WorldWideScience

Sample records for detector array design

  1. Mechanical Design and Development of TES Bolometer Detector Arrays for the Advanced ACTPol Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jonathan T.; Austermann, Jason; Beall, James A.; Choi, Steve K.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Devlin, Mark J.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio M.; Henderson, Shawn W.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; hide

    2016-01-01

    The next generation Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) experiment is currently underway and will consist of four Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer arrays, with three operating together, totaling 5800 detectors on the sky. Building on experience gained with the ACTPol detector arrays, AdvACT will utilize various new technologies, including 150 mm detector wafers equipped with multichroic pixels, allowing for a more densely packed focal plane. Each set of detectors includes a feedhorn array of stacked silicon wafers which form a spline pro le leading to each pixel. This is then followed by a waveguide interface plate, detector wafer, back short cavity plate, and backshort cap. Each array is housed in a custom designed structure manufactured from high purity copper and then gold plated. In addition to the detector array assembly, the array package also encloses cryogenic readout electronics. We present the full mechanical design of the AdvACT high frequency (HF) detector array package along with a detailed look at the detector array stack assemblies. This experiment will also make use of extensive hardware and software previously developed for ACT, which will be modi ed to incorporate the new AdvACT instruments. Therefore, we discuss the integration of all AdvACT arrays with pre-existing ACTPol infrastructure.

  2. Design of readout drivers for ATLAS pixel detectors using field programmable gate arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Sivasubramaniyan, Sriram

    Microstrip detectors are an integral patt of high energy physics research . Special protocols are used to transmit the data from these detectors . To readout the data from such detectors specialized instrumentation have to be designed . To achieve this task, creative and innovative high speed algorithms were designed simulated and implemented in Field Programmable gate arrays, using CAD/CAE tools. The simulation results indicated that these algorithms would be able to perform all the required tasks quickly and efficiently. This thesis describes the design of data acquisition system called the Readout Drivers (ROD) . It focuses on the ROD data path for ATLAS Pixel detectors. The data path will be an integrated part of Readout Drivers setup to decode the data from the silicon micro strip detectors and pixel detectors. This research also includes the design of Readout Driver controller. This Module is used to control the operation of the ROD. This module is responsible for the operation of the Pixel decoders bas...

  3. Design of data acquisition system for 2D-ARRAY ionization chamber detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Chaohui; Xing Guilai; Wu Zhifang; Wang Zhentao

    2012-01-01

    The introduction is given on the design and development of data acquisition system for 2D-ARRAY ionization chamber detector, which is used for dose verification of tumor radiotherapy. The paper describes the structure and the principle of the 2D-ARRAY ionization chamber detector system in detail, and focuses on the discussion on the design process of the detector's data acquisition system and the development of data acquisition system which is constituted by preamplifier, preamplifier control board and data acquisition board. The client can setup the parameters of the detector system via TCP/IP and do data processing such as high speed data collection and acquisition, further operation and so on. (authors)

  4. Design considerations for large detector arrays on submillimeter-wave telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Antony A.

    2000-07-01

    The emerging technology of large (approximately 10,000 pixel) submillimeter-wave bolometer arrays presents a novel optical design problem -- how can such arrays be fed by diffraction- limited telescope optics where the primary mirror is less than 100,000 wavelengths in diameter? Standard Cassegrain designs for radiotelescope optics exhibit focal surface curvature so large that detectors cannot be placed more than 25 beam diameters from the central ray. The problem is worse for Ritchey-Chretien designs, because these minimize coma while increasing field curvature. Classical aberrations, including coma, are usually dominated by diffraction in submillimeter- wave single dish telescopes. The telescope designer must consider (1) diffraction, (2) aberration, (3) curvature of field, (4) cross-polarization, (5) internal reflections, (6) the effect of blockages, (7) means of beam chopping on- and off-source, (8) gravitational and thermal deformations of the primary mirror, (9) the physical mounting of large detector packages, and (10) the effect of gravity and (11) vibration on those detectors. Simultaneous optimization of these considerations in the case of large detector arrays leads to telescopes that differ considerably from standard radiotelescope designs. Offset optics provide flexibility for mounting detectors, while eliminating blockage and internal reflections. Aberrations and cross-polarization can be the same as on-axis designs having the same diameter and focal length. Trade-offs include the complication of primary mirror homology and an increase in overall cost. A dramatic increase in usable field of view can be achieved using shaped optics. Solutions having one to six mirrors will be discussed, including possible six-mirror design for the proposed South Pole 10 m telescope.

  5. Design of a Dry Dilution Refrigerator for MMC Gamma Detector Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Stephan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Boyd, Stephen [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cantor, Robin

    2017-04-03

    The goal of this LCP is to develop an ultra-high resolution gamma detector based on magnetic microcalorimeters (MMCs) for accurate non-destructive analysis (NDA) of nuclear materials. For highest energy resolution, we will introduce erbium-doped silver (Ag:Er) as a novel sensor material to replace current Au:Er sensors. The detector sensitivity will be increased by developing arrays of 32 Ag:Er pixels read out by 16 SQUID preamplifiers. MMC detectors require operating temperatures of ~15 mK and thus the use of a dilution refrigerator, and the desire for user-friendly operation without cryogenic liquids requires that this refrigerator use pulse-tube pre-cooling to ~4 K. For long-term reliability, we intend to re-design the heat switch that is needed to apply the magnetizing current to the Ag:Er sensor and that used to fail in earlier designs after months of operation. A cryogenic Compton veto will be installed to reduce the spectral background of the MMC, especially at low energies where ultra-high energy resolution is most important. The goals for FY16 were 1) to purchase a liquid-cryogen-free dilution refrigerator and adapt it for MMC operation, and 2) to fabricate Ag:Er-based MMC γ-detectors with improved performance and optimize their response. This report discusses the design of the instruments, and progress in MMC detector fabrication. Details of the MMC fabrication have been discussed in an April 2016 report to DOE.

  6. Detector array and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timothy, J.G.; Bybee, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    A detector array and method are described in which sets of electrode elements are provided. Each set consists of a number of linear extending parallel electrodes. The sets of electrode elements are disposed at an angle (preferably orthogonal) with respect to one another so that the individual elements intersect and overlap individual elements of the other sets. Electrical insulation is provided between the overlapping elements. The detector array is exposed to a source of charged particles which in accordance with one embodiment comprise electrons derived from a microchannel array plate exposed to photons. Amplifier and discriminator means are provided for each individual electrode element. Detection means are provided to sense pulses on individual electrode elements in the sets, with coincidence of pulses on individual intersecting electrode elements being indicative of charged particle impact at the intersection of the elements. Electronic readout means provide an indication of coincident events and the location where the charged particle or particles impacted. Display means are provided for generating appropriate displays representative of the intensity and locaton of charged particles impacting on the detector array

  7. Design and operation of a 2-D thin-film semiconductor neutron detector array for use as a beamport monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unruh, Troy C.; Bellinger, Steven L.; Huddleston, David E.; McNeil, Walter J.; Patterson, Eric; Sobering, Tim J.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2009-01-01

    Silicon-based diodes coated with a thin film of neutron reactive materials have been shown to produce excellent low-efficiency neutron detectors. This work employs the same technology, but groups 25 equally sized and spaced diodes on a single 29 mm by 29 mm substrate. A 5x5 array was fabricated and coated with a thin film of 6 LiF for use as a low-efficiency neutron beam monitor. The 5x5 neutron detector array is coupled to an array of amplifiers, allowing the response to be interpreted using a LabVIEW FPGA. The 5x5 array has been characterized in a diffracted neutron beam. This work is a part of on-going research to develop various designs of high- and low-efficiency semiconductor neutron detectors.

  8. The high dynamic range pixel array detector (HDR-PAD): Concept and design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanks, Katherine S.; Philipp, Hugh T.; Weiss, Joel T.; Becker, Julian; Tate, Mark W. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Gruner, Sol M., E-mail: smg26@cornell.edu [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Experiments at storage ring light sources as well as at next-generation light sources increasingly require detectors capable of high dynamic range operation, combining low-noise detection of single photons with large pixel well depth. XFEL sources in particular provide pulse intensities sufficiently high that a purely photon-counting approach is impractical. The High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector (HDR-PAD) project aims to provide a dynamic range extending from single-photon sensitivity to 10{sup 6} photons/pixel in a single XFEL pulse while maintaining the ability to tolerate a sustained flux of 10{sup 11} ph/s/pixel at a storage ring source. Achieving these goals involves the development of fast pixel front-end electronics as well as, in the XFEL case, leveraging the delayed charge collection due to plasma effects in the sensor. A first prototype of essential electronic components of the HDR-PAD readout ASIC, exploring different options for the pixel front-end, has been fabricated. Here, the HDR-PAD concept and preliminary design will be described.

  9. The surface detector array of the Telescope Array experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Zayyad, T. [University of Utah, High Energy Astrophysics Institute, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Aida, R. [University of Yamanashi, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, Kofu, Yamanashi (Japan); Allen, M.; Anderson, R. [University of Utah, High Energy Astrophysics Institute, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Azuma, R. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J.W.; Bergman, D.R.; Blake, S.A.; Cady, R. [University of Utah, High Energy Astrophysics Institute, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Cheon, B.G. [Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chiba, J. [Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba (Japan); Chikawa, M. [Kinki University, Higashi Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Cho, E.J. [Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, W.R. [Yonsei University, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Fujii, H. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Fujii, T. [Osaka City University, Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Fukuda, T. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Fukushima, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); University of Tokyo, Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Gorbunov, D. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); and others

    2012-10-11

    The Telescope Array (TA) experiment, located in the western desert of Utah, USA, is designed for the observation of extensive air showers from extremely high energy cosmic rays. The experiment has a surface detector array surrounded by three fluorescence detectors to enable simultaneous detection of shower particles at ground level and fluorescence photons along the shower track. The TA surface detectors and fluorescence detectors started full hybrid observation in March, 2008. In this article we describe the design and technical features of the TA surface detector.

  10. The surface detector array of the Telescope Array experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Zayyad, T.; Aida, R.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J.W.; Bergman, D.R.; Blake, S.A.; Cady, R.; Cheon, B.G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, E.J.; Cho, W.R.; Fujii, H.; Fujii, T.; Fukuda, T.; Fukushima, M.; Gorbunov, D.

    2012-01-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) experiment, located in the western desert of Utah, USA, is designed for the observation of extensive air showers from extremely high energy cosmic rays. The experiment has a surface detector array surrounded by three fluorescence detectors to enable simultaneous detection of shower particles at ground level and fluorescence photons along the shower track. The TA surface detectors and fluorescence detectors started full hybrid observation in March, 2008. In this article we describe the design and technical features of the TA surface detector.

  11. A new DOI detector design using discrete crystal array with depth-dependent reflector patterns and single-ended readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Chaeyeong; Kang, Jihoon; Chung, Yong Hyun

    2017-01-01

    We developed a depth of interaction (DOI) positron emission tomography (PET) detector using depth-dependent reflector patterns in a discrete crystal array. Due to the different reflector patterns at depth, light distribution was changed relative to depth. As a preliminary experiment, we measured DOI detector module crystal identification performance. The crystal consisted of a 9×9 array of 2 mmx2 mmx20 mm lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystals. The crystal array was optically coupled to a 64-channel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube with a 2 mmx2 mm anode size and an 18.1 mmx18.1 mm effective area. We obtained the flood image with an Anger-type calculation. DOI layers and 9×9 pixels were well distinguished in the obtained images. Preclinical PET scanners based on this detector design offer the prospect of high and uniform spatial resolution.

  12. A new DOI detector design using discrete crystal array with depth-dependent reflector patterns and single-ended readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Chaeyeong [Department of Radiological Science, Yonsei University, Wonju 26493 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jihoon, E-mail: ray.jihoon.kang@gmail.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 50 Daehak-ro, Yeosu, Jeonnam 59626 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yong Hyun, E-mail: ychung@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Radiological Science, Yonsei University, Wonju 26493 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-21

    We developed a depth of interaction (DOI) positron emission tomography (PET) detector using depth-dependent reflector patterns in a discrete crystal array. Due to the different reflector patterns at depth, light distribution was changed relative to depth. As a preliminary experiment, we measured DOI detector module crystal identification performance. The crystal consisted of a 9×9 array of 2 mmx2 mmx20 mm lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystals. The crystal array was optically coupled to a 64-channel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube with a 2 mmx2 mm anode size and an 18.1 mmx18.1 mm effective area. We obtained the flood image with an Anger-type calculation. DOI layers and 9×9 pixels were well distinguished in the obtained images. Preclinical PET scanners based on this detector design offer the prospect of high and uniform spatial resolution.

  13. Conceptual design of the early implementation of the NEutron Detector Array (NEDA) with AGATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüyük, Tayfun; Di Nitto, Antonio; Jaworski, Grzegorz; Gadea, Andrés; Javier Valiente-Dobón, José; Nyberg, Johan; Palacz, Marcin; Söderström, Pär-Anders; Jose Aliaga-Varea, Ramon; de Angelis, Giacomo; Ataç, Ayşe; Collado, Javier; Domingo-Pardo, Cesar; Egea, Francisco Javier; Erduran, Nizamettin; Ertürk, Sefa; de France, Gilles; Gadea, Rafael; González, Vicente; Herrero-Bosch, Vicente; Kaşkaş, Ayşe; Modamio, Victor; Moszynski, Marek; Sanchis, Enrique; Triossi, Andrea; Wadsworth, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The NEutron Detector Array (NEDA) project aims at the construction of a new high-efficiency compact neutron detector array to be coupled with large γ-ray arrays such as AGATA. The application of NEDA ranges from its use as selective neutron multiplicity filter for fusion-evaporation reaction to a large solid angle neutron tagging device. In the present work, possible configurations for the NEDA coupled with the Neutron Wall for the early implementation with AGATA has been simulated, using Monte Carlo techniques, in order to evaluate their performance figures. The goal of this early NEDA implementation is to improve, with respect to previous instruments, efficiency and capability to select multiplicity for fusion-evaporation reaction channels in which 1, 2 or 3 neutrons are emitted. Each NEDA detector unit has the shape of a regular hexagonal prism with a volume of about 3.23l and it is filled with the EJ301 liquid scintillator, that presents good neutron- γ discrimination properties. The simulations have been performed using a fusion-evaporation event generator that has been validated with a set of experimental data obtained in the 58Ni + 56Fe reaction measured with the Neutron Wall detector array.

  14. Conceptual design of the early implementation of the NEutron Detector Array (NEDA) with AGATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hueyuek, Tayfun; Gadea, Andres; Domingo-Pardo, Cesar [Universidad de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC, Paterna (Valencia) (Spain); Di Nitto, Antonio [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Napoli (Italy); Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Jaworski, Grzegorz; Javier Valiente-Dobon, Jose; De Angelis, Giacomo; Modamio, Victor; Triossi, Andrea [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy); Nyberg, Johan [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala (Sweden); Palacz, Marcin [University of Warsaw, Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw (Poland); Soederstroem, Paer-Anders [RIKEN Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan); Aliaga-Varea, Ramon Jose [Universidad de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC, Paterna (Valencia) (Spain); Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, I3M, Valencia (Spain); Atac, Ayse [Ankara University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara (Turkey); The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Collado, Javier; Egea, Francisco Javier; Gonzalez, Vicente; Sanchis, Enrique [University of Valencia, Department of Electronic Engineering, Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain); Erduran, Nizamettin [Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University, Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Istanbul (Turkey); Ertuerk, Sefa [University of Nigde, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Arts, Nigde (Turkey); France, Gilles de [CNRS/IN2P3, GANIL, CEA/DSAM, Caen (France); Gadea, Rafael; Herrero-Bosch, Vicente [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, I3M, Valencia (Spain); Kaskas, Ayse [Ankara University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara (Turkey); Moszynski, Marek [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Wadsworth, Robert [University of York, Department of Physics, York (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    The NEutron Detector Array (NEDA) project aims at the construction of a new high-efficiency compact neutron detector array to be coupled with large γ -ray arrays such as AGATA. The application of NEDA ranges from its use as selective neutron multiplicity filter for fusion-evaporation reaction to a large solid angle neutron tagging device. In the present work, possible configurations for the NEDA coupled with the Neutron Wall for the early implementation with AGATA has been simulated, using Monte Carlo techniques, in order to evaluate their performance figures. The goal of this early NEDA implementation is to improve, with respect to previous instruments, efficiency and capability to select multiplicity for fusion-evaporation reaction channels in which 1, 2 or 3 neutrons are emitted. Each NEDA detector unit has the shape of a regular hexagonal prism with a volume of about 3.23l and it is filled with the EJ301 liquid scintillator, that presents good neutron- γ discrimination properties. The simulations have been performed using a fusion-evaporation event generator that has been validated with a set of experimental data obtained in the {sup 58}Ni + {sup 56}Fe reaction measured with the Neutron Wall detector array. (orig.)

  15. Design and study of a coplanar grid array CdZnTe detector for improved spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Yuedong; Xiao, Shali; Yang, Guoqiang; Zhang, Liuqiang

    2014-01-01

    Coplanar grid (CPG) CdZnTe detectors have been used as gamma-ray spectrometers for years. Comparing with pixelated CdZnTe detectors, CPG CdZnTe detectors have either no or poor spatial resolution, which directly limits its use in imaging applications. To address the issue, a 2×2 CPG array CdZnTe detector with dimensions of 7×7×5 mm 3 was fabricated. Each of the CPG pairs in the detector was moderately shrunk in size and precisely designed to improve the spatial resolution while maintaining good energy resolution, considering the charge loss at the surface between the strips of each CPG pairs. Preliminary measurements were demonstrated at an energy resolution of 2.7–3.9% for the four CPG pairs using 662 keV gamma rays and with a spatial resolution of 3.3 mm, which is the best spatial resolution ever achieved for CPG CdZnTe detectors. The results reveal that the CPG CdZnTe detector can also be applied to imaging applications at a substantially higher spatial resolution. - Highlights: • A novel structure of coplanar grid CdZnTe detector was designed to evaluate the possibility of applying the detector to gamma-ray imaging applications. • The best spatial resolution of coplanar grid CdZnTe detectors ever reported has been achieved, along with good spectroscopic performance. • Depth correction of the energy spectra using a new algorithm is presented

  16. Scintillator detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cusano, D.A.; Dibianca, F.A.

    1981-01-01

    This patent application relates to a scintillator detector array for use in computerized tomography and comprises a housing including a plurality of chambers, the said housing having a front wall transmissive to x-rays and side walls opaque to x-rays, such as of tungsten and tantalum, a liquid scintillation medium including a soluble fluor, the solvent for the fluor being disposed in the chambers. The solvent comprises either an intrinsically high Z solvent or a solvent which has dissolved therein a high Z compound e.g. iodo or bromonaphthalene; or toluene, xylene or trimethylbenzene with a lead or tin alkyl dissolved therein. Also disposed about the chambers are a plurality of photoelectric devices. (author)

  17. The Design, Implementation, and Performance of the Astro-H SXS Calorimeter Array and Anti-Coincidence Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Adams, Joseph S.; Brekosky, Regis P.; Chiao, Meng P.; Chervenak, James A.; Eckart, Megan E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Galeazzi, Masimilliano; Grein, Christoph; Jhabvala, Christine A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The calorimeter array of the JAXA Astro-H (renamed Hitomi) Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) was designed to provide unprecedented spectral resolution of spatially extended cosmic x-ray sources and of all cosmic x-ray sources in the Fe-K band around 6 keV, enabling essential plasma diagnostics. The SXS has a square array of 36 microcalorimeters at the focal plane. These calorimeters consist of ion-implanted silicon thermistors and HgTe thermalizing x-ray absorbers. These devices have demonstrated a resolution of better than 4.5 eV at 6 keV when operated at a heat-sink temperature of 50 mK. We will discuss the basic physical parameters of this array, including the array layout, thermal conductance of the link to the heat sink, resistance function, absorber details, and means of attaching the absorber to the thermistor-bearing element. We will also present the thermal characterization of the whole array, including thermal conductance and crosstalk measurements and the results of pulsing the frame temperature via alpha particles, heat pulses, and the environmental background. A silicon ionization detector is located behind the calorimeter array and serves to reject events due to cosmic rays. We will briefly describe this anti-coincidence detector and its performance.

  18. The FPGA Pixel Array Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hromalik, Marianne S.; Green, Katherine S.; Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Gruner, Sol M.

    2013-01-01

    A proposed design for a reconfigurable x-ray Pixel Array Detector (PAD) is described. It operates by integrating a high-end commercial field programmable gate array (FPGA) into a 3-layer device along with a high-resistivity diode detection layer and a custom, application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) layer. The ASIC layer contains an energy-discriminating photon-counting front end with photon hits streamed directly to the FPGA via a massively parallel, high-speed data connection. FPGA resources can be allocated to perform user defined tasks on the pixel data streams, including the implementation of a direct time autocorrelation function (ACF) with time resolution down to 100 ns. Using the FPGA at the front end to calculate the ACF reduces the required data transfer rate by several orders of magnitude when compared to a fast framing detector. The FPGA-ASIC high-speed interface, as well as the in-FPGA implementation of a real-time ACF for x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy experiments has been designed and simulated. A 16×16 pixel prototype of the ASIC has been fabricated and is being tested. -- Highlights: ► We describe the novelty and need for the FPGA Pixel Array Detector. ► We describe the specifications and design of the Diode, ASIC and FPGA layers. ► We highlight the Autocorrelation Function (ACF) for speckle as an example application. ► Simulated FPGA output calculates the ACF for different input bitstreams to 100 ns. ► Reduced data transfer rate by 640× and sped up real-time ACF by 100× other methods.

  19. Design of a linear detector array unit for high energy x-ray helical computed tomography and linear scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Tae; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Gi Yoon [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Geun [Medical Imaging Department, ASTEL Inc., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Park, Shin Woong; Yi, Yun [Dept. of Electronics and Information Eng, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Duk [Research Center, Luvantix ADM Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    A linear detector array unit (LdAu) was proposed and designed for the high energy X-ray 2-d and 3-d imaging systems for industrial non-destructive test. Specially for 3-d imaging, a helical CT with a 15 MeV linear accelerator and a curved detector is proposed. the arc-shape detector can be formed by many LdAus all of which are arranged to face the focal spot when the source-to-detector distance is fixed depending on the application. An LdAu is composed of 10 modules and each module has 48 channels of CdWO{sub 4} (CWO) blocks and Si PIn photodiodes with 0.4 mm pitch. this modular design was made for easy manufacturing and maintenance. through the Monte carlo simulation, the CWO detector thickness of 17 mm was optimally determined. the silicon PIn photodiodes were designed as 48 channel arrays and fabricated with NTD (neutron transmutation doping) wafers of high resistivity and showed excellent leakage current properties below 1 nA at 10 V reverse bias. to minimize the low-voltage breakdown, the edges of the active layer and the guard ring were designed as a curved shape. the data acquisition system was also designed and fabricated as three independent functional boards; a sensor board, a capture board and a communication board to a Pc. this paper describes the design of the detectors (CWO blocks and Si PIn photodiodes) and the 3-board data acquisition system with their simulation results.

  20. Array Detector Modules for Spent Fuel Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey

    2018-05-07

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) proposes to evaluate the arrays of position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid (VFG) detectors for passive gamma-ray emission tomography (ET) to verify the spent fuel in storage casks before storing them in geo-repositories. Our primary objective is to conduct a preliminary analysis of the arrays capabilities and to perform field measurements to validate the effectiveness of the proposed array modules. The outcome of this proposal will consist of baseline designs for the future ET system which can ultimately be used together with neutrons detectors. This will demonstrate the usage of this technology in spent fuel storage casks.

  1. Modeling Charge Collection in Detector Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardage, Donna (Technical Monitor); Pickel, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    A detector array charge collection model has been developed for use as an engineering tool to aid in the design of optical sensor missions for operation in the space radiation environment. This model is an enhancement of the prototype array charge collection model that was developed for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) program. The primary enhancements were accounting for drift-assisted diffusion by Monte Carlo modeling techniques and implementing the modeling approaches in a windows-based code. The modeling is concerned with integrated charge collection within discrete pixels in the focal plane array (FPA), with high fidelity spatial resolution. It is applicable to all detector geometries including monolithc charge coupled devices (CCDs), Active Pixel Sensors (APS) and hybrid FPA geometries based on a detector array bump-bonded to a readout integrated circuit (ROIC).

  2. X-ray detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The object of the invention (an ionization chamber X-ray detector array for use with high speed computerised tomographic imaging apparatus) is to reduce the time required to produce a tomographic image. The detector array described determines the distribution of X-ray intensities in one or more flat, coplanar X-ray beams. It comprises three flat anode sheets parallel to the X-ray beam, a plurality of rod-like cathodes between the anodes, a detector gas between the electrodes and a means for applying a potential between the electrodes. Each of the X-ray sources is collimated to give a narrow, planar section of X-ray photons. Sets of X-ray sources in the array are pulsed simultaneously to obtain X-ray transmission data for tomographic image reconstruction. (U.K.)

  3. Array of germanium detectors for nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, C.E.; Bernard, W.; Dowdy, E.J.; Garcia, C.; Lucas, M.C.; Pratt, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Our gamma-ray spectrometer system, designed for field use, offers high efficiency and high resolution for safeguards applications. The system consists of three 40% high-purity germanium detectors and a LeCroy 3500 data-acquisition system that calculates a composite spectrum for the three detectors. The LeCroy 3500 mainframe can be operated remotely from the detector array with control exercised through moderns and the telephone system. System performance with a mixed source of 125 Sb, 154 Eu, and 155 Eu confirms the expected efficiency of 120% with an overall resolution that is between the resolution of the best detector and that of the worst

  4. The Argonne silicon strip-detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuosmaa, A H; Back, B B; Betts, R R; Freer, M; Gehring, J; Glagola, B G; Happ, Th; Henderson, D J; Wilt, P [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bearden, I G [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-08-01

    Many nuclear physics experiments require the ability to analyze events in which large numbers of charged particles are detected and identified simultaneously, with good resolution and high efficiency, either alone, or in coincidence with gamma rays. The authors have constructed a compact large-area detector array to measure these processes efficiently and with excellent energy resolution. The array consists of four double-sided silicon strip detectors, each 5x5 cm{sup 2} in area, with front and back sides divided into 16 strips. To exploit the capability of the device fully, a system to read each strip-detector segment has been designed and constructed, based around a custom-built multi-channel preamplifier. The remainder of the system consists of high-density CAMAC modules, including multi-channel discriminators, charge-sensing analog-to-digital converters, and time-to-digital converters. The array`s performance has been evaluated using alpha-particle sources, and in a number of experiments conducted at Argonne and elsewhere. Energy resolutions of {Delta}E {approx} 20-30 keV have been observed for 5 to 8 MeV alpha particles, as well as time resolutions {Delta}T {<=} 500 ps. 4 figs.

  5. AIGO: a southern hemisphere detector for the worldwide array of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga, P; Blair, D G; Coward, D; Davidson, J; Dumas, J-C; Howell, E; Ju, L; Wen, L; Zhao, C [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); McClelland, D E; Scott, S M; Slagmolen, B J J; Inta, R [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Munch, J; Ottaway, D J; Veitch, P; Hosken, D [Department of Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Melatos, A; Chung, C; Sammut, L, E-mail: pbarriga@cyllene.uwa.edu.a [School of Physics University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic 3010 (Australia)

    2010-04-21

    This paper describes the proposed AIGO detector for the worldwide array of interferometric gravitational wave detectors. The first part of the paper summarizes the benefits that AIGO provides to the worldwide array of detectors. The second part gives a technical description of the detector, which will follow closely the Advanced LIGO design. Possible technical variations in the design are discussed.

  6. AIGO: a southern hemisphere detector for the worldwide array of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Barriga, P.; Blair, D.; Coward, D.; Davidson, J.; Dumas, J.; Howell, E.; Ju, L.; Wen, L.; Zhao, C.; McClelland, D.; Scott, S.; Slagmolen, B.; Inta, R.; Munch, J.; Ottaway, D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the proposed AIGO detector for the worldwide array of interferometric gravitational wave detectors. The first part of the paper summarizes the benefits that AIGO provides to the worldwide array of detectors. The second part gives a technical description of the detector, which will follow closely the Advanced LIGO design. Possible technical variations in the design are discussed.

  7. Detector Mount Design for IGRINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Sok Oh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS is a near-infrared wide-band high-resolution spectrograph jointly developed by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute and the University of Texas at Austin. IGRINS employs three HAWAII-2RG Focal Plane Array (H2RG FPA detectors. We present the design and fabrication of the detector mount for the H2RG detector. The detector mount consists of a detector housing, an ASIC housing, a Field Flattener Lens (FFL mount, and a support base frame. The detector and the ASIC housing should be kept at 65 K and the support base frame at 130 K. Therefore they are thermally isolated by the support made of GFRP material. The detector mount is designed so that it has features of fine adjusting the position of the detector surface in the optical axis and of fine adjusting yaw and pitch angles in order to utilize as an optical system alignment compensator. We optimized the structural stability and thermal characteristics of the mount design using computer-aided 3D modeling and finite element analysis. Based on the structural and thermal analysis, the designed detector mount meets an optical stability tolerance and system thermal requirements. Actual detector mount fabricated based on the design has been installed into the IGRINS cryostat and successfully passed a vacuum test and a cold test.

  8. The hyperion particle-γ detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.O.; Burke, J.T.; Casperson, R.J.; Ota, S. [Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Fisher, S.; Parker, J. [Science, Technology and Engineering Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Beausang, C.W. [Department of Physics, University of Richmond, 28 Westhampton Way, Richmond, VA 23173 (United States); Dag, M. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Humby, P. [Department of Physics, University of Richmond, 28 Westhampton Way, Richmond, VA 23173 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Surrey GU27XH (United Kingdom); Koglin, J. [Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); McCleskey, E.; McIntosh, A.B.; Saastamoinen, A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Tamashiro, A.S. [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Wilson, E. [Department of Physics, University of Richmond, 28 Westhampton Way, Richmond, VA 23173 (United States); Wu, T.C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City UT 84112-0830 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Hyperion is a new high-efficiency charged-particle γ-ray detector array which consists of a segmented silicon telescope for charged-particle detection and up to fourteen high-purity germanium clover detectors for the detection of coincident γ rays. The array will be used in nuclear physics measurements and Stockpile Stewardship studies and replaces the STARLiTeR array. This article discusses the features of the array and presents data collected with the array in the commissioning experiment.

  9. Modeling an array of encapsulated germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kshetri, R

    2012-01-01

    A probability model has been presented for understanding the operation of an array of encapsulated germanium detectors generally known as composite detector. The addback mode of operation of a composite detector has been described considering the absorption and scattering of γ-rays. Considering up to triple detector hit events, we have obtained expressions for peak-to-total and peak-to-background ratios of the cluster detector, which consists of seven hexagonal closely packed encapsulated HPGe detectors. Results have been obtained for the miniball detectors comprising of three and four seven hexagonal closely packed encapsulated HPGe detectors. The formalism has been extended to the SPI spectrometer which is a telescope of the INTEGRAL satellite and consists of nineteen hexagonal closely packed encapsulated HPGe detectors. This spectrometer comprises of twelve detector modules surrounding the cluster detector. For comparison, we have considered a spectrometer comprising of nine detector modules surrounding the three detector configuration of miniball detector. In the present formalism, the operation of these sophisticated detectors could be described in terms of six probability amplitudes only. Using experimental data on relative efficiency and fold distribution of cluster detector as input, the fold distribution and the peak-to-total, peak-to-background ratios have been calculated for the SPI spectrometer and other composite detectors at 1332 keV. Remarkable agreement between experimental data and results from the present formalism has been observed for the SPI spectrometer.

  10. Advanced ACTPol Cryogenic Detector Arrays and Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S. W.; Allison, R.; Austermann, J.; Baildon, T.; Battaglia, N.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; De Bernardis, F.; Bond, J. R.; Calabrese, E.; Choi, S. K.; Coughlin, K. P.; Crowley, K. T.; Datta, R.; Devlin, M. J.; Duff, S. M.; Dunkley, J.; Dünner, R.; van Engelen, A.; Gallardo, P. A.; Grace, E.; Hasselfield, M.; Hills, F.; Hilton, G. C.; Hincks, A. D.; Hloẑek, R.; Ho, S. P.; Hubmayr, J.; Huffenberger, K.; Hughes, J. P.; Irwin, K. D.; Koopman, B. J.; Kosowsky, A. B.; Li, D.; McMahon, J.; Munson, C.; Nati, F.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Niraula, P.; Page, L. A.; Pappas, C. G.; Salatino, M.; Schillaci, A.; Schmitt, B. L.; Sehgal, N.; Sherwin, B. D.; Sievers, J. L.; Simon, S. M.; Spergel, D. N.; Staggs, S. T.; Stevens, J. R.; Thornton, R.; Van Lanen, J.; Vavagiakis, E. M.; Ward, J. T.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Advanced ACTPol is a polarization-sensitive upgrade for the 6 m aperture Atacama Cosmology Telescope, adding new frequencies and increasing sensitivity over the previous ACTPol receiver. In 2016, Advanced ACTPol will begin to map approximately half the sky in five frequency bands (28-230 GHz). Its maps of primary and secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies—imaged in intensity and polarization at few arcminute-scale resolution—will enable precision cosmological constraints and also a wide array of cross-correlation science that probes the expansion history of the universe and the growth of structure via gravitational collapse. To accomplish these scientific goals, the Advanced ACTPol receiver will be a significant upgrade to the ACTPol receiver, including four new multichroic arrays of cryogenic, feedhorn-coupled AlMn transition edge sensor polarimeters (fabricated on 150 mm diameter wafers); a system of continuously rotating meta-material silicon half-wave plates; and a new multiplexing readout architecture which uses superconducting quantum interference devices and time division to achieve a 64-row multiplexing factor. Here we present the status and scientific goals of the Advanced ACTPol instrument, emphasizing the design and implementation of the Advanced ACTPol cryogenic detector arrays.

  11. Image scanning microscopy using a SPAD detector array (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, Marco; Tortarolo, Giorgio; Buttafava, Mauro; Tosi, Alberto; Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Diaspro, Alberto; Vicidomini, Giuseppe

    2017-02-01

    The use of an array of detectors can help overcoming the traditional limitation of confocal microscopy: the compromise between signal and theoretical resolution. Each element independently records a view of the sample and the final image can be reconstructed by pixel reassignment or by inverse filtering (e.g. deconvolution). In this work, we used a SPAD array of 25 detectors specifically designed for this goal and our scanning microscopy control system (Carma) to acquire the partial images and to perform online image processing. Further work will be devoted to optimize the image reconstruction step and to improve the fill-factor of the detector.

  12. Standard guide for digital detector array radiology

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This standard is a user guide, which is intended to serve as a tutorial for selection and use of various digital detector array systems nominally composed of the detector array and an imaging system to perform digital radiography. This guide also serves as an in-detail reference for the following standards: Practices E2597, , and E2737. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. Technique investigation on large area neutron scintillation detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jiabin

    2006-12-01

    The detailed project for developing Large Area Neutron Scintillation Detector Array (LaNSA) to be used for measuring fusion fuel area density on Shenguang III prototype is presented, including experimental principle, detector working principle, electronics system design and the needs for target chamber etc. The detailed parameters for parts are given and the main causes affecting the system function are analyzed. The realization path is introduced. (authors)

  14. Encapsulated thermopile detector array for IR microspectrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, H.; Emadi, A.; De Graaf, G.; Wolffenbuttel, R.F.

    2010-01-01

    The miniaturized IR spectrometer discussed in this paper is comprised of: slit, planar imaging diffraction grating and Thermo-Electric (TE) detector array, which is fabricated using CMOS compatible MEMS technology. The resolving power is maximized by spacing the TE elements at an as narrow as

  15. Status of the digital pixel array detector for protein crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Datte, P; Beuville, E; Endres, N; Druillole, F; Luo, L; Millaud, J E; Xuong, N H

    1999-01-01

    A two-dimensional photon counting digital pixel array detector is being designed for static and time resolved protein crystallography. The room temperature detector will significantly enhance monochromatic and polychromatic protein crystallographic through-put data rates by more than three orders of magnitude. The detector has an almost infinite photon counting dynamic range and exhibits superior spatial resolution when compared to present crystallographic phosphor imaging plates or phosphor coupled CCD detectors. The detector is a high resistivity N-type Si with a pixel pitch of 150x150 mu m, and a thickness of 300 mu m, and is bump bonded to an application specific integrated circuit. The event driven readout of the detector is based on the column architecture and allows an independent pixel hit rate above 1 million photons/s/pixel. The device provides energy discrimination and sparse data readout which yields minimal dead-time. This type of architecture allows a continuous (frameless) data acquisition, a f...

  16. Performance of a thermal imager employing a hybrid pyroelectric detector array with MOSFET readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watton, R.; Mansi, M.V.

    1988-01-01

    A thermal imager employing a two-dimensional hybrid array of pyroelectric detectors with MOSFET readout has been built. The design and theoretical performance of the detector are discussed, and the results of performance measurements are presented. 8 references

  17. Detector simulation needs for detector designers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.G.

    1987-11-01

    Computer simulation of the components of SSC detectors and of the complete detectors will be very important for the designs of the detectors. The ratio of events from interesting physics to events from background processes is very low, so detailed understanding of detector response to the backgrounds is needed. Any large detector for the SSC will be very complex and expensive and every effort must be made to design detectors which will have excellent performance and will not have to undergo major rebuilding. Some areas in which computer simulation is particularly needed are pattern recognition in tracking detectors and development of shower simulation code which can be trusted as an aid in the design and optimization of calorimeters, including their electron identification performance. Existing codes require too much computer time to be practical and need to be compared with test beam data at energies of several hundred GeV. Computer simulation of the processing of the data, including electronics response to the signals from the detector components, processing of the data by microprocessors on the detector, the trigger, and data acquisition will be required. In this report we discuss the detector simulation needs for detector designers

  18. Improved linear pyroelectric IR detector arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twiney, R.C.; Robinson, M.K.; Porter, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    Good agreement has been found between theoretical models and measured performance for a range of array geometries. A 64-element 80 x 140-micron element array with integral MOSFET IC buffer preamplifiers shows improved source voltage uniformity, a J-FET buffered array, and low-frequency specific detectivity (SD) of 1.7 x 10 to the 8th cm sq rt Hz/W at 40 Hz. The MOSFET array shows reduced degradation of SD at high temperatures, retaining an SD of not less than 1 x 10 to the 8th cm sq rt Hz/W at +70 C across much of the band. A 64-element array has been designed using onboard multiplexers, thus greatly reducing the connections needed to run the array

  19. Design and fabrication of 4π Clover Detector Array Assembly for gamma-spectroscopy studies using thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Manish; Kamble, S.R.; Chaudhari, A.T.; Sabharwal, T.P.; Pathak, Kavindra; Prasad, N.K.; Kinage, L.A.; Biswas, D.C.; Bhagwat, P.V.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear spectroscopy has been studied earlier from the measurement of prompt gamma rays produced in reactions with thermal neutrons from CIRUS reactor. For studying the prompt γ-spectroscopy using thermal neutrons from Dhruva Reactor, BARC, the development of a dedicated beam line (R-3001) is in progress. In this beam line a detector assembly consisting of Clover Ge detectors will be used. This experimental setup will be utilized to investigate nuclear structure using prompt (n,γ) reactions and also to study the spectroscopy of neutron-rich fission-fragment nuclei

  20. Muon Detector R&D in Telescope Array Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, T.; Takamura, M.; Honda, K.; Matthews, J. N.; Ogio, S.; Sakurai, N.; Sagawa, H.; Stokes, B. T.; Tsujimoto, M.; Yashiro, K.

    The Telescope Array (TA) experiment, located in the western desert of Utah, U.S.A., at 39.38° north and 112.9° west, is collecting data of ultra high energy cosmic rays in the energy range 1018-1020 eV. The experiment has a Surface Detector (SD) array surrounded by three Fluorescence Detector (FD) stations to enable simultaneous detection of shower particles and fluorescence photons generated by the extensive air shower. Measurement of shower particles at the ground level, with different absorber thickness, enables a more detailed studies of the experiment's energy scale and of hadron interaction models. In this report, we present a design and the first observation result of a surface muon detector using lead plates and concrete as absorbers.

  1. The detector calibration system for the CUORE cryogenic bolometer array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, Jeremy S., E-mail: jeremy.cushman@yale.edu [Wright Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Dally, Adam [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Davis, Christopher J. [Wright Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Ejzak, Larissa; Lenz, Daniel [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Lim, Kyungeun E. [Wright Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Heeger, Karsten M., E-mail: karsten.heeger@yale.edu [Wright Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Maruyama, Reina H. [Wright Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Nucciotti, Angelo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano I-20126 (Italy); INFN – Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milano I-20126 (Italy); Sangiorgio, Samuele [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Wise, Thomas [Wright Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is a ton-scale cryogenic experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of {sup 130}Te and other rare events. The CUORE detector consists of 988 TeO{sub 2} bolometers operated underground at 10 mK in a dilution refrigerator at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. Candidate events are identified through a precise measurement of their energy. The absolute energy response of the detectors is established by the regular calibration of each individual bolometer using gamma sources. The close-packed configuration of the CUORE bolometer array combined with the extensive shielding surrounding the detectors requires the placement of calibration sources within the array itself. The CUORE Detector Calibration System is designed to insert radioactive sources into and remove them from the cryostat while respecting the stringent heat load, radiopurity, and operational requirements of the experiment. This paper describes the design, commissioning, and performance of this novel source calibration deployment system for ultra-low-temperature environments.

  2. The NSLS 100 element solid state array detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furenlid, L.R.; Beren, J.; Kraner, H.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Stephani, D.; Beuttenmuller, R.H.; Cramer, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    X-ray absorption studies of dilute samples require fluorescence detection techniques. Since signal-to-noise ratios are governed by the ratio of fluorescent to scattered photons counted by a detector, solid state detectors which can discriminate between fluorescence and scattered photons have become the instruments of choice for trace element measurements. Commercially available 13 element Ge array detectors permitting total count rates < 500 000 counts per second are now in routine use. Since X-ray absorption beamlines at high brightness synchrotron sources can already illuminate most dilute samples with enough flux to saturate the current generation of solid state detectors, the development of next-generation instruments with significantly higher total count rates is essential. We present the design and current status of the 100 elements Si array detector being developed in a collaboration between the NSLS and the Instrumentation Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The detecting array consists of a 10 x 10 matrix of 4 mm x 4 mm elements laid out on a single piece of ultrahigh purity silicon mounted at the front end of a liquid nitrogen dewar assembly. A matrix of charge sensitive integrating preamplifiers feed signals to an array of shaping amplifiers, single channel analyzers, and scalers. An electronic switch, delay amplifier, linear gate, digital scope, peak sensing A/D converter, and histogramming memory module provide for complete diagnostics and channel calibration. The entrie instrument is controlled by a LabView 2 application on a MacII ci; the software also provides full control over beamline hardware and performs the data collection. (orig.)

  3. Solid state detector design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunarwan Prayitno; Ahmad Rifai

    2010-01-01

    Much has been charged particle detector radiation detector made by the industry, especially those engaged in the development of detection equipment and components. The development and further research will be made solid state detector with silicon material. To be able to detect charged particles (radiation), required the processing of silicon material into the detector material. The method used to make silicon detector material is a lithium evaporations. Having formed an intrinsic region contactor installation process, and with testing. (author)

  4. Low dark current InGaAs detector arrays for night vision and astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougal, Michael; Geske, Jon; Wang, Chad; Liao, Shirong; Getty, Jonathan; Holmes, Alan

    2009-05-01

    Aerius Photonics has developed large InGaAs arrays (1K x 1K and greater) with low dark currents for use in night vision applications in the SWIR regime. Aerius will present results of experiments to reduce the dark current density of their InGaAs detector arrays. By varying device designs and passivations, Aerius has achieved a dark current density below 1.0 nA/cm2 at 280K on small-pixel, detector arrays. Data is shown for both test structures and focal plane arrays. In addition, data from cryogenically cooled InGaAs arrays will be shown for astronomy applications.

  5. New submillimeter detectors and antenna arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, H.R.; Reible, S.A.; Sollner, G.; Parker, C.D.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary investigation has been made into the use of SIS (superconductor--insulator--superconductor) diodes for possible roles in sub-millimeter imaging systems. That is, extremely low noise, millimeter wave detectors and mixers have recently been reported which depend on single-particle tunnelling between two superconducting films separated by a thin oxide layer. The combination of excellent low-frequency sensitivity and well-developed fabrication technology make the SIS mixers particularly attractive for the systems using antenna structures and arrays in millimeter and submillimeter regions. The SIS diodes of Nb-Nb 2 O 5 -Pb showed a strong video response to the radiation which could be differentiated from the regular Josephson effect since it was not affected by a magnetic field. In exploring the three-terminal devices for possible detector and source applications in submillimeter region, the authors first determined that millimeter and submillimeter radiation could be effectively coupled to and detected in high-frequency FETs. Video response was readily obtained at 800 GHz, and carcinotron radiation at 350 GHz was mixed with the 5th harmonic of a 70 GHz klystron, producing over 45 db signal-to-noise ratio in the intermediate frequency. Since FET can function as a three-terminal oscillator simultaneously detecting submillimeter radiation or optical beats, it has interesting possibility, such as self-oscillating mixers or subharmonic local oscillators. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  6. Data acquisition for experiments with multi-detector arrays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Experiments with multi-detector arrays have special requirements and place higher demands on computer data acquisition systems. In this contribution we discuss data acquisition systems with special emphasis on multi-detector arrays and in particular we describe a new data acquisition system, AMPS which we have ...

  7. Low-energy CZT detector array for the ASIM mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cenkeramaddi, Linga Reddy; Genov, Georgi; Kohfeldt, Anja

    2012-01-01

    In this article we introduce the low-energy CZT (CdZnTe) 16 384-pixel detector array on-board the Atmosphere Space Interaction Monitor (ASIM), funded by the European Space Agency. This detector is a part of the larger Modular X-and Gamma-ray sensor (MXGS). The CZT detector array is sensitive...... to photons with energies between 15 keV and 400 keV. The principal objective of the MXGS instrument is to detect Terrestrial Gamma ray Flashes (TGFs), which are related to thunderstorm activity. The concept of the detector array is presented, together with brief descriptions of its mechanical structure...

  8. Development and Production of Array Barrier Detectors at SCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipstein, P. C.; Avnon, E.; Benny, Y.; Berkowicz, E.; Cohen, Y.; Dobromislin, R.; Fraenkel, R.; Gershon, G.; Glozman, A.; Hojman, E.; Ilan, E.; Karni, Y.; Klin, O.; Kodriano, Y.; Krasovitsky, L.; Langof, L.; Lukomsky, I.; Nevo, I.; Nitzani, M.; Pivnik, I.; Rappaport, N.; Rosenberg, O.; Shtrichman, I.; Shkedy, L.; Snapi, N.; Talmor, R.; Tessler, R.; Weiss, E.; Tuito, A.

    2017-09-01

    XB n or XB p barrier detectors exhibit diffusion-limited dark currents comparable with mercury cadmium telluride Rule-07 and high quantum efficiencies. In 2011, SemiConductor Devices (SCD) introduced "HOT Pelican D", a 640 × 512/15- μm pitch InAsSb/AlSbAs XB n mid-wave infrared (MWIR) detector with a 4.2- μm cut-off and an operating temperature of ˜150 K. Its low power (˜3 W), high pixel operability (>99.5%) and long mean time to failure make HOT Pelican D a highly reliable integrated detector-cooler product with a low size, weight and power. More recently, "HOT Hercules" was launched with a 1280 × 1024/15- μm format and similar advantages. A 3-megapixel, 10- μm pitch version ("HOT Blackbird") is currently completing development. For long-wave infrared applications, SCD's 640 × 512/15- μm pitch "Pelican-D LW" XB p type II superlattice (T2SL) detector has a ˜9.3- μm cut-off wavelength. The detector contains InAs/GaSb and InAs/AlSb T2SLs, and is fabricated into focal plane array (FPA) detectors using standard production processes including hybridization to a digital silicon read-out integrated circuit (ROIC), glue underfill and substrate thinning. The ROIC has been designed so that the complete detector closely follows the interfaces of SCD's MWIR Pelican-D detector family. The Pelican-D LW FPA has a quantum efficiency of ˜50%, and operates at 77 K with a pixel operability of >99% and noise equivalent temperature difference of 13 mK at 30 Hz and F/2.7.

  9. Design and performance of modularized NaI(Tl) detectors with rectangular crystal elements: An array of 49 and the Crystal Box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, S.L.; Hofstadter, R.; Hughes, E.B.; Lin, Y.C.; Parks, R.; Rolfe, J.; Bolton, R.D.; Bowman, J.D.; Cooper, M.D.; Hoffman, C.M.; Hogan, G.E.; Mariam, F.G.; Mischke, R.E.; Nagle, D.E.; Piilonen, L.E.; Sandberg, V.D.; Sanders, G.H.; Werbeck, R.; Williams, R.A.; Frank, J.S.; Hallin, A.L.; Matis, H.S.; Sennhauser, U.; Wright, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    An array of 49 NaI(Tl) modules each 20 inch in depth and 2.5 inch x 2.5 inch in cross section has been constructed and its properties, especially energy resolution, explored for positrons in the range 20 MeV - 18 GeV. A subsequent much larger detector, the Crystal Box, has also been constructed from 396 modules of the same cross section, but mostly 12 inch in depth, and operated as a γ-ray and positron detector in a search for rare muon decays. The calibration procedure used for the Crystal Box and its characteristic resolutions in energy, impact point and time are described. (orig.)

  10. A cryogenic thermal source for detector array characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuss, David T.; Rostem, Karwan; Wollack, Edward J.; Berman, Leah; Colazo, Felipe; DeGeorge, Martin; Helson, Kyle; Sagliocca, Marco

    2017-10-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and validation of a cryogenically compatible quasioptical thermal source for characterization of detector arrays. The source is constructed using a graphite-loaded epoxy mixture that is molded into a tiled pyramidal structure. The mold is fabricated using a hardened steel template produced via a wire electron discharge machining process. The absorptive mixture is bonded to a copper backplate enabling thermalization of the entire structure and measurement of the source temperature. Measurements indicate that the reflectance of the source is <0.001 across a spectral band extending from 75 to 330 GHz.

  11. Fabrication of Detector Arrays for the SPT-3G Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada, C. M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Anderson, A. J.; Austermann, J. E.; Avva, J. S.; Thakur, R. Basu; Bender, A. N.; Benson, B. A.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Carter, F. W.; Cecil, T.; Chang, C. L.; Cliche, J. F.; Cukierman, A.; Denison, E. V.; de Haan, T.; Ding, J.; Divan, R.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dutcher, D.; Everett, W.; Foster, A.; Gannon, R. N.; Gilbert, A.; Groh, J. C.; Halverson, N. W.; Harke-Hosemann, A. H.; Harrington, N. L.; Henning, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Huang, N.; Irwin, K. D.; Jeong, O. B.; Jonas, M.; Khaire, T.; Kofman, A. M.; Korman, M.; Kubik, D.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuo, C. L.; Lee, A. T.; Lowitz, A. E.; Meyer, S. S.; Michalik, D.; Miller, C. S.; Montgomery, J.; Nadolski, A.; Natoli, T.; Nguyen, H.; Noble, G. I.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Pan, Z.; Pearson, J.; Rahlin, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saunders, L. J.; Sayre, J. T.; Shirley, I.; Shirokoff, E.; Smecher, G.; Sobrin, J. A.; Stan, L.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suzuki, A.; Tang, Q. Y.; Thompson, K. L.; Tucker, C.; Vale, L. R.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, G.; Whitehorn, N.; Yefremenko, V.; Yoon, K. W.; Young, M. R.

    2018-05-01

    The South Pole Telescope third-generation (SPT-3G) receiver was installed during the austral summer of 2016-2017. It is designed to measure the cosmic microwave background across three frequency bands centered at 95, 150, and 220 GHz. The SPT-3G receiver has ten focal plane modules, each with 269 pixels. Each pixel features a broadband sinuous antenna coupled to a niobium microstrip transmission line. In-line filters define the desired band-passes before the signal is coupled to six bolometers with Ti/Au/Ti/Au transition edge sensors (three bands × two polarizations). In total, the SPT-3G receiver is composed of 16,000 detectors, which are read out using a 68× frequency-domain multiplexing scheme. In this paper, we present the process employed in fabricating the detector arrays.

  12. Recent upgrades and performance of the CACTUS detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, A.; Bergholt, L.; Guttormsen, M.

    1998-03-01

    The SCANDITRONIX MC-35 cyclotron laboratory, including the Oslo Cyclotron, has been in operation since 1980. The main auxiliary equipment consists of the multi-detector system CACTUS. During the last years, new, high efficiency Ge(HP) detectors were purchased and integrated in the CACTUS detector array. In this connection, the electronical setup was revised and altered. Several drawbacks of the old setup could be pointed out and eliminated. A test of the performance of all detector array elements was made with high accuracy. 27 refs

  13. Programmable Array Logic Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demon Handoyo; Djen Djen Djainal

    2007-01-01

    Good digital circuit design that part of a complex system, often becoming a separate problem. To produce finishing design according to wanted performance is often given on to considerations which each other confuse, hence thereby analyse optimization become important in this case. To realization is made design logic program, the first are determined global diagram block, then are decided contents of these block diagram, and then determined its interconnection in the form of logic expression, continued with election of component. These steps are done to be obtained the design with low price, easy in its interconnection, minimal volume, low power and certainty god work. (author)

  14. Design and implementation of an array of micro-electrochemical detectors for two-dimensional liquid chromatography--proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abia, Jude A; Putnam, Joel; Mriziq, Khaled; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-03-05

    Simultaneous two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC) is an implementation of two-dimensional liquid chromatography which has the potential to provide very fast, yet highly efficient separations. It is based on the use of time x space and space x space separation systems. The basic principle of this instrument has been validated long ago by the success of two-dimensional thin layer chromatography. The construction of a pressurized wide and flat column (100 mm x 100 mm x 1 mm) operated under an inlet pressure of up to 50 bar was described previously. However, to become a modern analytical method, simultaneous 2D-LC requires the development of detectors suitable for the monitoring of the composition of the eluent of this pressurized planar, wide column. An array of five equidistant micro-electrochemical sensors was built for this purpose and tested. Each sensor is a three-electrode system, with the working electrode being a 25 microm polished platinum micro-electrode. The auxiliary electrode is a thin platinum wire and the reference electrode an Ag/AgCl (3M sat. KCl) electrode. In this first implementation, proof of principle is demonstrated, but the final instrument will require a much larger array. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. MTF measurement and analysis of linear array HgCdTe infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tong; Lin, Chun; Chen, Honglei; Sun, Changhong; Lin, Jiamu; Wang, Xi

    2018-01-01

    The slanted-edge technique is the main method for measurement detectors MTF, however this method is commonly used on planar array detectors. In this paper the authors present a modified slanted-edge method to measure the MTF of linear array HgCdTe detectors. Crosstalk is one of the major factors that degrade the MTF value of such an infrared detector. This paper presents an ion implantation guard-ring structure which was designed to effectively absorb photo-carriers that may laterally defuse between adjacent pixels thereby suppressing crosstalk. Measurement and analysis of the MTF of the linear array detectors with and without a guard-ring were carried out. The experimental results indicated that the ion implantation guard-ring structure effectively suppresses crosstalk and increases MTF value.

  16. Infrared LED Array For Silicon Strip Detector Qualification

    CERN Document Server

    Dirkes, Guido; Hartmann, Frank; Heier, Stefan; Schwerdtfeger, Wolfgang; Waldschmitt, M; Weiler, K W; Weseler, Siegfried

    2003-01-01

    The enormous amount of silicon strip detector modules for the CMS tracker requires a test-sytem to allow qualification of each individual detector module and its front-end electronics within minutes. The objective is to test the detector with a physical signal. Signals are generated in the detector by illumination with lightpulses emitted by a LED at 950~nm and with a rise time of 10~ns. In order to avoid a detector moving, an array of 64 LEDs is used, overlaping the complete detector width. The total length of an array is 15~cm. The spot size of an individual LED is controlled by apertures to illuminate about 25 strips. Furthermore it is possible to simulate the high leakage current of irradiated sensors by constant illumination of the sensor. This provides an effective mean to identfy pinholes on a sensor.

  17. Gamma-spectrometry with Compton suppressed detectors arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueck, C.; Hannachi, F.; Chapman, R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent results of experiments performed with two different Compton-suppressed detectors arrays in Daresbury and Berkeley (/sup 163,164/Yb and 154 Er, respectively), are presented together with a brief description of the national French array presently under construction in Strasbourg. 25 refs., 15 figs

  18. Study on data acquisition circuit used in SSPA linear array detector X-ray detection

    CERN Document Server

    Wei Biao; Che Zhen Ping

    2002-01-01

    After SSPA used as X-ray array detector is developed, the authors take a research on the data acquisition circuit applied to the detector. The experiment designed has verified the feasibility of application of this array detector and its data acquisition circuit to X-ray computed tomography (X-CT). The preliminary test results indicate that the method of the X-ray detection is feasible for industry X-CT nondestructive testing, which brings about advantage for detecting and measuring with high resolution, good efficiency and low cost

  19. Silicon-CsI detector array for heavy-ion reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Norbeck, E; Pogodin, P I; Cheng, Y W; Ingram, F D; Bjarki, O; Grévy, S; Magestro, D J; Molen, A M V; Westfall, G D

    2000-01-01

    An array of 60 silicon-CsI(Tl) detector telescopes has been developed along with associated electronics. The close packing of the telescopes required novel designs for the photodiodes and the silicon DELTA E detectors. Newly developed electronics include preamplifiers, shaping amplifiers, test pulse circuitry, and a module to monitor leakage currents in the silicon diodes. The array covers angles from 5 deg. to 18 deg. in the 4 pi Array at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. It measures protons to 150 MeV and has isotopic resolution for intermediate mass nuclei.

  20. National Array of Neutron Detectors (NAND): A versatile tool for nuclear reaction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golda, K.S., E-mail: goldaks@gmail.com [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Jhingan, A.; Sugathan, P. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Singh, Hardev [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136119 (India); Singh, R.P. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Behera, B.R. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Mandal, S. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Delhi University, New Delhi 110007 (India); Kothari, A.; Gupta, Arti; Zacharias, J.; Archunan, M.; Barua, P.; Venkataramanan, S.; Bhowmik, R.K. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Govil, I.M. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Datta, S.K.; Chatterjee, M.B. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2014-11-01

    The first phase of the National Array of Neutron Detectors (NAND) consisting of 26 neutron detectors has been commissioned at the Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi. The motivation behind setting up of such a detector system is the need for more accurate and efficient study of reaction mechanisms in the projectile energy range of 5–8 MeV/n using heavy ion beams from a 15 UD Pelletron and an upgraded LINAC booster facility at IUAC. The above detector array can be used for inclusive as well as exclusive measurements of reaction products of which at least one product is a neutron. While inclusive measurements can be made using only the neutron detectors along with the time of flight technique and a pulsed beam, exclusive measurements can be performed by detecting neutrons in coincidence with charged particles and/or fission fragments detected with ancillary detectors. The array can also be used for neutron tagged gamma-ray spectroscopy in (HI, xn) reactions by detecting gamma-rays in coincidence with the neutrons in a compact geometrical configuration. The various features and the performance of the different aspects of the array are described in the present paper. -- Highlights: •We report the design, fabrication and installation of a 26 element modular neutron detection system (NAND). •The array has been designed for the fusion–fission studies at near and above the barrier energies. •The relevant characteristics of the array are studied exhaustively and reported. •The efficiency of the detectors are measured and compared with the monte carlo simulations. •The second phase of the array will be augmented with 80 more neutron detectors which will enable the system to measure the neutron multiplicity distribution.

  1. National Array of Neutron Detectors (NAND): A versatile tool for nuclear reaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golda, K.S.; Jhingan, A.; Sugathan, P.; Singh, Hardev; Singh, R.P.; Behera, B.R.; Mandal, S.; Kothari, A.; Gupta, Arti; Zacharias, J.; Archunan, M.; Barua, P.; Venkataramanan, S.; Bhowmik, R.K.; Govil, I.M.; Datta, S.K.; Chatterjee, M.B.

    2014-01-01

    The first phase of the National Array of Neutron Detectors (NAND) consisting of 26 neutron detectors has been commissioned at the Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi. The motivation behind setting up of such a detector system is the need for more accurate and efficient study of reaction mechanisms in the projectile energy range of 5–8 MeV/n using heavy ion beams from a 15 UD Pelletron and an upgraded LINAC booster facility at IUAC. The above detector array can be used for inclusive as well as exclusive measurements of reaction products of which at least one product is a neutron. While inclusive measurements can be made using only the neutron detectors along with the time of flight technique and a pulsed beam, exclusive measurements can be performed by detecting neutrons in coincidence with charged particles and/or fission fragments detected with ancillary detectors. The array can also be used for neutron tagged gamma-ray spectroscopy in (HI, xn) reactions by detecting gamma-rays in coincidence with the neutrons in a compact geometrical configuration. The various features and the performance of the different aspects of the array are described in the present paper. -- Highlights: •We report the design, fabrication and installation of a 26 element modular neutron detection system (NAND). •The array has been designed for the fusion–fission studies at near and above the barrier energies. •The relevant characteristics of the array are studied exhaustively and reported. •The efficiency of the detectors are measured and compared with the monte carlo simulations. •The second phase of the array will be augmented with 80 more neutron detectors which will enable the system to measure the neutron multiplicity distribution

  2. Integrated Miniature Arrays of Optical Biomolecule Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iltchenko, Vladimir; Maleki, Lute; Lin, Ying; Le, Thanh

    2009-01-01

    Integrated miniature planar arrays of optical sensors for detecting specific biochemicals in extremely small quantities have been proposed. An array of this type would have an area of about 1 cm2. Each element of the array would include an optical microresonator that would have a high value of the resonance quality factor (Q . 107). The surface of each microresonator would be derivatized to make it bind molecules of a species of interest, and such binding would introduce a measurable change in the optical properties of the microresonator. Because each microresonator could be derivatized for detection of a specific biochemical different from those of the other microresonators, it would be possible to detect multiple specific biochemicals by simultaneous or sequential interrogation of all the elements in the array. Moreover, the derivatization would make it unnecessary to prepare samples by chemical tagging. Such interrogation would be effected by means of a grid of row and column polymer-based optical waveguides that would be integral parts of a chip on which the array would be fabricated. The row and column polymer-based optical waveguides would intersect at the elements of the array (see figure). At each intersection, the row and column waveguides would be optically coupled to one of the microresonators. The polymer-based waveguides would be connected via optical fibers to external light sources and photodetectors. One set of waveguides and fibers (e.g., the row waveguides and fibers) would couple light from the sources to the resonators; the other set of waveguides and fibers (e.g., the column waveguides and fibers) would couple light from the microresonators to the photodetectors. Each microresonator could be addressed individually by row and column for measurement of its optical transmission. Optionally, the chip could be fabricated so that each microresonator would lie inside a microwell, into which a microscopic liquid sample could be dispensed.

  3. STAR PIXEL detector mechanical design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieman, H H; Anderssen, E; Greiner, L; Matis, H S; Ritter, H G; Sun, X; Szelezniak, M [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)], E-mail: hhwieman@lbl.gov

    2009-05-15

    A high resolution pixel detector is being designed for the STAR [1] experiment at RHIC. This device will use MAPS as the detector element and will have a pointing accuracy of {approx}25 microns. We will be reporting on the mechanical design required to support this resolution. The radiation length of the first layer ({approx}0.3% X{sub 0}) and its distance from the interaction point (2.5 cm) determines the resolution. The design makes use of air cooling and thin carbon composite structures to limit the radiation length. The mechanics are being developed to achieve spatial calibrations and stability to 20 microns and to permit rapid detector replacement in event of radiation damage or other potential failures from operation near the beam.

  4. Cryogenic and radiation-hard asic for interfacing large format NIR/SWIR detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Dupont, Benoit; Dierickx, Bart; Müller, Eric; Verbruggen, Geert; Gielis, Stijn; Valvekens, Ramses

    2017-11-01

    For scientific and earth observation space missions, weight and power consumption is usually a critical factor. In order to obtain better vehicle integration, efficiency and controllability for large format NIR/SWIR detector arrays, a prototype ASIC is designed. It performs multiple detector array interfacing, power regulation and data acquisition operations inside the cryogenic chambers. Both operation commands and imaging data are communicated via the SpaceWire interface which will significantly reduce the number of wire goes in and out the cryogenic chamber. This "ASIC" prototype is realized in 0.18um CMOS technology and is designed for radiation hardness.

  5. Conference on physics from large {gamma}-ray detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The conference on {open_quotes}Physics from Large {gamma}-ray Detector Arrays{close_quotes} is a continuation of the series of conferences that have been organized every two years by the North American Heavy-ion Laboratories. The aim of the conference this year was to encourage discussion of the physics that can be studied with such large arrays. This volume is the collected proceedings from this conference. It discusses properties of nuclear states which can be created in heavy-ion reactions, and which can be observed via such detector systems.

  6. Photoacoustic projection imaging using an all-optical detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Marschallinger, J.; Felbermayer, K.; Berer, T.

    2018-02-01

    We present a prototype for all-optical photoacoustic projection imaging. By generating projection images, photoacoustic information of large volumes can be retrieved with less effort compared to common photoacoustic computed tomography where many detectors and/or multiple measurements are required. In our approach, an array of 60 integrating line detectors is used to acquire photoacoustic waves. The line detector array consists of fiber-optic MachZehnder interferometers, distributed on a cylindrical surface. From the measured variation of the optical path lengths of the interferometers, induced by photoacoustic waves, a photoacoustic projection image can be reconstructed. The resulting images represent the projection of the three-dimensional spatial light absorbance within the imaged object onto a two-dimensional plane, perpendicular to the line detector array. The fiber-optic detectors achieve a noise-equivalent pressure of 24 Pascal at a 10 MHz bandwidth. We present the operational principle, the structure of the array, and resulting images. The system can acquire high-resolution projection images of large volumes within a short period of time. Imaging large volumes at high frame rates facilitates monitoring of dynamic processes.

  7. Assembly, characterization, and operation of large-scale TES detector arrays for ACTPol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Christine Goodwin

    2016-01-01

    The Polarization-sensitive Receiver for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACTPol) is designed to measure the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies on small angular scales. Measurements of the CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies have produced arguably the most important cosmological data to date, establishing the LambdaCDM model and providing the best constraints on most of its parameters. To detect the very small fluctuations in the CMB signal across the sky, ACTPol uses feedhorn-coupled Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) detectors. A TES is a superconducting thin film operated in the transition region between the superconducting and normal states, where it functions as a highly sensitive resistive thermometer. In this thesis, aspects of the assembly, characterization, and in-field operation of the ACTPol TES detector arrays are discussed. First, a novel microfabrication process for producing high-density superconducting aluminum/polyimide flexible circuitry (flex) designed to connect large-scale detector arrays to the first stage of readout is presented. The flex is used in parts of the third ACTPol array and is currently being produced for use in the AdvACT detector arrays, which will begin to replace the ACTPol arrays in 2016. Next, we describe methods and results for the in-lab and on-telescope characterization of the detectors in the third ACTPol array. Finally, we describe the ACTPol TES R(T,I) transition shapes and how they affect the detector calibration and operation. Methods for measuring the exact detector calibration and re-biasing functions, taking into account the R(T,I) transition shape, are presented.

  8. In-beam test of Neutron detector array facility at IUAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugathan, P.; Jhingan, A.; Saneesh, S.

    2014-01-01

    A new experimental facility dedicated for the study of fission dynamics has been installed and commissioned recently at Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi. The facility, National Array of Neutron Detectors (NAND) is used for the systematic studies on fission dynamics around Coulomb barrier energies using heavy ion beams from the Tandem plus LINAC accelerator facilities. The detector array consists 100 neutron detectors mounted on a geodesic dome structure at a radial distance of 175 cm from the target and multi wire proportional counters (MWPC) for detection of fission fragments. Each neutron detector is made of 5'' x 5'' cylindrical cell filled with BC501A organic liquid scintillator and coupled to a 5'' photo multiplier tube. A 100 cm diameter spherical vacuum chamber has been installed at the center of the array to house the targets, fission fragment detectors and other ancillary charged particle detectors. The vacuum chamber is made of 4mm thick steel and has target ladder with linear and rotary movements. The detector array is installed on a dedicated beam line of LINAC accelerator facilities at beam hall II. The neutrons are discriminated from gamma rays using pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique based on conventional analog electronics and the energies of neutrons are measured by the time of flight (TOF) method. For this purpose, custom made electronics modules have been built to process signal from each detector. This module contains the integrated electronics for n - γ discrimination, time of flight (TOF) and light output. The fission fragments are detected in low pressure MWPCs mounted inside the spherical vacuum chamber. The MWPC has been built based on the conventional design using three electrodes, having a central cathode foil electrode sandwiched between two position sensing anode wire/strip frames. In order to acquire data from detector array, the data acquisition system has been implemented using VME based hardware systems

  9. Application of a diode-array detector in capillary electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, W.; Hoek, van R.; Engelhardt, H.

    1993-01-01

    In the last decade diode-array detection has proved to be extremely useful in high performance liquid chromatography in recording UV-visible spectra directly and on-line in the column effluent. In capillary electrophoresis (CE) only fast-scanning detectors with long scan times (up to 2 s) are

  10. Isotropic gates in large gamma detector arrays versus angular distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacob, V.E.; Duchene, G.

    1997-01-01

    The quality of the angular distribution information extracted from high-fold gamma-gamma coincidence events is analyzed. It is shown that a correct quasi-isotropic gate setting, available at the modern large gamma-ray detector arrays, essentially preserves the quality of the angular information. (orig.)

  11. A phoswich detector design for improved spatial sampling in PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiessen, Jonathan D.; Koschan, Merry A.; Melcher, Charles L.; Meng, Fang; Schellenberg, Graham; Goertzen, Andrew L.

    2018-02-01

    Block detector designs, utilizing a pixelated scintillator array coupled to a photosensor array in a light-sharing design, are commonly used for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging applications. In practice, the spatial sampling of these designs is limited by the crystal pitch, which must be large enough for individual crystals to be resolved in the detector flood image. Replacing the conventional 2D scintillator array with an array of phoswich elements, each consisting of an optically coupled side-by-side scintillator pair, may improve spatial sampling in one direction of the array without requiring resolving smaller crystal elements. To test the feasibility of this design, a 4 × 4 phoswich array was constructed, with each phoswich element consisting of two optically coupled, 3 . 17 × 1 . 58 × 10mm3 LSO crystals co-doped with cerium and calcium. The amount of calcium doping was varied to create a 'fast' LSO crystal with decay time of 32.9 ns and a 'slow' LSO crystal with decay time of 41.2 ns. Using a Hamamatsu R8900U-00-C12 position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PS-PMT) and a CAEN V1720 250 MS/s waveform digitizer, we were able to show effective discrimination of the fast and slow LSO crystals in the phoswich array. Although a side-by-side phoswich array is feasible, reflections at the crystal boundary due to a mismatch between the refractive index of the optical adhesive (n = 1 . 5) and LSO (n = 1 . 82) caused it to behave optically as an 8 × 4 array rather than a 4 × 4 array. Direct coupling of each phoswich element to individual photodetector elements may be necessary with the current phoswich array design. Alternatively, in order to implement this phoswich design with a conventional light sharing PET block detector, a high refractive index optical adhesive is necessary to closely match the refractive index of LSO.

  12. Signal Attenuation Curve for Different Surface Detector Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicha, J.; Travnicek, P.; Nosek, D.; Ebr, J.

    2014-06-01

    Modern cosmic ray experiments consisting of large array of particle detectors measure the signals of electromagnetic or muon components or their combination. The correction for an amount of atmosphere passed is applied to the surface detector signal before its conversion to the shower energy. Either Monte Carlo based approach assuming certain composition of primaries or indirect estimation using real data and assuming isotropy of arrival directions can be used. Toy surface arrays of different sensitivities to electromagnetic and muon components are assumed in MC simulations to study effects imposed on attenuation curves for varying composition or possible high energy anisotropy. The possible sensitivity of the attenuation curve to the mass composition is also tested for different array types focusing on a future apparatus that can separate muon and electromagnetic component signals.

  13. Isotropic gates and large gamma detector arrays versus angular distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacob, V.E.; Duchene, G.

    1997-01-01

    Angular information extracted from in-beam γ ray measurements are of great importance for γ ray multipolarity and nuclear spin assignments. In our days large Ge detector arrays became available allowing the measurements of extremely weak γ rays in almost 4π sr solid angle (e.g., EUROGAM detector array). Given the high detector efficiency it is common for the mean suppressed coincidence multiplicity to reach values as high as 4 to 6. Thus, it is possible to gate on particular γ rays in order to enhance the relative statistics of a definite reaction channel and/or a definite decaying path in the level scheme of the selected residual nucleus. As compared to angular correlations, the conditioned angular distribution spectra exhibit larger statistics because in the latter the gate-setting γ ray may be observed by all the detectors in the array, relaxing somehow the geometrical restrictions of the angular correlations. Since the in-beam γ ray emission is anisotropic one could inquire that gate setting as mentioned above, based on anisotropic γ ray which would perturb the angular distributions in the unfolded events. As our work proved, there is no reason to worry about this if the energy gate runs over the whole solid angle in an ideal 4π sr detector, i.e., if the gate is isotropic. In real quasi 4π sr detector arrays the corresponding quasi isotropic gate preserves the angular properties of the unfolded data, too. However extraction of precise angular distribution coefficient especially a 4 , requires the consideration of the deviation of the quasi isotropic gate relative to the (ideal) isotropic gate

  14. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joshua; Zhang, Tiezhi; Lu, Weiguo

    2014-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source–dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10–15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source–dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented. (paper)

  15. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  16. A novel, SiPM-array-based, monolithic scintillator detector for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaart, Dennis R; Dam, Herman T van; Seifert, Stefan; Beekman, Freek J; Vinke, Ruud; Dendooven, Peter; Loehner, Herbert

    2009-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are of great interest to positron emission tomography (PET), as they enable new detector geometries, for e.g., depth-of-interaction (DOI) determination, are MR compatible, and offer faster response and higher gain than other solid-state photosensors such as avalanche photodiodes. Here we present a novel detector design with DOI correction, in which a position-sensitive SiPM array is used to read out a monolithic scintillator. Initial characterization of a prototype detector consisting of a 4 x 4 SiPM array coupled to either the front or back surface of a 13.2 mm x 13.2 mm x 10 mm LYSO:Ce 3+ crystal shows that front-side readout results in significantly better performance than conventional back-side readout. Spatial resolutions 2 detector, equals 960 ps FWHM.

  17. Detector block based on arrays of 144 SiPMs and monolithic scintillators: A performance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González, A.J.; Conde, P.; Iborra, A.; Aguilar, A.; Bellido, P.; García-Olcina, R.; Hernández, L.; Moliner, L.; Rigla, J.P.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, M.J.; Sánchez, F.; Seimetz, M.; Soriano, A.; Torres, J.; Vidal, L.F.; Benlloch, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a detector block composed by a monolithic LYSO scintillator coupled to a custom made 12×12 SiPMs array. The design is mainly focused to applications such as Positron Emission Tomography. The readout electronics is based on 3 identical and scalable Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC). We have determined the main performance of the detector block namely spatial, energy, and time resolution but also the system capability to determine the photon depth of interaction, for different crystal surface treatments. Intrinsic detector spatial resolution values as good as 1.7 mm FWHM and energies of 15% for black painted crystals were measured

  18. Spallation reactions studied with 4 -detector arrays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of inert or biological materials, these neutrons can be used to study details of the material ... ping zone- or neck-built up with part of projectile- and target-nuclei). ..... also been designed to complement the set of tools at our disposal [40].

  19. Conference on physics from large γ-ray detector arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The conference on open-quotes Physics from Large γ-ray Detector Arraysclose quotes is a continuation of the series of conferences that have been organized every two years by the North American Heavy-ion Laboratories. The aim of the conference this year was to encourage discussion of the physics that can be studied with such large arrays. This volume is the collected proceedings from this conference. It discusses properties of nuclear states which can be created in heavy-ion reactions, and which can be observed via such detector systems

  20. The water Cherenkov detector array for studies of cosmic rays at the University of Puebla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotzomi, J.; Moreno, E.; Murrieta, T.; Palma, B.; Perez, E.; Salazar, H.; Villasenor, L.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of a hybrid extensive air shower detector array built on the Campus of the University of Puebla (19 - bar N, 90 - bar W, 800g/cm 2 ) to measure the energy, arrival direction and composition of primary cosmic rays with energies around 1PeV, i.e., around the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum. The array consists of 3 water Cherenkov detectors of 1.86m 2 cross-section and 12 liquid scintillator detectors of 1m 2 distributed in a square grid with a detector spacing of 20m over an area of 4000m 2 . We discuss the calibration and stability of the array for both sets of detectors and report on preliminary measurements and reconstruction of the lateral distributions for the electromagnetic (EM) and muonic components of extensive air showers. We also discuss how the hybrid character of the array can be used to measure mass composition of the primary cosmic rays by estimating the relative contents of muons with respect to the EM component of extensive air showers. This facility is also used to train students interested in the field of cosmic rays

  1. Characterization and quality control of avalanche photodiode arrays for the Clear-PEM detector modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Conceicao; Amaral, Pedro; Carrico, Bruno; Ferreira, Miguel; Luyten, Joan; Moura, Rui; Ortigao, Catarina; Rato, Pedro; Varela, Joao

    2007-01-01

    Clear-PEM is a Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) prototype being developed in the framework of the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN. This device is a dedicated PET camera for mammography, based on LYSO:Ce scintillator crystals, Avalanche PhotoDiodes (APD) and a fast, low-noise electronics readout system, designed to examine both the breast and the axillary lymph node areas, and aiming at the detection of tumors down to 2 mm in diameter. The prototype has two planar detector heads, each composed of 96 detector modules. The Clear-PEM detector module is composed of a matrix of 32 identical 2x2x20 mm 3 LYSO:Ce crystals read at both ends by Hamamatsu S8550 APD arrays (4x8) for Depth-of-Interaction (DoI) capability. The APD arrays were characterized by the measurement of gain and dark current as a function of bias voltage, under controlled temperature conditions. Two independent setups were used. The full set of 398 APD arrays followed a well-defined quality control (QC) protocol, aiming at the rejection of arrays not complying within defined specifications. From a total of 398 arrays, only 2 (0.5%) were rejected, reassuring the trust in these detectors for prototype assembly and future developments

  2. Design and performance of a cesium iodide detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, T.; Bishop, J.M.; Cady, R. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States)] [and others

    1996-01-11

    The design, construction, and performance of a 198-element CsI detector built for Brookhaven experiment E852 is described. Design considerations for the array included such factors as rate, magnetic field, sensitivity and acceptance. Signals were obtained with a photodiode/preamplifier combination using PIN photodiodes. Data were taken over the course of two runs during the summers of 1993 and 1994. A calibration procedure using halo muons is described. The gain, energy resolution, and position resolution of the detector are discussed. Finally, the ability of the detector to be used as a low energy photon veto is illustrated using the data. (orig.).

  3. HgCdTe e-avalanche photodiode detector arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Singh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Initial results on the MWIR e-APD detector arrays with 30 μm pitch fabricated on LPE grown compositionally graded p-HgCdTe epilayers are presented. High dynamic resistance times active area (R0A product 2 × 106 Ω-cm2, low dark current density 4 nA/cm2 and high gain 5500 at -8 V were achieved in the n+-υ-p+ HgCdTe e-APD at 80 K. LPE based HgCdTe e-APD development makes this technology amenable for adoption in the foundries established for the conventional HgCdTe photovoltaic detector arrays without any additional investment.

  4. A 90 element CdTe array detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwase, Y.; Onozuka, A.; Ohmori, M. (Nippon Mining Co. Ltd., Toda, Saitama (Japan). Electronic Material and Components Labs.); Funaki, M. (Nippon Mining Co. Ltd., Toda, Saitama (Japan). Materials Development Research Labs.)

    1992-11-15

    The fabrication of a CdTe array radiation detector and its radiation detection characteristics are described. In order to obtain high efficiency of charge collection and realize uniform detection sensitivity, current-voltage characteristics with the combination of large and small barrier height contacts and three kinds of CdTe crystals have been investigated. It was found that the Schottky barrier height of electroless Pt deposition was 0.97 eV, which effectively suppressed electron injection. By using the crystal grown by the travelling heater method with a Cl concentration of 2 ppm, carrier lifetimes for electrons and holes of 1.0 and 0.5 [mu]s, respectively, were achieved. A 90 element array detector exhibited an energy resolution as low as 4.5 keV and a count rate variation of less than 5% for 60 keV [gamma]-rays. (orig.).

  5. A 90 element CdTe array detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Y.; Funaki, M.; Onozuka, A.; Ohmori, M.

    1992-11-01

    The fabrication of a CdTe array radiation detector and its radiation detection characteristics are described. In order to obtain high efficiency of charge collection and realize uniform detection sensitivity, current-voltage characteristics with the combination of large and small barrier height contacts and three kinds of CdTe crystals have been investigated. It was found that the Schottky barrier height of electroless Pt deposition was 0.97 eV, which effectively suppressed electron injection. By using the crystal grown by the travelling heater method with a Cl concentration of 2 ppm, carrier lifetimes for electrons and holes of 1.0 and 0.5 μs, respectively, were achieved. A 90 element array detector exhibited an energy resolution as low as 4.5 keV and a count rate variation of less than 5% for 60 keV γ-rays.

  6. Saturated virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy based on detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaocong; Sun, Shiyi; Kuang, Cuifang; Ge, Baoliang; Wang, Wensheng; Liu, Xu

    2017-07-01

    Virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy (vFED) has been proposed recently to enhance the lateral resolution of confocal microscopy with a detector array, implemented by scanning a doughnut-shaped pattern. Theoretically, the resolution can be enhanced by around 1.3-fold compared with that in confocal microscopy. For further improvement of the resolving ability of vFED, a novel method is presented utilizing fluorescence saturation for super-resolution imaging, which we called saturated virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy (svFED). With a point detector array, matched solid and hollow point spread functions (PSF) can be obtained by photon reassignment, and the difference results between them can be used to boost the transverse resolution. Results show that the diffraction barrier can be surpassed by at least 34% compared with that in vFED and the resolution is around 2-fold higher than that in confocal microscopy.

  7. Array detector for neutron pre-emission investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrascu, M.; Cruceru, I.; Bordeanu, C.

    1999-01-01

    It was predicted that in a fusion experiment induced by 11 Li halo nuclei on light targets, due to the very large dimension of 11 Li, one may expect that the valence neutrons will not be absorbed together with the 9 Li core, but will be emitted in the early stage of the fusion process. The experiment aiming at checking this expectation was performed at the RIKEN-RIPS facility. It was found from neutron energy spectra measurements, that an important number of fusions, more than 30%, are preceded by the pre-emission of one or two neutrons. In the position spectra measurements a very narrow neutron component has been found. This component is much narrower than that calculated by using the Cluster Shell Model Approximation (COSMA). The recent results of time- position coincidence measurements show that within the narrow component the neutrons are pre-emitted predominantly as neutron pairs. The Program Advisory Committee of RIKEN has approved a new measurement at RIKEN Ring Cyclotron aiming at investigation of neutron-neutron coincidences by using a new neutron array detector. This detector has been recently accomplished within the collaboration existing between IFIN-HH, Romania and RIKEN, Japan. The array system consists of 81 4 x 4 x 12 cm 3 BC400 plastic scintillators each coupled to XP2972 Phototubes. The mounting and the testing of the new neutron array detector will be done at RIKEN. The components of one of the 81 elements of the array detector are shown in a photo. The Monte Carlo calculated neutron detection efficiencies as a function of energy are shown. This detector will be used for the investigation of neutron-neutron coincidences in the case of Si( 11 Li, fusion) reaction. The cross- talk between adjacent and non adjacent detectors will be determined by using a 9 Li beam. As it is known in the case of Si( 9 Li, fusion) the neutrons are of evaporation origin, and since these neutrons are emitted in 4 π the chance for detecting 2 coincident neutrons in the

  8. A sub-millimeter resolution PET detector module using a multi-pixel photon counter array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tae Yong; Wu Heyu; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan; Siegel, Stefan B

    2010-01-01

    A PET block detector module using an array of sub-millimeter lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystals read out by an array of surface-mount, semiconductor photosensors has been developed. The detector consists of a LSO array, a custom acrylic light guide, a 3 x 3 multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) array (S10362-11-050P, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan) and a readout board with a charge division resistor network. The LSO array consists of 100 crystals, each measuring 0.8 x 0.8 x 3 mm 3 and arranged in 0.86 mm pitches. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to aid the design and fabrication of a custom light guide to control distribution of scintillation light over the surface of the MPPC array. The output signals of the nine MPPC are multiplexed by a charge division resistor network to generate four position-encoded analog outputs. Flood image, energy resolution and timing resolution measurements were performed using standard NIM electronics. The linearity of the detector response was investigated using gamma-ray sources of different energies. The 10 x 10 array of 0.8 mm LSO crystals was clearly resolved in the flood image. The average energy resolution and standard deviation were 20.0% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) and ±5.0%, respectively, at 511 keV. The timing resolution of a single MPPC coupled to a LSO crystal was found to be 857 ps FWHM, and the value for the central region of detector module was 1182 ps FWHM when ±10% energy window was applied. The nonlinear response of a single MPPC when used to read out a single LSO was observed among the corner crystals of the proposed detector module. However, the central region of the detector module exhibits significantly less nonlinearity (6.5% for 511 keV). These results demonstrate that (1) a charge-sharing resistor network can effectively multiplex MPPC signals and reduce the number of output signals without significantly degrading the performance of a PET detector and (2) a custom light guide to permit light sharing

  9. Active terahertz imaging with Ne indicator lamp detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeika, N. S.; Abramovich, A.; Yadid-Pecht, O.; Yitzhaky, Y.

    2009-08-01

    The advantages of terahertz (THz) imaging are well known. They penetrate well most non-conducting media and there are no known biological hazards, This makes such imaging systems important for homeland security, as they can be used to image concealed objects and often into rooms or buildings from the outside. There are also biomedical applications that are arising. Unfortunately, THz imaging is quite expensive, especially for real time systems, largely because of the price of the detector. Bolometers and pyroelectric detectors can each easily cost at least hundreds of dollars if not more, thus making focal plane arrays of them quite expensive. We have found that common miniature commercial neon indicator lamps costing typically about 30 cents each exhibit high sensitivity to THz radiation [1-3], with microsecond order rise times, thus making them excellent candidates for such focal plane arrays. NEP is on the order of 10-10 W/Hz1/2. Significant improvement of detection performance is expected when heterodyne detection is used Efforts are being made to develop focal plane array imagers using such devices at 300 GHz. Indeed, preliminary images using 4x4 arrays have already been obtained. An 8x8 VLSI board has been developed and is presently being tested. Since no similar imaging systems have been developed previously, there are many new problems to be solved with such a novel and unconventional imaging system. These devices act as square law detectors, with detected signal proportional to THz power. This allows them to act as mixers in heterodyne detection, thus allowing NEP to be reduced further by almost two orders of magnitude. Plans are to expand the arrays to larger sizes, and to employ super resolution techniques to improve image quality beyond that ordinarily obtainable at THz frequencies.

  10. ILC Reference Design Report Volume 4 - Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, Ties; Jaros, John; Miyamoto, Akiya; Aarons, Gerald; Abe, Toshinori; Abernathy, Jason; Ablikim, Medina; Abramowicz, Halina; Adey, David; Adloff, Catherine; Adolphsen, Chris; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Agapov, Ilya; Ahn, Jung-Keun; Aihara, Hiroaki; Akemoto, Mitsuo; del Carmen Alabau, Maria; Albert, Justin; Albrecht, Hartwig; Albrecht, Michael; Alesini, David; Alexander, Gideon; Alexander, Jim; Allison, Wade; Amann, John; Amirikas, Ramila; An, Qi; Anami, Shozo; Ananthanarayan, B.; Anderson, Terry; Andricek, Ladislav; Anduze, Marc; Anerella, Michael; Anfimov, Nikolai; Angal-Kalinin, Deepa; Antipov, Sergei; Antoine, Claire; Aoki, Mayumi; Aoza, Atsushi; Aplin, Steve; Appleby, Rob; Arai, Yasuo; Araki, Sakae; Arkan, Tug; Arnold, Ned; Arnold, Ray; Arnowitt, Richard; Artru, Xavier; Arya, Kunal; Aryshev, Alexander; Asakawa, Eri; Asiri, Fred; Asner, David; Atac, Muzaffer; Atoian, Grigor; Attié, David; Augustin, Jean-Eudes; Augustine, David B.; Ayres, Bradley; Aziz, Tariq; Baars, Derek; Badaud, Frederique; Baddams, Nigel; Bagger, Jonathan; Bai, Sha; Bailey, David; Bailey, Ian R.; Baker, David; Balalykin, Nikolai I.; Balbuena, Juan Pablo; Baldy, Jean-Luc; Ball, Markus; Ball, Maurice; Ballestrero, Alessandro; Ballin, Jamie; Baltay, Charles; Bambade, Philip; Ban, Syuichi; Band, Henry; Bane, Karl; Banerjee, Bakul; Barbanotti, Serena; Barbareschi, Daniele; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Desmond P.; Barbi, Mauricio; Bardin, Dmitri Y.; Barish, Barry; Barklow, Timothy L.; Barlow, Roger; Barnes, Virgil E.; Barone, Maura; Bartels, Christoph; Bartsch, Valeria; Basu, Rahul; Battaglia, Marco; Batygin, Yuri; Baudot, Jerome; Baur, Ulrich; Elwyn Baynham, D.; Beard, Carl; Bebek, Chris; Bechtle, Philip; Becker, Ulrich J.; Bedeschi, Franco; Bedjidian, Marc; Behera, Prafulla; Bellantoni, Leo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Paul; Bentson, Lynn D.; Benyamna, Mustapha; Bergauer, Thomas; Berger, Edmond; Bergholz, Matthias; Beri, Suman; Berndt, Martin; Bernreuther, Werner; Bertolini, Alessandro; Besancon, Marc; Besson, Auguste; Beteille, Andre; Bettoni, Simona; Beyer, Michael; Bhandari, R.K.; Bharadwaj, Vinod; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Bhattacherjee, Biplob; Bhuyan, Ruchika; Bi, Xiao-Jun; Biagini, Marica; Bialowons, Wilhelm; Biebel, Otmar; Bieler, Thomas; Bierwagen, John; Birch, Alison; Bisset, Mike; Biswal, S.S.; Blackmore, Victoria; Blair, Grahame; Blanchard, Guillaume; Blazey, Gerald; Blue, Andrew; Blümlein, Johannes; Boffo, Christian; Bohn, Courtlandt; Boiko, V.I.; Boisvert, Veronique; Bondarchuk, Eduard N.; Boni, Roberto; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Boogert, Stewart; Boonekamp, Maarten; Boorman, Gary; Borras, Kerstin; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bosco, Alessio; Bosio, Carlo; Bosland, Pierre; Bosotti, Angelo; Boudry, Vincent; Boumediene, Djamel-Eddine; Bouquet, Bernard; Bourov, Serguei; Bowden, Gordon; Bower, Gary; Boyarski, Adam; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bozzi, Concezio; Brachmann, Axel; Bradshaw, Tom W.; Brandt, Andrew; Brasser, Hans Peter; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James E.; Breidenbach, Martin; Bricker, Steve; Brient, Jean-Claude; Brock, Ian; Brodsky, Stanley; Brooksby, Craig; Broome, Timothy A.; Brown, David; Brown, David; Brownell, James H.; Bruchon, Mélanie; Brueck, Heiner; Brummitt, Amanda J.; Brun, Nicole; Buchholz, Peter; Budagov, Yulian A.; Bulgheroni, Antonio; Bulyak, Eugene; Bungau, Adriana; Bürger, Jochen; Burke, Dan; Burkhart, Craig; Burrows, Philip; Burt, Graeme; Burton, David; Büsser, Karsten; Butler, John; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buzulutskov, Alexei; Cabruja, Enric; Caccia, Massimo; Cai, Yunhai; Calcaterra, Alessandro; Caliier, Stephane; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cao, Jun-Jie; Cao, J.S.; Capatina, Ofelia; Cappellini, Chiara; Carcagno, Ruben; Carena, Marcela; Carloganu, Cristina; Carosi, Roberto; Stephen Carr, F.; Carrion, Francisco; Carter, Harry F.; Carter, John; Carwardine, John; Cassel, Richard; Cassell, Ronald; Cavallari, Giorgio; Cavallo, Emanuela; Cembranos, Jose A.R.; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chandez, Frederic; Charles, Matthew; Chase, Brian; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chauveau, Jacques; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chehab, Robert; Chel, Stéphane; Chelkov, Georgy; Chen, Chiping; Chen, He Sheng; Chen, Huai Bi; Chen, Jia Er; Chen, Sen Yu; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xun; Chen, Yuan Bo; Cheng, Jian; Chevallier, M.; Chi, Yun Long; Chickering, William; Cho, Gi-Chol; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Choi, Jin-Hyuk; Choi, Jong Bum; Choi, Seong Youl; Choi, Young-Il; Choudhary, Brajesh; Choudhury, Debajyoti; Rai Choudhury, S.; Christian, David; Christian, Glenn; Christophe, Grojean; Chung, Jin-Hyuk; Church, Mike; Ciborowski, Jacek; Cihangir, Selcuk; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Clarke, Christine; Clarke, Don G.; Clarke, James A.; Clements, Elizabeth; Coca, Cornelia; Coe, Paul; Cogan, John; Colas, Paul; Collard, Caroline; Colledani, Claude; Combaret, Christophe; Comerma, Albert; Compton, Chris; Constance, Ben; Conway, John; Cook, Ed; Cooke, Peter; Cooper, William; Corcoran, Sean; Cornat, Rémi; Corner, Laura; Cortina Gil, Eduardo; Clay Corvin, W.; Cotta Ramusino, Angelo; Cowan, Ray; Crawford, Curtis; Cremaldi, Lucien M; Crittenden, James A.; Cussans, David; Cvach, Jaroslav; da Silva, Wilfrid; Dabiri Khah, Hamid; Dabrowski, Anne; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dadoun, Olivier; Dai, Jian Ping; Dainton, John; Daly, Colin; Danilov, Mikhail; Daniluk, Witold; Daram, Sarojini; Datta, Anindya; Dauncey, Paul; David, Jacques; Davier, Michel; Davies, Ken P.; Dawson, Sally; De Boer, Wim; De Curtis, Stefania; De Groot, Nicolo; de la Taille, Christophe; de Lira, Antonio; De Roeck, Albert; de Sangro, Riccardo; De Santis,Stefano; Deacon, Laurence; Deandrea, Aldo; Dehmelt, Klaus; Delagnes, Eric; Delahaye, Jean-Pierre; Delebecque, Pierre; Delerue, Nicholas; Delferriere, Olivier; Demarteau, Marcel; Deng, Zhi; Denisov, Yu.N.; Densham, Christopher J.; Desch, Klaus; Deshpande, Nilendra; Devanz, Guillaume; Devetak, Erik; Dexter, Amos; Di benedetto, Vito; Diéguez, Angel; Diener, Ralf; Dinh, Nguyen Dinh; Dixit, Madhu; Dixit, Sudhir; Djouadi, Abdelhak; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dollan, Ralph; Dong, Dong; Dong, Hai Yi; Dorfan, Jonathan; Dorokhov, Andrei; Doucas, George; Downing, Robert; Doyle, Eric; Doziere, Guy; Drago, Alessandro; Dragt, Alex; Drake, Gary; Drásal, Zbynek; Dreiner, Herbert; Drell, Persis; Driouichi, Chafik; Drozhdin, Alexandr; Drugakov, Vladimir; Du, Shuxian; Dugan, Gerald; Duginov, Viktor; Dulinski, Wojciech; Dulucq, Frederic; Dutta, Sukanta; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Dychkant, Alexandre; Dzahini, Daniel; Eckerlin, Guenter; Edwards, Helen; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrlichman, Michael; Ehrlichmann, Heiko; Eigen, Gerald; Elagin, Andrey; Elementi, Luciano; Eliasson, Peder; Ellis, John; Ellwood, George; Elsen, Eckhard; Emery, Louis; Enami, Kazuhiro; Endo, Kuninori; Enomoto, Atsushi; Eozénou, Fabien; Erbacher, Robin; Erickson, Roger; Oleg Eyser, K.; Fadeyev, Vitaliy; Fang, Shou Xian; Fant, Karen; Fasso, Alberto; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Fehlberg, John; Feld, Lutz; Feng, Jonathan L.; Ferguson, John; Fernandez-Garcia, Marcos; Luis Fernandez-Hernando, J.; Fiala, Pavel; Fieguth, Ted; Finch, Alexander; Finocchiaro, Giuseppe; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Peter; Eugene Fisk, H.; Fitton, Mike D.; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischer, Manfred; Fleury, Julien; Flood, Kevin; Foley, Mike; Ford, Richard; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Brian; Fourches, Nicolas; Francis, Kurt; Frey, Ariane; Frey, Raymond; Friedsam, Horst; Frisch, Josef; Frishman, Anatoli; Fuerst, Joel; Fujii, Keisuke; Fujimoto, Junpei; Fukuda, Masafumi; Fukuda, Shigeki; Funahashi, Yoshisato; Funk, Warren; Furletova, Julia; Furukawa, Kazuro; Furuta, Fumio; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gadow, Karsten; Gaede, Frank; Gaglione, Renaud; Gai, Wei; Gajewski, Jan; Galik, Richard; Galkin, Alexei; Galkin, Valery; Gallin-Martel, Laurent; Gannaway, Fred; Gao, Jian She; Gao, Jie; Gao, Yuanning; Garbincius, Peter; Garcia-Tabares, Luis; Garren, Lynn; Garrido, Luís; Garutti, Erika; Garvey, Terry; Garwin, Edward; Gascón, David; Gastal, Martin; Gatto, Corrado; Gatto, Raoul; Gay, Pascal; Ge, Lixin; Ge, Ming Qi; Ge, Rui; Geiser, Achim; Gellrich, Andreas; Genat, Jean-Francois; Geng, Zhe Qiao; Gentile, Simonetta; Gerbick, Scot; Gerig, Rod; Ghosh, Dilip Kumar; Ghosh, Kirtiman; Gibbons, Lawrence; Giganon, Arnaud; Gillespie, Allan; Gillman, Tony; Ginzburg, Ilya; Giomataris, Ioannis; Giunta, Michele; Gladkikh, Peter; Gluza, Janusz; Godbole, Rohini; Godfrey, Stephen; Goldhaber, Gerson; Goldstein, Joel; Gollin, George D.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Francisco Javier; Goodrick, Maurice; Gornushkin, Yuri; Gostkin, Mikhail; Gottschalk, Erik; Goudket, Philippe; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gournaris, Filimon; Graciani, Ricardo; Graf, Norman; Grah, Christian; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grandjean, Damien; Grannis, Paul; Grassellino, Anna; Graugés, Eugeni; Gray, Stephen; Green, Michael; Greenhalgh, Justin; Greenshaw, Timothy; Grefe, Christian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Gerald; Grimes, Mark; Grimm, Terry; Gris, Philippe; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groll, Marius; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Grondin, Denis; Groom, Donald; Gross, Eilam; Grunewald, Martin; Grupen, Claus; Grzelak, Grzegorz; Gu, Jun; Gu, Yun-Ting; Guchait, Monoranjan; Guiducci, Susanna; Guler, Ali Murat; Guler, Hayg; Gulmez, Erhan; Gunion, John; Guo, Zhi Yu; Gurtu, Atul; Ha, Huy Bang; Haas, Tobias; Haase, Andy; Haba, Naoyuki; Haber, Howard; Haensel, Stephan; Hagge, Lars; Hagura, Hiroyuki; Hajdu, Csaba; Haller, Gunther; Haller, Johannes; Hallermann, Lea; Halyo, Valerie; Hamaguchi, Koichi; Hammond, Larry; Han, Liang; Han, Tao; Hand, Louis; Handu, Virender K.; Hano, Hitoshi; Hansen, Christian; Hansen, Jørn Dines; Hansen, Jorgen Beck; Hara, Kazufumi; Harder, Kristian; Hartin, Anthony; Hartung, Walter; Hast, Carsten; Hauptman, John; Hauschild, Michael; Hauviller, Claude; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Chris; Hawkings, Richard; Hayano, Hitoshi; Hazumi, Masashi; He, An; He, Hong Jian; Hearty, Christopher; Heath, Helen; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hedberg, Vincent; Hedin, David; Heifets, Samuel; Heinemeyer, Sven; Heini, Sebastien; Helebrant, Christian; Helms, Richard; Heltsley, Brian; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henschel, Hans; Hensel, Carsten; Hermel, Richard; Herms, Atilà; Herten, Gregor; Hesselbach, Stefan; Heuer, Rolf-Dieter; Heusch, Clemens A.; Hewett, Joanne; Higashi, Norio; Higashi, Takatoshi; Higashi, Yasuo; Higo, Toshiyasu; Hildreth, Michael D.; Hiller, Karlheinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen James; Himel, Thomas; Himmi, Abdelkader; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hioki, Zenro; Hirano, Koichiro; Hirose, Tachishige; Hisamatsu, Hiromi; Hisano, Junji; Hlaing, Chit Thu; Hock, Kai Meng; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hohlfeld, Mark; Honda, Yousuke; Hong, Juho; Hong, Tae Min; Honma, Hiroyuki; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horvath, Dezso; Hosoyama, Kenji; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Mi; Hou, Wei-Shu; Howell, David; Hronek, Maxine; Hsiung, Yee B.; Hu, Bo; Hu, Tao; Huang, Jung-Yun; Huang, Tong Ming; Huang, Wen Hui; Huedem, Emil; Huggard, Peter; Hugonie, Cyril; Hu-Guo, Christine; Huitu, Katri; Hwang, Youngseok; Idzik, Marek; Ignatenko, Alexandr; Ignatov, Fedor; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ilicheva, Tatiana; Imbault, Didier; Imhof, Andreas; Incagli, Marco; Ingbir, Ronen; Inoue, Hitoshi; Inoue, Youichi; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioakeimidi, Katerina; Ishihara, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishikawa, Tadashi; Issakov, Vladimir; Ito, Kazutoshi; Ivanov, V.V.; Ivanov, Valentin; Ivanyushenkov, Yury; Iwasaki, Masako; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Jackson, David; Jackson, Frank; Jacobsen, Bob; Jaganathan, Ramaswamy; Jamison, Steven; Janssen, Matthias Enno; Jaramillo-Echeverria, Richard; Jauffret, Clement; Jawale, Suresh B.; Jeans, Daniel; Jedziniak, Ron; Jeffery, Ben; Jehanno, Didier; Jenner, Leo J.; Jensen, Chris; Jensen, David R.; Jiang, Hairong; Jiang, Xiao Ming; Jimbo, Masato; Jin, Shan; Keith Jobe, R.; Johnson, Anthony; Johnson, Erik; Johnson, Matt; Johnston, Michael; Joireman, Paul; Jokic, Stevan; Jones, James; Jones, Roger M.; Jongewaard, Erik; Jönsson, Leif; Joshi, Gopal; Joshi, Satish C.; Jung, Jin-Young; Junk, Thomas; Juste, Aurelio; Kado, Marumi; Kadyk, John; Käfer, Daniela; Kako, Eiji; Kalavase, Puneeth; Kalinin, Alexander; Kalinowski, Jan; Kamitani, Takuya; Kamiya, Yoshio; Kamiya, Yukihide; Kamoshita, Jun-ichi; Kananov, Sergey; Kanaya, Kazuyuki; Kanazawa, Ken-ichi; Kanemura, Shinya; Kang, Heung-Sik; Kang, Wen; Kanjial, D.; Kapusta, Frédéric; Karataev, Pavel; Karchin, Paul E.; Karlen, Dean; Karyotakis, Yannis; Kashikhin, Vladimir; Kashiwagi, Shigeru; Kasley, Paul; Katagiri, Hiroaki; Kato, Takashi; Kato, Yukihiro; Katzy, Judith; Kaukher, Alexander; Kaur, Manjit; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamura, Hiroyuki; Kazakov, Sergei; Kekelidze, V.D.; Keller, Lewis; Kelley, Michael; Kelly, Marc; Kelly, Michael; Kennedy, Kurt; Kephart, Robert; Keung, Justin; Khainovski, Oleg; Khan, Sameen Ahmed; Khare, Prashant; Khovansky, Nikolai; Kiesling, Christian; Kikuchi, Mitsuo; Kilian, Wolfgang; Killenberg, Martin; Kim, Donghee; Kim, Eun San; Kim, Eun-Joo; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Hongjoo; Kim, Hyoungsuk; Kim, Hyun-Chui; Kim, Jonghoon; Kim, Kwang-Je; Kim, Kyung Sook; Kim, Peter; Kim, Seunghwan; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Sun Kee; Kim, Tae Jeong; Kim, Youngim; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimmitt, Maurice; Kirby, Robert; Kircher, François; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittel, Olaf; Klanner, Robert; Klebaner, Arkadiy L.; Kleinwort, Claus; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Klinkby, Esben; Kluth, Stefan; Knecht, Marc; Kneisel, Peter; Ko, In Soo; Ko, Kwok; Kobayashi, Makoto; Kobayashi, Nobuko; Kobel, Michael; Koch, Manuel; Kodys, Peter; Koetz, Uli; Kohrs, Robert; Kojima, Yuuji; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolodziej, Karol; Kolomensky, Yury G.; Komamiya, Sachio; Kong, Xiang Cheng; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korbel, Volker; Koscielniak, Shane; Kostromin, Sergey; Kowalewski, Robert; Kraml, Sabine; Krammer, Manfred; Krasnykh, Anatoly; Krautscheid, Thorsten; Krawczyk, Maria; James Krebs, H.; Krempetz, Kurt; Kribs, Graham; Krishnagopal, Srinivas; Kriske, Richard; Kronfeld, Andreas; Kroseberg, Jürgen; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Kruecker, Dirk; Krüger, Hans; Krumpa, Nicholas A.; Krumshtein, Zinovii; Kuang, Yu Ping; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuchler, Vic; Kudoh, Noboru; Kulis, Szymon; Kumada, Masayuki; Kumar, Abhay; Kume, Tatsuya; Kundu, Anirban; Kurevlev, German; Kurihara, Yoshimasa; Kuriki, Masao; Kuroda, Shigeru; Kuroiwa, Hirotoshi; Kurokawa, Shin-ichi; Kusano, Tomonori; Kush, Pradeep K.; Kutschke, Robert; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Kvasnicka, Peter; Kwon, Youngjoon; Labarga, Luis; Lacasta, Carlos; Lackey, Sharon; Lackowski, Thomas W.; Lafaye, Remi; Lafferty, George; Lagorio, Eric; Laktineh, Imad; Lal, Shankar; Laloum, Maurice; Lam, Briant; Lancaster, Mark; Lander, Richard; Lange, Wolfgang; Langenfeld, Ulrich; Langeveld, Willem; Larbalestier, David; Larsen, Ray; Lastovicka, Tomas; Lastovicka-Medin, Gordana; Latina, Andrea; Latour, Emmanuel; Laurent, Lisa; Le, Ba Nam; Le, Duc Ninh; Le Diberder, Francois; Dû, Patrick Le; Lebbolo, Hervé; Lebrun, Paul; Lecoq, Jacques; Lee, Sung-Won; Lehner, Frank; Leibfritz, Jerry; Lenkszus, Frank; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Levy, Aharon; Lewandowski, Jim; Leyh, Greg; Li, Cheng; Li, Chong Sheng; Li, Chun Hua; Li, Da Zhang; Li, Gang; Li, Jin; Li, Shao Peng; Li, Wei Ming; Li, Weiguo; Li, Xiao Ping; Li, Xue-Qian; Li, Yuanjing; Li, Yulan; Li, Zenghai; Li, Zhong Quan; Liang, Jian Tao; Liao, Yi; Lilje, Lutz; Guilherme Lima, J.; Lintern, Andrew J.; Lipton, Ronald; List, Benno; List, Jenny; Liu, Chun; Liu, Jian Fei; Liu, Ke Xin; Liu, Li Qiang; Liu, Shao Zhen; Liu, Sheng Guang; Liu, Shubin; Liu, Wanming; Liu, Wei Bin; Liu, Ya Ping; Liu, Yu Dong; Lockyer, Nigel; Logan, Heather E.; Logatchev, Pavel V.; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lohse, Thomas; Lola, Smaragda; Lopez-Virto, Amparo; Loveridge, Peter; Lozano, Manuel; Lu, Cai-Dian; Lu, Changguo; Lu, Gong-Lu; Lu, Wen Hui; Lubatti, Henry; Lucotte, Arnaud; Lundberg, Björn; Lundin, Tracy; Luo, Mingxing; Luong, Michel; Luth, Vera; Lutz, Benjamin; Lutz, Pierre; Lux, Thorsten; Luzniak, Pawel; Lyapin, Alexey; Lykken, Joseph; Lynch, Clare; Ma, Li; Ma, Lili; Ma, Qiang; Ma, Wen-Gan; Macfarlane, David; Maciel, Arthur; MacLeod, Allan; MacNair, David; Mader, Wolfgang; Magill, Stephen; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Maiheu, Bino; Maity, Manas; Majchrzak, Millicent; Majumder, Gobinda; Makarov, Roman; Makowski, Dariusz; Malaescu, Bogdan; Mallik, C.; Mallik, Usha; Malton, Stephen; Malyshev, Oleg B.; Malysheva, Larisa I.; Mammosser, John; Mamta; Mamuzic, Judita; Manen, Samuel; Manghisoni, Massimo; Manly, Steven; Marcellini, Fabio; Marcisovsky, Michal; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Marks, Steve; Marone, Andrew; Marti, Felix; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Victoria; Martin-Chassard, Gisèle; Martinez, Manel; Martinez-Rivero, Celso; Martsch, Dennis; Martyn, Hans-Ulrich; Maruyama, Takashi; Masuzawa, Mika; Mathez, Hervé; Matsuda, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Shuji; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Mättig, Peter; Mattison, Thomas; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mawatari, Kentarou; Mazzacane, Anna; McBride, Patricia; McCormick, Douglas; McCormick, Jeremy; McDonald, Kirk T.; McGee, Mike; McIntosh, Peter; McKee, Bobby; McPherson, Robert A.; Meidlinger, Mandi; Meier, Karlheinz; Mele, Barbara; Meller, Bob; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Mendez, Hector; Mercer, Adam; Merkin, Mikhail; Meshkov, I.N.; Messner, Robert; Metcalfe, Jessica; Meyer, Chris; Meyer, Hendrik; Meyer, Joachim; Meyer, Niels; Meyners, Norbert; Michelato, Paolo; Michizono, Shinichiro; Mihalcea, Daniel; Mihara, Satoshi; Mihara, Takanori; Mikami, Yoshinari; Mikhailichenko, Alexander A.; Milardi, Catia; Miller, David J.; Miller, Owen; Miller, Roger J.; Milstene, Caroline; Mimashi, Toshihiro; Minashvili, Irakli; Miquel, Ramon; Mishra, Shekhar; Mitaroff, Winfried; Mitchell, Chad; Miura, Takako; Miyata, Hitoshi; Mjörnmark, Ulf; Mnich, Joachim; Moenig, Klaus; Moffeit, Kenneth; Mokhov, Nikolai; Molloy, Stephen; Monaco, Laura; Monasterio, Paul R.; Montanari, Alessandro; Moon, Sung Ik; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid A.; Mora de Freitas, Paulo; Morel, Federic; Moretti, Stefano; Morgunov, Vasily; Mori, Toshinori; Morin, Laurent; Morisseau, François; Morita, Yoshiyuki; Morita, Youhei; Morita, Yuichi; Morozov, Nikolai; Morozumi, Yuichi; Morse, William; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Moultaka, Gilbert; Mtingwa, Sekazi; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Alex; Mueller, Wolfgang; Muennich, Astrid; Muhlleitner, Milada Margarete; Mukherjee, Bhaskar; Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup; Müller, Thomas; Munro, Morrison; Murayama, Hitoshi; Muto, Toshiya; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Nabhiraj, P.Y.; Nagaitsev, Sergei; Nagamine, Tadashi; Nagano, Ai; Naito, Takashi; Nakai, Hirotaka; Nakajima, Hiromitsu; Nakamura, Isamu; Nakamura, Tomoya; Nakanishi, Tsutomu; Nakao, Katsumi; Nakao, Noriaki; Nakayoshi, Kazuo; Nam, Sang; Namito, Yoshihito; Namkung, Won; Nantista, Chris; Napoly, Olivier; Narain, Meenakshi; Naroska, Beate; Nauenberg, Uriel; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nelson, Charles; Nelson, Janice; Nelson, Timothy; Nemecek, Stanislav; Neubauer, Michael; Neuffer, David; Newman, Myriam Q.; Nezhevenko, Oleg; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Nguyen, Anh Ky; Nguyen, Minh; Van Nguyen Thi,Hong; Niebuhr, Carsten; Niehoff, Jim; Niezurawski, Piotr; Nishitani, Tomohiro; Nitoh, Osamu; Noguchi, Shuichi; Nomerotski, Andrei; Noonan, John; Norbeck, Edward; Nosochkov, Yuri; Notz, Dieter; Nowak, Grazyna; Nowak, Hannelies; Noy, Matthew; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nyffeler, Andreas; Nygren, David; Oddone, Piermaria; O'Dell, Joseph; Oh, Jong-Seok; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohkuma, Kazumasa; Ohlerich, Martin; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Ohnishi, Yukiyoshi; Ohsawa, Satoshi; Ohuchi, Norihito; Oide, Katsunobu; Okada, Nobuchika; Okada, Yasuhiro; Okamura, Takahiro; Okugi, Toshiyuki; Okumi, Shoji; Okumura, Ken-ichi; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliver, William; Olivier, Bob; Olsen, James; Olsen, Jeff; Olsen, Stephen; Olshevsky, A.G.; Olsson, Jan; Omori, Tsunehiko; Onel, Yasar; Onengut, Gulsen; Ono, Hiroaki; Onoprienko, Dmitry; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Will; Orimoto, Toyoko J.; Oriunno, Marco; Orlandea, Marius Ciprian; Oroku, Masahiro; Orr, Lynne H.; Orr, Robert S.; Oshea, Val; Oskarsson, Anders; Osland, Per; Ossetski, Dmitri; Österman, Lennart; Ostiguy, Francois; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ottewell, Brian; Ouyang, Qun; Padamsee, Hasan; Padilla, Cristobal; Pagani, Carlo; Palmer, Mark A.; Pam, Wei Min; Pande, Manjiri; Pande, Rajni; Pandit, V.S.; Pandita, P.N.; Pandurovic, Mila; Pankov, Alexander; Panzeri, Nicola; Papandreou, Zisis; Paparella, Rocco; Para, Adam; Park, Hwanbae; Parker, Brett; Parkes, Chris; Parma, Vittorio; Parsa, Zohreh; Parsons, Justin; Partridge, Richard; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Pásztor, Gabriella; Paterson, Ewan; Patrick, Jim; Patteri, Piero; Ritchie Patterson, J.; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paver, Nello; Pavlicek, Vince; Pawlik, Bogdan; Payet, Jacques; Pchalek, Norbert; Pedersen, John; Pei, Guo Xi; Pei, Shi Lun; Pelka, Jerzy; Pellegrini, Giulio; Pellett, David; Peng, G.X.; Penn, Gregory; Penzo, Aldo; Perry, Colin; Peskin, Michael; Peters, Franz; Petersen, Troels Christian; Peterson, Daniel; Peterson, Thomas; Petterson, Maureen; Pfeffer, Howard; Pfund, Phil; Phelps, Alan; Van Phi, Quang; Phillips, Jonathan; Phinney, Nan; Piccolo, Marcello; Piemontese, Livio; Pierini, Paolo; Thomas Piggott, W.; Pike, Gary; Pillet, Nicolas; Jayawardena, Talini Pinto; Piot, Phillippe; Pitts, Kevin; Pivi, Mauro; Plate, Dave; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poehler, Michael; Poelker, Matthew; Poffenberger, Paul; Pogorelsky, Igor; Poirier, Freddy; Poling, Ronald; Poole, Mike; Popescu, Sorina; Popielarski, John; Pöschl, Roman; Postranecky, Martin; Potukochi, Prakash N.; Prast, Julie; Prat, Serge; Preger, Miro; Prepost, Richard; Price, Michael; Proch, Dieter; Puntambekar, Avinash; Qin, Qing; Qu, Hua Min; Quadt, Arnulf; Quesnel, Jean-Pierre; Radeka, Veljko; Rahmat, Rahmat; Rai, Santosh Kumar; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Ramberg, Erik; Ranjan, Kirti; Rao, Sista V.L.S.; Raspereza, Alexei; Ratti, Alessandro; Ratti, Lodovico; Raubenheimer, Tor; Raux, Ludovic; Ravindran, V.; Raychaudhuri, Sreerup; Re, Valerio; Rease, Bill; Reece, Charles E.; Regler, Meinhard; Rehlich, Kay; Reichel, Ina; Reichold, Armin; Reid, John; Reid, Ron; Reidy, James; Reinhard, Marcel; Renz, Uwe; Repond, Jose; Resta-Lopez, Javier; Reuen, Lars; Ribnik, Jacob; Rice, Tyler; Richard, François; Riemann, Sabine; Riemann, Tord; Riles, Keith; Riley, Daniel; Rimbault, Cécile; Rindani, Saurabh; Rinolfi, Louis; Risigo, Fabio; Riu, Imma; Rizhikov, Dmitri; Rizzo, Thomas; Rochford, James H.; Rodriguez, Ponciano; Roeben, Martin; Rolandi, Gigi; Roodman, Aaron; Rosenberg, Eli; Roser, Robert; Ross, Marc; Rossel, François; Rossmanith, Robert; Roth, Stefan; Rougé, André; Rowe, Allan; Roy, Amit; Roy, Sendhunil B.; Roy, Sourov; Royer, Laurent; Royole-Degieux, Perrine; Royon, Christophe; Ruan, Manqi; Rubin, David; Ruehl, Ingo; Jimeno, Alberto Ruiz; Ruland, Robert; Rusnak, Brian; Ryu, Sun-Young; Sabbi, Gian Luca; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadygov, Ziraddin Y; Saeki, Takayuki; Sagan, David; Sahni, Vinod C.; Saini, Arun; Saito, Kenji; Saito, Kiwamu; Sajot, Gerard; Sakanaka, Shogo; Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Salata, Zen; Salih, Sabah; Salvatore, Fabrizio; Samson, Joergen; Sanami, Toshiya; Levi Sanchez, Allister; Sands, William; Santic, John; Sanuki, Tomoyuki; Sapronov, Andrey; Sarkar, Utpal; Sasao, Noboru; Satoh, Kotaro; Sauli, Fabio; Saunders, Claude; Saveliev, Valeri; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Sawyer, Lee; Saxton, Laura; Schäfer, Oliver; Schälicke, Andreas; Schade, Peter; Schaetzel, Sebastien; Scheitrum, Glenn; Schibler, Emilie; Schindler, Rafe; Schlösser, Markus; Schlueter, Ross D.; Schmid, Peter; Schmidt, Ringo Sebastian; Schneekloth, Uwe; Schreiber, Heinz Juergen; Schreiber, Siegfried; Schroeder, Henning; Peter Schüler, K.; Schulte, Daniel; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schumacher, Markus; Schumann, Steffen; Schumm, Bruce A.; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Scott, Duncan J.; Scuri, Fabrizio; Sefkow, Felix; Sefri, Rachid; Seguin-Moreau, Nathalie; Seidel, Sally; Seidman, David; Sekmen, Sezen; Seletskiy, Sergei; Senaha, Eibun; Senanayake, Rohan; Sendai, Hiroshi; Sertore, Daniele; Seryi, Andrei; Settles, Ronald; Sever, Ramazan; Shales, Nicholas; Shao, Ming; Shelkov, G.A.; Shepard, Ken; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Sheppard, John C.; Shi, Cai Tu; Shidara, Tetsuo; Shim, Yeo-Jeong; Shimizu, Hirotaka; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Shimizu, Yuuki; Shimogawa, Tetsushi; Shin, Seunghwan; Shioden, Masaomi; Shipsey, Ian; Shirkov, Grigori; Shishido, Toshio; Shivpuri, Ram K.; Shrivastava, Purushottam; Shulga, Sergey; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Shuvalov, Sergey; Si, Zongguo; Siddiqui, Azher Majid; Siegrist, James; Simon, Claire; Simrock, Stefan; Sinev, Nikolai; Singh, Bhartendu K.; Singh, Jasbir; Singh, Pitamber; Singh, R.K.; Singh, S.K.; Singini, Monito; Sinha, Anil K.; Sinha, Nita; Sinha, Rahul; Sinram, Klaus; Sissakian, A.N.; Skachkov, N.B.; Skrinsky, Alexander; Slater, Mark; Slominski, Wojciech; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smith, A J Stewart; Smith, Alex; Smith, Brian J.; Smith, Jeff; Smith, Jonathan; Smith, Steve; Smith, Susan; Smith, Tonee; Neville Snodgrass, W.; Sobloher, Blanka; Sohn, Young-Uk; Solidum, Ruelson; Solyak, Nikolai; Son, Dongchul; Sonmez, Nasuf; Sopczak, Andre; Soskov, V.; Spencer, Cherrill M.; Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Speziali, Valeria; Spira, Michael; Sprehn, Daryl; Sridhar, K.; Srivastava, Asutosh; St. Lorant, Steve; Stahl, Achim; Stanek, Richard P.; Stanitzki, Marcel; Stanley, Jacob; Stefanov, Konstantin; Stein, Werner; Steiner, Herbert; Stenlund, Evert; Stern, Amir; Sternberg, Matt; Stockinger, Dominik; Stockton, Mark; Stoeck, Holger; Strachan, John; Strakhovenko, V.; Strauss, Michael; Striganov, Sergei I.; Strologas, John; Strom, David; Strube, Jan; Stupakov, Gennady; Su, Dong; Sudo, Yuji; Suehara, Taikan; Suehiro, Toru; Suetsugu, Yusuke; Sugahara, Ryuhei; Sugimoto, Yasuhiro; Sugiyama, Akira; Suh, Jun Suhk; Sukovic, Goran; Sun, Hong; Sun, Stephen; Sun, Werner; Sun, Yi; Sun, Yipeng; Suszycki, Leszek; Sutcliffe, Peter; Suthar, Rameshwar L.; Suwada, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Atsuto; Suzuki, Chihiro; Suzuki, Shiro; Suzuki, Takashi; Swent, Richard; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swinson, Christina; Syresin, Evgeny; Szleper, Michal; Tadday, Alexander; Takahashi, Rika; Takahashi, Tohru; Takano, Mikio; Takasaki, Fumihiko; Takeda, Seishi; Takenaka, Tateru; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Tanaka, Masami; Tang, Chuan Xiang; Taniguchi, Takashi; Tantawi, Sami; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tartaglia, Michael A.; Tassielli, Giovanni Francesco; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Tavian, Laurent; Tawara, Hiroko; Taylor, Geoffrey; Telnov, Alexandre V.; Telnov, Valery; Tenenbaum, Peter; Teodorescu, Eliza; Terashima, Akio; Terracciano, Giuseppina; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Teubner, Thomas; Teuscher, Richard; Theilacker, Jay; Thomson, Mark; Tice, Jeff; Tigner, Maury; Timmermans, Jan; Titov, Maxim; Toge, Nobukazu; Tokareva, N.A.; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomasek, Lukas; Tomovic, Savo; Tompkins, John; Tonutti, Manfred; Topkar, Anita; Toprek, Dragan; Toral, Fernando; Torrence, Eric; Traversi, Gianluca; Trimpl, Marcel; Mani Tripathi, S.; Trischuk, William; Trodden, Mark; Trubnikov, G.V.; Tschirhart, Robert; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsuchiya, Kiyosumi; Tsukamoto, Toshifumi; Tsunemi, Akira; Tucker, Robin; Turchetta, Renato; Tyndel, Mike; Uekusa, Nobuhiro; Ueno, Kenji; Umemori, Kensei; Ummenhofer, Martin; Underwood, David; Uozumi, Satoru; Urakawa, Junji; Urban, Jeremy; Uriot, Didier; Urner, David; Ushakov, Andrei; Usher, Tracy; Uzunyan, Sergey; Vachon, Brigitte; Valerio, Linda; Valin, Isabelle; Valishev, Alex; Vamra, Raghava; Van der Graaf, Harry; Van Kooten, Rick; Van Zandbergen, Gary; Vanel, Jean-Charles; Variola, Alessandro; Varner, Gary; Velasco, Mayda; Velte, Ulrich; Velthuis, Jaap; Vempati, Sundir K.; Venturini, Marco; Vescovi, Christophe; Videau, Henri; Vila, Ivan; Vincent, Pascal; Virey, Jean-Marc; Visentin, Bernard; Viti, Michele; Vo, Thanh Cuong; Vogel, Adrian; Vogt, Harald; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorozhtsov, S.B.; Vos, Marcel; Votava, Margaret; Vrba, Vaclav; Wackeroth, Doreen; Wagner, Albrecht; Wagner, Carlos E.M.; Wagner, Stephen; Wake, Masayoshi; Walczak, Roman; Walker, Nicholas J.; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wallon, Samuel; Walsh, Roberval; Walston, Sean; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walz, Dieter; Wang, Chao En; Wang, Chun Hong; Wang, Dou; Wang, Faya; Wang, Guang Wei; Wang, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Wang, Jiu Qing; Wang, Juwen; Wang, Lanfa; Wang, Lei; Wang, Min-Zu; Wang, Qing; Wang, Shu Hong; Wang, Xiaolian; Wang, Xue-Lei; Wang, Yi Fang; Wang, Zheng; Wanzenberg, Rainer; Ward, Bennie; Ward, David; Warmbein, Barbara; Warner, David W.; Warren, Matthew; Washio, Masakazu; Watanabe, Isamu; Watanabe, Ken; Watanabe, Takashi; Watanabe, Yuichi; Watson, Nigel; Wattimena, Nanda; Wayne, Mitchell; Weber, Marc; Weerts, Harry; Weiglein, Georg; Weiland, Thomas; Weinzierl, Stefan; Weise, Hans; Weisend, John; Wendt, Manfred; Wendt, Oliver; Wenzel, Hans; Wenzel, William A.; Wermes, Norbert; Werthenbach, Ulrich; Wesseln, Steve; Wester, William; White, Andy; White, Glen R.; Wichmann, Katarzyna; Wienemann, Peter; Wierba, Wojciech; Wilksen, Tim; Willis, William; Wilson, Graham W.; Wilson, John A.; Wilson, Robert; Wing, Matthew; Winter, Marc; Wirth, Brian D.; Wolbers, Stephen A.; Wolff, Dan; Wolski, Andrzej; Woodley, Mark D.; Woods, Michael; Woodward, Michael L.; Woolliscroft, Timothy; Worm, Steven; Wormser, Guy; Wright, Dennis; Wright, Douglas; Wu, Andy; Wu, Tao; Wu, Yue Liang; Xella, Stefania; Xia, Guoxing; Xia, Lei; Xiao, Aimin; Xiao, Liling; Xie, Jia Lin; Xing, Zhi-Zhong; Xiong, Lian You; Xu, Gang; Xu, Qing Jing; Yajnik, Urjit A.; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yamada, Ryuji; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Naoto; Yamamoto, Richard; Yamamoto, Yasuchika; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamaoka, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Satoru; Yamazaki, Hideki; Yan, Wenbiao; Yang, Hai-Jun; Yang, Jin Min; Yang, Jongmann; Yang, Zhenwei; Yano, Yoshiharu; Yazgan, Efe; Yeh, G.P.; Yilmaz, Hakan; Yock, Philip; Yoda, Hakutaro; Yoh, John; Yokoya, Kaoru; Yokoyama, Hirokazu; York, Richard C.; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Takuo; Yoshioka, Tamaki; Young, Andrew; Yu, Cheng Hui; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Xian Ming; Yuan, Changzheng; Yue, Chong-Xing; Yue, Jun Hui; Zacek, Josef; Zagorodnov, Igor; Zalesak, Jaroslav; Zalikhanov, Boris; Zarnecki, Aleksander Filip; Zawiejski, Leszek; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zerwas, Dirk; Zerwas, Peter; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Zhai, Ji Yuan; Zhang, Bao Cheng; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Chuang; Zhang, He; Zhang, Jiawen; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Jing Ru; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Zhige; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhang, Ziping; Zhao, Haiwen; Zhao, Ji Jiu; Zhao, Jing Xia; Zhao, Ming Hua; Zhao, Sheng Chu; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Tong Xian; Zhao, Zhen Tang; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhou, De Min; Zhou, Feng; Zhou, Shun; Zhu, Shou Hua; Zhu, Xiong Wei; Zhukov, Valery; Zimmermann, Frank; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zisman, Michael S.; Zomer, Fabian; Zong, Zhang Guo; Zorba, Osman; Zutshi, Vishnu

    2007-01-01

    This report, Volume IV of the International Linear Collider Reference Design Report, describes the detectors which will record and measure the charged and neutral particles produced in the ILC's high energy e+e- collisions. The physics of the ILC, and the environment of the machine-detector interface, pose new challenges for detector design. Several conceptual designs for the detector promise the needed performance, and ongoing detector R&D is addressing the outstanding technological issues. Two such detectors, operating in push-pull mode, perfectly instrument the ILC interaction region, and access the full potential of ILC physics.

  11. Digital readouts for large microwave low-temperature detector arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazin, Benjamin A.; Day, Peter K.; Irwin, Kent D.; Reintsema, Carl D.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2006-01-01

    Over the last several years many different types of low-temperature detectors (LTDs) have been developed that use a microwave resonant circuit as part of their readout. These devices include microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKID), microwave SQUID readouts for transition edge sensors (TES), and NIS bolometers. Current readout techniques for these devices use analog frequency synthesizers and IQ mixers. While these components are available as microwave integrated circuits, one set is required for each resonator. We are exploring a new readout technique for this class of detectors based on a commercial-off-the-shelf technology called software defined radio (SDR). In this method a fast digital to analog (D/A) converter creates as many tones as desired in the available bandwidth. Our prototype system employs a 100MS/s 16-bit D/A to generate an arbitrary number of tones in 50MHz of bandwidth. This signal is then mixed up to the desired detector resonant frequency (∼10GHz), sent through the detector, then mixed back down to baseband. The baseband signal is then digitized with a series of fast analog to digital converters (80MS/s, 14-bit). Next, a numerical mixer in a dedicated integrated circuit or FPGA mixes the resonant frequency of a specified detector to 0Hz, and sends the complex detector output over a computer bus for processing and storage. In this paper we will report on our results in using a prototype system to readout a MKID array, including system noise performance, X-ray pulse response, and cross-talk measurements. We will also discuss how this technique can be scaled to read out many thousands of detectors

  12. High-performance ferroelectric and magnetoresistive materials for next-generation thermal detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Michael A.; Donohue, Paul P.; Watton, Rex; Williams, Dennis J.; Anthony, Carl J.; Blamire, Mark G.

    2002-12-01

    This paper discusses the potential thermal imaging performance achievable from thermal detector arrays and concludes that the current generation of thin-film ferroelectric and resistance bolometer based detector arrays are limited by the detector materials used. It is proposed that the next generation of large uncooled focal plane arrays will need to look towards higher performance detector materials - particularly if they aim to approach the fundamental performance limits and compete with cooled photon detector arrays. Two examples of bolometer thin-film materials are described that achieve high performance from operating around phase transitions. The material Lead Scandium Tantalate (PST) has a paraelectric-to-ferroelectric phase transition around room temperature and is used with an applied field in the dielectric bolometer mode for thermal imaging. PST films grown by sputtering and liquid-source CVD have shown merit figures for thermal imaging a factor of 2 to 3 times higher than PZT-based pyroelectric thin films. The material Lanthanum Calcium Manganite (LCMO) has a paramagnetic to ferromagnetic phase transition around -20oC. This paper describes recent measurements of TCR and 1/f noise in pulsed laser-deposited LCMO films on Neodymium Gallate substrates. These results show that LCMO not only has high TCR's - up to 30%/K - but also low 1/f excess noise, with bolometer merit figures at least an order of magnitude higher than Vanadium Oxide, making it ideal for the next generation of microbolometer arrays. These high performance properties come at the expense of processing complexities and novel device designs will need to be introduced to realize the potential of these materials in the next generation of thermal detectors.

  13. Simulation tools for detector and instrument design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanaki, Kalliopi; Kittelmann, Thomas; Cai, Xiao Xiao

    2018-01-01

    The high performance requirements at the European Spallation Source have been driving the technological advances on the neutron detector front. Now more than ever is it important to optimize the design of detectors and instruments, to fully exploit the ESS source brilliance. Most of the simulation...... a powerful set of tools to tailor the detector and instrument design to the instrument application....

  14. A new detector array for charged particle spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cowin, R L; Chappell, S P G; Clarke, N M; Freer, M; Fulton, B R; Cunningham, R A; Curtis, N; Dillon, G; Lilley, J; Jones, C D; Lee, P; Rae, W D M

    1999-01-01

    A compact and highly segmented detector array consisting of 44 gas-silicon-caesium iodide, position sensitive, particle identification detector telescopes and up to 10 position-sensitive, silicon strip detectors has been constructed for the study of light-ion-heavy-ion reactions including cluster break-up in the energy range 5-15 MeV/nucleon. The detectors are housed in a purpose built vacuum chamber. The telescopes are placed in fixed positions, covering the forward hemisphere from 3 to 30 deg. in the laboratory with the target placed at 535 mm from the front of the telescopes or 6-52 deg. with the target placed at 215 mm. The strip detectors are placed in any of 30 fixed positions in the forward hemisphere. For 85 MeV sup 1 sup 2 C ions the telescope energy resolution (gas plus silicon) is 345 keV with an angular resolution of 0.03 deg. . Using the gas-silicon section ions with Z up to 21 can be identified. For ions that pass through the silicon isotopic identification is achieved using the silicon-CsI comb...

  15. Design of circular differential microphone arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Benesty, Jacob; Cohen, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we proposed a completely novel and efficient way to design differential beamforming algorithms for linear microphone arrays. Thanks to this very flexible approach, any order of differential arrays can be designed. Moreover, they can be made robust against white noise amplification, which is the main inconvenience in these types of arrays. The other well-known problem with linear arrays is that electronic steering is not really feasible.  In this book, we extend all these fundamental ideas to circular microphone arrays and show that we can design small and compact differential arrays of any order that can be electronically steered in many different directions and offer a good degree of control of the white noise amplification problem, high directional gain, and frequency-independent response. We also present a number of practical examples, demonstrating that differential beamforming with circular microphone arrays is likely one of the best candidates for applications involving speech enhancement (i....

  16. Far forward scattering on TOSCA tokamak using a detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cote, A.; Evans, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    A gaussian beam from a CW CO 2 , laser is directed across the vertical minor diameter of TOSCA tokamak where it undergoes collective scattering at angles within the beam divergence. Scattered radiation recombines with the unperturbed part of the beam on the detector, generating intensity oscillations whose spatial, temporal, and phase distributions convey information about the strength, scale length, frequency, and propagation direction of the plasma density fluctuations in which they originate. The distribution of these oscillations is measured across the diameter of the probe beam profile, either with a single photoconductive Ge:Hg detector over a sequence of plasma discharges, or with a 12-channel array of Ge:Hg detectors during a single discharge. A model describing counter-rotating waves, such as a poloidal structure encountered twice by the probe beam as it traverses the plasma, is able to furnish a satisfactory fit to the data. Use of the array provides a phase distribution from which the sense of rotation of the waves can be deduced. A dispersion relation with frequencies up to 250 kHz, wavenumbers in the range 60-300 m -1 , and a phase velocity of ≅ 6x10 3 ms -1 is found

  17. Standard practice for radiological examination using digital detector arrays

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice establishes the minimum requirements for radiological examination for metallic and nonmetallic material using a digital detector array (DDA) system. 1.2 The requirements in this practice are intended to control the quality of radiologic images and are not intended to establish acceptance criteria for parts or materials. 1.3 This practice covers the radiologic examination with DDAs including DDAs described in Practice E2597 such as a device that contains a photoconductor attached to a Thin Film Transistor (TFT) read out structure, a device that has a phosphor coupled directly to an amorphous silicon read-out structure, and devices where a phosphor is coupled to a CMOS (Complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor) array, a Linear Detector Array (LDA) or a CCD (charge coupled device) crystalline silicon read-out structure. 1.4 The DDA shall be selected for an NDT application based on knowledge of the technology described in Guide , and of the selected DDA properties provided by the manufactu...

  18. The 8{pi} miniball charged-particle detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, G C; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Andrews, H R; Bray, N C; Lori, J D; Radford, D C; Smith, L V; Tapp, G A; Ward, D [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Drake, T E [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics; Waddington, J C [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics

    1992-08-01

    A modular miniature array of 24 CsI(Tl) crystals (0.5 cm) thick coupled to large area photodiodes has been constructed to operate inside the 8{pi} spectrometer. The array was designed to have good resolution, high efficiency, and adequate granularity for detecting light charged particles emitted in coincidence with the gamma rays from the decay of high-spin states populated in heavy-ion fusion-evaporation reactions. 17 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  19. Assessment of array scintillation detector for follicle thyroid 2-d image acquisition using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Carlos Borges da; Braz, Delson

    2008-01-01

    Full text: This work presents an innovative study to find out the adequate scintillation inorganic detector array to be used coupled to a specific light photo sensor, a charge coupled device (CCD), through a fiber optic plate. The goal is to choose the type of detector that fits a 2-dimensional imaging acquisition of a cell thyroid tissue application with high resolution and detection efficiency in order to map a follicle image using gamma radiation emission. A point or volumetric source-detector simulation by using a MCNP4B general code, considering different source energies, detector materials and geometry including pixel sizes and reflector types was performed. In this study, simulations were performed for 7 x 7, 31 x 31 and 127 x 127 arrays using CsI(Tl), BGO, CdWO 4 , LSO, GOS and GSO scintillation detectors with pixel dimensions ranging from 1 x 1 cm 2 to 10 x 10 μm 2 and radiation thickness ranging from 1 mm to 10 mm. The effect of all these parameters was investigated to find the best source-detector system that results in an image with the best contrast details. The results showed that it is possible to design a specific imaging system that allows searching for in-vitro studies, specifically in radiobiology applied to endocrine physiology. A 2D image of two thyroid follicles simulated by using MCNP4B code is shown

  20. Trigger electronics of the new Fluorescence Detectors of the Telescope Array Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tameda, Yuichiro; Taketa, Akimichi; Smith, Jeremy D.; Tanaka, Manobu; Fukushima, Masaki; Jui, Charles C.H.; Kadota, Ken'ichi; Kakimoto, Fumio; Matsuda, Takeshi; Matthews, John N.; Ogio, Shoichi; Sagawa, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Nobuyuki; Shibata, Tatsunobu; Takeda, Masahiro; Thomas, Stanton B.; Tokuno, Hisao; Tsunesada, Yoshiki

    2009-01-01

    The Telescope Array Project is an experiment designed to observe Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays via a 'hybrid' detection technique utilizing both fluorescence light detectors (FDs) and scintillator surface particle detectors (SDs). We have installed three FD stations and 507 SDs in the Utah desert, and initiated observations from March 2008. The northern FD station reuses 14 telescopes from the High Resolution Fly's Eye, HiRes-I station. Each of the two southern FD stations contains 12 new telescopes utilizing new FADC electronics. Each telescope is instrumented with a camera composed of 256 PMTs. Since the detectors are composed of many PMTs and each PMT detects fluorescence photons together with the vast amount of night sky background, a sophisticated triggering system is required. In this paper, we describe the trigger electronics of these new FD stations. We also discuss performance of the FDs with this triggering system, in terms of efficiencies and apertures for various detector configurations.

  1. MUST: A silicon strip detector array for radioactive beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, Y.; Auger, F.; Sauvestre, J.E.; Marechal, F.; Ottini, S.; Alamanos, N.; Barbier, A.; Beaumel, D.; Bonnereau, B.; Charlet, D.; Clavelin, J.F.; Courtat, P.; Delbourgo-Salvador, P.; Douet, R.; Engrand, M.; Ethvignot, T.; Gillibert, A.; Khan, E.; Lapoux, V.; Lagoyannis, A.; Lavergne, L.; Lebon, S.; Lelong, P.; Lesage, A.; Le Ven, V.; Lhenry, I.; Martin, J.M.; Musumarra, A.; Pita, S.; Petizon, L.; Pollacco, E.; Pouthas, J.; Richard, A.; Rougier, D.; Santonocito, D.; Scarpaci, J.A.; Sida, J.L.; Soulet, C.; Stutzmann, J.S.; Suomijaervi, T.; Szmigiel, M.; Volkov, P.; Voltolini, G.

    1999-01-01

    A new and innovative array, MUST, based on silicon strip technology and dedicated to the study of reactions induced by radioactive beams on light particles is described. The detector consists of 8 silicon strip - Si(Li) telescopes used to identify recoiling light charged particles through time of flight, energy loss and energy measurements and to determine precisely their scattering angle through X, Y position measurements. Each 60x60 mm 2 double sided silicon strip detector with 60 vertical and 60 horizontal strips yields an X-Y position resolution of 1 mm, an energy resolution of 50 keV, a time resolution of around 1 ns and a 500 keV energy threshold for protons. The backing Si(Li) detectors stop protons up to 25 MeV with a resolution of approximately 50 keV. CsI crystals read out by photo-diodes which stop protons up to 70 MeV are added to the telescopes for applications where higher energy particles need to be detected. The dedicated electronics in VXIbus standard allow us to house the 968 logic and analog channels of the array in one crate placed adjacent to the reaction chamber and fully remote controlled, including pulse visualization on oscilloscopes. A stand alone data acquisition system devoted to the MUST array has been developed. Isotope identification of light charged particles over the full energy range has been achieved, and the capability of the system to measure angular distributions of states populated in inverse kinematics reactions has been demonstrated

  2. Limits in point to point resolution of MOS based pixels detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourches, N.; Desforge, D.; Kebbiri, M.; Kumar, V.; Serruys, Y.; Gutierrez, G.; Leprêtre, F.; Jomard, F.

    2018-01-01

    In high energy physics point-to-point resolution is a key prerequisite for particle detector pixel arrays. Current and future experiments require the development of inner-detectors able to resolve the tracks of particles down to the micron range. Present-day technologies, although not fully implemented in actual detectors, can reach a 5-μm limit, this limit being based on statistical measurements, with a pixel-pitch in the 10 μm range. This paper is devoted to the evaluation of the building blocks for use in pixel arrays enabling accurate tracking of charged particles. Basing us on simulations we will make here a quantitative evaluation of the physical and technological limits in pixel size. Attempts to design small pixels based on SOI technology will be briefly recalled here. A design based on CMOS compatible technologies that allow a reduction of the pixel size below the micrometer is introduced here. Its physical principle relies on a buried carrier-localizing collecting gate. The fabrication process needed by this pixel design can be based on existing process steps used in silicon microelectronics. The pixel characteristics will be discussed as well as the design of pixel arrays. The existing bottlenecks and how to overcome them will be discussed in the light of recent ion implantation and material characterization experiments.

  3. Array element of a space-based synchrotron radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.W.; Commichau, S.C.; Kim, G.N.; Son, D.; Viertel, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    A synchrotron radiation detector (SRD) has been proposed as part of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment on the International Space Station to study cosmic ray electrons and positrons in the TeV energy range. The SRD will identify these particles by detecting their emission of synchrotron radiation in the Earth's magnetic field. This article reports on the study of key technical parameters for the array elements which form the SRD, including the choice of the detecting medium, the sensor and the readout system

  4. National array of neutron detectors (NAND) a versatile setup for studies on reaction dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golda, K.S.; Singh, R.P.; Zacharias, J.; Archunan, M.; Kothari, A.; Barua, P.; Gupta, Arti; Venkataramanan, S.; Suman, S.K.; Kumar, Rajesh; Kumar, Pankaj; Jhingan, A.; Sugathan, P.; Datta, S.K.; Chatterjee, Mihir; Bhowmik, R.K.; Singh, Hardev; Behera, B.; Kumar, A.; Singh, G.; Ranjit; Mandal, S.

    2006-01-01

    National Array of Neutron Detectors (NAND) is a large array of neutron detectors being setup at Inter University Accelerator Centre. The primary motive behind the development of this array, is the study of reaction dynamics in the energy domain near the Coulomb barrier

  5. An MLC calibration method using a detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Thomas A.; Kahler, Darren; Simon, William E.; Fox, Christopher; Li, Jonathan; Palta, Jatinder; Liu, Chihray

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The authors have developed a quantitative calibration method for a multileaf collimator (MLC) which measures individual leaf positions relative to the MLC backup jaw on an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Methods: The method utilizes a commercially available two-axis detector array (Profiler 2; Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL). To calibrate the MLC bank, its backup jaw is positioned at the central axis and the opposing jaw is retracted to create a half-beam configuration. The position of the backup jaws field edge is then measured with the array to obtain what is termed the radiation defined reference line. The positions of the individual leaf ends relative to this reference line are then inferred by the detector response in the leaf end penumbra. Iteratively adjusting and remeasuring the leaf end positions to within specifications completes the calibration. Using the backup jaw as a reference for the leaf end positions is based on three assumptions: (1) The leading edge of an MLC leaf bank is parallel to its backup jaw's leading edge, (2) the backup jaw position is reproducible, and (3) the measured radiation field edge created by each leaf end is representative of that leaf's position. Data from an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) were used in a similar analysis to check the results obtained with the array. Results: The relative leaf end positions measured with the array differed from those measured with the EPID by an average of 0.11 ±0.09 mm per leaf. The maximum leaf positional change measured with the Profiler 2 over a 3 month period was 0.51 mm. A leaf positional accuracy of ±0.4 mm is easily attainable through the iterative calibration process. The method requires an average of 40 min to measure both leaf banks. Conclusions: This work demonstrates that the Profiler 2 is an effective tool for efficient and quantitative MLC quality assurance and calibration.

  6. An MLC calibration method using a detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Thomas A.; Kahler, Darren; Simon, William E.; Fox, Christopher; Li, Jonathan; Palta, Jatinder; Liu, Chihray [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, 202 Nuclear Science Building, Gainesville, Florida 32611-8300 (United States); Sun Nuclear Corporation, 425-A Pineda Court, Melbourne, Florida 32940 (United States) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Health Science Center, University of Florida, P.O. Box 100385, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0385 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Health Science Center, University of Florida, P.O. Box 100385, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0385 (United States); Sun Nuclear Corporation, 425-A Pineda Court, Melbourne, Florida 32940 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tulane University, 1415 Tulane Ave, HC65, New Orleans, Louisiana 70112 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Health Science Center, University of Florida, P.O. Box 100385, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0385 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: The authors have developed a quantitative calibration method for a multileaf collimator (MLC) which measures individual leaf positions relative to the MLC backup jaw on an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Methods: The method utilizes a commercially available two-axis detector array (Profiler 2; Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL). To calibrate the MLC bank, its backup jaw is positioned at the central axis and the opposing jaw is retracted to create a half-beam configuration. The position of the backup jaws field edge is then measured with the array to obtain what is termed the radiation defined reference line. The positions of the individual leaf ends relative to this reference line are then inferred by the detector response in the leaf end penumbra. Iteratively adjusting and remeasuring the leaf end positions to within specifications completes the calibration. Using the backup jaw as a reference for the leaf end positions is based on three assumptions: (1) The leading edge of an MLC leaf bank is parallel to its backup jaw's leading edge, (2) the backup jaw position is reproducible, and (3) the measured radiation field edge created by each leaf end is representative of that leaf's position. Data from an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) were used in a similar analysis to check the results obtained with the array. Results: The relative leaf end positions measured with the array differed from those measured with the EPID by an average of 0.11 {+-}0.09 mm per leaf. The maximum leaf positional change measured with the Profiler 2 over a 3 month period was 0.51 mm. A leaf positional accuracy of {+-}0.4 mm is easily attainable through the iterative calibration process. The method requires an average of 40 min to measure both leaf banks. Conclusions: This work demonstrates that the Profiler 2 is an effective tool for efficient and quantitative MLC quality assurance and calibration.

  7. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS): 38 GHz Detector Array of Bolometric Polarimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, John W.; Ali, Aamir; Amiri, Mandana; Araujo, Derek; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Chan, Manwei; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; hide

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) experiment aims to map the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at angular scales larger than a few degrees. Operating from Cerro Toco in the Atacama Desert of Chile, it will observe over 65% of the sky at 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz. In this paper we discuss the design, construction, and characterization of the CLASS 38 GHz detector focal plane, the first ever Q-band bolometric polarimeter array.

  8. The cosmology large angular scale surveyor (CLASS): 38-GHz detector array of bolometric polarimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, John W.; Ali, Aamir; Amiri, Mandana; Araujo, Derek; Bennet, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Chan, Manwei; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Crowe, Erik; Denis, Kevin; Dünner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Gothe, Dominik; Halpern, Mark; Harrington, Kathleen; Hilton, Gene; Hinshaw, Gary F.; Huang, Caroline; Irwin, Kent; Jones, Glenn; Karakula, John; Kogut, Alan J.; Larson, David; Limon, Michele; Lowry, Lindsay; Marriage, Tobias; Mehrle, Nicholas; Miller, Amber D.; Miller, Nathan; Moseley, Samuel H.; Novak, Giles; Reintsema, Carl; Rostem, Karwan; Stevenson, Thomas; Towner, Deborah; U-Yen, Kongpop; Wagner, Emily; Watts, Duncan; Wollack, Edward; Xu, Zhilei; Zeng, Lingzhen

    2014-07-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) experiment aims to map the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at angular scales larger than a few degrees. Operating from Cerro Toco in the Atacama Desert of Chile, it will observe over 65% of the sky at 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz. In this paper we discuss the design, construction, and characterization of the CLASS 38 GHz detector focal plane, the first ever Q-band bolometric polarimeter array.

  9. Three-dimensional cross point readout detector design for including depth information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Baek, Cheol-Ha

    2018-04-01

    We designed a depth-encoding positron emission tomography (PET) detector using a cross point readout method with wavelength-shifting (WLS) fibers. To evaluate the characteristics of the novel detector module and the PET system, we used the DETECT2000 to perform optical photon transport in the crystal array. The GATE was also used. The detector module is made up of four layers of scintillator arrays, the five layers of WLS fiber arrays, and two sensor arrays. The WLS fiber arrays in each layer cross each other to transport light to each sensor array. The two sensor arrays are coupled to the forward and left sides of the WLS fiber array, respectively. The identification of three-dimensional pixels was determined using a digital positioning algorithm. All pixels were well decoded, with the system resolution ranging from 2.11 mm to 2.29 mm at full width at half maximum (FWHM).

  10. A new recoil filter for {gamma}-detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heese, J; Lahmer, W; Maier, K H [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany); Janicki, M; Meczynski, W; Styczen, J [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1992-08-01

    A considerable improvement of gamma spectra recorded in heavy ion induced fusion evaporation residues can be achieved when gamma rays are detected in coincidence with the recoiling evaporations residues. This coincidence suppresses gamma rays from fission processes, Coulombic excitation, and reactions with target contaminations, and therefore cleans gamma spectra and improves the peak to background ratio. A sturdy detector for evaporation residues has been designed as an additional detector for the OSIRIS spectrometer. The recoil filter consists of two rings of six and twelve detector elements. In each detector element, nuclei hitting a thin Mylar foil produce secondary electrons, which are electrostatically accelerated and focussed onto a thin plastic scintillator. Recoiling evaporation residues are discriminated from other reaction products and scattered beam by the pulse height of the scintillation signal and time of flight. The detector signal is fast enough to allow the detection of an evaporation residue even if the scattered beam hits the detector first. In-beam experiment were performed with the reactions {sup 40}Ar+{sup 124}Sn, {sup 40}Ar+{sup 152}Sm at 185 MeV beam energy, and {sup 36}Ar+{sup 154,156}Gd at 175 MeV. In the latter two cases, fission amount to 50-75% of the total fusion cross section. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Advanced Antenna-Coupled Superconducting Detector Arrays for CMB Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, James

    2014-01-01

    We are developing high-sensitivity millimeter-wave detector arrays for measuring the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This development is directed to advance the technology readiness of the Inflation Probe mission in NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program. The Inflation Probe is a fourth-generation CMB satellite that will measure the polarization of the CMB to astrophysical limits, characterizing the inflationary polarization signal, mapping large-scale structure based on polarization induced by gravitational lensing, and mapping Galactic magnetic fields through measurements of polarized dust emission. The inflationary polarization signal is produced by a background of gravitational waves from the epoch of inflation, an exponential expansion of space-time in the early universe, with an amplitude that depends on the physical mechanism producing inflation. The inflationary polarization signal may be distinguished by its unique 'B-mode' vector properties from polarization from the density variations that predominantly source CMB temperature anisotropy. Mission concepts for the Inflation Probe are being developed in the US, Europe and Japan. The arrays are based on planar antennas that provide integral beam collimation, polarization analysis, and spectral band definition in a compact lithographed format that eliminates discrete fore-optics such as lenses and feedhorns. The antennas are coupled to transition-edge superconducting bolometers, read out with multiplexed SQUID current amplifiers. The superconducting sensors and readouts developed in this program share common technologies with NASA X-ray and FIR detector applications. Our program targets developments required for space observations, and we discuss our technical progress over the past two years and plans for future development. We are incorporating arrays into active sub-orbital and ground-based experiments, which advance technology readiness while producing state of the art CMB

  12. MUST: A silicon strip detector array for radioactive beam experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Blumenfeld, Y; Sauvestre, J E; Maréchal, F; Ottini, S; Alamanos, N; Barbier, A; Beaumel, D; Bonnereau, B; Charlet, D; Clavelin, J F; Courtat, P; Delbourgo-Salvador, P; Douet, R; Engrand, M; Ethvignot, T; Gillibert, A; Khan, E; Lapoux, V; Lagoyannis, A; Lavergne, L; Lebon, S; Lelong, P; Lesage, A; Le Ven, V; Lhenry, I; Martin, J M; Musumarra, A; Pita, S; Petizon, L; Pollacco, E; Pouthas, J; Richard, A; Rougier, D; Santonocito, D; Scarpaci, J A; Sida, J L; Soulet, C; Stutzmann, J S; Suomijärvi, T; Szmigiel, M; Volkov, P; Voltolini, G

    1999-01-01

    A new and innovative array, MUST, based on silicon strip technology and dedicated to the study of reactions induced by radioactive beams on light particles is described. The detector consists of 8 silicon strip - Si(Li) telescopes used to identify recoiling light charged particles through time of flight, energy loss and energy measurements and to determine precisely their scattering angle through X, Y position measurements. Each 60x60 mm sup 2 double sided silicon strip detector with 60 vertical and 60 horizontal strips yields an X-Y position resolution of 1 mm, an energy resolution of 50 keV, a time resolution of around 1 ns and a 500 keV energy threshold for protons. The backing Si(Li) detectors stop protons up to 25 MeV with a resolution of approximately 50 keV. CsI crystals read out by photo-diodes which stop protons up to 70 MeV are added to the telescopes for applications where higher energy particles need to be detected. The dedicated electronics in VXIbus standard allow us to house the 968 logic and a...

  13. Past and future detector arrays for complete event reconstruction in heavy-ion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardella, G.; Acosta, L.; Auditore, L.; Boiano, C.; Castoldi, A.; D'Andrea, M.; De Filippo, E.; Dell'Aquila, D.; De Luca, S.; Fichera, F.; Giudice, N.; Gnoffo, B.; Grimaldi, A.; Guazzoni, C.; Lanzalone, G.; Librizzi, F.; Lombardo, I.; Maiolino, C.; Maffesanti, S.; Martorana, N. S.; Norella, S.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Parsani, T.; Passaro, G.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Previdi, F.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Saccà, G.; Salemi, G.; Sciliberto, D.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Vigilante, M.

    2017-11-01

    Complex and more and more complete detector arrays have been developed in the last two decades, or are in advanced design stage, in different laboratories. Such arrays are necessary to fully characterize nuclear reactions induced by stable and exotic beams. The need for contemporary detection of charged particles, and/or γ -rays, and/or neutrons, has been stressed in many fields of nuclear structure and reaction dynamics, with particular attention to the improvement of both high angular and energy resolution. Some examples of detection systems adapted to various energy ranges is discussed. Emphasis is given to the possible update of relatively old 4π detectors with new electronics and new detection methods.

  14. Past and future detector arrays for complete event reconstruction in heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardella, G.; Acosta, L.; Auditore, L.

    2016-01-01

    Complex and more and more complete detector arrays have been developed in the last two decades, or are in advanced design stage, in different laboratories. Such arrays are necessary to fully characterize nuclear reactions induced by stable and exotic beams. The need for contemporary detection of charged particles, and/or γ-rays, and/or neutrons, has been stressed in many fields of nuclear structure and reaction dynamics, with particular attention to the improvement of both high angular and energy resolution. Some examples of detection systems adapted to various energy ranges is discussed. Emphasis is given to the possible update of relatively old 4π detectors with new electronics and new detection methods.

  15. Materials preparation and fabrication of pyroelectric polymer/silicon MOSFET detector arrays. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, P.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have delivered several 64-element linear arrays of pyroelectric elements fully integrated on silicon wafers with MOS readout devices. They have delivered detailed drawings of the linear arrays to LANL. They have processed a series of two inch wafers per submitted design. Each two inch wafer contains two 64 element arrays. After spin-coating copolymer onto the arrays, vacuum depositing the top electrodes, and polarizing the copolymer films so as to make them pyroelectrically active, each wafer was split in half. The authors developed a thicker oxide coating separating the extended gate electrode (beneath the polymer detector) from the silicon. This should reduce its parasitic capacitance and hence improve the S/N. They provided LANL three processed 64 element sensor arrays. Each array was affixed to a connector panel and selected solder pads of the common ground, the common source voltage supply connections, the 64 individual drain connections, and the 64 drain connections (for direct pyroelectric sensing response rather than the MOSFET action) were wire bonded to the connector panel solder pads. This entails (64 + 64 + 1 + 1) = 130 possible bond connections per 64 element array. This report now details the processing steps and the progress of the individual wafers as they were carried through from beginning to end

  16. Flat-plate photovoltaic array design optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is presented which integrates the results of specific studies in the areas of photovoltaic structural design optimization, optimization of array series/parallel circuit design, thermal design optimization, and optimization of environmental protection features. The analysis is based on minimizing the total photovoltaic system life-cycle energy cost including repair and replacement of failed cells and modules. This approach is shown to be a useful technique for array optimization, particularly when time-dependent parameters such as array degradation and maintenance are involved.

  17. A high resolution germanium detector array for hypernuclear studies at PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleser, Sebastian; Sanchez Lorente, Alicia; Steinen, Marcell [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Gerl, Juergen; Kojouharov, Ivan [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Iazzi, Felice [Politecnico, Torino, Turin (Italy); INFN, Torino, Turin (Italy); Pochodzalla, Josef; Rittgen, Kai; Sahin, Cihan [Institute for Nuclear Physics, JGU Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The PANDA experiment, planned at the FAIR facility in Darmstadt, aims at the high resolution γ-spectroscopy of double Λ hypernuclei. For this purpose a devoted detector setup is required, consisting of a primary nuclear target, an active secondary target and a germanium detector array for the γ-spectroscopy. Due to the limited space within the PANDA detector a compact design is required. In particular the conventional LN{sub 2} cooling system must be replaced by an electro-mechanical device and a new arrangement of the crystals is needed. This poster shows the ongoing development of the germanium detectors. Test measurements of a single crystal prototype with an improved cooling concept are shown. Thermal simulations for a triple crystal detector are presented. Aditionally studies of the optimization of the detector arrangement inside the PANDA barrel spectrometer are shown. Finally the status on digital pulse shape analysis is presented which will be necessary to deal with high counting rates and to recover the high original energy resolution in case of neutron damage.

  18. Design of a wire imaging synchrotron radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, J.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; Hogan, A.; King, M.; Rowe, W.; Watson, S.; Von Zanthier, C.; Briggs, D.D.; Levi, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper documents the design of a detector invented to measure the positions of synchrotron radiation beams for the precision energy spectrometers of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The energy measurements involve the determination, on a pulse-by-pulse basis, of the separation of pairs of intense beams of synchrotron photons in the MeV energy range. The detector intercepts the beams with arrays of fine wires. The ejection of Compton recoil electrons results in charges being developed in the wires, thus enabling a determination of beam positions. 10 refs., 4 figs

  19. Design of a lepton detector for ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnstein, R.; Carithers, W.C.; Duong-van, M.

    1975-01-01

    The theoretical background is given for a proposed experiment to detect W mesons using their leptonic decay mode. A lepton detector was designed for use at the planned ISABELLE proton--proton colliding beam storage rings. The general configuration of the detector is shown, and an electron identification module, an electron-hadron calorimeter, methods of muon identification, and an optional central detector (magnetic solenoid spectrometer) are discussed

  20. Designing Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Report presents overview of state of art in design techniques for flat-plate solar photovoltaic modules and arrays. Paper discusses design requirements, design analyses, and test methods identified and developed for this technology over past several years in effort to reduce cost and improve utility and reliability for broad spectrum of terrestrial applications.

  1. A main amplifier circuit and data acquisition system for charged particle detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Rui; Ge Yucheng

    2011-01-01

    The charged particle detector array has huge amounts of signal and needs high counting rate. To meet the requirements, a main amplifier and analog-to-digital conversion circuit based on high-speed op-amp chips and ADC chip was designed. A 51-MCU was used to control the circuit of ADC and the USB communication chip. The signals were digitized and uploaded by the MCU-ADC-USB circuit. The whole system has a compact hardware structure and a reasonable controlling software, which meet the design requirements. (authors)

  2. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Hugh T; Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S; Weiss, Joel T; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-03-01

    A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8-12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10-100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. The characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector are detailed.

  3. Study and characterization of arrays of detectors for dosimetric verification of radiotherapy, analysis of business solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gago Arias, A.; Brualla Gonzalez, L.; Gomez Rodriguez, F.; Gonzalez Castano, D. M.; Pardo Montero, J.; Luna Vega, V.; Mosquera Sueiro, J.; Sanchez Garcia, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of the detector arrays developed by different business houses to the demand for devices that speed up the verification process. Will analyze the effect of spatial response of individual detectors in the measurement of dose distributions, modeling the same and analyzing the ability of the arrays to detect variations in a treatment yield.

  4. Comparison of Thermal Detector Arrays for Off-Axis THz Holography and Real-Time THz Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Hack

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In terahertz (THz materials science, imaging by scanning prevails when low power THz sources are used. However, the application of array detectors operating with high power THz sources is increasingly reported. We compare the imaging properties of four different array detectors that are able to record THz radiation directly. Two micro-bolometer arrays are designed for infrared imaging in the 8–14 μm wavelength range, but are based on different absorber materials (i vanadium oxide; (ii amorphous silicon; (iii a micro-bolometer array optimized for recording THz radiation based on silicon nitride; and (iv a pyroelectric array detector for THz beam profile measurements. THz wavelengths of 96.5 μm, 118.8 μm, and 393.6 μm from a powerful far infrared laser were used to assess the technical performance in terms of signal to noise ratio, detector response and detectivity. The usefulness of the detectors for beam profiling and digital holography is assessed. Finally, the potential and limitation for real-time digital holography are discussed.

  5. Comparison of Thermal Detector Arrays for Off-Axis THz Holography and Real-Time THz Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Erwin; Valzania, Lorenzo; Gäumann, Gregory; Shalaby, Mostafa; Hauri, Christoph P; Zolliker, Peter

    2016-02-06

    In terahertz (THz) materials science, imaging by scanning prevails when low power THz sources are used. However, the application of array detectors operating with high power THz sources is increasingly reported. We compare the imaging properties of four different array detectors that are able to record THz radiation directly. Two micro-bolometer arrays are designed for infrared imaging in the 8-14 μm wavelength range, but are based on different absorber materials (i) vanadium oxide; (ii) amorphous silicon; (iii) a micro-bolometer array optimized for recording THz radiation based on silicon nitride; and (iv) a pyroelectric array detector for THz beam profile measurements. THz wavelengths of 96.5 μm, 118.8 μm, and 393.6 μm from a powerful far infrared laser were used to assess the technical performance in terms of signal to noise ratio, detector response and detectivity. The usefulness of the detectors for beam profiling and digital holography is assessed. Finally, the potential and limitation for real-time digital holography are discussed.

  6. A high resolution germanium detector array for hypernuclear studies at PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleser, Sebastian; Sanchez Lorente, Alicia; Steinen, Marcell [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Gerl, Juergen; Kojouharova, Jasmina; Kojouharov, Ivan [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Iazzi, Felice [Politecnico, Torino (Italy); INFN, Torino (Italy); Pochodzalla, Josef; Rittgen, Kai; Sahin, Cihan [Institute for Nuclear Physics, JGU Mainz (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The PANDA experiment, planned at the FAIR facility in Darmstadt, aims at the high resolution γ-spectroscopy of double Λ hypernuclei. For this purpose a devoted detector setup is required, consisting of a primary nuclear target, an active secondary target and a germanium detector array for the γ-spectroscopy. Due to the limited space within the PANDA detector a compact design is required. In particular the conventional LN{sub 2} cooling system must be replaced by an electro mechanical device and a new arrangement of the crystals is needed. This presentation shows the progress in the development of the germanium detectors. First results of in-beam measurements at COSY with a new electro mechanically cooled single crystal prototype are presented. Digital pulse shape analysis is used to disentangle pile up events due to the high event rate. This analysis technique also allows to recover the high original energy resolution in case of neutron damage. Finally the status of the new triple crystal detector prototype is given.

  7. Evaluation of digital detector arrays systems for industrial radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Aline S.S.; Oliveira, Davi F.; Gomes, Célio S.; Azeredo, Soraia R.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: aline@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: davi@lin.ufrj.br.br, E-mail: celio@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: soraia@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: davi.oliveira@uerj.br [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentação Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Digital Detector Arrays (DDA) or Flat Panel Detector (FPD) is a highly efficient technique that is used in nondestructive testing of internal features of an object. The evaluation of DDA systems for industrial radiography is important to ensure the image quality and to enables long-term stability of this system. This evaluation is specified by ASTM E2737 - 10, which describes the fundamental parameters of DDA systems to be measured. The tests require the usage of either the five-groove wedge or the duplex plate phantom with separate Image Quality Indicators (IQIs). The purpose of this work was evaluate the radiographic performance achieved using both techniques in two DDA systems manufactured by GEIT: DXR250P and DXR250V, which have thallium-doped cesium iodide (CsI:Tl) and terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb - GOS) scintillators, respectively. For this purpose, it was used an X-ray equipment as radiation source. The image quality parameters analyzed were Image Lag (IL), Offset Level (OL), Bad Pixel distribution, Burn In (BI), Spatial Resolution (SR), Material Thickness Range (MTR), Contrast Sensitivity (CS), Signal Level (SL) and Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR). As result of this study, has been observed that the use of the five-groove wedge phantom made the measurements to become easier to execute. Regarding the DDA system, the DXR250P presented more IL and BI, but produced images with better CS and SNR and needed a dose almost twice smaller than the DXR250V to achieve a similar SL. (author)

  8. Evaluation of digital detector arrays systems for industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Aline S.S.; Oliveira, Davi F.; Gomes, Célio S.; Azeredo, Soraia R.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2017-01-01

    Digital Detector Arrays (DDA) or Flat Panel Detector (FPD) is a highly efficient technique that is used in nondestructive testing of internal features of an object. The evaluation of DDA systems for industrial radiography is important to ensure the image quality and to enables long-term stability of this system. This evaluation is specified by ASTM E2737 - 10, which describes the fundamental parameters of DDA systems to be measured. The tests require the usage of either the five-groove wedge or the duplex plate phantom with separate Image Quality Indicators (IQIs). The purpose of this work was evaluate the radiographic performance achieved using both techniques in two DDA systems manufactured by GEIT: DXR250P and DXR250V, which have thallium-doped cesium iodide (CsI:Tl) and terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb - GOS) scintillators, respectively. For this purpose, it was used an X-ray equipment as radiation source. The image quality parameters analyzed were Image Lag (IL), Offset Level (OL), Bad Pixel distribution, Burn In (BI), Spatial Resolution (SR), Material Thickness Range (MTR), Contrast Sensitivity (CS), Signal Level (SL) and Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR). As result of this study, has been observed that the use of the five-groove wedge phantom made the measurements to become easier to execute. Regarding the DDA system, the DXR250P presented more IL and BI, but produced images with better CS and SNR and needed a dose almost twice smaller than the DXR250V to achieve a similar SL. (author)

  9. Development of a High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector for Synchrotrons and XFELs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Joel Todd

    Advances in synchrotron radiation light source technology have opened new lines of inquiry in material science, biology, and everything in between. However, x-ray detector capabilities must advance in concert with light source technology to fully realize experimental possibilities. X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) place particularly large demands on the capabilities of detectors, and developments towards diffraction-limited storage ring sources also necessitate detectors capable of measuring very high flux [1-3]. The detector described herein builds on the Mixed Mode Pixel Array Detector (MM-PAD) framework, developed previously by our group to perform high dynamic range imaging, and the Adaptive Gain Integrating Pixel Detector (AGIPD) developed for the European XFEL by a collaboration between Deustsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), the Paul-Scherrer-Institute (PSI), the University of Hamburg, and the University of Bonn, led by Heinz Graafsma [4, 5]. The feasibility of combining adaptive gain with charge removal techniques to increase dynamic range in XFEL experiments is assessed by simulating XFEL scatter with a pulsed infrared laser. The strategy is incorporated into pixel prototypes which are evaluated with direct current injection to simulate very high incident x-ray flux. A fully functional 16x16 pixel hybrid integrating x-ray detector featuring several different pixel architectures based on the prototypes was developed. This dissertation describes its operation and characterization. To extend dynamic range, charge is removed from the integration node of the front-end amplifier without interrupting integration. The number of times this process occurs is recorded by a digital counter in the pixel. The parameter limiting full well is thereby shifted from the size of an integration capacitor to the depth of a digital counter. The result is similar to that achieved by counting pixel array detectors, but the integrators presented here are designed to tolerate a

  10. Study and Design of Differential Microphone Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Benesty, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Microphone arrays have attracted a lot of interest over the last few decades since they have the potential to solve many important problems such as noise reduction/speech enhancement, source separation, dereverberation, spatial sound recording, and source localization/tracking, to name a few. However, the design and implementation of microphone arrays with beamforming algorithms is not a trivial task when it comes to processing broadband signals such as speech. Indeed, in most sensor arrangements, the beamformer tends to have a frequency-dependent response. One exception, perhaps, is the family of differential microphone arrays (DMAs) that have the promise to form frequency-independent responses. Moreover, they have the potential to attain high directional gains with small and compact apertures. As a result, this type of microphone arrays has drawn much research and development attention recently. This book is intended to provide a systematic study of DMAs from a signal processing perspective. The primary obj...

  11. High density processing electronics for superconducting tunnel junction x-ray detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburton, W.K., E-mail: bill@xia.com [XIA LLC, 31057 Genstar Road, Hayward, CA 94544 (United States); Harris, J.T. [XIA LLC, 31057 Genstar Road, Hayward, CA 94544 (United States); Friedrich, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) are excellent soft x-ray (100–2000 eV) detectors, particularly for synchrotron applications, because of their ability to obtain energy resolutions below 10 eV at count rates approaching 10 kcps. In order to achieve useful solid detection angles with these very small detectors, they are typically deployed in large arrays – currently with 100+ elements, but with 1000 elements being contemplated. In this paper we review a 5-year effort to develop compact, computer controlled low-noise processing electronics for STJ detector arrays, focusing on the major issues encountered and our solutions to them. Of particular interest are our preamplifier design, which can set the STJ operating points under computer control and achieve 2.7 eV energy resolution; our low noise power supply, which produces only 2 nV/√Hz noise at the preamplifier's critical cascode node; our digital processing card that digitizes and digitally processes 32 channels; and an STJ I–V curve scanning algorithm that computes noise as a function of offset voltage, allowing an optimum operating point to be easily selected. With 32 preamplifiers laid out on a custom 3U EuroCard, and the 32 channel digital card in a 3U PXI card format, electronics for a 128 channel array occupy only two small chassis, each the size of a National Instruments 5-slot PXI crate, and allow full array control with simple extensions of existing beam line data collection packages.

  12. A CMOS ASIC Design for SiPM Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Samrat; Banks, Lushon; Chen, Shaw-Pin; Xu, Wenbin; Lewellen, Thomas K; Miyaoka, Robert S; Rudell, Jacques C

    2011-12-01

    Our lab has previously reported on novel board-level readout electronics for an 8×8 silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) array featuring row/column summation technique to reduce the hardware requirements for signal processing. We are taking the next step by implementing a monolithic CMOS chip which is based on the row-column architecture. In addition, this paper explores the option of using diagonal summation as well as calibration to compensate for temperature and process variations. Further description of a timing pickoff signal which aligns all of the positioning (spatial channels) pulses in the array is described. The ASIC design is targeted to be scalable with the detector size and flexible to accommodate detectors from different vendors. This paper focuses on circuit implementation issues associated with the design of the ASIC to interface our Phase II MiCES FPGA board with a SiPM array. Moreover, a discussion is provided for strategies to eventually integrate all the analog and mixed-signal electronics with the SiPM, on either a single-silicon substrate or multi-chip module (MCM).

  13. Preliminary A ampersand PCT multiple detector design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberson, G.P.; Martz, H.E.; Camp, D.C.; Decman, D.J.; Johansson, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    The next generation, multi-detector active and passive computed tomography (A ampersand PCT) scanner will be optimized for speed and accuracy. At the Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) we have demonstrated the trade-offs between different A ampersand PCT design parameters that affect the speed and quality of the assay results. These fundamental parameters govern the optimum system design. Although the multi-detector scanner design has priority put on speed to increase waste drum throughput, higher speed should not compromise assay accuracy. One way to increase the speed of the A ampersand PCT technology is to use multiple detectors. This yields a linear speedup by a factor approximately equal to the number of detectors used without a compromise in system accuracy. There are many different design scenarios that can be developed using multiple detectors. Here we describe four different scenarios and discuss the trade-offs between them. Also, some considerations are given in this design description for the implementation of a multiple detector technology in a field- deployable mobile trailer system

  14. Standard practice for manufacturing characterization of digital detector arrays

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes the evaluation of Digital Detector Arrays (DDAs), and assures that one common standard exists for quantitative comparison of DDAs so that an appropriate DDA is selected to meet NDT requirements. 1.2 This practice is intended for use by manufacturers or integrators of DDAs to provide quantitative results of DDA characteristics for NDT user or purchaser consumption. Some of these tests require specialized test phantoms to assure consistency among results among suppliers or manufacturers. These tests are not intended for users to complete, nor are they intended for long term stability tracking and lifetime measurements. However, they may be used for this purpose, if so desired. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropr...

  15. Infrared detectors and focal plane arrays; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 18, 19, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereniak, Eustace L.; Sampson, Robert E.

    1990-09-01

    The papers contained in this volume provide an overview of recent advances and the current state of developments in the field of infrared detectors and focal plane arrays. Topics discussed include nickel silicide Schottky-barrier detectors for short-wavelength infrared applications; high performance PtSi linear and focal plane arrays; and multispectral band Schottky-barrier IRSSD for remote-sensing applications. Papers are also presented on the performance of an Insi hybrid focal array; characterization of IR focal plane test stations; GaAs CCD readout for engineered bandgap detectors; and fire detection system for aircraft cargo bays.

  16. Design Report for Low Power Acoustic Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    high speed integrated circuit (VHSIC) hardware description language ( VHDL ) implementation of both the HED and DCD detectors. Figures 4 and 5 show the...the hardware design, target detection algorithm design in both MATLAB and VHDL , and typical performance results. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Acoustic low...5 2.4 Algorithm Implementation ..............................................................................................6 3. Testing

  17. Active pixel sensor array as a detector for electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Leblanc, Philippe; Duttweiler, Fred; Jin, Liang; Bouwer, James C; Peltier, Steve; Ellisman, Mark; Bieser, Fred; Matis, Howard S; Wieman, Howard; Denes, Peter; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Xuong, Nguyen-Huu

    2005-09-01

    A new high-resolution recording device for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is urgently needed. Neither film nor CCD cameras are systems that allow for efficient 3-D high-resolution particle reconstruction. We tested an active pixel sensor (APS) array as a replacement device at 200, 300, and 400 keV using a JEOL JEM-2000 FX II and a JEM-4000 EX electron microscope. For this experiment, we used an APS prototype with an area of 64 x 64 pixels of 20 microm x 20 microm pixel pitch. Single-electron events were measured by using very low beam intensity. The histogram of the incident electron energy deposited in the sensor shows a Landau distribution at low energies, as well as unexpected events at higher absorbed energies. After careful study, we concluded that backscattering in the silicon substrate and re-entering the sensitive epitaxial layer a second time with much lower speed caused the unexpected events. Exhaustive simulation experiments confirmed the existence of these back-scattered electrons. For the APS to be usable, the back-scattered electron events must be eliminated, perhaps by thinning the substrate to less than 30 microm. By using experimental data taken with an APS chip with a standard silicon substrate (300 microm) and adjusting the results to take into account the effect of a thinned silicon substrate (30 microm), we found an estimate of the signal-to-noise ratio for a back-thinned detector in the energy range of 200-400 keV was about 10:1 and an estimate for the spatial resolution was about 10 microm.

  18. Large arrays of dual-polarized multichroic TES detectors for CMB measurements with the SPT-3G receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada, Chrystian M.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Anderson, Adam J.; Avva, Jessica; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Arnold, Kam S.; Austermann, Jason; Bender, Amy N.; Benson, Bradford A.; Bleem, Lindsey; Byrum, Karen; Carlstrom, John E.; Carter, Faustin W.; Chang, Clarence; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Cukierman, Ari; Czaplewski, David A.; Ding, Junjia; Divan, Ralu N. S.; de Haan, Tijmen; Dobbs, Matt; Dutcher, Daniel; Everett, Wenderline; Gannon, Renae N.; Guyser, Robert J.; Halverson, Nils W.; Harrington, Nicholas L.; Hattori, Kaori; Henning, Jason W.; Hilton, Gene C.; Holzapfel, William L.; Huang, Nicholas; Irwin, Kent D.; Jeong, Oliver; Khaire, Trupti; Korman, Milo; Kubik, Donna L.; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Lee, Adrian T.; Leitch, Erik M.; Lendinez Escudero, Sergi; Meyer, Stephan S.; Miller, Christina S.; Montgomery, Joshua; Nadolski, Andrew; Natoli, Tyler J.; Nguyen, Hogan; Novosad, Valentyn; Padin, Stephen; Pan, Zhaodi; Pearson, John E.; Rahlin, Alexandra; Reichardt, Christian L.; Ruhl, John E.; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Shirley, Ian; Sayre, James T.; Shariff, Jamil A.; Shirokoff, Erik D.; Stan, Liliana; Stark, Antony A.; Sobrin, Joshua; Story, Kyle; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tang, Qing Yang; Thakur, Ritoban B.; Thompson, Keith L.; Tucker, Carole E.; Vanderlinde, Keith; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Wang, Gensheng; Whitehorn, Nathan; Yefremenko, Volodymyr; Yoon, Ki Won

    2016-07-01

    Detectors for cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments are now essentially background limited, so a straightforward alternative to improve sensitivity is to increase the number of detectors. Large arrays of multichroic pixels constitute an economical approach to increasing the number of detectors within a given focal plane area. Here, we present the fabrication of large arrays of dual-polarized multichroic transition-edge-sensor (TES) bolometers for the South Pole Telescope third-generation CMB receiver (SPT-3G). The complete SPT-3G receiver will have 2690 pixels, each with six detectors, allowing for individual measurement of three spectral bands (centered at 95 GHz, 150 GHz and 220 GHz) in two orthogonal polarizations. In total, the SPT-3G focal plane will have 16140 detectors. Each pixel is comprised of a broad-band sinuous antenna coupled to a niobium microstrip transmission line. In-line filters are used to define the different band-passes before the millimeter-wavelength signal is fed to the respective Ti/Au TES sensors. Detectors are read out using a 64x frequency domain multiplexing (fMux) scheme. The microfabrication of the SPT-3G detector arrays involves a total of 18 processes, including 13 lithography steps. Together with the fabrication process, the effect of processing on the Ti/Au TES's Tc is discussed. In addition, detectors fabricated with Ti/Au TES films with Tc between 400 mK 560 mK are presented and their thermal characteristics are evaluated. Optical characterization of the arrays is presented as well, indicating that the response of the detectors is in good agreement with the design values for all three spectral bands (95 GHz, 150 GHz, and 220 GHz). The measured optical efficiency of the detectors is between 0.3 and 0.8. Results discussed here are extracted from a batch of research of development wafers used to develop the baseline process for the fabrication of the arrays of detectors to be deployed with the SPT-3G receiver. Results from

  19. Design of neutron detectors utilising luminescent glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spowart, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Impetus for the development of new neutron detector designs has derived from the worldwide commissioning of neutron spallation sources. The design concepts, and principal methods of utilisation of these major installations, have been recently reviewed. Their principal feature of interest is their broadband neutron emission allowing neutron investigations of all types of structure in materials from biological molecules to steels. Conventional neutron detectors are gas-filled devices, based on BF/sub 3/ or /sup 3/He gas. Their major advantage is their intrinsically low background count. Their principal disadvantage is their slow response time (10-100 μs), high cost and relative lack of flexibility in design to cope with large areas or complex geometry detection. They are, however, long established and the research facilities around the world have a heavy investment in the interpretative hardware for gas detectors

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of the standardization of {sup 22}Na using scintillation detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Y., E-mail: yss.sato@aist.go.j [National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Quantum Radiation Division, Radioactivity and Neutron Section, Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Murayama, H. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamada, T. [Japan Radioisotope Association, 2-28-45, Hon-komagome, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8941 (Japan); National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Quantum Radiation Division, Radioactivity and Neutron Section, Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Tohoku University, 6-6, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Hasegawa, T. [Kitasato University, 1-15-1, Kitasato, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 228-8555 (Japan); Oda, K. [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1 Nakacho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); Unno, Y.; Yunoki, A. [National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Quantum Radiation Division, Radioactivity and Neutron Section, Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    In order to calibrate PET devices by a sealed point source, we contrived an absolute activity measurement method for the sealed point source using scintillation detector arrays. This new method was verified by EGS5 Monte Carlo simulation.

  1. Assembly and Integration Process of the First High Density Detector Array for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaqiong; Choi, Steve; Ho, Shuay-Pwu; Crowley, Kevin T.; Salatino, Maria; Simon, Sara M.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Nati, Federico; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) upgrade on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) consists of multichroicTransition Edge Sensor (TES) detector arrays to measure the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization anisotropies in multiple frequency bands. The first AdvACT detector array, sensitive to both 150 and 230 GHz, is fabricated on a 150 mm diameter wafer and read out with a completely different scheme compared to ACTPol. Approximately 2000 TES bolometers are packed into the wafer leading to both a much denser detector density and readout circuitry. The demonstration of the assembly and integration of the AdvACT arrays is important for the next generation CMB experiments, which will continue to increase the pixel number and density. We present the detailed assembly process of the first AdvACT detector array.

  2. Superconducting Thin-Film Interconnects for Cryogenic Photon Detector Arrays, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced imaging spectrometers for x-ray astronomy will require significant improvements in the high density interconnects between the detector arrays and the first...

  3. Graphical user interface for a dual-module EMCCD x-ray detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Huang, Ying; Qu, Bin; Gupta, Sandesh K.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    A new Graphical User Interface (GUI) was developed using Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW) for a high-resolution, high-sensitivity Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII), which is a new x-ray detector for radiographic and fluoroscopic imaging, consisting of an array of Electron-Multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) each having a variable on-chip electron-multiplication gain of up to 2000x to reduce the effect of readout noise. To enlarge the field-of-view (FOV), each EMCCD sensor is coupled to an x-ray phosphor through a fiberoptic taper. Two EMCCD camera modules are used in our prototype to form a computer-controlled array; however, larger arrays are under development. The new GUI provides patient registration, EMCCD module control, image acquisition, and patient image review. Images from the array are stitched into a 2kx1k pixel image that can be acquired and saved at a rate of 17 Hz (faster with pixel binning). When reviewing the patient's data, the operator can select images from the patient's directory tree listed by the GUI and cycle through the images using a slider bar. Commonly used camera parameters including exposure time, trigger mode, and individual EMCCD gain can be easily adjusted using the GUI. The GUI is designed to accommodate expansion of the EMCCD array to even larger FOVs with more modules. The high-resolution, high-sensitivity EMCCD modular-array SSXII imager with the new user-friendly GUI should enable angiographers and interventionalists to visualize smaller vessels and endovascular devices, helping them to make more accurate diagnoses and to perform more precise image-guided interventions.

  4. Graphical User Interface for a Dual-Module EMCCD X-ray Detector Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Huang, Ying; Qu, Bin; Gupta, Sandesh K; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-03-16

    A new Graphical User Interface (GUI) was developed using Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW) for a high-resolution, high-sensitivity Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII), which is a new x-ray detector for radiographic and fluoroscopic imaging, consisting of an array of Electron-Multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) each having a variable on-chip electron-multiplication gain of up to 2000× to reduce the effect of readout noise. To enlarge the field-of-view (FOV), each EMCCD sensor is coupled to an x-ray phosphor through a fiberoptic taper. Two EMCCD camera modules are used in our prototype to form a computer-controlled array; however, larger arrays are under development. The new GUI provides patient registration, EMCCD module control, image acquisition, and patient image review. Images from the array are stitched into a 2k×1k pixel image that can be acquired and saved at a rate of 17 Hz (faster with pixel binning). When reviewing the patient's data, the operator can select images from the patient's directory tree listed by the GUI and cycle through the images using a slider bar. Commonly used camera parameters including exposure time, trigger mode, and individual EMCCD gain can be easily adjusted using the GUI. The GUI is designed to accommodate expansion of the EMCCD array to even larger FOVs with more modules. The high-resolution, high-sensitivity EMCCD modular-array SSXII imager with the new user-friendly GUI should enable angiographers and interventionalists to visualize smaller vessels and endovascular devices, helping them to make more accurate diagnoses and to perform more precise image-guided interventions.

  5. Units of signals in the surface and underground scintillation detectors of the Yakutsk array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedenko, L G; Fedorova, G F; Roganova, T M

    2013-01-01

    Signals in the surface and underground scintillation detectors from the extensive air shower particles at the Yakutsk array are measured in some practical units. These units are signals in detectors caused by the near vertical muons. These signals from the near vertical muons in the surface and underground detectors have been simulated with the help of the GEANT4 package. These simulations follow up the real experimental calibration of the surface and underground detectors carried out at the Yakutsk array. Results of simulations show the noticeable difference of ∼5% in energies deposited in these two types of detectors. This difference should be taken into account to interpret correctly data on the fraction of muons observed at the Yakutsk array and to make real conclusions about the composition of the primary cosmic radiation at ultra-high energies.

  6. Characterization of X3 Silicon Detectors for the ELISSA Array at ELI-NP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnevskaya, S.; Balabanski, D. L.; Choudhury, D.; Cognata, M. La; Constantin, P.; Filipescu, D. M.; Ghita, D. G.; Guardo, G. L.; Lattuada, D.; Matei, C.; Rotaru, A.; Spitaleri, C.; State, A.; Xu, Y.

    2018-01-01

    Position-sensitive silicon strip detectors represent one of the best solutions for the detection of charged particles as they provide good energy and position resolution over a large range of energies. A silicon array coupled with the gamma beams at the ELI-NP facility would allow measuring photodissociation reactions of interest for Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and on heavy nuclei intervening in the p-process. Forty X3 detectors for our ELISSA (ELI-NP Silicon Strip Detectors Array) project have been recently purchased and tested. We investigated several specifications, such as leakage currents, depletion voltage, and detector stability under vacuum. The energy and position resolution, and ballistic deficit were measured and analyzed. This paper presents the main results of our extensive testing. The measured energy resolution for the X3 detectors is better than results published for similar arrays (ANASEN or ORRUBA).

  7. Design of GRM phoswich detector readout system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiangtao; Dong Yongwei; Song Liming; Wu Bobing; Zhang Yongjie; Xu He

    2014-01-01

    A set of mixed-signal read out system was designed for the phoswich detectors of the γ-ray burst monitor in the SVOM satellite, which was used to obtain the amplitude and the width of the voltage pulse that came from the GRM phoswich detector, and classify the signals. The FPGA was used to control the timing in the system, high-speed peak holding circuit was used to get the peak of voltage pulse, and the RS232 interface was used to complete the data exchange between the system and the PC. The test results show that this design can achieve the data acquisition and the discrimination. (authors)

  8. Enhancement of concentration range of chromatographically detectable components with array detector mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enke, Christie

    2013-02-19

    Methods and instruments for high dynamic range analysis of sample components are described. A sample is subjected to time-dependent separation, ionized, and the ions dispersed with a constant integration time across an array of detectors according to the ions m/z values. Each of the detectors in the array has a dynamically adjustable gain or a logarithmic response function, producing an instrument capable of detecting a ratio of responses or 4 or more orders of magnitude.

  9. On site calibration for new fluorescence detectors of the telescope array experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuno, H.; Murano, Y.; Kawana, S.; Tameda, Y.; Taketa, A.; Ikeda, D.; Udo, S.; Ogio, S.; Fukushima, M.; Azuma, R.; Fukuda, M.; Inoue, N.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Shibata, T.; Takeda, M.; Tsunesada, Y.

    2009-01-01

    The Telescope Array experiment is searching for the origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using a ground array of particle detectors and three fluorescence telescope stations. The precise calibration of the fluorescence detectors is important for small systematic errors in shower reconstruction. This paper details the process of calibrating cameras for two of the fluorescence telescope stations. This paper provides the operational results of these camera calibrations.

  10. Simulation of sparse matrix array designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Rainer; Heckel, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    Matrix phased array probes are becoming more prominently used in industrial applications. The main drawbacks, using probes incorporating a very large number of transducer elements, are needed for an appropriate cabling and an ultrasonic device offering many parallel channels. Matrix arrays designed for extended functionality feature at least 64 or more elements. Typical arrangements are square matrices, e.g., 8 by 8 or 11 by 11 or rectangular matrixes, e.g., 8 by 16 or 10 by 12 to fit a 128-channel phased array system. In some phased array systems, the number of simultaneous active elements is limited to a certain number, e.g., 32 or 64. Those setups do not allow running the probe with all elements active, which may cause a significant change in the directivity pattern of the resulting sound beam. When only a subset of elements can be used during a single acquisition, different strategies may be applied to collect enough data for rebuilding the missing information from the echo signal. Omission of certain elements may be one approach, overlay of subsequent shots with different active areas may be another one. This paper presents the influence of a decreased number of active elements on the sound field and their distribution on the array. Solutions using subsets with different element activity patterns on matrix arrays and their advantages and disadvantages concerning the sound field are evaluated using semi-analytical simulation tools. Sound field criteria are discussed, which are significant for non-destructive testing results and for the system setup.

  11. A novel method to design sparse linear arrays for ultrasonic phased array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Chen, Bin; Shi, Ke-Ren

    2006-12-22

    In ultrasonic phased array testing, a sparse array can increase the resolution by enlarging the aperture without adding system complexity. Designing a sparse array involves choosing the best or a better configuration from a large number of candidate arrays. We firstly designed sparse arrays by using a genetic algorithm, but found that the arrays have poor performance and poor consistency. So, a method based on the Minimum Redundancy Linear Array was then adopted. Some elements are determined by the minimum-redundancy array firstly in order to ensure spatial resolution and then a genetic algorithm is used to optimize the remaining elements. Sparse arrays designed by this method have much better performance and consistency compared to the arrays designed only by a genetic algorithm. Both simulation and experiment confirm the effectiveness.

  12. Chemical imaging of cotton fibers using an infrared microscope and a focal-plane array detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this presentation, the chemical imaging of cotton fibers with an infrared microscope and a Focal-Plane Array (FPA) detector will be discussed. Infrared spectroscopy can provide us with information on the structure and quality of cotton fibers. In addition, FPA detectors allow for simultaneous spe...

  13. Trigger and aperture of the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anticic, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Baecker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Belletoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Castro, M. L. Diaz; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Froehlich, U.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gora, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hoerandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D. -H.; Krieger, A.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Aguera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafa, M.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parra, A.; Parrisius, J.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Riviere, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santo, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuessler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijarvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Susa, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tarutina, T.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Peixoto, C. J. Todero; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2010-01-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consists of 1600 water-Cherenkov detectors, for the study of extensive air showers (EAS) generated by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. We describe the trigger hierarchy, from the identification of candidate showers at the level of a single

  14. Infrared detectors and arrays; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 6, 7, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dereniak, E.L.

    1988-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume provide an overview of recent advances in theoretical and experimental research related to IR detector materials and arrays. The major subject areas covered include IR Schottky barrier silicide arrays, HdCdTe developments, SPRITE technology, superlattice or bandgap-engineered devices, extrinsic silicon technology, indium antimonide technology, and pyroelectric arrays. Papers are presented on time division multiplexed time delay integration, spatial noise in staring IR focal plane arrays, pyroelectrics in a harsh environment, and testing of focal plane arrays

  15. The system of the designing for PET detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Zongliang

    2006-01-01

    PET stands for Positron Emission Tomography, a new nuclear medicine imaging device. PET detector is the key of PET. This paper introduces a system of the designing for PET detector. The system can be used to design various PET detector. A PET detector BLOCK with 8 x 8 crystals has been designed and built by this system. (authors)

  16. Design innovations in neutron and gamma detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, K.R.

    2003-01-01

    Neutron and gamma radiation needs to be monitored in most nuclear installations since it is highly penetrating. On-line monitoring of these radiations is very important for the safe and controlled operation of nuclear reactors, accelerators etc. Several design innovations have been carried out on gas ionisation detectors such as boron-lined proportional counters and ion chambers, fission detectors, gamma ion chambers as well as self-powered detectors. The use of additional structures within boron-lined detectors has enhanced their neutron sensitivity without a corresponding increase in the unwanted gamma sensitivity. The neutron sensitivity of fission counters can be enhanced by designing them as transmission line devices. Ion chambers with two and six pairs of electrodes have been developed for monitoring pulsed x-ray background at accelerator areas. Ion chambers have been employed at gamma fields up to 80 kR/h by deriving the exposure levels on-line using microcontroller devices programmed on the basis of theoretical and empirical formulas. The use of gas electron multiplier foils is proposed for charge multiplication in ion chambers. Self-powered detectors with new emitter materials like Hi, Ni and Inconel have been developed. (author)

  17. Development of a charged particle detector array in Pelletron-LINAC facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Bency; Inkar, A.L.; Saxena, A.; Vind, R.P.; Gupta, Y.K.; Biswas, D.C.; Nayak, B.K.; Thomas, R.G.; Danu, L.S.; Choudhury, R.K.; Kailas, S.; Topkar, A.; Venkatramanan, S.; Kumar, Manish; Sunilkumar, S.

    2010-01-01

    A charged particle detector array consisting of 50 Si-CsI detector telescopes for study of heavy-ion reactions is under construction in BARC-TIFR Pelletron-LINAC facility. Developmental work carried out for the detector modules, front-end and pulse shape discrimination electronics, scattering chamber and other mechanical parts are summarized. Some new ideas developed during the course of work are pointed out. (author)

  18. Norm based design of fault detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Mike Lind; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The design of fault detectors for fault detection and isolation (FDI) in dynamic systems is considered in this paper from a norm based point of view. An analysis of norm based threshold selection is given based on different formulations of FDI problems. Both the nominal FDI problem as well...

  19. Build-up of the silicon micro-strip detector array in ETF of HIRFL-CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Pengfei; Li Zhankui; Li Haixia

    2014-01-01

    Silicon micro-strip detectors have been widely used in the world-famous nuclear physics laboratories due to their better position resolution and energy resolution. Double-sided silicon micro-strip detectors with a position resolution of 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm, have been fabricated in the IMP (Institute of Modern Physics, CAS) by using microelectronics technology. These detectors have been used in the ETF (External Target Facility) of HIRFL-CSR, as ΔE detectors of the ΔE-E telescope system and the track detectors. With the help of flexibility printed circuit board (FPCB) and the integrated ASIC chips, a compact multi-channel front-end electronic board has been designed to fulfill the acquisition of the energy and position information of the Silicon micro-strip detectors. It is described in this paper that the build-up of the Silicon micro-strip detector array in ETF of HIRFL-CSR, the determination of the energy resolution of the detector units, and the energy resolution of approximately 1% obtained for 5∼9 MeV α particles in vacuum. (authors)

  20. Burnout detector design for heat transfer experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the design of an burnout detector for heat transfer experiments, applied during tests for optimization of fuel elements for PWR reactors. The burnout detector avoids the fuel rods destruction during the experiments at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear. The detector evaluates the temperature changes over the fuel rods in the temperature changes over the fuel rods in the area where the burnout phenomenon could be anticipated. As soon as the phenomenon appears, the system power supply is turned off. The thermal Circuit No. 1, during the experiments, had been composed by nine fuel rods feed parallelly by the same power supply. Fine copper wires had been attached at the centre and at the ends of the fuel rod to take two Wheat stone bridge arms. The detector had been applied across the bridge diagonals, which must be balanced the burnout excursion can be detected as a small but fast increase of the signal over the detector. Large scale experiments had been carried out to compare the resistance bridge performance against a thermocouple attached through the fuel rod wall. These experiments had been showed us the advantages of the first method over the last, because the bridge evaluates the whole fuel rod, while the thermocouple evaluates only the area where it had been attached. (author)

  1. Conformal array design on arbitrary polygon surface with transformation optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Li, E-mail: dengl@bupt.edu.cn; Hong, Weijun, E-mail: hongwj@bupt.edu.cn; Zhu, Jianfeng; Peng, Biao; Li, Shufang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Network System Architecture and Convergence, School of Information and Communication Engineering, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, 100876 Beijing (China); Wu, Yongle, E-mail: wuyongle138@gmail.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Work Safety Intelligent Monitoring, School of Electronic Engineering, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, 100876 Beijing (China)

    2016-06-15

    A transformation-optics based method to design a conformal antenna array on an arbitrary polygon surface is proposed and demonstrated in this paper. This conformal antenna array can be adjusted to behave equivalently as a uniformly spaced linear array by applying an appropriate transformation medium. An typical example of general arbitrary polygon conformal arrays, not limited to circular array, is presented, verifying the proposed approach. In summary, the novel arbitrary polygon surface conformal array can be utilized in array synthesis and beam-forming, maintaining all benefits of linear array.

  2. Conformal array design on arbitrary polygon surface with transformation optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Li; Hong, Weijun; Zhu, Jianfeng; Peng, Biao; Li, Shufang; Wu, Yongle

    2016-01-01

    A transformation-optics based method to design a conformal antenna array on an arbitrary polygon surface is proposed and demonstrated in this paper. This conformal antenna array can be adjusted to behave equivalently as a uniformly spaced linear array by applying an appropriate transformation medium. An typical example of general arbitrary polygon conformal arrays, not limited to circular array, is presented, verifying the proposed approach. In summary, the novel arbitrary polygon surface conformal array can be utilized in array synthesis and beam-forming, maintaining all benefits of linear array.

  3. Electron spectroscopy using a multi-detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, P.A.; Cann, K.J.; Trzaska, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    A description is given of the novel electron spectrometer SACRED, which uses a multi-element Si array to detect cascades of conversion electrons. Its application to the study of deformed structures in 222 Th is described. (orig.)

  4. Performance studies of X3 silicon detectors for the future ELISSA array at ELI-NP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnevskaya, S.; Balabanski, D. L.; Choudhury, D.; Constantin, P.; Filipescu, D. M.; Ghita, D. G.; Guardo, G. L.; Lattuada, D.; Matei, C.; Rotaru, A.; State, A.

    2018-05-01

    ELISSA is an array of silicon strip detectors under construction at the ELI-NP facility for measurements of photodissociation reactions using high-brilliance, quasi monoenergetic gamma beams. The detection system consists of 35 single-sided position-sensitive X3 detectors arranged in a cylindrical configuration and eight QQQ3 detectors as end-caps. A batch of forty X3 detectors have been tested at ELI-NP. The energy and position resolution, ballistic deficit, leakage currents, and depletion voltage were measured and analyzed. Measurements of the energy resolution were carried out using two read-out electronic chains, one based on multichannel preamplifiers and another based on multiplexers.

  5. Design & fabrication of cantilever array biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anja; Thundat, T

    2009-01-01

    Surface immobilization of functional receptors on microfabricated cantilever arrays offers a new paradigm for the development of biosensors based on nanomechanics. Microcantilever-based systems are capable of real-time, multiplexed detection of unlabeled disease markers in extremely small volumes......, electronic processing, and even local telemetry on a single chip have the potential of satisfying the need for highly sensitive and selective multiple-target detection in very small samples. Here we will review the design and fabrication process of cantilever-based biosensors....

  6. National Array of Neutron Detectors (NAND): A versatile tool for nuclear reaction studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golda, K. S.; Jhingan, A.; Sugathan, P.; Singh, Hardev; Singh, R. P.; Behera, B. R.; Mandal, S.; Kothari, A.; Gupta, Arti; Zacharias, J.; Archunan, M.; Barua, P.; Venkataramanan, S.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Govil, I. M.; Datta, S. K.; Chatterjee, M. B.

    2014-11-01

    The first phase of the National Array of Neutron Detectors (NAND) consisting of 26 neutron detectors has been commissioned at the Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi. The motivation behind setting up of such a detector system is the need for more accurate and efficient study of reaction mechanisms in the projectile energy range of 5-8 MeV/n using heavy ion beams from a 15 UD Pelletron and an upgraded LINAC booster facility at IUAC. The above detector array can be used for inclusive as well as exclusive measurements of reaction products of which at least one product is a neutron. While inclusive measurements can be made using only the neutron detectors along with the time of flight technique and a pulsed beam, exclusive measurements can be performed by detecting neutrons in coincidence with charged particles and/or fission fragments detected with ancillary detectors. The array can also be used for neutron tagged gamma-ray spectroscopy in (HI, xn) reactions by detecting gamma-rays in coincidence with the neutrons in a compact geometrical configuration. The various features and the performance of the different aspects of the array are described in the present paper.

  7. Design and construction of the SAPHIR detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwille, W.J.; Bockhorst, M.; Burbach, G.; Burgwinkel, R.; Empt, J.; Guse, B.; Haas, K.M.; Hannappel, J.; Heinloth, K.; Hey, T.; Honscheid, K.; Jahnen, T.; Jakob, H.P.; Joepen, N.; Juengst, H.; Kirch, U.; Klein, F.J.; Kostrewa, D.; Lindemann, L.; Link, J.; Manns, J.; Menze, D.; Merkel, H.; Merkel, R.; Neuerburg, W.; Paul, E.; Ploetzke, R.; Schenk, U.; Schmidt, S.; Scholmann, J.; Schuetz, P.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schweitzer, M.; Tran, M.Q.; Vogl, W.; Wedemeyer, R.; Wehnes, F.; Wisskirchen, J.; Wolf, A.

    1994-01-01

    The design, construction, and performance of the large solid angle magnetic spectrometer SAPHIR is described. It was built for the investigation of photon-induced reactions on nucleous and light nuclei with mulit-particle final states up to photon energies of 3.1 GeV. The detector is equipped with a tagged photon beam facility and is operated at the stretcher ring ELSA in Bonn. (orig.)

  8. Design and construction of the SAPHIR detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwille, W.J. (Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.); Bockhorst, M. (Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.); Burbach, G. (Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.); Burgwinkel, R. (Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.); Empt, J. (Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.); Guse, B. (Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.); Haas, K.M. (Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.); Hannappel, J. (Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.); Heinloth, K. (Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.); Hey, T. (Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.); Honscheid, K. (Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.); Jahnen, T. (Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.); Jakob, H.P. (Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.); Joepen, N. (Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.); Juengst, H. (Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.); Kirch, U. (Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.); Klein, F.J. (Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.)

    1994-05-15

    The design, construction, and performance of the large solid angle magnetic spectrometer SAPHIR is described. It was built for the investigation of photon-induced reactions on nucleous and light nuclei with mulit-particle final states up to photon energies of 3.1 GeV. The detector is equipped with a tagged photon beam facility and is operated at the stretcher ring ELSA in Bonn. (orig.)

  9. The ZEUS vertex detector: Design and prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvisi, C.; Anzivino, G.; Arzarello, F.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Camerini, U.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Ciralli, F.; Contin, A.; Costa, M.; D'Auria, S.; Del Papa, C.; De Pasquale, S.; Fiori, F.; Forte, A.; Frasconi, F.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Lisowski, B.; Maccarrone, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; O'Shea, V.; Palmonari, F.; Pelfer, P.; Pilastrini, R.; Qian, S.; Sartorelli, G.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Timellini, R.; Zichichi, A.; Bologna Univ.; Cosenza Univ.; Florence Univ.; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Florence; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Florence

    1991-01-01

    A gas vertex detector, operated with dimethylether (DME) at atmospheric pressure, is presently being built for the ZEUS experiment at HERA. Its main design features, together with the performances of a prototype measured at various operating voltages, particle rates and geometrical conditions on a CERN Proton Synchrotron test beam, are presented. A spatial resolution down to 35 μm and an average wire efficiency of 96% have been achieved, for a 3 mm gas gap relative to each sense wire. (orig.)

  10. Study on the optimization of the water Cherenkov detector array of the LHAASO project for surveying VHE gamma ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-Cai; Chen, Ming-Jun; Jia, Huan-Yu; Gao, Bo; Wu, Han-Rong; Yao, Zhi-Guo; Yuo, Xiao-Hao; Zhou, Bin; Zhu, Feng-Rong

    2014-01-01

    It is prpopsed that a water Cherenkov detector array, LHAASO-WCDA, is to be built at Shangri-la, Yunnan Province, China. As one of the major components of the LHAASO project, the main purpose of it is to survey the northern sky for gamma ray sources in the energy range of 100 GeV-30 TeV. In order to design the water Cherenkov array efficiently to economize the budget, a Monte Carlo simulation is carried out. With the help of the simulation, the cost performance of different configurations of the array are obtained and compared with each other, serving as a guide for the more detailed design of the experiment in the next step.

  11. Study on the optimization of the water Cherenkov detector array of the LHAASO project for surveying VHE gamma ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huicai; Chen Mingjun; Gao Bo; Wu Hanrong; Yao Zhiguo; Zhou Bin; Jia Huanyu; Zhu Fengrong; You Xiaohao

    2014-01-01

    It is proposed that a water Cherenkov detector array, LHAASO-WCDA, is to be built at Shangri-la, Yunnan Province, China. As one of the major components of the LHAASO project, the main purpose of it is to survey the northern sky for gamma ray sources in the energy range of 100 GeV-30 TeV. In order to design the water Cherenkov array efficiently to economize the budget, a Monte Carlo simulation is carried out. With the help of the simulation, the cost performance of different configurations of the array are obtained and compared with each other, serving as a guide for the more detailed design of the experiment in the next step. (authors)

  12. A methodology for dosimetry audit of rotational radiotherapy using a commercial detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, Mohammad; Tsang, Yatman; Thomas, Russell A.S.; Gouldstone, Clare; Maughan, David; Snaith, Julia A.D.; Bolton, Steven C.; Nisbet, Andrew; Clark, Catharine H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a methodology for the use of a commercial detector array in dosimetry audits of rotational radiotherapy. Materials and methods: The methodology was developed as part of the development of a national audit of rotational radiotherapy. Ten cancer centres were asked to create a rotational radiotherapy treatment plan for a three-dimensional treatment-planning-system (3DTPS) test and audited. Phantom measurements using a commercial 2D ionisation chamber (IC) array were compared with measurements using 0.125 cm 3 IC, Gafchromic film and alanine pellets in the same plane. Relative and absolute gamma index (γ) comparisons were made for Gafchromic film and 2D-Array planes, respectively. Results: Comparisons between individual detectors within the 2D-Array against the corresponding IC and alanine measurement showed a statistically significant concordance correlation coefficient (both ρ c > 0.998, p < 0.001) with mean difference of −1.1 ± 1.1% and −0.8 ± 1.1%, respectively, in a high dose PTV. In the γ comparison between the 2D-Array and film it was that the 2D-Array was more likely to fail planes where there was a dose discrepancy due to the absolute analysis performed. Conclusions: It has been found that using a commercial detector array for a dosimetry audit of rotational radiotherapy is suitable in place of standard systems of dosimetry

  13. Dosimetric characterization of a commercial two-dimensional array detector; Caracterizacao dosimetrica de um detector matricial bidimensional comercial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gialluisi, Bruno L.; Santos, Gabriela R. dos; Sales, Camila P. de; Resende, Guilherme R.A.; Habitzreuter, Angela B.; Rodrigues, Laura N., E-mail: brunogialluisi@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMRP/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Servico de Radioterapia

    2013-04-15

    This paper investigates the dosimetric characteristics and performance of an array detector commercially available. The device is the I'mRT MatriXX® which is a two-dimensional detector array used in the verification of complex radiotherapy plans. It consists of 1,020 parallel plate ion chamber arranged in a 32x32 grid. Dose linearity was studied and its response was linear within the range of 5 to 1000 MU (R{sup 2} = 1). Dose rate dependence showed a maximum deviation of 0,62% comparatively with readings to 320 cGy/min. The detector stability was verified through repeated irradiations. Output factors matched well with measurements made with a Farmer chamber with an average deviation of 1,54%. The detector's effective point of measurement was determined and the inverse square law was also verified with a percentage deviation smaller than 3%. The results show that this detector can be used for quality control in IMRT thus reducing the time spent in the dosimetric verification of radiation fields. (author)

  14. Dosimetric characterization of a commercial two-dimensional array detector; Caracterizacao dosimetrica de um detector matricial bidimensional comercial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gialluisi, Bruno L.; Santos, Gabriela R. dos; Sales, Camila P. de; Resende, Guilherme R.A.; Habitzreuter, Angela B.; Rodrigues, Laura N., E-mail: brunogialluisi@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMRP/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Servico de Radioterapia

    2013-04-15

    This paper investigates the dosimetric characteristics and performance of an array detector commercially available. The device is the I'mRT MatriXX® which is a two-dimensional detector array used in the verification of complex radiotherapy plans. It consists of 1,020 parallel plate ion chamber arranged in a 32x32 grid. Dose linearity was studied and its response was linear within the range of 5 to 1000 MU (R{sup 2} = 1). Dose rate dependence showed a maximum deviation of 0,62% comparatively with readings to 320 cGy/min. The detector stability was verified through repeated irradiations. Output factors matched well with measurements made with a Farmer chamber with an average deviation of 1,54%. The detector's effective point of measurement was determined and the inverse square law was also verified with a percentage deviation smaller than 3%. The results show that this detector can be used for quality control in IMRT thus reducing the time spent in the dosimetric verification of radiation fields. (author)

  15. A new ion detector array and digital-signal-processor-based interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langstaff, D.P.; McGinnity, T.M.; Forbes, D.M.; Birkinshaw, K.; Lawton, M.W.

    1994-01-01

    A new one-dimensional ion detector array on a silicon chip has been developed for use in mass spectrometry. It is much smaller and simpler than electro-optical arrays currently in use and in addition has a higher resolution and a zero noise level. The array consists of a one-dimensional array of metal strips (electrodes) with a pitch of 25 μm on the top surface of a silicon chip, each electrode having its own charge pulse sensor, 8-bit counter and control/interface circuitry. The chip is mounted on a ceramic substrate and is preceded by a micro-channel plate electron multiplier. Chips are butted to give a longer array. Test results show a stable operating region. A digital-signal-processor-based interface is described, which controls the mode of operation and reads the accumulated array data at the maximum rate to avoid counter overflow. (author)

  16. A new ion detector array and digital-signal-processor-based interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langstaff, D.P.; McGinnity, T.M.; Forbes, D.M.; Birkinshaw, K. (University Coll. of Wales, Aberystwyth (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics); Lawton, M.W. (University of Wales Aberystwyth (United Kingdom). Dept. of Computer Science)

    1994-04-01

    A new one-dimensional ion detector array on a silicon chip has been developed for use in mass spectrometry. It is much smaller and simpler than electro-optical arrays currently in use and in addition has a higher resolution and a zero noise level. The array consists of a one-dimensional array of metal strips (electrodes) with a pitch of 25 [mu]m on the top surface of a silicon chip, each electrode having its own charge pulse sensor, 8-bit counter and control/interface circuitry. The chip is mounted on a ceramic substrate and is preceded by a micro-channel plate electron multiplier. Chips are butted to give a longer array. Test results show a stable operating region. A digital-signal-processor-based interface is described, which controls the mode of operation and reads the accumulated array data at the maximum rate to avoid counter overflow. (author).

  17. Application of neural networks to digital pulse shape analysis for an array of silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, J.L. [Dpto de Ingeniería Eléctrica y Térmica, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Martel, I. [Dpto de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); CERN, ISOLDE, CH 1211 Geneva, 23 (Switzerland); Jiménez, R. [Dpto de Ingeniería Electrónica, Sist. Informáticos y Automática, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Galán, J., E-mail: jgalan@diesia.uhu.es [Dpto de Ingeniería Electrónica, Sist. Informáticos y Automática, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Salmerón, P. [Dpto de Ingeniería Eléctrica y Térmica, Universidad de Huelva (Spain)

    2016-09-11

    The new generation of nuclear physics detectors that used to study nuclear reactions is considering the use of digital pulse shape analysis techniques (DPSA) to obtain the (A,Z) values of the reaction products impinging in solid state detectors. This technique can be an important tool for selecting the relevant reaction channels at the HYDE (HYbrid DEtector ball array) silicon array foreseen for the Low Energy Branch of the FAIR facility (Darmstadt, Germany). In this work we study the feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for particle identification with silicon detectors. Multilayer Perceptron networks were trained and tested with recent experimental data, showing excellent identification capabilities with signals of several isotopes ranging from {sup 12}C up to {sup 84}Kr, yielding higher discrimination rates than any other previously reported.

  18. MOS solid-state detector arrays for x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppel, L.N.

    1977-01-01

    Two types of MOS detector arrays were used to sense directly patterns of soft x-rays, in the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory experimental laser-fusion program. A linear self-scanning photodiode array (SSPA) is used in a wave-length-dispersive spectrometer. A frame transfer charge-coupled device (CCD) facilitates the use of an x-ray microscope. Measurements and calculations of the x-ray sensitivity of these devices are presented. Their linearity and dynamic range are discussed, as well as data recovery systems for each detector. Experiences in using these devices to detect pulses of x-rays in laser-fusion experiments are described

  19. The acceptance of surface detector arrays for high energy cosmological muon neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo Van Thuan; Hoang Van Khanh

    2011-01-01

    In order to search for ultra-high energy cosmological earth-skimming muon neutrinos by the surface detector array (SD) similar to one of the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), we propose to use the transition electromagnetic radiation at the medium interface induced by earth-skimming muons for triggering a few of aligned neighboring Cherenkov SD stations. Simulations of the acceptance of a modeling SD array have been done to estimate the detection probability of earth-skimming muon neutrinos.

  20. MEDEA: A multi element detector array for gamma ray and light charged particle detection at the LNS-Catania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migneco, E.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Maiolino, C.; Piattelli, P.; Raia, G.; Sapienza, P.; Bellia, G.

    1992-01-01

    A 4π highly granular Multi Element Detector Array (MEDEA) for γ-rays and light charged particles is described. Its basic configuration consists of 180 barium fluoride scintillator crystals, arranged in the shape of a ball, plus a forward angle wall of 120 phoswich detectors. The inner radius of the ball (22 cm) and the distance of the wall from the target (55 cm) allow the placement of other detectors in the inner volume. The whole detection system operates under vacuum inside a large scattering chamber. Dedicated electronics has been designed and realized. It includes a powerful hardware second level trigger and preanalysis system, which allows on-line event selection, and a modular VME-bus based data acquisition system. In-beam performances of the system are also described. (orig.)

  1. Device localization and dynamic scan plane selection using a wireless MRI detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffe, Matthew J.; Yutzy, Stephen R.; Jiang, Yun; Twieg, Michael D.; Blumenthal, Colin J.; Hsu, Daniel P.; Pan, Li; Gilson, Wesley D.; Sunshine, Jeffrey L.; Flask, Christopher A.; Duerk, Jeffrey L.; Nakamoto, Dean; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A prototype wireless guidance device using single sideband amplitude modulation (SSB) is presented for a 1.5T MRI system. Methods The device contained three fiducial markers each mounted to an independent receiver coil equipped with wireless SSB technology. Acquiring orthogonal projections of these markers determined the position and orientation of the device, which was used to define the scan plane for a subsequent image acquisition. Device localization and scan plane update required approximately 30 ms, so it could be interleaved with high temporal resolution imaging. Since the wireless device is used for localization and doesn’t require full imaging capability, the design of the SSB wireless system was simplified by allowing an asynchronous clock between the transmitter and receiver. Results When coupled to a high readout bandwidth, the error caused by the lack of a shared frequency reference was quantified to be less than one pixel (0.78 mm) in the projection acquisitions. Image-guidance with the prototype was demonstrated with a phantom where a needle was successfully guided to a target and contrast was delivered. Conclusion The feasibility of active tracking with a wireless detector array is demonstrated. Wireless arrays could be incorporated into devices to assist in image-guided procedures. PMID:23900921

  2. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Detector design for a Future Electron-Positron Collider (4/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    In this lecture I will discuss the issues related to the overall design and optimization of a detector for ILC and CLIC energies. I will concentrate on the two main detector concepts which are being developed in the context of the ILC. Here there has been much recent progress in developing realistic detector models and in understanding the physics performance of the overall detector concept. In addition, I will discuss the how the differences in the detector requirements for the ILC and CLIC impact the overall detector design.

  3. Application of the pulse-shape technique to proton-alpha discrimination in Si-detector arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pausch, G.; Moszynski, M.; Wolski, D.; Bohne, W.; Grawe, H.; Hilscher, D.; Schubart, R.; De Angelis, G.; De Poli, M.

    1995-04-01

    The capability of the pulse-shape technique with reversed n-type Si detectors for discrimination of protons and alphas produced in fusion-evaporation reactions was tested at the VICKSI cyclotron in Berlin. We applied a zero-crossing technique which does not need any external time reference, and which can therefore be exploited at DC accelerators. Excellent proton-alpha discrimination in the full energy range of the evaporation spectra, but also charge and even isotope resolution for heavier ions produced in projectile fragmentation, was obtained with detectors of an existing Si ball. There is no doubt that the pulse-shape discrimination works well with detectors from serial production and under experimental conditions which are typical for nuclear structure studies. An application of this technique in Si detector arrays is obvious, but some special features must be considered in the design of the electronics. The particle discrimination depends strongly on the electric field distribution inside the detector. Stabilization of the bias voltage at the detector is therefore recommended. A consequence of the rear-side injection mode is a strong variation of the charge-collection time with energy, charge, and mass number of the detected ion. To obtain a precise energy signal it is indispensable to correct for the ballistic deficit. (orig.)

  4. Research on influence of energy spectrum response of ICT detector arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Rifeng; Gao Fuqiang; Zhang Ping

    2008-01-01

    The energy spectrum response is important characteristic for X-ray ICT detector. But there exist many difficulties to measure these parameters by experiments. The energy spectrum response of CdWO 4 detector was simulated by using the EGSnrc code. Meanwhile the effect of detection efficiency was analyzed by the distribution of accelerator bremsstrahlung spectra and the X-ray spectrum hardening, and some theoretic parameters were offered for the consistent and no-linearity correction of detector arrays. It was applied to ICT image correction, and a satisfying result was obtained. (authors)

  5. Performance of a high-resolution depth-encoding PET detector module using linearly-graded SiPM arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Junwei; Bai, Xiaowei; Gola, Alberto; Acerbi, Fabio; Ferri, Alessandro; Piemonte, Claudio; Yang, Yongfeng; Cherry, Simon R.

    2018-02-01

    The goal of this study was to exploit the excellent spatial resolution characteristics of a position-sensitive silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) and develop a high-resolution depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding positron emission tomography (PET) detector module. The detector consists of a 30  ×  30 array of 0.445  ×  0.445  ×  20 mm3 polished LYSO crystals coupled to two 15.5  ×  15.5 mm2 linearly-graded SiPM (LG-SiPM) arrays at both ends. The flood histograms show that all the crystals in the LYSO array can be resolved. The energy resolution, the coincidence timing resolution and the DOI resolution were 21.8  ±  5.8%, 1.23  ±  0.10 ns and 3.8  ±  1.2 mm, respectively, at a temperature of -10 °C and a bias voltage of 35.0 V. The performance did not degrade significantly for event rates of up to 130 000 counts s-1. This detector represents an attractive option for small-bore PET scanner designs that simultaneously emphasize high spatial resolution and high detection efficiency, important, for example, in preclinical imaging of the rodent brain with neuroreceptor ligands.

  6. Resistive gaseous detectors designs, performance, and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Abbrescia, Marcello; Peskov, Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    This first book to critically summarize the latest achievements and emerging applications within this interdisciplinary topic focuses on one of the most important types of detectors for elementary particles and photons: resistive plate chambers (RPCs). In the first part, the outstanding, international team of authors comprehensively describes and presents the features and design of single and double-layer RPCs before covering more advanced multi-layer RPCs. The second part then focuses on the application of RPCs in high energy physics, materials science, medicine and security. Throughout, the experienced authors adopt a didactic approach, with each subject presented in a simple way, increasing in complexity step by step.

  7. Versatile, reprogrammable area pixel array detector for time-resolved synchrotron x-ray applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruner, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The final technical report for DOE grant DE-SC0004079 is presented. The goal of the grant was to perform research, development and application of novel imaging x-ray detectors so as to effectively utilize the high intensity and brightness of the national synchrotron radiation facilities to enable previously unfeasible time-resolved x-ray research. The report summarizes the development of the resultant imaging x-ray detectors. Two types of detector platforms were developed: The first is a detector platform (called a Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD) that can image continuously at over a thousand images per second while maintaining high efficiency for wide dynamic range signals ranging from 1 to hundreds of millions of x-rays per pixel per image. Research on an even higher dynamic range variant is also described. The second detector platform (called the Keck Pixel Array Detector) is capable of acquiring a burst of x-ray images at a rate of millions of images per second.

  8. Real-time imaging systems for superconducting nanowire single-photon detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofherr, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    Superconducting nanowire singe-photon detectors (SNSPD) are promising detectors in the field of applications, where single-photon resolution is required like in quantum optics, spectroscopy or astronomy. These cryogenic detectors gain from a broad spectrum in the optical and infrared range and deliver low dark counts and low jitter. This work provides a piece of deeper physical understanding of detector functionality in combination with highly engineered readout development. A detailed analysis focuses on the intrinsic detection mechanism of SNSPDs related to the detection in the infrared regime and the evolution of dark counts. With this fundamental knowledge, the next step is the development of a multi-pixel readout at cryogenic conditions. It is demonstrated, how two auspicious multi-pixel readout concepts can be realized, which enables statistical framing like in imaging applications using RSFQ electronics with fast framing rates and the readout of a detector array with continuous real-time single-photon resolution.

  9. Evaluation of a SiPM array detector coupled to a LFS-3 pixellated scintillator for PET/MR applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, Stratos; Fysikopoulos, Eleftherios; Georgiou, Maria; Loudos, George

    2015-01-01

    SiPM arrays are insensitive to magnetic fields and thus good candidates for hybrid PET/MR imaging systems. Moreover, due to their small size and flexibility can be used in dedicated small field of view small animal imaging detectors and especially in head PET/MR studies in mice. Co-doped LFS-3 scintillator crystals have higher light yield and slightly faster response than that of LSO:Ce mainly due to the co-doped activation of emission centers with varying materials such as Ce, Gd, Sc, Y, La, Tb, or Ca distributed at the molecular scale through the lutetium silicate crystal host. The purpose of this study is to investigate the behavior of the SensL ArraySL-4 (4x4 element array of 3x3 mm 2 silicon photomultipliers) optical detector coupled to a 6x6 LFS-3 scintillator array, with 2x2x5 mm 3 crystal size elements, for possible applications in small field of view PET/MR imaging detectors. We have designed a symmetric resistive charge division circuit to read out the signal outputs of 4x4 pixel SiPM array reducing the 16 pixel outputs of the photodetector to 4 position signals. The 4 position signals were digitized using free running Analog to Digital Converters. The ADCs sampling rate was 50 MHz. An FPGA (Spartan 6 LX150T) was used for triggering and digital signal processing of the pulses. Experimental evaluation was carried out with 22 Na radioactive source and the parameters studied where energy resolution and peak to valley ratio. The first preliminary results of the evaluation shows a clear visualization of the discrete 2x2x5 mm 3 LFS-3 scintillator elements. The mean peak to valley ratio of the horizontal profiles on the raw image was measured equal to 11 while the energy resolution was calculated equal to 30% at the central pixels.

  10. Testing and assembly of the detectors for the Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera on ACT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriage, T.A.; Chervenak, J.A.; Doriese, W.B.

    2006-01-01

    The Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera (MBAC) for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope consists of three Transition Edge Sensor (TES) arrays to make simultaneous observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background in three frequency bands. MBAC TESs are NASA Goddard Pop-Up Detectors (PUD) which are read-out by NIST time-domain multiplexers. MBAC is constructed by stacking 1x32 TES columns to form the 32x32 element arrays. The arrays are modular (connectorized) at the 1x32 column level such that array assembly is reversible and camera repair possible. Prior to assembly, each column is tested in a quick (2h) cycling 4 He/ 3 He adsorption refrigerator. Tests include measurements of TES current-voltage curves and TES complex impedance

  11. Testing and assembly of the detectors for the Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera on ACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriage, T.A. [Physics Department, Princeton University, Washington Road, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)]. E-mail: marriage@princeton.edu; Chervenak, J.A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Doriese, W.B. [National Institute of Standards, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    The Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera (MBAC) for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope consists of three Transition Edge Sensor (TES) arrays to make simultaneous observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background in three frequency bands. MBAC TESs are NASA Goddard Pop-Up Detectors (PUD) which are read-out by NIST time-domain multiplexers. MBAC is constructed by stacking 1x32 TES columns to form the 32x32 element arrays. The arrays are modular (connectorized) at the 1x32 column level such that array assembly is reversible and camera repair possible. Prior to assembly, each column is tested in a quick (2h) cycling {sup 4}He/{sup 3}He adsorption refrigerator. Tests include measurements of TES current-voltage curves and TES complex impedance.

  12. MEGHNAD – A multi element detector array for heavy ion collision ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    When heavy ion beam available from such machines fall on a target and undergo collision, very rich and often pristine fields of research open up. In order to carry on such activities, we have taken up a project to build a multi element gamma, heavy ion and neutron array of detectors (MEGHNAD) to detect and study the ...

  13. Application of Faraday cup array detector in measurement of electron-beam distribution homogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhiguo; Wang Jinchuan; Xiao Guoqing; Guo Zhongyan; Wu Lijie; Mao Ruishi; Zhang Li

    2005-01-01

    It is described that a kind of Faraday cup array detector, which consists of Faraday cup, suppressor electrode insulation PCB board, Base etc. The homogeneity of electron-beam distribution is measured and the absorbed dose for the irradiated sample is calculated. The results above provide the important parameters for the irradiation experiment and the improvement for the quality of electron beam. (authors)

  14. Two dimensional CCD [charged coupled device] arrays as parallel detectors in electron energy loss and x-ray wavelength dispersive spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaluzec, N.J.

    1988-08-01

    Parallel detection systems for spectroscopy have generally been based upon linear detector arrays. Replacing the linear arrays with two dimensional systems yields more complicated devices; however, there are corresponding benefits which can be realized for both x-ray and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The operational design of these systems, as well as preliminary results from the construction of such a device used for electron spectroscopy, are presented. 10 refs., 8 figs

  15. Analysis of flavonoids from lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) leaves using high performance liquid chromatography/photodiode array detector tandem electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and an extraction method optimized by orthogonal design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sha; Wu, Ben-Hong; Fang, Jin-Bao; Liu, Yan-Ling; Zhang, Hao-Hao; Fang, Lin-Chuan; Guan, Le; Li, Shao-Hua

    2012-03-02

    The extraction protocol of flavonoids from lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) leaves was optimized through an orthogonal design. The solvent was the most important factor comparing solvent, solvent:tissue ratio, extraction time, and temperature. The highest yield of flavonoids was achieved with 70% methanol-water and a solvent:tissue ratio of 30:1 at 4 °C for 36 h. The optimized analytical method for HPLC was a multi-step gradient elution using 0.5% formic acid (A) and CH₃CN containing 0.1% formic acid (B), at a flow rate of 0.6 mL/min. Using this optimized method, thirteen flavonoids were simultaneously separated and identified by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detection/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC/DAD/ESI-MS(n)). Five of the bioactive compounds are reported in lotus leaves for the first time. The flavonoid content of the leaves of three representative cultivars was assessed under the optimized extraction and HPLC analytical conditions, and the seed-producing cultivar 'Baijianlian' had the highest flavonoid content compared with rhizome-producing 'Zhimahuoulian' and wild floral cultivar 'Honglian'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Infrared detectors and focal plane arrays II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 23, 24, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereniak, Eustace L.; Sampson, Robert E.

    The present conference discusses Schottky-barrier IR image sensors, SWIR and MWIR Schottky-barrier imagers, a 640 x 640 PtSi, models of nonlinearities in focal plane arrays, retinal function relative to IRT focal plane arrays, a solid-state pyroelectric imager, and electrolyte electroreflectance spectroscopies for the ion-implanted HgCdTe with thermal annealing. Also discussed are HgCdTe hybrid focal plane arrays for thermoelectrically cooled applications, a novel IR detector plasma-edge detector, and IR detector circuits using monolithic CMOS amps with InSb detectors. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  17. Phased-array design for MST and ST radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecklund, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    All of the existing radar systems fully dedicated to clear-air radar studies use some type of phased-array antennas. The effects of beam-steering techniques including feed networks and phase shifters; sidelobe control; ground-clutter suppression; low altitude coverage; arrays with integrated radiating elements and feed networks; analysis of coaxial-collinear antennas; use of arrays with multiple beams; and array testing and measure on structural design of the antenna are discussed.

  18. A new MBE CdTe photoconductor array detector for X-ray applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, S.S.; Sivananthan, S.; Faurie, J.P.; Rodricks, B.; Bai, J.; Montano, P.A.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1994-10-01

    A CdTe photoconductor array x-ray detector was grown using Molecular Beam Epitaxially (MBE) on a Si (100) substrate. The temporal response of the photoconductor arrays is as fast as 21 psec risetime and 38 psec Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM). Spatial and energy responses were obtained using x-rays from a rotating anode and synchrotron radiation source. The spatial resolution of the photoconductor was good enough to provide 75 microm FWHM using a 50 microm synchrotron x-ray beam. A substantial number of x-ray photons are absorbed effectively within the MBE CdTe layer as observed from the linear response up to 15 keV. These results demonstrate that MBE grown CdTe is a suitable choice of the detector materials to meet the requirements for x-ray detectors in particular for the new high brightness synchrotron sources

  19. Resonant detectors and focal plane arrays for infrared detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, K. K.; Allen, S. C.; Sun, J. G.; DeCuir, E. A.

    2017-08-01

    We are developing resonator-QWIPs for narrowband and broadband long wavelength infrared detection. Detector pixels with 25 μm and 30 μm pitches were hybridized to fanout circuits and readout integrated electronics for radiometric measurements. With a low to moderate doping of 0.2-0.5 × 1018 cm-3 and a thin active layer thickness of 0.6-1.3 μm, we achieved a quantum efficiency between 25 and 37% and a conversion efficiency between of 15 and 20%. The temperature at which photocurrent equals dark current is about 65 K under F/2 optics for a cutoff wavelength up to 11 μm. The NEΔT of the FPAs is estimated to be 20 mK at 2 ms integration time and 60 K operating temperature. This good performance confirms the advantages of the resonator-QWIP approach.

  20. Ultrathin NbN film superconducting single-photon detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, K; Korneev, A; Minaeva, O; Divochiy, A; Tarkhov, M; Ryabchun, S; Seleznev, V; Kaurova, N; Voronov, B; Gol'tsman, G; Polonsky, S

    2007-01-01

    We report on the fabrication process of the 2 x 2 superconducting single-photon detector (SSPD) array. The SSPD array is made from ultrathin NbN film and is operated at liquid helium temperatures. Each detector is a nanowire-based structure patterned by electron beam lithography process. The advances in fabrication technology allowed us to produce highly uniform strips and preserve superconducting properties of the unpatterned film. SSPD exhibit up to 30% quantum efficiency in near infrared and up to 1% at 5-μm wavelength. Due to 120 MHz counting rate and 18 ps jitter, the time-domain multiplexing read-out is proposed for large scale SSPD arrays. Single-pixel SSPD has already found a practical application in non-invasive testing of semiconductor very-large scale integrated circuits. The SSPD significantly outperformed traditional single-photon counting avalanche diodes

  1. Charge sharing and charge loss in a cadmium-zinc-telluride fine-pixel detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaskin, J.A.; Sharma, D.P.; Ramsey, B.D.

    2003-01-01

    Because of its high atomic number, room temperature operation, low noise, and high spatial resolution a cadmium-zinc-telluride multi-pixel detector is ideal for hard X-ray astrophysical observation. As part of on-going research at MSFC to develop multi-pixel CdZnTe detectors for this purpose, we have measured charge sharing and charge loss for a 4x4 (750 μm pitch), 1 mm thick pixel array and modeled these results using a Monte-Carlo simulation. This model was then used to predict the amount of charge sharing for a much finer pixel array (with a 300 μm pitch). Future work will enable us to compare the simulated results for the finer array to measured values

  2. A FPGA-based signal processing unit for a GEM array detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, W.W.; Chou, H.P.

    2013-06-01

    in the present study, a signal processing unit for a GEM one-dimensional array detector is presented to measure the trajectory of photoelectrons produced by cosmic X-rays. The present GEM array detector system has 16 signal channels. The front-end unit provides timing signals from trigger units and energy signals from charge sensitive amplifies. The prototype of the processing unit is implemented using commercial field programmable gate array circuit boards. The FPGA based system is linked to a personal computer for testing and data analysis. Tests using simulated signals indicated that the FPGA-based signal processing unit has a good linearity and is flexible for parameter adjustment for various experimental conditions (authors)

  3. Study on single-channel signals of water Cherenkov detector array for the LHAASO project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.C., E-mail: lihuicai@ihep.ac.cn [University of Nankai, Tianjin 300071 (China); Yao, Z.G.; Chen, M.J. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yu, C.X. [University of Nankai, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zha, M.; Wu, H.R.; Gao, B.; Wang, X.J. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, J.Y.; Liao, W.Y. [University of Nankai, Tianjin 300071 (China); Huang, D.Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2017-05-11

    The Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) is planned to be built at Daocheng, Sichuan Province, China. The water Cherenkov detector array (WCDA), with an area of 78,000 m{sup 2} and capacity of 350,000 tons of purified water, is one of the major components of the LHAASO project. A 9-cell detector prototype array has been built at the Yangbajing site, Tibet, China to comprehensively understand the water Cherenkov technique and investigate the engineering issues of WCDA. In this paper, the rate and charge distribution of single-channel signals are evaluated using a full detail Monte Carlo simulation. The results are discussed and compared with the results obtained with prototype array.

  4. Note: The design of thin gap chamber simulation signal source based on field programmable gate array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Kun; Wang, Xu; Li, Feng; Jin, Ge; Lu, Houbing; Liang, Futian

    2015-01-01

    The Thin Gap Chamber (TGC) is an important part of ATLAS detector and LHC accelerator. Targeting the feature of the output signal of TGC detector, we have designed a simulation signal source. The core of the design is based on field programmable gate array, randomly outputting 256-channel simulation signals. The signal is generated by true random number generator. The source of randomness originates from the timing jitter in ring oscillators. The experimental results show that the random number is uniform in histogram, and the whole system has high reliability

  5. Characteristics of NaI detector in positron imaging device HEADTOME employing circular ring array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Shuichi; Kanno, Iwao; Aizawa, Yasuo; Murakami, Matsutaro; Uemura, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    In positron emission computed tomographs employing circular ring arrays of detectors, the performance of the imaging device has been specified ultimately by the characteristics of the detector. The responses of NaI detector were studied when detecting positron annihilation photon (511 keV). The study was mainly by using the NaI detector used in hybrid emission computed tomography (CT) ''HEADTOME'' we had developed. A series of measurements were carried out positioning two detectors with 40 cm distance and scanning 22 Na point source in water. Both detectors was inclined from 0 0 through 30 0 to change incident angle of positron annihilation toward crystal face. Energy window was set from 100 to 700 keV. The results were presented as follows; 1 Shortening the crystal length from 7 to 5 cm made sensitivity decrease about 10% and resolution deteriorate about 1 mm (FWHM). 2 As the results of varying the width of the crystal, 20 mm width was optimal at any incident angle. 3 The lead septum between the detectors was the thickness of 4 mm enough to reject multiple detector interactions (crosstalk). 4 Beam mask which was made of lead in order to improve spatial resolution and placed on crystal face worked effectively for incident angles from 0 0 to 15 0 but degraded uniformity of spatial resolution from 0 0 to through 30 0 . (author)

  6. Design and Deployment of a Multichroic Polarimeter Array on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, R.; Austermann, J.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; Coughlin, K. P.; Duff, S. M.; Gallardo, P.A.; Grace, E.; Hasselfield, M.; Henderson, S. W.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present the design and the preliminary on-sky performance with respect to beams and pass bands of a multichroic polarimeter array covering the 90 and 146 GHz cosmic microwave background bands and its enabling broad-band optical system recently deployed on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The constituent pixels are feedhorn-coupled multichroic polarimeters fabricated at NIST. This array is coupled to the ACT telescope via a set of three silicon lenses incorporating novel broad-band metamaterial anti-reflection coatings. This receiver represents the first multichroic detector array deployed for a CMB experiment and paves the way for the extensive use of multichroic detectors and broad-band optical systems in the next generation of CMB experiments.

  7. Design and Deployment of a Multichroic Polarimeter Array on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, R.; Austermann, J.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; Coughlin, K. P.; Duff, S. M.; Gallardo, P. A.; Grace, E.; Hasselfield, M.; Henderson, S. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Ho, S. P.; Hubmayr, J.; Koopman, B. J.; Lanen, J. V.; Li, D.; McMahon, J.; Munson, C. D.; Nati, F.; Niemack, M. D.; Page, L.; Pappas, C. G.; Salatino, M.; Schmitt, B. L.; Schillaci, A.; Simon, S. M.; Staggs, S. T.; Stevens, J. R.; Vavagiakis, E. M.; Ward, J. T.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present the design and the preliminary on-sky performance with respect to beams and passbands of a multichroic polarimeter array covering the 90 and 146 GHz cosmic microwave background bands and its enabling broad-band optical system recently deployed on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The constituent pixels are feedhorn-coupled multichroic polarimeters fabricated at NIST. This array is coupled to the ACT telescope via a set of three silicon lenses incorporating novel broad-band metamaterial anti-reflection coatings. This receiver represents the first multichroic detector array deployed for a CMB experiment and paves the way for the extensive use of multichroic detectors and broad-band optical systems in the next generation of CMB experiments.

  8. Design of a trichromatic cone array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Garrigan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Cones with peak sensitivity to light at long (L, medium (M and short (S wavelengths are unequal in number on the human retina: S cones are rare (<10% while increasing in fraction from center to periphery, and the L/M cone proportions are highly variable between individuals. What optical properties of the eye, and statistical properties of natural scenes, might drive this organization? We found that the spatial-chromatic structure of natural scenes was largely symmetric between the L, M and S sensitivity bands. Given this symmetry, short wavelength attenuation by ocular media gave L/M cones a modest signal-to-noise advantage, which was amplified, especially in the denser central retina, by long-wavelength accommodation of the lens. Meanwhile, total information represented by the cone mosaic remained relatively insensitive to L/M proportions. Thus, the observed cone array design along with a long-wavelength accommodated lens provides a selective advantage: it is maximally informative.

  9. The performance of a prototype array of water Cherenkov detectors for the LHAASO project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Q. [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics, Beijing 100049 (China); Bai, Y.X.; Bi, X.J.; Cao, Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chang, J.F. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, G.; Chen, M.J. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, S.M. [Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Chen, S.Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, T.L. [University of Tibet, Lhasa 851600 (China); Chen, X. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Y.T. [University of Yunnan, Kunming 650091 (China); Cui, S.W. [Normal University of Hebei, Shijiazhuang 050016 (China); Dai, B.Z. [University of Yunnan, Kunming 650091 (China); Du, Q. [Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Danzengluobu [University of Tibet, Lhasa 851600 (China); Feng, C.F. [University of Shandong, Jinan 250100 (China); Feng, S.H.; Gao, B. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Gao, S.Q. [National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); and others

    2013-10-01

    A large high-altitude air-shower observatory (LHAASO) is to be built at Shangri-La, Yunnan Province, China. This observatory is intended to conduct sub-TeV gamma astronomy, and as an important component of the LHAASO project, a water Cherenkov detector array (WCDA) is proposed. To investigate engineering issues and fully understand the water Cherenkov technique for detecting air showers, a prototype array at 1% scale of the LHAASO-WCDA has been built at Yang-Ba-Jing, Tibet, China. This paper introduces the prototype array setup and studies its performance by counting rate of each photomultiplier tube (PMT), trigger rates at different PMT multiplicities, and responses to air showers. Finally, the reconstructed shower directions and angular resolutions of the detected showers for the prototype array are given. -- Highlights: • The technique of the water Cherenkov array is studied. • Engineering issues of the water Cherenkov array are investigated. • The PMTs and electronics of the water Cherenkov array are tested. • Some key parameters of the water Cherenkov array are measured.

  10. The performance of a prototype array of water Cherenkov detectors for the LHAASO project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Q.; Bai, Y.X.; Bi, X.J.; Cao, Z.; Chang, J.F.; Chen, G.; Chen, M.J.; Chen, S.M.; Chen, S.Z.; Chen, T.L.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.T.; Cui, S.W.; Dai, B.Z.; Du, Q.; Danzengluobu; Feng, C.F.; Feng, S.H.; Gao, B.; Gao, S.Q.

    2013-01-01

    A large high-altitude air-shower observatory (LHAASO) is to be built at Shangri-La, Yunnan Province, China. This observatory is intended to conduct sub-TeV gamma astronomy, and as an important component of the LHAASO project, a water Cherenkov detector array (WCDA) is proposed. To investigate engineering issues and fully understand the water Cherenkov technique for detecting air showers, a prototype array at 1% scale of the LHAASO-WCDA has been built at Yang-Ba-Jing, Tibet, China. This paper introduces the prototype array setup and studies its performance by counting rate of each photomultiplier tube (PMT), trigger rates at different PMT multiplicities, and responses to air showers. Finally, the reconstructed shower directions and angular resolutions of the detected showers for the prototype array are given. -- Highlights: • The technique of the water Cherenkov array is studied. • Engineering issues of the water Cherenkov array are investigated. • The PMTs and electronics of the water Cherenkov array are tested. • Some key parameters of the water Cherenkov array are measured

  11. Final Scientific/Technical Report: Electronics for Large Superconducting Tunnel Junction Detector Arrays for Synchrotron Soft X-ray Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburton, William K

    2009-03-06

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors offer a an approach to detecting soft x-rays with energy resolutions 4-5 times better and at rates 10 faster than traditions semiconductor detectors. To make such detectors feasible, however, then need to be deployed in large arrays of order 1000 detectors, which in turn implies that their processing electronics must be compact, fully computer controlled, and low cost per channel while still delivering ultra-low noise performance so as to not degrade the STJ's performance. We report on our progress in designing a compact, low cost preamplifier intended for this application. In particular, we were able to produce a prototype preamplifier of 2 sq-cm area and a parts cost of less than $30 that matched the energy resolution of the best conventional system to date and demonstrated its ability to acquire an STJ I-V curve under computer control, the critical step for determining and setting the detectors' operating points under software control.

  12. A silicon strip detector array for energy verification and quality assurance in heavy ion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrot, Emily; Newall, Matthew; Guatelli, Susanna; Petasecca, Marco; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B

    2018-02-01

    The measurement of depth dose profiles for range and energy verification of heavy ion beams is an important aspect of quality assurance procedures for heavy ion therapy facilities. The steep dose gradients in the Bragg peak region of these profiles require the use of detectors with high spatial resolution. The aim of this work is to characterize a one dimensional monolithic silicon detector array called the "serial Dose Magnifying Glass" (sDMG) as an independent ion beam energy and range verification system used for quality assurance conducted for ion beams used in heavy ion therapy. The sDMG detector consists of two linear arrays of 128 silicon sensitive volumes each with an effective size of 2mm × 50μm × 100μm fabricated on a p-type substrate at a pitch of 200 μm along a single axis of detection. The detector was characterized for beam energy and range verification by measuring the response of the detector when irradiated with a 290 MeV/u 12 C ion broad beam incident along the single axis of the detector embedded in a PMMA phantom. The energy of the 12 C ion beam incident on the detector and the residual energy of an ion beam incident on the phantom was determined from the measured Bragg peak position in the sDMG. Ad hoc Monte Carlo simulations of the experimental setup were also performed to give further insight into the detector response. The relative response profiles along the single axis measured with the sDMG detector were found to have good agreement between experiment and simulation with the position of the Bragg peak determined to fall within 0.2 mm or 1.1% of the range in the detector for the two cases. The energy of the beam incident on the detector was found to vary less than 1% between experiment and simulation. The beam energy incident on the phantom was determined to be (280.9 ± 0.8) MeV/u from the experimental and (280.9 ± 0.2) MeV/u from the simulated profiles. These values coincide with the expected energy of 281 MeV/u. The sDMG detector

  13. The performance of a prototype array of water Cherenkov detectors for the LHAASO project

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Q.; Bai, Y. X.; Bi, X. J.; Cao, Z.; Chang, J. F.; Chen, G.; Chen, M. J.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, S. Z.; Chen, T. L.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y. T.; Cui, S. W.; Dai, B. Z.; Du, Q.; Danzengluobu; Feng, C. F.; Feng, S. H.; Gao, B.; Gao, S. Q.; Ge, M. M.; Gu, M. H.; Hao, X. J.; He, H. H.; Hou, C.; Hu, H. B.; Hu, X. B.; Huang, J.; Huang, W. P.; Jia, H. Y.; Jiang, K.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. L.; Liu, J. S.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y. N.; Li, Q. J.; Li, C.; Li, F.; Li, H. C.; Li, X. R.; Lu, H.; Lv, H. K.; Mao, Y. J.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, X. H.; Shao, J.; Shao, M.; Sheng, X. D.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, Z. B.; Tang, Z. B.; Wu, C. Y.; Wu, H. R.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, G.; Xu, Y.; Yang, Q. Y.; Yang, R.; Yao, Z. G.; You, X. H.; Yuan, A. F.; Zhang, B. K.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, S. R.; Zhang, S. S.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, L.; Zhai, L. M.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zha, M.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, F. R.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhuang, J.; Zuo, X.

    2013-10-01

    A large high-altitude air-shower observatory (LHAASO) is to be built at Shangri-La, Yunnan Province, China. This observatory is intended to conduct sub-TeV gamma astronomy, and as an important component of the LHAASO project, a water Cherenkov detector array (WCDA) is proposed. To investigate engineering issues and fully understand the water Cherenkov technique for detecting air showers, a prototype array at 1% scale of the LHAASO-WCDA has been built at Yang-Ba-Jing, Tibet, China. This paper introduces the prototype array setup and studies its performance by counting rate of each photomultiplier tube (PMT), trigger rates at different PMT multiplicities, and responses to air showers. Finally, the reconstructed shower directions and angular resolutions of the detected showers for the prototype array are given.

  14. Terahertz computed tomography in three-dimensional using a pyroelectric array detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Wang, Dayong; Zhou, Xun; Rong, Lu; Huang, Haochong; Wan, Min; Wang, Yunxin

    2017-05-01

    Terahertz frequency range spans from 0.1 to 10 THz. Terahertz radiation can penetrate nonpolar materials and nonmetallic materials, such as plastics, wood, and clothes. Then the feature makes the terahertz imaging have important research value. Terahertz computed tomography makes use of the penetrability of terahertz radiation and obtains three-dimensional object projection data. In the paper, continuous-wave terahertz computed tomography with a pyroelectric array detectoris presented. Compared with scanning terahertz computed tomography, a pyroelectric array detector can obtain a large number of projection data in a short time, as the acquisition mode of the array pyroelectric detector omit the projection process on the vertical and horizontal direction. With the two-dimensional cross-sectional images of the object are obtained by the filtered back projection algorithm. The two side distance of the straw wall account for 80 pixels, so it multiplied by the pixel size is equal to the diameter of the straw about 6.4 mm. Compared with the actual diameter of the straw, the relative error is 6%. In order to reconstruct the three-dimensional internal structure image of the straw, the y direction range from 70 to 150 are selected on the array pyroelectric detector and are reconstructed by the filtered back projection algorithm. As the pixel size is 80 μm, the height of three-dimensional internal structure image of the straw is 6.48 mm. The presented system can rapidly reconstruct the three-dimensional object by using a pyroelectric array detector and explores the feasibility of on non-destructive evaluation and security testing.

  15. Measurements and simulation-based optimization of TIGRESS HPGe detector array performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumaker, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    TIGRESS is a new γ-ray detector array being developed for installation at the new ISAC-II facility at TRIUMF in Vancouver. When complete, it will consist of twelve large-volume segmented HPGe clover detectors, fitted with segmented Compton suppression shields. The combined operation of prototypes of both a TIGRESS detector and a suppression shield has been tested. Peak-to-total ratios, relative photopeak efficiencies, and energy resolution functions have been determined in order to characterize the performance of TIGRESS. This information was then used to refine a GEANT4 simulation of the full detector array. Using this simulation, methods to overcome the degradation of the photopeak efficiency and peak-to-total response that occurs with high γ-ray multiplicity events were explored. These methods take advantage of the high segmentation of both the HPGe clovers and the suppression shields to suppress or sum detector interactions selectively. For a range of γ-ray energies and multiplicities, optimal analysis methods have been determined, which has resulted in significant gains in the expected performance of TIGRESS. (author)

  16. Arrays of Segmented, Tapered Light Guides for Use With Large, Planar Scintillation Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Vaigneur, Keith; Stolin, Alexander V.; Jaliparthi, Gangadhar

    2015-06-01

    Metabolic imaging techniques can potentially improve detection and diagnosis of cancer in women with radiodense and/or fibrocystic breasts. Our group has previously developed a high-resolution positron emission tomography imaging and biopsy device (PEM-PET) to detect and guide the biopsy of suspicious breast lesions. Initial testing revealed that the imaging field-of-view (FOV) of the scanner was smaller than the physical size of the detector's active area, which could hinder sampling of breast areas close to the chest wall. The purpose of this work was to utilize segmented, tapered light guides for optically coupling the scintillator arrays to arrays of position-sensitive photomultipliers to increase both the active FOV and identification of individual scintillator elements. Testing of the new system revealed that the optics of these structures made it possible to discern detector elements from the complete active area of the detector face. In the previous system the top and bottom rows and left and right columns were not identifiable. Additionally, use of the new light guides increased the contrast of individual detector elements by up to 129%. Improved element identification led to a spatial resolution increase by approximately 12%. Due to attenuation of light in the light guides the detector energy resolution decreased from 18.5% to 19.1%. Overall, these improvements should increase the field-of-view and spatial resolution of the dedicated breast-PET system.

  17. Evaluation of detector array technology for the verification of advanced intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussien, Mohammad

    Purpose: Quality assurance (QA) for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has evolved substantially. In recent years, various ionization chamber or diode detector arrays have become commercially available, allowing pre-treatment absolute dose verification with near real-time results. This has led to a wide uptake of this technology to replace point dose and film dosimetry and to facilitate QA streamlining. However, arrays are limited by their spatial resolution giving rise to concerns about their response to clinically relevant deviations. The common factor in all commercial array systems is the reliance on the gamma index (γ) method to provide the quantitative evaluation of the measured dose distribution against the Treatment Planning System (TPS) calculated dose distribution. The mathematical definition of the gamma index presents computational challenges that can cause a variation in the calculation in different systems. The purpose of this thesis was to evaluate the suitability of detector array systems, combined with their implementation of the gamma index, in the verification and dosimetry audit of advanced IMRT. Method: The response of various commercial detector array systems (Delta4®, ArcCHECK®, and the PTW 2D-Array seven29™ and OCTAVIUS II™ phantom combination, Gafchromic® EBT2 and composite EPID measurements) to simulated deliberate changes in clinical IMRT and VMAT plans was evaluated. The variability of the gamma index calculation in the different systems was also evaluated by comparing against a bespoke Matlab-based gamma index analysis software. A novel methodology for using a commercial detector array in a dosimetry audit of rotational radiotherapy was then developed. Comparison was made between measurements using the detector array and those performed using ionization chambers, alanine and radiochromic film. The methodology was developed as part of the development of a national audit of rotational radiotherapy. Ten cancer centres were

  18. Reference Design of the Mu2e Detector Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Feher, S; Brandt,, J; Cheban, S; Coleman, R; Dhanaraj, N; Fang, I; Lamm, M; Lombardo, V; Lopes, M; Miller, J; Ostojic, R ,; Orris, D; Page, T; Peterson, T; Tang, Z; Wands, R

    2014-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab has been approved by the Department of Energy to proceed developing the preliminary design. Integral to the success of Mu2e is the superconducting solenoid system. One of the three major solenoids is the Detector Solenoid that houses the stopping target and the detectors. The goal of the Detector Solenoid team is to produce detailed design specifications that are sufficient for vendors to produce the final design drawings, tooling and fabrication procedures and proceed to production. In this paper we summarize the Reference Design of the Detector Solenoid.

  19. Development of multi-channel gated integrator and PXI-DAQ system for nuclear detector arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Jie; Su Hong; Chen Zhiqiang; Dong Chengfu; Qian Yi; Gao Shanshan; Zhou Chaoyang; Lu Wan; Ye Ruiping; Ma Junbing

    2010-01-01

    A multi-channel gated integrator and PXI based data acquisition system have been developed for nuclear detector arrays with hundreds of detector units. The multi-channel gated integrator can be controlled by a programmable GI controller. The PXI-DAQ system consists of NI PXI-1033 chassis with several PXI-DAQ cards. The system software has a user-friendly GUI which is written in C language using LabWindows/CVI under Windows XP operating system. The performance of the PXI-DAQ system is very reliable and capable of handling event rate up to 40 kHz.

  20. A BGO detector array and its application in intermediate energy heavy ion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zuyu; Jin Genming; He Zhiyong; Duan Limin; Wu Heyu; Qi Yujin; Luo Qingzheng; Zhang Baoguo; Wen Wanxin; Dai Guangxi

    1996-01-01

    A BGO crystal (Bi 4 Ge 3 O 12 ) as the E detector of ΔE-E for identification of reaction products has been used for detecting the charged particles emitting from the 25 MeV 40 Ar induced reaction. The responses of the BGO crystal to various light charged particles were measured. A close-packed hexagonal array consisting of thirteen ΔE-E telescopes (Si-BGO) has been developed to detect the light charged particles interfering with each other in intermediate-energy heavy-ion induced reactions. Some applications of this telescope array are also described. (orig.)

  1. Noise analysis and performance of a selfscanned linear InSb detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finger, G.; Meyer, M.; Moorwood, A.F.M.

    1987-01-01

    A noise model for detectors operated in the capacitive discharge mode is presented. It is used to analyze the noise performance of the ESO nested timing readout technique applied to a linear 32-element InSb array which is multiplexed by a silicon switched-FET shift register. Analysis shows that KTC noise of the videoline is the major noise contribution; it can be eliminated by weighted double-correlated sampling. Best noise performance of this array is achieved at the smallest possible reverse bias voltage (not more than 20 mV) whereas excess noise is observed at higher reverse bias voltages. 5 references

  2. Calibration of the new composite ''clover'' detector as a Compton polarimeter for the EUROGAM array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.; Beck, F.A.; Butler, P.A.; Duchene, G.; France, G. de; Hannachi, F.; Jones, G.D.

    1995-01-01

    The application of a composite Ge detector to the measurement of the linear polarisation of γ-rays has been investigated. The polarisation sensitivity of this device has been determined over the energy range 197-1368 keV. Comparison to a previous design of a similar detector has been made. (orig.)

  3. Array capabilities and future arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, D.

    1993-01-01

    Early results from the new third-generation instruments GAMMASPHERE and EUROGAM are confirming the expectation that such arrays will have a revolutionary effect on the field of high-spin nuclear structure. When completed, GAMMASHPERE will have a resolving power am order of magnitude greater that of the best second-generation arrays. When combined with other instruments such as particle-detector arrays and fragment mass analysers, the capabilites of the arrays for the study of more exotic nuclei will be further enhanced. In order to better understand the limitations of these instruments, and to design improved future detector systems, it is important to have some intelligible and reliable calculation for the relative resolving power of different instrument designs. The derivation of such a figure of merit will be briefly presented, and the relative sensitivities of arrays currently proposed or under construction presented. The design of TRIGAM, a new third-generation array proposed for Chalk River, will also be discussed. It is instructive to consider how far arrays of Compton-suppressed Ge detectors could be taken. For example, it will be shown that an idealised open-quote perfectclose quotes third-generation array of 1000 detectors has a sensitivity an order of magnitude higher again than that of GAMMASPHERE. Less conventional options for new arrays will also be explored

  4. Development of a fast pixel array detector for use in microsecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barna, S.L.; Gruner, S.M.; Shepherd, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    A large-area pixel x-ray detector is being developed to collect eight successive frames of wide dynamic range two-dimensional images at 200kHz rates. Such a detector, in conjunction with a synchrotron radiation x-ray source, will enable time-resolved x-ray studies of proteins and other materials on time scales which have previously been inaccessible. The detector will consist of an array of fully-depleted 150 micron square diodes connected to a CMOS integrated electronics layer with solder bump-bonding. During each framing period, the current resulting from the x-rays stopped in the diodes is integrated in the electronics layer, and then stored in one of eight storage capacitors underneath the pixel. After the last frame, the capacitors are read out at standard data transmission rates. The detector has been designed for a well-depth of at least 10,000 x-rays (at 20keV), and a noise level of one x-ray. Ultimately, the authors intend to construct a detector with over one million pixels (1024 by 1024). They present the results of their development effort and various features of the design. The electronics design is discussed, with special attention to the performance requirements. The choice and design of the detective diodes, as they relate to x-ray stopping power and charge collection, are presented. An analysis of various methods of bump bonding is also presented. Finally, the authors discuss the possible need for a radiation-blocking layer, to be placed between the electronics and the detective layer, and various methods they have pursued in the construction of such a layer

  5. Detector array for measurement of high-frequency fluctuations in visible and near-UV emission from tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurwitz, P.D.; Hall, B.F.; Rowan, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    We developed an imaging detector to measure high-frequency fluctuations in visible and near-UV emission from tokamaks. The detector is intended for the study of plasma turbulence, mhd phenomena, and edge-localized modes. Particularly in the first two applications, it will complement existing techniques by providing higher spatial resolution as well as measurement capability in otherwise inaccessible regions of the plasma. The device consists of an optical system, a linear array of 32 photodiodes, and an amplifier for each photodiode. The amplifiers have a transimpedance gain of 10 5 --10 6 and the frequency response is flat to 100 kHz. Experience with this device has shown that optical imaging systems can be easily designed and tailored to a specific measurement because of the small size and close spacing of the individual light-sensitive elements. The device has been successfully tested on TEXT-U in measurements of H α fluctuations

  6. Segmented Monolithic Germanium Detector Arrays for X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, Ethan L.

    2011-01-01

    The experimental results from the Phase I effort were extremely encouraging. During Phase I PHDs Co. made the first strides toward a new detector technology that could have great impact on synchrotron x-ray absorption (XAS) measurements, and x-ray detector technology in general. Detector hardware that allowed critical demonstration measurements of our technology was designed and fabricated. This new technology allows good charge collection from many pixels on a single side of a multi-element monolithic germanium planar detector. The detector technology provides 'dot-like' collection electrodes having very low capacitance. The detector technology appears to perform as anticipated in the Phase I proposal. In particular, the 7-pixel detector studied showed remarkable properties; making it an interesting example of detector physics. The technology is enabled by the use of amorphous germanium contact technology on germanium planar detectors. Because of the scalability associated with the fabrication of these technologies at PHDs Co., we anticipate being able to supply larger detector systems at significantly lower cost than systems made in the conventional manner.

  7. Design and construction of a uniform magnetic field generator for a 32 channel cosmic ray detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Guzman, K. N.; Gutierrez-Sanchez, R. A.; Felix, J.; Arceo, L. J.; Araujo, C.

    2017-10-01

    The trajectory of a particle can be measured if some points of its track are known. This is applied to any kind of particle, including cosmic rays. We have designed and built a device for this purpose. We present the design, construction and characterization of a uniform magnetic field generator system in a finite volume. An array of Cerenkov detectors will be placed inside of it for determining the cosmic rays charge and to reconstruct their trajectories.

  8. Analytical Issues on the Determination of Carotenoids in Microalgae by Liquid Chromatography with Diode Array Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, S.; Perez, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    A preliminary study of literature review on the determination of carotenoids in microalgae samples by HPLC with diode array detector is presented. Main objective has been focused to compile data from literature and based on the main aspects of the analytical methodology used in the determination of these compounds. The work is structured as follows and affecting major analytical difficulties: Procurement and commercial availability of standard solutions. Stage of sample treatment. Chromatographic analysis. (Author) 19 refs.

  9. Muon System Design Studies for Detectors at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    van der Kraaij, E

    2011-01-01

    The two concepts for CLIC detectors inherited their design of the muon systems from the ILC community. In this note the outcome of a reevaluation of the design for the CLIC environment is presented. Based on a full detector simulation, the muon identification performance is analysed for different detector layouts and different cellsizes. As a result, nine layers are suggested for the muon systems of the CLIC ILD and CLIC SiD detectors, which are arranged in three groups of three layers. The cellsizes have been kept at 30×30 mm2. These layouts are used for the performance studies of the CLIC Conceptual Design Report (CDR).

  10. Design of two easily-testable VLSI array multipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, J.; Shen, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    Array multipliers are well-suited to VLSI implementation because of the regularity in their iterative structure. However, most VLSI circuits are very difficult to test. This paper shows that, with appropriate cell design, array multipliers can be designed to be very easily testable. An array multiplier is called c-testable if all its adder cells can be exhaustively tested while requiring only a constant number of test patterns. The testability of two well-known array multiplier structures are studied. The conventional design of the carry-save array multipler is shown to be not c-testable. However, a modified design, using a modified adder cell, is generated and shown to be c-testable and requires only 16 test patterns. Similar results are obtained for the baugh-wooley two's complement array multiplier. A modified design of the baugh-wooley array multiplier is shown to be c-testable and requires 55 test patterns. The implementation of a practical c-testable 16*16 array multiplier is also presented. 10 references.

  11. Instrumentation development for an array of water Cherenkov detectors for extensive air shower experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheidaei, F.; Bahmanabadi, M.; Keivani, A.; Samimi, J.

    2009-11-01

    A new small array of Cherenkov detectors has been deployed in Tehran, 1200 m above sea level. This array contains four tanks of distilled water with a diameter of 64 cm and a height of 130 cm. The effective area of each tank is about 1382 cm2. They are used to detect air showers and to record the arrival time of the secondary particles. We have collected about 640 000 extensive air showers (EAS) in 8298 h of observation time from November 2006 to October 2007. The distribution of air showers in zenith and azimuth angles has been studied and a cosnθ distribution with n = 6.02 ± 0.01 was obtained for the zenith angle distribution. An asymmetry has been observed in the azimuthal distribution of EAS of cosmic rays due to geomagnetic field. The first and second amplitudes of the asymmetry are AI = 0.183 ± 0.001 and AII = 0.038 ± 0.001. Since the recent results are in good agreement with our previous results of scintillation detectors, and tanks of distilled water are cheaper, we prefer to use them instead of scintillators in a future larger array. By simulation, we have improved the size of the detectors to yield the highest efficiency. The best dimensions for each tank with a photomultiplier tube in the center of its lid are 40 cm in diameter and 60 cm in height.

  12. Large arrays of discrete ionizing radiation detectors multiplexed using fluorescent optical converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koslow, E.E.; Edelman, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides a radiation imaging system employing arrays of scintillators. An object of the invention is to produce a detector with high spatial resolution, high gamma-photon absorption efficiency, excellent source and detector scatter rejection, and utilizing low-cost solid state opto-electronic devices. In one embodiment, it provides a radiation detection and conversion apparatus having an array of optically isolated radiation sensitive elements that emit optical radiation upon absorption of ionizing radiation. An array of channels, comprising a material that absorbs and traps the radiation emitted and transports it or radiation that has been shifted to longer wavelengths, is placed near the radiation-sensitive elements. Electro-optical detectors that convert the transported radiation into electrical signals are coupled to the channels. The activation of one of the electro-optical devices by radiation from one of the channels indicates that at least one of the radiation-sensitive elements near that channel has absorbed a quantity of radiation

  13. Lung counting: Comparison of a four detector array that has either metal or carbon fiber end caps, and the effect on array performance characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbir Ahmed, Asm; Kramer, Gary H.

    2011-01-01

    This study described the performance of an array of HPGe detectors, made by ORTEC. In the existing system, a metal end cap was used in the detector construction. In general, the natural metal contains some radioactive materials, create high background noises and signals during in vivo counting. ORTEC proposed a novel carbon fiber to be used in end cap, without any radio active content. This paper described the methodology of developing a model of the given HPGe array-detectors, comparing the detection efficiency and cross talk among the detectors using two end cap materials: either metal or carbon fiber and to provide a recommendation about the end cap material. The detector's counting efficiency were studied using point and plane sources. The cross talk among the array detectors were studied using a homogeneous attenuating medium made of tissue equivalent material. The cross talk was significant when single or multiple point sources (simulated to heterogeneous hot spots) were embedded inside the attenuating medium. With carbon fiber, the cross talk increased about 100% for photon energy at about 100 keV. For a uniform distribution of radioactive material, the cross talk increased about 5-10% when the end cap was made of carbon instead of steel. Metal end cap was recommended for the array of HPGe detectors.

  14. Numerical optimisation in spot detector design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Apperloo, W.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan

    1997-01-01

    Spots are image details resulting from objects, the projections of which are so small that the inner structure of these objects cannot be resolved from their image. Spot detectors are image operators aiming at the detection and localisation of spots in the image. Most spot detectors can be tuned

  15. Development of a PET detector module incorporating a silicon photodiode array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeld, A.B.; Takacs, G.J.; Lerch, M.L.F.; Simmonds, P.E.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: We are developing a new Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detection sub-module with depth of interaction capability. The new sub-module is simple and robust to minimise module assembly complications and is completely independent of photomultiplier tubes. The new sub-module has also been designed to maximise its flexibility for easy sub-module coupling so as to form a complete, customised, detection module to be used in PET scanners dedicated to human brain and breast, and small animal studies. Blue enhanced, silicon 8x8 detector arrays are used to read out the scintillation crystals, and form the basis of the new module. The new detectors were designed by the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP) at the University of Wollongong in collaboration with the High Energy Physics Department, University of Melbourne and produced by SPO D etector , Ukraine. Complementing the work on the silicon photodetectors, we have also carried out simulations of the propagation of the scintillation light in the crystals, and the effect of crystal dimensions and surface treatment on the distribution of light detected by the photodiode array. The distribution of light over the photodiodes has then been used to test various algorithms for calculating the point of interaction of the gamma ray in the crystal. Simulations of the light propagation show that for a crystal of dimensions 25mm x 25mm x 3mm, it is possible to determine the point of interaction in 2 dimensions with an average accuracy of just over 0.5mm. The resulting photon distribution detected by the array. The surface treatment, while having a large effect on the light output, does not have a great effect on the accuracy. If these dimensions change to 25mm x 25mm x 6mm then the surface conditions have a greater effect on the accuracy. It is possible however, with careful surface treatment, to achieve an accuracy of around 0.6mm, only marginally worse than the case for the 3mm thick crystal. Gamma ray

  16. Local polarization phenomena in In-doped CdTe x-ray detector arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Toshiyuki; Sato, Kenji; Ishida, Shinichiro; Kiri, Motosada; Hirooka, Megumi; Yamada, Masayoshi; Kanamori, Hitoshi

    1995-01-01

    Local polarization phenomena have been studied in detector arrays with the detector element size of 500 microm x 500 microm, which are fabricated from high-resistivity In-doped CdTe crystals grown by the vertical Bridgman technique. It has been found for the first time that a polarization effect, which is characterized by a progressive decrease of the pulse counting rate with increasing photon fluence, strongly depends on the detector elements, that is, the portion of crystals used. The influence of several parameters, such as the applied electric field strength, time, and temperature, on this local polarization effect is also investigated. From the photoluminescence measurements of the inhomogeneity of In dopant, it is concluded that the local polarization effect observed here originates from a deep level associated with In dopant in CdTe crystals

  17. A LSO scintillator array for a PET detector module with depth of interaction measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, J.S.; Moses, W.W.; Andreaco, M.S.; Petterson, O.

    2000-01-01

    We present construction methods and performance results for a production scintillator array of 64 optically isolated, 3 mm x 3 mm x 30 mm sized LSO crystals. This scintillator array has been developed for a PET detector module consisting of the 8x8 LSO array coupled on one end to a single photomultiplier tube (PMT) and on the opposite end to a 64 pixel array of silicon photodiodes (PD). The PMT provides an accurate timing pulse and initial energy discrimination, the PD identifies the crystal of interaction, the sum provides a total energy signal, and the PD/(PD+PMT) ratio determines the depth of interaction (DOI). Unlike the previous LSO array prototypes, we now glue Lumirror reflector material directly onto 4 sides of each crystal to obtain an easily manufactured, mechanically rugged array with our desired depth dependence. With 511 keV excitation, we obtain a total energy signal of 3600 electrons, pulse-height resolution of 25% fwhm, and 6-15 mm fwhm DOI resolution

  18. The development of a single-crystal fiber-array scintillator area detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loong, Chun; Vitt, Richard; Sayir, Ali; Sayir, Haluk

    2001-01-01

    The scientific output of a neutron instrument is directly proportional to the effectiveness of its detector system-coverage of scattering area, pixel resolution, counting efficiency, signal-to-noise ratio, life time and cost. The current neutron scintillator detectors employ mainly 6 Li-doped glass and ZnS, both of which present well-know limitations such as low light output, high gamma sensitivity in the case of 6 Li-glass and optical opacity in the case of ZnS. We aim to develop a position-sensitive, flight-time differentiable, efficient and cost-effective neutron detector system based on single-crystal scintillator fiber-arrays. The laser-heated melt modulation fiber growth technology developed at NASA provides the means to grow high-purity single-crystal fibers or rods of variable diameters (200 μm to 5 mm) and essentially unlimited length. Arrays of such fibers can be tailored to meet the requirements of pixel size, geometric configuration, and coverage area for a detector system. We report a plan in the growth and characterization of scintillators based on lithium silicates and boron aluminates using Ce as activator. (author)

  19. Mercuric iodide room-temperature array detectors for gamma-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, B. [Xsirius, Inc, Camarillo, CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Significant progress has been made recently in the development of mercuric iodide detector arrays for gamma-ray imaging, making real the possibility of constructing high-performance small, light-weight, portable gamma-ray imaging systems. New techniques have been applied in detector fabrication and then low noise electronics which have produced pixel arrays with high-energy resolution, high spatial resolution, high gamma stopping efficiency. Measurements of the energy resolution capability have been made on a 19-element protypical array. Pixel energy resolutions of 2.98% fwhm and 3.88% fwhm were obtained at 59 keV (241-Am) and 140-keV (99m-Tc), respectively. The pixel spectra for a 14-element section of the data is shown together with the composition of the overlapped individual pixel spectra. These techniques are now being applied to fabricate much larger arrays with thousands of pixels. Extension of these principles to imaging scenarios involving gamma-ray energies up to several hundred keV is also possible. This would enable imaging of the 208 keV and 375-414 keV 239-Pu and 240-Pu structures, as well as the 186 keV line of 235-U.

  20. Design of a new electrode array for cochlear implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kha, H.; Chen, B.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: This study aims to design a new electrode array which can be precisely located beneath the basilar membrane within the cochlear scala tympani. This placement of the electrode array is beneficial for increasing the effectiveness of the electrical stimulation of the audi tory nerves and maximising the growth factors delivered into the cochlea for regenerating the progressively lost auditory neurons, thereby significantly improving performance of the cochlear implant systems. Methods The design process involved two steps. First, the biocom patible nitinol-based shape memory alloy, of which mechanical deformation can be controlled using electrical cUTents/fields act vated by body temperature, was selected. Second, five different designs of the electrode array with embedded nitinol actuators were studied (Table I). The finite element method was employed to predict final positions of these electrode arrays. Results The electrode array with three 6 mm actuators at 2-8, 8-J4 and 14-20 mm from the tip (Fig. I) was found to be located most closely to the basilar membrane, compared with those in the other four cases. Conclusions A new nitinol cochlear implant electrode array with three embedded nitinol actuators has been designed. This electrode array is expected to be located beneath the basilar membrane for maximising the delivery of growth factors. Future research will involve the manufacturing of a prototype of this electrode array for use in insertion experiments and neurotrophin release tests.

  1. Multispectral linear array (MLA) focal plane mechanical and thermal design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, A. S.; Kaminski, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanical and thermal design of an integrated focal plane subsystem of a Multispectral Linear Array (MLA) instrument is discussed in terms of focal-plane alignment, thermoelastic performance, and thermal requirements. The modular construction and thermal control of the focal plane array are discussed.

  2. Probe design for expression arrays using OligoWiz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Since all measurements from a DNA microarray is dependant on the probes used, a good choice of probes is of vital importa nce when designing custom micro-arrays. This chapter describes how to de sign expression arrays using the “ OligoWiz ” software suite. The general desired features of good...... probes and the issues which probe design must address are introduced and a conceptual (rather than mathematical) description of how OligoWiz scores the quality of th e potential probes is presented. This is followed by a detailed step-by-step guide to designing expression arrays with OligoWiz....

  3. High-dynamic-range coherent diffractive imaging: ptychography using the mixed-mode pixel array detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giewekemeyer, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.giewekemeyer@xfel.eu [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Philipp, Hugh T. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Wilke, Robin N. [Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Aquila, Andrew [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Osterhoff, Markus [Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Tate, Mark W.; Shanks, Katherine S. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Zozulya, Alexey V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Salditt, Tim [Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Gruner, Sol M. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Kavli Institute of Cornell for Nanoscience, Ithaca, NY (United States); Mancuso, Adrian P. [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-08-07

    The advantages of a novel wide dynamic range hard X-ray detector are demonstrated for (ptychographic) coherent X-ray diffractive imaging. Coherent (X-ray) diffractive imaging (CDI) is an increasingly popular form of X-ray microscopy, mainly due to its potential to produce high-resolution images and the lack of an objective lens between the sample and its corresponding imaging detector. One challenge, however, is that very high dynamic range diffraction data must be collected to produce both quantitative and high-resolution images. In this work, hard X-ray ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging has been performed at the P10 beamline of the PETRA III synchrotron to demonstrate the potential of a very wide dynamic range imaging X-ray detector (the Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD). The detector is capable of single photon detection, detecting fluxes exceeding 1 × 10{sup 8} 8-keV photons pixel{sup −1} s{sup −1}, and framing at 1 kHz. A ptychographic reconstruction was performed using a peak focal intensity on the order of 1 × 10{sup 10} photons µm{sup −2} s{sup −1} within an area of approximately 325 nm × 603 nm. This was done without need of a beam stop and with a very modest attenuation, while ‘still’ images of the empty beam far-field intensity were recorded without any attenuation. The treatment of the detector frames and CDI methodology for reconstruction of non-sensitive detector regions, partially also extending the active detector area, are described.

  4. Optimization of a neutron detector design using adjoint transport simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, C.; Manalo, K.; Huang, M.; Chin, M.; Edgar, C.; Applegate, S.; Sjoden, G.

    2012-01-01

    A synthetic aperture approach has been developed and investigated for Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) detection in vehicles passing a checkpoint at highway speeds. SNM is postulated to be stored in a moving vehicle and detector assemblies are placed on the road-side or in chambers embedded below the road surface. Neutron and gamma spectral awareness is important for the detector assembly design besides high efficiencies, so that different SNMs can be detected and identified with various possible shielding settings. The detector assembly design is composed of a CsI gamma-ray detector block and five neutron detector blocks, with peak efficiencies targeting different energy ranges determined by adjoint simulations. In this study, formulations are derived using adjoint transport simulations to estimate detector efficiencies. The formulations is applied to investigate several neutron detector designs for Block IV, which has its peak efficiency in the thermal range, and Block V, designed to maximize the total neutron counts over the entire energy spectrum. Other Blocks detect different neutron energies. All five neutron detector blocks and the gamma-ray block are assembled in both MCNP and deterministic simulation models, with detector responses calculated to validate the fully assembled design using a 30-group library. The simulation results show that the 30-group library, collapsed from an 80-group library using an adjoint-weighting approach with the YGROUP code, significantly reduced the computational cost while maintaining accuracy. (authors)

  5. The MINDView brain PET detector, feasibility study based on SiPM arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, Antonio J., E-mail: agonzalez@i3m.upv.es [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), 46022 Valencia (Spain); Majewski, Stan [Radiology Research, Department of Radiology, University of Virginia, VA 22903 (United States); Sánchez, Filomeno [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), 46022 Valencia (Spain); Aussenhofer, Sebastian [NORAS MRI products GmbH, Hochberg (Germany); Aguilar, Albert; Conde, Pablo; Hernández, Liczandro; Vidal, Luis F. [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), 46022 Valencia (Spain); Pani, Roberto; Bettiol, Marco; Fabbri, Andrea [Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Bert, Julien; Visvikis, Dimitris [Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France); Jackson, Carl; Murphy, John; O’Neill, Kevin [SensL Technologies, Cork (Ireland); Benlloch, Jose M. [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2016-05-11

    The Multimodal Imaging of Neurological Disorders (MINDView) project aims to develop a dedicated brain Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanner with sufficient resolution and sensitivity to visualize neurotransmitter pathways and their disruptions in mental disorders for diagnosis and follow-up treatment. The PET system should be compact and fully compatible with a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) device in order to allow its operation as a PET brain insert in a hybrid imaging setup with most MRI scanners. The proposed design will enable the currently-installed MRI base to be easily upgraded to PET/MRI systems. The current design for the PET insert consists of a 3-ring configuration with 20 modules per ring and an axial field of view of ~15 cm and a geometrical aperture of ~33 cm in diameter. When coupled to the new head Radio Frequency (RF) coil, the inner usable diameter of the complete PET-RF coil insert is reduced to 26 cm. Two scintillator configurations have been tested, namely a 3-layer staggered array of LYSO with 1.5 mm pixel size, with 35×35 elements (6 mm thickness each) and a black-painted monolithic LYSO block also covering about 50×50 mm{sup 2} active area with 20 mm thickness. Laboratory test results associated with the current MINDView PET module concept are presented in terms of key parameters' optimization, such as spatial and energy resolution, sensitivity and Depth of Interaction (DOI) capability. It was possible to resolve all pixel elements from the three scintillator layers with energy resolutions as good as 10%. The monolithic scintillator showed average detector resolutions varying from 3.5 mm in the entrance layer to better than 1.5 mm near the photosensor, with average energy resolutions of about 17%.

  6. Design and Implementation of the ATLAS Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Boterenbrood, H; Cook, J; Filimonov, V; Hallgren, B I; Heubers, W P J; Khomoutnikov, V; Ryabov, Yu; Varela, F

    2004-01-01

    The overall dimensions of the ATLAS experiment and its harsh environment, due to radiation and magnetic field, represent new challenges for the implementation of the Detector Control System. It supervises all hardware of the ATLAS detector, monitors the infrastructure of the experiment, and provides information exchange with the LHC accelerator. The system must allow for the operation of the different ATLAS sub-detectors in stand-alone mode, as required for calibration and debugging, as well as the coherent and integrated operation of all sub-detectors for physics data taking. For this reason, the Detector Control System is logically arranged to map the hierarchical organization of the ATLAS detector. Special requirements are placed onto the ATLAS Detector Control System because of the large number of distributed I/O channels and of the inaccessibility of the equipment during operation. Standardization is a crucial issue for the design and implementation of the control system because of the large variety of e...

  7. LHCb: Detector Module Design, Construction and Performance for the LHCb SciFi Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Ekelhof, R

    2014-01-01

    The Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker for the LHCb Upgrade (CERN/LHCC 2014-001; LHCb TDR 15) is based on 2.5 m long multi-layered ribbons from 10,000 km of scintillating fibre over 12 planes covering 350 m2. The planes are separated into modular detectors, each with cooled silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays for photo-readout. In this talk, we will present the construction and performance of this novel detector, including the intricacies of scintillating fibre ribbon production, constructing precision detector planes with a rigid and light module design, and the integration of the readout components for this detector. The complexities and issues regarding this active part of the SciFi Tracker will be emphasised along with the current solutions and measured performances.

  8. Challenging aspects of contemporary cochlear implant electrode array design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistrík, Pavel; Jolly, Claude; Sieber, Daniel; Hochmair, Ingeborg

    2017-12-01

    A design comparison of current perimodiolar and lateral wall electrode arrays of the cochlear implant (CI) is provided. The focus is on functional features such as acoustic frequency coverage and tonotopic mapping, battery consumption and dynamic range. A traumacity of their insertion is also evaluated. Review of up-to-date literature. Perimodiolar electrode arrays are positioned in the basal turn of the cochlea near the modiolus. They are designed to initiate the action potential in the proximity to the neural soma located in spiral ganglion. On the other hand, lateral wall electrode arrays can be inserted deeper inside the cochlea, as they are located along the lateral wall and such insertion trajectory is less traumatic. This class of arrays targets primarily surviving neural peripheral processes. Due to their larger insertion depth, lateral wall arrays can deliver lower acoustic frequencies in manner better corresponding to cochlear tonotopicity. In fact, spiral ganglion sections containing auditory nerve fibres tuned to low acoustic frequencies are located deeper than 1 and half turn inside the cochlea. For this reason, a significant frequency mismatch might be occurring for apical electrodes in perimodiolar arrays, detrimental to speech perception. Tonal languages such as Mandarin might be therefore better treated with lateral wall arrays. On the other hand, closer proximity to target tissue results in lower psychophysical threshold levels for perimodiolar arrays. However, the maximal comfort level is also lower, paradoxically resulting in narrower dynamic range than that of lateral wall arrays. Battery consumption is comparable for both types of arrays. Lateral wall arrays are less likely to cause trauma to cochlear structures. As the current trend in cochlear implantation is the maximal protection of residual acoustic hearing, the lateral wall arrays seem more suitable for hearing preservation CI surgeries. Future development could focus on combining the

  9. Design of an ionization diffusion chamber detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiarto, S.

    1976-01-01

    Prototype of an Ionization Diffusion Chamber detector has been made. It is a silindrical glass, 20 cm in diameter, 13,5 cm in height, air gas filled, operated at room pressure and room temperature at the top of this instrument while for the box temperature dry ice (CO 2 solid) temperature is used. This detector is ready for seeing alpha and beta particle tracks. (author)

  10. APRON: A Cellular Processor Array Simulation and Hardware Design Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, David R. W.; Dudek, Piotr

    2009-12-01

    We present a software environment for the efficient simulation of cellular processor arrays (CPAs). This software (APRON) is used to explore algorithms that are designed for massively parallel fine-grained processor arrays, topographic multilayer neural networks, vision chips with SIMD processor arrays, and related architectures. The software uses a highly optimised core combined with a flexible compiler to provide the user with tools for the design of new processor array hardware architectures and the emulation of existing devices. We present performance benchmarks for the software processor array implemented on standard commodity microprocessors. APRON can be configured to use additional processing hardware if necessary and can be used as a complete graphical user interface and development environment for new or existing CPA systems, allowing more users to develop algorithms for CPA systems.

  11. APRON: A Cellular Processor Array Simulation and Hardware Design Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. W. Barr

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a software environment for the efficient simulation of cellular processor arrays (CPAs. This software (APRON is used to explore algorithms that are designed for massively parallel fine-grained processor arrays, topographic multilayer neural networks, vision chips with SIMD processor arrays, and related architectures. The software uses a highly optimised core combined with a flexible compiler to provide the user with tools for the design of new processor array hardware architectures and the emulation of existing devices. We present performance benchmarks for the software processor array implemented on standard commodity microprocessors. APRON can be configured to use additional processing hardware if necessary and can be used as a complete graphical user interface and development environment for new or existing CPA systems, allowing more users to develop algorithms for CPA systems.

  12. Gross beta determination in drinking water using scintillating fiber array detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wen-Hui; Yi, Hong-Chang; Liu, Tong-Qing; Zeng, Zhi; Li, Jun-Li; Zhang, Hui; Ma, Hao

    2018-04-04

    A scintillating fiber array detector for measuring gross beta counting is developed to monitor the real-time radioactivity in drinking water. The detector, placed in a stainless-steel tank, consists of 1096 scintillating fibers, both sides of which are connected to a photomultiplier tube. The detector parameters, including working voltage, background counting rate and stability, are tested, and the detection efficiency is calibrated using standard potassium chloride solution. Water samples are measured with the detector and the results are compared with those by evaporation method. The results show consistency with those by evaporation method. The background counting rate of the detector is 38.131 ± 0.005 cps, and the detection efficiency for β particles is 0.37 ± 0.01 cps/(Bq/l). The MDAC of this system can be less than 1.0 Bq/l for β particles in 120 min without pre-concentration. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of array scintillation detector for follicle thyroid 2D imaging acquisition using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Carlos Borges da

    2007-05-01

    The image acquisition methods applied to nuclear medicine and radiobiology are a valuable research study for determination of thyroid anatomy to seek disorders associated to follicular cells. The Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has also been used in problems related to radiation detection in order to map medical images since the improvement of data processing compatible with personnel computers (PC). This work presents an innovative study to find out the adequate scintillation inorganic detector array that could be coupled to a specific light photo sensor, a charge coupled device (CCD) through a fiber optic plate in order to map the follicles of thyroid gland. The goal is to choose the type of detector that fits the application suggested here with spatial resolution of 10 μm and good detector efficiency. The methodology results are useful to map a follicle image using gamma radiation emission. A source - detector simulation is performed by using a MCNP4B (Monte Carlo for Neutron Photon transport) general code considering different source energies, detector materials and geometries including pixel sizes and reflector types. The results demonstrate that by using MCNP4B code is possible to searching for useful parameters related to the systems used in nuclear medicine, specifically in radiobiology applied to endocrine physiology studies to acquiring thyroid follicles images. (author)

  14. Tiled Array of Pixelated CZT Imaging Detectors for ProtoEXIST2 and MIRAX-HXI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jaesub; Allen, Branden; Grindlay, Jonathan; Rodrigues, Barbara; Ellis, Jon Robert; Baker, Robert; Barthelmy, Scott; Mao, Peter; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Apple, Jeff

    2013-12-01

    We have assembled a tiled array (220 cm2) of fine pixel (0.6 mm) imaging CZT detectors for a balloon borne wide-field hard X-ray telescope, ProtoEXIST2. ProtoEXIST2 is a prototype experiment for a next generation hard X-ray imager MIRAX-HXI on board Lattes, a spacecraft from the Agencia Espacial Brasilieira. MIRAX will survey the 5 to 200 keV sky of Galactic bulge, adjoining southern Galactic plane and the extragalactic sky with 6 ' angular resolution. This survey will open a vast discovery space in timing studies of accretion neutron stars and black holes. The ProtoEXIST2 CZT detector plane consists of 64 of 5 mm thick 2 cm × 2 cm CZT crystals tiled with a minimal gap. MIRAX will consist of 4 such detector planes, each of which will be imaged with its own coded-aperture mask. We present the packaging architecture and assembly procedure of the ProtoEXIST2 detector. On 2012, Oct 10, we conducted a successful high altitude balloon experiment of the ProtoEXIST1 and 2 telescopes, which demonstrates their technology readiness for space application. During the flight both telescopes performed as well as on the ground. We report the results of ground calibration and the initial results for the detector performance in the balloon flight.

  15. Test and evaluation of infrared detectors and arrays; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Mar. 27-29, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, Forney M.

    Papers on the testing and evaluation of IR detectors and arrays are presented, covering topics such as a short wavelength IR test system, pulse height analysis, the use of an expert system for IR detector testing, low-background IR focal plane testing, electron beam testing, high performance silicide Schottky photodiodes, the SDI organization focal plane test program, the absorption cross section of arsenic in silicon, and long wavelength IR hybrids. Other topics include low background radiometric detector measurements, an ultralow background dewar for IR detector characterization studies, a computer assisted mosaic array test station, a configurable detector array test station, automated detector material characterization capabilities, and a test system for mercury cadmium telluride photoconductor arrays. Additional topics include ionization dosimetry measurements inside a dewar for linac electron and californium-252 neutron environments, a radiation test facility using a variable-flux electron beam source, automated visual inspection of IR focal plane arrays, a titanium cryostat for low temperature radiation effects studies, a low dose rate gamma test facility, and the test and evaluation of stability in IR staring focal plane arrays after nonuniformity correction.

  16. Design, calibration, and performance of the MINERvA detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliaga, L. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Sección Física, Departamento de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Apartado 1761, Lima, Perú (Peru); Bagby, L.; Baldin, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Baumbaugh, A. [Sección Física, Departamento de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Apartado 1761, Lima, Perú (Peru); Bodek, A.; Bradford, R. [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14610 (United States); Brooks, W.K. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Avda. España 1680, Casilla 110-V, Valparaíso (Chile); Boehnlein, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Boyd, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Budd, H. [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14610 (United States); Butkevich, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Martinez Caicedo, D.A.; Castromonte, C.M. [Hampton University, Department of Physics, Hampton, VA 23668 (United States); Christy, M.E. [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota – Duluth, Duluth, MN 55812 (United States); Chvojka, J. [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14610 (United States); Motta, H. da [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22290-180 (Brazil); and others

    2014-04-11

    The MINERvA experiment is designed to perform precision studies of neutrino-nucleus scattering using ν{sub μ} and ν{sup ¯}{sub μ} neutrinos incident at 1–20 GeV in the NuMI beam at Fermilab. This article presents a detailed description of the MINERvA detector and describes the ex situ and in situ techniques employed to characterize the detector and monitor its performance. The detector is composed of a finely segmented scintillator-based inner tracking region surrounded by electromagnetic and hadronic sampling calorimetry. The upstream portion of the detector includes planes of graphite, iron and lead interleaved between tracking planes to facilitate the study of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. Observations concerning the detector response over sustained periods of running are reported. The detector design and methods of operation have relevance to future neutrino experiments in which segmented scintillator tracking is utilized.

  17. Evaluation of a SiPM array detector coupled to a LFS-3 pixellated scintillator for PET/MR applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Stratos; Fysikopoulos, Eleftherios [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Georgiou, Maria [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Department of Medical School, University of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Loudos, George [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece)

    2015-05-18

    SiPM arrays are insensitive to magnetic fields and thus good candidates for hybrid PET/MR imaging systems. Moreover, due to their small size and flexibility can be used in dedicated small field of view small animal imaging detectors and especially in head PET/MR studies in mice. Co-doped LFS-3 scintillator crystals have higher light yield and slightly faster response than that of LSO:Ce mainly due to the co-doped activation of emission centers with varying materials such as Ce, Gd, Sc, Y, La, Tb, or Ca distributed at the molecular scale through the lutetium silicate crystal host. The purpose of this study is to investigate the behavior of the SensL ArraySL-4 (4x4 element array of 3x3 mm{sup 2} silicon photomultipliers) optical detector coupled to a 6x6 LFS-3 scintillator array, with 2x2x5 mm{sup 3} crystal size elements, for possible applications in small field of view PET/MR imaging detectors. We have designed a symmetric resistive charge division circuit to read out the signal outputs of 4x4 pixel SiPM array reducing the 16 pixel outputs of the photodetector to 4 position signals. The 4 position signals were digitized using free running Analog to Digital Converters. The ADCs sampling rate was 50 MHz. An FPGA (Spartan 6 LX150T) was used for triggering and digital signal processing of the pulses. Experimental evaluation was carried out with {sup 22}Na radioactive source and the parameters studied where energy resolution and peak to valley ratio. The first preliminary results of the evaluation shows a clear visualization of the discrete 2x2x5 mm{sup 3} LFS-3 scintillator elements. The mean peak to valley ratio of the horizontal profiles on the raw image was measured equal to 11 while the energy resolution was calculated equal to 30% at the central pixels.

  18. Pixel array detector for X-ray free electron laser experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, Hugh T., E-mail: htp2@cornell.edu [Department of Physics, Laboratory of Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hromalik, Marianne [Electrical and Computer Engineering, SUNY Oswego, Oswego, NY 13126 (United States); Tate, Mark; Koerner, Lucas [Department of Physics, Laboratory of Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Gruner, Sol M. [Department of Physics, Laboratory of Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Wilson Laboratory, Cornell University, CHESS, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) promise to revolutionize X-ray science with extremely high peak brilliances and femtosecond X-ray pulses. This will require novel detectors to fully realize the potential of these new sources. There are many current detector development projects aimed at the many challenges of meeting the XFEL requirements . This paper describes a pixel array detector (PAD) that has been developed for the Coherent X-ray Imaging experiment at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Laboratory . The detector features 14-bit in-pixel digitization; a 2-level in-pixel gain setting that can be used to make an arbitrary 2-D gain pattern that is adaptable to a particular experiment; the ability to handle instantaneous X-ray flux rates of 10{sup 17} photons per second; and continuous frames rates in excess of 120 Hz. The detector uses direct detection of X-rays in a silicon diode. The charge produced by the diode is integrated in a pixilated application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) which digitizes collected holes with single X-ray photon capability. Each ASIC is 194x185 pixels, each pixel is 110{mu}mx110{mu}m on a side. Each pixel can detect up to 2500 X-rays per frame in low-gain mode, yet easily detects single photons at high-gain. Cooled, single-chip detectors have been built and meet all the required specifications. SLAC National Laboratory is engaged in constructing a tiled, multi-chip 1516x1516 pixel detector.

  19. Mechanical design of the CDF SVX II silicon vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skarha, J.E.

    1994-08-01

    A next generation silicon vertex detector is planned at CDF for the 1998 Tevatron collider run with the Main Injector. The SVX II silicon vertex detector will allow high luminosity data-taking, enable online triggering of secondary vertex production, and greatly increase the acceptance for heavy flavor physics at CDF. The design specifications, geometric layout, and early mechanical prototyping work for this detector are discussed

  20. Performance study of monochromatic synchrotron X-ray computed tomography using a linear array detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazama, Masahiro; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Akiba, Masahiro; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Ando, Masami; Akatsuka, Takao

    1997-09-01

    Monochromatic x-ray computed tomography (CT) using synchrotron radiation (SR) is being developed for detection of non-radioactive contrast materials at low concentration for application in clinical diagnosis. A new SR-CT system with improved contrast resolution, was constructed using a linear array detector which provides wide dynamic ranges and a double monochromator. The performance of this system was evaluated in a phantom and a rat model of brain ischemia. This system consists of a silicon (111) double crystal monochromator, an x-ray shutter, an ionization chamber, x-ray slits, a scanning table for the target organ, and an x-ray linear array detector. The research was carried out at the BLNE-5A bending magnet beam line of the Tristan Accumulation Ring in KEK, Japan. In this experiment, the reconstructed image of the spatial-resolution phantom clearly showed the 1 mm holes. At 1 mm slice thickness, the above K-edge image of the phantom showed contrast resolution at the concentration of 200 {mu}g/ml iodine-based contrast materials whereas the K-edge energy subtraction image showed contrast resolution at the concentration of 500 {mu}g/ml contrast materials. The cerebral arteries filled with iodine microspheres were clearly revealed, and the ischemic regions at the right temporal lobe and frontal lobe were depicted as non-vascular regions. The measured minimal detectable concentration of iodine on the above K-edge image is about 6 times higher than the expected value of 35.3 {mu}g/ml because of the high dark current of this detector. Thus, the use of a CCD detector which is cooled by liquid nitrogen to improve the dynamic range of the detector, is being under construction. (author)

  1. Photon Counting Energy Dispersive Detector Arrays for X-ray Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S; Nygård, Einar; Meirav, Oded; Arenson, Jerry; Barber, William C; Hartsough, Neal E; Malakhov, Nail; Wessel, Jan C

    2009-01-01

    The development of an innovative detector technology for photon-counting in X-ray imaging is reported. This new generation of detectors, based on pixellated cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays electrically connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) for readout, will produce fast and highly efficient photon-counting and energy-dispersive X-ray imaging. There are a number of applications that can greatly benefit from these novel imagers including mammography, planar radiography, and computed tomography (CT). Systems based on this new detector technology can provide compositional analysis of tissue through spectroscopic X-ray imaging, significantly improve overall image quality, and may significantly reduce X-ray dose to the patient. A very high X-ray flux is utilized in many of these applications. For example, CT scanners can produce ~100 Mphotons/mm(2)/s in the unattenuated beam. High flux is required in order to collect sufficient photon statistics in the measurement of the transmitted flux (attenuated beam) during the very short time frame of a CT scan. This high count rate combined with a need for high detection efficiency requires the development of detector structures that can provide a response signal much faster than the transit time of carriers over the whole detector thickness. We have developed CdTe and CZT detector array structures which are 3 mm thick with 16×16 pixels and a 1 mm pixel pitch. These structures, in the two different implementations presented here, utilize either a small pixel effect or a drift phenomenon. An energy resolution of 4.75% at 122 keV has been obtained with a 30 ns peaking time using discrete electronics and a (57)Co source. An output rate of 6×10(6) counts per second per individual pixel has been obtained with our ASIC readout electronics and a clinical CT X-ray tube. Additionally, the first clinical CT images, taken with several of our prototype photon-counting and

  2. An ancient form of position-sensitive detector - the individual counter array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewat, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    Large position sensitive detectors (PSDs) have been very successful as high efficiency neutron powder diffractometers. Complete powder patterns can be obtained within minutes, making possible real-time measurements of structural changes accompanying chemical and electrochemical reactions. The angular resolution of such machines is determined by the diameter of the sample, and not simply by the resolution of the detector itself. It is argued that since sample diameters are usually 5mm to 10mm, it is possible to use an array of individual counters of similar diameter rather than a true PSD. Such a low to medium resolution individual counter array (ICA) can be made more efficient than the true PSD, produces an identical diffraction pattern, and has several practical advantages, including covering a greater solid angle. For high resolution powder diffraction, it has already been demonstrated that an ICA, in this case associated with Soller collimators, is again the most efficient solution. This is because the sample volume (and intensity) of a high resolution PSD decreases quadratically with the diameter of the sample. The only alternative to very small samples would be a large sample-detector distance, and then large vertical divergences cannot be achieved because of mechanical limitations on gas-filled PSD apertures; again intensity is lost. The resolution and efficiency of the ICA are discussed. (author)

  3. MT3250BA: a 320×256-50µm snapshot microbolometer ROIC for high-resistance detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eminoglu, Selim; Akin, Tayfun

    2013-06-01

    This paper reports the development of a new microbolometer readout integrated circuit (MT3250BA) designed for high-resistance detector arrays. MT3250BA is the first microbolometer readout integrated circuit (ROIC) product from Mikro-Tasarim Ltd., which is a fabless IC design house specialized in the development of monolithic CMOS imaging sensors and ROICs for hybrid photonic imaging sensors and microbolometers. MT3250BA has a format of 320 × 256 and a pixel pitch of 50 µm, developed with a system-on-chip architecture in mind, where all the timing and biasing for this ROIC are generated on-chip without requiring any external inputs. MT3250BA is a highly configurable ROIC, where many of its features can be programmed through a 3-wire serial interface allowing on-the-fly configuration of many ROIC features. MT3250BA has 2 analog video outputs and 1 analog reference output for pseudo-differential operation, and the ROIC can be programmed to operate in the 1 or 2-output modes. A unique feature of MT3250BA is that it performs snapshot readout operation; therefore, the image quality will only be limited by the thermal time constant of the detector pixels, but not by the scanning speed of the ROIC, as commonly found in the conventional microbolometer ROICs performing line-by-line (rolling-line) readout operation. The signal integration is performed at the pixel level in parallel for the whole array, and signal integration time can be programmed from 0.1 µs up to 100 ms in steps of 0.1 µs. The ROIC is designed to work with high-resistance detector arrays with pixel resistance values higher than 250 kΩ. The detector bias voltage can be programmed on-chip over a 2 V range with a resolution of 1 mV. The ROIC has a measured input referred noise of 260 µV rms at 300 K. The ROIC can be used to build a microbolometer infrared sensor with an NETD value below 100 mK using a microbolometer detector array fabrication technology with a high detector resistance value (≥ 250 K

  4. Introduction to embedded system design using field programmable gate arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Dubey, Rahul

    2009-01-01

    Offers information on the use of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) in the design of embedded systems. This text considers a hypothetical robot controller as an embedded application and weaves around it related concepts of FPGA-based digital design. It is suitable for both students and designers who have worked with microprocessors.

  5. Plasma Panel Detectors for MIP Detection for the SLHC and a Test Chamber Design

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Robert; Etzion, Erez; Friedman, Peter S; Levin, Daniel S; Moshe, Meny Ben; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Zhou, Bing

    2010-01-01

    Performance demands for high and super-high luminosity at the LHC (up to 10^35 cm^(-2) sec^(-1) after the 2017 shutdown) and at future colliders demand high resolution tracking detectors with very fast time response and excellent temporal and spatial resolution. We are investigating a new radiation detector technology based on Plasma Display Panels (PDP), the underlying engine of panel plasma television displays. The design and production of PDPs is supported by four decades of industrial development. Emerging from this television technology is the Plasma Panel Sensor (PPS), a novel variant of the micropattern radiation detector. The PPS is fundamentally an array of micro-Geiger plasma discharge cells operating in a non-ageing, hermetically sealed gas mixture . We report on the PPS development program, including design of a PPS Test Cell.

  6. Heat-rejection design for large concentrating solar arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, E. P.

    1980-01-01

    This paper considers the effect of heat rejection devices (radiators) on the performance and cost of large concentrating solar arrays for space application. Overall array characteristics are derived from the weight, cost, and performance of four major components; namely primary structure, optics/secondary structure, radiator, and solar panel. An ideal concentrator analysis is used to establish general cost and performance trends independent of specific array design. Both passive and heat-pipe radiation are evaluated, with an incremental cost-of-power approach used in the evaluation. Passive radiators are found to be more cost effective with silicon than with gallium arsenide (GaAs) arrays. Representative concentrating arrays have been evaluated for both near-term and advanced solar cell technology. Minimum cost of power is achieved at geometric concentration ratios in the range 2 to 6.

  7. Phased-array radar design application of radar fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Phased-Array Radar Design is a text-reference designed for electrical engineering graduate students in colleges and universities as well as for corporate in-house training programs for radar design engineers, especially systems engineers and analysts who would like to gain hands-on, practical knowledge and skills in radar design fundamentals, advanced radar concepts, trade-offs for radar design and radar performance analysis.

  8. A study into the design of steerable microphone arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, Chiong Ching; Leung, Yee Hong

    2017-01-01

    The book covers the design formulations for broadband beamformer targeting nearfield and farfield sources. The book content includes background information on the acoustic environment, including propagation medium, the array geometries, signal models and basic beamformer designs. Subsequently it introduces design formulation for nearfield, farfield and mixed nearfield-farfield beamformers and extends the design formulation into electronically steerable beamformers. In addition, a robust formulation is introduced for all the designs mentioned.

  9. AIDA: A 16-channel amplifier ASIC to read out the advanced implantation detector array for experiments in nuclear decay spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, D. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Coleman-Smith, P. J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Davinson, T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I. H. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Page, R. D. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Thomas, S. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    We have designed a read-out ASIC for nuclear decay spectroscopy as part of the AIDA project - the Advanced Implantation Detector Array. AIDA will be installed in experiments at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in GSI, Darmstadt. The AIDA ASIC will measure the signals when unstable nuclei are implanted into the detector, followed by the much smaller signals when the nuclei subsequently decay. Implant energies can be as high as 20 GeV; decay products need to be measured down to 25 keV within just a few microseconds of the initial implants. The ASIC uses two amplifiers per detector channel, one covering the 20 GeV dynamic range, the other selectable over a 20 MeV or 1 GeV range. The amplifiers are linked together by bypass transistors which are normally switched off. The arrival of a large signal causes saturation of the low-energy amplifier and a fluctuation of the input voltage, which activates the link to the high-energy amplifier. The bypass transistors switch on and the input charge is integrated by the high-energy amplifier. The signal is shaped and stored by a peak-hold, then read out on a multiplexed output. Control logic resets the amplifiers and bypass circuit, allowing the low-energy amplifier to measure the subsequent decay signal. We present simulations and test results, demonstrating the AIDA ASIC operation over a wide range of input signals. (authors)

  10. THE COSMIC-RAY ENERGY SPECTRUM OBSERVED WITH THE SURFACE DETECTOR OF THE TELESCOPE ARRAY EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Hanlon, W. [High Energy Astrophysics Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Aida, R. [University of Yamanashi, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, Kofu, Yamanashi (Japan); Azuma, R.; Fukuda, T. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Cheon, B. G.; Cho, E. J. [Department of Physics and Research Institute of Natural Science, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chiba, J. [Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba (Japan); Chikawa, M. [Department of Physics, Kinki University, Higashi Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Cho, W. R. [Department of Physics, Yonsei University, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Fujii, H. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Fujii, T. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Fukushima, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); and others

    2013-05-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) collaboration has measured the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with primary energies above 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} eV. This measurement is based upon four years of observation by the surface detector component of TA. The spectrum shows a dip at an energy of 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} eV and a steepening at 5.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV which is consistent with the expectation from the GZK cutoff. We present the results of a technique, new to the analysis of UHECR surface detector data, that involves generating a complete simulation of UHECRs striking the TA surface detector. The procedure starts with shower simulations using the CORSIKA Monte Carlo program where we have solved the problems caused by use of the ''thinning'' approximation. This simulation method allows us to make an accurate calculation of the acceptance of the detector for the energies concerned.

  11. The EUROBALL neutron wall - design and performance tests of neutron detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Skeppstedt, Ö; Lindström, L; Wadsworth, R; Hibbert, I; Kelsall, N; Jenkins, D; Grawe, H; aGórska, M; Moszynski, M; Sujkowski, Z; Wolski, D; Kapusta, M; Hellström, M; Kalogeropoulos, S; Oner, D; Johnson, A; Cederkäll, J; Klamra, W; Nyberg, J; Weiszflog, M; Kay, J; Griffiths, R; Garces-Narro, J; Pearson, C; Eberth, J

    1999-01-01

    The mechanical design of the EUROBALL neutron wall and neutron detectors, and their performance measured with a sup 2 sup 4 sup 6 sup , sup 2 sup 4 sup 8 Cm fission source are described. The array consists of 15 pseudohexaconical detector units subdivided into three, 149 mm high, hermetically separated segments and a smaller central pentagonal unit subdivided into five segments. The detectors are filled with Bicron BC501A liquid scintillator. Each section of the hexaconical detectors is viewed by a 130 mm diameter Philips XP4512PA photomultiplier while the sections of pentagonal detectors are viewed by Philips XP4312B PMTs. The tests of n-gamma discrimination performed by zero-crossing and time-of-flight methods show a full separation of gamma- and neutron events down to 50 keV recoil electron energy. These tests demonstrate the excellent timing properties of the detectors and an average time resolution of 1.56 ns. The factors determining the efficiency of neutron detectors are discussed. The total efficiency...

  12. Optimization of Compton-suppression and summing schemes for the TIGRESS HPGe detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, M. A.; Svensson, C. E.; Andreoiu, C.; Andreyev, A.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Boston, A. J.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Churchman, R.; Drake, T. E.; Finlay, P.; Garrett, P. E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hackman, G.; Hyland, B.; Jones, B.; Maharaj, R.; Morton, A. C.; Pearson, C. J.; Phillips, A. A.; Sarazin, F.; Scraggs, H. C.; Smith, M. B.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Waddington, J. C.; Watters, L. M.

    2007-04-01

    Methods of optimizing the performance of an array of Compton-suppressed, segmented HPGe clover detectors have been developed which rely on the physical position sensitivity of both the HPGe crystals and the Compton-suppression shields. These relatively simple analysis procedures promise to improve the precision of experiments with the TRIUMF-ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape-Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS). Suppression schemes will improve the efficiency and peak-to-total ratio of TIGRESS for high γ-ray multiplicity events by taking advantage of the 20-fold segmentation of the Compton-suppression shields, while the use of different summing schemes will improve results for a wide range of experimental conditions. The benefits of these methods are compared for many γ-ray energies and multiplicities using a GEANT4 simulation, and the optimal physical configuration of the TIGRESS array under each set of conditions is determined.

  13. Use of a neutrino detector for muon identification by the CYGNUS air-shower array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.C.; DeLay, R.S.; Lu, X.Q.; Yodh, G.B. (Univ. of California, Irvine (United States)); Burman, R.L.; Cady, D.R.; Lloyd-Evans, J.; Nagle, D.E.; Sandberg, V.D.; Sena, A.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Chang, C.Y.; Dingus, B.L.; Gupta, S.; Goodman, J.A.; Haines, T.J.; Krakauer, D.A.; Talaga, R.L. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States)); Ellsworth, R.W. (George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States)); Potter, M.E.; Thompson, T.N. (Univ. of California, Irvine (United States) Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The muon content of extensive air showers observed by the CYGNUS experiment are measured by a well-shielded apparatus originally used for accelerator neutrino detection. Primary identification and counting of muons relies on a 44 m{sup 2} array of multiwire proportional counters that has operated continously since the experiment's inception to the present time. During the experiment's first 20 months, the central detector, consisting of flash-tube chambers, was used for high-resolution reconstruction of muon trajectories for a limited subsample of air showers. The ability to distinguish individual muons in the tracking device enabled verification and calibration of the muon counting by the proportional-counter system. The tracking capability was also used to verify the systematic pointing accuracy of the extensive air-shower arrival direction, as determined, as determined by the CYGNUS array, to better than 0.5{sup 0}. (orig.).

  14. Design and control of phased ICRF antenna arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulding, R.H.; Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Phased antenna arrays operating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are used to produce highly directional wave spectra, primarily for use in current drive experiments. RF current drive using phased antennas has been demonstrated in both the JET and DIII-D tokamaks, and both devices are planning to operate new four-element arrays beginning early next year. Features of antenna design that are relevant to phased operation and production of directional spectra are reviewed. Recent advances in the design of the feed circuits and the related control systems for these arrays should substantially improve their performance, by reducing the coupling seen by the matching networks and rf power supplies caused by the mutual impedance of the array elements. The feed circuit designs for the DIII-D and JET phased antenna arrays are compared. The two configurations differ significantly due to the fact that one power amplifier is used for the entire array in the former case, and one per element in the latter. The JET system uses automatic feedback control of matching, phase and amplitude of antenna currents, and the transmitter power balance. The design of this system is discussed, and a time dependent model used to predict its behavior is described

  15. Improvements in 130Te double beta decay search with cryogenic TeO2 array detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessandrello, A.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Caspani, P.; Cremonesi, O.; Fiorini, E.; Giuliani, A.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Previtali, E.; Zanotti, L.

    1996-01-01

    Single crystal TeO 2 bolometers have been used since 5 years ago to search for neutrinoless DBD of 130 Te. During the last year, our group has been studying and preparing the first array of 4 crystals, 340 g each, opening this technique to new frontiers in rare events' physics. The results and perspectives of this second generation cryogenic detectors are here reported and discussed, with particular emphasis on the peculiarities which make them feasible for a consistent upgrading of our previous result in DBD search. (orig.)

  16. Search for high energy skimming neutrinos at a surface detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo Van Thuan; Hoang Van Khanh; Pham Ngoc Diep

    2010-01-01

    In the present study we propose a new method for detection of high energy cosmological muon neutrinos by transition radiations at a medium interface. The emerging electro-magnetic radiations induced by earth-skimming heavy charged leptons are able to trigger a few of aligned neighboring local water Cherenkov stations at a surface detector array similar to the Pierre Auger Observatory. The estimation applied to the model of Gamma Ray Burst induced neutrino fluxes and the spherical earth surface shows a competitive rate of muon neutrino events in the energy range below the GZK cut-off. (author)

  17. Coil Array Design Inspired on the Kepler's Lenten Pretzel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, F.; Solis, S. E.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2008-01-01

    The RF coil arrays are an important part in Magnetic Resonance Imaging, since they are the main device for transmission and reception of the magnetic resonance signal. An RF coil array with a new configuration based on the Kepler's Lenten pretzel for the geocentric path of Mars is proposed in this work. The evenly distributed trajectories may serve as the basic configuration to form a coil array to adequately cover a region of interest for magnetic resonance experiments. The main goal is to investigate the electromagnetic properties of this coil array geometry to obtain an optimal design for its further construction. Hence, the electromagnetic properties of the coil array were numerical simulated using the finite element method and the quasi-static approach. Resulting simulations showed that there is an important concentration of magnetic field lines at the centre of the coil array. This is an advantage over other coil arrays where the magnetic field usually decreased at their geometrical centre. Both the electric and magnetic fields had also a very good uniformity. These characteristics made this coil design a good candidate for applications where the use of multi-coil technology is mandatory

  18. The Science benefits and preliminary design of the southern hemisphere gravitational wave detector AIGO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, D G; Barriga, P; Coward, D; Dumas, J-C; Fan, Y; Gras, S; Howell, E; Ju, L; Miao, H [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Brooks, A F; Hosken, D J; Munch, J; Veitch, P J [Department of Physics, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, 5005 Australia (Australia); Charlton, P [School of Computing and Mathematics, Charles Sturt University, NSW 2678 (Australia); Galloway, D [School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Vic 3800 (Australia); Hughes, S [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); McClelland, D E; Scott, S M; Slagmolen, B J J [Department of Physics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Melatos, A [School of Physics University of Melbourne, Parkville Vic 3010 Australia (Australia)], E-mail: dgb@physics.uwa.edu.au (and others)

    2008-07-15

    The proposed southern hemisphere gravitational wave detector AIGO increases the projected average baseline of the global array of ground based gravitational wave detectors by a factor {approx}4. This allows the world array to be substantially improved. The orientation of AIGO allows much better resolution of both wave polarisations. This enables better distance estimates for inspiral events, allowing unambiguous optical identification of host galaxies for about 25% of neutron star binary inspiral events. This can allow Hubble Law estimation without optical identification of an outburst, and can also allow deep exposure imaging with electromagnetic telescopes to search for weak afterglows. This allows independent estimates of cosmological acceleration and dark energy as well as improved understanding of the physics of neutron star and black hole coalescences. This paper reviews and summarises the science benefits of AIGO and presents a preliminary conceptual design.

  19. The Science benefits and preliminary design of the southern hemisphere gravitational wave detector AIGO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, D G; Barriga, P; Coward, D; Dumas, J-C; Fan, Y; Gras, S; Howell, E; Ju, L; Miao, H; Brooks, A F; Hosken, D J; Munch, J; Veitch, P J; Charlton, P; Galloway, D; Hughes, S; McClelland, D E; Scott, S M; Slagmolen, B J J; Melatos, A

    2008-01-01

    The proposed southern hemisphere gravitational wave detector AIGO increases the projected average baseline of the global array of ground based gravitational wave detectors by a factor ∼4. This allows the world array to be substantially improved. The orientation of AIGO allows much better resolution of both wave polarisations. This enables better distance estimates for inspiral events, allowing unambiguous optical identification of host galaxies for about 25% of neutron star binary inspiral events. This can allow Hubble Law estimation without optical identification of an outburst, and can also allow deep exposure imaging with electromagnetic telescopes to search for weak afterglows. This allows independent estimates of cosmological acceleration and dark energy as well as improved understanding of the physics of neutron star and black hole coalescences. This paper reviews and summarises the science benefits of AIGO and presents a preliminary conceptual design

  20. Performance of A Compact Multi-crystal High-purity Germanium Detector Array for Measuring Coincident Gamma-ray Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Chris [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Daigle, Stephen [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Buckner, Matt [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Erikson, Luke E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Runkle, Robert C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stave, Sean C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Champagne, Art [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Cooper, Andrew [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Downen, Lori [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Glasgow, Brian D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kelly, Keegan [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Sallaska, Anne [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-02-18

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the 14N(p,γ)15O* reaction for several transition energies at an effective center of mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the segmented nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within the uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance will be presented.

  1. Performance of a compact multi-crystal high-purity germanium detector array for measuring coincident gamma-ray emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Chris; Daigle, Stephen; Buckner, Matt [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Erikson, Luke E.; Runkle, Robert C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Stave, Sean C., E-mail: Sean.Stave@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Champagne, Arthur E.; Cooper, Andrew; Downen, Lori [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Glasgow, Brian D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Kelly, Keegan; Sallaska, Anne [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2015-05-21

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the {sup 14}N(p,γ){sup 15}O{sup ⁎} reaction for several transition energies at an effective center-of-mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the granular nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within their uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance are presented.

  2. Design and construction of the POLAR detector

    OpenAIRE

    Produit, N.; Bao, T. W.; Batsch, T.; Bernasconi, T.; Britvich, I.; Cadoux, F.; Cernuda, I.; Chai, J. Y.; Dong, Y. W.; Gauvin, N.; Hajdas, W.; Kole, M.; Kong, M. N.; Kramert, R.; Li, L.

    2017-01-01

    The POLAR detector is a space based Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) polarimeter with a wide field of view, which covers almost half the sky. The instrument uses Compton scattering of gamma rays on a plastic scintillator hodoscope to measure the polarization of the incoming photons. The instrument has been successfully launched on board of the Chinese space laboratory Tiangong~2 on September 15, 2016. The construction of the instrument components is described in this article. Details are provided on pro...

  3. Signal encoding method for a time-of-flight PET detector using a silicon photomultiplier array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sun Il; Lee, Jae Sung

    2014-10-01

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a promising photosensor for magnetic resonance (MR) compatible time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. The compact size of the SiPM allows direct one-to-one coupling between the scintillation crystal and the photosensor, yielding better timing and energy resolutions than the light sharing methods that have to be used in photomultiplier tube (PMT) PET systems. However, the one-to-one coupling scheme requires a huge volume of readout and processing electronics if no electric signal multiplexing or encoding scheme is properly applied. In this paper, we develop an electric signal encoding scheme for SiPM array based TOF PET detector blocks with the aim of reducing the complexity and volume of the signal readout and processing electronics. In an M×N SiPM array, the output signal of each channel in the SiPM array is divided into two signal lines. These output lines are then tied together in row and column lines. The row and column signals are used to measure the energy and timing information (or vice versa) of each incident gamma-ray event, respectively. Each SiPM channel was directly coupled to a 3×3×20 mm3 LGSO crystal. The reference detector, which was used to measure timing, consisted of an R9800 PMT and a 4×4×10 mm3 LYSO crystal and had a single time resolution of ~200 ps (FWHM). Leading edge discriminators were used to determine coincident events. Dedicated front-end electronics were developed, and the timing and energy resolutions of SiPM arrays with different array sizes (4×4, 8×8, and 12×12) were compared. Breakdown voltage of each SiPM channel was measured using energy spectra within various bias voltages. Coincidence events were measured using a 22Na point source. The average coincidence time resolution of 4×4, 8×8, and 12×12 SiPM arrays were 316 ps, 320 ps, and 335 ps (FWHM), respectively. The energy resolution of 4×4, 8×8, and 12×12 SiPM arrays were 11.8%, 12.5%, and 12.8% (FWHM

  4. Fast infrared array spectrometer with a thermoelectrically cooled 160-element PbSe detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Jun; Gore, Jay P.; Sivathanu, Yudaya R.; Lim, Jongmook

    2004-01-01

    A fast infrared array spectrometer (FIAS) with a thermoelectrically cooled 160-element PbSe detector was demonstrated using measurements of instantaneous infrared radiation intensities simultaneously over the 1.8-4.9 μm wavelength range at a sampling rate of 390 Hz. A three-point second-degree Lagrange interpolation polynomial was constructed to calibrate the FIAS because of the nonlinear response of the infrared array detector to the incident radiation beam. This calibration method gave excellent measurements of blackbody radiation spectra except for a narrow band at wavelength of 4.3 μm due to absorption by room carbon dioxide, which is one of the two major gas radiation peaks (2.7 and 4.3 μm) from the lean premixed hydrocarbon/air combustion products in the midinfrared spectrum. Therefore, the absorption coefficient of room carbon dioxide was conveniently measured on site with the blackbody reference source, and was used in the calibration of the FIAS and also in the calculations of the radiation spectra. Blackbody tests showed that this procedure was effective in correcting for the room carbon dioxide absorption in the radiation spectra measured by the FIAS. For an example of its application, the calibrated FIAS was used to measure spectral radiation intensities from three lean premixed laminar flames and a premixed turbulent jet flame for which reference data with a grating spectrometer were available for comparison. The agreement between the FIAS measurements and the reference data was excellent

  5. Far infrared thermal detectors for laser radiometry using a carbon nanotube array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, John H.; Lee, Bob; Grossman, Erich N.

    2011-07-20

    We present a description of a 1.5 mm long, vertically aligned carbon nanotube array (VANTA) on a thermopile and separately on a pyroelectric detector. Three VANTA samples, having average lengths of 40 {mu}m, 150 {mu}m, and 1.5 mm were evaluated with respect to reflectance at a laser wavelength of 394 {mu}m(760 GHz), and we found that the reflectance decreases substantially with increasing tube length, ranging from 0.38 to 0.23 to 0.01, respectively. The responsivity of the thermopile by electrical heating (98.4 mA/W) was equal to that by optical heating (98.0 mA/W) within the uncertainty of the measurement. We analyzed the frequency response and temporal response and found a thermal decay period of 500 ms, which is consistent with the specific heat of comparable VANTAs in the literature. The extremely low (0.01) reflectance of the 1.5 mm VANTAs and the fact that the array is readily transferable to the detector's surface is, to our knowledge, unprecedented.

  6. Performance assessment of a 2D array of plastic scintillation detectors for IMRT quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Mathieu; Gingras, Luc; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2013-07-01

    The purposes of this work are to assess the performance of a 2D plastic scintillation detectors array prototype for quality assurance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to determine its sensitivity and specificity to positioning errors of one multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf and one MLC leaf bank by applying the principles of signal detection theory. Ten treatment plans (step-and-shoot delivery) and one volumetric modulated arc therapy plan were measured and compared to calculations from two treatment-planning systems (TPSs) and to radiochromic films. The averages gamma passing rates per beam found for the step-and-shoot plans were 95.8% for the criteria (3%, 2 mm), 97.8% for the criteria (4%, 2 mm), and 98.1% for the criteria (3%, 3 mm) when measurements were compared to TPS calculations. The receiver operating characteristic curves for the one leaf errors and one leaf bank errors were determined from simulations (theoretical upper limits) and measurements. This work concludes that arrays of plastic scintillation detectors could be used for IMRT quality assurance in clinics. The use of signal detection theory could improve the quality of dosimetric verifications in radiation therapy by providing optimal discrimination criteria for the detection of different classes of errors.

  7. Performance assessment of a 2D array of plastic scintillation detectors for IMRT quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillot, Mathieu; Gingras, Luc; Archambault, Louis; Beaulieu, Luc; Beddar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this work are to assess the performance of a 2D plastic scintillation detectors array prototype for quality assurance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to determine its sensitivity and specificity to positioning errors of one multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf and one MLC leaf bank by applying the principles of signal detection theory. Ten treatment plans (step-and-shoot delivery) and one volumetric modulated arc therapy plan were measured and compared to calculations from two treatment-planning systems (TPSs) and to radiochromic films. The averages gamma passing rates per beam found for the step-and-shoot plans were 95.8% for the criteria (3%, 2 mm), 97.8% for the criteria (4%, 2 mm), and 98.1% for the criteria (3%, 3 mm) when measurements were compared to TPS calculations. The receiver operating characteristic curves for the one leaf errors and one leaf bank errors were determined from simulations (theoretical upper limits) and measurements. This work concludes that arrays of plastic scintillation detectors could be used for IMRT quality assurance in clinics. The use of signal detection theory could improve the quality of dosimetric verifications in radiation therapy by providing optimal discrimination criteria for the detection of different classes of errors. (paper)

  8. High spin gamma-ray coincidence spectroscopy with large detector arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, M.H.

    1992-12-01

    In-beam γ-ray spectroscopy has been used to study rapidly rotating nuclei in the rare-earth region. The experiments were performed using the high-resolution multi detector arrays ESSA30 and TESSA3 at the Nuclear Structure Facility, Daresbury Laboratories in Great Britain and the NORDBALL at the Niels Bohr Tandem Accelerator at Risoe in Denmark. The studied nuclei were produced using heavy-ion induced fusion-evaporation reactions. New techniques for the analysis of γ-γ correlation spectra were developed. These involves viewing the two-dimensional γ-γ spectrum as well as projection in both energy axes, determination of centroids and volumes of peaks and full two-dimensional Gauss fits of an arbitrarily shaped area. The data acquisition system of the NORDBALL multi detector array is presented. In two of the studied nuclei ( 167 Lu and 163 Tm) the strongly shape driving πh 9/2 [541]1/2 - is studied. The shift to larger frequency of the neutron AB crossing in these decay sequences is not fully understood. The study of 171 Re revealed a second backbend of the [402]5/2 + band. The observed bandcrossings are interpreted using the CSM and three-band mixing calculations. The study of 171,172 W revealed five new bands and although these nuclei are expected to be stably deformed the small differences in the formation showed to be crucial in order to reproduce data well. (au)

  9. Construction of a radiometer for pyroelectric detector and presentation of a model for detector design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, C.A. de.

    1987-01-01

    An expression has been developed for the pyroelectric voltage as a function of electric and thermal parameters of the detector. It has also been developed expressions for determination of unknown parameters from the experimentally obtained pyroelectric voltage curve as function of time and some other known information. It has also been shown figures of merit for characterization of the detectors, a study showing the detector performance dependence on each electric and thermal parameter and some illustrative experimental results. The radiometer designed and built for this work, is described. (author) [pt

  10. Modeling and design of X-rays bidimensional detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quisbert, Elmer Paz Alcon

    2000-03-01

    In this work has been developed the scintillating fiber optic and semiconductor devices based 2-D detector design, modeling and performance evaluation using Monte Carlo methods, for high X-ray energy range (10-140 kV) radiography and tomography applications. These processes allowed us, also, the imaging system parameters and components optimization and appropriate detector design. The model estimated the detectors performance parameters (DQE, MTF and SNR), and radiation risk (in terms of mean absorbed dose in the patient) and to show up how the sequence of physical processes in X-ray detection influence the performance of this imaging PFOC detectors. In this way, the modeling of the detector includes the statistics of the spatial distribution of absorbed X-rays and of X-ray to light conversion, its transmission, and the light quanta conversion into electrons. Also contributions to noise from the detection system chain is included, mainly the CCD detector ambient noise. Performance prediction, based on calculation taken from simulations, illustrates how such detectors meet the exacting requirements of some medical and industrial applications. Also, it is envisaged that our modeling procedure of the imaging system will be suitable not only for investigating how the system components should be best designed but for CT and RD system performance prediction. The powerful techniques would enable us to give advice for future development, in this field, in search of more dose-efficient imaging systems. (author)

  11. A 128 x 128 InGaAs detector array for 1.0-1.7 microns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, G.; Joshi, A.; Lange, M.; Woodruff, W.; Mykietyn, E.; Gay, D.; Erickson, G.; Ackley, D.; Ban, V.; Staller, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on a two-dimensional 128 x 128 detector array for the 1.0 - 1.7 um spectral region that has been demonstrated with indium gallium arsenide (In .53 Ga .47 As). The 30 um square pixels had 60 um spacing in both directions and were designed to be compatible with a two-dimensional Reticon multiplexer. Dark currents below 100 pA, capacitance near 0.1 pF (-5V, room temperature) and quantum efficiencies about 80% (at 1.3 um) were measured. Probe maps of dark current and quantum efficiency are presented along with pixel dropout data and wafer yield which was as high as 99.89% (7 dropouts) in an area of 6528 pixels and 99.37% (103 dropouts) over an entire 128 x 128 pixel region

  12. ATLAS Pixel Detector Design For HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Smart, Ben; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced for the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) running in 2026. The new Inner Detector will be called the Inner Tracker (ITk). The ITk will cover an extended eta-range: at least to |eta|<3.2, and likely up to |eta|<4.0. The ITk will be an all-Silicon based detector, consisting of a Silicon strip detector outside of a radius of 362mm, and a Silicon pixel detector inside of this radius. Several novel designs are being considered for the ITk pixel detector, to cope with high-eta charged particle tracks. These designs are grouped into 'extended' and 'inclined' design-types. Extended designs have long pixel staves with sensors parallel to the beamline. High-eta particles will therefore hit these sensors at shallow angles, leaving elongated charge clusters. The length of such a charge cluster can be used to estimate the angle of the passing particle. This information can then be used in track reconstruction to improve tracking efficiency and reduce fake rates. Inclined designs ...

  13. Dosimetric performance and array assessment of plastic scintillation detectors for stereotactic radiosurgery quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Jean-Christophe; Thériault, Dany; Guillot, Mathieu; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-01-01

    To compare the performance of plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) for quality assurance (QA) in stereotactic radiosurgery conditions to a microion-chamber (IC), Gafchromic EBT2 films, 60 008 shielded photon diode (SD) and unshielded diodes (UD), and assess a new 2D crosshair array prototype adapted to small field dosimetry. The PSD consists of a 1 mm diameter by 1 mm long scintillating fiber (BCF-60, Saint-Gobain, Inc.) coupled to a polymethyl-methacrylate optical fiber (Eska premier, Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Output factors (S(c,p)) for apertures used in radiosurgery ranging from 4 to 40 mm in diameter have been measured. The PSD crosshair array (PSDCA) is a water equivalent device made up of 49 PSDs contained in a 1.63 cm radius area. Dose profiles measurements were taken for radiosurgery fields using the PSDCA and were compared to other dosimeters. Moreover, a typical stereotactic radiosurgery treatment using four noncoplanar arcs was delivered on a spherical phantom in which UD, IC, or PSD was placed. Using the Xknife planning system (Integra Radionics Burlington, MA), 15 Gy was prescribed at the isocenter, where each detector was positioned. Output Factors measured by the PSD have a mean difference of 1.3% with Gafchromic EBT2 when normalized to a 10 × 10 cm(2) field, and 1.0% when compared with UD measurements normalized to the 35 mm diameter cone. Dose profiles taken with the PSD crosshair array agreed with other single detectors dose profiles in spite of the presence of the 49 PSDs. Gamma values comparing 1D dose profiles obtained with PSD crosshair array with Gafchromic EBT2 and UD measured profiles shows 98.3% and 100.0%, respectively, of detector passing the gamma acceptance criteria of 0.3 mm and 2%. The dose measured by the PSD for a complete stereotactic radiosurgery treatment is comparable to the planned dose corrected for its SD-based S(c,p) within 1.4% and 0.7% for 5 and 35 mm diameter cone, respectively. Furthermore

  14. Dosimetric performance and array assessment of plastic scintillation detectors for stereotactic radiosurgery quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagnon, Jean-Christophe; Theriault, Dany; Guillot, Mathieu; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: To compare the performance of plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) for quality assurance (QA) in stereotactic radiosurgery conditions to a microion-chamber (IC), Gafchromic EBT2 films, 60 008 shielded photon diode (SD) and unshielded diodes (UD), and assess a new 2D crosshair array prototype adapted to small field dosimetry. Methods: The PSD consists of a 1 mm diameter by 1 mm long scintillating fiber (BCF-60, Saint-Gobain, Inc.) coupled to a polymethyl-methacrylate optical fiber (Eska premier, Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Output factors (S{sub c,p}) for apertures used in radiosurgery ranging from 4 to 40 mm in diameter have been measured. The PSD crosshair array (PSDCA) is a water equivalent device made up of 49 PSDs contained in a 1.63 cm radius area. Dose profiles measurements were taken for radiosurgery fields using the PSDCA and were compared to other dosimeters. Moreover, a typical stereotactic radiosurgery treatment using four noncoplanar arcs was delivered on a spherical phantom in which UD, IC, or PSD was placed. Using the Xknife planning system (Integra Radionics Burlington, MA), 15 Gy was prescribed at the isocenter, where each detector was positioned. Results: Output Factors measured by the PSD have a mean difference of 1.3% with Gafchromic EBT2 when normalized to a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field, and 1.0% when compared with UD measurements normalized to the 35 mm diameter cone. Dose profiles taken with the PSD crosshair array agreed with other single detectors dose profiles in spite of the presence of the 49 PSDs. Gamma values comparing 1D dose profiles obtained with PSD crosshair array with Gafchromic EBT2 and UD measured profiles shows 98.3% and 100.0%, respectively, of detector passing the gamma acceptance criteria of 0.3 mm and 2%. The dose measured by the PSD for a complete stereotactic radiosurgery treatment is comparable to the planned dose corrected for its SD-based S{sub c,p} within 1.4% and 0.7% for 5 and 35 mm diameter cone

  15. Dosimetric performance and array assessment of plastic scintillation detectors for stereotactic radiosurgery quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagnon, Jean-Christophe; Theriault, Dany; Guillot, Mathieu; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the performance of plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) for quality assurance (QA) in stereotactic radiosurgery conditions to a microion-chamber (IC), Gafchromic EBT2 films, 60 008 shielded photon diode (SD) and unshielded diodes (UD), and assess a new 2D crosshair array prototype adapted to small field dosimetry. Methods: The PSD consists of a 1 mm diameter by 1 mm long scintillating fiber (BCF-60, Saint-Gobain, Inc.) coupled to a polymethyl-methacrylate optical fiber (Eska premier, Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Output factors (S c,p ) for apertures used in radiosurgery ranging from 4 to 40 mm in diameter have been measured. The PSD crosshair array (PSDCA) is a water equivalent device made up of 49 PSDs contained in a 1.63 cm radius area. Dose profiles measurements were taken for radiosurgery fields using the PSDCA and were compared to other dosimeters. Moreover, a typical stereotactic radiosurgery treatment using four noncoplanar arcs was delivered on a spherical phantom in which UD, IC, or PSD was placed. Using the Xknife planning system (Integra Radionics Burlington, MA), 15 Gy was prescribed at the isocenter, where each detector was positioned. Results: Output Factors measured by the PSD have a mean difference of 1.3% with Gafchromic EBT2 when normalized to a 10 x 10 cm 2 field, and 1.0% when compared with UD measurements normalized to the 35 mm diameter cone. Dose profiles taken with the PSD crosshair array agreed with other single detectors dose profiles in spite of the presence of the 49 PSDs. Gamma values comparing 1D dose profiles obtained with PSD crosshair array with Gafchromic EBT2 and UD measured profiles shows 98.3% and 100.0%, respectively, of detector passing the gamma acceptance criteria of 0.3 mm and 2%. The dose measured by the PSD for a complete stereotactic radiosurgery treatment is comparable to the planned dose corrected for its SD-based S c,p within 1.4% and 0.7% for 5 and 35 mm diameter cone, respectively

  16. Array design and expression evaluation in POOMA II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmesin, S.; Crotinger, J.; Cummings, J.; Haney, S.; Humphrey, W.; Reynders, J.; Smith, S.; Williams, T.J.

    1998-12-31

    POOMA is a templated C++ class library for use in the development of large-scale scientific simulations on serial and parallel computers. POOMA II is a new design and implementation of POOMA intended to add richer capabilities and greater flexibility to the framework. The new design employs a generic Array class that acts as an interface to, or view on, a wide variety of data representation objects referred to as engines. This design separates the interface and the representation of multidimensional arrays. The separation is achieved using compile-time techniques rather than virtual functions, and thus code efficiency is maintained. POOMA II uses PETE, the Portable Expression Template Engine, to efficiently represent complex mathematical expressions involving arrays and other objects. The representation of expressions is kept separate from expression evaluation, allowing the use of multiple evaluator mechanisms that can support nested where-block constructs, hardware-specific optimizations and different run-time environments.

  17. Physics and Detectors at CLIC CLIC Conceptual Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Akiya; Stanitzki,Marcel; Weerts, Harry

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the physics potential and experiments at a future multi- TeV e+e− collider based on the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) technology. The physics scenarios considered include precision measurements of known quantities as well as the discovery potential of physics beyond the Standard Model. The report describes the detector performance required at CLIC, taking into account the interaction point environment and especially beaminduced backgrounds. Two detector concepts, designed around highly granular calorimeters and based on concepts studied for the International Linear Collider (ILC), are described and used to study the physics reach and potential of such a collider. Detector subsystems and the principal engineering challenges are illustrated. The overall performance of these CLIC detector concepts is demonstrated by studies of the performance of individual subdetector systems as well as complete simulation studies of six benchmark physics processes. These full detector simulation and rec...

  18. Design criteria for a hemispherical detector for LET measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schell, M.C.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.; Attix, F.H.

    1980-01-01

    A detector for the direct measurement of the Linear Energy Transfer (LET) in cylindrical geometry was developed by Brandan and DeLuca. The detector successfully measured the LET of protons and a fraction of the heavy charged particles generated in cylindrical A150 plastic and graphite walls by 14.8 MeV neutrons. In this report, we present design tests for the hemispherical LET detector which will measure the LET of charged particles in spherical geometry and allow comparison with calculated LET spectra. The hemispherical LET detector will also provide a data base for radiobiological predictions with the Track Structure Model by Katz. A comparison of predictions of radiobiological effects by the Theory of Dual Radiation Action and the Track Structure Model by Edwards and the authors indicate that the Track Structure Model predicts cell survival as a function of dose more accurately and hence an additional motivation for the present construction of the hemispherical LET detector

  19. Design and Construction of Prototype Dark Matter Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Fisher

    2012-03-23

    The Lepton Quark Studies (LQS) group is engaged in searching for dark matter using the Dark Matter Time Projection Chamber (DMTPC) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) (Carlsbad, NM). DMTPC is a direction-sensitive dark matter detector designed to measure the recoil direction and energy deposited by fluorine nuclei recoiling from the interaction with incident WIMPs. In the past year, the major areas of progress have been: to publish the first dark matter search results from a surface run of the DMTPC prototype detector, to build and install the 10L prototype in the underground laboratory at WIPP which will house the 1 m{sup 3} detector, and to demonstrate charge and PMT readout of the TPC using prototype detectors, which allow triggering and {Delta}z measurement to be used in the 1 m{sup 3} detector under development.

  20. Design and construction of the POLAR detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Produit, N.; Bao, T. W.; Batsch, T.; Bernasconi, T.; Britvich, I.; Cadoux, F.; Cernuda, I.; Chai, J. Y.; Dong, Y. W.; Gauvin, N.; Hajdas, W.; Kole, M.; Kong, M. N.; Kramert, R.; Li, L.; Liu, J. T.; Liu, X.; Marcinkowski, R.; Orsi, S.; Pohl, M.; Rapin, D.; Rybka, D.; Rutczynska, A.; Shi, H. L.; Socha, P.; Sun, J. C.; Song, L. M.; Szabelski, J.; Traseira, I.; Xiao, H. L.; Wang, R. J.; Wen, X.; Wu, B. B.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, L. Y.; Zhang, S. N.; Zhang, Y. J.; Zwolinska, A.

    2018-01-01

    The POLAR detector is a space based Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) polarimeter with a wide field of view, which covers almost half the sky. The instrument uses Compton scattering of gamma rays on a plastic scintillator hodoscope to measure the polarization of the incoming photons. The instrument has been successfully launched on board of the Chinese space laboratory Tiangong 2 on September 15, 2016. The construction of the instrument components is described in this article. Details are provided on problems encountered during the construction phase and their solutions. Initial performance of the instrument in orbit is as expected from ground tests and Monte Carlo simulation.

  1. Design and fabrication of a bidimentional microbolometer array for Terahertz detection characterized at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orduna-Diaz, A [CIBA-Tlaxcala, IPN, Tlaxcala, Tlax.(Mexico); Castillo-DomInguez, E; Torres-Jacome, A; De la Hidalga-Wade, F J; Trevino-Palacios, C G, E-mail: abdu@inaoep.mx [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Apdo. Postal 51 y 216, Puebla, Pue. 72000 (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    We present the design, micromachining and characterization of a bidimentional bolometer array for radiation detection in the 0.7-1.5 THz frequency range. The detector is based on a boron doped amorphous silicon film (a-Si-B:H). The film optimized for sensitivity enhancement was obtained using 500 sccm diborane flow with 95 nm thickness. The sensing layer was deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique at low frequency on a 0.45 {mu}m thick silicon nitride membrane sustained by a micromachined frame in crystalline silicon. The design consists of four 5x5 bolometer arrays made by conventional lithography. The bolometer active area is 660 {mu}m x 420 {mu}m and the detector will operate as a focal plane array. The current-voltage characteristics present an ohmic behaviour; the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) was obtained by measuring the bolometer performance from room temperature down to liquid nitrogen temperature. The responsivity was measured under illumination from a black body radiating at 300, 500, 700, 900 and 1100 deg. C, obtaining a value of R =1.17 x 10{sup -2} A/W with a dark current of 4.43 x 10{sup -9} A

  2. Life test of the InGaAs focal plane arrays detector for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xian-Liang; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Li, Xue; Huang, Zhang-Cheng; Gong, Hai-Mei

    2017-08-01

    The short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) InGaAs focal plane array (FPA) detector consists of infrared detector chip, readout integrated circuit (ROIC), and flip-chip bonding interconnection by Indium bump. In order to satisfy space application requirements for failure rates or Mean Time to Failure (MTTF), which can only be demonstrated with the large number of detectors manufactured, the single pixel in InGaAs FPAs was chosen as the research object in this paper. The constant-stress accelerated life tests were carried out at 70°C 80°C 90°C and100°C. The failed pixels increased gradually during more than 14000 hours at each elevated temperatures. From the random failure data the activation energy was estimated to be 0.46eV, and the average lifetime of a single pixel in InGaAs FPAs was estimated to be longer than 1E+7h at the practical operating temperature (5°C).

  3. Design and test of a high resolution plastic scintillating fiber detector with intensified CCD readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebourgeard, P.

    1991-01-01

    We present the design of a particle detector involving a coherent array of 100 000 plastic scintillating microfibers, with an individual core diameter around 50 micrometers, and an intensified bidimensional CCD array. We investigate both theoretically and experimentally the use of polystyrene based scintillators in optical multimodal fibers. The isotropic excitation of modes and the characteristics of energy transfers between the polystyrene matrix and the added fluorescent dyes are of particular interest. An experimental approach is proposed and applied to the development of a new binary scintillator. In order to study the transmission of the signal from the interaction area to the output face, we specify the loss factors, the resolution and the signal to noise ratio within the fiber array. The low light level at the output face of the detector leads us to use image intensifiers in photon counting mode. This requires a detailed analysis of resolutions, gain, noise and detectivity concepts. We propose to describe these strongly correlated notions by the moment generation formalism. Thus, a previous modelisation of the photoelectronic devices allows us to evaluate the performance of the readout chain. A complete detector has been assembled and tested on a high energy hadron beam; the measurements are in good agreement with the modelisation [fr

  4. Design and properties of silicon charged-particle detectors developed at the Institute of Electron Technology (ITE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzecki, Maciej; Bar, Jan; Budzyński, Tadeusz; CieŻ, Michal; Grabiec, Piotr; Kozłowski, Roman; Kulawik, Jan; Panas, Andrzej; Sarnecki, Jerzy; Słysz, Wojciech; Szmigiel, Dariusz; Wegrzecka, Iwona; Wielunski, Marek; Witek, Krzysztof; Yakushev, Alexander; Zaborowski, Michał

    2013-07-01

    The paper discusses the design of charged-particle detectors commissioned and developed at the Institute of Electron Technology (ITE) in collaboration with foreign partners, used in international research on transactinide elements and to build personal radiation protection devices in Germany. Properties of these detectors and the results obtained using the devices are also presented. The design of the following epiplanar detector structures is discussed: ♢ 64-element chromatographic arrays for the COMPACT (Cryo On-line Multidetector for Physics And Chemistry of Transactinides) detection system used at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt (GSI) for research on Hassium, Copernicium and Flerovium, as well as elements 119 and 120, ♢ 2-element flow detectors for the COLD (Cryo On-Line Detector) system used for research on Copernicium and Flerovium at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, ♢ detectors for a radon exposimeter and sensors for a neutron dosimeter developed at the Institut für Strahlenschutz, Helmholtz Zentrum München. The design of planar detectors - single-sided and double-sided strip detectors for the Focal Plane Detector Box used at GSI for research on Flerovium and elements 119 and 120 is also discussed.

  5. Infrared detectors, focal plane arrays, and imaging sensors; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Mar. 30, 31, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereniak, Eustace L.; Sampson, Robert T.

    1989-10-01

    The present conference on advancements in IR detectors, Schottky-barrier focal plane arrays, CCD image analysis, and HgCdTe materials gives attention to a 256 x 256 PtSi array for IR astronomy, proposals for a second-generation meteosat's advanced optical payload, cryogenic bipolar technology for on-focal-plane signal processing, a parallel cellular processing system for fast generation of perspective plots, and ultrahigh-speed CCD image sensors for scanning applications. Also discussed are MBE GaAs rib waveguide experiments at 10.6 microns, an interferometric thermal detector, the development status of superconducting IR detector research, the absorption coefficients of n-type Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te samples, and the influence of the surface channel on crosstalk in HgCdTe photovoltaic arrays.

  6. Infrared Imaging of Cotton Fiber Bundles Using a Focal Plane Array Detector and a Single Reflectance Accessory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Santiago Cintrón

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Infrared imaging is gaining attention as a technique used in the examination of cotton fibers. This type of imaging combines spectral analysis with spatial resolution to create visual images that examine sample composition and distribution. Herein, we report on the use of an infrared instrument equipped with a reflection accessory and an array detector system for the examination of cotton fiber bundles. Cotton vibrational spectra and chemical images were acquired by grouping pixels in the detector array. This technique reduced spectral noise and was employed to visualize cell wall development in cotton fibers bundles. Fourier transform infrared spectra reveal band changes in the C–O bending region that matched previous studies. Imaging studies were quick, relied on small amounts of sample and provided a distribution of the cotton fiber cell wall composition. Thus, imaging of cotton bundles with an infrared detector array has potential for use in cotton fiber examinations.

  7. The design and performance of the ZEUS micro vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polini, A.; Brock, I.; Goers, S.

    2007-08-01

    In order to extend the tracking acceptance, to improve the primary and secondary vertex reconstruction and thus enhancing the tagging capabilities for short lived particles, the ZEUS experiment at the HERA Collider at DESY installed a silicon strip vertex detector. The barrel part of the detector is a 63 cm long cylinder with silicon sensors arranged around an elliptical beampipe. The forward part consists of four circular shaped disks. In total just over 200k channels are read out using 2.9 m 2 of silicon. In this report a detailed overview of the design and construction of the detector is given and the performance of the completed system is reviewed. (orig.)

  8. Design of the flame detector based on pyroelectric infrared sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Yu, Benhua; Dong, Lei; Li, Kai

    2017-10-01

    As a fire detection device, flame detector has the advantages of short reaction time and long distance. Based on pyroelectric infrared sensor working principle, the passive pyroelectric infrared alarm system is designed, which is mainly used for safety of tunnel to detect whether fire occurred or not. Modelling and Simulation of the pyroelectric Detector Using Labview. An attempt was made to obtain a simple test platform of a pyroelectric detector which would make an excellent basis for the analysis of its dynamic behaviour. After many experiments, This system has sensitive response, high anti-interference ability and safe and reliable performance.

  9. Configuration Design of Detector Shielding for Gamma Prompt Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elin-Nuraini; Darsono; Elisabeth

    2000-01-01

    Configuration on design of detector shielding for gamma prompt analysishas been performed. The aim of this design is to obtain effective shieldingmaterial and configuration that able to protect the detector for fastneutron. The result shown that detector shielding configuration that obtainedby configuration of water and concrete, would be able to absorb fast neutronup to 99.5 %. The neutron flux that passed through shielding configuration is2.4 x 10 3 n/cm 2 dt, in the detector position of 60 cm (forward neutron beamdirection) on the X axis and 30 cm (side ward neutron beam direction) on theZ axis of target. On this position (60,30) counting result was 104358 for Pbcollimator and 246652 for PVC collimator. From examination result shown thatthe weight of silicon is in order 175 gram. (author)

  10. Design of nested Halbach cylinder arrays for magnetic refrigeration applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevizoli, Paulo V., E-mail: trevizoli@polo.ufsc.br; Lozano, Jaime A.; Peixer, Guilherme F.; Barbosa Jr, Jader R.

    2015-12-01

    We present an experimentally validated analytical procedure to design nested Halbach cylinder arrays for magnetic cooling applications. The procedure aims at maximizing the magnetic flux density variation in the core of the array for a given set of design parameters, namely the inner diameter of the internal magnet, the air gap between the magnet cylinders, the number of segments of each magnet and the remanent flux density of the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B magnet grade. The design procedure was assisted and verified by 3-D numerical modeling using a commercial software package. An important aspect of the optimal design is to maintain an uniform axial distribution of the magnetic flux density in the region of the inner gap occupied by the active magnetocaloric regenerator. An optimal nested Halbach cylinder array was manufactured and experimentally evaluated for the magnetic flux density in the inner gap. The analytically calculated magnetic flux density variation agreed to within 5.6% with the experimental value for the center point of the magnet gap. - Highlights: • An analytical procedure to design nested Halbach cylinder arrays is proposed. • An optimal magnet configuration was built based on the analytical procedure. • The procedure was validated with 3D COMSOL simulations and experimental data.

  11. Testing the characteristics of a neutron detector array by Monte-Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timis, C.; Cruceru, I.; Sandu, M.; Borcea, C.; Buta, A.; Negoita, F.; Angelique, J.C.; Martin, T.; Peter, J.; Grevy, S.; Lienard, E.; Orr, N.A.

    1998-01-01

    The characteristics of the neutron detector array TONNERRE have been determined experimentally via preliminary tests with a 252 Cf source and by means of simulation using a modified version of the Monte-Carlo program of Cecil et al. Of particular interest is the intrinsic detection efficiency. As it is well known, the neutron detection efficiency for one element of the detector array, depends on the threshold for the light collection (bias) expressed in energy electron equivalent. The experimental efficiencies for five neutron energies and for a bias of 80 KeV ee are presented. The efficiencies for three thresholds and neutron energies between 1-10 MeV are simulated. The neutron energy is determined by TOF over a flight path, s, and the relative energy resolution is given as a function of σ s and σ t (the uncertainties in the flight path), s (uniform as a function of depth) and flight time, t. The mean time resolution was 1.13 ns which gives a TOF resolution of 1.48 ns. That gives a relative energy resolution which increases slowly from 2% at E n =1 MeV to 3.5% at 5 MeV. Position resolution along one module is 12 cm. To help boosting the efficiency, the elements can be arranged in two layers, but that complicates the analysis by enhancing the effects of cross-talk and out-scattering. Cross-talk is the familiar problem of one neutron creating signals in two separate detectors. In out-scattering, a neutron scatters from the non-active part of a detector and is then detected in a different detector with incorrect position and TOF. While methods exist for identifying and eliminating cross-talk events, there are no methods available for identifying out-scattered events. For the case of two layers and a bias of 80 KeV ee, simulated efficiency of two superposed elements versus neutron energy, the out-scattering probability and the probability of cross-talk are presented. The out-scattering probability comes mainly from events when neutrons scatter first on carbon nuclei

  12. Technical Design Report for the: PANDA Micro Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Erni, W; Krusche, B; Steinacher, M; Heng, Y; Liu, Z; Liu, H; Shen, X; Wang, Q; Xu, H; Albrecht, M; Becker, J; Eickel, K; Feldbauer, F; Fink, M; Friedel, P; Heinsius, F H; Held, T; Koch, H; Kopf, B; Leyhe, M; Motzko, C; Pelizäus, M; Pychy, J; Roth, B; Schröder, T; Schulze, J; Steinke, M; Trifterer, T; Wiedner, U; Zhong, J; Beck, R; Becker, M; Bianco, S; Brinkmann, K -Th; Hammann, C; Hinterberger, F; Jäkel, R; Kaiser, D; Kliemt, R; Koop, K; Schmidt, C; Schnell, R; Thoma, U; Vlasov, P; Wendel, C; Winnebeck, A; Würschig, Th; Zaunick, H -G; Bianconi, A; Bragadireanu, M; Caprini, M; Ciubancan, M; Pantea, D; Tarta, P -D; De Napoli, M; Giacoppo, F; Rapisarda, E; Sfienti, C; Fiutowski, T; Idzik, N; Mindur, B; Przyborowski, D; Swientek, K; Bialkowski, E; Budzanowski, A; Czech, B; Kliczewski, S; Kozela, A; Kulessa, P; Lebiedowicz, P; Malgorzata, K; Pysz, K; Schäfer, W; Siudak, R; Szczurek, A; Brandys, P; Czyzewski, T; Czyzycki, W; Domagala, M; Hawryluk, M; Filo, G; Kwiatkowski, D; Lisowski, E; Lisowski, F; Bardan, W; Gil, D; Kamys, B; Kistryn, St; Korcyl, K; Krzemieñ, W; Magiera, A; Moskal, P; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Smyrski, J; Wroñska, A; Al-Turany, M; Arora, R; Augustin, I; Deppe, H; Dutta, D; Flemming, H; Götzen, K; Hohler, G; Karabowicz, R; Lehmann, D; Lewandowski, B; Lühning, J; Maas, F; Orth, H; Peters, K; Saito, T; Schepers, G; Schmidt, C J; Schmitt, L; Schwarz, C; Schwiening, J; Voss, B; Wieczorek, P; Wilms, A; Abazov, V M; Alexeev, G D; Arefiev, V A; Astakhov, V I; Barabanov, M Yu; Batyunya, B V; Davydov, Yu I; Dodokhov, V Kh; Efremov, A A; Fedunov, A G; Feshchenko, A A; Galoyan, A S; Grigoryan, S; Karmokov, A; Koshurnikov, E K; Lobanov, V I; Lobanov, Yu Yu; Makarov, A F; Malinina, L V; Malyshev, V L; Mustafaev, G A; Olshevski, A G; Pasyuk, M A; Perevalova, E A; Piskun, A A; Pocheptsov, T A; Pontecorvo, G; Rodionov, V K; Rogov, Yu N; Salmin, R A; Samartsev, A G; Sapozhnikov, M G; Shabratova, G S; Skachkova, A N; Skachkov, N B; Strokovsky, E A; Suleimanov, M K; Teshev, R Sh; Tokmenin, V V; Uzhinsky, V V; Vodopyanov, A S; Zaporozhets, S A; Zhuravlev, N I; Zorin, A G; Branford, D; Glazier, D; Watts, D; Woods, P; Britting, A; Eyrich, W; Lehmann, A; Uhlig, F; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K; Tann, B; Tomaradze, A; Bettoni, D; Carassiti, V; Dalpiaz, P; Drago, A; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Negrini, M; Savriè, M; Stancari, G; Dulach, B; Gianotti, P; Guaraldo, C; Lucherini, V; Pace, E; Bersani, A; Macri, M; Marinelli, M; Parodi, R F; Dormenev, V; Drexler, P; Düren, M; Eisner, T; Foehl, K; Hayrapetyan, A; Koch, P; Krïoch, B; Kühn, W; Lange, S; Liang, Y; Liu, M; Merle, O; Metag, V; Moritz, M; Nanova, M; Novotny, R; Spruck, B; Stenzel, H; Strackbein, C; Thiel, M; Wang, Q; Clarkson, T; Euan, C; Hill, G; Hoek, M; Ireland, D; Kaiser, R; Keri, T; Lehmann, I; Livingston, K; Lumsden, P; MacGregor, D; McKinnon, B; Montgomery, R; Murray, M; Protopopescu, D; Rosner, G; Seitz, B; Yang, G; Babai, M; Biegun, A K; Glazenborg-Kluttig, A; Guliyev, E; Jothi, V S; Kavatsyuk, M; Lemmens, P; Löhner, H; Messchendorp, J; Poelman, T; Smit, H; van der Weele, J C; Sohlbach, H; Büscher, M; Dosdall, R; Dzhygadlo, R; Esch, S; Gillitzer, A; Goldenbaum, F; Grunwald, D; Jha, V; Kemmerling, G; Kleines, H; Lehrach, A; Maier, R; Mertens, M; Ohm, H; Pohl, D L; Prasuhn, D; Randriamalala, T; Ritman, J; Roeder, M; Sterzenbach, G; Stockmanns, T; Wintz, P; Wüstner, P; Xu, H; Kisiel, J; Li, S; Li, Z; Sun, Z; Xu, H; Fissum, K; Hansen, K; Isaksson, L; Lundin, M; Schröder, B; Achenbach, P; Denig, A; Distler, M; Fritsch, M; Kangh, D; Karavdina, A; Lauth, W; Michel, M; Espi, M C Mora; Pochodzalla, J; Sanchez, S; Sanchez-Lorente, A; Sfienti, C; Weber, T; Dormenev, V I; Fedorov, A A; Korzhik, M V; Missevitch, O V; Boukharov, A; Malyshev, O; Marishev, I; Semenov, A; Varma, R; Höppner, C; Ketzer, B; Konorov, I; Mann, A; Neubert, S; Paul, S; Vandenbroucke, M; Zhang, Q; Khoukaz, A; Rausmann, T; Täschner, A; Wessels, J; Baldin, E; Kotov, K; Peleganchuk, S; Tikhonov, Yu; Hennino, T; Imre, M; Kunne, R; Galliard, C Le; Normand, J P Le; Marchand, D; Maroni, A; Ong, S; Pouthas, J; Ramstein, B; Rosier, P; Sudol, M; Theneau, C; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Van de Wiele, J; Zerguerras, T; Boca, G; Braghieri, A; Costanza, S; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Lavezzi, L; Montagna, P; Rotondi, A; Buda, V; Abramov, V V; Davidenko, A M; Derevschikov, A A; Goncharenko, Y M; Grishin, V N; Kachanov, V A; Konstantinov, D A; Kormilitsin, V A; Matulenko, Y A; Melnik, Y M; Meschanin, A P; Minaev, N G; Mochalov, V V; Morozov, D A; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Ryazantsev, A V; Semenov, P A; Soloviev, L F; Uzunian, A V; Vasiliev, A N; Yakutin, A E; Belostotski, S; Gavrilov, G; Itzotov, A; Kisselev, A; Kravchenko, P; Manaenkov, S; Miklukho, O; Naryshkin, Y; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Zhadanov, A; Bäck, T; Cederwall, B; Bargholtz, C; Gerén, L; Tegnér, P E; Thørngren, P; von Würtemberg, K M; Fava, L; Alberto, D; Amoroso, A; Bussa, M P; Busso, L; De Mori, F; Destefanis, M; Ferrero, L; Greco, M; Kugathasan, T; Maggiora, M; Marcello, S; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Calvo, D; Coli, S; De Remigis, P; Filippi, A; Giraudo, G; Lusso, S; Mazza, G; Mignone, M; Rivetti, A; Wheadon, R; Zotti, L; Morra, O; Iazzi, F; Lavagno, A; Quarati, P; Szymanska, K; Birsa, R; Bradamante, F; Bressan, A; Martin, A; Clement, H; Galnander, B; Calén, H; Fransson, K; Johansson, T; Kupsc, A; Marciniewski, P; Thomé, E; Wolke, M; Zlomanczuk, J; Díaz, J; Ortiz, A; Buda, P; Dmowski, K; Korzeniewski, R; Przemyslaw, D; Slowinski, B; Borsuk, S; Chlopik, A; Guzik, Z; Kopec, J; Kozlowski, T; Melnychuk, D; Plominski, M; Szewinski, J; Traczyk, K; Zwieglinski, B; Bühler, P; Gruber, A; Kienle, P; Marton, J; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2012-01-01

    This document illustrates the technical layout and the expected performance of the Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) of the PANDA experiment. The MVD will detect charged particles as close as possible to the interaction zone. Design criteria and the optimisation process as well as the technical solutions chosen are discussed and the results of this process are subjected to extensive Monte Carlo physics studies. The route towards realisation of the detector is outlined.

  13. Design considerations for large roof-integrated photovoltaic arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropp, M.E.; Begovic, M.; Rohatgi, A. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States); Long, R. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta (United States). Office of Facilities

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes calculations and modeling used in the design of the photovoltaic (PV) array built on the roof of the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center, the aquatic sports venue for the 1996 Olympic and Paralympic Games. The software package PVFORM (version 3.3) was extensively utilized; because of its importance to this work, it is thoroughly reviewed here. Procedures required to adapt PVFORM to this particular installation are described. The expected behavior and performance of the system, including maximum power output, annual energy output and maximum expected temperature, are then presented, and the use of this information in making informed design decisions is described. Finally, since the orientation of the PV array is not optimal, the effect of the unoptimized array orientation on the system`s performance is quantified. (author)

  14. Neutron detector array at IUAC: Design features and instrumentation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-02

    Nov 2, 2014 ... multi-wire proportional counters mounted inside a 1 m diameter SS target chamber. ... a powerful tool to study the dynamics of the fissioning system and a ... neutron multiplicity for three isotopes across a major closed shell, .... voltage by connecting to the control pin of the chip via a 0–5V programmable volt-.

  15. Silicon PIN diode hybrid arrays for charged particle detection: Building blocks for vertex detectors at the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, G.; Gaalema, S.; Shapiro, S.L.; Dunwoodie, W.M.; Arens, J.F.; Jernigan, J.G.

    1989-05-01

    Two-dimensional arrays of solid state detectors have long been used in visible and infrared systems. Hybrid arrays with separately optimized detector and readout substrates have been extensively developed for infrared sensors. The characteristics and use of these infrared readout chips with silicon PIN diode arrays produced by MICRON SEMICONDUCTOR for detecting high-energy particles are reported. Some of these arrays have been produced in formats as large as 512 /times/ 512 pixels; others have been radiation hardened to total dose levels beyond 1 Mrad. Data generation rates of 380 megasamples/second have been achieved. Analog and digital signal transmission and processing techniques have also been developed to accept and reduce these high data rates. 9 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Frequency-multiplexed bias and readout of a 16-pixel superconducting nanowire single-photon detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerner, S.; Kuzmin, A.; Wuensch, S.; Charaev, I.; Boes, F.; Zwick, T.; Siegel, M.

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate a 16-pixel array of microwave-current driven superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors with an integrated and scalable frequency-division multiplexing architecture, which reduces the required number of bias and readout lines to a single microwave feed line. The electrical behavior of the photon-sensitive nanowires, embedded in a resonant circuit, as well as the optical performance and timing jitter of the single detectors is discussed. Besides the single pixel measurements, we also demonstrate the operation of a 16-pixel array with a temporal, spatial, and photon-number resolution.

  17. Signal-Conditioning Block of a 1 × 200 CMOS Detector Array for a Terahertz Real-Time Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Ryul Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A signal conditioning block of a 1 × 200 Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS detector array is proposed to be employed with a real-time 0.2 THz imaging system for inspecting large areas. The plasmonic CMOS detector array whose pixel size including an integrated antenna is comparable to the wavelength of the THz wave for the imaging system, inevitably carries wide pixel-to-pixel variation. To make the variant outputs from the array uniform, the proposed signal conditioning block calibrates the responsivity of each pixel by controlling the gate bias of each detector and the voltage gain of the lock-in amplifiers in the block. The gate bias of each detector is modulated to 1 MHz to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the imaging system via the electrical modulation by the conditioning block. In addition, direct current (DC offsets of the detectors in the array are cancelled by initializing the output voltage level from the block. Real-time imaging using the proposed signal conditioning block is demonstrated by obtaining images at the rate of 19.2 frame-per-sec of an object moving on the conveyor belt with a scan width of 20 cm and a scan speed of 25 cm/s.

  18. The design of a second harmonic tangential array interferometer for C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretz, N.; Jobes, F.; Irby, J.

    1997-01-01

    A design for a tangential array interferometer for C-Mod operating at 1.06 and 0.53 μm is presented. This is a special type of two color interferometer in which a Nd:YAG laser is frequency doubled in a nonlinear crystal. Because the doubling efficiency is imperfect, two frequencies propagate collinearly through the plasma after which the 1.06 μm ray is doubled again mixing in the optical domain with the undoubled ray. The resulting interference is insensitive to path length but is affected by plasma dispersion in the usual way. A typical central fringe shift in C-Mod is expected to be 0.1 endash 1.0, but the absolute and relative accuracy in n e l measurements can be as high as in a conventional interferometer. This design uses a repetitively pulsed laser which is converted to a fan beam crossing the horizontal midplane. The chordal array is defined by internal retroreflectors on the C-Mod midplane which return the beam to the second doubler and a detector array. This interferometer design has beam diameters of a few millimeters and element spacings of a few centimeters, uses a repetitively pulsed, TEM 00 Nd:YAG laser, fiber optic beam transport, commercial components, and a compact optical design which minimizes port space requirements. An optical system design is presented which is based on the performance of a tabletop prototype at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  19. An automatic gain matching method for {gamma}-ray spectra obtained with a multi-detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattabiraman, N.S.; Chintalapudi, S.N.; Ghugre, S.S. E-mail: ssg@alpha.iuc.res.in

    2004-07-01

    The increasing size of data sets from large multi-detector arrays makes the traditional approach to the pre-evaluation of the data difficult and time consuming. The pre-sorting involves detection and correction of the observed on-line drifts followed by calibration of the raw data. A new method for automatic detection and correction of these instrumental drifts is presented. An application of this method to the data acquired using a multi-Clover array is discussed.

  20. An automatic gain matching method for γ-ray spectra obtained with a multi-detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattabiraman, N.S.; Chintalapudi, S.N.; Ghugre, S.S.

    2004-01-01

    The increasing size of data sets from large multi-detector arrays makes the traditional approach to the pre-evaluation of the data difficult and time consuming. The pre-sorting involves detection and correction of the observed on-line drifts followed by calibration of the raw data. A new method for automatic detection and correction of these instrumental drifts is presented. An application of this method to the data acquired using a multi-Clover array is discussed

  1. The design and construction of the ZEUS central tracking detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, B.; Malos, J.; Saxon, D.H.; Clark, D.E.; Jamdagni, A.K.; Markou, C.; Miller, D.B.; Miller, D.G.; Toudup, L.W.; Auty, C.G.; Blair, G.A.; Brooks, C.B.; Cashmore, R.J.; Hanford, A.T.; Harnew, N.; Holmes, A.R.; Linford, W.; Martin, N.C.; McArthur, I.C.; Nash, J.; Nobbs, K.N.; Wastie, R.L.; Williams, M.T.; Wilson, F.F.; Wilson, R.D.; Hart, J.C.; Hatley, R.W.; Hiddleston, J.W.; Gibson, M.D.; McCubbin, N.A.; Middleton, A.; Morrissey, M.C.; Morrow, D.; O' Brien, P.; Payne, B.T.; Roberts, J.C.H.; Shaw, T.B.; Sinclair, C.K.; Wallis, E.W.G.; White, D.J.; Yeo, K.L.; Bullock, F.W.; Dumper, J.; Fraser, T.J.; Hayes, D.; Jones, T.W.; Strachan, D.E.; Vine, I.A. (H.H. Wills Physics Lab., Univ. of Bristol (United Kingdom) Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom) Blackett Lab., Physics Dept., Imperial Coll., London (United Kingdom) Dept. of Physics, Nuclear Physics Lab., Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom) Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton (United Kingdom) Dept. of Physics an

    1994-01-15

    The mechanical, electrical and electronic design and construction of the ZEUS central tracking detector are described, together with the chamber monitoring and environmental control. This cylindrical drift chamber is designed for track reconstruction, electron identification and fast event triggering in a high beam-crossing rate, high magnetic field application. (orig.)

  2. 16-element photodiode array for the angular microdeflection detector and for stabilization of a laser radiation direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzecki, Maciej; Piotrowski, Tadeusz; Bar, Jan; Dobrowolski, Rafał; Klimov, Andrii; Klos, Helena; Marchewka, Michał; Nieprzecki, Marek; Panas, Andrzej; Prokaryn, Piotr; Seredyński, Bartłomiej; Sierakowski, Andrzej; Słysz, Wojciech; Szmigiel, Dariusz; Zaborowski, Michal

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the design and technology of two types of 16-element photodiode arrays is described. The arrays were developed by the ITE and are to be used in detection of microdeflection of laser radiation at the Institute of Metrology and Biomedical Engineering in the Faculty of Mechatronics of Warsaw University of Technology. The electrical and photoelectrical parameters of the arrays are presented.

  3. The Texas-Edinburgh-Catania Silicon Array (TECSA): A detector for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure studies with rare isotope beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeder, B.T., E-mail: broeder@comp.tamu.ed [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3366 (United States); McCleskey, M.; Trache, L.; Alharbi, A.A.; Banu, A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3366 (United States); Cherubini, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, I95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, I95123 Catania (Italy); Davinson, T. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Goldberg, V.Z. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3366 (United States); Gulino, M. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, I95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, I95123 Catania (Italy); Pizzone, R.G. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, I95123 Catania (Italy); Simmons, E. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3366 (United States); Sparta, R. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, I95123 Catania (Italy); Spiridon, A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3366 (United States); Spitaleri, C. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, I95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, I95123 Catania (Italy); Wallace, J.P. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Tribble, R.E. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3366 (United States); Woods, P.J. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-01

    We present the details of the construction and commissioning of the Texas-Edinburgh-Catania Silicon Array (TECSA). TECSA is composed of up to 16 Micron Semiconductor Ltd. type-YY1 silicon strip detectors and associated electronics, which is designed for use in studies of nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure with rare isotope beams. TECSA was assembled at the Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute and will be housed there for the next few years. The array was commissioned in a recent experiment where the d({sup 14}C,p){sup 15}C reaction at 11.7 MeV/u was measured in inverse kinematics. The results of the measurement and a discussion of the future use of this array are presented.

  4. The Texas-Edinburgh-Catania Silicon Array (TECSA): A detector for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure studies with rare isotope beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeder, B.T.; McCleskey, M.; Trache, L.; Alharbi, A.A.; Banu, A.; Cherubini, S.; Davinson, T.; Goldberg, V.Z.; Gulino, M.; Pizzone, R.G.; Simmons, E.; Sparta, R.; Spiridon, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Wallace, J.P.; Tribble, R.E.; Woods, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    We present the details of the construction and commissioning of the Texas-Edinburgh-Catania Silicon Array (TECSA). TECSA is composed of up to 16 Micron Semiconductor Ltd. type-YY1 silicon strip detectors and associated electronics, which is designed for use in studies of nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure with rare isotope beams. TECSA was assembled at the Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute and will be housed there for the next few years. The array was commissioned in a recent experiment where the d( 14 C,p) 15 C reaction at 11.7 MeV/u was measured in inverse kinematics. The results of the measurement and a discussion of the future use of this array are presented.

  5. Simulations and developments of the Low Energy Neutron detector Array LENA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, C.; Algora, A.; Couture, A.; Csatlós, M.; Gulyás, J.; Heil, M.; Krasznahorkay, A.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Plag, R.; Reifarth, R.; Stuhl, L.; Sonnabend, K.; Tornyi, T.; Tovesson, F.

    2011-01-01

    Prototypes of the Low Energy Neutron detector Array (LENA) have been tested and compared with detailed GEANT simulations. LENA will consist of plastic scintillation bars with the dimensions 1000×45×10 mm 3 . The tests have been performed with γ-ray sources and neutrons originating from the neutron-induced fission of 235 U. The simulations agreed very well with the measured response and were therefore used to simulate the response to mono-energetic neutrons with different detection thresholds. LENA will be used to detect low-energy neutrons from (p,n)-type reactions with low momentum transfer foreseen at the R 3 B and EXL setups at FAIR, Darmstadt.

  6. First results of neutrinoless double beta decay search with the GERmanium Detector Array "GERDA"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicskó Csáthy, József

    2014-06-01

    The study of neutrinoless double beta decay is the most powerful approach to the fundamental question if the neutrino is a Majorana particle, i.e. its own anti-particle. The observation of the lepton number violating neutrinoless double beta decay would establish the Majorana nature of the neutrino. Until now neutrinoless double beta decay was not observed. The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA is a double beta decay experiment located at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy. GERDA operates bare Ge diodes enriched in 76Ge in liquid argon supplemented by a water shield. The exposure accumulated adds up to 21.6 kg· yr with a background level of 1.8 · 10-2 cts/(keV·kg·yr). The results of the Phase I of the experiment are presented and the preparation of the Phase II is briefly discussed.

  7. Surface roughness studies with DALLAS-detector array for laser light angular scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorburger, T. V.; Teague, E. C.; Scire, F. E.; Mclay, M. J.; Gilsinn, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt is made to develop a better mathematical description of optical scattering phenomena, in order to construct an optical scattering apparatus for reliable and routine measurements of roughness parameters without resorting to comparator standards. After a brief outline of optical scattering theory, a description is presented of an experimental instrument for measuring surface roughness which incorporates optical scattering principles. The instrument has a He-Ne laser which illuminates the test surface at a variable angle of incidence. Scattered light distribution is detected by an array of 87 fiber-optic sensors positioned in a rotating semicircular yoke. The output from the detector is digitized and analyzed in a laboratory computer. For a comparison with experimental data, theoretical distributions are calculated by substituting the roughness profiles into the operand of and integral equation for electromagnetic scattering developed by Beckmann and Spizzichino (1963). A schematic diagram of the instrument is provided and the general implications of the experimental results are discussed.

  8. A Components Database Design and Implementation for Accelerators and Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, A.; Meyer, S.

    2011-01-01

    Many accelerator and detector systems being fabricated for the PEP-II Accelerator and BABAR Detector needed configuration control and calibration measurements tracked for their components. Instead of building a database for each distinct system, a Components Database was designed and implemented that can encompass any type of component and any type of measurement. In this paper we describe this database design that is especially suited for the engineering and fabrication processes of the accelerator and detector environments where there are thousands of unique component types. We give examples of information stored in the Components Database, which includes accelerator configuration, calibration measurements, fabrication history, design specifications, inventory, etc. The World Wide Web interface is used to access the data, and templates are available for international collaborations to collect data off-line.

  9. Spatial resolution of 2D ionization chamber arrays for IMRT dose verification: single-detector size and sampling step width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poppe, Bjoern; Djouguela, Armand; Blechschmidt, Arne; Willborn, Kay; Ruehmann, Antje; Harder, Dietrich

    2007-01-01

    The spatial resolution of 2D detector arrays equipped with ionization chambers or diodes, used for the dose verification of IMRT treatment plans, is limited by the size of the single detector and the centre-to-centre distance between the detectors. Optimization criteria with regard to these parameters have been developed by combining concepts of dosimetry and pattern analysis. The 2D-ARRAY Type 10024 (PTW-Freiburg, Germany), single-chamber cross section 5 x 5 mm 2 , centre-to-centre distance between chambers in each row and column 10 mm, served as an example. Additional frames of given dose distributions can be taken by shifting the whole array parallel or perpendicular to the MLC leaves by, e.g., 5 mm. The size of the single detector is characterized by its lateral response function, a trapezoid with 5 mm top width and 9 mm base width. Therefore, values measured with the 2D array are regarded as sample values from the convolution product of the accelerator generated dose distribution and this lateral response function. Consequently, the dose verification, e.g., by means of the gamma index, is performed by comparing the measured values of the 2D array with the values of the convolution product of the treatment planning system (TPS) calculated dose distribution and the single-detector lateral response function. Sufficiently small misalignments of the measured dose distributions in comparison with the calculated ones can be detected since the lateral response function is symmetric with respect to the centre of the chamber, and the change of dose gradients due to the convolution is sufficiently small. The sampling step width of the 2D array should provide a set of sample values representative of the sampled distribution, which is achieved if the highest spatial frequency contained in this function does not exceed the 'Nyquist frequency', one half of the sampling frequency. Since the convolution products of IMRT-typical dose distributions and the single-detector

  10. Laser beam shaping design based on micromirror array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Han; Su, Bida; Liu, Jiaguo; Fan, Xiaoli; Jing, Wang

    2017-10-01

    In the practical application of the laser, it is necessary to use the laser beam shaping technology to shape the output beam of laser device to the uniform light intensity distribution. The shaping divergent optical system of compound eye integrator way is composed of beam expanding mirror group and lens array. Its working principle is to expand the output laser to a certain size of caliber, and then divide the beam with lens array into multiple sub beam, where the lens unit of lens array can control the divergence angle of sub beam through the design of focal length, with mutual superposition of the sub beam in far field, to make up for the nonuniformity of beam, so that the radiant exitance on the radiated surface may become uniform. In this paper, we use a reflective microlens array to realize the laser beam shaping. By through of the practical optical path model established, the ray tracing is carried out and the simulation results for single-mode Gaussian beam with noise circumstance is provided. The analysis results show that the laser beam shaping under different inputs can be effectively realized by use of microlens array. All the energy is within the signal window, with a high energy efficiency of more than 90%; The measured surface has a better uniformity, and the uniformity is better than 99.5% at 150m.

  11. Study on the energy response to neutrons for a new scintillating-fiber-array neutron detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Qi; Wang Qun; Xie Zhong Shen

    2003-01-01

    The energy response of a new scintillating-fiber-array neutron detector to neutrons in the energy range 0.01 MeV<=E sub n<=14 MeV was modeled by combining a simplified Monte Carlo model and the MCNP 4b code. In order to test the model and get the absolute sensitivity of the detector to neutrons, one experiment was carried out for 2.5 and 14 MeV neutrons from T(p,n) sup 3 He and T(d,n) sup 4 He reactions at the Neutron Generator Laboratory at the Institute of Modern Physics, the Chinese Academy of Science. The absolute neutron fluence was obtained with a relative standard uncertainty 4.5% or 2.0% by monitoring the associated protons or sup 4 He particles, respectively. Another experiment was carried out for 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 MeV neutrons from T(p,n) sup 3 He reaction, and for 3.28, 3.50, 4.83, 5.74 MeV neutrons from D(d,n) sup 3 He reaction on the Model 5SDH-2 accelerator at China Institute of Atomic Energy. The absolute neutron fluence was obtained with a relative standard uncertainty 5.0% by usin...

  12. Simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption system using photodiode array detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, S.L.; Chin, K.S.

    1994-01-01

    A photodiode array (PDA) detector-multichannel analyser (MCA) system has been coupled to a flame and a graphite furnace atomiser and tested for simultaneous multielement atomic absorption analysis. Multielement hollow cathode lamps (HCL) are used as light source. Spectral lines are dispersed through a spectrograph with triple gratings and detected by a 25.4 mm PDA detector consisting of 1024 elements. The optical MCA system is capable of recording multiple spectra spanned by the spectrograph/PDA. The transmitted intensity spectra obtained for the standard and analyte solutions during flame or graphite furnace atomisation are converted to absorbance spectra using the MCA software provided. Results from the comparison studies show that the linear range and sensitivities for Ni-Co-Fe and Cu-Cr obtained from the simultaneous measurements are within the same order of magnitudes as those from conventional single element determinations using photomultiplier tube detection. The study also shows that non-atomic absorption can be readily corrected by a two-line method where non-atomic absorption lines can be chosen from the spectra recorded simultaneously. The proposed system has been evaluated for the determination of trace elements using NBS standard reference water SRM 1643b

  13. Digital pulse-timing technique for the neutron detector array NEDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modamio, V., E-mail: victor.modamio@lnl.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Valiente-Dobón, J.J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Jaworski, G. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Hüyük, T. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Triossi, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Egea, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Department of Electronic Engineering, Universitat de València, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); Di Nitto, A. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Söderström, P.-A. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Agramunt Ros, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Angelis, G. de [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); France, G. de [GANIL, CEA/DSAM and CNRS/IN2P3, F-14076 Caen (France); Erduran, M.N. [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University, 34303 Istanbul (Turkey); and others

    2015-03-01

    A new digital pulse-timing algorithm, to be used with the future neutron detector array NEDA, has been developed and tested. The time resolution of four 5 in. diameter photomultiplier tubes (XP4512, R4144, R11833-100, and ET9390-kb), coupled to a cylindrical 5 in. by 5 in. BC501A liquid scintillator detector was measured by employing digital sampling electronics and a constant fraction discriminator (CFD) algorithm. The zero crossing of the CFD algorithm was obtained with a cubic spline interpolation, which was continuous up to the second derivative. The performance of the algorithm was studied at sampling rates of 500 MS/s and 200 MS/s. The time resolution obtained with the digital electronics was compared to the values acquired with a standard analog CFD. The result of this comparison shows that the time resolution from the analog and the digital measurements at 500 MS/s and at 200 MS/s are within 15% for all the tested photomultiplier tubes.

  14. Effect of scattered electrons on the ‘Magic Plate’ transmission array detector response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrowaili, Z. A.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Carolan, M.; Rosenfeld, A.

    2017-02-01

    Transmission type detectors can provide a measure of the energy fluence and if they are real-time systems that do not significantly attenuate the radiation beam have a distinct advantage over the current method as Quality Assurance (QA) could in principle be done during the actual patient treatment. The use of diode arrays in QA holds much promise due to real-time operation and feedback when compared to other methods e.g. films which are not real-time. The goal of this work is to describe the characterization of the radiation response of a silicon diode array called the Magic Plate (MP) when operated in transmission mode (MPTM). The response linearity of MPTM was excellent (R2=1). When the MP was placed in linac block tray position; the change in PDD at phantom surface (SSD 100 cm) for a 10 × 10 cm2 was -0.037 %, -0.178 % and -0.949 % for 6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV beams. Therefore, MP does not provide a significant increase in skin dose to the patient and the percentage depth doses showed an excellent agreement with and without MPTM for 6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV beams.

  15. Effect of scattered electrons on the ‘Magic Plate’ transmission array detector response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alrowaili, Z A; Lerch, M; Petasecca, M; Rosenfeld, A; Carolan, M

    2017-01-01

    Transmission type detectors can provide a measure of the energy fluence and if they are real-time systems that do not significantly attenuate the radiation beam have a distinct advantage over the current method as Quality Assurance (QA) could in principle be done during the actual patient treatment. The use of diode arrays in QA holds much promise due to real-time operation and feedback when compared to other methods e.g. films which are not real-time. The goal of this work is to describe the characterization of the radiation response of a silicon diode array called the Magic Plate (MP) when operated in transmission mode (MPTM). The response linearity of MPTM was excellent (R2=1). When the MP was placed in linac block tray position; the change in PDD at phantom surface (SSD 100 cm) for a 10 × 10 cm 2 was -0.037 %, -0.178 % and -0.949 % for 6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV beams. Therefore, MP does not provide a significant increase in skin dose to the patient and the percentage depth doses showed an excellent agreement with and without MPTM for 6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV beams. (paper)

  16. Evaluation of InGaAS array detector suitability to space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauziede, L.; Beulé, K.; Boutillier, M.; Bernard, F.; Reverchon, J.-L.; Buffaz, A.

    2017-11-01

    InGaAs material has a natural cutoff wavelength of 1.65µm so it is naturally suitable for detection in Short Wavelength InfraRed (SWIR) spectral range. Regarding Earth Observation Spacecraft missions this spectral range can be used for the CO2 concentration measurements in the atmosphere. CNES (French Space agency) is studying a new mission, Microcarb with a spectral band centered on 1.6µm wavelength. InGaAs detector looks attractive for space application because its low dark current allows high temperature operation, reducing by the way the needed instrument resources. The Alcatel Thales III-VLab group has developed InGaAs arrays technology (320x256 & 640x512) that has been studied by CNES, using internal facilities. Performance tests and technological evaluation were performed on a 320x256 pixels array with a pitch of 30µm. The aim of this evaluation was to assess this new technology suitability for space applications. The carried out test plan includes proton radiations with Random Telegraph Signal (RTS) study, operating lifetest and evolution of performances as a function of the operating temperature.

  17. Electromagnetic linear machines with dual Halbach array design and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Liang; Peng, Juanjuan; Zhang, Lei; Jiao, Zongxia

    2017-01-01

    This book extends the conventional two-dimensional (2D) magnet arrangement into 3D pattern for permanent magnet linear machines for the first time, and proposes a novel dual Halbach array. It can not only effectively increase the radial component of magnetic flux density and output force of tubular linear machines, but also significantly reduce the axial flux density, radial force and thus system vibrations and noises. The book is also the first to address the fundamentals and provide a summary of conventional arrays, as well as novel concepts for PM pole design in electric linear machines. It covers theoretical study, numerical simulation, design optimization and experimental works systematically. The design concept and analytical approaches can be implemented to other linear and rotary machines with similar structures. The book will be of interest to academics, researchers, R&D engineers and graduate students in electronic engineering and mechanical engineering who wish to learn the core principles, met...

  18. Examination of cotton fibers and common contaminants using an infrared microscope and a focal-plane array detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical imaging of cotton fibers and common contaminants in fibers is presented. Chemical imaging was performed with an infrared microscope equipped with a Focal-Plane Array (FPA) detector. Infrared spectroscopy can provide us with information on the structure and quality of cotton fibers. In a...

  19. An engineering design network for SSC detector development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiGiacomo, N.J.

    1990-01-01

    The detector systems that are being proposed to exploit the capabilities of the SSC are of a scale and scope that will make them among the most complex devices ever built. To successfully design and build these systems over the next decade, the authors must make use of integrated state of the art computer aided engineering and design (CAE/CAD) tools that have been developed and employed in industry. The challenge is to made these tools and associated engineering resources available to the spectrum of institutions - large and small universities, industries and national labs - involved in SSC detector development in such a way that each may contribute and participate in the most effective manner. The authors believe that powerful workstations running sophisticated modeling, analysis and simulation software, linked by high speed data networks and governed by modern configuration management methods offer the ideal means of arriving at the optimum detector configuration for physics at the SSC

  20. Fabrication and testing of a 4-node micro-pocket fission detector array for the Kansas State University TRIGA Mk. II research nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenberger, Michael A.; Nichols, Daniel M.; Stevenson, Sarah R.; Swope, Tanner M.; Hilger, Caden W.; Unruh, Troy C.; McGregor, Douglas S.; Roberts, Jeremy A.

    2017-08-01

    Advancements in nuclear reactor core modeling and computational capability have encouraged further development of in-core neutron sensors. Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs) have been fabricated and tested previously, but successful testing of these prior detectors was limited to single-node operation with specialized designs. Described in this work is a modular, four-node MPFD array fabricated and tested at Kansas State University (KSU). The four sensor nodes were equally spaced to span the length of the fuel-region of the KSU TRIGA Mk. II research nuclear reactor core. The encapsulated array was filled with argon gas, serving as an ionization medium in the small cavities of the MPFDs. The unified design improved device ruggedness and simplified construction over previous designs. A 0.315-in. (8-mm) penetration in the upper grid plate of the KSU TRIGA Mk. II research nuclear reactor was used to deploy the array between fuel elements in the core. The MPFD array was coupled to an electronic support system which has been developed to support pulse-mode operation. Neutron-induced pulses were observed on all four sensor channels. Stable device operation was confirmed by testing under steady-state reactor conditions. Each of the four sensors in the array responded to changes in reactor power between 10 kWth and full power (750 kWth). Reactor power transients were observed in real-time including positive transients with periods of 5, 15, and 30 s. Finally, manual reactor power oscillations were observed in real-time.

  1. Design and performance of single photon APD focal plane arrays for 3-D LADAR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzler, Mark A.; Entwistle, Mark; Owens, Mark; Patel, Ketan; Jiang, Xudong; Slomkowski, Krystyna; Rangwala, Sabbir; Zalud, Peter F.; Senko, Tom; Tower, John; Ferraro, Joseph

    2010-08-01

    ×We describe the design, fabrication, and performance of focal plane arrays (FPAs) for use in 3-D LADAR imaging applications requiring single photon sensitivity. These 32 × 32 FPAs provide high-efficiency single photon sensitivity for three-dimensional LADAR imaging applications at 1064 nm. Our GmAPD arrays are designed using a planarpassivated avalanche photodiode device platform with buried p-n junctions that has demonstrated excellent performance uniformity, operational stability, and long-term reliability. The core of the FPA is a chip stack formed by hybridizing the GmAPD photodiode array to a custom CMOS read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) and attaching a precision-aligned GaP microlens array (MLA) to the back-illuminated detector array. Each ROIC pixel includes an active quenching circuit governing Geiger-mode operation of the corresponding avalanche photodiode pixel as well as a pseudo-random counter to capture per-pixel time-of-flight timestamps in each frame. The FPA has been designed to operate at frame rates as high as 186 kHz for 2 μs range gates. Effective single photon detection efficiencies as high as 40% (including all optical transmission and MLA losses) are achieved for dark count rates below 20 kHz. For these planar-geometry diffused-junction GmAPDs, isolation trenches are used to reduce crosstalk due to hot carrier luminescence effects during avalanche events, and we present details of the crosstalk performance for different operating conditions. Direct measurement of temporal probability distribution functions due to cumulative timing uncertainties of the GmAPDs and ROIC circuitry has demonstrated a FWHM timing jitter as low as 265 ps (standard deviation is ~100 ps).

  2. Design of photovoltaic central power station concentrator array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-02-01

    A design for a photovoltaic central power station using tracking concentrators has been developed. The 100 MW plant is assumed to be located adjacent to the Saguaro Power Station of Arizona Public Service. The design assumes an advanced Martin Marietta two-axis tracking fresnel lens concentrator. The concentrators are arrayed in 5 MW subfields, each with its own power conditioning unit. The photovoltaic plant output is connected to the existing 115 kV switchyard. The site specific design allows detailed cost estimates for engineering, site preparation, and installation. Collector and power conditioning costs have been treated parametrically.

  3. Four-layer DOI PET detectors using a multi-pixel photon counter array and the light sharing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadama, Naoko; Yoshida, Eiji; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2013-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) provide many advantages for PET detectors, such as their high internal gain, high photon detection efficiency and insensitivity to magnetic fields. The number of detectable scintillation photons of SiPMs, however, is limited by the number of microcells. Therefore, pulse height of PET detectors using SiPMs is saturated when large numbers of scintillation photons enter the SiPM pixels. On the other hand, we previously presented a depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding method that is based on the light sharing method. Since our encoding method detects scintillation photons with multiple readout pixels, the saturation effect can be suppressed. We constructed two prototype four-layer DOI detectors using a SiPM array and evaluated their performances. The two prototype detectors consisted of four layers of a 6×6 array of Lu 2(1−x) Y 2x SiO 5 (LYSO) crystals and a SiPM (multi-pixel photon detector, MPPC, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.) array of 4×4 pixels. The size of each LYSO crystal element was 1.46 mm×1.46 mm×4.5 mm and all surfaces of the crystal elements were chemically etched. We used two types of MPPCs. The first one had 3600 microcells and high photon detection efficiency (PDE). The other one had 14,400 microcells and lower PDE. In the evaluation experiment, all the crystals of the detector using the MPPC which had the high PDE were clearly identified. The respective energy and timing resolutions of lower than 15% and 1.0 ns were achieved for each crystal element. No saturation of output signals was observed in the 511 keV energy region due to suppression of the saturation effect by detecting scintillation photons with several MPPC pixels by the light sharing method. -- Highlights: •We constructed and evaluated four-layer DOI detectors by the light sharing method using a MPPC array. •The detectors using two types of the MPPC array were compared. •The energy and timing resolutions of lower than 15% and 1.0 ns were achieved for

  4. Four-layer DOI PET detectors using a multi-pixel photon counter array and the light sharing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikido, Fumihiko, E-mail: funis@nirs.go.jp; Inadama, Naoko; Yoshida, Eiji; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2013-11-21

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) provide many advantages for PET detectors, such as their high internal gain, high photon detection efficiency and insensitivity to magnetic fields. The number of detectable scintillation photons of SiPMs, however, is limited by the number of microcells. Therefore, pulse height of PET detectors using SiPMs is saturated when large numbers of scintillation photons enter the SiPM pixels. On the other hand, we previously presented a depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding method that is based on the light sharing method. Since our encoding method detects scintillation photons with multiple readout pixels, the saturation effect can be suppressed. We constructed two prototype four-layer DOI detectors using a SiPM array and evaluated their performances. The two prototype detectors consisted of four layers of a 6×6 array of Lu{sub 2(1−x)}Y{sub 2x}SiO{sub 5} (LYSO) crystals and a SiPM (multi-pixel photon detector, MPPC, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.) array of 4×4 pixels. The size of each LYSO crystal element was 1.46 mm×1.46 mm×4.5 mm and all surfaces of the crystal elements were chemically etched. We used two types of MPPCs. The first one had 3600 microcells and high photon detection efficiency (PDE). The other one had 14,400 microcells and lower PDE. In the evaluation experiment, all the crystals of the detector using the MPPC which had the high PDE were clearly identified. The respective energy and timing resolutions of lower than 15% and 1.0 ns were achieved for each crystal element. No saturation of output signals was observed in the 511 keV energy region due to suppression of the saturation effect by detecting scintillation photons with several MPPC pixels by the light sharing method. -- Highlights: •We constructed and evaluated four-layer DOI detectors by the light sharing method using a MPPC array. •The detectors using two types of the MPPC array were compared. •The energy and timing resolutions of lower than 15% and 1.0 ns were

  5. Design and implementation of the NaI(Tl)/CsI(Na) detectors output signal generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xu; Liu Congzhan; Zhao Jianling

    2014-01-01

    We designed and implemented a signal generator that can simulate the output of the NaI(Tl)/CsI(Na) detectors' pre-amplifier onboard the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT). Using the development of the FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) with VHDL language and adding a random constituent, we have finally produced the double exponential random pulse signal generator. The statistical distribution of the signal amplitude is programmable. The occurrence time intervals of the adjacent signals contain negative exponential distribution statistically. (authors)

  6. Design and implementation of the NaI(Tl)/CsI(Na) detectors output signal generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu; Liu, Cong-Zhan; Zhao, Jian-Ling; Zhang, Fei; Zhang, Yi-Fei; Li, Zheng-Wei; Zhang, Shuo; Li, Xu-Fang; Lu, Xue-Feng; Xu, Zhen-Ling; Lu, Fang-Jun

    2014-02-01

    We designed and implemented a signal generator that can simulate the output of the NaI(Tl)/CsI(Na) detectors' pre-amplifier onboard the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT). Using the development of the FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) with VHDL language and adding a random constituent, we have finally produced the double exponential random pulse signal generator. The statistical distribution of the signal amplitude is programmable. The occurrence time intervals of the adjacent signals contain negative exponential distribution statistically.

  7. Cryogenic and radiation hard ASIC design for large format NIR/SWIR detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Dupont, Benoit; Dierickx, Bart; Müller, Eric; Verbruggen, Geert; Gielis, Stijn; Valvekens, Ramses

    2014-10-01

    An ASIC is developed to control and data quantization for large format NIR/SWIR detector arrays. Both cryogenic and space radiation environment issue are considered during the design. Therefore it can be integrated in the cryogenic chamber, which reduces significantly the vast amount of long wires going in and out the cryogenic chamber, i.e. benefits EMI and noise concerns, as well as the power consumption of cooling system and interfacing circuits. In this paper, we will describe the development of this prototype ASIC for image sensor driving and signal processing as well as the testing in both room and cryogenic temperature.

  8. Optimal Design of Large Dimensional Adaptive Subspace Detectors

    KAUST Repository

    Ben Atitallah, Ismail

    2016-05-27

    This paper addresses the design of Adaptive Subspace Matched Filter (ASMF) detectors in the presence of a mismatch in the steering vector. These detectors are coined as adaptive in reference to the step of utilizing an estimate of the clutter covariance matrix using training data of signalfree observations. To estimate the clutter covariance matrix, we employ regularized covariance estimators that, by construction, force the eigenvalues of the covariance estimates to be greater than a positive scalar . While this feature is likely to increase the bias of the covariance estimate, it presents the advantage of improving its conditioning, thus making the regularization suitable for handling high dimensional regimes. In this paper, we consider the setting of the regularization parameter and the threshold for ASMF detectors in both Gaussian and Compound Gaussian clutters. In order to allow for a proper selection of these parameters, it is essential to analyze the false alarm and detection probabilities. For tractability, such a task is carried out under the asymptotic regime in which the number of observations and their dimensions grow simultaneously large, thereby allowing us to leverage existing results from random matrix theory. Simulation results are provided in order to illustrate the relevance of the proposed design strategy and to compare the performances of the proposed ASMF detectors versus Adaptive normalized Matched Filter (ANMF) detectors under mismatch scenarios.

  9. Optimal Design of Large Dimensional Adaptive Subspace Detectors

    KAUST Repository

    Ben Atitallah, Ismail; Kammoun, Abla; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim; Alnaffouri, Tareq Y.

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the design of Adaptive Subspace Matched Filter (ASMF) detectors in the presence of a mismatch in the steering vector. These detectors are coined as adaptive in reference to the step of utilizing an estimate of the clutter covariance matrix using training data of signalfree observations. To estimate the clutter covariance matrix, we employ regularized covariance estimators that, by construction, force the eigenvalues of the covariance estimates to be greater than a positive scalar . While this feature is likely to increase the bias of the covariance estimate, it presents the advantage of improving its conditioning, thus making the regularization suitable for handling high dimensional regimes. In this paper, we consider the setting of the regularization parameter and the threshold for ASMF detectors in both Gaussian and Compound Gaussian clutters. In order to allow for a proper selection of these parameters, it is essential to analyze the false alarm and detection probabilities. For tractability, such a task is carried out under the asymptotic regime in which the number of observations and their dimensions grow simultaneously large, thereby allowing us to leverage existing results from random matrix theory. Simulation results are provided in order to illustrate the relevance of the proposed design strategy and to compare the performances of the proposed ASMF detectors versus Adaptive normalized Matched Filter (ANMF) detectors under mismatch scenarios.

  10. High Performance Systolic Array Core Architecture Design for DNA Sequencer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiful Nurdin Dayana

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a high performance systolic array (SA core architecture design for Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA sequencer. The core implements the affine gap penalty score Smith-Waterman (SW algorithm. This time-consuming local alignment algorithm guarantees optimal alignment between DNA sequences, but it requires quadratic computation time when performed on standard desktop computers. The use of linear SA decreases the time complexity from quadratic to linear. In addition, with the exponential growth of DNA databases, the SA architecture is used to overcome the timing issue. In this work, the SW algorithm has been captured using Verilog Hardware Description Language (HDL and simulated using Xilinx ISIM simulator. The proposed design has been implemented in Xilinx Virtex -6 Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA and improved in the core area by 90% reduction.

  11. Micro vertex detector design for collider geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, M.; Crennell, D.; Fisher, C.M.; Hughes, P.; Kurtz, N.

    1984-05-01

    Previously the analysis of fixed target jet events using a scintillating optical fibre target to provide a projection of the topology on the plane transverse to the event axis has been considered. It was argued that this transverse plane projection is optimal for the detection of charm or beauty particle decay vertices. The idea is generalised to a jet analysis in a collider geometry particularly when associated with a high Psub(perpendicular to) or missing Esub(T) trigger. This report proposes a simple arrangement of fibres to give high precision track elements in the transverse plane projection coupled with a fast read-out capability. The principle physics aim of the design is to provide a tag for selecting top quark jets by detecting a beauty flavoured particle in the jet. (U.K.)

  12. Optimization of a large-area detector-block based on SiPM and pixelated LYSO crystal arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calva-Coraza, E; Alva-Sánchez, H; Murrieta-Rodríguez, T; Martínez-Dávalos, A; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M

    2017-10-01

    We present the performance evaluation of a large-area detector module based on the ArrayC-60035-64P, an 8×8 array of tileable, 7.2mm pitch, silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) by SensL, covering a total area of 57.4mm×57.4mm. We characterized the ArrayC-60035-64P, operating at room temperature, using LYSO pixelated crystal arrays of different pitch sizes (1.075, 1.430, 1.683, 2.080 and 2.280mm) to determine the resolvable crystal size. After an optimization process, a 7mm thick coupling light guide was used for all crystal pitches. To identify the interaction position a 16-channel (8 columns, 8 rows) symmetric charge division (SCD) readout board together with a center-of-gravity algorithm was used. Based on this, we assembled the detector modules using a 40×40 LYSO, 1.43mm pitch array, covering the total detector area. Calibration was performed using a 137 Cs source resulting in excellent crystal maps with minor geometric distortion, a mean 4.1 peak-to-valley ratio and 9.6% mean energy resolution for 662keV photons in the central region. The resolvability index was calculated in the x and y directions with values under 0.42 in all cases. We show that these large area SiPM arrays, combined with a 16-channel SCD readout board, can offer high spatial resolution, without processing a big number of signals, attaining excellent energy resolution and detector uniformity. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Design and evaluation of a SiPM-based large-area detector module for positron emission imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva-Sánchez, H.; Murrieta-Rodríguez, T.; Calva-Coraza, E.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.

    2018-03-01

    The design and evaluation of a large-area detector module for positron emission imaging applications, is presented. The module features a SensL ArrayC-60035-64P-PCB solid state detector (8×8 array of tileable silicon photomultipliers by SensL, 7.2 mm pitch) covering a total area of 57.4×57.4 mm2. The detector module was formed using a pixelated array of 40×40 lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) scintillator crystal elements with 1.43 mm pitch. A 7 mm thick coupling light guide was used to allow light sharing between adjacent SiPM. A 16-channel symmetric charge division (SCD) readout board was designed to multiplex the number of signals from 64 to 16 (8 columns and 8 rows) and a center-of-gravity algorithm to identify the position. Data acquisition and digitization was accomplished using a custom-made system based on FPGAs boards. Crystal maps were obtained using 18F-positron sources and Voronoi diagrams were used to correct for geometric distortions and to generate a non-uniformity correction matrix. All measurements were taken at a controlled room temperature of 22oC. The crystal maps showed minor distortion, 90% of the 1600 total crystal elements could be identified, a mean peak-to-valley ratio of 4.3 was obtained and a 10.8% mean energy resolution for 511 keV annihilation photons was determined. The performance of the detector using our own readout board was compared to that using two different commercially readout boards using the same detector module arrangement. We show that these large-area SiPM arrays, combined with a 16-channel SCD readout board, can offer high spatial resolution, excellent energy resolution and detector uniformity and thus, can be used for positron emission imaging applications.

  14. Design and Analysis of MEMS Linear Phased Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxiang Fan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A structure of micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS linear phased array based on “multi-cell” element is designed to increase radiation sound pressure of transducer working in bending vibration mode at high frequency. In order to more accurately predict the resonant frequency of an element, the theoretical analysis of the dynamic equation of a fixed rectangular composite plate and finite element method simulation are adopted. The effects of the parameters both in the lateral and elevation direction on the three-dimensional beam directivity characteristics are comprehensively analyzed. The key parameters in the analysis include the “cell” number of element, “cell” size, “inter-cell” spacing and the number of elements, element width. The simulation results show that optimizing the linear array parameters both in the lateral and elevation direction can greatly improve the three-dimensional beam focusing for MEMS linear phased array, which is obviously different from the traditional linear array.

  15. Design of data acquisition system for GEM detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jianliang; Chen Ziyu; Shen Ji; Jin Xi

    2011-01-01

    It describes the design and realization of the USB 2.0 high speed data acquisition devise which is used in the readout electronics of the GEM (gas electron multiplier) detector. By using of the USB Microcontroller EZ-USB FX2 CY7C68013A, high speed ADC and FPGA, high-speed data rate of data acquisition and transmission was realized. The data rate reaches to 20 MByte/s, meeting the requirements of data acquisition and transmission of the detector. (authors)

  16. SPECT detector system design based on embedded system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weizheng; Zhao Shujun; Zhang Lei; Sun Yuanling

    2007-01-01

    A single-photon emission computed tomography detector system based on embedded Linux designed. This system is composed of detector module, data acquisition module, ARM MPU module, network interface communication module and human machine interface module. Its software uses multithreading technology based on embedded Linux. It can achieve high speed data acquisition, real-time data correction and network data communication. It can accelerate the data acquisition and decrease the dead time. The accuracy and the stability of the system can be improved. (authors)

  17. Conceptual design of the ITER fast-ion loss detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Ayllon-Guerola, J.; Galdon, J.; Garcia Lopez, J.; Gonzalez-Martin, J.; Jimenez-Ramos, M. C.; Rodriguez-Ramos, M.; Rivero-Rodriguez, J. F.; Sanchis-Sanchez, L.; Kocan, M.; Bertalot, L.; Bonnet, Y.; Casal, N.; Giacomin, T.; Pinches, S. D.; Reichle, R.; Vayakis, G.; Veshchev, E.; Vorpahl, Ch.; Walsh, M.

    2016-01-01

    A conceptual design of a reciprocating fast-ion loss detector for ITER has been developed and is presented here. Fast-ion orbit simulations in a 3D magnetic equilibrium and up-to-date first wall have been carried out to revise the measurement requirements for the lost alpha monitor in ITER. In agreement with recent observations, the simulations presented here suggest that a pitch-angle resolution of ∼5° might be necessary to identify the loss mechanisms. Synthetic measurements including realistic lost alpha-particle as well as neutron and gamma fluxes predict scintillator signal-to-noise levels measurable with standard light acquisition systems with the detector aperture at ∼11 cm outside of the diagnostic first wall. At measurement position, heat load on detector head is comparable to that in present devices.

  18. The design and performance of the ZEUS micro vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polini, A. [Bologna Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN Bologna (Italy); Brock, I.; Goers, S. [Bonn Univ. (DE). Physikalisches Institut] (and others)

    2007-08-15

    In order to extend the tracking acceptance, to improve the primary and secondary vertex reconstruction and thus enhancing the tagging capabilities for short lived particles, the ZEUS experiment at the HERA Collider at DESY installed a silicon strip vertex detector. The barrel part of the detector is a 63 cm long cylinder with silicon sensors arranged around an elliptical beampipe. The forward part consists of four circular shaped disks. In total just over 200k channels are read out using 2.9 m{sup 2} of silicon. In this report a detailed overview of the design and construction of the detector is given and the performance of the completed system is reviewed. (orig.)

  19. A new event detector designed for the Seismic Research Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, James N.; Hutt, Charles R.

    1983-01-01

    A new short-period event detector has been implemented on the Seismic Research Observatories. For each signal detected, a printed output gives estimates of the time of onset of the signal, direction of the first break, quality of onset, period and maximum amplitude of the signal, and an estimate of the variability of the background noise. On the SRO system, the new algorithm runs ~2.5x faster than the former (power level) detector. This increase in speed is due to the design of the algorithm: all operations can be performed by simple shifts, additions, and comparisons (floating point operations are not required). Even though a narrow-band recursive filter is not used, the algorithm appears to detect events competitively with those algorithms that employ such filters. Tests at Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory on data supplied by Blandford suggest performance commensurate with the on-line detector of the Seismic Data Analysis Center, Alexandria, Virginia.

  20. Conceptual design of the ITER fast-ion loss detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Munoz, M., E-mail: mgm@us.es; Ayllon-Guerola, J.; Galdon, J.; Garcia Lopez, J.; Gonzalez-Martin, J.; Jimenez-Ramos, M. C.; Rodriguez-Ramos, M.; Rivero-Rodriguez, J. F.; Sanchis-Sanchez, L. [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Seville, 41012 Seville (Spain); CNA (Universidad de Sevilla-CSIC-J. Andalucía), Seville (Spain); Kocan, M.; Bertalot, L.; Bonnet, Y.; Casal, N.; Giacomin, T.; Pinches, S. D.; Reichle, R.; Vayakis, G.; Veshchev, E.; Vorpahl, Ch.; Walsh, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); and others

    2016-11-15

    A conceptual design of a reciprocating fast-ion loss detector for ITER has been developed and is presented here. Fast-ion orbit simulations in a 3D magnetic equilibrium and up-to-date first wall have been carried out to revise the measurement requirements for the lost alpha monitor in ITER. In agreement with recent observations, the simulations presented here suggest that a pitch-angle resolution of ∼5° might be necessary to identify the loss mechanisms. Synthetic measurements including realistic lost alpha-particle as well as neutron and gamma fluxes predict scintillator signal-to-noise levels measurable with standard light acquisition systems with the detector aperture at ∼11 cm outside of the diagnostic first wall. At measurement position, heat load on detector head is comparable to that in present devices.

  1. SU-F-T-576: Characterization of Two Dimensional Liquid Filled Detector Array(SRS 1000) in High Precision Cyberknife Robotic Radiosurgery System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthukumaran, M [Apollo Speciality Hospitals, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Manigandan, D [Fortis Cancer Institute, Mohali, Punjab (India); Murali, V; Chitra, S; Ganapathy, K [Apollo Speciality Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Vikraman, S [Jaypee Hospital – Radiation Onology, Noida, UTTAR PRADESH (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to characterize a two dimensional liquid filled detector array SRS 1000 for routine QA in Cyberknife Robotic Radiosurgery system. Methods: SRS 1000 consists of 977 liquid filled ionization chambers and is designed to be used in small field SRS/SBRT techniques. The detector array has got two different spacial resolutions. Till field size of 5.5×5.5 cm the spacial resolution is 2.5mm (center to center) and after that till field size of 11 × 11 cm the spacial resolution is 5mm. The size of the detector is 2.3 × 2.3 0.5 mm with a volume of .003 cc. The CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery System is a frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system in which a LINAC is mounted on a robotic manipulator to deliver beams with a high sub millimeter accuracy. The SRS 1000’s MU linearity, stability, reproducibility in Cyberknife Robotic Radiosurgery system was measured and investigated. The output factors for fixed and IRIS collimators for all available collimators (5mm till 60 mm) was measured and compared with the measurement done with PTW pin-point ionization chamber. Results: The MU linearity was measured from 2 MU till 1000 MU for doserates in the range of 700cGy/min – 780 cGy/min and compared with the measurement done with pin point chamber The MU linearity was with in 3%. The detector arrays stability and reproducibility was excellent and was withinin 0.5% The measured output factors showed an agreement of better than 2% when compared with the measurements with pinpoint chamber for both fixed and IRIS collimators with all available field sizes. Conclusion: We have characterised PTW 1000 SRS as a precise and accurate measurement tool for routine QA of Cyberknife Robotic radiosurgery system.

  2. SU-F-T-576: Characterization of Two Dimensional Liquid Filled Detector Array(SRS 1000) in High Precision Cyberknife Robotic Radiosurgery System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthukumaran, M; Manigandan, D; Murali, V; Chitra, S; Ganapathy, K; Vikraman, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to characterize a two dimensional liquid filled detector array SRS 1000 for routine QA in Cyberknife Robotic Radiosurgery system. Methods: SRS 1000 consists of 977 liquid filled ionization chambers and is designed to be used in small field SRS/SBRT techniques. The detector array has got two different spacial resolutions. Till field size of 5.5×5.5 cm the spacial resolution is 2.5mm (center to center) and after that till field size of 11 × 11 cm the spacial resolution is 5mm. The size of the detector is 2.3 × 2.3 0.5 mm with a volume of .003 cc. The CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery System is a frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system in which a LINAC is mounted on a robotic manipulator to deliver beams with a high sub millimeter accuracy. The SRS 1000’s MU linearity, stability, reproducibility in Cyberknife Robotic Radiosurgery system was measured and investigated. The output factors for fixed and IRIS collimators for all available collimators (5mm till 60 mm) was measured and compared with the measurement done with PTW pin-point ionization chamber. Results: The MU linearity was measured from 2 MU till 1000 MU for doserates in the range of 700cGy/min – 780 cGy/min and compared with the measurement done with pin point chamber The MU linearity was with in 3%. The detector arrays stability and reproducibility was excellent and was withinin 0.5% The measured output factors showed an agreement of better than 2% when compared with the measurements with pinpoint chamber for both fixed and IRIS collimators with all available field sizes. Conclusion: We have characterised PTW 1000 SRS as a precise and accurate measurement tool for routine QA of Cyberknife Robotic radiosurgery system.

  3. 1024x1024 resistive emitter array design and fabrication status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Paul T.; Oleson, Jim; McHugh, Stephen W.; Beuville, Eric; Schlesselmann, John D.; Woolaway, James T.; Barskey, Steve; Solomon, Steven L.; Joyner, Thomas W.

    2002-07-01

    Santa Barbara Infrared (SBIR) is producing a high performance 1,024 x 1,024 Large Format Resistive emitter Array (LFRA) for use in the next generation of IR Scene Projectors (IRSPs). LFRA requirements were developed through close cooperation with the Tri-Service IR Scene Projector working group, and through detailed trade studies sponsored by the OSD Central T&E Investment Program (CTEIP) and a Phase I US Navy Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract. The CMOS Read-In Integrated Circuit (RIIC) is being designed by SBIR and Indigo Systems under a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract. Performance and features include 750 K MWIR maximum apparent temperature, 5 ms radiance rise time, 200 Hz full frame update, and 400 Hz window mode operation. Ten 8-inch CMOS wafers will be fabricated and characterized in mid-2002, followed by emitter fabrication in late 2002. This paper discusses array performance, requirements flow-down, array design, fabrication of 2 X 2-inch CMOS devices, and plans for subsequent RIIC wafer test and emitter pixel fabrication.

  4. Solar cell array design handbook - The principles and technology of photovoltaic energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenbach, H. S.

    1980-01-01

    Photovoltaic solar cell array design and technology for ground-based and space applications are discussed from the user's point of view. Solar array systems are described, with attention given to array concepts, historical development, applications and performance, and the analysis of array characteristics, circuits, components, performance and reliability is examined. Aspects of solar cell array design considered include the design process, photovoltaic system and detailed array design, and the design of array thermal, radiation shielding and electromagnetic components. Attention is then given to the characteristics and design of the separate components of solar arrays, including the solar cells, optical elements and mechanical elements, and the fabrication, testing, environmental conditions and effects and material properties of arrays and their components are discussed.

  5. EUV high resolution imager on-board solar orbiter: optical design and detector performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halain, J. P.; Mazzoli, A.; Rochus, P.; Renotte, E.; Stockman, Y.; Berghmans, D.; BenMoussa, A.; Auchère, F.

    2017-11-01

    The EUV high resolution imager (HRI) channel of the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUI) on-board Solar Orbiter will observe the solar atmospheric layers at 17.4 nm wavelength with a 200 km resolution. The HRI channel is based on a compact two mirrors off-axis design. The spectral selection is obtained by a multilayer coating deposited on the mirrors and by redundant Aluminum filters rejecting the visible and infrared light. The detector is a 2k x 2k array back-thinned silicon CMOS-APS with 10 μm pixel pitch, sensitive in the EUV wavelength range. Due to the instrument compactness and the constraints on the optical design, the channel performance is very sensitive to the manufacturing, alignments and settling errors. A trade-off between two optical layouts was therefore performed to select the final optical design and to improve the mirror mounts. The effect of diffraction by the filter mesh support and by the mirror diffusion has been included in the overall error budget. Manufacturing of mirror and mounts has started and will result in thermo-mechanical validation on the EUI instrument structural and thermal model (STM). Because of the limited channel entrance aperture and consequently the low input flux, the channel performance also relies on the detector EUV sensitivity, readout noise and dynamic range. Based on the characterization of a CMOS-APS back-side detector prototype, showing promising results, the EUI detector has been specified and is under development. These detectors will undergo a qualification program before being tested and integrated on the EUI instrument.

  6. Nanoparticle array based optical frequency selective surfaces: theory and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidi, Chiya; van der Weide, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate a synthesis procedure for designing a bandstop optical frequency selective surface (FSS) composed of nanoparticle (NP) elements. The proposed FSS uses two-dimensional (2-D) periodic arrays of NPs with subwavelength unit-cell dimensions. We derive equivalent circuit for a nanoparticle array (NPA) using the closed-form solution for a 2-D NPA excited by a plane wave in the limit of the dipole approximation, which includes contribution from both individual and collective plasmon modes. Using the extracted equivalent circuit, we demonstrate synthesis of an optical FSS using cascaded NPA layers as coupled resonators, which we validate with both circuit model and full-wave simulation for a third-order Butterworth bandstop prototype.

  7. Design and performance of vacuum capable detector electronics for linear position sensitive neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, R.A.; Cooper, R.G.; Funk, L.L.; Clonts, L.G.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of electronics for linear position sensitive neutron detectors. The eight tube assembly requires 10 W of power and can be controlled via digital communication links. The electronics can be used without modification in vacuum. Using a transimpedance amplifier and gated integration, we achieve a highly linear system with coefficient of determinations of 0.9999 or better. Typical resolution is one percent of tube length.

  8. Design and performance of vacuum capable detector electronics for linear position sensitive neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedel, R.A., E-mail: riedelra@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Cooper, R.G.; Funk, L.L.; Clonts, L.G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    We describe the design and performance of electronics for linear position sensitive neutron detectors. The eight tube assembly requires 10 W of power and can be controlled via digital communication links. The electronics can be used without modification in vacuum. Using a transimpedance amplifier and gated integration, we achieve a highly linear system with coefficient of determinations of 0.9999 or better. Typical resolution is one percent of tube length.

  9. Calculation of track and vertex errors for detector design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harr, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Kalman Filter technique has come into wide use for charged track reconstruction in high-energy physics experiments. It is also well suited for detector design studies, allowing for the efficient estimation of optimal track covariance matrices without the need of a hit level Monte Carlo simulation. Although much has been published about the Kalman filter equations, there is a lack of previous literature explaining how to implement the equations. In this paper, the operators necessary to implement the Kalman filter equations for two common detector configurations are worked out: a central detector in a uniform solenoidal magnetic field, and a fixed-target detector with no magnetic field in the region of the interactions. With the track covariance matrices in hand, vertex and invariant mass errors are readily calculable. These quantities are particularly interesting for evaluating experiments designed to study weakly decaying particles which give rise to displaced vertices. The optimal vertex errors are obtained via a constrained vertex fit. Solutions are presented to the constrained vertex problem with and without kinematic constraints. Invariant mass errors are obtained via propagation of errors; the use of vertex constrained track parameters is discussed. Many of the derivations are new or previously unpublished

  10. Three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography using a conventional ultrasound linear detector array: whole-body tomographic system for small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gateau, Jerome; Caballero, Miguel Angel Araque; Dima, Alexander; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2013-01-01

    Optoacoustic imaging relies on the detection of ultrasonic waves induced by laser pulse excitations to map optical absorption in biological tissue. A tomographic geometry employing a conventional ultrasound linear detector array for volumetric optoacoustic imaging is reported. The geometry is based on a translate-rotate scanning motion of the detector array, and capitalizes on the geometrical characteristics of the transducer assembly to provide a large solid angular detection aperture. A system for three-dimensional whole-body optoacoustic tomography of small animals is implemented. The detection geometry was tested using a 128-element linear array (5.0∕7.0 MHz, Acuson L7, Siemens), moved by steps with a rotation∕translation stage assembly. Translation and rotation range of 13.5 mm and 180°, respectively, were implemented. Optoacoustic emissions were induced in tissue-mimicking phantoms and ex vivo mice using a pulsed laser operating in the near-IR spectral range at 760 nm. Volumetric images were formed using a filtered backprojection algorithm. The resolution of the optoacoustic tomography system was measured to be better than 130 μm in-plane and 330 μm in elevation (full width half maximum), and to be homogenous along a 15 mm diameter cross section due to the translate-rotate scanning geometry. Whole-body volumetric optoacoustic images of mice were performed ex vivo, and imaged organs and blood vessels through the intact abdominal and head regions were correlated to the mouse anatomy. Overall, the feasibility of three-dimensional and high-resolution whole-body optoacoustic imaging of small animal using a conventional linear array was demonstrated. Furthermore, the scanning geometry may be used for other linear arrays and is therefore expected to be of great interest for optoacoustic tomography at macroscopic and mesoscopic scale. Specifically, conventional detector arrays with higher central frequencies may be investigated.

  11. A Trigger-less Acquisition System for the EXILL Large Germanium Detectors Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutti, Paolo; Blanc, Aurelian; Jentschel, Michael; Koester, Ulli; Ruiz Martinez, Emilio; Soldner, Torsten; France, Gilles de; Simpson, Gary; Ur, Calin A.; Urban, Waldemar

    2013-06-01

    The combination of the intense cold neutron beam available at the PF1b beam position of the Institute Laue- Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, together with the high detection efficiency of a large array of high purity Ge detectors (HPGe) has offered a unique opportunity for a set of experiments devoted to nuclear spectroscopy on stable isotopes as well as on exotic nuclei produced in the fission process of uranium and plutonium samples. The emitted γ -rays from neutron capture on stable targets as well as from the decay of fission fragments have been acquired in a trigger-less mode to preserve a maximum of information for further off-line treatment. A dedicated fully digital acquisition system using a combination of a 14-bit 100 MS/s digitizers with a Power PC-based VME single board computer has been developed to ensure data collection and real-time processing capabilities. The present article will describe the experimental setup as well as the specific electronic configuration used during the EXILL campaign of measurements with particular emphasis on the technical achievements as well as on the preliminary results obtained in the various experiments. (authors)

  12. Evolution of miniature detectors and focal plane arrays for infrared sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Louis A.

    1993-06-01

    Sensors that are sensitive in the infrared spectral region have been under continuous development since the WW2 era. A quest for the military advantage of 'seeing in the dark' has pushed thermal imaging technology toward high spatial and temporal resolution for night vision equipment, fire control, search track, and seeker 'homing' guidance sensing devices. Similarly, scientific applications have pushed spectral resolution for chemical analysis, remote sensing of earth resources, and astronomical exploration applications. As a result of these developments, focal plane arrays (FPA) are now available with sufficient sensitivity for both high spatial and narrow bandwidth spectral resolution imaging over large fields of view. Such devices combined with emerging opto-electronic developments in integrated FPA data processing techniques can yield miniature sensors capable of imaging reflected sunlight in the near IR and emitted thermal energy in the Mid-wave (MWIR) and longwave (LWIR) IR spectral regions. Robotic space sensors equipped with advanced versions of these FPA's will provide high resolution 'pictures' of their surroundings, perform remote analysis of solid, liquid, and gas matter, or selectively look for 'signatures' of specific objects. Evolutionary trends and projections of future low power micro detector FPA developments for day/night operation or use in adverse viewing conditions are presented in the following test.

  13. Minority n out of m coincidence circuits for time-differential experiments with multi-detector arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunsfurth, J.; Geske, K.

    1976-01-01

    Two n out of m minority coincidence circuits (n<=8, 15<=m<=31), employed for time-differential experiments are presented. Specifications like obtainable prompt coincidence resolution time, expandability to higher detector numbers m, implementation variants and their consequences, and some application modes are discussed. Hardware expenses on electronics for m-detector arrays usually rise nearly proportional to m factorial. In the coincidence system proposed here, the rise in hardware expenses can be reduced to slightly more than proportional to m, without sacrifice in experimental quality and flexibility. (Auth.)

  14. Conceptual design and optimization of a plastic scintillator array for 2D tomography using a compact D-D fast neutron generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Robert; Zboray, Robert; Cortesi, Marco; Prasser, Horst-Michael

    2014-04-01

    A conceptual design optimization of a fast neutron tomography system was performed. The system is based on a compact deuterium-deuterium fast neutron generator and an arc-shaped array of individual neutron detectors. The array functions as a position sensitive one-dimensional detector allowing tomographic reconstruction of a two-dimensional cross section of an object up to 10 cm across. Each individual detector is to be optically isolated and consists of a plastic scintillator and a Silicon Photomultiplier for measuring light produced by recoil protons. A deterministic geometry-based model and a series of Monte Carlo simulations were used to optimize the design geometry parameters affecting the reconstructed image resolution. From this, it is expected that with an array of 100 detectors a reconstructed image resolution of ~1.5mm can be obtained. Other simulations were performed in order to optimize the scintillator depth (length along the neutron path) such that the best ratio of direct to scattered neutron counts is achieved. This resulted in a depth of 6-8 cm and an expected detection efficiency of 33-37%. Based on current operational capabilities of a prototype neutron generator being developed at the Paul Scherrer Institute, planned implementation of this detector array design should allow reconstructed tomograms to be obtained with exposure times on the order of a few hours. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Reconfigurable signal processor designs for advanced digital array radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Hernan; Zhang, Yan (Rockee); Yu, Xining

    2017-05-01

    The new challenges originated from Digital Array Radar (DAR) demands a new generation of reconfigurable backend processor in the system. The new FPGA devices can support much higher speed, more bandwidth and processing capabilities for the need of digital Line Replaceable Unit (LRU). This study focuses on using the latest Altera and Xilinx devices in an adaptive beamforming processor. The field reprogrammable RF devices from Analog Devices are used as analog front end transceivers. Different from other existing Software-Defined Radio transceivers on the market, this processor is designed for distributed adaptive beamforming in a networked environment. The following aspects of the novel radar processor will be presented: (1) A new system-on-chip architecture based on Altera's devices and adaptive processing module, especially for the adaptive beamforming and pulse compression, will be introduced, (2) Successful implementation of generation 2 serial RapidIO data links on FPGA, which supports VITA-49 radio packet format for large distributed DAR processing. (3) Demonstration of the feasibility and capabilities of the processor in a Micro-TCA based, SRIO switching backplane to support multichannel beamforming in real-time. (4) Application of this processor in ongoing radar system development projects, including OU's dual-polarized digital array radar, the planned new cylindrical array radars, and future airborne radars.

  16. Thermal design of spacecraft solar arrays using a polyimide foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianco, N; Iasiello, M; Naso, V

    2015-01-01

    The design of the Thermal Control System (TCS) of spacecraft solar arrays plays a fundamental role. Indeed, the spacecraft components must operate within a certain range of temperature. If this doesn't occur, their performance is reduced and they may even break. Solar arrays, which are employed to recharge batteries, are directly exposed to the solar heat flux, and they need to be insulated from the earth's surface irradiation. Insulation is currently provided either with a white paint coating or with a Multi Layer Insulation (MLI) system [1]. A configuration based on an open-cell polyimide foam has also been recently proposed [2]. Using polyimide foams in TCSs looks very attractive in terms of costs, weight and assembling. An innovative thermal analysis of the above cited TCS configurations is carried out in this paper, by solving the porous media energy equation, under the assumption of Local Thermal Equilibrium (LTE) between the two phases. Radiation effects through the solar array are also considered by using the Rosseland approximation. Under a stationary daylight condition, temperature profiles are obtained by means of the finite-element based code COMSOL Multiphysics ® . Finally, since the weight plays an important role in aerospace applications, weights of the three TCS configurations are compared. (paper)

  17. Thermal design of spacecraft solar arrays using a polyimide foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, N.; Iasiello, M.; Naso, V.

    2015-11-01

    The design of the Thermal Control System (TCS) of spacecraft solar arrays plays a fundamental role. Indeed, the spacecraft components must operate within a certain range of temperature. If this doesn't occur, their performance is reduced and they may even break. Solar arrays, which are employed to recharge batteries, are directly exposed to the solar heat flux, and they need to be insulated from the earth's surface irradiation. Insulation is currently provided either with a white paint coating or with a Multi Layer Insulation (MLI) system [1]. A configuration based on an open-cell polyimide foam has also been recently proposed [2]. Using polyimide foams in TCSs looks very attractive in terms of costs, weight and assembling. An innovative thermal analysis of the above cited TCS configurations is carried out in this paper, by solving the porous media energy equation, under the assumption of Local Thermal Equilibrium (LTE) between the two phases. Radiation effects through the solar array are also considered by using the Rosseland approximation. Under a stationary daylight condition, temperature profiles are obtained by means of the finite-element based code COMSOL Multiphysics®. Finally, since the weight plays an important role in aerospace applications, weights of the three TCS configurations are compared.

  18. Design studies on sensors for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hügging, F G

    2002-01-01

    For the ATLAS Pixel Detector, prototype sensors have been successfully developed. For the sensors design, attention was given to survivability of the harsh LHC radiation environment leading to the need to operate them at several hundreds of volts, while maintaining a good charge collection efficiency, small cell size and minimal multiple scattering. For a cost effective mass production, a bias grid is implemented to test the sensors before assembly under full bias. (6 refs).

  19. Development of a multi-channel front-end electronics module based on ASIC for silicon strip array detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xingwen; Yan Duo; Su Hong; Qian Yi; Kong Jie; Zhang Xueheng; Li Zhankui; Li Haixia

    2014-01-01

    The silicon strip array detector is one of external target facility subsystems in the Cooling Storage Ring on the Heavy Ion Research Facility at Lanzhou (HIRFL-CSR). Using the ASICs, the front-end electronics module has been developed for the silicon strip array detectors and can implement measurement of energy of 96 channels. The performance of the front-end electronics module has been tested. The energy linearity of the front-end electronics module is better than 0.3% for the dynamic range of 0.1∼0.7 V. The energy resolution is better than 0.45%. The maximum channel crosstalk is better than 10%. The channel consistency is better than 1.3%. After continuously working for 24 h at room temperature, the maximum drift of the zero-peak is 1.48 mV. (authors)

  20. Improved detection limits for electrospray ionization on a magnetic sector mass spectrometer by using an array detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, R B; Tamura, J; Finch, J W; Musselman, B D

    1994-03-01

    Array detection was compared with point detection for solutions of hen egg-white lysozyme, equine myoglobin, and ubiquitin analyzed by electrospray ionization with a magnetic sector mass spectrometer. The detection limits for samples analyzed by using the array detector system were at least 10 times lower than could be achieved by using a point detector on the same mass spectrometer. The minimum detectable quantity of protein corresponded to a signal-to-background ratio of approximately 2∶1 for a 500 amol/μL solution of hen egg-white lysozyme. However, the ultimate practical sample concentrations appeared to be in the 10-100 fmol/μL range for the analysis of dilute solutions of relatively pure proteins or simple mixtures.

  1. Design and fabrication of two-dimensional semiconducting bolometer arrays for HAWC and SHARC-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voellmer, George M.; Allen, Christine A.; Amato, Michael J.; Babu, Sachidananda R.; Bartels, Arlin E.; Benford, Dominic J.; Derro, Rebecca J.; Dowell, C. D.; Harper, D. A.; Jhabvala, Murzy D.; Moseley, S. H.; Rennick, Timothy; Shirron, Peter J.; Smith, W. W.; Staguhn, Johannes G.

    2003-02-01

    The High resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC) and the Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera II (SHARC II) will use almost identical versions of an ion-implanted silicon bolometer array developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The GSFC "Pop-Up" Detectors (PUD's) use a unique folding technique to enable a 12 × 32-element close-packed array of bolometers with a filling factor greater than 95 percent. A kinematic Kevlar suspension system isolates the 200 mK bolometers from the helium bath temperature, and GSFC - developed silicon bridge chips make electrical connection to the bolometers, while maintaining thermal isolation. The JFET preamps operate at 120 K. Providing good thermal heat sinking for these, and keeping their conduction and radiation from reaching the nearby bolometers, is one of the principal design challenges encountered. Another interesting challenge is the preparation of the silicon bolometers. They are manufactured in 32-element, planar rows using Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) semiconductor etching techniques, and then cut and folded onto a ceramic bar. Optical alignment using specialized jigs ensures their uniformity and correct placement. The rows are then stacked to create the 12 × 32-element array. Engineering results from the first light run of SHARC II at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) are presented.

  2. Design, development and evaluation of a resistor-based multiplexing circuit for a 20×20 SiPM array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhonghai; Sun, Xishan; Lou, Kai; Meier, Joseph; Zhou, Rong; Yang, Chaowen; Zhu, Xiaorong; Shao, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    One technical challenge in developing a large-size scintillator detector with multiple Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays is to read out a large number of detector output channels. To achieve this, different signal multiplexing circuits have been studied and applied with different performances and cost-effective tradeoffs. Resistor-based multiplexing circuits exhibit simplicity and signal integrity, but also present the disadvantage of timing shift among different channels. In this study, a resistor-based multiplexing circuit for a large-sized SiPM array readout was developed and evaluated by simulation and experimental studies. Similarly to a multiplexing circuit used for multi-anode PMT, grounding and branching resistors were connected to each SiPM output channel. The grounding resistor was used to simultaneously reduce the signal crosstalk among different channels and to improve timing performance. Both grounding and branching resistor values were optimized to maintain a balanced performance of the event energy, timing, and positioning. A multiplexing circuit was implemented on a compact PCB and applied for a flat-panel detector which consisted of a 32×32 LYSO scintillator crystals optically coupled to 5×5 SiPM arrays for a total 20×20 output channels. Test results showed excellent crystal identification for all 1024 LYSO crystals (each with 2×2×30 mm"3 size) with "2"2Na flood-source irradiation. The measured peak-to-valley ratio from typical crystal map profile is around 3:1 to 6.6:1, an average single crystal energy resolution of about 17.3%, and an average single crystal timing resolution of about 2 ns. Timing shift among different crystals, as reported in some other resistor-based multiplexing circuit designs, was not observed. In summary, we have designed and implemented a practical resistor-based multiplexing circuit that can be readily applied for reading out a large SiPM array with good detector performance.

  3. Design, development and evaluation of a resistor-based multiplexing circuit for a 20×20 SiPM array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhonghai [College of Physical Science and Technology, Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology, Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Tx (United States); Sun, Xishan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Tx (United States); Lou, Kai [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Tx (United States); Meier, Joseph [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Tx (United States); Zhou, Rong; Yang, Chaowen [College of Physical Science and Technology, Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology, Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Zhu, Xiaorong [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Tx (United States); Shao, Yiping [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Tx (United States)

    2016-04-21

    One technical challenge in developing a large-size scintillator detector with multiple Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays is to read out a large number of detector output channels. To achieve this, different signal multiplexing circuits have been studied and applied with different performances and cost-effective tradeoffs. Resistor-based multiplexing circuits exhibit simplicity and signal integrity, but also present the disadvantage of timing shift among different channels. In this study, a resistor-based multiplexing circuit for a large-sized SiPM array readout was developed and evaluated by simulation and experimental studies. Similarly to a multiplexing circuit used for multi-anode PMT, grounding and branching resistors were connected to each SiPM output channel. The grounding resistor was used to simultaneously reduce the signal crosstalk among different channels and to improve timing performance. Both grounding and branching resistor values were optimized to maintain a balanced performance of the event energy, timing, and positioning. A multiplexing circuit was implemented on a compact PCB and applied for a flat-panel detector which consisted of a 32×32 LYSO scintillator crystals optically coupled to 5×5 SiPM arrays for a total 20×20 output channels. Test results showed excellent crystal identification for all 1024 LYSO crystals (each with 2×2×30 mm{sup 3} size) with {sup 22}Na flood-source irradiation. The measured peak-to-valley ratio from typical crystal map profile is around 3:1 to 6.6:1, an average single crystal energy resolution of about 17.3%, and an average single crystal timing resolution of about 2 ns. Timing shift among different crystals, as reported in some other resistor-based multiplexing circuit designs, was not observed. In summary, we have designed and implemented a practical resistor-based multiplexing circuit that can be readily applied for reading out a large SiPM array with good detector performance.

  4. Design of Pixellated CMOS Photon Detector for Secondary Electron Detection in the Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Huang Chuah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel method of detecting secondary electrons generated in the scanning electron microscope (SEM. The method suggests that the photomultiplier tube (PMT, traditionally used in the Everhart-Thornley (ET detector, is to be replaced with a configurable multipixel solid-state photon detector offering the advantages of smaller dimension, lower supply voltage and power requirements, and potentially cheaper product cost. The design of the proposed detector has been implemented using a standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology with optical enhancement. This microchip comprises main circuit constituents of an array of photodiodes connecting to respective noise-optimised transimpedance amplifiers (TIAs, a selector-combiner (SC circuit, and a postamplifier (PA. The design possesses the capability of detecting photons with low input optical power in the range of 1 nW with 100 μm × 100 μm sized photodiodes and achieves a total amplification of 180 dBΩ at the output.

  5. Design of a Tritium-in-air-monitor using field programmable gate arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNelles, Phillip; Lu, Lixuan

    2015-01-01

    Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) have recently garnered significant interest for certain applications within the nuclear field. Some applications of these devices include Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems, pulse measurement systems, particle detectors and health physics purposes. In CANada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) nuclear power plants, the use of heavy water (D2O) as the moderator leads to the increased production of Tritium, which poses a health risk and must be monitored by Tritium-In-Air Monitors (TAMs). Traditional TAMs are mostly designed using microprocessors. More recent studies show that FPGAs could be a potential alternative to implement the electronic logic used in radiation detectors, such as the TAM, more effectively. In this paper, an FPGA-based TAM is designed and constructed in a laboratory setting using an FPGA-based cRIO system. New functionalities, such as the detection of Carbon-14 and the addition of noble gas compensation are incorporated into a new FPGA-based TAM. Additionally, all of the standard functions included in the original microprocessor-based TAM, such as tritium detection, gamma compensation, pump and air flow control, and background and thermal drift corrections were also implemented. The effectiveness of the new design is demonstrated through simulations as well as laboratory testing on the prototype system. (author)

  6. Radiographic inspection. Film replacement with digital detector arrays in aerospace applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, Frank; Bavendiek, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The new Digital Radiographic Inspection method replace more and more the conventional Film technique. For DDA (Digital Detector Array) systems it is currently necessary to use automated or semi-automated systems. For CR (Computer Radiography) Systems the conventional Film Systems may be used. For this CR technique operators can use same X-Ray Units (Bunker) and same X-Ray equipment. But on CR technique we have basically the same settings like the Film-based technique. More or less same exposure times and for aerospace application long scanning times for the CR foils. In fact there is no big benefit in capacity or in economical view. Regarding this issue we thought about the option to use a DDA System instead of a Film or CR System to use the current Film Equipment (Bunker, Generator, Tube.) and replace this 1:1 by a manual system. In this time only small detectors with fine pixel pitch was available on the market. With this type of DDA's is was absolutely uneconomical to inspect parts in serial inspection. Therefore a new generation of DDA's were developed, which is able to replace Film or CR System 1:1 with adequate economical properties for specific applications. The new PerkinElmer XRD 1611 Panel has a size of 40 x 40 cm and a pixel pitch of 100 μm. The baseline for the new DDA Panel was the most used X-Ray Film in size 30 x 40 cm. The Pixel Pitch and requirements for Bad Pixel based on the requirements for spatial resolution of the applicable ASTM standards and different customer specifications for castings. With this new DDA System is it possible to inspect small and medium castings in very short time with excellent image quality. The System is able to process images under 1 minute include averaging. Images will be transferred by a specific software tool to an offline reading station where certified Level 2 operator can inspect the images. Images will be archived as 16bit DICONDE File. All relevant images information are included in DICONDE File

  7. Uncooled Radiation Hard Large Area SiC X-ray and EUV Detectors and 2D Arrays, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project seeks to design, fabricate, characterize and commercialize large area, uncooled and radiative hard 4H-SiC EUV ? soft X-ray detectors capable of ultra...

  8. Admittance detector for high impedance systems: design and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Stamos, Brian N; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2014-12-02

    We describe an admittance detector for high impedance systems (small capillary bore and/or low solution specific conductance). Operation in the low frequency range (≤1 kHz, much lower than most relevant publications) provides optimum response to conductance changes in capillaries ≤20 μm in bore. The detector design was based on studies described in a preceding companion paper ( Zhang, M.; Stamos, B. N.; Amornthammarong, N.; Dasgupta, P. K. Anal. Chem. 2014, 8 , DOI 10.1021/ac503245a.). The highest S/N for detecting 100 μM KCl (5.5 μM peak concentration, ∼0.8 μS/cm) injected into water flowing through a capillary of 7.5 μm inner radius (r) was observed at 500-750 Hz. A low bias current operational amplifier in the transimpedance configuration permitted high gain (1 V/nA) to measure pA-nA level currents in the detection cell. Aside from an oscillator, an offset-capable RMS-DC converter formed the complete detection circuitry. Limits of detection (LODs) of KCl scaled inversely with the capillary cross section and were 2.1 and 0.32 μM injected KCl for r = 1 and 2.5 μm capillaries, respectively. When used as a detector on an r = 8 μm bore poly(methyl methacrylate) capillary in a split effluent stream from a suppressed ion chromatograph, the LOD was 27 nM bromide (Vex 22 V p-p), compared to 14 nM observed with a commercial bipolar pulse macroscale conductivity detector with an actively thermostated cell. We also show applications of the detector in electrophoresis in capillaries with r = 1 and 2.5 μm. Efficient heat dissipation permits high concentrations of the background electrolyte and sensitive detection because of efficient electrostacking.

  9. Development of high-resolution gamma detector using sub-mm GAGG crystals coupled to TSV-MPPC array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipovec, A.; Shimazoe, K.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-01-01

    In this study a high-resolution gamma detector based on an array of sub-millimeter Ce:GAGG (Cerium doped Gd 3 Al 2 Ga 3 O 12 ) crystals read out by an array of surface-mount type of TSV-MPPC was developed. MPPC sensor from Hamamatsu which has a 26 by 26 mm 2 detector area with 64 channels was used. One channel has a 3 by 3 mm 2 photosensitive area with 50 μ m pitch micro cells. MPPC sensor provides 576 mm 2 sensing area and was used to decode 48 by 48 array with 0.4 by 0.4 by 20 mm 3 Ce:GAGG crystals of 500 μ m pitch. The base of the detector with the crystal module was mounted to a read out board which consists of charge division circuit, thus allowing for a read out of four channels to identify the position of the incident event on the board. The read out signals were amplified using charge sensitive amplifiers. The four amplified signals were digitized and analyzed to produce a position sensitive event. For the performance analysis a 137 Cs source was used. The produced events were used for flood histogram and energy analysis. The effects of the glass thickness between the Ce:GAGG and MPPC were analyzed using the experimental flood diagrams and Geant4 simulations. The glass between the scintillator and the detector allows the spread of the light over different channels and is necessary if the channel's sensitive area is bigger than the scintillator's area. The initial results demonstrate that this detector module is promising and could be used for applications requiring compact and high-resolution detectors. Experimental results show that the detectors precision increases using glass guide thickness of 1.35 mm and 1.85 mm; however the precision using 2.5 mm are practically the same as if using 0.8 mm or 1.0 mm glass guide thicknesses. In addition, simulations using Geant4 indicate that the light becomes scarcer if thicker glass is used, thus reducing the ability to indicate which crystal was targeted. When 2.5 mm glass thickness is used, the scarce

  10. Detector design and evaluation for the solenoidal tracker at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, H.; Ahmad, S.; Bonner, B.E.

    1992-01-01

    There are two components to this research, both at the high-η ends of the STAR detector to be built in Brookhaven in 1997. The first project is to design the start counters to be placed along the incident beam-pipe. These detectors will be used to determine the starting time for the TOF layer, which, in conjunction with the main low-η TPC detectors, will determine particle identification. The TOF system will need a time resolution of 100 ps, which must be reflected in the start counter design. The start counter will detect particles emitted with pseudorapidities of η-4.5-5.5, and the size of the counter is dependent on the placement of the counter along the beam pipe. The authors will also explore start counter segmentation and light collection from the scintillator. Second, they are using computer simulation to try to calculate the initial momentum of particles, given their crossing points through the high-η TPCs. A computer model can give one such track through the TPCs. By modelling the track of the particle back through an ideal magnetic field, the authors can estimate the initial momentum. Then, based on this momentum, they project the particle through a complex magnetic field corresponding to the actual field generated and determine where that particle strikes the TPCs. By then varying the initial momentum slightly, they can minimize the difference between such tracks and the original track and, thus, accurately calculate the initial momentum

  11. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-06-10

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L).

  12. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Felis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L.

  13. Low Complexity Beampattern Design in MIMO Radars Using Planar Array

    KAUST Repository

    Bouchoucha, Taha

    2015-01-07

    In multiple-input multiple-output radar systems, it is usually desirable to steer transmitted power in the region-of-interest. To do this, conventional methods optimize the waveform covariance matrix, R, for the desired beampattern, which is then used to generate actual transmitted waveforms. Both steps require constrained optimization, therefore, use iterative and expensive algorithms. In this paper, we provide a closed-form solution to design covariance matrix for the given beampattern using the planar array, which is then used to derive a novel closed-form algorithm to directly design the finite-alphabet constant-envelope (FACE) waveforms. The proposed algorithm exploits the two-dimensional fast-Fourier-transform. The performance of our proposed algorithm is compared with existing methods that are based on semi-definite quadratic programming with the advantage of a considerably reduced complexity.

  14. The international linear collider. Technical design report. Vol. 4. Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnke, Ties; Brau, James E.; Burrows, Philip; Fuster, Juan; Peskin, Michael; Stanitzki, Marcel; Sugimoto, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Sakue; Yamamoto, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The Si Vertex detectors, the main tracker, calorimetry, muon detectors, the superconducting spectrometer magnet, the detector electronics and data acquisition, simulation and reconstruction, benchmarking, costs. (HSI)

  15. The international linear collider. Technical design report. Vol. 4. Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Ties; Brau, James E.; Burrows, Philip; Fuster, Juan; Peskin, Michael; Stanitzki, Marcel; Sugimoto, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Sakue; Yamamoto, Hitoshi [eds.

    2013-10-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The Si Vertex detectors, the main tracker, calorimetry, muon detectors, the superconducting spectrometer magnet, the detector electronics and data acquisition, simulation and reconstruction, benchmarking, costs. (HSI)

  16. The design of intelligentized nuclear radiation monitoring detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Yan; Fang Zongliang; Wen Qilin; Li Lirong; Hu Jiewei; Peng Jing

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduced an intelligentized nuclear radiation monitoring detector. The detector contains GM tubes, high voltage power supply and MCU circuit. The detector connect terminal via reformative serial port to provide power, accept the data and sent the command. (authors)

  17. Design and implementation of an expert system for the detector control systems of the ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henss, Tobias

    2008-12-01

    In the framework of this thesis an expert system ''Pixel-Advisor'' for the control system of the pixel detector was designed and implemented. This supports the operational personnel in the diagnosis and removal of possible problems, which are in connection with the detector control system and unburdens the few available DCS experts

  18. Electron identification and implications in SSC detector design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensinger, J.; Wang, E.M.; Yamamoto, H.

    1990-05-01

    In the context of Heavy Higgs searches in the decay mode H → ZZ → 4e, electron identification issues and their implications on detector design are discussed (though many of the issues are valid for muon modes as well). The backgrounds considered seem manageable (a net rejection of 100 for combined electron ID and isolation cut is needed and seems fairly straightforward). A detector must have wide electron rapidity coverage η T > GeV; be hermetic (in the sense of minimizing regions where electrons can disappear through cracks, dead spaces, or poorly placed walls); and have high efficiency electron ID (∼ 0.90) since we are trying to be sensitive to a feeble signal and we need 4 electrons. The product of a number of fairly high acceptances based on optimistic estimates still yields in the end a net Higgs acceptance about 0.15 to 0.25 depending on how hermetic a detector is assumed. For M Higgs < 500 GeV, this may be tolerable; whereas, for higher Higgs masses, the situation is much less clear

  19. Si(Li)-NaI(Tl) sandwich detector array for measurements of trace radionuclides in soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, M.G.; Sherman, I.S.; Roche, C.T.; Pehl, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    An ultra-sensitive X/γ-ray detector system for assaying trace radioactivity in actinide contaminated soil and ash samples has been developed. The new system consists of an array of 6 large Si(Li) X-ray detectors sensitive on both faces and mounted on edge in a paddle-shaped cryostat with a 14 cm diameter Be window on each side. The paddle, with a sample of the soil placed at each window, is sandwiched between 2 large NaI(Tl) scintillators which suppress the γ background. With X-rays being measured simultaneously from soil in 2 sample holders and background reduced by 50% using anticoincidence, the sensitivity of this detector is 4 times higher than that of conventionally mounted Si(Li) detectors. A soil sample containing 50 pCi/g 239 Pu was measured in 5 min with an uncertainty of 1 and NpLsub(β1) X-ray peaks are resolved thus permitting measurement of trace Pu in the presence of 241 Am. This is the most sensitive and selective detector known for nondestructive assay of radioactivity in soil and other samples. (orig.)

  20. Design of the digitizing beam position limit detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merl, R.

    1998-01-01

    The Digitizing Beam Position Limit Detector (DBPLD) is designed to identify and react to beam missteering conditions in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. The high power of the insertion devices requires these missteering conditions to result in a beam abort in less than 2 milliseconds. Commercially available beam position monitors provide a voltage proportional to beam position immediately upstream and downstream of insertion devices. The DBPLD is a custom VME board that digitizes these voltages and interrupts the heartbeat of the APS machine protection system when the beam position exceeds its trip limits

  1. Analysis of neighborhood behavior in lead optimization and array design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadatos, George; Cooper, Anthony W J; Kadirkamanathan, Visakan; Macdonald, Simon J F; McLay, Iain M; Pickett, Stephen D; Pritchard, John M; Willett, Peter; Gillet, Valerie J

    2009-02-01

    Neighborhood behavior describes the extent to which small structural changes defined by a molecular descriptor are likely to lead to small property changes. This study evaluates two methods for the quantification of neighborhood behavior: the optimal diagonal method of Patterson et al. and the optimality criterion method of Horvath and Jeandenans. The methods are evaluated using twelve different types of fingerprint (both 2D and 3D) with screening data derived from several lead optimization projects at GlaxoSmithKline. The principal focus of the work is the design of chemical arrays during lead optimization, and the study hence considers not only biological activity but also important drug properties such as metabolic stability, permeability, and lipophilicity. Evidence is provided to suggest that the optimality criterion method may provide a better quantitative description of neighborhood behavior than the optimal diagonal method.

  2. A high-spatial-resolution three-dimensional detector array for 30-200 keV X-rays based on structured scintillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ulrik Lund; Schmidt, Søren; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2008-01-01

    A three-dimensional X-ray detector for imaging 30-200 keV photons is described. It comprises a set of semi-transparent structured scintillators, where each scintillator is a regular array of waveguides in silicon, and with pores filled with CsI. The performance of the detector is described...

  3. A novel method for simultaneous observations of plasma ion and electron temperatures using a semiconductor-detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, T.; Numakura, T.; Kohagura, J.; Hirata, M.; Minami, R.; Watanabe, H.; Sasuga, T.; Nishizawa, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Nagashima, S.; Nakashima, Y.; Ogura, K.; Tamano, T.; Yatsu, K.; Miyoshi, S.

    2002-01-01

    A new method for a simultaneous observation of both plasma ion and electron temperatures is proposed using one semiconductor-detector array alone. This method will provide a new application of semiconductor-detector arrays for monitoring the key parameter set of nuclear-fusion triple product (i.e., ion temperatures, densities, and confinement time) as well as for clarifying physics mechanisms of energy transport between plasma ions and electrons under various plasma confining conditions. This method is developed on the basis of an alternative 'positive' use of a semiconductor 'dead layer'; that is, an SiO 2 layer is employed as a reliable ultra-thin energy analysis filter for low-energy charge-exchanged neutral particles from plasmas ranging in ion temperatures from 0.1 to several tens of kilo-electron-volts. Using recent fabrication techniques for the thin and uniform SiO 2 layers of the order of tens to hundreds of angstrom, our computer simulation and its experimental verification show the availability of such semiconductors for distinguishing neutral particles (for ion temperatures) from X-rays (for electron temperatures). These are simultaneously emitted from the plasmas into semiconductor detectors; however, we employ their quite different penetration lengths and the resultant different deposition depths and profiles in semiconductor materials. As a result, their output signals are distinguishable for these two different and fundamental species of plasmas

  4. Time walk correction for TOF-PET detectors based on a monolithic scintillation crystal coupled to a photosensor array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinke, R.; Loehner, H.; Schaart, D.R.; Dam, H.T. van; Seifert, S.; Beekman, F.J.; Dendooven, P.

    2010-01-01

    When optimizing the timing performance of a time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET) detector based on a monolithic scintillation crystal coupled to a photosensor array, time walk as a function of annihilation photon interaction location inside the crystal needs to be considered. In order to determine the 3D spatial coordinates of the annihilation photon interaction location, a maximum likelihood estimation algorithm was developed, based on a detector characterization by a scan of a 511 keV photon beam across the front and one of the side surfaces of the crystal. The time walk effect was investigated using a 20 mmx20 mmx12 mm LYSO crystal coupled to a fast 4x4 multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT). In the plane parallel to the photosensor array, a spatial resolution of 2.4 mm FWHM is obtained. In the direction perpendicular to the MAPMT (depth-of-interaction, DOI), the resolution ranges from 2.3 mm FWHM near the MAPMT to 4 mm FWHM at a distance of 10 mm. These resolutions are uncorrected for the ∼1mm beam diameter. A coincidence timing resolution of 358 ps FWHM is obtained in coincidence with a BaF 2 detector. A time walk depending on the 3D annihilation photon interaction location is observed. Throughout the crystal, the time walk spans a range of 100 ps. Calibration of the time walk vs. interaction location allows an event-by-event correction of the time walk.

  5. SOLID2: an antibody array-based life-detector instrument in a Mars Drilling Simulation Experiment (MARTE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parro, Víctor; Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Rodríguez Manfredi, José A; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes; Rivas, Luis A; García-Villadangos, Miriam; Bonaccorsi, Rosalba; González-Pastor, José Eduardo; Prieto-Ballesteros, Olga; Schuerger, Andrew C; Davidson, Mark; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Stoker, Carol R

    2008-10-01

    A field prototype of an antibody array-based life-detector instrument, Signs Of LIfe Detector (SOLID2), has been tested in a Mars drilling mission simulation called MARTE (Mars Astrobiology Research and Technology Experiment). As one of the analytical instruments on the MARTE robotic drilling rig, SOLID2 performed automatic sample processing and analysis of ground core samples (0.5 g) with protein microarrays that contained 157 different antibodies. Core samples from different depths (down to 5.5 m) were analyzed, and positive reactions were obtained in antibodies raised against the Gram-negative bacterium Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, a species of the genus Acidithiobacillus (both common microorganisms in the Río Tinto area), and extracts from biofilms and other natural samples from the Río Tinto area. These positive reactions were absent when the samples were previously subjected to a high-temperature treatment, which indicates the biological origin and structural dependency of the antibody-antigen reactions. We conclude that an antibody array-based life-detector instrument like SOLID2 can detect complex biological material, and it should be considered as a potential analytical instrument for future planetary missions that search for life.

  6. Evaluation of Uncertainty of IMRT QA Using 2 Dimensional Array Detector for Head and Neck Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Tae Joon; Lee, Woo Suk; Kim, Dae Sup; Baek, Geum Mun; Kwak, Jung Won

    2011-01-01

    IMRT QA using 2 Dimensional array detector is carried out with condition for discrete dose distribution clinically. And it can affect uncertainty of evaluation using gamma method. We analyze gamma index variation according to grid size and suggest validate range of grid size for IMRT QA in Hospital. We performed QA using OniPro I'mRT system software version 1.7b on 10 patients (head and neck) for IMRT. The reference dose plane (grid size, 0.1 cm; location, [0, 0, 0]) from RTP was compared with the dose plane that has different grid size (0.1 cm, 0.5 cm, 1.0 cm, 2.0 cm, 4.0 cm) and different location (along Y-axis 0 cm, 0.2 cm, 0.5 cm, 1.0 cm). The gamma index variation was evaluated by observing the level of changes in Gamma pass rate, Average signal, Standard deviation for each case. The average signal for each grid size showed difference levels of 0%, -0.19%, -0.04%, -0.46%, -8.32% and the standard deviation for each grid size showed difference levels of 0%, -0.30%, 1.24%, -0.70%, -7.99%. The gamma pass rate for each grid size showed difference levels of 0%, 0.27%, -1.43%, 5.32%, 5.60%. The gamma evaluation results according to distance in grid size range of 0.1 cm to 1.0 cm showed good agreement with reference condition (grid size 0.1 cm) within 1.5% and over 5% in case of the grid size was greater than 2.0 cm. We recognize that the grid size of gamma evaluation can make errors of IMRT QA. So we have to consider uncertainty of gamma evaluation according to the grid size and apply smaller than 2 cm grid size to reduce error and increase accuracy clinically.

  7. Anatomical Reconstruction and Functional Imaging Reveal an Ordered Array of Skylight Polarization Detectors in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Peter T; Henze, Miriam J; Bleul, Christiane; Baumann-Klausener, Franziska; Labhart, Thomas; Dickinson, Michael H

    2016-05-11

    Many insects exploit skylight polarization as a compass cue for orientation and navigation. In the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, photoreceptors R7 and R8 in the dorsal rim area (DRA) of the compound eye are specialized to detect the electric vector (e-vector) of linearly polarized light. These photoreceptors are arranged in stacked pairs with identical fields of view and spectral sensitivities, but mutually orthogonal microvillar orientations. As in larger flies, we found that the microvillar orientation of the distal photoreceptor R7 changes in a fan-like fashion along the DRA. This anatomical arrangement suggests that the DRA constitutes a detector for skylight polarization, in which different e-vectors maximally excite different positions in the array. To test our hypothesis, we measured responses to polarized light of varying e-vector angles in the terminals of R7/8 cells using genetically encoded calcium indicators. Our data confirm a progression of preferred e-vector angles from anterior to posterior in the DRA, and a strict orthogonality between the e-vector preferences of paired R7/8 cells. We observed decreased activity in photoreceptors in response to flashes of light polarized orthogonally to their preferred e-vector angle, suggesting reciprocal inhibition between photoreceptors in the same medullar column, which may serve to increase polarization contrast. Together, our results indicate that the polarization-vision system relies on a spatial map of preferred e-vector angles at the earliest stage of sensory processing. The fly's visual system is an influential model system for studying neural computation, and much is known about its anatomy, physiology, and development. The circuits underlying motion processing have received the most attention, but researchers are increasingly investigating other functions, such as color perception and object recognition. In this work, we investigate the early neural processing of a somewhat exotic sense, called

  8. Design and performance of the focusing DIRC detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, B. [University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Borsato, M.; Arnaud, N. [Laboratoire de l' Accélérateur Linéaire, Centre Scientifique d' Orsay, F-91898 Orsay Cedex (France); Leith, D.W.G.S.; Nishimura, K. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States); Roberts, D.A. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA. (United States); Ratcliff, B.N. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States); Varner, G. [University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA. (United States); Va' vra, J., E-mail: jjv@slac.stanford.edu [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States)

    2015-03-01

    We present the final results from a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC). This detector was designed as a full-scale prototype of the particle identification system for the SuperB experiment [1], and comprises 1/12 of the SuperB barrel azimuthal coverage, with partial photodetector and electronics implementation. The prototype was tested in the SLAC Cosmic Ray Telescope which provided 3D tracking of cosmic muons with an angular resolution of ~1.5 mrad, a position resolution of 4–5 mm, a start time resolution of 70 ps, and muon tracks above ~2 GeV tagged using an iron range stack. The fused silica focusing photon camera was coupled to a full-size BaBar DIRC bar box and was read out, over part of the full coverage, by 12 Hamamatsu H8500 multi-anode photomultipliers (MaPMTs) providing 768 pixels. We used waveform digitizing electronics to read out the MaPMTs. We give a detailed description of our data analysis methods and point out limitations on the present performance. We present results that demonstrate some basic performance characteristics of this design, including (a) single photon Cherenkov angle resolutions with and without chromatic corrections, (b) signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio between the Cherenkov peak and background, which primarily consists of ambiguities of the possible photon paths from emission along the track to a given pixel, (c) dTOP=TOP{sub measured} – TOP{sub expected} resolutions (with TOP being the photon Time-of-Propagation in fused silica), and (d) performance of the detector in the presence of high-rate backgrounds.

  9. Optimal density assignment to 2D diode array detector for different dose calculation algorithms in patient specific VMAT QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, So Yeon; Park, Jong Min; Choi, Chang Heon; Chun, MinSoo; Han, Ji Hye; Cho, Jin Dong; Kim, Jung In

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assign an appropriate density to virtual phantom for 2D diode array detector with different dose calculation algorithms to guarantee the accuracy of patient-specific QA. Ten VMAT plans with 6 MV photon beam and ten VMAT plans with 15 MV photon beam were selected retrospectively. The computed tomography (CT) images of MapCHECK2 with MapPHAN were acquired to design the virtual phantom images. For all plans, dose distributions were calculated for the virtual phantoms with four different materials by AAA and AXB algorithms. The four materials were polystyrene, 455 HU, Jursinic phantom, and PVC. Passing rates for several gamma criteria were calculated by comparing the measured dose distribution with calculated dose distributions of four materials. For validation of AXB modeling in clinic, the mean percentages of agreement in the cases of dose difference criteria of 1.0% and 2.0% for 6 MV were 97.2%±2.3%, and 99.4%±1.1%, respectively while those for 15 MV were 98.5%±0.85% and 99.8%±0.2%, respectively. In the case of 2%/2 mm, all mean passing rates were more than 96.0% and 97.2% for 6 MV and 15 MV, respectively, regardless of the virtual phantoms of different materials and dose calculation algorithms. The passing rates in all criteria slightly increased for AXB as well as AAA when using 455 HU rather than polystyrene. The virtual phantom which had a 455 HU values showed high passing rates for all gamma criteria. To guarantee the accuracy of patent-specific VMAT QA, each institution should fine-tune the mass density or HU values of this device

  10. Optimal density assignment to 2D diode array detector for different dose calculation algorithms in patient specific VMAT QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Yeon; Park, Jong Min; Choi, Chang Heon; Chun, MinSoo; Han, Ji Hye; Cho, Jin Dong; Kim, Jung In [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to assign an appropriate density to virtual phantom for 2D diode array detector with different dose calculation algorithms to guarantee the accuracy of patient-specific QA. Ten VMAT plans with 6 MV photon beam and ten VMAT plans with 15 MV photon beam were selected retrospectively. The computed tomography (CT) images of MapCHECK2 with MapPHAN were acquired to design the virtual phantom images. For all plans, dose distributions were calculated for the virtual phantoms with four different materials by AAA and AXB algorithms. The four materials were polystyrene, 455 HU, Jursinic phantom, and PVC. Passing rates for several gamma criteria were calculated by comparing the measured dose distribution with calculated dose distributions of four materials. For validation of AXB modeling in clinic, the mean percentages of agreement in the cases of dose difference criteria of 1.0% and 2.0% for 6 MV were 97.2%±2.3%, and 99.4%±1.1%, respectively while those for 15 MV were 98.5%±0.85% and 99.8%±0.2%, respectively. In the case of 2%/2 mm, all mean passing rates were more than 96.0% and 97.2% for 6 MV and 15 MV, respectively, regardless of the virtual phantoms of different materials and dose calculation algorithms. The passing rates in all criteria slightly increased for AXB as well as AAA when using 455 HU rather than polystyrene. The virtual phantom which had a 455 HU values showed high passing rates for all gamma criteria. To guarantee the accuracy of patent-specific VMAT QA, each institution should fine-tune the mass density or HU values of this device.

  11. CLIC CDR - physics and detectors: CLIC conceptual design report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, E.; Demarteau, M.; Repond, J.; Xia, L.; Weerts, H. (High Energy Physics); (Many)

    2012-02-10

    This report forms part of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC). The CLIC accelerator complex is described in a separate CDR volume. A third document, to appear later, will assess strategic scenarios for building and operating CLIC in successive center-of-mass energy stages. It is anticipated that CLIC will commence with operation at a few hundred GeV, giving access to precision standard-model physics like Higgs and top-quark physics. Then, depending on the physics landscape, CLIC operation would be staged in a few steps ultimately reaching the maximum 3 TeV center-of-mass energy. Such a scenario would maximize the physics potential of CLIC providing new physics discovery potential over a wide range of energies and the ability to make precision measurements of possible new states previously discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main purpose of this document is to address the physics potential of a future multi-TeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider based on CLIC technology and to describe the essential features of a detector that are required to deliver the full physics potential of this machine. The experimental conditions at CLIC are significantly more challenging than those at previous electron-positron colliders due to the much higher levels of beam-induced backgrounds and the 0.5 ns bunch-spacing. Consequently, a large part of this report is devoted to understanding the impact of the machine environment on the detector with the aim of demonstrating, with the example of realistic detector concepts, that high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC. Since the impact of background increases with energy, this document concentrates on the detector requirements and physics measurements at the highest CLIC center-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. One essential output of this report is the clear demonstration that a wide range of high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC with detectors which are challenging, but

  12. Technical Design Report for the ATLAS Inner Tracker Strip Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Collaboration, ATLAS

    2017-01-01

    This is the first of two Technical Design Report documents that describe the upgrade of the central tracking system for the ATLAS experiment for the operation at the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) starting in the middle of 2026. At this time the LHC will have been upgraded to reach a peak instantaneous luminosity of 7.5x10^34 cm^[-2]s^[-1], which corresponds to approximately 200 inelastic proton-proton collisions per beam crossing. The new Inner Tracker (ITk) will be operational for more than ten years, during which ATLAS aims to accumulate a total data set of 3,000 fb^[-1]. Meeting these requirements presents a unique challenge for the design of an all-silicon tracking system that consists of a pixel detector at small radius close to the beam line and a large-area strip tracking detector surrounding it. This document presents in detail the requirements of the new tracker, its layout and expected performance including the results of several benchmark physics studies at the highest numbers of collisions per beam...

  13. Design of Ka-band antipodal finline mixer and detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Changfei; Xu Jinping; Chen Mo

    2009-01-01

    This paper mainly discusses the analysis and design of a finline single-ended mixer and detector. In the circuit, for the purpose of eliminating high-order resonant modes and improving transition loss, metallic via holes are implemented along the mounting edge of the substrate embedded in the split-block of the WG-finline-microstrip transition. Meanwhile, a Ka band slow-wave and bandstop filter, which represents a reactive termination, is designed for the utilization of idle frequencies and operation frequencies energy. Full-wave analysis is carried out to optimize the input matching network of the mixer and the detector circuit using lumped elements to model the nonlinear diode. The exported S-matrix of the optimized circuit is used for conversion loss and voltage sensitivity analysis. The lowest measured conversion loss is 3.52 dB at 32.2 GHz; the conversion loss is flat and less than 5.68 dB in the frequency band of 29-34 GHz. The highest measured zero-bias voltage sensitivity is 1450 mV/mW at 38.6 GHz, and the sensitivity is better than 1000 mV/mW in the frequency band of 38-40 GHz.

  14. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 4: Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, Ties; Burrows, Philip N.; Fuster, Juan; Peskin, Michael; Stanitzki, Marcel; Sugimoto, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Sakue; Yamamoto, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to incr...

  15. Design The Cervical Cancer Detector Use The Artificial Neural Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Af'idah, Dwi Intan; Widianto, Eko Didik; Setyawan, Budi

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is one of the contagious diseases that become a public health issue, both in the world and in Indonesia. In the world, 12% of all deaths caused by cancer and is the second killer after cardiovascular disease. Early detection using the IVA is a practical and inexpensive (only requiring acetic acid). However, the accuracy of the method is quite low, as it can not detect the stage of the cancer. While other methods have a better sensitivity than the IVA method, is a method of PAP smear. However, this method is relatively expensive, and requires an experienced pathologist-cytologist. According to the case above, Considered important to make the cancer cervics detector that is used to detect the abnormality and cervical cancer stage and consists of a digital microscope, as well as a computer application based on artificial neural network. The use of cervical cancer detector software and hardware are integrated each other. After the specifications met, the steps to design the cervical cancer detection are: Modifying a conventional microscope by adding a lens, image recording, and the lights, Programming the tools, designing computer applications, Programming features abnormality detection and staging of cancer.

  16. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 4: Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Ties [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  17. Relevancies of multiple-interaction events and signal-to-noise ratio for Anger-logic based PET detector designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hao

    2015-10-01

    A fundamental challenge for PET block detector designs is to deploy finer crystal elements while limiting the number of readout channels. The standard Anger-logic scheme including light sharing (an 8 by 8 crystal array coupled to a 2×2 photodetector array with an optical diffuser, multiplexing ratio: 16:1) has been widely used to address such a challenge. Our work proposes a generalized model to study the impacts of two critical parameters on spatial resolution performance of a PET block detector: multiple interaction events and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The study consists of the following three parts: (1) studying light output profile and multiple interactions of 511 keV photons within crystal arrays of different crystal widths (from 4 mm down to 1 mm, constant height: 20 mm); (2) applying the Anger-logic positioning algorithm to investigate positioning/decoding uncertainties (i.e., "block effect") in terms of peak-to-valley ratio (PVR), with light sharing, multiple interactions and photodetector SNR taken into account; and (3) studying the dependency of spatial resolution on SNR in the context of modulation transfer function (MTF). The proposed model can be used to guide the development and evaluation of a standard Anger-logic based PET block detector including: (1) selecting/optimizing the configuration of crystal elements for a given photodetector SNR; and (2) predicting to what extent additional electronic multiplexing may be implemented to further reduce the number of readout channels.

  18. Search for neutrinoless double beta decay of Ge-76 with the GERmanium Detector Array '' GERDA ''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugnera, R.

    2009-01-01

    The study of neutrinoless double beta decay (DBD) is the most powerful approach to the fundamental question if the neutrino is a Majorana particle, i.e. its own anti-particle. The observation of neutrinoless DBD would not only establish the Majorana nature of the neutrino but also represent a determination of its effective mass if the nuclear matrix element is given. So far, the most sensitive results have been obtained with Ge-76, and the group of Klapdor-Kleingrothaus has made a claim of discovery. Future experiments have to reduce radioactive backgrounds to increase the sensitivity. '' GERDA '' is a new double beta-decay experiment which is currently under construction in the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy. It is implementing a new shielding concept by operating bare Ge diodes - enriched in Ge-76 - in high purity liquid argon supplemented by a water shield. The aim of '' GERDA '' is to verify or refute the recent claim of discovery, and, in a second phase, to achieve a two orders of magnitude lower background index than recent experiments, increasing the sensitive mass and reaching exposure of 100 kg yr. It be will discuss design, physics reach, and status of construction of '' GERDA '', and present results from various R efforts including long term stability of bare Ge diodes in cryogenic liquids, material screening, cryostat performance, detector segmentation, cryogenic precision electronics, safety aspects, and Monte Carlo simulations. (author)

  19. Stability and behavior of the outer array of small water Cherenkov detectors, outriggers, in the HAWC observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Capistrán, T.; Torres, I.; Moreno, E.; collaboration, for the HAWC

    2017-01-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is used for detecting TeV gamma rays. HAWC is operating at 4,100 meters above level sea on the slope of the Sierra Negra Volcano in the State of Puebla, Mexico, and consists of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs) covering an area of 22,000 $m^2$. Each WCD is equipped with four photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) to detect Cherenkov emission in the water from secondary particles of extensive air-shower (EAS) that are produced in the in...

  20. Modeling and design of X-rays bidimensional detectors; Modelagem e projeto de detectores bidimensionais para radiacao-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quisbert, Elmer Paz Alcon

    2000-03-01

    In this work has been developed the scintillating fiber optic and semiconductor devices based 2-D detector design, modeling and performance evaluation using Monte Carlo methods, for high X-ray energy range (10-140 kV) radiography and tomography applications. These processes allowed us, also, the imaging system parameters and components optimization and appropriate detector design. The model estimated the detectors performance parameters (DQE, MTF and SNR), and radiation risk (in terms of mean absorbed dose in the patient) and to show up how the sequence of physical processes in X-ray detection influence the performance of this imaging PFOC detectors. In this way, the modeling of the detector includes the statistics of the spatial distribution of absorbed X-rays and of X-ray to light conversion, its transmission, and the light quanta conversion into electrons. Also contributions to noise from the detection system chain is included, mainly the CCD detector ambient noise. Performance prediction, based on calculation taken from simulations, illustrates how such detectors meet the exacting requirements of some medical and industrial applications. Also, it is envisaged that our modeling procedure of the imaging system will be suitable not only for investigating how the system components should be best designed but for CT and RD system performance prediction. The powerful techniques would enable us to give advice for future development, in this field, in search of more dose-efficient imaging systems. (author)

  1. Positional glow curve simulation for thermoluminescent detector (TLD) system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branch, C.J.; Kearfott, K.J.

    1999-01-01

    Multi- and thin element dosimeters, variable heating rate schemes, and glow-curve analysis have been employed to improve environmental and personnel dosimetry using thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). Detailed analysis of the effects of errors and optimization of techniques would be highly desirable. However, an understanding of the relationship between TL light production, light attenuation, and precise heating schemes is made difficult because of experimental challenges involved in measuring positional TL light production and temperature variations as a function of time. This work reports the development of a general-purpose computer code, thermoluminescent detector simulator, TLD-SIM, to simulate the heating of any TLD type using a variety of conventional and experimental heating methods including pulsed focused or unfocused lasers with Gaussian or uniform cross sections, planchet, hot gas, hot finger, optical, infrared, or electrical heating. TLD-SIM has been used to study the impact on the TL light production of varying the input parameters which include: detector composition, heat capacity, heat conductivity, physical size, and density; trapped electron density, the frequency factor of oscillation of electrons in the traps, and trap-conduction band potential energy difference; heating scheme source terms and heat transfer boundary conditions; and TL light scatter and attenuation coefficients. Temperature profiles and glow curves as a function of position time, as well as the corresponding temporally and/or spatially integrated glow values, may be plotted while varying any of the input parameters. Examples illustrating TLD system functions, including glow curve variability, will be presented. The flexible capabilities of TLD-SIM promises to enable improved TLD system design

  2. Primary proton and helium spectra at energy range from 50 TeV to 1015 eV observed with the new Tibet AS core detector array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jing

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A new EAS hybrid experiment has been designed by constructing a YAC (Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array inside the existing Tibet-III air shower array. The first step of YAC, called “YAC-I” has been successfully carried out in 2009–2010 together with Tibet-III air-shower array. YAC-II has also been operated from 2011. Preliminary results of YAC-I and performance of YAC-II are presented in this paper. The primary proton and helium spectra at energy range from50 TeV to 1015 eV derived from YAC-I data based on QGSJET2 and SIBYLL2.1 are reported. The obtained P+He spectrum is smoothly connected with directobservation data below 100 TeV and also with our previously reported results at higher energies within statistical error s. Based on these results and the sharp kneeof all-particle energy spectrum observed by our experiment, the possible origin of the sharp knee is discussed. See the published papers.

  3. Design of Circularly-Polarised, Crossed Drooping Dipole, Phased Array Antenna Using Genetic Algorithm Optimisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Vesterdal

    2007-01-01

    A printed drooping dipole array is designed and constructed. The design is based on a genetic algorithm optimisation procedure used in conjunction with the software programme AWAS. By optimising the array G/T for specific combinations of scan angles and frequencies an optimum design is obtained...

  4. Final report on LDRD project : single-photon-sensitive imaging detector arrays at 1600 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, Kenton David; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Klem, John Frederick; Sheng, Josephine Juin-Jye; Patel, Rupal K.; Bolles, Desta; Bauer, Tom M.; Koudelka, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The key need that this project has addressed is a short-wave infrared light detector for ranging (LIDAR) imaging at temperatures greater than 100K, as desired by nonproliferation and work for other customers. Several novel device structures to improve avalanche photodiodes (APDs) were fabricated to achieve the desired APD performance. A primary challenge to achieving high sensitivity APDs at 1550 nm is that the small band-gap materials (e.g., InGaAs or Ge) necessary to detect low-energy photons exhibit higher dark counts and higher multiplication noise compared to materials like silicon. To overcome these historical problems APDs were designed and fabricated using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) regions. The absorption regions used (InGaAs or Ge) to leverage these materials 1550 nm sensitivity. Geiger mode detection was chosen to circumvent gain noise issues in the III-V and Ge multiplication regions, while a novel Ge/Si device was built to examine the utility of transferring photoelectrons in a silicon multiplication region. Silicon is known to have very good analog and GM multiplication properties. The proposed devices represented a high-risk for high-reward approach. Therefore one primary goal of this work was to experimentally resolve uncertainty about the novel APD structures. This work specifically examined three different designs. An InGaAs/InAlAs Geiger mode (GM) structure was proposed for the superior multiplication properties of the InAlAs. The hypothesis to be tested in this structure was whether InAlAs really presented an advantage in GM. A Ge/Si SAM was proposed representing the best possible multiplication material (i.e., silicon), however, significant uncertainty existed about both the Ge material quality and the ability to transfer photoelectrons across the Ge/Si interface. Finally a third pure germanium GM structure was proposed because bulk germanium has been reported to have better dark count properties. However, significant

  5. Final report on LDRD project : single-photon-sensitive imaging detector arrays at 1600 nm.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Kenton David; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Klem, John Frederick; Sheng, Josephine Juin-Jye; Patel, Rupal K.; Bolles, Desta; Bauer, Tom M.; Koudelka, Robert

    2006-11-01

    The key need that this project has addressed is a short-wave infrared light detector for ranging (LIDAR) imaging at temperatures greater than 100K, as desired by nonproliferation and work for other customers. Several novel device structures to improve avalanche photodiodes (APDs) were fabricated to achieve the desired APD performance. A primary challenge to achieving high sensitivity APDs at 1550 nm is that the small band-gap materials (e.g., InGaAs or Ge) necessary to detect low-energy photons exhibit higher dark counts and higher multiplication noise compared to materials like silicon. To overcome these historical problems APDs were designed and fabricated using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) regions. The absorption regions used (InGaAs or Ge) to leverage these materials 1550 nm sensitivity. Geiger mode detection was chosen to circumvent gain noise issues in the III-V and Ge multiplication regions, while a novel Ge/Si device was built to examine the utility of transferring photoelectrons in a silicon multiplication region. Silicon is known to have very good analog and GM multiplication properties. The proposed devices represented a high-risk for high-reward approach. Therefore one primary goal of this work was to experimentally resolve uncertainty about the novel APD structures. This work specifically examined three different designs. An InGaAs/InAlAs Geiger mode (GM) structure was proposed for the superior multiplication properties of the InAlAs. The hypothesis to be tested in this structure was whether InAlAs really presented an advantage in GM. A Ge/Si SAM was proposed representing the best possible multiplication material (i.e., silicon), however, significant uncertainty existed about both the Ge material quality and the ability to transfer photoelectrons across the Ge/Si interface. Finally a third pure germanium GM structure was proposed because bulk germanium has been reported to have better dark count properties. However, significant

  6. Design and construction of the prototype synchrotron radiation detector

    CERN Document Server

    Anderhub, H; Baetzner, D; Baumgartner, S; Biland, A; Camps, C; Capell, M; Commichau, V; Djambazov, L; Fanchiang, Y J; Flügge, G; Fritschi, M; Grimm, O; Hangarter, K; Hofer, H; Horisberger, Urs; Kan, R; Kaestli, W; Kenney, G P; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Koutsenko, V F; Kraeber, M; Kuipers, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, M W; Lee, S C; Lewis, R; Lustermann, W; Pauss, Felicitas; Rauber, T; Ren, D; Ren, Z L; Röser, U; Son, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Tiwari, A N; Viertel, Gert M; Gunten, H V; Wicki, S W; Wang, T S; Yang, J; Zimmermann, B

    2002-01-01

    The Prototype Synchrotron Radiation Detector (PSRD) is a small-scale experiment designed to measure the rate of low-energy charged particles and photons in near the Earth's orbit. It is a precursor to the Synchrotron Radiation Detector (SRD), a proposed addition to the upgraded version of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02). The SRD will use the Earth's magnetic field to identify the charge sign of electrons and positrons with energies above 1 TeV by detecting the synchrotron radiation they emit in this field. The differential energy spectrum of these particles is astrophysically interesting and not well covered by the remaining components of AMS-02. Precise measurements of this spectrum offer the possibility to gain information on the acceleration mechanism and characteristics of all cosmic rays in our galactic neighbourhood. The SRD will discriminate against protons as they radiate only weakly. Both the number and energy of the synchrotron photons that the SRD needs to detect are small. The identificat...

  7. Feature extraction using distribution representation for colorimetric sensor arrays used as explosives detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrøm, Tommy Sonne; Raich, Raviv; Kostesha, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    is required. We present a new approach of extracting features from a colorimetric sensor array based on a color distribution representation. For each sensor in the array, we construct a K-nearest neighbor classifier based on the Hellinger distances between color distribution of a test compound and the color......We present a colorimetric sensor array which is able to detect explosives such as DNT, TNT, HMX, RDX and TATP and identifying volatile organic compounds in the presence of water vapor in air. To analyze colorimetric sensors with statistical methods, a suitable representation of sensory readings...

  8. Neutron detection and multiplicity counting using a boron-loaded plastic scintillator/bismuth germanate phoswich detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.C.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron detection and multiplicity counting has been investigated using a boron-loaded plastic scintillator/bismuth germanate phoswich detector array. Boron-loaded plastic combines neutron moderation (H) and detection ( 10 B) at the molecular level, thereby physically coupling increasing detection efficiency and decreasing die-away time with detector volume. Both of these characteristics address a fundamental limitation of thermal-neutron multiplicity counters, where 3 He proportional counters are embedded in a polyethylene matrix. Separation of the phoswich response into its plastic scintillator and bismuth germanate components was accomplished on a pulse-by-pulse basis using custom integrator and timing circuits. In addition, a custom time-tag module was used to provide a time for each detector event. Analysis of the combined energy and time event stream was performed by calibrating each detector's response and filtering based on the presence of a simultaneous energy deposition corresponding to the 10 B(n,alpha) reaction products in the plastic scintillator (93 keV ee ) and the accompanying neutron-capture gamma ray in the bismuth germanate (478 keV). Time-correlation analysis was subsequently performed on the filtered event stream to obtain shift-register-type singles and doubles count rates. Proof-of-principle measurements were conducted with a variety of gamma-ray and neutron sources including 137 Cs, 54 Mn, AmLi, and 252 Cf. Results of this study indicate that a neutron-capture probability of ∼10% and a die-away time of ∼10 micros are possible with a 4-detector array with a detector volume of 1600 cm 3 . Simulations were performed that indicate neutron-capture probabilities on the order of 50% and die-away times of less than 4 micros are realistically achievable. While further study will be required for practical application of such a detection system, the results obtained in this investigation are encouraging and may lead to a new class of high

  9. Photon-counting hexagonal pixel array CdTe detector: Spatial resolution characteristics for image-guided interventional applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shrestha, Suman; Karellas, Andrew; Shi, Linxi; Gounis, Matthew J; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Spandre, Gloria; Brez, Alessandro; Minuti, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution, photon-counting, energy-resolved detector with fast-framing capability can facilitate simultaneous acquisition of precontrast and postcontrast images for subtraction angiography without pixel registration artifacts and can facilitate high-resolution real-time imaging during image-guided interventions. Hence, this study was conducted to determine the spatial resolution characteristics of a hexagonal pixel array photon-counting cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector. A 650 μm thick CdTe Schottky photon-counting detector capable of concurrently acquiring up to two energy-windowed images was operated in a single energy-window mode to include photons of 10 keV or higher. The detector had hexagonal pixels with apothem of 30 μm resulting in pixel pitch of 60 and 51.96 μm along the two orthogonal directions. The detector was characterized at IEC-RQA5 spectral conditions. Linear response of the detector was determined over the air kerma rate relevant to image-guided interventional procedures ranging from 1.3 nGy/frame to 91.4 μGy/frame. Presampled modulation transfer was determined using a tungsten edge test device. The edge-spread function and the finely sampled line spread function accounted for hexagonal sampling, from which the presampled modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined. Since detectors with hexagonal pixels require resampling to square pixels for distortion-free display, the optimal square pixel size was determined by minimizing the root-mean-squared-error of the aperture functions for the square and hexagonal pixels up to the Nyquist limit. At Nyquist frequencies of 8.33 and 9.62 cycles/mm along the apothem and orthogonal to the apothem directions, the modulation factors were 0.397 and 0.228, respectively. For the corresponding axis, the limiting resolution defined as 10% MTF occurred at 13.3 and 12 cycles/mm, respectively. Evaluation of the aperture functions yielded an optimal square pixel size of 54 μm. After resampling to 54

  10. Photon-counting hexagonal pixel array CdTe detector: Spatial resolution characteristics for image-guided interventional applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shrestha, Suman; Karellas, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.karellas@umassmed.edu; Shi, Linxi; Gounis, Matthew J. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Spandre, Gloria; Brez, Alessandro; Minuti, Massimo [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Pisa 56127, Italy and Pixirad Imaging Counters s.r.l., L. Pontecorvo 3, Pisa 56127 (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: High-resolution, photon-counting, energy-resolved detector with fast-framing capability can facilitate simultaneous acquisition of precontrast and postcontrast images for subtraction angiography without pixel registration artifacts and can facilitate high-resolution real-time imaging during image-guided interventions. Hence, this study was conducted to determine the spatial resolution characteristics of a hexagonal pixel array photon-counting cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector. Methods: A 650 μm thick CdTe Schottky photon-counting detector capable of concurrently acquiring up to two energy-windowed images was operated in a single energy-window mode to include photons of 10 keV or higher. The detector had hexagonal pixels with apothem of 30 μm resulting in pixel pitch of 60 and 51.96 μm along the two orthogonal directions. The detector was characterized at IEC-RQA5 spectral conditions. Linear response of the detector was determined over the air kerma rate relevant to image-guided interventional procedures ranging from 1.3 nGy/frame to 91.4 μGy/frame. Presampled modulation transfer was determined using a tungsten edge test device. The edge-spread function and the finely sampled line spread function accounted for hexagonal sampling, from which the presampled modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined. Since detectors with hexagonal pixels require resampling to square pixels for distortion-free display, the optimal square pixel size was determined by minimizing the root-mean-squared-error of the aperture functions for the square and hexagonal pixels up to the Nyquist limit. Results: At Nyquist frequencies of 8.33 and 9.62 cycles/mm along the apothem and orthogonal to the apothem directions, the modulation factors were 0.397 and 0.228, respectively. For the corresponding axis, the limiting resolution defined as 10% MTF occurred at 13.3 and 12 cycles/mm, respectively. Evaluation of the aperture functions yielded an optimal square pixel size of 54

  11. Design of New Complex Detector Used for Gross Beta Measuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Junmin

    2010-01-01

    The level of gross β for radioactive aerosol in the containment of nuclear plants can indicate how serious the radioactive pollution is in the shell, and it can provide evidence which shows whether there is the phenomenon of leak in the boundaries of confined aquifer of the primary coolant circuit equipment.In the process of measuring, the counting of gross β is influenced by γ. In order to avoid the influence of γ, a new method was introduced and a new detector was designed using plastic scintillator as the major detecting component and BGO as the sub-component. Based on distinctive difference of light attenuation time, signal induced in them can be discriminated. γ background in plastic scintillator was subtracted according to the counting of γ in BGO. The functions of absolute detection efficiency were obtained. The simulation for Monte-Carlo method shows that the influence of γ background is decreased about one order of magnitude. (authors)

  12. System software design for the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkaczyk, S. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)); Bailey, M. (Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States))

    1991-11-01

    An automated system for testing and performance evaluation of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) data acquisition electronics is described. The SVX data acquisition chain includes the Fastbus Sequencer and the Rabbit Crate Controller and Digitizers. The Sequencer is a programmable device for which we developed a high level assembly language. Diagnostic, calibration and data acquisition programs have been developed. A distributed software package was developed in order to operate the modules. The package includes programs written in assembly and Fortran languages that are executed concurrently on the SVX Sequencer modules and either a microvax or an SSP. Test software was included to assist technical personnel during the production and maintenance of the modules. Details of the design of different components of the package are reported.

  13. System software design for the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkaczyk, S.; Bailey, M.

    1991-11-01

    An automated system for testing and performance evaluation of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) data acquisition electronics is described. The SVX data acquisition chain includes the Fastbus Sequencer and the Rabbit Crate Controller and Digitizers. The Sequencer is a programmable device for which we developed a high level assembly language. Diagnostic, calibration and data acquisition programs have been developed. A distributed software package was developed in order to operate the modules. The package includes programs written in assembly and Fortran languages that are executed concurrently on the SVX Sequencer modules and either a microvax or an SSP. Test software was included to assist technical personnel during the production and maintenance of the modules. Details of the design of different components of the package are reported

  14. Design of a software for gamma detector efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, G.

    2011-01-01

    Gamma spectroscopy with highly-pure-germanium detector is one of the most used method for qualitative and quantitative analysis of samples. Nevertheless Gamma spectroscopy results require to be corrected, first for taking into account the self-shielding effect that represents the absorption of the photons by the sample itself and secondly for correcting the fact that 2 photons emitted simultaneously with energy E 1 and E 2 are likely to be simultaneously detected and then counted as a single photon with an energy E 1 +E 2 . This effect is called gamma-gamma coincidence. A software has been designed to simulate both effect and produce correcting factors in the case of cylindrical geometries. This software has been validated on Americium 241 for the self-shielding effect and on Cesium 134 for gamma-gamma coincidence. (A.C.)

  15. Algorithms and Array Design Criteria for Robust Imaging in Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Binoy George

    Optical interferometry is a technique for obtaining high-resolution imagery of a distant target by interfering light from multiple telescopes. Image restoration from interferometric measurements poses a unique set of challenges. The first challenge is that the measurement set provides only a sparse-sampling of the object's Fourier Transform and hence image formation from these measurements is an inherently ill-posed inverse problem. Secondly, atmospheric turbulence causes severe distortion of the phase of the Fourier samples. We develop array design conditions for unique Fourier phase recovery, as well as a comprehensive algorithmic framework based on the notion of redundant-spaced-calibration (RSC), which together achieve reliable image reconstruction in spite of these challenges. Within this framework, we see that classical interferometric observables such as the bispectrum and closure phase can limit sensitivity, and that generalized notions of these observables can improve both theoretical and empirical performance. Our framework leverages techniques from lattice theory to resolve integer phase ambiguities in the interferometric phase measurements, and from graph theory, to select a reliable set of generalized observables. We analyze the expected shot-noise-limited performance of our algorithm for both pairwise and Fizeau interferometric architectures and corroborate this analysis with simulation results. We apply techniques from the field of compressed sensing to perform image reconstruction from the estimates of the object's Fourier coefficients. The end result is a comprehensive strategy to achieve well-posed and easily-predictable reconstruction performance in optical interferometry.

  16. Low-cost modular array-field designs for flat-panel and concentrator photovoltaic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, H. N.; Carmichael, D. C.; Alexander, G.; Castle, J. A.

    1982-09-01

    Described are the design and development of low-cost, modular array fields for flat-panel and concentrator photovoltaic (PV) systems. The objective of the work was to reduce substantially the cost of the array-field Balance-of-System (BOS) subsystems and site-specific design costs as compared to previous PV installations. These subsystems include site preparation, foundations, support structures, electrical writing, grounding, lightning protection, electromagnetic interference considerations, and controls. To reduce these BOS and design costs, standardized modular (building-block) designs for flat-panel and concentrator array fields have been developed that are fully integrated and optimized for lowest life-cycle costs. Using drawings and specifications now available, these building-block designs can be used in multiples to install various size array fields. The developed designs are immediately applicable (1982) and reduce the array-field BOS costs to a fraction of previous costs.

  17. Test of digital neutron–gamma discrimination with four different photomultiplier tubes for the NEutron Detector Array (NEDA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, X.L., E-mail: luo.xiaoliang@physics.uu.se [Department of Instrument Science and Technology, College of Mechatronics and Automation, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Modamio, V. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Nyberg, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Valiente-Dobón, J.J. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Nishada, Q. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Angelis, G. de [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Agramunt, J. [IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Egea, F.J. [IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University, Istanbul (Turkey); Erduran, M.N.; Ertürk, S. [Nigde Universitesi, Fen-Edebiyat Falkültesi, Fizik Bölümü, Nigde (Turkey); France, G. de [GANIL, CEA/DSAM and CNRS/IN2P3, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Gadea, A. [IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); González, V. [Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Hüyük, T. [IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Jaworski, G. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5A, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Moszyński, M. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5A, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); National Centre for Nuclear Research, A. Soltana 7, PL 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); and others

    2014-12-11

    A comparative study of the neutron–γ discrimination performance of a liquid scintillator detector BC501A coupled to four different 5 in. photomultiplier tubes (ET9390kb, R11833-100, XP4512 and R4144) was carried out. Both the Charge Comparison method and the Integrated Rise-Time method were implemented digitally to discriminate between neutrons and γ rays emitted by a {sup 252}Cf source. In both methods, the neutron–γ discrimination capabilities of the four photomultiplier tubes were quantitatively compared by evaluating their figure-of-merit values at different energy regions between 50 keVee and 1000 keVee. Additionally, the results were further verified qualitatively using time-of-flight to distinguish γ rays and neutrons. The results consistently show that photomultiplier tubes R11833-100 and ET9390kb generally perform best regarding neutron–γ discrimination with only slight differences in figure-of-merit values. This superiority can be explained by their relatively higher photoelectron yield, which indicates that a scintillator detector coupled to a photomultiplier tube with higher photoelectron yield tends to result in better neutron–γ discrimination performance. The results of this work will provide reference for the choice of photomultiplier tubes for future neutron detector arrays like NEDA.

  18. Improved Design of Microphone-Array Hearing Aids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greenberg, Julie

    1994-01-01

    ...). Research on microphone array hearing aids is motivated by the lack of success of single-microphone systems, as well as the documented advantages of binaural hearing and multiple-element sensing systems...

  19. Novel silicon stripixel detector: concept, simulation, design, and fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.

    2004-01-01

    A novel detector concept has been developed in this work that has the necessary properties to provide two-dimensional (2-D) position sensitivity with a moderate number of readout electronic channels and single-sided detector fabrication process. The concept is based on interleaved pixel electrodes arranged in a projective X-Y readout, which makes possible position encoding with minimum number of channels. In further discussions, we refer to this concept as 'stripixel' detector, as it combines the 2-D position resolution of a pixel electrode geometry with the simplicity of the projective readout of a double-sided strip detector. For DC coupled detectors with large pitches (>20 μm), individual pixels are divided into X- and Y-cell that can be interleaved by many different schemes that ensure the charge sharing between them. This type of stripixel detectors is called interleaved stripixel detectors. When the detector pitch goes down (<20 μm), the X and Y-pixel may not have to be interleaved, and they can be connected in an alternating way to X-Y strip readout. This type of stripixel detectors is called alternating stripixel detectors (ASD). For ASD, a position resolution better than 1 μm in two dimensions can be achieved by determining the centroid of the charge collected on pixel electrodes with a granularity in the range of 5-6 μm. For AC coupled detectors, no interleaving scheme may be needed, and there may be no limit on the pitch size, i.e. it may go from pitches in the order of microns, to hundreds of microns or even mm's. This electrode granularity does not pose difficult demands on the lithography and the fabrication technology. This novel detector concept can be applied to any semiconductor detectors/sensors, such as Si, Ge, GaAs, SiC, diamond, etc

  20. The prototype opto-mechanical system for the Fluorescence detector Array of Single-pixel Telescopes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mandát, Dušan; Palatka, Miroslav; Pech, Miroslav; Schovánek, Petr; Trávníček, Petr; Nozka, L.; Hrabovský, M.; Horvath, P.; Fujii, T.; Privitera, P.; Malacari, M.; Farmer, J.; Galimova, A.; Matalon, A.; Merolle, M.; Ni, X.; Bellido, J.A.; Matthews, J.N.; Thomas, S.B.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, Jul (2017), 1-10, č. článku T07001. ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015038; GA MŠk LG15014; GA MŠk LE13012 Grant - others:OP VVV - AUGER-CZ(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/16_013/0001402 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : large detector systems for particle and astroparticle physics * particle detectors Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics OBOR OECD: Particles and field physics Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  1. Correction of complex nonlinear signal response from a pixel array detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt van Driel, Tim; Herrmann, Sven; Carini, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    The pulsed free-electron laser light sources represent a new challenge to photon area detectors due to the intrinsic spontaneous X-ray photon generation process that makes single-pulse detection necessary. Intensity fluctuations up to 100% between individual pulses lead to high linearity requirem......The pulsed free-electron laser light sources represent a new challenge to photon area detectors due to the intrinsic spontaneous X-ray photon generation process that makes single-pulse detection necessary. Intensity fluctuations up to 100% between individual pulses lead to high linearity...

  2. Efficiency calibration and coincidence summing correction for large arrays of NaI(Tl) detectors in soccer-ball and castle geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anil Kumar, G.; Mazumdar, I.; Gothe, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    Efficiency calibration and coincidence summing correction have been performed for two large arrays of NaI(Tl) detectors in two different configurations. They are, a compact array of 32 conical detectors of pentagonal and hexagonal shapes in soccer-ball geometry and an array of 14 straight hexagonal NaI(Tl) detectors in castle geometry. Both of these arrays provide a large solid angle of detection, leading to considerable coincidence summing of gamma rays. The present work aims to understand the effect of coincidence summing of gamma rays while determining the energy dependence of efficiencies of these two arrays. We have carried out extensive GEANT4 simulations with radio-nuclides that decay with a two-step cascade, considering both arrays in their realistic geometries. The absolute efficiencies have been simulated for gamma energies from 700 to 2800 keV using four different double-photon emitters, namely, 60 Co, 46 Sc, 94 Nb and 24 Na. The efficiencies so obtained have been corrected for coincidence summing using the method proposed by Vidmar et al. . The simulations have also been carried out for the same energies assuming mono-energetic point sources, for comparison. Experimental measurements have also been carried out using calibrated point sources of 137 Cs and 60 Co. The simulated and the experimental results are found to be in good agreement. This demonstrates the reliability of the correction method for efficiency calibration of two large arrays in very different configurations.

  3. Efficiency calibration and coincidence summing correction for large arrays of NaI(Tl) detectors in soccer-ball and castle geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anil Kumar, G., E-mail: anilg@tifr.res.i [Department of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India); Mazumdar, I.; Gothe, D.A. [Department of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2009-11-21

    Efficiency calibration and coincidence summing correction have been performed for two large arrays of NaI(Tl) detectors in two different configurations. They are, a compact array of 32 conical detectors of pentagonal and hexagonal shapes in soccer-ball geometry and an array of 14 straight hexagonal NaI(Tl) detectors in castle geometry. Both of these arrays provide a large solid angle of detection, leading to considerable coincidence summing of gamma rays. The present work aims to understand the effect of coincidence summing of gamma rays while determining the energy dependence of efficiencies of these two arrays. We have carried out extensive GEANT4 simulations with radio-nuclides that decay with a two-step cascade, considering both arrays in their realistic geometries. The absolute efficiencies have been simulated for gamma energies from 700 to 2800 keV using four different double-photon emitters, namely, {sup 60}Co, {sup 46}Sc, {sup 94}Nb and {sup 24}Na. The efficiencies so obtained have been corrected for coincidence summing using the method proposed by Vidmar et al. . The simulations have also been carried out for the same energies assuming mono-energetic point sources, for comparison. Experimental measurements have also been carried out using calibrated point sources of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co. The simulated and the experimental results are found to be in good agreement. This demonstrates the reliability of the correction method for efficiency calibration of two large arrays in very different configurations.

  4. Zero-bias microwave detectors based on array of nanorectifiers coupled with a dipole antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasjoo, Shahrir R.; Singh, Arun K.; Mat Isa, Siti S.; Ramli, Muhammad M.; Mohamad Isa, Muammar; Ahmad, Norhawati; Mohd Nor, Nurul I.; Khalid, Nazuhusna; Song, Ai Min

    2016-04-01

    We report on zero-bias microwave detection using a large array of unipolar nanodevices, known as the self-switching diodes (SSDs). The large array was realized in a single lithography step without the need of interconnection layers, hence allowing for a simple and low-cost fabrication process. The SSD array was coupled with a narrowband dipole antenna with a resonant frequency of 890 MHz, to form a simple rectenna (rectifying antenna). The extrinsic voltage responsivity and noise-equivalent-power (NEP) of the rectenna were ∼70 V/W and ∼0.18 nW/Hz1/2, respectively, measured in the far-field region at unbiased condition. Nevertheless, the estimated intrinsic voltage responsivity can achieve up to ∼5 kV/W with NEP of ∼2.6 pW/Hz1/2.

  5. Quasi-optical antenna-mixer-array design for terahertz frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yong; Potter, Kent A.; Rutledge, David B.

    1992-01-01

    A new quasi-optical antenna-mixer-array design for terahertz frequencies is presented. In the design, antenna and mixer are combined into an entity, based on the technology in which millimeter-wave horn antenna arrays have been fabricated in silicon wafers. It consists of a set of forward- and backward-looking horns made with a set of silicon wafers. The front side is used to receive incoming signal, and the back side is used to feed local oscillator signal. Intermediate frequency is led out from the side of the array. Signal received by the horn array is picked up by antenna probes suspended on thin silicon-oxynitride membranes inside the horns. Mixer diodes will be located on the membranes inside the horns. Modeling of such an antenna-mixer-array design is done on a scaled model at microwave frequencies. The impedance matching, RF and LO isolation, and patterns of the array have been tested and analyzed.

  6. Physical analysis for designing nested-wire arrays on Z-pinch implosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhenhua; Liu Quan; Ding Ning; Ning Cheng

    2005-01-01

    Z-pinch experiments have demonstrated that the X-ray power increases 40% with a nested-wire array compared with that with a single-layered wire array. The design of the nested-wire array on Z accelerator is studied through the implosion dynamics and the growth of RT instabilities. The analysis shows that the nested-wire array does not produce more total X-ray radiation energy than the single-layered wire array, but it obviously increases the X-ray power. The radius of the outer array of the nested-wire array could be determined based on the radius of the optimized single-layered. The masses of the outer and inner arrays could be determined by the implosion time of the nested-wire array, which is roughly the same as that of the single-layered wire array. Some suggestions are put forward which may be helpful in the nested-wire array design for Z-pinch experiments. (authors)

  7. MT6415CA: a 640×512-15µm CTIA ROIC for SWIR InGaAs detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eminoglu, Selim; Isikhan, Murat; Bayhan, Nusret; Gulden, M. Ali; Incedere, O. Samet; Soyer, S. Tuncer; Kocak, Serhat; Yilmaz, Gokhan S.; Akin, Tayfun

    2013-06-01

    This paper reports the development of a new low-noise CTIA ROIC (MT6415CA) suitable for SWIR InGaAs detector arrays for low-light imaging applications. MT6415CA is the second product in the MT6400 series ROICs from Mikro-Tasarim Ltd., which is a fabless IC design house specialized in the development of monolithic imaging sensors and ROICs for hybrid imaging sensors. MT6415CA is a low-noise snapshot CTIA ROIC, has a format of 640 × 512 and pixel pitch of 15 µm, and has been developed with the system-on-chip architecture in mind, where all the timing and biasing for this ROIC are generated on-chip without requiring any external inputs. MT6415CA is a highly configurable ROIC, where many of its features can be programmed through a 3-wire serial interface allowing on-the-fly configuration of many ROIC features. It performs snapshot operation both using Integrate-Then-Read (ITR) and Integrate-While-Read (IWR) modes. The CTIA type pixel input circuitry has three gain modes with programmable full-well-capacity (FWC) values of 10.000 e-, 20.000 e-, and 350.000 e- in the very high gain (VHG), high-gain (HG), and low-gain (LG) modes, respectively. MT6415CA has an input referred noise level of less than 5 e- in the very high gain (VHG) mode, suitable for very low-noise SWIR imaging applications. MT6415CA has 8 analog video outputs that can be programmed in 8, 4, or 2-output modes with a selectable analog reference for pseudo-differential operation. The ROIC runs at 10 MHz and supports frame rate values up to 200 fps in the 8-output mode. The integration time can be programmed up to 1s in steps of 0.1 µs. The ROIC uses 3.3 V and 1.8V supply voltages and dissipates less than 150 mW in the 4-output mode. MT6415CA is fabricated using a modern mixed-signal CMOS process on 200 mm CMOS wafers, and tested parts are available at wafer or die levels with test reports and wafer maps. A compact USB 3.0 camera and imaging software have been developed to demonstrate the imaging

  8. MEGHNAD – A multi element detector array for heavy ion collision ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of the prototype detector and brief outline of the research programme to be ... Such a nucleus often becomes unstable, and sheds away the extra energy and ... reaction products, and event by event analysis of the nuclear reactions for a .... High voltage is applied at the cathode grid, and the anode is kept at the ground.

  9. A novel, SiPM-array-based, monolithic scintillator detector for PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaart, Dennis R.; van Dam, Herman T.; Seifert, Stefan; Vinke, Ruud; Dendooven, Peter; Beekman, Freek J.; Löhner, H.

    2009-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are of great interest to positron emission tomography (PET), as they enable new detector geometries, for e. g., depth-of-interaction (DOI) determination, are MR compatible, and offer faster response and higher gain than other solid-state photosensors such as

  10. Volumetric CT with sparse detector arrays (and application to Si-strip photon counters).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Stayman, J W; Xu, J; Taguchi, K; Fredenberg, E; Lundqvist, Mats; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-01-07

    Novel x-ray medical imaging sensors, such as photon counting detectors (PCDs) and large area CCD and CMOS cameras can involve irregular and/or sparse sampling of the detector plane. Application of such detectors to CT involves undersampling that is markedly different from the commonly considered case of sparse angular sampling. This work investigates volumetric sampling in CT systems incorporating sparsely sampled detectors with axial and helical scan orbits and evaluates performance of model-based image reconstruction (MBIR) with spatially varying regularization in mitigating artifacts due to sparse detector sampling. Volumetric metrics of sampling density and uniformity were introduced. Penalized-likelihood MBIR with a spatially varying penalty that homogenized resolution by accounting for variations in local sampling density (i.e. detector gaps) was evaluated. The proposed methodology was tested in simulations and on an imaging bench based on a Si-strip PCD (total area 5 cm  ×  25 cm) consisting of an arrangement of line sensors separated by gaps of up to 2.5 mm. The bench was equipped with translation/rotation stages allowing a variety of scanning trajectories, ranging from a simple axial acquisition to helical scans with variable pitch. Statistical (spherical clutter) and anthropomorphic (hand) phantoms were considered. Image quality was compared to that obtained with a conventional uniform penalty in terms of structural similarity index (SSIM), image uniformity, spatial resolution, contrast, and noise. Scan trajectories with intermediate helical width (~10 mm longitudinal distance per 360° rotation) demonstrated optimal tradeoff between the average sampling density and the homogeneity of sampling throughout the volume. For a scan trajectory with 10.8 mm helical width, the spatially varying penalty resulted in significant visual reduction of sampling artifacts, confirmed by a 10% reduction in minimum SSIM (from 0.88 to 0.8) and a 40

  11. Performance evaluation of a sub-millimeter spatial resolution PET detector module using a digital silicon photomultiplier coupled LGSO array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leem, Hyun Tae [Molecular Imaging Research & Education (MiRe) Laboratory, Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong, E-mail: ychoi@sogang.ac.kr [Molecular Imaging Research & Education (MiRe) Laboratory, Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyu Bom; Lee, Sangwon [Molecular Imaging Research & Education (MiRe) Laboratory, Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yamamoto, Seiichi [Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Yeom, Jung-Yeol, E-mail: jungyeol@korea.ac.kr [School of Biomedical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-21

    In positron emission tomography (PET) for breast, brain and small animal imaging, the spatial resolution of a PET detector is crucial to obtain high quality PET images. In this study, a PET detector for sub-millimeter spatial resolution imaging purpose was assembled using 4×4 pixels of a digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM, DPC-3200-22-44, Philips) coupled with a 15×15 LGSO array with BaSO{sub 4} reflector, and a 1 mm thick acrylic light guide for light distribution between the dSiPM pixels. The active area of each dSiPM pixel was 3.2×3.9 mm{sup 2} and the size of each LGSO scintillator element was 0.7×0.7×6 mm{sup 3}. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrated the performance of the PET detector by measuring the energy resolution, 2D flood map, peak to valley (P/V) ratio, and coincidence resolving time (CRT). All measurements were performed at a temperature of 10±1 ℃. The average energy resolution was 15.6% (without correcting for saturation effects) at 511 keV and the best CRT was 242±5 ps. The 2D flood map obtained with an energy window of 400–600 keV demonstrated clear identification of all pixels, and the average P/V ratio of the X- and Y-directions were 7.31 and 7.81, respectively. This study demonstrated that the PET detector could be suitable for application in high resolution PET while achieving good timing resolution.

  12. Final report on the scientific and engineering design of a soft X-ray diode array diagnostic system for JET (KJ 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahrbach, H.U.; Goss, H.; Harmeyer, E.; Schramm, G.

    1982-07-01

    This report describes the Soft-X-Ray Diode Array Diagnostic System for JET. It was designed by the IPP under an Article 14 contract for Phase I. The diagnostics will be capable of measuring the Soft-X-ray emission from H and D plasmas in JET with high resolution in space and time. Two slot-hole cameras with 150 detectors viewing the same toroidal cross-section of the plasma are foreseen. Thin beryllium and aluminium filters in the line of sight of the detectors allow simultaneous measurements within different limits of the X-ray spectrum. Heavy shielding against neutron and gamma radiation is provided in order to reduce radiation induced signals and to increase detector lifetimes. The signals of 100 detectors can be simultaneously sampled with a sampling rate variable up to 250 KHz and stored in 12 bit memories of about 20 Kwords size. (orig.)

  13. Instrumentation: Photodiode Array Detectors in UV-VIS Spectroscopy. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dianna G.

    1985-01-01

    A previous part (Analytical Chemistry; v57 n9 p1057A) discussed the theoretical aspects of diode ultraviolet-visual (UV-VIS) spectroscopy. This part describes the applications of diode arrays in analytical chemistry, also considering spectroelectrochemistry, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), HPLC data processing, stopped flow, and…

  14. The International Pulsar Timing Array project: using pulsars as a gravitational wave detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobbs, G.; Archibald, A.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Backer, D.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N.D.R.; Burgay, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Champion, D.; Cognard, I.; Coles, W.; Cordes, J.; Demorest, P.; Desvignes, G.; Ferdman, R.D.; Finn, L.; Freire, P.; Gonzalez, M.; Hessels, J.; Hotan, A.; Janssen, G.; Jenet, F.; Jessner, A.; Jordan, C.; Kaspi, V.; Kramer, M.; Kondratiev, V.; Lazio, J.; Lazaridis, K.; Lee, K.J.; Levin, Y.; Lommen, A.; Lorimer, D.; Lynch, R.; Lyne, A.; Manchester, R.; McLaughlin, M.; Nice, D.; Oslowski, S.; Pilia, M.; Possenti, A.; Purver, M.; Ransom, S.; Reynolds, J.; Sanidas, S.; Sarkissian, J.; Sesana, A.; Shannon, R.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I.; Stappers, B.; Stinebring, D.; Theureau, G.; van Haasteren, R.; van Straten, W.; Verbiest, J.P.W.; Yardley, D.R.B.; You, X.P.

    2010-01-01

    The International Pulsar Timing Array project combines observations of pulsars from both northern and southern hemisphere observatories with the main aim of detecting ultra-low frequency (similar to 10(-9)-10(-8) Hz) gravitational waves. Here we introduce the project, review the methods used to

  15. Development and characterisation of a front-end ASIC for macro array of photo-detectors of large dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conforti Di Lorenzo, S.

    2010-10-01

    The coverage of large areas of photo-detection is a crucial element of experiments studying high energy atmospheric cosmic showers and neutrinos from different sources. The objective of this project is to realize big detectors using thousands of photomultipliers (PMT). The project proposes to segment the large surface of photo-detection into macro pixels consisting of an array of 16 PMT of 12 inches (2*2 m 2 ), connected to an autonomous front-end electronics which works in without-trigger data acquisition mode placed near the array. This is possible thanks to the microelectronics progress that allows to integrate the readout and the signal processing, of all the multipliers, in the same circuit (ASIC) named PARISROC (Photomultiplier Array Integrated ins SiGe Read Out Chip). The ASIC must only send out the digital data by network to the surface central data storage. The PARISROC chip made in AM's Silicon Germanium (SiGe) 0.35 μm technology, integrates 16 independent channels for each PMT of the array, providing charge and time measurements. The first prototype of PARISROC chip has a total surface of 19 mm 2 . The ASIC measurements have led to the realization of a second prototype. Important measurements were performed in terms of noise, dynamic range, readout frequency (from 10 MHz to 40 MHz), time measurements (TDC improvements) and charge measurements (Slow shaper improvements). This new prototype of PARISROC-2 has been tested and the characterisation has shown a good overall behavior and the verification of the improvements. (author)

  16. The ROSPHERE γ-ray spectroscopy array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucurescu, D.; Căta-Danil, I.; Ciocan, G.; Costache, C.; Deleanu, D.; Dima, R. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN-HH, R-077125 Bucharest (Romania); Filipescu, D. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN-HH, R-077125 Bucharest (Romania); Extreme Light Infrastructure Nuclear Physics - ELI-NP, Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN-HH, R-077125 Bucharest (Romania); Florea, N.; Ghiţă, D.G.; Glodariu, T.; Ivaşcu, M.; Lică, R.; Mărginean, N.; Mărginean, R. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN-HH, R-077125 Bucharest (Romania); Mihai, C., E-mail: cmihai@tandem.nipne.ro [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN-HH, R-077125 Bucharest (Romania); Negret, A.; Niţă, C.R.; Olăcel, A.; Pascu, S.; Sava, T. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN-HH, R-077125 Bucharest (Romania); and others

    2016-11-21

    The ROmanian array for SPectroscopy in HEavy ion REactions (ROSPHERE) has been designed as a multi-detector setup dedicated to γ-ray spectroscopy studies at the Bucharest 9 MV Tandem accelerator. Consisting of up to 25 detectors (either Compton suppressed HPGe detectors or fast LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillator detectors) together with a state of the art plunger device, ROSPHERE is a powerful tool for lifetime measurements using the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift (RDDS) and the in-beam Fast Electronic Scintillation Timing (FEST) methods. The array's geometry, detectors, electronics and data acquisition system are described. Selected results from the first experimental campaigns are also presented.

  17. Modelling physics detectors in a computer aided design system for simulation purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahvenainen, J.; Oksakivi, T.; Vuoskoski, J.

    1995-01-01

    The possibility of transferring physics detector models from computer aided design systems into physics simulation packages like GEANT is receiving increasing attention. The problem of exporting detector models constructed in CAD systems into GEANT is well known. We discuss the problem and describe an application, called DDT, which allows one to design detector models in a CAD system and then transfer the models into GEANT for simulation purposes. (orig.)

  18. Design and construction of a Cherenkov detector for Compton polarimetry at the ILC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, Christoph

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes the design and construction of a Cherenkov detector conceived with regard to high energy Compton polarimeters for the International Linear Collider, where beam diagnostic systems of unprecedented precision must complement the interaction region detectors to pursue an ambitious physics programme. Besides the design of the Cherenkov detector, detailed simulation studies and first testbeam results are presented. Good agreement of beam data with expectations from Monte Carlo simulations is observed. (orig.)

  19. Design and construction of a Cherenkov detector for Compton polarimetry at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartels, Christoph [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; Ebert, Joachim; Hartin, Anthony; Helebrant, Christian; Kaefer, Daniela; List, Jenny [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    This paper describes the design and construction of a Cherenkov detector conceived with regard to high energy Compton polarimeters for the International Linear Collider, where beam diagnostic systems of unprecedented precision must complement the interaction region detectors to pursue an ambitious physics programme. Besides the design of the Cherenkov detector, detailed simulation studies and first testbeam results are presented. Good agreement of beam data with expectations from Monte Carlo simulations is observed. (orig.)

  20. The RS-485 communication system design of the waste steel radioactivity detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongli

    2014-01-01

    The importance and schematic structure of the waste steel radioactivity detector system is given firstly in this paper, and then the RS-485 communication system design including the circuit and program of the waste steel radioactivity detector system is provided. The test result of RS-485 communication system is also introduced, that shows the design completely meets the requirements of the waste steel radioactivity detector system. (author)

  1. Design and realisation of an audiovisual speech activity detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Bree, K.C.

    2006-01-01

    For many speech telecommunication technologies a robust speech activity detector is important. An audio-only speech detector will givefalse positives when the interfering signal is speech or has speech characteristics. The modality video is suitable to solve this problem. In this report the approach

  2. Detectors for the superconducting super collider, design concepts, and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1989-06-01

    The physics of compensation calorimetry is reviewed in the light of the needs of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) detectors. The four major detector types: liquid argon, scintillator, room temperature liquids, and silicon, are analyzed with respect to some of their strengths and weaknesses. Finally, general comments are presented which reflect the reliability of simulation code systems.

  3. Detectors for the superconducting super collider, design concepts, and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1989-06-01

    The physics of compensation calorimetry is reviewed in the light of the needs of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) detectors. The four major detector types: liquid argon, scintillator, room temperature liquids, and silicon, are analyzed with respect to some of their strengths and weaknesses. Finally, general comments are presented which reflect the reliability of simulation code systems

  4. Detectors for the Superconducting Super Collider, design concepts, and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    The physics of compensation calorimetry is reviewed in the light of the need of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) detectors. The four major detector types: liquid argon, scintillator, room temperature liquids, and silicon, are analyzed with respect to some of their strengths and weaknesses. Finally, general comments are presented which reflect the reliability of simulation code systems. 29 refs., 20 figs., 6 tabs

  5. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    An ionization detector having an array of detectors has, for example, grounding pads positioned in the spaces between some detectors (data detectors) and other detectors (reference detectors). The grounding pads are kept at zero electric potential, i.e. grounded. The grounding serves to drain away electrons and thereby prevent an unwanted accumulation of charge in the spaces, and cause the electric field lines to be more perpendicular to the detectors in regions near the grounding pads. Alternatively, no empty space is provided there being additional, grounded, detectors provided between the data and reference detectors. (author)

  6. A Study of the Operation of Especially Designed Photosensitive Gaseous Detectors at Cryogenic Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Lund-Jensen, B; Pavlopoulos, P; Peskov, Vladimir; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F

    2006-01-01

    In some experiments and applications there is need for large-area photosensitive detectors to operate at cryogenic temperatures. Nowadays, vacuum PMs are usually used for this purpose. We have developed special designs of planar photosensitive gaseous detectors able to operate at cryogenic temperatures. Such detectors are much cheaper PMs and are almost insensitive to magnetic fields. Results of systematic measurements of their quantum efficiencies, the maximum achievable gains and long-term stabilities will be presented. The successful operation of these detectors open realistic possibilities in replacing PMs by photosensitive gaseous detectors in some applications dealing with cryogenic liquids; for example in experiments using noble liquid TPCs or noble liquid scintillating calorimeters.

  7. ASIC design in the KM3NeT detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajanana, D; Gromov, V; Timmer, P

    2013-01-01

    In the KM3NeT project [1], Cherenkov light from the muon interactions with transparent matter around the detector, is used to detect neutrinos. Photo multiplier tubes (PMT) used as photon sensor, are housed in a glass sphere (aka Optical Module) to detect single photons from the Cherenkov light. The PMT needs high operational voltage ( ∼ 1.5 kV) and is generated by a Cockroft-Walton (CW) multiplier circuit. The electronics required to control the PMT's and collect the signals is integrated in two ASIC's namely: 1) a front-end mixed signal ASIC (PROMiS) for the readout of the PMT and 2) an analog ASIC (CoCo) to generate pulses for charging the CW circuit and to control the feedback of the CW circuit. In this article, we discuss the two integrated circuits and test results of the complete setup. PROMiS amplifies the input charge, converts it to a pulse width and delivers the information via LVDS signals. These LVDS signals carry accurate information on the Time of arrival ( 2 C bus. This unique combination of the ASIC's results in a very cost and power efficient PMT base design.

  8. The International Pulsar Timing Array project: using pulsars as a gravitational wave detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, G; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO, PO Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Archibald, A [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, PQ, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arzoumanian, Z [CRESST/USRA, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Backer, D [Astronomy Department and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, PO Box 218, Hawthorn VIC 3122 (Australia); Burgay, M [Universita di Cagliari, Dipartimento di Fisica, SP Monserrato-Sestu km 0.7, 09042 Monserrato (Canada) (Italy); Cognard, I; Desvignes, G; Ferdman, R D [Station de Radioastronomie de Nanay, Observatoire de Paris, 18330 Nancay (France); Coles, W [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Cordes, J [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Demorest, P [National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Finn, L [Center for Gravitational Wave Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Freire, P [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf Dem Huegel 69, 53121, Bonn (Germany); Gonzalez, M [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Hessels, J [Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, Kruislaan 403, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hotan, A, E-mail: george.hobbs@csiro.a [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University, Bentley, WA (Australia)

    2010-04-21

    The International Pulsar Timing Array project combines observations of pulsars from both northern and southern hemisphere observatories with the main aim of detecting ultra-low frequency (approx 10{sup -9}-10{sup -8} Hz) gravitational waves. Here we introduce the project, review the methods used to search for gravitational waves emitted from coalescing supermassive binary black-hole systems in the centres of merging galaxies and discuss the status of the project.

  9. Development of an application specific scintimammography detector based on a crystal scintillator array and a PSPMT

    CERN Document Server

    Majewski, S; Goode, A; Kross, B J; Steinbach, D; Weisenberger, A; Williams, M; Wojci, R

    1998-01-01

    We report the results of studies conducted with small field of view scintimammography camera based on a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (5'' Hamamatsu R3292) and several pixelized crystal scintillator arrays made of YAP, CsI(Na) and NaI(Tl) scintillators. Laboratory tests and pre-clinical phantom studies were conducted to compare and optimize the performances of the prototypes with special emphasis on spatial resolution (approx 2-3mm) and sufficient energy resolution for scatter rejection.

  10. Open-field mouse brain PET: design optimisation and detector characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyme, Andre Z; Judenhofer, Martin S; Gong, Kuang; Bec, Julien; Selfridge, Aaron; Du, Junwei; Qi, Jinyi; Cherry, Simon R; Meikle, Steven R

    2017-07-13

    'Open-field' PET, in which an animal is free to move within an enclosed space during imaging, is a very promising advance for neuroscientific research. It provides a key advantage over conventional imaging under anesthesia by enabling functional changes in the brain to be correlated with an animal's behavioural response to environmental or pharmacologic stimuli. Previously we have demonstrated the feasibility of open-field imaging of rats using motion compensation techniques applied to a commercially available PET scanner. However, this approach of 'retro-fitting' motion compensation techniques to an existing system is limited by the inherent geometric and performance constraints of the system. The goal of this project is to develop a purpose-built PET scanner with geometry, motion tracking and imaging performance tailored and optimised for open-field imaging of the mouse brain. The design concept is a rail-based sliding tomograph which moves according to the animal's motion. Our specific aim in this work was to evaluate candidate scanner designs and characterise the performance of a depth-of-interaction detector module for the open-field system. We performed Monte Carlo simulations to estimate and compare the sensitivity and spatial resolution performance of four scanner geometries: a ring, parallel plate, and two box variants. Each system was based on a detector block consisting of a 23  ×  23 array of 0.785  ×  0.785  ×  20 mm 3 LSO crystals (overall dim. 19.6  ×  19.6  ×  20 mm). We found that a DoI resolution capability of 3 mm was necessary to achieve approximately uniform sub-millimetre spatial resolution throughout the FoV for all scanners except the parallel-plate geometry. With this DoI performance, the sensitivity advantage afforded by the box geometry with overlapping panels (16% peak absolute sensitivity, a 36% improvement over the ring design) suggests this unconventional design is best suited for

  11. Open-field mouse brain PET: design optimisation and detector characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyme, Andre Z.; Judenhofer, Martin S.; Gong, Kuang; Bec, Julien; Selfridge, Aaron; Du, Junwei; Qi, Jinyi; Cherry, Simon R.; Meikle, Steven R.

    2017-08-01

    ‘Open-field’ PET, in which an animal is free to move within an enclosed space during imaging, is a very promising advance for neuroscientific research. It provides a key advantage over conventional imaging under anesthesia by enabling functional changes in the brain to be correlated with an animal’s behavioural response to environmental or pharmacologic stimuli. Previously we have demonstrated the feasibility of open-field imaging of rats using motion compensation techniques applied to a commercially available PET scanner. However, this approach of ‘retro-fitting’ motion compensation techniques to an existing system is limited by the inherent geometric and performance constraints of the system. The goal of this project is to develop a purpose-built PET scanner with geometry, motion tracking and imaging performance tailored and optimised for open-field imaging of the mouse brain. The design concept is a rail-based sliding tomograph which moves according to the animal’s motion. Our specific aim in this work was to evaluate candidate scanner designs and characterise the performance of a depth-of-interaction detector module for the open-field system. We performed Monte Carlo simulations to estimate and compare the sensitivity and spatial resolution performance of four scanner geometries: a ring, parallel plate, and two box variants. Each system was based on a detector block consisting of a 23  ×  23 array of 0.785  ×  0.785  ×  20 mm3 LSO crystals (overall dim. 19.6  ×  19.6  ×  20 mm). We found that a DoI resolution capability of 3 mm was necessary to achieve approximately uniform sub-millimetre spatial resolution throughout the FoV for all scanners except the parallel-plate geometry. With this DoI performance, the sensitivity advantage afforded by the box geometry with overlapping panels (16% peak absolute sensitivity, a 36% improvement over the ring design) suggests this unconventional design is best

  12. Determination of ascorbic acid by high performance liquid chromatography (H. P. L. C.) using photodiode array detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbashier, E. E.; Greenway, G. M; Townshend, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a simple and rapid method for the determination of vitamin C using H. P. L. C. A reversed phase C 1 8 column was used to perform ion pairing chromatography, the ion pairing agent tri-n-butylamine and mobile phase 90:10 phospate buffer (pH 4.5) to methanol. A diode array spectrophotometric detector facilitated method development allowing chromatograms to be obtained for range of wavelengths. A linear calibration curve was obtained in range 0-50 μg/ml with correlation coefficient of 0.999 and detection limit was 1.5 μg/ml and relative standard deviation was 1.8% for ten samples at 10μg/ml.(Author)

  13. Measuring extensive air showers with Cherenkov light detectors of the Yakutsk array: the energy spectrum of cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A A; Knurenko, S P; Sleptsov, I Ye

    2009-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic rays in the range E∼10 15 eV to 6x10 19 eV is studied in this paper using air Cherenkov light detectors of the Yakutsk array. The total flux of photons produced by the relativistic electrons (including positrons as well, hereafter) of extensive air showers in the atmosphere is used as an energy estimator of the primary particle initiating a shower. The resultant differential flux of cosmic rays exhibits, in agreement with previous measurements, a knee and ankle feature at energies of 3x10 15 and ∼10 19 eV, respectively. A comparison of observational data with simulations is made in the knee and ankle regions in order to choose the models of galactic and extragalactic components of cosmic rays that describe well the energy spectrum measured.

  14. Measuring extensive air showers with Cherenkov light detectors of the Yakutsk array: the energy spectrum of cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A A; Knurenko, S P; Sleptsov, I Ye [Shafer Institute for Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, Yakutsk 677980 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: ivanov@ikfia.ysn.ru

    2009-06-15

    The energy spectrum of cosmic rays in the range E{approx}10{sup 15} eV to 6x10{sup 19} eV is studied in this paper using air Cherenkov light detectors of the Yakutsk array. The total flux of photons produced by the relativistic electrons (including positrons as well, hereafter) of extensive air showers in the atmosphere is used as an energy estimator of the primary particle initiating a shower. The resultant differential flux of cosmic rays exhibits, in agreement with previous measurements, a knee and ankle feature at energies of 3x10{sup 15} and {approx}10{sup 19} eV, respectively. A comparison of observational data with simulations is made in the knee and ankle regions in order to choose the models of galactic and extragalactic components of cosmic rays that describe well the energy spectrum measured.

  15. Spectral Resolution for Five-Element, Filtered, X-Ray Detector (XRD) Arrays Using the Methods of Backus and Gilbert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FEHL, DAVID LEE; BIGGS, F.; CHANDLER, GORDON A.; STYGAR, WILLIAM A.

    2000-01-01

    The generalized method of Backus and Gilbert (BG) is described and applied to the inverse problem of obtaining spectra from a 5-channel, filtered array of x-ray detectors (XRD's). This diagnostic is routinely fielded on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories to study soft x-ray photons ((le)2300 eV), emitted by high density Z-pinch plasmas. The BG method defines spectral resolution limits on the system of response functions that are in good agreement with the unfold method currently in use. The resolution so defined is independent of the source spectrum. For noise-free, simulated data the BG approximating function is also in reasonable agreement with the source spectrum (150 eV black-body) and the unfold. This function may be used as an initial trial function for iterative methods or a regularization model

  16. Design and performance of a 50mK rapid turnaround detector characterization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Dipirro, Michael J.; Forgione, Joshua B.; Jackson, Michael L.; Harvey Moseley, S.; Panek, John; Shirron, Peter J.; Staguhn, Johannes G.

    2006-01-01

    Upcoming major NASA missions such as the Einstein Inflation Probe and the Single Aperture Far-Infrared Observatory will require arrays of detectors with thousands of background-limited elements sensitive to wavelengths from ∼50μm to ∼3mm. Because of the low power levels present in space with cryogenic telescopes, these detectors will likely operate at temperatures below 100mK. In order to make rapid progress on detector development, the cryogenic testing cycle must be made convenient and quick. We have developed a cryogenic detector characterization system capable of testing superconducting detector arrays in formats up to 8x32, read out by SQUID multiplexers. The system relies on the cooling of a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator immersed in a liquid helium bath. This approach permits a detector to be cooled from 300K to 50mK in under 6h, so that a test cycle begun in the morning will be over by the end of the day. The system is modular, with two identical immersible units, so that while one unit is cooling, the second can be reconfigured for the next battery of tests

  17. Evaluation of linear array MOSFET detectors for in vivo dosimetry to measure rectal dose in HDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughey, Aisling; Coalter, George; Mugabe, Koki

    2011-09-01

    The study aimed to assess the suitability of linear array metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor detectors (MOSFETs) as in vivo dosimeters to measure rectal dose in high dose rate brachytherapy treatments. The MOSFET arrays were calibrated with an Ir192 source and phantom measurements were performed to check agreement with the treatment planning system. The angular dependence, linearity and constancy of the detectors were evaluated. For in vivo measurements two sites were investigated, transperineal needle implants for prostate cancer and Fletcher suites for cervical cancer. The MOSFETs were inserted into the patients' rectum in theatre inside a modified flatus tube. The patients were then CT scanned for treatment planning. Measured rectal doses during treatment were compared with point dose measurements predicted by the TPS. The MOSFETs were found to require individual calibration factors. The calibration was found to drift by approximately 1% ±0.8 per 500 mV accumulated and varies with distance from source due to energy dependence. In vivo results for prostate patients found only 33% of measured doses agreed with the TPS within ±10%. For cervix cases 42% of measured doses agreed with the TPS within ±10%, however of those not agreeing variations of up to 70% were observed. One of the most limiting factors in this study was found to be the inability to prevent the MOSFET moving internally between the time of CT and treatment. Due to the many uncertainties associated with MOSFETs including calibration drift, angular dependence and the inability to know their exact position at the time of treatment, we consider them to be unsuitable for in vivo dosimetry in rectum for HDR brachytherapy.

  18. Evaluation of linear array MOSFET detectors for in vivo dosimetry to measure rectal dose in DHR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haughey, A.; Coalter, G.; Mugabe, K.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The study aimed to assess the suitability of linear array metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor detectors (MOSFETs) as in vivo dosimeters to measure rectal dose in high dose rate brachytherapy treatments. The MOSFET arrays were calibrated with an Ir192 source and phantom measurements were performed to check agreement with the treatment planning system. The angular dependence, linearity and constancy of the detectors were evaluated. For in vivo measurements two sites were investigated, transperineal needle implants for prostate cancer and Fletcher suites for cervical cancer. The MOSFETs were inserted into the patients' rectum in theatre inside a modified flatus tube. The patients were then CT scanned for treatment planning. Measured rectal doses during treatment were compared with point dose measurements predicted by the TPS. The MOSFETs were found to require individual calibration factors. The calibration was found to drift by approximately 1% ±0.8 per 500 mV accumulated and varies with distance from source due to energy dependence. In vivo results for prostate patients found only 33% of measured doses agreed with the TPS within ±1O%. For cervix cases 42% of measured doses agreed with the TPS within ± 10%, however of those not agreeing variations of up to 70% were observed. One of the most limiting factors in this study was found to be the inability to prevent the MOSFET moving internally between the time of CT and treatment. Due to the many uncertainties associated with MOSFETs including calibration drift, angular dependence and the inability to know their exact position at the time of treatment, we consider them to be unsuitable for in vivo dosimetry in rectum for HDR brachytherapy. (author)

  19. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbell, Earl A.; Morris, MacDonald S.; Winkler, James L.

    1996-01-01

    An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system (100) is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files (104) to design and/or generate lithographic masks (110).