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Sample records for detector spectrometric properties

  1. Study of natural diamond detector spectrometric properties under neutron irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseyev, A B; Kaschuck, Y; Krasilnikov, A; Portnov, D; Tugarinov, S

    2002-01-01

    Natural diamond detector (NDD) performance was studied up to a neutron fluence of 10 sup 1 sup 5 neutron/cm sup 2. The variations of the NDD spectrometric response to incident alpha-particles from sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am source after exposure to fast neutron fluences up to 3x10 sup 1 sup 6 n/cm sup 2 were examined. No significant variations up to the level of 10 sup 1 sup 4 n/cm sup 2 were observed. Degradation of charge collection efficiency at higher fluences is reported. No remarkable increase of the NDD leakage current and count rate change had been observed up to a neutron fluence of 3x10 sup 1 sup 6 n/cm sup 2. The charge collection efficiency variations of neutron irradiated diamond spectrometer were studied ex situ under gamma-rays, beta-radiation and visible light excitation. Charge collection efficiency restoration up to 75% level and the NDD performance stabilization by extrinsic low-intensity visible light (550 nm

  2. Development of gallium arsenide gamma spectrometric detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Kuru, I.

    1975-03-01

    GaAs semiconductor material has been considered to be a suitable material for gamma-ray spectrometer operating at room temperature since it has a wid-band gap, larger than that of silicon and germanium. The basic objective of this work is to develop a GaAs gamma-ray spectrometric detector which could be used for gamma spectrometric measurement of uranium and plutonium in nuclear fuel safeguards. Liquid phase epitaxial techniques using iron (Fe) as dopant have been developed in making high purity GaAs crystals suitable for gamma-ray spectrometer operating at room temperature. Concentration of Fe in the epitaxial crystal was controlled by initial growth temperature. The best quality epitaxial crystal was obtained under the following conditions: starting temperature is about 800degC, the proportion of Fe to Ga solvent is 1 to 300. Carrier concentration of epitaxial crystals grown distributed in the ranges of 10 12 cm -3 to 10 14 cm -3 at room temperature. The thickness of the crystals ranged from 38 μm to 120 μm. Au-GaAs surface barrier detector was made of epitaxial crystal. Some of the detector were encapsulated in a can with a 50 μm Be window by welding a can to the detector holder. The detector with high energy resolution and good charge collecting characteristics was selected by alpha spectrometry at room temperature. Energy resolution of the detector for gamma-rays up to about 200 keV was very good at room temperature operation. The best energy resolutions taken with a GaAs detector were 3 keV (fwhm) and 3.8 keV for 241 Am 59.6 keV and 57 Co 122 keV, respectively, at room temperature. In order to study the applicability of the detector for nuclear safeguards, the measurements of 235 U gamma-ray spectrum have been carried out at room temperature. It was clarified that the gamma-ray spectrum of enriched U sample could be measured in high resolution with GaAs detector at room temperature, and that the content of 235 U in enriched U sources could be determined by

  3. Improved spectrometric characteristics of thallium bromide nuclear radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hitomi, K; Shoji, T; Suehiro, T; Hiratate, Y

    1999-01-01

    Thallium bromide (TlBr) is a compound semiconductor with a high atomic number and wide band gap. In this study, nuclear radiation detectors have been fabricated from the TlBr crystals. The TlBr crystals were grown by the horizontal travelling molten zone (TMZ) method using the materials purified by many pass zone refining. The crystals were characterized by measuring the resistivity, the mobility-lifetime (mu tau) product and the energy required to create an electron-hole pair (the epsilon value). Improved energy resolution has been obtained by the TlBr radiation detectors. At room temperature the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) for the 59.5, 122 and 662 keV gamma-ray photo peak obtained from the detectors were 3.3, 8.8 and 29.5 keV, respectively. By comparing the saturated peak position of the TlBr detector with that of the CdTe detector, the epsilon value has been estimated to be about 5.85 eV for the TlBr crystal.

  4. Spectrometric properties and radiation damage of BGO crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gen C.; Gasanov, Eldar M.

    1997-07-01

    Spectrometric properties, such as light output, energy resolution BGO crystals before and after (superscript 60)Co gamma-ray (dose 10(superscript 4) - 10(superscript 6) R) and neutron irradiation (fluence 10(superscript 14) cm(superscript -2)) are investigated. Condition for degradation of spectrometric properties and their recovering after irradiation are studied. The energy spectrum of the photons emitted from BGO crystals irradiated with neutron fluence contains the long living background peak which is caused by self-irradiation with radioactive isotopes produced in the crystals. The defect production was studied in crystals under the high dose gamma-irradiation with (superscript 60)Co isotope. It was found that after doses above 10(superscript 8) R the color center at 365 nm and doses higher than 10(superscript 9) R a wide absorption band in the region of 300 - 350 nm occur. Comparison of these results with those of reactor irradiation has shown that under the high dose gamma-irradiation the structure defect production takes place.

  5. Spectrometric properties of crystals for low-energy x-ray diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrus, D.m.; Blake, R.L.; Felthauser, H.; Fenimore, E.E.

    1981-01-01

    Quantitative diagnostics of fusion and astrophysical plasmas require knowledge of crystal spectrometric properties. To provide more reliable and versatile diagnostics of plasma conditions, increasingly accurate knowledge of crystal spectrometric properties is becoming necessary. A summary is presented of the following accurately measured parameters for the crystals KAP, RbAP, TlAP, NH 4 AP, NaAP, ADP, and EDDT: the interplanar spacing of atoms; the angle correction for normal and anomalous dispersion that is required for application of the Bragg formula; the thermal expansion coefficient near room temperature for commonly used planes; and the integrated coefficient of reflection

  6. Basis material decomposition method for material discrimination with a new spectrometric X-ray imaging detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, A.; Gorecki, A.; Potop, A.; Paulus, C.; Verger, L.

    2017-08-01

    Energy sensitive photon counting X-ray detectors provide energy dependent information which can be exploited for material identification. The attenuation of an X-ray beam as a function of energy depends on the effective atomic number Zeff and the density. However, the measured attenuation is degraded by the imperfections of the detector response such as charge sharing or pile-up. These imperfections lead to non-linearities that limit the benefits of energy resolved imaging. This work aims to implement a basis material decomposition method which overcomes these problems. Basis material decomposition is based on the fact that the attenuation of any material or complex object can be accurately reproduced by a combination of equivalent thicknesses of basis materials. Our method is based on a calibration phase to learn the response of the detector for different combinations of thicknesses of the basis materials. The decomposition algorithm finds the thicknesses of basis material whose spectrum is closest to the measurement, using a maximum likelihood criterion assuming a Poisson law distribution of photon counts for each energy bin. The method was used with a ME100 linear array spectrometric X-ray imager to decompose different plastic materials on a Polyethylene and Polyvinyl Chloride base. The resulting equivalent thicknesses were used to estimate the effective atomic number Zeff. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical Zeff, regardless of the plastic sample thickness. The linear behaviour of the equivalent lengths makes it possible to process overlapped materials. Moreover, the method was tested with a 3 materials base by adding gadolinium, whose K-edge is not taken into account by the other two materials. The proposed method has the advantage that it can be used with any number of energy channels, taking full advantage of the high energy resolution of the ME100 detector. Although in principle two channels are sufficient, experimental measurements show

  7. Detector system for in-situ spectrometric analysis of 241Am and Pu in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, J.A.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Phelps, P.L.; Amantrout, G.A.; Sawyer, D.

    1975-01-01

    This system for quantitative analysis of Pu in soil via 241 Am has four 2.5-mm high-purity Ge detectors of 33 cm 2 total detecting surface area. These detectors are paralleled by gating circuitry to avoid the degradation of energy resolution associated with electronic output summing. In field tests the system was approximately three times as sensitive as a 70-cm 3 Ge(Li) detector and approximately an order of magnitude more sensitive than the FIDLER system

  8. Influence of hydrostatic pressure on nuclear radiation detector's properties based on semiconductor alloy CdZnTe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutnij, V.E.; Kutnij, D.V.; Rybka, A.V.; Nakonechnyj, D.V.; Babun, A.V.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure on properties of CdZnTe semiconductor detectors (Cd-50,Zn-2,Te-48 mas.%, 5 centre dot 5 centre dot 2 mm) was investigated. Were considered different types of hydrostatic treatment at 100 MPa, second hydrostatic treatment at 100 MPa and 200 MPa. Hydrostatic pressure influence on detectors electric resistance, J-V characteristics and spectrometric parameters was determined

  9. The Dosepix detector—an energy-resolving photon-counting pixel detector for spectrometric measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Zang, A; Ballabriga, R; Bisello, F; Campbell, M; Celi, J C; Fauler, A; Fiederle, M; Jensch, M; Kochanski, N; Llopart, X; Michel, N; Mollenhauer, U; Ritter, I; Tennert, F; Wölfel, S; Wong, W; Michel, T

    2015-01-01

    The Dosepix detector is a hybrid photon-counting pixel detector based on ideas of the Medipix and Timepix detector family. 1 mm thick cadmium telluride and 300 μm thick silicon were used as sensor material. The pixel matrix of the Dosepix consists of 16 x 16 square pixels with 12 rows of (200 μm)2 and 4 rows of (55 μm)2 sensitive area for the silicon sensor layer and 16 rows of pixels with 220 μm pixel pitch for CdTe. Besides digital energy integration and photon-counting mode, a novel concept of energy binning is included in the pixel electronics, allowing energy-resolved measurements in 16 energy bins within one acquisition. The possibilities of this detector concept range from applications in personal dosimetry and energy-resolved imaging to quality assurance of medical X-ray sources by analysis of the emitted photon spectrum. In this contribution the Dosepix detector, its response to X-rays as well as spectrum measurements with Si and CdTe sensor layer are presented. Furthermore, a first evaluation wa...

  10. Characterization of spectrometric photon-counting X-ray detectors at different pitches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurdit, M.; Brambilla, A.; Moulin, V.; Ouvrier-Buffet, P.; Radisson, P.; Verger, L.

    2017-09-01

    There is growing interest in energy-sensitive photon-counting detectors based on high flux X-ray imaging. Their potential applications include medical imaging, non-destructive testing and security. Innovative detectors of this type will need to count individual photons and sort them into selected energy bins, at several million counts per second and per mm2. Cd(Zn)Te detector grade materials with a thickness of 1.5 to 3 mm and pitches from 800 μm down to 200 μm were assembled onto interposer boards. These devices were tested using in-house-developed full-digital fast readout electronics. The 16-channel demonstrators, with 256 energy bins, were experimentally characterized by determining spectral resolution, count rate, and charge sharing, which becomes challenging at low pitch. Charge sharing correction was found to efficiently correct X-ray spectra up to 40 × 106 incident photons.s-1.mm-2.

  11. Spectrometric techniques 4

    CERN Document Server

    Vanasse, George A

    2013-01-01

    Spectrometric Techniques, Volume IV discusses three widely diversified areas of spectrometric techniques. The book focuses on three spectrometric methods. Chapter 1 discusses the phenomenology and applications of Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS), the most commonly used optical technique that exploit the Raman effect. The second chapter is concerned with diffraction gratings and mountings for the Vacuum Ultraviolet Spectral Region. Chapter 3 accounts the uses of mass spectrometry, detectors, types of spectrometers, and ion sources. Physicists and chemists will find the book a go

  12. Characterization of spectrometric photon-counting X-ray detectors at different pitches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurdit, M.; Moulin, V.; Ouvrier-Buffet, P.; Verger, L.; Brambilla, A.; Radisson, P.

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in energy-sensitive photon-counting detectors based on high flux X-ray imaging. Their potential applications include medical imaging, non-destructive testing and security. Innovative detectors of this type will need to count individual photons and sort them into selected energy bins, at several million counts per second and per mm 2 . Cd(Zn)Te detector grade materials with a thickness of 1.5 to 3 mm and pitches from 800 μm down to 200 μm were assembled onto interposer boards. These devices were tested using in-house-developed full-digital fast readout electronics. The 16-channel demonstrators, with 256 energy bins, were experimentally characterized by determining spectral resolution, count rate, and charge sharing, which becomes challenging at low pitch. Charge sharing correction was found to efficiently correct X-ray spectra up to 40 × 10 6 incident photons.s −1 .mm −2 .

  13. Property of the diamond radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sochor, V.; Cechak, T.; Sopko, B.

    2008-01-01

    The outstanding properties of diamond, such as radiation hardness, high carrier mobility, high band gap and breakdown field, distinguish it as a good candidate for radiation detectors. In the dosimetry for radiotherapy is permanently searched the detector with high sensitivity, high stability, linear dependence of the response, small size, tissue equivalent material and fast response, for the measuring of the temporal and space variations of the dose. The diamond detector properties as high sensitivity, good spatial and temporal resolution, low Leakage currents, low capacitance, possibility to fabricate robust and compact device and high temperature operation make it possible to use these detectors in many fields from high energy physics till radiation monitoring, from Medical therapy dosimetry till synchrotron radiation measurement. (authors)

  14. Properties of silver chloride track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriev, V.D.; Kocherov, N.P.; Novikova, N.R.; Perfilov, N.A.

    1976-01-01

    The experiments on preparation of silver chloride track detectors and their properties are described. The results of X-ray structural analysis and data on sensitivity to charged particles and actinic light of silver chloride crystals, doped with several elements, are presented. (orig.) [de

  15. A spectrometer using semi-conductor detectors; study and applications (1963); Spectrometre utilisant les detecteurs a semi-conducteur: etudes et applications (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roux, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The low average energy, 2.5 to 3.5 eV, required to produce one hole-electron pair in a semiconductor allows an accurate measurement of the energy of the ionizing particles. A high resolution spectrometer has been built using semiconductor detectors. The limit of resolution, due to electronics associated to the detector, to the detector itself and to the source of particles is studied here. The present practical limit of resolution of the spectrometer is 1700 elementary electric charges (full width at half maximum of a ray of a spectrum) or 6 keV in terms of energy lost by a particle in a silicon detector. The physical resolution usually obtained is 20 keV (0.33 per cent) with {alpha} particles of the {sup 212}Bi (6.087 MeV). It depends a lot of the kind of detector used. Some results, concerning the background of the detectors and limit of measurements for low energies are given. Various applications are presented: spectrometry {beta}, spectrometry {gamma} and X, spectrometry of mixtures of {alpha} radioactive elements, collection of {alpha} spectra. (author) [French] La faible energie moyenne, 2,5 a 3,5 eV, necessaire pour produire une paire electron-trou dans un semi-conducteur, permet une mesure precise de l'energie des particules ionisantes. Un spectrometre a haute resolution a ete construit utilisant des detecteurs a semi-conducteur. La limitation en resolution due a l'electronique associee au detecteur, au detecteur lui-meme et a la source de particules, est etudiee. La resolution pratique limite actuelle du spectrometre est 1700 charges electriques elementaires (largeur a mi-hauteur d'une raie de spectre) ou 6 keV exprimee en energie perdue par une particule dans un detecteur au silicium. La resolution physique couramment obtenue est de 20 keV (0,33 pour cent) pour les particules {alpha} du bismuth 212 (6,087 MeV). Elle depend beaucoup du detecteur utilise. Quelques resultats sont donnes concernant le mouvement propre des detecteurs et la limitation des

  16. Characterization of HPGe gamma spectrometric detectors systems for Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) at the Colombian Geological Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, O., E-mail: osierra@sgc.gov.co; Parrado, G., E-mail: gparrado@sgc.gov.co; Cañón, Y.; Porras, A.; Alonso, D.; Herrera, D. C.; Peña, M., E-mail: mlpena@sgc.gov.co; Orozco, J. [Colombian Geological Survey, Nuclear Affairs Technical Division, Neutron Activation Analysis Laboratory, Bogota D. C. (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    This paper presents the progress made by the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) laboratory at the Colombian Geological Survey (SGC in its Spanish acronym), towards the characterization of its gamma spectrometric systems for Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA), with the aim of introducing corrections to the measurements by variations in sample geometry. Characterization includes the empirical determination of the interaction point of gamma radiation inside the Germanium crystal, through the application of a linear model and the use of a fast Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) software to estimate correction factors for differences in counting efficiency that arise from variations in sample density between samples and standards.

  17. Rational utilisation of a spectrometer detector for leaks; Utilisation rationnelle d'un spectrometre detecteur de fuites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geller, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay(France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1954-07-01

    In this following article, we expose the general problem of the leakage in a vacuum installation. We consider the principles of the detection in general and study especially the conditions of detection by an helium spectrometer. We deduce practical conclusions as for the branching of this last and to its application in the most current cases. (author) [French] Dans l'article qui suit, nous exposons le probleme general des fuites dans une installation a vide. Nous y envisageons les principes de la detection en general et etudions particulierement les conditions de detection par spectrometre a helium. Noue tirons des conclusions pratiques quant au branchement de ce dernier et a son application dans les cas les plus courants. (auteur)

  18. New medical imaging systems exploiting the energy dispersive X-ray diffraction with spectrometric CdZnTe based detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbes, Damien

    2016-01-01

    This thesis studies the interest of measuring the coherent scattering of X-rays for breast diagnosis imaging. Nowadays, most of X-ray-based medical imaging techniques use the information of X-rays attenuation through the tissues. It is the case for mammography, the most common breast imaging modality. The recent emergence of energy resolved detectors (based on semiconductors in particular) allows to consider using another phenomenon: the coherent X-ray scattering. Measurement of diffracted spectra can provide new information related to the molecular structure of the examined tissues, in order to improve their characterization and therefore improve the final diagnosis. Two modalities are considered: the breast cancer detection in vivo, following a suspicious mammography result, or biopsy analysis. The coherent scattering measurement system developed during this thesis work uses energy-resolved CdZnTe-based detectors, these detectors combining performances (energy resolution, sensitivity, spatial resolution, and compactness) promising for clinical application. This system is also based on the detector pixelation, which allows to provide an imaging modality capable of characterizing analyzed materials or tissues in one direction without any translation or rotation. A complete study of the measurement system is proposed in this thesis, structured in three main parts: modeling and simulation of the system, development of the processing of the data measured by the detector in order to image and characterize the analyzed sample and finally, designing of a new and more complex experimental setup based on a whole detector and multi-slit collimation system. An experimental validation is proposed for each of these three parts. (author) [fr

  19. Measurement stand for diagnosis of semiconductor detectors based on IBM PC/XT computer (4-way spectrometric analysis of pulses)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruszecki, M.

    1990-01-01

    The technical assumptions and partial realization of our technological stand for quality inspection of semiconductor detectors for ionizing radiation manufactured in the INP in Cracow are described. To increase the efficiency of the measurements simultaneous checking of 4 semiconductor chips or finished products is suggested. In order to justify this measurement technique a review of possible variants of the measurement apparatus is presented for the systems consisting of home made units. Comparative parameters for the component modules and for complete measuring systems are given. The construction and operation of data acquisition system based on IBM PC/XT are described. The system ensures simultaneous registration of pulses obtained from 4 detectors with maximal rate of up to 500 x 10 3 pulses/s. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs. (author)

  20. Gamma spectrometric characterization of short cooling time nuclear spent fuels using hemispheric CdZnTe detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, A; Szabó, J L; Arenas-Carrasco, J; Arlt, R; Dubreuil, A; Esmailpur-Kazerouni, K

    2000-01-01

    After years of cooling, nuclear spent fuel gamma emissions are mainly due to caesium isotopes which are emitters at 605, 662 and 796-801 keV. Extensive work has been done on such fuels using various CdTe or CdZnTe probes. When fuels have to be measured after short cooling time (during NPP outage) the spectrum is much more complex due to the important contributions of niobium and zirconium in the 700 keV range. For the first time in a nuclear power plant, four spent fuels of the Kozloduy VVER reactor no 4 were measured during outage, 37 days after shutdown of the reactor. In such conditions, good resolution is of particular interest, so a 20 mm sup 3 hemispheric crystal was used with a resolution better than 7 keV at 662 keV. This paper presents the experimental device and analyzes the results which show that CdZnTe commercially available detectors enabled us to perform a semi-quantitative determination of the burn-up after a short cooling time. In addition, it is discussed how a burn-up evolution code (CESAR)...

  1. Mass spectrometric determination of the thermodynamic excess properties of ternary Fe-Co-Cr melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Harald; Tomiska, Josef

    2004-01-01

    Computer-aided Knudsen cell mass spectrometry is used for the thermodynamic investigations on ternary Fe-Co-Cr melts over the entire range of composition. The thermodynamic mixing behavior has been determined by means of the 'digital intensity-ratio' (DIR) method. The ternary thermodynamically adapted power (TAP) series concept is used for the algebraic representation of the molar excess properties. The corresponding TAP parameters, and the values of the molar excess quantities Z E (T, x) (Z is the Gibbs energy G, heat of mixing H, entropy S) as well as the thermodynamic activities of all three constituents at 1950 K are presented

  2. Timing properties of a time-of-flight detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Takahide; Yuasa-Nakagawa, Keiko.

    1989-01-01

    The time resolution of a time-of-flight (T.O.F.) detector which consists of a channel plate detector (CPD) with a central hole and a surface barrier detector (SBD) was measured. A time resolution of 80 psec fwhm was obtained for 8.78 MeV alpha particles. The influence on fast timing of the SBD of alpha particles was carefully studied. The plasma delay time and time resolution of the SBD were found to strongly depend on the electric field strength and properties of the SBD. (author)

  3. Mass spectrometric analysis and aerodynamic properties of various types of combustion-related aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J.; Weimer, S.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Helas, G.; Gwaze, P.; Schmid, O.; Andreae, M. O.; Kirchner, U.

    2006-12-01

    Various types of combustion-related particles in the size range between 100 and 850 nm were analyzed with an aerosol mass spectrometer and a differential mobility analyzer. The measurements were performed with particles originating from biomass burning, diesel engine exhaust, laboratory combustion of diesel fuel and gasoline, as well as from spark soot generation. Physical and morphological parameters like fractal dimension, effective density, bulk density and dynamic shape factor were derived or at least approximated from the measurements of electrical mobility diameter and vacuum aerodynamic diameter. The relative intensities of the mass peaks in the mass spectra obtained from particles generated by a commercial diesel passenger car, by diesel combustion in a laboratory burner, and by evaporating and re-condensing lubrication oil were found to be very similar. The mass spectra from biomass burning particles show signatures identified as organic compounds like levoglucosan but also others which are yet unidentified. The aerodynamic behavior yielded a fractal dimension (Df) of 2.09 +/- 0.06 for biomass burning particles from the combustion of dry beech sticks, but showed values around three, and hence more compact particle morphologies, for particles from combustion of more natural oak. Scanning electron microscope images confirmed the finding that the beech combustion particles were fractal-like aggregates, while the oak combustion particles displayed a much more compact shape. For particles from laboratory combusted diesel fuel, a Df value of 2.35 was found, for spark soot particles, Df [approximate] 2.10. The aerodynamic properties of fractal-like particles from dry beech wood combustion indicate an aerodynamic shape factor [chi] that increases with electrical mobility diameter, and a bulk density of 1.92 g cm-3. An upper limit of [chi] [approximate] 1.2 was inferred for the shape factor of the more compact particles from oak combustion.

  4. NZG 201 portable spectrometric unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jursa, P.; Novakova, O.; Slezak, V.

    The NZG 201 spectrometric unit is a portable single-channel processing unit supplied from the mains or a battery which allows the qualitative and quantitative measurement of different types of ionizing radiation when connected to a suitable detection unit. The circuit layout and the choice of control elements makes the spectrometric unit suitable for use with scintillation detector units. The spectrometric unit consists of a pulse amplifier, an amplitude pulse analyzer, a pulse counter, a pulse rate counter with an output for a recorder, a high voltage source and a low voltage source. The block diagram is given. All circuits are modular and are mounted on PCB's. The apparatus is built in a steel cabinet with a raised edge which protects the control elements. The linear pulse amplifier has a maximum gain of 1024, the pulse counter has a maximum capacity of 10 6 -1 imp and time resolution better than 0.5 μs. The temperature interval at which the apparatus is operational is 0 to 45 degC, its weight is 12.5 kg and dimensions 36x280x310 mm, energy range O.025 to 2.5 MeV, for 137 Cs the energy resolution is 8 to 10%. The spectrometric unit NZG 2O1 may, with regard to its parameters, number and range of control elements, be used as a universal measuring unit. (J.P.)

  5. Properties of GaAs:Cr-based Timepix detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolyanskiy, P.; Bergmann, B.; Chelkov, G.; Kotov, S.; Kruchonak, U.; Kozhevnikov, D.; Mora Sierra, Y.; Stekl, I.; Zhemchugov, A.

    2018-02-01

    The hybrid pixel detector technology brought to the X-ray imaging a low noise level at a high spatial resolution, thanks to the single photon counting. However, silicon as the most widespread detector material is marginally sensitive to photons with energies above 30 keV. Therefore, the high-Z alternatives to silicon such as gallium arsenide and cadmium telluride are increasingly attracting attention of the community for the development of X-ray imaging systems. The results of our investigations of the Timepix detectors bump bonded to sensors made of gallium arsenide compensated by chromium (GaAs:Cr) are presented in this work. The following properties are most important from the practical point of view: the IV characteristics, the charge transport characteristics, photon detection efficiency, operational stability, homogeneity, temperature dependence, as well as energy and spatial resolution are considered. The applicability of these detectors for spectroscopic X-ray imaging is discussed.

  6. Thermal Properties of the Silicon Microstrip Endcap Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Feld, Lutz; Hammarström, R

    1998-01-01

    Irradiated silicon detectors must be cooled in order to guarantee stable short and long term operation. Using the SiF1 milestone prototype we have performed a detailed analysis of the thermal properties of the silicon microstrip endcap detector. The strongest constraint on the cooling system is shown to be set by the need to avoid thermal runaway of the silicon detectors. We show that, taking into account the radiation damage to the silicon after 10 years of LHC operation and including some safety margin, the detector will need a cooling fluid temperature of around -20 C. The highest temperature on the silicon will then be in the range -15 C to -10 C. This sets an upper limit on the ambient temperature in the tracker volume.

  7. A study of the thermoluminescent properties of CVD diamond detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marczewska, B.; Bilski, P.; Olko, P.; Rebisz, M.; Nesladek, M.; Waligorski, M.P.R.

    2002-01-01

    A batch of 20 diamond detectors obtained by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method at the Institute for Materials Research at the Limburg University, Belgium, was investigated with respect to their thermoluminescent (TL) properties. The investigated detectors demonstrate TL sensitivity similar to that of the standard LiF:Mg, Ti (MTS) thermoluminescent detectors, lack of fading after two weeks from irradiation and apparent linearity of dose response. In spite of the persistent fluctuation of individual detector sensitivity observed in this batch, a new annealing procedure improved the stability of the TL signal. It has been concluded that 1 h annealing at 350 C assures the highest reproducibility for this set of detectors. A 30% discrepancy of the value of the TL signal between individual detectors from the batch may be caused by non-uniform distribution of dopants in the volume of the CVD diamond. A prototype of a planar TL reader equipped with a CCD camera was employed in this investigation. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Charge Transfer Properties Through Graphene for Applications in Gaseous Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Franchino, S.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Jackman, R.B.; Muller, H.; Nguyen, T.T.; de Oliveira, R.; Oliveri, E.; Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Ropelewski, L.; Smith, J.; van Stenis, M.; Streli, C.; Thuiner, P.; Veenhof, R.

    2016-07-11

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical and electrical properties. Regarded as the thinnest and narrowest conductive mesh, it has drastically different transmission behaviours when bombarded with electrons and ions in vacuum. This property, if confirmed in gas, may be a definitive solution for the ion back-flow problem in gaseous detectors. In order to ascertain this aspect, graphene layers of dimensions of about 2x2cm$^2$, grown on a copper substrate, are transferred onto a flat metal surface with holes, so that the graphene layer is freely suspended. The graphene and the support are installed into a gaseous detector equipped with a triple Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM), and the transparency properties to electrons and ions are studied in gas as a function of the electric fields. The techniques to produce the graphene samples are described, and we report on preliminary tests of graphene-coated GEMs.

  9. Change in detector properties caused by electronegative impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deptuch, M.; Kowalski, T.Z.; Mindur, B.

    2006-01-01

    Detector properties (energy resolution, gas gain, drift-time measurements) depend quite critically on the concentration of impurities. The most frequent impurities in the working gas are water vapour and oxygen. Systematic measurements of the detector properties as a function of both H 2 O vapour and O 2 concentration have been made. Ar/CO 2 (80/20) and Ar/CO 2 /CF 4 (70/10/20) have been selected as the working gases. The first mixture is commonly used, the second one is very promising due to its fastness. The concentration of H 2 O vapour and O 2 was varied from 0% to 1.9% and 3%, respectively

  10. Charge Transfer Properties Through Graphene Layers in Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Thuiner, P.; Jackman, R.B.; Müller, H.; Nguyen, T.T.; Oliveri, E.; Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Ropelewski, L.; Smith, J.A.; van Stenis, M.; Veenhof, R.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical, electrical and optical properties. For the first time graphene layers suspended on copper meshes were installed into a gas detector equipped with a gaseous electron multiplier. Measurements of low energy electron and ion transfer through graphene were conducted. In this paper we describe the sample preparation for suspended graphene layers, the testing procedures and we discuss the preliminary results followed by a prospect of further applications.

  11. Study on dosimetric properties of radiophotoluminescent glass rod detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rah, Jeong Eun; Hong, Ju Young; Suh, Tea Suk [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong Oh [Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Sun [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chun Il; Jeong, Hee Gyo [Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    A radiophotoluminescent Glass Rod Detector (GRD) system has recently become commercially available. We investigate the dosimetric properties of the GRD regarding the reproducibility of signal, dose linearity and energy dependence. The reproducibility of five measurements for 50 GRDs is presented by an average of one standard deviation of each GRD and it is {+-}1.2%. It is found to be linear in response to doses of {sup 60}Co beam in the range 0.5 to 50 Gy with a coefficient of linearity of 0.9998. The energy dependence of the GRD is determined by comparing the dose obtained using cylindrical chamber to that by using the GRD. The GRD response for each beam is normalized to the response for a {sup 60}Co beam. The responses for 6 and 15 MV x-ray beams are within {+-}1.5% (1SD). The energy response of GRD for high-energy photon is almost the same as the energy dependence of LiF:Mg:Ti (TLD-100) and shows little energy dependence unlike p-type silicon diode detector. The GRDs have advantages over other detectors such diode detector, and TLD: linearity, reproducibility and energy dependency. It has been verified to be an effective device for small field dosimetry for stereotactic radiosurgery.

  12. Top quark properties and mass measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Moreno Llacer, Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    ID# 104 Top quark properties and mass measurements with the ATLAS detector The top quark is unique among the known quarks in that it decays before it has an opportunity to form hadronic bound states. This makes measurements of its properties particularly interesting as one can access directly the properties of a bare quark. The latest measurements of these properties with the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented using 8 TeV and 13 TeV data. Measurements of top quark spin observables in top-antitop events, each sensitive to a different coefficient of the spin density matrix, are presented and compared to the Standard Model predictions. The helicity of the W boson from the top decays and the production angles of the top quark are further discussed. Limits on the rate of flavour changing neutral currents in the production or decay of the top quark are reported. The production of top-quark pairs in association with W and Z bosons is also presented. The measurement probes the coupling between the top quark and ...

  13. Crosstalk properties of 36-fold segmented symmetric hexagonal HPGe detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruyneel, Bart; Reiter, Peter; Wiens, Andreas; Eberth, Juergen; Hess, Herbert; Pascovici, Gheorghe; Warr, Nigel; Weisshaar, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Crosstalk properties of three 36-fold segmented, symmetric, large volume, HPGe detectors from the AGATA Collaboration were deduced from coincidence measurements performed with digitized segment and core signals after interaction of γ rays with energies of 1.33 MeV. The mean energy values measured by the core signal fluctuate for γ-ray interactions with energy deposited in two segments. A regular pattern is observed depending on the hit segment combinations. The core energy shifts deviate 0.03-0.06% from the average energy calibration. The segment-sum energy is reduced with respect to the core energy as a function of the decoupling capacitance and the segment multiplicity. The deviation of the segment-sum energies from multiplicity two events fluctuates within an interval of less than 0.1% depending on the different segment combinations. The energy shifts caused by crosstalk for the core and segment signals are comparable for all three detectors. A linear electronic model of the detector and preamplifier assembly was developed to evaluate the results. The fold-dependent energy shifts of the segment-sum energies are reproduced. The model yields a constant shift in all segments, proportional to the core signal. The measured crosstalk pattern and its intensity variation in the segments agree well with the calculated values. The regular variation observed in the core energies cannot be directly related to crosstalk and may be caused by other effects like electron trapping.

  14. Radiation damage in silicon. Defect analysis and detector properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoenniger, F.

    2008-01-01

    describe the radiation induced changes in macrsocopic detector properties as affected by the microscopic defect generation. Finally charge collection measurements have been performed at high radiation doses. (orig.)

  15. Radiation damage in silicon. Defect analysis and detector properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenniger, F.

    2008-01-15

    acceptor, a model has been introduced to describe the radiation induced changes in macrsocopic detector properties as affected by the microscopic defect generation. Finally charge collection measurements have been performed at high radiation doses. (orig.)

  16. Calculation of critical level value for radioactivity detection in gamma spectrometric analysis on the base of semiconductor detectors under the Chernobyl' conditions in 1986-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazunov, V.O.; Rusyaev, R.V.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of determination of radioactivity critical level in a sample by means of gamma spectrometer with semiconductor detector is studied theoretically. The formula for critical level, which shows that it is necessary to know the background pulse counting rate in order to determine the minimum gamma photon pulse counting rates, is derived. Calculations of critical level for the Chernobyl' conditions in time period from October 1986 till July 1987 are made. 8 refs.; 7 figs.; 17 tabs

  17. Spectral and spatial resolution properties of photon counting X-ray detectors like the Medipix-Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korn, A.

    2007-01-01

    resolutions. The simulations using the augmented ROSI program allow a perfect reproduction of the measurements. The phenomenon of the low frequency drop, known from previous measurements of the Medipix detector's MTF, can be explained with backscattering inside the detector. For the development of the next generation of detectors, Medipix3, it's prospective properties were implemented into the simulations. In comparison to Medipix2, a significant amelioration of the energy resolution may be expected. Beyond this, a method was developed permitting to maintain the high spatial resolution of Medipix2 with Medipix3. (orig.)

  18. Top quark mass and properties measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Moreno Llacer, Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest elementary particle and unique among the known quarks since it decays before forming hadronic bound states. This makes measurements of its properties particularly interesting as one can access directly the properties of a bare quark. The latest measurements of these properties with the ATLAS detector are reported using 8 TeV and 13 TeV data of proton-proton collisions from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN laboratory. Measurements of the top quark decay width, top quark spin observables and $W$ boson helicity in events with top quark pairs ($t\\bar{t}$) are presented and compared to the Standard Model predictions. The cross-section measurements of top quark pairs production in association with photons, $Z$ or $W$ bosons is also presented and compared to the most accurate theoretical calculations. These measurements probe the top quark electroweak couplings. Limits on the rate of flavour changing neutral currents in the production or decay of the top quark are also reported. In add...

  19. Top quark properties and mass measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Tomas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The top quark is unique among the known quarks in that it decays before it has an opportunity to form hadronic bound states. This makes measurements of its properties particularly interesting as one can access directly the properties of a bare quark. The latest measurements of these properties with the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. Measurements of top quark spin observables in top-antitop events, each sensitive to a different coefficient of the spin density matrix, are presented and compared to the Standard Model predictions. The helicity of the W boson from the top decays and the production angles of the top quark are further discussed. Limits on the rate of flavour changing neutral currents in the production or decay of the top quark are reported. The production of top-quark pairs in association with W and Z bosons is also presented. The measurement probes the coupling between the top quark and the Z boson. The cross-section measurement of photons produced in association with top-quark pairs is a...

  20. Applying a low energy HPGe detector gamma ray spectrometric technique for the evaluation of Pu/Am ratio in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, I S; Mishra, Lokpati; Yadav, J R; Nadar, M Y; Rao, D D; Pradeepkumar, K S

    2015-10-01

    The estimation of Pu/(241)Am ratio in the biological samples is an important input for the assessment of internal dose received by the workers. The radiochemical separation of Pu isotopes and (241)Am in a sample followed by alpha spectrometry is a widely used technique for the determination of Pu/(241)Am ratio. However, this method is time consuming and many times quick estimation is required. In this work, Pu/(241)Am ratio in the biological sample was estimated with HPGe detector based measurements using gamma/X-rays emitted by these radionuclides. These results were compared with those obtained from alpha spectroscopy of sample after radiochemical analysis and found to be in good agreement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. HP Ge planar detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gornov, M.G.; Gurov, Yu.B.; Soldatov, A.M.; Osipenko, B.P.; Yurkowski, J.; Podkopaev, O.I.

    1989-01-01

    Parameters of planar detectors manufactured of HP Ge are presented. The possibilities to use multilayer spectrometers on the base of such semiconductor detectors for nuclear physics experiments are discussed. It is shown that the obtained detectors including high square ones have spectrometrical characteristics close to limiting possible values. 9 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  2. Spectrometric techniques 3

    CERN Document Server

    Vanasse, George A

    2013-01-01

    Spectrometric Techniques, Volume III presents the applications of spectrometric techniques to atmospheric and space studies. This book reviews the spectral data processing and analysis techniques that are of broad applicability.Organized into five chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the instrumentation used for obtaining field data. This text then reviews the contribution that space-borne spectroscopy in the thermal IR has made to the understanding of the planets. Other chapters consider the instruments that have recorded the planetary emission spectra. This book discusses as well

  3. Effect of radiation on the electrical properties of plastic detector CR-39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, S.A.; Hamed, A.E.; Abou El-Kier, A.A.; Mousse, M.G.; Kassem, M.E.; El-Shafey, E.M.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of high alpha-particle fluence on plastic detector CR-39 was studied by measuring the electrical properties of the detector as a function of irradiation dose and frequency using an impedance meter in the frequency range 0.005-500 kHz. When the plastic detector CR-39 is exposed to high irradiation doses, it loses its advantage as a track detector, because of the overlapping of the tracks occurring in the detector at high irradiation fluence. Through the present measurements of dielectric permittivity and conductivity at different frequencies and temperatures, CR-39 could be used as a dosimeter for high irradiation doses

  4. Effect of radiation on the electrical properties of plastic detector CR-39

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, S.A.; Hamed, A.E.; Abou El-Kier, A.A.; Mousse, M.G.; Kassem, M.E.; El-Shafey, E.M. (Physics Department Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt))

    1994-10-15

    The effect of high alpha-particle fluence on plastic detector CR-39 was studied by measuring the electrical properties of the detector as a function of irradiation dose and frequency using an impedance meter in the frequency range 0.005-500 kHz. When the plastic detector CR-39 is exposed to high irradiation doses, it loses its advantage as a track detector, because of the overlapping of the tracks occurring in the detector at high irradiation fluence. Through the present measurements of dielectric permittivity and conductivity at different frequencies and temperatures, CR-39 could be used as a dosimeter for high irradiation doses.

  5. Marine gamma spectrometric survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostoglodov, V.V.

    1979-01-01

    Presented are theoretical problems physical and geochemical prerequisites and possibilities of practical application of the method of continuous submarine gamma-spectrometric survey and radiometric survey destined for rapid study of the surface layer of marine sediments. Shown is high efficiency and advantages of this method in comparison with traditional and widely spread in marine geology methods of bottom sediments investigation

  6. Mobile spectrometric laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isajenko, K.A.; Lipinski, P.

    2002-01-01

    The article presents the Mobile Spectrometric Laboratory used by Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection since year 2000. The equipment installed in the Mobile Laboratory and its uses is described. The results of international exercises and intercalibrations, in which the Laboratory participated are presented. (author)

  7. Mass spectrometric study of thermodynamic properties of gaseous lead tellurates. Estimation of formation enthalpies of gaseous lead polonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shugurov, S.M., E-mail: s.shugurov@spbu.ru; Panin, A.I.; Lopatin, S.I.; Emelyanova, K.A.

    2016-10-15

    Gaseous reactions involving lead oxides, tellurium oxide and lead tellurates were studied by the Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry. Equilibrium constants and reaction enthalpies were evaluated. Structures, molecular parameters and thermodynamic functions of gaseous PbTeO{sub 3} and Pb{sub 2}TeO{sub 4} were calculated by quantum chemistry methods. The formation enthalpies Δ{sub f}H{sup 0} (298.15) = −294 ± 13 for gaseous PbTeO{sub 3} and Δ{sub f}H{sup 0} (298.15) = −499 ± 12 for gaseous Pb{sub 2}TeO{sub 4} were obtained. On the base of these results the formation enthalpies of gaseous PbPoO{sub 3} and Pb{sub 2}PoO{sub 4} were estimated as −249 ± 34 and −478 ± 38, respectively. - Highlights: • Gaseous lead tellurates PbTeO{sub 3}, Pb{sub 2}TeO{sub 4} were discovered. • Their thermodynamic properties were studied using both high temperature mass spectrometry and quantum chemistry computations. • The obtained data allows to predict the formation enthalpies of gaseous lead polonates PbPoO{sub 3}, Pb{sub 2}PoO{sub 4}.

  8. Single-laboratory validation of a high-performance liquid chromatographic-diode array detector-fluorescence detector/mass spectrometric method for simultaneous determination of water-soluble vitamins in multivitamin dietary tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei; Atkinson, Renata; Wolf, Wayne R

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a single-laboratory validated (SLV) method using high-performance liquid chromatography with different detectors [diode array detector (DAD); fluorescence detector (FLD); and mass spectrometry (MS)] for determination of 7 B-complex vitamins (B1-thiamin, B2-riboflavin, B3-nicotinamide, B6-pyridoxine, B9-folic acid, pantothenic acid, and biotin) and vitamin C in multivitamin/multimineral dietary supplements. The method involves the use of a reversed-phase octadecylsilyl column (4 microm, 250 x 2.0 mm id) and a gradient mobile phase profile. Gradient elution was performed at a flow rate of 0.25 mL/min. After a 5 min isocratic elution at 100% A (0.1% formic acid in water), a linear gradient to 50% A and 50% B (0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile) at 15 min was employed. Detection was performed with a DAD as well as either an FLD or a triple-quadrupole MS detector in the multiple reaction monitoring mode. SLV was performed using Standard Reference Material (SRM) 3280 Multivitamin/Multimineral Tablets, being developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, with support by the Office of Dietary Supplements of the National Institutes of Health. Phosphate buffer (10 mM, pH 2.0) extracts of the NIST SRM 3280 were analyzed by the liquid chromatographic (LC)-DAD-FLDIMS method. Following extraction, the method does not require any sample cleanup/preconcentration steps except centrifugation and filtration.

  9. Charge collection properties of heavily irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramberger, G.; Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I.; Fretwurst, E.; Lindstroem, G.; Mandic, I.; Mikuz, M.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2005-01-01

    Detectors processed on epitaxial silicon seem to be a viable solution for the extreme radiation levels in the innermost layers of tracking detectors at upgraded LHC (SLHC). A set of epitaxial pad detectors of 50 and 75μm thicknesses (ρ=50Ωcm) was irradiated with 24GeV/c protons and reactor neutrons up to equivalent fluences of 10 16 cm -2 . Charge collection for minimum ionizing electrons from a 90 Sr source was measured using a charge sensitive preamplifier and a 25ns shaping circuit. The dependence of collected charge on annealing time and operation temperature was studied. Results were used to predict the performance of fine pitch pixel detectors proposed for SLHC

  10. Charge collection properties of heavily irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramberger, G. [Institute Jozef Stefan, Jamova 39, SI-1111 Ljubljana (Slovenia)]. E-mail: Gregor.Kramberger@ijs.si; Cindro, V. [Institute Jozef Stefan, Jamova 39, SI-1111 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Dolenc, I. [Institute Jozef Stefan, Jamova 39, SI-1111 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Fretwurst, E. [University of Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Lindstroem, G. [University of Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Mandic, I. [Institute Jozef Stefan, Jamova 39, SI-1111 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mikuz, M. [Institute Jozef Stefan, Jamova 39, SI-1111 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zavrtanik, M. [Institute Jozef Stefan, Jamova 39, SI-1111 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2005-12-01

    Detectors processed on epitaxial silicon seem to be a viable solution for the extreme radiation levels in the innermost layers of tracking detectors at upgraded LHC (SLHC). A set of epitaxial pad detectors of 50 and 75{mu}m thicknesses ({rho}=50{omega}cm) was irradiated with 24GeV/c protons and reactor neutrons up to equivalent fluences of 10{sup 16}cm{sup -2}. Charge collection for minimum ionizing electrons from a {sup 90}Sr source was measured using a charge sensitive preamplifier and a 25ns shaping circuit. The dependence of collected charge on annealing time and operation temperature was studied. Results were used to predict the performance of fine pitch pixel detectors proposed for SLHC.

  11. Properties of potential eco-friendly gas replacements for particle detectors in high-energy physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saviano, G.; Ferrini, M.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Colafranceschi, S.; KjØlbro, J.; Sharma, A.; Yang, D.; Chen, G.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Grassini, S.; Parvis, M.

    2018-03-01

    Gas detectors for elementary particles require F-based gases for optimal performance. Recent regulations demand the use of environmentally unfriendly F-based gases to be limited or banned. This work studies properties of potential eco-friendly gas replacements by computing the physical and chemical parameters relevant for use as detector media, and suggests candidates to be considered for experimental investigation.

  12. arXiv On the localization properties of an RPWELL gas-avalanche detector

    CERN Document Server

    Moleri, Luca; Coimbra, Artur E. C.; Breskin, Amos; Bressler, Shikma

    2017-10-23

    A study of the localization properties of a single-element Resistive Plate WELL (RPWELL) detector is presented. The detector comprises of a single-sided THick Gaseous Electron Multiplier (THGEM) coupled to a segmented readout anode through a doped silicate-glass plate of 10(10) Ω⋅cm bulk resistivity. Operated in ambient \

  13. Pyroelectric Materials for Uncooled Infrared Detectors: Processing, Properties, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, M. D.; Batra, A. K.; Guggilla, P.; Edwards, M. E.; Penn, B. G.; Currie, J. R., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Uncooled pyroelectric detectors find applications in diverse and wide areas such as industrial production; automotive; aerospace applications for satellite-borne ozone sensors assembled with an infrared spectrometer; health care; space exploration; imaging systems for ships, cars, and aircraft; and military and security surveillance systems. These detectors are the prime candidates for NASA s thermal infrared detector requirements. In this Technical Memorandum, the physical phenomena underlying the operation and advantages of pyroelectric infrared detectors is introduced. A list and applications of important ferroelectrics is given, which is a subclass of pyroelectrics. The basic concepts of processing of important pyroelectrics in various forms are described: single crystal growth, ceramic processing, polymer-composites preparation, and thin- and thick-film fabrications. The present status of materials and their characteristics and detectors figures-of-merit are presented in detail. In the end, the unique techniques demonstrated for improving/enhancing the performance of pyroelectric detectors are illustrated. Emphasis is placed on recent advances and emerging technologies such as thin-film array devices and novel single crystal sensors.

  14. Emission spectrometric isotope analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauersberger, K.; Meier, G.; Nitschke, W.; Rose, W.; Schmidt, G.; Rahm, N.; Andrae, G.; Krieg, D.; Kuefner, W.; Tamme, G.; Wichlacz, D.

    1982-01-01

    An emission spectrometric isotope analyzer has been designed for determining relative abundances of stable isotopes in gaseous samples in discharge tubes, in liquid samples, and in flowing gaseous samples. It consists of a high-frequency generator, a device for defined positioning of discharge tubes, a grating monochromator with oscillating slit and signal converter, signal generator, window discriminator, AND connection, read-out display, oscillograph, gas dosing device and chemical conversion system with carrier gas source and vacuum pump

  15. Charge transport properties of CdMnTe radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim K.; Rafiel, R.; Boardman, M.; Reinhard, I.; Sarbutt, A.; Watt, G.; Watt, C.; Uxa, S.; Prokopovich, D.A.; Belas, E.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; James, R.B.

    2012-04-11

    Growth, fabrication and characterization of indium-doped cadmium manganese telluride (CdMnTe)radiation detectors have been described. Alpha-particle spectroscopy measurements and time resolved current transient measurements have yielded an average charge collection efficiency approaching 100 %. Spatially resolved charge collection efficiency maps have been produced for a range of detector bias voltages. Inhomogeneities in the charge transport of the CdMnTe crystals have been associated with chains of tellurium inclusions within the detector bulk. Further, it has been shown that the role of tellurium inclusions in degrading chargecollection is reduced with increasing values of bias voltage. The electron transit time was determined from time of flight measurements. From the dependence of drift velocity on applied electric field the electron mobility was found to be n = (718 55) cm2/Vs at room temperature.

  16. Charge transport properties of CdMnTe radiation detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokopovich D. A.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Growth, fabrication and characterization of indium-doped cadmium manganese telluride (CdMnTe radiation detectors have been described. Alpha-particle spectroscopy measurements and time resolved current transient measurements have yielded an average charge collection efficiency approaching 100 %. Spatially resolved charge collection efficiency maps have been produced for a range of detector bias voltages. Inhomogeneities in the charge transport of the CdMnTe crystals have been associated with chains of tellurium inclusions within the detector bulk. Further, it has been shown that the role of tellurium inclusions in degrading charge collection is reduced with increasing values of bias voltage. The electron drift velocity was calculated from the rise time distribution of the preamplifier output pulses at each measured bias. From the dependence of drift velocity on applied electric field the electron mobility was found to be μn = (718 ± 55 cm2/Vs at room temperature.

  17. Investigation of some properties of the dielectric particle detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavalyan, V.G.; Gukasyan, S.M.; Kavalov, R.L.; Karapetyan, R.A.; Lorikyan, M.P. (Erevanskij Fizicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1981-01-01

    Results of investigation into temporary dispersion and amplitude resolution of a dielectric detector (DD) of particles are given. In this detector secondary electrons produced by a particle passing through a dielectric layer are gathered on thin anode filaments strenched inside the dielectric layer. As a working substance of the detector investigated used was CsI having 1.7% relative density of monocrystal, gap between planes of 20 ..mu..m diameter anode filaments and cathode electrodes was approximately equal to 200 ..mu..m, distance between anode filaments was approximately 250 ..mu..m. DD having working area S=5 cm/sup 2/ was placed at a distance of 2 cm from 5 MeV radioactive alpha source of 10/sup 4/ particle/s intensity. Curve of particle detection efficiency for this detector reached plateau at a level of 100% in the range of working voltages from 800 to 1200 V. Coincidence method together with a time-amplitude converter, at inlets of which applied were pulses from DD and a scintillation counter placed under DD, were used to measure temporary dispersion. Data on behaviour of particle registration efficiency depending on time of continuous effect of working and inverse voltages are given. It is found that temporary dispersion of the DD and scintillation counter system is a value of order of 1 ns and amplitude resolution of DD is an order of 100%.

  18. Spectrometric techniques 2

    CERN Document Server

    Vanasse, George A

    2013-01-01

    Spectrometric Techniques, Volume II provides information pertinent to vacuum ultraviolet techniques to complete the demonstration of the diversity of methods available to the spectroscopist interested in the ultraviolet visible and infrared spectral regions. This book discusses the specific aspects of the technique of Fourier transform spectroscopy.Organized into five chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the large number of systematic effects in the recording of an interferogram. This text then examines the design approach for a Fourier transform spectrometer with focus on optics.

  19. Property of a CZT semiconductor detector for radionuclide identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Sung-Dae; Park, Se-Hwan; Ha, Jang Ho; Kang, Sang Mook; Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, Yong Kyun; Cho, Yun Ho; Kim, Jong Kyung; Hong, Duk-Geun

    2008-01-01

    Compound semiconductors of high Z value material have been studied intensively for X-ray and γ-ray spectroscopy at room temperature. CdZnTe has wide band gap energy as 1.6 eV and can provide high quantum efficiency with reasonably good energy resolution at room temperature. This study is aimed at determining radionuclide analysis ability by measuring energy resolution of CZT detector which will be applied at nuclear material identification purpose. For experiment we used a CZT detector (5 x 5 x 5 mm 3 ) which is manufactured by eV Products. We have performed our measurement at varied temperatures similar to the outdoor environment for the investigation about temperature dependence of energy resolution and peak centroid fluctuation of CZT detector by using gas cooling and Peltier cooling methods. In order to test radionuclide identification we used various radionuclide samples; plutonium, europium and other standard sources. Pulse height spectra were obtained by standard electronics which consists of a preamplifier, a shaping amplifier, and a multi-channel analyzer. (author)

  20. OFDM Signal Detector Based on Cyclic Autocorrelation Function and its Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Fedra

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to research of the general and particular properties of the OFDM signal detector based on the cyclic autocorrelation function. The cyclic autocorrelation function is estimated using DFT. The parameters of the testing signal have been chosen according to 802.11g WLAN. Some properties are described analytically; all events are examined via computer simulations. It is shown that the detector is able to detect an OFDM signal in the case of multipath propagation, inexact frequency synchronization and without time synchronization. The sensitivity of the detector could be decreased in the above cases. An important condition for proper value of the detector sampling interval was derived. Three types of the channels were studied and compared. Detection threshold SNR=-9 dB was found for the signal under consideration and for two-way propagation.

  1. Properties of a barium fluoride-TMAE-multiwire proportional chamber detector using a large single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woody, C.L.; Petridou, C.I.; Smith, G.C.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of a detector consisting of a large barium fluoride crystal and a multiwire proportional chamber operating at low pressure with TMAE have been studied. Measurements of the time resolution, pulse width, energy resolution, photoelectron yield and the effective energy threshold were carried out in a test beam using minimum ionizing particles. Although the detector is sensitive to signals originating from an adsorbed layer of TMAE from the crystal surface, no indication of such a signal was observed. 7 refs., 6 figs

  2. Determination of uranium enrichment by using gamma-spectrometric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutnyj, D.V.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Odejchuk, N.P.; Mikhailov, V.A.; Tovkanets, V.E.

    2009-01-01

    By using commercial analysis programs MGAU (LLNL, USA) and FRAM (LANL, USA) the summary error of gamma-spectrometric uranium enrichment measurements was investigated. Uranium samples with enrichments of 0,71; 4,46 and 20,1 % were measured. The coaxial high purity germanium detector (type GC) and the planar germanium detector (type LEGe) were used as gamma-radiation detectors. It was shown that experimental equipment and mathematical software available in NSC KIPT allow us to measure uranium enrichment by nondestructive method with accuracy of not worse than 2%.

  3. Electrical properties study under radiation of the 3D-open-shell-electrode detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manwen Liu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the 3D-Open-Shell-Electrode Detector (3DOSED is proposed and the structure is optimized, it is important to study 3DOSED’s electrical properties to determine the detector’s working performance, especially in the heavy radiation environments, like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC and it’s upgrade, the High Luminosity (HL-LHC at CERN. In this work, full 3D technology computer-aided design (TCAD simulations have been done on this novel silicon detector structure. Simulated detector properties include the electric field distribution, the electric potential distribution, current-voltage (I-V characteristics, capacitance-voltage (C-V characteristics, charge collection property, and full depletion voltage. Through the analysis of calculations and simulation results, we find that the 3DOSED’s electric field and potential distributions are very uniform, even in the tiny region near the shell openings with little perturbations. The novel detector fits the designing purpose of collecting charges generated by particle/light in a good fashion with a well defined funnel shape of electric potential distribution that makes these charges drifting towards the center collection electrode. Furthermore, by analyzing the I-V, C-V, charge collection property and full depletion voltage, we can expect that the novel detector will perform well, even in the heavy radiation environments.

  4. Measurement of Top Mass and Properties with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    The extraordinary success of the LHC in delivering proton-proton collisions with large integrated luminosity allows the study of top-quark-enriched data samples with unprecedented statistics. This opens new possibilities for the assessment and further refinements of detector performance, and of data analysis tools. At the same time, different aspects of top-quark event modeling, as implemented in Monte Carlo simulations, can be tested and confronted with data with impressive precision. As an example, the description of the extra QCD radiation accompanying the top-anti-top system can be refined based on measurements. In this context, the experimental challenges and recent results on precision top-quark physics measurements within the ATLAS experiment are summarized and reviewed. In particular, the recent ATLAS top-quark mass result, obtained using a three dimensional template method, which allows the simultaneous determination of the top-quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor (JSF), and a ...

  5. Measurements of the Higgs boson properties with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Tomoto, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Slide draft for the Crimea 2013 workshop. The subject of the talk will be measurements of the Higgs boson properties, including the spin, mass, signal strength, and couplings of a new boson discovered in 2012 at the ATLAS experiment.

  6. The depletion properties of silicon microstrip detectors with variable strip pitch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krizmanic, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the depletion properties of trapezoidal shaped silicon microstrip detectors which have variable strip pitch. Four types of detectors were examined: three detectors have constant strip width and a fourth has a varying strip width. The detectors are single sided with readout performed via p + strips. The depletion properties of the devices were measured using two different methods. The first used capacitance versus voltage measurements, while the second used a 1060 nm wavelength laser coupled to a single mode fiber with a mode field diameter less than 10 μm. The small laser spot size allowed for the depletion depth to be measured in a localized area of the detector. The laser induced charge on an electrode was measured as a function of reverse bias voltage using a sensitive charge preamplifier. The depletion voltages of the detectors demonstrate a strong dependence upon the ratio of strip width to strip pitch. Moreover, these measurements show that a large value of this ratio yields a lower depletion voltage and vice versa. (orig.)

  7. The theoretical study of full spectrum analysis method for airborne gamma-ray spectrometric data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Weichong

    2011-01-01

    Spectra of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry was found to be the synthesis of spectral components of radioelement sources by analyzing the constitution of radioactive sources for airborne gamma-ray spectrometric survey and establishing the models of gamma-ray measurement. The mathematical equation for analysising airborne gamma-ray full spectrometric data can be expressed into matrix and related expansions were developed for the mineral resources exploration, environmental radiation measurement, nuclear emergency monitoring, and so on. Theoretical study showed that the atmospheric radon could be directly computed by airborne gamma-ray spectrometric data with full spectrum analysis without the use of the accessional upward-looking detectors. (authors)

  8. Investigation of the Electronic Properties of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) Detectors using a Nuclear Microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRUNETT, BRUCE A.; DOYLE, BARNEY L.; JAMES, RALPH B.; VIZKELETHY, GYORGY; WALSH, DAVID S.

    1999-01-01

    The electronic transport properties of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) determine the charge collection efficiency (i.e. the signal quality) of CZT detectors. These properties vary on both macroscopic and microscopic scale and depend on the presence of impurities and defects introduced during the crystal growth. Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) is a proven method to measure the charge collection efficiency. Using an ion microbeam, the charge collection efficiency can be mapped with submicron resolution, and the map of electronic properties (such as drift length) can be calculated from the measurement. A more sophisticated version of IBICC, the Time Resolved IBICC (TRIBICC) allows them to determine the mobility and the life time of the charge carriers by recording and analyzing the transient waveform of the detector signal. Furthermore, lateral IBICC and TRIBICC can provide information how the charge collection efficiency depends on the depth where the charge carriers are generated. This allows one to deduce information on the distribution of the electric field and transport properties of the charge carriers along the detector axis. IBICC and TRIBICC were used at the Sandia microbeam facility to image electronic properties of several CZT detectors. From the lateral TRIBICC measurement the electron and hole drift length profiles were calculated

  9. On the operation of a cryostat for Ge(Li) detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donde, A.L.; L'vov, A.N.

    1974-01-01

    Operating experience with cryostats for Ge(Li) detectors developed at the FTI of the Academy of Science of the Ukrainian SSR, and used in several laboratories for 5 years is reported. It is shown that the spectrometric properties of all cryostat-mounted detectors operating since 1969 have not been affected and up to now the detectors are operating successfully. Nitrogen consumption has not increased and is at a level of 0.5 l/d. During five-year continuous operation the cryostat pressure has varied from 6.10 -7 to 8.10 -6 torr

  10. System for Gamma an X rays fluorescence spectrometric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso Abad, D.; Arista Romeu, E.; Bolanos Perez, L. and others

    1997-01-01

    A system for spectrometry of gamma or fluorescence X rays is presented. It sis composed by a Si(Li) semiconductors detector, a charge sensitive preamplifier, a high voltage power supply, a spectrometric amplifier and a monolithic 1024 channels multichannel analyzers or an IBM compatible 4096 channels add - on- card multichannel analyzer. The system can be configured as a 1024 or 4096 channels gamma or fluorescent X rays spectrometer

  11. Top quark properties and mass measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Negrini, Matteo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Highlights on recent measurements of top quark properties in ATLAS, using pp collision data at \\sqrt{s}= 8 TeV and 13 TeV, are presented. The measurements of the top quark polarization and spin correlation coefficients, the W boson helicity fractions, the structure of the Wtb vertex, the associated production of a t anti-t pair with a vector boson or a photon, and the top quark mass are all in agreement with the Standard Model expectations.

  12. Dosimetric properties of carbon loaded LiF detectors for beta photon extremity dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgkhardt, B.; Klipfel, A.

    1990-01-01

    The dosimetric properties of carbon loaded LiF detectors manufactured by Alnor and Vinten are presented in comparison with various LiF detectors. In particular, the beta and photon response, the residual reading after repeated annealing in the oven or reader as well as light sensitivity and fading are discussed. In comparison with LiF detectors of 240 mg.cm -2 , LiF + C detectors indicate a photon response of only 2% and in finger rings irradiated on a finger phantom an unexpected high photon energy response. Regarding repeated use, oven annealing in air or N 2 affects mainly Vinten LiF + 1% C by discoloration and reduces the 147 Pm response of LiF + C detectors by between 1% and 6% per N 2 annealing, whereas reader annealing in the Toledo and Alnor reader does not affect the relative beta response. The residual dose H 0 of LiF + C remains sufficiently low after oven annealing, but increases for Alnor LiF + 4% C after reader annealing, which is therefore more suitable for Vinten LiF + 1% C. Spurious detector reading exceeds H 0 and its standard deviation by a factor of 2 to 3. (author)

  13. Study of statistical properties of hybrid statistic in coherent multi-detector compact binary coalescences Search

    OpenAIRE

    Haris, K; Pai, Archana

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we revisit the problem of coherent multi-detector search of gravitational wave from compact binary coalescence with Neutron stars and Black Holes using advanced interferometers like LIGO-Virgo. Based on the loss of optimal multi-detector signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), we construct a hybrid statistic as a best of maximum-likelihood-ratio(MLR) statistic tuned for face-on and face-off binaries. The statistical properties of the hybrid statistic is studied. The performance of this ...

  14. Evaluation of neutron shielding properties of lead glass using bubble detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, S.; Vishwa Prasad, K.; Srinivasan, T.K.; Ponraju, D.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron shielding properties of lead glass had been studied using a 241 Am-Be neutron source. Indigenously developed bubble detector was used as neutron detector. Attenuation curves were determined experimentally for the lead glass under the conditions of broad beam geometry. Theoretical calculations were made using Monte Carlo code MCNP3. Measurements were made for polyethylene and concrete to serve as reference. The measured and calculated neutron removal cross sections of lead glass, polyethylene and concrete are reported in this paper. Good agreement is observed between the experimental results and theoretical calculations. (author)

  15. Top quark properties measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Span\\`o, Francesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Precise measurements of the properties of the top quark test the Standard Model (SM) and can be used to constrain new physics models. As it may be significantly enhanced by the presence of new physics, the $t\\overline{t}$ production charge asymmetry is measured inclusively and differentially using the 8 TeV ATLAS dataset using both the lepton+jets and dilepton channels, including a dedicated measurement for highly boosted top quarks. In the SM the top quark is predicted to decay almost exclusively into W boson and a $b$-quark. Measurements of the W-helicity and spin correlations in $t\\overline{t}$ production are presented as well as new measurements of CP asymmetries in $b$-hadron decays using top-quark events.

  16. Top quark properties measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Spano, Francesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Precise measurements of the properties of the top quark test the Standard Model (SM) and can be used to constrain new physics models. As it may be significantly enhanced by the presence of new physics, the ttbar production charge asymmetry is measured inclusively and differentially using the 8 TeV ATLAS dataset using both the lepton+jets and dilepton channels, including a dedicated measurement for highly boosted top-quarks. In the SM the top-quark is predicted to decay almost exclusively into a W boson and a b-quark. Measurements of the W-helicity and spin correlations in ttbar production are presented as well as new measurements of CP asymmetries in b-hadron decays using top-quark events.

  17. Gamma spectrometric analyses of environmental samples at PINSTECH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faruq, M.U.; Parveen, N.; Ahmed, B.; Aziz, A.

    1979-01-01

    Gamma spectrometric analyses of air and other environmental samples from PINSTECH were carried out. Air particulate samples were analyzed by a Ge(Li) detector on a computer-based multichannel analyzer. Other environmental samples were analyzed by a Na(T1) scintillation detector spectrometer and a multichannel analyzer with manual analysis. Concentration of radionuclides in the media was determined and the sources of their production were identified. Age of the fall out was estimated from the ratios of the fission products. (authors)

  18. Properties of the lithium carbonate for to be used as thermal neutrons detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera A, E.; Urena N, F.

    2003-01-01

    In this work the dosimetric properties of the lithium carbonate used as detecting of thermal neutrons and by means of free radicals is evaluated and presented. The studied parameters that were carried out for this detector were: intensity of the Electron paramagnetic resonance signal (EPR); reproducibility, fading of the signal to ambient temperature, stability of the signal to low temperature (0 degrees); answer of zero dose and homogeneity or reliability of the data of the detector, humidity, solar light, temperature and radio sensitivity. These parameters indicate the utility that have the detectors for the estimation of fields of neutron fluences that are applicable to capture therapies by neutron-boron and, nuclear reactors. (Author)

  19. Study of SUSY particles properties at the future International Linear Collider with the International Large Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wichmann, K.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, Letters of Intent (LoI) for experiments at the International Linear Collider (ILC) have been submitted. Among the three proposals is the International Large Detector (ILD) concept which is at the focus of these studies. From various subjects addressed in the LoI, a wide spectrum of studies of SUSY particle properties is presented here. Most of them are benchmark reactions for the ILC and can be used both in physics studies and in work on detector design and optimization, respectively. All studies were performed with a full detector simulation using GEANT4, which is a great improvement compared to the previous results with much less detailed, so called f ast , simulation (SIMDET). The importance of this improved simulation is reflected in the results. The presented analyzes have been chosen to be the most challenging for the detector to study its performance and guide the detector development. Additionally an important problem of unavoidable beam induced backgrounds at linear colliders is addressed and ways of reducing its impact on physics studies are shown for an example SUSY analysis. (author)

  20. A New Approach for Evaluating Charge Transport Properties of Semiconductor Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung O; Kim, Jong Kyung; Kim, Soon Young; Ha, Jang Ho

    2009-01-01

    The semiconductor detectors (e.g., CdTe, CdZnTe, and HgI 2 ) have been widely used for radiation detection and medical imaging because of its various outstanding features such as excellent energy resolution, wide bandgap energy, room temperature operation, and so on. Unfortunately, the performance of these detectors is mainly limited by the charge transport properties of semiconductor, especially the mobility-lifetime products (i.e., (μτ) e and ((μτ) h ). Hence, the analysis on the mobility-lifetime products is very important for evaluating correct characteristics of semiconductor detectors. A commonly used method to analyze the mobilitylifetime products is based on their responses to α particle. However, the α particle method cannot evaluate the ((μτ)h product in many cases, because a semiconductor detector operating at positive bias voltages often yields the energy spectrum without the peaks. This method is also known to be very sensitive to the experimental conditions as well as surface conditions of the detector. In this study, a new approach with gamma-ray instead of α particle was carried out to solve the determination difficulty of the ((μτ) h product with common method. The special relation between the two mobility-lifetime products, which we call the 'Nural equation', was also developed to simply obtain each parameter based on Hecht equation

  1. Investigation of efficient termination structure for improved breakdown properties of semiconductor radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krizaj, D.; Resnik, D.; Vrtacnik, D.; Amon, S.

    1998-01-01

    Efficiency of a new junction termination structure for improvement of breakdown properties of semiconductor radiation detectors is investigated. The structure consists of a diffused resistor winding around the active junction in a spiral fashion. The current flow through the spiral enables controlled potential distribution along the spiral turns and thus controlled depletion spreading from the main junction, efficiently preventing premature avalanche breakdown. Both multiple guard-ring structures and spiral junction termination structures have shown good breakdown properties typically three to five times higher than breakdown voltages of diodes without junction termination. The breakdown voltages of spiral junction termination structures are only weakly influenced by changes in substrate doping concentration caused by neutron irradiation. They can thus be considered for termination of future semiconductor radiation detectors

  2. Selection and optimization of spectrometric amplifiers for gamma spectrometry: part II - linearity, live time correction factors and software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Marco Antonio Proenca Vieira de; Pugliesi, Reinaldo

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to establish simple criteria to choose the best combination of electronic modules to achieve an adequate high resolution gamma spectrometer. Linearity, live time correction factors and softwares of a gamma spectrometric system composed by a Hp Ge detector have been studied by using several kinds of spectrometric amplifiers: Canberra 2021, Canberra 2025, Ortec 673 and Tennelec 244 and the MCA cards Ortec and Nucleus. The results showed low values of integral non-linearity for all spectrometric amplifiers connected to the Ortec and Nucleus boards. The MCA card should be able to correct amplifier dead time for 17 kcps count rates. (author)

  3. Gas chromatography of organic microcontaminants using atomic emission and mass spectrometric detection combined in one instrument (GC-AED/MS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, H.G.J.; Hankemeier, T.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1999-01-01

    This study describes the coupling of an atomic-emission detector and mass-spectrometric detector to a single gas chromatograph. Splitting of the column effluent enables simultaneous detection by atomic-emission detection (AED) and mass spectrometry (MS) and yields a powerful system for the target

  4. Measurement of 235U enrichment with a LaBr3 scintillation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortreau, P.; Berndt, R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of a 1.5 in.x1.5 in. LaBr 3 gamma radiation detector for determining 235 U enrichment by non-destructive analysis. The spectrometric properties of the detector, brought to market under the trade name BrillanCe-380 , were first evaluated. Enrichment measurements were subsequently carried out in different experimental conditions on certified uranium samples with enrichment ranging from 0.31% to 60% and on UF 6 containers of the type 30B and 48Y.

  5. High-temperature mass spectrometric study of the vaporization processes and thermodynamic properties of melts in the PbO-B2O3-SiO2 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolyarova, V L; Lopatin, S I; Shilov, A L; Shugurov, S M

    2013-07-15

    The unique properties of the PbO-B2O3-SiO2 system, especially its extensive range of glass-forming compositions, make it valuable for various practical applications. The thermodynamic properties and vaporization of PbO-B2O3-SiO2 melts are not well established so far and the data obtained on these will be useful for optimization of technology and thermodynamic modeling of glasses. High-temperature Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry was used to study vaporization processes and to determine the partial pressures of components of the PbO-B2O3-SiO2 melts. Measurements were performed with a MS-1301 mass spectrometer. Vaporization was carried out using two quartz effusion cells containing the sample under study and pure PbO (reference substance). Ions were produced by electron ionization at an energy of 25 eV. To facilitate interpretation of the mass spectra, the appearance energies of ions were also measured. Pb, PbO and O2 were found to be the main vapor species over the samples studied at 1100 K. The PbO activities as a function of the composition of the system were derived from the measured PbO partial pressures. The B2O3 and SiO2 activities, the Gibbs energy of formation, the excess Gibbs energy of formation and mass losses in the samples studied were calculated. Partial pressures of the vapor species over PbO-B2O3-SiO2 melts were measured at 1100 K in the wide range of compositions using the Knudsen mass spectrometric method. The data enabled the PbO, B2O3, and SiO2 activities in these melts to be derived and provided evidence of their negative deviations from ideal behavior. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Growth, characterization and properties of CVD diamond films for applications as radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciorti, S.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the work is to give a picture of the current state of the art of CVD (chemical vapour deposition) diamond. The interest is due to the capability to grow over large areas a material with physical properties suitable for an impressive number of applications. The authors focuses on the potential of diamond as a radiation detector and gets into details of the huge field that extends from the thermochemistry of the deposition process to the test of a diamond-based tracker with a fast readout electronics

  7. Design and properties of silicon charged-particle detectors developed at the Institute of Electron Technology (ITE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzecki, Maciej; Bar, Jan; Budzyński, Tadeusz; CieŻ, Michal; Grabiec, Piotr; Kozłowski, Roman; Kulawik, Jan; Panas, Andrzej; Sarnecki, Jerzy; Słysz, Wojciech; Szmigiel, Dariusz; Wegrzecka, Iwona; Wielunski, Marek; Witek, Krzysztof; Yakushev, Alexander; Zaborowski, Michał

    2013-07-01

    The paper discusses the design of charged-particle detectors commissioned and developed at the Institute of Electron Technology (ITE) in collaboration with foreign partners, used in international research on transactinide elements and to build personal radiation protection devices in Germany. Properties of these detectors and the results obtained using the devices are also presented. The design of the following epiplanar detector structures is discussed: ♢ 64-element chromatographic arrays for the COMPACT (Cryo On-line Multidetector for Physics And Chemistry of Transactinides) detection system used at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt (GSI) for research on Hassium, Copernicium and Flerovium, as well as elements 119 and 120, ♢ 2-element flow detectors for the COLD (Cryo On-Line Detector) system used for research on Copernicium and Flerovium at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, ♢ detectors for a radon exposimeter and sensors for a neutron dosimeter developed at the Institut für Strahlenschutz, Helmholtz Zentrum München. The design of planar detectors - single-sided and double-sided strip detectors for the Focal Plane Detector Box used at GSI for research on Flerovium and elements 119 and 120 is also discussed.

  8. Modifications of the optical properties for DAM-ADC nuclear track detector exposed to alpha particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammah, Y. S.; Awad, E. M.

    2018-05-01

    Modifications of the optical properties of diallyl maleate-allyl diglycol carbonate (DAM-ADC) nuclear detector induced by alpha particles are described. DAM-ADC samples were irradiated perpendicularly by thin 241Am disk source that emits alpha particles with 5.48 MeV. The optical absorption has been measured using the ultraviolet-visible (UV-1100) spectroscopy. It was found that DAM-ADC polymer shows substantial modifications in its optical characteristics upon irradiated with alpha particles with different energies. The optical energy band gap (Egap) for the detector was calculated for the direct and the indirect allowed transitions in K-space using two approaches (Tauc's model and absorption spectrum fitting (ASF) method). Urbach's energy (Ea), number of carbon atoms per conjugated length (N), number of carbon atoms per cluster (M), and refractive index (n) for the present samples were determined. Results reveal that the values of energy gap in direct transition are greater than those of indirect, before and after irradiation. (Egap), (Ea), (N), (M), and (n) of the present samples are changed significantly with irradiation time and value of alpha energy. Results reflect the possibility of using DAM-ADC polymer track detectors to estimate alpha particle energies using the variation of the absorbance.

  9. PHAROS A pluri-detector, high-resolution, analyser of radiometric properties of soil

    CERN Document Server

    Rigollet, C

    2002-01-01

    PHAROS is a new type of core logger, designed to measure activity concentrations of sup 4 sup 0 K, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U, sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th and sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs in sediment and rock cores with a spatial resolution of a few centimetres along the core. PHAROS has been developed as a non-destructive alternative to the traditional slicing of cores into sub-samples and their analysis on an HPGe detector. The core is scanned at fixed increments by three BGO scintillation detectors and the spectra analysed by the full spectrum analysis method. The core logger is also equipped with a collimated lead castle and a sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs source for transmission measurements. In this paper, we report on the properties of the core logger and its detectors, and on the analysis techniques used for the determination of the radionuclides activity concentrations. Results from initial measurements are presented and discussed.

  10. Magnetoresistance and noise properties of chevron stretcher detectors for field access bubble domain devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, P. K.; Oeffinger, T. R.; Chen, T. T.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were devised to study the angular variation of the resistance and noise properties of one- and two-level chevron stretcher magnetoresistive detectors for use in field access bubble memory devices. All measurements, made with an electronic system, were performed on glass or garnet samples upon which 1 micron of SiO2 was sputter-deposited, followed by 4000 A of Permalloy for the 28-micron-period devices and 0.8 microns of SiO2, followed by 3000 A of Permalloy for the 20-micron-period devices. The geometrical and drive-state dependence of the zero-state noise were studied, as was its frequency dependence. It is found that both types of detectors operate primarily in the amplitude-shift mode for drive fields of interest and that the presence of a bubble in a detector causes a magnetoresistance change equal to that produced by increasing the in-plane drive field about 8 Oe in the absence of a bubble.

  11. Properties of the lithium carbonate for to be used as thermal neutrons detector; Propiedades del carbonato de litio para ser usado como detector de neutrones termicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera A, E.; Urena N, F. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In this work the dosimetric properties of the lithium carbonate used as detecting of thermal neutrons and by means of free radicals is evaluated and presented. The studied parameters that were carried out for this detector were: intensity of the Electron paramagnetic resonance signal (EPR); reproducibility, fading of the signal to ambient temperature, stability of the signal to low temperature (0 degrees); answer of zero dose and homogeneity or reliability of the data of the detector, humidity, solar light, temperature and radio sensitivity. These parameters indicate the utility that have the detectors for the estimation of fields of neutron fluences that are applicable to capture therapies by neutron-boron and, nuclear reactors. (Author)

  12. Investigation of DEPFET as vertex detector at ILC. Intrinsic properties, radiation hardness and alternative readout schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummel, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is supposed to be the next generation lepton collider. The detectors at ILC are intended to be precision instruments improving the performance in impact parameter (IP), momentum and energy resolution significantly compared to previous detectors at lepton colliders. To achieve this goal it is necessary to develop new detector technologies or pushing existing technologies to their technological edges. Regarding the Vertex detector (VTX) this implies challenges in resolution, material budget, power consumption and readout speed. A promising technology for the Vertex detector is the Depleted Field Effect Transistor (DEPFET). The DEPFET is a semiconductor device with in-pixel ampli cation integrated on a fully depleted bulk. This allows building detectors with intrinsically high SNR due to the large sensitive volume and the small input capacitance at the rst ampli er. To reach the ambitious performance goals it is important to understand its various features: clear performance, internal amplification, noise and radiation hardness. The intrinsic noise is analyzed, showing that the contribution of the DEPFET is below 50 e - at the required speed. Moreover it is possible to show that the internal ampli cation could be further improved to more than 1nA/e - using the standard DEPFET technology. The clear performance is investigated on matrix level utilizing a dedicated setup for single pixel testing which allows direct insight into the DEPFET operation, without the complexity of the full readout system. It is possible to show that a full clear could be achieved with a voltage pulse of 10 V. Furthermore a novel clear concept - the capacitive coupled clear gate - is demonstrated. The radiation hardness is studied with respect to the system performance utilizing various irradiations with ionizing and non ionizing particles. The impact on the bulk as well as the interface damage is investigated. Up to now the readout is performed with

  13. Investigation of DEPFET as vertex detector at ILC. Intrinsic properties, radiation hardness and alternative readout schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rummel, Stefan

    2009-07-20

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is supposed to be the next generation lepton collider. The detectors at ILC are intended to be precision instruments improving the performance in impact parameter (IP), momentum and energy resolution significantly compared to previous detectors at lepton colliders. To achieve this goal it is necessary to develop new detector technologies or pushing existing technologies to their technological edges. Regarding the Vertex detector (VTX) this implies challenges in resolution, material budget, power consumption and readout speed. A promising technology for the Vertex detector is the Depleted Field Effect Transistor (DEPFET). The DEPFET is a semiconductor device with in-pixel ampli cation integrated on a fully depleted bulk. This allows building detectors with intrinsically high SNR due to the large sensitive volume and the small input capacitance at the rst ampli er. To reach the ambitious performance goals it is important to understand its various features: clear performance, internal amplification, noise and radiation hardness. The intrinsic noise is analyzed, showing that the contribution of the DEPFET is below 50 e{sup -} at the required speed. Moreover it is possible to show that the internal ampli cation could be further improved to more than 1nA/e{sup -} using the standard DEPFET technology. The clear performance is investigated on matrix level utilizing a dedicated setup for single pixel testing which allows direct insight into the DEPFET operation, without the complexity of the full readout system. It is possible to show that a full clear could be achieved with a voltage pulse of 10 V. Furthermore a novel clear concept - the capacitive coupled clear gate - is demonstrated. The radiation hardness is studied with respect to the system performance utilizing various irradiations with ionizing and non ionizing particles. The impact on the bulk as well as the interface damage is investigated. Up to now the readout is performed

  14. Semiconductor ionizino. radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Spectrometric semiconductor detectors of ionizing radiation with the electron-hole junction, based on silicon and germanium are presented. The following parameters are given for the individual types of germanium detectors: energy range of detected radiation, energy resolution given as full width at half maximum (FWHM) and full width at one tenth of maximum (FWTM) for 57 Co and 60 Co, detection sensitivity, optimal voltage, and electric capacitance at optimal voltage. For silicon detectors the value of FWHM for 239 Pu is given, the sensitive area and the depth of the sensitive area. (E.S.)

  15. Prospects of In/CdTe X- and γ-ray detectors with MoO Ohmic contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslyanchuk, Olena L.; Solovan, Mykhailo M.; Maistruk, Eduard V.; Brus, Viktor V.; Maryanchuk, Pavlo D.; Gnatyuk, Volodymyr A.; Aoki, Toru

    2018-01-01

    The present paper analyzes the charge transport mechanisms and spectrometric properties of In/CdTe/MoOx heterojunctions prepared by magnetron sputtering of indium and molybdenum oxide thin films onto semi-insulating p-type single-crystal CdTe semiconductor, produced by Acrorad Co. Ltd. Current-voltage characteristics of the detectors at different temperatures were investigated. The charge transport mechanisms in the heterostructures under investigation were determined: the generation-recombination in the space charge region (SCR) at relatively low voltages and the space charge limited currents at high voltages. The spectra of 137Cs and 241Am isotopes taken at different applied bias voltages are presented. It is shown that the In/CdTe/MoOx structures can be used as X/γ-ray detectors in the spectrometric mode.

  16. Measurement of radiation shielding properties of polymer composites by using HPGe detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Anil; Pillay, H.C.M.; Kale, P.K.; Datta, D.; Suman, S.K.; Gover, V.

    2014-01-01

    Lead is the most common radiation shield and its composite with polymers can be used as flexible radiation shields for different applications. However, lead is very hazardous and has been found to be associated with neurological disorders, kidney failure and hematotoxicity. Lead free radiation shield material has been developed by synthesizing radiation cross linked PDMS/Bi 2 O 3 polymer composites. In order to have a lead free radiation shield the relevant shielding properties such as linear attenuation, half value thickness (HVT) and tenth value thickness (TVT) have been measured by using HPGe detector. The present study describes the methodology of measurement of the shielding properties of the lead free shield material. In the measurement gamma energies such as 59.537 keV ( 241 Am), 122.061 keV and 136.474 keV ( 57 Co) are taken into consideration

  17. The properties of the cylindrical drift chambers of the CELLO detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, U.

    1983-12-01

    In the present thesis the study of the properties of the cylindrical drift chamber of the CELLO interior detector by muons from the cosmic radiation is described. An iterative procedure for the parametrization of the timepath relation is presented. The numerical approximation obtained by means of this procedure deviated in all ranges of drift time by less than 50 μm from the experimentally determined, nonlinear time-path relation. The chamber properties were determined with and without magnetic fields: With an argon-ethane 50%/50% gas mixture a long plateau of the detection probabilities was reached. Without magnetic field by the drift chambers a mean spatial resolution of 170 μm was obtained. From the dependence of the spatial resolution from the drift path results that the drift chambers respond if the electrons from the first 2 to 3 primary ionizations reach the signal wire. The mean response probability of the drift chambers contributes to 97.5% and the overresponse probability to 3.6%. The mean spatial resolution in the magnetic field was determined by means of the chi 2 -distribution, it contributes to 170 μm. For the response probability the value of 98.3% was determined. The errors in the track parameters were determined by comparison of the cosmic ray tracks in the upper and lower half of the detector. (orig./HSI) [de

  18. Capabilities of CdTe-Based Detectors With {mathrm {MoO}}_{x} Contacts for Detection of X- and gamma -Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslyanchuk, O. L.; Solovan, M. M.; Brus, V. V.; Kulchynsky, V. V.; Maryanchuk, P. D.; Fodchuk, I. M.; Gnatyuk, V. A.; Aoki, T.; Potiriadis, C.; Kaissas, Y.

    2017-05-01

    The charge transport mechanism and spectrometric properties of the X-ray and γ-ray detectors, fabricated by the deposition of molybdenum oxide thin films onto semi-insulating p-CdTe crystals were studied. The current transport processes in the Mo-MoOx/p-CdTe/MoOx-Mo structure are well described in the scope of the carrier's generation in the space-charge region and the space-charge-limited current models. The lifetime of charge carriers, the energy of hole traps, and the density of discrete trapping centers were determined from the comparison of the experimental data and calculations. Spectrometric properties of Mo-MoOx/p-CdTe/MoOx-Mo structures were also investigated. It is shown that the investigated heterojunctions have demonstrated promising characteristics for practical application in X-ray and γ-ray detector fabrication.

  19. Mass spectrometric and chemometric studies of thermoplastic properties of coals. 1. Chemometry of conventional, solvent swelling and extraction data of coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzec, A.; Czajkowska, S.; Moszynski, J.; Schulten, H.-R. (Polish Academy of Sciences, Gliwice (Poland). Inst. of Coal Chemistry)

    Twenty-seven coals from Carboniferous seams in Poland were studied with the aim to find links between thermoplastic properties and chemical characteristics of the coals. Three sets of data were obtained for all the coals: (1) thermoplastic properties measured using the Gieseler plastometer; (2) yields of pyridine extractables and swelling measurements for pyridine residues; (3) ultimate, proximate, and petrographic analyses. The three data sets were evaluated using chemometric techniques with the purpose of looking for significant correlations between all the data. Temperature of softening is a linear regression of pyridine extractables and hydrogen content in coals as well as of swelling data. Temperatures of maximum fluidity and resolidification are correlated with each other and with oxygen, exinite, and moisture contents of the coals as well as with the swelling data. It has been concluded that temperature of softening is a colligative property and indicates a phase transition resulting in an increase of thermal induced mobility of coal material; the energy demand of the transition is dependent on contents of bulk components of coal system that were specified in this study. Temperatures of maximum fluidity and resolidification appear to have the same chemical background; i.e. the temperatures depend on the content of the same structural units or components. However, the means of chemical characterization of coal material used in this study were not capable of identifying them. Volatile matter and petrographic composition showed rather limited value as predictive means for some (T{sub F(max)} and T{sub R}) and no predictive value for the other thermoplastic properties. 20 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  20. Spectrometric microbiological analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlager, Kenneth J.; Meissner, Ken E.

    1996-04-01

    Currently, there are four general approaches to microbiological analysis, i.e., the detection, identification and quantification of micro-organisms: (1) Traditional culturing and staining procedures, metabolic fermentations and visual morphological characteristics; (2) Immunological approaches employing microbe-specific antibodies; (3) Biotechnical techniques employing DNA probes and related genetic engineering methods; and (4) Physical measurement techniques based on the biophysical properties of micro-organisms. This paper describes an instrumentation development in the fourth of the above categories, physical measurement, that uses a combination of fluorometric and light scatter spectra to detect and identify micro-organisms at the species level. A major advantage of this approach is the rapid turnaround possible in medical diagnostic or water testing applications. Fluorometric spectra serve to define the biochemical characteristics of the microbe, and light scatter spectra the size and shape morphology. Together, the two spectra define a 'fingerprint' for each species of microbe for detection, identification and quantification purposes. A prototype instrument has been developed and tested under NASA sponsorship based on fluorometric spectra alone. This instrument demonstrated identification and quantification capabilities at the species level. The paper reports on test results using this instrument, and the benefits of employing a combination of fluorometric and light scatter spectra.

  1. A quantitative structure- property relationship of gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric retention data of 85 volatile organic compounds as air pollutant materials by multivariate methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkhosh Maryam

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR study is suggested for the prediction of retention times of volatile organic compounds. Various kinds of molecular descriptors were calculated to represent the molecular structure of compounds. Modeling of retention times of these compounds as a function of the theoretically derived descriptors was established by multiple linear regression (MLR and artificial neural network (ANN. The stepwise regression was used for the selection of the variables which gives the best-fitted models. After variable selection ANN, MLR methods were used with leave-one-out cross validation for building the regression models. The prediction results are in very good agreement with the experimental values. MLR as the linear regression method shows good ability in the prediction of the retention times of the prediction set. This provided a new and effective method for predicting the chromatography retention index for the volatile organic compounds.

  2. Influence of damage caused by Kr ions and neutrons on electrical properties of silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croitoru, N.; Gubbini, E.; Rancoita, P.G.; Rattaggi, M.; Seidman, A.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, new measurements of physical properties of high-resistivity silicon, used in high-energy detectors, are presented. The obtained data contribute to the understanding of the causes which damage the 2electronic characteristics of the detection systems under irradiation of neutrons and ionized particles (Kr). The Hall effect coefficient (R H ) and resistivity (ρ) measurements as a function of temperature (T), for non-irradiated and irradiated by neutrons and Kr ions, were performed. The measurements of the Hall coefficient and resistivity of non-irradiated samples and irradiated at neutron fluences (PHI≤9.9x10 10 n/cm 2 ) and Kr (PHI≤7.5x10 8 Kr/cm 2 ), have shown that the obtained characteristics, R H (T) and ρ(T), are of the same shape as those known for a silicon single crystal. A slight difference of the slope of ln ρ∼ln T, for neutron- and a large difference for Kr ion irradiation as compared with that of non-irradiated samples, was observed. On increasing the irradiation to PHI larger than the value indicated above, for neutrons and Kr ions, important changes in the physical properties were observed. The resistivity increases with increasing PHI, up to a value of the same order with intrinsic silicon (ρ∼10 5 Ω cm), for both neutron and Kr ion irradiation. The values of R H increase with increasing PHI up to a fluence, for which a change of sign, from negative to positive, occurs. The variation of values of R H and ρ as a function of PHI, for neutrons and Kr ions, is similar, but the characteristics R H (PHI) and ρ(PHI), are displaced. Therefore, larger values of PHI are needed in order to obtain the same values of ρ as those for Kr ion irradiation. The dependence on T of electrical parameters of samples, irradiated at PHI≥9.9x10 10 n/cm 2 (neutrons) and PHI≥7.5x10 8 Kr/cm 3 (ions), cannot be explained, considering the usual theoretical relations. The results, obtained in these experiments, have shown a change of mechanism of

  3. Influence of reverse bias on the LEDs properties used as photo-detectors in VLC systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Marcin; Siuzdak, Jerzy

    2015-09-01

    Continuous increasing share of light emitting diodes (LEDs) in a lighting market, which we observe during the last couple years, opens new possibilities. Especially, when we talk about practical realization the concept of visible light communications (VLC), which gains on popularity recently. The VLC concept presupposes utilization of illumination systems for a purpose of data transmission. It means, the emitters, in this case the LEDs, will not of a light source only, but also the data transmitters. Currently, most of the conducted researches in this area is concentrated on achievement of effective transmission methods. It means a transmission only in one direction. This is not enough, when we talk about the fully functional transmission system. Ensuring of feedback transmission channel is a necessary also. One of the ideas, which was postulated by authors of this article, is using for this purpose the LEDs in a double role. A utilization of LEDs as photo-detectors requires a reverse polarization, in contrast to a forward bias, which has a place when they work as light emitters. Ensuring of proper polarization get significant meaning. The article presents the investigations results on the influence of reverse bias on photo-receiving properties of LEDs used as light detectors. The conducted research proved that an improvement of sensitivity and bandwidth parameters are possible by application of appropriate value of the reverse voltage in a receiver.

  4. Influence of damage caused by Kr ions and neutrons on electrical properties of silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Croitoru, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Seidman, A

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, new measurements of physical properties of high-resistivity silicon, used in high-energy detectors, are presented. The obtained data contribute to the understanding of the causes which damage the 2electronic characteristics of the detection systems under irradiation of neutrons and ionized particles (Kr). The Hall effect coefficient (R sub H) and resistivity (rho) measurements as a function of temperature (T), for non-irradiated and irradiated by neutrons and Kr ions, were performed. The measurements of the Hall coefficient and resistivity of non-irradiated samples and irradiated at neutron fluences (PHI=9.9x10 sup 1 sup 0 n/cm sup 2 (neutrons) and PHI>=7.5x10 sup 8 Kr/cm sup 3 (ions), cannot be explained, considering the usual theoretical relations. The results, obtained in these experiments, have shown a change of mechanism of conduction due to the damaged regions, where localized levels are created, which are the main cause of the deviation of the electrical characteristics of the detectors ...

  5. Spectrometric assembly for portable installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluger, A.; Popescu, C.

    1997-01-01

    The components of the portable spectrometric assembly are: - the detecting probe with Na I(Tl) crystal and air-tight case of industrial type; - a microcomputer; - a unit of analogical processing of the signal from the detecting probe; - a single-channel analyzer with adjustable threshold; - commands and display module; - a source of high voltage; - an electrical supply battery. The device uses the method of gamma photons detection in energetic windows. Through theoretical and experimental studies carried out during the prototype development phase, the superiority of this method has been proved as compared with the installations which make use of the classical principle of photon integral detection. The achieved prototype has a basic program enabling the setting of all working parameters (measuring time, discriminating thresholds, discriminators operating conditions, etc.). Through the included interface RS232 it is possible to transmit the data to a more powerful computer in order to continually process the results. The spectrometric assembly, realized on the basis of micro-computers, can be used in a wide range of applications: measurement of thickness and erosion of walls and tubes, measurement of level in closed containers, of soil density, etc. The adjustment for specific application is performed only through a program modification. (authors)

  6. Aging of imaging properties of a CMOS flat-panel detector for dental cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D. W.; Han, J. C.; Yun, S.; Kim, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated the long-term stability of imaging properties of a flat-panel detector in conditions used for dental x-ray imaging. The detector consists of a CsI:Tl layer and CMOS photodiode pixel arrays. Aging simulations were carried out using an 80-kVp x-ray beam at an air-kerma rate of approximately 5 mGy s-1 at the entrance surface of the detector with a total air kerma of up to 0.6 kGy. Dark and flood-field images were periodically obtained during irradiation, and the mean signal and noise levels were evaluated for each image. We also evaluated the modulation-transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The aging simulation showed a decrease in both the signal and noise of the gain-offset-corrected images, but there was negligible change in the signal-to-noise performance as a function of the accumulated dose. The gain-offset correction for analyzing images resulted in negligible changes in MTF, NPS, and DQE results over the total dose. Continuous x-ray exposure to a detector can cause degradation in the physical performance factors such the detector sensitivity, but linear analysis of the gain-offset-corrected images can assure integrity of the imaging properties of a detector during its lifetime.

  7. Top quark pair properties using the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barone, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    These proceeding review the most recent results on the top quark measurements performed by the ATLAS detector, based upon datasets of 4.59 fb"−"1 and of 20.3 fb"−"1 of proton–proton collisions delivered by the Large Hadron Collider at the centres-of-mass energy of √s=7 TeV and of √s=8 TeV, respectively. The measurements of the top quark mass, the cross section of tt-bar production in association of vector bosons (W, Z and γ) and the measurement of the charge asymmetry are detailed. The importance of evermore precise measurement of the top quark’s properties is highlighted

  8. Dosimetric properties of a radiochromic gel detector for diagnostic X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bero, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    The gel dosimetry method was found to be capable of addressing complicated issues related to dose measurements particularly in modern sophisticated radiotherapy applications. The Ferrous-sulphate Xylenol-orange and Gelatin (FXG) radiochromic gel dosemeter is one of the systems used for such applications. Some chemical dosemeters show different responses for low- and medium-energy X-rays in comparison with high-energy γ-photons. The energy and dose rate dependence of the FXG dose response was examined. In addition to the detector response, other important dosimetric properties of the system were investigated for different X-ray beam qualities with tube voltages in the range 100-300 kV. An orthovoltage X-ray therapy unit was used to irradiate standard sized samples of FXG from different batches for radiation doses in the range 0-20 Gy

  9. Measurements of the top-quark properties with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The top-quark discovered in 1995 is the third-generation up-type quark of the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Precise measurements of the top-quark properties at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies are of great interest, providing an opportunity to test the SM and to search for new physics in the top-quark sector. This review covers recent results from the ATLAS experiment on measurements of top-quark mass, polarization, spin correlations between top-quark and antitop-quark, $t\\bar{t}\\gamma$ cross section, $W$-boson polarization in top-quark decays and searches for new physics in events with top-quarks in the final state. Measurements have been performed on data collected by the ATLAS detector corresponding up to 5 $fb^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity at centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV.

  10. Gamma irradiation effects on the thermal, optical and structural properties of Cr-39 nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouh, S.A.; Said, A.F.; Atta, M.R.; EL-Mellegy, W.M.; EL-Meniawi, S.

    2006-01-01

    A study of the effect of gamma irradiation on the thermal, optical and structural properties of CR-39 diglycol carbonate solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) has been carried out. Samples from CR-39 polymer were irradiated with gamma doses at levels between 20 and 300 KGy. Non-isothermal studies were carried out using thermo-gravimetry (TG), differential thermo-gravimetry (DTG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) to obtain the activation energy of decomposition and the transition temperatures for the non-irradiated and irradiated CR-39 samples. In addition, optical and structural property studies were performed on non-irradiated and irradiated CR-39 samples using refractive index and X-ray diffraction measurements. The variation of onset temperature of decomposition (To) thermal activation energy of decomposition (Ea) melting temperature (Tm) refractive index (n) and the mass fraction of the amorphous phase with the gamma dose were studied. It was found that many changes in the thermal, optical and structural properties of the CR-39 polymer could be produced by gamma irradiation via the degradation and cross linking mechanisms. Also, the gamma dose gave an advantage for increasing the correlation between the thermal stability of CR-39 polymer and the bond formation created by the ionizing effect of gamma radiation

  11. Top-quark properties and mass measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Tomas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The top quark is unique among the known quarks in that it decays before it has an opportunity to form hadronic bound states. This makes measurements of its properties particularly interesting as one can access directly the properties of a bare quark. The latest measurements of these properties with the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. Measurements of top-quark spin observables in top-antitop events, each sensitive to a different coefficient of the spin density matrix, are presented and compared to the Standard Model predictions. The helicity of the $W$ boson from the top decays and the production angles of the top quark are further discussed. Limits on the rate of flavour changing neutral currents in the production or decay of the top quark are reported. The production of top-quark pairs in association with $W$ and $Z$ bosons is also presented. The measurement probes the coupling between the top quark and the $Z$ boson. The cross-section measurement of photons produced in association with top-quark pa...

  12. Silicon radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, G.

    1995-01-01

    An introduction to and an overview of function principles and properties of semiconductor radiation detectors is attempted. The paper is addressed to people interested in detector development but not already experts in the field of semiconductor detectors. (orig.)

  13. First results on the charge collection properties of segmented detectors made with p-type bulk silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casse, G.; Allport, P.P.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Greenall, A.; Hanlon, M.; Jackson, J.N.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation damage of n-type bulk detectors introduces stable defects acting as effective p-type doping and leads to the change of the conductivity type of the silicon substrate (type inversion) after a fluence of a few times 10 13 protons cm -2 . The diode junction after inversion migrates from the original side to the back plane of the detector. The migration of the junction can be prevented using silicon detectors with p-type substrates. Furthermore, the use of n-side readout gives higher charge collection efficiency for segmented devices operated below the full depletion voltage. Large area (∼6.4x6.4 cm 2 ) capacitively coupled 80 μm pitch detectors using polysilicon bias resistors have been fabricated on p-type substrates (n-in-p diode structure). These detectors have been irradiated with 24 GeV/c protons to an integrated fluence of 3x10 14 cm -2 and kept for 7 days at 25 deg. C to reach the broad minimum of the annealing curve. Results are presented on the comparison of their charge collection properties with detectors using p-strip read-out after corresponding dose and annealing

  14. Commercial Applications of X Ray Spectrometric Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegrzynek, D.

    2013-01-01

    In the 21st century, the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique is widely used in process control, industrial applications and for routine elemental analysis. The technique has a multielement capability capable of detecting elements with Z ≥ 10, with a few instruments capable of detecting also elements with Z ≥ 5. It is characterized by a non-destructive analysis process and relatively good detection limits, typically one part per million, for a wide range of elements. The first commercial XRF instruments were introduced to the market about 50 years ago. They were the wavelength dispersive X ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometers utilizing Bragg’s law and reflection on crystal lattices for sequential elemental analysis of sample composition. The advances made in radiation detector technology, especially the introduction of semiconductor detectors, improvements in signal processing electronics, availability and exponential growth of personal computer market led to invention of energy dispersive X ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique. The EDXRF is more cost effective as compared to WDXRF. It also allows for designing compact instruments. Such instruments can be easily tailored to the needs of different customers, integrated with industrial installations, and also miniaturized for the purpose of in-situ applications. The versatility of the technique has been confirmed in a spectacular way by using the XRF and X-ray spectrometric techniques, among few others, during the NASA and ESA missions in search for the evidence of life and presence of water on the surface of Mars. The XRF technique has achieved its strong position within the atomic spectroscopy group of analytical techniques not only due to its versatility but also due to relatively low running costs, as compared to the commonly used methods, e.g., atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) or inductively coupled plasma atomic emission/mass spectrometry (ICP-AES/MS). Presently, the XRF technique together with X ray

  15. Commercial Applications of X Ray Spectrometric Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegrzynek, D., E-mail: D.Wedgrznek@iaea.org [International Atomic Energy Agency, The IAEA Laboratories, Seibersdorf, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-15

    In the 21st century, the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique is widely used in process control, industrial applications and for routine elemental analysis. The technique has a multielement capability capable of detecting elements with Z {>=} 10, with a few instruments capable of detecting also elements with Z {>=} 5. It is characterized by a non-destructive analysis process and relatively good detection limits, typically one part per million, for a wide range of elements. The first commercial XRF instruments were introduced to the market about 50 years ago. They were the wavelength dispersive X ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometers utilizing Bragg's law and reflection on crystal lattices for sequential elemental analysis of sample composition. The advances made in radiation detector technology, especially the introduction of semiconductor detectors, improvements in signal processing electronics, availability and exponential growth of personal computer market led to invention of energy dispersive X ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique. The EDXRF is more cost effective as compared to WDXRF. It also allows for designing compact instruments. Such instruments can be easily tailored to the needs of different customers, integrated with industrial installations, and also miniaturized for the purpose of in-situ applications. The versatility of the technique has been confirmed in a spectacular way by using the XRF and X-ray spectrometric techniques, among few others, during the NASA and ESA missions in search for the evidence of life and presence of water on the surface of Mars. The XRF technique has achieved its strong position within the atomic spectroscopy group of analytical techniques not only due to its versatility but also due to relatively low running costs, as compared to the commonly used methods, e.g., atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) or inductively coupled plasma atomic emission/mass spectrometry (ICP-AES/MS). Presently, the XRF technique together with X ray

  16. Imaging properties of small-pixel spectroscopic x-ray detectors based on cadmium telluride sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, Thomas; Schulze, Julia; Zuber, Marcus; Rink, Kristian; Oelfke, Uwe; Butzer, Jochen; Hamann, Elias; Cecilia, Angelica; Zwerger, Andreas; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Spectroscopic x-ray imaging by means of photon counting detectors has received growing interest during the past years. Critical to the image quality of such devices is their pixel pitch and the sensor material employed. This paper describes the imaging properties of Medipix2 MXR multi-chip assemblies bump bonded to 1 mm thick CdTe sensors. Two systems were investigated with pixel pitches of 110 and 165 μm, which are in the order of the mean free path lengths of the characteristic x-rays produced in their sensors. Peak widths were found to be almost constant across the energy range of 10 to 60 keV, with values of 2.3 and 2.2 keV (FWHM) for the two pixel pitches. The average number of pixels responding to a single incoming photon are about 1.85 and 1.45 at 60 keV, amounting to detective quantum efficiencies of 0.77 and 0.84 at a spatial frequency of zero. Energy selective CT acquisitions are presented, and the two pixel pitches' abilities to discriminate between iodine and gadolinium contrast agents are examined. It is shown that the choice of the pixel pitch translates into a minimum contrast agent concentration for which material discrimination is still possible. We finally investigate saturation effects at high x-ray fluxes and conclude with the finding that higher maximum count rates come at the cost of a reduced energy resolution. (paper)

  17. Physics properties of non-helical scan using 320-row multi detector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urikura, Atsushi; Nakaya, Yoshihiro; Kawatani, Keisuke; Kawashima, Ippei; Goto, Hironori; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Recently, clinical applications utilizing 320-row multi detector computed tomography (320MDCT) have increased, and the physical image properties of 320MDCT have been more concerned. We evaluated the spatial resolution in scan plane and z-direction, image noise and low-contrast sensitivity of non-helical mode (320NH), 640 slices mode by a double slice reconstruction technology (640DS), and 64-row helical mode (64HE) by using a 320MDCT. The spatial resolution in z-direction was evaluated by the section sensitivity profile (SSP) measurement with the micro coin phantom and the contrast transfer ratio (CTR) with the 0.5-mm comb phantom. The in-plane spatial resolution of 320NH was uniform over all the slice positions. The spatial resolution in z-direction decreased from the cathode side toward the anode side. The image noise of the anode side was higher than that of the cathode side. The contrast to noise ratio as index of the low contrast sensitivity was uniform over all the slice position. The CTR of 320NH fluctuated in the z-position, and the fluctuation was improved by 640DS except for the center of rotation. (author)

  18. Preliminary results of the experimental and simulated intrinsic properties of the Compteur A Trou (CAT) detector: behavior with synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplier, G; Bouillot, C; Lemonnier, M; Megtert, S

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a wireless proportional gas detector using a new type of intrinsic electric field shape for electronic amplification cascade. Its properties are analyzed by means of numerical simulations compared with experimental measurements. Electronic gain, energy resolution and count rate are established for pure argon gas and a mixture of argon and CO sub 2. Measurements with a synchrotron light source show that CAT can achieve count rates as high as 10 sup 7 mm sup 2 S.

  19. Preliminary results of the experimental and simulated intrinsic properties of the Compteur A Trou (CAT) detector: behavior with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaplier, G.; Boeuf, J.P.; Bouillot, C.; Lemonnier, M.; Megtert, S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a wireless proportional gas detector using a new type of intrinsic electric field shape for electronic amplification cascade. Its properties are analyzed by means of numerical simulations compared with experimental measurements. Electronic gain, energy resolution and count rate are established for pure argon gas and a mixture of argon and CO 2 . Measurements with a synchrotron light source show that CAT can achieve count rates as high as 10 7 mm 2 S

  20. High irradiation and ageing properties of resistive Micromegas detectors at the new CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Andreou, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Resistive Micromegas have been developed in recent years with the aim of making this technology usable in HEP experiments where the high sparking rate of classical Micromegas is not tolerable. A resistive Micromegas with four layers and an active surface of 0.5 m2 each, has been designed and built at CERN as prototype of the detectors to be used for the upgrade of the ATLAS experiment. The detector has been exposed to an intense gamma source of 16 TBq in order to study the effects of ageing and evaluate the detector behavior under high irradiation.

  1. The influence of fast neutron irradiation on the noise properties of silicon surface-barrier detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowski, W.; Korbel, K.

    1988-01-01

    The susceptibility to the fast neutron irradiation of silicon surface-barrier detectors has been investigated. It was shown that the 1/f-noise decreases substantially with increasing fluence in the range from 10 10 n/cm 2 to 10 11 n/cm 2 . The deterioration of the detector performance is caused mainly by the positively-charged defects induced by the radiation. The critical value of the neutron fluence, at which the detector performance begins to be worsened was also determined. 5 refs., 5 figs. (author)

  2. Dosimetric properties of radiophotoluminescent glass detector in low-energy photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoya, Noriyuki; Shimomura, Kouhei; Kitou, Satoshi; Shiota, Yasuo; Fujita, Yukio; Dobashi, Suguru; Takeda, Ken; Jingu, Keiichi; Matsushita, Haruo; Namito, Yoshihito; Ban, Syuichi; Koyama, Syuji; Tabushi, Katsuyoshi

    2012-10-01

    A radiophotoluminescent glass rod dosimeter (RGD) has recently become commercially available. It is being increasingly used for dosimetry in radiotherapy to measure the absorbed dose including scattered low-energy photons on the body surface of a patient and for postal dosimetry audit. In this article, the dosimetric properties of the RGD, including energy dependence of the dose response, reproducibly, variation in data obtained by the RGD for each energy, and angular dependence in low-energy photons, are discussed. An RGD (GD-301, Asahi Techno Glass Corporation, Shizuoka, Japan) was irradiated with monochromatic low-energy photon beams generated by synchrotron radiation at Photon Factory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The size of GD-301 was 1.5 mm in diameter and 8.5 mm in length and the active dose readout volume being 1 mm diameter and 0.6 mm depth located 0.7 mm from the end of the detector. The energy dependence of the dose response and reproducibility and variation were investigated for RGDs irradiated with a plastic holder and those irradiated without the plastic holder. Response of the RGD was obtained by not only conventional single field irradiation but also bilateral irradiation. Angular dependence of the RGD was measured in the range of 0°-90° for 13, 17, 40, and 80 keV photon beams by conventional single field irradiation. The dose responses had a peak at around 40 keV. For the energy range of less than 25 keV, all dose response curves steeply decreased in comparison with the ratio of mass energy absorption coefficient of the RGD to that of air. As for the reproducibility and variation in data obtained by the RGD, the coefficient of variance increased with decrease in photon energy. Furthermore, the variation for bilateral irradiation was less than that for single field irradiation. Regarding angular dependence of the RGD, for energies of 13 and 17 keV, the response decreased with increase in the irradiation angle, and the

  3. Contribution of silicon recombination properties in resolution of short-range particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbitskaya, E.M.; Eremin, V.K.; Malyarenko, A.M.; Strokan, N.B.; Sukhanov, V.L.

    1987-01-01

    Tracks of short-range particles represent dense clusters of electron-hole pairs 2-4 μm in diameter and 20-30 μm long. Thus, conditions for charge carrier transport in microscopic Si volume are discovered at registration of each particle. Statistical distribution by the specimen square of the main parameter - lifetime of charge carriers (τ) is disclosed as a result of particle chaotic hitting the detector. Analytical description for the shape of the spectral line of the detector is found in the assumption of Gauss distribution τ. The function is applied to the analysis of detector spectra with maximum energy resolution, for which contributions to the shape of the line of the fundamental factors and nonperfection of Si or of the detector structure as a whole are comparable. Excess fluctuations of α-particle energy transformation to the charge of electron-hole pairs are found relatively to adopted values

  4. Contribution of silicon recombination properties in resolution of short-range particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbitskaya, E M; Eremin, V K; Malyarenko, A M; Strokan, N B; Sukhanov, V L

    1987-10-01

    Tracks of short-range particles represent dense clusters of electron-hole pairs 2-4 ..mu..m in diameter and 20-30 ..mu..m long. Thus, conditions for charge carrier transport in microscopic Si volume are discovered at registration of each particle. Statistical distribution by the specimen square of the main parameter - lifetime of charge carriers (tau) is disclosed as a result of particle chaotic hitting the detector. Analytical description for the shape of the spectral line of the detector is found in the assumption of Gauss distribution tau. The function is applied to the analysis of detector spectra with maximum energy resolution, for which contributions to the shape of the line of the fundamental factors and nonperfection of Si or of the detector structure as a whole are comparable. Excess fluctuations of ..cap alpha..-particle energy transformation to the charge of electron-hole pairs are found relatively to adopted values.

  5. On the timing properties of germanium detectors: The centroid diagrams of prompt photopeaks and Compton events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penev, I.; Andrejtscheff, W.; Protochristov, Ch.; Zhelev, Zh.

    1987-01-01

    In the applications of the generalized centroid shift method with germanium detectors, the energy dependence of the time centroids of prompt photopeaks (zero-time line) and of Compton background events reveal a peculiar behavior crossing each other at about 100 keV. The effect is plausibly explained as associated with the ratio of γ-quanta causing the photoeffect and Compton scattering, respectively, at the boundaries of the detector. (orig.)

  6. Comparison of experimental and theoretical efficiency of HPGe X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, B.P.; Balouria, P.; Garg, M.L.; Nandi, T.K.; Mittal, V.K.; Govil, I.M.

    2008-01-01

    The low energy high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are being increasingly used for the quantitative estimation of elements using X-ray spectrometric techniques. The softwares used for quantitative estimation normally evaluate model based efficiency of detector using manufacturer supplied detector physical parameters. The present work shows that the manufacturer supplied detector parameters for low energy HPGe detectors need to be verified by comparing model based efficiency with the experimental ones. This is particularly crucial for detectors with ion implanted P type contacts

  7. Point Defect Properties of Cd(Zn)Te and TlBr for Room-Temperature Gamma Radiation Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordi, Vincenzo

    2013-03-01

    The effects of various crystal defects in CdTe, Cd1-xZnxTe (CZT), and TlBr are critical for their performance as room-temperature gamma radiation detectors. We use predictive first principles theoretical methods to provide fundamental, atomic scale understanding of the defect properties of these materials to enable design of optimal growth and processing conditions, such as doping, annealing, and stoichiometry. Several recent cases will be reviewed, including (i) accurate calculations of the thermodynamic and electronic properties of native point defects and point defect complexes in CdTe and CZT; (ii) the effects of Zn alloying on the native point defect properties of CZT; (iii) point defect diffusion and binding related to Te clustering in Cd(Zn)Te; (iv) the profound effect of native point defects--principally vacancies--on the intrinsic material properties of TlBr, particularly electronic and ionic conductivity; (v) tailored doping of TlBr to independently control the electronic and ionic conductivity; and (vi) the effects of metal impurities on the electronic properties and device performance of TlBr detectors. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 with support from the National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Nonproliferation and Verification Research and Development NA-22.

  8. Electrical properties of Au/CdZnTe/Au detectors grown by the boron oxide encapsulated Vertical Bridgman technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turturici, A.A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy); Abbene, L., E-mail: leonardo.abbene@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy); Gerardi, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy); Benassi, G. [due2lab s.r.l., Via Paolo Borsellino 2, Scandiano, 42019 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Bettelli, M.; Calestani, D. [IMEM/CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, Parma 43100 (Italy); Zambelli, N. [due2lab s.r.l., Via Paolo Borsellino 2, Scandiano, 42019 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Raso, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy); Zappettini, A. [IMEM/CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, Parma 43100 (Italy); Principato, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy)

    2016-09-11

    In this work we report on the results of electrical characterization of new CdZnTe detectors grown by the Boron oxide encapsulated Vertical Bridgman technique (B-VB), currently produced at IMEM-CNR (Parma, Italy). The detectors, with gold electroless contacts, have different thicknesses (1 and 2.5 mm) and the same electrode layout, characterized by a central anode surrounded by a guard-ring electrode. Investigations on the charge transport mechanisms and the electrical contact properties, through the modeling of the measured current–voltage (I–V) curves, were performed. Generally, the detectors are characterized by low leakage currents at high bias voltages even at room temperature: 34 nA/cm{sup 2} (T=25 °C) at 10,000 V/cm, making them very attractive for high flux X-ray measurements, where high bias voltage operation is required. The Au/CdZnTe barrier heights of the devices were estimated by using the interfacial layer-thermionic-diffusion (ITD) model in the reverse bias voltage range. Comparisons with CdZnTe detectors, grown by Traveling Heater Method (THM) and characterized by the same electrode layout, deposition technique and resistivity, were also performed.

  9. Spectral and spatial resolution properties of photon counting X-ray detectors like the Medipix-Detector; Spektrale und bildgebende Eigenschaften photonenzaehlender Roentgendetektoren am Beispiel des Medipix-Detektors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korn, A.

    2007-05-14

    resolutions. The simulations using the augmented ROSI program allow a perfect reproduction of the measurements. The phenomenon of the low frequency drop, known from previous measurements of the Medipix detector's MTF, can be explained with backscattering inside the detector. For the development of the next generation of detectors, Medipix3, it's prospective properties were implemented into the simulations. In comparison to Medipix2, a significant amelioration of the energy resolution may be expected. Beyond this, a method was developed permitting to maintain the high spatial resolution of Medipix2 with Medipix3. (orig.)

  10. LHCb: Characterisation and magnetic field properties of Multianode Photomultiplier tubes for the use in LHCb Upgrade RICH detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Eisenhardt, S; Morris, A; Needham, M; Neill, J

    2013-01-01

    A key feature of the LHCb upgrade, scheduled for 2019, is to remove the first level trigger and its data reduction from 40MHz to 1MHz, which is implemented in the on-detector readout electronics. The consequence for the LHCb Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors is that the Hybrid Photon Detectors need to be replaced as the readout chip is embedded in the tubes. Baseline for replacement are Multianode Photomultiplier tubes (MaPMT) and new readout electronics. Here we report about characterisation studies of the model Hamamatsu R11265 in the effort to qualify them for use in the LHCb RICH upgrade. Comparisons to the known model R7600 are also made. Two types of readout electronics are used. Most measurements to characterise the properties of the MaPMTs are taken with a VME based reference readout, using a x100 linear amplification and the CAEN V792 12-bit charge integrating digitiser. This allows to derive the signal properties from fits to the single photon spectra. In addition a prototype readout using the...

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of the imaging properties of scintillator-coated X-ray pixel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjelm, M.; Norlin, B.; Nilsson, H.-E.; Froejdh, C.; Badel, X.

    2003-01-01

    The spatial resolution of scintillator-coated X-ray pixel detectors is usually limited by the isotropic light spread in the scintillator. One way to overcome this limitation is to use a pixellated scintillating layer on top of the semiconductor pixel detector. Using advanced etching and filling techniques, arrays of CsI columns have been successfully fabricated and characterized. Each CsI waveguide matches one pixel of the semiconductor detector, limiting the spatial spread of light. Another concept considered in this study is to detect the light emitted from the scintillator by diodes formed in the silicon pore walls. There is so far no knowledge regarding the theoretical limits for these two approaches, which makes the evaluation of the fabrication process difficult. In this work we present numerical calculations of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for detector designs based on scintillator-filled pores in silicon. The calculations are based on separate Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of X-ray absorption and light transport in scintillator waveguides. The resulting data are used in global MC simulations of flood exposures of the detector array, from which the SNR values are obtained. Results are presented for two scintillator materials, namely CsI(Tl) and GADOX

  12. Study of Silicon Microstrip Detector Properties for the LHCb Silicon Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Lois-Gómez, C; Vázquez-Regueiro, P

    2006-01-01

    The LHCb experiment, at present under construction at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, has been designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violating phenomena and rare decays in the B meson systems. The need of a good tracking performance and the high density of particles close to the beam pipe lead to the use of silicon microstrip detectors in a significant part of the LHCb tracking system. The Silicon Tracker (ST) will be built using p-on-n silicon detectors with strip pitches of approximately 200 $\\mu$m and readout strips up to 38 cm in length. This thesis describes the tests carried out on silicon microstrip detectors for the ST, starting from the characterization of different prototypes up to the final tests on the detectors that are being installed at CERN. The results can be divided in three main blocks. The first part comprises an exhaustive characterization of several prototype sensors selected as suitable candidates for the detector and was performed in order to decide some design param...

  13. Properties of SiC semiconductor detector of fast neutrons investigated using MCNPX code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlakova, K.; Sagatova, A.; Necas, V.; Zatko, B.

    2013-01-01

    The potential of silicon carbide (SiC) for use in semiconductor nuclear radiation detectors has been long recognized. The wide bandgap of SiC (3.25 eV for 4H-SiC polytype) compared to that for more conventionally used semiconductors, such as silicon (1.12 eV) and germanium (0.67 eV), makes SiC an attractive semiconductor for use in high dose rate and high ionization nuclear environments. The present work focused on the simulation of particle transport in SiC detectors of fast neutrons using statistical analysis of Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX. Its possibilities in detector design and optimization are presented.(authors)

  14. Properties of polymer foils used as solid-state track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurny, F.

    1973-05-01

    Polymer foils were studied with a view to their application as solid-state alpha track detectors. The detection efficiency was determined as was its alpha energy dependence and the quality of the surface and the natural background of the foils were evaluated. The kinetics of etching was studied in three selected type of foils. Characteristic constants for the selected foils and methods of etching were calculated. The possible applications of the foils as track detectors are discussed and the effect is dealt with of the selected foil and of the method of chemical etching on the foil applicability in nuclear sciences, especially in fast neutron dosimetry and in alpha spectrometry. (author)

  15. Liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... Purpose: To develop and validate a simple, efficient and reliable Liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method for the quantitative determination of two dermatological drugs, ... By Country · List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access.

  16. Mass spectrometric researches in isotope cosmochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalan, K.

    1979-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of solar system processes, past and present, based on mass spectrometric researches on meteorites and moon samples are reviewed. The topics include the following : (1) Duration of nebular condensation, (2) Terminal stages of nucleosynthesis, (3) Planetary formation and evolution, (4) Heterogeneities in the solar nebula and (5) Solar wind composition. (auth.)

  17. Electrical and optical properties of multiple quantum well structures and their applications to infrared detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgesen, P.

    1992-04-01

    In this work the author investigate the subband nature of multiple quantum well structures by photoconductance spectroscopy, optical absorption measurements and tunneling experiments. Both interband and intraband transitions have been studied. The work is aimed at making an infrared detector using wide band gap semiconductors. 14 refs

  18. Neutron detection performance of silicon carbide and diamond detectors with incomplete charge collection properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, M., E-mail: michael.hodgson@becq.co.uk [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Lohstroh, A.; Sellin, P. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Thomas, D. [NPL, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-01

    The benefits of neutron detection and spectroscopy with carbon based, wide band gap, semiconductor detectors have previously been discussed within the literature. However, at the time of writing there are still limitations with these detectors related to availability, cost, size and perceived quality. This study demonstrates that lower quality materials—indicated by lower charge collection efficiency (CCE), poor resolution and polarisation effect—available at wafer scale and lower cost, can fulfil requirements for fast neutron detection and spectroscopy for fluxes over several orders of magnitude, where only coarse energy discrimination is required. In this study, a single crystal diamond detector (D-SC, with 100% CCE), a polycrystalline diamond (D-PC, with ≈4% CCE) and semi-insulating silicon carbide (SiC-SI, with ≈35% CCE) have been compared for alpha and fast neutron performance. All detectors demonstrated alpha induced polarisation effects in the form of a change of both energy peak position and count rate with irradiation time. Despite these operational issues the ability to detect fast neutrons and distinguish neutron energies was observed. This performance was demonstrated over a wide dynamic range (500–40,000 neutrons/s), with neutron induced polarisation being demonstrated in D-PC and SiC-SI at high fluxes.

  19. Effects of Te inclusions on charge-carrier transport properties in CdZnTe radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Yaxu; Rong, Caicai; Xu, Yadong; Shen, Hao; Zha, Gangqiang; Wang, Ning; Lv, Haoyan; Li, Xinyi; Wei, Dengke; Jie, Wanqi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This work reveals the behaviors of Te inclusion in affecting charge-carrier transport properties in CdZnTe detectors for the first time and analysis the mechanism therein. • The results show that charge collection efficiencies in Te inclusion degraded regions experience fast ascent under low biases and slow descent at high applied biases, which deviates from the Hecht rule. • This phenomenon is attributed to the competitive influence of two mechanisms under different biases, namely charge carrier trapping due to uniformly distributed point defects and Te inclusion induced transient charge loss. • A modified Hecht equation is further proposed to explain the effects of high-density localized defects, say Te inclusions, on the charge collection efficiency. • We believe that this research has wide appeal to analyze the macroscopic defects and their influence on charge transport properties in semiconductor radiation detectors. - Abstract: The influence of tellurium (Te) inclusions on the charge collection efficiency in cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) detectors has been investigated using ion beam induced charge (IBIC) technique. Combining the analysis of infrared transmittance image, most of the low charge collection areas in the IBIC images prove the existence of Te inclusions. To further clarify the role of Te inclusions on charge transport properties, bias dependent local IBIC scan was performed on Te inclusion related regions from 20 V to 500 V. The result shows that charge collection efficiencies in Te inclusion degraded regions experience fast ascent under low biases and slow descent at high applied biases, which deviates from Hecht rule. This behavior is attributed to the competitive influence of two mechanisms under different biases, namely charge carrier trapping due to uniformly distributed point defects and Te inclusion induced transient charge loss. A modified Hecht equation is further proposed to explain the effects of high

  20. The thermal neutron detection using 4H-SiC detectors with 6LiF conversion layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zatko, B.; Bohacek, P.; Sekacova, M.; Arbet, J.; Sagatova, A.; Necas, V.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we have examined 4H-SiC detector using a thermal neutron source and studied its detection properties. The detector was exposed to neutrons generated by 238 Pu-Be radiation source. The detection properties of 4H-SiC detectors were evaluated considering the use of the 6 LiF conversion. We prepared 4H-SiC Schottky contact detectors based on high-quality of epitaxial layer. The current-voltage characteristic show operating region between 100 V and 400 V. The detector was connected to the spectrometric set-up and used for detection of alpha particles from 241 Am. Following the 6 LiF conversion layer was applied on the Schottky contact of detector and the detection of thermal neutrons was performed. We are able to resolve alpha particles and tritons which are products of nuclear reaction between thermal neutrons and conversion layer. Also bare detector was used for neutron detection to clearly show significant influence of the used conversion layer.(authors)

  1. Effect of electron transport properties on unipolar CdZnTe radiation detectors: LUND, SpectrumPlus, and Coplanar Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, Ralph B.

    2000-01-01

    Device simulations of (1) the laterally-contacted-unipolar-nuclear detector (LUND), (2) the SpectrumPlus, (3) and the coplanar grid made of Cd 0.9 Zn 0.1 Te (CZT) were performed for 137 Cs irradiation by 662.15 keV gamma-rays. Realistic and controlled simulations of the gamma-ray interactions with the CZT material were done using the MCNP4B2 Monte Carlo program, and the detector responses were simulated using the Sandia three-dimensional multielectrode simulation program (SandTMSP). The simulations were done for the best and the worst expected carrier nobilities and lifetimes of currently commercially available CZT materials for radiation detector applications. For the simulated unipolar devices, the active device volumes were relatively large and the energy resolutions were fairly good, but these performance characteristics were found to be very sensitive to the materials properties. The internal electric fields, the weighting potentials, and the charge induced efficiency maps were calculated to give insights into the operation of these devices

  2. Diamond Particle Detector Properties during High Fluence Material Damage Tests and their Future Applications for Machine Protection in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Burkart, F; Borburgh, J; Dehning, B; Di Castro, M; Griesmayer, E; Lechner, A; Lendaro, J; Loprete, F; Losito, R; Montesano, S; Schmidt, R; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2013-01-01

    Experience with LHC machine protection (MP) during the last three years of operation shows that the MP systems sufficiently protect the LHC against damage in case of failures leading to beam losses with a time constant exceeding 1ms. An unexpected fast beam loss mechanism, called UFOs [1], was observed, which could potentially quench superconducting magnets. For such fast losses, but also for better understanding of slower losses, an improved understanding of the loss distribution within a bunch train is required [2]. Diamond particle detectors with bunch-by-bunch resolution and high dynamic range have been developed and successfully tested in the LHC and in experiments to quantify the damage limits of LHC components. This paper will focus on experience gained in use of diamond detectors. The properties of these detectors were measured during high-fluence material damage tests in CERN’s Hi-RadMat facility. The results will be discussed and compared to the cross-calibration with FLUKA simulations. Future app...

  3. Hybrid Detector for the Measurement of Properties of Secondary Cosmic Rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez, N.; Pasaye, E.; Salazar, H.; Villasenor, L.

    2003-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the lifetimes of pions, kaons and muons in the secondary cosmic-ray radiation by using a hybrid detector. The detector consists of a container filled with liquid scintillator that produces scintillation light when crossed by charged particles; this container is located atop a water tank that produces Cherenkov light when crossed by charged particles. Both containers have one phototube inside to detect the light produced. The electronics used consists of NIM modules, two digital oscilloscopes and one PC. This equipment is multipurpose and can be conventionally found in any modern physics laboratory. The results obtained for the muon, pion and kaon lifetimes are the following: τμ =2.120±0.02 μs, τπ =24.63±3 ns y τK = 12.52±2 ns in good agreement with the literature

  4. Processing of gamma-ray spectrometric logs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umiastowski, K.; Dumesnil, P.

    1984-10-01

    CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) has developped a gamma-ray spectrometric tool, containing an analog-to-digital converter. This new tool permits to perform very precise uranium logs (natural gamma-ray spectrometry), neutron activation logs and litho-density logs (gamma-gamma spectrometric logs). Specific processing methods were developped to treate the particular problems of down-hole gamma-ray spectrometry. Extraction of the characteristic gamma-ray peak, even if they are superposed on the background radiation of very high intensity, is possible. This processing methode enables also to obtain geological informations contained in the continuous background of the spectrum. Computer programs are written in high level language for SIRIUS (VICTOR) and APOLLO computers. Exemples of uranium and neutron activation logs treatment are presented [fr

  5. Simulation of thermal properties of the silicon detector modules in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Duerdoth, I P; Yuldashev, B S

    2002-01-01

    The temperature distribution and power flow from cell on the Silicon Module of the Forward Semiconductor Tracker in the ATLAS experiment have been simulated for irradiated detector. Power generated by conduction was compared for the modules with one and two cooling points. To obtain an optimal cooling temperature, the temperature of the hottest cell was plotted against power on the silicon module. The analysis of the approximation function and values for the critical power for each cooling temperature are presented. The optimal value of the cooling temperature occurred to be 260 K. (author)

  6. Optical properties studies of glass samples for prototyping a TORCH detector module

    CERN Multimedia

    Castillo García, L

    2014-01-01

    TORCH (Time Of internally Reflected CHerenkov light) ) is a proposed particle identification system to achieve positive π/K/p separation at a ≥3σ level in the momentum range below 10 GeV/c. Cherenkov photons are generated from charged particle tracks crossing a 1cm-thick quartz plate. They propagate by total internal reflection to the edge and are focused onto an array of micro-channel plate photon detectors. Their position and arrival time are recorded. This allows the reconstruction of the photon trajectory and the particle crossing time. Results on optical tests are presented.

  7. Some properties of the streamer tube system of the charm neutrino detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergsma, F.; Dorenbosch, J.; Jonker, M.

    1982-01-01

    The fine-grain and low-density neutrino calorimeter of the CHARM Collaboration has been designed to measure the energy and the direction of particle showers. To further improve the spatial resolution the calorimeter has been upgraded by adding 20,000 aluminium tubes, working in the limited streamer mode. Each subunit is now equipped with crossed wire planes. Results of a new energy calibration of the upgraded detector using electron and pion beams from 5 to 140 GeV/c, and on the angular and spatial resolution are presented. The use of the streamer tube system to discriminate between electromagnetic and hadronic showers is discussed

  8. Study of the neutrino electromagnetic properties with prototype of Borexino detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back, H.O.; Balata, M.; Bari, A. de

    2002-01-01

    Results of background measurements with the prototype of the Borexino detector have been used to obtain upper bound on neutrino magnetic moment μ ν and lifetime of radiative neutrino decay ν H → ν L + γ. The new upper limit for μ ν of pp and 7 Be neutrino is 5.5 · 10 -10 μ B and lifetime τ c.m. (ν H → ν L + γ)/m ν ≥ 1.5 · 10 3 s · eV -1 . The latter result is an order of magnitude more restrictive than obtained in previous laboratory experiments

  9. Electronic equipment for spectrometric data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, L.J.; Trenev, A.M.; Todorova, E.I.; Dimitrov, V.D.

    1978-01-01

    Electronic equipment carrying out logical operations and a full set of the arithmetic operations was developed for spectrometric data processing. The flowsheet of the computing part of the device, made on the basis of a specialized integral circuit, is given. The device includes input registers, multiplexor, matrix commutator, arithmetic unit and indication unit. The equipment is rated to carry out calculations according to comparatively complex formulae in several seconds

  10. Car-borne multichannel gamma-ray spectrometric system model CZD-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Shili; Zhai Yugui; Ma Yanfang; Jiao Cangwen; Zhang Biao

    1998-01-01

    The car-borne multichannel gamma-ray spectrometric system Mode CZD-6 is composed of a HDY-256 of portable multichannel gamma-ray spectrometer developed by the Beijing Research Institute of Uranium Geology and a large volume scintillation detector. the position for each measurement point is determined by the GPS instrument. Its latitude and longitude, as well as measured 256 channels of γ-spectrometric data are collected by a notebook computer, which can show the 256 channels of spectra for each point during measuring processes. The complete system can be loaded in a field car. This system has been used to environmental radioactive monitoring after calibration by airborne radiometric models in Shijiazhuang, Hebei province. A lot of data confirm that the system works stably and reliably, and is a fast and advanced approach for environmental γ-spectrometric monitoring. It can be used not only to determination of contents of natural radioactive elements in environments, but also to monitoring nuclear pollution and emergency treatment in nuclear accidents significantly

  11. Measurement of top quark properties from pair production and decay with the CMS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosemann, C.

    2009-02-15

    Semileptonic top quark pair decays are analysed using full simulation of the CMS detector at the proton-proton collider LHC. A complete analysis of event selection and reconstruction is performed with the goal of the determination of differential cross sections. Special emphasis is put on object reconstruction and an efficient and unbiased event selection procedure. The reconstruction of semileptonic t anti t decays uses the full combination of all reconstruction objects. These objects are specifically defined and analysed in their reconstruction performance. For this several methods are developed and implemented. A highly efficient electron identification and a clear procedure of lepton isolation are defined. Two selections are compared, a cut-based and a neural network-based selection with a common efficiency of 10%. For the event selection and reconstruction a kinematic fit is implemented. As final step the t anti t spectra of rapidity, invariant mass and transverse momentum are analysed. (orig.)

  12. Measurement of top quark properties from pair production and decay with the CMS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosemann, C.

    2009-02-01

    Semileptonic top quark pair decays are analysed using full simulation of the CMS detector at the proton-proton collider LHC. A complete analysis of event selection and reconstruction is performed with the goal of the determination of differential cross sections. Special emphasis is put on object reconstruction and an efficient and unbiased event selection procedure. The reconstruction of semileptonic t anti t decays uses the full combination of all reconstruction objects. These objects are specifically defined and analysed in their reconstruction performance. For this several methods are developed and implemented. A highly efficient electron identification and a clear procedure of lepton isolation are defined. Two selections are compared, a cut-based and a neural network-based selection with a common efficiency of 10%. For the event selection and reconstruction a kinematic fit is implemented. As final step the t anti t spectra of rapidity, invariant mass and transverse momentum are analysed. (orig.)

  13. Production and Properties of B-Hadrons with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Reznicek, Pavel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A wide program of studies on heavy flavours is performed with the ATLAS detector. Production cross sections have been measured for hadrons with b and c quark, for quarkonia states, and for associated production J/psi+J/psi, J/psi+muon, J/psi+W and J/psi+Z. The talk will discuss recent results on J/psi+J/psi prompt production (including the extraction of the double-parton-scattering component), and on the kinematical correlation in B hadron pair production, studied through their inclusive decays to J/psi and muons, respectively. Exotic states containing b and c quark have also been studies, and the talk will report on the searches for structures in the invariant mass of J/psi+hadron in the decay products of Lambda_b, and in the mass spectrum of Bs+pion.

  14. Properties of CMOS devices and circuits fabricated on high-resistivity, detector-grade silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, S.

    1991-11-01

    A CMOS process that is compatible with silicon p-i-n radiation detectors has been developed and characterized. A total of twelve mask layers are used in the process. The NMOS device is formed in a retrograde well while the PMOS device is fabricated directly in the high-resistivity silicon. Isolation characteristics are similar to a standard foundary CMOS process. Circuit performance using 3 μm design rules has been evaluated. The measured propagation delay and power-delay product for a 51-stage ring oscillator was 1.5 ns and 43 fJ, respectively. Measurements on a simple cascode amplifier results in a gain-bandwidth product of 200 MHz at a bias current of 15 μA. The input-referred noise of the cascode amplifier is 20 nV/√Hz at 1 MHz

  15. The JADE muon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, J.; Armitage, J.C.M.; Baines, J.T.M.; Ball, A.H.; Bamford, G.; Barlow, R.J.; Bowdery, C.K.; Chrin, J.T.M.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Glendinning, I.; Greenshaw, T.; Hassard, J.F.; Hill, P.; King, B.T.; Loebinger, F.K.; Macbeth, A.A.; McCann, H.; Mercer, D.; Mills, H.E.; Murphy, P.G.; Prosper, H.B.; Rowe, P.; Stephens, K.

    1985-01-01

    The JADE muon detector consists of 618 planar drift chambers interspersed between layers of hadron absorber. This paper gives a detailed description of the construction and operation of the detector as a whole and discusses the properties of the drift chambers. The muon detector has been operating successfully at PETRA for five years. (orig.)

  16. THE IMAGING PROPERTIES OF THE GAS PIXEL DETECTOR AS A FOCAL PLANE POLARIMETER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabiani, S.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Muleri, F.; Soffitta, P.; Rubini, A. [INAF-IAPS, via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Bellazzini, R.; Brez, A.; De Ruvo, L.; Minuti, M.; Pinchera, M.; Sgró, C.; Spandre, G. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo, 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Spiga, D.; Tagliaferri, G.; Pareschi, G.; Basso, S.; Citterio, O. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via Brera 28, I-20121 Milano (Italy); Burwitz, V.; Burkert, W., E-mail: sergio.fabiani@iaps.inaf.it [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Gautinger Str. 45, D-82061 Neuired (Germany); and others

    2014-06-01

    X-rays are particularly suited to probing the physics of extreme objects. However, despite the enormous improvements of X-ray astronomy in imaging, spectroscopy, and timing, polarimetry remains largely unexplored. We propose the photoelectric polarimeter Gas Pixel Detector (GPD) as a candidate instrument to fill the gap created by more than 30 yr without measurements. The GPD, in the focus of a telescope, will increase the sensitivity of orders of magnitude. Moreover, since it can measure the energy, the position, the arrival time, and the polarization angle of every single photon, it allows us to perform polarimetry of subsets of data singled out from the spectrum, the light curve, or an image of the source. The GPD has an intrinsic, very fine imaging capability, and in this work we report on the calibration campaign carried out in 2012 at the PANTER X-ray testing facility of the Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik of Garching (Germany) in which, for the first time, we coupled it with a JET-X optics module with a focal length of 3.5 m and an angular resolution of 18 arcsec at 4.5 keV. This configuration was proposed in 2012 aboard the X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer (XIPE) in response to the ESA call for a small mission. We derived the imaging and polarimetric performance for extended sources like pulsar wind nebulae and supernova remnants as case studies for the XIPE configuration and also discuss possible improvements by coupling the detector with advanced optics that have a finer angular resolution and larger effective areas to study extended objects with more detail.

  17. Transmission properties of barite mortar using X-ray spectra measured with Cd Te detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, J. C.; Mariano, L.; Costa, P. R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Rua do Matao Travessa R. 187, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-090 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Tomal, A., E-mail: josilene@usp.br [Universidade Federal de Goias, Instituto de Fisica, Campus Samambaia, 74001-970 Goiania (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Current methods for calculating X-ray shielding barriers do not take into account spectral distribution of the beam transmitted by the protective material. This consideration is important in dose estimations for radiation workers and general public in diagnostic radiology facilities. The aim of the present study was to estimate barite mortar attenuation curves using X-ray spectra weighted by a workload distribution. These curves were described in units of ambient dose equivalent (H (10)), since it is the radiation quantity adopted by IAEA for dose assessment in medical environment. Attenuation curves were determined using the optimized model for shielding evaluation presented by Costa and Caldas (2002). Workload distribution presented by Simpkin (1996), measured primary spectra and mass attenuation coefficients of barite mortar were used as input data in this model. X-ray beams in diagnostic energy range were generated by an industrial X-ray tube with 3 mm of aluminum additional filtration. Primary experimental spectra were measured by a Cd Te detector and corrected by the response function of detector by means of a stripping procedure. Air kerma measurements were performed using an ionization chamber for normalization purpose of the spectra. The corrected spectra presented good agreement with spectra generated by a semi-empirical model. The variation of the ambient dose equivalent as a function of barite mortar thickness was calculated. Using these data, it was estimated the optimized thickness of protective barrier needed for shielding a particular area in an X-ray imaging facility. The results obtained for primary protective barriers exhibit qualitative agreement with those presented in literature. (Author)

  18. The central drift chamber of the SAPHIR detector - implementation into the experiment and study of its properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    At the Bonn accelerator facility ELSA the large solid angle detector SAPHIR was built for the investigation of photon induced reactions. A main component of SAPHIR is the central drift chamber (CDC) matching the magneto gap of 1m 3 . The diameter of the in total 1828 hexagonal drift cells is about 18 mm. The subject of this paper is the implementation of the CDC in the experiment. After the description of the hardware follows the presentation of the software tools for filtering and monitoring the data, which have been developed and tested. An algorithm for extracting the space time relationship is presented. The properties of the chamber with an improved gas mixture (Helium/Neon/Isobutane8 21.25:63.75:15) have been investigated. A spatial resolution of about 200 μm was achieved. The efficiency of the chamber is 97% at a tagged photon of 5x10 4 per second crossing the chamber. (orig.) [de

  19. Measurement of the Higgs boson coupling properties in the diphoton, ZZ and WW decay channels using the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ruchi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The coupling properties of the Higgs boson are studied in the diphoton, ZZ to four-lepton decay channels using 36.1 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data from the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector. Measurements of simplified template cross sections, designed to measure the different Higgs boson production processes in specific regions of phase space, are reported for diphoton and four-leptons decay channels. Cross sections for different higgs boson production modes are interpreted in terms of coupling modifiers. In ZZ decay channel, the tensor structure of the Higgs boson couplings is studied using an effective Lagrangian approach for the description of interactions beyond the Standard Model.

  20. Development of the MCNPX model for the portable HPGe detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koleska, Michal; Viererbl, Ladislav; Marek, Milan

    2014-01-01

    The portable HPGe coaxial detector Canberra Big MAC is used in LVR-15 research reactor for spectrometric measurement of spent nuclear fuel. The fuel is measured in the dedicated system located in the spent fuel pool situated near the reactor. For the purpose of the spectrometric system calibration, the detector was precisely modeled with the MCNPX code. This model was constructed with the data acquired from the technical specification provided by the manufacturer and from the data obtained by the radiography of the crystal. The detector model was verified on the experimental data measured with available standard radionuclide sources and on-site prepared 110m Ag source. - Highlights: • Inner structure of the HPGe detector is determined. • An MCNPX model of the detector is developed. • The model is verified using different sources for two measurement geometries

  1. Top quark pair property measurements and $t\\bar{t}+X$, using the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00451917; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Measuring the properties of the top quark has been proven to be a reliable test of the Standard Model of particle physics (SM). At the Large Hadron Collider, top quark physics has entered the era of precision measurements which allows to measure new top quark properties and to repeat other top quark properties measurements with improved precision. This article presents the measurements of top quark spin observables, charge and CP asymmetries, $W$ boson polarisation from $t\\bar{t}$ events and the cross section of $t\\bar{t}$ pairs produced in association with a $W$ or $Z$ boson. All these measurements are using data from proton-proton collisions taken with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The spin correlation $C(n,n)$ is measured for the first time and direct CP violation is measured directly for the first time in the context of $b$-hadron decays. The measured value of the CP mixing asymmetry $A^{b}_{mix}$ presented here cannot disprove the deviation in the dimuon asymmetry seen by the DØ exper...

  2. Graphene oxide/carbon nanoparticle thin film based IR detector: Surface properties and device characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Aktar Chowdhury

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the synthesis, characterization, and application of carbon nanoparticles (CNP adorned graphene oxide (GO nanocomposite materials. Here we mainly focus on an emerging topic in modern research field presenting GO-CNP nanocomposite as a infrared (IR radiation detector device. GO-CNP thin film devices were fabricated from liquid phase at ambient condition where no modifying treatments were necessary. It works with no cooling treatment and also for stationary objects. A sharp response of human body IR radiation was detected with time constants of 3 and 36 sec and radiation responsivity was 3 mAW−1. The current also rises for quite a long time before saturation. This work discusses state-of-the-art material developing technique based on near-infrared photon absorption and their use in field deployable instrument for real-world applications. GO-CNP-based thin solid composite films also offer its potentiality to be utilized as p-type absorber material in thin film solar cell, as well.

  3. The NA62 Gigatracker: Detector properties and pixel read-out architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, M.; Carassiti, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Cortina, E.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Martin, E.; Martoiu, S.; Mazza, G.; Noy, M.; Petrucci, F.; Riedler, P.; Rivetti, A.; Tiuraniemi, S.

    2010-01-01

    The beam spectrometer of the NA62 experiment, named Gigatracker, has to perform single track reconstruction with unprecedented time resolution (150 ps rms) in a harsh radiation environment. To meet these requirements, and in order to reduce material budget to a minimum, three hybrid silicon pixel detector stations will be installed in vacuum. An adequate strategy to compensate for the discriminator time-walk must be implemented and R and D investigating two different options is ongoing. Two read-out chip prototypes have been designed in order to compare their performance: one approach is based on the use of a constant-fraction discriminator followed by an on-pixel TDC, while the other one is based on the use of a time-over-threshold circuit followed by a TDC shared by a group of pixels. This paper describes the Gigatracker system, presents the global architectures of both read-out ASICs and reviews the current status of the R and D project.

  4. Etching Properties of Poly ethyleneterephthalate (PET) Melinex-E Nuclear Track Detectors (NTDs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanim, E.H.; Hussein, A.; El-samman, H.M.; Tretyakova, S.P.

    2009-01-01

    One of the main parameters that control track formation is the bulk etch rate, VB. The dependence of VB on etchant concentrations and temperatures was extensively carried out. It is found that, VB of the PET Melinex-E (C 10 H 8 O 4 ) depends upon the etchant temperature T through an Arrhenius equation. While, the dependence of VB on the etchant concentration; C followed the relation VB = A C n. The activation energy of etching, Eb, for the studied Melinex-E detector was calculated. An average value of Eb = 0.83 ± 0.03 eV was extracted. The variation of, VB, of PET with etching duration was studied and compared with that of CR-39 plastic at certain etching temperature; T e =60 degree C and at different etchant concentrations. The irradiation facilities were performed with the 252 Cf fission fragments and 129 Xe +8 (θi =π/2). Results of these studies were discussed in the frame work of nuclear track formation and etching theories

  5. Graphene oxide/carbon nanoparticle thin film based IR detector: Surface properties and device characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Farzana Aktar [Experimental Physics Division, Atomic Energy Centre, 4, Kazi Nazrul Islam Avenue, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh); Hossain, Mohammad Abul [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh); Uchida, Koji; Tamura, Takahiro; Sugawa, Kosuke; Mochida, Tomoaki; Otsuki, Joe [College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8-14 Kanda Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Mohiuddin, Tariq [Department of Physics, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat (Oman); Boby, Monny Akter [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh); Alam, Mohammad Sahabul, E-mail: msalam@ksu.edu.sa [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh); Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering & King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-10-15

    This work deals with the synthesis, characterization, and application of carbon nanoparticles (CNP) adorned graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite materials. Here we mainly focus on an emerging topic in modern research field presenting GO-CNP nanocomposite as a infrared (IR) radiation detector device. GO-CNP thin film devices were fabricated from liquid phase at ambient condition where no modifying treatments were necessary. It works with no cooling treatment and also for stationary objects. A sharp response of human body IR radiation was detected with time constants of 3 and 36 sec and radiation responsivity was 3 mAW{sup −1}. The current also rises for quite a long time before saturation. This work discusses state-of-the-art material developing technique based on near-infrared photon absorption and their use in field deployable instrument for real-world applications. GO-CNP-based thin solid composite films also offer its potentiality to be utilized as p-type absorber material in thin film solar cell, as well.

  6. Experimental characterization of the Clear-PEM scanner spectrometric performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugalho, R; Carrico, B; Ferreira, C S; Frade, M; Ferreira, M; Moura, R; Ortigao, C; Pinheiro, J F; Rodrigues, P; Rolo, I; Silva, J C; Trindade, A; Varela, J [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas (LIP), Av. Elias Garcia 14-1, 1000-149 Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: frade@lip.pt

    2009-10-15

    In the framework of the Clear-PEM project for the construction of a high-resolution and high-specificity scanner for breast cancer imaging, a Positron Emission Mammography tomograph has been developed and installed at the Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto hospital. The Clear-PEM scanner is mainly composed by two planar detector heads attached to a robotic arm, trigger/data acquisition electronics system and computing servers. The detector heads hold crystal matrices built from 2 x 2 x 20 mm{sup 3} LYSO:Ce crystals readout by Hamamatsu S8550 APD arrays. The APDs are optically coupled to both ends of the 6144 crystals in order to extract the DOI information for each detected event. Each one of 12288 APD's pixels is read and controlled by Application Specific Integrated Circuits water-cooled by an external cooling unit. The Clear-PEM frontend boards innovative design results in a unprecedented integration of the crystal matrices, APDs and ASICs, making Clear-PEM the PET scanner with the highest number of APD pixels ever integrated so far. In this paper, the scanner's main technical characteristics, calibration strategies and the first spectrometric performance evaluation in a clinical environment are presented. The first commissioning results show 99.7% active channels, which, after calibration, have inter-pixel and absolute gain distributions with dispersions of, respectively, 12.2% and 15.3%, demonstrating that despite the large number of channels, the system is uniform. The mean energy resolution at 511 keV is of 15.9%, with a 8.8% dispersion, and the mean C{sub DOI}{sup -1} is 5.9%/mm, with a 7.8% dispersion. The coincidence time resolution, at 511 keV, for a energy window between 400 and 600 keV, is 5.2 ns FWHM.

  7. Spectrometric control of radionuclides production parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuk, I.; Potarenko, A.; Yarochevich, O.; Hluboky, N.; Kerko, P.; Bogdanov, V.; Dyatel, N.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: A radioactive preparations and sources are widely used all over the world for scientific, industrial and medical purposes. These preparations in Belarus are planned to produce by the Joint Belarussian-Russian Closed Joint Stock Company 'Isotope technologies' (CJSC IT). The company was created in 1998 by two leading scientific centers-SSI 'Joint Institute of Power and Nuclear Research-Sosny' the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus and the State Center of Science of the Russian Federation 'Scientific research institute of nuclear reactors'. One of the mainstream directions in CJSC IT activities is production of radioactive preparations for the industrial and scientific application (such as 133 Ba, 109 Cd, 63 Ni, 60 Co) and for the medical purposes (such as 19 '2Ir, 60 Co). All radioactive preparations have a good export potential and adequate to modern technical and consumer requirements. X-γ spectrometric analysis of considered radioactive sources is one of the basic methods for quality control of radioactive sources. At present, we are developing x-γ spectrometric support of purification process from contaminating radionuclides of 109 Cd -γ preparation and 63 Ni - β preparation. Work on x-γ spectrometric quality control of 133 Ba preparation is carried out. The description of the used equipment is given. Techniques of contaminating radionuclides determination (contents ∼10 - '6 from activity of the basic radionuclide) are presented. Problems of the choice of geometry of measurements of sources with activity about 10 7 -10 9 Bq and possible sources of errors are discussed. (author)

  8. A measuring generator for testing spectrometric channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh Sy Hien; Kalinkin, A.I.

    1984-01-01

    A measuring generator for testing and tuning an amplitude spectrometric channel is described. The device consists of a pseudo random pulse generator, constructed on shifters, a sawtooth wave generator and a shaper of stable amplitude pulses with exponential decay times. The device is made as CAMAC unit width modules and has the following specifications: average pulse repetition rate of pseudo random pulses is 3.1; 25; 50; 100; 200 kHz; peak amplitude of 2 Hz pulse repetition of saw tooth pulses is 6 V; peak amplitude of exponential shape pulses is 5 V. The block-diagram and basic circuits of the device are given

  9. Using a 2D detector array for meaningful and efficient linear accelerator beam property validations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Timothy A; Gallagher, Ian; Roberson, Peter L

    2014-11-08

    Following linear accelerator commissioning, the qualified medical physicist is responsible for monitoring the machine's ongoing performance, detecting and investigating any changes in beam properties, and assessing the impact of unscheduled repairs. In support of these responsibilities, the authors developed a method of using a 2D ionization chamber array to efficiently test and validate important linear accelerator photon beam properties. A team of three physicists identified critical properties of the accelerator and developed constancy tests that were sensitive to each of the properties. The result was a 14-field test plan. The test plan includes large and small fields at varying depths, a reduced SSD field at shallow depth for sensitivity to extra focal photon and electron components, and analysis of flatness, symmetry, dose, dose profiles, and dose ratios. Constancy tests were repeated five times over a period of six weeks and used to set upper and lower investigation levels at ± 3 SDs. Deliberate variations in output, penumbra, and energy were tested to determine the suitability of the proposed method. Measurements were also performed on a similar, but distinct, machine to assess test sensitivity. The results demonstrated upper and lower investigation levels significantly smaller than the comparable TG-142 annual recommendations, with the exception of the surrogate used for output calibration, which still fell within the TG-142 monthly recommendation. Subtle changes in output, beam energy, and penumbra were swiftly identified for further investigation. The test set identified the distinct nature of the second accelerator. The beam properties of two photon energies can be validated in approximately 1.5 hrs using this method. The test suite can be used to evaluate the impact of minor repairs, detect changes in machine performance over time, and supplement other machine quality assurance testing.

  10. Characterization of CR 39 nuclear track detector for use as a radon/thoron dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandaiya, S.

    1988-02-01

    For the estimation of radon, thoron and their short-lived daughter products in air radon diffusion chambers with passive α-track etch detectors have been used. The report describes the properties of CR 39 track etch detectors in particular with respect to the spectrometric detection of α-particles in the energy range up to 8.77 MeV using chemical and a combination of chemical-electrochemical etching technique. In order to optimize the etching conditions for an α-energy discrimination in the energy range up to 8.77 MeV, the ECE track size diameter and the track density have been investigated as a function of the chemical pre-etching time using three electrical field strengths. In a mixed α-spectrum the contributions of various α-particles with energies between 4.6 to 8.77 MeV have been determined experimentally in CR 39 and compared with the spectral measurement using a surface barrier detector and the same irradiation geometry. Beside CR 39 detectors etched chemically and electrochemically, in addition surface barrier detectors and a Monte Carlo calculation have been used to evaluate the α-energy spectrum for thoron and its daughter products emitted by α-decays in the air volume and the plate-out of daughters at the inner surface on the diffusion chamber. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This sixth chapter presents the operational principles of the radiation detectors; detection using photographic emulsions; thermoluminescent detectors; gas detectors; scintillation detectors; liquid scintillation detectors; detectors using semiconductor materials; calibration of detectors; Bragg-Gray theory; measurement chain and uncertainties associated to measurements

  12. Properties of a novel linear sulfur response mode in a multiple flame photometric detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Adrian G; Thurbide, Kevin B

    2014-01-24

    A new linear sulfur response mode was established in the multiple flame photometric detector (mFPD) by monitoring HSO* emission in the red spectral region above 600nm. Optimal conditions for this mode were found by using a 750nm interference filter and oxygen flows to the worker flames of this device that were about 10mL/min larger than those used for monitoring quadratic S2* emission. By employing these parameters, this mode provided a linear response over about 4 orders of magnitude, with a detection limit near 5.8×10(-11)gS/s and a selectivity of sulfur over carbon of about 3.5×10(3). Specifically, the minimum detectable masses for 10 different sulfur analytes investigated ranged from 0.4 to 3.6ng for peak half-widths spanning 4-6s. The response toward ten different sulfur compounds was examined and produced an average reproducibility of 1.7% RSD (n=10) and an average equimolarity value of 1.0±0.1. In contrast to this, a conventional single flame S2* mode comparatively yielded respective values of 6.7% RSD (n=10) and 1.1±0.4. HSO* emission in the mFPD was also found to be relatively much less affected by response quenching due to hydrocarbons compared to a conventional single flame S2* emission mode. Results indicate that this new alternative linear mFPD response mode could be beneficial for sulfur monitoring applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Gamma Spectrometric Determination of U, Th, K and Some Geochemical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodona, A.; Tashko, A.

    2001-01-01

    The application of 'in situ' gamma-spectrometric method (''infinite'' environment), made possible the simultanious determination of U, Th and K. 4 channel gamma-spectrometric analyser with NaI(TI) scintilation counter crystal detector (103 cm 3 φ=50x50mm) was used to determin U, Th(more than 1-2 ppm) and K (more than 1%) in laboratory conditions. The detector was inserted into a lead camera and calibrated for measurement geometry with vessel of ''Marineli'' type of a 17o cm 3 volume. The study of main factors, which influence in the gamma spectrometric measurements, (the technical, physical, geometrical and time parameters) has been carried out. International standards of U, Th, K and internal monitoring standard samples are used for the calibration. External analytical control has been realized by other radiometric and chemical methods. The detection limits ( 1 ppm Th, 2ppm U and 1% K) and the relative errors (17-20% for 1-10 ppm U, Th and 10-15% for more than 10 ppm U, Th and more than 1% K) guarantee a quantitative analysis that may be used successfully in the geochemical studies. Some geochemical applications, based on the content of Th, U and Th/U ratio in rocks samples that we have we have analyzed with this method, are shown in this paper. U, Th and their ratio are used as trace elements to indicate the differences between the acidic magmatic rocks of Albania (Th/U ratio=2-6 and>10). The bimodal character of Th/U scattering in ignimbrides and monzonites (Korabi zone) shows that in addition to the ''normal'' rocks, there are also some ones enriched with Th, So, the differential analysis of Th, U, and K may be used as geochemical exploration criteria for the radioactive and non-radioactive mineralization, such as REE (Rare Earth Elements), phospghorites, bauxites, placers etc. (authors)

  14. Investigating the Quantum Properties of Jets and the Search for a Supersymmetric Top Quark Partner with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00376212; Schwartzman, Ariel

    Quarks and gluons are the fundamental building blocks of matter responsible for most of the visible energy density in the universe. However, they cannot be directly observed due to the confining nature of the strong force. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) uses proton-proton collisions to probe the highest energy reactions involving quarks and gluons happening at the smallest distance scales ever studied in a terrestrial laboratory. The observable consequence of quark and gluon production in these reactions is the emergent phenomenon known as the jet: a collimated stream of particles traveling at nearly the speed of light. The quantum properties of the initiating quarks and gluons are encoded in the distribution of energy inside and around jets. These quantum properties of jets can be used to study the high energy nature of the strong force and provide a way to tag the hadronic decays of heavy boosted particles. The ATLAS detector at the LHC is well-suited to perform measurements of the internal structur...

  15. Mass Spectrometric Analysis for Nuclear Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulyga, S.

    2013-01-01

    The release of man-made radionuclides into the environment results in contamination that carries specific isotopic signatures according to the release scenarios and the previous usage of materials and facilities. In order to trace the origin of such contamination and/or to assess the potential impact on the public and environmental health, it is necessary to determine the isotopic composition and activity concentrations of radionuclides in environmental samples in an accurate and timely fashion. Mass spectrometric techniques, such as thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) belong to the most powerful methods for analysis of nuclear and related samples in nuclear safeguards, forensics, and environmental monitoring. This presentation will address the potential of mass spectrometric analysis of actinides at ultra-trace concentration levels, isotopic analysis of micro-samples, age determination of nuclear materials as well as identification and quantification of elemental and isotopic signatures of nuclear samples in general. (author)

  16. Measurement of the jet production properties at the LHC with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Tokar, Stanislav; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Latest results on the jet production properties obtained by the ATLAS experiment are presented. Jet physics events produced in pp collisions at 7 TeV have been studied. The dijet double differential cross sections as a function of dijet invariant mass for different rapidity regions are reported. Dijet flavour decomposition, a lower limit on the quark compositeness scale, inclusive jet production differential cross sections, three-jet differential production cross sections as well as a measurement of jet shapes for b-jets and light jets from top quark pair events are also reported.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition diamond based multilayered radiation detector: Physical analysis of detection properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almaviva, S.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.; Dolbnya, I.; Sawhney, K.; Tartoni, N.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, solid state photovoltaic Schottky diodes, able to detect ionizing radiation, in particular, x-ray and ultraviolet radiation, have been developed at the University of Rome 'Tor Vergata'. We report on a physical and electrical properties analysis of the device and a detailed study of its detection capabilities as determined by its electrical properties. The design of the device is based on a metal/nominally intrinsic/p-type diamond layered structure obtained by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition of homoepitaxial single crystal diamond followed by thermal evaporation of a metallic contact. The device can operate in an unbiased mode by using the built-in potential arising from the electrode-diamond junction. We compare the expected response of the device to photons of various energies calculated through Monte Carlo simulation with experimental data collected in a well controlled experimental setup i.e., monochromatic high flux x-ray beams from 6 to 20 keV, available at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron in Harwell (U.K.).

  18. Measurement of the properties of the 125 GeV Higgs boson with the CMS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Varela, Joao

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of the properties of the recently discovered boson is central to the LHC physics program. In this contribution we review preliminary measurements of the properties of the new 125 GeV boson performed by the CMS experiment using the full proton-proton dataset collected in 2011-12 (~25 fb-1). In the H to ZZ(4l) channel, a signal significance of 6.7 sigma is now observed. In the other high-resolution mode, H to two-photon, updated results were obtained on the signal strength which is now measured to be 0.8+-0.3. The two high-resolution modes allowed independent determinations of the Higgs mass 125.8+-0.6 GeV, in H to ZZ(4l); and 125.4+-0.8 GeV, in H to two-photon. The four-lepton channel permitted tests of the spin-parity of the new boson. From these studies, the pure pseudoscalar hypothesis is excluded at 99.8pct C.L. and, for the first time, simple spin 2 models are excluded with greater than 98.5pct C.L. Significantly, strong evidence is seen in a fermionic decay mode of the Higgs for the firs...

  19. Study of the optical properties and the carbonaceous clusters in thermally-annealed CR-39 and Makrofol-E polymer-based solid-state nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ghazaly, M.

    2012-01-01

    The induced modifications in the optical properties of CR-39 and Makrofol-E polymer-based solid state nuclear track detectors were investigated after thermal annealing at a temperature of 200 .deg. C for different durations. The optical properties were studied using an UV-visible spectrophotometer. From the UV-visible spectra, the direct and the indirect optical band gaps, Urbach's energies, and the number of carbon atoms in a cluster were determined. The absorbance of CR-39 plastic detector was found to decrease with increasing annealing time while the absorbance of Makrofol-E decreased with increasing annealing time. The width of the tail of localized states in the band gap ΔE was evaluated with the Urbach method. The optical energy band gaps were obtained from the direct and the indirect allowed transitions in K-space. Both of the direct and the indirect band gaps of the annealed CR-39 detector decrease with increasing annealing time while in Makrofol-E, they decreased after an annealing time of 15 minute and then showed no remarkable changes for a prolonged annealing times. Urbach's energy decreased significantly for both CR-39 and Makrofol-E with increasing annealing time. The number of carbon atoms in a cluster increased in the CR-39 detector with increasing annealing time while it decreased with increasing annealing time for Makrofol-E. We may conclude that the CR-39 detector undergoes greater modifications than the Makrofol-E detector upon thermal annealing at 200 .deg. C. In conclusion, the induced modifications in the optical properties of CR-39 and Makrofol-E are correlated with the temperature and the duration of annealing.

  20. Top quark pair property measurements using the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kluth, Stefan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Precise measurements of the properties of the top quark test the Standard Model (SM) and can be used to constrain new physics models. As it may be significantly enhanced by the presence of new physics, the ttbar production charge asymmetry is measured inclusively and differentially using the 8 TeV dataset of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using both the lepton+jets and dilepton channels, including a dedicated measurement for highly boosted top-quarks. The top-quark is predicted in the SM to decay almost exclusively into a W boson and a b-quark. We present a wide range of searches for non-SM top quark decays using the 13 TeV ATLAS dataset, including t->qH and t->qZ decays. In addition, measurements of the spin correlation and colour flow in ttbar production are presented.

  1. Comparison of imaging properties of direct-type and indirect-type of flat-panel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Masao; Suekane, Koji; Ichimaru, Yasunobu; Ogata, Yuji; Inamura, Kiyonari; Kanai, Kouzou; Kanamori, Hitoshi

    2002-01-01

    A Flat-Panel Detector (FPD) has many advantages such as eliminating cassette handling and being able to display a preview image immediately in addition to the digital image processing and the networking. Thus, the FPD has ability to innovate the radiology department. We measured and evaluated the digital and over-all imaging properties (characteristic curves, modulation Transfer Functions, Wiener spectra and Noise Equivalent Quanta (NEQ) for the direct-type and indirect-type of FPD. The pre-sampling and overall NEQ of the indirect-type of FPD were better than the NEQ of the direct-type of FPD at lower spatial frequencies, but were worse at higher spatial frequencies. The FPD can take image data at real-time and be easy to digitalize. From these results, Screen/Film system and Computed Radiography system will be replaced by the FPD system, together with diffusion of CAD, cone beam Computed Tomography (CT) system and open-type Magnetic Resonance Imagining (MRI) system. (T. Tanaka)

  2. Moessbauer spectrometric data acquisition based on FPGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yuan; Li Shimin; Chen Nan; Zhu Jingbo; Xia Yuanfu

    2008-01-01

    FPGA(Field Programmable Gate Array) is a programmable device with strong logical function and timing control ability. It is extremely potent in acquiring and processing timing signals. By replacing the traditional used SCM (Single-Chip Microcomputer) with FPGA, counting speed of Moessbauer spectrometric data acquisition can be improved markedly with significantly decreased size of the spectrometer. The counter, RAM and RS-232 communication of the module are developed on Altera Cyclone series chip EP1C6T144C8 with Quartus II. EP1C6T144C8 has 5980 logical units accompanied by 92160 bits of memory space. It is so powerful that all needs in data acquisition of the Moessbauer spectrometer can be perfectly satisfied while allowing modifications in functions and parameters. (authors)

  3. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Synthetic Organic Pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, Naeko; Takahashi, Mitsuko; Sakurai, Katsumi; Tanaka, Nobuko; Okubo, Ichiro; Kawakami, Tsuyoshi

    2018-04-18

    Though synthetic organic colorants are used in various applications nowadays, there is the concern that impurities by-produced during the manufacturing and degradation products in some of these colorants are persistent organic pollutants and carcinogens. Thus, it is important to identify the synthetic organic colorants in various products, such as commercial paints, ink, cosmetics, food, textile, and plastics. Dyes, which are soluble in water and other solvents, could be analyzed by chromatographic methods. In contrast, it is difficult to analyze synthetic organic pigments by these methods because of their insolubility. This review is an overview of mass spectrometric analysis of synthetic organic pigments by various ionization methods. We highlight a recent study of textile samples by atmospheric pressure solid analysis probe MS. Furthermore, the mass spectral features of synthetic organic pigments and their separation from other components such as paint media and plasticizers are discussed.

  4. Modifications in the optical and thermal properties of a CR-39 polymeric detector induced by high doses of γ-radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, A. F.; Ibraheim, Mona H.; Nwara, Aya M.; Kandil, S. A.

    2018-04-01

    Effects of γ-radiation on the optical and thermal properties of a poly allyl diglycol carbonate (PADC), a form of CR-39, polymer have been investigated. CR-39 detectors were exposed to γ-rays at very high doses ranging from 5.0 × 105 to 3.0 × 106 Gy. The induced changes were analyzed using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS) in absorbance mode, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The UV-visible spectra of the virgin and γ-irradiated CR-39 polymer detectors displayed a significant decreasing trend in their optical energy band gaps for indirect transitions, whereas for the direct ones showed a little change. This drop in the energy band gap with increasing dose is discussed on the basis of the gamma irradiation induced modifications in the CR-39 polymeric detector. The TGA thermograms show that the weight loss rate increased with increase in dose, which may be due to the disordered system via scission followed by crosslinking in the irradiated polymer detector. The TGA thermograms also indicated that the CR-39 detector decomposed in three/four stages for the virgin and irradiated samples. The activation energy for thermal decomposition was determined using a type of Arrhenius equation based on the TGA experimental results. These experimental results so obtained can be well used in radiation dosimetry.

  5. Infrared Illuminated CdZnTe detectors with improved performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.; Loutchanski, A.; Dorogov, P.; Khinoverov, S.

    2013-06-01

    It was found that IR illumination of a properly chosen wavelength and intensity can significantly improve spectrometric characteristics of CdZnTe quasi-hemispherical detectors [1]. Improving of the spectrometric characteristics is due to improvement of uniformity of charge collection by the detector volume. For operation at room temperature the optimal wavelength of IR illumination is about 940 nm, but for operation at lower temperature of -20 deg. C the optimal wavelengths of IR illumination is about 1050 nm. Infrared illumination can be performed using conventional low-power IR LEDs. Application of SMD LEDs allows produce miniature detection probes with IR illuminated CdZnTe detectors. We have fabricated and tested a variety of detection probes with CdZnTe quasi-hemispherical detectors from the smallest with volumes of 1-5 mm 3 to larger with volumes of 1.5 cm 3 and 4.0 cm 3 . The use of IR illumination significantly improves spectrometric characteristics of the probes operating at room temperature, especially probes with detectors of large volumes. The probe with the detector of 4 cm 3 without IR illumination had energy resolution of 24.2 keV at 662 keV and of 12.5 keV with IR illumination. (authors)

  6. Gamma-ray detector based on high pressure xenon for radiation and environmental safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutny, V.E.; Rybka, A.V.; Davydov, L.N.; Pudov, A.O.; Sokolov, S.A.; Kholomeyev, G.A.; Melnikov, S.I.; Turchin, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    Gamma-spectrometers based on compressed xenon gas assigned for monitoring the reactors and the radiation background at nuclear power plants, non-proliferation of radioactive materials, supervision and control over the radiation background in the environmentally disadvantaged areas, and other applications, are very promising detectors with excellent performance characteristics. This article reports on the results of the first stage of work on the creation of the portable gamma-spectrometer based on compressed xenon that is unique for Ukraine. In order to work with ultra-pure gases under pressure, the complex cryogenic installation for Xe purification and detector filling was designed and manufactured. The installation was made of specially cleaned components, equipped with a heating system for the degassing of the inner walls, and is able of maintaining high vacuum down to 2 centre dot 10"-"9 mbar. A prototype ionization chamber for the use in portable HP Xe detectors was developed and made. For the detector testing, a spectrometric channel based on high-quality electronic components was designed and manufactured. In the initial experiments, a study of the properties of the purified Xe mixed with the dopant H_2 was carried out. The assessment of the lifetime of charge carriers τ in the working gas at a pressure of 30 bar gave the value of τ > 150 μs

  7. Energy dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectrometric study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Energy dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectrometric study of compositional differences in trace elements in dried Moringa oleifera leaves grown in two different agro-ecological locations in Ebonyi State, Nigeria.

  8. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometric Analysis and Insecticidal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Original Research Article. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometric Analysis and ... into a natural fumigant/insecticide for the control of stored product insects. Keywords: Mallotus ..... stability as well as reduce cost. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT.

  9. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Nematicidal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Nematicidal Essential Oil of Valeriana ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... have a potential to be developed to natural nematicides for the control of cereal cyst nematodes.

  10. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometric Analysis and Insecticidal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... apelta aerial parts was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) to determine its composition. ... into a natural fumigant/insecticide for the control of stored product insects.

  11. Noble Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, Elena; Bolozdynya, Alexander I; Doke, Tadayoshi

    2006-01-01

    This book discusses the physical properties of noble fluids, operational principles of detectors based on these media, and the best technical solutions to the design of these detectors. Essential attention is given to detector technology: purification methods and monitoring of purity, information readout methods, electronics, detection of hard ultra-violet light emission, selection of materials, cryogenics etc.The book is mostly addressed to physicists and graduate students involved in the preparation of fundamental next generation experiments, nuclear engineers developing instrumentation

  12. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    An ionization detector having an array of detectors has, for example, grounding pads positioned in the spaces between some detectors (data detectors) and other detectors (reference detectors). The grounding pads are kept at zero electric potential, i.e. grounded. The grounding serves to drain away electrons and thereby prevent an unwanted accumulation of charge in the spaces, and cause the electric field lines to be more perpendicular to the detectors in regions near the grounding pads. Alternatively, no empty space is provided there being additional, grounded, detectors provided between the data and reference detectors. (author)

  13. Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klanner, R.

    1984-08-01

    The status and recent progress of silicon detectors for high energy physics is reviewed. Emphasis is put on detectors with high spatial resolution and the use of silicon detectors in calorimeters. (orig.)

  14. Physics of scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, R.

    1991-01-01

    The general concept of a radiation detector is based on three fundamental principles: sensitivity of the device to the radiation of interest which requires a large cross-section in the detector material, detector response function to the physical properties of the radiation. As an example, a scintillation detector for charged particles should allow to identify the charge of the particle, its kinetic energy and the time of impact combined with optimum resolutions. Optimum conversion of the detector response (like luminescence of a scintillator) into electronical signals for further processing. The following article will concentrate on the various aspects of the first two listed principles as far as they appear to be relevant for photon and charged particle detection using organic and inorganic scintillation detectors. (orig.)

  15. Effect of neutron irradiation on etching, optical and structural properties of microscopic glass slide used as a solid state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Surinder; Kaur Sandhu, Amanpreet; Prasher, Sangeeta; Prakash Pandey, Om

    2007-01-01

    Microscopic glass slides are soda-lime glasses which are readily available and are easy to manufacture with low production cost. The application of these glasses as nuclear track detector will help us to make use of these glasses as solid-state nuclear track detector. The present paper describes the variation in the etching, optical and structural properties of the soda-lime microscopic glass slides due to neutron irradiation of different fluences. The color transformation and an increase in the optical absorption with neutron irradiation are observed. Both the bulk and track etch rates are found to increase with neutron fluence, thus showing a similar dependence on neutron fluence, but the sensitivity remains almost constant

  16. Microstructure, electrical, and optical properties of evaporated PtSi/p-Si(100) Schottky barriers as high quantum efficient infrared detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jihhuah; Chang Rongsen; Horng Gwoji

    2004-01-01

    The effects of the microstructure and the electrical and optical properties on the formation at highly efficient infrared PtSi Schottky barrier detectors (SBD) have been studied in detail. Two- to twelve-nanometer-thick PtSi films were grown by evaporation at temperature ranging from 350 to 550 deg. C. The electron diffraction patterns indicate the existence of both the (11-bar0) and (12-bar1) orientations when PtSi films formed at 350 deg. C. However, the diffraction patterns show only the (12-bar1) orientation when the PtSi films are formed at 450 deg. C or above. The electrical barrier height of the Schottky barrier detector that formed at 350 deg. C was about 20 meV higher than that formed at 450 deg. C or above. The grain size and the film thickness had a negligible effect on the electrical barrier height. However, the optical performance was strongly dependent on the film thickness and the growth conditions. The 350 deg. C PtSi film showed increased quantum efficiency as the film thickness decreased. The optimal thickness that provided the highest responsivity was 2 nm. On the other hand, the optimal thickness shifted to 8 nm for PtSi film formed at 450 deg. C or above. These results indicate that the quantum efficiency of a detector can be improved if the PtSi film has an orientation at (12-bar1), a larger grain size, and an optimal film thickness

  17. Transmutation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viererbl, L., E-mail: vie@ujv.c [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Lahodova, Z. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Klupak, V. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Sus, F. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Kucera, J. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Kus, P.; Marek, M. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic)

    2011-03-11

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  18. Transmutation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Klupak, V.; Sus, F.; Kucera, J.; Kus, P.; Marek, M.

    2011-01-01

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  19. Diamond radiation detectors II. CVD diamond development for radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    Interest in radiation detectors has supplied some of the impetus for improving the electronic properties of CVD diamond. In the present discussion, we will restrict our attention to polycrystalhne CVD material. We will focus on the evolution of these materials over the past decade and the correlation of detector performance with other properties of the material

  20. Development, construction and test of the planar forward drift chambers of the ZEUS inner detector and analyses of chamber properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramarczyk, S.

    1993-08-01

    The three planar drift chambers FTD1-3 are part of the inner tracking system of the ZEUS detector at the ep facility HERA, DESY. Together with 2x2 transition radiation modules they form the Forward Detector which covers the range of forward (proton) angles. Development, construction and tests of the drift chambers are described, emphasizing design features and details of the manufacture. Two compensation methods were tested to annihilate the cross talk which emerges from the influence of one signal wire on the others in the same drift cell. A prototyp system of the final digital readout electronics was used together with a test cell. The single wire resolution was studied with optimized drift time algorithms. For the first time it was possible to measure the influence of the track angle on the single wire resolution of the FTDs. (orig.)

  1. Gamma radiation detectors for safeguards applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carchon, R.; Moeslinger, M.; Bourva, L.; Bass, C.; Zendel, M.

    2007-01-01

    The IAEA uses extensively a variety of gamma radiation detectors to verify nuclear material. These detectors are part of standardized spectrometry systems: germanium detectors for High-Resolution Gamma Spectrometry (HRGS); Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors for Room Temperature Gamma Spectrometry (RTGS); and NaI(Tl) detectors for Low Resolution Gamma Spectrometry (LRGS). HRGS with high-purity Germanium (HpGe) detectors cooled by liquid nitrogen is widely used in nuclear safeguards to verify the isotopic composition of plutonium or uranium in non-irradiated material. Alternative cooling systems have been evaluated and electrically cooled HpGe detectors show a potential added value, especially for unattended measurements. The spectrometric performance of CZT detectors, their robustness and simplicity are key to the successful verification of irradiated materials. Further development, such as limiting the charge trapping effects in CZT to provide improved sensitivity and energy resolution are discussed. NaI(Tl) detectors have many applications-specifically in hand-held radioisotope identification devices (RID) which are used to detect the presence of radioactive material where a lower resolution is sufficient, as they benefit from a generally higher sensitivity. The Agency is also continuously involved in the review and evaluation of new and emerging technologies in the field of radiation detection such as: Peltier-cooled CdTe detectors; semiconductor detectors operating at room temperature such as HgI 2 and GaAs; and, scintillator detectors using glass fibres or LaBr 3 . A final conclusion, proposing recommendations for future action, is made

  2. Introduction to detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Walenta, Albert H

    1995-01-01

    Concepts for momentum measurements,particle identification and energy measurements (calorimeters) as well for imaging applications in medecine, biology and industry (non destructive testing) will be put into relation to the specific detection princip In particular the resolution for position, time, energy and intensity measurement and the efficiency will be discussed. Signal extraction,electronic signal processing and principles of information capture will close the logic circle to the input : the radiation properties.The lecture will provide some sources for data tables and small demonstration computer programs f The basic detector physics as interaction of radiation with matter, information transport via free charges,photons and phonons and the signal formation will be presented in some depth with emphasis on the influence on specific parameters for detector The lecture will cover the most popular detector principles, gas detectors (ion chambers,MPWC's and MSGC's), semiconductor detectors scintillators and ...

  3. Detector Unit

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Original detector unit of the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) BOL project. This detector unit shows that silicon detectors for nuclear physics particle detection were already developed and in use in the 1960's in Amsterdam. Also the idea of putting 'strips' onto the silicon for high spatial resolution of a particle's impact on the detector were implemented in the BOL project which used 64 of these detector units. The IKO BOL project with its silicon particle detectors was designed, built and operated from 1965 to roughly 1977. Detector Unit of the BOL project: These detectors, notably the ‘checkerboard detector’, were developed during the years 1964-1968 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by the Natuurkundig Laboratorium of the N.V. Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken. This was done in close collaboration with the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) where the read-out electronics for their use in the BOL Project was developed and produced.

  4. Detector trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.

    1986-01-01

    The author describes briefly the development of detectors for high energy physics experiments. Especially considered are semiconductor microstrip detectors, drift tubes, holographic bubble chambers, scintillating fiber optics, and calorimeters. (HSI).

  5. Sensitive detectors in HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Detection of sample components in HPLC is difficult for many reasons; the key difficulty is the mobile phase which usually has properties similar to the solute. A variety of detectors have been developed for use in HPLC based on one of the above approaches; however, the search is still continuing for an ideal or universal detector. A universal detector should have the following characteristics: (1) responds to all solutes or has predictable specificity; (2) high detectability and the same predictable response; (3) fast response; (4) wide range of linearity; (5) unaffected by changes in temperature and mobile-phase flow; (6) responds independently of the mobile phase; (7) makes no contribution to extracolumn band broadening; (8) reliable and convenient to use; (9) nondestructive to the solute; (10) provides qualitative information on the detected peak. Unfortunately, no available HPLC detector possesses all these properties. 145 refs

  6. Infrared detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalski, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    This second edition is fully revised and reorganized, with new chapters concerning third generation and quantum dot detectors, THz detectors, cantilever and antenna coupled detectors, and information on radiometry and IR optics materials. Part IV concerning focal plane arrays is significantly expanded. This book, resembling an encyclopedia of IR detectors, is well illustrated and contains many original references … a really comprehensive book.-F. Sizov, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine

  7. Mass spectrometric investigation of vinyl-substituted organic boron compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarielashvili, V.O.; Ordzhonikidze, K.G.; Parulava, L.P.; Vakhaniya, G.V.

    1992-01-01

    Mass spectrometric investigation of vinyl-substituted organic compounds was conducted. Ionization was performed by electron shock. Possibility of determining boron isotope content is all analyzed organic boron vinyl-substituted compounds by direct method is shown. This simplifies sufficiently and lowers the price of analysis, improves its accuracy and rapidity

  8. Spectrometric determination of ammonium-nitrogen with quinol in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quinol is proposed as a reagent for the spectrometric determination of ammonium-nitrogen (NH4+-N) in aqueous medium. Quinol forms a pink complex with ammonium salt in aqueous medium. Hydrogen peroxide is needed for colour accentuation. The quinol/ammonium charge transfer complex has absorption maximum ...

  9. Preparation and spectrometric identification of amide derivatives with antimalaric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    The structures of polymeric compounds using spectrometric analysis of infrared, ultraviolet and protonic magnetic resonance and 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance are studied. Some structural models are used such as antimalaric-sulfones and pyrimidinic derivatives, and non-polymeric derivatives of active compounds. A comparative analysis on structures less complexes is shown. (M.J.C.). Spectrums 186 p [pt

  10. Detectors for Tomorrow's Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Harvey

    2009-01-01

    Cryogenically cooled superconducting detectors have become essential tools for a wide range of measurement applications, ranging from quantum limited heterodyne detection in the millimeter range to direct searches for dark matter with superconducting phonon detectors operating at 20 mK. Superconducting detectors have several fundamental and practical advantages which have resulted in their rapid adoption by experimenters. Their excellent performance arises in part from reductions in noise resulting from their low operating temperatures, but unique superconducting properties provide a wide range of mechanisms for detection. For example, the steep dependence of resistance with temperature on the superconductor/normal transition provides a sensitive thermometer for calorimetric and bolometric applications. Parametric changes in the properties of superconducting resonators provides a mechanism for high sensitivity detection of submillimeter photons. From a practical point of view, the use of superconducting detectors has grown rapidly because many of these devices couple well to SQUID amplifiers, which are easily integrated with the detectors. These SQUID-based amplifiers and multiplexers have matured with the detectors; they are convenient to use, and have excellent noise performance. The first generation of fully integrated large scale superconducting detection systems are now being deployed. I will discuss the prospects for a new generation of instruments designed to take full advantage of the revolution in detector technology.

  11. Development of spectrometric probes for emergency preparedness. Status and way forward; Entwicklung von spektrometrierenden Sonden fuer den Notfallschutz. Stand und Perspektiven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaehringer, M.; Bleher, M. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS), Salzgitter (Germany); Dambacher, M. [X-Ray Imaging Europe, Freiburg (Germany); and others

    2014-01-20

    Spectrometric probes with medium energy resolution (NaI, LaBr{sub 3}, CZT) have the potential to enhance existing gamma dose rate monitoring networks as a early warning system by increasing the sensitivity and specificity. In an emergency situation nuclide specific information with sufficient spatial resolution can be made available to decision makers. An ongoing research project between BfS and the Freiburg Material Research Centre (FMF) aims at the development of semiconductor detectors based on Cadmium-Zink-Telluride which can be used for low cost ruggedized spectrometric systems suitable for deployment in an environmental network. The new probe contains also a newly developed versatile multi channel analyser. The system has a modular design and is based - where ever possible - on open source components. It is complemented by specific analysis software using established data exchange formats. This facilitates international cooperation and exploits synergies through distributed development of components.

  12. Ionization detectors, ch. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevcik, J.

    1976-01-01

    Most measuring devices used in gas chromatography consist of detectors that measure the ionization current. The process is based on the collision of a moving high-energy particle with a target particle that is ionised while an electron is freed. The discussion of the conditions of the collision reaction, the properties of the colliding particles, and the intensity of the applied field point to a unified classification of ionisation detectors. Radioactive sources suitable for use in these detectors are surveyed. The slow-down mechanism, recombination and background current effect are discussed

  13. Seminar on Detectors and measurements techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, E.

    2002-01-01

    A Nordic Seminar on detectors and radionuclide measurement techniques was held in Lund, Sweden, May 3-4, 2001. The objective was to highlight recent progress and problems for techniques to study environmental radioactivity. It covered the aspect of detector sample geometry's and methods for evaluation of gamma gamma pulse height distributions. Within the field of alpha-spectrometric techniques gridded ionisation chambers, semiconductor detectors and a general description for analysis of alpha-particle-spectra were presented. Recent development in mass spectrometric techniques, AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) and ICPMS (Inductively Coupled Plasma mass Spectrometry) for long-lived radionuclides was described. Principles for analysis of beta particle emitters, especially by liquid scintillation were presented. The seminar also covered radiochemistry such advantages and disadvantages between ion exchange, solvent extraction and extraction chromatography. The use of controlled laboratory conditions for discerning the dynamics of accumulation in organisms was demonstrated. Other techniques such as neutron activation were also shown to be useful analytical tool for certain long-lived radionuclides. The results of the intercalibration exercises within the Nordic countries showed the importance of such analytical quality control. (au)

  14. Seminar on Detectors and measurements techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, E. (ed.) [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2002-07-01

    A Nordic Seminar on detectors and radionuclide measurement techniques was held in Lund, Sweden, May 3-4, 2001. The objective was to highlight recent progress and problems for techniques to study environmental radioactivity. It covered the aspect of detector sample geometry's and methods for evaluation of gamma gamma pulse height distributions. Within the field of alpha-spectrometric techniques gridded ionisation chambers, semiconductor detectors and a general description for analysis of alpha-particle-spectra were presented. Recent development in mass spectrometric techniques, AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) and ICPMS (Inductively Coupled Plasma mass Spectrometry) for long-lived radionuclides was described. Principles for analysis of beta particle emitters, especially by liquid scintillation were presented. The seminar also covered radiochemistry such advantages and disadvantages between ion exchange, solvent extraction and extraction chromatography. The use of controlled laboratory conditions for discerning the dynamics of accumulation in organisms was demonstrated. Other techniques such as neutron activation were also shown to be useful analytical tool for certain long-lived radionuclides. The results of the intercalibration exercises within the Nordic countries showed the importance of such analytical quality control. (au)

  15. Determination of actinides by alpha spectrometric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galanda, D.

    2011-01-01

    defined attributes of mass activities of radionuclides in oyster mushroom's sporocarps compared to their sub-base. We used two methods to separate the monitored radionuclides in a radiochemical analyse. The first of them was an extraction fluid - fluid with Aliquat-336 to separate Pu and TOPO to separate Am. The second method was a proceeding modified by us and utilizing principles of an extraction chromatography with TRU Resin and DGA Resin sorbents made by Eichrom Company. An effectivity and a suitability of both applied methods were monitored following the attributes of radiochemical extractions used in tracer's radionuclides 242 Pu a 243 Am in this particular type of environmental samples. The reliability of the modified methodology, in accordance to selected criteria for validation of analytical method, was proved by comparison of both above mentioned methods. material delivered from IAEA, which presented a soil sample with code identification Soil IAEA-375. The obtained values of mass activities of 239 + 240 Pu, 239 Pu and 241 Am used in reference material, demonstrated a conformity with IAEA values, whereby we fulfilled one of the significant conditions of validate process. At the end of this thesis we applied the modified method of extraction chromatography with UTEVA Resin sorbent to define mass activities of uranium on soil and water samples where we monitored attributes of radiochemical extractions of 232 U tracer's radionuclide as the criteria of utilizability. The reliability of our modified method was verified by participation in international interlaboratory comparative proficiency tests and our results were in accordance with results of the reference laboratory. It means also a fulfilment of notable standard of the validate process. The results of all realized experimentations of radionuclides separation whether by extraction fluid - fluid or by extraction chromatography were determined by alpha-spectrometric measurements. (author)

  16. Radiation damage in silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lindström, G

    2003-01-01

    Radiation damage effects in silicon detectors under severe hadron and gamma-irradiation are surveyed, focusing on bulk effects. Both macroscopic detector properties (reverse current, depletion voltage and charge collection) as also the underlying microscopic defect generation are covered. Basic results are taken from the work done in the CERN-RD48 (ROSE) collaboration updated by results of recent work. Preliminary studies on the use of dimerized float zone and Czochralski silicon as detector material show possible benefits. An essential progress in the understanding of the radiation-induced detector deterioration had recently been achieved in gamma irradiation, directly correlating defect analysis data with the macroscopic detector performance.

  17. Lithium-based neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yursova, L.

    1977-01-01

    The problems of using scintillation lithium-based detectors (LiJ(Eu) and 6 LiJ(Eu)), as well as lithium glasses for neutron detection are described. As compared with the glasses the LiJ(Eu) monocrystal possesses substantially higher energy resolution, its luminescence yield is considerably higher (in some cases ten fold), its application makes possible gamma radiation discrimination with the energy approximately four times higher and its higher specific mass ensures better efficiency of gamma radiation counting. The only 6 LiJ(Eu) drawback is its high hydroscopicity as well as its possibility to be used only in a limited temperature range (maximum temperature +35 deg C). The lithium glass can be used (with the exception of spectrometric measurements and radiation mixed regions measurement) with more than 1 MeV gamma radiation energy in a wide temperature range, in agressive, corroding and acid media

  18. Improved optical properties and detectivity of an uncooled silicon carbide mid-wave infrared optical detector with increased dopant concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Geunsik; Kar, Aravinda; Manzur, Tariq

    2012-01-01

    An n-type 4H-SiC substrate is doped with gallium using a laser doping technique and its optical response is investigated at the mid-wave infrared (MWIR) wavelength 4.21 μm as a function of the dopant concentration. The dopant creates a p-type energy level of 0.3 eV, which is the energy of a photon corresponding to the MWIR wavelength 4.21 μm. Therefore, Ga-doped SiC can be used as an uncooled MWIR detector because an optical signal was obtained at this wavelength when the sample was at room temperature. The energy level of the Ga dopant in the substrate was confirmed by optical absorption spectroscopy. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) of the doped samples revealed an enhancement in the solid solubility of Ga in the substrate when doping is carried out by increasing the number of laser scans. A higher dopant concentration increases the number of holes in the dopant energy level, enabling photoexcitation of more electrons from the valence band by the incident MWIR photons. The detector performance improves as the dopant concentration increases from 1.15 × 10 19 to 6.25 × 10 20 cm −3 . The detectivity of the optical photodetector is found to be 1.07 × 10 10 cm Hz 1/2 W −1 for the case of doping with four laser passes. (paper)

  19. Spectrometric devices of itinerant radiometric laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgirev, E.I.; Moroz, G.L.; Shchedrin, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    Scintillation gamma-spectrometer is described designed for mobile radiometric laboratory for individual monitoring of internal γ-radiation of members of the general population and service personnel as well as for analysis of the isotopic composition of radiocontaminants in the environment. Description and technical features of device are given. The detection unit consists of detectors made on the basis of NaI(Tl) monocrystals 63 x 63 mm in size. The unit permits measurement of various levels of gamma-emitting nuclides throughout the body and in the thyroid and lungs of man. Provision is made for measuring samples with high specific activities (more than 10 -5 Cu/g) and for examining individuals having high levels of incorporated radionuclides

  20. PARTIAL LEAST SQUARES−NEAR INFRARED SPECTROMETRIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    6], gas chromatography [3, 7], capillary electrophoresis [3], high performance liquid ... of the moves of stretching and angular bending of the water OH. In the vicinity of 1160 nm, ..... for the determination of the quality properties of beers. Anal.

  1. APPLICATION OF THE SPECTROMETRIC METHOD FOR CALCULATING THE DOSE RATE FOR CREATING CALIBRATION HIGHLY SENSITIVE INSTRUMENTS BASED ON SCINTILLATION DETECTION UNITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Lukashevich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Devices based on scintillation detector are highly sensitive to photon radiation and are widely used to measure the environment dose rate. Modernization of the measuring path to minimize the error in measuring the response of the detector to gamma radiation has already reached its technological ceiling and does not give the proper effect. More promising for this purpose are new methods of processing the obtained spectrometric information. The purpose of this work is the development of highly sensitive instruments based on scintillation detection units using a spectrometric method for calculating dose rate.In this paper we consider the spectrometric method of dosimetry of gamma radiation based on the transformation of the measured instrumental spectrum. Using predetermined or measured functions of the detector response to the action of gamma radiation of a given energy and flux density, a certain function of the energy G(E is determined. Using this function as the core of the integral transformation from the field to dose characteristic, it is possible to obtain the dose value directly from the current instrumentation spectrum. Applying the function G(E to the energy distribution of the fluence of photon radiation in the environment, the total dose rate can be determined without information on the distribution of radioisotopes in the environment.To determine G(E by Monte-Carlo method instrumental response function of the scintillator detector to monoenergetic photon radiation sources as well as other characteristics are calculated. Then the whole full-scale energy range is divided into energy ranges for which the function G(E is calculated using a linear interpolation.Spectrometric method for dose calculation using the function G(E, which allows the use of scintillation detection units for a wide range of dosimetry applications is considered in the article. As well as describes the method of calculating this function by using Monte-Carlo methods

  2. Measurements of Silicon Detector Thermal Runaway

    CERN Document Server

    Heusch, C A; Moser, H G

    1999-01-01

    We measured thermal runaway properties of previously irradiated silicon detectors cooled by TPG bars. We simulated their expected behaviour to measure the energy gap in the detector material and to test the validity of various underlying assumptions.

  3. The effect of ArF laser irradiation (193 nm) on the photodegradation and etching properties of alpha-irradiated CR-39 detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakeri Jooybari, B. [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSRT), Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghergherehchi, M. [College of Information and Technology/ school of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Afarideh, H., E-mail: hafarideh@aut.ac.ir [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Lamehi-Rachti, M. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSRT), Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-01

    The effects of ArF laser irradiation (λ=193nm) at various fluences (energy dose or energy density) on the etching properties of pre-exposed (laser + alpha) CR-39 detectors were studied. First, UV–Vis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra were acquired for non-laser-irradiated and laser-irradiated samples to detect the influence of the ArF laser on the chemical modification of the CR-39. Changes observed in the spectra indicated that the predominant process that occurred upon ArF laser irradiation was a bond-scission process. Thereafter, the mean track and bulk etching parameters were experimentally measured in ArF-laser-irradiated CR-39 detectors exposed to an alpha source ({sup 241}Am, E = 5.49 MeV). Inhomogeneous regions in the laser-irradiated side of the CR-39 demonstrated a variable etching rate on only the front side of the CR-39 detector. New equations are also presented for the average bulk etching rate for these inhomogeneous regions (front side). The mean bulk and track etching rates and the mean track dimensions increased in a fluence range of 0–37.03 mJ/cm{sup 2} because of photodegradation and the scission of chemical bonds, which are the predominant processes in this range. When the fluence was increased from 37.03 to 123.45 mJ/cm{sup 2}, the bulk and track etching rates and the track dimensions slowly decreased because of the formation of cross-linked structures on the CR-39 surface. The behavior of the bulk and track etching rates and the track dimensions appears to be proportional to the dose absorbed on the detector surface. It was observed that as the etching time was increased, the bulk and track etching rates and the track dimensions of the laser-irradiated samples decreased because of the shallow penetration depth of the 193 nm laser and the reduction in the oxygen penetration depth.

  4. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Highly Reactive Glycosyl Halides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lajos Kovács

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Highly reactive glycosyl chlorides and bromides have been analysed by a routine mass spectrometric method using electrospray ionization and lithium salt adduct-forming agents in anhydrous acetonitrile solution, providing salient lithiated molecular ions [M+Li]+, [2M+Li]+ etc. The role of other adduct-forming salts has also been evaluated. The lithium salt method is useful for accurate mass determination of these highly sensitive compounds.

  5. Mass spectrometric detection of radiocarbon for dating applications

    OpenAIRE

    Synal Hans-Arno

    2013-01-01

    Radiocarbon is still the most important nuclide measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The related capabilities for dating and tracer studies are eminent not only in archaeology but also drive important applications in the earth and environmental sciences as well as in biomedical research. So far standard mass spectrometric systems have not been capable of radiocarbon dating because of interfering molecular isobars which however can be completely eliminated in charge changing proces...

  6. Gamma spectrometric system based on the personal computer Pravetz-83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanakiev, K; Grigorov, T.; Vuchkov, M.

    1985-01-01

    A gamma spectrometric system based on a personal microcomputer Pravets-85 is described. The analog modules are NIM standard. ADC data are stored in the memory of the computer via a DMA channel and a real-time data processing is possible. The results from a series of tests indicate that the performance of the system is comparable with that of comercially avalable computerized spectrometers Ortec and Canberra

  7. Neutron activation and mass spectrometric measurement of /sup 129/I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strebin, R.S. Jr.; Brauer, F.P.; Kaye, J.H.; Rapids, M.S.; Stoffels, J.J.

    1987-11-01

    An integrated procedure has been developed for measurement of /sup 129/I by neutron activation analysis and mass spectrometry. An iodine isolation procedure previously used for neutron activation has been modified to provide separated iodine suitable for mass spectrometric measurement as well. Agreement between both methods has been achieved within error limits. The measurement limit by each method is about 10/sup 7/ atoms (2 fg) of /sup 129/I. 13 refs,. 4 figs., 1 tab

  8. Studies of the underlying-event properties and of hard double parton scattering with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kuprash, Oleg; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A correct modelling of the underlying event in proton-proton collisions is important for the proper simulation of kinematic distributions of high-energy collisions. The ATLAS collaboration extended previous studies at 7 TeV with a leading track or jet or Z boson by a new study at 13 TeV, measuring the number and transverse-momentum sum of charged particles as a function of pseudorapidity and azimuthal angle in dependence of the reconstructed leading track. These measurements are sensitive to the underlying-event as well as the onset of hard emissions. The results are compared to predictions of several MC generators. + Inclusive four-jet events produced in proton--proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV have been analyzed for the presence of hard double parton scattering collected with the ATLAS detector. The contribution of hard double parton scattering to the production of four-jet events has been extracted using an artificial neural network. The assumption was made that hard double parton scat...

  9. Studies of the underlying-event properties and of hard double parton scattering with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00173407; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    A correct modelling of the underlying event in proton-proton collisions at Large Hadron Collider is important for the proper simulation of kinematic distributions of final state objects. The ATLAS collaboration performed a study at 13 TeV, measuring the number and transverse-momentum sum of charged particles in different regions with respect to the direction of the reconstructed leading track. These measurements are sensitive to the underlying-event activity. The results are compared to predictions of several Monte Carlo generators. Inclusive four-jet events produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV in the ATLAS detector have been analysed for the presence of hard double parton scattering. The fraction of events originating from hard double parton scattering has been extracted, and used to measure the effective proton cross section. Distributions sensitive to the presence of double parton scattering were unfolded to the parton level and compared to various tunes of a selected Mo...

  10. Measurements of top-quark properties at 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naranjo, Roger

    2017-09-01

    This work presents the measurements of the charge asymmetry and top quark spin observables in t anti t events based on 20.3 fb{sup -1} of √(s)=8 TeV proton-proton collisions recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. These analyses are performed in the dilepton final state, characterized by the presence of two isolated leptons (electrons or muons). Two different reconstruction algorithms are studied and applied to reconstruct the t anti t system. For the measurements of the charge asymmetry, inclusive and differential measurements are performed using top-quark and lepton based observables. The differential measurements are performed as a function of the transverse momentum, mass, and boost of the t anti t system. For the top quark spin measurements, 15 observables, each sensitive to a different coefficient of the spin density matrix of t anti t production, are measured independently. Ten of these observables are measured for the first time. These measurements represent a full characterization of the spin density matrix. The measurements are corrected to particle and parton level by using the Fully Bayesian Unfolding method. At particle level, all measurements are performed in a fiducial region, while at parton level they are performed in the full phase space. No significant deviation from the Standard Model is observed for any of the measurements performed.

  11. Search for lightly ionizing particles using CDMS-II data and fabrication of CDMS detectors with improved homogeneity in properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Kunj Bihari [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Fundamental particles are always observed to carry charges which are integral multiples of one-third charge of electron, e/3. While this is a well established experimental fact, the theoretical understanding for the charge quantization phenomenon is lacking. On the other hand, there exist numerous theoretical models that naturally allow for existence of particles with fractional electromagnetic charge. These particles, if existing, hint towards existence of physics beyond the standard model. Multiple high energy, optical, cosmological and astrophysical considerations restrict the allowable mass-charge parameter space for these fractional charges. Still, a huge unexplored region remains. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II), located at Soudan mines in northern Minnesota, employs germanium and silicon crystals to perform direct searches for a leading candidate to dark matter called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Alternately, the low detection threshold allows search for fractional electromagnetic-charged particles, or Lightly Ionizing Particles (LIPs), moving at relativistic speed. Background rejection is obtained by requiring that the magnitude and location of energy deposited in each detector be consistent with corresponding \\signatures" resulting from the passage of a fractionally charged particle. In this dissertation, the CDMS-II data is analyzed to search for LIPs, with an expected background of 0.078 0.078 events. No candidate events are observed, allowing exclusion of new parameter space for charges between e/6 and e/200.

  12. Measurement of cross sections and properties of the Higgs boson in decays to bosons using the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bruni, Lucrezia Stella; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Measurements of Higgs boson properties and cross sections measured in Higgs boson decays to two photons, two Z bosons, and two W bosons based on pp collision data collected at 13 TeV are presented. In addition, results from the combination of different decay channels are shown.

  13. Material properties of large-volume cadmium zinc telluride crystals and their relationship to nuclear detector performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, R.B.; Lund, J. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Yoon, H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-09-01

    The material showing the greatest promise today for production of large-volume gamma-ray spectrometers operable at room temperature is cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). Unfortunately, because of deficiencies in the quality of the present material, high-resolution CZT spectrometers have thus far been limited to relatively small dimensions, which makes them inefficient at detecting high photon energies and ineffective for weak radiation signals except in near proximity. To exploit CZT fully, it will be necessary to make substantial improvements in the material quality. Improving the material involves advances in the purity, crystallinity, and control of the electrical compensation mechanism. Sandia National Laboratories, California, in close collaboration with US industry and academia, has initiated efforts to develop a detailed understanding of the underlying material problems limiting the performance of large volume gamma-ray spectrometers and to overcome them through appropriate corrections therein. A variety of analytical and numerical techniques are employed to quantify impurities, compositional and stoichiometric variations, crystallinity, strain, bulk and surface defect states, carrier mobilities and lifetimes, electric field distributions, and contact chemistry. Data from these measurements are correlated with spatial maps of the gamma-ray and alpha particle spectroscopic response to determine improvements in the material purification, crystal growth, detector fabrication, and surface passivation procedures. The results of several analytical techniques will be discussed. The intended accomplishment of this work is to develop a low-cost, high-efficiency CZT spectrometer with an active volume of 5 cm{sup 3} and energy resolution of 1--2% (at 662 keV), which would give the US a new field capability for screening radioactive substances.

  14. Material properties of large-volume cadmium zinc telluride crystals and their relationship to nuclear detector performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.B.; Lund, J.; Yoon, H.

    1997-01-01

    The material showing the greatest promise today for production of large-volume gamma-ray spectrometers operable at room temperature is cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). Unfortunately, because of deficiencies in the quality of the present material, high-resolution CZT spectrometers have thus far been limited to relatively small dimensions, which makes them inefficient at detecting high photon energies and ineffective for weak radiation signals except in near proximity. To exploit CZT fully, it will be necessary to make substantial improvements in the material quality. Improving the material involves advances in the purity, crystallinity, and control of the electrical compensation mechanism. Sandia National Laboratories, California, in close collaboration with US industry and academia, has initiated efforts to develop a detailed understanding of the underlying material problems limiting the performance of large volume gamma-ray spectrometers and to overcome them through appropriate corrections therein. A variety of analytical and numerical techniques are employed to quantify impurities, compositional and stoichiometric variations, crystallinity, strain, bulk and surface defect states, carrier mobilities and lifetimes, electric field distributions, and contact chemistry. Data from these measurements are correlated with spatial maps of the gamma-ray and alpha particle spectroscopic response to determine improvements in the material purification, crystal growth, detector fabrication, and surface passivation procedures. The results of several analytical techniques will be discussed. The intended accomplishment of this work is to develop a low-cost, high-efficiency CZT spectrometer with an active volume of 5 cm 3 and energy resolution of 1--2% (at 662 keV), which would give the US a new field capability for screening radioactive substances

  15. filled neutron detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boron trifluoride (BF3) proportional counters are used as detectors for thermal neutrons. They are characterized by high neutron sensitivity and good gamma discriminating properties. Most practical BF3 counters are filled with pure boron trifluoride gas enriched up to 96% 10B. But BF3 is not an ideal proportional counter ...

  16. Property measurements of the Higgs boson in the diphoton decay channel with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This poster presents the latest measurements of the Higgs boson properties measured in the H → γγ decay channel using 36.1fb −1 of proton-proton collision data taken at √ s = 13TeV by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Fiducial and differential cross section measurements are presented in a variety of phase space regions and as a function of several kinematic variables, to be compared with the Standard Model Higgs predicted distributions.

  17. Cryogenic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehnder, A.

    1987-01-01

    Presently the development of new large scale detector systems, used in very high energy physics experiments, is very active. In the low energy range, the introduction of charge coupled devices allows improved spacial and energy resolution. In the keV region, high resolution can only be achieved via the well established diffraction spectrometers with the well-known disadvantage of a small throughput. There exist no efficient detectors for non-ionizing radiation such as coherent nuclear scattering of weakly interacting particles. The development of high resolution solid state detectors in the keV-region with the possibility of nuclear recoil detection is therefore highly desired. Such detectors applied in astro and particle physics would thus allow one to obtain new information not achievable otherwise. Three types of cryogenic detectors exist: Calorimeters/Bolometers. This type is sensitive to the produced excess phonons and measures the deposited energy by detecting the heat pulses. Excess charge carriers should be used to produce phonons. Tunneling junctions. This type is sensitive to excess charge produced by the Cooper pair breakup. Excess phonons should be used to break up Cooper pairs. Superheated superconducting granules (SSG). An SSG detector consists of granules, the metastability of which is disturbed by radiation. The Meissner effect then causes a change in the field distribution of the applied external field, which can be detected. The present paper discusses the basic principle of calorimetric and tunneling junction detectors and some of their applications. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  18. Study of non-validity of mixture rule near K-absorption edges by X-ray spectrometric technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharanabasappa; Chitralekha, A.; Kerur, B.R.; Anilkumar, S.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray spectrometric technique has been described to determine the X-ray mass attenuation coefficient, μ/ρ, of X-rays employing HPGe X-ray detector and radioactive sources. The photon intensity is measured by gating the channel of the spectrometer at FWHM/photo peak. Using the technique the 'best value' values of μ/ρ were obtained for those thicknesses which lie in the transmission (T) range 0.5 ≥ T ≥ 0.02. Total attenuation cross sections for other elements and lead compounds were measured at photon energies from 17 to 88 keV to study the Bragg's additivity law near the absorption edge of the lead. The measured values of mass attenuation coefficient values are compared with theoretical values obtained using Winxcom (programme). This study suggests that measured mass attenuation coefficient values at and near absorption edges differ from the theoretical value by about 17-23%. (author)

  19. Detectors - Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregeault, J.; Gabriel, J.L.; Hierle, G.; Lebotlan, P.; Leconte, A.; Lelandais, J.; Mosrin, P.; Munsch, P.; Saur, H.; Tillier, J.

    1998-01-01

    The reports presents the main results obtained in the fields of radiation detectors and associated electronics. In the domain of X-ray gas detectors for the keV range efforts were undertaken to rise the detector efficiency. Multiple gap parallel plate chambers of different types as well as different types of X → e - converters were tested to improve the efficiency (values of 2.4% at 60 KeV were reached). In the field of scintillators a study of new crystals has been carried out (among which Lutetium orthosilicate). CdTe diode strips for obtaining X-ray imaging were studied. The complete study of a linear array of 8 CdTe pixels has been performed and certified. The results are encouraging and point to this method as a satisfying solution. Also, a large dimension programmable chamber was used to study the influence of temperature on the inorganic scintillators in an interval from -40 deg. C to +150 deg. C. Temperature effects on other detectors and electronic circuits were also investigated. In the report mentioned is also the work carried out for the realization of the DEMON neutron multidetector. For neutron halo experiments different large area Si detectors associated with solid and gas position detectors were realized. In the frame of a contract with COGEMA a systematic study of Li doped glasses was undertaken aiming at replacing with a neutron probe the 3 He counters presently utilized in pollution monitoring. An industrial prototype has been realised. Other studies were related to integrated analog chains, materials for Cherenkov detectors, scintillation probes for experiments on fundamental processes, gas position sensitive detectors, etc. In the field of associated electronics there are mentioned the works related to the multidetector INDRA, data acquisition, software gamma spectrometry, automatic gas pressure regulation in detectors, etc

  20. Hydrogen detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagaya, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Sanada, Kazuo; Chigira, Sadao.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a hydrogen detector for detecting water-sodium reaction. The hydrogen detector comprises a sensor portion having coiled optical fibers and detects hydrogen on the basis of the increase of light transmission loss upon hydrogen absorption. In the hydrogen detector, optical fibers are wound around and welded to the outer circumference of a quartz rod, as well as the thickness of the clad layer of the optical fiber is reduced by etching. With such procedures, size of the hydrogen detecting sensor portion can be decreased easily. Further, since it can be used at high temperature, diffusion rate is improved to shorten the detection time. (N.H.)

  1. Measurements of the Properties of the Higgs-Like Boson in the Four Lepton Decay Channel with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00334314

    On July 4, 2012, experimental physicists from both the A Toroidal LHC Apparatus (ATLAS), and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiments at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC), reported evidence for the existence of a particle consistent with the Higgs boson at the level of 5 standard deviations, with a mass around 125 GeV. In March 2013, in the light of the updated ATLAS and CMS results, CERN announced that the new particle was indeed a Higgs boson. Having analyzed two-and-a-half times more data than was available for the discovery announcement in July, the confidence of observation has risen to 10 standard deviations. The experiments were also able to show that the properties of the particle as well as the ways it interacts with other particles were well-matched with those of a Higgs boson, which is expected to have spin 0 and even(+) parity . This dissertation presents Higgs property measurements using the “golden” channel $H \\to ZZ^{*} \\to l^+ l^- l^{\\prime +} l^{\\prime -}$, where l, l′ = e, μ. A clear ...

  2. Physical principles of semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micek, S.L.

    1979-01-01

    The general properties of semiconductors with respect to the possibilities of their use as the ionization radiation detectors are discussed. Some chosen types of semiconductor junctions and their characteristics are briefly presented. There are also discussed the physical phenomena connected with the formation of barriers in various types of semiconductor counters. Finally, the basic properties of three main types of semiconductor detectors are given. (author)

  3. Status of diamond particle detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammer, M.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; van Eijk, B.; Fallou, A.; Fish, D.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K. K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Manfredi, P. F.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; LeNormand, F.; Pan, L. S.; Pernegger, H.; Pernicka, M.; Re, V.; Riester, G. L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Tapper, R. J.; Tesarek, R.; Thomson, G. B.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Turchetta, R.; Walsh, A. M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M.

    1998-11-01

    To continue the exciting research in the field of particle physics new accelerators and experiments are under construction. In some of these experiments, e.g. ATLAS and CMS at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN or HERA-B at DESY, the detectors have to withstand an extreme environment. The detectors must be radiation hard, provide a very fast signal, and be as thin as possible. The properties of CVD diamond allow to fulfill these requirements and make it an ideal material for the detectors close to the interaction region of these experiments, i.e. the vertex detectors or the inner trackers. The RD42 collaboration is developing diamond detectors for these applications. The program of RD42 includes the improvement of the charge collection properties of CVD diamond, the study of the radiation hardness and the development of low-noise radiation hard readout electronics. An overview of the progress achieved during the last years will be given.

  4. DUMAND detector

    CERN Multimedia

    This object is one of the 256 other detectors of the DUMAND (Deep Underwater Muon And Neutrino Detection) experiment. The goal of the experiment was the construction of the first deep ocean high energy neutrino detector, to be placed at 4800 m depth in the Pacific Ocean off Keahole Point on the Big Island of Hawaii. A few years ago, a European conference with Cosmic experiments was organized at CERN as they were projects like DUMAND in Hawaii. Along with the conference, a temporary exhibition was organised as well. It was a collaboration of institutions from Germany, Japan, Switzerland and the U.S.A. CERN had borrowed equipment and objects from different institutes around the world, including this detector of the DUMAND experiment. Most of the equipment were sent back to the institutes, however this detector sphere was offered to a CERN member of the personnel.

  5. Detector applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehl, R.H.

    1977-10-01

    Semiconductor detectors are now applied to a very wide range of problems. The combination of relatively low cost, excellent energy resolution, and simultaneous broad energy-spectrum analysis is uniquely suited to many applications in both basic and applied physics. Alternative techniques, such as magnetic spectrometers for charged-particle spectroscopy, while offering better energy resolution, are bulky, expensive, and usually far more difficult to use. Furthermore, they do not directly provide the broad energy-spectrum measurements easily accomplished using semiconductor detectors. Scintillation detectors, which are approximately equivalent to semiconductor detectors in convenience and cost, exhibit 10 to 100 times worse energy resolution. However, their high efficiency and large potential size recommend their use in some measurements

  6. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, J.; Howes, J.H.; Smout, D.W.S.

    1979-01-01

    A smoke detector is described which provides a smoke sensing detector and an indicating device and in which a radioactive substance is used in conjunction with two ionisation chambers. The system includes an outer electrode, a collector electrode and an inner electrode which is made of or supports the radioactive substance which, in this case, is 241 Am. The invention takes advantage of the fact that smoke particles can be allowed to enter freely the inner ionisation chamber. (U.K.)

  7. Radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillies, W.

    1980-01-01

    The radiation detector for measuring e.g. a neutron flux consists of a central emitter, an insulating shell arranged around it, and a tube-shaped collector enclosing both. The emitter itself is composed of a great number of stranded, spiral wires of small diameter giving a defined flexibility to the detector. For emitter material Pt, Rh, V, Co, Ce, Os or Ta may be used. (DG) [de

  8. Split detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederstrand, C.N.; Chism, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    A gas analyzer is disclosed which provides a dual channel capability for the simultaneous determination of the presence and concentration of two gases in a stream of sample gas and which has a single infrared source, a single sample cell, two infrared bandpass filters, and two infrared detectors. A separator between the filters and detectors prevents interchange of radiation between the filters. The separator is positioned by fitting it in a slot

  9. Liquid scintillators and liquefied rare gases for particle detectors. Background-determination in Double Chooz and scintillation properties of liquid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, Martin Alexander

    2012-01-01

    the BiPo analysis show the high level of radiopurity reached in Double Chooz. In addition, with the BiPo analysis the α-quenching factors for the Target and the GammaCatcher liquids have been determined, respectively, to 9.94±0.04 and 13.69±0.02 at 7.7 MeV, and 9.05±0.01 and 14.3±0.1 at 8.8 MeV. The former values show a good agreement with the values obtained in a dedicated laboratory measurement. The time stability of the peak position of the 214 Po α-peak could be proven, too, showing a stable detector performance at low visible energies. The direct search for Dark Matter can, amongst others, be performed with liquid rare gas detectors, which make use of the scintillation light. However, a good background discrimination is needed. Studies on the wavelength- and time-resolved scintillation properties of liquid argon have therefore been carried out with high resolution and best statistics. The results obtained for different ion beams show that particle discrimination is not feasible in any realistic experiment by means of the wavelength-resolved scintillation light only, but the time structure of the emitted light provides a good handle to distinguish between different incident particles. For heavy ions (sulfur) a ratio of the fast to the slow scintillation component of (1.6 ± 0.6) is found, while lighter particles (protons) exhibit a ratio of (0.25 ± 0.05). The outcome of the present studies shows that this ratio can also be used in wavelength-integrating measurements which have a comparable detection efficiency for wavelengths below and above ∝170 nm. The present results demonstrate that for a number of 90 detected photons the singlet-to-triplet distributions obtained for sulfur ions and protons as exciting particles cease to overlap. In a Dark Matter experiment, if all photons produced can be detected, this corresponds to a discrimination threshold of only 2.25 keV.

  10. Liquid scintillators and liquefied rare gases for particle detectors. Background-determination in Double Chooz and scintillation properties of liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Martin Alexander

    2012-11-27

    }(g)/(g)). Both gamma spectroscopy measurements and the BiPo analysis show the high level of radiopurity reached in Double Chooz. In addition, with the BiPo analysis the {alpha}-quenching factors for the Target and the GammaCatcher liquids have been determined, respectively, to 9.94{+-}0.04 and 13.69{+-}0.02 at 7.7 MeV, and 9.05{+-}0.01 and 14.3{+-}0.1 at 8.8 MeV. The former values show a good agreement with the values obtained in a dedicated laboratory measurement. The time stability of the peak position of the {sup 214}Po {alpha}-peak could be proven, too, showing a stable detector performance at low visible energies. The direct search for Dark Matter can, amongst others, be performed with liquid rare gas detectors, which make use of the scintillation light. However, a good background discrimination is needed. Studies on the wavelength- and time-resolved scintillation properties of liquid argon have therefore been carried out with high resolution and best statistics. The results obtained for different ion beams show that particle discrimination is not feasible in any realistic experiment by means of the wavelength-resolved scintillation light only, but the time structure of the emitted light provides a good handle to distinguish between different incident particles. For heavy ions (sulfur) a ratio of the fast to the slow scintillation component of (1.6 {+-} 0.6) is found, while lighter particles (protons) exhibit a ratio of (0.25 {+-} 0.05). The outcome of the present studies shows that this ratio can also be used in wavelength-integrating measurements which have a comparable detection efficiency for wavelengths below and above {proportional_to}170 nm. The present results demonstrate that for a number of 90 detected photons the singlet-to-triplet distributions obtained for sulfur ions and protons as exciting particles cease to overlap. In a Dark Matter experiment, if all photons produced can be detected, this corresponds to a discrimination threshold of only 2.25 keV.

  11. Photoelectrostimulated passivation of spectrometric Cd1–xZnxTe-detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorenko O. A.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A new physical method of Cd1–xZnxTe-detector’s treatment – photoelectrostimulated passivation is developed. In its frames, oxidation of the sample followed by the formation of high-resistance oxide layer on the surface occurs at simultaneous action of both intense light radiation and electric field. It is shown that the method is easily realized and provides the obtaining of thick high-resistance oxide films, that essentially increases the surface electrical resistance of Cd1–xZnxTe-samples and diminishes leakage currents in them.

  12. A method for the determination of counting efficiencies in γ-spectrometric measurements with HPGe detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, J.P.; Garcia-Leon, M.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper a general method for γ-ray efficiency calibration is presented. The method takes into account the differences of densities and counting geometry between the real sample and the calibration sample. It is based on the γ-transmission method and gives the correction factor f as a function of E γ , the density and counting geometry. Altough developed for soil samples, its underlying working philosophy is useful for any sample whose geometry can be adequately reproduced. (orig.)

  13. Effect of track etch rate on geometric track characteristics for polymeric track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Naby, A.A.; El-Akkad, F.A.

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of the variable track etch rate on geometric track characteristic for polymeric track detectors has been applied to the case of LR-155 II SSNTD. Spectrometric characteristics of low energy alpha particles response by the polymeric detector have been obtained. The track etching kinematics theory of development of minor diameter of the etched tracks has been applied. The calculations show that, for this type of detector, the energy dependence of the minor track diameter d is linear for small-etched removal layer h. The energy resolution gets better for higher etched removal layer

  14. Comparison of Response Characteristics of High-Purity Germanium Detectors using Analog Versus Digital Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luke, S J; Raschke, K

    2004-01-01

    In this article we will discuss some of the results of the response characteristics of High Purity germanium detectors using analog versus digital processing of the signals that are outputted from the detector. The discussion will focus on whether or not there is a significant difference in the response of the detector with digital electronics that it limits the ability of the detection system to get reasonable gamma ray spectrometric results. Particularly, whether or not the performance of the analysis code Pu600 is compromised

  15. Mass spectrometric analysis of simple hydrogen compounds; Analyse de composes hydrogenes simples au spectrometre de masse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nief, C; Botter, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    A uranium furnace is inserted in the gas inlet line of a mass spectrometer between the leak and the source. The line is fed with simple hydrogen compounds (H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S) which are in this way reduced to hydrogen gas. Memory effects are largely avoided by heating the sample line to 90 deg. C. The speed of the isotopic analysis is only slightly less than that of hydrogen gas itself; the accuracy is better due to the reduction of fractionating effects in the leak. For the absolute measurements of deuterium in water, the presence of H{sub 3}{sup +} is a problem. Water samples, prepared by mixing an unknown light water sample with different amounts of heavy water, are equilibrated with hydrogen sulphide and analysis of the two phases of each sample enables the zero of the concentration scale to be determined from the point of intersection of the two curves obtained by plotting mixture composition against the observed isotope ratio in the two phases. The whole experiment can be carried out in the apparatus described which analyses hydrogen in H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}O in the same way. (author) [French] Un four a uranium est insere dans la ligne d'introduction de gaz d'un spectrometre de masse entre la fuite et la source. La ligne est alimentee par des composes hydrogenes simples (H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S) qui sont de cette facon transformes en hydrogene gazeux. On evite dans une large mesure les effets de memoire en chauffant la ligne de l'echantillon jusqu'a 90 deg. C. La vitesse de l'analyse isotopique est seulement legerement inferieure a celle de l'hydrogene gazeux lui-meme; la precision est meilleure du fait de la reduction des effets de fractionnement dans la fuite. Pour les mesures absolues du deuterium dans l'eau, la presence de H{sub 3}{sup +} pose un probleme. Les echantillons d'eau, prepares en melangeant un echantillon inconnu d'eau legere a differentes quantites d'eau lourde, sont equilibres par de l'hydrogene sulfure et l'analyse de

  16. Challenges and recent advances in mass spectrometric imaging of neurotransmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemperline, Erin; Chen, Bingming; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool that grants the ability to investigate a broad mass range of molecules, from small molecules to large proteins, by creating detailed distribution maps of selected compounds. To date, MSI has demonstrated its versatility in the study of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides of different classes toward investigation of neurobiological functions and diseases. These studies have provided significant insight in neurobiology over the years and current technical advances are facilitating further improvements in this field. neurotransmitters, focusing specifically on the challenges and recent Herein, we advances of MSI of neurotransmitters. PMID:24568355

  17. Photometric and emission-spectrometric determination of boron in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierig, D.

    1982-01-01

    A method for the photometric determination of boron in unalloyed and alloyed steels is described, in which Curcumine is used as reagent. A separation of boron is not necessary. Limit of detection: 0.0003% B. The decomposition of boron nitride in the steel is achieved by heating the whole sample in fuming sulphuric acid/phosphoric acid. For the emission spectrometric investigation of solid steel samples and for the spectrochemical analysis of solutions with plasma excitation working parameters are given and possibilities of interferences are demonstrated. (orig.) [de

  18. Mass spectrometric study of Nd2S3 vaporization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenochka, B.V.

    1987-01-01

    The authors conduct a mass-spectrometric study of neodymium(III) sulfide vaporization. The chemical composition of the samples was stoichiometric and the samples were vaporized from tantalum effusion cells. When the vapor over Nd 2 S 3 is ionized by electrons the mass spectra shows monovalent cations of Nd, S, NdS, and NdO. The enthalpy of vaporization if Nd atoms from Nd 2 S 3 at average experimental temperatures and the standard enthalpy of reaction is shown. Also presented is the enthalpy of vaporization of NdS molecules from Nd 2 S 3 at average experimental temperatures and the standard enthalpy of reaction

  19. Mass spectrometric investigation of fluorated europium. beta. -diketonates. [Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khomenko, V.S.; Lozinskij, M.O.; Fialkov, Yu.A.; Rasshinina, T.A.; Suboch, V.P. (AN Belorusskoj SSR, Minsk. Inst. Fiziki; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Organicheskoj Khimii)

    Ternary complexes of europium with two organic ligands - fluorated ..beta..-diketone and organic base - in the aqueous phase at electron shock are investigated; regroupings that take place in them are established. Mass-spectrometric investigation has shown that complexes with ..beta..-diketones, containing in oxygen atom in a fluorated radical, eliminate stable molecules of difluorophosgen, CoF/sub 2/. For the complexes studied under the above conditions the Co molecule elimination is also typical which is accompanied by the formation of ions with a metal-carbon bond.

  20. Mass spectrometric investigation of fluorated europium β-diketonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomenko, V.S.; Lozinskij, M.O.; Fialkov, Yu.A.; Rasshinina, T.A.; Suboch, V.P.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Organicheskoj Khimii)

    1983-01-01

    Ternary complexes of europium with two organic lidands - fluorated β-diketone and organic base - in the aqueous phase at electron shock are investigated; regroupings that take place in them are established. Mass-spectrometric investigation has shown that complexes with β-diketones, containing in oxygen atom in a fluorated radical, eliminate stable molecules of difluorophosgen, CoF 2 . For the complexes studied under the above conditions the Co molecule elimination is also typical which is accompanied by the formation of ions with a metal-carbon bond

  1. Thermogravimetric-quadrupole mass-spectrometric analysis of geochemical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Johnson, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    Thermogravimetric-quadrupole mass-spectrometric-analysis techniques can be used to study a wide variety of problems involving decomposition processes and identification of released volatile components. A recording vacuum thermoanalyzer has been coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The rapid scan capabilities of the quadrupole mass spectrometer are used to identify the gaseous components released. The capability of the thermogravimetric-quadrupole mass spectrometer to provide analytical data for identification of the released volatile components, for determination of their sequence of release and for correlation of thermal-decomposition studies is illustrated by an analysis of the Orgueil carbonaceous chondrite.

  2. Self-powered detectors with thulium emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, P.; Klar, E.

    1978-01-01

    In addition to fission chambers, prompt-indicating self-powered (SPN) detectors are used for measuring the neutron flux density in the core of power reactors. Although current SPN detectors with a cobalt emitter give satisfactora results, detectors with other emitter materials have been analyzed and tested. The author describes the properties and decay pattern of the nuclide thulium and presents the results of measurements made while testing thulium detectors. (orig.) [de

  3. Properties of jets measured from tracks in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Akesson, Torsten Paul; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amoros, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Asman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Galtieri, Angela Barbaro; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bartsch, Valeria; 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D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Silva, Paulo Vitor; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Daum, Cornelis; Dauvergne, Jean-Pierre; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Dawson, John; Daya, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; De Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; de la Taille, Christophe; de la Torre, Hector; De Lotto, Barbara; De Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Oliveira Branco, Miguel; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; de Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dean, Simon; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Dehchar, Mohamed; del Papa, Carlo; del Peso, Jose; del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delpierre, Pierre; Delruelle, Nicolas; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Yagci, Kamile Dindar; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, Andre; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dobson, Marc; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donega, Mauro; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; dos Anjos, Andre; Dosil, Mireia; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Dowell, John; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Drasal, Zbynek; Drees, Jurgen; Dressnandt, Nandor; Drevermann, Hans; Driouichi, Chafik; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jorg; Dubbs, Tim; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duhrssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Dzahini, Daniel; Duren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckert, Simon; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrich, Thies; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Woiciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Fellmann, Denis; Felzmann, Ulrich; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Ferland, Jonathan; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipcic, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Matthew; Fisher, Steve; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fokitis, Manolis; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Forbush, David Alan; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Joe; Fournier, Daniel; Foussat, Arnaud; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallas, Manuel; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galyaev, Eugene; Gan, K.K.; Gao, Yongsheng; Gapienko, Vladimir; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Garcia, Carmen; Garcia Navarro, Jose Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Garvey, John; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaumer, Olivier; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Dani\\|{e}l Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Helene; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghez, Philippe; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilbert, Laura; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gilewsky, Valentin; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Borge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Gopfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gossling, Claus; Gottfert, Tobias; Goldfarb, Steven; Goldin, Daniel; Golling, Tobias; Golovnia, Serguei; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Goncalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gonidec, Allain; Gonzalez, Saul; Gonzalez de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorisek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gorokhov, Serguei; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grabski, Varlen; Grafstrom, Per; Grah, Christian; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenfield, Debbie; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grognuz, Joel; Groh, Manfred; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guarino, Victor; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Andrea; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hackenburg, Robert; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Hongguang; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jorgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Hatch, Mark; Hauff, Dieter; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawes, Brian; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayden, Daniel; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Hazen, Eric; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Mathieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frederic; Hensel, Carsten; Henss, Tobias; Medina Hernandez, Carlos; Hernandez Jimenez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hessey, Nigel; Hidvegi, Attila; Higon-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Daniel; Hill, John; Hill, Norman; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homma, Yasuhiro; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Horton, Katherine; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Houlden, Michael; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Howell, David; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurst, Peter; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Ichimiya, Ryo; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Idzik, Marek; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Imbault, Didier; Imhaeuser, Martin; Imori, Masatoshi; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Ionescu, Gelu; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Ishii, Koji; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jankowski, Ernest; Jansen, Eric; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Goran; Jeanty, Laura; Jelen, Kazimierz; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jez, Pavel; Jezequel, Stephane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Ge; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tegid; Jones, Tim; Jonsson, Ove; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joseph, John; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagoz, Muge; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karr, Kristo; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keates, James Robert; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kelly, Marc; Kennedy, John; Kenney, Christopher John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kersevan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Ketterer, Christian; Keung, Justin; Khakzad, Mohsen; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Kholodenko, Anatoli; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Peter; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Guillaume; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kiyamura, Hironori; Kladiva, Eduard; Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knecht, Neil; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knobloch, Juergen; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kocnar, Antonin; Kodys, Peter; Koneke, Karsten; Konig, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Kopke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kokott, Thomas; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollar, Daniel; Kollefrath, Michael; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Kopikov, Sergey; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Koreshev, Victor; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotamaki, Miikka Juhani; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Kruger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kundu, Nikhil; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuykendall, William; Kuze, Masahiro; Kuzhir, Polina; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramon; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Landsman, Hagar; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larionov, Anatoly; Larner, Aimee; Lasseur, Christian; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorato, Antonia; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; Lebel, Celine; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Leger, Annie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Leltchouk, Mikhail; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lesser, Jonas; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Leveque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levitski, Mikhail; Lewandowska, Marta; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhihua; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lifshitz, Ronen; Lilley, Joseph; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Shengli; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Lockwitz, Sarah; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Loken, James; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Sterzo, Francesco Lo; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dorthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Bjorn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lupi, Anna; Lutz, Gerhard; Lynn, David; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macek, Bostjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mattig, Peter; Mattig, Stefan; Magalhaes Martins, Paulo Jorge; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amelia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandic, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, Jose; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Manz, Andreas; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin, Alexandru; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Robin; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Martin, Tim; Martin Dit Latour, Bertrand; Martin--Haugh, Stewart; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mathes, Markus; Matricon, Pierre; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maugain, Jean-Marie; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; May, Edward; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mazzoni, Enrico; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McLaren, Robert Andrew; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meinhardt, Jens; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Menot, Claude; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meuser, Stefan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W.Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Miele, Paola; Migas, Sylwia; Mijovic, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuz, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Minano, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Miralles Verge, Lluis; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitrofanov, Gennady; Mitsou, Vasiliki A.; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjornmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mockett, Paul; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Monig, Klaus; Moser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Mock, Susanne; Moisseev, Artemy; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morita, Youhei; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morozov, Sergey; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Muller, Thomas; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Nash, Michael; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Silke; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Nesterov, Stanislav; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Hong, Van Nguyen Thi; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Niinikoski, Tapio; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozicka, Miroslav; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nyman, Tommi; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Ohska, Tokio Kenneth; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olcese, Marco; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, Antonio; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pajchel, Katarina; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pasztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Pengo, Ruggero; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Cavalcanti, Tiago Perez; Perez Codina, Estel; Perez Garcia-Estan, Maria Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Persembe, Seda; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Alan; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickford, Andrew; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, Joao Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Ping, Jialun; Pinto, Belmiro; Pirotte, Olivier; Pizio, Caterina; Placakyte, Ringaile; Plamondon, Mathieu; Plano, Will; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskach, Anatoly; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomarede, Daniel Marc; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommes, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Bueso, Xavier Portell; Porter, Robert; Posch, Christoph; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Price, Michael John; Prichard, Paul; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Zuxuan; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Ramstedt, Magnus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Ratoff, Peter; Rauscher, Felix; Rauter, Emanuel; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reichold, Armin; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Reljic, Dusan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Renkel, Peter; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richards, Alexander; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rieke, Stefan; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robinson, Mary; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodier, Stephane; Rodriguez, Diego; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Rohne, Ole; Rojo, Victoria; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romanov, Victor; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Maltrana, Diego; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rossi, Lucio; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckert, Benjamin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Gerald; Ruhr, Frederik; Ruggieri, Federico; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rulikowska-Zarebska, Elzbieta; Rumiantsev, Viktor; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Runge, Kay; Runolfsson, Ogmundur; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rust, Dave; Rutherfoord, John; Ruwiedel, Christoph; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Ryadovikov, Vasily; Ryan, Patrick; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Rzaeva, Sevda; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, Jose; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Bjorn Hallvard; Sanchez, Arturo; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sandvoss, Stephan; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, Joao; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Takashi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Savva, Panagiota; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Says, Louis-Pierre; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scallon, Olivia; Scannicchio, Diana; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schafer, Uli; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schlereth, James; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitz, Martin; Schoning, Andre; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schuh, Silvia; Schuler, Georges; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Jan; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedykh, Evgeny; Segura, Ester; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, Jose; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sevior, Martin; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaver, Leif; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shibata, Akira; Shichi, Hideharu; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siebel, Anca-Mirela; Siegert, Frank; Siegrist, James; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, Jose; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simmons, Brinick; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjolin, Jorgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Skvorodnev, Nikolai; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Sloan, Terrence; Sloper, John erik; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snuverink, Jochem; Snyder, Scott; Soares, Mara; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Sondericker, John; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sorbi, Massimo; Sosebee, Mark; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spano, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St. Denis, Richard Dante; Stahl, Thorsten; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Stavropoulos, Georgios; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stevenson, Kyle; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockmanns, Tobias; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Strohmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Sugimoto, Takuya; Suhr, Chad; Suita, Koichi; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sushkov, Serge; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Svatos, Michal; Sviridov, Yuri; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Szeless, Balazs; Sanchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taga, Adrian; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanaka, Yoshito; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tappern, Geoffrey; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terwort, Mark; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Thadome, Jocelyn; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothee; Thioye, Moustapha; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tic, Tom\\'{a}\\v{s}; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timmermans, Charles; Tipton, Paul; Viegas, Florbela De Jes Tique Aires; Tisserant, Sylvain; Tobias, Jurgen; Toczek, Barbara; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokar, Stanislav; Tokunaga, Kaoru; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Guoliang; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torro Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Traynor, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Trinh, Thi Nguyet; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trivedi, Arjun; Trocme, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Tyrvainen, Harri; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Underwood, David; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urkovsky, Evgeny; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valenta, Jan; Valente, Paolo; Valentinetti, Sara; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Ferrer, Juan Antonio Valls; Van der Graaf, Harry; van der Kraaij, Erik; van der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; Van Eijk, Bob; van Eldik, Niels; Van Gemmeren, Peter; van Kesteren, Zdenko; Van Vulpen, Ivo; Vandelli, Wainer; Vandoni, Giovanna; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Varela Rodriguez, Fernando; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Vellidis, Constantine; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vlasov, Nikolai; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Loeben, Joerg; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobiev, Alexander; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Voss, Thorsten Tobias; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Anh, Tuan Vu; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walbersloh, Jorg; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Joshua C.; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Warsinsky, Markus; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Jens; Weber, Marc; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wellenstein, Hermann; Wells, Phillippa; Wen, Mei; Wenaus, Torre; Wendler, Shanti; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Weydert, Carole; Whalen, Kathleen; Wheeler-Ellis, Sarah Jane; Whitaker, Scott; White, Andrew; White, Martin; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Catherine; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wunstorf, Renate; Wynne, Benjamin; Xaplanteris, Leonidas; Xella, Stefania; Xie, Song; Xie, Yigang; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Guofa; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamaoka, Jared; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Weiming; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ybeles Smit, Gabriel Valentijn; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Young, Charles; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zaets, Vassilli; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zalite, Youris; Zanello, Lucia; Zarzhitsky, Pavel; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Oleg; Zenis, Tibor; Zenonos, Zenonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Zhan, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zheng, Shuchen; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zieminska, Daria; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Zivkovic, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zolnierowski, Yves; Zsenei, Andras; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2011-01-01

    Jets are identified and their properties studied in center-of-mass energy sqrt(s) = 7 TeV proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider using charged particles measured by the ATLAS inner detector. Events are selected using a minimum bias trigger, allowing jets at very low transverse momentum to be observed and their characteristics in the transition to high-momentum fully perturbative jets to be studied. Jets are reconstructed using the anti-kt algorithm applied to charged particles with two radius parameter choices, 0.4 and 0.6. An inclusive charged jet transverse momentum cross section measurement from 4 GeV to 100 GeV is shown for four ranges in rapidity extending to 1.9 and corrected to charged particle-level truth jets. The transverse momenta and longitudinal momentum fractions of charged particles within jets are measured, along with the charged particle multiplicity and the particle density as a function of radial distance from the jet axis. Comparison of the data with the theoretical models i...

  4. Properties of jets measured from tracks in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolin, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Jets are identified and their properties studied in center-of-mass energy √s = 7 TeV proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider using charged particles measured by the ATLAS inner detector. Events are selected using a minimum bias trigger, allowing jets at very low transverse momentum to be observed and their characteristics in the transition to high-momentum fully perturbative jets to be studied. Jets are reconstructed using the anti-k t algorithm applied to charged particles with two radius parameter choices, 0.4 and 0.6. An inclusive charged jet transverse momentum cross section measurement from 4 GeV to 100 GeV is shown for four ranges in rapidity extending to 1.9 and corrected to charged particle-level truth jets. The transverse momenta and longitudinal momentum fractions of charged particles within jets are measured, along with the charged particle multiplicity and the particle density as a function of radial distance from the jet axis. Comparison of the data with the theoretical models implemented in existing tunings of Monte Carlo event generators indicates reasonable overall agreement between data and Monte Carlo. These comparisons are sensitive to Monte Carlo parton showering, hadronization, and soft physics models.

  5. Shaped detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A radiation detector or detector array which has a non-constant spatial response, is disclosed individually and in combination with a tomographic scanner. The detector has a first dimension which is oriented parallel to the plane of the scan circle in the scanner. Along the first dimension, the detector is most responsive to radiation received along a centered segment of the dimension and less responsive to radiation received along edge segments. This non-constant spatial response can be achieved in a detector comprised of a scintillation crystal and a photoelectric transducer. The scintillation crystal in one embodiment is composed of three crystals arranged in layers, with the center crystal having the greatest light conversion efficiency. In another embodiment, the crystal is covered with a reflective substance around the center segment and a less reflective substance around the remainder. In another embodiment, an optical coupling which transmits light from adjacent the center segment with the greatest intensity couples the scintillation crystal and the photoelectric transducer. In yet another embodiment, the photoelectric transducer comprises three photodiodes, one receiving light produced adjacent the central segment and the other two receiving light produced adjacent the edge segments. The outputs of the three photodiodes are combined with a differential amplifier

  6. Quantitative mass-spectrometric analysis of hydrogen helium isotope mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, U.

    1998-12-01

    This work deals with the mass-spectrometric method for the quantitative analysis of hydrogen-helium-isotope mixtures, with special attention to fusion plasma diagnostics. The aim was to use the low-resolution mass spectrometry, a standard measuring method which is well established in science and industry. This task is solved by means of the vector mass spectrometry, where a mass spectrum is repeatedly measured, but with stepwise variation of the parameter settings of a quadruple mass spectrometer. In this way, interfering mass spectra can be decomposed and, moreover, it is possible to analyze underestimated mass spectra of complex hydrogen-helium-isotope mixtures. In this work experimental investigations are presented which show that there are different parameters which are suitable for the UMS-method. With an optimal choice of the parameter settings hydrogen-helium-isotope mixtures can be analyzed with an accuracy of 1-3 %. In practice, a low sensitivity for small helium concentration has to be noted. To cope with this task, a method for selective hydrogen pressure reduction has been developed. Experimental investigations and calculations show that small helium amounts (about 1 %) in a hydrogen atmosphere can be analyzed with an accuracy of 3 - 10 %. Finally, this work deals with the effects of the measuring and calibration error on the resulting error in spectrum decomposition. This aspect has been investigated both in general mass-spectrometric gas analysis and in the analysis of hydrogen-helium-mixtures by means of the vector mass spectrometry. (author)

  7. Mass spectrometric detection of radiocarbon for dating applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Synal, H.-A., E-mail: synal@phys.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, Building HPK, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Schulze-Koenig, T.; Seiler, M.; Suter, M.; Wacker, L. [ETH Zurich, Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, Building HPK, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    Radiocarbon is still the most important nuclide measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The related capabilities for dating and tracer studies are eminent not only in archaeology but also drive important applications in the earth and environmental sciences as well as in biomedical research. So far, standard mass spectrometric systems have not been capable of radiocarbon dating because of interfering molecular isobars which, however, can be completely eliminated in charge changing processes at high ion beam energies (MeV) [1,2]. Here, we present a novel type mass spectrometry system for radiocarbon analyses. Radiocarbon dating was performed using 45 keV {sup 14}C ions from the ion source and a molecule dissociation unit kept at ground potential. This proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of mass spectrometric radiocarbon dating without an accelerator. The results obtained will be the basis of an optimized design for a radiocarbon dating instrument comparable in size, complexity and cost to standard mass spectrometers.

  8. Mass spectrometric detection of radiocarbon for dating applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synal, H.-A.; Schulze-König, T.; Seiler, M.; Suter, M.; Wacker, L.

    2013-01-01

    Radiocarbon is still the most important nuclide measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The related capabilities for dating and tracer studies are eminent not only in archaeology but also drive important applications in the earth and environmental sciences as well as in biomedical research. So far, standard mass spectrometric systems have not been capable of radiocarbon dating because of interfering molecular isobars which, however, can be completely eliminated in charge changing processes at high ion beam energies (MeV) [1,2]. Here, we present a novel type mass spectrometry system for radiocarbon analyses. Radiocarbon dating was performed using 45 keV 14 C ions from the ion source and a molecule dissociation unit kept at ground potential. This proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of mass spectrometric radiocarbon dating without an accelerator. The results obtained will be the basis of an optimized design for a radiocarbon dating instrument comparable in size, complexity and cost to standard mass spectrometers.

  9. Mass spectrometric detection of radiocarbon for dating applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synal, H.-A.; Schulze-König, T.; Seiler, M.; Suter, M.; Wacker, L.

    2013-01-01

    Radiocarbon is still the most important nuclide measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The related capabilities for dating and tracer studies are eminent not only in archaeology but also drive important applications in the earth and environmental sciences as well as in biomedical research. So far, standard mass spectrometric systems have not been capable of radiocarbon dating because of interfering molecular isobars which, however, can be completely eliminated in charge changing processes at high ion beam energies (MeV) [1,2]. Here, we present a novel type mass spectrometry system for radiocarbon analyses. Radiocarbon dating was performed using 45 keV 14C ions from the ion source and a molecule dissociation unit kept at ground potential. This proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of mass spectrometric radiocarbon dating without an accelerator. The results obtained will be the basis of an optimized design for a radiocarbon dating instrument comparable in size, complexity and cost to standard mass spectrometers.

  10. Carbon nanotubes as solid-phase extraction sorbents prior to atomic spectrometric determination of metal species: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero Latorre, C., E-mail: carlos.herrero@usc.es [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Dpto. Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Alfonso X el Sabio s/n, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Alvarez Mendez, J.; Barciela Garcia, J.; Garcia Martin, S.; Pena Crecente, R.M. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Dpto. Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Alfonso X el Sabio s/n, 27002 Lugo (Spain)

    2012-10-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The use of CNTs as sorbent for metal species in solid phase extraction has been described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and chemical strategies for functionalization of carbon nanotubes have been discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Published analytical methods concerning solid phase extraction and atomic spectrometric determination have been reviewed. - Abstract: New materials have significant impact on the development of new methods and instrumentation for chemical analysis. From the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes - due to their high adsorption and desorption capacities - have been employed as sorption substrates in solid-phase extraction for the preconcentration of metal species from diverse matrices. Looking for successive improvements in sensitivity and selectivity, in the past few years, carbon nanotubes have been utilized as sorbents for solid phase extraction in three different ways: like as-grown, oxidized and functionalized nanotubes. In the present paper, an overview of the recent trends in the use of carbon nanotubes for solid phase extraction of metal species in environmental, biological and food samples is presented. The determination procedures involved the adsorption of metals on the nanotube surface, their quantitative desorption and subsequent measurement by means of atomic spectrometric techniques such as flame atomic absorption spectrometry, electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry/mass spectrometry, among others. Synthesis, purification and types of carbon nanotubes, as well as the diverse chemical and physical strategies for their functionalization are described. Based on 140 references, the performance and general properties of the applications of solid phase extraction based on carbon nanotubes for metal species atomic spectrometric determination are discussed.

  11. Carbon nanotubes as solid-phase extraction sorbents prior to atomic spectrometric determination of metal species: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrero Latorre, C.; Álvarez Méndez, J.; Barciela García, J.; García Martín, S.; Peña Crecente, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The use of CNTs as sorbent for metal species in solid phase extraction has been described. ► Physical and chemical strategies for functionalization of carbon nanotubes have been discussed. ► Published analytical methods concerning solid phase extraction and atomic spectrometric determination have been reviewed. - Abstract: New materials have significant impact on the development of new methods and instrumentation for chemical analysis. From the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes – due to their high adsorption and desorption capacities – have been employed as sorption substrates in solid-phase extraction for the preconcentration of metal species from diverse matrices. Looking for successive improvements in sensitivity and selectivity, in the past few years, carbon nanotubes have been utilized as sorbents for solid phase extraction in three different ways: like as-grown, oxidized and functionalized nanotubes. In the present paper, an overview of the recent trends in the use of carbon nanotubes for solid phase extraction of metal species in environmental, biological and food samples is presented. The determination procedures involved the adsorption of metals on the nanotube surface, their quantitative desorption and subsequent measurement by means of atomic spectrometric techniques such as flame atomic absorption spectrometry, electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry/mass spectrometry, among others. Synthesis, purification and types of carbon nanotubes, as well as the diverse chemical and physical strategies for their functionalization are described. Based on 140 references, the performance and general properties of the applications of solid phase extraction based on carbon nanotubes for metal species atomic spectrometric determination are discussed.

  12. BES detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, J.Z.; Bian, Q.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, L.J.; Chen, S.N.; Chen, Y.Q.; Chen, Z.Q.; Chi, Y.K.; Cui, H.C.; Cui, X.Z.; Deng, S.S.; Deng, Y.W.; Ding, H.L.; Dong, B.Z.; Dong, X.S.; Du, X.; Du, Z.Z.; Feng, C.; Feng, Z.; Fu, Z.S.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, M.L.; Gao, S.Q.; Gao, W.X.; Gao, Y.N.; Gu, S.D.; Gu, W.X.; Guan, Y.Z.; Guo, H.F.; Guo, Y.N.; Guo, Y.Y.; Han, S.W.; Han, Y.; Hao, W.; He, J.; He, K.R.; He, M.J.; Hou, X.J.; Hu, G.Y.; Hu, J.S.; Hu, J.W.; Huang, D.Q.; Huang, Y.Z.; Jia, Q.P.; Jiang, C.H.; Ju, Q.; Lai, Y.F.; Lang, P.F.; Li, D.S.; Li, F.; Li, H.; Li Jia; Li, J.T.; Li Jin; Li, L.L.; Li, P.Q.; Li, Q.M.; Li, R.B.; Li, S.Q.; Li, W.; Li, W.G.; Li, Z.X.; Liang, G.N.; Lin, F.C.; Lin, S.Z.; Lin, W.; Liu, Q.; Liu, R.G.; Liu, W.; Liu, X.; Liu, Z.A.; Liu, Z.Y.; Lu, C.G.; Lu, W.D.; Lu, Z.Y.; Lu, J.G.; Ma, D.H.; Ma, E.C.; Ma, J.M.; Mao, H.S.; Mao, Z.P.; Meng, X.C.; Ni, H.L.; Nie, J.; Nie, Z.D.; Niu, W.P.; Pan, L.J.; Qi, N.D.; Qian, J.J.; Qu, Y.H.; Que, Y.K.; Rong, G.; Ruan, T.Z.; Shao, Y.Y.; Shen, B.W.; Shen, D.L.; Shen, J.; Sheng, H.Y.; Sheng, J.P.; Shi, H.Z.; Song, X.F.; Sun, H.S.; Tang, F.K.; Tang, S.Q.; Tian, W.H.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.Y.; Wang, J.G.; Wang, J.Y.; Wang, L.S.; Wang, L.Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.L.; Wang, S.M.; Wang, S.Q.; Wang, T.J.; Wang, X.W.; Wang, Y.Y.; Wang, Z.H.; Wang, Z.J.; Wei, C.L.; Wei, Z.Z.; Wu, J.W.; Wu, S.H.; Wu, S.Q.; Wu, W.M.; Wu, X.D.; Wu, Z.D.; Xi, D.M.; Xia, X.M.; Xiao, J.; Xie, P.P.; Xie, X.X.; Xu, J.G.; Xu, R.S.; Xu, Z.Q.; Xuan, B.C.; Xue, S.T.; Yan, J.; Yan, S.P.; Yan, W.G.; Yang, C.Z.; Yang, C.M.; Yang, C.Y.; Yang, X.F.; Yang, X.R.; Ye, M.H.; Yu, C.H.; Yu, C.S.; Yu, Z.Q.; Zhang, B.Y.; Zhang, C.D.; Zhang, C.C.; Zhang, C.Y.; Zhang, D.H.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.Y.; Zhang, H.L.; Zhang, J.W.; Zhang, L.S.; Zhang, S.Q.; Zhang, Y.P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.M.; Zhao, D.X.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, M.; Zhao, P.D.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhao, W.R.; Zhao, Z.G.; Zhao, Z.Q.; Zheng, J.P.; Zheng, L.S.; Zheng, M.; Zheng, W.S.; Zheng, Z.P.; Zhong, G.P.; Zhou, G.P.; Zhou, H.S.; Zhou, J.; Zhou Li; Zhou Lin; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Y.S.; Zhou, Y.H.; Zhu, G.S.; Zhu, Q.M.; Zhu, S.G.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zhu, Y.S.; Zhuang, B.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Beijing Spectrometer (BES) is a general purpose solenoidal detector at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC). It is designed to study exclusive final states in e + e - annihilations at the center of mass energy from 3.0 to 5.6 GeV. This requires large solid angle coverage combined with good charged particle momentum resolution, good particle identification and high photon detection efficiency at low energies. In this paper we describe the construction and the performance of BES detector. (orig.)

  13. GaAs detectors with an ultra-thin Schottky contact for spectrometry of charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernykh, S.V., E-mail: chsv_84@mail.ru [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Research Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Chernykh, A.V. [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Didenko, S.I.; Baryshnikov, F.M. [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Research Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Burtebayev, N. [Research Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Institute of Nuclear Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Britvich, G.I. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Protvino, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Chubenko, A.P. [Research Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Guly, V.G.; Glybin, Yu.N. [LLC “SNIIP Plus”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zholdybayev, T.K.; Burtebayeva, J.T.; Nassurlla, M. [Research Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Institute of Nuclear Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2017-02-11

    For the first time, samples of particle detectors based on high-purity GaAs epilayers with an active area of 25 and 80 mm{sup 2} and an ultra-thin Pt Schottky barrier were fabricated for use in the spectrometry of charged particles and their operating characteristics were studied. The obtained FWHM of 14.2 (for 25 mm{sup 2} detector) and 15.5 keV (for 80 mm{sup 2} detector) on the 5.499 MeV line of {sup 238}Pu is at the level of silicon spectrometric detectors. It was found that the main component that determines the energy resolution of the detector is a fluctuation in the number of collected electron–hole pairs. This allows us to state that the obtained energy resolution is close to the limit for VPE GaAs. - Highlights: • VPE GaAs particle detectors with an active area of 25 and 80 mm{sup 2} were fabricated. • 120 Å ultra-thin Pt Schottky barrier was used as a rectifying contact. • The obtained FWHM of 14.2 keV ({sup 238}Pu) is at the level of Si spectrometric detectors. • Various components of the total energy resolution were analyzed. • It was shown that obtained energy resolution is close to its limit for VPE GaAs.

  14. Evaluation of the data of the HERA-B vertex detector with regards to the physical properties of the applied silicon strip counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, W.

    1999-01-01

    The HERA-B experiment at the DESY laboratory in Hamburg is dedicated to measuring CP-violation in the decays of neutral B-mesons. The primary purpose of the experiment in the measurement of the CP-asymmetry in the decay channel B 0 → J/ψK S 0 . In order to identify the B-mesons and to determine the time-dependent asymmetry, the decay length anti Δ anti l of the B-mesons must be measured to an accuracy of σ Δl ≤ 500 μm. To achieve this aim, HERA-B has a vertex detector which is based on double-sided silicon strip detectors mounted in a Roman pot system. One important specification of the vertex detector is to allow independent tracking with an efficiency above 95%. Therefore, it is required to select hits on the strip detectors with an efficiency above 99% and optimize the suppression of noise. This thesis describes a detailed investigation of the behaviour of the silicon strip detectors used in the vertex detector. The first part presents measurements performed in the laboratory using a tunable infrared dye laser to simulate the passage of charged particles through the detector. This includes measurements of the charge division between adjacent readout strips and mapping of the detector depletion. The results of the measurements agree excellently with the predictions from a detailed model calculation carried out in this thesis. The second part of the thesis the analysis of data recorded with the HERA-B vertex detector during the commissioning run of spring 1999. The analysis focusses on the investigation of cluster shapes and cluster sizes. In particular, the dependence of these distributions from the selection cuts is analyzed. Additionally, the differences between the two detector designs used, p-spray and p-stop detectors with intermediate strip or without respectively, are worked out. The measured distributions agree very well with the predictions from a model calculation taking all relevant detector parameters into account. The results of the data

  15. Vertex detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10 -13 s, among them the τ lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation

  16. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, E.

    1976-01-01

    A smoke detector is described consisting of a ventilated ionisation chamber having a number of electrodes and containing a radioactive source in the form of a foil supported on the surface of the electrodes. This electrode consists of a plastic material treated with graphite to render it electrically conductive. (U.K.)

  17. Semiconductor Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortina, E.

    2007-01-01

    Particle detectors based on semiconductor materials are among the few devices used for particle detection that are available to the public at large. In fact we are surrounded by them in our daily lives: they are used in photoelectric cells for opening doors, in digital photographic and video camera, and in bar code readers at supermarket cash registers. (Author)

  18. Capillary detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konijn, J.; Winter, K.; Vilain, P.; Wilquet, G.; Fabre, J.P.; Kozarenko, E.; Kreslo, I.; Goldberg, J.; Hoepfner, K.; Bay, A.; Currat, C.; Koppenburg, P.; Frekers, D.; Wolff, T.; Buontempo, S.; Ereditato, A.; Frenkel, A.; Liberti, B.; Martellotti, G.; Penso, G.; Ekimov, A.; Golovkin, S.; Govorun, V.; Medvedkov, A.; Vasil'chenko, V.

    1998-01-01

    The option for a microvertex detector using glass capillary arrays filled with liquid scintillator is presented. The status of capillary layers development and possible read-out techniques for high rate environment are reported. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  19. Measurements of Higgs boson properties in the $H \\rightarrow ZZ^* \\rightarrow 4\\ell$ and $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ channels at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV using the ATLAS detector

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Recent measurements of the Higgs boson properties in the four lepton and di-photon channels for 36.1 fb$^{-1}$ of pp collisions at 13 TeV using the ATLAS detector will be presented. The measurements include the Higgs boson mass as well as inclusive, fiducial, differential and, so-called, simplified template cross sections. Constraints on Higgs boson couplings are derived and interpreted within the Standard Model and various extensions.

  20. Comparison of methods for H*(10) calculation from measured LaBr3(Ce) detector spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, A; Cornejo, N; Camp, A

    2018-07-01

    The Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC) and the Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT) have evaluated methods based on stripping, conversion coefficients and Maximum Likelihood Estimation using Expectation Maximization (ML-EM) in calculating the H*(10) rates from photon pulse-height spectra acquired with a spectrometric LaBr 3 (Ce)(1.5″ × 1.5″) detector. There is a good agreement between results of the different H*(10) rate calculation methods using the spectra measured at the UPC secondary standard calibration laboratory in Barcelona. From the outdoor study at ESMERALDA station in Madrid, it can be concluded that the analysed methods provide results quite similar to those obtained with the reference RSS ionization chamber. In addition, the spectrometric detectors can also facilitate radionuclide identification. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Double Slow Neutron Spectrometer; Spectrometre double pour neutrons lents; Dvojnoj spektrometr medlennykh nejtronov; Espectrometro doble para neutrones lentos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarenko, I I; Liforov, V G; Nikolaev, M N; Orlov, V V; Parfenov, V A; Semenov, V A; Smirnov, V I; Turchin, V F [Fehi, Moscow, SSSR (Russian Federation)

    1963-01-15

    The neutron spectrometer described in the paper is intended for measurements of the angular and energy distribution of monochromatic slow neutrons, inelasticaily scattered by liquid and solid bodies. Experiments of this type permit detailed information to be obtained concerning the dynamics of the atoms in various aggregate states of a substance. The spectromeeter is based on the time-of-flight method. The pulse source of neutrons is the IBR (1) reactor. A mechanical interrupter, rotating synchronously with the disc of the IBR and having a prescribed phase shift, serves as the monochromator. A special phasing system ensures a phasee stability better than 0.5{sup o}. The neutrons scattered by the sample are recorded by a scintillation detector set at a given angle to the neutron beam. The resolving power of the spectrometer is - 15 {mu}s/m. The paper gives a detailed description of the construction of the spectroscope and its characteristics. (author) [French] Le spectrometre neutronique decrit dans le memoire est destine a mesurer la distribution en energie, la distribution angulaire et la diffusion inelastique des neutrons lents monochromatiques dans des liquides et des solides. Les experiences de ce genre permettent d'obtenir des renseignements detailles sur la dynamique des atomes dans de divers etats de la matiere. Le spectrometre est fonde sur la mesure du temps de vol. Comme source puisee de neutrons on a utilise le reacteur IBR-1. Le systeme monochromateur etait constitue par un interrupteur mecanique en rotation synchronisee avec celle du disque du reacteur IBR, avec un dephasage determine. Un dispositif special de dephasage assure la stabilite de la phase a 0,5{sup o} pres. La diffusion des neutrons par l'echantillon est enregistree a l'aide d'un detecteur a scintillations dispose sous un angle determine par rapport au faisceau de neutrons. Le pouvoir de resolution du spectrometre est d'environ 15 {mu}s/m. Les auteurs decrivent en detail la construction du

  2. Detector materials: germanium and silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, E.E.

    1981-11-01

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1981 Nuclear Science Symposium. The basic physical properties of elemental semiconductors are reviewed. The interaction of energetic radiation with matter is discussed in order to develop a feeling for the appropriate semiconductor detector dimensions. The extremely low net dopant concentrations which are required are derived directly from the detector dimensions. A survey of the more recent techniques which have been developed for the analysis of detector grade semiconductor single crystals is presented

  3. Quantum biological gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopvillem, U.Kh.

    1985-01-01

    A possibility of producing biological detectors of gravitational waves is considered. High sensitivity of biological systems to outer effects can be ensured by existence of molecule subgroups in Dicke states. Existence of clusters in Dicke state-giant electric dipoles (GED) is supposed in the Froehlich theory. Comparison of biological and physical detectors shows that GED systems have unique properties for detection of gravitational waves if the reception range is narrow

  4. Characterization of used lubricating oil by spectrometric techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Andressa Moreira de, E-mail: andressa@ctaa.embrapa.br [Embrapa Agroindustria de Alimentos, Guaratiba, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Correa, Sergio Machado [Faculdade de Engenharia. Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Resende, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Glauco Correa da [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The engine lubricating oil drags all kinds of impurities generated by wear of internal components. Thus, it is necessary to monitor the physical and chemical properties and concentration of metals in lubricants used to determine the appropriate time to replace them. Moreover, one can monitor the wear of the engines through the levels of metals in oils. To achieve these goals, some detection techniques such as Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF), have been widely used to determine metals in lubricating oils and also in other oil derivatives. Thus, some of these techniques were used in this study. Also the technique used was Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC / MS) for characterization of chromatographic profile of the engine lubricating oil after use. Through the technique of ICP-OES for method of United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) METHOD 6010B - Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry was performed to characterize metals in lubricating oil motor, using equipment from ICP-OES Perkin-Elmer{sup R} OPTIMA 3000 ICP-Winlab and software, obtaining the following identification of metals: barium (Ba), calcium (Ca), lead (Pb), copper (Cu), Chromium (Cr), iron (Fe), magnesium (Mg), molybdenum (Mo) and zinc (Zn). Using the XRF technique, through the equipment EDFRX Shimadzu{sup R} model 800HS EDX, Rh tube, applied voltage of 50kV, amperage 100{mu}A, detector Si (Li) cooled with liquid nitrogen and collimator 10mm, we analyzed all the components comprised in the range of Ti to U and Na to SC, identified the following metals: calcium (Ca), zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), copper (Cu), molybdenum (Mo) and nickel (Ni). The characterization was performed by chromatographic methods: USEPA METHOD 5021A - Volatile organic compounds in various sample matrices using equilibrium headspace analysis, USEPA METHOD 8015B - Nonhalogenated Organics

  5. Characterization of used lubricating oil by spectrometric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Andressa Moreira de; Correa, Sergio Machado; Silva, Glauco Correa da

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The engine lubricating oil drags all kinds of impurities generated by wear of internal components. Thus, it is necessary to monitor the physical and chemical properties and concentration of metals in lubricants used to determine the appropriate time to replace them. Moreover, one can monitor the wear of the engines through the levels of metals in oils. To achieve these goals, some detection techniques such as Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF), have been widely used to determine metals in lubricating oils and also in other oil derivatives. Thus, some of these techniques were used in this study. Also the technique used was Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC / MS) for characterization of chromatographic profile of the engine lubricating oil after use. Through the technique of ICP-OES for method of United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) METHOD 6010B - Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry was performed to characterize metals in lubricating oil motor, using equipment from ICP-OES Perkin-Elmer R OPTIMA 3000 ICP-Winlab and software, obtaining the following identification of metals: barium (Ba), calcium (Ca), lead (Pb), copper (Cu), Chromium (Cr), iron (Fe), magnesium (Mg), molybdenum (Mo) and zinc (Zn). Using the XRF technique, through the equipment EDFRX Shimadzu R model 800HS EDX, Rh tube, applied voltage of 50kV, amperage 100μA, detector Si (Li) cooled with liquid nitrogen and collimator 10mm, we analyzed all the components comprised in the range of Ti to U and Na to SC, identified the following metals: calcium (Ca), zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), copper (Cu), molybdenum (Mo) and nickel (Ni). The characterization was performed by chromatographic methods: USEPA METHOD 5021A - Volatile organic compounds in various sample matrices using equilibrium headspace analysis, USEPA METHOD 8015B - Nonhalogenated Organics Using GC

  6. Mass spectrometric study of vaporization of cesium tellurate and tellurite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, G.A.; Fokina, L.A.; Mouldagalieva, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The process of vaporization of cesium tellurate and tellurite was studied by the Knudsen effusion method with a mass spectrometric analysis of the vapor composition. The thermal dissociation of Cs 2 TeO 4 to Cs 2 TeO 3 and the congruent vaporization of Cs 2 TeO 3 were established. Thermodynamic functions for gaseous Cs 2 TeO 3 have been calculated. The standard enthalpy of sublimation Δ s H (298.15)=268.1±13.0 kJ mol -1 was determined by the 2nd and 3rd laws of thermodynamics. The enthalpy of formation Δ f H (298.15)=-725.1±13.0 kJ mol -1 for gaseous Cs 2 TeO 3 and the enthalpy of atomization Δ at H (298.15)=1841.3±15.0 kJ mol -1 have been computed. ((orig.))

  7. Mass spectrometric methods for trace analysis of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahr, U.; Schulten, H.R.

    1981-01-01

    A brief outline is given of the principles of mass spectrometry (MS) and the fundamentals of qualitative and quantitative mass spectrometric analysis emphasizing recent developments and results. Classical methods of the analysis of solids, i.e. spark-source MS and thermal ionization MS, as well as recent methods of metal analysis are described. Focal points in this survey of recently developed techniques include secondary ion MS, laser probe MS, plasma ion source MS, gas discharge MS and field desorption MS. Here, a more detailed description is given and the merits of these emerging methods are discussed more explicitly. In particular, the results of the field desorption techniques in elemental analyses are reviewed and critically evaluated

  8. 5th colloquium on atomic spectrometric trace analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welz, B.

    1989-01-01

    This book deals with apparatus, use-oriented and theoretical aspects of trace analysis and spectroscopy. General articles are concerned with the analysis of environmentally relevant samples; a comparison of modern spectroscopic techniques, the coupling of hydride production, chromatography and spectrometry; chemical modifiers for graphite tube furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), and possible applications of flow injection to atomic spectrometric trace analysis - one of the outstanding subjects of the colloquium. About one quarter of the 85 contributions deals with new techniques including flow injection. Other priority subjects are the theory and application of graphite tube furnace AAS, and a comparison between different dissolution methods and direct solid analysis. Medicine and toxicology, analysis of biological materials and environmentally relevant samples are in the foreground of use-oriented papers. (orig./BBR) [de

  9. Modern spectrometric methods for the analysis of labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaspersen, F.M.; Funke, C.W.; Wagenaars, G.N.; Jacobs, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    A proper analysis of chemical compounds should give information about the chemical identity (not only the structure but also enantiomeric form), the chemical purity and chemical composition (e.g. giving information about counter-ions, solvents of crystallization). For labelled compounds information is also needed about isotopic purity (defined as the % of isotope present in the compound), the position/distribution of the isotope in the molecule and degree of labelling/specific activity. In the past ten years the possibilities for spectrometric analyses of labelled compounds have increased enormously and this chapter will give an overview of these methods with the exception of (radio)chromatography that will be dealt with in another chapter. (author)

  10. On determining dead layer and detector thicknesses for a position-sensitive silicon detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, J.; Lee, Jenny; Lynch, W. G.; Niu, C. Y.; Tsang, M. B.; Anderson, C.; Barney, J.; Brown, K. W.; Chajecki, Z.; Chan, K. P.; Chen, G.; Estee, J.; Li, Z.; Pruitt, C.; Rogers, A. M.; Sanetullaev, A.; Setiawan, H.; Showalter, R.; Tsang, C. Y.; Winkelbauer, J. R.; Xiao, Z.; Xu, Z.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, two particular properties of the position-sensitive, thick silicon detectors (known as the "E" detectors) in the High Resolution Array (HiRA) are investigated: the thickness of the dead layer on the front of the detector, and the overall thickness of the detector itself. The dead layer thickness for each E detector in HiRA is extracted using a measurement of alpha particles emitted from a 212Pb pin source placed close to the detector surface. This procedure also allows for energy calibrations of the E detectors, which are otherwise inaccessible for alpha source calibration as each one is sandwiched between two other detectors. The E detector thickness is obtained from a combination of elastically scattered protons and an energy-loss calculation method. Results from these analyses agree with values provided by the manufacturer.

  11. Neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew C [Knoxville, TN; Jardret,; Vincent, D [Powell, TN

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  12. Ionization detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, E E

    1976-02-27

    This invention concerns a fire detection system making use of a beta source. The ionisation detector includes a first and second chamber respectively comprising a first and second electrode, preferably a plate, with a common electrode separating the first and second chamber. Communication is provided between these chambers through a set of orifices and each chamber also has a set of orifices for communication with the ambient atmosphere. One or both chambers can comprise a particle source, preferably beta. The detector also has an adjustable electrode housed in one of the chambers to regulate the voltage between the fixed electrode of this chamber and the common electrode located between the chambers. The electrodes of the structure are connected to a detection circuit that spots a change in the ionisation current when a fire alarm condition arises. The detection circuit of a new type includes a relaxation oscillator with a programmable unijunction transistor and a light emitting diode.

  13. MUST detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, Y.; Auger, F.; Sauvestre, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    The IPN-Orsay, in collaboration with the SPhN-Saclay and the DPTA Bruyeres, has built an array of 8 telescopes based on Si-strip technology for the study of direct reactions induced by radioactive beams. The detectors are described, along with the compact high density VXI electronics and the stand-alone data acquisition system developed in the laboratory. One telescope was tested using an 40 Ar beam and the measured performances are discussed. (authors)

  14. Radiation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohata, Shuichi; Takeuchi, Yoji

    1968-10-30

    Herein disclosed is an ionization chamber the airtightness of which can be readily tested. The ionization chamber is characterized in that a small amount of helium gas is filled in the chamber in combination with other ionization gases such as argon gas, xenon gas and the like. Helium leakage from the chamber is measured by a known helium gas sensor in a vacuum vessel. Hence the long term drift of the radiation detector sensitivity may be determined.

  15. Influence of infrared stimulation on spectroscopy characteristics of co-planar grid CdZnTe detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fjodorov, V.; Ivanov, V.; Loutchanski, A.

    2015-01-01

    It was previously found that illumination with monochromatic infrared (IR) light with wavelengths close to the absorption edge of the CdZnTe exert significant positive influence on the spectrometric characteristics of quasi-hemispherical CdZnTe detectors at room temperature. In this paper, preliminary results of IR stimulation on the spectrometric characteristics of coplanar-grid CdZnTe detectors as well as results of further studies of planar and quasi-hemispherical detectors are presented. Coplanar-grid detectors of 10 mm x 10 mm x 10 mm from Redlen Technologies and commercial available IR LEDs with different wavelengths of 800-1000 nm were used in the experiments. Influence of intensity and direction of IR illumination on the detector's characteristics was studied. Analysis of signals shapes from the preamplifiers outputs at registration of alpha particles showed that IR illumination leads to a change in the shapes of these signals. This may indicate changes in electric fields distributions. An improvement in energy resolution at gamma-energy of 662 keV was observed with quasi-hemispherical and co-planar detectors at the certain levels of IR illumination intensity. The most noticeable effect of IR stimulation was observed with quasi-hemispherical detectors. It is due with optimization of charge collection conditions in the quasi-hemispherical detectors under IT stimulation. (authors)

  16. Mass spectrometric identification of isoforms of PR proteins in xylem sap of fungus-infected tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rep, Martijn; Dekker, Henk L.; Vossen, Jack H.; de Boer, Albert D.; Houterman, Petra M.; Speijer, Dave; Back, Jaap W.; de Koster, Chris G.; Cornelissen, Ben J. C.

    2002-01-01

    The protein content of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) xylem sap was found to change dramatically upon infection with the vascular wilt fungus Fusarium oxysporum. Peptide mass fingerprinting and mass spectrometric sequencing were used to identify the most abundant proteins appearing during

  17. Review of procedures involving separation and preconcentration for the determination of cadmium using spectrometric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Sergio L.C.; Andrade, Jailson B. de; Korn, Maria das Gracas A.; Pereira, Madson de G.; Lemos, Valfredo A.; Santos, Walter N.L. dos; Rodrigues, Frederico de Medeiros; Souza, Anderson S.; Ferreira, Hadla S.; Silva, Erik G.P. da

    2007-01-01

    Spectrometric techniques for the analysis of trace cadmium have developed rapidly due to the increasing need for accurate measurements at extremely low levels of this element in diverse matrices. This review covers separation and preconcentration procedures, such as electrochemical deposition, precipitation, coprecipitation, solid phase extraction, liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and cloud point extraction (CPE), and consider the features of the their application with several spectrometric techniques

  18. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Although elemental semiconductors such as silicon and germanium are standard for energy dispersive spectroscopy in the laboratory, their use for an increasing range of applications is becoming marginalized by their physical limitations, namely the need for ancillary cooling, their modest stopping powers, and radiation intolerance. Compound semiconductors, on the other hand, encompass such a wide range of physical and electronic properties that they have become viable competitors in a number of applications. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detectors is a consolidated source of information on all aspects of the use of compound semiconductors for radiation detection and measurement. Serious Competitors to Germanium and Silicon Radiation Detectors Wide-gap compound semiconductors offer the ability to operate in a range of hostile thermal and radiation environments while still maintaining sub-keV spectral resolution at X-ray wavelengths. Narrow-gap materials offer the potential of exceeding the spectral resolutio...

  19. The Cherenkov correlated timing detector: materials, geometry and timing constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronstein, D.; Bergfeld, T.; Horton, D.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thayer, G.; Boyer, V.; Honscheid, K.; Kichimi, H.; Sugaya, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Kanda, S.; Olsen, S.; Ueno, K.; Tamura, N.; Yoshimura, K.; Lu, C.; Marlow, D.; Mindas, C.; Prebys, E.; Pomianowski, P.

    1996-01-01

    The key parameters of Cherenkov correlated timing (CCT) detectors are discussed. Measurements of radiator geometry, optical properties of radiator and coupling materials, and photon detector timing performance are presented. (orig.)

  20. Detectors of Cosmic Rays, Gamma Rays, and Neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altamirano, A.; Navarra, G.

    2009-01-01

    We summarize the main features, properties and performances of the typical detectors in use in Cosmic Ray Physics. A brief historical and general introduction will focus on the main classes and requirements of such detectors.

  1. Dosimetric studies, spectrometric, radiographic, metallographic of a new argentinean seed of 125 I used in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirchio, R.; Saravi, M.; Banchik, D.; Munoz, C.

    2006-01-01

    A new source of 125 I model Braquibac TM has been developed in Argentina for applications in interstitial brachytherapy. The AAPM Task Group 43 (TG-43) recommends that dosimetric characteristics of new sources of brachytherapy of Iodine-125 have been theoretically and experimentally determined before its clinical use. The objectives outlined in this work were the study of the design of the new seed, the calculation of dosimetric parameters and the photons spectra analysis. Its were carried out radiographic and metallographic studies to determine the physical characteristics of the source. For the realization of the dosimetric calculations it was used the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. Values of the radial dose function, g(r), of the constant of dose rate, Λ, of the function of anisotropy of two dimensions, F(r, θ), of the factor and constant of anisotropy its were obtained simulating the source in water according to the recommended methodology in TG-43. The constant of dose rate is similar to 0,880 ± 0,080 c Gy h -1 U -1 . The kerma in air rate of reference, S K , was calculated as 1,036 c Gy cm 2 h -1 mCi -1 simulating the seed in dry air. Its were carried out spectrometric studies using a semiconductor planar detector of HPGe (high purity germanium). Photons spectra showed characteristic x-rays of 125 I with energies of 27,20 keV, 27,47 keV, 31 keV and 31,70 keV gamma photons of 35,5 keV, and x-ray fluorescent coming from the silver nucleus of 22,10 keV, 24,94 keV and 25,45 keV. The angular dependence of the intensity of photons around the seed and in air it was analyzed with the planar detector. This was carried out to study the anisotropy in the photons flow due to variation in the thickness of the titanium wall and of the welding, movements of the silver tube inside the source and deposition of the radioactive material on the silver tube. (Author)

  2. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, C.K.

    1981-01-01

    This describes a smoke detector comprising a self-luminous light source and a photosensitive device which is so arranged that the light source is changed by the presence of smoke in a detecting region. A gaseous tritium light source is used. This consists of a borosilicate glass bulb with an internal phosphor coating, filled with tritium gas. The tritium emits low energy beta particles which cause the phosphor to glow. This is a reliable light source which needs no external power source. The photosensitive device may be a phototransistor and may drive a warning device through a directly coupled transistor amplifier. (U.K.)

  3. Low frequency noise in semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojanovic, M.; Marjanovic, N.

    1998-01-01

    Noise characteristics of surface-barrier detectors based on Au contacts on n-Si were measured and analyzed. The metal layers were deposited by evaporation to 40-100 nm thickness. Standard surface-barrier detectors based on Au/Si structures are known to have favorable characteristics, but they tend to degrade with aging and under severe working conditions. Degradation is particularly related to the increase in noise level, leakage current and the reduction of detector efficiency and resolution. Therefore, practical applications of surface-barrier detectors demand their constant upgrading. Improvements of detector properties are concentrated mainly on the front surface and front (rectifying) contact. The aim was to improve the noise characteristics of the surface-barrier structures and retain the favorable detector properties of the Au/Si system. (authors)

  4. Mass Spectrometric Identification and Differentiation of Botulinum Neurotoxins through Toxin Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, Suzanne R; Barr, John R

    2013-08-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the disease botulism, which can be lethal if untreated. There are seven known serotypes of BoNT, A-G, defined by their response to antisera. Many serotypes are distinguished into differing subtypes based on amino acid sequence and immunogenic properties, and some subtypes are further differentiated into toxin variants. Toxin characterization is important as different types of BoNT can respond differently to medical countermeasures for botulism, and characterization of the toxin can aid in epidemiologic and forensic investigations. Proteomic techniques have been established to determine the serotype, subtype, or toxin variant of BoNT. These techniques involve digestion of the toxin into peptides, tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) analysis of the peptides, and database searching to identify the BoNT protein. These techniques demonstrate the capability to detect BoNT and its neurotoxin-associated proteins, and differentiate the toxin from other toxins which are up to 99.9% identical in some cases. This differentiation can be accomplished from toxins present in a complex matrix such as stool, food, or bacterial cultures and no DNA is required.

  5. 1980, a revolution in silicon detectors, from energy spectrometer to radiation imager: Some technical and historical details

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijne, Erik H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon nuclear particle detectors were introduced just 50 years ago, after single crystal manufacturing was mastered. A major change took place around 1980 when the 'planar' Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) technology developed in microelectronics was systematically applied also in detector construction. With the simultaneous introduction of matched readout chips this eventually would lead to pixelized matrix detectors that function as radiation imaging devices. The critical contributions to this revolution by Josef Kemmer and Paul Burger are described. Performance of the segmented planar technology detectors improved significantly in comparison with the earlier spectrometric diodes. With efficient industrial support the use of silicon detectors in many new applications has become possible and detector systems with a sensitive area of several tens to >100m 2 have been constructed recently

  6. Study of gamma irradiation effects on the etching and optical properties of CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector and its application to uranium assay in soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amol Mhatre; Kalsi, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    The gamma irradiation effects in the dose range of 2.5-43.0 Mrad on the etching and optical characteristics of CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) have been studied by using etching and UV-Visible spectroscopic techniques. From the measured bulk etch rates at different temperatures, the activation energies for bulk etching at different doses have also been determined. It is seen that the bulk etch rates increase and the activation energies for bulk etching decrease with the increase in gamma dose. The optical band gaps of the unirradiated and the gamma -irradiated detectors determined from the UV-Visible spectra were found to decrease with the increase in gamma dose. These results have been explained on the basis of scission of the detector due to gamma irradiation. The present studies can be used for the estimation of gamma dose in the range of 2.5-43.0 Mrad and can also be used for estimating track registration efficiency in the presence of gamma dose. The CR-39 detector has also been applied for the assay of uranium in some soil samples of Jammu city. (author)

  7. Simultaneous resolution of spectral and temporal properties of UV and visible fluorescence using single-photon counting with a position-sensitive detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, L.A.; Trunk, J.G.; Polewski, K.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    A new fluorescence spectrometer has been assembled at the U9B beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source to allow simultaneous multiwavelength and time-resolved fluorescence detection, as well as spatial imaging of the sample fluorescence. The spectrometer employs monochromatized, tunable UV and visible excitation light from a synchrotron bending magnet and an imaging spectrograph equipped with a single-photon sensitive emission detector. The detector is comprised of microchannel plates in series, with a resistive anode for encoding the position of the photon-derived current. The centroid position of the photon-induced electron cascade is derived in a position analyzer from the four signals measured at the corners of the resistive anode. Spectral information is obtained by dispersing the fluorescence spectrum across one dimension of the detector photocathode. Timing information is obtained by monitoring the voltage divider circuit at the last MCP detector. The signal from the MCP is used as a ''start'' signal to perform a time-correlated single photon counting experiment. The analog signal representing the position, and hence wavelength, is digitized concomitantly with the start/stop time difference and stored in the two-dimensional histogramming memory of a multiparameter analyzer

  8. Radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, B.; Finkenzeller, J.; Kiiehn, G.; Lichtenberg, W.

    1984-01-01

    In an exemplary embodiment, a flat radiation beam is detected having a common electrode disposed parallel to the beam plane at one side and a common support with a series of individual conductors providing electrodes opposite successive portions of the common electrode and lying in a plane also parallel to the beam plane. The beam may be fan-shaped and the individual electrodes may be aligned with respective ray paths separated by uniform angular increments in the beam plane. The individual conductors and the connection thereof to the exterior of the detector housing may be formed on an insulator which can be folded into a T-shape for leading the supply conductors for alternate individual conductors toward terminals at opposite sides of the chamber

  9. Particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Joram, Christian; CERN. Geneva

    1991-01-01

    Lecture 5: Detector characteristics: ALEPH Experiment cut through the devices and events - Discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection ( including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operartion and a few ideas on the future performance. Lecture 4-pt. b Following the Scintillators. Lecture 4-pt. a : Scintillators - Used for: -Timing (TOF, Trigger) - Energy Measurement (Calorimeters) - Tracking (Fibres) Basic scintillation processes- Inorganic Scintillators - Organic Scintil - Discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection ( including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operation and a fiew ideas on future developpement session 3 - part. b Following Calorimeters lecture 3-pt. a Calorimeters - determine energy E by total absorption of charged or neutral particles - fraction of E is transformed into measurable quantities - try to acheive sig...

  10. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, J.

    1979-01-01

    An ionization smoke detector consisting of two electrodes defining an ionization chamber permitting entry of smoke, a radioactive source to ionize gas in the chamber and a potential difference applied across the first and second electrodes to cause an ion current to flow is described. The current is affected by entry of smoke. An auxiliary electrode is positioned in the ionization chamber between the first and second electrodes, and it is arranged to maintain or create a potential difference between the first electrode and the auxiliary electrode. The auxiliary electrode may be used for testing or for adjustment of sensitivity. A collector electrode divides the chamber into two regions with the auxiliary electrode in the outer sensing region. (U.K.)

  11. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, E.E.

    1980-01-01

    A safe and reliable apparatus for detecting products of combustion and aerosols in the atmosphere was developed which uses a beta source. It is easy to adjust for optimum performance. The ionization detector comprises a double chamber; one of the chambers is the basic sensing chamber. The sensing chamber is ported to both the secondary chambers to account for slow ambient changes in the atmosphere outside of the chamber. The voltages from the ionization chamber are adjusted with electrodes in each chamber. The ionization chamber contains baffles to direct the air to be sensed as well as an electrostatic screen. A unique electronic circuit provides an inexpensive and reliable means for detecting the signal change which occurs in the ionization chamber. The decision level of the alarm circuit can be adjusted to allow for any desired sensitivity. (D.N.)

  12. Radio spectrometric survey of un-surveyed areas in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aissa, M.; Al-Hent, R; Jubeli, Y.

    2002-11-01

    The values and distribution of the radioelements e U, e Th, % K and Ur units in the surface geological formations of the west and south sectors of Syrian region, were estimated using carbone gamma ray spectrometric survey. The radiometric maps were prepared, as well as, many geological profiles, cross sections studied in different locations and geochemical samples were analyzed by laboratory gamma ray spectrometry and by x-ray diffractometry, the results of the all sets were compared. In general, the survey shows, low radioelement concentrations in the area, especially on basic rocks (Jabal Al-arab, Hawran) south Syria, and on ultra basic rocks (ophiolitic complex) north-west Syria, but there are some separate anomalous spots were connected with phosphate rocks, detected on cretaceous and Palaeogene age. Some times we noticed high radioelement concentrations haloes associated with fractured zones were already arise from secondary uranium mineralization, as a result of solutions movement through fissures in carbonatic and/or chalk like limestone rocks. finally, the obtained concentrations, represent a background values which has no significant importance for uranium exploration point of view. (author)

  13. Functional proteomics with new mass spectrometric and bioinformatics tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesners, P.W.A.

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive range of mass spectrometric tools is required to investigate todays life science applications and a strong focus is on addressing the needs of functional proteomics. Application examples are given showing the streamlined process of protein identification from low femtomole amounts of digests. Sample preparation is achieved with a convertible robot for automated 2D gel picking, and MALDI target dispensing. MALDI-TOF or ESI-MS subsequent to enzymatic digestion. A choice of mass spectrometers including Q-q-TOF with multipass capability, MALDI-MS/MS with unsegmented PSD, Ion Trap and FT-MS are discussed for their respective strengths and applications. Bioinformatics software that allows both database work and novel peptide mass spectra interpretation is reviewed. The automated database searching uses either entire digest LC-MS n ESI Ion Trap data or MALDI MS and MS/MS spectra. It is shown how post translational modifications are interactively uncovered and de-novo sequencing of peptides is facilitated

  14. Determination of iodine to compliment mass spectrometric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohorst, F.A.

    1994-11-01

    The dose of iodine-129 to facility personnel and the general public as a result of past, present, and future activities at DOE sites is of continuing interest, WINCO received about 160 samples annually in a variety of natural matrices, including snow, milk, thyroid tissue, and sagebrush, in which iodine-129 is determined in order to evaluate this dose, Currently, total iodine and the isotopic ratio of iodine-127 to iodine-129 are determined by mass spectrometry. These two measurements determine the concentration of iodine-129 in each sample, These measurements require at least 16 h of mass spectrometer operator time for each sample. A variety of methods are available which concentrate and determine small quantities of iodine. Although useful, these approaches would increase both time and cost. The objective of this effort was to determine total iodine by an alternative method in order to decrease the load on mass spectrometry by 25 to 50%. The preparation of each sample for mass spectrometric analysis involves a common step--collection of iodide on an ion exchange bed. This was the focal point of the effort since the results would be applicable to all samples

  15. Mass Spectrometric C-14 Detection Techniques: Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synal, H.

    2013-12-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) has been established as the best-suited radiocarbon detection technique. In the past years, significant progress with AMS instrumentation has been made resulting in a boom of new AMS facilities around the World. Today, carbon only AMS systems predominantly utilize 1+ charge state and molecule destruction in multiple ion gas collisions in stripper gas cell. This has made possible a significant simplification of the instruments, a reduction of ion energies and related to this less required space of the installations. However, state-of-the-art AMS instruments have still not reached a development stage where they can be regarded as table-top systems. In this respect, more development is needed to further advance the applicability of radiocarbon not only in the traditional fields of dating but also in biomedical research and new fields in Earth and environmental sciences. In a the proof-of-principle experiment the feasibility of radiocarbon detection over the entire range of dating applications was demonstrated using a pure mass spectrometer and ion energies below 50 keV. Now an experimental platform has been completed to test performance and to explore operation and measurement conditions of pure mass spectrometric radiocarbon detection. This contribution will overview the physical principles, which make this development possible and discuss key parameters of the instrumental design and performance of such an instrument.

  16. Status of mass spectrometric radiocarbon detection at ETHZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, Martin; Maxeiner, Sascha; Wacker, Lukas; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2015-10-15

    A prototype of a mass spectrometric radiocarbon detection instrument without accelerator stage was built for the first time and set into operation at ETH Zurich. The system is designed as an experimental platform to optimize performance of {sup 14}C detection at low ion energies and to study the most relevant processes that may limit system performance. The optimized stripper unit incorporates differential pumping to maintain a low gas outflow and a revised tube design to better match the phase space volume of the ion beam at low energies. The system is fully operational and has demonstrated true radiocarbon dating capabilities. The overall beam transmission through the stripper tube is about 40% for the 1{sup +} charge state. Radiocarbon analyses with an overall precision of 0.6% were obtained on a single sample under regular measurement conditions. By analyzing multiple targets of the same sample material an uncertainty level of 0.3% has been reached. The background level corresponds to a radiocarbon age of 40,000 years.

  17. Surface acoustic wave nebulization facilitating lipid mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sung Hwan; Huang, Yue; Edgar, J Scott; Ting, Ying S; Heron, Scott R; Kao, Yuchieh; Li, Yanyan; Masselon, Christophe D; Ernst, Robert K; Goodlett, David R

    2012-08-07

    Surface acoustic wave nebulization (SAWN) is a novel method to transfer nonvolatile analytes directly from the aqueous phase to the gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. The lower ion energetics of SAWN and its planar nature make it appealing for analytically challenging lipid samples. This challenge is a result of their amphipathic nature, labile nature, and tendency to form aggregates, which readily precipitate clogging capillaries used for electrospray ionization (ESI). Here, we report the use of SAWN to characterize the complex glycolipid, lipid A, which serves as the membrane anchor component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and has a pronounced tendency to clog nano-ESI capillaries. We also show that unlike ESI SAWN is capable of ionizing labile phospholipids without fragmentation. Lastly, we compare the ease of use of SAWN to the more conventional infusion-based ESI methods and demonstrate the ability to generate higher order tandem mass spectral data of lipid A for automated structure assignment using our previously reported hierarchical tandem mass spectrometry (HiTMS) algorithm. The ease of generating SAWN-MS(n) data combined with HiTMS interpretation offers the potential for high throughput lipid A structure analysis.

  18. Rise time spectroscopy in cadmium telluride detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharager, Claude; Siffert, Paul; Carnet, Bernard; Le Meur, Roger.

    1980-11-01

    By a simultaneous analysis of rise time and pulse amplitude distributions of the signals issued from various cadmium telluride detectors, it is possible to obtain informations about surface and bulk trapping, field distribution within the detectors, as well as charge collection and transport properties. These investigations have been performed on both pure and chlorine doped and materials for various surfaces preparation conditions [fr

  19. Laboratory course on silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montano, Luis M

    2005-01-01

    In this laboratory course we present an elementary introduction to the characteristics and applications of silicon detectors in High-Energy Physics, through performing some measurements which give an overview of the properties of these detectors as position resolution. The principles of operation are described in the activities the students have to develop together with some exercises to reinforce their knowledge on these devices

  20. Observation of the Higgs boson and measurement of its properties in the H → WW* channel with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yichen

    2015-01-01

    The Higgs boson decays to WW* are observed based on an excess of events over background corresponding to 6.1 standard deviations in the dilepton final state including all lepton flavour channels (ee/μμ and eμ/μe) and jet multiplicity categories (n_j = 0, 1,i ≥ 2), for a Standard Model expectation of 5.8 standard deviations. Evidence for the vector-boson fusion (VBF) production process is also obtained with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations. The different flavour channels eμ/μe have the best expected signal sensitivity. The low jet multiplicity categories are dominantly sensitive to the gluon-gluon fusion (ggF) production process whereas the large jet multiplicity category has the best sensitivity to the VBF production process. The results are obtained from proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC, corresponding to 4.5 fb"-"1 at √(s) = 7 TeV and 20.3 fb"-"1 at √(s) = 8 TeV. The background contribution in each channel and jet multiplicity category varies and is determined mostly with data-driven techniques with dedicated control or validation regions. The dominant background processes are the continuum WW and top quark productions. In the same flavour channels (ee/μμ), the Drell-Yan process is another important background source. For a Higgs boson mass of 125.36 GeV, the ratio of the measured value to the expected value of the total production cross section times branching ratio fraction is 1.09+0.16 -0.15 (stat.)+0.17 -0.14 (syst.). The corresponding ratios for the gluon fusion and vector-boson fusion production modes are 1.02 ± 0.19 (stat.)+0.22 -0.18 (syst.) and 1.27+0.44 -0.40 (stat.)+0.30 -0.21 (syst.), respectively. At √(s) = 8 TeV, the total production cross section is measured to be σ(gg → H → WW*) = [4.6 ± 0.9 (stat.)+0.8 -0.7 (syst.)] pb and σ(VBFH → WW*) = [0.51+0.17 -0.15 (stat.)+0.13 -0.08 (syst.)] pb. The fiducial cross section is determined for the gluon-fusion process in exclusive final

  1. Research of Spectrometric and Exploitation Characteristics of BGO-PMP-165 Scintiblock in Temperature Interval from +25 to -140$^{o}$C

    CERN Document Server

    Ainbund, M R; Gundorin, N A; Matveev, D V; Serov, D G

    2001-01-01

    Photomultipliers based on microchannel plates are used for fast systems which form time marks of physical setups as well as in special technical areas. It is not uncommon when they substitute traditional dynode system photomultipliers. The possibility of compatible work of the PMP-165 photomultiplier with BGO crystal which were cooled down to temperature necessary for appropriate functioning of a semiconductor Ge detector with taking into account of temperature dependencies of own PMP characteristics is investigated during experiment. Cooling down of the system from room temperature down to v140^{o}C during 8 hours is done. Lower limit of temperature which allows PMP to function properly is registered. Changes of spectrometric characteristics caused by temperature are studied.

  2. Modeling of diamond radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milazzo, L.; Mainwood, A.

    2004-01-01

    We have built up a computer simulation of the detection mechanism in the diamond radiation detectors. The diamond detectors can be fabricated from a chemical vapour deposition polycrystalline diamond film. In this case, the trapping-detrapping and recombination at the defects inside the grains and at the grain boundaries degrade the transport properties of the material and the charge induction processes. These effects may strongly influence the device's response. Previous simulations of this kind of phenomena in the diamond detectors have generally been restricted to the simple detector geometries and homogeneous distribution of the defects. In our model, the diamond film (diamond detector) is simulated by a grid. We apply a spatial and time discretization, regulated by the grid resolution, to the equations describing the charge transport and, by using the Shockley-Ramo theorem, we calculate the signal induced on the electrodes. In this way, we can simulate the effects of the nonhomogeneous distributions of the trapping, recombination, or scattering centers and can investigate the differences observed when different particles, energies, and electrode configurations are used. The simulation shows that the efficiency of the detector increases linearly with the average grain size, that the charge collection distance is small compared to the dimensions of a single grain, and that for small grains, the trapping at the intragrain defects is insignificant compared to the effect of the grain boundaries

  3. SHiP: a new facility with a dedicated detector to search for new neutral particles and studying tau neutrino properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevchenko V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available SHiP (Search for Hidden Particles is a new general purpose fixed target facility, whose Technical Proposal has been recently reviewed by the CERN SPS Committee and by the CERN Research Board. The two boards recommended that the experiment proceeds further to a Comprehensive Design phase in the context of the new CERNWorking group "Physics Beyond Colliders", aiming at presenting a CERN strategy for the European Strategy meeting of 2019. In the initial phase of SHiP, the 400 GeV proton beam extracted from the SPS will be dumped on a heavy target with the aim of integrating 2×1020 pot in 5 years. A dedicated detector, based on a long vacuum tank followed by a spectrometer and particle identification detectors, will allow probing a variety of models with light long-lived exotic particles and masses below O(10 GeV/c2. The main focus will be the physics of the so-called Hidden Portals, i.e. search for Dark Photons, Light scalars and pseudo-scalars, and Heavy Neutrinos. The sensitivity to Heavy Neutrinos will allow for the first time to probe, in the mass range between the kaon and the charm meson mass, a coupling range for which Baryogenesis and active neutrino masses could also be explained. Another dedicated detector will allow the study of neutrino cross-sections and angular distributions.

  4. Studies of the dependence on oxidation thermal processes of effects on the electrical properties of silicon detectors by fast neutron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zheng; Kraner, H.W.

    1991-11-01

    High resistivity silicon detectors along with MOS capacitors made on five silicon dioxides with different thermal conditions (975 degree C to 1200 degree C) have been exposed to fast neutron irradiation up to the fluence of a few times 10 14 n/cm 2 . New measurement techniques such as capacitance-voltage (C-V) of MOS capacitors and current-voltage (I-V) of back to back diodes (p + -n - - p + if n - is not inverted to p) or resistors (p + -p-p + if inverted) have been introduced in this study in monitoring the possible type-inversion (n→p) under high neutron fluence. No type-inversion in the material underneath SiO 2 and the p + contact has been observed so far in this work for detectors made on the five oxides up to the neutron fluence of a few times 10 13 n/cm 2 . However, it has been found that detectors made on higher temperature oxides (T≤ 1100 degree C) exhibit less leakage current increase at high neutron fluence (φ ≤ 10 13 n/cm 2 )

  5. Calibration of detector efficiency of neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Hongsheng; He Xijun; Xu Rongkun; Peng Taiping

    2001-01-01

    BF 3 neutron detector has been set up. Detector efficiency is calibrated by associated particle technique. It is about 3.17 x 10 -4 (1 +- 18%). Neutron yield of neutron generator per pulse (10 7 /pulse) is measured by using the detector

  6. Status of diamond particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krammer, M.; Adam, W.; Friedl, M.; Hrubec, J.; Pernegger, H.; Pernicka, M. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der Oesterr. Akademie d. Wissenschaften, Nikolsdorferg. 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria); Bauer, C. [MPI fuer Kernphysik, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Berdermann, E.; Stelzer, H. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Bogani, F. [LENS, Florence (Italy); Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Sciortino, S. [University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Colledani, C.; Dulinski, W.; Husson, D.; LeNormand, F.; Riester, G.L.; Turchetta, R. [LEPSI, CRN Strasbourg (France); Conway, J.; Fish, D.; Schnetzer, S.; Stone, R.; Tesarek, R.; Thomson, G.B.; Walsh, A.M. [Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Dabrowski, W.; Kaplon, J.; Meier, D.; Roe, S.; Rudge, A.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Delpierre, P.; Hallewell, G. [CPPM, Marseille (France); Deneuville, A.; Cheeraert, E. [LEPES, Grenoble (France); Eijk, B.V.; Hartjes, F. [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Fallou, A. [CPPM, Marseille (France); Foulon, F. [Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Gan, K.K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Trawick, M.; Zoeller, M. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Grigoriev, E.; Knoepfle, K.T. [MPI fuer Kernphysik, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Hall-Wilton, R. [Bristol University, Bristol (United Kingdom); Han, S.; Ziock, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Research Division, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kania, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Manfredi, P.F.; Re, V.; Speziali, V. [Universita di Pavia, Dipartimento di Elettronica, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Mishina, M. [FNAL, Batavia, IL (United States); Pan, L.S. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roff, D.; Tapper, R.J. [Bristol University, Bristol (United Kingdom); Trischuk, W. [University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    1998-11-21

    To continue the exciting research in the field of particle physics new accelerators and experiments are under construction. In some of these experiments, e.g. ATLAS and CMS at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN or HERA-B at DESY, the detectors have to withstand an extreme environment. The detectors must be radiation hard, provide a very fast signal, and be as thin as possible. The properties of CVD diamond allow to fulfill these requirements and make it an ideal material for the detectors close to the interaction region of these experiments, i.e. the vertex detectors or the inner trackers. The RD42 collaboration is developing diamond detectors for these applications. The program of RD42 includes the improvement of the charge collection properties of CVD diamond, the study of the radiation hardness and the development of low-noise radiation hard readout electronics. An overview of the progress achieved during the last years will be given. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  7. Status of diamond particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krammer, M.; Adam, W.; Friedl, M.; Hrubec, J.; Pernegger, H.; Pernicka, M.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Stelzer, H.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Sciortino, S.; Colledani, C.; Dulinski, W.; Husson, D.; LeNormand, F.; Riester, G.L.; Turchetta, R.; Conway, J.; Fish, D.; Schnetzer, S.; Stone, R.; Tesarek, R.; Thomson, G.B.; Walsh, A.M.; Dabrowski, W.; Kaplon, J.; Meier, D.; Roe, S.; Rudge, A.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Delpierre, P.; Hallewell, G.; Deneuville, A.; Cheeraert, E.; Eijk, B.V.; Hartjes, F.; Fallou, A.; Foulon, F.; Gan, K.K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Trawick, M.; Zoeller, M.; Grigoriev, E.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Ziock, H.; Kania, D.; Manfredi, P.F.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.; Mishina, M.; Pan, L.S.; Roff, D.; Tapper, R.J.; Trischuk, W.

    1998-01-01

    To continue the exciting research in the field of particle physics new accelerators and experiments are under construction. In some of these experiments, e.g. ATLAS and CMS at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN or HERA-B at DESY, the detectors have to withstand an extreme environment. The detectors must be radiation hard, provide a very fast signal, and be as thin as possible. The properties of CVD diamond allow to fulfill these requirements and make it an ideal material for the detectors close to the interaction region of these experiments, i.e. the vertex detectors or the inner trackers. The RD42 collaboration is developing diamond detectors for these applications. The program of RD42 includes the improvement of the charge collection properties of CVD diamond, the study of the radiation hardness and the development of low-noise radiation hard readout electronics. An overview of the progress achieved during the last years will be given. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  8. A system design of gamma-ray spectrometric data processing for gold prospecting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Xueqin; Cheng Xuchu; Fang Lianxi; Huang Zuofeng.

    1992-01-01

    Based on different correlation between gamma-ray spectrometric data and gold grade in different types of gold deposits, it is necessary and possible to establish a mathematical model of gamma-ray spectrometric data processing for predicting specific gold deposits. A system design of gamma-ray spectrometric data processing for prospecting gold deposits has been worked out according to the mathematical method and procedure of data processing. The prediction effectiveness of commonly used multiple linear regression analysis is always not ideal but regression accuracy will be evidently increased after pre-processing of the calculated weight, deviation and favorability on gamma-ray spectrometric data. This system can establish more than ten models at the same time which enable users to have more choice. Tree structure and Chinese menu prompting are adopted in this system which can be utilized separately, sub-systems at different levels can be also individually operated. It can be transplanted to data processing of other similar geological deposit models (including non-gamma ray spectrometric data). The system is rapid, accurate, simple, convenient and flexible in use, more practical and easily popularized

  9. The use of car-borne gamma-ray spectrometric survey in a basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tengyao; Lu Shili; Luo Zongquan.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the geological results in a basin in the Inner Mongolia which were obtained by using our newly-developed and assembled car-borne gamma-ray spectrometric system. Combined with the work of regional geology and remote sensing, five relatively favourable uranium zones were located within the working area. The field procedures of car-borne gamma-ray spectrometry for less rigid regions is discussed. The gamma-ray spectrometric profiling is mainly used for regional reconnaissance. In the case of enhanced anomalious radioactivity the profiling with varying directions is adopted and the data are plotted on scale 1:50000 topographic map. It is suggested that the car-borne gamma-ray spectrometric system can be calibrated both by the pads specified for portable spectrometers and by testing site when the calibration facility for the car-borne gamma-ray spectrometric system is not available. The effect of rainfall on car-borne gamma-ray spectrometric survey and the simplified field qualitative determination of U-Ra disequilibrium are also briefly discussed

  10. Gas Chromatographic-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Essential Oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To analyze the essential oil composition of the flower of Jasminum officinale L. var. grandifloroum L. (Jasminum grandiflorum) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Methods: The optimum GC-MS conditions used for the analysis were 250 oC inlet temperature, 150 oC MSD detector temperature, ...

  11. Chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of ethanol extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: The dried root of Maesa perlaria var. formosana was extracted with 95 % ethanol for composition analysis under the following optimum GC-MS conditions: 250 °C inlet temperature, 250 °C MSD detector temperature, and GC oven temperature programmed as follows: initial temperature held at 70 °C for 15 min, ...

  12. Fiber optic fluid detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  13. Fiber optic fluid detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, S. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element (11, 11a to 11j) having a cladding or coating of a material (23, 23a to 23j) which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector (24, 24a to 24j) may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses.

  14. Position detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Toshifumi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to detect the position of an moving object in a control rod position detector, stably in a digital manner at a high accuracy and free from the undesired effects of circumstantial conditions such as the reactor temperature. Constitution: Coils connected in parallel with each other are disposed along the passage of a moving object and variable resistors and relays are connected in series with each of the coils respectively. Light emitting diodes is connected in series with the contacts of the respective relays. The resistance value of the variable resistors are adjusted depending on the changes in the circumstantial conditions and temperature distribution upon carrying out the positional detection. When the object is inserted into a coils, the relevant relay is deenergized, by which the relay contacts are closed to light up the diode. In the same manner, as the object is successively inserted into the coils, the diodes are lighted-up successively thereby enabling highly accurate and stable positional detection in a digital manner, free from the undesired effects of the circumstantial conditions. (Horiuchi, T.)

  15. MUON DETECTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    F. Gasparini

    DT As announced in the previous Bulletin MU DT completed the installation of the vertical chambers of barrel wheels 0, +1 and +2. 242 DT and RPC stations are now installed in the negative barrel wheels. The missing 8 (4 in YB-1 and 4 in YB-2) chambers can be installed only after the lowering of the two wheels into the UX cavern, which is planned for the last quarter of the year. Cabling on the surface of the negative wheels was finished in May after some difficulties with RPC cables. The next step was to begin the final commissioning of the wheels with the final trigger and readout electronics. Priority was giv¬en to YB0 in order to check everything before the chambers were covered by cables and services of the inner detectors. Commissioning is not easy since it requires both activity on the central and positive wheels underground, as well as on the negative wheels still on the surface. The DT community is requested to commission the negative wheels on surface to cope with a possible lack of time a...

  16. Atomic absorption spectrometric determination of mineral elements in mammalian bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udoh, Anthony P.

    2000-01-01

    The phosphorus content of the major bones of male and female selected mammals was determined using the yellow vanadomolybdate colorimetric method. For each animal, the bone with the highest phosphorus content was used as pilot sample. Varying concentrations of strontium were added to solutions of the ashed pilot samples to minimize phosphorus interference in the determination of calcium and magnesium using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry operated on the air-acetylene mode. At least 6,000 ppm (0.6%) of strontium was required to give optimum results for calcium. The amount of magnesium obtained from the analysis was not affected by the addition of strontium. With the incorporation of strontium in the sample solution, all elements of interest can be determined in the same sample solution. Based on this, a procedure is proposed for the determination of calcium and other elements in bones. Average recoveries of spiked calcium and magnesium were 97.85% and 98.16%, respectively at the 95% confidence level. The coefficients of variation obtained for replicate determinations using one of the samples were 0.00% for calcium, lead and sodium, 2.93% for magnesium, 3.27% for iron and 3.92% for zinc at the concentration levels found in that sample. Results from the proposed procedure compared well with those from classical chemical methods at the 95% confidence level. It is evident that calcium phosphorus, magnesium and sodium which are the most abundant elements in the bones are distributed in varying amounts both in the different types of bones and different animal species, although the general trend is Ca > P > Na > Mg for each bone considered. The calcium - phosphorus ratio is generally 3:1. The work set out to propose an atomic absorption spectrometric method for the multi-element analysis of mammalian bones with a single sample preparation and to study the distribution pattern of these elements in the bones. (Author)

  17. Interpretation of Spectrometric Measurements of Active Geostationary Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, D.; Wade, G.

    2014-09-01

    Over 5000 visible near-infrared (VNIR) spectrometric measurements of active geostationary satellites have been collected with the National Research Council (NRC) 1.8m Plaskett telescope located at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO) in Victoria, Canada. The objective of this ongoing experiment is to study how reflectance spectroscopy can be used to reliably identify specific material types on the surface of artificial Earth-orbiting objects. Active geostationary satellites were selected as the main subjects for this experiment since their orientation is stable and can be estimated to a high-level of confidence throughout a night of observation. Furthermore, for most geostationary satellites, there is a wide variety of sources that can provide some level of information as to their external surface composition. Notwithstanding the high number of measurements that have been collected to date, it was assumed that the experimenters would have a much greater success rate in material identification given the choice experimental subjects. To date, only the presence of aluminum has been confidently identified in some of the reflectance spectra that have been collected. Two additional material types, namely photovoltaic cells and polyimide film, the first layer of multi-layer insulation (MLI), have also been possibly identified. However uncertainties in the reduced spectral measurements prevent any definitive conclusion with respect to these materials at this time. The surprising lack of results with respect to material identification have forced the experimenters to use other data interpretation methods to characterize the spectral scattering characteristics of the studied satellites. The results from this study have already led to improvements in the ways that reflectance spectra from spacecraft are collected and analysed. Equally important, the data interpretation techniques elaborated over the course of this experiment will also serve to increase the body of

  18. Department of Radiation Detectors: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piekoszewski, J.

    1998-01-01

    (full text) Work carried out in 1997 in the Department of Radiation Detectors concentrated on three subjects: (i) Semiconductor Detectors (ii) X-ray Tube Generators (iii) Material Modification using Ion and Plasma Beams. Semiconductor detectors: Semiconductor detectors of ionizing radiation are among the basic tools utilized in such fields of research and industry as nuclear physics, high energy physics, medical (oncology) radiotherapy, radiological protection, environmental monitoring, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence non-destructive analysis of chemical composition, nuclear power industry. The Department all objectives are: - search for new types of detectors, - adapting modern technologies (especially of industrial microelectronics) to detector manufacturing, - producing unique detectors tailored for physics experiments, - manufacturing standard detectors for radiation measuring instruments, - scientific development of the staff. These 1997 objectives were accomplished particularly by: - research on unique detectors for nuclear physics (e.g. transmission type Si(Li) detectors with extremely thin entrance and exit window), - development of technology of high-resistivity (HRSi) silicon detectors and thermoelectric cooling systems (KBN grant), - study of the applicability of industrial planar technology in producing detectors, - manufacturing detectors developed in previous years, re-generating and servicing customer detectors of various origin. In accomplishing of the above, the Department cooperated with interested groups of physicists from our Institute (P-I and P-II Departments), Warsaw University, Warsaw Heavy Ion Laboratory and with some technology Institutes based in Warsaw (ITME, ITE). Some detectors and services have been delivered to customers on a commercial basis. X-Rat tube generators: The Department conducts research on design and technology of producing X-ray generators based on X-ray tubes of special construction. In 1997, work on a special

  19. Detector simulation needs for detector designers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.G.

    1987-11-01

    Computer simulation of the components of SSC detectors and of the complete detectors will be very important for the designs of the detectors. The ratio of events from interesting physics to events from background processes is very low, so detailed understanding of detector response to the backgrounds is needed. Any large detector for the SSC will be very complex and expensive and every effort must be made to design detectors which will have excellent performance and will not have to undergo major rebuilding. Some areas in which computer simulation is particularly needed are pattern recognition in tracking detectors and development of shower simulation code which can be trusted as an aid in the design and optimization of calorimeters, including their electron identification performance. Existing codes require too much computer time to be practical and need to be compared with test beam data at energies of several hundred GeV. Computer simulation of the processing of the data, including electronics response to the signals from the detector components, processing of the data by microprocessors on the detector, the trigger, and data acquisition will be required. In this report we discuss the detector simulation needs for detector designers

  20. The micro slit gas detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claude Labbe, J.; Gomez, F. E-mail: fgomez@cern.ch; Nunez, T.; Pazos, A.; Vazquez, P

    1999-06-01

    We describe the first tests with a new proportional gas detector. Its geometry consists of slits opened in a copper metallized kapton foil with 30 {mu}m anode strips suspended in these openings. In this way, the multiplication process is similar to a standard MSGC. The fundamental difference is the absence of an insulating substrate around the anode. Also the material budget is significantly reduced, and the problems related to charging-up or polarization are removed. Ageing properties of this detector are under study.

  1. The micro slit gas detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claude Labbe, J.; Gomez, F.; Nunez, T.; Pazos, A.; Vazquez, P.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the first tests with a new proportional gas detector. Its geometry consists of slits opened in a copper metallized kapton foil with 30 μm anode strips suspended in these openings. In this way, the multiplication process is similar to a standard MSGC. The fundamental difference is the absence of an insulating substrate around the anode. Also the material budget is significantly reduced, and the problems related to charging-up or polarization are removed. Ageing properties of this detector are under study

  2. Rapid in situ gamma spectrometric determination of fallout radioactivity in the environment. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zombori, Peter

    1995-01-01

    The main aim of the present CRP is to identify the existing analytical methods and develop new ones, if possible, which provide rapid, reliable, and detailed information on the radioactive contamination of the environment after a major nuclear accident. Gamma spectrometry has long been regarded as one of the most applicable radioanalytical techniques but its use for environmental studies requires some further considerations. There are two possible approaches to measure environmental radioactivity: (a) taking samples of the different environmental media and measuring them in a laboratory or (b) taking the spectrometer to the place of interest and making in situ measurements. In the former case sampling is a crucial factor hindering the rapid analysis while the latter case is not always reliable due to the problems and uncertainties of the measurement interpretation. The application of in situ gamma spectrometry for the determination of environmental radioactivity has become increasingly attractive since the advent of the high resolution semiconductor gamma detectors, especially, more recently, portable high purity Ge diodes (HpGe). The applicability of this technique was very well proved after the Chernobyl reactor accident when in situ spectrometry played an important role in the rapid evaluation of the fall-out situation. Our measurements provided information on the amount and composition of the radioactive contamination of the ground surface already in the first hours. These measurements enabled us to predict the time variation of the environmental radioactivity after the stabilization of the situation. The portability of the system was an important factor in performing a rapid and efficient survey in different parts of the country. A serious disadvantage of this method is, however, that it requires some knowledge about the radionuclide distribution in the soil, which is normally determined by tedious and time consuming sample analysis of the different soil

  3. Significance of Airborne Gamma-ray spectrometric data of Umm bisilla Area, central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabie, S I [Nuclear materials authority, Maadi, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    Umm bisilla area, located in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt, consists mainly of basement rocks. The present investigation of the airborne spectrometric data is to define the meaningful anomalies from the raw data by applying the significance factor techniques, by calculating the significant radioactive provinces. Determination of the gross structural pattern and broad variations in composition of the crystalline basement, to define the relationships between the tectonic features of the area as interpreted from aeromagnetic data, with the significant anomalies revealed from spectrometric data was carried out through the application of different magnetic techniques. Five significant uraniferous zones were detected associated with Umm Bisilla granite, amphibolite, and grey granite. The intersection of the structural lineaments interpreted from aeromagnetic data illustrated good correlation with the significant uranium anomalous zones interpreted from spectrometric data, and indicated that the concentration is structurally. 15 figs.

  4. Low-activity spectrometric gamma-ray logging technique for delineation of coal/rock interfaces in dry blast holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asfahani, J.; Borsaru, M.

    2007-01-01

    A low-activity spectrometric gamma-ray logging technique is proposed in this paper as a sensitive tool for the delineation of coal/rock interfaces in dry blast holes. The advantages and superiority of this technique over traditional micro-density non-spectrometric gamma-ray tools are demonstrated

  5. The GRANDE detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, A.; Bond, R.; Coleman, L.; Rollefson, A.; Wold, D.; Bratton, C.B.; Gurr, H.; Kropp, W.; Nelson, M.; Price, L.R.; Reines, F.; Schultz, J.; Sobel, H.; Svoboda, R.; Yodh, G.; Burnett, T.; Chaloupka, V.; Wilkes, R.J.; Cherry, M.; Ellison, S.B.; Guzik, T.G.; Wefel, J.; Gaidos, J.; Loeffler, F.; Sembroski, G.; Wilson, C.; Goodman, J.; Haines, T.J.; Kielczewska, D.; Lane, C.; Steinberg, R.; Lieber, M.; Nagle, D.; Potter, M.; Tripp, R.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we present a detector facility which meets the requirements outlined above for a next-generation instrument. GRANDE (Gamma Ray and Neutrino DEtector) is an imaging, water Cerenkov detector, which combines in one facility an extensive air shower array and a high-energy neutrino detector. (orig.)

  6. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs

  7. Spectrometric methods for the determination of chlorine in crude oil and petroleum derivatives — A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, Adriana; Saavedra, Alvaro; Tristão, Maria Luiza B.; Mendes, Luiz A.N.; Aucélio, Ricardo Q.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorine determination in crude oil is made in order to guarantee that the oil does not contain levels of this element that might cause damages in the oil processing equipment. In petroleum products, the determination of chlorine is made, for instance, to evaluate if there are proper concentrations of organochloride compounds, which are used as additives. Such determinations are currently performed following official guidelines from the ASTM International and from the United States Environmental Protection Agency as well as protocols indicated by the Universal Oil Products. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy plays an important role in many of these official methods. In contrast, other spectrometric methods based on optical and mass detection are plagued by limitations related to both the fundamental characteristics of non-metals and to the complex sample matrices, which reflects in the small number of articles devoted to these applications. In this review, the current status of the spectrometric methods, especially the role played by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, is evaluated in terms of the determination of chlorine in crude oil and petroleum derivatives. Comparison of the performance of the methods, limitations and potential new approaches to ensure proper spectrometric determinations of chlorine is indicated. - Highlights: • Critical evaluation of spectrometric methods for chlorine in petroleum products. • Reviews on element determination in petroleum have not address the case of chlorine. • Peculiarities of the spectrometric determination of Cl in petroleum are discussed. • The spectrometric approaches are detailed and compared to the official methods. • New trends in chlorine determination in petroleum products are indicated

  8. Neutron spectrometric evaluations in the Argentine research reactor RA-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunst, J.J.; Papadopulos, S.B.; Gregori, B.N.; Cruzate, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The determination of the quantities dose equivalent H * (10) and personal dose equivalent Hp(10) in mixed field (n,γ) needs the knowledge of the related spectrum. In order to fulfill this aim spectrometer system has been built based on the combination of polyethylene spheres of different diameters (Bonner Spheres System-BSS) and a He 3 proportional counter detector sensitive to thermal neutrons. The detector is located in the geometrical centre of each of the spheres and has an associated electronics with a charge preamplifier, an amplifier and a multichannel system that allows the outgoing spectrum analysis. In order to determine the neutron spectrum a deconvolution method is applied based on the LOUHI82 code. In this work are shown the spectra and the related values of H * (10) that have been got in five places of the reactor and in the command room with the BSS. (author) [es

  9. Stability and linearity control of spectrometric channels of the Cherenkov counters using controllable units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollar, D.; Kollarova, L.; Khorvat, P.

    1976-01-01

    A system is elaborated to control stability and linearity of the Cherenkov counter spectrometric channels in an experiment on a magnetic monopole search. Linearity of a light characteristic of a photoelectric multiplier is checked with the help of the calibrated light-strikings of light emitting diodes with flare intensity adjusted by controlling generator voltage across the mercury body. A program algorithm is presented for checking stability and linearity of the Cherenkov counter spectrometric channels which helps to consider the fatigue effects of the photoelectric multiplier resulting from the considerable loads

  10. Mass Spectrometric Characteristics of Prenylated Indole Derivatives from Marine-Derived Penicillium sp. NH-SL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hui; Ding, Wanjing; Ma, Zhongjun

    2017-03-22

    Two prenylated indole alkaloids were isolated from the ethyl acetate extracts of a marine-derived fungus Penicillium sp. NH-SL and one of them exhibited potent cytotoxic activity against mouse hepa 1c1c7 cells. In order to detect other bioactive analogs, we used liquid chromatogram tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to analyze the mass spectrometric characteristics of the isolated compounds as well as the crude extracts. As a result, three other analogs were detected, and their structures were deduced according to the similar fragmentation patterns. This is the first systematic report on the mass spectrometric characteristics of prenylated indole derivatives.

  11. Spectrometric methods used in the calibration of radiodiagnostic measuring instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vries, W [Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1995-12-01

    Recently a set of parameters for checking the quality of radiation for use in diagnostic radiology was established at the calibration facility of Nederlands Meetinstituut (NMI). The establishment of the radiation quality required re-evaluation of the correction factors for the primary air-kerma standards. Free-air ionisation chambers require several correction factors to measure air-kerma according to its definition. These correction factors were calculated for the NMi free-air chamber by Monte Carlo simulations for monoenergetic photons in the energy range from 10 keV to 320 keV. The actual correction factors follow from weighting these mono-energetic correction factors with the air-kerma spectrum of the photon beam. This paper describes the determination of the photon spectra of the X-ray qualities used for the calibration of dosimetric instruments used in radiodiagnostics. The detector used for these measurements is a planar HPGe-detector, placed in the direct beam of the X-ray machine. To convert the measured pulse height spectrum to the actual photon spectrum corrections must be made for fluorescent photon escape, single and multiple compton scattering inside the detector, and detector efficiency. From the calculated photon spectra a number of parameters of the X-ray beam can be calculated. The calculated first and second half value layer in aluminum and copper are compared with the measured values of these parameters to validate the method of spectrum reconstruction. Moreover the spectrum measurements offer the possibility to calibrate the X-ray generator in terms of maximum high voltage. The maximum photon energy in the spectrum is used as a standard for calibration of kVp-meters.

  12. Physical motivations for thermal detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, E.

    1993-01-01

    Low temperature bolometers can be complementary and sometimes superior to open-quotes classicalclose quotes ionization detectors in many experiments without accelerators in nuclear, subnuclear and astroparticle physics. After a short review of the open-quotes toolsclose quotes that cryogenics offer for the detection of particles the author first considers a few practical applications of bolometers in the spectroscopy of α, γ and X rays, in the detection of neutrons, and in measurements of weak radioactive contaminations. Searches with this technique on single and double beta decay, of which some are already being carried out, are then considered and discussed. The various properties which make thermal detectors particularly suitable for searches on dark matter are reviewed, stressing the potentiality of this technique. The promising, but still far, potentiality of thermal detectors in solar neutrino experiments is finally discussed

  13. Solid state detector design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunarwan Prayitno; Ahmad Rifai

    2010-01-01

    Much has been charged particle detector radiation detector made by the industry, especially those engaged in the development of detection equipment and components. The development and further research will be made solid state detector with silicon material. To be able to detect charged particles (radiation), required the processing of silicon material into the detector material. The method used to make silicon detector material is a lithium evaporations. Having formed an intrinsic region contactor installation process, and with testing. (author)

  14. Fast neutron activating detectors for pulsed flow measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyatlov, V.D.; Kunaev, G.T.; Popytaev, A.N.; Cheremukhov, B.V.

    1979-01-01

    The requirements to the activation detectors of the pulsed flows of the fast neutrons are considered; the criteria of optimum measurement time, geometrical moderator sizes and radioactive detector element properties have been obtained. On their analysis parameter selection has been carried out. The neutron detector to register the short pulses has been designed and calibrated. The ways of further increase of sensitivity and efficiency of such detectors are discussed

  15. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. K.; Park, S. H.; Lee, W. G.; Ha, J. H.

    2005-01-01

    In 1945, Van Heerden measured α, β and γ radiations with the cooled AgCl crystal. It was the first radiation measurement using the compound semiconductor detector. Since then the compound semiconductor has been extensively studied as radiation detector. Generally the radiation detector can be divided into the gas detector, the scintillator and the semiconductor detector. The semiconductor detector has good points comparing to other radiation detectors. Since the density of the semiconductor detector is higher than that of the gas detector, the semiconductor detector can be made with the compact size to measure the high energy radiation. In the scintillator, the radiation is measured with the two-step process. That is, the radiation is converted into the photons, which are changed into electrons by a photo-detector, inside the scintillator. However in the semiconductor radiation detector, the radiation is measured only with the one-step process. The electron-hole pairs are generated from the radiation interaction inside the semiconductor detector, and these electrons and charged ions are directly collected to get the signal. The energy resolution of the semiconductor detector is generally better than that of the scintillator. At present, the commonly used semiconductors as the radiation detector are Si and Ge. However, these semiconductor detectors have weak points. That is, one needs thick material to measure the high energy radiation because of the relatively low atomic number of the composite material. In Ge case, the dark current of the detector is large at room temperature because of the small band-gap energy. Recently the compound semiconductor detectors have been extensively studied to overcome these problems. In this paper, we will briefly summarize the recent research topics about the compound semiconductor detector. We will introduce the research activities of our group, too

  16. Diodes based on semi-insulating CdTe crystals with Mo/MoO{sub x} contacts for X- and γ-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslyanchuk, O.; Kulchynsky, V.; Solovan, M. [Chernivtsi National University, Chernivtsi (Ukraine); Gnatyuk, V. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Potiriadis, C. [Greek Atomic Energy Commission, Attiki (Greece); Kaissas, I. [Greek Atomic Energy Commission, Attiki (Greece); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece); Brus, V. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    This paper reports on the possible applications of molybdenum oxide (Mo/MoO{sub x}) contacts in combination with semi-insulating CdTe crystals. The electrical contacts to p-type Cl-doped CdTe crystals were formed by the deposition of molybdenum oxide and pure molybdenum thin films by the DC reactive magnetron sputtering. Electrical properties of the prepared Mo-MoO{sub x}/p-CdTe/MoO{sub x}-Mo surface-barrier structures were investigated at different temperatures. It is shown that the rapid growth of the reverse current with increasing bias voltage higher than 10 V is caused by the space-charge limited currents. Spectrometric properties of the Mo-MoO{sub x}/p-CdTe/MoO{sub x}-Mo structures have been also analyzed. It is revealed that the developed heterojunction has shown promising characteristics for its practical application in X- and γ-ray radiation detector fabrication. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Proposals of counting method for bubble detectors and their intercomparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramalho, Eduardo; Silva, Ademir X.; Bellido, Luis F.; Facure, Alessandro; Pereira, Mario

    2009-01-01

    The study of neutron's spectrometry and dosimetry has become significantly easier due to relatively new devices called bubble detectors. Insensitive to gamma rays and composed by superheated emulsions, they still are subjects of many researches in Radiation Physics and Nuclear Engineering. In bubble detectors, either exposed to more intense neutron fields or for a long time, when more bubbles are produced, the statistical uncertainty during the dosimetric and spectrometric processes is reduced. A proposal of this nature is set up in this work, which presents ways to perform counting processes for bubble detectors and an updated proceeding to get the irradiated detectors' images in order to make the manual counting easier. Twelve BDS detectors were irradiated by RDS111 cyclotron from IEN's (Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear) and photographed using an assembly specially designed for this experiment. Counting was proceeded manually in a first moment; simultaneously, ImagePro was used in order to perform counting automatically. The bubble counting values, either manual or automatic, were compared and the time to get them and their difficult levels as well. After the bubble counting, the detectors' standardizes responses were calculated in both cases, according to BDS's manual and they were also compared. Among the results, the counting on these devices really becomes very hard at a large number of bubbles, besides higher variations in counting of many bubbles. Because of the good agreement between manual counting and the custom program, the last one revealed a good alternative in practical and economical levels. Despite the good results, the custom program needs of more adjustments in order to achieve more accuracy on higher counting on bubble detectors for neutron measurement applications. (author)

  18. Structural and electrical properties of InAs/GaSb superlattices grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy for midwavelength infrared detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arikata, Suguru; Kyono, Takashi [Semiconductor Technologies Laboratory, Sumitomo Electric Industries, LTD., Hyogo (Japan); Miura, Kouhei; Balasekaran, Sundararajan; Inada, Hiroshi; Iguchi, Yasuhiro [Transmission Devices Laboratory, Sumitomo Electric Industries, LTD., Yokohama (Japan); Sakai, Michito [Sensor System Research Group, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Katayama, Haruyoshi [Space Technology Directorate I, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kimata, Masafumi [College of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, Shiga (Japan); Akita, Katsushi [Sumiden Semiconductor Materials, LTD., Hyogo (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    InAs/GaSb superlattice (SL) structures were fabricated on GaSb substrates by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) toward midwavelength infrared (MWIR) photodiodes. Almost defect-free 200-period SLs with a strain-compensation interfacial layer were successfully fabricated and demonstrate an intense photoluminescence peak centered at 6.1 μm at 4 K and an external quantum efficiency of 31% at 3.5 μm at 20 K. These results indicate that the high-performance MWIR detectors can be fabricated in application with the InAs/GaSb SLs grown by MOVPE as an attractive method for production. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Domestic smoke detectors - a radioactive waste problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, M.W.

    1996-01-01

    A common form of domestic smoke detector is the ionization chamber smoke detector. A small radioactive source provides the ionization and when smoke enters the sensitive volume the change in voltage is sensed electronically. The use of domestic ionization chamber smoke detectors is widespread and is recommended by fire authorities and insurance companies. That one million such detectors were imported into New South Wales in 1994 is an indication of the numbers involved. The typical radioactive source in a domestic smoke detector is Am 241, which is regarded as one of the more hazardous radionuclides. If it is such a hazardous material, should it be allowed in the normal household without any control? Or, in a smoke detector, is it in a less hazardous form than assumed in the ICRP recommendations and do its benefits outweigh its possible risks? In spite of the apparent hazard of Am 241, the possession of the radioactive source in smoke detectors is generally exempt from any form of regulation. Waste regulations, however, set requirements for the disposal of Am 241 and these regulations can be interpreted as applying to smoke detectors. We appear to have a situation where a home owner can legally purchase any number of smoke detectors but when they fail there are codes of practice that prevent them being disposed of. On the other hand, smoke detectors have a direct life saving function and reports indicate that smoke detectors can reduce both injury and property damage by up to 50%. Do these benefits from the use of smoke detectors compensate for any radiological risk? (author)

  20. Mass spectrometric studies of the cluster formation of radon progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    A new experimental system is developed to study the cluster formation of radon progeny with neutral molecules in the environment, which includes a modified mass spectrometer and a surface barrier detector. With the system, the cluster research is carried out at molecular level at which the mass of individual cluster formed is measured. A theory is also proposed to treat the cluster formation as a discrete process based on the ion-dipole and dipole-dipole interactions. Comparison between the theory and experiment is given. (author). 16 refs., 6 figs

  1. Mass spectrometric studies of the cluster formation of radon progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, S L [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry

    1994-12-31

    A new experimental system is developed to study the cluster formation of radon progeny with neutral molecules in the environment, which includes a modified mass spectrometer and a surface barrier detector. With the system, the cluster research is carried out at molecular level at which the mass of individual cluster formed is measured. A theory is also proposed to treat the cluster formation as a discrete process based on the ion-dipole and dipole-dipole interactions. Comparison between the theory and experiment is given. (author). 16 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Gamma-spectrometric analysis of river sediments collected around phosphate fertilizer industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallardo, M.C.; Garcia-Leon, M.; Mundi, M.; Respaldiza, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometric analysis has been carried out on sediments collected in an estuarine system formed by two major rivers in southern Spain. The results show clearly that important amounts of natural radioactivity are accumulating on the bed of both rivers. This radioactivity appears to originate from effluent from several phoshate fertilizer factories adjacent to the estuary. (author)

  3. Spectrometric storage device in VME standard; Spektrometricheskoe zapominayushchee ustrojstvo v standarte VME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaev, V E

    1996-12-31

    Paper describes module of histogram Memory Module designed to implement hardware way of accumulation of spectrometric data in systems based on VME standard equipment. Application of HMM module enables to increase throughput of the system for data acquisition and processing as in this case VME bus trunk is not occupied and may be used to control experiment course. 2 figs.

  4. On the Origin of Microheterogeneity : A Mass Spectrometric Study of Dimethyl Sulfoxide-Water Binary Mixture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shin, Dong Nam; Wijnen, Jan W.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.; Wakisaka, Akihiro

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the microscopic solvent structure of dimethyl sulfoxide-water mixtures and its influence on the solvation structure of solute from a clustering point of View, by means of a specially designed mass spectrometric system. It was observed that the propensity to the cluster formation is

  5. Retrospective detection of exposure to organophosphorus anti-cholinesterases: Mass spectrometric analysis of phosphylated human butyrylcholinesterase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fidder, A.; Hulst, A.G.; Noort, D.; Ruiter, R. de; Schans, M.J. van der; Benschop, H.P.; Langenberg, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper a novel and general procedure is presented for detection of organophosphate-inhibited human butyrylcholinesterase (HuBuChE), which is based on electrospray tandem mass spectrometric analysis of phosphylated nonapeptides obtained after pepsin digestion of the enzyme. The utility of this

  6. Radiochemical separation and alpha-spectrometric determination of Americium in different matrixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radenkovic, M.; Joksic, J.; Paligoric, D.

    2009-01-01

    A method of separation and alpha-spectrometric determination of americium, developed in VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences is described in the paper. The procedure is convenient to be used for 241 Am determination in environmental matrixes as well as samples of human origin if a very small concentrations are expected, using 243 Am as a tracer for radiochemical yield recovery. (author) [sr

  7. Structure elucidation of metabolite x17299 by interpretation of mass spectrometric data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qibo; Ford, Lisa A; Evans, Anne M; Toal, Douglas R

    2017-01-01

    A major bottleneck in metabolomic studies is metabolite identification from accurate mass spectrometric data. Metabolite x17299 was identified in plasma as an unknown in a metabolomic study using a compound-centric approach where the associated ion features of the compound were used to determine the true molecular mass. The aim of this work is to elucidate the chemical structure of x17299, a new compound by de novo interpretation of mass spectrometric data. An Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer was used for acquisition of mass spectra up to MS 4 at high resolution. Synthetic standards of N,N,N -trimethyl-l-alanyl-l-proline betaine (l,l-TMAP), a diastereomer, and an enantiomer were chemically prepared. The planar structure of x17299 was successfully proposed by de novo mechanistic interpretation of mass spectrometric data without any laborious purification and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis. The proposed structure was verified by deuterium exchanged mass spectrometric analysis and confirmed by comparison to a synthetic standard. Relative configuration of x17299 was determined by direct chromatographic comparison to a pair of synthetic diastereomers. Absolute configuration was assigned after derivatization of x17299 with a chiral auxiliary group followed by its chromatographic comparison to a pair of synthetic standards. The chemical structure of metabolite x17299 was determined to be l,l-TMAP.

  8. The AS-76 interlaboratory experiment on the alpha spectrometric determination of Pu-238. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyrich, W.; Spannagel, G.

    1979-12-01

    In cooperation with 26 laboratories of 11 countries or international organizations, the Safeguards Project of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center carried out the interlaboratory program AS-76. It focused on the alpha-spectrometric determination of the Pu-238 isotope. The performance of the program as well as the results obtained are described. (orig.) 891 HP/orig. 892 MKO [de

  9. Mass spectrometric identification of isocyanate-induced modifications of keratins in human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulst, A.G.; Verstappen, D.R.W.; Riet-van Oeveren, D. van der; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Noort, D.

    2015-01-01

    In the current paper we show that exposure of human callus to isocyanates leads to covalent modifications within keratin proteins. Mass spectrometric analyses of pronase digests of keratin isolated from exposed callus show that both mono- and di-adducts (for di-isocyanates) are predominantly formed

  10. Spherical Detector Device Mathematical Modelling with Taking into Account Detector Module Symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyj, V.G.; Fedorchenko, D.V.; Prokopets, S.I.; Prokopets, I.M.; Kazhmuradov, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Mathematical Model for spherical detector device accounting to symmetry properties is considered. Exact algorithm for simulation of measurement procedure with multiple radiation sources is developed. Modelling results are shown to have perfect agreement with calibration measurements

  11. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I; Martinez laso, L

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  12. Department of Radiation Detectors: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piekoszewski, J.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Work carried out in 1998 in the Department of Radiation Detectors concentrated on three subjects: (i) Semiconductor Detectors (ii) X-ray Tube Generators (iii) Material Modification Using Ion and Plasma Beams. SEMICONDUCTOR DETECTORS: Semiconductor detectors of ionizing radiation are among the basic tools utilized in such fields of research and industry as nuclear physics, high energy physics, medical (oncology) radiotherapy, radiological protection, environmental monitoring, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence non-destructive analysis of chemical composition, nuclear power industry. The departmental objectives are: a search for new types of detectors; producing unique detectors tailored for physics experiments; manufacturing standard detectors for radiation measuring instruments; scientific development of the staff. These objectives were accomplished in 1998 particularly by: research on unique thin silicon detectors for identification of particles in E-ΔE telescopes, modernization of technology of manufacturing Ge(Li) detectors capable of detecting broader range of gamma energies, manufacturing detectors developed in previous years, re-generating and servicing customer detectors of various origin. In accomplishment of the above the Department co-operated with groups of physicists from IPJ, PAN Institute of Physics (Warsaw), and with some technology Institutes based in Warsaw (ITME, ITE). Some detectors and services have been delivered to customers on a commercial basis. X-Ray TUBE GENERATORS: The Department conducts research on design and technology of manufacturing X-ray generators as well as on imaging and dosimetry of X-ray beams. Various models of special construction X-ray tubes and their power supplies are under construction. In 1998 work concentrated on: completing laboratory equipment for manufacturing X-ray tubes and their components, developing technology of manufacturing X-ray tubes and their components, completing a laboratory set-up with

  13. Laser tests of silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolezal, Zdenek; Escobar, Carlos; Gadomski, Szymon; Garcia, Carmen; Gonzalez, Sergio; Kodys, Peter; Kubik, Petr; Lacasta, Carlos; Marti, Salvador; Mitsou, Vasiliki A.; Moorhead, Gareth F.; Phillips, Peter W.; Reznicek, Pavel; Slavik, Radan

    2007-01-01

    This paper collects experiences from the development of a silicon sensor laser testing setup and from tests of silicon strip modules (ATLAS End-cap SCT), pixel modules (DEPFET) and large-area diodes using semiconductor lasers. Lasers of 1060 and 680 nm wavelengths were used. A sophisticated method of focusing the laser was developed. Timing and interstrip properties of modules were measured. Analysis of optical effects involved and detailed discussion about the usability of laser testing for particle detectors are presented

  14. Processing of plastic track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somogyi, G.

    1977-01-01

    A survey of some actual problems of the track processing methods available at this time for plastics is presented. In the case of the conventional chemical track-etching technique, mainly the etching situations related to detector geometry, and the relationship between registration sensitivity and the etching parameters are considered. Special attention is paid to the behaviour of track-revealing by means of electrochemical etching. Finally, some properties of a promising new track processing method based on graft polymerization are discussed. (author)

  15. Processing of plastic track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somogyi, G.

    1976-01-01

    A survey of some actual problems of the track processing methods available at this time for plastics is presented. In the case of the conventional chemical track etching technique mainly the etching situations related to detector geometry and the relationship of registration sensitivity and the etching parameters are considered. A special attention is paid to the behaviour of track revealing by means of electrochemical etching. Finally, some properties of a promising new track processing method based on graft polymerization is discussed. (orig.) [de

  16. Mica fission detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.; Anderson, J.D.; Hansen, L.; Lehn, A.V.; Williamson, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The present development status of the mica fission detectors is summarized. It is concluded that the techniques have been refined and developed to a state such that the mica fission counters are a reliable and reproducible detector for fission events

  17. Barrier Infrared Detector (BIRD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recent breakthrough in MWIR detector design, has resulted in a high operating temperature (HOT) barrier infrared detector (BIRD) that is capable of spectral...

  18. Simulating detectors dead time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustom, Ibrahim Farog Ibrahim

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear detectors are used in all aspects of nuclear measurements. All nuclear detectors are characterized by their dead time i.e. the time needed by a detector to recover from a previous incident. A detector dead time influences measurements taken by a detector and specially when measuring high decay rate (>) where is the detector dead time. Two models are usually used to correct for the dead time effect: the paralayzable and the non-paralayzable models. In the current work we use Monte Carlo simulation techniques to simulate radioactivity and the effect of dead time and the count rate of a detector with a dead time =5x10 - 5s assuming the non-paralayzable model. The simulation indicates that assuming a non -paralayzable model could be used to correct for decay rate measured by a detector. The reliability of the non-paralayzable model to correct the measured decay rate could be gauged using the Monte Carlo simulation. (Author)

  19. Forward tracking detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Forward tracking is an essential part of a detector at the international linear collider (ILC). The requirements for forward tracking are explained and the proposed solutions in the detector concepts are shown.

  20. Measurements of properties of the Higgs-like boson in the H → ZZ(* → 4ℓ decay channel using the ATLAS detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stahlman JM

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents results on measurements of the signal strength, mass, and spin of the recently discovered Higgs-like boson in the H → ZZ(* → 4ℓ decay channel using the ATLAS detector. The results are based on the combined dataset of the 2011 and 2012 LHC runs consisting of 4.6 fb−1 of ps √s = 7 TeV and 20.7 fb−1 of √s = 8 TeV proton-proton collision data. An excess of events is observed corresponding to mH = 124.3 GeV with a p0 value of 2.7 × 10−11 (6.6 standard deviations. The fit at this mass point yields a signal strength relative to the SM of 1.7−0.4+0.5 with mH = 124.3−0.5+0.6 (stat−0.3+0.5 (syst GeV. Tests of various spin-parity hypotheses are also presented, with the 0− and 1+ hypotheses being excluded versus the 0+ hypothesis at >97% confidence level.

  1. Observation of the Higgs boson and measurement of its properties in the HWW* channel with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00364274; Shenjian, Chen (NJU)

    The Higgs boson decays to WW* is observed based on an excess of events over background of 6.1 standard deviations in the dilepton final state including all flavour channels (ee/μμ and eμ/μe) and jet multiplicity categories (nj = 0, 1,≥ 2), where theStandard Model expectation is 5.8 standard deviations. Evidence for thevector-boson fusion (VBF) production process is also obtained with a significance of3.2 standard deviations. The different favour channels eμ/μe have the best expected signal sensitivity. The low jet multiplicity categories are dominantly contributed by the gluon-gluon fusion (ggF) production process whereas the large jet multiplicity category has the best sensitivity to the VBF production process. The results are obtained from proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC, corresponding to 4.5fb-1 at √s = 7TeV and 20.3fb-1 at √s = 8TeV. The background contribution in each channel and jet multiplicity category varies and is determined mostly with data-driven ...

  2. The pin pixel detector--neutron imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Bateman, J E; Derbyshire, G E; Duxbury, D M; Marsh, A S; Rhodes, N J; Schooneveld, E M; Simmons, J E; Stephenson, R

    2002-01-01

    The development and testing of a neutron gas pixel detector intended for application in neutron diffraction studies is reported. Using standard electrical connector pins as point anodes, the detector is based on a commercial 100 pin connector block. A prototype detector of aperture 25.4 mmx25.4 mm has been fabricated, giving a pixel size of 2.54 mm which matches well to the spatial resolution typically required in a neutron diffractometer. A 2-Dimensional resistive divide readout system has been adapted to permit the imaging properties of the detector to be explored in advance of true pixel readout electronics. The timing properties of the device match well to the requirements of the ISIS-pulsed neutron source.

  3. HIBP primary beam detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    A position measuring detector was fabricated for the Heavy Ion Beam Probe. The 11 cm by 50 cm detector was a combination of 15 detector wires in one direction and 63 copper bars - .635 cm by 10 cm to measure along an orthogonal axis by means of a current divider circuit. High transmission tungsten meshes provide entrance windows and suppress secondary electrons. The detector dimensions were chosen to resolve the beam position to within one beam diameter

  4. The OSMOND detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, J.E. [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Dalgliesh, R. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Duxbury, D.M., E-mail: dom.duxbury@stfc.ac.uk [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Helsby, W.I. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Holt, S.A.; Kinane, C.J. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Marsh, A.S. [Diamond Light Source LTD, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Diamond House, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Rhodes, N.J.; Schooneveld, E.M. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Spill, E.J.; Stephenson, R. [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-11

    The development and testing of the Off Specular MicrOstrip Neutron Detector (OSMOND) is described. Based on a microstrip gas chamber the aim of the project was to produce a high counting rate detector capable of replacing the existing rate limited scintillator detectors currently in use on the CRISP reflectometer for off specular reflectometry experiments. The detector system is described together with results of neutron beam tests carried out at the ISIS spallation neutron source.

  5. Calibration of gamma-ray detectors using Gaussian photopeak fitting in the multichannel spectra with a LabVIEW-based digital system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlattauer, Leo; Parali, Levent; Pechousek, Jiri; Sabikoglu, Israfil; Celiktas, Cuneyt; Tektas, Gozde; Novak, Petr; Jancar, Ales; Prochazka, Vit

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports on the development of a gamma-ray spectroscopic system for the (i) recording and (ii) processing of spectra. The utilized data read-out unit consists of a PCI digital oscilloscope, personal computer and LabVIEW™ programming environment. A pulse-height spectra of various sources were recorded with two NaI(Tl) detectors and analyzed, demonstrating the proper usage of the detectors. A multichannel analyzer implements the Gaussian photopeak fitting. The presented method provides results which are in compliance to the ones taken from commercial spectroscopy systems. Each individual hardware or software unit can be further utilized in different spectrometric user-systems. An application of the developed system for research and teaching purposes regarding the design of digital spectrometric systems has been successfully tested at the laboratories of the Department of Experimental Physics.

  6. WORKSHOP: Scintillating fibre detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Scintillating fibre detector development and technology for the proposed US Superconducting Supercollider, SSC, was the subject of a recent workshop at Fermilab, with participation from the high energy physics community and from industry. Sessions covered the current status of fibre technology and fibre detectors, new detector applications, fluorescent materials and scintillation compositions, radiation damage effects, amplification and imaging structures, and scintillation fibre fabrication techniques

  7. Shielded regenerative neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terhune, J.H.; Neissel, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    An ion chamber type neutron detector is disclosed which has a greatly extended lifespan. The detector includes a fission chamber containing a mixture of active and breeding material and a neutron shielding material. The breeding and shielding materials are selected to have similar or substantially matching neutron capture cross-sections so that their individual effects on increased detector life are mutually enhanced

  8. The CAPRICE RICH detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basini, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Codino, A.; Grimani, C. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); De Pascale, M.P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Sezione Univ. `Tor Vergata` Rome (Italy); Cafagna, F. [Bari Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Bari (Italy); Golden, R.L. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Lab.; Brancaccio, F.; Bocciolini, M. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Barbiellini, G.; Boezio, M. [Trieste Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Trieste (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    A compact RICH detector has been developed and used for particle identification in a balloon borne spectrometer to measure the flux of antimatter in the cosmic radiation. This is the first RICH detector ever used in space experiments that is capable of detecting unit charged particles, such as antiprotons. The RICH and all other detectors performed well during the 27 hours long flight.

  9. Self powered neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalan, C.S.; Ramachandra Rao, M.N.; Ingale, A.D.

    1976-01-01

    Two types of self powered neutron detectors used for in-core flux measurements are described. The characteristics of the various detectors, with emitters Rh, V, Co, Py are presented. Details about the fabrication of these detectors are given. (A.K.)

  10. Economical stabilized scintillation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anshakov, O.M.; Chudakov, V.A.; Gurinovich, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    An economical scintillation detector with the stabilization system of an integral type is described. Power consumed by the photomultiplier high-voltage power source is 40 mW, energy resolution is not worse than 9%. The given detector is used in a reference detector of a digital radioisotope densimeter for light media which is successfully operating for several years

  11. Gas filled detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan, C.

    1993-01-01

    The main types of gas filled nuclear detectors: ionization chambers, proportional counters, parallel-plate avalanche counters (PPAC) and microstrip detectors are described. New devices are shown. A description of the processes involved in such detectors is also given. (K.A.) 123 refs.; 25 figs.; 3 tabs

  12. Fast-timing methods for semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spieler, H.

    1982-03-01

    The basic parameters are discussed which determine the accuracy of timing measurements and their effect in a practical application, specifically timing with thin-surface barrier detectors. The discussion focusses on properties of the detector, low-noise amplifiers, trigger circuits and time converters. New material presented in this paper includes bipolar transistor input stages with noise performance superior to currently available FETs, noiseless input terminations in sub-nanosecond preamplifiers and methods using transmission lines to couple the detector to remotely mounted preamplifiers. Trigger circuits are characterized in terms of effective rise time, equivalent input noise and residual jitter

  13. Fast timing methods for semiconductor detectors. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spieler, H.

    1984-10-01

    This tutorial paper discusses the basic parameters which determine the accuracy of timing measurements and their effect in a practical application, specifically timing with thin-surface barrier detectors. The discussion focusses on properties of the detector, low-noise amplifiers, trigger circuits and time converters. New material presented in this paper includes bipolar transistor input stages with noise performance superior to currently available FETs, noiseless input terminations in sub-nanosecond preamplifiers and methods using transmission lines to couple the detector to remotely mounted preamplifiers. Trigger circuits are characterized in terms of effective rise time, equivalent input noise and residual jitter

  14. Neutron radiation damage studies on silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, W.; Kraner, H.W.

    1990-10-01

    Effects of neutron radiation on electrical properties of Si detectors have been studied. At high neutron fluence (Φ n ≥ 10 12 n/cm 2 ), C-V characteristics of detectors with high resistivities (ρ ≥ 1 kΩ-cm) become frequency dependent. A two-trap level model describing this frequency dependent effect is proposed. Room temperature anneal of neutron damaged (at LN 2 temperature) detectors shows three anneal stages, while only two anneal stages were observed in elevated temperature anneal. 19 refs., 14 figs

  15. DUMAND: the ocean as a neutrino detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, A.; Blood, H.; Learned, J.; Reines, F.

    1976-01-01

    It is looked for the possibility of using the ocean as a neutrino detector. Neutrino produced interactions result in charged particles which generate Cerenkov radiation in the water, which can be detected by light-gathering equipment and photomultipliers. The properties of the ocean as seen from this standpoint are critically examined, and the advantages and disadvantages pointed out. Possible uses for such a neutrino detector are the detection of neutrinos emitted in gravitational collapse of stars for example. (BJ) [de

  16. The AMANDA Neutrino Detector - Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wischnewski, R.; Andres, E.; Bai, X.; Barouch, G.; Barwick, S.; Bay, R.; Becker, K.; Bergstroem, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D.; Biron, A.; Booth, J.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Carius, S.; Carlson, M.; Chinowsky, W.; Chirkin, D.; Conrad, J.; Cowen, D.F.; Costa, C.; Dalberg, E.; Desiati, P.; Dewulf, J.; Deyoung, T.; Doksus, P.; Edsjoe, J.; Ekstroem, P.; Feser, T.; Frichter, G.; Gaisser, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goobar, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hardtke, R.; Hellwig, M.; Hill, G.; Hulth, P.; Hundertmark, S.; Jacobsen, J.; Karle, A.; Kim, J.; Koepke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Kravchenko, I.; Lamoureux, J.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Lindahl, P.; Liss, T.; Loaiza, P.; Lowder, D.; Ludvig, J.; Marciniewski, P.; Matis, H.; Miller, T.; Miocinovic, P.; Mock, P.; Morse, R.; Neunhoeffer, T.; Newcomer, M.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Porrata, R.; Price, P.; Przybylski, G.; Rawlins, K.; Rhode, W.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Romenesko, P.; Ross, D.; Rubinstein, H.; Sander, H.; Schaefer, U.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, E.; Schwarz, R.; Schwendicke, U.; Silvestri, A.; Smoot, G.; Solarz, M.; Spiczak, G.; Spiering, C.; Starinski, N.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.; Streicher, O.; Taboada, I.; Thollander, L.; Thon, T.; Tilav, S.; Vander Donckt, M.; Walck, C.; Wiebusch, C.; Woschnagg, K.; Wu, W.; Yodh, G.; Young, S.

    2000-01-01

    The first stage of the AMANDA High Energy Neutrino Detector at the South Pole, the 302 PMT array AMANDA-B10, is taking data since 1997. We describe results on atmospheric neutrinos, limits on indirect WIMP detection, seasonal muon flux variation, relativistic monopole flux limits, a search for gravitational collapse neutrinos, and a depth scan of the optical ice properties. The next stage 19-string detector AMANDA-II with ∼650 PMTs will be completed in spring 2000

  17. DETECTORS USED IN PARTICLE PHYSICS RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melissines, A. C.

    1963-10-15

    Detectors used in particle physics are discussed, and their specific properties are compared. With the pictorial'' devices are included nuclear emulsions, cloud and bubble chambers, and spark chambers. Included in the digital'' devices are counters, e.g., the Geiger counter, scintillation counters, solid-state detectors, Cherenkov counters, and spark counters. Sensitivity, resolving power, time resolutions, saturation level, and energy detection are discussed. (R.E.U.)

  18. An automated measuring system based on gamma spectrometry with HPGe detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mala, Helena; Rulik, Petr; Hyza, Miroslav; Dragounova, Lenka; Helebrant, Jan; Hroznicek, Marek; Jelinek, Pavel; Zak, Jan

    2016-01-01

    An automatic system for unattended gamma spectrometric measurements of bulk samples ( “Gamma Automat”, GA) was developed by the National Radiation Protection Institute and Nuvia, Inc. as a part of a research project. The basic parts include a detection system with two HPGe detectors in the lead shielded chambers, sample changer, sample tray and a control unit. The GA enables counting in two geometries: (i) with cylindrical containers (200 ml) either one placed at the detector face or 2-6 placed around the detector or (II) with Marinelli beakers (600 ml). The shelf can accommodate 180 cylindrical containers or 54 Marinelli beakers. Samples are changed by a robotic arm. The sample data and the analysis required are passed to the GA by a matrix code (generated within the laboratory system) located on the lid of a sample container, whence the GA reads information. Spectrometric analysis is performed automatically after the counting. Current status of GA can be remotely monitored. Information about the activities of the GA, measurement completion or failures of the equipment are automatically generated and sent to a mobile phone and the operator PC. A presentation of the GA is available at https://youtu.be/1lQhfo0Fljo. (orig.)

  19. Charge-sensitive and shaping amplifier microassemblies for dosimetry and spectrometry on CZT-detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perevertaylo, V.L.; Zaitsevsky, I.L.; Tarasenko, L.I.; Perevertaylo, A.V.; Shkirenko, E.A.

    2012-01-01

    Developments of new spectrometric channel electronics on the basis of microassemblies, which allowed to reduce the noise and increase of signal-to-noise ratio, lowering power consumption and dimensions. The complete line of front-end electronics for CZT detectors implemented as micro-assemblies is described, the design concept, operation details and application features of charge sensitive amplifier and shaping amplifier microassemblies are discussed, and the results obtained when registering low energy X-ray spectra are shown. It has a high energy resolution δE at the level of the leading companies. For direct detection with silicon p-i-n-diode new electronic channel can resolve 241 Am peaks up to 8 keV with a resolution of about 2 keV at room temperature. New electronics is universal and can be used with different semiconductor detectors - Si, CdZnTe, Scintillator-photodiode, as shown in the spectra. Low power consumption and reduced dimensions allows the using in portable equipment. Manufacturability of micro assembly opens up the possibility for mass production and low cost opens up the possibility to supply them with detectors as S tart kit f or the construction of radiometric and spectrometric devices

  20. Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piele, Philip K.

    Numerous cases in this year's chapter dealt with the same topics of previous years--contracts and bids for building construction, and detachment and annexation of a portion of a school district. The courts continued to attribute board discretionary authority to school boards in school property matters. Intergovernmental disputes over ownership or…

  1. Locating gamma radiation source by self collimating BGO detector system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orion, I; Pernick, A; Ilzycer, D; Zafrir, H [Israel Atomic Energy Commission, Yavne (Israel). Soreq Nuclear Research Center; Shani, G [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel)

    1996-12-01

    The need for airborne collimated gamma detector system to estimate the radiation released from a nuclear accident has been established. A BGO detector system has been developed as an array of separate seven cylindrical Bismuth Germanate scintillators, one central detector symmetrically surrounded by six detectors. In such an arrangement, each of the detectors reduced the exposure of other detectors in the array to a radiation incident from a possible specific spatial angle, around file array. This shielding property defined as `self-collimation`, differs the point source response function for each of the detectors. The BGO detector system has a high density and atomic number, and therefore provides efficient self-collimation. Using the response functions of the separate detectors enables locating point sources as well as the direction of a nuclear radioactive plume with satisfactory angular resolution, of about 10 degrees. The detector`s point source response, as function of the source direction, in a horizontal plane, has been predicted by analytical calculation, and was verified by Monte-Carlo simulation using the code EGS4. The detector`s response was tested in a laboratory-scale experiment for several gamma ray energies, and the experimental results validated the theoretical (analytical and Monte-Carlo) results. (authors).

  2. A comparison of semiconductor gamma spectrometric analysis using the peak net area calculations and the whole spectrum processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krnac, S.; Koskelo, M.; Venkatamaran, R.

    1998-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the results of gamma spectrometric analysis using the Scaling Confirmatory Factor Analysis (SCFA) method to that of Genie2K, which uses a more traditional method. Gamma ray spectra had had been acquired for several gamma standard sources, all of which except Co-57 and Eu-152 being single gamma ray emitting nuclides. These standard sources spanned the energy range from 60 keV (Am-241) to 1116 keV (Zn-65). The standard sources were counted at 3 different geometries at 3 different geometries, with source-detector distances of 0, 5, and 15 cm. Using single gamma ray spectra collected at a given counting geometry, and the certificate file, an efficiency calibration was created for that geometry. Three different test spectra, one for each counting geometry, had been created by combining several of the standard source spectra. The efficiency calibrations created for the 3 geometries were loaded into the respective spectrum files. Each test spectrum was analyzed using the standard Genie2K engines; Peak locate, Peak search, Interactive peak fit, Background subs-traction, Efficiency correction, and Nuclide Identification with interference analysis. The results of the various calculation steps were reported. In all 3 test cases, the SCFA method identified all the nuclides correctly. The K-40 activities calculated by the SCFA method were reasonably close to that from Genie2K analysis. In general, the quantitative results of the SCFA method were impressive in all 3 cases. On a positive note, the SCFA method did identify low yield gamma lines in Eu-152, which were not identified by the Genie2K analysis. This substantiates claim that the SCFA is more sensitive than the traditional method of spectrum analysis. (authors)

  3. Non-Destructive X-ray Spectrometric and Chromatographic Analysis of Metal Containers and Their Contents, from Ancient Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos S. Katsifas

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a holistic archaeometric approach to ancient Macedonian specimens. In the region of the ancient city Lete, the deceased members of a rich and important family were interred in a cluster of seven tombs (4th century BC. Among the numerous grave goods, there was also a set of metal containers preserving their original content. The physico-chemical analysis of the containers and their contents was performed in order to understand the purpose of their use. For the containers, Energy Dispersive micro-X-Ray Fluorescence (EDμXRF spectroscopy was implemented taking advantage of its non-invasive character. The case (B35 and the small pyxis (B37 were made of a binary Cu-Sn alloy accompanied by a slight amount of impurities (Fe, Pb, As and the two miniature bowls were made of almost pure Cu. For the study of the contents, a combination of EDμXRF, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD, and Gas Chromatography—Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS was carried out. Especially for the extraction of the volatile compounds, the Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (SPME technique was used in the headspace mode. Because of the detection of Br, High Pressure Liquid Chromatography coupled to a Diode-Array-Detector (HPLC-DAD was implemented, confirming the existence of the ancient dye shellfish purple (porphyra in Greek. The analytical results of the combined implementation of spectrometric and chromatographic analytical techniques of the metal containers and their contents expand our knowledge about the pharmaceutical practices in Macedonia during the 4th century BC.

  4. Radiation detectors laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez J, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation detectors laboratory was established with the assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency which gave this the responsibility to provide its services at National and regional level for Latin America and it is located at the ININ. The more expensive and delicate radiation detectors are those made of semiconductor, so it has been put emphasis in the use and repairing of these detectors type. The supplied services by this laboratory are: selection consultant, detectors installation and handling and associated systems. Installation training, preventive and corrective maintenance of detectors and detection systems calibration. (Author)

  5. The ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Huegging, Fabian

    2006-06-26

    The contruction of the ATLAS Pixel Detector which is the innermost layer of the ATLAS tracking system is prgressing well. Because the pixel detector will contribute significantly to the ATLAS track and vertex reconstruction. The detector consists of identical sensor-chip-hybrid modules, arranged in three barrels in the centre and three disks on either side for the forward region. The position of the detector near the interaction point requires excellent radiation hardness, mechanical and thermal robustness, good long-term stability for all parts, combined with a low material budget. The final detector layout, new results from production modules and the status of assembly are presented.

  6. Thermal neutron detectors based on complex oxide crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Ryzhikov, V; Volkov, V; Chernikov, V; Zelenskaya, O

    2002-01-01

    The ways of improvement of spectrometric quality of CWO and GSO crystals have been investigated with the aim of their application in thermal neutron detectors based on radiation capture reactions. The efficiency of the neutron detection by these crystals was measured, and the obtained data were compared with the results for sup 6 LiI(Tl) crystals. It is shown that the use of complex oxide crystals and neutron-absorption filters for spectrometry of thermal and resonance neutrons could be a promising method in combination with computer data processing. Numerical calculations are reported for spectra of gamma-quanta due to radiation capture of the neutrons. To compensate for the gamma-background lines, we used a crystal pair of heavy complex oxides with different sensitivity to neutrons.

  7. Radiation detectors laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez J, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    The National Institute for Nuclear Research has established a Radiation detector laboratory that has the possibility of providing to the consultants on the handling and applications of the nuclear radiation detectors. It has special equipment to repair the radiation detectors used in spectroscopy as the hyper pure Germanium for gamma radiation and the Lithium-silica for X-rays. There are different facilities in the laboratory that can become useful for other institutions that use radiation detectors. This laboratory was created to satisfy consultant services, training and repairing of the radiation detectors both in national and regional levels for Latin America. The laboratory has the following sections: Nuclear Electronic Instrumentation; where there are all kind of instruments for the measurement and characterization of detectors like multichannel analyzers of pulse height, personal computers, amplifiers and nuclear pulse preamplifiers, nuclear pulses generator, aleatories, computer programs for radiation spectra analysis, etc. High vacuum; there is a vacuum escape measurer, two high vacuum pumps to restore the vacuum of detectors, so the corresponding measurers and the necessary tools. Detectors cleaning; there is an anaerobic chamber for the detectors handling at inert atmosphere, a smoke extraction bell for cleaning with the detector solvents. Cryogenic; there are vessels and tools for handling liquid nitrogen which is used for cooling the detectors when they required it. (Author)

  8. High-energy detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E [South Setauket, NY; Camarda, Giuseppe [Farmingville, NY; Cui, Yonggang [Upton, NY; James, Ralph B [Ridge, NY

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  9. High-efficient method for spectrometric data real time processing with increased resolution of a measuring channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashkinaze, S.I.; Voronov, V.A.; Nechaev, Yu.I.

    1988-01-01

    Solution of reduction problem as a mean to increase spectrometric tract resolution when it is realized using the digit-by-digit modified method and special strategy, significantly reducing the time of processing, is considered. The results presented confirm that the complex measurement tract plus microcomputer is equivalent to the use of the tract with a higher resolution, and the use of the digit-by-digit modified method permits to process spectrometric information in real time scale

  10. Recent Developments in GEM-Based Neutron Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenboonruang, K.

    2014-01-01

    The gas electron multiplier (GEM) detector is a relatively new gaseous detector that has been used for less than 20 years. Since the discovery in 1997 by F. Sauli, the GEM detector has shown excellent properties including high rate capability, excellent resolutions, low discharge probability, and excellent radiation hardness. These promising properties have led the GEM detector to gain popularity and attention amongst physicists and researchers. In particular, the GEM detector can also be modified to be used as a neutron detector by adding appropriate neutron converters. With properties stated above and the need to replace the expensive 3 He-based neutron detectors, the GEM-based neutron detector will be one of the most powerful and affordable neutron detectors. Applications of the GEM-based neutron detectors vary from researches in nuclear and particle physics, neutron imaging, and national security. Although several promising progresses and results have been shown and published in the past few years, further improvement is still needed in order to improve the low neutron detection efficiency (only a few percent) and to widen the possibilities for other uses.

  11. Novel atomic absorption spectrometric and rapid spectrophotometric methods for the quantitation of paracetamol in saliva: application to pharmacokinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, M M; Nejem, R M; El-Abadla, N S; Al-Kholy, M; Saleh, Akila A

    2008-01-01

    A novel atomic absorption spectrometric method and two highly sensitive spectrophotometric methods were developed for the determination of paracetamol. These techniques based on the oxidation of paracetamol by iron (III) (method I); oxidation of p-aminophenol after the hydrolysis of paracetamol (method II). Iron (II) then reacts with potassium ferricyanide to form Prussian blue color with a maximum absorbance at 700 nm. The atomic absorption method was accomplished by extracting the excess iron (III) in method II and aspirates the aqueous layer into air-acetylene flame to measure the absorbance of iron (II) at 302.1 nm. The reactions have been spectrometrically evaluated to attain optimum experimental conditions. Linear responses were exhibited over the ranges 1.0-10, 0.2-2.0 and 0.1-1.0 mug/ml for method I, method II and atomic absorption spectrometric method, respectively. A high sensitivity is recorded for the proposed methods I and II and atomic absorption spectrometric method value indicate: 0.05, 0.022 and 0.012 mug/ml, respectively. The limit of quantitation of paracetamol by method II and atomic absorption spectrometric method were 0.20 and 0.10 mug/ml. Method II and the atomic absorption spectrometric method were applied to demonstrate a pharmacokinetic study by means of salivary samples in normal volunteers who received 1.0 g paracetamol. Intra and inter-day precision did not exceed 6.9%.

  12. Study of different properties of the top-anti-top pairs in the dilepton channel with the D0 and ATLAS detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deterre, C.

    2012-01-01

    The studies of different properties of the top-anti-top pair in the dilepton final state are presented in this thesis. Two analyses have been performed in different experiments: D0 at the Tevatron and ATLAS at the LHC. Since the two colliders are different, the measurements from these experiments are complementary for studies of the top quark properties. The first analysis, performed at D0, consisted in measuring the top-anti-top production cross-section simultaneously with the branching ratio t → Wb. This measurement was done in the dilepton channel with a sample of data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb -1 . It has then been combined with the measurement in the semileptonic channel. We obtain a precision of 8% on the cross-section which is comparable to the precision of theoretical predictions. The second analysis, performed in ATLAS, consisted in measuring the top charge asymmetry in the dilepton channel with the full 2011 dataset corresponding to 4.7 fb -1 . The result has been combined with the result for 1 fb -1 of the semileptonic channel. We obtain: A C (tt-bar) = 0.029 ± 0.018 (stat.) ± 0.014 (syst.), which is compatible with the standard model prediction of 0.004 ± 0.001. (author) [fr

  13. Nuclear radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapoor, S.S.; Ramamurthy, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    The present monograph is intended to treat the commonly used detectors in the field of nuclear physics covering important developments of the recent years. After a general introduction, a brief account of interaction of radiation with matter relevant to the processes in radiation detection is given in Chapter II. In addition to the ionization chamber, proportional counters and Geiger Mueller counters, several gas-filled detectors of advanced design such as those recently developed for heavy ion physics and other types of studies have been covered in Chapter III. Semiconductor detectors are dealt with in Chapter IV. The scintillation detectors which function by sensing the photons emitted by the luminescence process during the interaction of the impinging radiation with the scintillation detector medium are described in Chapter V. The topic of neutron detectors is covered in Chapter VI, as in this case the emphasis is more on the method of neutron detection rather than on detector type. Electronic instrumentation related to signal pulse processing dealt with in Chapter VII. The track etch detectors based on the visualization of the track of the impinging charge particle have also been briefly covered in the last chapter. The scope of this monograph is confined to detectors commonly used in low and medium energy nuclear physics research and applications of nuclear techniques. The monograph is intended for post-graduate students and those beginning to work with the radiation detectors. (author)

  14. The measurement of mass spectrometric peak height ratio of helium isotope in trace samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Mingliang

    1989-01-01

    An experiment study on the measurement of mass spectrometric peak height ratio of helium isotope in the trace gaseous sample is discussed by using the gas purification line designed by the authors and model VG-5400 static-vacuum noble gas mass spectrometer imported and air helium as a standard. The results show that the amount of He and Ne in natural gas sample is 99% after purification. When the amount of He in Mass Spectrometer is more than 4 x 10 -7 cm 3 STP, it's sensitivity remains stable, about 10 -4 A/cm 3 STP He and the precision of 3 He/ 4 He ratio within the following 17 days is 1.32%. The 'ABA' pattern and experiment condition in the measurement of mass spectrometric peak height ratio of He isotope are presented

  15. New FORTRAN computer programs to acquire and process isotopic mass-spectrometric data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.H.

    1982-08-01

    The computer programs described in New Computer Programs to Acquire and Process Isotopic Mass Spectrometric Data have been revised. This report describes in some detail the operation of these programs, which acquire and process isotopic mass spectrometric data. Both functional and overall design aspects are addressed. The three basic program units - file manipulation, data acquisition, and data processing - are discussed in turn. Step-by-step instructions are included where appropriate, and each subsection is described in enough detail to give a clear picture of its function. Organization of file structure, which is central to the entire concept, is extensively discussed with the help of numerous tables. Appendices contain flow charts and outline file structure to help a programmer unfamiliar with the programs to alter them with a minimum of lost time

  16. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade boron carbide

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade boron carbide powder and pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Total Carbon by Combustion and Gravimetry 7-17 Total Boron by Titrimetry 18-28 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrometry 29-38 Chloride and Fluoride Separation by Pyrohydrolysis 39-45 Chloride by Constant-Current Coulometry 46-54 Fluoride by Ion-Selective Electrode 55-63 Water by Constant-Voltage Coulometry 64-72 Impurities by Spectrochemical Analysis 73-81 Soluble Boron by Titrimetry 82-95 Soluble Carbon by a Manometric Measurement 96-105 Metallic Impurities by a Direct Reader Spectrometric Method 106-114

  17. The interlaboratory experiment IDA-72 on mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyrich, W.; Drosselmeyer, E.

    1975-07-01

    Volume II of the report on the IDA-72 experiment contains papers written by different authors on a number of special topics connected with the preparation, performance and evaluation of the interlaboratory test. In detail the sampling procedures for active samples of the reprocessing plant and the preparation of inactive reference and spike solution from standard material are described as well as new methods of sample conditioning by evaporation. An extra chapter is devoted to the chemical sample treatment as a preparation for mass spectrometric analysis of the U and Pu content of the solutions. Special topics are also methods for mass discrimination corrections, α-spectrometer measurements as a supplement for the determination of Pu-238 and the comparison of concentration determinations by mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis with those performed by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The last part of this volume contains papers connected with the computerized statistical evaluation of the high number of data. (orig.) [de

  18. [Determination of trace cobalt in human urine by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometr].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, L X; Ding, B M; Jiang, D; Liu, D Y; Yu, B; Zhu, B L; Ding, L

    2016-05-20

    To establish a method to determine cobalt in human urine by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Urine with 2% nitric acid diluted two-fold, to quantify the curve, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric detection. Co was linear within 2.5~40.0 ng/ml with r>0.999. Spike experiment showed that Co received good recovery rate, which was 90.8%~94.8%. Intra-assay precisions were 3.2%~5.1% for Co, inter-assay precisions were 4.4%~5.2% for Co. The method by using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometr to determine urine Co was fast, accurate and with low matrix effect. It could meet the requirement in GBZ/T 210.5-2008.

  19. The fast gamma spectrometric method of the Am-241 determination in Chernobyl restricted zone soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleisberg, B.; Lukachina, V.V.; Kirsenko, V.N.; Tepikin, V.E.; Rajevsky, V.S.; Libman, V.A.; Stoljarevsky, I.P.; Isajev, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    The known methods of the 241 Am contents determination in environmental objects, as a rule, is based on ion-chromatographic or extraction separation techniques. This approach reflects widespread opinion, that only the α-spectrometric analysis termination is suitable to ensure necessary sensitivity of the overall method of 241 Am actively determination. Really, the minimal detectable activity for such methods is about 0.05 Bq/kg (considering that Am is usually concentrated during separation procedure). However, because of α-spectrometry does not permit to separate the α-peaks of the 241 Am, and 238 Pu, but also in view of high requests to the α-spectrometric specimen purity, the multistage and laborious chemical procedures to separate 241 Am from plutonium radionuclides and other elements (with a thorough control of each separation stage) are needed

  20. Gas Chromatographic-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Essential Oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hepatitis, dysmenorrhea, stomatitis, duodenitis and depression in south China [1]. There are few reports about its chemical constituents and pharmacological properties, such as the hydroalcoholic extract from the buds of. Jasminum grandiflorum showing preferable antiviral efficacy against HBV replication in. HepG2 2.2.15 ...

  1. Mass-spectrometric exploration of proteome structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aebersold, Ruedi; Mann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    , the structures and functions of selected proteins have been studied using biochemical and biophysical methods. However, the properties and behaviour of the proteome as an integrated system have largely remained elusive. Powerful mass-spectrometry-based technologies now provide unprecedented insights...

  2. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric determination of traces of ether-type icing inhibitors in free-floating fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, H.S. [Dept. of Environmental Education, Kongju National Univ., Kongju (Korea); Abuse Drug Research Center, Kongju National Univ., Kongju (Korea); Ahn, H.S. [Dept. of Environmental Science, Kongju National Univ., Kongju (Korea)

    2004-08-01

    A gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) assay method has been developed for simultaneous determination of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME) and diethylene glycol monomethly ether (DEGME) in spilled aviation fuels. Ethylene glycol monobutyl ether (EGBE) and ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGEE) were used as internal standard and surrogate, respectively. Sample preparation consisted of back-extraction with 7 mL dichloromethane after extraction of 50 mL of fuel with 2 mL of water. The extract was concentrated to dryness, dissolved in 100 {mu}L methanol, and analyzed by GC-MS with selected-ion monitoring (SIM). The peaks had good chromatographic properties on a semi-polar column. EGME and DEGME were extracted from fuel with high recovery of 75 and 85%, with small variations, respectively. Method detection limits were 1.3 and 1.0 ng mL{sup -1} for EGME and DEGME, respectively, in spilled fuel. DEGME was detected at concentrations of 22.6 and 19.7 ng mL{sup -1} in two samples from among five free-floating samples collected in a tunnel of a subway station located in the vicinity of an army base in Korea. The method might be useful for differentiation between the fuel-types kerosene and JP-8, which might originate from a storage tank. (orig.)

  3. Ultra-fast silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadrozinski, H. F.-W., E-mail: hartmut@scipp.ucsc.edu [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Ngo, J.; Parker, C.; Petersen, B.; Seiden, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Cartiglia, N.; Marchetto, F. [INFN Torino, Torino (Italy); Bruzzi, M.; Mori, R.; Scaringella, M.; Vinattieri, A. [University of Florence, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    We propose to develop a fast, thin silicon sensor with gain capable to concurrently measure with high precision the space (∼10 μm) and time (∼10 ps) coordinates of a particle. This will open up new application of silicon detector systems in many fields. Our analysis of detector properties indicates that it is possible to improve the timing characteristics of silicon-based tracking sensors, which already have sufficient position resolution, to achieve four-dimensional high-precision measurements. The basic sensor characteristics and the expected performance are listed, the wide field of applications are mentioned and the required R and D topics are discussed. -- Highlights: •We are proposing thin pixel silicon sensors with 10's of picoseconds time resolution. •Fast charge collection is coupled with internal charge multiplication. •The truly 4-D sensors will revolutionize imaging and particle counting in many applications.

  4. Aspects of optical fibers and spectrometric sensors in chemical process and industrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisde, G.; Perez, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    For on-line control, the two alternatives of automatic sample transfer and in situ remote analysis are discussed. New concepts are emerging from the possibilities offered by optical fibers. Absorption in the visible, UV and IR, fluorescence and Raman spectrometric techniques are examined. The state of the art of optodes and devices in chemical process control are given, with some examples of applications in nuclear plants

  5. Gamma-spectrometric examination of hot particles emitted during the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balashazy, I.; Szabadine-Szende, G.; Loerinc, M.; Zombori, P.

    1987-05-01

    Ge(Li) gamma-spectrometric examination of hot particles prepared from air filtered dust of Budapest air after the Chernobyl accident is presented. The method of separating hot particles is described and their concentration in the air is determined. The radioactive isotope composition of hot particles is discussed and compared with that of dust samples. Finally, the inhalation probability and radiation burden of hot particles are evaluated. (author)

  6. A method for exploring the distribution of radioelements at depth using gamma-ray spectrometric data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qingyang

    1997-01-01

    Based on the inherent relation between radioelements and terrestrial heat flow, theoretically shows the possibility of exploring the distribution of radioelements at depth using gamma-ray spectrometric data, and a data-processing and synthesizing method has been adopted to deduce the calculation formula. The practical application in the uranium mineralized area No. 2801 in Yunnan Province proves that this method is of practical value, and it has been successfully applied to the data processing and good results have been obtained

  7. Mass-spectrometric investigation of rare earth acetylacetonates dipivaloylmethanates and their adducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrishzhuk, E.M.; Dzyubenko, N.G.; Martynenko, L.I.

    1985-01-01

    Peculiarities of fragmentation of molecular ions of rare earth acetylacetonates and dipivaloylmethanates under mass-spectrometric investigation of these compounds as well as their adducts with o-phenanthroline, α,α'-dipyridyl, triphenylphosphine oxide are considered in the given review. Similar data for identical derivants of some transitions metals are presented. Data on potentials of appearance and dissociation energy of basic ions in mass-spectra of the studied β-diketonates are analyzed

  8. Sensitive emission spectrometric method for the analysis of airborne particulate matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimae, A.

    1975-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive emission spectrometric method for the routine analysis of airborne particulate matter collected on the glass fiber filter is reported. The method is a powder--dc arc technique involving no chemical pre-enrichment procedures. The elements--Ag, BA: Be, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, La, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sn, V, Y, Yb, and Zn--were determined. (U.S.)

  9. Influence of sampling properties of fast-waveform digitizers on neutron−gamma-ray, pulse-shape discrimination for organic scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flaska, Marek; Faisal, Muhammad; Wentzloff, David D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important questions to be answered with regard to digital pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) systems based on organic scintillators is: What sampling properties are required for a fast-waveform digitizer used for digitizing neutron/gamma-ray pulses, while an accurate PSD is desired? Answering this question is the main objective of this paper. Specifically, the paper describes the influence of the resolution and sampling frequency of a waveform digitizer on the PSD performance of organic scintillators. The results presented in this paper are meant to help the reader choosing a waveform digitizer with appropriate bit resolution and sampling frequency. The results presented here show that a 12-bit, 250-MHz digitizer is a good choice for applications that require good PSD performance. However, when more accurate PSD performance is the main requirement, this paper presents PSD figures of merit to qualify the impact of further increasing either sampling frequency or resolution of the digitizer

  10. Semiconductor detectors in current energy dispersive X-ray spectral analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betin, J; Zhabin, E; Krampit, I; Smirnov, V

    1980-04-01

    A review is presented of the properties of semiconductor detectors and of the possibilities stemming therefrom of using the detectors in X-ray spectral analysis in industries, in logging, in ecology and environmental control, in medicine, etc.

  11. Uncertainty assessment in gamma spectrometric measurements of plutonium isotope ratios and age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramebaeck, H., E-mail: henrik.ramebeck@foi.se [Swedish Defence Research Agency, FOI, Division of CBRN Defence and Security, SE-901 82 Umea (Sweden); Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Nygren, U.; Tovedal, A. [Swedish Defence Research Agency, FOI, Division of CBRN Defence and Security, SE-901 82 Umea (Sweden); Ekberg, C.; Skarnemark, G. [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2012-09-15

    A method for the assessment of the combined uncertainty in gamma spectrometric measurements of plutonium composition and age was evaluated. Two materials were measured. Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-SFMS) was used as a reference method for comparing the results obtained with the gamma spectrometric method for one of the materials. For this material (weapons grade plutonium) the measurement results were in agreement between the two methods for all measurands. Moreover, the combined uncertainty in all isotope ratios considered in this material (R{sub Pu238/Pu239}, R{sub Pu240/Pu239}, R{sub Pu241/Pu239}, and R{sub Am241/Pu241} for age determination) were limited by counting statistics. However, the combined uncertainty for the other material (fuel grade plutonium) were limited by the response fit, which shows that the uncertainty in the response function is important to include in the combined measurement uncertainty of gamma spectrometric measurements of plutonium.

  12. Maintenance of stability in γ spectrometric system of low active and environmental samples - a practical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravishankar, R.; Bandyopadhyay, T.; Sarkar, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    Particle Accelerators are becoming part of the society with more and more medical and Industrial types are added every year in addition to research type of accelerators. The outflow of materials to the public domain from such accelerator facilities need to checked carefully and must be released after ensuring the activities of such materials should not exceed the regulatory limits. Health Physics Unit, VECC is involved in analyzing food product samples, seized samples which are suspected to contain Uranium etc and other environmental samples in addition to analyzing radioactive materials evolved from Operational Health Physics work. Most of these analyses involve γ Spectrometric Systems of high efficiency and high resolution types. The efficacy of the analysis and results depends on various parameters of the spectrometric system. The electrical noise from the power supply system and other noises picked up, even in the range of a few milli volts range, have been found to affect the stability of the system. These effects may not be present initially during installation but may creep in due course due to various reasons including weather conditions, wear and tear etc. Unless these problems are attended in regular intervals, the stability of the spectrometric systems and hence the results of analysis of the low active and environmental samples, will not be satisfactory. The work describes the practical problems faced by Health Physics Unit, the methods employed in identifying the problems, the necessary remedial measures taken, the final outcome in the stability and the procedures framed in order to avoid in future. (author)

  13. Spectrometric aerial survey as a new tool for geological survey and mining prospecting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambon, R.

    1997-01-01

    Airborne survey for radioactive minerals started around 1945. The limited sensitivity of the tools used, the difficulties found for the topographic and training effect corrections, made difficult the evaluation of the results. The technical progresses realized in the recent past years in electronic and computer sciences allowed to overcome these difficulties and gave to the method all its potentialities. With the aerial spectrometric survey, a new step was made, because this method can be used for other topics than radioactive prospection such as geological survey and mining prospection for metallic and industrial minerals. The spectrometric method is based on the possibility to measure photopeak energies (gamma radiation) emitted by radioactive minerals and discriminate between them those emitted by U238, TI 208 and K40 respectively daughter products of uranium, thorium and potassium. For airborne survey, one consider that measuring instruments will allow to pick-up 80% of the radioactive emission concerning the first 15 to 30 centimetres of ground (1 metre maximum). The use of this method for geological and mineral exploration is based on the assumption that different rock types or ore bearing rock types are composed of certain amounts of rock forming minerals which comprise specific quantities of radioactive elements such as potassium, uranium and thorium (cf: Gabelman 77). To be able to evaluate the results of the spectrometric survey it will be necessary to know roughly the behaviour of the different radioactive elements through a complete geological cycle. (author)

  14. Mirion--a software package for automatic processing of mass spectrometric images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, C; Leisner, A; Hester, A; Maass, K; Guenther, S; Bouschen, W; Spengler, B

    2013-08-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) techniques are of growing interest for the Life Sciences. In recent years, the development of new instruments employing ion sources that are tailored for spatial scanning allowed the acquisition of large data sets. A subsequent data processing, however, is still a bottleneck in the analytical process, as a manual data interpretation is impossible within a reasonable time frame. The transformation of mass spectrometric data into spatial distribution images of detected compounds turned out to be the most appropriate method to visualize the results of such scans, as humans are able to interpret images faster and easier than plain numbers. Image generation, thus, is a time-consuming and complex yet very efficient task. The free software package "Mirion," presented in this paper, allows the handling and analysis of data sets acquired by mass spectrometry imaging. Mirion can be used for image processing of MSI data obtained from many different sources, as it uses the HUPO-PSI-based standard data format imzML, which is implemented in the proprietary software of most of the mass spectrometer companies. Different graphical representations of the recorded data are available. Furthermore, automatic calculation and overlay of mass spectrometric images promotes direct comparison of different analytes for data evaluation. The program also includes tools for image processing and image analysis.

  15. Detectors for Particle Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinknecht, Konrad

    1999-01-01

    This textbook provides a clear, concise and comprehensive review of the physical principles behind the devices used to detect charged particles and gamma rays, and the construction and performance of these many different types of detectors. Detectors for high-energy particles and radiation are used in many areas of science, especially particle physics and nuclear physics experiments, nuclear medicine, cosmic ray measurements, space sciences and geological exploration. This second edition includes all the latest developments in detector technology, including several new chapters covering micro-strip gas chambers, silicion strip detectors and CCDs, scintillating fibers, shower detectors using noble liquid gases, and compensating calorimeters for hadronic showers. This well-illustrated textbook contains examples from the many areas in science in which these detectors are used. It provides both a coursebook for students in physics, and a useful introduction for researchers in other fields.

  16. Silicon Telescope Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gurov, Yu B; Sandukovsky, V G; Yurkovski, J

    2005-01-01

    The results of research and development of special silicon detectors with a large active area ($> 8 cm^{2}$) for multilayer telescope spectrometers (fulfilled in the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR) are reviewed. The detector parameters are listed. The production of totally depleted surface barrier detectors (identifiers) operating under bias voltage two to three times higher than depletion voltage is described. The possibility of fabrication of lithium drifted counters with a very thin entrance window on the diffusion side of the detector (about 10--20 $\\mu$m) is shown. The detector fabrication technique has allowed minimizing detector dead regions without degradation of their spectroscopic characteristics and reliability during long time operation in charge particle beams.

  17. To the use of bubble detectors in personal neutron dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spurny, F; Vlcek, B [Academy of the Sciences of Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic). Nuclear Physics Institute, Department of Radiation Dosimetry

    1996-12-31

    In this paper the commercially available bubble neutron detectors (bubble damage neutron detectors (BDNDs*) from Bubble Technology Industries, Chalk River; and superheated drop detectors (SDDs*) from APFEL Industries, New Haven) for lowest limit of detection of an individual neutron dosimeter were tested. They were tested with the different neutron sources. BDNDs* tested had the sensitivity about 1 bubble per 1 Sv of H*(10) of AmBe neutrons, they were evaluated by eye counting (20 to 30 bubbles per detector). Two types of reusable BDNDs* were tested: BD-100R without and with temperature compensation, both with neutron energy threshold about 100 keV. SDDs* tested had the sensitivity about 3 bubbles per 1 {mu}Sv of H*10 from AmBe neutrons, they were evaluated using APFEL Survey Meter Model 202. SDDs* with three different energy thresholds have been used: 0.1, 1 and 6 MeV. For energetical dependence of BDNDs* the general conclusions were formulated in the following way: (1) With the exception of thermal neutron source SIGMA (50% of H*(10) from thermal neutrons) and high energy reference fields there is a reasonable agreement of data measured with BDNDs* and expected values; (2) the new lots to have a little different energetic dependence. The relative responses for `soft` fields are for them systematically higher than for previous samples. The response to energies between 0.01 and 1 MeV is for these lots relatively higher. (3) The underestimation of high energy neutrons is typical for any LET-threshold type detectors.It should be kept in mind when BDNDs* are used as dosemeters in high energy neutron environment. For energetical dependence of SDDs* was concluded: (1) The energetical dependence of SDD 100 is comparable with the dependencies of BD-100R and PND, the underestimation of high energy neutrons included; (2) The use of SDD with different energy thresholds can provide interesting spectrometric information; (Abstract Truncated)

  18. Dosimetry in radiotherapy with natural diamond detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, C.; Onori, S.; Pacilio, M.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Raffaele, L.; Bucciolini, M.; Mazzocchi, S.

    2002-01-01

    There is wide interest in the use of diamond detectors for dosimetry in radiotherapy mainly because of the small dimensions, radiation hardness, nearly tissue equivalence of sensitive material and capability to deliver the dosimetric response 'on line'. In order to assess the dosimetric properties of PTW Riga diamond detectors type 60003, experiments were performed in conventional (high energy photon and electron) therapy beams as well as in proton therapy beams. The main detector features investigated were reproducibility of response, dose-signal relationship, temperature dependence, dose-rate dependence, energy dependence and angular dependence. High energy photons (6-25 MV) and electrons (6-22 MeV), available at the Radiotherapy Department of the Florence University, were used for investigating the general properties. Two different PTW diamond detectors of the same type were used to evidence inter-sample differences. The beam quality dependence of the detector response is probably the most critical point and this statement is of particular relevance for proton dosimetry since the proton LET changes with depth in the medium. Mainly because of the little information available on detector sensitivity variations with beam energy, the use of diamonds for clinical proton dosimetry is not widespread. In two recent papers a sensitivity dependence on proton energy of a natural PTW diamond detector has been reported. Due to the necessity to characterise each diamond detector individually the PTW Riga natural diamond detector in operation at the LNS-INFN, Catania, Italy was tested with the local proton beam line. This experiment is of main concern because this proton beam, produced by a superconducting cyclotron and used for ocular melanoma treatment, is available only since 2001 (CATANA beam). The first patient has been treated in February 2002. Proton irradiations were performed with non modulated and modulated 62 MeV beams. Attention was focused on diamond sensitivity

  19. History of infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, A.

    2012-09-01

    This paper overviews the history of infrared detector materials starting with Herschel's experiment with thermometer on February 11th, 1800. Infrared detectors are in general used to detect, image, and measure patterns of the thermal heat radiation which all objects emit. At the beginning, their development was connected with thermal detectors, such as thermocouples and bolometers, which are still used today and which are generally sensitive to all infrared wavelengths and operate at room temperature. The second kind of detectors, called the photon detectors, was mainly developed during the 20th Century to improve sensitivity and response time. These detectors have been extensively developed since the 1940's. Lead sulphide (PbS) was the first practical IR detector with sensitivity to infrared wavelengths up to ˜3 μm. After World War II infrared detector technology development was and continues to be primarily driven by military applications. Discovery of variable band gap HgCdTe ternary alloy by Lawson and co-workers in 1959 opened a new area in IR detector technology and has provided an unprecedented degree of freedom in infrared detector design. Many of these advances were transferred to IR astronomy from Departments of Defence research. Later on civilian applications of infrared technology are frequently called "dual-use technology applications." One should point out the growing utilisation of IR technologies in the civilian sphere based on the use of new materials and technologies, as well as the noticeable price decrease in these high cost technologies. In the last four decades different types of detectors are combined with electronic readouts to make detector focal plane arrays (FPAs). Development in FPA technology has revolutionized infrared imaging. Progress in integrated circuit design and fabrication techniques has resulted in continued rapid growth in the size and performance of these solid state arrays.

  20. The atlas detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrodo, P.

    2001-01-01

    The ATLAS detector, one of the two multi-purpose detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, is currently being built in order to meet the first proton-proton collisions in time. A description of the detector components will be given, corresponding to the most up to date design and status of construction, completed with test beam results and performances of the first serial modules. (author)

  1. Cherenkov water detector NEVOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrukhin, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    A unique multipurpose Cherenkov water detector, the NEVOD facility, uses quasispherical measuring modules to explore all the basic components of cosmic rays on Earth's surface, including neutrinos. Currently, the experimental complex includes the Cherenkov water detector, a calibration telescope system, and a coordinate detector. This paper traces the basic development stages of NEVOD, examines research directions, presents the results obtained, including the search for the solution to the 'muon puzzle', and discusses possible future development prospects.

  2. Study on Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervino, G.; Boero, M.; Manfredotti, C.; Icardi, M.; Gabutti, A.; Bagnolatti, E.; Monticone, E.

    1990-01-01

    Prototypes of Silicon microstrip detectors and Silicon large area detectors (3x2 cm 2 ), realized directly by our group, either by ion implantation or by diffusion are presented. The physical detector characteristics and their performances determined by exposing them to different radioactive sources and the results of extensive tests on passivation, where new technological ways have been investigated, are discussed. The calculation of the different terms contributing to the total dark current is reported

  3. The Gerda Phase II detector assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bode, Tobias; Schoenert, Stefan [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Schwingenheuer, Bernhard [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Phase II of the Gerda (Germanium Detector Array) experiment will continue the search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of {sup 76}Ge. Prerequisites for Phase II are an increased target mass and a reduced background index of < 10 {sup -3} cts/(keV.kg.yr). Major hardware upgrades to achieve these requirements are scheduled for 2013. They include the deployment of a new radio pure low mass detector assembly. The structural properties of available radio-pure materials and reduction of mass necessitate a change of the electrical contacting used to bias and read-out the detectors. The detector assembly design and the favored contacting solution are presented.

  4. Sources, instrumentation and detectors for protein crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Nave, C

    2001-01-01

    Some of the requirements for protein crystallography experiments on a synchrotron are described. Although data from different types of crystal are often collected without changing the X-ray beam properties, there are benefits if the incident beam is matched to a particular crystal and its diffraction pattern. These benefits are described with some examples. Radiation damage and other effects impose limits on the dose and dose rate on a protein crystal if the maximum amount of data is to be obtained. These limitations have possible consequences for the X-ray source required. Presently available commercial detector systems provide excellent data for protein crystallography but do not quite reach the specifications of the 'ideal' detector. In order to collect the most accurate data (e.g. for very weak anomalous scattering applications) detectors that produce near photon counting statistics over a wide dynamic range are required. It is possible that developments in 'pixel' detectors will allow these demanding exp...

  5. CVD diamond detectors for ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Friedl, M; Bauer, C; Berfermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Grigoriev, E; Hallewell, G D; Hall-Wilton, R; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Karl, C; Kass, R; Knöpfle, K T; Krammer, Manfred; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; Manfredi, P F; Manfredotti, C; Marshall, R D; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Palmieri, V G; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Pirollo, S; Polesello, P; Pretzl, Klaus P; Re, V; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Roff, D G; Rudge, A; Schnetzer, S R; Sciortino, S; Speziali, V; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R J; Thomson, G B; Trawick, M L; Trischuk, W; Vittone, E; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; Ziock, H J; Zöller, M

    1999-01-01

    In future HEP accelerators, such as the LHC (CERN), detectors and electronics in the vertex region of the experiments will suffer from extreme radiation. Thus radiation hardness is required for both detectors and electronics to survive in this harsh environment. CVD diamond, which is investigated by the RD42 Collaboration at CERN, can meet these requirements. Samples of up to 2*4 cm/sup 2/ have been grown and refined for better charge collection properties, which are measured with a beta source or in a test beam. A large number of diamond samples has been irradiated with hadrons to fluences of up to 5*10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/ to study the effects of radiation. Both strip and pixel detectors were prepared in various geometries. Samples with strip metallization have been tested with both slow and fast readout electronics, and the first diamond pixel detector proved fully functional with LHC electronics. (16 refs).

  6. CVD diamond detectors for ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedl, M. E-mail: markus.friedl@cern.ch; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P.F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R.D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Pernegger, H.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Re, V.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Thomson, G.B.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M

    1999-10-01

    In future HEP accelerators, such as the LHC (CERN), detectors and electronics in the vertex region of the experiments will suffer from extreme radiation. Thus radiation hardness is required for both detectors and electronics to survive in this harsh environment. CVD diamond, which is investigated by the RD42 Collaboration at CERN, can meet these requirements. Samples of up to 2x4 cm{sup 2} have been grown and refined for better charge collection properties, which are measured with a {beta} source or in a test beam. A large number of diamond samples has been irradiated with hadrons to fluences of up to 5x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} to study the effects of radiation. Both strip and pixel detectors were prepared in various geometries. Samples with strip metallization have been tested with both slow and fast readout electronics, and the first diamond pixel detector proved fully functional with LHC electronics. (author)

  7. CVD diamond detectors for ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, M.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; van Eijk, B.; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Gan, K. K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P. F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R. D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L. S.; Palmieri, V. G.; Pernegger, H.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Re, V.; Riester, J. L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Tapper, R. J.; Tesarek, R.; Thomson, G. B.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A. M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M.; RD42 Collaboration

    1999-10-01

    In future HEP accelerators, such as the LHC (CERN), detectors and electronics in the vertex region of the experiments will suffer from extreme radiation. Thus radiation hardness is required for both detectors and electronics to survive in this harsh environment. CVD diamond, which is investigated by the RD42 Collaboration at CERN, can meet these requirements. Samples of up to 2×4 cm2 have been grown and refined for better charge collection properties, which are measured with a β source or in a testbeam. A large number of diamond samples has been irradiated with hadrons to fluences of up to 5×10 15 cm-2 to study the effects of radiation. Both strip and pixel detectors were prepared in various geometries. Samples with strip metallization have been tested with both slow and fast readout electronics, and the first diamond pixel detector proved fully functional with LHC electronics.

  8. Basic processes and trends in gaseous detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    Almost a century after the invention of the proportional counter, a large research effort is still devoted to better understand the basic properties of gaseous detectors, and to improve their performances and reliability, particularly in view of use at the high radiation levels expected at LHC. In the first part of the lectures, after a brief introduction on underlying physical phenomena, I will review modern sophisticated computational tools, as well as some classic "back of the envelope" analytical methods, available today for estimating the general performances of gaseous detectors. In the second part, I will analyze in more detail problems specific to the use of detectors at high rates (space charge, discharges, aging), and describe the recent development of powerful and perhaps more reliable devices, particularly in the field of position-sensitive micro-pattern detectors.

  9. P-type silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.T.; Krieger, B.; Krofcheck, D.; O'Donnell, R.; Odyniec, G.; Partlan, M.D.; Wang, N.W.

    1995-06-01

    Preliminary results on 16 CM 2 , position-sensitive silicon drift detectors, fabricated for the first time on p-type silicon substrates, are presented. The detectors were designed, fabricated, and tested recently at LBL and show interesting properties which make them attractive for use in future physics experiments. A pulse count rate of approximately 8 x l0 6 s -1 is demonstrated by the p-type silicon drift detectors. This count rate estimate is derived by measuring simultaneous tracks produced by a laser and photolithographic mask collimator that generates double tracks separated by 50 μm to 1200 μm. A new method of using ion-implanted polysilicon to produce precise valued bias resistors on the silicon drift detectors is also discussed

  10. Radiation detectors based by polymer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherestes, Margareta; Cherestes, Codrut; Constantinescu, Livia

    2004-01-01

    Scintillation counters make use of the property of certain chemical compounds to emit short light pulses after excitation produced by the passage of charged particles or photons of high energy. These flashes of light are detected by a photomultiplier tube that converts the photons into a voltage pulse. The light emitted from the detector also can be collected, focussed and dispersed by a CCD detector. The study of the evolution of the light emission and of the radiation damage under irradiation is a primary topic in the development of radiation hard polymer based scintillator. Polymer scintillator thin films are used in monitoring radiation beam intensities and simultaneous counting of different radiations. Radiation detectors have characteristics which depend on: the type of radiation, the energy of radiation, and the material of the detector. Three types of polymer thin films were studied: a polyvinyltoluene based scintillator, fluorinated polyimide and PMMA. (authors)

  11. The solenoidal detector collaboration silicon detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziock, H.J.; Gamble, M.T.; Miller, W.O.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Thompson, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    Silicon tracking systems (STS) will be fundamental components of the tracking systems for both planned major SSC experiments. The STS is physically a small part of the central tracking system and the calorimeter of the detector being proposed by the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC). Despite its seemingly small size, it occupies a volume of more than 5 meters in length and 1 meter in diameter and is an order of magnitude larger than any silicon detector system previously built. The STS will consist of silicon microstrip detectors and possibly silicon pixel detectors. The other two components are an outer barrel tracker, which will consist of straw tubes or scintillating fibers; and an outer intermediate angle tracker, which will consist of gas microstrips. The components are designed to work as an integrated system. Each componenet has specific strengths, but is individually incapable of providing the overall performance required by the physics goals of the SSC. The large particle fluxes, the short times between beam crossing, the high channel count, and the required very high position measurement accuracy pose challenging problems that must be solved. Furthermore, to avoid degrading the measurements, the solutions must be achieved using only a minimal amount of material. An additional constraint is that only low-Z materials are allowed. If that were not difficlut enough, the solutions must also be affordable

  12. LHCb Detector Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2015-03-05

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The experiment is designed for precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. In this paper the performance of the various LHCb sub-detectors and the trigger system are described, using data taken from 2010 to 2012. It is shown that the design criteria of the experiment have been met. The excellent performance of the detector has allowed the LHCb collaboration to publish a wide range of physics results, demonstrating LHCb's unique role, both as a heavy flavour experiment and as a general purpose detector in the forward region.

  13. ALFA Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus). The ALFA system is composed by four stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronics for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  14. ALFA Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS/LHC. The ALFA system is composed by two stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from each side of the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronic for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  15. The LHC detector challenge

    CERN Document Server

    Virdee, Tejinder S

    2004-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) from CERN, scheduled to come online in 2007, is a multi-TeV proton-proton collider with vast detectors. Two of the more significant detectors for LHC are ATLAS and CMS. Currently, both detectors are more than 65% complete in terms of financial commitment, and the experiments are being assembled at an increasing pace. ATLAS is being built directly in its underground cavern, whereas CMS is being assembled above ground. When completed, both detectors will aid researchers in determining what lies at the high-energy frontier, in particular the mechanism by which particles attain mass. (Edited abstract).

  16. Property measurements of the Higgs boson and search for high mass resonances in four-lepton final state with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00378788; Zhou, Bing

    The discovery of a Higgs boson by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in 2012 marked the beginning of a new era of experimental particle physics research through studies of the properties of this new particle. It is extremely important to determine the new particle's quantum numbers - spin and parity, and to measure its couplings to fermions and vector bosons to confirm if the newly discovered particle is the Higgs boson predicted almost 50 years ago by the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. In the SM, the Higgs boson is a scalar particle with positive parity ($J^P = 0^+$). It is responsible for generating masses for all the massive particles in our universe through the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. This dissertation presents the measurements of the quantum numbers and couplings of the newly discovered boson using data collected in proton-proton collisions at the center-of-mass energies ($\\sqrt s$) of 7, 8 and 13 TeV at the LHC by the ATLAS experiment duri...

  17. Measurement of the Higgs boson properties and search for new resonances using $\\mathrm{W^+ W^-}$ decays with the CMS detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00396444

    The Higgs mechanism is an essential element of the Standard Model (SM), explaining the origin of mass and playing a key role in the physics of electroweak symmetry breaking. A suitable Higgs boson candidate, predicted by the Higgs mechanism, was found with a mass of $125\\,\\mathrm{GeV}$ by the ATLAS and CMS experiments in the first run of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). After the discovery, the accurate measurement of the Higgs boson properties has become one of the main goals of the LHC. The Higgs sector could in fact be more entangled with respect to what discovered so far and Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) effects could emerge from accurate measurements of the couplings with fermions and bosons, which can be determined from the Higgs boson production processes and decays. The $\\mathrm{H \\to W^+W^-}$ channel is one of the most sensitive to these effects and the high branching fraction allows the statistics needed for a precision measurement to be collected. Measurements of the production cross section...

  18. Semi-insulating GaAs detectors of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagatova, A.; Sedlackova, K.; Necas, V.; Zatko, B.; Dubecky, F.; Bohacek, P.

    2012-01-01

    The present work deals with the technology of HDPE neutron conversion layer application on the surface of semi-insulating (SI) GaAs detectors via developed polypropylene (PP) based glue. The influence of glue deposition on the electric properties of the detectors was studied as well as the ability of the detectors to register the fast neutrons from "2"3"9Pu-Be neutron source. (authors)

  19. Transmission diamond imaging detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedley, John, E-mail: smedley@bnl.gov; Pinelli, Don; Gaoweia, Mengjia [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Muller, Erik; Ding, Wenxiang; Zhou, Tianyi [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Bohon, Jen [Case Center for Synchrotron Biosciences, Center for Proteomics and Bioinformatics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Many modern synchrotron techniques are trending toward use of high flux beams and/or beams which require enhanced stability and precise understanding of beam position and intensity from the front end of the beamline all the way to the sample. For high flux beams, major challenges include heat load management in optics (including the vacuum windows) and a mechanism of real-time volumetric measurement of beam properties such as flux, position, and morphology. For beam stability in these environments, feedback from such measurements directly to control systems for optical elements or to sample positioning stages would be invaluable. To address these challenges, we are developing diamond-based instrumented vacuum windows with integrated volumetric x-ray intensity, beam profile and beam-position monitoring capabilities. A 50 µm thick single crystal diamond has been lithographically patterned to produce 60 µm pixels, creating a >1kilopixel free-standing transmission imaging detector. This device, coupled with a custom, FPGA-based readout, has been used to image both white and monochromatic x-ray beams and capture the last x-ray photons at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This technology will form the basis for the instrumented end-station window of the x-ray footprinting beamline (XFP) at NSLS-II.

  20. Measurement of the Higgs boson coupling properties in the H → ZZ ∗ → 4ℓ decay channel at √{s}=13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

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P.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antrim, D. J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Araujo Ferraz, V.; Arce, A. T. H.; Ardell, R. E.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahmani, M.; Bahrasemani, H.; Baines, J. T.; Bajic, M.; Baker, O. K.; Bakker, P. J.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M.-S.; Barkeloo, J. T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Beck, H. C.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beermann, T. A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Bergsten, L. J.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernardi, G.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Betti, A.; Bevan, A. J.; Beyer, J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bittrich, C.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bolz, A. E.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozson, A. J.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Braren, F.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Briglin, D. L.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Bruno, S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burch, T. J.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burger, A. M.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cai, H.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carlson, B. T.; Carminati, L.; Carney, R. M. D.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrá, S.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casha, A. F.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castelijn, R.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Celebi, E.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, W. S.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, J.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. 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J.; Creager, R. A.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cueto, A.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cukierman, A. R.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Czekierda, S.; Czodrowski, P.; D'amen, G.; D'Auria, S.; D'eramo, L.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Daneri, M. F.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Daubney, T.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davis, D. R.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Maria, A.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vasconcelos Corga, K.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. 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M.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, Q.; Wang, R.-J.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, W.; Wang, Z.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, A. F.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. M.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weirich, M.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Weston, T. D.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A. S.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Whitmore, B. W.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkels, E.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wobisch, M.; Wolf, A.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolff, R.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, V. W. S.; Woods, N. L.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xi, Z.; Xia, L.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Xu, T.; Xu, W.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamane, F.; Yamatani, M.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yigitbasi, E.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zacharis, G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zemaityte, G.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zou, R.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2018-03-01

    The coupling properties of the Higgs boson are studied in the four-lepton ( e, μ) decay channel using 36.1 fb-1 of pp collision data from the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector. Cross sections are measured for the main production modes in several exclusive regions of the Higgs boson production phase space and are interpreted in terms of coupling modifiers. The inclusive cross section times branching ratio for H → ZZ ∗ decay and for a Higgs boson absolute rapidity below 2.5 is measured to be 1. 73 - 0.23 + 0.24 (stat.) - 0.08 + 0.10 (exp.) ± 0.04(th.) pb compared to the Standard Model prediction of 1 .34±0 .09 pb. In addition, the tensor structure of the Higgs boson couplings is studied using an effective Lagrangian approach for the description of interactions beyond the Standard Model. Constraints are placed on the non-Standard-Model CP-even and CP-odd couplings to Z bosons and on the CP-odd coupling to gluons. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Measurement of the Higgs boson coupling properties in the $H\\rightarrow ZZ^{*} \\rightarrow 4\\ell$ decay channel at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The coupling properties of the Higgs boson are studied in the four-lepton decay channel using 36.1 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data from the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector. Cross sections are measured for the four key production modes in several exclusive regions of the phase space and are interpreted in terms of coupling modifiers. The inclusive cross section in the $H \\rightarrow ZZ^*$ decay and for a Higgs boson absolute rapidity below 2.5 is measured to be $1.73^{+0.24}_{-0.23}$(stat.)$^{+0.10}_{-0.08}$(exp.)$\\pm 0.04$(th.)~pb compared to the Standard Model prediction of $1.34\\pm0.06$~pb. In addition, the tensor structure of the Higgs boson couplings is studied using an effective Lagrangian approach for the description of interactions beyond the Standard Model. Improved constraints are placed on the non-Standard-Model CP-even and CP-odd couplings to $Z$ bosons and on the CP-odd coupling to gluons.

  2. Preparation of bubble damage detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu Caiqing; Guo Shilun; Wang Yulan; Hao Xiuhong; Chen Changmao; Su Jingling

    1997-01-01

    Bubble damage detectors have been prepared by using polyacrylamide as detector solid and freon as detector liquid. Tests show that the prepared detectors are sensitive to fast neutrons and have proportionality between bubble number and neutron fluence within a certain range of neutron fluence. Therefore, it can be used as a fast neutron detector and a dosimeter

  3. The Martian Oasis Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P. H.; tomasko, M. G.; McEwen, A.; Rice, J.

    2000-07-01

    The next phase of unmanned Mars missions paves the way for astronauts to land on the surface of Mars. There are lessons to be learned from the unmanned precursor missions to the Moon and the Apollo lunar surface expeditions. These unmanned missions (Ranger, Lunar Orbiter, and Surveyor) provided the following valuable information, useful from both a scientific and engineering perspective, which was required to prepare the way for the manned exploration of the lunar surface: (1) high resolution imagery instrumental to Apollo landing site selection also tremendously advanced the state of Nearside and Farside regional geology; (2) demonstrated precision landing (less than two kilometers from target) and soft landing capability; (3) established that the surface had sufficient bearing strength to support a spacecraft; and (4) examination of the chemical composition and mechanical properties of the surface. The search for extinct or extant life on Mars will follow the water. However, geomorphic studies have shown that Mars has had liquid water on its surface throughout its geologic history. A cornucopia of potential landing sites with water histories (lakes, floodplains, oceans, deltas, hydrothermal regions) presently exist. How will we narrow down site selection and increase the likelihood of finding the signs of life? One way to do this is to identify 'Martian oases.' It is known that the Martian surface is often highly fractured and some areas have karst structures that support underground caves. Much of the water that formed the channels and valley networks is thought to be frozen underground. All that is needed to create the potential for liquid water is a near surface source of heat; recent lava flows and Martian meteorites attest to the potential for volcanic activity. If we can locate even one spot where fracturing, ice, and underground heat are co-located then we have the potential for an oasis. Such a discovery could truly excite the imaginations of both the

  4. ALICE Photon Multiplicity Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nayak, T

    2013-01-01

    Photon Multiplicity Detector (PMD) measures the multiplicity and spatial distribution of photons in the forward region of ALICE on a event-by-event basis. PMD is a pre-shower detector having fine granularity and full azimuthal coverage in the pseudo-rapidity region 2.3 < η < 3.9.

  5. New detector concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemmer, J.; Lutz, G.

    1986-07-01

    On the basis of the semiconductor drift chamber many new detectors are proposed, which enable the determination of energy, energy loss, position and penetration depth of radiation. A novel integrated transistor-detector configuration allows non destructive repeated readout and amplification of the signal. The concept may be used for the construction of one or two-dimensional PIXEL arrays. (orig.)

  6. Stanford's big new detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    A detector constructed for the Standford Linear Collider is described. It consists of a central drift chamber in the field of a surrounding superconducting solenoid. Furthermore included are a Cherenkov ring imaging detector for particle identification and a liquid argon calorimeter. (HSI).

  7. CMS Detector Posters

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    CMS Detector posters (produced in 2000): CMS installation CMS collaboration From the Big Bang to Stars LHC Magnetic Field Magnet System Trackering System Tracker Electronics Calorimetry Eletromagnetic Calorimeter Hadronic Calorimeter Muon System Muon Detectors Trigger and data aquisition (DAQ) ECAL posters (produced in 2010, FR & EN): CMS ECAL CMS ECAL-Supermodule cooling and mechatronics CMS ECAL-Supermodule assembly

  8. Pixel detector readout chip

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    Close-up of a pixel detector readout chip. The photograph shows an aera of 1 mm x 2 mm containing 12 separate readout channels. The entire chip contains 1000 readout channels (around 80 000 transistors) covering a sensitive area of 8 mm x 5 mm. The chip has been mounted on a silicon detector to detect high energy particles.

  9. Drift chamber detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez Laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    A review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers is presented. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysied, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author)

  10. Drift Chambers detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs

  11. Solid state track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuther, H.

    1976-11-01

    This paper gives a survey of the present state of the development and the application of solid state track detectors. The fundamentals of the physical and chemical processes of the track formation and development are explained, the different detector materials and their registration characteristics are mentioned, the possibilities of the experimental practice and the most variable applications are discussed. (author)

  12. LHCb detector performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinol, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Wilschut, H. W.

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The experiment is designed for precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. In this paper the performance of the various LHCb sub-detectors and the trigger system are

  13. The LDC detector concept

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In preparation of the experimental program at the international linear collider (ILC), the large detector concept (LDC) is being developed. The main points of the LDC are a large volume gaseous tracking system, combined with high precision vertex detector and an extremely granular calorimeter. The main design ...

  14. Detector Systems at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider CLIC is designed to deliver e+e- collisions at a center of mass energy of up to 3 TeV. The detector systems at this collider have to provide highly efficient tracking and excellent jet energy resolution and hermeticity for multi-TeV final states with multiple jets and leptons. In addition, the detector systems have to be capable of distinguishing physics events from large beam-induced background at a crossing frequency of 2 GHz. Like for the detector concepts at the ILC, CLIC detectors are based on event reconstruction using particle flow algorithms. The two detector concepts for the ILC, ILD and SID, were adapted for CLIC using calorimeters with dense absorbers limiting leakage through increased compactness, as well as modified forward and vertex detector geometries and precise time stamping to cope with increased background levels. The overall detector concepts for CLIC are presented, with particular emphasis on the main detector and engineering challenges, such as: the ultra-thi...

  15. Future particle detector systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Allan G.

    2000-01-01

    Starting with a short summary of the major new experimental physics programs, we attempt to motivate the reasons why existing general-purpose detectors at Hadron Colliders are what they are, why they are being upgraded, and why new facilities are being constructed. The CDF and ATLAS detectors are used to illustrate these motivations. Selected physics results from the CDF experiment provide evidence for limitations on the detector performance, and new physics opportunities motivate both machine and detector upgrades. This is discussed with emphasis on the improved physics reach of the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron (√(s)=2 TeV). From 2005, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will become operational at a collision energy of √(s)=14 TeV, seven times larger than at the Tevatron Collider. To exploit the physics capability of the LHC, several large detectors are being constructed. The detectors are significantly more complex than those at the Tevatron Collider because of physics and operational constraints. The detector design and technology of the aspects of the large general-purpose detector ATLAS is described

  16. Developments on RICH detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, P.; Bourgeois, P.

    1996-01-01

    The RICH (ring imaging Cherenkov) detector which is dedicated to Cherenkov radiation detection is described. An improvement made by replacing photo sensible vapor with solid photocathode is studied. A RICH detector prototype with a CsI photocathode has been built in Saclay and used with Saturne. The first results are presented. (A.C.)

  17. ALICE Silicon Strip Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nooren, G

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) constitutes the two outermost layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE Experiment. The SSD plays a crucial role in the tracking of the particles produced in the collisions connecting the tracks from the external detectors (Time Projection Chamber) to the ITS. The SSD also contributes to the particle identification through the measurement of their energy loss.

  18. Parametric Adaptive Radar Detector with Enhanced Mismatched Signals Rejection Capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Bin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of adaptive signal detection in the presence of Gaussian noise with unknown covariance matrix. We propose a parametric radar detector by introducing a design parameter to trade off the target sensitivity with sidelobes energy rejection. The resulting detector merges the statistics of Kelly's GLRT and of the Rao test and so covers Kelly's GLRT and the Rao test as special cases. Both invariance properties and constant false alarm rate (CFAR behavior for this detector are studied. At the analysis stage, the performance of the new receiver is assessed and compared with several traditional adaptive detectors. The results highlight better rejection capabilities of this proposed detector for mismatched signals. Further, we develop two two-stage detectors, one of which consists of an adaptive matched filter (AMF followed by the aforementioned detector, and the other is obtained by cascading a GLRT-based Subspace Detector (SD and the proposed adaptive detector. We show that the former two-stage detector outperforms traditional two-stage detectors in terms of selectivity, and the latter yields more robustness.

  19. The GDH-Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Helbing, K; Fausten, M; Menze, D; Michel, T; Nagel, A; Ryckbosch, D; Speckner, T; Vyver, R V D; Zeitler, G

    2002-01-01

    For the GDH-Experiment at ELSA, the helicity dependent total photoabsorption cross-section is to be determined. These measurements will be performed with the newly developed GDH-Detector which is presented here. The concept of the GDH-Detector is to detect at least one reaction product from all possible hadronic processes with almost complete acceptance concerning solid angle and efficiency. This is realized by an arrangement of scintillators and lead. The overall acceptance for hadronic processes is better than 99%. The electromagnetic background is suppressed by about five orders of magnitude by means of a threshold Cherenkov detector. In dedicated tests, it has been demonstrated that all individual components of the GDH-Detector fulfill the design goals. Measurements of unpolarized total photoabsorption cross-sections were performed to ensure that the complete GDH-Detector is operational.

  20. ATLAS ITk Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gemme, Claudia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) in 2026 will provide new challenge to the ATLAS tracker. The current inner detector will be replaced with a whole silicon tracker which will consist of a five barrel layer Pixel detector surrounded by a four barrel layer Strip detector. The expected high radiation level are requiring the development of upgraded silicon sensors as well as new a front-end chip. The dense tracking environment will require finer granularity detectors. The data rates will require new technologies for high bandwidth data transmission and handling. The current status of the HL-LHC ATLA Pixel detector developments as well as the various layout options will be reviewed.

  1. Undepleted silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rancoita, P.G.; Seidman, A.

    1985-01-01

    Large-size silicon detectors employing relatively low resistivity material can be used in electromagnetic calorimetry. They can operate in strong magnetic fields, under geometric constraints and with microstrip detectors a high resolution can be achieved. Low noise large capacitance oriented electronics was developed to enable good signal-to-noise ratio for single relativistic particles traversing large area detectors. In undepleted silicon detectors, the charge migration from the field-free region has been investigated by comparing the expected peak position (from the depleted layer only) of the energy-loss of relativistic electrons with the measured one. Furthermore, the undepleted detectors have been employed in a prototype of Si/W electromagnetic colorimeter. The sensitive layer was found to be systematically larger than the depleted one

  2. Advanced far infrared detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, E.E.

    1993-05-01

    Recent advances in photoconductive and bolometric semiconductor detectors for wavelength 1 mm > λ > 50 μm are reviewed. Progress in detector performance in this photon energy range has been stimulated by new and stringent requirements for ground based, high altitude and space-borne telescopes for astronomical and astrophysical observations. The paper consists of chapters dealing with the various types of detectors: Be and Ga doped Ge photoconductors, stressed Ge:Ga devices and neutron transmutation doped Ge thermistors. Advances in the understanding of basic detector physics and the introduction of modern semiconductor device technology have led to predictable and reliable fabrication techniques. Integration of detectors into functional arrays has become feasible and is vigorously pursued by groups worldwide

  3. Charged corpuscular beam detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hikawa, H; Nishikawa, Y

    1970-09-29

    The present invention relates to a charged particle beam detector which prevents transient phenomena disturbing the path and focusing of a charged particle beam travelling through a mounted axle. The present invention provides a charged particle beam detector capable of decreasing its reaction to the charge in energy of the charged particle beam even if the relative angle between the mounted axle and the scanner is unstable. The detector is characterized by mounting electrically conductive metal pieces of high melting point onto the face of a stepped, heat-resistant electric insulating material such that the pieces partially overlap each other and individually provide electric signals, whereby the detector is no longer affected by the beam. The thickness of the metal piece is selected so that an eddy current is not induced therein by an incident beam, thus the incident beam is not affected. The detector is capable of detecting a misaligned beam since the metal pieces partially overlap each other.

  4. The Solenoidal Detector Collaboration silicon detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziock, H.J.; Gamble, M.T.; Miller, W.O.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Thompson, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    Silicon tracking systems will be fundamental components of the tracking systems for both planned major SSC experiments. Despite its seemingly small size, it occupies a volume of more than 5 meters in length and 1 meter in diameter and is an order of magnitude larger than any silicon detector system previously built. This report discusses its design and operation

  5. CDF [Collider Detector at Fermilab] detector simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, J.

    1987-12-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) uses several different simulation programs, each tuned for specific applications. The programs rely heavily on the extensive test beam data that CDF has accumulated. Sophisticated shower parameterizations are used, yielding enormous gains in speed over full cascade programs. 3 refs., 5 figs

  6. CdTe and CdZnTe detectors in nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Scheiber, C

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear medicine diagnostic applications are growing in search for more disease specific or more physiologically relevant imaging. The data are obtained non-invasively from large field gamma cameras or from miniaturised probes. As far as single photon emitters are concerned, often labelled with sup 9 sup 9 sup m Tc (140 keV, gamma), nuclear instrumentation deals with poor counting statistics due to the method of spatial localisation and low contrast to noise due to scatter in the body. Since the 1960s attempts have been made to replace the NaI scintillator by semiconductor detectors with better spectrometric characteristics to improve contrast and quantitative measurements. They allow direct conversion of energy and thus more compact sensors. Room-temperature semiconductor detectors such as cadmium tellure and cadmium zinc tellure have favourable physical characteristics for medical applications which have been investigated in the 1980s. During one decade, they have been used in miniaturised probes such as fo...

  7. The possibility of using plastic detectors CR-39 as UV dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shweikani, R.; Raja, G.; Sawaf, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of solar ultraviolet (SUV) and ultraviolet type A (UVA) produced by a solar UV simulator on CR-39 detectors were studied. This was done using three techniques: 1 - Alpha tracks diameters and tracks densities, 2 - UV-Vis spectrometry and 3 - FTIR spectrometry. The detectors were divided into two groups, the first was exposed to UV and then to alpha particles, the second group was exposed to alpha particles first and then to UV. The results showed that the effect of UVA on CR-39 was not clear using the three techniques. While, the effect of SUV was clear when using UV-Vis and FTIR spectrometric, and not clear when using track parameters. (author)

  8. The possibility of using plastic detectors CR-39 as UV dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shweikani, R.; Raja, G.; Sawaf, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of solar ultraviolet (SUV) and ultraviolet type A (UVA) produced by a solar UV simulator on CR-39 detectors were studied. This was done using three techniques: 1 - Alpha tracks diameters and tracks densities, 2 - UV-Vis spectrometry and 3 - FTIR spectrometry. The detectors were divided into two groups, the first was exposed to UV and then to alpha particles, the second group was exposed to alpha particles first and then to UV. The results showed that the effect of UVA on CR-39 was not clear using the three techniques. While, the effect of SUV was clear when using UV-Vis and FTIR spectrometric, and not clear when using track parameters

  9. A flexible VME-based multiparametric apparatus for coincidence spectroscopy and investigation of parameters of detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubek, J.

    2000-01-01

    The methodology of Coincidence Instrumental Activation Analysis (CIAA) based on a three-parameter gamma-gamma coincidence spectrometer with two high-purity Ge detectors is presented. A flexible coincidence system was built on standard NIM spectrometric modules connected to a VME or CAMAC data acquisition system. The detailed setup of the system optimized for the maximum energy resolution, maximum data throughput (dead time correction, pile-up rejection) and maximum flexibility is described. The use of different data acquisition platforms is discussed (VME bus with several different controllers, CAMAC bus). The software developed for reading and basic processing of measured data is also described. The possibilities of off-line data evaluation are discussed. The system was tested with respect to its compliance with the criteria of the CIAA method. Some results of measurement by this method are also presented. The flexibility of the system is demonstrated on its ability to measure the time characteristics of different detectors. (author)

  10. Neutron beam imaging with GEM detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albani, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M.; Gorini, G.; Croci, G.; Muraro, A.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Cavenago, M.; Murtas, F.; Claps, G.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2015-01-01

    Neutron GEM-based detectors represent a new frontier of devices in neutron physics applications where a very high neutron flux must be measured such as future fusion experiments (e.g. ITER Neutral beam Injector) and spallation sources (e.g. the European Spallation source). This kind of detectors can be properly adapted to be used both as beam monitors but also as neutron diffraction detectors that could represent a valid alternative for the 3 He detectors replacement. Fast neutron GEM detectors (nGEM) feature a cathode composed by one layer of polyethylene and one of aluminium (neutron scattering on hydrogen generates protons that are detected in the gas) while thermal neutron GEM detectors (bGEM) are equipped with a borated aluminium cathode (charged particles are generated through the 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction). GEM detectors can be realized in large area (1 m 2 ) and their readout can be pixelated. Three different prototypes of nGEM and one prototype of bGEM detectors of different areas and equipped with different types of readout have been built and tested. All the detectors have been used to measure the fast and thermal neutron 2D beam image at the ISIS-VESUVIO beamline. The different kinds of readout patterns (different areas of the pixels) have been compared in similar conditions. All the detectors measured a width of the beam profile consitent with the expected one. The imaging property of each detector was then tested by inserting samples of different material and shape in the beam. All the samples were correctly reconstructed and the definition of the reconstruction depends on the type of readout anode. The fast neutron beam profile reconstruction was then compared to the one obtained by diamond detectors positioned on the same beamline while the thermal neutron one was compared to the imaged obtained by cadmium-coupled x-rays films. Also efficiency and the gamma background rejection have been determined. These prototypes represent the first step towards

  11. Latent tracks in polymeric etched track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Tomoya

    2013-01-01

    Track registration properties in polymeric track detectors, including Poly(allyl diglycol carbonate), Bispenol A polycarbonate, Poly(ethylen terephtarate), and Polyimide, have been investigated by means of Fourie transform Infararede FT-IR spectrometry. Chemical criterion on the track formation threshold has been proposes, in stead of the conventional physical track registration models. (author)

  12. Measurement of fission yields for 232-Th (n,f) at 14,7 MeV by direct gamma spectrometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chouak, K.; Berrada, M.; Embarech, K.

    1994-01-01

    Fission yields for the reaction 232-Th (n,f) were measured at 14,7 MeV using the activation technique with direct gamma spectrometric method. Neutrons were produced via the T(d,n) sup 4 He reaction. The neutron fluences were determined relative to the well-known sup 2 sup 7 Al(n,p) sup 2 sup 7 Mg or sup 2 sup 7 Al(n,alpha) sup 2 sup 4 Na cross section, according to the irradiation time. Yields of fission products were determined by measuring the induced gamma ray activities of the irradiated Th foils, using a calibrated Ge(Li) detector. All necessary corrections were taken into account: self absorption, coincidence losses and natural gamma rays. Fifty six cumulative yields were measured and only twenty one corresponding results were found in the literature (Crouch,1977). A satisfactory agreement is observed between our results and the published data with the exception of the masses:A=134 and A=140. 1 tab., 2 refs. (author)

  13. Stabilization of spectra provided by a gamma-ray spectrometer. Application to the construction of a stabilizer; Stabilisation des spectres fournis par un spectrometre a rayons gamma. Application a la realisation d'un stabilisateur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detourne, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-06-15

    This research is concerned with the stabilization of spectra provided by a gamma-ray spectrometer. It is required to hold the calibration straight line of the spectrometer in a position which is fixed initially to better than 5x10{sup -5} channel. A prototype numerical stabilizer has been constructed : the SPECTROSTAB; it is made up of two independent control loops; one of these makes the spectrometer gain depend on the derivatives of a reference peak at high energies; the other makes the origin of the energy scale depend on the derivatives of a second reference peak at low energies A theoretical study of the behaviour of a control loop shows that a direct action stabilizer gives the most accurate stabilization; the loss in resolving power on the theoretical peaks of the spectra attains about 1 % with a scintillation detector, and 10 % with a semi-conductor detector. Various tests show that the expected results are obtained and that the displacement of the spectral peaks produced by the derivatives are hidden by errors in the calculation of the peak abscissae. (author) [French] Cette etude a pour objet la stabilisation des spectres fournis par un spectrometre a rayons gamma. On veut maintenir la droite d'etalonnage du spectrometre dans une position fixee initialement a mieux de 6.10{sup -5} canal pres. On realise un prototype de stabilisateur numerique, le SPECTROSTAB; il comprend deux boucles d'asservissement independantes; l'une d'elles asservit le gain du spectrometre aux derives d'un pic de reference aux hautes energies; l'autre asservit l'origine de l'echelle des energies aux derives d'un second pic de reference aux basses energies. Une etude theorique du comportement d'une boucle d'asservissement montre qu'un stabilisateur a action directe permet la stabilisation la plus precise; la perte en resolution sur les pics theoriques des spectres atteint environ 1 % avec un detecteur a scintillateur et 10 % avec un detecteur a semi-conducteur. Divers essais montrent

  14. The pin pixel detector--X-ray imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Bateman, J E; Derbyshire, G E; Duxbury, D M; Marsh, A S; Simmons, J E; Stephenson, R

    2002-01-01

    The development and testing of a soft X-ray gas pixel detector, which uses connector pins for the anodes is reported. Based on a commercial 100 pin connector block, a prototype detector of aperture 25.4 mm centre dot 25.4 mm can be economically fabricated. The individual pin anodes all show the expected characteristics of small gas detectors capable of counting rates reaching 1 MHz per pin. A 2-dimensional resistive divide readout system has been developed to permit the imaging properties of the detector to be explored in advance of true pixel readout electronics.

  15. ATLAS Detector Interface Group

    CERN Multimedia

    Mapelli, L

    Originally organised as a sub-system in the DAQ/EF-1 Prototype Project, the Detector Interface Group (DIG) was an information exchange channel between the Detector systems and the Data Acquisition to provide critical detector information for prototype design and detector integration. After the reorganisation of the Trigger/DAQ Project and of Technical Coordination, the necessity to provide an adequate context for integration of detectors with the Trigger and DAQ lead to organisation of the DIG as one of the activities of Technical Coordination. Such an organisation emphasises the ATLAS wide coordination of the Trigger and DAQ exploitation aspects, which go beyond the domain of the Trigger/DAQ project itself. As part of Technical Coordination, the DIG provides the natural environment for the common work of Trigger/DAQ and detector experts. A DIG forum for a wide discussion of all the detector and Trigger/DAQ integration issues. A more restricted DIG group for the practical organisation and implementation o...

  16. The HERMES recoil detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airapetian, A.; Belostotski, S.

    2013-02-01

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with an integrated field strength of 1Tm. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  17. Smile detectors correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Kivanc; Chang, Xin; Skarbek, Władysław

    2017-08-01

    The novel smile recognition algorithm is presented based on extraction of 68 facial salient points (fp68) using the ensemble of regression trees. The smile detector exploits the Support Vector Machine linear model. It is trained with few hundreds exemplar images by SVM algorithm working in 136 dimensional space. It is shown by the strict statistical data analysis that such geometric detector strongly depends on the geometry of mouth opening area, measured by triangulation of outer lip contour. To this goal two Bayesian detectors were developed and compared with SVM detector. The first uses the mouth area in 2D image, while the second refers to the mouth area in 3D animated face model. The 3D modeling is based on Candide-3 model and it is performed in real time along with three smile detectors and statistics estimators. The mouth area/Bayesian detectors exhibit high correlation with fp68/SVM detector in a range [0:8; 1:0], depending mainly on light conditions and individual features with advantage of 3D technique, especially in hard light conditions.

  18. The HERMES recoil detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Laboratory of Physics; Aschenauer, E.C. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Belostotski, S. [B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Insitute, Gatchina (Russian Federation)] [and others; Collaboration: HERMES Recoil Detector Group

    2013-02-15

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with an integrated field strength of 1Tm. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  19. A New Virtual Point Detector Concept for a HPGe detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Jong In; Yun, Ju Yong

    2009-01-01

    For last several decades, the radiation measurement and radioactivity analysis techniques using gamma detectors have been well established. Especially , the study about the detection efficiency has been done as an important part of gamma spectrometry. The detection efficiency depends strongly on source-to-detector distance. The detection efficiency with source-to-detector distance can be expressed by a complex function of geometry and physical characteristics of gamma detectors. In order to simplify the relation, a virtual point detector concept was introduced by Notea. Recently, further studies concerning the virtual point detector have been performed. In previous other works the virtual point detector has been considered as a fictitious point existing behind the detector end cap. However the virtual point detector position for the front and side of voluminous detectors might be different due to different effective central axis of them. In order to more accurately define the relation, therefore, we should consider the virtual point detector for the front as well as side and off-center of the detector. The aim of this study is to accurately define the relation between the detection efficiency and source-to-detector distance with the virtual point detector. This paper demonstrates the method to situate the virtual point detectors for a HPGe detector. The new virtual point detector concept was introduced for three area of the detector and its characteristics also were demonstrated by using Monte Carlo Simulation method. We found that the detector has three virtual point detectors except for its rear area. This shows that we should consider the virtual point detectors for each area when applying the concept to radiation measurement. This concept can be applied to the accurate geometric simplification for the detector and radioactive sources.

  20. Detectors - Electronics; Detecteurs - Electronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bregeault, J.; Gabriel, J.L.; Hierle, G.; Lebotlan, P.; Leconte, A.; Lelandais, J.; Mosrin, P.; Munsch, P.; Saur, H.; Tillier, J. [Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire, Caen Univ., 14 (France)

    1998-04-01

    The reports presents the main results obtained in the fields of radiation detectors and associated electronics. In the domain of X-ray gas detectors for the keV range efforts were undertaken to rise the detector efficiency. Multiple gap parallel plate chambers of different types as well as different types of X {yields} e{sup -} converters were tested to improve the efficiency (values of 2.4% at 60 KeV were reached). In the field of scintillators a study of new crystals has been carried out (among which Lutetium orthosilicate). CdTe diode strips for obtaining X-ray imaging were studied. The complete study of a linear array of 8 CdTe pixels has been performed and certified. The results are encouraging and point to this method as a satisfying solution. Also, a large dimension programmable chamber was used to study the influence of temperature on the inorganic scintillators in an interval from -40 deg. C to +150 deg. C. Temperature effects on other detectors and electronic circuits were also investigated. In the report mentioned is also the work carried out for the realization of the DEMON neutron multidetector. For neutron halo experiments different large area Si detectors associated with solid and gas position detectors were realized. In the frame of a contract with COGEMA a systematic study of Li doped glasses was undertaken aiming at replacing with a neutron probe the {sup 3}He counters presently utilized in pollution monitoring. An industrial prototype has been realised. Other studies were related to integrated analog chains, materials for Cherenkov detectors, scintillation probes for experiments on fundamental processes, gas position sensitive detectors, etc. In the field of associated electronics there are mentioned the works related to the multidetector INDRA, data acquisition, software gamma spectrometry, automatic gas pressure regulation in detectors, etc