WorldWideScience

Sample records for detection implementation group

  1. Main Memory Implementations for Binary Grouping

    OpenAIRE

    May, Norman; Moerkotte, Guido

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of applications depend on efficient storage and analysis features for XML data. Hence, query optimization and efficient evaluation techniques for the emerging XQuery standard become more and more important. Many XQuery queries require nested expressions. Unnesting them often introduces binary grouping. We introduce several algorithms implementing binary grouping and analyze their time and space complexity. Experiments demonstrate their performance.

  2. The standing advisory group on safeguards implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennekens, J.H.F.

    1982-09-01

    In 1975 the Director General of the IAEA called together ten persons from member states with nuclear programs at varying stages of development to form the Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation. The group was later expanded to twelve. The Director General asked the group to evaluate the technical objectives of Agency safeguards, assess the effectiveness and efficiency of specific safeguards operating methods in meeting these technical objectives, advise on techniques to be employed in safeguards operations, and recommend areas where further work is needed. This paper reviews the work of the Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation since its formation in 1975, summarizes the subjects that have been examined and the advice rendered, and outlines the problem areas requiring further study

  3. Explaining Groupware Implementation Through Group Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bondarouk, Tatiana; Sikkel, Nicolaas; Kosrow-Pour, M.

    Implementation of groupware tends to be an evolutionary process. We apply a theory of group learning as a framework to highlight relevant aspects of such a process. Here we present the results of a longitudinal case study to which this framework was applied. A human resource information system

  4. Explaining IT Implementation Through Group Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bondarouk, Tatiana; Sikkel, Nicolaas

    2005-01-01

    Implementation of an IT system in an organization takes a certain amount of time. System usage becomes stable when users have appropriated the system and new work practices have been established. We propose a concept of group learning as a framework to highlight relevant aspects of such a process. A

  5. Summary muon detection working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanton, N.R.

    1993-01-01

    The areas of concentration of the Muon Working Group reflected its composition: about half of the group was interested primarily is extending the capability of existing general purpose colliders (CDF, D0). Smaller numbers of people were interested in B physics with general purpose colliders at the SSC and LHC, with SSC fixed target experiments, and with dedicated forward colliders. Good muon tagging, and possibly also muon triggering, is essential for studying CP violation in B i →J/ψX, J/ψ→μ + μ - ; as a flavor tag, with the semimuonic decay B→μ + X or bar B→μ - X tagging the flavor of the partner; for studying the physics of the semimuonic B decays themselves; and for looking for really rare decays like B→μ + μ -

  6. Community detection in networks with unequal groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pan; Moore, Cristopher; Newman, M E J

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a phase transition has been discovered in the network community detection problem below which no algorithm can tell which nodes belong to which communities with success any better than a random guess. This result has, however, so far been limited to the case where the communities have the same size or the same average degree. Here we consider the case where the sizes or average degrees differ. This asymmetry allows us to assign nodes to communities with better-than-random success by examining their local neighborhoods. Using the cavity method, we show that this removes the detectability transition completely for networks with four groups or fewer, while for more than four groups the transition persists up to a critical amount of asymmetry but not beyond. The critical point in the latter case coincides with the point at which local information percolates, causing a global transition from a less-accurate solution to a more-accurate one.

  7. Implementation. Improving caries detection, assessment, diagnosis and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, N B

    2009-01-01

    This chapter deals with improving the detection, assessment, diagnosis and monitoring of caries to ensure optimal personalized caries management. This can be achieved by delivering what we have (synthesized evidence and international consensus) better and more consistently, as well as driving research and innovation in the areas where we need them. There is a need to better understand the interrelated pieces of the jigsaw that makes up evidence-based dentistry, i.e. the linkages between (a) research and synthesis, (b) dissemination of research results and (c) the implementation of research findings which should ensure that research findings change practice at the clinician-patient level. The current situation is outlined; it is at the implementation step where preventive caries control seems to have failed in some countries but not others. Opportunities for implementation include: capitalizing on the World Health Organization's global policy for improvement of oral health, which sets out an action plan for health promotion and integrated disease prevention; utilizing the developments around the International Caries Detection and Assessment System wardrobe of options and e-learning; building on initiatives from the International Dental Federation and the American Dental Association and linking these to patients' preferences, the wider moves to wellbeing and health maintenance. Challenges for implementation include the slow pace of evolution around dental remuneration systems and some groups of dentists failing to embrace clinical prevention. In the future, implementation of current and developing evidence should be accompanied by research into getting research findings into routine practice, with impacts on the behaviour of patients, professionals and policy makers. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Active facilitation of focus groups: exploring the implementation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article, we explain how we took an “active” approach to focus group discussions with teachers in three South African schools. The topic of discussion was their views on the implementation of inclusive education. We shall also show how we sought feedback from the participants on their experiences of these ...

  9. Flattening the organization: implementing self-directed work groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, G M

    1996-01-01

    In response to tremendous growth of managed care and threats to financial stability and job security, the Greater Baltimore Medical Center (GBMC) restructured itself into independent business units. The radiology department at GBMC resolved to reduce cost per unit-of-service, improve service, determine optimal staffing levels and reduce the number of layers of organization. It was decided to achieve those goals by implementing self-directed work groups. Staff buy-in was critical to success of the project. To begin, the staff was educated intensively about current trends in healthcare, managed care and potential changes in the job market. The radiology department was allowed to reduce the size of its staff through attrition and worked hard to focus staff concern on the impact each individual could have on the bottom line and the resultant effect on job security. Self-directed work groups were designed on a matrix that used small "service teams" in combinations to form larger "work groups." Actual work and daily activities occur at the service team level; information exchange and major decisions occue at the work group level. Seventeen months after beginning the project and 10 months after implementation, the organization has flattened, staff members have adjusted well to new roles, there have been no lay-offs, and the matrix system of small and large groups have proved particularly valuable.

  10. Working Group 3: Greenhouse signal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, T.; Ellsaesser, H.; Groisman, P.Ya.; Grotch, S.; Jenkins, G.; Karoly, D.; Riches, M.; Santer, B.; Schoenwiese, C.; Vinnikov, K.; Zwiers, F.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative efforts to detect the greenhouse-gas signal (GHG) in nature are in their infancy. The reasons for this state of affairs are numerous. It is only in the last few years that GCMs have advanced to the point where their simulations of GHG signals might be marginally believable. Without reasonably good a priori predictions of expected GHG signals from the models, the detection problem is moot. The observational data sets describing changes in the global climate system over the last 50-100 years needed for adequate detection studies have also only come into existence in the last five years. Finally, no coherent, generally-agreed-on detection strategy has been developed by the scientific community interested in the GHG problem. The lack of adequate model predictions and observational sets are largely responsible for this latter condition. The rudimentary detection efforts that have been conducted have generally been based on recognizing the fingerprint of GHG signals in the oceans and atmosphere. GCM results for 1 x 2 x CO 2 equilibrium runs have been used to search for GHG effects induced in tropospheric air and ocean surface temperature fields since the early 1900s. No significant effect has been found

  11. Dose constraint implementation in AREVA group: an optimization tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decobert, Veronique

    2008-01-01

    AREVA offers customers reliable technology solutions for CO 2 free power generation and electricity transmission and distribution. The group counts 68000 employees worldwide and for its nuclear activities there are about 33.000 people who work under ionizing radiation. Risk management and prevention is one of the ten engagements of the sustainable development policy of AREVA, to establish and maintain the highest level of nuclear and occupational safety in all of the group's operations to preserve public and worker health, and to protect the environment. The implementation of these engagements is founded on a voluntary continuous improvement program, AREVA Way: objectives, common for the all entities, are laid down in the policies documents. Indicators are defined and a common reporting method for each indicator and the result of performance self-assessment is set up. AREVA chose to federate the whole of the nuclear entities around a common policy, the Nuclear Safety Charter, implemented at the beginning of 2005. This charter sets up principles of organization, action and engagements of transparency. Regarding radiation protection, the Charter reaffirms the engagement to limit in the installations of the group, at a level as low as reasonably possible, the exposure of the workers, through the implementation of the ALARA principle and the implementation of a continuous improvement policy. This approach, basically different from the simple respect of imposed limits, radically modifies the dynamics of progress. In the activities of engineering, the optimization of protection against radiation is also integrated in the design, by taking account the experience feedback of the operational activities. This determination of constraints is taken on all levels of the organization. Thus sustainable development performance indicators and especially those relating to protection against radiation are discussed between the managers in charge of Units Business and the Top managers

  12. Implementation of anomaly detection algorithms for detecting transmission control protocol synchronized flooding attacks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mkuzangwe, NNP

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This work implements two anomaly detection algorithms for detecting Transmission Control Protocol Synchronized (TCP SYN) flooding attack. The two algorithms are an adaptive threshold algorithm and a cumulative sum (CUSUM) based algorithm...

  13. Towards Detecting Group Identities in Complex Artificial Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grappiolo, Corrado; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for modelling group struc- tures and dynamics in both artificial societies and human-populated vir- tual environments such as computer games. The group modelling (GM) framework proposed focuses on the detection of existing, pre-defined group structures and is compo......This paper presents a framework for modelling group struc- tures and dynamics in both artificial societies and human-populated vir- tual environments such as computer games. The group modelling (GM) framework proposed focuses on the detection of existing, pre-defined group structures...

  14. Detection of breast diseases in various age groups among women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vapnik, T.N.

    1981-01-01

    A comprehensive study among women in various age groups provided data on the detection of dyshormonal and tumorous diseases of the breast which are necessary for organizing preventive measures and identifying groups for screening. Data on the distribution of breast pathology in various age groups are presented. The highest percentage of pathology is marked in women aged 31 to 40, with focal lesions 4 times as many as in the previous age group [ru

  15. Qualitative Research in Group Work: Status, Synergies, and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubel, Deborah; Okech, Jane E. Atieno

    2017-01-01

    The article aims to advance the use of qualitative research methods to understand group work. The first part of this article situates the use of qualitative research methods in relationship to group work research. The second part examines recent qualitative group work research using a framework informed by scoping and systematic review methods and…

  16. Implement the medical group revenue function. Create competitive advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, C

    1998-01-01

    This article shows medical groups how they can employ new financial management and information technology techniques to safeguard their revenue and income streams. These managerial techniques stem from the application of the medical group revenue function, which is defined herein. This article also describes how the medical group revenue function can be used to create value by employing a database and a decision support system. Finally, the article describes how the decision support system can be used to create competitive advantage. Through the wise use of internally generated information, medical groups can negotiate better contract terms, improve their operations, cut their costs, embark on capital investment programs and improve market share. As medical groups gain market power by improving in these areas, they will be more attractive to potential strategic allies, payers and investment bankers.

  17. Implementation Issues of Adaptive Energy Detection in Heterogeneous Wireless Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobron, Iker; Eizmendi, Iñaki; Martins, Wallace A.; Diniz, Paulo S. R.; Ordiales, Juan Luis; Velez, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Spectrum sensing (SS) enables the coexistence of non-coordinated heterogeneous wireless systems operating in the same band. Due to its computational simplicity, energy detection (ED) technique has been widespread employed in SS applications; nonetheless, the conventional ED may be unreliable under environmental impairments, justifying the use of ED-based variants. Assessing ED algorithms from theoretical and simulation viewpoints relies on several assumptions and simplifications which, eventually, lead to conclusions that do not necessarily meet the requirements imposed by real propagation environments. This work addresses those problems by dealing with practical implementation issues of adaptive least mean square (LMS)-based ED algorithms. The paper proposes a new adaptive ED algorithm that uses a variable step-size guaranteeing the LMS convergence in time-varying environments. Several implementation guidelines are provided and, additionally, an empirical assessment and validation with a software defined radio-based hardware is carried out. Experimental results show good performance in terms of probabilities of detection (Pd>0.9) and false alarm (Pf∼0.05) in a range of low signal-to-noise ratios around [-4,1] dB, in both single-node and cooperative modes. The proposed sensing methodology enables a seamless monitoring of the radio electromagnetic spectrum in order to provide band occupancy information for an efficient usage among several wireless communications systems. PMID:28441751

  18. Teacher educators' design and implementation of group learning activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Hei, Miranda S.A.; Sjoer, Ellen; Admiraal, Wilfried; Strijbos, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Group Learning Activities (GLAs) are a key ingredient of course designs in higher education. Various approaches for designing GLAs have been developed, featuring different design components. However, this has not yet resulted in clear guidelines for teachers on how to design GLAs. The purpose of

  19. Active facilitation of focus groups: exploring the implementation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The focus group research reported in this article forms part of a broader inter- ..... “scientific research in education” should “refrain from writing [and acting] as if our ..... http://www.qualitative-research.net/index.php/fqs/article/view/338/737.

  20. Implementing a short-term family support group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, E; Cox, D; Hastings, S

    1991-05-01

    1. Although family involvement has been increasingly recognized as a vital component in the treatment and care of the mentally ill, little has been written about efforts to provide education and support to the families of patients hospitalized for short-term evaluation and treatment. 2. The family education and support group provided emotional support and critical information to increase family members' coping and problem solving abilities, and enabled them to return to a pre-crisis or higher level of functioning. 3. The family education and support group not only enhances the assessment and planning phases of the nursing process, but it also can serve as a useful intervention for strengthening the patient's major support system.

  1. Detecting groups of similar components in complex networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jiao; Lai, C-H

    2008-01-01

    We study how to detect groups in a complex network each of which consists of component nodes sharing a similar connection pattern. Based on the mixture models and the exploratory analysis set up by Newman and Leicht (2007 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 104 9564), we develop an algorithm that is applicable to a network with any degree distribution. The partition of a network suggested by this algorithm also applies to its complementary network. In general, groups of similar components are not necessarily identical with the communities in a community network; thus partitioning a network into groups of similar components provides additional information of the network structure. The proposed algorithm can also be used for community detection when the groups and the communities overlap. By introducing a tunable parameter that controls the involved effects of the heterogeneity, we can also investigate conveniently how the group structure can be coupled with the heterogeneity characteristics. In particular, an interesting example shows a group partition can evolve into a community partition in some situations when the involved heterogeneity effects are tuned. The extension of this algorithm to weighted networks is discussed as well.

  2. Detection of dengue group viruses by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquin Vincent

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue fever (DF and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF represent a global challenge in public health. It is estimated that 50 to 100 million infections occur each year causing approximately 20,000 deaths that are usually linked to severe cases like DHF and dengue shock syndrome. The causative agent of DF is dengue virus (genus Flavivirus that comprises four distinct serotypes (DENV-1 to DENV-4. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH has been used successfully to detect pathogenic agents, but has not been implemented in detecting DENV. To improve our understanding of DENV infection and dissemination in host tissues, we designed specific probes to detect DENV in FISH assays. Methods Oligonucleotide probes were designed to hybridize with RNA from the broadest range of DENV isolates belonging to the four serotypes, but not to the closest Flavivirus genomes. Three probes that fit the criteria defined for FISH experiments were selected, targeting both coding and non-coding regions of the DENV genome. These probes were tested in FISH assays against the dengue vector Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae. The FISH experiments were led in vitro using the C6/36 cell line, and in vivo against dissected salivary glands, with epifluorescence and confocal microscopy. Results The three 60-nt oligonucleotides probes DENV-Probe A, B and C cover a broad range of DENV isolates from the four serotypes. When the three probes were used together, specific fluorescent signals were observed in C6/36 infected with each DENV serotypes. No signal was detected in either cells infected with close Flavivirus members West Nile virus or yellow fever virus. The same protocol was used on salivary glands of Ae. albopictus fed with a DENV-2 infectious blood-meal which showed positive signals in the lateral lobes of infected samples, with no significant signal in uninfected mosquitoes. Conclusion Based on the FISH technique, we propose a way to design and use

  3. Proton detected 13C imaging. Implementation and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, A.M.J.

    1999-08-01

    The work described in this thesis has been undertaken by the author, except where indicated by reference, within the Magnetic Resonance Centre at the University of Nottingham during the period from October 1996 to March 1999. This thesis documents the implementation and development of an imaging technique used to generate proton detected nuclear magnetic resonance images, representing the density of carbon-13 nuclear spins. The technique uses rotating frame, liquid state coherent polarisation transfer to generate carbon-13 edited proton signal. The dual resonant radio frequency (RF) coils used to create the homogeneous RF fields, intrinsic to the polarisation transfer are described, along with a consideration of their properties. Single resonant structures are also investigated, and a microscopy coil suitable for side access imaging studies is presented. By the use of field plotting methods, the main magnet field homogeneity was optimised, and the resonator RF fields were characterised. This provided the information for a theoretical evaluation of the efficacy of this implementation of the cyclic cross polarisation sequence, which was confirmed experimentally. Applications of the cyclic cross polarisation imaging scheme are presented, along with a novel variant of the sequence, used for mapping the RF field within samples with a low magnetogyric ratio. (author)

  4. Leak detection in turbo group condensers using helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Cores, C.; Lloret, J.

    1997-01-01

    This method allows a rapid location of leaks (small or not) in the pipelines of a turbo group condenser, before opening the condenser boxes and no need of stooping the turbo group operation. This operation can last two hours maximum depending on the volume of the box or semi box. The technique consists of injecting helium into the water side and detecting it in the steam side, in the outlet of not condensable gases of the ejector. In the same way, probable air inlet to the condenser can be proved (auxiliary systems, turbo group joints to the condenser, etc.) in order to improve the vacuum and/or reduce the quantity of oxygen dissolved in the water of the steam side. (author) [es

  5. Extending Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Detection to Older Age Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makrygiannis, Georgios; Labalue, Philippe; Erpicum, Marie

    2016-01-01

    . Current screening policies (e.g., men aged 65-74 years), however, do not account for aging and increased life expectancy of Western populations. This study investigated AAA detection by extending the target population to older age groups (75-85 years). METHODS: AAA screening was conducted in the County......-74 age group but rose to 7.3% in the age-extended group (75-85 years). Further in addition to age, height, current smoking, history of coronary artery disease, hypercholesterolemia, peripheral artery disease of the lower limbs, and varicose veins were significantly associated with the presence of AAA......BACKGROUND: There is evident benefit in terms of reduced aneurysm-related mortality from screening programs of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in men aged 65 years and more. Recent studies in the United Kingdom and Sweden have shown a decline of the prevalence of AAA in the general population...

  6. Interpersonal success factors for strategy implementation: a case study using group model building

    OpenAIRE

    Rodney J Scott; Robert Y Cavana; Donald Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Strategy implementation has been identified as an area of system dynamics literature requiring greater attention. Most strategies fail to be implemented successfully, and processes for effectively implementing strategy are yet to be fully explained and explored. The reported interpersonal success factors for strategy implementation are reported outcomes for group model building, suggesting potential applicability. A case study using validated survey methods yielded promising results, and sugg...

  7. Group-based Motion Detection for Energy-Efficient Localisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alban Cotillon

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Long-term outdoor localization remains challenging due to the high energy profiles of GPS modules. Duty cycling the GPS module combined with inertial sensors can improve energy consumption. However, inertial sensors that are kept active all the time can also drain mobile node batteries. This paper proposes duty cycling strategies for inertial sensors to maintain a target position accuracy and node lifetime. We present a method for duty cycling motion sensors according to features of movement events, and evaluate its energy and accuracy profile for an empirical data trace of cattle movement. We further introduce the concept of group-based duty cycling, where nodes that cluster together can share the burden of motion detection to reduce their duty cycles. Our evaluation shows that both variants of motion sensor duty cycling yield up to 78% improvement in overall node power consumption, and that the group-based method yields an additional 20% power reduction during periods of low mobility.

  8. Detection of Electronic Anklet Wearers’ Groupings throughout Telematics Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Lima Machado

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ankle bracelets (anklets imposed by law to track convicted individuals are being used in many countries as an alternative to overloaded prisons. There are many different systems for monitoring individuals wearing such devices, and these electronic anklet monitoring systems commonly detect violations of circulation areas permitted to holders. In spite of being able to monitor individual localization, such systems do not identify grouping activities of the monitored individuals, although this kind of event could represent a real risk of further offenses planned by those individuals. In order to address such a problem and to help monitoring systems to be able to have a proactive approach, this paper proposes sensor data fusion algorithms that are able to identify such groups based on data provided by anklet positioning devices. The results from the proposed algorithms can be applied to support risk assessment in the context of monitoring systems. The processing is performed using geographic points collected by a monitoring center, and as result, it produces a history of groups with their members, timestamps, locations and frequency of meetings. The proposed algorithms are validated in various serial and parallel computing scenarios, and the correspondent results are presented and discussed. The information produced by the proposed algorithms yields to a better characterization of the monitored individuals and can be adapted to support decision-making systems used by authorities that are responsible for planning decisions regarding actions affecting public security.

  9. Using Group Communication to Implement a Fault-Tolerant Directory Service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaashoek, M.F.; Tanenbaum, A.S.; Verstoep, C.

    1993-01-01

    Group communication is an important paradigm for building distributed applications. This paper discusses a fault-tolerant distributed directory service based on group communication, and compares it with the previous design and implementation based on remote procedure call. The group directory

  10. The Implementation of Group Investigation to Improve the Students' Speaking Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iswardati

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to find out how group investigation improves the student's speaking skill of the second grade students of SMA 2 Samarinda, how group investigation improves the student's participation in speaking of second grade students of SMA 2 Samarinda, and what the obstacles are in the implementation of Group Investigation. The classroom…

  11. Development and Implementation of a Psychoeducational Group for Ghanaian Adolescents Experiencing Parental Divorce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkyi, Anthony K.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents development and informal assessment of a 10-week psychoeducational program designed for 8 adolescent group members experiencing parental divorce in a rural community in Ghana. Group design, cultural considerations, program implementation, and impacts are described. The literature review pertaining to group work as an…

  12. Group Coaching on Pre-School Teachers' Implementation of Pyramid Model Strategies: A Program Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettig, Angel; Artman-Meeker, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe a group coaching model and present preliminary evidence of its impact on teachers' implementation of Pyramid Model practices. In particular, we described coaching strategies used to support teachers in reflecting and problem solving on the implementation of the evidence-based strategies. Preliminary…

  13. Collaborative learning in higher education : design, implementation and evaluation of group learning activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hei, de M.S.A.

    2016-01-01

    In higher education, group learning activities (GLAs) are frequently implemented in online, blended or face-to-face educational contexts. A major problem for the design and implementation of good quality GLAs that lead to the desired learning outcomes is that many approaches to GLAs have been

  14. Some Practical Issues in the Design and Implementation of Group Communication Services

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mishra, Shivakant

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of the proposed research was to investigate four important practical issues in the understanding, design, and implementation of group communication services. These issues were (1) Performance...

  15. Using group learning to enhance the implementation of information technology : The results of discourse analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bondarouk, Tatiana

    2004-01-01

    This thesis is about the influence of group interactional processes on the implementation of information technologies. The starting point of this research is the belief that it is neither the quality of the technology, nor that of the individual users, but the interactions among people in groups of

  16. Implementing an Intrusion Detection System in the Mysea Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tenhunen, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    .... The objective of this thesis is to design an intrusion detection system (IDS) architecture that permits administrators operating on MYSEA client machines to conveniently view and analyze IDS alerts from the single level networks...

  17. Cascade Boosting-Based Object Detection from High-Level Description to Hardware Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Khattab

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Object detection forms the first step of a larger setup for a wide variety of computer vision applications. The focus of this paper is the implementation of a real-time embedded object detection system while relying on high-level description language such as SystemC. Boosting-based object detection algorithms are considered as the fastest accurate object detection algorithms today. However, the implementation of a real time solution for such algorithms is still a challenge. A new parallel implementation, which exploits the parallelism and the pipelining in these algorithms, is proposed. We show that using a SystemC description model paired with a mainstream automatic synthesis tool can lead to an efficient embedded implementation. We also display some of the tradeoffs and considerations, for this implementation to be effective. This implementation proves capable of achieving 42 fps for 320×240 images as well as bringing regularity in time consuming.

  18. Design and implementation of network attack analysis and detect system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Zhigang; Wu Huan; Liu Baoxu

    2007-01-01

    This paper first analyzes the present research state of IDS (intrusion detection system), classifies and compares existing methods. According to the problems existing in IDS, such as false-positives, false-negatives and low information visualization, this paper suggests a system named NAADS which supports multi data sources. Through a series of methods such as clustering analysis, association analysis and visualization, rate of detection and usability of NAADS are increased. (authors)

  19. Implementation and assessment of the renormalization group (Rng) k - ε model in gothic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytis, G.Th.

    2001-01-01

    In GOTHIC, the standard k - ε model is used to model turbulence. In an attempt to enhance the turbulence modelling capabilities of the code for simulation of mixing driven by highly buoyant discharges, we implemented the Renormalization Group (RNG) k - ε model. This model which for the time being, is only implemented in the ''gas'' phase, was tested with different simple test-problems and its predictions were compared to the corresponding ones obtained when the standard k - ε model was used. (author)

  20. Improvement and implementation for Canny edge detection algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Qiu, Yue-hong

    2015-07-01

    Edge detection is necessary for image segmentation and pattern recognition. In this paper, an improved Canny edge detection approach is proposed due to the defect of traditional algorithm. A modified bilateral filter with a compensation function based on pixel intensity similarity judgment was used to smooth image instead of Gaussian filter, which could preserve edge feature and remove noise effectively. In order to solve the problems of sensitivity to the noise in gradient calculating, the algorithm used 4 directions gradient templates. Finally, Otsu algorithm adaptively obtain the dual-threshold. All of the algorithm simulated with OpenCV 2.4.0 library in the environments of vs2010, and through the experimental analysis, the improved algorithm has been proved to detect edge details more effectively and with more adaptability.

  1. Designing and Implementing a Family of Intrusion Detection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-11-01

    configure (train), generates many false alarms – Misuse detection (signature analysis) (NFR, Emerald , Snort, STAT) • Generates few false alarms • Detects...to create .rhosts file in world-writable ftp home directory – rlogin using bogus .rhosts file S0 create_file read_rhosts S3S2 login S1 STAT KN-14...world-writable ftp home directory – rlogin using bogus .rhosts file S0 create_file read_rhosts S3S2 login S1 STAT KN-17 ftp-write in STATL use ustat

  2. Barriers and facilitators to implementing electronic prescription: a systematic review of user groups' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Nsangou, Édith-Romy; Payne-Gagnon, Julie; Grenier, Sonya; Sicotte, Claude

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review identifying users groups' perceptions of barriers and facilitators to implementing electronic prescription (e-prescribing) in primary care. We included studies following these criteria: presence of an empirical design, focus on the users' experience of e-prescribing implementation, conducted in primary care, and providing data on barriers and facilitators to e-prescribing implementation. We used the Donabedian logical model of healthcare quality (adapted by Barber et al) to analyze our findings. We found 34 publications (related to 28 individual studies) eligible to be included in this review. These studies identified a total of 594 elements as barriers or facilitators to e-prescribing implementation. Most user groups perceived that e-prescribing was facilitated by design and technical concerns, interoperability, content appropriate for the users, attitude towards e-prescribing, productivity, and available resources. This review highlights the importance of technical and organizational support for the successful implementation of e-prescribing systems. It also shows that the same factor can be seen as a barrier or a facilitator depending on the project's own circumstances. Moreover, a factor can change in nature, from a barrier to a facilitator and vice versa, in the process of e-prescribing implementation. This review summarizes current knowledge on factors related to e-prescribing implementation in primary care that could support decision makers in their design of effective implementation strategies. Finally, future studies should emphasize on the perceptions of other user groups, such as pharmacists, managers, vendors, and patients, who remain neglected in the literature.

  3. A model-guided symbolic execution approach for network protocol implementations and vulnerability detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Shameng; Meng, Qingkun; Feng, Chao; Tang, Chaojing

    2017-01-01

    Formal techniques have been devoted to analyzing whether network protocol specifications violate security policies; however, these methods cannot detect vulnerabilities in the implementations of the network protocols themselves. Symbolic execution can be used to analyze the paths of the network protocol implementations, but for stateful network protocols, it is difficult to reach the deep states of the protocol. This paper proposes a novel model-guided approach to detect vulnerabilities in network protocol implementations. Our method first abstracts a finite state machine (FSM) model, then utilizes the model to guide the symbolic execution. This approach achieves high coverage of both the code and the protocol states. The proposed method is implemented and applied to test numerous real-world network protocol implementations. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method is more effective than traditional fuzzing methods such as SPIKE at detecting vulnerabilities in the deep states of network protocol implementations.

  4. A model-guided symbolic execution approach for network protocol implementations and vulnerability detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shameng Wen

    Full Text Available Formal techniques have been devoted to analyzing whether network protocol specifications violate security policies; however, these methods cannot detect vulnerabilities in the implementations of the network protocols themselves. Symbolic execution can be used to analyze the paths of the network protocol implementations, but for stateful network protocols, it is difficult to reach the deep states of the protocol. This paper proposes a novel model-guided approach to detect vulnerabilities in network protocol implementations. Our method first abstracts a finite state machine (FSM model, then utilizes the model to guide the symbolic execution. This approach achieves high coverage of both the code and the protocol states. The proposed method is implemented and applied to test numerous real-world network protocol implementations. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method is more effective than traditional fuzzing methods such as SPIKE at detecting vulnerabilities in the deep states of network protocol implementations.

  5. Motion Detection Implementation on a Game Using Raspberry Pi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunawan Putra Gozali

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Along with the development of advanced gaming technology, we can play the game with so many tools or platforms such as console games, PC games, mobile games and handheld games. The disadvantage of those games is the difficulty to connect additional sensors to the PC computer. Large power requirements will also be a constraint. Besides, the size of the PC could be a weakness that makes it difficult to carry and play anytime. Raspberry is a small computer that can be added with motion detection sensors. By using the raspberry, the researchers managed to create a game "Crows Adventure" that uses motion detection sensor as the controller. Some of the sensors used in the game is UDS Sensor ( Ultrasonic Sensor disctance and touch sensors are applied to smarthphone to control the game. This allows the use of sensors in making more varied games by using raspberry devices.

  6. Stakeholders inverted question mark contributions to tailored implementation programs: an observational study of group interview methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huntink, E.; Lieshout, J. van; Aakhus, E.; Baker, R.; Flottorp, S.; Godycki-Cwirko, M.; Jager, C.; Kowalczyk, A.; Szecsenyi, J.; Wensing, M.

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundTailored strategies to implement evidence-based practice can be generated in several ways. In this study, we explored the usefulness of group interviews for generating these strategies, focused on improving healthcare for patients with chronic diseases.MethodsParticipants included at least

  7. Motion Detection Implementation on a Game Using Raspberry Pi

    OpenAIRE

    Gunawan Putra Gozali

    2017-01-01

    Along with the development of advanced gaming technology, we can play the game with so many tools or platforms such as console games, PC games, mobile games and handheld games. The disadvantage of those games is the difficulty to connect additional sensors to the PC computer. Large power requirements will also be a constraint. Besides, the size of the PC could be a weakness that makes it difficult to carry and play anytime. Raspberry is a small computer that can be added with motion detection...

  8. Considerations for implementing machine vision for detecting watercore in apples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upchurch, Bruce L.; Throop, James A.

    1993-05-01

    Watercore in apples is a physiological disorder that affects the internal quality of the fruit. Growers can experience serious economic losses due to internal breakdown of the apple if watercored apples are placed unknowingly into long term storage. Economic losses can also occur if watercore is detected and the entire `lot' is downgraded; however, a gain can be obtained if watercored fruit is segregated and marketed as a premium apple soon after harvest. Watercore is characterized by the accumulation of fluid around the vascular bundles replacing air spaces between cells. This fluid reduces the light scattering properties of the apple. Using machine vision to measure the amount of light transmitted through the apple, watercored apples were segregated according to the severity of damage. However, the success of the method was dependent upon two factors. First, the sensitivity of the camera dictated the classes of watercore that could be detected. A highly sensitive camera could separate the less severe classes at the expense of not distinguishing between the more severe classes. A second factor which is common to most quality attributes in perishable commodities is the elapsed time after harvest at which the measurement was made. At the end of the study, light transmission levels decreased to undetectable levels with the initial camera settings for all watercore classes.

  9. Oriented regions grouping based candidate proposal for infrared pedestrian detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiangtao; Zhang, Jingai; Li, Huaijiang

    2018-04-01

    Effectively and accurately locating the positions of pedestrian candidates in image is a key task for the infrared pedestrian detection system. In this work, a novel similarity measuring metric is designed. Based on the selective search scheme, the developed similarity measuring metric is utilized to yield the possible locations for pedestrian candidate. Besides this, corresponding diversification strategies are also provided according to the characteristics of the infrared thermal imaging system. Experimental results indicate that the presented scheme can achieve more efficient outputs than the traditional selective search methodology for the infrared pedestrian detection task.

  10. Working Group Report: WIMP Dark Matter Direct Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cushman, P.; Galbiati, C.; McKinsey, D. N.; Robertson, H.; Tait, T. M.P.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Snowmass process, the Cosmic Frontier WIMP Direct Detection subgroup (CF1) has drawn on input from the Cosmic Frontier and the broader Particle Physics community to produce this document. The charge to CF1 was (a) to summarize the current status and projected sensitivity of WIMP direct detection experiments worldwide, (b) motivate WIMP dark matter searches over a broad parameter space by examining a spectrum of WIMP models, (c) establish a community consensus on the type of experimental program required to explore that parameter space, and (d) identify the common infrastructure required to practically meet those goals.

  11. Working Group Report: WIMP Dark Matter Direct Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, P.; Galbiati, C.; McKinsey, D. N.; Robertson, H.; Tait, T. M.P.

    2013-10-30

    As part of the Snowmass process, the Cosmic Frontier WIMP Direct Detection subgroup (CF1) has drawn on input from the Cosmic Frontier and the broader Particle Physics community to produce this document. The charge to CF1 was (a) to summarize the current status and projected sensitivity of WIMP direct detection experiments worldwide, (b) motivate WIMP dark matter searches over a broad parameter space by examining a spectrum of WIMP models, (c) establish a community consensus on the type of experimental program required to explore that parameter space, and (d) identify the common infrastructure required to practically meet those goals.

  12. Cultural diversity and work-group performance : Detecting the rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girndt, T.

    2000-01-01

    With greater levels of international cooperation, work-groups are increasingly composed of members from different cultures. These groups often suffer from communication problems; however, research suggests that they also benefit from their members cultural diversity and generate higher ranges of

  13. Research and Implementation of Collision Detection Based on Modbus Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinglan Fang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve the communication errors resulted by traditional working condition multi-platform device communication using the custom protocol communication and link congestion malpractice brought by retransmission, it ensures network communication using time-sharing communication conflict detection based on mature Modbus protocol. Thereby it enhances the stability of the entire system during operation process, and provides simple, efficient, stable business specification interface for the future expansion of the system. After a comprehensive evaluation and analysis of system communication messages before and after improvement, system comprehensive evaluation target has improved. While the system is more flexible to modular design, develop transparent, structure open side and has a broad application prospects.

  14. Adaptive Pseudo Dilation for Gestalt Edge Grouping and Contour Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papari, Giuseppe; Petkov, Nicolai

    2008-01-01

    We consider the problem of detecting object contours in natural images. In many cases, local luminance changes turn out to be stronger in textured areas than on object contours. Therefore, local edge features, which only look at a small neighborhood of each pixel, cannot be reliable indicators of

  15. A novel hardware implementation for detecting respiration rate using photoplethysmography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinable, Joseph; Jones, Peter; Thamrin, Cindy; McEwan, Alistair

    2017-07-01

    Asthma is a serious public health problem. Continuous monitoring of breathing may offer an alternative way to assess disease status. In this paper we present a novel hardware implementation for the capture and storage of a photoplethysmography (PPG) signal. The LED duty cycle was altered to determine the effect on respiratory rate accuracy. The oximeter was mounted to the left index finger of ten healthy volunteers. The breathing rate derived from the oximeter was validated against a nasal airflow sensor. The duty cycle of a pulse oximeter was changed between 5%, 10% and 25% at a sample rate of 500 Hz. A PPG signal and reference signal was captured for each duty cycle. The PPG signals were post processed in Matlab to derive a respiration rate using an existing Matlab toolbox. At a 25% duty cycle the RMSE was <;2 breaths per minute for the top performing algorithm. The RMSE increased to over 5 breaths per minute when the duty cycle was reduced to 5%. The power consumed by the hardware for a 5%, 10% and 25% duty cycle was 5.4 mW, 7.8 mW, and 15 mW respectively. For clinical assessment of respiratory rate, a RSME of <;2 breaths per minute is recommended. Further work is required to determine utility in asthma management. However for non-clinical applications such as fitness tracking, lower accuracy may be sufficient to allow a reduced duty cycle setting.

  16. The Implementation of Group Investigation to Improve the Students’ Speaking Skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iswardati Iswardati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to find out how group investigation improves the student’s speaking skill of the second grade students of SMA 2 Samarinda, how group investigation improves the student’s participation in speaking of second grade students of SMA 2 Samarinda, and what the obstacles are in the implementation of Group Investigation. The classroom action research was employed in this study and was done in two cycles. Each cycle consisted of four stages: (1 planning, (2 action, (3 observation, and (4 reflection. Each cycle took three meetings. The instruments used to collect the data were observation, checklist, field-note, and speaking test. After the implementation of Group Investigation through two cycles, the researcher concluded: First, Group Investigation improves the students’ speaking ability by (a increasing the students’ pronunciation, grammatical, vocabulary, and fluency, (b by reducing the students’ reluctance to speak, worry of making mistakes, and afraid of being laughed at by other students. Second, Group Investigation improves the students’ participation in speaking (a the students learnt how to investigate a certain problem and to solve the problem using English, (b how to share, (c how to discuss, (d how to give their ideas, (e how to accept other opinions, and (f how to present their ideas. Third, the obstacles in the implementation of Group Investigation are: (a The students were noisy, (b Some students spent too short in the presentation, (c Some students had difficulties in expressing their arguments and suggestion related to the topics, and (d Few students dominated the group investigation.

  17. Hall Sensor Output Signal Fault-Detection & Safety Implementation Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee SangHun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently BLDC motors have been popular in various industrial applications and electric mobility. Recently BLDC motors have been popular in various industrial applications and electric mobility. In most brushless direct current (BLDC motor drives, there are three hall sensors as a position reference. Low resolution hall effect sensor is popularly used to estimate the rotor position because of its good comprehensive performance such as low cost, high reliability and sufficient precision. Various possible faults may happen in a hall effect sensor. This paper presents a fault-tolerant operation method that allows the control of a BLDC motor with one faulty hall sensor and presents the hall sensor output fault-tolerant control strategy. The situations considered are when the output from a hall sensor stays continuously at low or high levels, or a short-time pulse appears on a hall sensor signal. For fault detection, identification of a faulty signal and generating a substitute signal, this method only needs the information from the hall sensors. There are a few research work on hall effect sensor failure of BLDC motor. The conventional fault diagnosis methods are signal analysis, model based analysis and knowledge based analysis. The proposed method is signal based analysis using a compensation signal for reconfiguration and therefore fault diagnosis can be fast. The proposed method is validated to execute the simulation using PSIM.

  18. Topological color codes on Union Jack lattices: a stable implementation of the whole Clifford group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katzgraber, Helmut G.; Bombin, H.; Andrist, Ruben S.; Martin-Delgado, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    We study the error threshold of topological color codes on Union Jack lattices that allow for the full implementation of the whole Clifford group of quantum gates. After mapping the error-correction process onto a statistical mechanical random three-body Ising model on a Union Jack lattice, we compute its phase diagram in the temperature-disorder plane using Monte Carlo simulations. Surprisingly, topological color codes on Union Jack lattices have a similar error stability to color codes on triangular lattices, as well as to the Kitaev toric code. The enhanced computational capabilities of the topological color codes on Union Jack lattices with respect to triangular lattices and the toric code combined with the inherent robustness of this implementation show good prospects for future stable quantum computer implementations.

  19. Implementation of lesson study in physics teaching by group of teachers in Solok West Sumatera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurnetti, Y.

    2018-04-01

    This article based of collaborative classroom action research with science teachers group or MGMP at Solok West Sumatera; based on their willingness to implementation of lesson study by this group. The study started by discussing some problems according to the implementation of the lesson study, establishing the teaching materials, developing learning tools, defining the model teachers, conducting classroom activities, and reflecting by discussions. The preparation of this study includes some learning material according to temperature and heat; the observation form that led by observer teachers; teachers’s model impression and open questionnaire implementation of lesson study that applied to the students and teachers. This research got some information about the strengths and weaknesses of learning using lesson study from the students involved. To conclude, the implementation of lesson study should be able to support the principle of collaborative in learning. The challenge of this study is how to make a condition to gather some teachers in one school at a certain time because they have the schedule at their own school.

  20. Group spike-and-slab lasso generalized linear models for disease prediction and associated genes detection by incorporating pathway information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zaixiang; Shen, Yueping; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xinyan; Wen, Jia; Qian, Chen'ao; Zhuang, Wenzhuo; Shi, Xinghua; Yi, Nengjun

    2018-03-15

    Large-scale molecular data have been increasingly used as an important resource for prognostic prediction of diseases and detection of associated genes. However, standard approaches for omics data analysis ignore the group structure among genes encoded in functional relationships or pathway information. We propose new Bayesian hierarchical generalized linear models, called group spike-and-slab lasso GLMs, for predicting disease outcomes and detecting associated genes by incorporating large-scale molecular data and group structures. The proposed model employs a mixture double-exponential prior for coefficients that induces self-adaptive shrinkage amount on different coefficients. The group information is incorporated into the model by setting group-specific parameters. We have developed a fast and stable deterministic algorithm to fit the proposed hierarchal GLMs, which can perform variable selection within groups. We assess the performance of the proposed method on several simulated scenarios, by varying the overlap among groups, group size, number of non-null groups, and the correlation within group. Compared with existing methods, the proposed method provides not only more accurate estimates of the parameters but also better prediction. We further demonstrate the application of the proposed procedure on three cancer datasets by utilizing pathway structures of genes. Our results show that the proposed method generates powerful models for predicting disease outcomes and detecting associated genes. The methods have been implemented in a freely available R package BhGLM (http://www.ssg.uab.edu/bhglm/). nyi@uab.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  1. What it Takes to Successfully Implement Technology for Aging in Place: Focus Groups With Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Sebastiaan Theodorus Michaël; Wouters, Eveline J M; Luijkx, Katrien G; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M

    2016-05-03

    There is a growing interest in empowering older adults to age in place by deploying various types of technology (ie, eHealth, ambient assisted living technology, smart home technology, and gerontechnology). However, initiatives aimed at implementing these technologies are complicated by the fact that multiple stakeholder groups are involved. Goals and motives of stakeholders may not always be transparent or aligned, yet research on convergent and divergent positions of stakeholders is scarce. To provide insight into the positions of stakeholder groups involved in the implementation of technology for aging in place by answering the following questions: What kind of technology do stakeholders see as relevant? What do stakeholders aim to achieve by implementing technology? What is needed to achieve successful implementations? Mono-disciplinary focus groups were conducted with participants (n=29) representing five groups of stakeholders: older adults (6/29, 21%), care professionals (7/29, 24%), managers within home care or social work organizations (5/29, 17%), technology designers and suppliers (6/29, 21%), and policy makers (5/29, 17%). Transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. Stakeholders considered 26 different types of technologies to be relevant for enabling independent living. Only 6 out of 26 (23%) types of technology were mentioned by all stakeholder groups. Care professionals mentioned fewer different types of technology than other groups. All stakeholder groups felt that the implementation of technology for aging in place can be considered a success when (1) older adults' needs and wishes are prioritized during development and deployment of the technology, (2) the technology is accepted by older adults, (3) the technology provides benefits to older adults, and (4) favorable prerequisites for the use of technology by older adults exist. While stakeholders seemed to have identical aims, several underlying differences emerged, for example, with regard

  2. A Fuzzy Group Prioritization Method for Deriving Weights and its Software Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarifa Almulhim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Several Multi-Criteria Decision Making (MCDM methods involve pairwise comparisons to obtain the preferences of decision makers (DMs. This paper proposes a fuzzy group prioritization method for deriving group priorities/weights from fuzzy pairwise comparison matrices. The proposed method extends the Fuzzy Preferences Programming Method (FPP by considering the different importance weights of multiple DMs . The elements of the group pairwise comparison matrices are presented as fuzzy numbers rather than exact numerical values, in order to model the uncertainty and imprecision in the DMs’ judgments. Unlike the known fuzzy prioritization techniques, the proposed method is able to derive crisp weights from incomplete and fuzzy set of comparison judgments and does not require additional aggregation procedures. A prototype of a decision tool is developed to assist DMs to implement the proposed method for solving fuzzy group prioritization problems in MATLAB. Detailed numerical examples are used to illustrate the proposed approach.

  3. Implementing evidence-based medicine in general practice: a focus group based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aertgeerts Bert

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past years concerns are rising about the use of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM in health care. The calls for an increase in the practice of EBM, seem to be obstructed by many barriers preventing the implementation of evidence-based thinking and acting in general practice. This study aims to explore the barriers of Flemish GPs (General Practitioners to the implementation of EBM in routine clinical work and to identify possible strategies for integrating EBM in daily work. Methods We used a qualitative research strategy to gather and analyse data. We organised focus groups between September 2002 and April 2003. The focus group data were analysed using a combined strategy of 'between-case' analysis and 'grounded theory approach'. Thirty-one general practitioners participated in four focus groups. Purposeful sampling was used to recruit participants. Results A basic classification model documents the influencing factors and actors on a micro-, meso- as well as macro-level. Patients, colleagues, competences, logistics and time were identified on the micro-level (the GPs' individual practice, commercial and consumer organisations on the meso-level (institutions, organisations and health care policy, media and specific characteristics of evidence on the macro-level (policy level and international scientific community. Existing barriers and possible strategies to overcome these barriers were described. Conclusion In order to implement EBM in routine general practice, an integrated approach on different levels needs to be developed.

  4. Early Detection of Risk Taking in Groups and Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    analysis  to   twitter  content  in  the... analysis  indicated  that   Twitter  messages  correspond  closely  in   tone  to  similarly  codified  results  from  news...Yardi, S., & Boyd, D. (2010). Dynamic debates: An analysis of group polarization over time on Twitter . Bulletin of Science, Technology &

  5. Accounting for imperfect detection of groups and individuals when estimating abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Matthew J; Converse, Sarah J; Royle, J Andrew

    2017-09-01

    If animals are independently detected during surveys, many methods exist for estimating animal abundance despite detection probabilities account for imperfect detection of groups, while assuming that individuals within groups are detected perfectly. However, this assumption is often unsupported. We introduce an abundance estimator for grouped animals when detection of groups is imperfect and group size may be under-counted, but not over-counted. The estimator combines an MRDS model with an N-mixture model to account for imperfect detection of individuals. The new MRDS-Nmix model requires the same data as an MRDS model (independent detection histories, an estimate of distance to transect, and an estimate of group size), plus a second estimate of group size provided by the second observer. We extend the model to situations in which detection of individuals within groups declines with distance. We simulated 12 data sets and used Bayesian methods to compare the performance of the new MRDS-Nmix model to an MRDS model. Abundance estimates generated by the MRDS-Nmix model exhibited minimal bias and nominal coverage levels. In contrast, MRDS abundance estimates were biased low and exhibited poor coverage. Many species of conservation interest reside in groups and could benefit from an estimator that better accounts for imperfect detection. Furthermore, the ability to relax the assumption of perfect detection of individuals within detected groups may allow surveyors to re-allocate resources toward detection of new groups instead of extensive surveys of known groups. We believe the proposed estimator is feasible because the only additional field data required are a second estimate of group size.

  6. Charged Particle Tracking and Vertex Detection Group summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.; Meyer, D.

    1984-09-01

    Charged particle tracking is essential in order to investigate the new physics expected at the SSC. The Tracking Group studied radiation damage and rate limitations to tracking devices, vertex detectors, and central tracking. The Group concluded that silicon strips and large wire tracking chambers with small cells can probably survive at the design luminosity of 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 ; however, the presently designed electronics for silicon strip vertex detectors can withstand a luminosity of only 10 31 cm -2 sec -1 . Wire chambers at a radius of less than about 25 cm can withstand a luminosity of less than or equal to 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 only. Actual tracking and pattern recognition in central tracking chambers at a luminosity of 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 will be very difficult because of multiple interactions within the resolving time of the chambers; detailed simulations are needed in order to decide whether tracking is indeed possible at this luminosity. Scintillating glass fibers are an interesting possibility both for vertex detectors and for central trackers, but much research and development is still needed both on the fibers themselves and on the readout

  7. Implementing clinical governance in English primary care groups/trusts: reconciling quality improvement and quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S M; Sheaff, R; Sibbald, B; Marshall, M N; Pickard, S; Gask, L; Halliwell, S; Rogers, A; Roland, M O

    2002-03-01

    To investigate the concept of clinical governance being advocated by primary care groups/trusts (PCG/Ts), approaches being used to implement clinical governance, and potential barriers to its successful implementation in primary care. Qualitative case studies using semi-structured interviews and documentation review. Twelve purposively sampled PCG/Ts in England. Fifty senior staff including chief executives, clinical governance leads, mental health leads, and lay board members. Participants' perceptions of the role of clinical governance in PCG/Ts. PCG/Ts recognise that the successful implementation of clinical governance in general practice will require cultural as well as organisational changes, and the support of practices. They are focusing their energies on supporting practices and getting them involved in quality improvement activities. These activities include, but move beyond, conventional approaches to quality assessment (audit, incentives) to incorporate approaches which emphasise corporate and shared learning. PCG/Ts are also engaged in setting up systems for monitoring quality and for dealing with poor performance. Barriers include structural barriers (weak contractual levers to influence general practices), resource barriers (perceived lack of staff or money), and cultural barriers (suspicion by practice staff or problems overcoming the perceived blame culture associated with quality assessment). PCG/Ts are focusing on setting up systems for implementing clinical governance which seek to emphasise developmental and supportive approaches which will engage health professionals. Progress is intentionally incremental but formidable challenges lie ahead, not least reconciling the dual role of supporting practices while monitoring (and dealing with poor) performance.

  8. The importance of early detection of lip cancer risk groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratila, M.; Rosu, S.

    2014-03-01

    in frequency as well as in the therapeutic problems raised. In the face and oral cavity cancer catagory, lip represents 2% of all cases and 19-25% of the total facial cancer area. Lip cancer is one of the localizations that, when detected early, can benefit from an effective therapy with high chances of healing. In order to achieve a complex treatment, interdisciplinary collaboration is required, only thus being able to determine both the therapeutic methods as well as their association.

  9. The importance of early detection of lip cancer risk groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victor Babeş Timişoara, Piaţa Eftimie Murgu No. 2, 300041 (Romania))" data-affiliation=" (Maxillo-facial surgeon, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Victor Babeş Timişoara, Piaţa Eftimie Murgu No. 2, 300041 (Romania))" >Fratila, M; Victor Babeş Timişoara, Piaţa Eftimie Murgu No. 2, 300041 (Romania))" data-affiliation=" (Maxillo-facial surgeon, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Victor Babeş Timişoara, Piaţa Eftimie Murgu No. 2, 300041 (Romania))" >Rosu, S

    2014-01-01

    . Neoplastic pathology is constantly increasing both in frequency as well as in the therapeutic problems raised. In the face and oral cavity cancer catagory, lip represents 2% of all cases and 19-25% of the total facial cancer area. Lip cancer is one of the localizations that, when detected early, can benefit from an effective therapy with high chances of healing. In order to achieve a complex treatment, interdisciplinary collaboration is required, only thus being able to determine both the therapeutic methods as well as their association

  10. Implementation of the AAPM Task Group 21 protocol by the Radiological Physics Center and its implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastorf, R.J.; Hanson, W.F.; Shalek, R.J.; Berkley, L.W.

    1984-01-01

    The Radiation Therapy Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine appointed Task Group 21 to write a new protocol for the calibration of high-energy photon and electron therapy beams. This protocol updates the physical parameters used in the calculations and is intended to account for differences in ionization chamber design and some differences between phantom materials that were not considered in previous protocols. This paper discusses how the Radiological Physics Center (RPC) intends to implement the new protocol, the changes required in the RPC calibration techniques, and the magnitude of the change in the RPC calculations of absorbed dose resulting from the implementation of the new protocol. Although the change in the RPC absorbed-dose calculations will be only 0%-2% over the range of photon and electron energies of interest, some institutions using specific dosimetry systems may find their absorbed-dose calculations changing by 4% or more

  11. Global oral health inequalities: task group--implementation and delivery of oral health strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheiham, A; Alexander, D; Cohen, L

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the shortcomings of present approaches to reduce oral diseases and inequalities, details the importance of social determinants, and links that to research needs and policies on implementation of strategies to reduce oral health inequalities. Inequalities in health...... their environment. There is a dearth of oral health research on social determinants that cause health-compromising behaviors and on risk factors common to some chronic diseases. The gap between what is known and implemented by other health disciplines and the dental fraternity needs addressing. To re-orient oral...... strategies tailored to determinants and needs of each group along the social gradient. Approaches focusing mainly on downstream lifestyle and behavioral factors have limited success in reducing health inequalities. They fail to address social determinants, for changing people's behaviors requires changing...

  12. Design and Implementation of Video Shot Detection on Field Programmable Gate Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jharna Majumdar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Video has become an interactive medium of communication in everyday life. The sheer volume of video makes it extremely difficult to browse through and find the required data. Hence extraction of key frames from the video which represents the abstract of the entire video becomes necessary. The aim of the video shot detection is to find the position of the shot boundaries, so that key frames can be selected from each shot for subsequent processing such as video summarization, indexing etc. For most of the surveillance applications like video summery, face recognition etc., the hardware (real time implementation of these algorithms becomes necessary. Here in this paper we present the architecture for simultaneous accessing of consecutive frames, which are then used for the implementation of various Video Shot Detection algorithms. We also present the real time implementation of three video shot detection algorithms using the above mentioned architecture on FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Arrays.

  13. A conceptual basis to encode and detect organic functional groups in XML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Punnaivanam; Krief, Alain; Vijayasarathi, Durairaj

    2013-06-01

    A conceptual basis to define and detect organic functional groups is developed. The basic model of a functional group is termed as a primary functional group and is characterized by a group center composed of one or more group center atoms bonded to terminal atoms and skeletal carbon atoms. The generic group center patterns are identified from the structures of known functional groups. Accordingly, a chemical ontology 'Font' is developed to organize the existing functional groups as well as the new ones to be defined by the chemists. The basic model is extended to accommodate various combinations of primary functional groups as functional group assemblies. A concept of skeletal group is proposed to define the characteristic groups composed of only carbon atoms to be regarded as equivalent to functional groups. The combination of primary functional groups with skeletal groups is categorized as skeletal group assembly. In order to make the model suitable for reaction modeling purpose, a Graphical User Interface (GUI) is developed to define the functional groups and to encode in XML format appropriate to detect them in chemical structures. The system is capable of detecting multiple instances of primary functional groups as well as the overlapping poly-functional groups as the respective assemblies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The implementation of problem-based learning in collaborative groups in a chiropractic program in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Ni Ni; Nadarajah, Vishna Devi V; Win, Daw Khin

    2015-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is usually conducted in small-group learning sessions with approximately eight students per facilitator. In this study, we implemented a modified version of PBL involving collaborative groups in an undergraduate chiropractic program and assessed its pedagogical effectiveness. This study was conducted at the International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and involved the 2012 chiropractic student cohort. Six PBL cases were provided to chiropractic students, consisting of three PBL cases for which learning resources were provided and another three PBL cases for which learning resources were not provided. Group discussions were not continuously supervised, since only one facilitator was present. The students' perceptions of PBL in collaborative groups were assessed with a questionnaire that was divided into three domains: motivation, cognitive skills, and perceived pressure to work. Thirty of the 31 students (97%) participated in the study. PBL in collaborative groups was significantly associated with positive responses regarding students' motivation, cognitive skills, and perceived pressure to work (Plearning resources increased motivation and cognitive skills (Plearning resources.

  15. Real-time implementation of logo detection on open source BeagleBoard

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, M.; Kehtarnavaz, N.; Estevez, L.

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents the real-time implementation of our previously developed logo detection and tracking algorithm on the open source BeagleBoard mobile platform. This platform has an OMAP processor that incorporates an ARM Cortex processor. The algorithm combines Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) with k-means clustering, online color calibration and moment invariants to robustly detect and track logos in video. Various optimization steps that are carried out to allow the real-time execution of the algorithm on BeagleBoard are discussed. The results obtained are compared to the PC real-time implementation results.

  16. The implementation evaluation of primary care groups of practice: a focus on organizational identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pozzebon Marlei

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 2002 the Health Ministry of Québec (Canada has been implementing a primary care organizational innovation called 'family medicine groups'. This is occurring in a political context in which the reorganization of primary care is considered necessary to improve health care system performance. More specifically, the purpose of this reform has been to overcome systemic deficiencies in terms of accessibility and continuity of care. This paper examines the first years of implementation of the family medicine group program, with a focus on the emergence of the organizational identity of one of the pilot groups located in the urban area of Montreal. Methods An in-depth longitudinal case study was conducted over two and a half years. Face to face individual interviews with key informants from the family medicine group under study were conducted over the research period considered. Data was gathered throuhg observations and documentary analysis. The data was analyzed using temporal bracketing and Fairclough's three-dimensional critical discourse analytical techniques. Results Three different phases were identified over the period under study. During the first phase, which corresponded to the official start-up of the family medicine group program, new resources and staff were only available at the end of the period, and no changes occurred in medical practices. Power struggles between physicians and nurses characterized the second phase, resulting in a very difficult integration of advanced nurse practitioners into the group. Indeed, the last phase was portrayed by initial collaborative practices associated with a sensegiving process prompted by a new family medicine group director. Conclusions The creation of a primary care team is a very challenging process that goes beyond the normative policy definitions of who is on the team or what the team has to do. To fulfil expectations of quality improvement through team-based care

  17. SU-E-T-181: Clinical Implementation of Task Group 176

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgdorf, B [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Yeager, C; Zhou, F; Hand, C [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The implementation of TG-176 with regards to immobilization devices and couch tops as they effect dosimetric treatment planning. Methods: The external devices used clinically were scanned to measure their HU values. Plans were created in the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) using these devices, one that accounted for the correct HU value of the each device and another that did not include the device as a structure. A dose subtraction was performed between the two plans to evaluate the dosimetric differences. The metrics used for evaluation included attenuation and surface dose. Plan parameters were varied to evaluate the impact of the devices in different clinical scenarios. Results: While the exact HU values of our results are clinic-dependent, the protocol being implemented is widely applicable. We recommend a four step process for implementing this task group. First, physics should scan each treatment device to determine accurate HU values. Second, CT therapists should include in the setup note which table top was used during patient CT simulation and are asked to make immobilization devices as uniform in thickness as possible. Therapists should also index the devices whenever possible so beam will traverse the same area of the device. Third, the dosimetrist should manually correct the HU value for any external device, including the couch. For H&N cases, the rails must be removed from the couch structure. When rails are used during treatments, it is important to make note of their exact position in the setup notes. Finally, physicians should be made aware that there could be changes in surface doses depending on whether or not immobilization devices or couch tops are in the beam path. Conclusion: The protocol outlined above was implemented to reduce the errors that arise from ignoring effects of external devices, thus ensuring safer, more accurate patient treatments.

  18. Lessons Learned From Implementation of Westinghouse Owners Group Risk-Informed Inservice Inspection Methodology for Piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, Paul R.; Haessler, Richard L.; McNeill, Alex; Pyne, Mark A.; West, Raymond A.

    2006-01-01

    Risk-informed inservice inspection (ISI) programs have been in use for over seven years as an alternative to current regulatory requirements in the development and implementation of ISI programs for nuclear plant piping systems. Programs using the Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG) (now known as the Pressurized Water Reactor Owners Group - PWROG) risk-informed ISI methodology have been developed and implemented within the U.S. and several other countries. Additionally, many plants have conducted or are in the process of conducting updates to their risk-informed ISI programs. In the development and implementation of these risk-informed ISI programs and the associated updates to those programs, the following important lessons learned have been identified and are addressed. Concepts such as 'loss of inventory', which are typically not modeled in a plant's probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) model for all systems. The importance of considering operator actions in the identification of consequences associated with a piping failure and the categorization of segments as high safety significant (HSS) or low safety significant (LSS). The impact that the above considerations have had on the large early release frequency (LERF) and categorization of segments as HSS or LSS. The importance of automation. Making the update process more efficient to reduce costs associated with maintaining the risk-informed ISI program. The insights gained are associated with many of the steps in the risk-informed ISI process including: development of the consequences associated with piping failures, categorization of segments, structural element selection and program updates. Many of these lessons learned have impacted the results of the risk-informed ISI programs and have impacted the updates to those programs. This paper summarizes the lessons learned and insights gained from the application of the WOG risk-informed ISI methodology in the U.S., Europe and Asia. (authors)

  19. Development and implementation of a balanced scorecard in an academic hospitalist group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Michael; Sharpe, Bradley A; Wachter, Robert M

    2013-03-01

    Academic hospitalist groups (AHGs) are often expected to excel in multiple domains: quality improvement, patient safety, education, research, administration, and clinical care. To be successful, AHGs must develop strategies to balance their energies, resources, and performance. The balanced scorecard (BSC) is a strategic management system that enables organizations to translate their mission and vision into specific objectives and metrics across multiple domains. To date, no hospitalist group has reported on BSC implementation. We set out to develop a BSC as part of a strategic planning initiative. Based on a needs assessment of the University of California, San Francisco, Division of Hospital Medicine, mission and vision statements were developed. We engaged representative faculty to develop strategic objectives and determine performance metrics across 4 BSC perspectives. There were 41 metrics identified, and 16 were chosen for the initial BSC. It allowed us to achieve several goals: 1) present a broad view of performance, 2) create transparency and accountability, 3) communicate goals and engage faculty, and 4) ensure we use data to guide strategic decisions. Several lessons were learned, including the need to build faculty consensus, establish metrics with reliable measureable data, and the power of the BSC to drive goals across the division. We successfully developed and implemented a BSC in an AHG as part of a strategic planning initiative. The BSC has been instrumental in allowing us to achieve balanced success in multiple domains. Academic groups should consider employing the BSC as it allows for a data-driven strategic planning and assessment process. Copyright © 2013 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  20. Real-time DSP implementation for MRF-based video motion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumontier, C; Luthon, F; Charras, J P

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the real time implementation of a simple and robust motion detection algorithm based on Markov random field (MRF) modeling, MRF-based algorithms often require a significant amount of computations. The intrinsic parallel property of MRF modeling has led most of implementations toward parallel machines and neural networks, but none of these approaches offers an efficient solution for real-world (i.e., industrial) applications. Here, an alternative implementation for the problem at hand is presented yielding a complete, efficient and autonomous real-time system for motion detection. This system is based on a hybrid architecture, associating pipeline modules with one asynchronous module to perform the whole process, from video acquisition to moving object masks visualization. A board prototype is presented and a processing rate of 15 images/s is achieved, showing the validity of the approach.

  1. Memory Efficient VLSI Implementation of Real-Time Motion Detection System Using FPGA Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Singh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Motion detection is the heart of a potentially complex automated video surveillance system, intended to be used as a standalone system. Therefore, in addition to being accurate and robust, a successful motion detection technique must also be economical in the use of computational resources on selected FPGA development platform. This is because many other complex algorithms of an automated video surveillance system also run on the same platform. Keeping this key requirement as main focus, a memory efficient VLSI architecture for real-time motion detection and its implementation on FPGA platform is presented in this paper. This is accomplished by proposing a new memory efficient motion detection scheme and designing its VLSI architecture. The complete real-time motion detection system using the proposed memory efficient architecture along with proper input/output interfaces is implemented on Xilinx ML510 (Virtex-5 FX130T FPGA development platform and is capable of operating at 154.55 MHz clock frequency. Memory requirement of the proposed architecture is reduced by 41% compared to the standard clustering based motion detection architecture. The new memory efficient system robustly and automatically detects motion in real-world scenarios (both for the static backgrounds and the pseudo-stationary backgrounds in real-time for standard PAL (720 × 576 size color video.

  2. Implementing Kanban for agile process management within the ALMA Software Operations Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveco, Johnny; Mora, Matias; Shen, Tzu-Chiang; Soto, Ruben; Sepulveda, Jorge; Ibsen, Jorge

    2014-07-01

    After the inauguration of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), the Software Operations Group in Chile has refocused its objectives to: (1) providing software support to tasks related to System Integration, Scientific Commissioning and Verification, as well as Early Science observations; (2) testing the remaining software features, still under development by the Integrated Computing Team across the world; and (3) designing and developing processes to optimize and increase the level of automation of operational tasks. Due to their different stakeholders, each of these tasks presents a wide diversity of importances, lifespans and complexities. Aiming to provide the proper priority and traceability for every task without stressing our engineers, we introduced the Kanban methodology in our processes in order to balance the demand on the team against the throughput of the delivered work. The aim of this paper is to share experiences gained during the implementation of Kanban in our processes, describing the difficulties we have found, solutions and adaptations that led us to our current but still evolving implementation, which has greatly improved our throughput, prioritization and problem traceability.

  3. Product information representation for feature conversion and implementation of group technology automated coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medland, A. J.; Zhu, Guowang; Gao, Jian; Sun, Jian

    1996-03-01

    Feature conversion, also called feature transformation and feature mapping, is defined as the process of converting features from one view of an object to another view of the object. In a relatively simple implementation, for each application the design features are automatically converted into features specific for that application. All modifications have to be made via the design features. This is the approach that has attracted most attention until now. In the ideal situation, however, conversions directly from application views to the design view, and to other applications views, are also possible. In this paper, some difficulties faced in feature conversion are discussed. A new representation scheme of feature-based parts models has been proposed for the purpose of one-way feature conversion. The parts models consist of five different levels of abstraction, extending from an assembly level and its attributes, single parts and their attributes, single features and their attributes, one containing the geometric reference element and finally one for detailed geometry. One implementation of feature conversion for rotational components within GT (Group Technology) has already been undertaken using an automated coding procedure operating on a design-feature database. This database has been generated by a feature-based design system, and the GT coding scheme used in this paper is a specific scheme created for a textile machine manufacturing plant. Such feature conversion techniques presented here are only in their early stages of development and further research is underway.

  4. Interactions of selected policy-stakeholder groups implementing middle school science standards-based systemic reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydston, Theodore Lewis, III

    1999-12-01

    This research is an interpretive inquiry into the views and interactions of stakeholders in a district office of a large school system responsible for implementing science systemic reform. Three major sources of data were used in this research: surveys, stakeholder interviews, and autobiographical reflection on experiences as part of the reform initiative. This is an emergent research that is evident in the shift in the focus of research questions and their supporting assumptions during the research. The literature review describes standards-based reform, arguments about reform, and the major dimensions of reform research. The results of the survey of stakeholders revealed that the views among the stakeholder groups followed the system hierarchy and could be separated into two large groups; staff responsible for implementing the reform initiative and the other stakeholder groups. Each of these groups was composed of identifiable subgroups. The interviews with stakeholders revealed how their different attitudes, values, and beliefs frame the context of stakeholder interactions. An over reliance on an authoritarian view of decision-making leaves many stakeholders feeling disempowered and critical of others. This atmosphere promotes blaming, which inhibits collegial interaction. Work experiences in the district office revealed how stakeholders' unaddressed assumptions, attitudes, and beliefs promote fragmentation and competition rather than cooperation. Hidden assumptions about management by control and mandate, competition, and teaching and learning appear to restrain the interactions of stakeholders. Support of the National Science Education Standards was identified as a unifying view among the stakeholders, yet the professional development program focused on content and pedagogical knowledge without addressing stakeholder concerns and beliefs about the intended constructivist framework of the program. Stakeholders' attitudes about the issue of equity demonstrated

  5. 76 FR 22017 - Implementation of the Understandings Reached at the 2010 Australia Group (AG) Plenary Meeting and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ...-01] RIN 0694-AF04 Implementation of the Understandings Reached at the 2010 Australia Group (AG... understandings reached at the June 2010 plenary meeting of the Australia Group (AG) and to make certain AG... reached at the annual plenary meeting of the Australia Group (AG) that was held in Paris, France, from May...

  6. Detection of group D and viridans streptococci in blood by radiometric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckwith, D.G.

    1979-01-01

    A prospective study was conducted to evaluate the radiometric detection of group D and viridans streptococci in blood, using three media preparations, Bactec 6A and 6B isotonic media and 8B hypertonic medium. All enterococci tested were detected by the 6A and 6B media. However, the 6A medium failed to detect 76% of the Streptococcus bovis isolates and 57% of the viridans streptococci, whereas all S. bovis isolates and 95% of the viridans streptococci were detected with the 6B formulation. No improvement in detection was noted in comparing the 6B and the 8B hypertonic media. The importance of adequate detection of this group of organisms, especially in patients with endocarditis, is discussed

  7. The report of the Black Advisory Group and the implementation of its recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubery, E.D.

    1986-01-01

    The report of the Black Inquiry concluded that mortality in the whole of west Cumbria was near to the national average, but this finding did not preclude the existence of local pockets of high incidence. In particular, studies available to the Group did show that incidence of lymphoid malignancy in young people under the age of 15 in Seascale and mortality from leukaemia in those under 25 years in former Millom Rural District, which includes Seascale, were above the expected level. When estimates of the average doses of radiation received by members of the public living in the area were calculated, these doses seemed to be insufficient to explain the observed excess. The Group gave a qualified reassurance to the people who were concerned about a possible health hazard in the neighbourhood of Sellafield, stressed the uncertainties with regard to both available epidemiological data and estimation of radiation doses, and made 10 recommendations for further work, which were accepted by government. Progress on their implementation is described. (author)

  8. Hardware Implementation of a Modified Delay-Coordinate Mapping-Based QRS Complex Detection Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Zemva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a modified delay-coordinate mapping-based QRS complex detection algorithm, suitable for hardware implementation. In the original algorithm, the phase-space portrait of an electrocardiogram signal is reconstructed in a two-dimensional plane using the method of delays. Geometrical properties of the obtained phase-space portrait are exploited for QRS complex detection. In our solution, a bandpass filter is used for ECG signal prefiltering and an improved method for detection threshold-level calculation is utilized. We developed the algorithm on the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database (sensitivity of 99.82% and positive predictivity of 99.82% and tested it on the long-term ST database (sensitivity of 99.72% and positive predictivity of 99.37%. Our algorithm outperforms several well-known QRS complex detection algorithms, including the original algorithm.

  9. Implementation of Simple and Functional Web Applications at the Alaska Volcano Observatory Remote Sensing Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    Web pages are ubiquitous and accessible, but when compared to stand-alone applications they are limited in capability. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) Remote Sensing Group has implemented web pages and supporting server software that provide relatively advanced features to any user able to meet basic requirements. Anyone in the world with access to a modern web browser (such as Mozilla Firefox 1.5 or Internet Explorer 6) and reasonable internet connection can fully use the tools, with no software installation or configuration. This allows faculty, staff and students at AVO to perform many aspects of volcano monitoring from home or the road as easily as from the office. Additionally, AVO collaborators such as the National Weather Service and the Anchorage Volcanic Ash Advisory Center are able to use these web tools to quickly assess volcanic events. Capabilities of this web software include (1) ability to obtain accurate measured remote sensing data values on an semi- quantitative compressed image of a large area, (2) to view any data from a wide time range of data swaths, (3) to view many different satellite remote sensing spectral bands and combinations, to adjust color range thresholds, (4) and to export to KML files which are viewable virtual globes such as Google Earth. The technologies behind this implementation are primarily Javascript, PHP, and MySQL which are free to use and well documented, in addition to Terascan, a commercial software package used to extract data from level-0 data files. These technologies will be presented in conjunction with the techniques used to combine them into the final product used by AVO and its collaborators for operational volcanic monitoring.

  10. A novel reduced-complexity group detection structure in MIMO frequency selective fading channels

    KAUST Repository

    Qaraqe, Khalid A.; Ahimian, Nariman R.; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a novel reduced complexity detection method named modified symbol flipping method is introduced and its advantages on reducing the burden of the calculations at the receiver compared to the optimum maximum likelihood detection method on multiple input- multiple output frequency selective fading channels are explained. The initial concept of the symbol flipping method is derived from a preliminary detection scheme named bit flipping which was introduced in [1]. The detection structure employed in this paper is ing, detection, and cancellation. On the detection stage, the proposed method is employed and the results are compared to the group maximum likelihood detection scheme proposed in [2]. Simulation results show that a 6 dB performance gain can be achieved at the expense of a slight increase in complexity in comparison with the conventional symbol flipping scheme. © 2010 Crown.

  11. A novel reduced-complexity group detection structure in MIMO frequency selective fading channels

    KAUST Repository

    Qaraqe, Khalid A.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper a novel reduced complexity detection method named modified symbol flipping method is introduced and its advantages on reducing the burden of the calculations at the receiver compared to the optimum maximum likelihood detection method on multiple input- multiple output frequency selective fading channels are explained. The initial concept of the symbol flipping method is derived from a preliminary detection scheme named bit flipping which was introduced in [1]. The detection structure employed in this paper is ing, detection, and cancellation. On the detection stage, the proposed method is employed and the results are compared to the group maximum likelihood detection scheme proposed in [2]. Simulation results show that a 6 dB performance gain can be achieved at the expense of a slight increase in complexity in comparison with the conventional symbol flipping scheme. © 2010 Crown.

  12. Serological and molecular detection of spotted fever group Rickettsia in a group of pet dogs from Luanda, Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barradas, Patrícia F; Vilhena, Hugo; Oliveira, Ana Cristina; Granada, Sara; Amorim, Irina; Ferreira, Paula; Cardoso, Luís; Gärtner, Fátima; de Sousa, Rita

    2017-05-31

    Infections with tick-borne rickettsiae can cause diseases well known in humans but still not so well characterized in dogs. Susceptibility to infection depends on the virulence of Rickettsia spp. and only a few of them have been described to cause disease in dogs. The aim of this study was to investigate the exposure to Rickettsia spp. among a group of pet dogs from Luanda, Angola. Out of 103 dogs included in the study, 62 (60.2%) were infested with ticks. Plasma specimens tested for serology by an immunofluorescence assay (IFA) revealed that six (5.8%) dogs had detectable immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to spotted fever group Rickettsia (SFGR), with endpoint titers of 64 for two dogs, 128 for three dogs and 1024 for one dog. From the seropositive group of dogs, five (83%) of them were males, with their age ranging from 1 to 8 years old. Among the seropositive dogs, four (66.7%) were parasitized with ticks and no breed (or cross) was found to be associated with specific antibodies. Rickettsia spp. DNA was detected by nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in two (1.9%) dogs that were found to be seronegative. Seroprevalence and molecular detection of Rickettsia spp. infection in this group of pet dogs from Luanda is low compared with other studies performed in the same type of hosts in other areas. Although many dogs were parasitized with ticks, a low prevalence of Rickettsia spp. could be related with the hypothesis of a low rickettsial prevalence in the infesting ticks. This study provides evidence that dogs in Luanda are exposed to Rickettsia spp., but further studies are needed to better characterize the bacterial infections in dogs and in their ectoparasites.

  13. A method for real-time memory efficient implementation of blob detection in large images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Vladimir L.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a method for real-time blob detection in large images with low memory cost. The method is suitable for implementation on the specialized parallel hardware such as multi-core platforms, FPGA and ASIC. It uses parallelism to speed-up the blob detection. The input image is divided into blocks of equal sizes to which the maximally stable extremal regions (MSER blob detector is applied in parallel. We propose the usage of multiresolution analysis for detection of large blobs which are not detected by processing the small blocks. This method can find its place in many applications such as medical imaging, text recognition, as well as video surveillance or wide area motion imagery (WAMI. We explored the possibilities of usage of detected blobs in the feature-based image alignment as well. When large images are processed, our approach is 10 to over 20 times more memory efficient than the state of the art hardware implementation of the MSER.

  14. A CCTV system with SMS alert (CMDSA): An implementation of pixel processing algorithm for motion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nurul Hidayah Ab; Abdullah, Nurul Azma; Hamid, Isredza Rahmi A.; Wen, Chuah Chai; Jelani, Mohamad Shafiqur Rahman Mohd

    2017-10-01

    Closed-Circuit TV (CCTV) system is one of the technologies in surveillance field to solve the problem of detection and monitoring by providing extra features such as email alert or motion detection. However, detecting and alerting the admin on CCTV system may complicate due to the complexity to integrate the main program with an external Application Programming Interface (API). In this study, pixel processing algorithm is applied due to its efficiency and SMS alert is added as an alternative solution for users who opted out email alert system or have no Internet connection. A CCTV system with SMS alert (CMDSA) was developed using evolutionary prototyping methodology. The system interface was implemented using Microsoft Visual Studio while the backend components, which are database and coding, were implemented on SQLite database and C# programming language, respectively. The main modules of CMDSA are motion detection, capturing and saving video, image processing and Short Message Service (SMS) alert functions. Subsequently, the system is able to reduce the processing time making the detection process become faster, reduce the space and memory used to run the program and alerting the system admin instantly.

  15. Systematic Assessment of Neutron and Gamma Backgrounds Relevant to Operational Modeling and Detection Technology Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archer, Daniel E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hornback, Donald Eric [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Jeffrey O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nicholson, Andrew D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Patton, Bruce W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peplow, Douglas E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, Thomas Martin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ayaz-Maierhafer, Birsen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings of a two year effort to systematically assess neutron and gamma backgrounds relevant to operational modeling and detection technology implementation. The first year effort focused on reviewing the origins of background sources and their impact on measured rates in operational scenarios of interest. The second year has focused on the assessment of detector and algorithm performance as they pertain to operational requirements against the various background sources and background levels.

  16. A framework for implementing a Distributed Intrusion Detection System (DIDS) with interoperabilty and information analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Davicino, Pablo; Echaiz, Javier; Ardenghi, Jorge Raúl

    2011-01-01

    Computer Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS) are primarily designed to protect availability, condentiality and integrity of critical information infrastructures. A Distributed IDS (DIDS) consists of several IDS over a large network(s), all of which communicate with each other, with a central server or with a cluster of servers that facilitates advanced network monitoring. In a distributed environment, DIDS are implemented using cooperative intelligent sensors distributed across the network(s). ...

  17. An efficient and cost effective FPGA based implementation of the Viola-Jones face detection algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Irgens

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We present an field programmable gate arrays (FPGA based implementation of the popular Viola-Jones face detection algorithm, which is an essential building block in many applications such as video surveillance and tracking. Our implementation is a complete system level hardware design described in a hardware description language and validated on the affordable DE2-115 evaluation board. Our primary objective is to study the achievable performance with a low-end FPGA chip based implementation. In addition, we release to the public domain the entire project. We hope that this will enable other researchers to easily replicate and compare their results to ours and that it will encourage and facilitate further research and educational ideas in the areas of image processing, computer vision, and advanced digital design and FPGA prototyping.

  18. IMPLEMENTATION OF INCIDENT DETECTION ALGORITHM BASED ON FUZZY LOGIC IN PTV VISSIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Borisovich Nikolaev

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Traffic incident management is a major challenge in the management of movement, requiring constant attention and significant investment, as well as fast and accurate solutions in order to re-establish normal traffic conditions. Automatic control methods are becoming an important factor for the reduction of traffic congestion caused by an arising incident. In this paper, the algorithm of automatic detection incident based on fuzzy logic is implemented in the software PTV VISSIM. 9 different types of tests were conducted on the two lane road section segment with changing traffic conditions: the location of the road accident, loading of traffic. The main conclusion of the research is that the proposed algorithm for the incidents detection demonstrates good performance in the time of detection and false alarms

  19. Implementation of a custom time-domain firmware trigger for RADAR-based cosmic ray detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prohira, S.; Besson, D.; Kunwar, S.; Ratzlaff, K.; Young, R.

    2018-05-01

    Interest in Radio-based detection schemes for ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) has surged in recent years, owing to the potentially very low cost/detection ratio. The method of radio-frequency (RF) scatter has been proposed as potentially the most economical detection technology. Though the first dedicated experiment to employ this method, the Telescope Array RADAR experiment (TARA) reported no signal, efforts to develop more robust and sensitive trigger techniques continue. This paper details the development of a time-domain firmware trigger that exploits characteristics of the expected scattered signal from an UHECR extensive-air shower (EAS). The improved sensitivity of this trigger is discussed, as well as implementation in two separate field deployments from 2016 to 2017.

  20. Flexible feature-space-construction architecture and its VLSI implementation for multi-scale object detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Aiwen; An, Fengwei; Zhang, Xiangyu; Chen, Lei; Huang, Zunkai; Jürgen Mattausch, Hans

    2018-04-01

    Feature extraction techniques are a cornerstone of object detection in computer-vision-based applications. The detection performance of vison-based detection systems is often degraded by, e.g., changes in the illumination intensity of the light source, foreground-background contrast variations or automatic gain control from the camera. In order to avoid such degradation effects, we present a block-based L1-norm-circuit architecture which is configurable for different image-cell sizes, cell-based feature descriptors and image resolutions according to customization parameters from the circuit input. The incorporated flexibility in both the image resolution and the cell size for multi-scale image pyramids leads to lower computational complexity and power consumption. Additionally, an object-detection prototype for performance evaluation in 65 nm CMOS implements the proposed L1-norm circuit together with a histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) descriptor and a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The proposed parallel architecture with high hardware efficiency enables real-time processing, high detection robustness, small chip-core area as well as low power consumption for multi-scale object detection.

  1. Design and implementation of an intrusion detection system based on IPv6 protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Li, Zhitang; Li, Yao; Li, Zhanchun

    2005-11-01

    Network intrusion detection systems (NIDS) are important parts of network security architecture. Although many NIDS have been proposed, there is little effort to expand the current set of NIDS to support IPv6 protocol. This paper presents the design and implementation of a Network-based Intrusion Detection System that supports both IPv6 protocol and IPv4 protocol. It characters rules based logging to perform content pattern matching and detect a variety of attacks and probes from IPv4 and IPv6.There are four primary subsystems to make it up: packet capture, packet decoder, detection engine, and logging and alerting subsystem. A new approach to packet capture that combined NAPI with MMAP is proposed in this paper. The test results show that the efficiency of packet capture can be improved significantly by this method. Several new attack tools for IPv6 have been developed for intrusion detection evaluation. Test shows that more than 20 kinds of IPv6 attacks can be detected by this system and it also has a good performance under heavy traffic load.

  2. Implementation intention and planning interventions in Health Psychology : Recommendations from the Synergy Expert Group for research and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagger, M.S.; Luszczynska, A.; de Wit, J.; Benyamini, Y.; Burkert, S.; Chamberland, P.-E.; Chater, A.; Dombrowski, S.U.; van Dongen, A.; French, D.P.; Gauchet, A.; Hankonen, N.; Karekla, M.; Kinney, A.Y.; Kwasnicka, D.; Lo, S.H.; López-Roig, S.; Meslot, C.; Marques, M.M.; Neter, E.; Plass, A.M.; Potthoff, S.; Rennie, L.; Scholz, U.; Stadler, G.; Stolte, E.; ten Hoor, G.; Verhoeven, A.A.C.; Wagner, M.; Oettingen, G.; Sheeran, P.; Gollwitzer, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    The current article details a position statement and recommendations for future research and practice on planning and implementation intentions in health contexts endorsed by the Synergy Expert Group. The group comprised world-leading researchers in health and social psychology and behavioural

  3. Implementation intention and planning interventions in Health Psychology: Recommendations from the Synergy Expert Group for research and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagger, M.S.; Luszczynska, A.; de Wit, J.; Benyamini, Y.; Burkert, S.; Chamberland, P.E.; Chater, A.; Dombrowski, S.U.; van Dongen, A.; French, D.P.; Gauchet, A.; Hankonen, N.; Karekla, M.; Kinney, A.Y.; Kwasnicka, D.; Lo, S.H.; López-Roig, S.; Meslot, C.; Marques, M.M.; Neter, E.; Plass, A.M.; Potthoff, S.; Rennie, L.; Scholz, U; Stadler, G.; Stolte, E.; Ten Hoor, G.; Verhoeven, A.; Wagner, M.; Oettingen, G.; Sheeran, P.; Gollwitzer, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    The current article details a position statement and recommendations for future research and practice on planning and implementation intentions in health contexts endorsed by the Synergy Expert Group. The group comprised world-leading researchers in health and social psychology and behavioural

  4. Implementation of a ferromagnetic detection system in a clinical MRI setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orchard, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the implementation of a ferromagnetic detection system (FMDS) into a clinical MRI setting. Materials and methods: One thousand patients were considered for MRI safety screening using an FMDS. Equipment used was a Ferroguard ® Screener (Metrasens Ltd, Malvern, Worcestershire, UK). Fully gowned patients rotated 360° in front of the FMDS in a standardized manner following traditional MRI screening methods (the use of a written questionnaire (Fig. B.1) and verbal interview. Results: Final results included 1032 individual screening events performed in 977 patients. There were 922 (94%) initial passes using the FMDS; 34 (4%) failed initial screens but passed a subsequent screen; 21 (2%) failed the initial and subsequent screens. Thus, including all screening events (n = 1032), there were 956 (93%) true negatives (TN); 21 (2%) false positives (FP) and 55 (5%) true positives (TP). No false negatives (FN) were recorded. Therefore, sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 98%. Conclusion: Implementation and correct usage of an FMDS proved to increase safety within a clinical MRI environment by alerting staff to ferromagnetic items or implants not identified using traditional MRI screening methods. An FMDS should be used as an adjunct to these methods. The information in this study pertains to the specific equipment used in this investigation. - Highlights: • Ferromagnetic detection system sensitivity in this study was 100%. • Ferromagnetic detection system specificity in this study was 98%. • The additional screening procedure had little impact on throughput ie additional time taken was minimal. • Staff training, technique and compliance is important in implementing the screening procedures. • The ferromagnetic detection system identified objects that may have demonstrated projectile, heating or artefact effects

  5. Establishing support groups for HIV-infected women: using experiences to develop guiding principles for project implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Maretha J; Mundell, Jonathan P

    2008-07-01

    HIV-infected women need support to deal with their diagnosis as well as with the stigma attached to HIV. As part of their practical training, Master's-level psychology students negotiated with the staff of four clinics in townships in Tshwane, South Africa, to establish support groups for HIV+ women and offered to assist them in facilitating the groups. This study aimed to understand why the implementation of groups was successful in one clinic and not other clinics. The student reports on their experiences and interaction with clinic staff and clients were used as sources of data. Using qualitative data analysis, different dynamics and factors that could affect project implementation were identified in each clinic. The socio-ecological and systems theories were used to understand implementation processes and obstacles in implementation. The metaphor of building a bridge over a gorge was used to describe the different phases in and obstacles to the implementation of the intervention. Valuable lessons were learnt, resulting in the development of guiding principles for the implementation of support groups in community settings.

  6. Software Design and Implementation of a Next Generation GNSS Data Logger for Radio Frequency Interference Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Sean

    The aim of this thesis is to implement a new GNSS interference detection system that extends the functionality of previous systems. This technology will be evaluated on the effectiveness of data collection in GPS L1, GPS L2C and all software changes required to implement it. Additionally there is discussion about extending the technology to log GLONASS L1 and GLONASS L2 data. This thesis is broken up into three sections. First, it describes the current state of GPS ASIC systems, using the SiGe receiver. It covers the reasons that this ASIC requires modernization as well as what behavior the system seeks to emulate. Next, it describes the new hardware that will make up the base of the new system. It covers what each component has been added for and its differences from the previous version. The focus is on the new ability of the receiver to receiver L2C simultaneously with L1 as well as the increased data rate which allows for better positioning. Finally, the thesis describes new software development effort centered around the new system. The thesis describes three test modes used, continuous logging, triggered logging and periodic logging. Extra attention is paid to the implementation of a real time networked version of the code. The final goal of the thesis is to build a low cost distributed system that is capable of detecting and localizing GPS and GLONASS interference on both the L1 and L2 bands.

  7. Understanding conflict-resolution taskload: Implementing advisory conflict-detection and resolution algorithms in an airspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Adan Ernesto

    2011-12-01

    From 2010 to 2030, the number of instrument flight rules aircraft operations handled by Federal Aviation Administration en route traffic centers is predicted to increase from approximately 39 million flights to 64 million flights. The projected growth in air transportation demand is likely to result in traffic levels that exceed the abilities of the unaided air traffic controller in managing, separating, and providing services to aircraft. Consequently, the Federal Aviation Administration, and other air navigation service providers around the world, are making several efforts to improve the capacity and throughput of existing airspaces. Ultimately, the stated goal of the Federal Aviation Administration is to triple the available capacity of the National Airspace System by 2025. In an effort to satisfy air traffic demand through the increase of airspace capacity, air navigation service providers are considering the inclusion of advisory conflict-detection and resolution systems. In a human-in-the-loop framework, advisory conflict-detection and resolution decision-support tools identify potential conflicts and propose resolution commands for the air traffic controller to verify and issue to aircraft. A number of researchers and air navigation service providers hypothesize that the inclusion of combined conflict-detection and resolution tools into air traffic control systems will reduce or transform controller workload and enable the required increases in airspace capacity. In an effort to understand the potential workload implications of introducing advisory conflict-detection and resolution tools, this thesis provides a detailed study of the conflict event process and the implementation of conflict-detection and resolution algorithms. Specifically, the research presented here examines a metric of controller taskload: how many resolution commands an air traffic controller issues under the guidance of a conflict-detection and resolution decision-support tool. The goal

  8. Design and implement of infrared small target real-time detection system based on pipeline technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lihui; Wang, Yongzhong; He, Yongqiang

    2007-01-01

    The detection for motive small target in infrared image sequence has become a hot topic nowadays. Background suppress algorithm based on minim gradient median filter and temporal recursion target detection algorithm are introduced. On the basis of contents previously mentioned, a four stages pipeline structure infrared small target detection process system, which aims at characters of algorithm complexity, large amounts of data to process, high frame frequency and exigent real-time character in this kind of application, is designed and implemented. The logical structure of the system was introduced and the function and signals flows are programmed. The system is composed of two FPGA chips and two DSP chips of TI. According to the function of each part, the system is divided into image preprocess stage, target detection stage, track relation stage and image output stage. The experiment of running algorithms on the system presented in this paper proved that the system could meet acquisition and process of 50Hz 240x320 digital image and the system could real time detect small target with a signal-noise ratio more than 3 reliably. The system achieves the characters of large amount of memory, high real-time processing, excellent extension and favorable interactive interface.

  9. Implementing the Bruker MALDI Biotyper in the Public Health Laboratory for C. botulinum Neurotoxin Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Perry

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the gold standard method for active botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT detection is the mouse bioassay (MBA. A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-developed mass spectrometry (MS-based assay that detects active BoNT was successfully validated and implemented in a public health laboratory in clinical matrices using the Bruker MALDI-TOF MS (Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry Biotyper. For the first time, a direct comparison with the MBA was performed to determine MS-based assay sensitivity using the Bruker MALDI Biotyper. Mice were injected with BoNT/A, /B, /E, and /F at concentrations surrounding the established MS assay limit of detection (LOD and analyzed simultaneously. For BoNT/B, /E, and /F, MS assay sensitivity was equivalent or better than the MBA at 25, 0.3, and 8.8 mLD50, respectively. BoNT/A was detected by the MBA between 1.8 and 18 mLD50, somewhat more sensitive than the MS method of 18 mLD50. Studies were performed to compare assay performance in clinical specimens. For all tested specimens, the MS method rapidly detected BoNT activity and serotype in agreement with, or in the absence of, results from the MBA. We demonstrate that the MS assay can generate reliable, rapid results while eliminating the need for animal testing.

  10. Design, Evaluation and Implementation of an Islanding Detection Method for a Micro-grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiying Zheng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Correct and fast detection of a micro-grid (MG islanding is essential to the MG since operation, control, and protection of the MG depend on its operating mode i.e., an interconnected mode or islanding mode. This study describes the design, evaluation and implementation of an islanding detection method for an MG, which includes a natural gas-fired generator, a doubly fed induction generator type wind generator, a photovoltaic generator, and some associated local loads. The proposed method is based on the instantaneous active and reactive powers at the point of common coupling (PCC of the MG. During the islanding mode, the instantaneous active and reactive powers at the PCC are constants, which depend on the voltage of the PCC and the impedance of the dedicated line. The performance of the proposed method is verified under various scenarios including islanding conditions for the different outputs of the MG, and fault conditions by varying the position, type, inception angle and resistance of the fault, using the PSCAD/EMTDC simulator. This paper also concludes by implementing proposed method into a TMS320C6701 digital signal processor. The results indicate that the proposed method successfully detects islanding for the MG in islanding conditions, and remains stable in fault conditions.

  11. Group-focused morality is associated with limited conflict detection and resolution capacity: Neuroanatomical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Kyle; Baumgartner, Thomas; Knoch, Daria

    2017-02-01

    Group-focused moral foundations (GMFs) - moral values that help protect the group's welfare - sharply divide conservatives from liberals and religiously devout from non-believers. However, there is little evidence about what drives this divide. Moral foundations theory and the model of motivated social cognition both associate group-focused moral foundations with differences in conflict detection and resolution capacity, but in opposing directions. Individual differences in conflict detection and resolution implicate specific neuroanatomical differences. Examining neuroanatomy thus affords an objective and non-biased opportunity to contrast these influential theories. Here, we report that increased adherence to group-focused moral foundations was strongly associated (whole-brain corrected) with reduced gray matter volume in key regions of the conflict detection and resolution system (anterior cingulate cortex and lateral prefrontal cortex). Because reduced gray matter is reliably associated with reduced neural and cognitive capacity, these findings support the idea outlined in the model of motivated social cognition that belief in group-focused moral values is associated with reduced conflict detection and resolution capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A TBB-CUDA Implementation for Background Removal in a Video-Based Fire Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a parallel TBB-CUDA implementation for the acceleration of single-Gaussian distribution model, which is effective for background removal in the video-based fire detection system. In this framework, TBB mainly deals with initializing work of the estimated Gaussian model running on CPU, and CUDA performs background removal and adaption of the model running on GPU. This implementation can exploit the combined computation power of TBB-CUDA, which can be applied to the real-time environment. Over 220 video sequences are utilized in the experiments. The experimental results illustrate that TBB+CUDA can achieve a higher speedup than both TBB and CUDA. The proposed framework can effectively overcome the disadvantages of limited memory bandwidth and few execution units of CPU, and it reduces data transfer latency and memory latency between CPU and GPU.

  13. Age group classification and gender detection based on forced expiratory spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgun, Sema; Ozbek, I Yucel

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigates the utility of forced expiratory spirometry (FES) test with efficient machine learning algorithms for the purpose of gender detection and age group classification. The proposed method has three main stages: feature extraction, training of the models and detection. In the first stage, some features are extracted from volume-time curve and expiratory flow-volume loop obtained from FES test. In the second stage, the probabilistic models for each gender and age group are constructed by training Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) and Support vector machine (SVM) algorithm. In the final stage, the gender (or age group) of test subject is estimated by using the trained GMM (or SVM) model. Experiments have been evaluated on a large database from 4571 subjects. The experimental results show that average correct classification rate performance of both GMM and SVM methods based on the FES test is more than 99.3 % and 96.8 % for gender and age group classification, respectively.

  14. Improving case detection of tuberculosis among children in Bangladesh: lessons learned through an implementation research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziaul Islam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to the Bangladesh National Tuberculosis Control Program (NTP, the proportion of childhood tuberculosis (TB among all reported cases is only 3%. This is considerably lower compared to other high-burden countries. One of our previous studies identified substantial gaps at the primary care level related to capacity of service providers, supply of required logistics and community awareness about childhood TB. Therefore, we conducted an implementation study with the objectives to address those gaps. Methods This implementation research was designed with pre and post-test evaluation at selected primary care facilities in urban and rural areas. Three interventions were implemented: (1 Training on childhood TB management for all categories of service providers (2 mass awareness campaign among primary and secondary school students and their teachers, mothers of <5y children, religious and community leaders and (3 facilitation of logistics supply at the study facilities. Training was conducted following the national guideline. We developed posters, leaflets, flipcharts and organized folksongs and street dramas as awareness campaign strategy. Quarterly follow up meetings were held with the facility managers of the study clinics. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted at the baseline and end line alongside review of service statistics to compare the change in community awareness and case detection of childhood TB. Results Awareness regarding childhood TB among all target audience increased significantly showing better understanding of child TB symptoms, transmission, duration and treatment option. Overall proportion of TB case detection among children increased in all three sites compared to baseline as well as NTP estimate with relatively higher proportion in urban site. Majority of the children were suffering from extra-pulmonary TB and there were more female TB cases than male. However, supply and maintenance of necessary

  15. Implementation Of Vision-Based Landing Target Detection For VTOL UAV Using Raspberry Pi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ei Ei Nyein

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents development and implementation of a real-time vision-based landing system for VTOL UAV. We use vision for precise target detection and recognition. A UAV is equipped with the onboard raspberry pi camera to take images and raspberry pi platform to operate the image processing techniques. Today image processing is used for various applications in this paper it is used for landing target extraction. And vision system is also used for take-off and landing function in VTOL UAV. Our landing target design is used as the helipad H shape. Firstly the image is captured to detect the target by the onboard camera. Next the capture image is operated in the onboard processor. Finally the alert sound signal is sent to the remote control RC for landing VTOL UAV. The information obtained from vision system is used to navigate a safe landing. The experimental results from real tests are presented.

  16. Barriers to Implementing Person-Centered Recovery Planning in Public Mental Health Organizations in Texas: Results from Nine Focus Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodge, Amy C; Kaufman, Laura; Stevens Manser, Stacey

    2017-05-01

    Despite being an established practice in the disabilities service systems, person-centered planning is a relatively new practice in the behavioral health system. As a result, little is known about the barriers that mental health organizations face in implementing person-centered recovery planning (PCRP). To fill this gap, results are presented from a qualitative analysis of nine focus groups at three public mental health organizations in Texas that have been implementing PCRP for at least 2 years. Findings suggest that organizations experienced 12 distinct barriers to PCRP implementation which were categorized into the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research domains of intervention characteristics, the outer setting, the inner setting, characteristics of individuals, and the implementation process. Half of these 12 barriers fell within the inner setting domain, suggesting that implementation efforts should be flexible and adaptable to organizational culture and context. One-quarter of the barriers fell into the domain of characteristics of individuals involved in the intervention, which further suggests implementation efforts should assess the impact that both staff and consumers have on implementation success.

  17. Cochrane Qualitative and Implementation Methods Group guidance series-paper 6: reporting guidelines for qualitative, implementation, and process evaluation evidence syntheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Kate; Booth, Andrew; Hannes, Karin; Cargo, Margaret; Noyes, Jane

    2018-05-01

    To outline contemporary and novel developments for the presentation and reporting of syntheses of qualitative, implementation, and process evaluation evidence and provide recommendations for the use of reporting guidelines. An overview of reporting guidelines for qualitative, implementation, and process evaluation evidence syntheses drawing on current international literature and the collective expert knowledge of the Cochrane Qualitative and Implementation Methods Group. Several reporting guidelines exist that can be used or adapted to report syntheses of qualitative, implementation, and process evaluation evidence. Methods to develop individual guidance varied. The use of a relevant reporting guideline can enhance the transparency, consistency, and quality of reporting. Guidelines that exist are generic, method specific, and for particular aspects of the reviewing process, searching. Caution is expressed over the potential for reporting guidelines to produce a mechanistic approach moving the focus away from the content and toward the procedural aspects of the review. The use of a reporting guideline is recommended and a five-step decision flowchart to guide the choice of reporting guideline is provided. Gaps remain in method-specific reporting guidelines such as mixed-study, implementation, and process evaluation evidence syntheses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Design and implementation of quench detection instrumentation for TF magnet system of SST-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khristi, Y.; Sharma, A.N.; Doshi, K.; Banaudha, M.; Prasad, U.; Varmora, P.; Patel, D.; Pradhan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Steady State Superconducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India is now in engineering validation phase. The assembled Toroidal Field (TF) magnet system of SST-1 will be operated at 10 kA of nominal current at helium cooled condition of 4.5 K. A reliable and fail proof quench detection (QD) system is essential for the safety and the investment protection requirements of the magnets. This QD system needs to continuously monitor all the superconducting coils, which include 16 TF magnets, return-loop, bus bars and current leads. In case of any event initiating the normal resistive zone and reaching thermal run-away, the QD system needs to trigger the magnet protection circuits. Precision instrumentation and control system with 204 signal channels had been developed for detection of quench anywhere in the entire TF magnet system. In the present configuration of quench detection scheme, the voltage drop across each double pancake (DP) of each TF coil are compared with its two adjacent DPs for the detection of normal zone and cancelation of inductive couples. Two identical redundant systems with one out of two configurations are successfully commissioned and tested at IPR. This paper describes the design and implementation of the QD system, Installation experience, validation test and initial results from the recent SST-1 magnet system charging

  19. Design And Implementation Of Tool For Detecting Anti-Patterns In Relational Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Kumar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anti-patterns are poor solution to design and im-plementation problems. Developers may introduce anti-patterns in their software systems because of time pressure lack of understanding communication and or-skills. Anti-patterns create problems in software maintenance and development. Database anti-patterns lead to complex and time consuming query process-ing and loss of integrity constraints. Detecting anti-patterns could reduce costs efforts and resources. Researchers have proposed approaches to detect anti-patterns in software development. But not much research has been done about database anti-patterns. This report presents two approaches to detect schema design anti-patterns in relational database. Our first approach is based on pattern matchingwe look into potential candidates based on schema patterns. Second approach is a machine learning based approach we generate features of possible anti-patterns and build SVMbased classifier to detect them. Here we look into these four anti-patterns a Multi-valued attribute b Nave tree based c Entity Attribute Value and dPolymorphic Association . We measure precision and recall of each approach and compare the results. SVM-based approach provides more precision and recall with more training dataset.

  20. Artificial Evolution for the Detection of Group Identities in Complex Artificial Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grappiolo, Corrado; Togelius, Julian; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at detecting the presence of group structures in complex artificial societies by solely observing and analysing the interactions occurring among the artificial agents. Our approach combines: (1) an unsupervised method for clustering interactions into two possible classes, namely in...

  1. Implementing Operational Analytics using Big Data Technologies to Detect and Predict Sensor Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, J.; Mital, R.; Nittur, S.; SanNicolas, B.; Wolf, C.; Jusufi, R.

    2016-09-01

    Operational analytics when combined with Big Data technologies and predictive techniques have been shown to be valuable in detecting mission critical sensor anomalies that might be missed by conventional analytical techniques. Our approach helps analysts and leaders make informed and rapid decisions by analyzing large volumes of complex data in near real-time and presenting it in a manner that facilitates decision making. It provides cost savings by being able to alert and predict when sensor degradations pass a critical threshold and impact mission operations. Operational analytics, which uses Big Data tools and technologies, can process very large data sets containing a variety of data types to uncover hidden patterns, unknown correlations, and other relevant information. When combined with predictive techniques, it provides a mechanism to monitor and visualize these data sets and provide insight into degradations encountered in large sensor systems such as the space surveillance network. In this study, data from a notional sensor is simulated and we use big data technologies, predictive algorithms and operational analytics to process the data and predict sensor degradations. This study uses data products that would commonly be analyzed at a site. This study builds on a big data architecture that has previously been proven valuable in detecting anomalies. This paper outlines our methodology of implementing an operational analytic solution through data discovery, learning and training of data modeling and predictive techniques, and deployment. Through this methodology, we implement a functional architecture focused on exploring available big data sets and determine practical analytic, visualization, and predictive technologies.

  2. Detecting groups of coevolving positions in a molecule: a clustering approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galtier Nicolas

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the patterns of co-substitutions in RNA is now well characterized, detection of coevolving positions in proteins remains a difficult task. It has been recognized that the signal is typically weak, due to the fact that (i amino-acid are characterized by various biochemical properties, so that distinct amino acids changes are not functionally equivalent, and (ii a given mutation can be compensated by more than one mutation, at more than one position. Results We present a new method based on phylogenetic substitution mapping. The two above-mentioned problems are addressed by (i the introduction of a weighted mapping, which accounts for the biochemical effects (volume, polarity, charge of amino-acid changes, (ii the use of a clustering approach to detect groups of coevolving sites of virtually any size, and (iii the distinction between biochemical compensation and other coevolutionary mechanisms. We apply this methodology to a previously studied data set of bacterial ribosomal RNA, and to three protein data sets (myoglobin of vertebrates, S-locus Receptor Kinase and Methionine Amino-Peptidase. Conclusion We succeed in detecting groups of sites which significantly depart the null hypothesis of independence. Group sizes range from pairs to groups of size ≃ 10, depending on the substitution weights used. The structural and functional relevance of these groups of sites are assessed, and the various evolutionary processes potentially generating correlated substitution patterns are discussed.

  3. Detection of shielded radionuclides from weak and poorly resolved spectra using group positive RIVAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kump, Paul; Bai, Er-Wei; Chan, Kung-Sik; Eichinger, William

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the identification of nuclides from weak and poorly resolved spectra in the presence of unknown radiation shielding materials such as carbon, water, concrete and lead. Since a shield will attenuate lower energies more so than higher ones, isotope sub-spectra must be introduced into models and into detection algorithms. We propose a new algorithm for detection, called group positive RIVAL, that encourages the selection of groups of sub-spectra rather than the selection of individual sub-spectra that may be from the same parent isotope. Indeed, the proposed algorithm incorporates group positive LASSO, and, as such, we supply the consistency results of group positive LASSO and adaptive group positive LASSO. In an example employing various shielding materials and material thicknesses, group positive RIVAL is shown to perform well in all scenarios with the exception of ones in which the shielding material is lead. - Highlights: ► Identification of nuclides from weak and poorly resolved spectra. ► Shielding materials such as carbon, water, concrete, and lead are considered. ► Isotope spectra are decomposed into their sub-spectra. ► A variable selection algorithm is proposed that encourages group selection. ► Simulations demonstrate the proposed method's performance when nuclides have been shielded

  4. Technical note: Risk detection in light steel frame buildings in design, construction and implementation phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yeganeh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Light Steel Frame System that is briefly called "LSF" is a building system which is used for implying of short-rise and mid-rise buildings (up to five floors. It is a desirable building system for civil engineers (in terms of gravity and lateral load in developing countries. This system gets significant benefits, although in Iran it is not much used due to the reasons such as: opposite with people’s culture, higher price in, lack of specialists, executive problems and etc. So in this article, we are tried to study LSF structures from the design and implementation stage to the operation and identify its risks exactly and finally offer a solution for each risk. Risk detections process is executed with interview technique in the Mashhad city and countryside. Totally, 56 projects are examined in this research. The study projects have been classified here. This classification includes residential buildings, villas, added-storey, schools, administrative, commercial, fastfood, industrial structures and LSF non-load-bearing walls. All the mentioned projects have been implemented in holy city of Mashhad or will be implemented in the future. Designers, administrators and employers are interviewed in person in all the above projects. Because of novelty of this system and its unknown risks, this research can be useful for managers decision making and for executing engineers in the field of choosing the best system for project and adoption of appropriate method for preventing these risks.

  5. Implementation of molecularly imprinted polymer beads for surface enhanced Raman detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamra, Tripta; Zhou, Tongchang; Montelius, Lars; Schnadt, Joachim; Ye, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have a predesigned molecular recognition capability that can be used to build robust chemical sensors. MIP-based chemical sensors allow label-free detection and are particularly interesting due to their simple operation. In this work we report the use of thiol-terminated MIP microspheres to construct surfaces for detection of a model organic analyte, nicotine, by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The nicotine-imprinted microspheres are synthesized by RAFT precipitation polymerization and converted into thiol-terminated microspheres through aminolysis. The thiol groups on the MIP surface allow the microspheres to be immobilized on a gold-coated substrate. Three different strategies are investigated to achieve surface enhanced Raman scattering in the vicinity of the imprinted sites: (1) direct sputtering of gold nanoparticles, (2) immobilization of gold colloids through the MIP's thiol groups, and (3) trapping of the MIP microspheres in a patterned SERS substrate. For the first time we show that large MIP microspheres can be turned into selective SERS surfaces through the three different approaches of assembly. The MIP-based sensing surfaces are used to detect nicotine to demonstrate the proof of concept. As synthesis and surface functionalization of MIP microspheres and nanoparticles are well established, the methods reported in this work are handy and efficient for constructing label-free chemical sensors, in particular for those based on SERS detection.

  6. Comparison of user groups' perspectives of barriers and facilitators to implementing electronic health records: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leduc Yvan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electronic health record (EHR implementation is currently underway in Canada, as in many other countries. These ambitious projects involve many stakeholders with unique perceptions of the implementation process. EHR users have an important role to play as they must integrate the EHR system into their work environments and use it in their everyday activities. Users hold valuable, first-hand knowledge of what can limit or contribute to the success of EHR implementation projects. A comprehensive synthesis of EHR users' perceptions is key to successful future implementation. This systematic literature review was aimed to synthesize current knowledge of the barriers and facilitators influencing shared EHR implementation among its various users. Methods Covering a period from 1999 to 2009, a literature search was conducted on nine electronic databases. Studies were included if they reported on users' perceived barriers and facilitators to shared EHR implementation, in healthcare settings comparable to Canada. Studies in all languages with an empirical study design were included. Quality and relevance of the studies were assessed. Four EHR user groups were targeted: physicians, other health care professionals, managers, and patients/public. Content analysis was performed independently by two authors using a validated extraction grid with pre-established categorization of barriers and facilitators for each group of EHR users. Results Of a total of 5,695 potentially relevant publications identified, 117 full text publications were obtained after screening titles and abstracts. After review of the full articles, 60 publications, corresponding to 52 studies, met the inclusion criteria. The most frequent adoption factors common to all user groups were design and technical concerns, ease of use, interoperability, privacy and security, costs, productivity, familiarity and ability with EHR, motivation to use EHR, patient and health

  7. 76 FR 26583 - Implementation of the Understandings Reached at the 2010 Australia Group (AG) Plenary Meeting and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security 15 CFR Part 774 [Docket No. 110106012-1013-01] RIN 0694-AF04 Implementation of the Understandings Reached at the 2010 Australia Group (AG) Plenary Meeting and Other AG-Related Clarifications and Corrections to the EAR Correction In rule document...

  8. What it takes to successfully implement technology for aging in place: focus groups with stakeholders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eveline J.M. Wouters; Katrien G. Luijkx; Hubertus J.M. Vrijhoef; Sebastiaan Theodorus Michaël Peek MSc

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a growing interest in empowering older adults to age in place by deploying various types of technology (ie, eHealth, ambient assisted living technology, smart home technology, and gerontechnology). However, initiatives aimed at implementing these technologies are complicated by

  9. Implementation and Process Issues in Using Group Triple P with Chinese Parents: Preliminary Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisante, Lea; Ng, Sally

    2003-01-01

    Implements and evaluates a positive parenting program intervention with Chinese parents. Results reveal significant improvements on the Prosocial Behavior Score. Given the unwillingness of some parents to complete questionnaires, the difficulties encountered in conducting evaluation in cross-cultural contexts are discussed, along with…

  10. FOCUS School-Based Skill-Building Groups: Training and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ediza; De Pedro, Kris Tunac; Astor, Ron Avi; Lester, Patricia; Benbenishty, Rami

    2015-01-01

    Military children encounter unique stressors that can affect their social and emotional well-being. These challenges can serve as a risk to the military child's successful academic performance. This study fills a much-needed research gap by examining the training and implementation of a public school-based intervention, Families OverComing Under…

  11. A New M Dwarf Debris Disk Candidate in a Young Moving Group Discovered with Disk Detective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Steven M.; Kuchner, Marc J.; Wisniewski, John P.; Gagne, Jonathan; Bans, Alissa S.; Bhattacharjee, Shambo; Currie, Thayne R.; Debes, John R.; Biggs, Joseph R; Bosch, Milton

    2016-01-01

    We used the Disk Detective citizen science project and the BANYAN II Bayesian analysis tool to identify a new candidate member of a nearby young association with infrared excess. WISE J080822.18-644357.3, an M5.5-type debris disk system with significant excess at both 12 and 22 microns, is a likely member (approx.90% BANYAN II probability) of the approx.45 Myr old Carina association. Since this would be the oldest M dwarf debris disk detected in a moving group, this discovery could be an important constraint on our understanding of M dwarf debris disk evolution.

  12. Working Group 1: Software System Design and Implementation for Environmental Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ISCMEM Working Group One Presentation, presentation with the purpose of fostering the exchange of information about environmental modeling tools, modeling frameworks, and environmental monitoring databases.

  13. A real time QRS detection using delay-coordinate mapping for the microcontroller implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Whan; Kim, Kyeong-Seop; Lee, Bongsoo; Lee, Byungchae; Lee, Myoung-Ho

    2002-01-01

    In this article, we propose a new algorithm using the characteristics of reconstructed phase portraits by delay-coordinate mapping utilizing lag rotundity for a real-time detection of QRS complexes in ECG signals. In reconstructing phase portrait the mapping parameters, time delay, and mapping dimension play important roles in shaping of portraits drawn in a new dimensional space. Experimentally, the optimal mapping time delay for detection of QRS complexes turned out to be 20 ms. To explore the meaning of this time delay and the proper mapping dimension, we applied a fill factor, mutual information, and autocorrelation function algorithm that were generally used to analyze the chaotic characteristics of sampled signals. From these results, we could find the fact that the performance of our proposed algorithms relied mainly on the geometrical property such as an area of the reconstructed phase portrait. For the real application, we applied our algorithm for designing a small cardiac event recorder. This system was to record patients' ECG and R-R intervals for 1 h to investigate HRV characteristics of the patients who had vasovagal syncope symptom and for the evaluation, we implemented our algorithm in C language and applied to MIT/BIH arrhythmia database of 48 subjects. Our proposed algorithm achieved a 99.58% detection rate of QRS complexes.

  14. Implementing Self-Management within a Group Counseling Context: Effects on Academic Enabling Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briesch DuBois, Jacquelyn M.; Briesch, Amy M.; Hoffman, Jessica A.; Struzziero, Joan; Toback, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Self-management interventions have been adapted to serve as targeted interventions to increase academic enabling behaviors in groups of students. However, a trade-off exists between adapting these interventions to feasibly fit group contexts and maintaining theoretical intervention components. This study examines the use of self-management within…

  15. Focus Group Interview in Family Practice Research: Implementing a qualitative research method

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Marjorie L.

    1992-01-01

    Focus group interviews, described as a qualitative research method with good potential in family medicine, are traced from their origins in market research to their growing role in sociology and medicine. Features of this method are described, including design, conduct, and analysis. Both proven and potential areas for primary care research using focus groups are outlined.

  16. Advancing Social Justice in Urban Schools through the Implementation of Transformative Groups for Youth of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Richard Q.; Rogers, Jennifer; Stanciu, Amalia; Silas, Melany; Brown-Smythe, Claudette; Austin, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    The unique challenges faced by some youth of color living in high poverty contexts necessitate the creation of innovative, culturally relevant, group interventions. Framing the work of group counselors from a social justice perspective provides a structure for emphasizing the complex intersection of economic, political, and socio-historical issues…

  17. Implementing structure and control over unofficial inventories in a multispecialty group practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, M

    1994-02-01

    Materiel managers have been in control of most aspects of the supply chain except for the inventories of the end users, which account for 70 percent of the inventory supply dollars. When the Materials Manager at Lexington Clinic in Lexington, Kentucky, was approached by the Clinic's Chief Executive Officer to implement cost containment measures, the Materials Manager seized the opportunity to implement a six-step program aimed at controlling those supply dollars. Through requisition training, enforcing approval levels, limiting the number of requisitioners, and establishing par levels on floor inventories, the clinic's "unofficial" inventory supply dollars were reduced by 7 percent in the first 12 departments where the par levels were established. The program was hailed as a tremendous success and a positive experience for everyone, from nurses to warehouse clerks.

  18. MimiLook: A Phylogenetic Workflow for Detection of Gene Acquisition in Major Orthologous Groups of Megavirales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sourabh; Panda, Arup; Colson, Philippe; Raoult, Didier; Pontarotti, Pierre

    2017-04-07

    With the inclusion of new members, understanding about evolutionary mechanisms and processes by which members of the proposed order, Megavirales, have evolved has become a key area of interest. The central role of gene acquisition has been shown in previous studies. However, the major drawback in gene acquisition studies is the focus on few MV families or putative families with large variation in their genetic structure. Thus, here we have tried to develop a methodology by which we can detect horizontal gene transfers (HGTs), taking into consideration orthologous groups of distantly related Megavirale families. Here, we report an automated workflow MimiLook, prepared as a Perl command line program, that deduces orthologous groups (OGs) from ORFomes of Megavirales and constructs phylogenetic trees by performing alignment generation, alignment editing and protein-protein BLAST (BLASTP) searching across the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) non-redundant (nr) protein sequence database. Finally, this tool detects statistically validated events of gene acquisitions with the help of the T-REX algorithm by comparing individual gene tree with NCBI species tree. In between the steps, the workflow decides about handling paralogs, filtering outputs, identifying Megavirale specific OGs, detection of HGTs, along with retrieval of information about those OGs that are monophyletic with organisms from cellular domains of life. By implementing MimiLook, we noticed that nine percent of Megavirale gene families (i.e., OGs) have been acquired by HGT, 80% OGs were Megaviralespecific and eight percent were found to be sharing common ancestry with members of cellular domains (Eukaryote, Bacteria, Archaea, Phages or other viruses) and three percent were ambivalent. The results are briefly discussed to emphasize methodology. Also, MimiLook is relevant for detecting evolutionary scenarios in other targeted phyla with user defined modifications. It can be accessed at

  19. Polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of Bacillus cereus group cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarne Munk; Leser, Thomas D.; Hendriksen, Niels Bohse

    2001-01-01

    of the B. cereus group in food and in the environment. Using 16S rDNA as target, a PCR assay for the detection of B. cereus group cells has been developed. Primers specific for the 16S rDNA of the B. cereus group bacteria were selected and used in combination with consensus primers for 165 rDNA as internal...... PCR procedure control. The PCR procedure was optimized with respect to annealing temperature. When DNA from the B. cereus group bacteria was present, the PCR assay yielded a B. cereus specific fragment, while when non-B. cereus prokaryotic DNA was present, the consensus 165 rDNA primers directed...

  20. Social Fingerprinting: detection of spambot groups through DNA-inspired behavioral modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cresci, Stefano; Di Pietro, Roberto; Petrocchi, Marinella

    2017-01-01

    Spambot detection in online social networks is a long-lasting challenge involving the study and design of detection techniques capable of efficiently identifying ever-evolving spammers. Recently, a new wave of social spambots has emerged, with advanced human-like characteristics that allow them...... to go undetected even by current state-of-the-art algorithms. In this paper, we show that efficient spambots detection can be achieved via an in-depth analysis of their collective behaviors exploiting the digital DNA technique for modeling the behaviors of social network users. Inspired by its...... biological counterpart, in the digital DNA representation the behavioral lifetime of a digital account is encoded in a sequence of characters. Then, we define a similarity measure for such digital DNA sequences. We build upon digital DNA and the similarity between groups of users to characterize both genuine...

  1. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) detect rhythmic groups in music, but not the beat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honing, Henkjan; Merchant, Hugo; Háden, Gábor P; Prado, Luis; Bartolo, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    It was recently shown that rhythmic entrainment, long considered a human-specific mechanism, can be demonstrated in a selected group of bird species, and, somewhat surprisingly, not in more closely related species such as nonhuman primates. This observation supports the vocal learning hypothesis that suggests rhythmic entrainment to be a by-product of the vocal learning mechanisms that are shared by several bird and mammal species, including humans, but that are only weakly developed, or missing entirely, in nonhuman primates. To test this hypothesis we measured auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) in two rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), probing a well-documented component in humans, the mismatch negativity (MMN) to study rhythmic expectation. We demonstrate for the first time in rhesus monkeys that, in response to infrequent deviants in pitch that were presented in a continuous sound stream using an oddball paradigm, a comparable ERP component can be detected with negative deflections in early latencies (Experiment 1). Subsequently we tested whether rhesus monkeys can detect gaps (omissions at random positions in the sound stream; Experiment 2) and, using more complex stimuli, also the beat (omissions at the first position of a musical unit, i.e. the 'downbeat'; Experiment 3). In contrast to what has been shown in human adults and newborns (using identical stimuli and experimental paradigm), the results suggest that rhesus monkeys are not able to detect the beat in music. These findings are in support of the hypothesis that beat induction (the cognitive mechanism that supports the perception of a regular pulse from a varying rhythm) is species-specific and absent in nonhuman primates. In addition, the findings support the auditory timing dissociation hypothesis, with rhesus monkeys being sensitive to rhythmic grouping (detecting the start of a rhythmic group), but not to the induced beat (detecting a regularity from a varying rhythm).

  2. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta detect rhythmic groups in music, but not the beat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henkjan Honing

    Full Text Available It was recently shown that rhythmic entrainment, long considered a human-specific mechanism, can be demonstrated in a selected group of bird species, and, somewhat surprisingly, not in more closely related species such as nonhuman primates. This observation supports the vocal learning hypothesis that suggests rhythmic entrainment to be a by-product of the vocal learning mechanisms that are shared by several bird and mammal species, including humans, but that are only weakly developed, or missing entirely, in nonhuman primates. To test this hypothesis we measured auditory event-related potentials (ERPs in two rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta, probing a well-documented component in humans, the mismatch negativity (MMN to study rhythmic expectation. We demonstrate for the first time in rhesus monkeys that, in response to infrequent deviants in pitch that were presented in a continuous sound stream using an oddball paradigm, a comparable ERP component can be detected with negative deflections in early latencies (Experiment 1. Subsequently we tested whether rhesus monkeys can detect gaps (omissions at random positions in the sound stream; Experiment 2 and, using more complex stimuli, also the beat (omissions at the first position of a musical unit, i.e. the 'downbeat'; Experiment 3. In contrast to what has been shown in human adults and newborns (using identical stimuli and experimental paradigm, the results suggest that rhesus monkeys are not able to detect the beat in music. These findings are in support of the hypothesis that beat induction (the cognitive mechanism that supports the perception of a regular pulse from a varying rhythm is species-specific and absent in nonhuman primates. In addition, the findings support the auditory timing dissociation hypothesis, with rhesus monkeys being sensitive to rhythmic grouping (detecting the start of a rhythmic group, but not to the induced beat (detecting a regularity from a varying rhythm.

  3. Detection of a typhus group Rickettsia in Amblyomma ticks in the state of Nuevo Leon, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Sanchez, Aaron; Bouyer, Donald H; Alcantara-Rodriguez, Virginia; Mafra, Claudio; Zavala-Castro, Jorge; Whitworth, Ted; Popov, Vsevolod L; Fernandez-Salas, Ildefonso; Walker, David H

    2005-12-01

    The state of Nuevo Leon, Mexico has had outbreaks of typhus group rickettsiosis, most recently recognized in 1997. Evaluation of the sera of 345 patients with a dengue-like illness revealed that 25.5% had antibodies reactive with typhus group rickettsiae and 16% had antibodies to Rickettsia parkeri. Rickettsiae were detected by PCR and shell-vial isolations in the field-collected Amblyomma ticks. Molecular characterization by DNA sequence analysis of the gltA, ompB, and 17-kDa gene identified the organisms to be R. prowazekii.

  4. Group method of data handling and neral networks applied in monitoring and fault detection in sensors in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno, Elaine Inacio

    2011-01-01

    The increasing demand in the complexity, efficiency and reliability in modern industrial systems stimulated studies on control theory applied to the development of Monitoring and Fault Detection system. In this work a new Monitoring and Fault Detection methodology was developed using GMDH (Group Method of Data Handling) algorithm and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) which was applied to the IEA-R1 research reactor at IPEN. The Monitoring and Fault Detection system was developed in two parts: the first was dedicated to preprocess information, using GMDH algorithm; and the second part to the process information using ANNs. The GMDH algorithm was used in two different ways: firstly, the GMDH algorithm was used to generate a better database estimated, called matrix z , which was used to train the ANNs. After that, the GMDH was used to study the best set of variables to be used to train the ANNs, resulting in a best monitoring variable estimative. The methodology was developed and tested using five different models: one Theoretical Model and four Models using different sets of reactor variables. After an exhausting study dedicated to the sensors Monitoring, the Fault Detection in sensors was developed by simulating faults in the sensors database using values of 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% in these sensors database. The results obtained using GMDH algorithm in the choice of the best input variables to the ANNs were better than that using only ANNs, thus making possible the use of these methods in the implementation of a new Monitoring and Fault Detection methodology applied in sensors. (author)

  5. Implementation in an FPGA circuit of Edge detection algorithm based on the Discrete Wavelet Transforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouganssa, Issam; Sbihi, Mohamed; Zaim, Mounia

    2017-07-01

    The 2D Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) is a computationally intensive task that is usually implemented on specific architectures in many imaging systems in real time. In this paper, a high throughput edge or contour detection algorithm is proposed based on the discrete wavelet transform. A technique for applying the filters on the three directions (Horizontal, Vertical and Diagonal) of the image is used to present the maximum of the existing contours. The proposed architectures were designed in VHDL and mapped to a Xilinx Sparten6 FPGA. The results of the synthesis show that the proposed architecture has a low area cost and can operate up to 100 MHz, which can perform 2D wavelet analysis for a sequence of images while maintaining the flexibility of the system to support an adaptive algorithm.

  6. Implementation of Microfluidic Chip Electrophoresis for the Detection of B-cell Clonality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vazan M

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A clonal population of B-cells is defined as those cells arising from the mitotic division of a single somatic cell with the same rearrangement of immunoglobulin genes. This gives rise to DNA markers for each individual lymphoid cell and its progenies and enables us to study clonality in different B-cell malignancies using multiplex polymerase chain reaction - PCR. The BIOMED-2 protocol has been implemented for clonality detection in lymphoproliferative diseases and exploits multiplex PCR reaction, subsequently analyzed by heteroduplex analysis (HDA using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE. With the advent of miniaturization and automation of molecular biology methods, lab-on-chip technologies were developed and replace partially the conventional approaches. We tested device for microfluidic chip, which is used for B-cells clonality analysis, using a PCR reaction for three subregions called frameworks (FR of the immunoglobulin heavy locus (IGH gene.

  7. Implementation of Reconfigurable Manufacturing Systems, the Case of The LEGO Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Ying; Bilberg, Arne; Hadar, Ronen

    of reconfigurable manufacturing systems (RMS). A literature review is made to describe the advantages and core characteristics of RMS. Based on the theory, a conceptual model is developed to analyze where RMS would be most suitable and have most benefits in The LEGO Group. Finally, the conclusion is drawn based...... on the analysis through the model. Keywords: Reconfigurable Manufacturing Systems, Conceptual Model of RMS, Production of The LEGO Group...

  8. Grouped fuzzy SVM with EM-based partition of sample space for clustered microcalcification detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiya; Feng, Jun; Wang, Hongyu

    2017-07-20

    Detection of clustered microcalcification (MC) from mammograms plays essential roles in computer-aided diagnosis for early stage breast cancer. To tackle problems associated with the diversity of data structures of MC lesions and the variability of normal breast tissues, multi-pattern sample space learning is required. In this paper, a novel grouped fuzzy Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm with sample space partition based on Expectation-Maximization (EM) (called G-FSVM) is proposed for clustered MC detection. The diversified pattern of training data is partitioned into several groups based on EM algorithm. Then a series of fuzzy SVM are integrated for classification with each group of samples from the MC lesions and normal breast tissues. From DDSM database, a total of 1,064 suspicious regions are selected from 239 mammography, and the measurement of Accuracy, True Positive Rate (TPR), False Positive Rate (FPR) and EVL = TPR* 1-FPR are 0.82, 0.78, 0.14 and 0.72, respectively. The proposed method incorporates the merits of fuzzy SVM and multi-pattern sample space learning, decomposing the MC detection problem into serial simple two-class classification. Experimental results from synthetic data and DDSM database demonstrate that our integrated classification framework reduces the false positive rate significantly while maintaining the true positive rate.

  9. Shilling attack detection for recommender systems based on credibility of group users and rating time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Wen, Junhao; Qu, Qiang; Zeng, Jun; Cheng, Tian

    2018-01-01

    Recommender systems are vulnerable to shilling attacks. Forged user-generated content data, such as user ratings and reviews, are used by attackers to manipulate recommendation rankings. Shilling attack detection in recommender systems is of great significance to maintain the fairness and sustainability of recommender systems. The current studies have problems in terms of the poor universality of algorithms, difficulty in selection of user profile attributes, and lack of an optimization mechanism. In this paper, a shilling behaviour detection structure based on abnormal group user findings and rating time series analysis is proposed. This paper adds to the current understanding in the field by studying the credibility evaluation model in-depth based on the rating prediction model to derive proximity-based predictions. A method for detecting suspicious ratings based on suspicious time windows and target item analysis is proposed. Suspicious rating time segments are determined by constructing a time series, and data streams of the rating items are examined and suspicious rating segments are checked. To analyse features of shilling attacks by a group user's credibility, an abnormal group user discovery method based on time series and time window is proposed. Standard testing datasets are used to verify the effect of the proposed method.

  10. A New Strategy to Reduce Influenza Escape: Detecting Therapeutic Targets Constituted of Invariance Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Lao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenicity of the different flu species is a real public health problem worldwide. To combat this scourge, we established a method to detect drug targets, reducing the possibility of escape. Besides being able to attach a drug candidate, these targets should have the main characteristic of being part of an essential viral function. The invariance groups that are sets of residues bearing an essential function can be detected genetically. They consist of invariant and synthetic lethal residues (interdependent residues not varying or slightly varying when together. We analyzed an alignment of more than 10,000 hemagglutinin sequences of influenza to detect six invariance groups, close in space, and on the protein surface. In parallel we identified five potential pockets on the surface of hemagglutinin. By combining these results, three potential binding sites were determined that are composed of invariance groups located respectively in the vestigial esterase domain, in the bottom of the stem and in the fusion area. The latter target is constituted of residues involved in the spring-loaded mechanism, an essential step in the fusion process. We propose a model describing how this potential target could block the reorganization of the hemagglutinin HA2 secondary structure and prevent viral entry into the host cell.

  11. Performance Analysis of Hierarchical Group Key Management Integrated with Adaptive Intrusion Detection in Mobile ad hoc Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-05

    applications in wireless networks such as military battlefields, emergency response, mobile commerce , online gaming, and collaborative work are based on the...www.elsevier.com/locate/peva Performance analysis of hierarchical group key management integrated with adaptive intrusion detection in mobile ad hoc...Accepted 19 September 2010 Available online 26 September 2010 Keywords: Mobile ad hoc networks Intrusion detection Group communication systems Group

  12. Detecting gender before you know it: How implementation intentions control early gender categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hügelschäfer, Sabine; Jaudas, Alexander; Achtziger, Anja

    2016-10-15

    Gender categorization is highly automatic. Studies measuring ERPs during the presentation of male and female faces in a categorization task showed that this categorization is extremely quick (around 130ms, indicated by the N170). We tested whether this automatic process can be controlled by goal intentions and implementation intentions. First, we replicated the N170 modulation on gender-incongruent faces as reported in previous research. This effect was only observed in a task in which faces had to be categorized according to gender, but not in a task that required responding to a visual feature added to the face stimuli (the color of a dot) while gender was irrelevant. Second, it turned out that the N170 modulation on gender-incongruent faces was altered if a goal intention was set that aimed at controlling a gender bias. We interpret this finding as an indicator of nonconscious goal pursuit. The N170 modulation was completely absent when this goal intention was furnished with an implementation intention. In contrast, intentions did not alter brain activity at a later time window (P300), which is associated with more complex and rather conscious processes. In line with previous research, the P300 was modulated by gender incongruency even if individuals were strongly involved in another task, demonstrating the automaticity of gender detection. We interpret our findings as evidence that automatic gender categorization that occurs at a very early processing stage can be effectively controlled by intentions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Short-Term Impact of a Teen Pregnancy-Prevention Intervention Implemented in Group Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Roy F; Vesely, Sara K; Green, Jennifer; Fluhr, Janene; Williams, Jean

    2016-11-01

    Youth living in group home settings are at significantly greater risk for sexual risk behaviors; however, there are no sexual health programs designed specifically for these youth. The study's purpose was to assess the effectiveness of a teen pregnancy-prevention program for youth living in group home foster care settings and other out-of-home placements. The study design was a cluster randomized controlled trial involving youth (N = 1,037) recruited from 44 residential group homes located in California, Maryland, and Oklahoma. Within each state, youth (mean age = 16.2 years; 82% male; 37% Hispanic, 20% African-American, 20% white, and 17% multiracial) in half the group homes were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n = 40 clusters) and the other half were randomly assigned to a control group that offered "usual care" (n = 40 clusters). The intervention (i.e., Power Through Choices [PTC]) was a 10-session, age-appropriate, and medically accurate sexual health education program. Compared to the control group, youth in the PTC intervention showed significantly greater improvements (p attitude areas, all three self-efficacy areas, and two of three behavioral intention areas. This is the first published randomized controlled trial of a teen pregnancy-prevention program designed for youth living in foster care settings and other out-of-home placements. The numerous significant improvements in short-term outcomes are encouraging and provide preliminary evidence that the PTC program is an effective pregnancy-prevention program. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Importance sampling implemented in the code PRIZMA for deep penetration and detection problems in reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandiev, Y.Z.; Zatsepin, O.V.

    2013-01-01

    At RFNC-VNIITF, the PRIZMA code which has been developed for more than 30 years, is used to model radiation transport by the Monte Carlo method. The code implements individual and coupled tracking of neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons and ions in one dimensional (1D), 2D or 3D geometry. Attendance estimators are used for tallying, i.e., the estimators whose scores are only nonzero from particles which cross a region or surface of interest. Importance sampling is used to make deep penetration and detection calculations more effective. However, its application to reactor analysis appeared peculiar and required further development. The paper reviews methods used for deep penetration and detection calculations by PRIZMA. It describes in what these calculations differ when applied to reactor analysis and how we compute approximated importance functions and parameters for biased distributions. Methods to control the statistical weight of particles are also discussed. A number of test and applied calculations which were done for the purpose of verification are provided. They are shown to agree either with asymptotic solutions if exist, or with results of analog calculations or predictions by other codes. The applied calculations include the estimation of ex-core detector response from neutron sources arranged in the core, and the estimation of in-core detector response. (authors)

  15. Detection of Group B Streptococcus in Brazilian pregnant women and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Silveira Castellano-Filho

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Group B Streptococcus (GBS is still not routinely screened during pregnancy in Brazil, being prophylaxis and empirical treatment based on identification of risk groups. This study aimed to investigate GBS prevalence in Brazilian pregnant women by culture or polymerase chain reaction (PCR associated to the enrichment culture, and to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of isolated bacteria, so as to support public health policies and empirical prophylaxis. After an epidemiological survey, vaginal and anorectal specimens were collected from 221 consenting laboring women. Each sample was submitted to enrichment culture and sheep blood agar was used to isolate suggestive GBS. Alternatively, specific PCR was performed from enrichment cultures. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined for isolated bacteria by agar diffusion method. No risk groups were identified. Considering the culture-based methodology, GBS was detected in 9.5% of the donors. Twenty five bacterial strains were isolated and identified. Through the culture-PCR methodology, GBS was detected in 32.6% specimens. Bacterial resistance was not detected against ampicillin, cephazolin, vancomycin and ciprofloxacin, whereas 22.7% were resistant to erythromycin and 50% were resistant to clindamycin. GBS detection may be improved by the association of PCR and enrichment culture. Considering that colony selection in agar plates may be laboring and technician-dependent, it may not reflect the real prevalence of streptococci. As in Brazil prevention strategies to reduce the GBS associated diseases have not been adopted, prospective studies are needed to anchor public health policies especially considering the regional GBS antimicrobial susceptibility patterns.

  16. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: successful systematic implementation of a group approach to genetic counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benusiglio, Patrick R; Di Maria, Marina; Dorling, Leila; Jouinot, Anne; Poli, Antoine; Villebasse, Sophie; Le Mentec, Marine; Claret, Béatrice; Boinon, Diane; Caron, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    The increase in referrals to cancer genetics clinics, partially associated with the "Angelina Jolie effect", presents a challenge to existing services, many are already running at full capacity. More efficient ways to deliver genetic counselling are therefore urgently needed. We now systematically offer group instead of standard individual counselling to patients with suspected Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer. Group sessions last 30 min. The first twenty consist of a presentation by the genetic counsellor, the next ten of a discussion involving a cancer geneticist and a psychologist. A short individual consultation ensues, where personal and family issues are addressed and consent obtained. Blood is drawn afterwards. Satisfaction and knowledge are evaluated. We report data for the Oct-2014-Aug-2015 period. 210 patients attended group counselling, up to eight simultaneously. We always fitted them within a 4-h time frame. Mean satisfaction score was 41/43. Knowledge scores increased from 3.1/6 to 4.9/6 post-counselling (p value group counselling, we have withstood increases in referrals without compromising care. The "Angelina Jolie effect" and rapid developments in personalized medicine threaten to overwhelm cancer genetics clinics. In this context, our innovative approach should ensure that all patients have access to approved services.

  17. Identifying Key Stakeholder Groups for Implementing a Place Branding Policy in Saint Petersburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulibanova V. V.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Regional brands have become a valuable intangible asset and a crucial competitive resource for forging partnerships. An effective place branding policy is impossible without a precise understanding of the interests of stakeholder groups. It is essential to realize that each region is unique in its own way. Territories differ in the structure of stakeholders, their influence on regional development, and the range of leverages over regional decision-makers. This study aims to give a more precise definition of key groups of stakeholders in Saint Petersburg place branding, and to identify them. The authors employ the method of theoretical and empirical typology of a territory’s stakeholders within a theoretical framework proposed by E. Freeman, P. Kotler, S. Zenker, and E. Brown. The article defines the concept of key regional stakeholders and identifies them. The proposed target audience (stakeholder group model for a place branding policy is tested on the case of Saint Petersburg. The authors show that each target audience of place marketing requires an individual policy. This is explained by the fact that each group enjoys its unique features that should be taken into account when creating and transmitting messages.

  18. Norms for creativity and implementation in healthcare teams: testing the group innovation inventory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.H. Strating (Mathilde); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract OBJECTIVE: To test to what extent the four-factor structure of the group innovation inventory (GII) is confirmed for improvement teams participating in a quality improvement collaborative. DESIGN: Quasi-experimental design with baseline and end-measurement after

  19. Implementation of burnup credit in spent fuel management systems. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    The criticality safety analysis of spent fuel systems has traditionally assumed that the fuel is fresh. This results in significant conservatism in the calculated value of the system's reactivity. Improved calculational methods allows one to take credit for the reactivity reduction associated with fuel burnup, hence reducing the analysis conservatism while maintaining an adequate criticality safety margin. Motivation for using burnup credit in criticality safety applications is generally based on economic considerations. Although economics may be a primary factor in deciding to use burnup credit, other benefits may be realized. Many of the additional benefits of burnup credit that are not strictly economic, may be considered to contribute to public health and safety, and resource conservation and environmental quality. Interest in the implementation of burnup credit has been shown by many countries. A summary of the information gathered by the IAEA about ongoing activities and regulatory status of burnup credit in different countries is included. Burnup credit implementation introduces new parameters and effects that should be addressed in the criticality analysis (e.g., axial and radial burnup shapes, fuel irradiation history, and others). Analysis of these parameters introduces new variations as well as the uncertainties, that should be considered in the safety assessment of the system. Also, the need arises to validate the isotopic composition that results from a depletion calculation, as well as to extend the current validation range of criticality codes to cover spent fuel. The use of burnup credit implies a verification of the fuel burnup before loading for transport, storage, disposal, or reprocessing each assembly, to make sure that the burnup level achieved complies with the criteria established. Methods and procedures used in different countries are described in this report

  20. Implementation of burnup credit in spent fuel management systems. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The criticality safety analysis of spent fuel systems has traditionally assumed that the fuel is fresh. This results in significant conservatism in the calculated value of the system`s reactivity. Improved calculational methods allows one to take credit for the reactivity reduction associated with fuel burnup, hence reducing the analysis conservatism while maintaining an adequate criticality safety margin. Motivation for using burnup credit in criticality safety applications is generally based on economic considerations. Although economics may be a primary factor in deciding to use burnup credit, other benefits may be realized. Many of the additional benefits of burnup credit that are not strictly economic, may be considered to contribute to public health and safety, and resource conservation and environmental quality. Interest in the implementation of burnup credit has been shown by many countries. A summary of the information gathered by the IAEA about ongoing activities and regulatory status of burnup credit in different countries is included. Burnup credit implementation introduces new parameters and effects that should be addressed in the criticality analysis (e.g., axial and radial burnup shapes, fuel irradiation history, and others). Analysis of these parameters introduces new variations as well as the uncertainties, that should be considered in the safety assessment of the system. Also, the need arises to validate the isotopic composition that results from a depletion calculation, as well as to extend the current validation range of criticality codes to cover spent fuel. The use of burnup credit implies a verification of the fuel burnup before loading for transport, storage, disposal, or reprocessing each assembly, to make sure that the burnup level achieved complies with the criteria established. Methods and procedures used in different countries are described in this report. Refs, figs, tabs.

  1. The role of medical group practice administrators in the adoption and implementation of Medicare's physician quality reporting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulam, Robert; Kralewski, John; Dowd, Bryan; Gans, David

    2016-01-01

    Although there are numerous studies of the factors influencing the adoption of quality assurance (QA) programs by medical group practices, few have focused on the role of group practice administrators. To gain insights into the role these administrators play in QA programs, we analyzed how medical practices adopted and implemented the Medicare Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS), the largest physician quality reporting system in the United States. We conducted focus group interviews in 2011 with a national convenience sample of 76 medical group practice administrators. Responses were organized and analyzed using the innovation decision framework of Van de Ven and colleagues. Administrators conducted due diligence on PQRS, influenced how the issue was presented to physicians for adoption, and managed implementation thereafter. Administrators' recommendations were heavily influenced by practice characteristics, financial incentives, and practice commitments to early adoption of quality improvement innovations. Virtually, all who attempted it agreed that PQRS was straightforward to implement. However, the complexities of Medicare's PQRS reports impeded use of the data by administrators to support quality management. Group practice administrators are playing a prominent role in activities related to the quality of patient care--they are not limited to the business side of the practice. Especially, as PQRS becomes more nearly universal after 2014, Medicare should take account of the role that administrators play, by more actively engaging administrators in shaping these programs and making it easier for administrators to use the results. More research is needed on the rapidly evolving role of nonphysician administration in medical group practices. Practice administrators have a larger role than commonly understood in how quality reporting initiatives are adopted and used and are in an exceptional position to influence the more appropriate use of these resources if

  2. Fast Photo-detection in Phototransistors based on Group III-VI Layered Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Prasanna; Ghosh, Sujoy; Wasala, Milinda; Lei, Sidong; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel; Talapatra, Saikat

    Response time of a photo detector is one of the crucial aspect of photo-detection. Recently it has been shown that direct band gap of few layered group III-VI materials helps in increased absorption of light thereby enhancing the photo responsive properties of these materials. Ternary system of Copper Indium Selenide has been extensively used in optoelectronics industry and it is expected that 2D layered structure of Copper Indium Selenide will be a key component of future optoelectronics devices based on 2D materials. Here we report fast photo detection in few layers of Copper Indium Selenide (CuIn7Se11) phototransistor. Few-layers of CuIn7Se11 flakes were exfoliated from crystals grown using chemical vapor transport technique. Our photo response characterization indicates responsivity of 104 mA/W with external quantum efficiency exceeding 103. We have found response time of few μs which is one of the fastest response among photodetectors based on 2D materials. We also found specific detectivity of 1012 Jones which is an order higher than conventional photodetectors. A comparison between response times of various layered group III-VI materials will be presented and discussed. This work is supported by the U.S. Army Research Office through a MURI Grant # W911NF-11-1-0362.

  3. Detection of virulence genes and the phylogenetic groups of Escherichia coli isolated from dogs in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Morcatti Coura

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study identified the virulence genes, pathovars, and phylogenetic groups of Escherichia coli strains obtained from the feces of dogs with and without diarrhea. Virulence genes and phylogenetic group identification were studied using polymerase chain reaction. Thirty-seven E. coli isolates were positive for at least one virulence factor gene. Twenty-one (57.8% of the positive isolates were isolated from diarrheal feces and sixteen (43.2% were from the feces of non-diarrheic dogs. Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC were the most frequently (62.2% detected pathovar in dog feces and were mainly from phylogroup B1 and E. Necrotoxigenic E. coli were detected in 16.2% of the virulence-positive isolates and these contained the cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (cnf1 gene and were classified into phylogroups B2 and D. All E. coli strains were negative for the presence of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC enterotoxin genes, but four strains were positive for ETEC-related fimbriae 987P and F18. Two isolates were Shiga toxin-producing E. coli strains and contained the toxin genesStx2 or Stx2e, both from phylogroup B1. Our data showed that EPEC was the most frequent pathovar and B1 and E were the most common phylogroups detected in E. coli isolated from the feces of diarrheic and non-diarrheic dogs.

  4. Multiplex real-time PCR SYBR Green for detection and typing of group III Clostridium botulinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anniballi, Fabrizio; Auricchio, Bruna; Delibato, Elisabetta; Antonacci, Monia; De Medici, Dario; Fenicia, Lucia

    2012-01-27

    Clostridium botulinum type C and type D belonging to the group III organisms, are mainly responsible for animal botulism outbreaks. Clinical signs alone are often insufficient to make a diagnosis of botulism and a laboratory confirmation is required. Laboratory confirmation can be performed by demonstrating the presence of botulinum neurotoxins in serum, gastrointestinal contents, liver, wound of sick or dead animals, or by demonstrating the presence of C. botulinum in gastrointestinal contents, liver, and wound. Demonstration of spores in gastrointestinal contents or tissue of animals with clinical signs indicative of botulism reinforces the clinical diagnosis. With the aim of detecting and typing C. botulinum group III organisms, a multiplex real-time PCR SYBR Green was developed and in-house validated. Selectivity, limit of detection, relative accuracy, relative specificity, relative sensitivity, and repeatability of the method were investigated. The multiplex real-time PCR SYBR green used showed a 100% selectivity, 100% relative accuracy, 100% relative specificity, 100% relative sensitivity and a limit of detection of 277 and 580 DNA copies for C. botulinum type C and C. botulinum type D, respectively. The method reported here represents a suitable tool for laboratory diagnosis of type C and D botulism and for testing a large number of samples collected during the animal botulism surveillance and prevention activities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Divide and Conquer: Sub-Grouping of ASD Improves ASD Detection Based on Brain Morphometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Stefi A.; Cahill, Nathan D.; Michael, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Low success (ASD) classification using brain morphometry from the large multi-site ABIDE dataset and inconsistent findings on brain morphometric abnormalities in ASD can be attributed to the ASD heterogeneity. In this study, we show that ASD brain morphometry is highly heterogeneous, and demonstrate that the heterogeneity can be mitigated and classification improved if autism severity (AS), verbal IQ (VIQ) and age are used with morphometric features. Morphometric features from structural MRIs (sMRIs) of 734 males (ASD: 361, controls: 373) of ABIDE were derived using FreeSurfer. Applying the Random Forest classifier, an AUC of 0.61 was achieved. Adding VIQ and age to morphometric features, AUC improved to 0.68. Sub-grouping the subjects by AS, VIQ and age improved the classification with the highest AUC of 0.8 in the moderate-AS sub-group (AS = 7–8). Matching subjects on age and/or VIQ in each sub-group further improved the classification with the highest AUC of 0.92 in the low AS sub-group (AS = 4–5). AUC decreased with AS and VIQ, and was the lowest in the mid-age sub-group (13–18 years). The important features were mainly from the frontal, temporal, ventricular, right hippocampal and left amygdala regions. However, they highly varied with AS, VIQ and age. The curvature and folding index features from frontal, temporal, lingual and insular regions were dominant in younger subjects suggesting their importance for early detection. When the experiments were repeated using the Gradient Boosting classifier similar results were obtained. Our findings suggest that identifying brain biomarkers in sub-groups of ASD can yield more robust and insightful results than searching across the whole spectrum. Further, it may allow identification of sub-group specific brain biomarkers that are optimized for early detection and monitoring, increasing the utility of sMRI as an important tool for early detection of ASD. PMID:27065101

  6. Corporate Social Responsibility: A Case Study of BSCI Implementation at Best Friend Group Oy

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    With the current polarized debate over CSR issues worldwide, ever increasing number of companies believe that incorporating ethical values into the business operation is an attractive option to upgrade the brand value, maintain the competitive advantage and cater for the social demand of various stakeholders. Business Social Compliance Initiative, a division of FTA, serves as a platform to assist companies in achieving the goal. The study was commissioned by Best Friend Group Oy, a medium...

  7. Norms for creativity and implementation in healthcare teams: testing the group innovation inventory

    OpenAIRE

    Strating, Mathilde M.H.; Nieboer, Anna P.

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract OBJECTIVE: To test to what extent the four-factor structure of the group innovation inventory (GII) is confirmed for improvement teams participating in a quality improvement collaborative. DESIGN: Quasi-experimental design with baseline and end-measurement after intervention. SETTING: This study included quality improvement teams participating in the Care for Better improvement programme for home care, care for the handicapped and the elderly in the Netherlands between 20...

  8. Designing and Implementing a Retrospective Earthquake Detection Framework at the U.S. Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, J.; Yeck, W.; Benz, H.

    2017-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center (USGS NEIC) is implementing and integrating new signal detection methods such as subspace correlation, continuous beamforming, multi-band picking and automatic phase identification into near-real-time monitoring operations. Leveraging the additional information from these techniques help the NEIC utilize a large and varied network on local to global scales. The NEIC is developing an ordered, rapid, robust, and decentralized framework for distributing seismic detection data as well as a set of formalized formatting standards. These frameworks and standards enable the NEIC to implement a seismic event detection framework that supports basic tasks, including automatic arrival time picking, social media based event detections, and automatic association of different seismic detection data into seismic earthquake events. In addition, this framework enables retrospective detection processing such as automated S-wave arrival time picking given a detected event, discrimination and classification of detected events by type, back-azimuth and slowness calculations, and ensuring aftershock and induced sequence detection completeness. These processes and infrastructure improve the NEIC's capabilities, accuracy, and speed of response. In addition, this same infrastructure provides an improved and convenient structure to support access to automatic detection data for both research and algorithmic development.

  9. Group-specific multiplex PCR detection systems for the identification of flying insect prey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Sint

    Full Text Available The applicability of species-specific primers to study feeding interactions is restricted to those ecosystems where the targeted prey species occur. Therefore, group-specific primer pairs, targeting higher taxonomic levels, are often desired to investigate interactions in a range of habitats that do not share the same species but the same groups of prey. Such primers are also valuable to study the diet of generalist predators when next generation sequencing approaches cannot be applied beneficially. Moreover, due to the large range of prey consumed by generalists, it is impossible to investigate the breadth of their diet with species-specific primers, even if multiplexing them. However, only few group-specific primers are available to date and important groups of prey such as flying insects have rarely been targeted. Our aim was to fill this gap and develop group-specific primers suitable to detect and identify the DNA of common taxa of flying insects. The primers were combined in two multiplex PCR systems, which allow a time- and cost-effective screening of samples for DNA of the dipteran subsection Calyptratae (including Anthomyiidae, Calliphoridae, Muscidae, other common dipteran families (Phoridae, Syrphidae, Bibionidae, Chironomidae, Sciaridae, Tipulidae, three orders of flying insects (Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera, Plecoptera and coniferous aphids within the genus Cinara. The two PCR assays were highly specific and sensitive and their suitability to detect prey was confirmed by testing field-collected dietary samples from arthropods and vertebrates. The PCR assays presented here allow targeting prey at higher taxonomic levels such as family or order and therefore improve our ability to assess (trophic interactions with flying insects in terrestrial and aquatic habitats.

  10. Implementation of the EU-policy framework WFD and GWD in Europe - Activities of CIS Working Group Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grath, Johannes; Ward, Rob; Hall, Anna

    2013-04-01

    At the European level, the basic elements for groundwater management and protection are laid down in the Water Framework Directive (WFD) (2000/60/EC) and the Groundwater Daughter Directive (2006/118/EC). EU Member States, Norway and the European Commission (EC) have jointly developed a common strategy for supporting the implementation of the WFD. The main aim of this Common Implementation Strategy (CIS) is to ensure the coherent and harmonious implementation of the directives through the clarification of a number of methodological questions enabling a common understanding to be reached on the technical and scientific implications of the WFD (European Communities, 2008). Groundwater specific issues are dealt with in Working Group C Groundwater. Members of the working group are experts nominated by Member states, Norway, Switzerland and Accession Countries (from administrative bodies, research institutes, …) and representatives from relevant stakeholders and NGOs. Working Group C Groundwater has produced numerous guidance documents and technical reports that have been endorsed by EU Water Directors to support and enable Member States to implement the directives. All the documents are published by the EC. Access is available via the following link: http://ec.europa.eu/environment/water/water-framework/groundwater/activities.htm Having addressed implementations issues during the 1st river basin planning cycle, WG C Groundwater is currently focussing on the following issues: groundwater dependent ecosystems, and climate change and groundwater. In the future, the outcome and recommendations of the "Blueprint" - to safeguard Europe's water resources - which was recently published by the EC will be of utmost importance in setting the agenda for the group. Most likely this will include water pricing, water demand management and water abstraction. Complementory to the particular working groups, a Science Policy Interface (SPI) activity has been established. Its purpose is

  11. Evaluation of a Kalman filter based power pressurizer instrument failure detection system implemented on a nuclear power plant training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seegmiller, D.S.

    1984-01-01

    The usefulness of a nuclear power plant training simulator for developing and testing modern estimation and control applications for nuclear power plants is demonstrated. A Kalman filter based instrument failure detection technique for a pressurized water reactor pressurizer is implemented on the Department of Energy N Reactor Training Simulator. This real-time failure detection method computes the first two moments (mean and variance) of each element of a normalized filter innovations vector. Failed pressurizer instrumentation can be detected by comparing these moments to the known statistical properties of the steady state, linear Kalman fitler innovations sequence. The capabilities of the detection system are evaluated using simulated plant transients and instrument failures

  12. Message Collision Avoidance Protocols for Detecting Stray Nodes in a Scuba Diving Group Using Ultrasonic Multi-Hop Message Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Kaido

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen a growing interest in underwater communication and some progress has been made in this area. However, underwater communication is still immature compared with terrestrial communication. A prime reason for this is that the underwater environment is intrinsically not suitable for propagation of electric waves. Instead, ultrasonic waves are mainly used for underwater communication. Since ultrasonic waves cannot provide sufficient communication speed or capacity, they cannot use existing network technologies, which assume use of radio waves. In particular, communication in shallow water is still an uncharted territory. Few communication technologies are employed in environments where people enjoy scuba diving. This paper addresses problems faced by recreational scuba divers. It proposes constructing an ad hoc mesh-shaped network between divers within a group and use ultrasonic waves as transmission media in order to enable the detection of a stray diver. It also proposes a communication protocol in which messages are relayed in multiple hops, and a message collision avoidance method, which is intended to reduce the rate of packet loss caused by message propagation delay. We have implemented the proposed methods in a network simulator, and compared them with an existing communication method that has no message collision avoidance function, in terms of the packet loss rate, the stray driver detection rate, and the rate of the ability to communicate in multiple hops.

  13. Implementation of small group discussion as a teaching method in earth and space science subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryani, N. P.; Supriyadi

    2018-03-01

    In Physics Department Universitas Negeri Semarang, Earth and Space Science subject is included in the curriculum of the third year of physics education students. There are various models of teaching earth and space science subject such as textbook method, lecturer, demonstrations, study tours, problem-solving method, etc. Lectures method is the most commonly used of teaching earth and space science subject. The disadvantage of this method is the lack of two ways interaction between lecturers and students. This research used small group discussion as a teaching method in Earth and Space science. The purpose of this study is to identify the conditions under which an efficient discussion may be initiated and maintained while students are investigating properties of earth and space science subjects. The results of this research show that there is an increase in student’s understanding of earth and space science subject proven through the evaluation results. In addition, during the learning process, student’s activeness also increase.

  14. Network-based group variable selection for detecting expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xuegong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL aims to identify the genetic loci associated with the expression level of genes. Penalized regression with a proper penalty is suitable for the high-dimensional biological data. Its performance should be enhanced when we incorporate biological knowledge of gene expression network and linkage disequilibrium (LD structure between loci in high-noise background. Results We propose a network-based group variable selection (NGVS method for QTL detection. Our method simultaneously maps highly correlated expression traits sharing the same biological function to marker sets formed by LD. By grouping markers, complex joint activity of multiple SNPs can be considered and the dimensionality of eQTL problem is reduced dramatically. In order to demonstrate the power and flexibility of our method, we used it to analyze two simulations and a mouse obesity and diabetes dataset. We considered the gene co-expression network, grouped markers into marker sets and treated the additive and dominant effect of each locus as a group: as a consequence, we were able to replicate results previously obtained on the mouse linkage dataset. Furthermore, we observed several possible sex-dependent loci and interactions of multiple SNPs. Conclusions The proposed NGVS method is appropriate for problems with high-dimensional data and high-noise background. On eQTL problem it outperforms the classical Lasso method, which does not consider biological knowledge. Introduction of proper gene expression and loci correlation information makes detecting causal markers more accurate. With reasonable model settings, NGVS can lead to novel biological findings.

  15. Implementation of combined SVM-algorithm and computer-aided perception feedback for pulmonary nodule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Rannou, Didier; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2012-02-01

    This pilot study examines the effect of a novel decision support system in medical image interpretation. This system is based on combining image spatial frequency properties and eye-tracking data in order to recognize over and under calling errors. Thus, before it can be implemented as a detection aided schema, training is required during which SVMbased algorithm learns to recognize FP from all reported outcomes, and, FN from all unreported prolonged dwelled regions. Eight radiologists inspected 50 PA chest radiographs with the specific task of identifying lung nodules. Twentyfive cases contained CT proven subtle malignant lesions (5-20mm), but prevalence was not known by the subjects, who took part in two sequential reading sessions, the second, without and with support system feedback. MCMR ROC DBM and JAFROC analyses were conducted and demonstrated significantly higher scores following feedback with p values of 0.04, and 0.03 respectively, highlighting significant improvements in radiology performance once feedback was used. This positive effect on radiologists' performance might have important implications for future CAD-system development.

  16. Development and implementation of novel interfaces for miniaturized analysis systems with vibrational spectroscopic detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberkorn, M.

    2003-05-01

    The presented thesis describes the development and application of two software packages for computer controlled operation of the devices of the newly developed analysis systems as well as the first time implementation of silicon microstructured microdispensers, an automated xy-stage and quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in miniaturized chemical analysis systems. The software package Sagittarius V2 allows automated operation of flow system components, microdispensers and an electronic xy-stage. QCL-Control is a software package for computer controlled quantum cascade laser operation and data acquisition. Using a flow-through microdispenser generating picoliter droplets, an interface enabling deposition of liquid samples on solid infrared (IR) transparent supports for enhanced solvent elimination prior to IR transmission measurements was developed. Furthermore, the microdispenser was combined with an ultrasonic levitator to conduct surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) experiments by in-situ preparation of the SERS substrate (silver colloid) in the levitated droplet. Finally, quantum cascade lasers were investigated for their performance as novel light sources in combination with an in-house made fibre optic flow-through cell for IR detection of aqueous samples in automated flow systems. (author)

  17. Impact detection method for composite winglets based on neural network implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscardi, Massimo; Arena, Maurizio; Napolitano, Pasquale

    2018-03-01

    Maintenance tasks and safety aspects represent a strategic role in the managing of the modern aircraft fleets. The demand for reliable techniques for structural health monitoring represent so a key aspect looking forward to new generation aircraft. In particular, the use of more technologically complex materials and manufacturing methods requires anyway more efficient as well as rapid application processes to improve the design strength and service life. Actually, it is necessary to rely on survey instruments, which allow for safeguarding the structural integrity of the aircraft, especially after the wide use of composite structures highly susceptible to non-detected damages as delamination of the ply. In this paper, the authors have investigated the feasibility to implement a neural network-based algorithm to predict the impact event at low frequency, typically due to the bird collision. Relying upon a numerical model, representative of a composite flat panel, the approach has been also experimentally validated. The purpose of the work is therefore the presentation of an innovative application within the Non Destructive Testing field based upon vibration measurements. The aim of the research has been the development of a Non Destructive Test which meets most of the mandatory requirements for effective health monitoring systems while, at the same time, reducing as much as possible the complexity of the data analysis algorithm and the experimental acquisition instrumentation. Future activities will be addressed to test such technique on a more complex aeronautical system.

  18. Partnerships for the Design, Conduct, and Analysis of Effectiveness, and Implementation Research: Experiences of the Prevention Science and Methodology Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C. Hendricks; Kellam, Sheppard G.; Kaupert, Sheila; Muthén, Bengt O.; Wang, Wei; Muthén, Linda K.; Chamberlain, Patricia; PoVey, Craig L.; Cady, Rick; Valente, Thomas W.; Ogihara, Mitsunori; Prado, Guillermo J.; Pantin, Hilda M.; Gallo, Carlos G.; Szapocznik, José; Czaja, Sara J.; McManus, John W.

    2012-01-01

    What progress prevention research has made comes through strategic partnerships with communities and institutions that host this research, as well as professional and practice networks that facilitate the diffusion of knowledge about prevention. We discuss partnership issues related to the design, analysis, and implementation of prevention research and especially how rigorous designs, including random assignment, get resolved through a partnership between community stakeholders, institutions, and researchers. These partnerships shape not only study design, but they determine the data that can be collected and how results and new methods are disseminated. We also examine a second type of partnership to improve the implementation of effective prevention programs into practice. We draw on social networks to studying partnership formation and function. The experience of the Prevention Science and Methodology Group, which itself is a networked partnership between scientists and methodologists, is highlighted. PMID:22160786

  19. Group B streptococcus detection in China: comparison of different screening methods and different sampling sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Wang, Yingna Song, Liangkun Ma, Juntao Liu, Yingchun Xu, Jie Yi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the use of real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and bacterial culture methods to detect group B streptococcus (GBS in Chinese pregnant women in the third trimester; to separately assess the prevalence of rectal and vaginal GBS colonization ; and to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the isolates. Methodology: Samples were collected from 505 women at 35 and 37 weeks gestation at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital. Bacterial culture and RT-PCR were performed. Antimicrobial susceptibility to commonly used antibiotics was also analyzed. Results: The overall GBS colonization rate was 7.5%. The colonization rate, sensitivity, and negative predictive value of the bacterial culture method were 2.8%, 36.8%, and 95.1%, respectively, and these values were 7.3%, 97.4%, and 99.8%, respectively, for PCR (p<0.001. The GBS colonization rate of the rectum (6.7% was higher than that of the vagina (2.8% (p=0.005. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that 100% were sensitive to penicillin, cephalosporin and vancomycin. Conclusions: RT-PCR was found to be a rapid and sensitive test for the detection of GBS colonization in Chinese pregnant women. Rectal swabbing was also important for detecting GBS colonization. β-lactams are the first-line antibiotics used for the treatment of GBS. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2016;6(4: 179-183

  20. An Automated Detection System for Microaneurysms That Is Effective across Different Racial Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Michael Saleh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients without diabetic retinopathy (DR represent a large proportion of the caseload seen by the DR screening service so reliable recognition of the absence of DR in digital fundus images (DFIs is a prime focus of automated DR screening research. We investigate the use of a novel automated DR detection algorithm to assess retinal DFIs for absence of DR. A retrospective, masked, and controlled image-based study was undertaken. 17,850 DFIs of patients from six different countries were assessed for DR by the automated system and by human graders. The system’s performance was compared across DFIs from the different countries/racial groups. The sensitivities for detection of DR by the automated system were Kenya 92.8%, Botswana 90.1%, Norway 93.5%, Mongolia 91.3%, China 91.9%, and UK 90.1%. The specificities were Kenya 82.7%, Botswana 83.2%, Norway 81.3%, Mongolia 82.5%, China 83.0%, and UK 79%. There was little variability in the calculated sensitivities and specificities across the six different countries involved in the study. These data suggest the possible scalability of an automated DR detection platform that enables rapid identification of patients without DR across a wide range of races.

  1. An Automated Detection System for Microaneurysms That Is Effective across Different Racial Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, George Michael; Wawrzynski, James; Caputo, Silvestro; Peto, Tunde; Al Turk, Lutfiah Ismail; Wang, Su; Hu, Yin; Da Cruz, Lyndon; Smith, Phil; Tang, Hongying Lilian

    2016-01-01

    Patients without diabetic retinopathy (DR) represent a large proportion of the caseload seen by the DR screening service so reliable recognition of the absence of DR in digital fundus images (DFIs) is a prime focus of automated DR screening research. We investigate the use of a novel automated DR detection algorithm to assess retinal DFIs for absence of DR. A retrospective, masked, and controlled image-based study was undertaken. 17,850 DFIs of patients from six different countries were assessed for DR by the automated system and by human graders. The system's performance was compared across DFIs from the different countries/racial groups. The sensitivities for detection of DR by the automated system were Kenya 92.8%, Botswana 90.1%, Norway 93.5%, Mongolia 91.3%, China 91.9%, and UK 90.1%. The specificities were Kenya 82.7%, Botswana 83.2%, Norway 81.3%, Mongolia 82.5%, China 83.0%, and UK 79%. There was little variability in the calculated sensitivities and specificities across the six different countries involved in the study. These data suggest the possible scalability of an automated DR detection platform that enables rapid identification of patients without DR across a wide range of races.

  2. AFM imaging and analysis of local mechanical properties for detection of surface pattern of functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knotek, Petr, E-mail: petr.knotek@upce.cz [University of Pardubice, Faculty of Chemical Technology, Joint Laboratory of Solid State Chemistry of IMC ASCR and University of Pardubice, Studentska 573, 532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Chanova, Eliska; Rypacek, Frantisek [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovskeho sq. 2, 162 06 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-05-01

    In this work we evaluate the applicability of different atomic force microscopy (AFM) modes, such as Phase Shift Imaging, Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy (AFAM) and Force Spectroscopy, for mapping of the distribution pattern of low-molecular-weight biomimetic groups on polymer biomaterial surfaces. Patterns with either random or clustered spatial distribution of bioactive peptide group derived from fibronectin were prepared by surface deposition of functional block copolymer nano-colloids and grafted with RGDS peptide containing the sequence of amino acids arginine–glycine–aspartic acid–serine (conventionally labeled as RGDS) and carrying biotin as a tag. The biotin-tagged peptides were labeled with 40 nm streptavidin-modified Au nanospheres. The peptide molecules were localized through the detection of bound Au nanospheres by AFM, and thus, the surface distribution of peptides was revealed. AFM techniques capable of monitoring local mechanical properties of the surface were proved to be the most efficient for identification of Au nano-markers. The efficiency was successfully demonstrated on two different patterns, i.e. random and clustered distribution of RGDS peptides on structured surface of the polymer biomaterial. Highlights: ► Bioactive peptides for cell adhesion on PLA-b-PEO biomimetic surface were visualized. ► The biotin-tagged RGDS peptides were labeled with streptavidin-Au nanospheres. ► The RGDS pattern was detected using different atomic force microscopy (AFM) modes. ► Phase Shift Image was proved to be suitable method for studying peptide distribution.

  3. Implementation of a FPGA-Based Feature Detection and Networking System for Real-time Traffic Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jieshi; Schafer, Benjamin Carrion; Ho, Ivan Wang-Hei

    2016-01-01

    With the growing demand of real-time traffic monitoring nowadays, software-based image processing can hardly meet the real-time data processing requirement due to the serial data processing nature. In this paper, the implementation of a hardware-based feature detection and networking system prototype for real-time traffic monitoring as well as data transmission is presented. The hardware architecture of the proposed system is mainly composed of three parts: data collection, feature detection,...

  4. Cochrane Qualitative and Implementation Methods Group guidance series-paper 5: methods for integrating qualitative and implementation evidence within intervention effectiveness reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Angela; Thomas, James; Cargo, Margaret; Harris, Janet; Pantoja, Tomas; Flemming, Kate; Booth, Andrew; Garside, Ruth; Hannes, Karin; Noyes, Jane

    2018-05-01

    The Cochrane Qualitative and Implementation Methods Group develops and publishes guidance on the synthesis of qualitative and mixed-method evidence from process evaluations. Despite a proliferation of methods for the synthesis of qualitative research, less attention has focused on how to integrate these syntheses within intervention effectiveness reviews. In this article, we report updated guidance from the group on approaches, methods, and tools, which can be used to integrate the findings from quantitative studies evaluating intervention effectiveness with those from qualitative studies and process evaluations. We draw on conceptual analyses of mixed methods systematic review designs and the range of methods and tools that have been used in published reviews that have successfully integrated different types of evidence. We outline five key methods and tools as devices for integration which vary in terms of the levels at which integration takes place; the specialist skills and expertise required within the review team; and their appropriateness in the context of limited evidence. In situations where the requirement is the integration of qualitative and process evidence within intervention effectiveness reviews, we recommend the use of a sequential approach. Here, evidence from each tradition is synthesized separately using methods consistent with each tradition before integration takes place using a common framework. Reviews which integrate qualitative and process evaluation evidence alongside quantitative evidence on intervention effectiveness in a systematic way are rare. This guidance aims to support review teams to achieve integration and we encourage further development through reflection and formal testing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. How do small groups make decisions? : A theoretical framework to inform the implementation and study of clinical competency committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, Saad; Cristancho, Sayra; Padgett, Jessica; Lingard, Lorelei

    2017-06-01

    In the competency-based medical education (CBME) approach, clinical competency committees are responsible for making decisions about trainees' competence. However, we currently lack a theoretical model for group decision-making to inform this emerging assessment phenomenon. This paper proposes an organizing framework to study and guide the decision-making processes of clinical competency committees.This is an explanatory, non-exhaustive review, tailored to identify relevant theoretical and evidence-based papers related to small group decision-making. The search was conducted using Google Scholar, Web of Science, MEDLINE, ERIC, and PsycINFO for relevant literature. Using a thematic analysis, two researchers (SC & JP) met four times between April-June 2016 to consolidate the literature included in this review.Three theoretical orientations towards group decision-making emerged from the review: schema, constructivist, and social influence. Schema orientations focus on how groups use algorithms for decision-making. Constructivist orientations focus on how groups construct their shared understanding. Social influence orientations focus on how individual members influence the group's perspective on a decision. Moderators of decision-making relevant to all orientations include: guidelines, stressors, authority, and leadership.Clinical competency committees are the mechanisms by which groups of clinicians will be in charge of interpreting multiple assessment data points and coming to a shared decision about trainee competence. The way in which these committees make decisions can have huge implications for trainee progression and, ultimately, patient care. Therefore, there is a pressing need to build the science of how such group decision-making works in practice. This synthesis suggests a preliminary organizing framework that can be used in the implementation and study of clinical competency committees.

  6. Bearing fault detection utilizing group delay and the Hilbert-Huang transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Shuai; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2017-01-01

    Vibration signals measured from a mechanical system are useful to detect system faults. Signal processing has been used to extract fault information in bearing systems. However, a wide vibration signal frequency band often affects the ability to obtain the effective fault features. In addition, a few oscillation components are not useful at the entire frequency band in a vibration signal. By contrast, useful fatigue information can be embedded in the noise oscillation components. Thus, a method to estimate which frequency band contains fault information utilizing group delay was proposed in this paper. Group delay as a measure of phase distortion can indicate the phase structure relationship in the frequency domain between original (with noise) and denoising signals. We used the empirical mode decomposition of a Hilbert-Huang transform to sift the useful intrinsic mode functions based on the results of group delay after determining the valuable frequency band. Finally, envelope analysis and the energy distribution after the Hilbert transform were used to complete the fault diagnosis. The practical bearing fault data, which were divided into inner and outer race faults, were used to verify the efficiency and quality of the proposed method

  7. Clinical value of polymerase chain reaction in detecting group B streptococcus during labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppes, Dorothea Maria; Vriends, Antonius Arnoldus Cornelis Maria; van Rijn, Michiel; van Heesewijk, Antonine Dimphne

    2017-06-01

    To reduce the intrapartum use of antibiotics in women with prolonged rupture of the membranes (PROM) by restriction of antibiotics to women who are colonized with group B streptococci (GBS), as identified with the Cepheid Gene Xpert polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detecting GBS. We conducted a randomized controlled trial among full-term delivering women with PROM. Fifty-four women were enrolled, based on a power calculation with a significance level of 5% and a power of 95%. Twenty-seven women received the standard treatment (rectovaginal swab [RVS] for bacterial culture and antibiotics). For another 27 women PCR was performed on the RVS and antibiotics were used only when the PCR was positive. The primary outcome was reduction in antibiotic use, defined as the percentage of women who received antibiotics during labor. 54 Women were enrolled in the study between 1 May and 18 November 2014. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics. In total, 10 of the 54 women were GBS positive (18.5%). Of those 10 women, three were identified on bacterial culture and seven on PCR. In the bacterial culture group all the women received antibiotics. In the PCR group 10 women (37%) received antibiotics (P = 0.002). Two false-positive PCR tests were identified. There were no false-negative PCR tests. Real-time identification of GBS on PCR reduces the intrapartum use of antibiotics in women with PROM. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  8. Bearing fault detection utilizing group delay and the Hilbert-Huang transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Shuai; Lee, Sang-Kwon [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Vibration signals measured from a mechanical system are useful to detect system faults. Signal processing has been used to extract fault information in bearing systems. However, a wide vibration signal frequency band often affects the ability to obtain the effective fault features. In addition, a few oscillation components are not useful at the entire frequency band in a vibration signal. By contrast, useful fatigue information can be embedded in the noise oscillation components. Thus, a method to estimate which frequency band contains fault information utilizing group delay was proposed in this paper. Group delay as a measure of phase distortion can indicate the phase structure relationship in the frequency domain between original (with noise) and denoising signals. We used the empirical mode decomposition of a Hilbert-Huang transform to sift the useful intrinsic mode functions based on the results of group delay after determining the valuable frequency band. Finally, envelope analysis and the energy distribution after the Hilbert transform were used to complete the fault diagnosis. The practical bearing fault data, which were divided into inner and outer race faults, were used to verify the efficiency and quality of the proposed method.

  9. A SKIN TEST FOR DETECTING GROUP C HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCAL INFECTION CAUSING EPIZOOTIC LYMPHADENITIS IN GUINEA PIGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Johannes K.

    1936-01-01

    1. A skin test with a crude bacterial extract prepared from group C (Lancefield) hemolytic streptococci was used as a means of detecting possible carriers of the streptococcus causing epizootic lymphadenitis in guinea pigs. A positive test similar to a positive tuberculin reaction was considered presumptive evidence of present or recent infection with this streptococcus. 2. 20 positive reactors were found in 330 supposedly normal guinea pigs. 3. 195 negatively reacting animals were used as a breeding stock which yielded 1,296 progeny over a period of 15 months. None of the breeding stock or their progeny showed evidence of spontaneous lymphadenitis. Skin tests of 100 of the progeny were all negative. 4. The use of this skin test as a means of obtaining guinea pig breeding stock free of the streptococcus causing spontaneous lymphadenitis is suggested. PMID:19870552

  10. Detection of rare blood group, Bombay (Oh) phenotype patients and management by acute normovolemic hemodilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Manisha; Navaid, Seema; Peethambarakshan, A; Agrawal, Kalpana; Khan, Athar

    2015-01-01

    Due to lack of correct blood grouping practices, the rare Bombay Oh phenotype may be missed, subjecting patients to the risk of severe hemolytic transfusion reaction. In the absence of blood donor registry, transfusion management of patients needing immediate surgery is a challenge. This study presents detection of rare Bombay Oh phenotype patients and their management by acute peri-operative acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) in a hospital from central India. Blood grouping of patients and blood donors with a standard tube method was carried out and samples identified as rare Bombay phenotype were confirmed by saliva inhibition test. Surgical management of cases needing transfusion was done by ANH, as per the British Committee for Standards in Hematology guidelines. The incidence of Bombay phenotype was 0.002% or 1 in 51,924 in the study. Amongst three cases (patients) identified as Bombay phenotype, one was Bombay Oh, Rh negative. Two cases were missed in the first instance and one case actually did not require transfusion. In the absence of a blood donor registry for Bombay phenotype, the cases needing transfusion were successfully managed with ANH in the operation theatre. A simple test like blood grouping should be done with serious intention with incorporation of both forward and reverse grouping, so that no patient receives wrong blood leading to fatal hemolysis due to transfusion. ANH is a cost-effective transfusion option for suitable patients. Appropriate clinical decision making, use of strategies to decrease peri-operative blood losses and cost-effective country based planning could be more widely applied to improve clinical transfusion practice.

  11. Detection of rare blood group, Bombay (Oh phenotype patients and management by acute normovolemic hemodilution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Shrivastava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to lack of correct blood grouping practices, the rare Bombay Oh phenotype may be missed, subjecting patients to the risk of severe hemolytic transfusion reaction. In the absence of blood donor registry, transfusion management of patients needing immediate surgery is a challenge. This study presents detection of rare Bombay Oh phenotype patients and their management by acute peri-operative acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH in a hospital from central India. Materials and Methods: Blood grouping of patients and blood donors with a standard tube method was carried out and samples identified as rare Bombay phenotype were confirmed by saliva inhibition test. Surgical management of cases needing transfusion was done by ANH, as per the British Committee for Standards in Hematology guidelines. Results: The incidence of Bombay phenotype was 0.002% or 1 in 51,924 in the study. Amongst three cases (patients identified as Bombay phenotype, one was Bombay Oh, Rh negative. Two cases were missed in the first instance and one case actually did not require transfusion. In the absence of a blood donor registry for Bombay phenotype, the cases needing transfusion were successfully managed with ANH in the operation theatre. Conclusion: A simple test like blood grouping should be done with serious intention with incorporation of both forward and reverse grouping, so that no patient receives wrong blood leading to fatal hemolysis due to transfusion. ANH is a cost-effective transfusion option for suitable patients. Appropriate clinical decision making, use of strategies to decrease peri-operative blood losses and cost-effective country based planning could be more widely applied to improve clinical transfusion practice.

  12. Conducting polymer based DNA biosensor for the detection of the Bacillus cereus group species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velusamy, Vijayalakshmi; Arshak, Khalil; Korostynska, Olga; Oliwa, Kamila; Adley, Catherine

    2009-05-01

    Biosensor designs are emerging at a significant rate and play an increasingly important role in foodborne pathogen detection. Conducting polymers are excellent tools for the fabrication of biosensors and polypyrrole has been used in the detection of biomolecules due to its unique properties. The prime intention of this paper was to pioneer the design and fabrication of a single-strand (ss) DNA biosensor for the detection of the Bacillus cereus (B.cereus) group species. Growth of B. cereus, results in production of several highly active toxins. Therefore, consumption of food containing >106 bacteria/gm may results in emetic and diarrhoeal syndromes. The most common source of this bacterium is found in liquid food products, milk powder, mixed food products and is of particular concern in the baby formula industry. The electrochemical deposition technique, such as cyclic voltammetry, was used to develop and test a model DNA-based biosensor on a gold electrode electropolymerized with polypyrrole. The electrically conducting polymer, polypyrrole is used as a platform for immobilizing DNA (1μg) on the gold electrode surface, since it can be more easily deposited from neutral pH aqueous solutions of pyrrolemonomers. The average current peak during the electrodeposition event is 288μA. There is a clear change in the current after hybridization of the complementary oligonucleotide (6.35μA) and for the noncomplementary oligonucleotide (5.77μA). The drop in current after each event was clearly noticeable and it proved to be effective.

  13. Implementation of integrated care for diabetes mellitus type 2 by two Dutch care groups: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busetto, Loraine; Luijkx, Katrien; Huizing, Anna; Vrijhoef, Bert

    2015-08-21

    Even though previous research has demonstrated improved outcomes of integrated care initiatives, it is not clear why and when integrated care works. This study aims to contribute to filling this knowledge gap by examining the implementation of integrated care for type 2 diabetes by two Dutch care groups. An embedded single case study was conducted including 26 interviews with management staff, care purchasers and health professionals. The Context + Mechanism = Outcome Model was used to study the relationship between context factors, mechanisms and outcomes. Dutch integrated care involves care groups, bundled payments, patient involvement, health professional cooperation and task substitution, evidence-based care protocols and a shared clinical information system. Community involvement is not (yet) part of Dutch integrated care. Barriers to the implementation of integrated care included insufficient integration between the patient databases, decreased earnings for some health professionals, patients' insufficient medical and policy-making expertise, resistance by general practitioner assistants due to perceived competition, too much care provided by practice nurses instead of general practitioners and the funding system incentivising the provision of care exactly as described in the care protocols. Facilitators included performance monitoring via the care chain information system, increased earnings for some health professionals, increased focus on self-management, innovators in primary and secondary care, diabetes nurses acting as integrators and financial incentives for guideline adherence. Economic and political context and health IT-related barriers were discussed as the most problematic areas of integrated care implementation. The implementation of integrated care led to improved communication and cooperation but also to insufficient and unnecessary care provision and deteriorated preconditions for person-centred care. Dutch integrated diabetes care is still a

  14. Typical xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A fibroblasts have detectable ultraviolet light-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petinga, R.A.; Andrews, A.D.; Robbins, J.H.; Tarone, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    Ultraviolet-induced nuclear uptake of tritiated thymidine [ 3 H]dThd demonstrable by autoradiography in non-synthesis phases of the cell cycle is known as unscheduled DNA synthesis and reflects repair replication of ultraviolet-damaged DNA. We have reported that the rate of any such unscheduled DNA synthesis in typical group A xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts, if present, is less than 2% of the normal rate. We have now performed experiments to determine whether these fibroblasts have any unscheduled DNA synthesis. Fibroblast coverslip cultures of four xeroderma pigmentosum group A strains were prepared. Irradiated (254 nm ultraviolet light) and unirradiated cultures from each strain were incubated with [ 3 H]dThd at 37degC, and autoradiograms were prepared using NTB-3 emulsion. A nuclear grain count was made of 100 consecutive nuclei of non-S-phase irradiated and unirradiated cells. A slide background grain count was simultaneously made from an acellular area adjacent to each cell analyzed. When a strain's irradiated and unirradiated autoradiograms having similar slide background grain count averages were compared, the nuclear grain count average of the irradiated cells was always higher than that of the unirradiated cells. This ultraviolet-induced increase in the mean nuclear grain count ranged from 0.4 to 1.3% of that given by normal non-xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts and was not reduced by 10 -2 M hydroxyurea. Planimetric studies showed that the ultraviolet-induced increase in nuclear grain count is not due to an increased nuclear area in irradiated cells. We conclude that these typical group A xeroderma pigmentosum strains perform very low, but detectable, ultraviolet-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis which probably reflects repair replication. We cannot, however, determine if there are significantly different rates of ultraviolet-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis among these ultraviolet strains

  15. Implementing a Parallel Image Edge Detection Algorithm Based on the Otsu-Canny Operator on the Hadoop Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jianfang; Chen, Lichao; Wang, Min; Tian, Yun

    2018-01-01

    The Canny operator is widely used to detect edges in images. However, as the size of the image dataset increases, the edge detection performance of the Canny operator decreases and its runtime becomes excessive. To improve the runtime and edge detection performance of the Canny operator, in this paper, we propose a parallel design and implementation for an Otsu-optimized Canny operator using a MapReduce parallel programming model that runs on the Hadoop platform. The Otsu algorithm is used to optimize the Canny operator's dual threshold and improve the edge detection performance, while the MapReduce parallel programming model facilitates parallel processing for the Canny operator to solve the processing speed and communication cost problems that occur when the Canny edge detection algorithm is applied to big data. For the experiments, we constructed datasets of different scales from the Pascal VOC2012 image database. The proposed parallel Otsu-Canny edge detection algorithm performs better than other traditional edge detection algorithms. The parallel approach reduced the running time by approximately 67.2% on a Hadoop cluster architecture consisting of 5 nodes with a dataset of 60,000 images. Overall, our approach system speeds up the system by approximately 3.4 times when processing large-scale datasets, which demonstrates the obvious superiority of our method. The proposed algorithm in this study demonstrates both better edge detection performance and improved time performance.

  16. The clinical database and implementation of treatment guidelines by the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group in 2007-2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maj-Britt; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Offersen, Birgitte V

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since 40 years, Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG) has provided comprehensive guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. This population-based analysis aimed to describe the plurality of modifications introduced over the past 10 years in the national Danish...... guidelines for the management of early breast cancer. By use of the clinical DBCG database we analyze the effectiveness of the implementation of guideline revisions in Denmark. METHODS: From the DBCG guidelines we extracted modifications introduced in 2007-2016 and selected examples regarding surgery......, radiotherapy (RT) and systemic treatment. We assessed introduction of modifications from release on the DBCG webpage to change in clinical practice using the DBCG clinical database. RESULTS: Over a 10-year period data from 48,772 patients newly diagnosed with malignant breast tumors were entered into DBCG...

  17. DIANA Code: Design and implementation of an analytic core calculus code by two group, two zone diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochi, Ignacio

    2005-01-01

    The principal parameters of nuclear reactors are determined in the conceptual design stage.For that purpose, it is necessary to have flexible calculation tools that represent the principal dependencies of such parameters.This capability is of critical importance in the design of innovative nuclear reactors.In order to have a proper tool that could assist the conceptual design of innovative nuclear reactors, we developed and implemented a neutronic core calculus code: DIANA (Diffusion Integral Analytic Neutron Analysis).To calculate the required parameters, this code generates its own cross sections using an analytic two group, two zones diffusion scheme based only on a minimal set of data (i.e. 2200 m/s and fission averaged microscopic cross sections, Wescott factors and Effective Resonance Integrals).Both to calculate cross sections and core parameters, DIANA takes into account heterogeneity effects that are included when it evaluates each zone.Among them lays the disadvantage factor of each energy group.DIANA was totally implemented through Object Oriented Programming using C++ language. This eases source code understanding and would allow a quick expansion of its capabilities if needed.The final product is a versatile and easy-to-use code that allows core calculations with a minimal amount of data.It also contains the required tools needed to perform many variational calculations such as the parameterisation of effective multiplication factors for different radii of the core.The diffusion scheme s simplicity allows an easy following of the involved phenomena, making DIANA the most suitable tool to design reactors whose physics lays beyond the parameters of present reactors.All this reasons make DIANA a good candidate for future innovative reactor analysis

  18. Prospective Randomized Double-Blind Pilot Study of Site-Specific Consensus Atlas Implementation for Rectal Cancer Target Volume Delineation in the Cooperative Group Setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, Clifton D.; Nijkamp, Jasper; Duppen, Joop C.; Rasch, Coen R.N.; Thomas, Charles R.; Wang, Samuel J.; Okunieff, Paul; Jones, William E.; Baseman, Daniel; Patel, Shilpen; Demandante, Carlo G.N.; Harris, Anna M.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Katz, Alan W.; McGann, Camille

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Variations in target volume delineation represent a significant hurdle in clinical trials involving conformal radiotherapy. We sought to determine the effect of a consensus guideline-based visual atlas on contouring the target volumes. Methods and Materials: A representative case was contoured (Scan 1) by 14 physician observers and a reference expert with and without target volume delineation instructions derived from a proposed rectal cancer clinical trial involving conformal radiotherapy. The gross tumor volume (GTV), and two clinical target volumes (CTVA, including the internal iliac, presacral, and perirectal nodes, and CTVB, which included the external iliac nodes) were contoured. The observers were randomly assigned to receipt (Group A) or nonreceipt (Group B) of a consensus guideline and atlas for anorectal cancers and then instructed to recontour the same case/images (Scan 2). Observer variation was analyzed volumetrically using the conformation number (CN, where CN = 1 equals total agreement). Results: Of 14 evaluable contour sets (1 expert and 7 Group A and 6 Group B observers), greater agreement was found for the GTV (mean CN, 0.75) than for the CTVs (mean CN, 0.46-0.65). Atlas exposure for Group A led to significantly increased interobserver agreement for CTVA (mean initial CN, 0.68, after atlas use, 0.76; p = .03) and increased agreement with the expert reference (initial mean CN, 0.58; after atlas use, 0.69; p = .02). For the GTV and CTVB, neither the interobserver nor the expert agreement was altered after atlas exposure. Conclusion: Consensus guideline atlas implementation resulted in a detectable difference in interobserver agreement and a greater approximation of expert volumes for the CTVA but not for the GTV or CTVB in the specified case. Visual atlas inclusion should be considered as a feature in future clinical trials incorporating conformal RT.

  19. Prospective randomized double-blind pilot study of site-specific consensus atlas implementation for rectal cancer target volume delineation in the cooperative group setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Clifton D.; Nijkamp, Jasper; Duppen, Joop; Rasch, Coen R.N.; Thomas, Charles R.; Wang, Samuel J.; Okunieff, Paul; Jones, William E.; Baseman, Daniel; Patel, Shilpen; Demandante, Carlo G. N.; Harris, Anna M.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Katz, Alan W.; McGann, Camille; Harper, Jennifer L.; Chang, Daniel T.; Smalley, Stephen; Marshall, David T.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Papanikolaou, Niko; Kachnic, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Variation in target volume delineation represents a significant hurdle in clinical trials involving conformal radiotherapy. We sought to determine the impact of a consensus guideline-based visual atlas on contouring of target volumes. Methods A representative case and target volume delineation instructions derived from a proposed rectal cancer clinical trial involving conformal radiotherapy were contoured (Scan1) by 14 physician observers and a reference expert. Gross tumor volume (GTV), and 2 clinical target volumes (CTVA, comprising internal iliac, pre-sacral, and peri-rectal nodes, and CTVB, external iliac nodes) were contoured. Observers were randomly assigned to receipt (Group_A) /non-receipt (Group_B) of a consensus guideline and atlas for anorectal cancers, then instructed to re-contour the same case/images (Scan2). Observer variation was analyzed volumetrically using conformation number (CN, where CN=1 equals a total agreement). Results In 14 evaluable contour sets (1 expert, 7 Group_A, 6 Group_B), there was greater agreement for GTV (mean CN 0.75) than CTVs (mean CN 0.46–0.65). Atlas exposure for Group_A led to a significant increased inter-observer agreement for CTVA (mean initial CN 0.68, post-atlas 0.76; p=0.03), as well as increased agreement with the expert reference (initial mean CN 0.58, 0.69 post-atlas; p=0.02). For GTV and CTVB, neither inter-observer nor expert agreement was altered after atlas exposure. Conclusion Consensus guideline atlas implementation resulted in a detectable difference in inter-observer agreement and greater approximation of expert volumes for CTVA, but not GTV or CTVB, in the specified case. Visual atlas inclusion should be considered as a feature in future clinical trials incorporating conformal radiotherapy. PMID:20400244

  20. Detecting the Subtle Shape Differences in Hemodynamic Responses at the Group Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang eChen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The nature of the hemodynamic response (HDR is still not fully understood due to the multifaceted processes involved. Aside from the overall amplitude, the response may vary across cognitive states, tasks, brain regions, and subjects with respect to characteristics such as rise and fall speed, peak duration, undershoot shape, and overall duration. Here we demonstrate that the fixed-shape or adjusted-shape methods may fail to detect some shape subtleties. In contrast, the estimated-shape method (ESM through multiple basis functions can provide the opportunity to identify some subtle shape differences and achieve higher statistical power at both individual and group levels. Previously, some dimension reduction approaches focused on the peak magnitude, or made inferences based on the area under the curve or interaction, which can lead to potential misidentifications. By adopting a generic framework of multivariate modeling (MVM, we showcase a hybrid approach that is validated by simulations and real data. Unlike the few analyses that were limited to main effect, two- or three-way interactions, we extend the approach to an inclusive platform that is more adaptable than the conventional GLM, achieving a practical equipoise among representation, false positive control, statistical power, and modeling flexibility.

  1. Molecular Self-Assembly of Group 11 Pyrazolate Complexes as Phosphorescent Chemosensors for Detection of Benzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazalli, N. F.; Yuliati, L.; Lintang, H. O.

    2018-01-01

    We highlight the systematic study on vapochromic sensing of aromatic vapors such as benzene using phosphorescent trinuclear pyrazolate complexes (2) with supramolecular assembly of a weak intermolecular metal-metal interaction consisting of 4-(3,5-dimethoxybenzyl)-3,5-dimethyl pyrazole ligand (1) and group 11 metal ions (Cu(I), Ag(I), Au(I)). The resulting chemosensor 2(Cu) revealed positive response to benzene vapors in 5 mins by blue-shifting its emission band in 44 nm (from 616 to 572 nm) and emitted bright orange to green, where this change cannot be recovered even with external stimuli. Comparing to 2(Ag) with longer metal-metal distance (473 nm) with same sensing time and quenching in 37%, 2(Au) gave quenching in 81% from its original intensity at 612 nm with reusability in 82% without external stimuli and emitted less emissive of red-orange from its original color. The shifting phenomenon in 2(Cu) suggests diffusion of benzene vapors to inside molecules for formation of intermolecular interaction with Cu(I)-Cu(I) interaction while quenching phenomenon in 2(Au) suggests diffusion of benzene vapors to between the Au(I)-Au(I) interaction. These results indicate that suitable molecular structure of ligand and metal ion in pyrazolate complex is important for designing chemosensor in the detection of benzene vapors.

  2. Detection of high GS risk group prostate tumors by diffusion tensor imaging and logistic regression modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertas, Gokhan

    2018-07-01

    To assess the value of joint evaluation of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures by using logistic regression modelling to detect high GS risk group prostate tumors. Fifty tumors imaged using DTI on a 3 T MRI device were analyzed. Regions of interests focusing on the center of tumor foci and noncancerous tissue on the maps of mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) were used to extract the minimum, the maximum and the mean measures. Measure ratio was computed by dividing tumor measure by noncancerous tissue measure. Logistic regression models were fitted for all possible pair combinations of the measures using 5-fold cross validation. Systematic differences are present for all MD measures and also for all FA measures in distinguishing the high risk tumors [GS ≥ 7(4 + 3)] from the low risk tumors [GS ≤ 7(3 + 4)] (P Logistic regression modelling provides a favorable solution for the joint evaluations easily adoptable in clinical practice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Detection of spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae in Dermacentor reticulatus (Acari: Ixodidae) in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stańczak, Joanna

    2006-05-01

    Dermacentor reticulatus ticks from Poland were investigated by molecular methods for the presence of rickettsiae. During 2003/2004, a total of 285 adult ticks was assayed using primers RpCS.877 and RpCS.1258 derived from the citrate synthase (gltA) gene, and 116 samples (40.7%) were positive for rickettsial DNA. Ten out of these positive samples were further assayed using SLO1F and SLO1R primers derived form the rOmpA-encoding gene to confirm that detected rickettsiae belong to the spotted fever group (SFG). The obtained sequence of a fragment of the gltA gene of Rickettsia sp. isolated from Polish D. reticulatus demonstrated 96-98% similarities to Rickettsia slovaca, Rickettsia sibirica, Rickettsia honei, and other SFG rickettsiae. The nucleotide sequences of the amplified fragments of the ompA gene were 98% homologous to RpA4 Rickettsia sp. reported from ticks collected in territories of the former Soviet Union.

  4. Design and Implementation of 1-2 GHz Stepped Frequency GPR for Buried Metal Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Suryana

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the design and realization steps of 1 - 2 GHz SFGPR (Stepped Frequency Ground Penetrating Radar transceiver for metal detection under the ground. Before using prototyped GPR for detecting the metal under the ground, several of calibration processes must be performed, namely phase calibration and monocycle pulse waveform calibration. After completing the calibrations, this prototyped GPR would be ready for detecting a  hidden object such as a metal plate 5 cm under the ground in our small test range size 25 cm x 75 cm x 10 cm. From the calibration and detection results, we concluded that the prototyped SFGPR passed the technical specifications of the design and could perform the metal detection under the ground with high SNR.

  5. Detection of Vandalism in Wikipedia using Metadata Features – Implementation in Simple English and Albanian sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsim Susuri

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we evaluate a list of classifiers in order to use them in the detection of vandalism by focusing on metadata features. Our work is focused on two low resource data sets (Simple English and Albanian from Wikipedia. The aim of this research is to prove that this form of vandalism detection applied in one data set (language can be extended into another data set (language. Article views data sets in Wikipedia have been used rarely for the purpose of detecting vandalism. We will show the benefits of using article views data set with features from the article revisions data set with the aim of improving the detection of vandalism. The key advantage of using metadata features is that these metadata features are language independent and simple to extract because they require minimal processing. This paper shows that application of vandalism models across low resource languages is possible, and vandalism can be detected through view patterns of articles.

  6. Implementation of modified team-based learning within a problem based learning medical curriculum: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Annette; Roberts, Chris; Ayton, Tom; Mellis, Craig

    2018-04-10

    While Problem Based Learning (PBL) has long been established internationally, Team-based learning (TBL) is a relatively new pedagogy in medical curricula. Both PBL and TBL are designed to facilitate a learner-centred approach, where students, in interactive small groups, use peer-assisted learning to solve authentic, professionally relevant problems. Differences, however, exist between PBL and TBL in terms of preparation requirements, group numbers, learning strategies, and class structure. Although there are many similarities and some differences between PBL and TBL, both rely on constructivist learning theory to engage and motivate students in their learning. The aim of our study was to qualitatively explore students' perceptions of having their usual PBL classes run in TBL format. In 2014, two iterations in a hybrid PBL curriculum were converted to TBL format, with two PBL groups of 10 students each, being combined to form one TBL class of 20, split into four groups of five students. At the completion of two TBL sessions, all students were invited to attend one of two focus groups, with 14 attending. Thematic analysis was used to code and categorise the data into themes, with constructivist theory used as a conceptual framework to identify recurrent themes. Four key themes emerged; guided learning, problem solving, collaborative learning, and critical reflection. Although structured, students were attracted to the active and collaborative approach of TBL. They perceived the key advantages of TBL to include the smaller group size, the preparatory Readiness Assurance Testing process, facilitation by a clinician, an emphasis on basic science concepts, and immediate feedback. The competitiveness of TBL was seen as a spur to learning. These elements motivated students to prepare, promoted peer assisted teaching and learning, and focussed team discussion. An important advantage of PBL over TBL, was the opportunity for adequate clinical reasoning within the problem

  7. Detecting Symptom Exaggeration in Combat Veterans Using the MMPI-2 Symptom Validity Scales: A Mixed Group Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolin, David F.; Steenkamp, Maria M.; Marx, Brian P.; Litz, Brett T.

    2010-01-01

    Although validity scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2; J. N. Butcher, W. G. Dahlstrom, J. R. Graham, A. Tellegen, & B. Kaemmer, 1989) have proven useful in the detection of symptom exaggeration in criterion-group validation (CGV) studies, usually comparing instructed feigners with known patient groups, the…

  8. Field programmable gate array based hardware implementation of a gradient filter for edge detection in colour images with subpixel precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellhorn, M; Rosenberger, M; Correns, M; Blau, M; Goepfert, A; Rueckwardt, M; Linss, G

    2010-01-01

    Within the field of industrial image processing the use of colour cameras becomes ever more common. Increasingly the established black and white cameras are replaced by economical single-chip colour cameras with Bayer pattern. The use of the additional colour information is particularly important for recognition or inspection. Become interesting however also for the geometric metrology, if measuring tasks can be solved more robust or more exactly. However only few suitable algorithms are available, in order to detect edges with the necessary precision. All attempts require however additional computation expenditure. On the basis of a new filter for edge detection in colour images with subpixel precision, the implementation on a pre-processing hardware platform is presented. Hardware implemented filters offer the advantage that they can be used easily with existing measuring software, since after the filtering a single channel image is present, which unites the information of all colour channels. Advanced field programmable gate arrays represent an ideal platform for the parallel processing of multiple channels. The effective implementation presupposes however a high programming expenditure. On the example of the colour filter implementation, arising problems are analyzed and the chosen solution method is presented.

  9. Economic Evaluation of a Multifaceted Implementation Strategy for the Prevention of Hand Eczema Among Healthcare Workers in Comparison with a Control Group: The Hands4U Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Meer, Esther W C; van Dongen, J.M.; Boot, C.R.; van der Gulden, J.W.; Bosmans, J.E.; Anema, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a multifaceted implementation strategy for the prevention of hand eczema in comparison with a control group among healthcare workers. A total of 48 departments (n=1,649) were randomly allocated to the implementation strategy or the

  10. Economic Evaluation of a Multifaceted Implementation Strategy for the Prevention of Hand Eczema Among Healthcare Workers in Comparison with a Control Group: The Hands4U Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, E.W. van der; Dongen, J.M. van; Boot, C.R.; Gulden, J.W.J. van der; Bosmans, J.E.; Anema, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a multifaceted implementation strategy for the prevention of hand eczema in comparison with a control group among healthcare workers. A total of 48 departments (n=1,649) were randomly allocated to the implementation strategy or the

  11. Implementation and Impact of an Automated Group Monitoring and Feedback System to Promote Hand Hygiene Among Health Care Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Laurie J.; Riley, Linda; Saiman, Lisa; Cohen, Bevin; Alper, Paul; Larson, Elaine L.

    2015-01-01

    Article-at-a-Glance Background Despite substantial evidence to support the effectiveness of hand hygiene for preventing health care–associated infections, hand hygiene practice is often inadequate. Hand hygiene product dispensers that can electronically capture hand hygiene events have the potential to improve hand hygiene performance. A study on an automated group monitoring and feedback system was implemented from January 2012 through March 2013 at a 140-bed community hospital. Methods An electronic system that monitors the use of sanitizer and soap but does not identify individual health care personnel was used to calculate hand hygiene events per patient-hour for each of eight inpatient units and hand hygiene events per patient-visit for the six outpatient units. Hand hygiene was monitored but feedback was not provided during a six-month baseline period and three-month rollout period. During the rollout, focus groups were conducted to determine preferences for feedback frequency and format. During the six-month intervention period, graphical reports were e-mailed monthly to all managers and administrators, and focus groups were repeated. Results After the feedback began, hand hygiene increased on average by 0.17 events/patient-hour in inpatient units (interquartile range = 0.14, p = .008). In outpatient units, hand hygiene performance did not change significantly. A variety of challenges were encountered, including obtaining accurate census and staffing data, engendering confidence in the system, disseminating information in the reports, and using the data to drive improvement. Conclusions Feedback via an automated system was associated with improved hand hygiene performance in the short term. PMID:25252389

  12. Implementation and impact of an automated group monitoring and feedback system to promote hand hygiene among health care personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Laurie J; Riley, Linda; Saiman, Lisa; Cohen, Bevin; Alper, Paul; Larson, Elaine L

    2014-09-01

    Despite substantial evidence to support the effectiveness of hand hygiene for preventing health care-associated infections, hand hygiene practice is often inadequate. Hand hygiene product dispensers that can electronically capture hand hygiene events have the potential to improve hand hygiene performance. A study on an automated group monitoring and feedback system was implemented from January 2012 through March 2013 at a 140-bed community hospital. An electronic system that monitors the use of sanitizer and soap but does not identify individual health care personnel was used to calculate hand hygiene events per patient-hour for each of eight inpatient units and hand hygiene events per patient-visit for the six outpatient units. Hand hygiene was monitored but feedback was not provided during a six-month baseline period and three-month rollout period. During the rollout, focus groups were conducted to determine preferences for feedback frequency and format. During the six-month intervention period, graphical reports were e-mailed monthly to all managers and administrators, and focus groups were repeated. After the feedback began, hand hygiene increased on average by 0.17 events/patient-hour in inpatient units (interquartile range = 0.14, p = .008). In outpatient units, hand hygiene performance did not change significantly. A variety of challenges were encountered, including obtaining accurate census and staffing data, engendering confidence in the system, disseminating information in the reports, and using the data to drive improvement. Feedback via an automated system was associated with improved hand hygiene performance in the short-term.

  13. Framework for evaluating public health surveillance systems for early detection of outbreaks: recommendations from the CDC Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, James W; Hopkins, Richard S; Overhage, J Marc; Sosin, Daniel M; Tong, Van

    2004-05-07

    The threat of terrorism and high-profile disease outbreaks has drawn attention to public health surveillance systems for early detection of outbreaks. State and local health departments are enhancing existing surveillance systems and developing new systems to better detect outbreaks through public health surveillance. However, information is limited about the usefulness of surveillance systems for outbreak detection or the best ways to support this function. This report supplements previous guidelines for evaluating public health surveillance systems. Use of this framework is intended to improve decision-making regarding the implementation of surveillance for outbreak detection. Use of a standardized evaluation methodology, including description of system design and operation, also will enhance the exchange of information regarding methods to improve early detection of outbreaks. The framework directs particular attention to the measurement of timeliness and validity for outbreak detection. The evaluation framework is designed to support assessment and description of all surveillance approaches to early detection, whether through traditional disease reporting, specialized analytic routines for aberration detection, or surveillance using early indicators of disease outbreaks, such as syndromic surveillance.

  14. Use of nonstatistical techniques for pattern recognition to detect risk groups among liquidators of the Chernobyl NPP accident aftereffects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinov, N.N.; Guslistyj, V.P.; Misyurev, A.V.; Novitskaya, N.N.; Snigireva, G.P.

    1993-01-01

    Attempt of using of the nonstatistical techniques for pattern recognition to detect the risk groups among liquidators of the Chernobyl NPP accident aftereffects was described. 14 hematologic, biochemical and biophysical blood serum parameters of the group of liquidators of the Chernobyl NPP accident impact as well as the group of donors free of any radiation dose (controlled group) were taken as the diagnostic parameters. Modification of the nonstatistical techniques for pattern recognition based on the assessment calculations were used. The patients were divided into risk group at the truth ∼ 80%

  15. Implementation of sobel method to detect the seed rubber plant leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyanto; Munte, J.

    2018-03-01

    This research was conducted to develop a system that can identify and recognize the type of rubber tree based on the pattern of leaves of the plant. The steps research are started with the identification of the image data acquisition, image processing, image edge detection and identification method template matching. Edge detection is using Sobel edge detection. Pattern recognition would detect image as input and compared with other images in a database called templates. Experiments carried out in one phase, identification of the leaf edge, using a rubber plant leaf image 14 are superior and 5 for each type of test images (clones) of the plant. From the experimental results obtained by the recognition rate of 91.79%.

  16. Molecular detection of Rickettsia conorii and other zoonotic spotted fever group rickettsiae in ticks, Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionita, Mariana; Silaghi, Cornelia; Mitrea, Ioan Liviu; Edouard, Sophie; Parola, Philippe; Pfister, Kurt

    2016-02-01

    The diverse tick fauna as well as the abundance of tick populations in Romania represent potential risks for both human and animal health. Spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae are recognized as important agents of emerging human tick-borne diseases worldwide. However, the epidemiology of rickettsial diseases has been poorly investigated in Romania. In urban habitats, companion animals which are frequently exposed to tick infestation, play a role in maintenance of tick populations and as reservoirs of tick-borne pathogens. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the occurrence of SFG rickettsiae in ticks infesting dogs in a greater urban area in South-eastern Romania. Adult ixodid ticks (n=205), including Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (n=120), Dermacentor reticulatus (n=76) and Ixodes ricinus (n=9) were collected from naturally infested dogs and were screened for SFG rickettsiae using conventional PCR followed by sequencing. Additionally, ticks were screened for DNA of Babesia spp., Hepatozoon spp., Ehrlichia canis, and Anaplasma platys. Four zoonotic SFG rickettsiae were identified: Rickettsia raoultii (16%) and Rickettsia slovaca (3%) in D. reticulatus, Rickettsia monacensis (11%) in I. ricinus, and Rickettsia conorii (0.8%) in Rh. sanguineus s.l. Moreover, pathogens of veterinary importance, such as B. canis (21%) in D. reticulatus and E. canis (7.5%) in Rh. sanguineus s.l. were identified. The findings expand the knowledge on distribution of SFG rickettsiae as well as canine pathogens in Romania. Additionally, this is the first report describing the molecular detection of R. conorii in ticks from Romania. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Implementation and testing of a fault detection software tool for improving control system performance in a large commercial building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salsbury, T.I.; Diamond, R.C.

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes a model-based, feedforward control scheme that can detect faults in the controlled process and improve control performance over traditional PID control. The tool uses static simulation models of the system under control to generate feed-forward control action, which acts as a reference of correct operation. Faults that occur in the system cause discrepancies between the feedforward models and the controlled process. The scheme facilitates detection of faults by monitoring the level of these discrepancies. We present results from the first phase of tests on a dual-duct air-handling unit installed in a large office building in San Francisco. We demonstrate the ability of the tool to detect a number of preexisting faults in the system and discuss practical issues related to implementation.

  18. Virulence Gene Pool Detected in Bovine Group C Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae Isolates by Use of a Group A S. pyogenes Virulence Microarray ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rato, Márcia G.; Nerlich, Andreas; Bergmann, René; Bexiga, Ricardo; Nunes, Sandro F.; Vilela, Cristina L.; Santos-Sanches, Ilda; Chhatwal, Gursharan S.

    2011-01-01

    A custom-designed microarray containing 220 virulence genes of Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) was used to test group C Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae (GCS) field strains causing bovine mastitis and group C or group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (GCS/GGS) isolates from human infections, with the latter being used for comparative purposes, for the presence of virulence genes. All bovine and all human isolates carried a fraction of the 220 genes (23% and 39%, respectively). The virulence genes encoding streptolysin S, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, the plasminogen-binding M-like protein PAM, and the collagen-like protein SclB were detected in the majority of both bovine and human isolates (94 to 100%). Virulence factors, usually carried by human beta-hemolytic streptococcal pathogens, such as streptokinase, laminin-binding protein, and the C5a peptidase precursor, were detected in all human isolates but not in bovine isolates. Additionally, GAS bacteriophage-associated virulence genes encoding superantigens, DNase, and/or streptodornase were detected in bovine isolates (72%) but not in the human isolates. Determinants located in non-bacteriophage-related mobile elements, such as the gene encoding R28, were detected in all bovine and human isolates. Several virulence genes, including genes of bacteriophage origin, were shown to be expressed by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Phylogenetic analysis of superantigen gene sequences revealed a high level (>98%) of identity among genes of bovine GCS, of the horse pathogen Streptococcus equi subsp. equi, and of the human pathogen GAS. Our findings indicate that alpha-hemolytic bovine GCS, an important mastitis pathogen and considered to be a nonhuman pathogen, carries important virulence factors responsible for virulence and pathogenesis in humans. PMID:21525223

  19. Automation in airport security X-ray screening of cabin baggage: Examining benefits and possible implementations of automated explosives detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hättenschwiler, Nicole; Sterchi, Yanik; Mendes, Marcia; Schwaninger, Adrian

    2018-10-01

    Bomb attacks on civil aviation make detecting improvised explosive devices and explosive material in passenger baggage a major concern. In the last few years, explosive detection systems for cabin baggage screening (EDSCB) have become available. Although used by a number of airports, most countries have not yet implemented these systems on a wide scale. We investigated the benefits of EDSCB with two different levels of automation currently being discussed by regulators and airport operators: automation as a diagnostic aid with an on-screen alarm resolution by the airport security officer (screener) or EDSCB with an automated decision by the machine. The two experiments reported here tested and compared both scenarios and a condition without automation as baseline. Participants were screeners at two international airports who differed in both years of work experience and familiarity with automation aids. Results showed that experienced screeners were good at detecting improvised explosive devices even without EDSCB. EDSCB increased only their detection of bare explosives. In contrast, screeners with less experience (tenure automated decision provided better human-machine detection performance than on-screen alarm resolution and no automation. This came at the cost of slightly higher false alarm rates on the human-machine system level, which would still be acceptable from an operational point of view. Results indicate that a wide-scale implementation of EDSCB would increase the detection of explosives in passenger bags and automated decision instead of automation as diagnostic aid with on screen alarm resolution should be considered. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Implementation of a General Real-Time Visual Anomaly Detection System Via Soft Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Jesus A.; Klinko, Steve; Ferrell, Bob; Steinrock, Todd (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The intelligent visual system detects anomalies or defects in real time under normal lighting operating conditions. The application is basically a learning machine that integrates fuzzy logic (FL), artificial neural network (ANN), and generic algorithm (GA) schemes to process the image, run the learning process, and finally detect the anomalies or defects. The system acquires the image, performs segmentation to separate the object being tested from the background, preprocesses the image using fuzzy reasoning, performs the final segmentation using fuzzy reasoning techniques to retrieve regions with potential anomalies or defects, and finally retrieves them using a learning model built via ANN and GA techniques. FL provides a powerful framework for knowledge representation and overcomes uncertainty and vagueness typically found in image analysis. ANN provides learning capabilities, and GA leads to robust learning results. An application prototype currently runs on a regular PC under Windows NT, and preliminary work has been performed to build an embedded version with multiple image processors. The application prototype is being tested at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, to visually detect anomalies along slide basket cables utilized by the astronauts to evacuate the NASA Shuttle launch pad in an emergency. The potential applications of this anomaly detection system in an open environment are quite wide. Another current, potentially viable application at NASA is in detecting anomalies of the NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter's radiator panels.

  1. Development and Validation of a Spike Detection and Classification Algorithm Aimed at Implementation on Hardware Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Biffi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurons cultured in vitro on MicroElectrode Array (MEA devices connect to each other, forming a network. To study electrophysiological activity and long term plasticity effects, long period recording and spike sorter methods are needed. Therefore, on-line and real time analysis, optimization of memory use and data transmission rate improvement become necessary. We developed an algorithm for amplitude-threshold spikes detection, whose performances were verified with (a statistical analysis on both simulated and real signal and (b Big O Notation. Moreover, we developed a PCA-hierarchical classifier, evaluated on simulated and real signal. Finally we proposed a spike detection hardware design on FPGA, whose feasibility was verified in terms of CLBs number, memory occupation and temporal requirements; once realized, it will be able to execute on-line detection and real time waveform analysis, reducing data storage problems.

  2. A Framework to Evaluate Ecological and Social Outcomes of Collaborative Management: Lessons from Implementation with a Northern Arizona Collaborative Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Erickson, Tischa A.; Aguilar-González, Bernardo; Loeser, Matthew R. R.; Sisk, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    As collaborative groups gain popularity as an alternative means for addressing conflict over management of public lands, the need for methods to evaluate their effectiveness in achieving ecological and social goals increases. However, frameworks that examine both effectiveness of the collaborative process and its outcomes are poorly developed or altogether lacking. This paper presents and evaluates the utility of the holistic ecosystem health indicator (HEHI), a framework that integrates multiple ecological and socioeconomic criteria to evaluate management effectiveness of collaborative processes. Through the development and application of the HEHI to a collaborative in northern Arizona, the Diablo Trust, we present the opportunities and challenges in using this framework to evaluate the ecological and social outcomes of collaborative adaptive management. Baseline results from the first application of the HEHI are presented as an illustration of its potential as a co-adaptive management tool. We discuss lessons learned from the process of selecting indicators and potential issues to their long-term implementation. Finally, we provide recommendations for applying this framework to monitoring and adaptive management in the context of collaborative management.

  3. Economic Evaluation of a Multifaceted Implementation Strategy for the Prevention of Hand Eczema Among Healthcare Workers in Comparison with a Control Group: The Hands4U Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Esther W C; van Dongen, Johanna M; Boot, Cécile R L; van der Gulden, Joost W J; Bosmans, Judith E; Anema, Johannes R

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a multifaceted implementation strategy for the prevention of hand eczema in comparison with a control group among healthcare workers. A total of 48 departments (n=1,649) were randomly allocated to the implementation strategy or the control group. Data on hand eczema and costs were collected at baseline and every 3 months. Cost-effectiveness analyses were performed using linear multilevel analyses. The probability of the implementation strategy being cost-effective gradually increased with an increasing willingness-to-pay, to 0.84 at a ceiling ratio of €590,000 per person with hand eczema prevented (societal perspective). The implementation strategy appeared to be not cost-effective in comparison with the control group (societal perspective), nor was it cost-beneficial to the employer. However, this study had some methodological problems which should be taken into account when interpreting the results.

  4. Faster implementation of the hierarchical search algorithm for detection of gravitational waves from inspiraling compact binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, Anand S.; Dhurandhar, Sanjeev; Lazzarini, Albert

    2003-01-01

    The first scientific runs of kilometer scale laser interferometric detectors such as LIGO are under way. Data from these detectors will be used to look for signatures of gravitational waves from astrophysical objects such as inspiraling neutron-star-black-hole binaries using matched filtering. The computational resources required for online flat-search implementation of the matched filtering are large if searches are carried out for a small total mass. A flat search is implemented by constructing a single discrete grid of densely populated template waveforms spanning the dynamical parameters--masses, spins--which are correlated with the interferometer data. The correlations over the kinematical parameters can be maximized a priori without constructing a template bank over them. Mohanty and Dhurandhar showed that a significant reduction in computational resources can be accomplished by using a hierarchy of such template banks where candidate events triggered by a sparsely populated grid are followed up by the regular, dense flat-search grid. The estimated speedup in this method was a factor ∼25 over the flat search. In this paper we report an improved implementation of the hierarchical search, wherein we extend the domain of hierarchy to an extra dimension--namely, the time of arrival of the signal in the bandwidth of the interferometer. This is accomplished by lowering the Nyquist sampling rate of the signal in the trigger stage. We show that this leads to further improvement in the efficiency of data analysis and speeds up the online computation by a factor of ∼65-70 over the flat search. We also take into account and discuss issues related to template placement, trigger thresholds, and other peculiar problems that do not arise in earlier implementation schemes of the hierarchical search. We present simulation results for 2PN waveforms embedded in the noise expected for initial LIGO detectors

  5. Implementation of a national detection plan of neonatal hypothyroidism. First year of experience from population sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aznarez, A.; Balter, H.; Giambruno, G.

    1992-01-01

    The experience of the first year of development from a detection program of congenital hypothyroidism is presented. The radioimmunoassay of TSH from heel capillary blood, obtained before the discharge of new-born baby in two obstetrics assistance centers of Medicine Faculty is also studied. (C.G.C.)

  6. Control for nuclear fusion : implementation of the real-time wavelet crash detection algorithm on TCV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijs, M.J.; Berkel, van M.; Lauret, M.; Baar, de M.R.; Steinbuch, M.

    2011-01-01

    This pre-Master's final project report contains a study on sawtooth crash detection in nuclear plasma’s. This introduction starts with a description of the setting of the project, see paragraph 1.1. Further, in paragraph 1.2, an overview is given of the work that is done concerning sawtooth

  7. Molecular analysis of group A rotaviruses detected in hospitalized children from Rawalpindi, Pakistan during 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umair, Massab; Abbasi, Bilal Haider; Nisar, Nadia; Alam, Muhammad Masroor; Sharif, Salmaan; Shaukat, Shahzad; Rana, Muhammad Suleman; Khurshid, Adnan; Mujtaba, Ghulam; Aamir, Uzma Bashir; Zaidi, Syed Sohail Zahoor

    2017-09-01

    As a part of strategy to control diarrheal diseases, World Health Organization (WHO) recommends to include rotavirus vaccines in national immunization programs. Sentinel surveillance networks have been established to monitor rotavirus disease burden and genotype distribution in both pre and post vaccine era in many countries. Unfortunately, due to lack of proper surveillance programs, data on rotavirus disease burden and genotype distribution from Pakistan is scarce. We investigated 502 stool samples from children (Pakistan during 2014 for the presence of group A rotavirus (RVA) and its genotypic diversity. Among 147 ELISA positive samples, 131 were successfully genotyped for RVA. Common G types detected were G1 (23.6%), followed by G3 (22.9%), G12 (19.8%), G2 (19.08%) and G9 (9.9%). The most common P-type was P[8] (41.2%), followed by P[6] (29%) and P[4] (28.24%). G3P[8] (17.55%) was the most prevalent genotype combination followed by G12P[6] (16.7%), G2P[4] (15.2%) and G1P[8] (14.5%). Mixed infection of rotavirus G-P types was also observed in 6% of samples. Phylogenetic analysis of VP7 and VP4 genes of Pakistani strains showed that G1, G2, G9 and P[4], P[6], P[8] were closely related to strains circulating worldwide as well as previously reported strains from Pakistan. Pakistani G12P[8] strains NIH-BBH-3981 and NIH-BBH-4003 belonged to lineage 3 cluster 3a along with strains from USA and Italy whereas G12P[6] strains NIH-BBH-3978, NIH-BBH-4052 and NIH-BBH-4444 were closely related to strains from Italy, Thailand, United Kingdom and with previously reported G12 strains from Pakistan within lineage 3 cluster 3b. This pre-vaccination data supports the need for RVA vaccine inclusion at our national level and will be helpful in assessing the effect of vaccination on RVA genotype diversity due to vaccine selection pressure once post-vaccination data becomes available. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A case study of Markdale High School's implementation of heterogeneously-grouped classes in English, mathematics, science, and social studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre-Louis, Fred

    The purpose of this study was to describe Markdale High School's change from separate college preparatory and general level classes to heterogeneously-grouped classes in English, mathematics, science, and social studies, with particular emphasis on the principal's leadership style, change process, and teacher concerns (Hall & Hord, 2006) experienced during this effort. The researcher used Hall and Hord's (2006) Concern-Based Adoption Model (CBAM) as a conceptual framework. Specifically, the researcher applied three elements of the CBAM model: (a) the Twelve Principles of Change, (b) the Change Facilitator Styles, and (c) the Stages of Concerns. Hall and Hord's framework served as a lens through which the researcher analyzed all data. The researcher used a mixed-method (qualitative and quantitative) approach to answer the four research questions. The participants completed three instruments: (a) the Stages of Concern Questionnaire (SoCQ), (b) the Principles of Change Survey, and (c) the Facilitator Style Survey. All three instruments were self-report, paper-pencil surveys. The sample included 72 faculty members who experienced the change over the past three years. Findings from the three data sources and the school principal's comments during debriefing are indicated for each research question and reported by unit of analysis. Respective to the research questions, the researcher concluded that: (1) Markdale High School accomplished the change by implementing both structural and instructional changes supporting to the change to heterogeneous grouping; (2) even though teachers had divergent opinions on the school principal's facilitation style, the principal thought of himself as an incrementalist and a practitioner of differentiated facilitation styles; (3) while half of the faculty felt that they received formal training on heterogeneous grouping, (4) half felt that they did not have a choice in the decision-making process as it occurred with college preparatory and

  9. A Generalized Logistic Regression Procedure to Detect Differential Item Functioning among Multiple Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magis, David; Raiche, Gilles; Beland, Sebastien; Gerard, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We present an extension of the logistic regression procedure to identify dichotomous differential item functioning (DIF) in the presence of more than two groups of respondents. Starting from the usual framework of a single focal group, we propose a general approach to estimate the item response functions in each group and to test for the presence…

  10. Comparing radio-tracking and visual detection methods to quantify group size measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiczigel Jenő

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available 1. Average values of animal group sizes are prone to be overestimated in traditional field studies because small groups and singletons are easier to overlook than large ones. This kind of bias also applies for the method of locating groups by tracking previously radio-collared individuals in the wild. If the researcher randomly chooses a collared animal to locate a group to visit, a large group has higher probability to be selected than a small one, simply because it has more members.

  11. Nuclear Security Systems and Measures for the Detection of Nuclear and Other Radioactive Material out of Regulatory Control. Implementing Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear terrorism and the illicit trafficking of nuclear and other radioactive material threaten the security of all States. There are large quantities of diverse radioactive material in existence, which are used in areas such as health, the environment, agriculture and industry. The possibility that nuclear and other radioactive material may be used for terrorist acts cannot be ruled out in the current global situation. States have responded to this risk by engaging in a collective commitment to strengthen the protection and control of such material, and to establish capabilities for detection and response to nuclear and other radioactive material out of regulatory control. Through its nuclear security programme, the IAEA supports States to establish, maintain and sustain an effective nuclear security regime. The IAEA has adopted a comprehensive approach to nuclear security. This approach recognizes that an effective national nuclear security regime builds on: the implementation of relevant international legal instruments; information protection; physical protection; material accounting and control; detection of and response to trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive material; national response plans; and contingency measures. Within its nuclear security programme, the IAEA aims to assist States in implementing and sustaining such a regime in a coherent and integrated manner. Each State carries the full responsibility for nuclear security, specifically: to provide for the security of nuclear and other radioactive material and associated facilities and activities; to ensure the security of such material in use, storage or in transport; to combat illicit trafficking; and to detect and respond to nuclear security events. This is an Implementing Guide on nuclear security systems and measures for the detection of nuclear and other radioactive material out of regulatory control. The objective of the publication is to provide guidance to Member States for the

  12. Parallel Hough Transform-Based Straight Line Detection and Its FPGA Implementation in Embedded Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Ling

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Hough Transform has been widely used for straight line detection in low-definition and still images, but it suffers from execution time and resource requirements. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA provide a competitive alternative for hardware acceleration to reap tremendous computing performance. In this paper, we propose a novel parallel Hough Transform (PHT and FPGA architecture-associated framework for real-time straight line detection in high-definition videos. A resource-optimized Canny edge detection method with enhanced non-maximum suppression conditions is presented to suppress most possible false edges and obtain more accurate candidate edge pixels for subsequent accelerated computation. Then, a novel PHT algorithm exploiting spatial angle-level parallelism is proposed to upgrade computational accuracy by improving the minimum computational step. Moreover, the FPGA based multi-level pipelined PHT architecture optimized by spatial parallelism ensures real-time computation for 1,024 × 768 resolution videos without any off-chip memory consumption. This framework is evaluated on ALTERA DE2-115 FPGA evaluation platform at a maximum frequency of 200 MHz, and it can calculate straight line parameters in 15.59 ms on the average for one frame. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation results have validated the system performance regarding data throughput, memory bandwidth, resource, speed and robustness.

  13. Results of automatic system implementation for Cofrentes power plant detection system LPRM inspection execution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, M., E-mail: mpalomo@iqn.upv.es [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain); Urrea, M., E-mail: matias.urrea@iberdrola.es [C.N.Cofrentes - Iberdrola Generacion S.A., Valencia (Spain); Curiel, M., E-mail: m.curiel@lainsa.com [LAINSA, Grupo Dominguis, Valencia (Brazil); Arnaldos, A., E-mail: a.arnaldos@titaniast.com [TITANIA Servicios Teconologicos, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    During this presentation we are going to introduce the results of Cofrentes nuclear power plant automation of the detection system LPRM (Local Power Range Monitor) inspection procedure. An LPRM's test system has been developed and it consists in a software application and data acquisition hardware that performs automatically the complete detection system process: refueling, storage and operation inspection: Ramp voltage generation, measured voltage Plateaux evaluation, qualification report emission; historical analysis to scan burn evolution. The inspections differentiations are developed by the different specifications that it has to fulfil: operation inspection: it is made to check the fission bolt wearing, the detection system functioning and to analyse malfunctioning. From technical specifications and curves analyses it can be determined each LPRM's substitution. Storage inspection: it is made to check the correct functioning and isolation losses before being installed in the core during refueling. Refueling inspection: it is checked that storage LPRM's installation is correct and that they are ready for new fuel cycle. The software application LPRM's Test has been developed by National Instruments LabVIEW, and it performs the following actions: Protocol IEEE-488 (GPIB) control of the source KEITHLEY 237. This source generates the ramp voltage and measure voltage; information acquisition of storage, process and source, identifying LPRM and realization conditions of the same; data analysis and conditions report, historical comparative analysis. (author)

  14. Parallel Hough Transform-based straight line detection and its FPGA implementation in embedded vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaofeng; Song, Li; Shen, Sumin; He, Kang; Yu, Songyu; Ling, Nam

    2013-07-17

    Hough Transform has been widely used for straight line detection in low-definition and still images, but it suffers from execution time and resource requirements. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) provide a competitive alternative for hardware acceleration to reap tremendous computing performance. In this paper, we propose a novel parallel Hough Transform (PHT) and FPGA architecture-associated framework for real-time straight line detection in high-definition videos. A resource-optimized Canny edge detection method with enhanced non-maximum suppression conditions is presented to suppress most possible false edges and obtain more accurate candidate edge pixels for subsequent accelerated computation. Then, a novel PHT algorithm exploiting spatial angle-level parallelism is proposed to upgrade computational accuracy by improving the minimum computational step. Moreover, the FPGA based multi-level pipelined PHT architecture optimized by spatial parallelism ensures real-time computation for 1,024 × 768 resolution videos without any off-chip memory consumption. This framework is evaluated on ALTERA DE2-115 FPGA evaluation platform at a maximum frequency of 200 MHz, and it can calculate straight line parameters in 15.59 ms on the average for one frame. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation results have validated the system performance regarding data throughput, memory bandwidth, resource, speed and robustness.

  15. Design and implementation of an electrocardiographical signal acquisition and digital processing system orientated to the detection of paroxysmal arrhythmias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braceli, Agustín Iriart; Morani, Jorge Exequiel

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the design, technical aspects and implementation of a device capable of acquiring electrocardiograph signals; visualize them in real time over a graphic liquid crystal display (GLCD), and the storage of these ECG registers on a SD memory card. It also details a noise suppression algorithm using the Wavelet Transform. This system was specially developed to cover some bankruptcy that presents actual Holters or ECG regarding the detection of paroxysmal arrhythmias. The contribution of this work is settled on its portability and low production cost. The filtering method used provides an ECG signal without any significant noise and appropriate to the diagnosis of cardiac pathologies.

  16. Design and implementation of an electrocardiographical signal acquisition and digital processing system orientated to the detection of paroxysmal arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriart Braceli, Agustín; Exequiel Morani, Jorge

    2011-12-01

    This article describes the design, technical aspects and implementation of a device capable of acquiring electrocardiograph signals; visualize them in real time over a graphic liquid crystal display (GLCD), and the storage of these ECG registers on a SD memory card. It also details a noise suppression algorithm using the Wavelet Transform. This system was specially developed to cover some bankruptcy that presents actual Holters or ECG regarding the detection of paroxysmal arrhythmias. The contribution of this work is settled on its portability and low production cost. The filtering method used provides an ECG signal without any significant noise and appropriate to the diagnosis of cardiac pathologies.

  17. Classification Accuracy of MMPI-2 Validity Scales in the Detection of Pain-Related Malingering: A Known-Groups Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, Kevin J.; Etherton, Joseph L.; Greve, Kevin W.; Heinly, Matthew T.; Meyers, John E.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of "Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory" 2nd edition (MMPI-2; Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989) validity indicators in the detection of malingering in clinical patients with chronic pain using a hybrid clinical-known groups/simulator design. The…

  18. Detection of Group B Streptococci in Lim Broth by Use of Group B Streptococcus Peptide Nucleic Acid Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization and Selective and Nonselective Agars▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Naomi S.; Cleary, Timothy J.; Martinez, Octavio V.; Procop, Gary W.

    2008-01-01

    The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the detection of group B streptococci from Lim enrichment broth with sheep blood agar (SBA), with selective Streptococcus agar (SSA), and by a peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) assay were as follows: for culture on SBA, 68.4%, 100%, 100%, and 87.9%, respectively; for culture on SSA, 85.5%, 100%, 100%, and 94.1%, respectively; and for the PNA FISH assay, 97.4%, 98.3%, 96.1%, and 98.9%, respectively. PMID:18667597

  19. Detection of group B streptococci in Lim broth by use of group B streptococcus peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization and selective and nonselective agars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Naomi S; Cleary, Timothy J; Martinez, Octavio V; Procop, Gary W

    2008-10-01

    The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the detection of group B streptococci from Lim enrichment broth with sheep blood agar (SBA), with selective Streptococcus agar (SSA), and by a peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) assay were as follows: for culture on SBA, 68.4%, 100%, 100%, and 87.9%, respectively; for culture on SSA, 85.5%, 100%, 100%, and 94.1%, respectively; and for the PNA FISH assay, 97.4%, 98.3%, 96.1%, and 98.9%, respectively.

  20. Primary social and emotional aspects of learning (SEAL small group interventions: a qualitative study of factors affecting implementation and the role of Local Authority support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Humphrey

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the current study were to examine the factors affecting implementation of social and emotional aspects of learning (SEAL small group interventions in primary schools and to explore the role of support from Local Authorities (LAs in the implementation process. Telephone interviews were conducted with lead SEAL staff in 12 LAs across England as part of a larger national evaluation of this educational initiative. Data were transcribed and subjected to qualitative content analysis. Subsequently, a tentative model was developed to document the relationship between the nature of support provided by LAs (e.g. training events, developing/providing additional materials, factors affecting implementation at school level (e.g. school readiness, the profile of SEAL and perceived barriers to success (e.g. misconceptions about the purpose of small group interventions. These findings are discussed in relation to the existing literature on the implementation of social-emotional initiatives and interventions in education.

  1. Implementing wavelet packet transform for valve failure detection using vibration and acoustic emission signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, H Y; Ramli, R; Abdullah, M A K

    2012-01-01

    The efficiency of reciprocating compressors relies heavily on the health condition of its moving components, most importantly its valves. Previous studies showed good correlation between the dynamic response and the physical condition of the valves. These can be achieved by employing vibration technique which is capable of monitoring the response of the valve, and acoustic emission technique which is capable of detecting the valves' material deformation. However, the relationship/comparison between the two techniques is rarely investigated. In this paper, the two techniques were examined using time-frequency analysis. Wavelet packet transform (WPT) was chosen as the multi-resolution analysis technique over continuous wavelet transform (CWT), and discrete wavelet transform (DWT). This is because WPT could overcome the high computational time and high redundancy problem in CWT and could provide detailed analysis of the high frequency components compared to DWT. The features of both signals can be extracted by evaluating the normalised WPT coefficients for different time window under different valve conditions. By comparing the normalised coefficients over a certain time frame and frequency range, the feature vectors revealing the condition of valves can be constructed. One way analysis of variance was employed on these feature vectors to test the significance of data under different valve conditions. It is believed that AE signals can give a better representation of the valve condition as it can detect both the fluid motion and material deformation of valves as compared to the vibration signals.

  2. Multimodal Detection of Engagement in Groups of Children Using Rank Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Jaebok; Truong, Khiet Phuong; Charisi, Vasiliki; Zaga, Cristina; Evers, Vanessa; Chetouani, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    In collaborative play, children exhibit different levels of engagement. Some children are engaged with other children while some play alone. In this study, we investigated multimodal detection of individual levels of engagement using a ranking method and non-verbal features: turn-taking and body

  3. Group method of data handling and neral networks applied in monitoring and fault detection in sensors in nuclear power plants; Group Method of Data Handling (GMDH) e Redes Neurais na Monitoracao e Deteccao de Falhas em sensores de centrais nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, Elaine Inacio

    2011-07-01

    The increasing demand in the complexity, efficiency and reliability in modern industrial systems stimulated studies on control theory applied to the development of Monitoring and Fault Detection system. In this work a new Monitoring and Fault Detection methodology was developed using GMDH (Group Method of Data Handling) algorithm and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) which was applied to the IEA-R1 research reactor at IPEN. The Monitoring and Fault Detection system was developed in two parts: the first was dedicated to preprocess information, using GMDH algorithm; and the second part to the process information using ANNs. The GMDH algorithm was used in two different ways: firstly, the GMDH algorithm was used to generate a better database estimated, called matrix{sub z}, which was used to train the ANNs. After that, the GMDH was used to study the best set of variables to be used to train the ANNs, resulting in a best monitoring variable estimative. The methodology was developed and tested using five different models: one Theoretical Model and four Models using different sets of reactor variables. After an exhausting study dedicated to the sensors Monitoring, the Fault Detection in sensors was developed by simulating faults in the sensors database using values of 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% in these sensors database. The results obtained using GMDH algorithm in the choice of the best input variables to the ANNs were better than that using only ANNs, thus making possible the use of these methods in the implementation of a new Monitoring and Fault Detection methodology applied in sensors. (author)

  4. Adapting and Implementing a Community Program to Improve Retention in Care among Patients with HIV in Southern Haiti: “Group of 6”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Naslund

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In Mozambique, a patient-led Community ART Group model developed by Médecins Sans Frontières improved retention in care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART among persons with HIV. We describe the adaptation and implementation of this model within the HIV clinic located in the largest public hospital in Haiti’s Southern Department. Methods. Our adapted model was named Group of 6. Hospital staff enabled stable patients with HIV receiving ART to form community groups with 4–6 members to facilitate monthly ART distribution, track progress and adherence, and provide support. Implementation outcomes included recruitment success, participant retention, group completion of monthly monitoring forms, and satisfaction surveys. Results. Over one year, 80 patients from nine communities enrolled into 15 groups. Six participants left to receive HIV care elsewhere, two moved away, and one died of a non-HIV condition. Group members successfully completed monthly ART distribution and returned 85.6% of the monthly monitoring forms. Members reported that Group of 6 made their HIV management easier and hospital staff reported that it reduced their workload. Conclusions. We report successful adaptation and implementation of a validated community HIV-care model in Southern Haiti. Group of 6 can reduce barriers to ART adherence, and will be integrated as a routine care option.

  5. Implementation of the SFRA method as valuable tool for detection of power transformer active part deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milić Saša D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the SFRA (Sweep Frequency Response Analysis-SFRA method for analyzing frequency response of transformer windings in order to identify potential defects in the geometry of the core and winding. The most frequent problems (recognized by SFRA are: core shift, shorted or open winding, unwanted contact between core and mass, etc. Comparative analysis of this method with conventional methods is carried out in situ transformer in real hard industrial conditions. Benefits of SFRA method are great reliability and repeatability of the measurements. This method belongs to the non-invasive category. Due to the high reliability and repeatability of the measurements it is very suitable for detection of changes in the geometry of the coil and the core during prophylactic field testing, or after transporting the transformer.

  6. Implementation of microfluidic sandwich ELISA for superior detection of plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaitrong, Numrin; Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Himananto, Orawan; Seepiban, Channarong; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and economical screening of plant pathogens is a high-priority need in the seed industry. Crop quality control and disease surveillance demand early and accurate detection in addition to robustness, scalability, and cost efficiency typically required for selective breeding and certification programs. Compared to conventional bench-top detection techniques routinely employed, a microfluidic-based approach offers unique benefits to address these needs simultaneously. To our knowledge, this work reports the first attempt to perform microfluidic sandwich ELISA for Acidovorax citrulli (Ac), watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV), and melon yellow spot virus (MYSV) screening. The immunoassay occurs on the surface of a reaction chamber represented by a microfluidic channel. The capillary force within the microchannel draws a reagent into the reaction chamber as well as facilitates assay incubation. Because the underlying pad automatically absorbs excess fluid, the only operation required is sequential loading of buffers/reagents. Buffer selection, antibody concentrations, and sample loading scheme were optimized for each pathogen. Assay optimization reveals that the 20-folds lower sample volume demanded by the microchannel structure outweighs the 2- to 4-folds higher antibody concentrations required, resulting in overall 5-10 folds of reagent savings. In addition to cutting the assay time by more than 50%, the new platform offers 65% cost savings from less reagent consumption and labor cost. Our study also shows 12.5-, 2-, and 4-fold improvement in assay sensitivity for Ac, WSMoV, and MYSV, respectively. Practical feasibility is demonstrated using 19 real plant samples. Given a standard 96-well plate format, the developed assay is compatible with commercial fluorescent plate readers and readily amendable to robotic liquid handling systems for completely hand-free assay automation.

  7. Implementation of microfluidic sandwich ELISA for superior detection of plant pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Numrin Thaitrong

    Full Text Available Rapid and economical screening of plant pathogens is a high-priority need in the seed industry. Crop quality control and disease surveillance demand early and accurate detection in addition to robustness, scalability, and cost efficiency typically required for selective breeding and certification programs. Compared to conventional bench-top detection techniques routinely employed, a microfluidic-based approach offers unique benefits to address these needs simultaneously. To our knowledge, this work reports the first attempt to perform microfluidic sandwich ELISA for Acidovorax citrulli (Ac, watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV, and melon yellow spot virus (MYSV screening. The immunoassay occurs on the surface of a reaction chamber represented by a microfluidic channel. The capillary force within the microchannel draws a reagent into the reaction chamber as well as facilitates assay incubation. Because the underlying pad automatically absorbs excess fluid, the only operation required is sequential loading of buffers/reagents. Buffer selection, antibody concentrations, and sample loading scheme were optimized for each pathogen. Assay optimization reveals that the 20-folds lower sample volume demanded by the microchannel structure outweighs the 2- to 4-folds higher antibody concentrations required, resulting in overall 5-10 folds of reagent savings. In addition to cutting the assay time by more than 50%, the new platform offers 65% cost savings from less reagent consumption and labor cost. Our study also shows 12.5-, 2-, and 4-fold improvement in assay sensitivity for Ac, WSMoV, and MYSV, respectively. Practical feasibility is demonstrated using 19 real plant samples. Given a standard 96-well plate format, the developed assay is compatible with commercial fluorescent plate readers and readily amendable to robotic liquid handling systems for completely hand-free assay automation.

  8. A Soft Computing Approach to Crack Detection and Impact Source Identification with Field-Programmable Gate Array Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arati M. Dixit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The real-time nondestructive testing (NDT for crack detection and impact source identification (CDISI has attracted the researchers from diverse areas. This is apparent from the current work in the literature. CDISI has usually been performed by visual assessment of waveforms generated by a standard data acquisition system. In this paper we suggest an automation of CDISI for metal armor plates using a soft computing approach by developing a fuzzy inference system to effectively deal with this problem. It is also advantageous to develop a chip that can contribute towards real time CDISI. The objective of this paper is to report on efforts to develop an automated CDISI procedure and to formulate a technique such that the proposed method can be easily implemented on a chip. The CDISI fuzzy inference system is developed using MATLAB’s fuzzy logic toolbox. A VLSI circuit for CDISI is developed on basis of fuzzy logic model using Verilog, a hardware description language (HDL. The Xilinx ISE WebPACK9.1i is used for design, synthesis, implementation, and verification. The CDISI field-programmable gate array (FPGA implementation is done using Xilinx’s Spartan 3 FPGA. SynaptiCAD’s Verilog Simulators—VeriLogger PRO and ModelSim—are used as the software simulation and debug environment.

  9. Measuring the impact and costs of a universal group based parenting programme: protocol and implementation of a trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winstanley Sarah

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sub-optimal parenting is a common risk factor for a wide range of negative health, social and educational outcomes. Most parenting programmes have been developed in the USA in the context of delinquency prevention for targeted or indicated groups and the main theoretical underpinning for these programmes is behaviour management. The Family Links Nurturing Programme (FLNP focuses on family relationships as well as behaviour management and is offered on a universal basis. As a result it may be better placed to improve health and educational outcomes. Developed in the UK voluntary sector, FLNP is popular with practitioners, has impressed policy makers throughout the UK, has been found to be effective in before/after and qualitative studies, but lacks a randomised controlled trial (RCT evidence base. Methods/Design A multi-centre, investigator blind, randomised controlled trial of the FLNP with a target sample of 288 south Wales families who have a child aged 2-4 yrs living in or near to Flying Start/Sure Start areas. Changes in parenting, parent child relations and parent and child wellbeing are assessed with validated measures immediately and at 6 months post intervention. Economic components include cost consequences and cost utility analyses based on parental ranking of states of quality of life. Attendance and completion rates and fidelity to the FLNP course delivery are assessed. A nested qualitative study will assess reasons for participation and non-participation and the perceived value of the programme to families. By the end of May 2010, 287 families have been recruited into the trial across four areas of south Wales. Recruitment has not met the planned timescales with barriers including professional anxiety about families entering the control arm of the trial, family concern about video and audio recording, programme facilitator concern about the recording of FLNP sessions for fidelity purposes and delays due to the

  10. Detection of a group 2 coronavirus in dogs with canine infectious respiratory disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erles, Kerstin; Toomey, Crista; Brooks, Harriet W.; Brownlie, Joe

    2003-01-01

    An investigation into the causes of canine infectious respiratory disease was carried out in a large rehoming kennel. Tissue samples taken from the respiratory tract of diseased dogs were tested for the presence of coronaviruses using RT-PCR with conserved primers for the polymerase gene. Sequence analysis of four positive samples showed the presence of a coronavirus with high similarity to both bovine and human coronavirus (strain OC43) in their polymerase and spike genes, whereas there was a low similarity to comparable genes in the enteric canine coronavirus. This canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCV) was detected by RT-PCR in 32/119 tracheal and 20/119 lung samples, with the highest prevalence being detected in dogs with mild clinical symptoms. Serological analysis showed that the presence of antibodies against CRCV on the day of entry into the kennel decreased the risk of developing respiratory disease

  11. Line grouping using perceptual saliency and structure prediction for car detection in traffic scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denasi, Sandra; Quaglia, Giorgio

    1993-08-01

    Autonomous and guide assisted vehicles make a heavy use of computer vision techniques to perceive the environment where they move. In this context, the European PROMETHEUS program is carrying on activities in order to develop autonomous vehicle monitoring that assists people to achieve safer driving. Car detection is one of the topics that are faced by the program. Our contribution proposes the development of this task in two stages: the localization of areas of interest and the formulation of object hypotheses. In particular, the present paper proposes a new approach that builds structural descriptions of objects from edge segmentations by using geometrical organization. This approach has been applied to the detection of cars in traffic scenes. We have analyzed images taken from a moving vehicle in order to formulate obstacle hypotheses: preliminary results confirm the efficiency of the method.

  12. Detecting concealed information from groups using a dynamic questioning approach: simultaneous skin conductance measurement and immediate feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewout H Meijer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lie detection procedures typically aim at determining the guilt or innocence of a single suspect. The Concealed Information Test (CIT, for example, has been shown to be highly successful in detecting the presence or absence of crime-related information in a suspect’s memory. Many of today’s security threats, however, do not come from individuals, but from organized groups such as criminal organizations or terrorist networks. In this study, we tested whether a plan of an upcoming mock terrorist attack could be extracted from a group of suspects using a dynamic questioning approach. One-hundred participants were tested in 20 groups of 5. Each group was asked to plan a mock terrorist attack based on a list of potential countries, cities and streets. Next, three questions referring to the country, city, and street were presented, each with 5 options. Skin conductance in all 5 members of the group was measured simultaneously during this presentation. The dynamic questioning approach entailed direct analysis of the data, and if the average skin conductance of the group to a certain option exceeded a threshold, this option was followed up. E.g., if the reaction to the option ‘Italy’ exceeded the threshold, this was followed up by presenting 5 cities in Italy. Results showed that in 19 of the 20 groups the country was correctly detected using this procedure. In 13 of these remaining 19 groups the city was correctly detected. In 7 of these 13, the street was also correctly detected. The question about the country resulted in no false positives (out of 20, the question about the city resulted in 2 false positives (out of 19, while the question about the streets resulted in 2 false positives (out of 13. Furthermore, the 2 false positives at the city level also yielded a false positive at the street level. Taken together these results indicate our dynamic questioning approach can help to unveil plans about a mock terrorist attack.

  13. CNES studies for on-board implementation via HLS tools of a cloud-detection module for selective compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarero, R.; Thiebaut, C.; Dejean, Ph.; Speciel, A.

    2010-08-01

    Future CNES high resolution instruments for remote sensing missions will lead to higher data-rates because of the increase in resolution and dynamic range. For example, the ground resolution improvement has induced a data-rate multiplied by 8 from SPOT4 to SPOT5 [1] and by 28 to PLEIADES-HR [2]. Innovative "smart" compression techniques will be then required, performing different types of compression inside a scene, in order to reach higher global compression ratios while complying with image quality requirements. This socalled "selective compression", allows important compression gains by detecting and then differently compressing the regions-of-interest (ROI) and non-interest in the image (e.g. higher compression ratios are assigned to the non-interesting data). Given that most of CNES high resolution images are cloudy [1], significant mass-memory and transmission gain could be reached by just detecting and suppressing (or compressing significantly) the areas covered by clouds. Since 2007, CNES works on a cloud detection module [3] as a simplification for on-board implementation of an already existing module used on-ground for PLEIADES-HR album images [4]. The different steps of this Support Vector Machine classifier have already been analyzed, for simplification and optimization, during this on-board implementation study: reflectance computation, characteristics vector computation (based on multispectral criteria) and computation of the SVM output. In order to speed up the hardware design phase, a new approach based on HLS [5] tools is being tested for the VHDL description stage. The aim is to obtain a bit-true VDHL design directly from a high level description language as C or Matlab/Simulink [6].

  14. Detection of explosives (in particular landmines) by low-cost methods. Final report of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this Advisory Group Meeting was to put together experts from several areas of explosives (landmines) detection, both nuclear and non-nuclear, to generate ideas which might lead to development of a low-cost method for detection of explosives (in particular landmines), or to a modification of existing methods. The discussions included nuclear, acoustic, radar, infrared, x-ray, and nuclear quadrupole resonance methods for localizing and characterizing landmines. Many technologies are still under laboratory development. This document includes 8 contributed papers, each of them was indexed and abstracted

  15. Exercise muscle fatigue detection system implementation via wireless surface electromyography and empirical mode decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kang-Ming; Liu, Shing-Hong; Wang, Jia-Jung; Cheng, Da-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) is an important measurement for monitoring exercise and fitness. A wireless Bluetooth transmission sEMG measurement system with a sampling frequency of 2 KHz is developed. Traditional muscle fatigue is detected from the median frequency of the sEMG power spectrum. The regression slope of the linear regression of median frequency is an important muscle fatigue index. As fatigue increases, the power spectrum of the sEMG shifts toward lower frequencies. The goal of this study is to evaluate the sensitivity of empirical mode decomposition (EMD) quantifying the electrical manifestations of the local muscle fatigue during exercising in health people. We also compared this method with the raw data and discrete wavelet transform (DWT). Five male and five female volunteers participated. Each subject was asked to run on a multifunctional pedaled elliptical trainer for about 30 minutes, twice a week, and there were a total of six recording times for each subject with a wireless EMG recording system. The results show that sensitivity of the highest frequency component of EMD is better than the highest frequency component of DWT, and raw data.

  16. Modeling LIDAR Detection of Biological Aerosols to Determine Optimum Implementation Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, David M.; Aker, Pam M.

    2007-09-19

    This report summarizes work performed for a larger multi-laboratory project named the Background Interferent Measurement and Standards project. While originally tasked to develop algorithms to optimize biological warfare agent detection using UV fluorescence LIDAR, the current uncertainties in the reported fluorescence profiles and cross sections the development of any meaningful models. It was decided that a better approach would be to model the wavelength-dependent elastic backscattering from a number of ambient background aerosol types, and compare this with that generated from representative sporulated and vegetative bacterial systems. Calculations in this report show that a 266, 355, 532 and 1064 nm elastic backscatter LIDAR experiment will allow an operator to immediately recognize when sulfate, VOC-based or road dust (silicate) aerosols are approaching, independent of humidity changes. It will be more difficult to distinguish soot aerosols from biological aerosols, or vegetative bacteria from sporulated bacteria. In these latter cases, the elastic scattering data will most likely have to be combined with UV fluorescence data to enable a more robust categorization.

  17. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN GROUPS AND CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES: DETECTION AND HOST MORPHOLOGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, Timothy J.; Martini, Paul; Mulchaey, John S.; Berti, Angela; Jeltema, Tesla E.

    2009-01-01

    The incidence and properties of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the field, groups, and clusters can provide new information about how these objects are triggered and fueled, similar to how these environments have been employed to study galaxy evolution. We have obtained new XMM-Newton observations of seven X-ray selected groups and poor clusters with 0.02 -1 ). We find that the X-ray selected AGN fraction increases from f A (L X ≥ 10 41 ; M R ≤ M* R + 1) = 0.047 +0.023 -0.016 in clusters to 0.091 +0.049 -0.034 for the groups (85% significance), or a factor of 2, for AGN above an 0.3-8 keV X-ray luminosity of 10 41 ergs -1 hosted by galaxies more luminous than M* R + 1. The trend is similar, although less significant, for a lower-luminosity host threshold of M R = -20 mag. For many of the groups in the sample, we have also identified AGN via standard emission-line diagnostics and find that these AGNs are nearly disjoint from the X-ray selected AGN. Because there are substantial differences in the morphological mix of galaxies between groups and clusters, we have also measured the AGN fraction for early-type galaxies alone to determine if the differences are directly due to environment, or indirectly due to the change in the morphological mix. We find that the AGN fraction in early-type galaxies is also lower in clusters f A,n≥2.5 (L X ≥ 10 41 ; M R ≤ M* R + 1) = 0.048 +0.028 -0.019 compared to 0.119 +0.064 -0.044 for the groups (92% significance), a result consistent with the hypothesis that the change in AGN fraction is directly connected to environment.

  18. Reduction of snapshots for MIMO radar detection by block/group orthogonal matching pursuit

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Hussain El Hosiny

    2014-10-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar works on the principle of transmission of independent waveforms at each element of its antenna array and is widely used for surveillance purposes. In this work, we investigate MIMO radar target localization problem with compressive sensing. Specifically, we try to solve the problem of estimation of target location in MIMO radar by group and block sparsity algorithms. It will lead us to a reduced number of snapshots required and also we can achieve better radar resolution. We will use group orthogonal matching pursuit (GOMP) and block orthogonal matching pursuit (BOMP) for our problem. © 2014 IEEE.

  19. Reduction of snapshots for MIMO radar detection by block/group orthogonal matching pursuit

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Hussain El Hosiny; Ahmed, Sajid; Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2014-01-01

    localization problem with compressive sensing. Specifically, we try to solve the problem of estimation of target location in MIMO radar by group and block sparsity algorithms. It will lead us to a reduced number of snapshots required and also we can achieve

  20. Article Commentary: Group Learning Assessments as a Vital Consideration in the Implementation of New Peer Learning Pedagogies in the Basic Science Curriculum of Health Profession Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte L. Briggs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by reports of successful outcomes in health profession education literature, peer learning has progressively grown to become a fundamental characteristic of health profession curricula. Many studies, however, are anecdotal or philosophical in nature, particularly when addressing the effectiveness of assessments in the context of peer learning. This commentary provides an overview of the rationale for using group assessments in the basic sciences curriculum of health profession programs and highlights the challenges associated with implementing group assessments in this context. The dearth of appropriate means for measuring group process suggests that professional collaboration competencies need to be more clearly defined. Peer learning educators are advised to enhance their understanding of social psychological research in order to implement best practices in the development of appropriate group assessments for peer learning.

  1. Disability and Family in the People's Republic of China: Implementation, Benefits, and Comparison of Two Mutual Support Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Helen; McCabe, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Background: The authors and 2 Chinese parents established 2 support groups in China. One group was for parents of children with autism, and the other was for young adults with either mental health issues or intellectual disability, and their parents. The purpose of this study was to examine the meaning and effectiveness of these groups from the…

  2. Detecting non-orthology in the COGs database and other approaches grouping orthologs using genome-specific best hits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessimoz, Christophe; Boeckmann, Brigitte; Roth, Alexander C J; Gonnet, Gaston H

    2006-01-01

    Correct orthology assignment is a critical prerequisite of numerous comparative genomics procedures, such as function prediction, construction of phylogenetic species trees and genome rearrangement analysis. We present an algorithm for the detection of non-orthologs that arise by mistake in current orthology classification methods based on genome-specific best hits, such as the COGs database. The algorithm works with pairwise distance estimates, rather than computationally expensive and error-prone tree-building methods. The accuracy of the algorithm is evaluated through verification of the distribution of predicted cases, case-by-case phylogenetic analysis and comparisons with predictions from other projects using independent methods. Our results show that a very significant fraction of the COG groups include non-orthologs: using conservative parameters, the algorithm detects non-orthology in a third of all COG groups. Consequently, sequence analysis sensitive to correct orthology assignments will greatly benefit from these findings.

  3. Disability and family in the People's Republic of China: implementation, benefits, and comparison of two mutual support groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Helen; McCabe, Karen

    2013-03-01

    The authors and 2 Chinese parents established 2 support groups in China. One group was for parents of children with autism, and the other was for young adults with either mental health issues or intellectual disability, and their parents. The purpose of this study was to examine the meaning and effectiveness of these groups from the parents' perspectives. Qualitative interviews and questionnaires were completed by members of the groups, across the first 16 months. Facilitator monthly reports were also analysed. Members of both groups found the groups provided a feeling of belonging and a place to interact with similar people. Differences existed relating to perspectives on the purpose of the groups and how families benefited, as well as in participation rates. Suggestions were provided by members. Implications of the differences in participation and desires of the parents are considered, including the understanding and perceptions of various disabilities in China.

  4. Achieving behaviour change for detection of Lynch syndrome using the Theoretical Domains Framework Implementation (TDFI) approach: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Natalie; Long, Janet C; Debono, Deborah; Williams, Rachel; Salisbury, Elizabeth; O'Neill, Sharron; Eykman, Elizabeth; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Chin, Melvin

    2016-03-12

    Lynch syndrome is an inherited disorder associated with a range of cancers, and found in 2-5 % of colorectal cancers. Lynch syndrome is diagnosed through a combination of significant family and clinical history and pathology. The definitive diagnostic germline test requires formal patient consent after genetic counselling. If diagnosed early, carriers of Lynch syndrome can undergo increased surveillance for cancers, which in turn can prevent late stage cancers, optimise treatment and decrease mortality for themselves and their relatives. However, over the past decade, international studies have reported that only a small proportion of individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome were referred for genetic consultation and possible genetic testing. The aim of this project is to use behaviour change theory and implementation science approaches to increase the number and speed of healthcare professional referrals of colorectal cancer patients with a high-likelihood risk of Lynch syndrome to appropriate genetic counselling services. The six-step Theoretical Domains Framework Implementation (TDFI) approach will be used at two large, metropolitan hospitals treating colorectal cancer patients. Steps are: 1) form local multidisciplinary teams to map current referral processes; 2) identify target behaviours that may lead to increased referrals using discussion supported by a retrospective audit; 3) identify barriers to those behaviours using the validated Influences on Patient Safety Behaviours Questionnaire and TDFI guided focus groups; 4) co-design interventions to address barriers using focus groups; 5) co-implement interventions; and 6) evaluate intervention impact. Chi square analysis will be used to test the difference in the proportion of high-likelihood risk Lynch syndrome patients being referred for genetic testing before and after intervention implementation. A paired t-test will be used to assess the mean time from the pathology test results to referral for high

  5. Detection of biologically important anions in aqueous media by dicationic azaborines bearing ammonio or phosphonio groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agou, Tomohiro; Sekine, Masaki; Kobayashi, Junji; Kawashima, Takayuki

    2009-01-01

    New cationic triarylboranes bearing ammonio or phosphonio groups on the periphery were synthesized from a common intermediate, a dibromodibenzoazaborine. These cationic molecules are soluble in highly polar organic solvents as well as water, and they exhibit strong light absorption and photoluminescence emission in water. Complexation of the cationic azaborines with fluoride and cyanide ions in aqueous media proceeded and could be monitored by NMR, UV/Vis, and fluorescence spectroscopy.

  6. Academic Leadership: Management of Groups or Leadership of Teams? A Multiple-Case Study on Designing and Implementing a Team-Based Development Programme for Academic Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderhjelm, Teresa; Björklund, Christina; Sandahl, Christer; Bolander-Laksov, Klara

    2018-01-01

    Demands on academic leadership are increasing, which raises the need for leadership training. This article describes development and implementation of a group training intervention in academic leadership at a departmental level. Little systematic research has addressed the question of what forms of leadership training are associated with…

  7. Large-scale parallel configuration interaction. II. Two- and four-component double-group general active space implementation with application to BiH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knecht, Stefan; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Fleig, Timo

    2010-01-01

    We present a parallel implementation of a large-scale relativistic double-group configuration interaction CIprogram. It is applicable with a large variety of two- and four-component Hamiltonians. The parallel algorithm is based on a distributed data model in combination with a static load balanci...

  8. Implementation of integrated care for diabetes mellitus type 2 by two Dutch care groups : A case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busetto, Loraine; Luijkx, Katrien; Huizing, Anna; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Even though previous research has demonstrated improved outcomes of integrated care initiatives, it is not clear why and when integrated care works. This study aims to contribute to filling this knowledge gap by examining the implementation of integrated care for type 2 diabetes by two

  9. Detection of Duchenne/Becker Muscular Dystrophy Carriers in a Group of Iranian Families by Linkage Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fardeen Ali Malayeri

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This study determines the value of linkage analysis using six RFLP markers for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis in familial DMD/BMD cases and their family members for the first time in the Iranian population. We studied the dystrophin gene in 33 unrelated patients with clinical diagnosis of DMD or BMD. Subsequently, we determined the rate of heterozygosity for six intragenic RFLP markers in the mothers of patients with dystrophin gene deletions. Finally, we studied the efficiency of linkage analysis by using RFLP markers for carrier status detection of DMD/BMD. In 63.6% of the patients we found one or more deletions. The most common heterozygous RFLP marker with 57.1% heterozygosity was pERT87.15Taq1. More than 80% of mothers in two groups of familial or non-familial cases had at least two heterozygous markers. Family linkage analysis was informative in more than 80% of the cases, allowing for accurate carrier detection. We found that linkage analysis using these six RFLP markers for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis is a rapid, easy, reliable, and inexpensive method, suitable for most routine diagnostic services. The heterozygosity frequency of these markers is high enough in the Iranian population to allow carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis of DMD/BMD in more than 80% of familial cases in Iran.

  10. Hydroxyl group as IR probe to detect the structure of ionic liquid-acetonitrile mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Deng, Geng; Zhou, Yu; Ashraf, Hamad; Yu, Zhi-Wu

    2018-06-01

    Task-specific ionic liquids (ILs) are those with functional groups introduced in the cations or anions of ILs to bring about specific properties for various tasks. In this work, the hydrogen bonding interactions between a hydroxyl functionalized IL 1-(2-hydroxylethyl)-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([C2OHMIM][BF4]) and acetonitrile were investigated in detail by infrared spectroscopy, excess spectroscopy, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy, combined with hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance and density functional theory calculations (DFT). The hydroxyl group rather than C2sbnd H is found to be the main interaction site in the cation. And the ν(Osbnd H) is more sensitive than v(C-Hs) to the environment, which has been taken as an intrinsic probe to reflect the structural change of IL. Examining the region of ν(Osbnd H), by combining excess spectroscopy and DFT calculation, a number of species were identified in the mixtures. Other than the hydrogen bond between a cation and an anion, the hydroxyl group allows the formation of a hydrogen bond between two like-charged cations. The Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonding interactions in the hydroxyl-mediated cation-cation complexes are cooperative, while Osbnd H⋯F and C2sbnd H⋯F hydrogen bonding interactions in cation-anion complexes are anti-cooperative. These in-depth studies on the properties of the ionic liquid-acetonitrile mixtures may shed light on exploring their applications as mixed solvents and understanding the nature of doubly ionic hydrogen bonds.

  11. Comparison of different sampling techniques and of different culture methods for detection of group B streptococcus carriage in pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhelst Rita

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus; GBS is a significant cause of perinatal and neonatal infections worldwide. To detect GBS colonization in pregnant women, the CDC recommends isolation of the bacterium from vaginal and anorectal swab samples by growth in a selective enrichment medium, such as Lim broth (Todd-Hewitt broth supplemented with selective antibiotics, followed by subculture on sheep blood agar. However, this procedure may require 48 h to complete. We compared different sampling and culture techniques for the detection of GBS. Methods A total of 300 swabs was taken from 100 pregnant women at 35-37 weeks of gestation. For each subject, one rectovaginal, one vaginal and one rectal ESwab were collected. Plating onto Columbia CNA agar (CNA, group B streptococcus differential agar (GBSDA (Granada Medium and chromID Strepto B agar (CA, with and without Lim broth enrichment, were compared. The isolates were confirmed as S. agalactiae using the CAMP test on blood agar and by molecular identification with tDNA-PCR or by 16S rRNA gene sequence determination. Results The overall GBS colonization rate was 22%. GBS positivity for rectovaginal sampling (100% was significantly higher than detection on the basis of vaginal sampling (50%, but not significantly higher than for rectal sampling (82%. Direct plating of the rectovaginal swab on CNA, GBSDA and CA resulted in detection of 59, 91 and 95% of the carriers, respectively, whereas subculturing of Lim broth yielded 77, 95 and 100% positivity, respectively. Lim broth enrichment enabled the detection of only one additional GBS positive subject. There was no significant difference between GBSDA and CA, whereas both were more sensitive than CNA. Direct culture onto GBSDA or CA (91 and 95% detected more carriers than Lim broth enrichment and subculture onto CNA (77%. One false negative isolate was observed on GBSDA, and three false positives on CA. Conclusions In

  12. Detection of Hidden Hostile/Terrorist Groups in Harsh Territories by Using Animals as Mobile Biological Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Yasar Guneri; Ercan, Tuncay

    2008-07-25

    Terrorism is the greatest threat to national security and cannot be defeated by conventional military force alone. In critical areas such as Iraq, Afghanistan and Turkey, regular forces cannot reach these hostile/terrorist groups, the instigators of terrorism. These groups have a clear understanding of the relative ineffectiveness of counter-guerrilla operations and rely on guerrilla warfare to avoid major combat as their primary means of continuing the conflict with the governmental structures. In Internal Security Operations, detection of terrorist and hostile groups in their hiding places such as caves, lairs, etc. can only be achieved by professionally trained people such as Special Forces or intelligence units with the necessary experience and tools suitable for collecting accurate information in these often harsh, rugged and mountainous countries. To assist these forces, commercial micro-sensors with wireless interfaces could be utilized to study and monitor a variety of phenomena and environments from a certain distance for military purposes. In order to locate hidden terrorist groups and enable more effective use of conventional military resources, this paper proposes an active remote sensing model implanted into animals capable of living in these environments. By using these mobile sensor devices, improving communications for data transfer from the source, and developing better ways to monitor and detect threats, terrorist ability to carry out attacks can be severely disrupted.

  13. Detection of Hidden Hostile/Terrorist Groups in Harsh Territories by Using Animals as Mobile Biological Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuncay Ercan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Terrorism is the greatest threat to national security and cannot be defeated by conventional military force alone. In critical areas such as Iraq, Afghanistan and Turkey, regular forces cannot reach these hostile/terrorist groups, the instigators of terrorism. These groups have a clear understanding of the relative ineffectiveness of counter-guerrilla operations and rely on guerrilla warfare to avoid major combat as their primary means of continuing the conflict with the governmental structures. In Internal Security Operations, detection of terrorist and hostile groups in their hiding places such as caves, lairs, etc. can only be achieved by professionally trained people such as Special Forces or intelligence units with the necessary experience and tools suitable for collecting accurate information in these often harsh, rugged and mountainous countries. To assist these forces, commercial micro-sensors with wireless interfaces could be utilized to study and monitor a variety of phenomena and environments from a certain distance for military purposes. In order to locate hidden terrorist groups and enable more effective use of conventional military resources, this paper proposes an active remote sensing model implanted into animals capable of living in these environments. By using these mobile sensor devices, improving communications for data transfer from the source, and developing better ways to monitor and detect threats, terrorist ability to carry out attacks can be severely disrupted.

  14. The Detection of Spotted Fever Group Rickettsia DNA in Tick Samples From Pastoral Communities in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koka, Hellen; Sang, Rosemary; Kutima, Helen Lydia; Musila, Lillian

    2017-05-01

    In this study, ticks from pastoral communities in Kenya were tested for Rickettsia spp. infections in geographical regions where the presence of tick-borne arboviruses had previously been reported. Rickettsial and arbovirus infections have similar clinical features which makes differential diagnosis challenging when both diseases occur. The tick samples were tested for Rickettsia spp. by conventional PCR using three primer sets targeting the gltA, ompA, and ompB genes followed by amplicon sequencing. Of the tick pools screened, 25% (95/380) were positive for Rickettsia spp. DNA using the gltA primer set. Of the tick-positive pools, 60% were ticks collected from camels. Rickettsia aeschlimannii and R. africae were the main Rickettsia spp. detected in the tick pools sequenced. The findings of this study indicate that multiple Rickettsia species are circulating in ticks from pastoral communities in Kenya and could contribute to the etiology of febrile illness in these areas. Diagnosis and treatment of rickettsial infections should be a public health priority in these regions. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Nuclear Security Systems and Measures for the Detection of Nuclear and Other Radioactive Material out of Regulatory Control. Implementing Guide (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This publication provides guidance to Member States for the development, or improvement of nuclear security systems and measures for the detection of criminal or unauthorized acts with nuclear security implications involving nuclear and other radioactive material out of regulatory control. It describes the elements of an effective nuclear security detection architecture which is composed of an integrated set of nuclear security systems and measures, and is based on an appropriate legal and regulatory framework for the implementation of the national detection strategy. The publication is an implementing guide within the IAEA Nuclear Security Series and is intended for use by national policy makers, legislative bodies, competent authorities, institutions, and individuals involved in the establishment, implementation, maintenance or sustainability of nuclear security systems and measures for the detection of nuclear and other radioactive material out of regulatory control

  16. Effect of implementing anti-HLA antibody detection by Luminex in the kidney transplant program in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgueta, S; Fuentes, C; López, M; Hernández, J; Arenas, A; Jiménez, M; Gajardo, J G; Rodríguez, H; Labraña, C

    2011-11-01

    The development of new highly sensitive, specific technologies to detect HLA antibodies has allowed a better definition of the profile of non-permitted antigens for patients awaiting kidney transplantation. The use of calculated or virtual panel reactive antibodies (CPRA or vPRA) seeks to improve the prediction of positive crossmatches (XM), but increases the proportion of sensitized patients on the waiting list. In 2008-2009, we implemented detection of antibodies using Luminex technology and applied vPRA since 2009. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of these innovations in defecting patient sensitization on kidney transplant waiting lists for deceased donors and among transplanted patients. We analyzed the waiting list for 2007 through 2009 and the first semester of 2010, including the patients transplanted in these periods and the XM with deceased donors. We observed an increase in the mean peak PRA of transplanted patients from 7.2% in 2007 to 17.1% in 2010 (P = .001), and in the proportion of patients transplanted with a peak PRA > 50% from 2.8% in 2007 to 15.7% in 2010 (P = .0001), with no increase in the proportion of this population on the waiting lists. There was a concurrent decrease in positive XM among patients with a peak PRA > 50%. The use of vPRA and Luminex permitted a greater number of transplants of patients with peak PRA > 50% and was a good predictor of a positive XM. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. EPLD/CPLD based solution for sodium vapour leak detection processing instrumentation - ECIL's development, design, manufacturing and commissioning for implementation of DDCS at SGTF, IGCAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasekhara Rao, K.S.; Mitra, S.G.; Kannaiah, B.

    2004-01-01

    For the Complex Process and Instrumentation needs of Sodium System of SGTF (Steam Generator Test Facility) of IGCAR, ECIL has developed the State of the Art EPLD / CPLD based solutions for Sodium Vapour Leak Detection Processing with Distributed I/O Intelligence for the task of Acquiring the Data, Analog to Digital Conversion, Data Interpretation as Sodium Leak, Healthy, Sensor /Cable Open/Short, Annunciation and Data Communication with DDCS. The System is flexible on a programmable chip for each group of 32 Sensors Data Processing and the Processing is Software Controlled rather than traditional hardware based. The System is adaptable to process requirement changes with simple Software updation/tuning rather than cumbersome and time-consuming hardware changes. Since the design is Software based, there is no drift and it is calibration free. The implementation is based on conceptual Design, Schematic Capture, VHDL Coding and Compilation, EPLD/CPLD Programming using J-Tag, Prefabrication Simulation Testing with Test Bench, Thermal-EMI-EMC Analysis, Fabrication, Assembly and Testing. The Leak Detection Processing is Integrated as part of 'DDCS - Developed, Designed, Manufactured and Commissioned at SGTF, IGCAR' consisting of Dual Redundant Multi Loop PID Controllers/PLCs, DAS and net worked HMI. The System is well established and, operational at IGCAR. (author)

  18. Gaps in the implementation of antenatal syphilis detection and treatment in health facilities across sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyangarara, Mufaro; Walker, Neff; Boerma, Ties

    2018-01-01

    Syphilis in pregnancy is an under-recognized public health problem, especially in sub-Saharan Africa which accounts for over 60% of the global burden of syphilis. If left untreated, more than half of maternal syphilis cases will result in adverse pregnancy outcomes including stillbirth and fetal loss, neonatal death, prematurity or low birth weight, and neonatal infections. Achieving universal coverage of antenatal syphilis screening and treatment has been the focus of the global campaign for the elimination of mother-to-child transmission of syphilis. However, little is known about the availability of antenatal syphilis screening and treatment across sub-Saharan Africa. The objective of this study was to estimate the 'likelihood of appropriate care' for antenatal syphilis screening and treatment by analyzing health facility surveys and household surveys conducted from 2010 to 2015 in 12 sub-Saharan African countries. In this secondary data analysis, we linked indicators of health facility readiness to provide antenatal syphilis detection and treatment from Service Provision Assessments (SPAs) and Service Availability and Readiness Assessments (SARAs) to indicators of ANC use from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) to compute estimates of the 'likelihood of appropriate care'. Based on data from 5,593 health facilities that reported offering antenatal care (ANC) services, the availability of syphilis detection and treatment in ANC facilities ranged from 2% to 83%. The availability of syphilis detection and treatment was substantially lower in ANC facilities in West Africa compared to the other sub-regions. Levels of ANC attendance were high (median 94.9%), but only 27% of ANC attendees initiated care at less than 4 months gestation. We estimated that about one in twelve pregnant women received ANC early (<4 months) at a facility ready to provide syphilis detection and treatment (median 8%, range 7-32%). The largest implementation bottleneck identified was low

  19. A group approach to genetic counselling of cardiomyopathy patients: satisfaction and psychological outcomes sufficient for further implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Ellen; Birnie, Erwin; Ranchor, Adelita V; van Tintelen, J Peter; van Langen, Irene M

    2015-11-01

    The introduction of next-generation sequencing in everyday clinical genetics practise is increasing the number of genetic disorders that can be confirmed at DNA-level, and consequently increases the possibilities for cascade screening. This leads to a greater need for genetic counselling, whereas the number of professionals available to provide this is limited. We therefore piloted group genetic counselling for symptomatic cardiomyopathy patients at regional hospitals, to assess whether this could be an acceptable alternative to individual counselling. We performed a cohort study with pre- and post-counselling patient measurements using questionnaires, supplemented with evaluations of the group counselling format by the professionals involved. Patients from eight regional hospitals in the northern part of the Netherlands were included. Questionnaires comprised patient characteristics, psychological measures (personal perceived control (PPC), state and trait anxiety inventory (STAI)), and satisfaction with counsellors, counselling content and design. In total, 82 patients (mean age 57.5 year) attended one of 13 group sessions. Median PPC and STAI scores showed significantly higher control and lower anxiety after the counselling. Patients reported they were satisfied with the counsellors, and almost 75% of patients were satisfied with the group counselling. Regional professionals were also, overall, satisfied with the group sessions. The genetics professionals were less satisfied, mainly because of their perceived large time investment and less-than-expected group interaction. Hence, a group approach to cardiogenetic counselling is feasible, accessible, and psychologically effective, and could be one possible approach to counselling the increasing patient numbers in cardiogenetics.

  20. Developing a common framework for evaluating the implementation of genomic medicine interventions in clinical care: the IGNITE Network's Common Measures Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Lori A; Sperber, Nina R; Voils, Corrine; Nichols, Marshall; Myers, Rachel A; Wu, R Ryanne; Rakhra-Burris, Tejinder; Levy, Kenneth D; Levy, Mia; Pollin, Toni I; Guan, Yue; Horowitz, Carol R; Ramos, Michelle; Kimmel, Stephen E; McDonough, Caitrin W; Madden, Ebony B; Damschroder, Laura J

    2018-06-01

    PurposeImplementation research provides a structure for evaluating the clinical integration of genomic medicine interventions. This paper describes the Implementing Genomics in Practice (IGNITE) Network's efforts to promote (i) a broader understanding of genomic medicine implementation research and (ii) the sharing of knowledge generated in the network.MethodsTo facilitate this goal, the IGNITE Network Common Measures Working Group (CMG) members adopted the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) to guide its approach to identifying constructs and measures relevant to evaluating genomic medicine as a whole, standardizing data collection across projects, and combining data in a centralized resource for cross-network analyses.ResultsCMG identified 10 high-priority CFIR constructs as important for genomic medicine. Of those, eight did not have standardized measurement instruments. Therefore, we developed four survey tools to address this gap. In addition, we identified seven high-priority constructs related to patients, families, and communities that did not map to CFIR constructs. Both sets of constructs were combined to create a draft genomic medicine implementation model.ConclusionWe developed processes to identify constructs deemed valuable for genomic medicine implementation and codified them in a model. These resources are freely available to facilitate knowledge generation and sharing across the field.

  1. Network-Based Detection and Classification of Seismovolcanic Tremors: Example From the Klyuchevskoy Volcanic Group in Kamchatka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubestre, Jean; Shapiro, Nikolai M.; Seydoux, Léonard; de Rosny, Julien; Droznin, Dmitry V.; Droznina, Svetlana Ya.; Senyukov, Sergey L.; Gordeev, Evgeniy I.

    2018-01-01

    We develop a network-based method for detecting and classifying seismovolcanic tremors. The proposed approach exploits the coherence of tremor signals across the network that is estimated from the array covariance matrix. The method is applied to four and a half years of continuous seismic data recorded by 19 permanent seismic stations in the vicinity of the Klyuchevskoy volcanic group in Kamchatka (Russia), where five volcanoes were erupting during the considered time period. We compute and analyze daily covariance matrices together with their eigenvalues and eigenvectors. As a first step, most coherent signals corresponding to dominating tremor sources are detected based on the width of the covariance matrix eigenvalues distribution. Thus, volcanic tremors of the two volcanoes known as most active during the considered period, Klyuchevskoy and Tolbachik, are efficiently detected. As a next step, we consider the daily array covariance matrix's first eigenvector. Our main hypothesis is that these eigenvectors represent the principal components of the daily seismic wavefield and, for days with tremor activity, characterize dominant tremor sources. Those daily first eigenvectors, which can be used as network-based fingerprints of tremor sources, are then grouped into clusters using correlation coefficient as a measure of the vector similarity. As a result, we identify seven clusters associated with different periods of activity of four volcanoes: Tolbachik, Klyuchevskoy, Shiveluch, and Kizimen. The developed method does not require a priori knowledge and is fully automatic; and the database of the network-based tremor fingerprints can be continuously enriched with newly available data.

  2. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid detection of Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus) in vaginal swabs - a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, James Patrick; Cox, Ciara; Fairley, Derek John; Burke, Rachael; Shields, Michael D; Watt, Alison; Coyle, Peter Valentine

    2017-03-01

    Neonatal sepsis caused by Streptococcus agalactiae [group B streptococcus (GBS)] is a life-threatening condition, which is preventable if colonized mothers are identified and given antibiotic prophylaxis during labour. Conventional culture is time consuming and unreliable, and many available non-culture diagnostics are too complex to implement routinely at point of care. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a method that, enables the rapid and specific detection of target nucleic acid sequences in clinical materials without the requirement for extensive sample preparation. A prototype LAMP assay targeting GBS sip gene is described. The assay was 100 % specific for GBS, with a limit of detection of 14 genome copies per reaction. The clinical utility of the LAMP assay for rapid direct molecular detection of GBS was determined by testing a total of 157 vaginal swabs with minimal sample processing using a rapid lysis solution. Compared to a reference quantitative real-time PCR assay, the direct LAMP protocol had a sensitivity and specificity of 95.4 and 100 %, respectively, with positive and negative predictive values of 100 and 98.3 %, respectively. Positive and negative likelihood ratios were infinity and 0.05, respectively. The direct LAMP method required a mean time of 45 min from the receipt of a swab to generation of a confirmed result, compared to 2 h 30 min for the reference quantitative real-time PCR test. The direct LAMP protocol described is easy to perform, facilitating rapid and accurate detection of GBS in vaginal swabs. This test has a potential for use at point of care.

  3. Detecting and accounting for multiple sources of positional variance in peak list registration analysis and spin system grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelter, Andrey; Rouchka, Eric C; Moseley, Hunter N B

    2017-08-01

    Peak lists derived from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra are commonly used as input data for a variety of computer assisted and automated analyses. These include automated protein resonance assignment and protein structure calculation software tools. Prior to these analyses, peak lists must be aligned to each other and sets of related peaks must be grouped based on common chemical shift dimensions. Even when programs can perform peak grouping, they require the user to provide uniform match tolerances or use default values. However, peak grouping is further complicated by multiple sources of variance in peak position limiting the effectiveness of grouping methods that utilize uniform match tolerances. In addition, no method currently exists for deriving peak positional variances from single peak lists for grouping peaks into spin systems, i.e. spin system grouping within a single peak list. Therefore, we developed a complementary pair of peak list registration analysis and spin system grouping algorithms designed to overcome these limitations. We have implemented these algorithms into an approach that can identify multiple dimension-specific positional variances that exist in a single peak list and group peaks from a single peak list into spin systems. The resulting software tools generate a variety of useful statistics on both a single peak list and pairwise peak list alignment, especially for quality assessment of peak list datasets. We used a range of low and high quality experimental solution NMR and solid-state NMR peak lists to assess performance of our registration analysis and grouping algorithms. Analyses show that an algorithm using a single iteration and uniform match tolerances approach is only able to recover from 50 to 80% of the spin systems due to the presence of multiple sources of variance. Our algorithm recovers additional spin systems by reevaluating match tolerances in multiple iterations. To facilitate evaluation of the

  4. The effect of implementing a new guideline and operative pro forma on the detection and management of third- and fourth-degree perineal tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornell K

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Kristin Cornell,1 Alison De Souza,2 Mark Tacey,3 David M Long,4 Mayooran Veerasingham5 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The Northern Hospital, Epping, VIC, 2Department of Urogynecology, Mercy Hospital for Women, Melbourne, VIC, 3Northern Clinical Research Centre, The Northern Hospital and Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, 4Department of Emergency Medicine, The Austin Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, 5The Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ipswich General Hospital, Ipswich, QLD, Australia Background: Obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASI is a serious complication of vaginal births, resulting in possible long-term consequences such as incontinence and pain. Adequate detection and management of these injuries is vital in minimizing the impact they have on women. Aim: To assess the rates of detection, management, and outcomes of OASI before and after the implementation of a new clinical practice guideline and operative pro forma. Materials and methods: A 12-month audit of the incidence, management, and outcomes of OASI was conducted in 2009. An operative pro forma and practice guideline were implemented in 2010 followed by a further audit undertaken between 2010 and 2012. Statistical analysis was performed to determine any significant change in practice. Results: The distribution of risk factors for OASI including primiparity, birthweight, and type of vaginal delivery was similar between the two audited groups. After implementation of the pro forma, the reported incidence of OASI increased from 1.62% to 3.1% (P=0.004. Significant changes in management included an increase in the use of recommended suture material (48% vs 80%, P=0.002, postoperative antibiotics (78% vs 99%, P=0.001, postoperative catheterization (52% vs 90%, P<0.001, and inpatient physiotherapy consultations (44% vs 97%, P=<0.001. An increase was seen in women attending their 6-week follow-up appointment (33% vs 54% P=0.058; however, this was

  5. Implementation of a computer-aided detection tool for quantification of intracranial radiologic markers on brain CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Ross, Stephen R.; Wang, Yunzhi; Wu, Dee H.; Cornwell, Benjamin O.; Ray, Bappaditya; Zheng, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is a form of hemorrhagic stroke that affects middle-aged individuals and associated with significant morbidity and/or mortality especially those presenting with higher clinical and radiologic grades at the time of admission. Previous studies suggested that blood extravasated after aneurysmal rupture was a potentially clinical prognosis factor. But all such studies used qualitative scales to predict prognosis. The purpose of this study is to develop and test a new interactive computer-aided detection (CAD) tool to detect, segment and quantify brain hemorrhage and ventricular cerebrospinal fluid on non-contrasted brain CT images. First, CAD segments brain skull using a multilayer region growing algorithm with adaptively adjusted thresholds. Second, CAD assigns pixels inside the segmented brain region into one of three classes namely, normal brain tissue, blood and fluid. Third, to avoid "black-box" approach and increase accuracy in quantification of these two image markers using CT images with large noise variation in different cases, a graphic User Interface (GUI) was implemented and allows users to visually examine segmentation results. If a user likes to correct any errors (i.e., deleting clinically irrelevant blood or fluid regions, or fill in the holes inside the relevant blood or fluid regions), he/she can manually define the region and select a corresponding correction function. CAD will automatically perform correction and update the computed data. The new CAD tool is now being used in clinical and research settings to estimate various quantitatively radiological parameters/markers to determine radiological severity of aSAH at presentation and correlate the estimations with various homeostatic/metabolic derangements and predict clinical outcome.

  6. Importance of physical examination in early detection of lump in breast in women of different age groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, H.; Imran, S.; Waris, Noorul-ain-Hafeez; Khanam, A.; Khurshid, R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The spectrum of breast lesions in adolescents varies markedly from that for adults, with the former lesions being overwhelmingly benign. Fine needle biopsy can be used to distinguish benign and malignant tumour. Study Design: This study examined the characteristics and outcome of women with different age groups in whom physical examination was their sole method of lump in breast detection. Patients and Methods: A total of 200 patients were included in the study. These were divided into 3 groups. Group A was consisting of 75 girls with age of pubescent. Group B included 69 suspected breast cancer women with age range 26-38 years. Fifty-six suspected breast cancer women with age range 41-60 year were included as group C. Study was carried out in patients admitted in the Department/Out-door of Surgery, Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan. Study period was 6 months. All women received a physical examination by a breast surgeon. Proforma including demographic and clinical characteristics were filled. The diagnosis for patients in this study was achieved by core needle biopsy using a 14-gauge cutting needle. Results: It was observed that early age at menarche ( 25 may be a risk factor in peri/post menopausal women. Active life style is more important with increasing age as it decreases the risk of developing tumour state. Family history was more common in women with peri/post menopausal status as compared to other age groups. Clinical characteristics showed that lump size <2.5 cm was more common in both pubescent and reproductive age. While lump size with a range of 2.5-5.0 cm, was observed in all groups of patients. Fibroadenoma is observed in almost all women with pubescent age while both benign and malignant tumour observed in women with reproductive age. Malignant tumour was observed mostly in women with peri/post menopausal status. Conclusion: Study concluded that early detection or clinical examination with FNA cut out the patients from harassment

  7. Detection and molecular characterization of group A rotavirus from hospitalized children in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2004

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    Filipe Anibal Carvalho-Costa

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is a major cause of infantile acute diarrhea, causing about 440,000 deaths per year, mainly in developing countries. The World Health Organization has been recommending the assessment of rotavirus burden and strain characterization as part of the strategies of immunization programs against this pathogen. In this context, a prospective study was made on a sample of 134 children with acute diarrhea and severe dehydration admitted to venous fluid therapy in two state hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from February to September 2004. Rotavirus where detected by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE and by an enzyme-linked immunoassay to rotavirus and adenovirus (EIARA in 48% of the children. Positive samples for group A rotavirus (n = 65 were analyzed by reverse transcription/heminested multiplex polymerase chain reaction to determine the frequency of G and [P] genotypes and, from these, 64 samples could be typed. The most frequent G genotype was G1 (58% followed by G9 (40%. One mixed infection (G1/G9 was detected. The only [P] genotype identified was [8]. In order to estimate the rotavirus infection frequency in children who acquired diarrhea as hospital infection in those hospitals, we studied 24 patients, detecting the pathogen in 41% of them. This data suggest that genotype G9 is an important genotype in Rio de Janeiro, with implications to the future strategies of vaccination against rotavirus, reinforcing the need of continuous monitoring of circulating strains of the pathogen, in a surveillance context.

  8. Detection and genotyping of group A rotaviruses isolated from sewage samples in Monastir, Tunisia between April 2007 and April 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassine-Zaafrane, M; Kaplon, J; Ben Salem, I; Sdiri-Loulizi, K; Sakly, N; Pothier, P; Aouni, M; Ambert-Balay, K

    2015-11-01

    To ascertain the viral load, the distribution of G and P types of group A rotaviruses (RV-A) in sewage samples and to compare strains in clinical, animal and environmental samples. During our study from April 2007 to April 2010, 518 samples of raw and treated sewage were collected from two biological sewage treatment plants (STPs) located in the Monastir region, Tunisia. RV-A was detected by real-time RT-PCR in 375 (72·4%) sewage samples. According to the quantification results of RV-A, it appears that the viral load in raw and treated sewage of the two STPs was quite similar (P = 0·735). The genotyping of RV-A strains detected in sewage samples showed a great diversity with 10 G types and 8 P types. Most of them were described as common in humans, but we also detected genotypes commonly found in animals. All the genotypes detected in two previous studies performed in our laboratory on clinical and bovine samples were also found in environmental samples. However, some genotypes commonly found in animal were only found in sewage samples. The comparison of environmental, clinical and animal data suggests that STPs may convey not only human sewage but also animal wastes, both of them contaminated with numerous RV-A strains which are not efficiently eliminated by the sewage treatment process and may spread to surface waters. This work demonstrates the potential release of human and animal RV-A into water sources, representing a public health risk, by inducing gastroenteritis in population, but also by increasing the risk of zoonotic transmission and formation of reassortant viruses which could get a higher infectious potential. Our findings also suggest that monitoring of sewage may provide an additional tool to determine the epidemiology of RV-A circulating in a given community. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. SCPS: a fast implementation of a spectral method for detecting protein families on a genome-wide scale

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    Paccanaro Alberto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important problem in genomics is the automatic inference of groups of homologous proteins from pairwise sequence similarities. Several approaches have been proposed for this task which are "local" in the sense that they assign a protein to a cluster based only on the distances between that protein and the other proteins in the set. It was shown recently that global methods such as spectral clustering have better performance on a wide variety of datasets. However, currently available implementations of spectral clustering methods mostly consist of a few loosely coupled Matlab scripts that assume a fair amount of familiarity with Matlab programming and hence they are inaccessible for large parts of the research community. Results SCPS (Spectral Clustering of Protein Sequences is an efficient and user-friendly implementation of a spectral method for inferring protein families. The method uses only pairwise sequence similarities, and is therefore practical when only sequence information is available. SCPS was tested on difficult sets of proteins whose relationships were extracted from the SCOP database, and its results were extensively compared with those obtained using other popular protein clustering algorithms such as TribeMCL, hierarchical clustering and connected component analysis. We show that SCPS is able to identify many of the family/superfamily relationships correctly and that the quality of the obtained clusters as indicated by their F-scores is consistently better than all the other methods we compared it with. We also demonstrate the scalability of SCPS by clustering the entire SCOP database (14,183 sequences and the complete genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (6,690 sequences. Conclusions Besides the spectral method, SCPS also implements connected component analysis and hierarchical clustering, it integrates TribeMCL, it provides different cluster quality tools, it can extract human-readable protein

  10. SCPS: a fast implementation of a spectral method for detecting protein families on a genome-wide scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepusz, Tamás; Sasidharan, Rajkumar; Paccanaro, Alberto

    2010-03-09

    An important problem in genomics is the automatic inference of groups of homologous proteins from pairwise sequence similarities. Several approaches have been proposed for this task which are "local" in the sense that they assign a protein to a cluster based only on the distances between that protein and the other proteins in the set. It was shown recently that global methods such as spectral clustering have better performance on a wide variety of datasets. However, currently available implementations of spectral clustering methods mostly consist of a few loosely coupled Matlab scripts that assume a fair amount of familiarity with Matlab programming and hence they are inaccessible for large parts of the research community. SCPS (Spectral Clustering of Protein Sequences) is an efficient and user-friendly implementation of a spectral method for inferring protein families. The method uses only pairwise sequence similarities, and is therefore practical when only sequence information is available. SCPS was tested on difficult sets of proteins whose relationships were extracted from the SCOP database, and its results were extensively compared with those obtained using other popular protein clustering algorithms such as TribeMCL, hierarchical clustering and connected component analysis. We show that SCPS is able to identify many of the family/superfamily relationships correctly and that the quality of the obtained clusters as indicated by their F-scores is consistently better than all the other methods we compared it with. We also demonstrate the scalability of SCPS by clustering the entire SCOP database (14,183 sequences) and the complete genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (6,690 sequences). Besides the spectral method, SCPS also implements connected component analysis and hierarchical clustering, it integrates TribeMCL, it provides different cluster quality tools, it can extract human-readable protein descriptions using GI numbers from NCBI, it interfaces with

  11. Implementation of rigorous renormalization group method for ground space and low-energy states of local Hamiltonians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Brenden; Vidick, Thomas; Motrunich, Olexei I.

    2017-12-01

    The success of polynomial-time tensor network methods for computing ground states of certain quantum local Hamiltonians has recently been given a sound theoretical basis by Arad et al. [Math. Phys. 356, 65 (2017), 10.1007/s00220-017-2973-z]. The convergence proof, however, relies on "rigorous renormalization group" (RRG) techniques which differ fundamentally from existing algorithms. We introduce a practical adaptation of the RRG procedure which, while no longer theoretically guaranteed to converge, finds matrix product state ansatz approximations to the ground spaces and low-lying excited spectra of local Hamiltonians in realistic situations. In contrast to other schemes, RRG does not utilize variational methods on tensor networks. Rather, it operates on subsets of the system Hilbert space by constructing approximations to the global ground space in a treelike manner. We evaluate the algorithm numerically, finding similar performance to density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) in the case of a gapped nondegenerate Hamiltonian. Even in challenging situations of criticality, large ground-state degeneracy, or long-range entanglement, RRG remains able to identify candidate states having large overlap with ground and low-energy eigenstates, outperforming DMRG in some cases.

  12. Long-Term Improvements in Knowledge and Psychosocial Factors of a Teen Pregnancy Prevention Intervention Implemented in Group Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jennifer; Oman, Roy F; Lu, Minggen; Clements-Nolle, Kristen D

    2017-06-01

    Youth in out-of-home care have higher rates of sexual risk behaviors and pregnancy than youth nationally. This study aimed to determine if Power Through Choices (PTC), a teen pregnancy prevention program developed for youth in out-of-home care, significantly improves knowledge and psychosocial outcomes regarding HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), sexual activity and contraception methods, long term. A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted with 1,036 ethnically diverse youths (aged 13-18 years) recruited from 44 residential group homes in three states. Intervention participants received the 10-session PTC intervention; control participants received usual care. Participants were administered self-report surveys at baseline, after intervention, 6 and 12 months after the intervention. Survey items assessed knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and behavioral intentions regarding HIV and STIs, sexual activity and contraception methods. Random intercept logistic regression analyses were used to assess differences between the intervention and control groups. Compared with youth in the control group, youth in the PTC intervention demonstrated significant improvements in knowledge about anatomy and fertility (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03-1.11), HIV and STIs (AOR = 1.03, 95% CI = 1.002-1.07), and methods of protection (AOR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.03-1.09), as well as self-efficacy regarding self-efficacy to communicate with a partner (AOR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.04-1.26), plan for protected sex and avoid unprotected sex (AOR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.04-1.28), and where to get methods of birth control (AOR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.01-1.26) 12 months after the intervention. Findings suggest that the PTC intervention can have positive long-term knowledge and psychosocial effects regarding contraception methods on youth in out-of-home care. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by

  13. Implementation of a Targeted Screening Program to Detect Airflow Obstruction Suggestive of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease within a Presurgical Screening Clinic

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    Chantal Robitaille

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Targeted spirometry screening for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD has been studied in primary care and community settings. Limitations regarding availability and quality of testing remain. A targeted spirometry screening program was implemented within a presurgical screening (PSS clinic to detect undiagnosed airways disease and identify patients with COPD/asthma in need of treatment optimization.

  14. Detecting change in water quality from implementation of limestone treatment systems in a coal-minded watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta,, Charles A.; Weitzel, Jeffrey B.

    2000-01-01

    had such a pronounced effect on water quality in Swatara Creek, the effects of recent implementation of limestone treatments are difficult to detect at a watershed scale. Nevertheless, during ecological surveys prior to 1991, no fish were found in Swatara Creek at Ravine. Only six species of fish were found in 1994 and 1996. However, increasing numbers of fish have been found annually since 1996. In 1999, 21 species of fish were documented. The recent monitoring on the mainstem of Swatara Creek indicates the limestone treatments mitigate extreme fluctuations in pH during storm events; however, additional buffering capacity is needed to maintain near-neutral pH of Swatara Creek during large storm events. Concentration 2 of sulfate, specific conductance, and pH are inversely related to streamflow at Ravine, indicating dilution and acidification during stormflow. Declines in stream-water pH to values approaching 5.0 could result in the remobilization of adsorbed or precipitated metals associated with sediments; declines in pH below 5.0 could cause injury to aquatic organisms. Generally, to maintain stream pH during storms, additional or larger limestone diversion wells could be constructed to begin or increase alkalinity production as the stream stage rises and/or additional or larger limestone drains could be constructed to produce greater amounts of alkalinity and enhance the buffering capacity of baseflow.

  15. Clinician Perspectives of Barriers to Effective Implementation of a Rapid Response System in an Academic Health Centre: A Focus Group Study

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    John Rihari-Thomas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Systemic and structural issues of rapid response system (RRS models can hinder implementation. This study sought to understand the ways in which acute care clinicians (physicians and nurses experience and negotiate care for deteriorating patients within the RRS. Methods Physicians and nurses working within an Australian academic health centre within a jurisdictional-based model of clinical governance participated in focus group interviews. Verbatim transcripts were analysed using thematic content analysis. Results Thirty-four participants (21 physicians and 13 registered nurses [RNs] participated in six focus groups over five weeks in 2014. Implementing the RRS in daily practice was a process of informal communication and negotiation in spite of standardised protocols. Themes highlighted several systems or organisational-level barriers to an effective RRS, including (1 responsibility is inversely proportional to clinical experience; (2 actions around system flexibility contribute to deviation from protocol; (3 misdistribution of resources leads to perceptions of inadequate staffing levels inhibiting full optimisation of the RRS; and (4 poor communication and documentation of RRS increases clinician workloads. Conclusion Implementing a RRS is complex and multifactorial, influenced by various inter- and intra-professional factors, staffing models and organisational culture. The RRS is not a static model; it is both reflexive and iterative, perpetually transforming to meet healthcare consumer and provider demands and local unit contexts and needs. Requiring more than just a strong initial implementation phase, new models of care such as a RRS demand good governance processes, ongoing support and regular evaluation and refinement. Cultural, organizational and professional factors, as well as systems-based processes, require consideration if RRSs are to achieve their intended outcomes in dynamic healthcare settings.

  16. Absorption-line detections of 105-106 K gas in spiral-rich groups of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocke, John T.; Keeney, Brian A.; Danforth, Charles W.; Syphers, David; Yamamoto, H.; Shull, J. Michael; Green, James C.; Froning, Cynthia; Savage, Blair D.; Wakker, Bart; Kim, Tae-Sun; Ryan-Weber, Emma V.; Kacprzak, Glenn G.

    2014-01-01

    Using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope, the COS Science Team has conducted a high signal-to-noise survey of 14 bright QSOs. In a previous paper, these far-UV spectra were used to discover 14 'warm' (T ≥ 10 5 K) absorbers using a combination of broad Lyα and broad O VI absorptions. A reanalysis of a few of this new class of absorbers using slightly relaxed fitting criteria finds as many as 20 warm absorbers could be present in this sample. A shallow, wide spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey has been conducted around these sight lines to investigate the warm absorber environment, which is found to be spiral-rich groups or cluster outskirts with radial velocity dispersions σ = 250-750 km s –1 . While 2σ evidence is presented favoring the hypothesis that these absorptions are associated with the galaxy groups and not with the individual, nearest galaxies, this evidence has considerable systematic uncertainties and is based on a small sample size so it is not entirely conclusive. If the associations are with galaxy groups, the observed frequency of warm absorbers (dN/dz = 3.5-5 per unit redshift) requires them to be very extended as an ensemble on the sky (∼1 Mpc in radius at high covering factor). Most likely these warm absorbers are interface gas clouds whose presence implies the existence of a hotter (T ∼ 10 6.5 K), diffuse, and probably very massive (>10 11 M ☉ ) intra-group medium which has yet to be detected directly.

  17. Design and Implementation of Acute Emergency Decision Making Tools to Aid Case Managers: A Focus Group Study

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    Marquita D. Bradshaw

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate and determine if use of specific reference cards for diabetes, stroke, and heat stroke [1] heightened understanding of the signs and symptoms of these conditions and [2] helped case managers (CMs on the community-based integrated multidisciplinary program of assertive community treatment (IMPACT team better evaluate patients. Background: Healthcare professionals who service those with a severe mental illness (SMI diagnosis face many unique challenges. One particular challenge is medical assessment of patients with a SMI diagnosis. Often CMs do not have a background or work experience differentiating medical concerns from psychiatric signs and symptoms. Methods: Reference cards were developed at the request of the IMPACT team. Feedback was elicited through a one-time focus group session conducted by an independent party on the use of the reference cards as an educational tool. Anonymity was maintained. The responses were evaluated for themes. The moderator asked questions regarding the reference cards in each of the following areas: usability when answering questions about hypo- and hyperglycemia, stroke and heat stroke, understanding key points, recommendations for enhancement, and presentation of information. Results: Of the 8 CMs on the IMPACT team, 5 participated. Identified themes were quick reference and easily identifiable information. The use of pictures to illustrate the concepts was helpful. The language was appropriate for the cards and readily understandable. Suggestions for changes to the existing cards included use of a larger font, lighter background color, and moving medication information to the same side of the card. The limited availability of the heat stroke card in the summer was an identified limitation. Conclusions: The use of reference cards as an educational tool for CMs has not been extensively reviewed. Although data are limited from this pilot project, the CMs are enthusiastic about this

  18. Implementation of Remote 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Yunfeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Parker, William [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Breen, Stephen [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Yin Fangfang; Cai Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Papiez, Lech S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Bednarz, Greg [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen Wenzhou [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xiao Ying, E-mail: ying.xiao@jefferson.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Methods and Materials: Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is established at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. Results: The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. Conclusion: This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as part of QA

  19. New Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection of Inducible and Acquired Clarithromycin Resistance in the Mycobacterium abscessus Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shallom, Shamira J; Moura, Natalia S; Olivier, Kenneth N; Sampaio, Elizabeth P; Holland, Steven M; Zelazny, Adrian M

    2015-11-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium abscessus group (MAG) cause lung, soft tissue, and disseminated infections. The oral macrolides clarithromycin and azithromycin are commonly used for treatment. MAG can display clarithromycin resistance through the inducible erm(41) gene or via acquired mutations in the rrl (23S rRNA) gene. Strains harboring a truncation or a T28C substitution in erm(41) lose the inducible resistance trait. Phenotypic detection of clarithromycin resistance requires extended incubation (14 days), highlighting the need for faster methods to detect resistance. Two real-time PCR-based assays were developed to assess inducible and acquired clarithromycin resistance and tested on a total of 90 clinical and reference strains. A SYBR green assay was designed to distinguish between a full-length and truncated erm(41) gene by temperature shift in melting curve analysis. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele discrimination assays were developed to distinguish T or C at position 28 of erm(41) and 23S rRNA rrl gene mutations at position 2058 and/or 2059. Truncated and full-size erm(41) genes were detected in 21/90 and 69/90 strains, respectively, with 64/69 displaying T at nucleotide position 28 and 5/69 containing C at that position. Fifteen isolates showed rrl mutations conferring clarithromycin resistance, including A2058G (11 isolates), A2058C (3 isolates), and A2059G (1 isolate). Targeted sequencing and phenotypic assessment of resistance concurred with molecular assay results. Interestingly, we also noted cooccurring strains harboring an active erm(41), inactive erm(41), and/or acquired mutational resistance, as well as slowly growing MAG strains and also strains displaying an inducible resistance phenotype within 5 days, long before the recommended 14-day extended incubation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Immigration Reform and Administrative Relief for 2014 and Beyond: A Report on Behalf of the Committee for Immigration Reform Implementation (CIRI, Human Resources Working Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Kamasaki

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Successful implementation of any broad-scale immigrant legalization program requires an adequately funded infrastructure of immigrant-serving organizations. In 2014, President Obama announced an expanded Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA program, as well as the Deferred Action for Parents of Citizens and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA program, which would make it possible for approximately five million people to attain lawful, albeit temporary, status and employment authorization. As the initial DACA program instituted in 2012 has already stretched the capacity of immigrant-serving organizations to their limits or even beyond them, the possibility of full implementation of DAPA and the expanded DACA programs presents a formidable challenge for these organizations.In this paper, the Human Resources Working Group of the Committee for Immigration Reform Implementation (CIRI draws on the lessons of the Immigrant Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA, DACA, and other initiatives to provide a roadmap for immigrant service delivery agencies and their partners in planning for implementation of the expanded DACA and the DAPA programs, with an eye (ultimately to broad legislative reform. In particular, this paper focuses on the funding and human resources that the immigrant service delivery field, writ large, would require to implement these programs.If expanded DACA and DAPA were implemented, the CIRI Working Group estimates that, of the total of five million that may be eligible, 1.08 million individuals will require extensive application assistance, generating the need for approximately three times more full-time staff than are currently in the field. Moreover, without additional funding and staff, agencies will likely not be able to shift a portion of staff time to accommodate any new program, even taking the typical fee-for-service model into account. Thus, the paper identifies a pressing need for “upfront” funding as early in the

  1. Surveillance of invasive diseases caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in Italy: evolution of serotypes and antibiotic resistance in different age groups before and after implementation of PCV7

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    Fabio D’Ambrosio

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: PCV7 has been available in Italy since 2001, however only in 2005 national recommendations were issued and vaccination was implemented with different modalities by the Regions. Objectives: Aim of this study was to describe changes in serotype distribution and antibiotic susceptibility of S. pneumoniae from invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD in the last decade. Study Design: S. pneumoniae isolates from IPD, collected through a national surveillance system, were serotyped and antibiotic susceptibility was determined by E-test. Data were analyzed according to age groups (5 years, >5-64 years, 65 years and to 3 time periods: prior, during and after PCV7 implementation (2001- 2003, 2006-2008 and 2009-2011. Results: The percentage of PCV7 serotypes (vaccine serotypes, VS decreased over the years not only in children (from 60% to 26% but also in the other age groups. Penicillin resistance was rather low in 2001-2003 (7-12%, but peaked in children in 2006-2008 (24%, and decreased in 2009-2011, while erythromycin resistance slightly decreased over the 3 periods. Conclusions: PCV7 use has largely impacted the epidemiology of S. pneumoniae in Italy, with a decrease in VS in all age groups.The impact of PCV 13, available in Italy since the end of 2010, requires future evaluations.

  2. A simplified implementation of edge detection in MATLAB is faster and more sensitive than fast fourier transform for actin fiber alignment quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemeny, Steven Frank; Clyne, Alisa Morss

    2011-04-01

    Fiber alignment plays a critical role in the structure and function of cells and tissues. While fiber alignment quantification is important to experimental analysis and several different methods for quantifying fiber alignment exist, many studies focus on qualitative rather than quantitative analysis perhaps due to the complexity of current fiber alignment methods. Speed and sensitivity were compared in edge detection and fast Fourier transform (FFT) for measuring actin fiber alignment in cells exposed to shear stress. While edge detection using matrix multiplication was consistently more sensitive than FFT, image processing time was significantly longer. However, when MATLAB functions were used to implement edge detection, MATLAB's efficient element-by-element calculations and fast filtering techniques reduced computation cost 100 times compared to the matrix multiplication edge detection method. The new computation time was comparable to the FFT method, and MATLAB edge detection produced well-distributed fiber angle distributions that statistically distinguished aligned and unaligned fibers in half as many sample images. When the FFT sensitivity was improved by dividing images into smaller subsections, processing time grew larger than the time required for MATLAB edge detection. Implementation of edge detection in MATLAB is simpler, faster, and more sensitive than FFT for fiber alignment quantification.

  3. A predictive screening tool to detect diabetic retinopathy or macular edema in primary health care: construction, validation and implementation on a mobile application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Azrak

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The most described techniques used to detect diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema have to be interpreted correctly, such that a person not specialized in ophthalmology, as is usually the case of a primary care physician, may experience difficulties with their interpretation; therefore we constructed, validated and implemented as a mobile app a new tool to detect diabetic retinopathy or diabetic macular edema (DRDME using simple objective variables. We undertook a cross-sectional, observational study of a sample of 142 eyes from Spanish diabetic patients suspected of having DRDME in 2012–2013. Our outcome was DRDME and the secondary variables were: type of diabetes, gender, age, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, foveal thickness and visual acuity (best corrected. The sample was divided into two parts: 80% to construct the tool and 20% to validate it. A binary logistic regression model was used to predict DRDME. The resulting model was transformed into a scoring system. The area under the ROC curve (AUC was calculated and risk groups established. The tool was validated by calculating the AUC and comparing expected events with observed events. The construction sample (n = 106 had 35 DRDME (95% CI [24.1–42.0], and the validation sample (n = 36 had 12 DRDME (95% CI [17.9–48.7]. Factors associated with DRDME were: HbA1c (per 1% (OR = 1.36, 95% CI [0.93–1.98], p = 0.113, foveal thickness (per 1 µm (OR = 1.03, 95% CI [1.01–1.04], p < 0.001 and visual acuity (per unit (OR = 0.14, 95% CI [0.00–0.16], p < 0.001. AUC for the validation: 0.90 (95% CI [0.75–1.00], p < 0.001. No significant differences were found between the expected and the observed outcomes (p = 0.422. In conclusion, we constructed and validated a simple rapid tool to determine whether a diabetic patient suspected of having DRDME really has it. This tool has been implemented on a mobile app. Further validation studies are required in the general diabetic population.

  4. Lasting impact of an implemented self-management programme for people with type 2 diabetes referred from primary care: a one-group, before-after design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fløde, Mari; Iversen, Marjolein M; Aarflot, Morten; Haltbakk, Johannes

    2017-12-01

    Research interventions in uniform clinical settings and in patients fulfilling well-defined inclusion criteria might show a more pronounced effect than implementing the same intervention in existing practice. Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) is complex, and should be assessed in existing practice as it is an intervention widely implemented. To examine the impact of an established group-based DSME in unselected people with type 2 diabetes referred from primary care. A one-group, before-after design was used for assessments before, immediately after, and 3 months after participation in a group-based DSME programme conducted at two Learning and Mastering Centres in Norway between November 2013 and June 2014. Participants completed a questionnaire before (n = 115), immediately after (n = 95) and 3 months after (n = 42) the DSME programme. Primary outcome measure was diabetes knowledge (Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test). Also patient activation (Patient Activation Measure [PAM]) and self-efficacy (General Self-Efficacy scale [GSE]) were measured. Changes in outcome measures were analysed using paired t-tests for normally distributed data and Wilcoxon signed-rank test for skewed data. Mean knowledge improved significantly from baseline (p < 0.001). Changes persisted at the 3-month assessment. Mean PAM scores improved significantly from baseline (p < 0.001), and changes persisted for 3 months. Mean GSE scores improved from baseline (p = 0.022) and persisted for 3 months. However, when results were stratified for participants who responded at all three time points, GSE showed no change during the study period. The complexity self-management in the individual is challenging to reflect in DSME. This implemented DSME programme for people with type 2 diabetes improved levels of diabetes knowledge and patient activation, persisting for at least 3 months. Hence, the DSME programme appears to be robust beyond standardised research settings, in educating unselected

  5. Implementation of immunomagnetic separation (IMS) for the enrichment and automated detection of bacterial contaminants in flow through lab on the chip technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Shakil

    Due to an increased public concern for food safety and quality, food processing industries have an urgent need for fast and reliable contaminant detection technologies. Conventional pathogen detection methods are time consuming, cost intensive, require skilled laboratory workers and are inappropr...... and detect pathogens in food, feed or beverage industries in real-time and has the potential to offer significant advantages compared to conventional systems.......Due to an increased public concern for food safety and quality, food processing industries have an urgent need for fast and reliable contaminant detection technologies. Conventional pathogen detection methods are time consuming, cost intensive, require skilled laboratory workers...... diacetate (CFDA) was used to evaluate the viability of the cell. Under final optimized condition, the developed method showed 98 % capture efficiency towards the specific antigen Salmonella Typhimurium and very low (target bacterial strains. Subsequently, IMS was implemented...

  6. How do general practitioners implement decision-making regarding COPD patients with exacerbations? An international focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laue J

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Johanna Laue,1 Hasse Melbye,1 Peder A Halvorsen,1 Elena A Andreeva,2 Maciek Godycki-Cwirko,3 Anja Wollny,4 Nick A Francis,5 Mark Spigt,6 Kenny Kung,7 Mette Bech Risør1 1Department of Community Medicine, General Practice Research Unit, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; 2Department of Family Medicine, Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk, Russia; 3Department of Family and Community Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland; 4Institute of General Practice, University Medical Center Rostock, Rostock, Germany; 5Cochrane Institute of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; 6CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands; 7The Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Purpose: To explore the decision-making of general practitioners (GPs concerning treatment with antibiotics and/or oral corticosteroids and hospitalization for COPD patients with exacerbations.Methods: Thematic analysis of seven focus groups with 53 GPs from urban and rural areas in Norway, Germany, Wales, Poland, Russia, the Netherlands, and Hong Kong.Results: Four main themes were identified. 1 Dealing with medical uncertainty: the GPs aimed to make clear medical decisions and avoid unnecessary prescriptions and hospitalizations, yet this was challenged by uncertainty regarding the severity of the exacerbations and concerns about overlooking comorbidities. 2 Knowing the patient: contextual knowledge about the individual patient provided a supplementary framework to biomedical knowledge, allowing for more differentiated decision-making. 3 Balancing the patients’ perspective: the GPs considered patients’ experiential knowledge about their own body and illness as valuable in assisting their decision-making, yet felt that dealing with disagreements between their own

  7. Thoughts on implementation of the recommendations of the GBIF Task Group on a Global Strategy and Action Plan for Mobilisation of Natural History Collections Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas King

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF has a mandate to facilitate free and open access to primary biodiversity data worldwide. This Special Issue of Biodiversity Informatics publishes the findings of the recent GBIF Task Group on a Global Strategy and Action Plan for Mobilisation of Natural History Collections Data (GSAP-NHC. The GSAP-NHC Task Group has made three primary recommendations dealing with discovery, capture, and publishing of natural history collections data. This overview article provides insight on various activities initiated by GBIF to date to assist with an early uptake and implementation of these recommendations. It calls for proactive participation by all relevant players and stakeholder communities. Given recent technological progress and growing recognition and attention to biodiversity science worldwide, we think rapid progress in discovery, publishing and access to large volumes of useful collection data can be achieved for the immediate benefit of science and society.

  8. [Implementation of cytology images classification--the Bethesda 2001 System--in a group of screened women from Podlaskie region--effect evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbroch, Tomasz; Knapp, Paweł Grzegorz; Knapp, Piotr Andrzej

    2007-09-01

    Increasing knowledge concerning carcinogenesis within cervical epithelium has forced us to make continues modifications of cytology classification of the cervical smears. Eventually, new descriptions of the submicroscopic cytomorphological abnormalities have enabled the implementation of Bethesda System which was meant to take place of the former Papanicolaou classification although temporarily both are sometimes used simultaneously. The aim of this study was to compare results of these two classification systems in the aspect of diagnostic accuracy verified by further tests of the diagnostic algorithm for the cervical lesion evaluation. The study was conducted in the group of women selected from general population, the criteria being the place of living and cervical cancer age risk group, in the consecutive periods of mass screening in Podlaski region. The performed diagnostic tests have been based on the commonly used algorithm, as well as identical laboratory and methodological conditions. Performed assessment revealed comparable diagnostic accuracy of both analyzing classifications, verified by histological examination, although with marked higher specificity for dysplastic lesions with decreased number of HSIL results and increased diagnosis of LSILs. Higher number of performed colposcopies and biopsies were an additional consequence of TBS classification. Results based on Bethesda System made it possible to find the sources and reasons of abnormalities with much greater precision, which enabled causing agent treatment. Two evaluated cytology classification systems, although not much different, depicted higher potential of TBS and better, more effective communication between cytology laboratory and gynecologist, making reasonable implementation of The Bethesda System in the daily cytology screening work.

  9. The implementation of an automated tracking algorithm for the track detection of migratory anticyclones affecting the Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzaki, Maria; Flocas, Elena A.; Simmonds, Ian; Kouroutzoglou, John; Keay, Kevin; Rudeva, Irina

    2013-04-01

    Migratory cyclones and anticyclones mainly account for the short-term weather variations in extra-tropical regions. By contrast to cyclones that have drawn major scientific attention due to their direct link to active weather and precipitation, climatological studies on anticyclones are limited, even though they also are associated with extreme weather phenomena and play an important role in global and regional climate. This is especially true for the Mediterranean, a region particularly vulnerable to climate change, and the little research which has been done is essentially confined to the manual analysis of synoptic charts. For the construction of a comprehensive climatology of migratory anticyclonic systems in the Mediterranean using an objective methodology, the Melbourne University automatic tracking algorithm is applied, based to the ERA-Interim reanalysis mean sea level pressure database. The algorithm's reliability in accurately capturing the weather patterns and synoptic climatology of the transient activity has been widely proven. This algorithm has been extensively applied for cyclone studies worldwide and it has been also successfully applied for the Mediterranean, though its use for anticyclone tracking is limited to the Southern Hemisphere. In this study the performance of the tracking algorithm under different data resolutions and different choices of parameter settings in the scheme is examined. Our focus is on the appropriate modification of the algorithm in order to efficiently capture the individual characteristics of the anticyclonic tracks in the Mediterranean, a closed basin with complex topography. We show that the number of the detected anticyclonic centers and the resulting tracks largely depend upon the data resolution and the search radius. We also find that different scale anticyclones and secondary centers that lie within larger anticyclone structures can be adequately represented; this is important, since the extensions of major

  10. Molecular Detection and Identification of Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae in Ticks Collected from the West Bank, Palestinian Territories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suheir Ereqat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tick-borne rickettsioses are caused by obligate intracellular bacteria belonging to the spotted fever group (SFG rickettsiae. Although Spotted Fever is prevalent in the Middle East, no reports for the presence of tick-borne pathogens are available or any studies on the epidemiology of this disease in the West Bank. We aimed to identify the circulating hard tick vectors and genetically characterize SFG Rickettsia species in ixodid ticks from the West Bank-Palestinian territories.A total of 1,123 ixodid ticks belonging to eight species (Haemaphysalis parva, Haemaphysalis adleri, Rhipicephalus turanicus, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Rhipicephalus bursa, Hyalomma dromedarii, Hyalomma aegyptium and Hyalomma impeltatum were collected from goats, sheep, camels, dogs, a wolf, a horse and a tortoise in different localities throughout the West Bank during the period of January-April, 2014. A total of 867 ticks were screened for the presence of rickettsiae by PCR targeting a partial sequence of the ompA gene followed by sequence analysis. Two additional genes, 17 kDa and 16SrRNA were also targeted for further characterization of the detected Rickettsia species. Rickettsial DNA was detected in 148 out of the 867 (17% tested ticks. The infection rates in Rh. turanicus, Rh. sanguineus, H. adleri, H. parva, H. dromedarii, and H. impeltatum ticks were 41.7, 11.6, 16.7, 16.2, 11.8 and 20%, respectively. None of the ticks, belonging to the species Rh. bursa and H. aegyptium, were infected. Four SFG rickettsiae were identified: Rickettsia massiliae, Rickettsia africae, Candidatus Rickettsia barbariae and Candidatus Rickettsia goldwasserii.The results of this study demonstrate the geographic distribution of SFG rickettsiae and clearly indicate the presence of at least four of them in collected ticks. Palestinian clinicians should be aware of emerging tick-borne diseases in the West Bank, particularly infections due to R. massiliae and R. africae.

  11. Can high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection under all conditions be regarded as a sufficiently conclusive confirmatory method for B-group substances?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, T.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Lasaroms, J.J.P.; Stappers, S.J.W.; Rhijn, van J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Commission Decision 2002/657/EC requires confirmatory analysis of B-group compounds when detected at levels above the permitted limit. In contrast to banned substances, for B-group substances, the use of mass spectrometric techniques is not obligatory and several techniques including liquid

  12. Implementing and scaling up HCV treatment services for people who inject drugs and other high risk groups in Ukraine: An evaluation of programmatic and treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhnaya, Alyona; Meteliuk, Anna; Barnard, Tetiana; Zelenev, Alexei; Filippovych, Sergii; Altice, Frederick L

    2017-09-01

    HCV prevalence estimates among people who inject drugs (PWID) in Ukraine is high (60-90%), yet barriers to HCV treatment and care remain substantial including limited access to direct acting antiviral (DAA) medications. A feasibility scale-up project implemented HCV treatment in community-based settings to improve access to DAA treatment for key populations in this context. Using program-level data and verified medical records, we describe the development, implementation processes and outcomes for HCV treatment for PWID and other risks groups. Most participants (76%) received a combination of sofosbuvir, pegylated interferon, and ribavirin for 12 weeks. Treatment enrollment started in June 2015; the first two waves are reported. Data on demographics, HIV characteristics, HCV genotype and RNA levels, including sustained virologic response (SVR) were obtained from verified medical records. We used logistic regression to examine the independent correlates of achieving a SVR. The project was implemented in 19 healthcare institutions from 16 regions of Ukraine, mainly within AIDS specialty centers. Our analytical sample included 1126 participants who were mostly men (73%) and the majority were HIV co-infected (79%). Treatment retention was 97.7%; the proportions of participants who achieved SVR for the overall sample and for those with complete data (N=1029) were 86.2% (95% CI 84.08-88.19%) and 94.3% (95% CI 92.8-95.7%) respectively. The analysis of data restricted to only those with SVR data available showed that PWID who were currently injecting had comparable SVR rates (89.2%, 95% CI 81.5-94.5%) to PWID not injecting (94.4%, 95% CI 92.4-96.1), PWID on methadone (94.4%, 95%CI 92.4-96.1), and 'other' risk groups (95.2%, 95% CI 91.3-97.7). Independent factors associated with achieving a SVR were female sex (AOR: 3.44, 95% CI 1.45-8.14), HCV genotype 3 (AOR: 4.57, 95% CI 1.97-10.59) compared to genotype 1. SVR rates in PWID actively injecting did not differ significantly

  13. Insights of health district managers on the implementation of primary health care outreach teams in Johannesburg, South Africa: a descriptive study with focus group discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosa, Shabir; Derese, Anselme; Peersman, Wim

    2017-01-21

    Primary health care (PHC) outreach teams are part of a policy of PHC re-engineering in South Africa. It attempts to move the deployment of community health workers (CHWs) from vertical programmes into an integrated generalised team-based approach to care for defined populations in municipal wards. There has little evaluation of PHC outreach teams. Managers' insights are anecdotal. This is descriptive qualitative study with focus group discussions with health district managers of Johannesburg, the largest city in South Africa. This was conducted in a sequence of three meetings with questions around implementation, human resources, and integrated PHC teamwork. There was a thematic content analysis of validated transcripts using the framework method. There were two major themes: leadership-management challenges and human resource challenges. Whilst there was some positive sentiment, leadership-management challenges loomed large: poor leadership and planning with an under-resourced centralised approach, poor communications both within the service and with community, concerns with its impact on current services and resistance to change, and poor integration, both with other streams of PHC re-engineering and current district programmes. Discussion by managers on human resources was mostly on the plight of CHWs and calls for formalisation of CHWs functioning and training and nurse challenges with inappropriate planning and deployment of the team structure, with brief mention of the extended team. Whilst there is positive sentiment towards intent of the PHC outreach team, programme managers in Johannesburg were critical of management of the programme in their health district. Whilst the objective of PHC reform is people-centred health care, its implementation struggles with a centralising tendency amongst managers in the health service in South Africa. Managers in Johannesburg advocated for decentralisation. The implementation of PHC outreach teams is also limited by

  14. Comprehensive Implementation of the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS in a Dental School and University Oral Health Centre: A Stepwise Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Ahlawat

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available ICDAS (the International Caries Detection and Assessment System is a new approach to the detection and classification of dental caries, starting with the stage showing the earliest visual changes. Methodology: This article describes the implementation of the ICDAS at the School of Dentistry, International Medical University, and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in a step-by-step systematically planned process. Beginning with the setting up of a Task Force in 2011 for the evaluation and preparation of the training resources and the running of exploratory training exercises, it finally culminated in carrying out training workshops for the entire staff and students. After the internal processes had been completed, an international expert (KE was invited to evaluate the process and conduct another workshop using the resources developed within the University, including a reference set of carious teeth. The overall time taken was one and a half years. Conclusions: The implementation of the ICDAS has been comprehensively set into motion within the context of our local curriculum and oral healthcare delivery arrangements. However, this will be an ongoing process with further quality assurance measures being required clinically together with the continuing training of new staff. Sharing this ‘framework’ of the ICDAS implementation process should considerably ease the path and reduce the time period of future implementations by other dental teaching institutions.

  15. Implementing the patient-centered medical home model for chronic disease care in small medical practices: practice group characteristics and physician understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Louisa; Nash, David B

    2013-01-01

    Strengthening primary care may improve health outcomes and restrain spending. The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model is endorsed as a tool to achieve this. Early evaluations in large group practices demonstrate improvements in some health outcomes. Evidence is lacking from small medical practices that deliver the majority of primary health care. This was a national survey of 200 physicians that explored perceptions of PCMH. There was considerable interest in adoption of the model; however, providing PCMH care was seen as an extension of traditional roles that requires additional reimbursement. No differentiation was made among a variety of payment models to do this. All joint principle components of the model were identified as important: extending access and information technology were the most contentious. There was consensus that PCMH might improve the quality of primary care; however, tension between wider societal benefits and rising costs for individual practices was a challenge to implementation.

  16. Accelerating object detection via a visual-feature-directed search cascade: algorithm and field programmable gate array implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrkou, Christos; Theocharides, Theocharis

    2016-07-01

    Object detection is a major step in several computer vision applications and a requirement for most smart camera systems. Recent advances in hardware acceleration for real-time object detection feature extensive use of reconfigurable hardware [field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs)], and relevant research has produced quite fascinating results, in both the accuracy of the detection algorithms as well as the performance in terms of frames per second (fps) for use in embedded smart camera systems. Detecting objects in images, however, is a daunting task and often involves hardware-inefficient steps, both in terms of the datapath design and in terms of input/output and memory access patterns. We present how a visual-feature-directed search cascade composed of motion detection, depth computation, and edge detection, can have a significant impact in reducing the data that needs to be examined by the classification engine for the presence of an object of interest. Experimental results on a Spartan 6 FPGA platform for face detection indicate data search reduction of up to 95%, which results in the system being able to process up to 50 1024×768 pixels images per second with a significantly reduced number of false positives.

  17. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent problem in information-systems development (ISD) is that many design shortcomings are not detected during development, but first after the system has been delivered and implemented in its intended environment. Pilot implementations appear to promise a way to extend prototyping from...... the laboratory to the field, thereby allowing users to experience a system design under realistic conditions and developers to get feedback from realistic use while the design is still malleable. We characterize pilot implementation, contrast it with prototyping, propose a iveelement model of pilot...... implementation and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can be difficult...

  18. Test-bed of a real time detection system of L/H and H/L transitions implemented with the ITMS platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, M.; Barrera, E.; Gonzalez, J.; Melendez, R. [Grupo de Investigacion en Instrumentacion y Acustica Aplicada - Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Vega, J.; Ratta, G.; Gonzalez, S. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Madrid (Spain); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX - Associazione EURATOM ENEA per la Fusione, Padova (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    A basic requirement of the data acquisition systems used in long pulse fusion experiments is to detect events of interest in the acquired signals in real time. Developing such applications is usually a complex task, so it is necessary to develop a set of hardware and software tools that simplify their implementation. An example of these tools is the Intelligent Test and Measurement System (ITMS), which offers distributed data acquisition, distribution and real time processing capabilities with advanced, but easy to use, software tools that simplify application development and system setup. This poster presents the application of the ITMS platform to solve the problem of detecting L/H and H/L transitions in real time based on the use of efficient pattern recognition algorithms. The system architecture used to implement this solution and its performance evaluation are discussed. The system consists of the following elements: a) the ITMS, which is used both to implement the data acquisition and real time LH-HL detection, and to simulate the working environment by reproducing real signals obtained from JET database; b) an event detector, developed using advanced pattern recognition algorithms, that will continuously analyze the information of the acquired signals in order to detect the L/H and H/L transitions; and c) a host computer with several software tools developed with LabVIEW, JAVA and JINI to simplify the development of these complex experiments. These tools allow the user to describe data acquisition and processing tasks using state machines defined in SCXML. These state machines become part of the system setup information, so the behaviour of the system can be changed subsequently by simply modifying these state machines. All the events and key detected are stored by the host computer. This document is a poster. (authors)

  19. Implementation of a one-group interfacial area transport equation in a CFD code for the simulation of upward adiabatic bubbly flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellacani, F.; Macian, R.; Chiva, S.; Pena, C.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper upward, isothermal and turbulent bubbly flow in tubes is numerically modeled by using ANSYS CFX 12.1 with the aim of creating a basis for the reliable simulation of the flow along a vertical channel in a nuclear reactor as long term goal. Two approaches based on the mono-dispersed model and on the one-group Interfacial Area Transport Equation (IATE) model are used in order to maintain the computational effort as low as possible. This work represents the necessary step to implement a two-group interfacial area transport equation that will be able to dynamically represent the changes in interfacial structure in the transition region from bubbly to slug flow. The drag coefficient is calculated using the Grace model and the interfacial non-drag forces are also included. The Antal model is used for the calculation of the wall lubrication force coefficient. The lift force coefficient is obtained from the Tomiyama model. The turbulent dispersion force is taken into account and is modeled using the FAD (Favre averaged drag) approach, while the turbulence transfer is simulated with the Sato's model. The liquid velocity is in the range between 0.5 and 2 m/s and the average void fraction varies between 5 and 15%.The source and sink terms for break-up and coalescence needed for the calculation of the implemented Interfacial Area Density are those proposed by Yao and Morel. The model has been checked using experimental results by Mendez. Radial profile distributions of void fraction, interfacial area density and bubble mean diameter are shown at the axial position equivalent to z/D=56. The results obtained by the simulations have a good agreement with the experimental data but show also the need of a better study of the coalescence and breakup phenomena to develop more accurate interaction models. (author)

  20. Collaborative leadership and the implementation of community-based fall prevention initiatives: a multiple case study of public health practice within community groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markle-Reid, Maureen; Dykeman, Cathy; Ploeg, Jenny; Kelly Stradiotto, Caralyn; Andrews, Angela; Bonomo, Susan; Orr-Shaw, Sarah; Salker, Niyati

    2017-02-16

    Falls among community-dwelling older adults are a serious public health concern. While evidence-based fall prevention strategies are available, their effective implementation requires broad cross-sector coordination that is beyond the capacity of any single institution or organization. Community groups comprised of diverse stakeholders that include public health, care providers from the public and private sectors and citizen volunteers are working to deliver locally-based fall prevention. These groups are examples of collective impact and are important venues for public health professionals (PHPs) to deliver their mandate to work collaboratively towards achieving improved health outcomes. This study explores the process of community-based group work directed towards fall prevention, and it focuses particular attention on the collaborative leadership practices of PHPs, in order to advance understanding of the competencies required for collective impact. Four community groups, located in Ontario, Canada, were studied using an exploratory, retrospective, multiple case study design. The criteria for inclusion were presence of a PHP, a diverse membership and the completion of an initiative that fit within the scope of the World Health Organization Fall Prevention Model. Data were collected using interviews (n = 26), focus groups (n = 4), and documents. Cross-case synthesis was conducted by a collaborative team of researchers. The community groups differed by membership, the role of the PHP and the type of fall prevention initiatives. Seven practice themes emerged: (1) tailoring to address context; (2) making connections; (3) enabling communication; (4) shaping a vision; (5) skill-building to mobilize and take action; (6) orchestrating people and projects; and (7) contributing information and experience. The value of recognized leadership competencies was underscored and the vital role of institutional supports was highlighted. To align stakeholders working

  1. Detecting concealed information from groups using a dynamic questioning approach: simultaneous skin conductance measurement and immediate feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, E.H.; Bente, G.; Ben-Shakhar, G.; Schumacher, A.

    2013-01-01

    Lie detection procedures typically aim at determining the guilt or innocence of a single suspect. The Concealed Information Test (CIT), for example, has been shown to be highly successful in detecting the presence or absence of crime-related information in a suspect's memory. Many of today's

  2. VLSI implementation of MIMO detection for 802.11n using a novel adaptive tree search algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Heng; Jian Haifang; Zhou Liguo; Shi Yin

    2013-01-01

    A 4×4 64-QAM multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) detector is presented for the application of an IEEE 802.11n wireless local area network. The detectoris the implementation of a novel adaptive tree search(ATS) algorithm, and multiple ATS cores need to be instantiated to achieve the wideband requirement in the 802.11n standard. Both the ATS algorithm and the architectural considerations are explained. The latency of the detector is 0.75 μs, and the detector has a gate count of 848 k with a total of 19 parallel ATS cores. Each ATS core runs at 67 MHz. Measurement results show that compared with the floating-point ATS algorithm, the fixed-point implementation achieves a loss of 0.9 dB at a BER of 10 −3 . (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  3. Implementation of a cost-effective strategy to prevent neonatal early-onset group B haemolytic streptococcus disease in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkman, Diny G E; Rijnders, Marlies E B; Wouters, Maurice G A J; van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; van der Ploeg, Cpb Kitty; de Groot, Christianne J M; Fleuren, Margot A H

    2013-07-30

    Early-onset Group B haemolytic streptococcus infection (EOGBS) is an important cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality in the first week of life. Primary prevention of EOGBS is possible with intra-partum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP.) Different prevention strategies are used internationally based on identifying pregnant women at risk, either by screening for GBS colonisation and/or by identifying risk factors for EOGBS in pregnancy or labour. A theoretical cost-effectiveness study has shown that a strategy with IAP based on five risk factors (risk-based strategy) or based on a positive screening test in combination with one or more risk factors (combination strategy) was the most cost-effective approach in the Netherlands. IAP for all pregnant women with a positive culture in pregnancy (screening strategy) and treatment in line with the current Dutch guideline (IAP after establishing a positive culture in case of pre-labour rupture of membranes or preterm birth and immediate IAP in case of intra-partum fever, previous sibling with EOGBS or GBS bacteriuria), were not cost-effective. Cost-effectiveness was based on the assumption of 100% adherence to each strategy. However, adherence in daily practice will be lower and therefore have an effect on cost-effectiveness. The aims are to: a.) implement the current Dutch guideline, the risk-based strategy and the combination strategy in three pilot regions and b.) study the effects of these strategies in daily practice. Regions where all the care providers in maternity care implement the allocated strategy will be randomised. Before the introduction of the strategy, there will be a pre-test (use of the current guideline) involving 105 pregnant women per region. This will be followed by a post-test (use of the allocated strategy) involving 315 women per region. The outcome measures are: 1.) adherence to the specific prevention strategy and the determinants of adherence among care providers and pregnant women, 2.) outcomes

  4. The healthy options for nutrition environments in schools (Healthy ONES group randomized trial: using implementation models to change nutrition policy and environments in low income schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coleman Karen J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Healthy Options for Nutrition Environments in Schools (Healthy ONES study was an evidence-based public health (EBPH randomized group trial that adapted the Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s (IHI rapid improvement process model to implement school nutrition policy and environmental change. Methods A low-income school district volunteered for participation in the study. All schools in the district agreed to participate (elementary = 6, middle school = 2 and were randomly assigned within school type to intervention (n = 4 and control (n =4 conditions following a baseline environmental audit year. Intervention goals were to 1 eliminate unhealthy foods and beverages on campus, 2 develop nutrition services as the main source on campus for healthful eating (HE, and 3 promote school staff modeling of HE. Schools were followed across a baseline year and two intervention years. Longitudinal assessment of height and weight was conducted with second, third, and sixth grade children. Behavioral observation of the nutrition environment was used to index the amount of outside foods and beverages on campuses. Observations were made monthly in each targeted school environment and findings were presented as items per child per week. Results From an eligible 827 second, third, and sixth grade students, baseline height and weight were collected for 444 second and third grade and 135 sixth grade students (51% reach. Data were available for 73% of these enrolled students at the end of three years. Intervention school outside food and beverage items per child per week decreased over time and control school outside food and beverage items increased over time. The effects were especially pronounced for unhealthy foods and beverage items. Changes in rates of obesity for intervention school (28% baseline, 27% year 1, 30% year 2 were similar to those seen for control school (22% baseline, 22% year 1, 25% year 2 children

  5. Implementation of fuzzy modeling system for faults detection and diagnosis in three phase induction motor drive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shorouk Ossama Ibrahim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Induction motors have been intensively utilized in industrial applications, mainly due to their efficiency and reliability. It is necessary that these machines work all the time with its high performance and reliability. So it is necessary to monitor, detect and diagnose different faults that these motors are facing. In this paper an intelligent fault detection and diagnosis for different faults of induction motor drive system is introduced. The stator currents and the time are introduced as inputs to the proposed fuzzy detection and diagnosis system. The direct torque control technique (DTC is adopted as a suitable control technique in the drive system especially, in traction applications, such as Electric Vehicles and Sub-Way Metro that used such a machine. An intelligent modeling technique is adopted as an identifier for different faults; the proposed model introduces the time as an important factor or variable that plays an important role either in fault detection or in decision making for suitable corrective action according to the type of the fault. Experimental results have been obtained to verify the efficiency of the proposed intelligent detector and identifier; a matching between the simulated and experimental results has been noticed.

  6. The Hardware and Software Implementation of Low-Frequency Active Channel Signals in an Information Leakage Detection and Prevention Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mamaev

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses a new way of developing a special channel for the alarms, through computer’s power supply network, to solve the problem of protection from removal of the temporary control over the victim’s machine, using information leakage detection and prevention systems.

  7. Implementation of a SPR immunosensor for the simultaneous detection of the 22K and 20K hGH isoforms in human serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Juan-Franco, Elena; Rodríguez-Frade, J M; Mellado, M; Lechuga, Laura M

    2013-09-30

    We have implemented a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) immunosensor based on a sandwich assay for the simultaneous detection of the two main hGH isoforms, of 22 kDa (22K) and 20 kDa (20K). An oriented-antibody sensor surface specific for both hormone isoforms was assembled by using the biotin-streptavidin system. The immunosensor functionality was checked for the direct detection of the 22K hGH isoform in buffer, which gave high specificity and reproducibility (intra and inter-assay mean coefficients of variation of 8.23% and 9% respectively). The selective determination of the 22K and 20K hGH isoforms in human serum samples in a single assay was possible by using two specific anti-hGH monoclonal antibodies. The detection limit for both hormone isoforms was 0.9 ng mL(-1) and the mean coefficient of variation was below 7.2%. The excellent reproducibility and sensitivity obtained indicate the high performance of this immunosensor for implementing an anti-doping test. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling and Implementing Two-Stage AdaBoost for Real-Time Vehicle License Plate Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Kyou Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available License plate (LP detection is the most imperative part of the automatic LP recognition system. In previous years, different methods, techniques, and algorithms have been developed for LP detection (LPD systems. This paper proposes to automatical detection of car LPs via image processing techniques based on classifier or machine learning algorithms. In this paper, we propose a real-time and robust method for LPD systems using the two-stage adaptive boosting (AdaBoost algorithm combined with different image preprocessing techniques. Haar-like features are used to compute and select features from LP images. The AdaBoost algorithm is used to classify parts of an image within a search window by a trained strong classifier as either LP or non-LP. Adaptive thresholding is used for the image preprocessing method applied to those images that are of insufficient quality for LPD. This method is of a faster speed and higher accuracy than most of the existing methods used in LPD. Experimental results demonstrate that the average LPD rate is 98.38% and the computational time is approximately 49 ms.

  9. Data management implementation plan for the site characterization of the Waste Area Grouping 1 Groundwater Operable Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, T.S.; Nickle, E.B.

    1994-10-01

    The Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is undergoing a site characterization. This project is not mandated by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); therefore, no formalized meetings for data quality objective (DQO) development were held. Internally, DQOs were generated by the project team based on the end uses of the data to be collected. The 150-acre WAG 1 is contained within the ORNL security area. It includes all of the former ORNL radioisotope research, production, and maintenance facilities; former waste management areas; and some former administrative facilities. The goal of the WAG 1 Groundwater Site Characterization is to provide the necessary data on the nature and extent of groundwater contamination with an acceptable level of uncertainty to support the selection of remedial alternatives and to identify additional data needs for future actions. Primary objectives for the site characterization are: (1) To identify and characterize contaminant migration pathways based on the collection of groundwater data; (2) to identify sources of groundwater contamination and evaluate remedial actions which could be implemented to control or eliminate these sources; and (3) To conduct groundwater monitoring in support of other OUs in WAG 1 and the ORNL Groundwater OU

  10. An Investigation of Detect, Practice, and Repair to Remedy Math-Fact Deficits in a Group of Third-Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncy, Brian C.; Skinner, Christopher H.; Axtell, Philip K.

    2010-01-01

    A multiple-probe-across-problem-sets (tasks) design was used to evaluate the effects of the Detect, Practice, and Repair (DPR) on multiplication-fact fluency development in seven third-grade students nominated by their teacher as needing remediation. DPR is a multicomponent intervention and begins with a group-administered, metronome-paced…

  11. Utility of the MMPI-2-RF (Restructured Form) Validity Scales in Detecting Malingering in a Criminal Forensic Setting: A Known-Groups Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellbom, Martin; Toomey, Joseph A.; Wygant, Dustin B.; Kucharski, L. Thomas; Duncan, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined the utility of the recently released Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008) validity scales to detect feigned psychopathology in a criminal forensic setting. We used a known-groups design with the Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS;…

  12. Constructing Memory: Competence Maintenance, Education and Training Working Group on the Implementation of Geological Disposal of the Radioactive Waste Technology Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmu, Marjatta

    2015-01-01

    The Implementing Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste Technology Platform (IGD-TP) community, with over 115 participants in 2014, according to its Vision 2025 (IGD-TP, 2009) aims to proceed to obtaining licences to construct and to safely operate deep geological repositories for spent fuel, high-level waste, and other long-lived radioactive waste in their respective countries. The commitment to Vision 2025 includes developing joint means to facilitate access to expertise and technology, and maintain competencies in the field of geological disposal in Europe. In 2012, IGD-TP launched a Working Group on Competence Maintenance, Education and Training (CMET), as one of its permanent joint activities for addressing its commitment to maintain competencies. In 2013, this permanent organisational working group convened for its first meeting and started working with the support of the IGD-TP Secretariat. The work on competence maintenance within this IGD-TP's working group is first of all focusing on benefiting from and promoting the ECVET approach's application in geological disposal and in future competence building of the community. ECVET approach identifies the LOs that need to be mastered by professionals to carry out their work - starting from the early stages of a waste management programme to running the nuclear waste facilities safely and efficiently. LOs are defined in terms of knowledge, skills and competence (KSC) in ECVET ('attitude' is the corresponding term used by the International Atomic Energy Agency). In their different job functions or tasks the professionals carrying out their work need to master these KSCs at specified European Qualification Framework qualification levels (European Qualification Framework or International Standard Classification for Education according to the job's requirements. The ECVET approach is useful for higher education and continuous professional development, too, not just for vocational education

  13. Toward a standard for the evaluation of PET-Auto-Segmentation methods following the recommendations of AAPM task group No. 211: Requirements and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthon, Beatrice; Spezi, Emiliano; Galavis, Paulina; Shepherd, Tony; Apte, Aditya; Hatt, Mathieu; Fayad, Hadi; De Bernardi, Elisabetta; Soffientini, Chiara D; Ross Schmidtlein, C; El Naqa, Issam; Jeraj, Robert; Lu, Wei; Das, Shiva; Zaidi, Habib; Mawlawi, Osama R; Visvikis, Dimitris; Lee, John A; Kirov, Assen S

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to define the requirements and describe the design and implementation of a standard benchmark tool for evaluation and validation of PET-auto-segmentation (PET-AS) algorithms. This work follows the recommendations of Task Group 211 (TG211) appointed by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The recommendations published in the AAPM TG211 report were used to derive a set of required features and to guide the design and structure of a benchmarking software tool. These items included the selection of appropriate representative data and reference contours obtained from established approaches and the description of available metrics. The benchmark was designed in a way that it could be extendable by inclusion of bespoke segmentation methods, while maintaining its main purpose of being a standard testing platform for newly developed PET-AS methods. An example of implementation of the proposed framework, named PETASset, was built. In this work, a selection of PET-AS methods representing common approaches to PET image segmentation was evaluated within PETASset for the purpose of testing and demonstrating the capabilities of the software as a benchmark platform. A selection of clinical, physical, and simulated phantom data, including "best estimates" reference contours from macroscopic specimens, simulation template, and CT scans was built into the PETASset application database. Specific metrics such as Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), Positive Predictive Value (PPV), and Sensitivity (S), were included to allow the user to compare the results of any given PET-AS algorithm to the reference contours. In addition, a tool to generate structured reports on the evaluation of the performance of PET-AS algorithms against the reference contours was built. The variation of the metric agreement values with the reference contours across the PET-AS methods evaluated for demonstration were between 0.51 and 0.83, 0.44 and 0.86, and 0.61 and 1

  14. Prevention of Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis: Clinical audit to evaluate the implementation of National Osteoporosis Guideline Group 2017 guidelines in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Matthew

    2018-04-12

    Treatment with glucocorticoids is the leading cause of drug-induced osteoporosis. National Osteoporosis Guideline Group (NOGG) 2017 guidelines advise a case-finding strategy for patients at risk. The aims of the audit were to evaluate the implementation of the NOGG 2017 guidelines for patients receiving long-term glucocorticoid therapy in a suburban general practice, to instigate changes to ensure 90% of patients are investigated and treated appropriately, and to evaluate impact at a 6-mo re-audit. Reporting Analysis and Intelligence Delivering Results (RAIDR) is a health-care intelligence tool accessing primary care clinical data. Using RAIDR, data on relevant osteoporotic risk factors were combined to produce FRAX scores for patients who had been prescribed glucocorticoids 3 or more times in the past 12 months. FRAX data were displayed in a NOGG guidance graph for major osteoporotic fracture probability. Patients were assessed as high, intermediate, or low risk. High- and intermediate-risk patients above the NOGG threshold were recommended to start bisphosphonates; these patients were sent a prescription for alendronate and a letter of explanation. There were no intermediate patients below the NOGG threshold. Low-risk patients were recommended to have lifestyle advice; a leaflet was produced and sent to these patients. Initial results showed that only 25% of patients recommended to be on bisphosphonates were taking them. Steps were taken to educate the general practitioners in the FRAX tool and NOGG guidelines; the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease annual template was amended to aid adherence by alerting the nurse to the number of glucocorticoid courses prescribed, with additional boxes for prescribing alendronate and printing the lifestyle leaflet; and 2-monthly RAIDR searches by the practice pharmacist were started. A re-audit 6 mo later showed improvement to 92%. This audit showed that education, reminders, and simple computer prompts can greatly improve

  15. PRELIMINARY STUDY FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OFAN IMAGE ANALYSIS ALGORITHM TO DETECT DAIRY COW PRESENCE AT THE FEED BARRIER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona M.C. Porto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the applicability of the Viola-Jones algorithm for continuous detection of the feeding behaviour of dairy cows housed in an open free-stall barn. A methodology was proposed in order to train, test and validate the classifier. A lower number of positive and negative images than those used by Viola and Jones were required during the training. The testing produced the following results: hit rate of about 97.85%, missed rate of about 2.15%, and false positive rate of about 0.67%. The validation was carried out by an accuracy assessment procedure which required the time-consuming work of an operator who labelled the true position of the cows within the barn and their behaviours. The accuracy assessment revealed that among the 715 frames about 90.63% contained only true positives, whereas about 9.37% were affected by underestimation, i.e., contained also one or two false negatives. False positives occurred only in 2.93% of the analyzed frames. Though a moderate mismatch between the testing and the validation performances was registered, the results obtained revealed the adequacy of the Viola-Jones algorithm for detecting the feeding behaviour of dairy cows housed in open free-stall barns. This, in turn, opens up opportunities for an automatic analysis of cow behaviour.

  16. Human group A rotavirus infections in children in Denmark; detection of reassortant G9 strains and zoonotic P 14 strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midgley, S.; Bottiger, B.; Jensen, T. G.

    2014-01-01

    One of the leading causes of severe childhood gastroenteritis are group A rotaviruses, and they have been found to be associated with similar to 40% of the annual gastroenteritis-associated hospitalizations in young Danish children......One of the leading causes of severe childhood gastroenteritis are group A rotaviruses, and they have been found to be associated with similar to 40% of the annual gastroenteritis-associated hospitalizations in young Danish children...

  17. Planning, implementation and analysis of mine-surveying measurements to detect rock movements at the Asse salt mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hensel, G.

    1991-01-01

    At the Asse pit, a former salt mine, research has been done since 1965 mainly for the ultimate disposal of radioactive wastes. Within this framework a mine-surveying measurement program has been developed to detect local and extensive rock movements in the mine structure and on the surface. The rock observation program consists of surface levelling, levellings in the mine structure, measurement of shaft depth, shaft sounding, position and gyroscopic measurements as well as cavity convergence and extensometer measurements. The results of that measuring program are taken into account to judge stability. The subject of this work is to analyse the position measurements by priorities to find out to which extent the results, that is the horizontal displacement components, are interpretable. Such analysis is carried out according to the rules of compensating calculation by means of strict compensation after mediating observations. (HS) [de

  18. Detection of Mycobacterium chelonae, Mycobacterium abscessus Group, and Mycobacterium fortuitum Complex by a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Directly from Clinical Samples Using the BD MAX System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchetti, Talita T; Silbert, Suzane; Gostnell, Alicia; Kubasek, Carly; Campos Pignatari, Antonio C; Widen, Raymond

    2017-03-01

    A new multiplex PCR test was designed to detect Mycobacterium chelonae, Mycobacterium abscessus group, and Mycobacterium fortuitum complex on the BD MAX System. A total of 197 clinical samples previously submitted for mycobacterial culture were tested using the new protocol. Samples were first treated with proteinase K, and then each sample was inoculated into the BD MAX Sample Buffer Tube. Extraction and multiplex PCR were performed by the BD MAX System, using the BD MAX ExK TNA-3 extraction kit and BD TNA Master Mix, along with specific in-house designed primers and probes for each target. The limit of detection of each target, as well as specificity, was evaluated. Of 197 clinical samples included in this study, 133 were positive and 60 were negative for mycobacteria by culture, and another 4 negative samples were spiked with M. chelonae ATCC 35752. The new multiplex PCR on the BD MAX had 97% concordant results with culture for M. abscessus group detection, 99% for M. chelonae, and 100% for M. fortuitum complex. The new multiplex PCR test performed on the BD MAX System proved to be a sensitive and specific test to detect M. chelonae, M. abscessus group, and M. fortuitum complex by real-time PCR on an automated sample-in results-out platform. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Detection or Sunyaev-Zel'Dovich Decrement in Groups and Clusters Associated with Luminous Red Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Nick; Appel, John William; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J. Richard; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Dunner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fowler, Joseph W.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We present a detection of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) decrement associated with the Luminous Red Galaxy (LRG) sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The SZ data come from 148 GHz maps of the equatorial region made by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The LRG sample is divided by luminosity into four bins, and estimates for the central Sunyaev-Zel'dovich temperature decrement are calculated through a stacking process. We detect and account for a bias of the SZ signal due to weak radio sources. We use numerical simulations to relate the observed decrement to Y(sub 200) and clustering properties to relate the galaxy luminosity bins to mass. We also use a relation between BCG luminosity and cluster mass based on stacked gravitational lensing measurements to estimate the characteristic halo masses. The masses are found to be in the range approx.10(exp 13) - 10(exp 14)/h Stellar Mass, a lower range than has been previously probed.

  20. Combination of Morphological Operations with Structure based Partitioning and grouping for Text String detection from Natural Scenes

    OpenAIRE

    Vyankatesh V. Rampurkar; Gyankamal J. Chhajed

    2014-01-01

    Text information in natural scene images serves as important clues for many image-based applications such as scene perceptive, content-based image retrieval, assistive direction-finding and automatic geocoding. Now days different approaches like countours based, Image binarization and enhancement based, Gradient based and colour reduction based techniques can be used for the text detection from natural scenes. In this paper the combination of morphological operations with structure based part...

  1. Report of year 2000 version on basic study for promotion of joint implementation. Feasibility study on energy saving at Anshan Iron and Steel Group Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    In order to promote the COP3 joint implementation, a survey was conducted in fiscal 1999 at Anshan Iron and Steel Group Complex in China. The complex is the leading iron and steel maker in China. The unit requirement for energy consumption per ton of crude ore is 7.00 Gcal, which is close to 1.4 times that in Japan. The feasibility study has discussed and planned modification of ignition furnace facilities and waste heat recovery in the sintering process, top-pressure gas recovery at uniform pressure, and top-pressure recovery turbine (TRT) in the blast furnace, based on the locally available data and surveys. The modification of the ignition furnace in the sintering process resulted in reduction of fuel consumption of 578.0 TJ/year in the facility No. 2, and 718.9 TJ/year in the facility No. 3. The amount of electric power generated by the TRT is 121.13 GWh/year assuming the annual blast furnace operation factor of 90%. This can be converted to the heat quantity of 1,370 TJ/year. The top-pressure gas recovery amount is 163 TJ/year when converted to the heat quantity. Annual CO2 reduction amounted to 15,373 tons. The profitability was discussed by using the present worth method. Because of coal price being low and the energy unit price being low in China, it was revealed that the profitability at the private sector level could not be achieved. (NEDO)

  2. Facilitating organisational development using a group-based formative assessment and benchmarking method: design and implementation of the International Family Practice Maturity Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwyn, Glyn; Bekkers, Marie-Jet; Tapp, Laura; Edwards, Adrian; Newcombe, Robert; Eriksson, Tina; Braspenning, Jozé; Kuch, Christine; Adzic, Zlata Ozvacic; Ayankogbe, Olayinka; Cvetko, Tatjana; In 't Veld, Kees; Karotsis, Antonis; Kersnik, Janko; Lefebvre, Luc; Mecini, Ilir; Petricek, Goranka; Pisco, Luis; Thesen, Janecke; Turón, José María; van Rossen, Edward; Grol, Richard

    2010-12-01

    Well-organised practices deliver higher-quality care. Yet there has been very little effort so far to help primary care organisations achieve higher levels of team performance and to help them identify and prioritise areas where quality improvement efforts should be concentrated. No attempt at all has been made to achieve a method which would be capable of providing comparisons--and the stimulus for further improvement--at an international level. The development of the International Family Practice Maturity Matrix took place in three phases: (1) selection and refinement of organisational dimensions; (2) development of incremental scales based on a recognised theoretical framework; and (3) testing the feasibility of the approach on an international basis, including generation of an automated web-based benchmarking system. This work has demonstrated the feasibility of developing an organisational assessment tool for primary care organisations that is sufficiently generic to cross international borders and is applicable across a diverse range of health settings, from state-organised systems to insurer-based health economies. It proved possible to introduce this assessment method in 11 countries in Europe and one in Africa, and to generate comparison benchmarks based on the data collected. The evaluation of the assessment process was uniformly positive with the view that the approach efficiently enables the identification of priorities for organisational development and quality improvement at the same time as motivating change by virtue of the group dynamics. We are not aware of any other organisational assessment method for primary care which has been 'born international,' and that has involved attention to theory, dimension selection and item refinement. The principal aims were to achieve an organisational assessment which gains added value by using interaction, engagement comparative benchmarks: aims which have been achieved. The next step is to achieve wider

  3. Real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier opening via subharmonic acoustic emission detection: implementation of confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chih-Hung; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Liao, Yi-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-04-01

    Burst-tone focused ultrasound exposure in the presence of microbubbles has been demonstrated to be effective at inducing temporal and local opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which promises significant clinical potential to deliver therapeutic molecules into the central nervous system (CNS). Traditional contrast-enhanced imaging confirmation after focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure serves as a post-operative indicator of the effectiveness of FUS-BBB opening, however, an indicator that can concurrently report the BBB status and BBB-opening effectiveness is required to provide effective feedback to implement this treatment clinically. In this study, we demonstrate the use of subharmonic acoustic emission detection with implementation on a confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric ceramic structure to perform real-time monitoring of FUS-BBB opening. A confocal dual-frequency (0.55 MHz/1.1 MHz) focused ultrasound transducer was designed. The 1.1 MHz spherically-curved ceramic was employed to deliver FUS exposure to induce BBB-opening, whereas the outer-ring 0.55 MHz ceramic was employed to detect the subharmonic acoustic emissions originating from the target position. In stage-1 experiments, we employed spectral analysis and performed an energy spectrum density (ESD) calculation. An optimized 0.55 MHz ESD level change was shown to effectively discriminate the occurrence of BBB-opening. Wideband acoustic emissions received from 0.55 MHz ceramics were also analyzed to evaluate its correlations with erythrocyte extravasations. In stage-2 real-time monitoring experiments, we applied the predetermined ESD change as a detection threshold in PC-controlled algorithm to predict the FUS exposure intra-operatively. In stage-1 experiment, we showed that subharmonic ESD presents distinguishable dynamics between intact BBB and opened BBB, and therefore a threshold ESD change level (5.5 dB) can be identified for BBB-opening prediction. Using this ESD change threshold detection as a

  4. Real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier opening via subharmonic acoustic emission detection: implementation of confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Chih-Hung; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Liao, Yi-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-01-01

    Burst-tone focused ultrasound exposure in the presence of microbubbles has been demonstrated to be effective at inducing temporal and local opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which promises significant clinical potential to deliver therapeutic molecules into the central nervous system (CNS). Traditional contrast-enhanced imaging confirmation after focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure serves as a post-operative indicator of the effectiveness of FUS-BBB opening, however, an indicator that can concurrently report the BBB status and BBB-opening effectiveness is required to provide effective feedback to implement this treatment clinically. In this study, we demonstrate the use of subharmonic acoustic emission detection with implementation on a confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric ceramic structure to perform real-time monitoring of FUS-BBB opening. A confocal dual-frequency (0.55 MHz/1.1 MHz) focused ultrasound transducer was designed. The 1.1 MHz spherically-curved ceramic was employed to deliver FUS exposure to induce BBB-opening, whereas the outer-ring 0.55 MHz ceramic was employed to detect the subharmonic acoustic emissions originating from the target position. In stage-1 experiments, we employed spectral analysis and performed an energy spectrum density (ESD) calculation. An optimized 0.55 MHz ESD level change was shown to effectively discriminate the occurrence of BBB-opening. Wideband acoustic emissions received from 0.55 MHz ceramics were also analyzed to evaluate its correlations with erythrocyte extravasations. In stage-2 real-time monitoring experiments, we applied the predetermined ESD change as a detection threshold in PC-controlled algorithm to predict the FUS exposure intra-operatively. In stage-1 experiment, we showed that subharmonic ESD presents distinguishable dynamics between intact BBB and opened BBB, and therefore a threshold ESD change level (5.5 dB) can be identified for BBB-opening prediction. Using this ESD change threshold detection as a

  5. Loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification for asymptomatic malaria detection in challenging field settings: Technical performance and pilot implementation in the Peruvian Amazon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Serra-Casas

    Full Text Available Loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification (LAMP methodology offers an opportunity for point-of-care (POC molecular detection of asymptomatic malaria infections. However, there is still little evidence on the feasibility of implementing this technique for population screenings in isolated field settings.Overall, we recruited 1167 individuals from terrestrial ('road' and hydric ('riverine' communities of the Peruvian Amazon for a cross-sectional survey to detect asymptomatic malaria infections. The technical performance of LAMP was evaluated in a subgroup of 503 samples, using real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR as reference standard. The operational feasibility of introducing LAMP testing in the mobile screening campaigns was assessed based on field-suitability parameters, along with a pilot POC-LAMP assay in a riverine community without laboratory infrastructure.LAMP had a sensitivity of 91.8% (87.7-94.9 and specificity of 91.9% (87.8-95.0, and the overall accuracy was significantly better among samples collected during road screenings than riverine communities (p≤0.004. LAMP-based diagnostic strategy was successfully implemented within the field-team logistics and the POC-LAMP pilot in the riverine community allowed for a reduction in the turnaround time for case management, from 12-24 hours to less than 5 hours. Specimens with haemolytic appearance were regularly observed in riverine screenings and could help explaining the hindered performance/interpretation of the LAMP reaction in these communities.LAMP-based molecular malaria diagnosis can be deployed outside of reference laboratories, providing similar performance as qPCR. However, scale-up in remote field settings such as riverine communities needs to consider a number of logistical challenges (e.g. environmental conditions, labour-intensiveness in large population screenings that can influence its optimal implementation.

  6. [Detection of risks for the safety of the patients in the implementation of continuous techniques of extracorporeal depuration (CTED)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molano Álvarez, E; Guirao Moya, A; Esteban Sánchez, M E; Sanz Cruz, P; García Delgado, E; Sánchez-Izquierdo Riera, J Á

    2011-01-01

    Continuous techniques of extracorporeal depuration (CTED) manage high volumes of fluid exchange and extensive control of its safety is required. To detect the risks of CTED and to determine its frequency per patient. An observational, retrospective study was performed. Inclusion criteria were patients admitted from January 2009 to December 2009, with CTED in the Polyvalent Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the Hospital 12 de Octubre. We previously identified 10 risks that were detectable in the clinical records. We analyzed demographic and treatment variables. The quantitative variables were expressed as mean±SD and the qualitative ones as absolute and relative frequencies. SPSS 15.0(®). A total of 54 patients (11.7%), with ages 59.78±14.8, 42 men (77.8%) were included. In 81.4%, the indication was acute kidney failure; 80.3% were treated with hemodiafiltration. Mean hours of CTED were 112.9±139.9 and the medium of 2 filters per patient (recommended intakes 0-31). Risk/patient rate was: 100% of patients without monitoring of the Mg and P, and 3.7% (n=2) urea; in 16 (29.6%), there was coagulation of the circuit prior to 24 hours and in 25 (46.3%) the blood could not be returned; in 14 (29.3%), written regime was always lacking on the order for treatment. The dose was not reflected on the patient's chart in 2 (3.7%); in 3 patients (5.6%) with coagulation disorder, anticoagulants were prescribed in the circuit. In 1 (1.9%) bleeding was observed and in 10 (18.5%) there was mild hypothermia (35-32°C). A standardized monitoring of the Mg and P is required. The therapy should be prescribed in the medical treatment. The technique needs to be improved in order to prolong its duration and avoid blood losses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  7. Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kristy J.; Brickman, Peggy; Brame, Cynthia J.

    2018-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics faculty are increasingly incorporating both formal and informal group work in their courses. Implementing group work can be improved by an understanding of the extensive body of educational research studies on this topic. This essay describes an online, evidence-based teaching guide published by…

  8. Clinical and molecular profile of newborns with confirmed or suspicious congenital adrenal hyperplasia detected after a public screening program implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopacek, Cristiane; Prado, Mayara J; da Silva, Claudia M D; de Castro, Simone M; Beltrão, Luciana A; Vargas, Paula R; Grandi, Tarciana; Rossetti, Maria L R; Spritzer, Poli Mara

    2018-04-30

    To describe the results obtained in a neonatal screening program after its implementation and to assess the clinical and molecular profiles of confirmed and suspicious congenital adrenal hyperplasia cases. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Newborns with suspected disease due to high 17-hydroxyprogesterone levels and adjusted for birth weight were selected. Classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (salt-wasting and simple virilizing forms) was diagnosed by an increase in 17-hydroxyprogesterone levels as confirmed in the retest, clinical evaluation, and genotype determined by SNaPshot and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. After 24 months, 15 classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia cases were diagnosed in a total of 217,965 newborns, with an estimated incidence of 1:14,531. From 132 patients, seven non-classical and 14 heterozygous patients were screened for CYP21A2 mutations, and 96 patients presented false positives with wild type CYP21A2. On retest, increased 17-hydroxyprogesterone levels were found in classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients and showed significant correlation with genotype-related classical genital adrenal hyperplasia. The most frequent mutations were IVS2-13A/C>G followed by gene deletion or rearrangement events in the classical form. In non-classical and heterozygous diseases, p.Val282Leu was the most common mutation. The results underscore the effectiveness of congenital adrenal hyperplasia neonatal screening in the public health system and indicate that the adopted strategy was appropriate. The second sample collection along with genotyping of suspected cases helped to properly diagnose both severe and milder cases and delineate them from false positive patients. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  9. CH PLIF and PIV implementation using C-X (0,0) and intra-vibrational band filtered detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammack, Stephen D.; Skiba, Aaron W.; Lee, Tonghun; Carter, Campbell D.

    2018-02-01

    This study demonstrates advancement in a low-pulse energy methylidyne (CH) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) method that facilitates its application alongside flows seeded for particle image velocimetry (PIV) or other particle scattering based methods, as well as in high scattering environments. The C-X (0,0) R-branch excitation and filtered detection are carefully selected such that the laser line frequency is heavily attenuated by an edge filter while allowing transmission of most of the (0,0) band fluorescence. There are strong OH A-X (0,0) lines in the vicinity, but they can be avoided or utilized through dye laser tuning. As a demonstration of efficacy, PIV is performed simultaneously with the PLIF imaging. Using the edge filter, particle scattering signal is reduced to sub-fluorescence levels, allowing for flame-front analysis. This achievement enables flame-front tracking at high repetition rates (due to the low-pulse energy required) in combination with a scattering method such as PIV or use in high scattering environments such as enclosed combustors or near burner surfaces.

  10. Implementation of the first worldwide quality assurance program for cystic fibrosis multiple mutation detection in population-based screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earley, Marie C; Laxova, Anita; Farrell, Philip M; Driscoll-Dunn, Rena; Cordovado, Suzanne; Mogayzel, Peter J; Konstan, Michael W; Hannon, W Harry

    2011-07-15

    CDC's Newborn Screening Quality Assurance Program collaborated with several U.S. Cystic Fibrosis Care Centers to collect specimens for development of a molecular CFTR proficiency testing program using dried-blood spots for newborn screening laboratories. Adult and adolescent patients or carriers donated whole blood that was aliquoted onto filter paper cards. Five blind-coded specimens were sent to participating newborn screening laboratories quarterly. Proficiency testing results were evaluated based on presumptive clinical assessment. Individual evaluations and summary reports were sent to each participating laboratory and technical consultations were offered if incorrect assessments were reported. The current CDC repository contains specimens with 39 different CFTR mutations. Up to 45 laboratories have participated in the program. Three years of data showed that correct assessments were reported 97.7% of the time overall when both mutations could be determined. Incorrect assessments that could have lead to a missed case occurred 0.9% of the time, and no information was reported 1.1% of the time due to sample failure. Results show that laboratories using molecular assays to detect CFTR mutations are performing satisfactorily. The programmatic results presented demonstrate the importance and complexity of providing proficiency testing for DNA-based assays. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Remote detection and recognition of bio-aerosols by laser-induced fluorescense lidar: practical implementation and field tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreysho, Anatoly; Savin, Andrey; Morozov, Alexey; Konyaev, Maxim; Konovalov, Konstantin

    2007-06-01

    Recognition of aerosol clouds material at some significant distance is now a key requirement for the wide range of applications. The elastic backscatter lidar have demonstrated high capabilities in aerosol remote detection, cloud real-time mapping at very long distances for low-concentration natural aerosols as well as artificial ones [1]. However, recognition ability is required to make them more relevant. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) looks very promising with respect to the recognition problem. New approach based on mobile lidar complex [2] equipped by spectrally-and range-resolved LIF-sensor is described as well as some results of field tests. The LIF-sensor consists of four-harmonics Nd:YAG laser equipped by an output expander to provide final beam divergence camera collimated with the lidar scanning direction. The LIF-lidar is mounted on a truck-based platform (20-feet container) as a part of multi-purpose mobile lidar complex and adjusted for field conditions.

  12. Real-Time Fault Detection Approach for Nonlinear Systems and its Asynchronous T-S Fuzzy Observer-Based Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linlin; Ding, Steven X; Qiu, Jianbin; Yang, Ying

    2017-02-01

    This paper is concerned with a real-time observer-based fault detection (FD) approach for a general type of nonlinear systems in the presence of external disturbances. To this end, in the first part of this paper, we deal with the definition and the design condition for an L ∞ / L 2 type of nonlinear observer-based FD systems. This analytical framework is fundamental for the development of real-time nonlinear FD systems with the aid of some well-established techniques. In the second part, we address the integrated design of the L ∞ / L 2 observer-based FD systems by applying Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy dynamic modeling technique as the solution tool. This fuzzy observer-based FD approach is developed via piecewise Lyapunov functions, and can be applied to the case that the premise variables of the FD system is nonsynchronous with the premise variables of the fuzzy model of the plant. In the end, a case study on the laboratory setup of three-tank system is given to show the efficiency of the proposed results.

  13. Selective and sensitive fluorescence-shift probes based on two dansyl groups for mercury(ii) ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li-Jun; Liu, Jialun; Deng, Lefang; Zhao, Meili; Deng, Zhifu; Li, Xutian; Tang, Jian; Yang, Liting

    2014-11-01

    Two probes ( and ) bearing two dansyl fluorophores were synthesized and applied to the detection of mercury(ii) ions in aqueous solution. These probes exhibited a selective response to Hg(2+) in a buffered solution, with high sensitivity and a unique fluorescence response signal which displayed a blue-shift effect in the fluorescence emission peak. The Hg(2+) recognition mechanisms of the probes were determined by NMR spectroscopy, ESI-MS and UV-vis spectroscopy. The results showed that probe and mercury(ii) ions formed an unusual 2:2 stoichiometric ratio complex, while probe and Hg(2+) formed a multidentate complex with a stoichiometric ratio of 2:1.

  14. The Power to Detect Sex Differences in IQ Test Scores Using Multi-Group Covariance and Means Structure Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Dylan; Dolan, Conor V.; Wicherts, Jelle M.

    2009-01-01

    Research into sex differences in general intelligence, g, has resulted in two opposite views. In the first view, a g-difference is nonexistent, while in the second view, g is associated with a male advantage. Past research using Multi-Group Covariance and Mean Structure Analysis (MG-CMSA) found no sex difference in g. This failure raised the…

  15. 'Candidatus Rickettsia mendelii', a novel basal group rickettsia detected in Ixodes ricinus ticks in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hajdušková, Eva; Literák, I.; Papoušek, I.; Costa, F.B.; Nováková, M.; Labruna, M. B.; Zdražilová-Dubská, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2016), s. 482-486 ISSN 1877-959X Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Rickettsiae * Candidatus Rickettsia mendelii * Ixodes ricinus * basal group rickettsiae * ticks * Czech Republic Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.230, year: 2016

  16. Spotted fever group rickettsiae detected in immature stages of ticks parasitizing on Iberian endemic lizard Lacerta schreiberi Bedriaga, 1878

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubelová, M.; Papoušek, I.; Bělohlávek, T.; Goüy de Bellocq, Joëlle; Baird, Stuart J. E.; Široký, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 6 (2015), s. 711-714 ISSN 1877-959X Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Spotted fever group rickettsiae * Rickettsia monacensis * Rickettsia helvetica * Ixodes ricinus * Lacerta schreiberi Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.690, year: 2015

  17. Molecular detection of spotted fever group Rickettsia in Dermacentor silvarum from a forest area of northeastern China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.-C. Cao (Wu-Chun); L. Zhan (Lin); S.J. de Vlas (Sake); B.-H. Wen (Bo-Hai); H. Yang (Honghui); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIn total, 676 Dermacentor silvarum Olenev (Acari: Ixodidae) from a forest area of Jilin Province in northeastern China were examined by polymerase chain reaction for the presence of spotted fever group (SFG) Rickettsia. The overall positive rate was 10.7%, with a 95% confidence interval

  18. Localization-Free Detection of Replica Node Attacks in Wireless Sensor Networks Using Similarity Estimation with Group Deployment Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Ding

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the unattended nature and poor security guarantee of the wireless sensor networks (WSNs, adversaries can easily make replicas of compromised nodes, and place them throughout the network to launch various types of attacks. Such an attack is dangerous because it enables the adversaries to control large numbers of nodes and extend the damage of attacks to most of the network with quite limited cost. To stop the node replica attack, we propose a location similarity-based detection scheme using deployment knowledge. Compared with prior solutions, our scheme provides extra functionalities that prevent replicas from generating false location claims without deploying resource-consuming localization techniques on the resource-constraint sensor nodes. We evaluate the security performance of our proposal under different attack strategies through heuristic analysis, and show that our scheme achieves secure and robust replica detection by increasing the cost of node replication. Additionally, we evaluate the impact of network environment on the proposed scheme through theoretic analysis and simulation experiments, and indicate that our scheme achieves effectiveness and efficiency with substantially lower communication, computational, and storage overhead than prior works under different situations and attack strategies.

  19. Highly sensitive, colorimetric detection of mercury(II) in aqueous media by quaternary ammonium group-capped gold nanoparticles at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dingbin; Qu, Weisi; Chen, Wenwen; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhuo; Jiang, Xingyu

    2010-12-01

    We provide a highly sensitive and selective assay to detect Hg(2+) in aqueous solutions using gold nanoparticles modified with quaternary ammonium group-terminated thiols at room temperature. The mechanism is the abstraction of thiols by Hg(2+) that led to the aggregation of nanoparticles. With the assistance of solar light irradiation, the detection limit can be as low as 30 nM, which satisfies the guideline concentration of Hg(2+) in drinking water set by the WHO. In addition, the dynamic range of detection is wide (3 × 10(-8)-1 × 10(-2) M). This range, to our best knowledge, is the widest one that has been reported so far in gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based assays for Hg(2+).

  20. Molecular diversity, cultivation, and improved detection by fluorescent in situ hybridization of a dominant group of human gut bacteria related to Roseburia spp. or Eubacterium rectale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminov, Rustam I; Walker, Alan W; Duncan, Sylvia H; Harmsen, Hermie J M; Welling, Gjalt W; Flint, Harry J

    2006-09-01

    Phylogenetic analysis was used to compare 16S rRNA sequences from 19 cultured human gut strains of Roseburia and Eubacterium rectale with 356 related sequences derived from clone libraries. The cultured strains were found to represent five of the six phylotypes identified. A new oligonucleotide probe, Rrec584, and the previous group probe Rint623, when used in conjunction with a new helper oligonucleotide, each recognized an average of 7% of bacteria detected by the eubacterial probe Eub338 in feces from 10 healthy volunteers. Most of the diversity within this important group of butyrate-producing gut bacteria can apparently be retrieved through cultivation.

  1. Comparative evaluation of Strepto B ID chromogenic medium and Granada media for the detection of Group B streptococcus from vaginal samples of pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazi, Asmaa; Réglier-Poupet, Hélène; Dautezac, François; Raymond, Josette; Poyart, Claire

    2008-06-01

    Two types of selective media, the chromogenic medium Strepto B ID and two non-chromogenic media Strepto B agar and the Granada medium, were tested and compared to blood agar plates (BAP) for screening of Group B streptococcus vaginal colonization in pregnant women. All tested media were comparable in terms of sensitivity however, their use in routine laboratories may markedly facilitate the rapid detection of GBS in vaginal samples.

  2. Molecular Diversity, Cultivation, and Improved Detection by Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization of a Dominant Group of Human Gut Bacteria Related to Roseburia spp. or Eubacterium rectale

    OpenAIRE

    Aminov, Rustam I.; Walker, Alan W.; Duncan, Sylvia H.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; Welling, Gjalt W.; Flint, Harry J.

    2006-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis was used to compare 16S rRNA sequences from 19 cultured human gut strains of Roseburia and Eubacterium rectale with 356 related sequences derived from clone libraries. The cultured strains were found to represent five of the six phylotypes identified. A new oligonucleotide probe, Rrec584, and the previous group probe Rint623, when used in conjunction with a new helper oligonucleotide, each recognized an average of 7% of bacteria detected by the eubacterial probe Eub338 i...

  3. An Ionic 1,4-Bis(styrylbenzene-Based Fluorescent Probe for Mercury(II Detection in Water via Deprotection of the Thioacetal Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Sang Le

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Highly sensitive and selective mercury detection in aqueous media is urgently needed because mercury poisoning usually results from exposure to water-soluble forms of mercury by inhalation and/or ingesting. An ionic conjugated oligoelectrolye (M1Q based on 1,4-bis(styrylbenzene was synthesized as a fluorescent mercury(II probe. The thioacetal moiety and quaternized ammonium group were incorporated for Hg2+ recognition and water solubility. A neutral Hg2+ probe (M1 was also prepared based on the same molecular backbone, and their sensor characteristics were investigated in a mixture of acetonitrile/water and in water. In the presence of Hg2+, the thioacetal group was converted to aldehyde functionality, and the resulting photoluminescence intensity decreased. In water, M1Q successfully demonstrated highly sensitive detection, showing a binding toward Hg2+ that was ~15 times stronger and a signal on/off ratio twice as high, compared to M1 in acetonitrile/water. The thioacetal deprotection by Hg2+ ions was substantially facilitated in water without an organic cosolvent. The limit of detection was measured to be 7 nM with a detection range of 10–180 nM in 100% aqueous medium.

  4. Selective versus non-selective culture medium for group B streptococcus detection in pregnancies complicated by preterm labor or preterm-premature rupture of membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Luís Nomura

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify group B streptococcus (GBS colonization rates and compare detection efficiency of selective versus non-selective culture media and anorectal versus vaginal cultures in women with preterm labor and preterm-premature rupture of membranes (PROM. A prospective cohort study of 203 women was performed. Two vaginal and two anorectal samples from each woman were collected using sterile swabs. Two swabs (one anorectal and one vaginal were placed separately in Stuart transport media and cultured in blood-agar plates for 48 hours; the other two swabs were inoculated separately in Todd-Hewitt selective media for 24 hours and then subcultured in blood-agar plates. Final GBS identification was made by the CAMP test. A hundred thrity-two cultures out of 812 were positive. The maternal colonization rate was 27.6%. Colonization rates were 30% for preterm PROM and 25.2% for preterm labor. Todd-Hewitt selective medium detected 87.5% and non-selective medium 60.7% GBS-positive women. Vaginal samples and anorectal samples had the same detection rate of 80.3%. Anorectal selective cultures detected 75% of carriers; 39% of GBS-positive women were detected only in selective medium. A combined vaginal-anorectal selective culture is appropriate for GBS screening in this population, minimizing laboratory costs.

  5. Prevalence and global initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease group distribution of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease detected by preoperative pulmonary function test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Mi Choi

    Full Text Available Despite being a major public health problem, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD remains underdiagnosed, and only 2.4% COPD patients are aware of their disease in Korea. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of COPD detected by spirometry performed as a preoperative screening test and to determine the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD group distribution and self-awareness of COPD.We reviewed the medical records of adults (age, ≥ 40 years who had undergone spirometry during preoperative screening between April and August 2013 at a tertiary hospital in Korea. COPD was defined as a postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity ratio of 40 years who had undergone spirometry as a preoperative screening test, 474 (15.6%; 404 men; median age, 70 years; range, 44-93 years were diagnosed with COPD. Only 26 (5.5% patients reported previous diagnosis of COPD (2.1%, emphysema (0.8%, or chronic bronchitis (2.5%. The GOLD group distribution was as follows: 63.3% in group A, 31.2% in group B, 1.7% in group C, and 3.8% in group D.The prevalence of COPD diagnosed by preoperative spirometry was 15.6%, and only 5.5% patients were aware of their disease. Approximately one-third of the COPD patients belonged to GOLD groups B, C, and D, which require regular treatment.

  6. Significance and management of computed tomography detected pulmonary nodules: a report from the National Wilms Tumor Study Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisel, Jay A.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Breslow, Norman E.; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Green, Daniel M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To define the optimal treatment for children with Wilms tumor who have pulmonary nodules identified on chest computed tomography (CT) scan, but have a negative chest radiograph, we evaluated the outcome of all such patients randomized or followed on National Wilms Tumor Study (NWTS)-3 and -4. Patients and Methods: We estimated the event-free and overall survival percentages of 53 patients with favorable histology tumors and pulmonary densities identified only by CT scan (CT-only) who were treated as Stage IV with intensive doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy and whole-lung irradiation, and compared these to the event-free and overall survival percentages of 37 CT-only patients who were treated less aggressively based on the extent of locoregional disease with 2 or 3 drugs, and without whole-lung irradiation. Results: The 4-year event-free and overall survival percentages of the 53 patients with CT-only nodules and favorable histology Wilms tumor who were treated as Stage IV were 89% and 91%, respectively. The 4-year event-free and overall survival percentages for the 37 patients with CT-only nodules and favorable histology who were treated according to the extent of locoregional disease were 80% and 85%, respectively. The differences observed between the 2 groups were not statistically significant. Among the patients who received whole-lung irradiation, there were fewer pulmonary relapses, but more deaths attributable to lung toxicity. Conclusions: The current data raise the possibility that children with Wilms tumor and CT-only pulmonary nodules who receive whole lung irradiation have fewer pulmonary relapses, but a greater number of deaths due to treatment toxicity. The role of whole lung irradiation in the treatment of this group of patients cannot be definitively determined based on the present data. Prolonged follow-up of this group of patients is necessary to accurately estimate the frequency of late, treatment-related mortality

  7. SU-E-T-465: Implementation of An Automated Collision Detection Program Using Open Source Software for the Pinnacle Treatment Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanny, S; Bogue, J; Parsai, E; Sperling, N [University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Potential collisions between the gantry head and the patient or table assembly are difficult to detect in most treatment planning systems. We have developed and implemented a novel software package for the representation of potential gantry collisions with the couch assembly at the time of treatment planning. Methods: Physical dimensions of the Varian Edge linear accelerator treatment head were measured and reproduced using the Visual Python display package. A script was developed for the Pinnacle treatment planning system to generate a file with the relevant couch, gantry, and isocenter positions for each beam in a planning trial. A python program was developed to parse the information from the TPS and produce a representative model of the couch/gantry system. Using the model and the Visual Python libraries, a rendering window is generated for each beam that allows the planner to evaluate the possibility of a collision. Results: Comparison against heuristic methods and direct verification on the machine validated the collision model generated by the software. Encounters of <1 cm between the gantry treatment head and table were visualized as collisions in our virtual model. Visual windows were created depicting the angle of collision for each beam, including the anticipated table coordinates. Visual rendering of a 6 arc trial with multiple couch positions was completed in under 1 minute, with network bandwidth being the primary bottleneck. Conclusion: The developed software allows for quick examination of possible collisions during the treatment planning process and helps to prevent major collisions prior to plan approval. The software can easily be implemented on future planning systems due to the versatility and platform independence of the Python programming language. Further integration of the software with the treatment planning system will allow the possibility of patient-gantry collision detection for a range of treatment machines.

  8. SU-E-T-465: Implementation of An Automated Collision Detection Program Using Open Source Software for the Pinnacle Treatment Planning System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanny, S; Bogue, J; Parsai, E; Sperling, N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Potential collisions between the gantry head and the patient or table assembly are difficult to detect in most treatment planning systems. We have developed and implemented a novel software package for the representation of potential gantry collisions with the couch assembly at the time of treatment planning. Methods: Physical dimensions of the Varian Edge linear accelerator treatment head were measured and reproduced using the Visual Python display package. A script was developed for the Pinnacle treatment planning system to generate a file with the relevant couch, gantry, and isocenter positions for each beam in a planning trial. A python program was developed to parse the information from the TPS and produce a representative model of the couch/gantry system. Using the model and the Visual Python libraries, a rendering window is generated for each beam that allows the planner to evaluate the possibility of a collision. Results: Comparison against heuristic methods and direct verification on the machine validated the collision model generated by the software. Encounters of <1 cm between the gantry treatment head and table were visualized as collisions in our virtual model. Visual windows were created depicting the angle of collision for each beam, including the anticipated table coordinates. Visual rendering of a 6 arc trial with multiple couch positions was completed in under 1 minute, with network bandwidth being the primary bottleneck. Conclusion: The developed software allows for quick examination of possible collisions during the treatment planning process and helps to prevent major collisions prior to plan approval. The software can easily be implemented on future planning systems due to the versatility and platform independence of the Python programming language. Further integration of the software with the treatment planning system will allow the possibility of patient-gantry collision detection for a range of treatment machines

  9. FIRST MOLECULAR DETECTION AND VP7 (G GENOTYPING OF GROUP A ROTAVIRUS BY SEMI-NESTED RT-PCR FROM SEWAGE IN NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babatunde Olanrewaju MOTAYO

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Rotavirus is the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis worldwide, and sewage is a major source of the virus dissemination in the environment. Our aim was to detect and genotype rotaviruses from sewages in Nigeria. One hundred and ninety sewage samples were collected between June 2014 and January 2015. The two phase concentration method using PEG 6000 and dextran was used to concentrate sewage samples following WHO protocols. Molecular detection was performed by RT-PCR, and VP7 genotyping by semi-nested multiplex PCR. A total of 14.2% (n = 27 samples tested positive. Monthly distribution showed that June to September had a lower rate (3.7% to 7.4%, while October to January recorded 11% to 26%. Genotype G1 predominated followed by G8, G9, G4 and lastly G2, 7.4% (n = 2 of isolates were nontypeable. This is the first report of rotavirus detection in sewages from Nigeria. Genotype G1 remains the most prevalent genotype. This observation calls for an effort by the governmental authorities to implement a molecular surveillance, both clinical and environmental, in order to provide vital information for the control and the vaccine efficacy not only in Nigeria, but globally.

  10. Application of the thiocarbohydrazide method for vicinal glycol group detection to the study of gastric mucosa endocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefranc, G; Chung, Y T; Barrière, P; Pradal, G

    1980-01-01

    The thiocarbohydrazide-silver proteinate (TCH SP) method was applied to the study of cat, rabbit and mouse gastric mucosa endocrine cells. After 24-h treatment with thiocarbohydrazide (TCH), glycogen was seen in the hyaloplasm of X, D, P, A and O cells but not in EC, EC-like or D1 cells. With flotation times as short as 30 to 40 min glycogen was readily detected in X cells. Secretory granules of EC cells were constantly stained, while those of D1 cells failed to react. In most experiments granules of X, A and O cells showed peripheral "staining", while in others staining of variable intensity affected the entire granular cross-section in X, D and P cells. With 72-h exposure to TCH, EC and EC-like cells showed particles resembling glycogen, even staining or only peripheral staining of certain EC cell granules. From the results of this and previous studies, EC cell staining is believed to be due wholly or partly, according to exposure times, to the action of silver proteinate, while that of certain non-EC cells is probably a specific indicator of complexed carbohydrates.

  11. Detection of MYCN Gene Amplification in Neuroblastoma by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization: A Pediatric Oncology Group Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Mathew

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess the utility of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH for analysis of MYCN gene amplification in neuroblastoma, we compared this assay with Southern blot analysis using tumor specimens collected from 232 patients with presenting characteristics typical of this disease. The FISH technique identified MYCN amplification in 47 cases, compared with 39 by Southern blotting, thus increasing the total number of positive cases by 21%. The major cause of discordancy was a low fraction of tumor cells (≤30% replacement in clinical specimens, which prevented an accurate estimate of MYCN copy number by Southern blotting. With FISH, by contrast, it was possible to analyze multiple interphase nuclei of tumor cells, regardless of the proportion of normal peripheral blood, bone marrow, or stromal cells in clinical samples. Thus, FISH could be performed accurately with very small numbers of tumor cells from touch preparations of needle biopsies. Moreover, this procedure allowed us to discern the heterogeneous pattern of MYCN amplification that is characteristic of neuroblastoma. We conclude that FISH improves the detection of MYCN gene amplification in childhood neuroblastomas in a clinical setting, thus facilitating therapeutic decisions based on the presence or absence of this prognostically important biologic marker.

  12. 'Candidatus Rickettsia mendelii', a novel basal group rickettsia detected in Ixodes ricinus ticks in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajduskova, Eva; Literak, Ivan; Papousek, Ivo; Costa, Francisco B; Novakova, Marketa; Labruna, Marcelo B; Zdrazilova-Dubska, Lenka

    2016-04-01

    A novel rickettsial sequence in the citrate synthase gltA gene indicating a novel Rickettsia species has been detected in 7 out of 4524 Ixodes ricinus ticks examined within several surveys performed in the Czech Republic from 2005 to 2009. This new Candidatus Rickettsia sp. sequence has been found in 2 nymphs feeding on wild birds (Luscinia megarhynchos and Erithacus rubecula), in a male tick from vegetation, and 4 ticks feeding on a dog (3 males, 1 female tick). Portions of the ompA, ompB, sca4, and htrA genes were not amplifiable in these samples. A maximum likelihood tree of rickettsiae based on comparisons of partial amino acid sequences of citrate synthase and nucleotide sequences of 16S rDNA genes and phylogenetic analysis revealed a basal position of the novel species in the proximity of R. bellii and R. canadensis. The novel species has been named 'Candidatus Rickettsia mendelii' after the founder of genetics, Gregor Mendel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular characterization of group A rotaviruses detected in children with gastroenteritis in Ireland in 2006-2009.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cashman, O

    2012-02-01

    SUMMARYCommunity and hospital-acquired cases of human rotavirus are responsible for millions of gastroenteritis cases in children worldwide, chiefly in developing countries, and vaccines are now available. During surveillance activity for human rotavirus infections in Ireland, between 2006 and 2009, a total of 420 rotavirus strains were collected and analysed. Upon either PCR genotyping and sequence analysis, a variety of VP7 (G1-G4 and G9) and VP4 (P[4], P[6], P[8] and P[9]) genotypes were detected. Strains G1P[8] were found to be predominant throughout the period 2006-2008, with slight fluctuations seen in the very limited samples available in 2008-2009. Upon either PCR genotyping and sequence analysis of selected strains, the G1, G3 and G9 viruses were found to contain E1 (Wa-like) NSP4 and I1 VP6 genotypes, while the analysed G2 strains possessed E2 NSP4 and I2 VP6 genotypes, a genetic make-up which is highly conserved in the major human rotavirus genogroups Wa- and Kun-like, respectively. Upon sequence analysis of the most common VP4 genotype, P[8], at least two distinct lineages were identified, both unrelated to P[8] Irish rotaviruses circulating in previous years, and more closely related to recent European humans rotaviruses. Moreover, sequence analysis of the VP7 of G1 rotaviruses revealed the onset of a G1 variant, previously unseen in the Irish population.

  14. Evaluating the systematic implementation of the 'Let Me Decide' advance care planning programme in long term care through focus groups: staff perspectives.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cornally, Nicola

    2015-11-01

    The \\'Let Me Decide\\' Advance Care Planning (LMD-ACP) programme offers a structured approach to End-of-Life (EoL) care planning in long-term care for residents with and without capacity to complete an advance care directive\\/plan. The programme was implemented in three homes in the South of Ireland, with a view to improving quality of care at end of life. This paper will present an evaluation of the systematic implementation of the LMD-ACP programme in the homes.

  15. Screening, early detection, education, and trends for melanoma: current status (2007-2013) and future directions: Part I. Epidemiology, high-risk groups, clinical strategies, and diagnostic technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Jonathan E; Swetter, Susan M; Fu, Teresa; Geller, Alan C

    2014-10-01

    While most cancers have shown both decreased incidence and mortality over the past several decades, the incidence of melanoma has continued to grow, and mortality has only recently stabilized in the United States and in many other countries. Certain populations, such as men >60 years of age and lower socioeconomic status groups, face a greater burden from disease. For any given stage and across all ages, men have shown worse melanoma survival than women, and low socioeconomic status groups have increased levels of mortality. Novel risk factors can help identify populations at greatest risk for melanoma and can aid in targeted early detection. Risk assessment tools have been created to identify high-risk patients based on various factors, and these tools can reduce the number of patients needed to screen for melanoma detection. Diagnostic techniques, such as dermatoscopy and total body photography, and new technologies, such as multispectral imaging, may increase the accuracy and reliability of early melanoma detection. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Improved overall survival after implementation of targeted therapy for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: Results from the Danish Renal Cancer Group (DARENCA) study-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne V.; Donskov, Frede; Hermann, Gregers G.

    2014-01-01

    AbstractAim To evaluate the implementation of targeted therapy on overall survival (OS) in a complete national cohort of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Methods All Danish patients with mRCC referred for first line treatment with immunotherapy, TKIs or mTOR-inhibitors between...

  17. Simulating the implementation of the administrative justice act with ThinkLets and GroupSystems: a comparative analysis from three field studies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Phahlamohlaka, J

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Presented in this paper are the results of three simulation exercises performed as part of a series of field studies whose object is the implementation of the Promotion of Administrative Justice Act. The unit of analysis of the study is the process...

  18. Detection of Babesia Sp. EU1 and members of spotted fever group rickettsiae in ticks collected from migratory birds at Curonian Spit, North-Western Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movila, Alexandru; Reye, Anna L; Dubinina, Helen V; Tolstenkov, Oleg O; Toderas, Ion; Hübschen, Judith M; Muller, Claude P; Alekseev, Andrey N

    2011-01-01

    To reveal the prevalence of spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae and Babesia sp. in Ixodes ricinus (L.) ticks from migratory birds, 236 specimens represented 8 species of Passeriformes and were collected at Curonian Spit in Kaliningrad enclave of North-Western Russia. The ticks (total 126) being detached from four bird species, Turdus philomelos, Fringilla coelebs, Parus major, and Sturnus vulgaris, were investigated by PCR using the primers Rp CS.877p/Rp CS.1258n for the detection of Rickettsia and BJ1/BN2 for Babesia spp. Babesia spp. were detected in 2 of 126 (1.6%) ticks. The partial sequence of 18S rDNA had 100% similarity to human pathogenic Babesia sp. EU1. The SFG rickettsiae were detected in 19 of 126 (15.1%) ticks collected from the above-mentioned bird species. BLAST analysis of SFG rickettsia gltA assigned sequences to human pathogenic Rickettsia helvetica (10.3%), Rickettsia monacensis (3.9%), and Rickettsia japonica (0.8%) with 98%-100% sequence similarity. The SFG rickettsiae and Babesia sp. EU1 in ticks collected from the passerines in Russia were detected for the first time. The survey indicates that migratory birds may become a reservoir for Babesia spp. and SFG rickettsiae. Future investigations need to characterize the role of birds in the epidemiology of these human pathogens in the region.

  19. Diversity of group A rotavirus genes detected in the Triângulo Mineiro region, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Bernardes Dulgheroff

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Group A rotaviruses are the main causative agent of infantile gastroenteritis. The segmented nature of the viral genome allows reassortment of genome segments, which can generate genetic variants. In this study, we characterized the diversity of the VP7, VP4 (VP8*, VP6, NSP4, and NSP5 genes of the rotaviruses that circulated from 2005 to 2011 in the Triângulo Mineiro (TM region of Brazil. Samples with genotypes G2 (sublineages IVa-1 and IVa-3, G1 (sublineage I-A, G9 (lineage III, G12 (lineages II and III, G8 (lineage II, G3 (lineage III, P[4] (sublineages IVa and IVb, P[8] (sublineages P[8]-3.6, P[8]-3.3, and P[8]-3.1, I2 (lineage VII, E2 (lineages VI, XII, and X, and H2 (lineage III were identified. The associations found in the samples were G1, G9, or G12 with P[8]-I1-E1-H1; G2 or G8 with P[4]-I2-E2-H2; G12 with I3-E3-H6; and G3 with P[4]-I2-E3-H3 (previously unreported combination. Reassortment events in G2P[4] strains and an apparent pattern of temporal segregation within the lineages were observed. Five TM samples contained genes that exhibited high nucleotide and amino acid identities with strains of animal origin. The present study includes a period of pre- and post-introduction of rotavirus vaccination in all Brazilian territories, thereby serving as a basis for monitoring changes in the genetic constitution of rotaviruses. The results also contribute to the understanding of the diversity and evolution of rotaviruses in a global context.

  20. Molecular surveillance of spotted fever group rickettsioses in wildlife and detection of Rickettsia sibirica in a Topi (Damaliscus lunatus ssp. jimela) in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndeereh, David; Thaiyah, Andrew; Muchemi, Gerald; Miyunga, Antoinette A

    2017-01-30

    Spotted fever group rickettsioses are a group of tick-borne zoonotic diseases caused by intracellular bacteria of the genus Rickettsia. The diseases are widely reported amongst international travellers returning from most sub-Saharan Africa with fever, yet their importance in local populations largely remains unknown. Although this has started to change and recently there have been increasing reports of the diseases in livestock, ticks and humans in Kenya, they have not been investigated in wildlife. We examined the presence, prevalence and species of Rickettsia present in wildlife in two regions of Kenya with a unique human-wildlife-livestock interface. For this purpose, 79 wild animals in Laikipia County and 73 in Maasai Mara National Reserve were sampled. DNA extracted from blood was tested using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify the intergenic spacer rpmE-tRNAfMet and the citrate synthase-encoding gene gltA. Rickettsial DNA was detected in 2 of the 79 (2.5%) animals in Laikipia and 4 of the 73 (5.5%) in Maasai Mara. The PCR-positive amplicons of the gltA gene were sequenced to determine the detected Rickettsia species. This revealed Rickettsia sibirica in a Topi (Damaliscus lunatus ssp. jimela). This is the first report of spotted fever group rickettsioses in wildlife and the first to report R. sibirica in Kenya. The finding demonstrates the potential role of wild animals in the circulation of the diseases.

  1. Molecular surveillance of spotted fever group rickettsioses in wildlife and detection of Rickettsia sibirica in a Topi (Damaliscus lunatus ssp. jimela in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ndeereh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spotted fever group rickettsioses are a group of tick-borne zoonotic diseases caused by intracellular bacteria of the genus Rickettsia. The diseases are widely reported amongst international travellers returning from most sub-Saharan Africa with fever, yet their importance in local populations largely remains unknown. Although this has started to change and recently there have been increasing reports of the diseases in livestock, ticks and humans in Kenya, they have not been investigated in wildlife. We examined the presence, prevalence and species of Rickettsia present in wildlife in two regions of Kenya with a unique human–wildlife–livestock interface. For this purpose, 79 wild animals in Laikipia County and 73 in Maasai Mara National Reserve were sampled. DNA extracted from blood was tested using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR to amplify the intergenic spacer rpmE-tRNAfMet and the citrate synthase-encoding gene gltA. Rickettsial DNA was detected in 2 of the 79 (2.5% animals in Laikipia and 4 of the 73 (5.5% in Maasai Mara. The PCR-positive amplicons of the gltA gene were sequenced to determine the detected Rickettsia species. This revealed Rickettsia sibirica in a Topi (Damaliscus lunatus ssp. jimela. This is the first report of spotted fever group rickettsioses in wildlife and the first to report R. sibirica in Kenya. The finding demonstrates the potential role of wild animals in the circulation of the diseases.

  2. An Automatic Segmentation Method Combining an Active Contour Model and a Classification Technique for Detecting Polycomb-group Proteinsin High-Throughput Microscopy Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoretti, Francesco; Cesarini, Elisa; Lanzuolo, Chiara; Oliva, Gennaro; Antonelli, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The large amount of data generated in biological experiments that rely on advanced microscopy can be handled only with automated image analysis. Most analyses require a reliable cell image segmentation eventually capable of detecting subcellular structures.We present an automatic segmentation method to detect Polycomb group (PcG) proteins areas isolated from nuclei regions in high-resolution fluorescent cell image stacks. It combines two segmentation algorithms that use an active contour model and a classification technique serving as a tool to better understand the subcellular three-dimensional distribution of PcG proteins in live cell image sequences. We obtained accurate results throughout several cell image datasets, coming from different cell types and corresponding to different fluorescent labels, without requiring elaborate adjustments to each dataset.

  3. Multiplex quantification of 16S rDNA of predominant bacteria group within human fecal samples by polymerase chain reaction--ligase detection reaction (PCR-LDR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Chen, Bei; Zhou, Yuxun; Huang, Rui; Liang, Yinming; Wang, Qinxi; Xiao, Zhenxian; Xiao, Junhua

    2009-03-01

    A new method, based on ligase detection reaction (LDR), was developed for quantitative detection of multiplex PCR amplicons of 16S rRNA genes present in complex mixtures (specifically feces). LDR has been widely used in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay but never applied for quantification of multiplex PCR products. This method employs one pair of DNA probes, one of which is labeled with fluorescence for signal capture, complementary to the target sequence. For multiple target sequence analysis, probes were modified with different lengths of polyT at the 5' end and 3' end. Using a DNA sequencer, these ligated probes were separated and identified by size and dye color. Then, relative abundance of target DNA were normalized and quantified based on the fluorescence intensities and exterior size standards. 16S rRNA gene of three preponderant bacteria groups in human feces: Clostridium coccoides, Bacteroides and related genera, and Clostridium leptum group, were amplified and cloned into plasmid DNA so as to make standard curves. After PCR-LDR analysis, a strong linear relationship was found between the florescence intensity and the diluted plasmid DNA concentrations. Furthermore, based on this method, 100 human fecal samples were quantified for the relative abundance of the three bacterial groups. Relative abundance of C. coccoides was significantly higher in elderly people in comparison with young adults, without gender differences. Relative abundance of Bacteroides and related genera and C. leptum group were significantly higher in young and middle aged than in the elderly. Regarding the whole set of sample, C. coccoides showed the highest relative abundance, followed by decreasing groups Bacteroides and related genera, and C. leptum. These results imply that PCR-LDR can be feasible and flexible applied to large scale epidemiological studies.

  4. [Detection of alcoholism in the medical office: applicability of the CAGE questionnaire by the practicing physician. Group of Medical Practitioners PMU].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdrix, A; Decrey, H; Pécoud, A; Burnand, B; Yersin, B

    1995-09-23

    The general practitioner (GP) plays a very important role in early detection of alcoholism. Clinical evaluation is often the only method used, although it has been suggested that any systematic patient history should include the CAGE test. We compare the effectiveness of these two approaches and attempt to determine the applicability of the CAGE test in a general practitioner's usual practice. 12 GPs took part in this study during 6 months. They looked for possible alcohol abuse in each new patient by a standard patient history and clinical examination. Patients were randomized into 2 groups, one of which was given the CAGE test and the other not. For each patient in the CAGE group the applicability of the test was quantified by the GP. 416 patients were included; 214 were randomized into the "CAGE group" and 202 into the control group. On a clinical basis, 15 patients in the control group and 16 in the "CAGE group" (14 men, 2 women) were suspected of alcohol abuse. The CAGE test was positive in 15 patients (7%); among these, 6 were not suspect on a clinical basis. In patients aged 18-34, the detection rate of alcohol-related problems more than doubled when the CAGE test was used. The age of the patients influenced performance of the CAGE test and clinical evaluation. Only 2% of women had a positive CAGE test. Administration of the CAGE test was considered easy in 112 patients and average to difficult in 50, while the test was inapplicable with 52 patients. The latter proportion was higher than that observed in institutions (hospitals, outpatient departments) of the same region. Applicability was influenced neither by the sex nor the age of the patients, but varied greatly according to the physician (from 38% to 100%). The CAGE test increases the number of patients detected with alcohol problems by 37% and seems to be especially useful when administered to young people. The number of women with alcohol problems is probably underestimated by both clinical evaluation

  5. Adaptation and Employment of Special Groups of Manpower. Implementing an Active Manpower Policy; Conclusions of the Manpower and Social Affairs Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    Conclusions are presented indicating the role which public bodies, employers, trade unions, and other private groups can play in improving the employment opportunities of special groups, such as older workers, workers with family responsibilities, and workers of rural origin engaged in non-agricultural employment. Because of the increasing number…

  6. Implementing DDR in Settings of Ongoing Conflict: The Organization and Fragmentation of Armed Groups in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Richards

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although it is common for armed groups to splinter (or “fragment” during contexts of multi-party civil war, current guidance on Disarmament, Demobilization, and Reintegration (DDR does not address the challenges that arise when recalcitrant fighters, unwilling to report to DDR, break ranks and form new armed groups. This Practice Note addresses this issue, drawing lessons from the multi-party context of the DRC and from the experiences of former members of three armed groups: the Rally for Congolese Democracy-Goma (RCD-Goma, the National Congress for the Defense of the People (CNDP, and the DRC national army (FARDC. While the findings indicate that the fragmentation of armed groups may encourage desertion and subsequent participation in DDR, they also show that active armed groups may monitor DDR programs and track those who demobilize. Remobilization may follow, either as active armed groups target ex-combatants for forced re-recruitment or as ex-combatants remobilize in armed groups of their own choice. Given these dynamics, practitioners in settings of partial peace may find it useful to consider non-traditional methods of DDR such as the use of mobile patrols and mobile disarmament units. The temporary relocation of ex-combatants to safe areas free from armed groups, or to protected transitional assistance camps, may also help to minimize remobilization during the reintegration phase.

  7. Training for the seismic qualification utility group (SQUG) generic implementation procedure (GIP) for verification of seismic effects on nuclear power plant equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffstall, R.E.; Smith, N.P.; Baker, K.M.

    1993-01-01

    Resolution of USI A-46 was accomplished May, 1992 with the issuance of the SER for the GIP, Revision 2. The implementation of the resolution for the SQUG plants will be completed by 1996. Both the USNRC and the SQUG utilities have expended considerable resources to effect a common understanding that the effort has been worth the price. The Training Program developed to ensure that the efforts expended by the SQUG was indeed worth the price will be a major contributor in the success of the implementation. All of the older nuclear power plants in the United States now have an alternative standard to determine seismic resistance using experience data- a standard against which they can be evaluated and found seismically adequate to achieve and maintain a safe and reliable shutdown when subjected to strong motion earthquakes

  8. Effect of laser in situ keratomileusis with corneal flap created by femtosecond laser on tear film detected by Keratograph in different age groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Xia Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To explore the changes of tear film detected by Keratograph in the patients after laser in situ keratomileusis(LASIKwith corneal flap created by femtosecond laser. METHODS: Totally 75 myopic patients(150 eyeswere enrolled who underwent femtosecond laser LASIK from July 2014 to June 2015, including patientsRESULTS: Before surgeries, the dry eye symptoms score of three groups had no significant difference(P>0.05. After surgeries, there were significant difference at each follow-up time among the three groups on symptoms score(PPCONCLUSION: LASIK can affect the dry eye symptoms and the stability of tear film, which decreased by postoperative time. And the index recovered to preoperative levels earlier in younger patients.

  9. A Policy Analysis on the Proactive Prevention of Chronic Disease: Learnings from the Initial Implementation of Integrated Measurement for Early Detection (MIDO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Tapia-Conyer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mexico, like many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs, faces an epidemic of chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs, specifically diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and lipid disorders. Many people with these NCDs may not be aware that they have a disease, pointing to the need for broader screening programs. The traditional prevention policy in Mexico was based on screening with a paper-based risk factor questionnaire. However, this was used to screen patients already seeking healthcare services at facilities, and screening goals were set as a function of the number of questionnaires applied, not number of individuals screened. Due to this, Fundación Carlos Slim developed Medición Integrada para la Detección Oportuna (MIDOTM, or Integrated Measurement for Early Detection, an NCD screening and proactive prevention policy. This document is a policy analysis based on early learnings from the initial implementation of MIDO in eight primary healthcare centers in two central Mexican states. MIDO was found to expand screening programs beyond clinic walls, systematize community screening strategies, emphasize the detection of pre-disease phases, incorporate lifestyle counseling, and propose screening goals based on population targets. In collaboration with the Mexican Ministry of Health, MIDO has successfully screened over 500 000 individuals—about 40% of whom would not have been screened under previous policies. Of these more than 500 000 screened individuals, 13.4% had pre-diabetes (fasting glucose between 100 and 125 mg/dL, and 5.8% had undiagnosed diabetes (defined as fasting glucose above 126 mg/dL or random glucose above 200 mg/dL. However, there is still room for improvement in linking positive results from screening with disease confirmation and with patient incorporation into disease management. The experience of implementing MIDO in Mexico suggests that primary and secondary prevention programs in other parts of the world should

  10. Increased Cancer Detection Rate and Variations in the Recall Rate Resulting from Implementation of 3D Digital Breast Tomosynthesis into a Population-based Screening Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Shambavi; Phillips, Jordana; Dialani, Vandana; Fein-Zachary, Valerie J.; Prakash, Seema; Slanetz, Priscilla J.; Mehta, Tejas S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the recall and cancer detection rates (CDRs) at screening with digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) with those at screening with two-dimensional (2D) mammography and to evaluate variations in the recall rate (RR) according to patient age, risk factors, and breast density and among individual radiologists at a single U.S. academic medical center. Materials and Methods This institutional review board–approved, HIPAA-compliant prospective study with a retrospective cohort included 85 852 asymptomatic women who presented for breast cancer screening over a 3-year period beginning in 2011. A DBT unit was introduced into the existing 2D mammography screening program, and patients were assigned to the first available machine. Ten breast-subspecialized radiologists interpreted approximately 90% of the examinations. RRs were calculated overall and according to patient age, breast density, and individual radiologist. CDRs were calculated. Single and multiple mixed-effect logistic regression analyses, χ2 tests, and Bonferroni correction were utilized, as appropriate. Results The study included 5703 (6.6%) DBT examinations and 80 149 (93.4%) 2D mammography examinations. The DBT subgroup contained a higher proportion of patients with risk factors for breast cancer and baseline examinations. DBT was used to detect 54.3% more carcinomas (+1.9 per 1000, P < .0018) than 2D mammography. The RR was 7.51% for 2D mammography and 6.10% for DBT (absolute change, 1.41%; relative change, –18.8%; P < .0001). The DBT subgroup demonstrated a significantly lower RR for patients with extremely or heterogeneously dense breasts and for patients in their 5th and 7th decades. Conclusion Implementing DBT into a U.S. breast cancer screening program significantly decreased the screening RR overall and for certain patient subgroups, while significantly increasing the CDR. These findings may encourage more widespread adoption and reimbursement of DBT and facilitate improved patient

  11. Nordic working group on x-ray diagnostics - Practical implementation of the directive on medical exposures in the Nordic EU countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltenburg, H.N.; Groen, P. [National Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Herlev (Denmark); Leitz, W. [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, Stockholm (Sweden); Servomaa, A. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland); Einarsson, G. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute, Reykjavik (Iceland); Olerud, H. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oslo (Norway)

    2003-06-01

    The EU directive on medical exposure, 97/43/EURATOM (referred to in the following as MED) imposes new requirements on hospital departments using ionising radiation for either diagnostics or treatment of illnesses. The directive was approved on 30 June 1997, and the member states were obliged to implement the requirements into national legislation before 13 May 2000. The implementation of a directive of this kind is a complicated process requiring time as well as other resources. The Nordic EU countries (Sweden, Finland and Denmark) must comply with the rules in MED, while this is not the case for Norway and Iceland as EFTA (European Free Trade Association) members, since the agreements between EFTA and EU does not cover the EURATOM treaty. The issues that have to be addressed in the national legislation are justification, optimisation, responsibilities, procedures, training, equipment, special protection during pregnancy and breast-feeding, and potential exposure. A central aspect in MED is the requirement for quality assurance programmes to be established in radiological departments (and in other departments employing ionising radiation). A change of this magnitude in legislation requires adjustments in the routines of the individual departments. The staff in each department needs to prepare and follow procedures and instructions for daily work and also participate in day-to-day quality assurance. A considerable burden has also been laid on the radiation protection authorities in the member states, first in the process of transposing MED into national law or regulations, and secondly in guiding the process of practical implementation. Here we will describe how the individual Nordic EU countries have chosen to implement MED in national legislation and how far the process of complying with the requirements has come so far. Although Norway and Iceland are not required to follow MED, it is still interesting for comparison to include the situation in these countries

  12. Nordic working group on x-ray diagnostics - Practical implementation of the directive on medical exposures in the Nordic EU countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltenburg, H.N.; Groen, P.; Leitz, W.; Servomaa, A.; Einarsson, G.; Olerud, H.

    2003-01-01

    The EU directive on medical exposure, 97/43/EURATOM (referred to in the following as MED) imposes new requirements on hospital departments using ionising radiation for either diagnostics or treatment of illnesses. The directive was approved on 30 June 1997, and the member states were obliged to implement the requirements into national legislation before 13 May 2000. The implementation of a directive of this kind is a complicated process requiring time as well as other resources. The Nordic EU countries (Sweden, Finland and Denmark) must comply with the rules in MED, while this is not the case for Norway and Iceland as EFTA (European Free Trade Association) members, since the agreements between EFTA and EU does not cover the EURATOM treaty. The issues that have to be addressed in the national legislation are justification, optimisation, responsibilities, procedures, training, equipment, special protection during pregnancy and breast-feeding, and potential exposure. A central aspect in MED is the requirement for quality assurance programmes to be established in radiological departments (and in other departments employing ionising radiation). A change of this magnitude in legislation requires adjustments in the routines of the individual departments. The staff in each department needs to prepare and follow procedures and instructions for daily work and also participate in day-to-day quality assurance. A considerable burden has also been laid on the radiation protection authorities in the member states, first in the process of transposing MED into national law or regulations, and secondly in guiding the process of practical implementation. Here we will describe how the individual Nordic EU countries have chosen to implement MED in national legislation and how far the process of complying with the requirements has come so far. Although Norway and Iceland are not required to follow MED, it is still interesting for comparison to include the situation in these countries

  13. Distribution, detection of enterotoxigenic strains and antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns of Bacteroides fragilis group in diarrheic and non-diarrheic feces from Brazilian infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Paula Ferreira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of gastrointestinal diseases and their global distribution, affecting millions of individuals around the world, the role and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of anaerobic bacteria such as those in the Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG are still unclear in young children. This study investigated the occurrence and distribution of species in the BFG and enterotoxigenic strains in the fecal microbiota of children and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Diarrheic (n=110 and non-diarrheic (n=65 fecal samples from children aged 0-5 years old were evaluated. BFG strains were isolated and identified by conventional biochemical, physiological and molecular approaches. Alternatively, bacteria and enterotoxigenic strains were detected directly from feces by molecular biology. Antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns were determined by the agar dilution method according to the guidelines for isolated bacteria. BFG was detected in 64.3% of the fecal samples (55% diarrheic and 80.4% non-diarrheic, and 4.6% were enterotoxigenic. Antimicrobial resistance was observed against ampicillin, ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam, meropenem, ceftriaxone, clindamycin and chloramphenicol. The data show that these bacteria are prevalent in fecal microbiota at higher levels in healthy children. The molecular methodology was more effective in identifying the B. fragilis group when compared to the biochemical and physiological techniques. The observation of high resistance levels stimulates thoughts about the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs in early infancy. Further quantitative studies are needed to gain a better understanding of the role of these bacteria in acute diarrhea in children.

  14. New method for early detection of two random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD groups of Staphylococcus aureus causing bovine mastitis infection in Paraná State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dicezar Gonçalves

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to develop a fast and accurate molecular approach to allow early detection of two RAPD groups of S. aureus causing bovine mastitis. Seventy five S. aureus isolates from infected animals were characterized by RAPD. Genomic fragments isolated from the unique bands present in either group were cloned and sequenced. Based on the DNA sequences, specific primers were designed to allow for the simultaneous detection of either group by multiplex PCR of S. aureus DNA isolated from clinical and subclinical bovine mastitis. Results showed that these proposed primers set could be used to detect various clinical and subclinical S. aureus isolates as well as the detection of the microorganism in bulk milk. Their use as a specific method for effective and early diagnostic tool for S. aureus infection in dairy herds is suggested.Esta pesquisa objetivou o desenvolvimento de técnica rápida e eficiente para diagnosticar precocemente diferentes linhagens de S. aureus causadoras de mastite bovina. Como resultados da metodologia empregada, foram isoladas duas linhagens destas bactérias que causam diferentes tipos de mastite bovina. Os fragmentos de DNA genômico caracterizando ambas as linhagens, por meio de RAPD foram inseridos em vetor plasmidial pGEM e clonados por meio de clones T10 F1 de Escherichia coli. As seqüências obtidas permitiram desenhar iniciadores específicos para o reconhecimento de ambas as linhagens, os quais foram testados com amostras de S. aureus e com outras linhagens próximas. O diagnóstico por meios moleculares, pode ser realizado diretamente de amostras coletadas de rebanhos leiteiros assim como dos equipamentos de ordenha. A significância deste estudo consiste em um rápido e acurado método para localizar animais infectados, representando importante ferramenta no manejo do rebanho, na redução de custos com tratamentos e, rápida recuperação de rebanhos infectados.

  15. Using non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to detect unique aspects of protein Amide functional groups and chemical properties of modeled forage from different sourced-origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-05

    The non-invasive molecular spectroscopic technique-FT/IR is capable to detect the molecular structure spectral features that are associated with biological, nutritional and biodegradation functions. However, to date, few researches have been conducted to use these non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to study forage internal protein structures associated with biodegradation and biological functions. The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of protein Amide functional groups in terms of protein Amide I and II spectral profiles and chemical properties in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa L.) from different sourced-origins. In this study, alfalfa hay with two different origins was used as modeled forage for molecular structure and chemical property study. In each forage origin, five to seven sources were analyzed. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using FT/IR non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters of protein spectral profiles included functional groups of Amide I, Amide II and Amide I to II ratio. The results show that the modeled forage Amide I and Amide II were centered at 1653 cm(-1) and 1545 cm(-1), respectively. The Amide I spectral height and area intensities were from 0.02 to 0.03 and 2.67 to 3.36 AI, respectively. The Amide II spectral height and area intensities were from 0.01 to 0.02 and 0.71 to 0.93 AI, respectively. The Amide I to II spectral peak height and area ratios were from 1.86 to 1.88 and 3.68 to 3.79, respectively. Our results show that the non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques are capable to detect forage internal protein structure features which are associated with forage chemical properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cochrane Qualitative and Implementation Methods Group guidance series-paper 2: methods for question formulation, searching, and protocol development for qualitative evidence synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Janet L; Booth, Andrew; Cargo, Margaret; Hannes, Karin; Harden, Angela; Flemming, Kate; Garside, Ruth; Pantoja, Tomas; Thomas, James; Noyes, Jane

    2018-05-01

    This paper updates previous Cochrane guidance on question formulation, searching, and protocol development, reflecting recent developments in methods for conducting qualitative evidence syntheses to inform Cochrane intervention reviews. Examples are used to illustrate how decisions about boundaries for a review are formed via an iterative process of constructing lines of inquiry and mapping the available information to ascertain whether evidence exists to answer questions related to effectiveness, implementation, feasibility, appropriateness, economic evidence, and equity. The process of question formulation allows reviewers to situate the topic in relation to how it informs and explains effectiveness, using the criterion of meaningfulness, appropriateness, feasibility, and implementation. Questions related to complex questions and interventions can be structured by drawing on an increasingly wide range of question frameworks. Logic models and theoretical frameworks are useful tools for conceptually mapping the literature to illustrate the complexity of the phenomenon of interest. Furthermore, protocol development may require iterative question formulation and searching. Consequently, the final protocol may function as a guide rather than a prescriptive route map, particularly in qualitative reviews that ask more exploratory and open-ended questions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An Efficient, FPGA-Based, Cluster Detection Algorithm Implementation for a Strip Detector Readout System in a Time Projection Chamber Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Kyle J.; Hill, Joanne E. (Editor); Black, J. Kevin; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Jahoda, Keith

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in a spaceborne application of a gas-based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for observation of X-ray polarization is handling the large amount of data collected. The TPC polarimeter described uses the APV-25 Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to readout a strip detector. Two dimensional photoelectron track images are created with a time projection technique and used to determine the polarization of the incident X-rays. The detector produces a 128x30 pixel image per photon interaction with each pixel registering 12 bits of collected charge. This creates challenging requirements for data storage and downlink bandwidth with only a modest incidence of photons and can have a significant impact on the overall mission cost. An approach is described for locating and isolating the photoelectron track within the detector image, yielding a much smaller data product, typically between 8x8 pixels and 20x20 pixels. This approach is implemented using a Microsemi RT-ProASIC3-3000 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), clocked at 20 MHz and utilizing 10.7k logic gates (14% of FPGA), 20 Block RAMs (17% of FPGA), and no external RAM. Results will be presented, demonstrating successful photoelectron track cluster detection with minimal impact to detector dead-time.

  18. DNA-based culture-independent analysis detects the presence of group a streptococcus in throat samples from healthy adults in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Tejaswini; Aikawa, Chihiro; Nozawa, Takashi; Murase, Kazunori; Maruyama, Fumito; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2016-10-11

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) causes a range of mild to severe infections in humans. It can also colonize healthy persons asymptomatically. Therefore, it is important to study GAS carriage in healthy populations, as carriage of it might lead to subsequent disease manifestation, clonal spread in the community, and/or diversification of the organism. Throat swab culture is the gold standard method for GAS detection. Advanced culture-independent methods provide rapid and efficient detection of microorganisms directly from clinical samples. We investigated the presence of GAS in throat swab samples from healthy adults in Japan using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. Two throat swab samples were collected from 148 healthy volunteers. One was cultured on selective medium, while total DNA extracted from the other was polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified with two GAS-specific primer pairs: one was a newly designed 16S rRNA-specific primer pair, the other a previously described V-Na + -ATPase primer pair. Although only 5 (3.4 %) of the 148 samples were GAS-positive by the culture-dependent method, 146 (98.6 %) were positive for the presence of GAS DNA by the culture-independent method. To obtain serotype information by emm typing, we performed nested PCR using newly designed emm primers. We detected the four different emm types in 25 (16.9 %) samples, and these differed from the common emm types associated with GAS associated diseases in Japan. The different emm types detected in the healthy volunteers indicate that the presence of unique emm types might be associated with GAS carriage. Our results suggest that culture-independent methods should be considered for profiling GAS in the healthy hosts, with a view to obtaining better understanding of these organisms. The GAS-specific primers (16S rRNA and V-Na + -ATPase) used in this study can be used to estimate the maximum potential GAS carriage in people.

  19. Influenza vaccine effectiveness for hospital and community patients using control groups with and without non-influenza respiratory viruses detected, Auckland, New Zealand 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierse, Nevil; Kelly, Heath; Thompson, Mark G; Bissielo, Ange; Radke, Sarah; Huang, Q Sue; Baker, Michael G; Turner, Nikki

    2016-01-20

    We aimed to estimate the protection afforded by inactivated influenza vaccine, in both community and hospital settings, in a well characterised urban population in Auckland during 2014. We used two different comparison groups, all patients who tested negative for influenza and only those patients who tested negative for influenza and had a non-influenza respiratory virus detected, to calculate the vaccine effectiveness in a test negative study design. Estimates were made separately for general practice outpatient consultations and hospitalised patients, stratified by age group and by influenza type and subtype. Vaccine status was confirmed by electronic record for general practice patients and all respiratory viruses were detected by real time polymerase chain reaction. 1039 hospitalised and 1154 general practice outpatient consultations met all the study inclusion criteria and had a respiratory sample tested for influenza and other respiratory viruses. Compared to general practice patients, hospitalised patients were more likely to be very young or very old, to be Māori or Pacific Islander, to have a low income and to suffer from chronic disease. Vaccine effectiveness (VE) adjusted for age and other participant characteristics using all influenza negative controls was 42% (95% CI: 16 to 60%) for hospitalised and 56% (95% CI: 35 to 70%) for general practice patients. The vaccine appeared to be most effective against the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 strain with an adjusted VE of 62% (95% CI:38 to 77%) for hospitalised and 59% (95% CI:36 to 74%) for general practice patients, using influenza virus negative controls. Similar results found when patients testing positive for a non-influenza respiratory virus were used as the control group. This study contributes to validation of the test negative design and confirms that inactivated influenza vaccines continue to provide modest but significant protection against laboratory-confirmed influenza. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd

  20. Once a week is not enough: Effects of a widely implemented group based exercise programme for older adults; a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stiggelbout, M.; Popkema, D.Y.; Hopman-Rock, M.; Greef, M. de; Mechelen, W. van

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the effects of gymnastics on the health related quality of life (HRQoL) and functional status of independently living people, aged 65 to 80 years. Gymnastics formed part of the More Exercise for Seniors (MBvO in Dutch) programme, a group based exercise programme for older

  1. Once a week is not enough : effects of a widely implemented group based exercise programme for older adults; a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stiggelbout, M.; Popkema, D.Y.; Hopman-Rock, M.; de Greef, M.; van Mechelen, W.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of gymnastics on the health related quality of life (HRQoL) and functional status of independently living people, aged 65 to 80 years. Gymnastics formed part of the More Exercise for Seniors (MBvO in Dutch) programme, a group based exercise programme for older

  2. Study protocol for a group randomized controlled trial of a classroom-based intervention aimed at preventing early risk factors for drug abuse: integrating effectiveness and implementation research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poduska, Jeanne; Kellam, Sheppard; Brown, C Hendricks; Ford, Carla; Windham, Amy; Keegan, Natalie; Wang, Wei

    2009-09-02

    While a number of preventive interventions delivered within schools have shown both short-term and long-term impact in epidemiologically based randomized field trials, programs are not often sustained with high-quality implementation over time. This study was designed to support two purposes. The first purpose was to test the effectiveness of a universal classroom-based intervention, the Whole Day First Grade Program (WD), aimed at two early antecedents to drug abuse and other problem behaviors, namely, aggressive, disruptive behavior and poor academic achievement. The second purpose--the focus of this paper--was to examine the utility of a multilevel structure to support high levels of implementation during the effectiveness trial, to sustain WD practices across additional years, and to train additional teachers in WD practices. The WD intervention integrated three components, each previously tested separately: classroom behavior management; instruction, specifically reading; and family-classroom partnerships around behavior and learning. Teachers and students in 12 schools were randomly assigned to receive either the WD intervention or the standard first-grade program of the school system (SC). Three consecutive cohorts of first graders were randomized within schools to WD or SC classrooms and followed through the end of third grade to test the effectiveness of the WD intervention. Teacher practices were assessed over three years to examine the utility of the multilevel structure to support sustainability and scaling-up. The design employed in this trial appears to have considerable utility to provide data on WD effectiveness and to inform the field with regard to structures required to move evidence-based programs into practice. NCT00257088.

  3. Study protocol for a group randomized controlled trial of a classroom-based intervention aimed at preventing early risk factors for drug abuse: integrating effectiveness and implementation research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keegan Natalie

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While a number of preventive interventions delivered within schools have shown both short-term and long-term impact in epidemiologically based randomized field trials, programs are not often sustained with high-quality implementation over time. This study was designed to support two purposes. The first purpose was to test the effectiveness of a universal classroom-based intervention, the Whole Day First Grade Program (WD, aimed at two early antecedents to drug abuse and other problem behaviors, namely, aggressive, disruptive behavior and poor academic achievement. The second purpose--the focus of this paper--was to examine the utility of a multilevel structure to support high levels of implementation during the effectiveness trial, to sustain WD practices across additional years, and to train additional teachers in WD practices. Methods The WD intervention integrated three components, each previously tested separately: classroom behavior management; instruction, specifically reading; and family-classroom partnerships around behavior and learning. Teachers and students in 12 schools were randomly assigned to receive either the WD intervention or the standard first-grade program of the school system (SC. Three consecutive cohorts of first graders were randomized within schools to WD or SC classrooms and followed through the end of third grade to test the effectiveness of the WD intervention. Teacher practices were assessed over three years to examine the utility of the multilevel structure to support sustainability and scaling-up. Discussion The design employed in this trial appears to have considerable utility to provide data on WD effectiveness and to inform the field with regard to structures required to move evidence-based programs into practice. Trial Registration Clinical Trials Registration Number: NCT00257088

  4. Do variations in the composition and structure of vegetation allow floristic groups to be detected in a subtropical moist forest in southern Brazil?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo de Maçaneiro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Variations in vegetation based on topographic location have become an interest of researchers. However, few studies have verified floristic associations related to the topographic position of a slope. In this work, we analyzed if variations in vegetation allow floristic groups to be detected in a subtropical moist forest. The vegetation was sampled in 25 plots of 400 m² distributed systematically, where individuals with a DBH ≥ 5.0 cm were measured. We sampled 1,727 individuals and 144 species. The NMDS ordination segregated three groups based on the topographic position of the slope (Monte Carlo, P ≥ 0.05; ANOSIM, P < 0.001. Euterpe edulis and Sloanea guianensis were notable in the lower and middle sections of the slope, whereas Ocotea aciphylla and Alchornea triplinervia were notable in the upper section. Some species were indicators of the analyzed sectors, such as Actinostemon concolor and Alsophila setosa in the lower section, Cyathea corcovadensis and Rudgea recurva in the middle section, and Myrcia pulchra and Podocarpus sellowii in the upper section. Our results indicate that the floristic and structural variations observed by Veloso and Klein (1959 and Klein (1980; 1984 for Vale do Itajaí in Santa Catarina are statistically valid today, because we verified the formation of different groups according to the topographic position of the slope.

  5. Implementation of the 2017 Berlin Concussion in Sport Group Consensus Statement in contact and collision sports: a joint position statement from 11 national and international sports organisations.

    OpenAIRE

    Patricios, JS; Ardern, CL; Hislop, MD; Aubry, M; Bloomfield, P; Broderick, C; Clifton, P; Echemendia, RJ; Ellenbogen, RG; Falvey, ÉC; Fuller, GW; Grand, J; Hack, D; Harcourt, PR; Hughes, D

    2018-01-01

    The 2017 Berlin Concussion in Sport Group Consensus Statement provides a global summary of best practice in concussion prevention, diagnosis and management, underpinned by systematic reviews and expert consensus. Due to their different settings and rules, individual sports need to adapt concussion guidelines according to their specific regulatory environment. At the same time, consistent application of the Berlin Consensus Statement's themes across sporting codes is likely to facilitate super...

  6. SeaSketch: Implementation of a Decision-Support Platform for a Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Multi-sector Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, G.; McClintock, W.

    2016-12-01

    Effective interagency and cross-sector coordination is essential to ecosystem based management which depends on processes characterized by collaboration and science-based information. Many technological barriers that exist in the development of science-based management plans are closely tied to process challenges, such as the sharing of data and information or the inclusion of parties with varied levels of technical experience. The Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary has convened a diverse working group to develop recommendations for the management of marine shipping in and around the Santa Barbara Channel, as well as recommendations regarding research needs and outreach strategies. Working group members take a multi-issue approach with four distinct goals related to the reduction of ship strikes on whales, emissions and air quality, conflicting ocean uses, and issues of navigational safety. Members range from industry representatives, scientists, and multiple local and federal government entities. The recommended management plans will be based in the best-available science, and will build off of previous efforts, making this an interesting case study of adaptive management. In addition to support from the Sanctuary and professional facilitators, the group is using a decision-support platform, SeaSketch (safepassage.seasketch.org). SeaSketch is a web-based GIS that supports collaborative science-based marine spatial planning (MSP). Each feature supports a step of the MSP process, from data gathering, identification of data needs, the design of spatial plans, evaluation of those plans with analytics, and map-based forums that facilitate data-driven discussions. Working group members are able to access these tools to explore management options and collaborate remotely, in addition to using the platform during in-person meetings and webinars. Empowering diverse audiences to engage in the design of science-based plans is of key importance to developing ecosystem

  7. MIES-Industry working group. Implementing an emission credits trading system in France to optimize industry's contribution to reducing greenhouse gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Jean Jacques; Gillet, Marc; Cournede, Boris; Gastaldo, Sylviane; Liffard, Dominique; Pesson, Alain; Cros, Christine; Ewald, Christophe; Nollet, Patrick; BERTHOUD, Thierry; Boury, Michel; Boyd, Christopher; Caneill, Jean-Yves; Darras, Marc

    2000-01-01

    This report is the result of work done by a group which includes representatives of the authorities and industry (members of Entreprises pour l'Environnement (EpE) - see list in annex), which met between 14 January and 27 March. It reflects the shared opinions of the majority of the Working Group's members, and does not commit the organisations for which they work. It is one of the measures contained in the 'National programme for combating climate change' released by the government on 19 January 2000. It also fits in an international context in which experiments concerning and schemes for emission permit trading systems are being established (cf. Chapter 2). Finally, it refers in part to the 'Proposal by Entreprises pour l'Environnement (EpE) for an effective system for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the manufacturing sector', as well as the report of the 'Industry' Working Group established by MIES (Inter-ministerial Task Force on climate change) in the first half of 1999

  8. Phylogenetic Grouping and Phenotypic Detection of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases Among Escherichia coli From Calves and Dairy Cows in Khuzestan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhdeh Barzan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Food-producing animals are under suspicion for the reservoir and colonization of ESBL (extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacteria especially Enterobacteriaceae and therefore infection of the humans with them. The increasing reports on the ESBLs presence in the pathogenic and commensal Escherichia coli isolates have been a concern worldwide. These strains can be attributed to one of the main phylogenetic groups and subgroups. Several studies have shown the relationship between the phylogeny and antimicrobial resistance of E. coli strains. Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze the phylogenetic group of ESBL-producing E. coli and detect its phenotype using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR and combined disk method. Materials and Methods: Two hundred five E. coli fecal isolates were obtained from 103 calves (90 healthy and 13 diarrheic and 102 dairy cows (healthy from 8 farms in Khuzestan province, Iran. The triplex PCR method was used to allocate the E. coli isolates based on the presence or absence of 3 genes (chuA, yjaA, and tspE4.C2 to yield 4 definite phylogenetic groups and 7 subgroups. Phenotypic ESBL-producing E. coli was determined using the double disk diffusion method according to the manufacturer’s instructions and Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. Results: A total of 65.04% and 22.3% of isolates from calves and 70.5% and 20.5% of isolates from dairy cows belonged to phylogroups B1 and A, respectively. In addition, no isolate from the diarrhoeic calves was found to belong to group B2 and subgroups D2 and A0. A low prevalence (2/205 isolates, 0.97% of ESBL-producing E. coli was found only in the samples of dairy cows which belonged to the phylogenetic group A and phylogenetic subgroup A1. There was no statistically significant relationship between the phylogenetic group and the production of ESBLs (P = 0.11. There was also no difference between the E. coli isolates

  9. “Partners rather than just providers…”: A qualitative study on health care professionals’ views on implementation of multidisciplinary group meetings in the North West London Integrated Care Pilot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelos P Kassianos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multidisciplinary group meetings are one of the key drivers of facilitating integrated care. Health care professionals attending such groups have a key role in the success of these discussions and hence, in the forming of multi-professional integrated care. The study aimed to explore the professionals’ experiences and views of participating and implementing the groups in integrated care context. Methods: A qualitative study including 25 semi-structured interviews with professionals participating in the Northwest London Integrated Care Pilot analysed using thematic content analysis. Results: Participants mentioned a number of benefits of participating in the meetings, including shared learning and shared decision-making between different services and specialties. Yet, they perceived barriers that diminish the efficiency of the groups, such as time constraints, group dynamics and technicalities. The participants felt that the quality of discussions and facilitation could be improved, as well as technical arrangements that would make them easier to participate. Most of the participants perceived the groups to be beneficial for providers mostly questioning the benefits for patient care. Conclusion: Findings provide an insight into how health professionals’ views of their participation to the multidisciplinary group meetings can be more effectively translated into more tangible benefits to the patients. To benefit patient care, the multidisciplinary groups need to be more patient-oriented rather than provider-oriented, while overcoming professional boundaries for participating.

  10. Report of the AAPM Task Group No. 105: Issues associated with clinical implementation of Monte Carlo-based photon and electron external beam treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetty, Indrin J.; Curran, Bruce; Cygler, Joanna E.; DeMarco, John J.; Ezzell, Gary; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Kawrakow, Iwan; Keall, Paul J.; Liu, Helen; Ma, C.-M. Charlie; Rogers, D. W. O.; Seuntjens, Jan; Sheikh-Bagheri, Daryoush; Siebers, Jeffrey V.

    2007-01-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method has been shown through many research studies to calculate accurate dose distributions for clinical radiotherapy, particularly in heterogeneous patient tissues where the effects of electron transport cannot be accurately handled with conventional, deterministic dose algorithms. Despite its proven accuracy and the potential for improved dose distributions to influence treatment outcomes, the long calculation times previously associated with MC simulation rendered this method impractical for routine clinical treatment planning. However, the development of faster codes optimized for radiotherapy calculations and improvements in computer processor technology have substantially reduced calculation times to, in some instances, within minutes on a single processor. These advances have motivated several major treatment planning system vendors to embark upon the path of MC techniques. Several commercial vendors have already released or are currently in the process of releasing MC algorithms for photon and/or electron beam treatment planning. Consequently, the accessibility and use of MC treatment planning algorithms may well become widespread in the radiotherapy community. With MC simulation, dose is computed stochastically using first principles; this method is therefore quite different from conventional dose algorithms. Issues such as statistical uncertainties, the use of variance reduction techniques, the ability to account for geometric details in the accelerator treatment head simulation, and other features, are all unique components of a MC treatment planning algorithm. Successful implementation by the clinical physicist of such a system will require an understanding of the basic principles of MC techniques. The purpose of this report, while providing education and review on the use of MC simulation in radiotherapy planning, is to set out, for both users and developers, the salient issues associated with clinical implementation and

  11. Low Frequency Waves Detected in a Large Wave Flume under Irregular Waves with Different Grouping Factor and Combination of Regular Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigia Riefolo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a set of experiments undertaken at Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya in the large wave flume of the Maritime Engineering Laboratory. The purpose of this study is to highlight the effects of wave grouping and long-wave short-wave combinations regimes on low frequency generations. An eigen-value decomposition has been performed to discriminate low frequencies. In particular, measured eigen modes, determined through the spectral analysis, have been compared with calculated modes by means of eigen analysis. The low frequencies detection appears to confirm the dependence on groupiness of the modal amplitudes generated in the wave flume. Some evidence of the influence of low frequency waves on runup and transport patterns are shown. In particular, the generation and evolution of secondary bedforms are consistent with energy transferred between the standing wave modes.

  12. A SKIN TEST FOR DETECTING GROUP C HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCAL INFECTION CAUSING EPIZOOTIC LYMPHADENITIS IN GUINEA PIGS : APPLICATIONS IN SELECTING BREEDING STOCK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, J K

    1936-09-30

    1. A skin test with a crude bacterial extract prepared from group C (Lancefield) hemolytic streptococci was used as a means of detecting possible carriers of the streptococcus causing epizootic lymphadenitis in guinea pigs. A positive test similar to a positive tuberculin reaction was considered presumptive evidence of present or recent infection with this streptococcus. 2. 20 positive reactors were found in 330 supposedly normal guinea pigs. 3. 195 negatively reacting animals were used as a breeding stock which yielded 1,296 progeny over a period of 15 months. None of the breeding stock or their progeny showed evidence of spontaneous lymphadenitis. Skin tests of 100 of the progeny were all negative. 4. The use of this skin test as a means of obtaining guinea pig breeding stock free of the streptococcus causing spontaneous lymphadenitis is suggested.

  13. Absorption-line detections of 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} K gas in spiral-rich groups of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stocke, John T.; Keeney, Brian A.; Danforth, Charles W.; Syphers, David; Yamamoto, H.; Shull, J. Michael; Green, James C.; Froning, Cynthia [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Savage, Blair D.; Wakker, Bart; Kim, Tae-Sun [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Ryan-Weber, Emma V.; Kacprzak, Glenn G., E-mail: john.stocke@colorado.edu [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2014-08-20

    Using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope, the COS Science Team has conducted a high signal-to-noise survey of 14 bright QSOs. In a previous paper, these far-UV spectra were used to discover 14 'warm' (T ≥ 10{sup 5} K) absorbers using a combination of broad Lyα and broad O VI absorptions. A reanalysis of a few of this new class of absorbers using slightly relaxed fitting criteria finds as many as 20 warm absorbers could be present in this sample. A shallow, wide spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey has been conducted around these sight lines to investigate the warm absorber environment, which is found to be spiral-rich groups or cluster outskirts with radial velocity dispersions σ = 250-750 km s{sup –1}. While 2σ evidence is presented favoring the hypothesis that these absorptions are associated with the galaxy groups and not with the individual, nearest galaxies, this evidence has considerable systematic uncertainties and is based on a small sample size so it is not entirely conclusive. If the associations are with galaxy groups, the observed frequency of warm absorbers (dN/dz = 3.5-5 per unit redshift) requires them to be very extended as an ensemble on the sky (∼1 Mpc in radius at high covering factor). Most likely these warm absorbers are interface gas clouds whose presence implies the existence of a hotter (T ∼ 10{sup 6.5} K), diffuse, and probably very massive (>10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}) intra-group medium which has yet to be detected directly.

  14. Evaluation of a primary-care setting at a veterinary teaching hospital by a student business group: implementing business training within the curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisa Poon, W Y; Covington, Jennifer P; Dempsey, Lauren S; Goetgeluck, Scott L; Marscher, William F; Morelli, Sierra C; Powell, Jana E; Rivers, Elizabeth M; Roth, Ira G

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to the use of students' business skills in optimizing teaching opportunities, student learning, and client satisfaction in a primary health care setting at a veterinary teaching hospital. Seven veterinary-student members of the local chapter of the Veterinary Business Management Association (VBMA) evaluated the primary-care service at the University of Georgia (UGA) veterinary teaching hospital and assessed six areas of focus: (1) branding and marketing, (2) client experience, (3) staff and staffing, (4) student experience, (5) time management, and (6) standard operating procedures and protocols. For each area of focus, strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats were identified. Of the six areas, two were identified as areas in need of immediate improvement, the first being the updating of standard operating protocols and the second being time management and the flow of appointments. Recommendations made for these two areas were implemented. Overall, the staff and students provided positive feedback on the recommended changes. Through such a student-centered approach to improving the quality of their education, students are empowered and are held accountable for their learning environment. The fact that the VBMA functions without a parent organization and that the primary-care service at UGA functions primarily as a separate entity from the specialty services at the College of Veterinary Medicine allowed students to have a direct impact on their learning environment. We hope that this model for advancing business education will be studied and promoted to benefit both veterinary education and business practice within academia.

  15. The new final Clinical Skills examination in human medicine in Switzerland: Essential steps of exam development, implementation and evaluation, and central insights from the perspective of the national Working Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berendonk, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Since 2011, the new national final examination in human medicine has been implemented in Switzerland, with a structured clinical-practical part in the OSCE format. From the perspective of the national Working Group, the current article describes the essential steps in the development, implementation and evaluation of the Federal Licensing Examination Clinical Skills (FLE CS as well as the applied quality assurance measures. Finally, central insights gained from the last years are presented. Methods: Based on the principles of action research, the FLE CS is in a constant state of further development. On the foundation of systematically documented experiences from previous years, in the Working Group, unresolved questions are discussed and resulting solution approaches are substantiated (planning, implemented in the examination (implementation and subsequently evaluated (reflection. The presented results are the product of this iterative procedure.Results: The FLE CS is created by experts from all faculties and subject areas in a multistage process. The examination is administered in German and French on a decentralised basis and consists of twelve interdisciplinary stations per candidate. As important quality assurance measures, the national Review Board (content validation and the meetings of the standardised patient trainers (standardisation have proven worthwhile. The statistical analyses show good measurement reliability and support the construct validity of the examination. Among the central insights of the past years, it has been established that the consistent implementation of the principles of action research contributes to the successful further development of the examination.Conclusion: The centrally coordinated, collaborative-iterative process, incorporating experts from all faculties, makes a fundamental contribution to the quality of the FLE CS. The processes and insights presented here can be useful for others planning a

  16. Solid-state NMR detection of 14N-13C dipolar couplings between amino acid side groups provides constraints on amyloid fibril architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, David A

    2011-02-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) is a powerful technique for the structural analysis of amyloid fibrils. With suitable isotope labelling patterns, SSNMR can provide constraints on the secondary structure, alignment and registration of β-strands within amyloid fibrils and identify the tertiary and quaternary contacts defining the packing of the β-sheet layers. Detection of (14)N-(13)C dipolar couplings may provide potentially useful additional structural constraints on β-sheet packing within amyloid fibrils but has not until now been exploited for this purpose. Here a frequency-selective, transfer of population in double resonance SSNMR experiment is used to detect a weak (14)N-(13)C dipolar coupling in amyloid-like fibrils of the peptide H(2)N-SNNFGAILSS-COOH, which was uniformly (13)C and (15)N labelled across the four C-terminal amino acids. The (14)N-(13)C interatomic distance between leucine and asparagine side groups is constrained between 2.4 and 3.8 Å, which allows current structural models of the β-spine arrangement within the fibrils to be refined. This procedure could be useful for the general structural analysis of other proteins in condensed phases and environments, such as biological membranes. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Implementation Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Meeting the identified needs of Earth science requires approaching EOS as an information system and not simply as one or more satellites with instruments. Six elements of strategy are outlined as follows: implementation of the individual discipline missions as currently planned; use of sustained observational capabilities offered by operational satellites without waiting for the launch of new mission; put first priority on the data system; deploy an Advanced Data Collection and Location System; put a substantial new observing capability in a low Earth orbit in such a way as to provide for sustained measurements; and group instruments to exploit their capabilities for synergism; maximize the scientific utility of the mission; and minimize the costs of implementation where possible.

  18. Restitution report of the working group called 'access to the information' implemented in the framework of the public debate EPR ''head of series'' at Flamanville

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    The works realized by this working group show some strong conclusions. The citizen confidence in the information access availability must be reinforced. The existence of secrets protecting the industrialists and the Nation interests seems all the more legitimate since they are well limited.The respect of the industrial and commercial secret is not an opposition to a better access to the nuclear safety documents. The defense secret is an indispensable element of the nuclear safety but its role and limits must be debated. (A.L.B.)

  19. Implementation of the 2017 Berlin Concussion in Sport Group Consensus Statement in contact and collision sports: a joint position statement from 11 national and international sports organisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricios, Jon S; Hislop, Michael David; Aubry, Mark; Bloomfield, Paul; Broderick, Carolyn; Clifton, Patrick; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Falvey, Éanna Cian; Grand, Julie; Hack, Dallas; Harcourt, Peter Rex; Hughes, David; McGuirk, Nathan; Meeuwisse, Willem; Miller, Jeffrey; Parsons, John T; Richiger, Simona; Sills, Allen; Moran, Kevin B; Shute, Jenny; Raftery, Martin

    2018-01-01

    The 2017 Berlin Concussion in Sport Group Consensus Statement provides a global summary of best practice in concussion prevention, diagnosis and management, underpinned by systematic reviews and expert consensus. Due to their different settings and rules, individual sports need to adapt concussion guidelines according to their specific regulatory environment. At the same time, consistent application of the Berlin Consensus Statement’s themes across sporting codes is likely to facilitate superior and uniform diagnosis and management, improve concussion education and highlight collaborative research opportunities. This document summarises the approaches discussed by medical representatives from the governing bodies of 10 different contact and collision sports in Dublin, Ireland in July 2017. Those sports are: American football, Australian football, basketball, cricket, equestrian sports, football/soccer, ice hockey, rugby league, rugby union and skiing. This document had been endorsed by 11 sport governing bodies/national federations at the time of being published. PMID:29500252

  20. Evaluation of Countermeasures Effectiveness in a Radioactively Contaminated Urban Area Using METRO-K : The Implementation of Scenarios Designed by the EMRAS II Urban Areas Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Won Tae; Jeong, Hae Sun; Jeong, Hyo Joon; Kim, Eun Han; Han, Moon Hee

    2012-01-01

    The Urban Areas Working Group within the EMRAS-2 (Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety, Phase 2), which has been supported by the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency), has designed some types of accidental scenarios to test and improve the capabilities of models used for evaluation of radioactive contamination in urban areas. For the comparison of the results predicted from the different models, the absorbed doses in air were analyzed as a function of time following the accident with consideration of countermeasures to be taken. Two kinds of considerations were performed to find the dependency of the predicted results. One is the 'accidental season', i.e. summer and winter, in which an event of radioactive contamination takes place in a specified urban area. Likewise, the 'rainfall intensity' on the day of an event was also considered with the option of 1) no rain, 2) light rain, and 3) heavy rain. The results predicted using a domestic model of METRO-K have been submitted to the Urban Areas Working Group for the intercomparison with those of other models. In this study, as a part of these results using METRO-K, the countermeasures effectiveness in terms of dose reduction was analyzed and presented for the ground floor of a 24-story business building in a specified urban area. As a result, it was found that the countermeasures effectiveness is distinctly dependent on the rainfall intensity on the day of an event, and season when an event takes place. It is related to the different deposition amount of the radionuclides to the surfaces and different behavior on the surfaces following a deposition, and different effectiveness from countermeasures. In conclusion, a selection of appropriate countermeasures with consideration of various environmental conditions may be important to minimize and optimize the socio-economic costs as well as radiation-induced health detriments.

  1. "CAN Stop"--implementation and evaluation of a secondary group prevention for adolescent and young adult cannabis users in various contexts--study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldus, Christiane; Miranda, Alejandra; Weymann, Nina; Reis, Olaf; Moré, Kerstin; Thomasius, Rainer

    2011-04-18

    Current research shows that overall numbers for cannabis use among adolescents and young adults dropped in recent years. However, this trend is much less pronounced in continuous cannabis use. With regard to the heightened risk for detrimental health- and development-related outcomes, adolescents and young adults with continuous cannabis use need special attention. The health services structure for adolescents and young adults with substance related problems in Germany, is multifaceted, because different communal, medical and judicial agencies are involved. This results in a rather decentralized organizational structure of the help system. This and further system-inherent characteristics make the threshold for young cannabis users rather high. Because of this, there is a need to establish evidence-based low-threshold help options for young cannabis users, which can be easily disseminated. Therefore, a training programme for young cannabis users (age 14-21) was developed in the "CAN Stop" project. Within the project, we seek to implement and evaluate the training programme within different institutions of the help system. The evaluation is sensitive to the different help systems and their specific prerequisites. Moreover, within this study, we also test the practicability of a training provision through laypersons. The CAN Stop study is a four-armed randomized wait-list controlled trial. The four arms are needed for the different help system settings, in which the CAN Stop training programme is evaluated: (a) the drug addiction aid and youth welfare system, (b) the out-patient medical system, (c) the in-patient medical system and (d) prisons for juvenile offenders. Data are collected at three points, before and after the training or a treatment as usual, and six months after the end of either intervention. The CAN Stop study is expected to provide an evidence-based programme for young cannabis users seeking to reduce or quit their cannabis use. Moreover, we seek to

  2. "CAN Stop" - Implementation and evaluation of a secondary group prevention for adolescent and young adult cannabis users in various contexts - study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moré Kerstin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current research shows that overall numbers for cannabis use among adolescents and young adults dropped in recent years. However, this trend is much less pronounced in continuous cannabis use. With regard to the heightened risk for detrimental health- and development-related outcomes, adolescents and young adults with continuous cannabis use need special attention. The health services structure for adolescents and young adults with substance related problems in Germany, is multifaceted, because different communal, medical and judicial agencies are involved. This results in a rather decentralized organizational structure of the help system. This and further system-inherent characteristics make the threshold for young cannabis users rather high. Because of this, there is a need to establish evidence-based low-threshold help options for young cannabis users, which can be easily disseminated. Therefore, a training programme for young cannabis users (age 14-21 was developed in the "CAN Stop" project. Within the project, we seek to implement and evaluate the training programme within different institutions of the help system. The evaluation is sensitive to the different help systems and their specific prerequisites. Moreover, within this study, we also test the practicability of a training provision through laypersons. Methods/Design The CAN Stop study is a four-armed randomized wait-list controlled trial. The four arms are needed for the different help system settings, in which the CAN Stop training programme is evaluated: (a the drug addiction aid and youth welfare system, (b the out-patient medical system, (c the in-patient medical system and (d prisons for juvenile offenders. Data are collected at three points, before and after the training or a treatment as usual, and six months after the end of either intervention. Discussion The CAN Stop study is expected to provide an evidence-based programme for young cannabis users

  3. Rapid detection of rRNA group I pseudomonads in contaminated metalworking fluids and biofilm formation by fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Ratul; Donofrio, Robert S; Goeres, Darla M; Bagley, Susan T

    2012-05-01

    Metalworking fluids (MWFs), used in different machining operations, are highly prone to microbial degradation. Microbial communities present in MWFs lead to biofilm formation in the MWF systems, which act as a continuous source of contamination. Species of rRNA group I Pseudomonas dominate in contaminated MWFs. However, their actual distribution is typically underestimated when using standard culturing techniques as most fail to grow on the commonly used Pseudomonas Isolation Agar. To overcome this, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to study their abundance along with biofilm formation by two species recovered from MWFs, Pseudomonas fluorescens MWF-1 and the newly described Pseudomonas oleovorans subsp. lubricantis. Based on 16S rRNA sequences, a unique fluorescent molecular probe (Pseudo120) was designed targeting a conserved signature sequence common to all rRNA group I Pseudomonas. The specificity of the probe was evaluated using hybridization experiments with whole cells of different Pseudomonas species. The probe's sensitivity was determined to be 10(3) cells/ml. It successfully detected and enumerated the abundance and distribution of Pseudomonas indicating levels between 3.2 (± 1.1) × 10(6) and 5.0 (± 2.3) × 10(6) cells/ml in four different industrial MWF samples collected from three different locations. Biofilm formation was visualized under stagnant conditions using high and low concentrations of cells for both P. fluorescens MWF-1 and P. oleovorans subsp. lubricantis stained with methylene blue and Pseudo120. On the basis of these observations, this molecular probe can be successfully be used in the management of MWF systems to monitor the levels and biofilm formation of rRNA group I pseudomonads.

  4. Implementation of the 2017 Berlin Concussion in Sport Group Consensus Statement in contact and collision sports: a joint position statement from 11 national and international sports organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricios, Jon S; Ardern, Clare L; Hislop, Michael David; Aubry, Mark; Bloomfield, Paul; Broderick, Carolyn; Clifton, Patrick; Echemendia, Ruben J; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Falvey, Éanna Cian; Fuller, Gordon Ward; Grand, Julie; Hack, Dallas; Harcourt, Peter Rex; Hughes, David; McGuirk, Nathan; Meeuwisse, Willem; Miller, Jeffrey; Parsons, John T; Richiger, Simona; Sills, Allen; Moran, Kevin B; Shute, Jenny; Raftery, Martin

    2018-05-01

    The 2017 Berlin Concussion in Sport Group Consensus Statement provides a global summary of best practice in concussion prevention, diagnosis and management, underpinned by systematic reviews and expert consensus. Due to their different settings and rules, individual sports need to adapt concussion guidelines according to their specific regulatory environment. At the same time, consistent application of the Berlin Consensus Statement's themes across sporting codes is likely to facilitate superior and uniform diagnosis and management, improve concussion education and highlight collaborative research opportunities. This document summarises the approaches discussed by medical representatives from the governing bodies of 10 different contact and collision sports in Dublin, Ireland in July 2017. Those sports are: American football, Australian football, basketball, cricket, equestrian sports, football/soccer, ice hockey, rugby league, rugby union and skiing. This document had been endorsed by 11 sport governing bodies/national federations at the time of being published. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. The evolution of diagnosis-related groups (DRGs): from its beginnings in case-mix and resource use theory, to its implementation for payment and now for its current utilization for quality within and outside the hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfield, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Policymakers are searching for ways to control health care costs and improve quality. Diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) are by far the most important cost control and quality improvement tool that governments and private payers have implemented. This article reviews why DRGs have had this singular success both in the hospital sector and, over the past 10 years, in ambulatory and managed care settings. Last, the author reviews current trends in the development and implementation of tools that have the key ingredients of DRG success: categorical clinical model, separation of the clinical model from payment weights, separate payment adjustments for nonclinical factors, and outlier payments. Virtually all current tools used to manage health care costs and improve quality do not have these characteristics. This failure explains a key reason for the failure, for example, of the Medicare Advantage program to control health care costs. This article concludes with a discussion of future developments for DRG-type models outside the hospital sector.

  6. Evaluation of chromogenic medium and direct latex agglutination test for detection of group B streptococcus in vaginal specimens from pregnant women in Lebanon and Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaddar, Nahed; Alfouzan, Wadha; Anastasiadis, Elie; Al Jiser, Tamima; Itani, Saad Eddine; Dernaika, Racha; Eid, Toufic; Ghaddar, Ali; Charafeddine, Adib; Dhar, Rita; El Hajj, Hiba

    2014-10-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate chromogenic medium and a direct latex agglutination test (DLA) for detection of Group B Streptococcus (GBS) in the vaginal specimens of pregnant women, and to ascertain the prevalence of GBS in this population in Kuwait and Lebanon. Vaginal swabs, collected from women at 35-37 weeks of gestation, were cultured on 5 % sheep blood agar (SBA), colistin nalidixic acid agar (CNA), Strept B Select chromogenic agar (SBS) as well as Lim enrichment broth in 168 cases in Lebanon while only SBA was used for 1391 samples in Kuwait. In addition, vaginal samples from 102 GBS-positive and 20 GBS-negative women near the time of delivery were collected in Kuwait for evaluation of the DLA test. During the study period, the prevalence of GBS colonization was determined to be 20.7 % (288/1391) in Kuwait while 18.4 % (31) of 168 pregnant women in Lebanon had vaginal cultures positive for GBS. By direct plating of vaginal swabs on the three media used, the isolation rates of GBS were 51.6, 64.5 and 77.4 % on SBA, CNA and SBS, respectively, which increased to 90.35, 93.1 and 96.8 %, respectively, following subculture in Lim broth after 18 h of incubation. The sensitivity of the DLA test was found to be dependent on the density of GBS colonization, resulting in 100 % sensitivity and 100 % specificity for heavy (>10(2) c.f.u. per swab) and moderately heavy (50-100 c.f.u. per swab) growth of GBS. However, for vaginal specimens yielding women. The DLA test, in particular, could prove to be a useful tool for immediate detection of GBS in women near delivery so that intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis can be initiated. © 2014 The Authors.

  7. Detecting prediabetes among Hispanics/Latinos from diverse heritage groups: Does the test matter? Findings from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilés-Santa, M Larissa; Pérez, Cynthia M; Schneiderman, Neil; Savage, Peter J; Kaplan, Robert C; Teng, Yanping; Suárez, Erick L; Cai, Jianwen; Giachello, Aida L; Talavera, Gregory A; Cowie, Catherine C

    2017-02-01

    The objectives of this analysis were to compare the ability of fasting plasma glucose (FPG), post oral load plasma glucose (2hPG), and hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) to identify U.S. Hispanic/Latino individuals with prediabetes, and to assess its cardiovascular risk factor correlates. This is a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 15,507 adults without self-reported diabetes mellitus from six Hispanic/Latino heritage groups, enrolled in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, which takes place in four U.S. communities. The prevalence of prediabetes was determined according to individual or combinations of ADA-defined cut points: FPG=5.6-7.0mmol/L, 2hPG=7.8-11.1mmol/L, and HbA 1c =5.7%-6.4% (39-46mmol/mol). The sensitivity of these criteria to detect prediabetes was estimated. The prevalence ratios (PRs) for selected cardiovascular risk factors were compared among alternative categories of prediabetes versus normoglycemia [FPGprediabetes criteria. Using 2hPG as the gold standard, the sensitivity of FPG was 40.1%, HbA 1c was 45.6%, and that of HbA 1c +FPG was 62.2%. The number of significant PRs for cardiovascular risk factors was higher among individuals with isolated 2hPG=7.8-11.1mmol/L, FPG=5.6-7.0mmol/L+HbA 1c =5.7%-6.4%, or those who met the three prediabetes criteria. Assessing FPG, HbA 1c , and cardiovascular risk factors in Hispanics/Latinos at risk might enhance the early prevention of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular complications in this young and growing population, independent of their heritage group. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. A Theoretical Methodology and Prototype Implementation for Detection Segmentation Classification of Digital Mammogram Tumor by Machine Learning and Problem Solving Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Raman Valliappan; Sumari Putra; Rajeswari Mandava

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer continues to be a significant public health problem in the world. Early detection is the key for improving breast cancer prognosis. The CAD systems can provide such help and they are important and necessary for breast cancer control. Microcalcifications and masses are the two most important indicators of malignancy, and their automated detection is very valuable for early breast cancer diagnosis. The main objective of this paper is to detect, segment and classify the tumor from ...

  9. One-pot preparation of conducting composite containing abundant amino groups on electrode surface for electrochemical detection of von willebrand factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Ma, Chao; Li, Yi; Liu, Baihui; Tan, Liang

    2018-03-01

    A one-pot protocol based on cyclic voltammetric scan was employed to prepare new conducting composite that was abundant in amino groups. The scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and infrared spectrum characterization demonstrate that poly(azure A), gold nanoparticles, chitosan and cysteine were immobilized simultaneously on glassy carbon electrode surface. Von Willebrand factor (vWF) antibody (Ab) was subsequently assembled by using glutaraldehyde to construct the Ab/composite-modified electrode. The capture of vWF could inhibit the charge transfer between the ferri-/ferrocyanide probe and the electrode and exert the negative effect on the electrochemical response of the dye polymer in the conducting composite due to the strong steric hindrance effect. The DPV peak current change before and after the immunoreaction was found to be proportional to the logarithm of the vWF concentration from 0.001 to 100 μg mL-1 with a detection limit of 0.4 ng mL-1. The proposed label-free electrochemical method was employed in the investigation on the release of vWF by oxidation-injured vascular endothelial cells. The experimental results exhibit that the vWF content in growth medium was increased when the oxidation injury of the cells was intensified in the presence of H2O2.

  10. Bioelectrical impedance for detecting and monitoring lymphedema in patients with breast cancer. Preliminary results of the florence nightingale breast study group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan Iyigun, Zeynep; Selamoglu, Derya; Alco, Gul; Pilancı, Kezban Nur; Ordu, Cetin; Agacayak, Filiz; Elbüken, Filiz; Bozdogan, Atilla; Ilgun, Serkan; Guler Uysal, Fusun; Ozmen, Vahit

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of bioimpedance spectroscopy for the follow-up of patients with lymphedema in Turkey and its benefits in the diagnosis of stage 0, 1, and 2 lymphedema in patients who are under treatment for breast cancer. Thirty-seven female patients with breast cancer who underwent surgical procedures in our Breast Health Centre were followed up for lymphedema using bioimpedance, and clinical measurements were taken for a minimum period of 1 year at 3-month intervals. Patients who had been monitored regularly between November, 2011, and September, 2013, were enrolled to the study. In total, 8 patients developed lymphedema with an overall rate of 21.6%. Among the 8 patients who developed lymphedema, 4 had Stage 2, 1 had Stage 1, and 3 had Stage 0 lymphedema. Stage 0 lymphedema could not be detected with clinical measurements. During the patients' 1-year follow-up period using measurements of bioimpedance, a statistically significant relationship was observed between the occurrence of lymphedema and the disease characteristics. including the number of the extracted and remaining lymph nodes and the region of radiotherapy (p=0.042, p=0.024, p=0.040). Bioimpedance analysis seems to be a practical and reliable method for the early diagnosis of lymphedema. It is believed that regular monitoring of patients in the high-risk group using bioimpedance analyses increases the ability to treat lymphedema.

  11. Multidimensional Recurrence Quantification Analysis (MdRQA) for the Analysis of Multidimensional Time-Series: A Software Implementation in MATLAB and Its Application to Group-Level Data in Joint Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallot, Sebastian; Roepstorff, Andreas; Mønster, Dan

    2016-01-01

    We introduce Multidimensional Recurrence Quantification Analysis (MdRQA) as a tool to analyze multidimensional time-series data. We show how MdRQA can be used to capture the dynamics of high-dimensional signals, and how MdRQA can be used to assess coupling between two or more variables. In particular, we describe applications of the method in research on joint and collective action, as it provides a coherent analysis framework to systematically investigate dynamics at different group levels-from individual dynamics, to dyadic dynamics, up to global group-level of arbitrary size. The Appendix in Supplementary Material contains a software implementation in MATLAB to calculate MdRQA measures.

  12. Group key management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  13. Design and Implementation of a C++ Multithreaded Operational Tool for the Generation of Detection Time Grids in 2D for P- and S-waves taking into Consideration Seismic Network Topology and Data Latency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardina, V.

    2017-12-01

    The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center's round the clock operations rely on the rapid determination of the source parameters of earthquakes occurring around the world. To rapidly estimate source parameters such as earthquake location and magnitude the PTWC analyzes data streams ingested in near-real time from a global network of more than 700 seismic stations. Both the density of this network and the data latency of its member stations at any given time have a direct impact on the speed at which the PTWC scientists on duty can locate an earthquake and estimate its magnitude. In this context, it turns operationally advantageous to have the ability of assessing how quickly the PTWC operational system can reasonably detect and locate and earthquake, estimate its magnitude, and send the corresponding tsunami message whenever appropriate. For this purpose, we designed and implemented a multithreaded C++ software package to generate detection time grids for both P- and S-waves after taking into consideration the seismic network topology and the data latency of its member stations. We first encapsulate all the parameters of interest at a given geographic point, such as geographic coordinates, P- and S-waves detection time in at least a minimum number of stations, and maximum allowed azimuth gap into a DetectionTimePoint class. Then we apply composition and inheritance to define a DetectionTimeLine class that handles a vector of DetectionTimePoint objects along a given latitude. A DetectionTimesGrid class in turn handles the dynamic allocation of new TravelTimeLine objects and assigning the calculation of the corresponding P- and S-waves' detection times to new threads. Finally, we added a GUI that allows the user to interactively set all initial calculation parameters and output options. Initial testing in an eight core system shows that generation of a global 2D grid at 1 degree resolution setting detection on at least 5 stations and no azimuth gap restriction takes under 25

  14. Laboratory simulations of prebiotic molecule stability in the jarosite mineral group; end member evaluation of detection and decomposition behavior related to Mars sample return

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Michelle Kotler; Nancy W. Hinman; C. Doc Richardson; Andrew G. Conly; Jill R. Scott

    2009-10-01

    Recently, the prebiotic amino acid glycine has been found associated with natural jarosite samples from various locations around the world. Since the discovery of jarosite on Mars, extensive research focuses on linking this mineral group with possible detection of biosignatures in the geologic record on Earth and Mars. Multiple analytical methods, including extraction and mass spectrometry techniques have identified glycine and other biomolecules in jarosite samples. The jarosite end members jarosite (sensu stricto-potassium jarosite), natrojarosite (sodium jarosite), and ammoniojarosite (ammonium jarosite) have different thermodynamic stabilities, decompose at different rates, and have potentially different susceptibilities to substitution. Planetary protection issues have led to the suggestion that samples returned from Mars would need to be heat-treated before they could be analyzed on Earth. Although heat treatment of the samples would in theory destroy any potential biosignatures, valuable information can be obtained during thermal treatment by employing gravimetric techniques. The relationship between the thermodynamic stability of the jarosite end members and the effect that glycine has on the thermal decomposition behavior of each end member was investigated using thermal gravimetric analysis. Thermal gravimetric analysis has been suggested as a method capable of providing the heat treatment necessary to provide planetary protection while still providing useful information about the original state and composition of the potentially returned materials. Introducing glycine into the synthesis procedure of the potassium, sodium and ammonium jarosite end-member has elucidated the effects that glycine has on the thermal stability of the mineral group. Potassium jarosite appears to be the least susceptible to the effects of glycine, with the sodium and ammonium end members showing marked changes in thermal decomposition behavior and decomposition rates. In

  15. The effect of implementation of an early detection team: A nationwide register-based study of characteristics and help-seeking behavior in first-episode schizophrenia in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastrup, Lene Halling; Haahr, Ulrik Helt; Nordgaard, Julie; Simonsen, Erik

    2018-04-26

    In an effort to make people with signs of psychosis seek help as early as possible, Region Zealand launched in 2012 an early detection team project as the first and only in Denmark. The project consisted of a combination of easy access and an information campaign targeting the public. This nation-wide study examined characteristics and help-seeking behavior of patients with first-episode schizophrenia (FES) in the early detection region in comparison with other Danish regions. Data from the Danish National Schizophrenia register on all Danish patients diagnosed with first-episode schizophrenia during 2012 to 2015 were linked to demographic and health care data drawn from official national registers. Binary logistic regression analyses examined the difference between the early detection region and other regions controlling for demographic characteristics and utilization of mental health care services and contacts to general practitioner (GP). Patients in the early detection region were younger (OR = 0.51; CI: 0.42-0.62; p < 0.000) than in regions without early detection teams. Furthermore, they were more likely to be of Danish origin, and less likely to have contact with mental health services and GPs prior to FES. The study suggests that implementing an early detection team in combination with an information campaign contributed to detecting patients with first-episode schizophrenia earlier than in regions without the early detection team. The study gives an indication of different pathways among patients in the early detection region. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. FPGA/NIOS Implementation of an Adaptive FIR Filter Using Linear Prediction to Reduce Narrow-Band RFI for Radio Detection of Cosmic Rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szadkowski, Zbigniew; Fraenkel, E. D.; van den Berg, Ad M.

    2013-01-01

    We present the FPGA/NIOS implementation of an adaptive finite impulse response (FIR) filter based on linear prediction to suppress radio frequency interference (RFI). This technique will be used for experiments that observe coherent radio emission from extensive air showers induced by

  17. Assessing the cost of implementing the 2011 Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada and Canadian College of Medical Genetics practice guidelines on the detection of fetal aneuploidies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, Margaret; Hume, Stacey; Karpoff, Nina; Maire, Georges; Taylor, Sherry; Tomaszewski, Robert; Yoshimoto, Maisa; Christian, Susan

    2017-09-01

    The Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada and the Canadian College of Medical Genetics published guidelines, in 2011, recommending replacement of karyotype with quantitative fluorescent polymerase chain reaction when prenatal testing is performed because of an increased risk of a common aneuploidy. This study's objective is to perform a cost analysis following the implementation of quantitative fluorescent polymerase chain reaction as a stand-alone test. A total of 658 samples were received between 1 April 2014 and 31 August 2015: 576 amniocentesis samples and 82 chorionic villi sampling. A chromosome abnormality was identified in 14% (93/658) of the prenatal samples tested. The implementation of the 2011 Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada and the Canadian College of Medical Genetics guidelines in Edmonton and Northern Alberta resulted in a cost savings of $46 295.80. The replacement of karyotype with chromosomal microarray for some indications would be associated with additional costs. The implementation of new test methods may provide cost savings or added costs. Cost analysis is important to consider during the implementation of new guidelines or technologies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Prevention of cardiovascular disease guided by total risk estimations - challenges and opportunities for practical implementation: highlights of a CardioVascular Clinical Trialists (CVCT) Workshop of the ESC Working Group on CardioVascular Pharmacology and Drug Therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zannad, Faiez

    2011-11-03

    This paper presents a summary of the potential practical and economic barriers to implementation of primary prevention of cardiovascular disease guided by total cardiovascular risk estimations in the general population. It also reviews various possible solutions to overcome these barriers. The report is based on discussion among experts in the area at a special CardioVascular Clinical Trialists workshop organized by the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Drug Therapy that took place in September 2009. It includes a review of the evidence in favour of the \\'treat-to-target\\' paradigm, as well as potential difficulties with this approach, including the multiple pathological processes present in high-risk patients that may not be adequately addressed by this strategy. The risk-guided therapy approach requires careful definitions of cardiovascular risk and consideration of clinical endpoints as well as the differences between trial and \\'real-world\\' populations. Cost-effectiveness presents another issue in scenarios of finite healthcare resources, as does the difficulty of documenting guideline uptake and effectiveness in the primary care setting, where early modification of risk factors may be more beneficial than later attempts to manage established disease. The key to guideline implementation is to improve the quality of risk assessment and demonstrate the association between risk factors, intervention, and reduced event rates. In the future, this may be made possible by means of automated data entry and various other measures. In conclusion, opportunities exist to increase guideline implementation in the primary care setting, with potential benefits for both the general population and healthcare resources.

  19. Real-time RT-PCR high-resolution melting curve analysis and multiplex RT-PCR to detect and differentiate grapevine leafroll-associated associated virus 3 variant groups I, II, III and VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bester Rachelle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 (GLRaV-3 is the main contributing agent of leafroll disease worldwide. Four of the six GLRaV-3 variant groups known have been found in South Africa, but their individual contribution to leafroll disease is unknown. In order to study the pathogenesis of leafroll disease, a sensitive and accurate diagnostic assay is required that can detect different variant groups of GLRaV-3. Methods In this study, a one-step real-time RT-PCR, followed by high-resolution melting (HRM curve analysis for the simultaneous detection and identification of GLRaV-3 variants of groups I, II, III and VI, was developed. A melting point confidence interval for each variant group was calculated to include at least 90% of all melting points observed. A multiplex RT-PCR protocol was developed to these four variant groups in order to assess the efficacy of the real-time RT-PCR HRM assay. Results A universal primer set for GLRaV-3 targeting the heat shock protein 70 homologue (Hsp70h gene of GLRaV-3 was designed that is able to detect GLRaV-3 variant groups I, II, III and VI and differentiate between them with high-resolution melting curve analysis. The real-time RT-PCR HRM and the multiplex RT-PCR were optimized using 121 GLRaV-3 positive samples. Due to a considerable variation in melting profile observed within each GLRaV-3 group, a confidence interval of above 90% was calculated for each variant group, based on the range and distribution of melting points. The intervals of groups I and II could not be distinguished and a 95% joint confidence interval was calculated for simultaneous detection of group I and II variants. An additional primer pair targeting GLRaV-3 ORF1a was developed that can be used in a subsequent real-time RT-PCR HRM to differentiate between variants of groups I and II. Additionally, the multiplex RT-PCR successfully validated 94.64% of the infections detected with the real-time RT-PCR HRM

  20. Cochrane Qualitative and Implementation Methods Group guidance series-paper 3: methods for assessing methodological limitations, data extraction and synthesis, and confidence in synthesized qualitative findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Jane; Booth, Andrew; Flemming, Kate; Garside, Ruth; Harden, Angela; Lewin, Simon; Pantoja, Tomas; Hannes, Karin; Cargo, Margaret; Thomas, James

    2018-05-01

    The Cochrane Qualitative and Implementation Methods Group develops and publishes guidance on the synthesis of qualitative and mixed-method implementation evidence. Choice of appropriate methodologies, methods, and tools is essential when developing a rigorous protocol and conducting the synthesis. Cochrane authors who conduct qualitative evidence syntheses have thus far used a small number of relatively simple methods to address similarly written questions. Cochrane has invested in methodological work to develop new tools and to encourage the production of exemplar reviews to show the value of more innovative methods that address a wider range of questions. In this paper, in the series, we report updated guidance on the selection of tools to assess methodological limitations in qualitative studies and methods to extract and synthesize qualitative evidence. We recommend application of Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation-Confidence in the Evidence from Qualitative Reviews to assess confidence in qualitative synthesized findings. This guidance aims to support review authors to undertake a qualitative evidence synthesis that is intended to be integrated subsequently with the findings of one or more Cochrane reviews of the effects of similar interventions. The review of intervention effects may be undertaken concurrently with or separate to the qualitative evidence synthesis. We encourage further development through reflection and formal testing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Development and implementation of real-time nucleic acid amplification for the detection of enterovirus infections in comparison to rapid culture of various clinical specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doornum, G J J; Schutten, Martin; Voermans, J; Guldemeester, G J J; Niesters, H G M

    2007-01-01

    Several real-time PCR and nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) primer pairs and a modified real-time PCR primer pair for the detection of enteroviruses were compared. The modified real-time PCR primer pair was evaluated on clinical samples in comparison with cell culture using the

  2. Implementation of a Low-Cost Automated LED Photometer for Enzymatic Reaction Detection to Teach Basic Bioelectronics Technologies in Vocational High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huai-Yi; Nieh, Hwa-Ming; Yang, Ming-Feng; Chou, Yu-Kung; Chung, Jui-Hsu; Liou, Je-Wen

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a home-assembled, low-cost blue light-emitting diode (LED) photometer that uses simple and low-cost hardware and software, costing about US $150. This 425-nm wavelength photometer is controlled by an 89C51 microcontroller chip. Glucose concentration detection experiments involving enzyme coupling reactions were carried out to…

  3. Application of asymmetric mapping and selective filtering (AM and SF) method to Cosmo/SkyMed images by implementation of a selective blocks approach for ship detection optimization in SEASAFE framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreggia, D.; Tataranni, F.; Trivero, P.; Biamino, W.; Di Matteo, L.

    2017-10-01

    We present the implementation of a procedure to adapt an Asymmetric Wiener Filtering (AWF) methodology aimed to detect and discard ghost signal due to azimuth ambiguities in SAR images to the case for X-band Cosmo Sky Med (CSK) images in the framework of SEASAFE (Slick Emissions And Ship Automatic Features Extraction) project, developed at the Department of Science and Technology Innovation of the University of Piemonte Orientale, Alessandria, Italy. SAR is a useful tool to daily and nightly monitoring of the sea surface in all weather conditions. SEASAFE project is a software platform developed in IDL language able to process data in C- Land X-band SAR images with enhanced algorithm modules for land masking, sea pollution (oil spills) and ship detection; wind and wave evaluation are also available. In this contest, the need to individuate and discard false alarms is a critical requirement. The azimuth ambiguity is one of the main causes that generate false alarm in the ship detection procedure. Many methods to face with this problem were proposed and presented in recent literature. After a review of different approach to this problem, we describe the procedure to adapt the AWF approach presented in [1,2] to the case of X-band CSK images by implementing a selective blocks approach.

  4. LAMP-based group specific detection of aflatoxin producers within Aspergillus section Flavi in food raw materials, spices, and dried fruit using neutral red for visible-light signal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Ludwig; Bechtner, Julia; Fodil, Sihem; Taniwaki, Marta H; Vogel, Rudi F

    2018-02-02

    Aflatoxins can be produced by 21 species within sections Flavi (16 species), Ochraceorosei (2), and Nidulantes (3) of the fungal genus Aspergillus. They pose risks to human and animal health due to high toxicity and carcinogenicity. Detecting aflatoxin producers can help to assess toxicological risks associated with contaminated commodities. Species specific molecular assays (PCR and LAMP) are available for detection of major producers, but fail to detect species of minor importance. To enable rapid and sensitive detection of several aflatoxin producing species in a single analysis, a nor1 gene-specific LAMP assay was developed. Specificity testing showed that among 128 fungal species from 28 genera, 15 aflatoxigenic species in section Flavi were detected, including synonyms of A. flavus and A. parasiticus. No cross reactions were found with other tested species. The detection limit of the assay was 9.03pg of A. parasiticus genomic DNA per reaction. Visual detection of positive LAMP reactions under daylight conditions was facilitated using neutral red to allow unambiguous distinction between positive and negative assay results. Application of the assay to the detection of A. parasiticus conidia revealed a detection limit of 211 conidia per reaction after minimal sample preparation. The usefulness of the assay was demonstrated in the analysis of aflatoxinogenic species in samples of rice, nuts, raisins, dried figs, as well as powdered spices. Comparison of LAMP results with presence/absence of aflatoxins and aflatoxin producing fungi in 50 rice samples showed good correlation between these parameters. Our study suggests that the developed LAMP assay is a rapid, sensitive and user-friendly tool for surveillance and quality control in our food industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Potential loss of revenue due to errors in clinical coding during the implementation of the Malaysia diagnosis related group (MY-DRG®) Casemix system in a teaching hospital in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafirah, S A; Nur, Amrizal Muhammad; Puteh, Sharifa Ezat Wan; Aljunid, Syed Mohamed

    2018-01-25

    The accuracy of clinical coding is crucial in the assignment of Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs) codes, especially if the hospital is using Casemix System as a tool for resource allocations and efficiency monitoring. The aim of this study was to estimate the potential loss of income due to an error in clinical coding during the implementation of the Malaysia Diagnosis Related Group (MY-DRG ® ) Casemix System in a teaching hospital in Malaysia. Four hundred and sixty-four (464) coded medical records were selected, re-examined and re-coded by an independent senior coder (ISC). This ISC re-examined and re-coded the error code that was originally entered by the hospital coders. The pre- and post-coding results were compared, and if there was any disagreement, the codes by the ISC were considered the accurate codes. The cases were then re-grouped using a MY-DRG ® grouper to assess and compare the changes in the DRG assignment and the hospital tariff assignment. The outcomes were then verified by a casemix expert. Coding errors were found in 89.4% (415/424) of the selected patient medical records. Coding errors in secondary diagnoses were the highest, at 81.3% (377/464), followed by secondary procedures at 58.2% (270/464), principal procedures of 50.9% (236/464) and primary diagnoses at 49.8% (231/464), respectively. The coding errors resulted in the assignment of different MY-DRG ® codes in 74.0% (307/415) of the cases. From this result, 52.1% (160/307) of the cases had a lower assigned hospital tariff. In total, the potential loss of income due to changes in the assignment of the MY-DRG ® code was RM654,303.91. The quality of coding is a crucial aspect in implementing casemix systems. Intensive re-training and the close monitoring of coder performance in the hospital should be performed to prevent the potential loss of hospital income.

  6. Gas Detection for Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Hay, D

    2001-01-01

    Flammable gases are often used in detectors for physics experiments. The storage, distribution and manipulation of such flammable gases present several safety hazards. As most flammable gases cannot be detected by human senses, specific well-placed gas detection systems must be installed. Following a request from the user group and in collaboration with CERN safety officers, risk analyses are performed. An external contractor, who needs to receive detailed user requirements from CERN, performs the installations. The contract is passed on a guaranteed results basis. Co-ordination between all the CERN groups and verification of the technical installation is done by ST/AA/AS. This paper describes and focuses on the structured methodology applied to implement such installations based on goal directed project management techniques (GDPM). This useful supervision tool suited to small to medium sized projects facilitates the task of co-ordinating numerous activities to achieve a completely functional system.

  7. Diagnostic imaging costs before and after digital tomosynthesis implementation in patient management after detection of suspected thoracic lesions on chest radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaia, Emilio; Grisi, Guido; Baratella, Elisa; Cuttin, Roberto; Poillucci, Gabriele; Kus, Sara; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate diagnostic imaging costs before and after DTS implementation in patients with suspected thoracic lesions on CXR. Four hundred sixty-five patients (263 male, 202 female; age, 72.47 ± 11.33 years) with suspected thoracic lesion(s) after CXR underwent DTS. Each patient underwent CT when a pulmonary non-calcified lesion was identified by DTS while CT was not performed when a benign pulmonary or extrapulmonary lesion or pseudolesion was identified. The average per-patient imaging cost was calculated by normalising the costs before and after DTS implementation. In 229/465 patients who underwent DTS after suspicious CXR, DTS showed 193 pulmonary lesions and 36 pleural lesions, while in the remaining 236/465 patients, lesions were ruled out as pseudolesions of CXR. Chest CT examination was performed in 127/465 (27 %) patients while in the remaining 338/465 patients (73 %) CXR doubtful findings were resolved by DTS. The average per-patient costs of CXR, DTS and CT were 15.15, 41.55 and 113.66. DTS allowed an annual cost saving of 8,090.2 considering unenhanced CT and 19,298.12 considering contrast-enhanced CT. Considering a DTS reimbursement rate of 62.7 the break even point corresponds to 479 DTS examinations. Per-patient diagnostic imaging costs decreased after DTS implementation in patients with suspected thoracic lesions. • Digital tomosynthesis improves the diagnostic accuracy and confidence in chest radiography • Digital tomosynthesis reduces the need for CT for a suspected pulmonary lesion • Digital tomosynthesis requires a dose level equivalent to that of around two chest radiographies • Digital tomosynthesis produces a significant per-patient saving in diagnostic imaging costs.

  8. Determination of biogenic amines in chocolate by ion chromatographic separation and pulsed integrated amperometric detection with implemented wave-form at Au disposable electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Paolo; Favaro, Gabriella; Badocco, Denis; Tapparo, Andrea; Cavalli, Silvano; Saccani, Giovanna

    2005-12-09

    A rapid and selective cation exchange chromatographic method coupled to integrated pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) has been developed to quantify biogenic amines in chocolate. The method is based on gradient elution of aqueous methanesulfonic acid with post column addition of strong base to obtain suitable conditions for amperometric detection. A potential waveform able to keep long time performance of the Au disposable electrode was set up. Total analysis time is less than 20min. Concentration levels of dopamine, serotonin, tyramine, histamine and 2-phenylethylamine were measured, after extraction with perchloric acid from 2g samples previously defatted twice with petroleum ether. The method was used to determine the analytes in chocolate real matrices and their quantification was made with standard addition method. Only dopamine, histamine and serotonin were found in the analysed real samples. Repeatabilities of their signals, computed on their amounts in the real samples, were 5% for all of them. Repeatabilities of tyramine and phenethylamine were relative to standard additions to real samples (close to 1mg/l in the extract) and were 7 and 3%, respectively. Detection limits were computed with the 3s of the baseline noise combined with the calibration plot regression parameters. They were satisfactorily low for all amines: 3mg/kg for dopamine, 2mg/kg for tyramine, 1mg/kg for histamine, 2mg/kg for serotonin, 3mg/kg for 2-phenylethylamine.

  9. Pilot Implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manikas, Maria Ie

    by conducting a literature review. The concept of pilot implementation, although commonly used in practice, is rather disregarded in research. In the literature, pilot implementations are mainly treated as secondary to the learning outcomes and are presented as merely a means to acquire knowledge about a given...... objective. The prevalent understanding is that pilot implementations are an ISD technique that extends prototyping from the lab and into test during real use. Another perception is that pilot implementations are a project multiple of co-existing enactments of the pilot implementation. From this perspective......This PhD dissertation engages in the study of pilot (system) implementation. In the field of information systems, pilot implementations are commissioned as a way to learn from real use of a pilot system with real data, by real users during an information systems development (ISD) project and before...

  10. Wavelet-based peak detection and a new charge inference procedure for MS/MS implemented in ProteoWizard's msConvert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, William R; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Schilling, Birgit; Gibson, Bradford W; Miller, Christine A; Townsend, R Reid; Sherrod, Stacy D; Goodwin, Cody R; McLean, John A; Tabb, David L

    2015-02-06

    We report the implementation of high-quality signal processing algorithms into ProteoWizard, an efficient, open-source software package designed for analyzing proteomics tandem mass spectrometry data. Specifically, a new wavelet-based peak-picker (CantWaiT) and a precursor charge determination algorithm (Turbocharger) have been implemented. These additions into ProteoWizard provide universal tools that are independent of vendor platform for tandem mass spectrometry analyses and have particular utility for intralaboratory studies requiring the advantages of different platforms convergent on a particular workflow or for interlaboratory investigations spanning multiple platforms. We compared results from these tools to those obtained using vendor and commercial software, finding that in all cases our algorithms resulted in a comparable number of identified peptides for simple and complex samples measured on Waters, Agilent, and AB SCIEX quadrupole time-of-flight and Thermo Q-Exactive mass spectrometers. The mass accuracy of matched precursor ions also compared favorably with vendor and commercial tools. Additionally, typical analysis runtimes (∼1-100 ms per MS/MS spectrum) were short enough to enable the practical use of these high-quality signal processing tools for large clinical and research data sets.

  11. Wavelet-Based Peak Detection and a New Charge Inference Procedure for MS/MS Implemented in ProteoWizard’s msConvert

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We report the implementation of high-quality signal processing algorithms into ProteoWizard, an efficient, open-source software package designed for analyzing proteomics tandem mass spectrometry data. Specifically, a new wavelet-based peak-picker (CantWaiT) and a precursor charge determination algorithm (Turbocharger) have been implemented. These additions into ProteoWizard provide universal tools that are independent of vendor platform for tandem mass spectrometry analyses and have particular utility for intralaboratory studies requiring the advantages of different platforms convergent on a particular workflow or for interlaboratory investigations spanning multiple platforms. We compared results from these tools to those obtained using vendor and commercial software, finding that in all cases our algorithms resulted in a comparable number of identified peptides for simple and complex samples measured on Waters, Agilent, and AB SCIEX quadrupole time-of-flight and Thermo Q-Exactive mass spectrometers. The mass accuracy of matched precursor ions also compared favorably with vendor and commercial tools. Additionally, typical analysis runtimes (∼1–100 ms per MS/MS spectrum) were short enough to enable the practical use of these high-quality signal processing tools for large clinical and research data sets. PMID:25411686

  12. DETECTION OF SEROLOGIC ANTIBODIES AGAINST Chlamydophila abortus IN TWO GROUPS OF PEOPLE EXPOSED TO RISK IN OVINE FARMS IN XALATLACO, MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Montes de Oca Jiménez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydophila abortus (Cp. abortus is the bacterial etiologic agent of the ovine enzootic abortion; zoonotic relevance rises during handling of ill animals.  The present work estimates the prevalence of serum antibodies against Cp. abortus in groups of people at risk of infection derived from working activities, and estimates possible risk factors involve in the infection. A transversal study was conducted in two groups of exposed people. In Group A 86 sheep flock owners or workers were included. In Group B 52 veterinary doctors were included. Antibody titers were determined by rELISA assay, additionally it was asked to people sampled to answer a questionnaire to establish risk factors. Overall serum antibody prevalence against Cp. abortus in both groups was 6.52% (IC95%, 3.02-12.01%. According to the risk group, people from group A was 4.45% (IC95% 1.28 – 11.48 and in group B 9.62 (IC95% 3.19 – 21.02, according to gender prevalences were 5.07% (IC95% 1.99 – 11.29and 1.44% for women and men respectively; no differences were found (P>0.05. It is concluded that serum anti Cp. abortus antibody prevalence in relatively low among sheep flock owners, workers and veterinarians and no significant differences were found among possible risk factors.

  13. Investigation of Three-Group Classifiers to Fully Automate Detection and Classification of Breast Lesions in an Intelligent CAD Mammography Workstation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edwards, Darrin C; Metz, Charles E; Giger, Maryellen Lissak

    2007-01-01

    .... We proved that the area under the ROC curve (AUC) is not useful in classification tasks with three or more groups, and showed that the three decision boundary lines used by the three-group ideal observer are intricately related to one another...

  14. Mark Carlton Ellis: "The Effects of Concurrent Music Reading on the Ability of Three Groups of Musicians to Detect Tempo Modulation." A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goolsby, Thomas W.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews and critiques a doctoral dissertation that investigated the ability to detect tempo changes. Points out some omissions in the study, suggesting that its brevity caused the author to omit some possible interpretations. Comments that Ellis' research design provides new ideas for research. (LS)

  15. Detection of Differential Item Functioning on the Kirton Adaption-Innovation Inventory Using Multiple-Group Mean and Covariance Structure Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David

    2000-01-01

    Demonstrates how the mean and covariance structure analysis model of D. Sorbom (1974) can be used to detect uniform and nonuniform differential item functioning (DIF) on polytomous ordered response items assumed to approximate a continuous scale. Uses results from 773 civil service employees administered the Kirton Adaption-Innovation Inventory…

  16. Performance analysis and implementation of proposed mechanism for detection and prevention of security attacks in routing protocols of vehicular ad-hoc network (VANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Tyagi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation communication networks have become widely popular as ad-hoc networks, broadly categorized as the mobile nodes based on mobile ad-hoc networks (MANET and the vehicular nodes based vehicular ad-hoc networks (VANET. VANET is aimed at maintaining safety to vehicle drivers by begin autonomous communication with the nearby vehicles. Each vehicle in the ad-hoc network performs as an intelligent mobile node characterized by high mobility and formation of dynamic networks. The ad-hoc networks are decentralized dynamic networks that need efficient and secure communication requirements due to the vehicles being persistently in motion. These networks are more susceptible to various attacks like Warm Hole attacks, denial of service attacks and Black Hole Attacks. The paper is a novel attempt to examine and investigate the security features of the routing protocols in VANET, applicability of AODV (Ad hoc On Demand protocol to detect and tackle a particular category of network attacks, known as the Black Hole Attacks. A new algorithm is proposed to enhance the security mechanism of AODV protocol and to introduce a mechanism to detect Black Hole Attacks and to prevent the network from such attacks in which source node stores all route replies in a look up table. This table stores the sequences of all route reply, arranged in ascending order using PUSH and POP operations. The priority is calculated based on sequence number and discard the RREP having presumably very high destination sequence number. The result show that proposed algorithm for detection and prevention of Black Hole Attack increases security in Intelligent Transportation System (ITS and reduces the effect of malicious node in the VANET. NCTUNs simulator is used in this research work.

  17. Aims of failed fuel detection and substantiation of radiation safety at implementation of new kinds of nuclear fuel and fuel cycles on NPP with WWER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miglo, V.; Luzanova, L.

    2011-01-01

    Limiting of number of leaking fuel rods in a core during reactor operation in the analyses which are carried out for a substantiation of radiating safety for NPP with WWER as well as problems and possibilities of FFD at implementation of new kinds of fuel and fuel cycles are the main topics discussed in this paper. Available experience of designing of the NPP with WWER shows, that for ensuring of implementation of the RS criteria regarding limiting radioactive emissions from the NPP and doses of an irradiation of the population living near to NPP, it is required to regulate more rigidly number of failed fuel rods in comparison with requirements of Rules of nuclear safety NP-082-07. The reason of it is necessity to consider a technical condition of all safety barriers on a path of radioactive FP extension in a complex, first and foremost of uncontrolled leakage of the primary coolant to the NPP premises and efficiency of filters of ventilating systems, and also spike-effect on activity of isotopes of iodine after a power unit shutdown for fuel reloading and openings of a cover of a reactor. Depending on the project of NPP, parameters of fuel loading, a place of placing of the NPP and other factors the limit level of activity of isotopes of iodine in the primary coolant will be reached at various number of leaking fuel rods which can be unequal for various power units and the NPP with WWER, constructed on one design. The quantity of leaking fuel rods at which the design limit on FP-activity in the primary coolant of operating reactor is reached, can be essential below an operational limit on number of failed fuel rods established by Rules of nuclear safety. However the reached quality of fabrication of the WWER fuel rods providing their high reliability (the probability of fuel rod failure in the course of one operation year is not higher than 10 -5 ) as well as due to the levels of the WWER fuel rod depressurization actually attainable in the normal conditions of

  18. Implementation of leak detection techniques in ducts with critical regimen multiphase flow; Implementacao de tecnicas de deteccao de vazamentos em dutos em regime de escoamento multifasico critico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Rodrigo S.; Maitelli, Andr L.; Doria Neto, Adriao D.; Salazar, Andres O. [Rio Grande do Norte Univ., Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents signals processing techniques and artificial neural networks to identify leaks in multiphase flow pipeline. The greatest difficulty on traditional methods of leak detection (volume balance, pressure point analysis, etc) is that they are insufficient to design an adequate profile for the real conditions of oil pipeline transport. These difficult conditions goes since unevenly soil, that cause columns or vacuum throughout pipelines, until the presence of multi phases like water, gas and oil; plus other components as sand, which use to produce discontinuous flow off and diverse variations. To attenuate these difficulties, the transform wavelet was used to map the signal pressure in different resolution plan allowing the extraction of descriptors that identify leaks patterns and with then to provide training for the neural network multilayer perceptron (MLP) to learning of how to classify this pattern and report whenever this characterize leaks. During the tests were used transient and regime signals and pipelines with punctures with size variations from 1/2'' to 1'' of diameter to simulate leaks and, this way, it was possible to detect leaks with a time window of two minutes. The result show that the proposed descriptors considered, based in statistical methods applied in domain transform, are sufficient to identify leaks patterns and make it possible to train the neural classifier to indicate the occurrence of pipeline leaks. (author)

  19. In-season monitoring of hip and groin strength, health and function in elite youth soccer: Implementing an early detection and management strategy over two consecutive seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollin, Martin; Thorborg, Kristian; Welvaert, Marijke; Pizzari, Tania

    2018-03-14

    The primary purpose of this study was to describe an early detection and management strategy when monitoring in-season hip and groin strength, health and function in soccer. Secondly to compare pre-season to in-season test results. Longitudinal cohort study. Twenty-seven elite male youth soccer players (age: 15.07±0.73years) volunteered to participate in the study. Monitoring tests included: adductor strength, adductor/abductor strength ratio and hip and groin outcome scores (HAGOS). Data were recorded at pre-season and at 22 monthly intervals in-season. Thresholds for alerts to initiate further investigations were defined as any of the following: adductor strength reductions >15%, adductor/abductor strength ratio time-point one (ptime-loss were classified minimal or mild. In-season monitoring aimed at early detection and management of hip and groin strength, health and function appears promising. Hip and groin strength, health and function improved quickly from pre-season to in-season in a high-risk population for ongoing hip and groin problems. Copyright © 2018 Sports Medicine Australia. All rights reserved.

  20. Creativity and group innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijstad, B.A.; de Dreu, C.K.W.

    2002-01-01

    Comments on M. West's article regarding the validity of an integrative model of creativity and innovation implementation in work groups. Variables affecting the level of team innovation; Relationship between predictors and team innovation; Promotion of constructive conflict.

  1. Target-specific NMR detection of protein–ligand interactions with antibody-relayed {sup 15}N-group selective STD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetényi, Anasztázia [University of Szeged, Department of Medical Chemistry (Hungary); Hegedűs, Zsófia [University of Szeged, SZTE-MTA Lendület Foldamer Research Group, Institute of Pharmaceutical Analysis Department (Hungary); Fajka-Boja, Roberta; Monostori, Éva [Biological Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Lymphocyte Signal Transduction Laboratory, Institute of Genetics (Hungary); Kövér, Katalin E. [University of Debrecen, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry (Hungary); Martinek, Tamás A., E-mail: martinek@pharm.u-szeged.hu [University of Szeged, SZTE-MTA Lendület Foldamer Research Group, Institute of Pharmaceutical Analysis Department (Hungary)

    2016-12-15

    Fragment-based drug design has been successfully applied to challenging targets where the detection of the weak protein–ligand interactions is a key element. {sup 1}H saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for this work but it requires pure homogeneous proteins as targets. Monoclonal antibody (mAb)-relayed {sup 15}N-GS STD spectroscopy has been developed to resolve the problem of protein mixtures and impure proteins. A {sup 15}N-labelled target-specific mAb is selectively irradiated and the saturation is relayed through the target to the ligand. Tests on the anti-Gal-1 mAb/Gal-1/lactose system showed that the approach is experimentally feasible in a reasonable time frame. This method allows detection and identification of binding molecules directly from a protein mixture in a multicomponent system.

  2. Implementation of 3D spatial indexing and compression in a large-scale molecular dynamics simulation database for rapid atomic contact detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toofanny, Rudesh D; Simms, Andrew M; Beck, David A C; Daggett, Valerie

    2011-08-10

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations offer the ability to observe the dynamics and interactions of both whole macromolecules and individual atoms as a function of time. Taken in context with experimental data, atomic interactions from simulation provide insight into the mechanics of protein folding, dynamics, and function. The calculation of atomic interactions or contacts from an MD trajectory is computationally demanding and the work required grows exponentially with the size of the simulation system. We describe the implementation of a spatial indexing algorithm in our multi-terabyte MD simulation database that significantly reduces the run-time required for discovery of contacts. The approach is applied to the Dynameomics project data. Spatial indexing, also known as spatial hashing, is a method that divides the simulation space into regular sized bins and attributes an index to each bin. Since, the calculation of contacts is widely employed in the simulation field, we also use this as the basis for testing compression of data tables. We investigate the effects of compression of the trajectory coordinate tables with different options of data and index compression within MS SQL SERVER 2008. Our implementation of spatial indexing speeds up the calculation of contacts over a 1 nanosecond (ns) simulation window by between 14% and 90% (i.e., 1.2 and 10.3 times faster). For a 'full' simulation trajectory (51 ns) spatial indexing reduces the calculation run-time between 31 and 81% (between 1.4 and 5.3 times faster). Compression resulted in reduced table sizes but resulted in no significant difference in the total execution time for neighbour discovery. The greatest compression (~36%) was achieved using page level compression on both the data and indexes. The spatial indexing scheme significantly decreases the time taken to calculate atomic contacts and could be applied to other multidimensional neighbor discovery problems. The speed up enables on-the-fly calculation

  3. Implementation of 3D spatial indexing and compression in a large-scale molecular dynamics simulation database for rapid atomic contact detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toofanny Rudesh D

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular dynamics (MD simulations offer the ability to observe the dynamics and interactions of both whole macromolecules and individual atoms as a function of time. Taken in context with experimental data, atomic interactions from simulation provide insight into the mechanics of protein folding, dynamics, and function. The calculation of atomic interactions or contacts from an MD trajectory is computationally demanding and the work required grows exponentially with the size of the simulation system. We describe the implementation of a spatial indexing algorithm in our multi-terabyte MD simulation database that significantly reduces the run-time required for discovery of contacts. The approach is applied to the Dynameomics project data. Spatial indexing, also known as spatial hashing, is a method that divides the simulation space into regular sized bins and attributes an index to each bin. Since, the calculation of contacts is widely employed in the simulation field, we also use this as the basis for testing compression of data tables. We investigate the effects of compression of the trajectory coordinate tables with different options of data and index compression within MS SQL SERVER 2008. Results Our implementation of spatial indexing speeds up the calculation of contacts over a 1 nanosecond (ns simulation window by between 14% and 90% (i.e., 1.2 and 10.3 times faster. For a 'full' simulation trajectory (51 ns spatial indexing reduces the calculation run-time between 31 and 81% (between 1.4 and 5.3 times faster. Compression resulted in reduced table sizes but resulted in no significant difference in the total execution time for neighbour discovery. The greatest compression (~36% was achieved using page level compression on both the data and indexes. Conclusions The spatial indexing scheme significantly decreases the time taken to calculate atomic contacts and could be applied to other multidimensional neighbor discovery

  4. Conjugated polymer with carboxylate groups-Hg2 + system as a turn-on fluorescence probe for label-free detection of cysteine-containing compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Hongyu; Guan, Mingming; Liu, Jilin; Shan, Hongyan; Fei, Qiang; Huan, Yanfu; Feng, Guodong

    2017-04-01

    In this work, a turn on fluorescent sensor, based on Hg2 + coordination conjugated polymer, was developed to detect cysteine-containing compounds. The fluorescence of conjugated polymer (poly(2,5-bis (sodium 4-oxybutyrate) -1,4 - phenylethynylene-alt-1,4-phenyleneethynylene; PPE-OBS) would be quenched by Hg2 + because of the coordination-induced aggregation and electron transfers of PPE-OBS toward Hg2 +. When there were some cysteine-containing compounds in PPE-OBS-Hg2 + system, the fluorescence of PPE-OBS would be recovered. It indicated that the PPE-OBS-Hg2 + system could be used to detect cysteine-containing compounds. Under the optimized conditions, the experiment results showed that there were particularly linear range, high sensitivity and selectivity over other amino acids. The limit of detection (LOD) of cysteine (Cys), homocysteine (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH) were 0.725 μmol L- 1, 0.982 μmol L- 1 and 1.21 μmol L- 1 by using this sensor. In addition, Cys standard recovery in several green tea drink and honey samples was also demonstrated. The recovery of Cys was range from 96.3 to 105.0% and RSD was less than 3.25%. The satisfactory results demonstrated that the proposed method could be as a potential fluorescent method for determining cysteine-containing compounds in real samples.

  5. Vertical integration of oil groups in gas downstream activities after the deregulation of gas and electricity industries: Determining factors and means of implementation of this strategy. Research report period: October 2000 - September 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benadjaoud, Nawel

    2003-12-01

    After a presentation of some characteristics of gas and electric power industries, and an overview of the process and consequences of the general trend of deregulation in these sectors, the author of this research proposes a contribution to the economic analysis of movements of vertical integration of large oil companies and groups in which downstream gas activities and power activities represent a small fraction of their activities. The objectives of this research were then to understand why oil companies are practising vertical integration on the gas sector, and how these oil companies proceed in terms of organisational means to perform this successful movement of vertical integration. The author addresses theoretical concepts as they are analysed in some theories of the firm. The studied questions are then addressed in the case of some major European oil companies through a detailed examination of all their operations related to the gas downstream activities and to electricity activities, and by examining the most used organisational modes for the implementation of such vertical integrations

  6. Karst Depression Detection Using ASTER, ALOS/PRISM and SRTM-Derived Digital Elevation Models in the Bambuí Group, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmar Abílio de Carvalho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing has been used in karst studies to identify limestone terrain, describe exokarst features, analyze karst depressions, and detect geological structures important to karst development. The aim of this work is to investigate the use of ASTER-, SRTM- and ALOS/PRISM-derived digital elevation models (DEMs to detect and quantify natural karst depressions along the São Francisco River near Barreiras city, northeast Brazil. The study area is a karst landscape characterized by karst depressions (dolines, closed depressions in limestone, many of which contain standing water connected with the ground-water table. The base of dolines is typically sealed with an impermeable clay layer covered by standing water or herbaceous vegetation. We identify dolines by combining the extraction of sink depth from DEMs, morphometric analysis using GIS, and visual interpretation. Our methodology is a semi-automatic approach involving several steps: (a DEM acquisition; (b sink-depth calculation using the difference between the raw DEM and the corresponding DEM with sinks filled; and (c elimination of falsely identified karst depressions using morphometric attributes. The advantages and limitations of the applied methodology using different DEMs are examined by comparison with a sinkhole map generated from traditional geomorphological investigations based on visual interpretation of the high-resolution remote sensing images and field surveys. The threshold values of the depth, area size and circularity index appropriate for distinguishing dolines were identified from the maximum overall accuracy obtained by comparison with a true doline map. Our results indicate that the best performance of the proposed methodology for meso-scale karst feature detection was using ALOS/PRISM data with a threshold depth > 2 m; areas > 13,125 m2 and circularity indexes > 0.3 (overall accuracy of 0.53. The overall correct identification of around half of the true dolines suggests

  7. Implementing a C++ Version of the Joint Seismic-Geodetic Algorithm for Finite-Fault Detection and Slip Inversion for Earthquake Early Warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. E.; Felizardo, C.; Minson, S. E.; Boese, M.; Langbein, J. O.; Guillemot, C.; Murray, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The earthquake early warning (EEW) systems in California and elsewhere can greatly benefit from algorithms that generate estimates of finite-fault parameters. These estimates could significantly improve real-time shaking calculations and yield important information for immediate disaster response. Minson et al. (2015) determined that combining FinDer's seismic-based algorithm (Böse et al., 2012) with BEFORES' geodetic-based algorithm (Minson et al., 2014) yields a more robust and informative joint solution than using either algorithm alone. FinDer examines the distribution of peak ground accelerations from seismic stations and determines the best finite-fault extent and strike from template matching. BEFORES employs a Bayesian framework to search for the best slip inversion over all possible fault geometries in terms of strike and dip. Using FinDer and BEFORES together generates estimates of finite-fault extent, strike, dip, preferred slip, and magnitude. To yield the quickest, most flexible, and open-source version of the joint algorithm, we translated BEFORES and FinDer from Matlab into C++. We are now developing a C++ Application Protocol Interface for these two algorithms to be connected to the seismic and geodetic data flowing from the EEW system. The interface that is being developed will also enable communication between the two algorithms to generate the joint solution of finite-fault parameters. Once this interface is developed and implemented, the next step will be to run test seismic and geodetic data through the system via the Earthworm module, Tank Player. This will allow us to examine algorithm performance on simulated data and past real events.

  8. Development and application of a selective pcr-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis approach to detect a recently cultivated Bacillus group predominant in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzeneva, V.A.; Li, Y.; Felske, A.; Vos, de W.M.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Vaughan, E.E.; Smidt, H.

    2004-01-01

    The worldwide presence of a hitherto-nondescribed group of predominant soil microorganisms related to Bacillus benzoevorans was analyzed after development of two sets of selective primers targeting 16S rRNA genes in combination with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The high abundance

  9. Designing and Implementing an Assay for the Detection of Rare and Divergent NRPS and PKS Clones in European, Antarctic and Cuban Soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory C A Amos

    Full Text Available The ever increasing microbial resistome means there is an urgent need for new antibiotics. Metagenomics is an underexploited tool in the field of drug discovery. In this study we aimed to produce a new updated assay for the discovery of biosynthetic gene clusters encoding bioactive secondary metabolites. PCR assays targeting the polyketide synthases (PKS and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS were developed. A range of European soils were tested for their biosynthetic potential using clone libraries developed from metagenomic DNA. Results revealed a surprising number of NRPS and PKS clones with similarity to rare Actinomycetes. Many of the clones tested were phylogenetically divergent suggesting they were fragments from novel NRPS and PKS gene clusters. Soils did not appear to cluster by location but did represent NRPS and PKS clones of diverse taxonomic origin. Fosmid libraries were constructed from Cuban and Antarctic soil samples; 17 fosmids were positive for NRPS domains suggesting a hit rate of less than 1 in 10 genomes. NRPS hits had low similarities to both rare Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria; they also clustered with known antibiotic producers suggesting they may encode for pathways producing novel bioactive compounds. In conclusion we designed an assay capable of detecting divergent NRPS and PKS gene clusters from the rare biosphere; when tested on soil samples results suggest the majority of NRPS and PKS pathways and hence bioactive metabolites are yet to be discovered.

  10. Using group-specific PCR to detect predation of mayflies (Ephemeroptera) by wolf spiders (Lycosidae) at a mercury-contaminated site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, Weston T; Allison, Lizabeth A; Cristol, Daniel A

    2012-02-01

    Bioaccumulation of contaminants can occur across ecosystem boundaries via transport by emergent aquatic insects. In the South River, Virginia, USA, aquatic mercury has contaminated songbirds nesting in adjacent riparian forests. Spiders contribute the majority of mercury to these songbirds' diets. We tested the hypothesis that massive annual mayfly emergences provide a vector for mercury from river sediments to the Lycosid spiders most frequently eaten by contaminated songbirds. We designed mayfly-specific PCR primers that amplified mtDNA from 76% of adult mayflies collected at this site. By combining this approach with an Agilent 2100 electrophoresis system, we created a highly sensitive test for mayfly predation by Lycosids, commonly known as wolf spiders. In laboratory spider feeding trials, mayfly DNA could be detected up to 192h post-ingestion; however, we detected no mayfly predation in a sample of 110 wolf spiders collected at the site during mayfly emergence. We suggest that mayfly predation is not an important mechanism for dietary transfer of mercury to wolf spiders and their avian predators at the South River. Instead, floodplain soil should be considered as a potential proximate source for mercury in the terrestrial food web. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Detection of B. fragilis group and diversity of bft enterotoxin and antibiotic resistance markers cepA, cfiA and nim among intestinal Bacteroides fragilis strains in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidan, Marjan; Azimirad, Masoumeh; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Ghobakhlou, Mehdi; Asadzadeh Aghdaei, Hamid; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2018-04-01

    We compared frequency of the members of B. fragilis group in 100 and 20 colon biopsy specimens of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and non-IBD patients. Agar dilution and PCR were orderly used to detect minimal inhibitory concentration of ampicillin, imipenem, and metronidazole, and carriage of related resistance genes cepA, cfi, and nim. B. fragilis group was detected in 38% of IBD (UC: 36/89; CD:1/11) and 25% (5/20) of non-IBD patients. While B. vulgatus (UC: 20/36, CD: 1/2, control: 1/6); B. fragilis (UC: 18/36, CD: 1/2, control: 5/6); B. ovatus (UC: 2/36); B. caccae (UC: 1/36); and B. eggerthii (UC: 1/36) were characterized, colonization of B. thetaiotamicron, B. merdae, B. distasonis, B. stercoris and B. dorei species was not detected in these specimens. Co-existence of B. fragilis + B. vulgatus (5 patients) and B. vulgatus + B. caccae (1 patient) was detected just in UC patients. bft was detected among 31.5% (6/19) of B. fragilis strains in the IBD and 40% (2/5) in the non-IBD groups. Nearly, 73.6% of the strains from the patient group and 80% in control group harbored cepA; 31.5% and 20% in the patients and control groups harbored cfiA, and none of them harbored nim determinant. Co-occurrence of the cepA and cfiA was orderly detected in 10.5% (2/19) and 20% (1/5) of the strains in these groups. The resistance rates were detected as 95.8% (23/24 (to ampicillin (MIC range of ≤0.5-≥16 μg/ml), 0% to metronidazole and 29.1% to imipenem (7/24, MIC range ≤4-32 μg/ml). Nearly 25% (6/24) of the strains were resistant to ampicillin and imipenem, simultaneously. No statistically significant difference was detected between the IBD and control groups for drug resistance phenotypes. Statistical analysis showed significant associations between resistance to ampicillin or imipenem and carriage of cepA or cfiA, respectively (p value = 0.0007). PCR results on the extracted plasmids confirmed their roles in carriage of cfiA and cepA. These

  12. The Oryctes virus: its detection, identification, and implementation in biological control of the coconut palm rhinoceros beetle, Oryctes rhinoceros (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huger, Alois M

    2005-05-01

    In view of the increasing and devastating damage by rhinoceros beetle (Oryctes rhinoceros) to coconut palms in the middle of last century, many efforts were made to find an efficient natural control factor against this pest, which could not be controlled by pesticides. The basic procedures of these monitoring programmes are outlined together with the final detection of a virus disease in oil palm estates in Malaysia in 1963. In extensive laboratory studies, the virus was isolated and identified as the first non-occluded, rod-shaped insect virus, morphologically resembling the baculoviruses. Infection experiments clarified the pathology, histopathology, and virulence of the virus and demonstrated that the virus was extremely virulent to larvae after peroral application. These findings encouraged the first pilot release of virus in 1967 in coconut plantations of Western Samoa where breeding sites were contaminated with virus. Surprisingly, the virus became established in the Samoan rhinoceros beetle populations and spread autonomously throughout the Western Samoan islands. As a consequence, there was a drastic decline of the beetle populations followed by a conspicuous recovery of the badly damaged coconut stands. This unexpected phenomenon could only be explained after it was shown that the adult beetle itself is a very active virus vector and thus was responsible for the efficient autodissemination of the virus. The functioning of the beetle as a 'flying virus factory' is due to the unique cytopathic process developing in the midgut after peroral virus infection. Pathological details of this process are presented. Because of the long-term persistence of the virus in the populations, rhinoceros beetle control is maintained. Incorporation of virus into integrated control measures and successful virus releases in many other countries are recorded.

  13. Treaty implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper touches on three aspects of the relationship between intelligence and treaty implementation, a two-way association. First the author discusses the role of intelligence as a basis for compliance monitoring and treaty verification. Second the authors discusses payoffs of intelligence gathering and the intelligence process of treaty implementation, in particular on-site inspection. Third, the author goes in another direction and discusses some of the tensions between the intelligence gathering and treaty-implementation processes, especially with regard to extensive use of on-site inspection, such as we are likely to see in monitoring compliance of future arms control treaties

  14. Detecting Treatment Group Differences in Alzheimer's Disease Clinical Trials: A Comparison of Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-Cog) and the Clinical Dementia Rating - Sum of Boxes (CDR-SB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, A M; Dowsett, S A; Sims, J R

    2018-01-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale's cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) has been widely used as an outcome measure in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) clinical trials. In its original form (ADAS-Cog11), the scale has been used successfully in mild-to-moderate AD dementia populations, but its use is more limited in the study of earlier disease (mild cognitive impairment [MCI] or mild dementia due to AD) owing to lack of appropriate sensitivity of some items. With recent focus on earlier treatment, efforts have focused on the development of more sensitive tools, including the Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (CDR-SB), a global assessment tool to evaluate both cognition and function. The ability of the ADAS-Cog and CDR-SB to detect treatment group differences in the clinical trial environment has not been systematically studied. The aim of this analysis was to compare the utility of these tools in detecting treatment group differences, by reviewing study findings identified through advanced searches of clinicaltrials.gov and Ovid, and press releases and scientific presentations. Findings from placebo-controlled studies of ≥ 6m duration and enrolling >100 participants were included; reporting of both the ADAS-Cog and CDR-SB at endpoint was also a requirement. Of the >300 records identified, 34 studies fulfilled the criteria. There were significant placebo versus active drug group differences based on findings from at least one measure for 14 studies. The ADAS-Cog detected treatment differences more frequently than the CDR-SB. Based on these and previously published findings, the ADAS-Cog appears more useful than the CDR-SB in detecting treatment group differences.

  15. High similarity of Trypanosoma cruzi kDNA genetic profiles detected by LSSP-PCR within family groups in an endemic area of Chagas disease in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Maria Alkmim-Oliveira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Determining the genetic similarities among Trypanosoma cruzi populations isolated from different hosts and vectors is very important to clarify the epidemiology of Chagas disease. Methods An epidemiological study was conducted in a Brazilian endemic area for Chagas disease, including 76 chronic chagasic individuals (96.1% with an indeterminate form; 46.1% with positive hemoculture. Results T. cruzi I (TcI was isolated from one child and TcII was found in the remaining (97.1% subjects. Low-stringency single-specific-primer-polymerase chain reaction (LSSP-PCR showed high heterogeneity among TcII populations (46% of shared bands; however, high similarities (80-100% among pairs of mothers/children, siblings, or cousins were detected. Conclusions LSSP-PCR showed potential for identifying similar parasite populations among individuals with close kinship in epidemiological studies of Chagas disease.

  16. Simplifying consent for HIV testing is associated with an increase in HIV testing and case detection in highest risk groups, San Francisco January 2003-June 2007.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola M Zetola

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Populations at highest risk for HIV infection face multiple barriers to HIV testing. To facilitate HIV testing procedures, the San Francisco General Hospital Medical Center eliminated required written patient consent for HIV testing in its medical settings in May 2006. To describe the change in HIV testing rates in different hospital settings and populations after the change in HIV testing policy in the SFDH medical center, we performed an observational study using interrupted time series analysis.Data from all patients aged 18 years and older seen from January 2003 through June 2007 at the San Francisco Department of Public Health (SFDPH medical care system were included in the analysis. The monthly HIV testing rate per 1000 had patient-visits was calculated for the overall population and stratified by hospital setting, age, sex, race/ethnicity, homelessness status, insurance status and primary language.By June 2007, the average monthly rate of HIV tests per 1000 patient-visits increased 4.38 (CI, 2.17-6.60, p<0.001 over the number predicted if the policy change had not occurred (representing a 44% increase. The monthly average number of new positive HIV tests increased from 8.9 (CI, 6.3-11.5 to 14.9 (CI, 10.6-19.2, p<0.001, representing a 67% increase. Although increases in HIV testing were seen in all populations, populations at highest risk for HIV infection, particularly men, the homeless, and the uninsured experienced the highest increases in monthly HIV testing rates after the policy change.The elimination of the requirement for written consent in May 2006 was associated with a significant and sustained increase in HIV testing rates and HIV case detection in the SFDPH medical center. Populations facing the higher barriers to HIV testing had the highest increases in HIV testing rates and case detection in response to the policy change.

  17. Group Work. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Karen

    2010-01-01

    According to Johnson and Johnson, group work helps increase student retention and satisfaction, develops strong oral communication and social skills, as well as higher self-esteem (University of Minnesota, n.d.). Group work, when planned and implemented deliberately and thoughtfully helps students develop cognitive and leadership skills as well as…

  18. Group purchasing: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetrich, J G

    1987-07-01

    The various types and operational methods of purchasing groups are described, and evaluation of groups is discussed. Since group purchasing is increasing in popularity as a method of controlling drug costs, community and hospital pharmacy managers may need to evaluate various groups to determine the appropriateness of their services. Groups are categorized as independent, system based, or alliance or association based. Instead of "purchasing," some groups develop contracts for hospitals, which then purchase directly from the vendor. Aside from this basic difference between groups that purchase and groups that contract, comparisons among groups are difficult because of the wide variation in sizes and services. Competition developing from diversification among groups has led to "super groups," formed from local and regional groups. In evaluating groups, advantages and disadvantages germane to accomplishing the member's objectives must be considered. To ensure a group's success, members must be committed and support the group's philosophies; hospital pharmacists must help to establish a strong formulary system. To select vendors, groups should develop formal qualification and selection criteria and should not base a decision solely on price. The method of solicitation (bidding or negotiating), as well as the role of the prime vendor, should be studied. Legal implications of group purchasing, especially in the areas of administrative fees and drug diversion, must also be considered. The most advantageous group for each organization will include members with common missions and will be able to implement strategies for future success.

  19. The Prevalence, Correlates, Detection and Control of Diabetes among Older People in Low and Middle Income Countries. A 10/66 Dementia Research Group Population-Based Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquiles Salas

    Full Text Available Little is known of the epidemiology of diabetes among older people in low and middle income countries. We aimed to study and compare prevalence, social patterning, correlates, detection, treatment and control of diabetes among older people in Latin America, India, China and Nigeria.Cross-sectional surveys in 13 catchment area sites in nine countries. Diagnosed diabetes was assessed in all sites through self-reported diagnosis. Undiagnosed diabetes was assessed in seven Latin American sites through fasting blood samples (glucose > = 7 mmol/L.Total diabetes prevalence in catchment sites in Cuba (prevalence 24.2%, SMR 116, Puerto Rico (43.4%, 197, and urban (27.0%, 125, and rural Mexico (23.7%, 111 already exceeds that in the USA, while that in Venezuela (20.9%, 100 is similar. Diagnosed diabetes prevalence varied very widely, between low prevalences in sites in rural China (0.9%, rural India (6.6% and Nigeria (6.0%. and 32.1% in Puerto Rico, explained mainly by access to health services. Treatment coverage varied substantially between sites. Diabetes control (40 to 61% of those diagnosed was modest in the Latin American sites where this was studied. Diabetes was independently associated with less education, but more assets. Hypertension, central obesity and hypertriglyceridaemia, but not hypercholesterolaemia were consistently associated with total diabetes.Diabetes prevalence is already high in most sites. Identifying undiagnosed cases is essential to quantify population burden, particularly in least developed settings where diagnosis is uncommon. Metabolic risk factors and associated lifestyles may play an important part in aetiology, but this requires confirmation with longitudinal data. Given the high prevalence among older people, more population research is indicated to quantify the impact of diabetes, and to monitor the effect of prevention and health system strengthening on prevalence, treatment and control.

  20. The Prevalence, Correlates, Detection and Control of Diabetes among Older People in Low and Middle Income Countries. A 10/66 Dementia Research Group Population-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Aquiles; Acosta, Daisy; Ferri, Cleusa P; Guerra, Mariella; Huang, Yueqin; Jacob, K S; Jimenez-Velazquez, Ivonne Z; Llibre Rodriguez, Juan J; Sosa, Ana L; Uwakwe, Richard; Williams, Joseph D; Jotheeswaran, A T; Liu, Zhaorui; Lopez Medina, A M; Salinas-Contreras, Rosa Maria; Prince, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Little is known of the epidemiology of diabetes among older people in low and middle income countries. We aimed to study and compare prevalence, social patterning, correlates, detection, treatment and control of diabetes among older people in Latin America, India, China and Nigeria. Cross-sectional surveys in 13 catchment area sites in nine countries. Diagnosed diabetes was assessed in all sites through self-reported diagnosis. Undiagnosed diabetes was assessed in seven Latin American sites through fasting blood samples (glucose > = 7 mmol/L). Total diabetes prevalence in catchment sites in Cuba (prevalence 24.2%, SMR 116), Puerto Rico (43.4%, 197), and urban (27.0%, 125), and rural Mexico (23.7%, 111) already exceeds that in the USA, while that in Venezuela (20.9%, 100) is similar. Diagnosed diabetes prevalence varied very widely, between low prevalences in sites in rural China (0.9%), rural India (6.6%) and Nigeria (6.0%). and 32.1% in Puerto Rico, explained mainly by access to health services. Treatment coverage varied substantially between sites. Diabetes control (40 to 61% of those diagnosed) was modest in the Latin Americ