rehman, Rehana; Ali, Mohammad Ashfaq; Abdullah, Umme Hani; Gul, Hina

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify predictors of fertilization rate in patients of unexplained infertility after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Methods: Retrospective analysis of females (282) enrolled in quasi experimental design for ICSI at “Islamabad Clinic Serving Infertile Couples” was carried out from July 2013 till June 2014. Females with unexplained infertility were included, whereas well defined male and female causes of infertility were excluded. Fertilization rate (FR) was calculated as percentage transformation of micro injected oocytes into two pronuclei. Categorical variable of FR defined on the basis of 50% FR grouped females; Group I with FR ≤50% and Group II with FR >50%. The groups were compared in terms of demographic variables, base line hormones and oocyte parameters. Univariate logistic regression was executed to obtain odds ratio with 95% confidence interval to quantify the association of predictors like age, duration of infertility, oocytes parameters, hormones; Estradiol, progesterone, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone, prolactin and cytokines interleukin-Iβ (IL-Iβ) with the FR. Results: In our study out of 282 females, 19 (6.73%) were in group I and 263 (93.26%) comprised of Group II. Females with high FR(group II) had low Progesterone and FSH (p=0.04, p=0.02) respectively. Mature oocytes (OR: 0.35; 95% CI 1 – 2.56) and IL-Iβ in follicular phase (OR: 1.04; 95% CI: 0.000- 1.20) were significant positive predictors of FR while peak progesterone and FSH had significant negative effect on it Conclusion: Fertilization of oocytes in females of unexplained infertility depended on maturity of oocytes and optimal amounts of ILI- β released by developing follicles in the follicular phase of stimulation cycles of ICSI. PMID:27022334

  17. Theoretical study of the mechanism and rate constant of the B + CO2 reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poully, Benjamin; Bergeat, Astrid; Hannachi, Yacine

    2008-09-04

    The different stationary points on the potential energy surface relative to the title reaction have been reinvestigated at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level with relative energies computed at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ optimized geometries and by using the G3B3 composite method. Two entrance channels have been identified. The first one corresponds to boron addition at one of the oxygen atoms of the CO 2 molecule leading to trans-BOCO, which is found to be about 27 kcal/mol exothermic with a potential energy barrier of 16.4 kcal/mol (G3B3). The second channel, which has not been identified in previous theoretical works, corresponds to a direct insertion of the boron atom into a CO bond and leads to OBCO. The B + CO 2 --> OBCO step is found to be about 84 kcal/mol exothermic and needs to overcome a potential energy barrier of only 3.6 kcal/mol (G3B3). The rate constant at 300 K of the insertion step, calculated by using TST theory with G3B3 calculated activation energy value, is 5.4 10 (-14) cm (3) molecule (-1) s (-1), in very good agreement with the experimental data ((7.0 +/- 2.8) 10 (-14) cm (3) molecule (-1) s (-1), DiGiuseppe, T. G.; Davidovits, P. J. Chem. Phys. 1981, 74, 3287). The one corresponding to the addition process is found to be several orders of magnitude smaller because of a much higher potential energy barrier. The addition channel would not contribute to the title reaction even at high temperature. A modified Arrhenius equation has been fitted in the 300-1000 K temperature range, which might be useful for chemical models.

  18. Experimental measurements of low temperature rate coefficients for neutral-neutral reactions of interest for atmospheric chemistry of Titan, Pluto and Triton: reactions of the CN radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Sébastien B; Le Picard, Sébastien D; Canosa, André; Sims, Ian R

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of cyano radical, CN (X2sigma+) with three hydrocarbons, propane (CH3CH2CH3), propene (CH3CH=CH2) and 1-butyne (CH[triple band]CCH2CH3) have been studied over the temperature range of 23-298 K using a CRESU (Cinétique de Réaction en Ecoulement Supersonique Uniforme or Reaction Kinetics in Uniform Supersonic Flow) apparatus combined with the pulsed laser photolysis-laser induced fluorescence technique. These reactions are of interest for the cold atmospheres of Titan, Pluto and Triton, as they might participate in the formation of nitrogen and carbon bearing molecules, including nitriles, that are thought to play an important role in the formation of hazes and biological molecules. All three reactions are rapid with rate coefficients in excess of 10(-10) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) at the lowest temperatures of this study and show behaviour characteristic of barrierless reactions. Temperature dependences, different for each reaction, are compared to those used in the most recent photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere.

  19. Mass loss rate determinations of southern OB stars

    CERN Document Server

    Benaglia, P; Koribalski, B S

    2001-01-01

    A sample of OB stars (eleven Of, one O and one B supergiant) has been surveyed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array at 4.8 and 8.64 GHz with a resolution of 2'' -- 4''. Five stars were detected; three of them have negative spectral indices, consistent with non-thermal emission, and two have positive indices. The thermal radiation from HD 150135 and HD 163181 can be explained as coming from an optically thick ionized stellar wind. The non-thermal radiation from CD-47 4551, HD 124314 and HD 150136 possibly comes from strong shocks in the wind itself and/or in the wind colliding region if the stars have a massive early-type companion. The percentage of non-thermal emitters among detected O stars has increased up to ~50%. The Of star HD 124314 clearly shows flux density variations. Mass loss rates (or upper limits) were derived for all the observed stars and the results compared with non-radio measurements and theoretical predictions.

  20. Temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients for the reaction of C2H4 + HO2 on the C2H4O2H potential energy surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, JunJiang; Xu, JiaQi; Li, ZeRong; Tan, NingXin; Li, XiangYuan

    2015-04-02

    The potential energy surface (PES) for reaction C2H4 + HO2 was examined by using the quantum chemical methods. All rates were determined computationally using the CBS-QB3 composite method combined with conventional transition state theory(TST), variational transition-state theory (VTST) and Rice-Ramsberger-Kassel-Marcus/master-equation (RRKM/ME) theory. The geometries optimization and the vibrational frequency analysis of reactants, transition states, and products were performed at the B3LYP/CBSB7 level. The composite CBS-QB3 method was applied for energy calculations. The major product channel of reaction C2H4 + HO2 is the formation C2H4O2H via an OH(···)π complex with 3.7 kcal/mol binding energy which exhibits negative-temperature dependence. We further investigated the reactions related to this complex, which were ignored in previous studies. Thermochemical properties of the species involved in the reactions were determined using the CBS-QB3 method, and enthalpies of formation of species were compared with literature values. The calculated rate constants are in good agreement with those available from literature and given in modified Arrhenius equation form, which are serviceable in combustion modeling of hydrocarbons. Finally, in order to illustrate the effect for low-temperature ignition of our new rate constants, we have implemented them into the existing mechanisms, which can predict ethylene ignition in a shock tube with better performance.

  1. Measured rates of fluoride/metal association correlate with rates of superoxide/metal reactions for Fe(III)EDTA(H2O)- and related complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Jack S; Baker, Joseph B; Meyerstein, Dan; Mizrahi, Amir; Zilbermann, Israel; Cohen, Haim; Wilson, Christopher M; Jones, Jamie R

    2008-02-06

    The effects of 10 paramagnetic metal complexes (Fe(III)EDTA(H2O)-, Fe(III)EDTA(OH)2-, Fe(III)PDTA-, Fe(III)DTPA2-, Fe(III)2O(TTHA)2-, Fe(III)(CN)6(3-), Mn(II)EDTA(H2O)2-, Mn(II)PDTA2-, Mn(II)beta-EDDADP2-, and Mn(II)PO4(-)) on F- ion 19F NMR transverse relaxation rates (R2 = 1/T2) were studied in aqueous solutions as a function of temperature. Consistent with efficient relaxation requiring formation of a metal/F- bond, only the substitution inert complexes Fe(III)(CN)6(3-) and Fe(III)EDTA(OH)2- had no measured effect on T2 relaxation of the F- 19F resonance. For the remaining eight complexes, kinetic parameters (apparent second-order rate constants and activation enthalpies) for metal/F- association were determined from the dependence of the observed relaxation enhancements on complex concentration and temperature. Apparent metal/F- association rate constants for these complexes (k(app,F-)) spanned 5 orders of magnitude. In addition, we measured the rates at which O2*- reacts with Fe(III)PDTA-, Mn(II)EDTA(H2O)2-, Mn(II)PDTA2-, and Mn(II)beta-EDDADP2- by pulse radiolysis. Although no intermediate is observed during the reduction of Fe(III)PDTA- by O2*-, each of the Mn(II) complexes reacts with formation of a transient intermediate presumed to form via ligand exchange. These reactivity patterns are consistent with literature precedents for similar complexes. With these data, both k(app,O2-) and k(app,F-) are available for each of the eight reactive complexes. A plot of log(k(app,O2-)) versus log(k(app,F-)) for these eight showed a linear correlation with a slope approximately 1. This correlation suggests that rapid metal/O2*- reactions of these complexes occur via an inner-sphere mechanism whereas formation of an intermediate coordination complex limits the overall rate. This hypothesis is also supported by the very low rates at which the substitution inert complexes (Fe(III)(CN)6(3-) and Fe(III)EDTA(OH)2-) are reduced by O2*-. These results suggest that F- 19F NMR

  2. Application of the compensated Arrhenius formalism to explain the dielectric constant dependence of rates for Menschutkin reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrowsky, Matt; Glatzhofer, Daniel T; Frech, Roger

    2013-11-21

    The dependence of the reaction rate on solvent dielectric constant is examined for the reaction of trihexylamine with 1-bromohexane in a series of 2-ketones over the temperature range 25-80 °C. The rate constant data are analyzed using the compensated Arrhenius formalism (CAF), where the rate constant assumes an Arrhenius-like equation that also contains a dielectric constant dependence in the exponential prefactor. The CAF activation energies are substantially higher than those obtained using the simple Arrhenius equation. A master curve of the data is observed by plotting the prefactors against the solvent dielectric constant. The master curve shows that the reaction rate has a weak dependence on dielectric constant for values approximately less than 10 and increases more rapidly for dielectric constant values greater than 10.

  3. Rate of meristem maturation determines inflorescence architecture in tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soon Ju; Jiang, Ke; Schatz, Michael C.; Lippman, Zachary B.

    2012-01-01

    Flower production and crop yields are highly influenced by the architectures of inflorescences. In the compound inflorescences of tomato and related nightshades (Solanaceae), new lateral inflorescence branches develop on the flanks of older branches that have terminated in flowers through a program of plant growth known as “sympodial.” Variability in the number and organization of sympodial branches produces a remarkable array of inflorescence architectures, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying sympodial growth and branching diversity. One hypothesis is that the rate of termination modulates branching. By performing deep sequencing of transcriptomes, we have captured gene expression dynamics from individual shoot meristems in tomato as they gradually transition from a vegetative state to a terminal flower. Surprisingly, we find thousands of age-dependent expression changes, even when there is little change in meristem morphology. From these data, we reveal that meristem maturation is an extremely gradual process defined molecularly by a “meristem maturation clock.” Using hundreds of stage-enriched marker genes that compose this clock, we show that extreme branching, conditioned by loss of expression of the COMPOUND INFLORESCENCE gene, is driven by delaying the maturation of both apical and lateral meristems. In contrast, we find that wild tomato species display a delayed maturation only in apical meristems, which leads to modest branching. Our systems genetics approach reveals that the program for inflorescence branching is initiated surprisingly early during meristem maturation and that evolutionary diversity in inflorescence architecture is modulated by heterochronic shifts in the acquisition of floral fate. PMID:22203998

  4. Generalized Temporal Acceleration Scheme for Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations of Surface Catalytic Processes by Scaling the Rates of Fast Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybeck, Eric Christopher; Plaisance, Craig Patrick; Neurock, Matthew

    2017-02-14

    A novel algorithm has been developed to achieve temporal acceleration during kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations of surface catalytic processes. This algorithm allows for the direct simulation of reaction networks containing kinetic processes occurring on vastly disparate timescales which computationally overburden standard KMC methods. Previously developed methods for temporal acceleration in KMC have been designed for specific systems and often require a priori information from the user such as identifying the fast and slow processes. In the approach presented herein, quasi-equilibrated processes are identified automatically based on previous executions of the forward and reverse reactions. Temporal acceleration is achieved by automatically scaling the intrinsic rate constants of the quasi-equilibrated processes, bringing their rates closer to the timescales of the slow kinetically relevant non-equilibrated processes. All reactions are still simulated directly, although with modified rate constants. Abrupt changes in the underlying dynamics of the reaction network are identified during the simulation and the reaction rate constants are rescaled accordingly. The algorithm has been utilized here to model the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis reaction over ruthenium nanoparticles. This reaction network has multiple timescale-disparate processes which would be intractable to simulate without the aid of temporal acceleration. The accelerated simulations are found to give reaction rates and selectivities indistinguishable from those calculated by an equivalent mean-field kinetic model. The computational savings of the algorithm can span many orders of magnitude in realistic systems and the computational cost is not limited by the magnitude of the timescale disparity in the system processes. Furthermore, the algorithm has been designed in a generic fashion and can easily be applied to other surface catalytic processes of interest.

  5. Validated spectrophotometric methods for determination of sodium valproate based on charge transfer complexation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belal, Tarek S.; El-Kafrawy, Dina S.; Mahrous, Mohamed S.; Abdel-Khalek, Magdi M.; Abo-Gharam, Amira H.

    2016-02-01

    This work presents the development, validation and application of four simple and direct spectrophotometric methods for determination of sodium valproate (VP) through charge transfer complexation reactions. The first method is based on the reaction of the drug with p-chloranilic acid (p-CA) in acetone to give a purple colored product with maximum absorbance at 524 nm. The second method depends on the reaction of VP with dichlone (DC) in dimethylformamide forming a reddish orange product measured at 490 nm. The third method is based upon the interaction of VP and picric acid (PA) in chloroform resulting in the formation of a yellow complex measured at 415 nm. The fourth method involves the formation of a yellow complex peaking at 361 nm upon the reaction of the drug with iodine in chloroform. Experimental conditions affecting the color development were studied and optimized. Stoichiometry of the reactions was determined. The proposed spectrophotometric procedures were effectively validated with respect to linearity, ranges, precision, accuracy, specificity, robustness, detection and quantification limits. Calibration curves of the formed color products with p-CA, DC, PA and iodine showed good linear relationships over the concentration ranges 24-144, 40-200, 2-20 and 1-8 μg/mL respectively. The proposed methods were successfully applied to the assay of sodium valproate in tablets and oral solution dosage forms with good accuracy and precision. Assay results were statistically compared to a reference pharmacopoeial HPLC method where no significant differences were observed between the proposed methods and reference method.

  6. Upper limits for the rate constants of the reactions of CF3O2 and CF3O radicals with ozone at 295 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.J.; Sehested, J.

    1993-01-01

    Using the pulse radiolysis UV absorption technique and subsequent simulations of experimental absorption transients at 254 and 276 nm, upper limits of the rate constants for the reactions of CF3O2 and CF3O radicals with ozone were determined at 295 K, CF3O2+O3-->CF3O+2O2 (4), CF3O+O3-->CF3O2+O2 (......). The upper limits were derived as k4 ozone depletion by hydrofluorocarbons.......Using the pulse radiolysis UV absorption technique and subsequent simulations of experimental absorption transients at 254 and 276 nm, upper limits of the rate constants for the reactions of CF3O2 and CF3O radicals with ozone were determined at 295 K, CF3O2+O3-->CF3O+2O2 (4), CF3O+O3-->CF3O2+O2 (5...

  7. Prediction and validation of burnout curves for Goettelborn char using reaction kinetics determined in shock tube experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moors, J.H.J.; Banin, V.E.; Haas, J.H.P.; Weber, R.; Veefkind, A. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands). Dept. of Applied Physics

    1999-01-01

    Using a shock tube facility the combustion characteristics of pulverised char ({lt} 10 {mu}m) were measured. A prediction was made for the burnout behaviour of a commercial sized char particle (75-90 {mu}m) in different ambient conditions using a `pseudo kinetic` approach. In this approach the kinetic rate of a surface containing micro pores is determined and these `pseudo kinetics` are then applied to the larger particle not taking into account the micro pores. Comparison of the predictions with measurements done with an isothermal plug flow reactor showed this approach to be valid within experimental error for low burnout. A linear decrease of the kinetic reaction rate with burnout is shown to predict the burnout behaviour in the complete range of burnout. A possible explanation for this linear decrease could be a growing fraction of non-combustible material in the char particles during burnout. 11 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Effect of Five-Finger Shoes on Vertical Ground Reaction Force Loading Rates and Perceived Comfort during the Stance Phase of the Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyede Zeynab Hoseini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:  Increased vertical ground reaction force loading rates and lack of comfort footwear in the early stance phase can increase the risk of overuse injuries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Five-finger shoes on vertical ground reaction force loading rate and perceived comfort during the stance phase of running. Methods: 15 male students (aged 24 ± 5/24 years, weight 75/8 ± 4/61 kg, height 178/6 ± 6/64 cm were selected. Subjects were asked to run over a force plate, in control shoe, five finger shoe and barefoot conditions. Loading rate using the slope of the vertical reaction force and perceived comfort were determined using a visual analogue scale. One factor repeated measures ANOVA was used to test the loading rate hypothesis and Paired t-tests was used to test the meaningfulness of perceived comfort (P<0/05. Results: The effect of shoes on loading rate was found to be not significant (P=0.1. However, comfort of control shoes increased by 10. 92% as compared to that of five-finger shoes (P=0.001.  Conclusion: The loading rate of five-finger shoes is the same as that of barefoot during running; however, as subjects did not perceive them as comfortable as regular shoes are five-finger shoes cannot be advised as a desirable choice in exercises.

  9. Rate Coefficients of the Reaction of OH with Allene and Propyne at High Temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Es-Sebbar, Et Touhami

    2016-09-28

    Allene (H2C═C═CH2; a-C3H4) and propyne (CH3C≡CH; p-C3H4) are important species in various chemical environments. In combustion processes, the reactions of hydroxyl radicals with a-C3H4 and p-C3H4 are critical in the overall fuel oxidation system. In this work, rate coefficients of OH radicals with allene (OH + H2C═C═CH2 → products) and propyne (OH + CH3C≡CH → products) were measured behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 843–1352 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. Hydroxyl radicals were generated by rapid thermal decomposition of tert-butyl hydroperoxide ((CH3)3–CO–OH), and monitored by narrow line width laser absorption of the well-characterized R1(5) electronic transition of the OH A–X (0,0) electronic system near 306.7 nm. Results show that allene reacts faster with OH radicals than propyne over the temperature range of this study. Measured rate coefficients can be expressed in Arrhenius form as follows: kallene+OH(T) = 8.51(±0.03) × 10–22T3.05 exp(2215(±3)/T), T = 843–1352 K; kpropyne+OH(T) = 1.30(±0.07) × 10–21T3.01 exp(1140(±6)/T), T = 846–1335 K.

  10. New reaction rates for improved primordial D/H calculation and the cosmic evolution of deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Coc, Alain; Uzan, Jean-Philippe; Vangioni, Elisabeth; Descouvemont, Pierre; Illiadis, Christian; Longland, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Primordial or big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is one of the three historical strong evidences for the big bang model. Standard BBN is now a parameter free theory, since the baryonic density of the Universe has been deduced with an unprecedented precision from observations of the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. There is a good agreement between the primordial abundances of 4He, D, 3He and 7Li deduced from observations and from primordial nucleosynthesis calculations. However, the 7Li calculated abundance is significantly higher than the one deduced from spectroscopic observations and remains an open problem. In addition, recent deuterium observations have drastically reduced the uncertainty on D/H, to reach a value of 1.6%. It needs to be matched by BBN predictions whose precision is now limited by thermonuclear reaction rate uncertainties. This is especially important as many attempts to reconcile Li observations with models lead to an increased D prediction. Here, we re-evalua...

  11. Predicting reaction rate constants of ozone with organic compounds from radical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinliang; Yi, Bing; Wang, Xueye; Chen, Jianfang

    2012-05-01

    The reaction rate constants of ozone with organic compounds in the atmosphere were predicted by a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations, for the first time, were carried out on the radicals from organic compounds, at the UB3LYP level of theory with 6-31G(d) basis set. A set of quantum chemical descriptors calculated from the radicals, the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital of beta spin states (EβHOMO), the molecular average polarizability (α), and the total energy (ET), were used to build the general QSAR model for aliphatic compounds, applying the genetic algorithm (GA) technique and support vector machine (SVM) regression. The root mean square errors (RMSE) are 0.680 for the training set (68 compounds), 0.777 for the validation set (36 compounds) and 0.709 for the test set (35 compounds). Investigated results indicate that the SVM model given here has good predictivity for aliphatic compounds.

  12. Reaction rates, depositional history and sources of indium in sediments from Appalachian and Canadian Shield lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, André; Gobeil, Charles; Laforte, Lucie

    2014-07-01

    Sediment cores were collected at the deepest site of twelve headwater lakes from the Province of Québec, Canada that receive contaminants only from atmospheric deposition, either directly to the lake surface or indirectly from the watershed. Several of the lakes are located within relatively short distance (In2S3(s) do not precipitate in the sediments and that adsorption of In onto sedimentary FeS(s) does not occur. However, similarities in the In and Fe porewater profiles, and the presence of In in the authigenic Fe-rich solids, reveal that part of the In becomes associated with authigenic Fe oxyhydroxides in the perennially oxic lake and is coupled to the Fe redox cycling. Comparison of the In/Corg and In/Fe molar ratios in the authigenic Fe-rich material and in surface sediments (0-0.5 cm) of this lake suggests that most non-lithogenic In was bound to humic substances. From the magnitude of the net In reaction rates, we infer that the post-depositional redistribution of this element is quantitatively not important and that the In sedimentary record represents accurately In deposition at the sampling sites. Reconstructed chronologies of the anthropogenic In deposition and comparison of In inventories among lakes point to non-ferrous metal smelters as a past significant source of atmospheric In contamination and to a significant reduction of industrial In emissions into the North American atmosphere in recent decades.

  13. NMR-based screening method for transglutaminases: rapid analysis of their substrate specificities and reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimba, Nobuhisa; Yokoyama, Kei-ichi; Suzuki, Ei-ichiro

    2002-03-13

    Incorporation of inter- or intramolecular covalent cross-links into food proteins with microbial transglutaminase (MTG) improves the physical and textural properties of many food proteins such as tofu, boiled fish paste, and sausage. Other transglutaminases (TGases) are expected to be used in the same way, and also to extend the scope of industrial applications to materials, drugs, and so on. The TGases have great diversity, not only in amino acid sequence and size, but also in their substrate specificities and catalytic activities, and therefore, it is quite difficult to estimate their reactivity. We have developed an NMR-based method using the enzymatic labeling technique (ELT) for simultaneous analysis of the substrate specificities and reaction rates of TGases. It is quite useful for comparing the existing TGases and for screening new TGases or TGases variants. This method has shown that MTG is superior for industrial use because of its lower substrate specificity compared with those of guinea pig liver transglutaminase (GTG) and red sea bream liver transglutaminase (FTG). We have also found that an MTG variant lacking an N-terminal aspartic acid residue has higher activity than that of the native enzyme.

  14. Determining neutron-capture cross sections via the surrogate reaction technique

    CERN Document Server

    Forssén, C; Escher, J; Hoffman, R D; Kelley, K

    2007-01-01

    Indirect methods play an important role in the determination of nuclear reaction cross sections that are hard to measure directly. In this paper we investigate the feasibility of using the so-called surrogate method to extract neutron-capture cross sections for low energy compound-nuclear reactions in spherical and near-spherical nuclei. We present the surrogate method and develop a statistical nuclear-reaction simulation to explore different approaches to utilize surrogate reaction data. We assess the success of each approach by comparing the extracted cross sections with a predetermined benchmark. In particular, we employ regional systematics of nuclear properties in the 34 <= Z <= 46 region to calculate (n,gamma) cross sections for a series of Zr isotopes, and to simulate a surrogate experiment and the extraction of the desired cross section. We identify one particular approach that may provide very useful estimates of the cross section, and we discuss some of the limitations of the method. General r...

  15. Capture cross-section and rate of the 14C(, )15C reaction from the Coulomb dissociation of 15C

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shubhchintak; Neelam; R Chatterjee

    2014-10-01

    We calculate the Coulomb dissociation of 15C on a Pb target at 68 MeV/u incident beam energy within the fully quantum mechanical distorted wave Born approximation formalism of breakup reactions. The capture cross-section and the subsequent rate of the 14C(, )15C reaction are calculated from the photodisintegration of 15C, using the principle of detailed balance. Our theoretical model is free from the uncertainties associated with the multipole strength distributions of the projectile.

  16. Ab initio and density functional theory evidence on the rate-limiting step in the Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Dipankar; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2007-11-08

    The first ab initio and DFT studies on the mechanism of the MBH reaction show that the rate-limiting step involves an intramolecular proton transfer in the zwitterionic intermediate generated by the addition of enolate to electrophile. The activation barrier for the C-C bond-formation is found to be 20.2 kcal/mol lower than the proton-transfer step for the MBH reaction between methyl vinyl ketone and benzaldehyde catalyzed by DABCO.

  17. Measurement of rate constant for gas-phase reaction of DDVP with OH radical by using LP-FTIR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Pollution caused by organic pesticides has received increasing attention. Until now, studies on organic pesticides pollution are mainly focused on soil and water. For reactions of organic pesticides in gas-phase, there are very little research results reported. Using a long path quartz reactor to simulate the atmospheric reaction of dimethyl_dichloro_vinyl_phosphate(DDVP) with OH radicals, the rate constant for the reaction at room temperature is measured at (3.06±0.46)×10-11 cm3 s-1 with Fourier transform infrared spectrograph.The result indicates that DDVP degrades relatively fast in the atmosphere and is unlikely to cause persistent pollution.

  18. Variational RRKM calculation of thermal rate constant for C–H bond fission reaction of nitro methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Taghva Manesh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work provides quantitative results for the rate constants of unimolecular C–H bond fission reactions in the nitro methane at elevated temperatures up to 2000 K. In fact, there are three different hydrogen atoms in the nitro methane. The potential energy surface for each C–H bond fission reaction of nitro methane was investigated by ab initio calculations. The geometry and vibrational frequencies of the species involved in this process were optimized at the MP2 level of theory, using the cc-pvdz basis set. Since C–H bond fission channel is a barrierless reaction, we have used variational RRKM theory to predict rate coefficients. By means of calculated rate coefficients at different temperatures, the Arrhenius expression of the channel over the temperature range of 100–2000 K is k(T = 5.9E19∗exp(−56274.6/T.

  19. Rate constants for the thermal decomposition of ethanol and its bimolecular reactions with OH and D: reflected shock tube and theoretical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, R; Su, M-C; Michael, J V; Klippenstein, S J; Harding, L B; Ruscic, B

    2010-09-09

    The thermal decomposition of ethanol and its reactions with OH and D have been studied with both shock tube experiments and ab initio transition state theory-based master equation calculations. Dissociation rate constants for ethanol have been measured at high T in reflected shock waves using OH optical absorption and high-sensitivity H-atom ARAS detection. The three dissociation processes that are dominant at high T are C2H5OH--> C2H4+H2O (A) -->CH3+CH2OH (B) -->C2H5+OH (C).The rate coefficient for reaction C was measured directly with high sensitivity at 308 nm using a multipass optical White cell. Meanwhile, H-atom ARAS measurements yield the overall rate coefficient and that for the sum of reactions B and C , since H-atoms are instantaneously formed from the decompositions of CH(2)OH and C(2)H(5) into CH(2)O + H and C(2)H(4) + H, respectively. By difference, rate constants for reaction 1 could be obtained. One potential complication is the scavenging of OH by unreacted ethanol in the OH experiments, and therefore, rate constants for OH+C2H5OH-->products (D)were measured using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBH) as the thermal source for OH. The present experiments can be represented by the Arrhenius expression k=(2.5+/-0.43) x 10(-11) exp(-911+/-191 K/T) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) over the T range 857-1297 K. For completeness, we have also measured the rate coefficient for the reaction of D atoms with ethanol D+C2H5OH-->products (E) whose H analogue is another key reaction in the combustion of ethanol. Over the T range 1054-1359 K, the rate constants from the present experiments can be represented by the Arrhenius expression, k=(3.98+/-0.76) x10(-10) exp(-4494+/-235 K/T) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1). The high-pressure rate coefficients for reactions B and C were studied with variable reaction coordinate transition state theory employing directly determined CASPT2/cc-pvdz interaction energies. Reactions A , D , and E were studied with conventional transition state theory

  20. Determination of free fatty acids and triglycerides by gas chromatography using selective esterification reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kail, Brian W; Link, Dirk D; Morreale, Bryan D

    2012-01-01

    A method for selectively determining both free fatty acids (FFA) and triacylglycerides (TAGs) in biological oils was investigated and optimized using gas chromatography after esterification of the target species to their corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). The method used acid catalyzed esterification in methanolic solutions under conditions of varying severity to achieve complete conversion of more reactive FFAs while preserving the concentration of TAGs. Complete conversion of both free acids and glycerides to corresponding FAMEs was found to require more rigorous reaction conditions involving heating to 120°C for up to 2 h. Method validation was provided using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The method improves on existing methods because it allows the total esterified lipid to be broken down by FAMEs contributed by FFA compared to FAMEs from both FFA and TAGs. Single and mixed-component solutions of pure fatty acids and triglycerides, as well as a sesame oil sample to simulate a complex biological oil, were used to optimize the methodologies. Key parameters that were investigated included: HCl-to-oil ratio, temperature and reaction time. Pure free fatty acids were found to esterify under reasonably mild conditions (10 min at 50°C with a 2.1:1 HCl to fatty acid ratio) with 97.6 ± 2.3% recovery as FAMEs, while triglycerides were largely unaffected under these reaction conditions. The optimized protocol demonstrated that it is possible to use esterification reactions to selectively determine the free acid content, total lipid content, and hence, glyceride content in biological oils. This protocol also allows gas chromatography analysis of FAMEs as a more ideal analyte than glyceride species in their native state.