WorldWideScience

Sample records for detailed ray-tracing simulation

  1. Adaptive image ray-tracing for astrophysical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, E R

    2010-01-01

    A technique is presented for producing synthetic images from numerical simulations whereby the image resolution is adapted around prominent features. In so doing, adaptive image ray-tracing (AIR) improves the efficiency of a calculation by focusing computational effort where it is needed most. The results of test calculations show that a factor of >~ 4 speed-up, and a commensurate reduction in the number of pixels required in the final image, can be achieved compared to an equivalent calculation with a fixed resolution image.

  2. MCViNE -- An object oriented Monte Carlo neutron ray tracing simulation package

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Jiao Y Y; Granroth, Garrett E; Abernathy, Douglas L; Lumsden, Mark D; Winn, Barry; Aczel, Adam A; Aivazis, Michael; Fultz, Brent

    2015-01-01

    MCViNE (Monte-Carlo VIrtual Neutron Experiment) is a versatile Monte Carlo (MC) neutron ray-tracing program that provides researchers with tools for performing computer modeling and simulations that mirror real neutron scattering experiments. By adopting modern software engineering practices such as using composite and visitor design patterns for representing and accessing neutron scatterers, and using recursive algorithms for multiple scattering, MCViNE is flexible enough to handle sophisticated neutron scattering problems including, for example, neutron detection by complex detector systems, and single and multiple scattering events in a variety of samples and sample environments. In addition, MCViNE can take advantage of simulation components in linear-chain-based MC ray tracing packages widely used in instrument design and optimization, as well as NumPy-based components that make prototypes useful and easy to develop. These developments have enabled us to carry out detailed simulations of neutron scatteri...

  3. Spin tracking simulations in AGS based on ray-tracing methods - bare lattice, no snakes -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meot, F.; Ahrens, L.; Gleen, J.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-09-01

    This Note reports on the first simulations of and spin dynamics in the AGS using the ray-tracing code Zgoubi. It includes lattice analysis, comparisons with MAD, DA tracking, numerical calculation of depolarizing resonance strengths and comparisons with analytical models, etc. It also includes details on the setting-up of Zgoubi input data files and on the various numerical methods of concern in and available from Zgoubi. Simulations of crossing and neighboring of spin resonances in AGS ring, bare lattice, without snake, have been performed, in order to assess the capabilities of Zgoubi in that matter, and are reported here. This yields a rather long document. The two main reasons for that are, on the one hand the desire of an extended investigation of the energy span, and on the other hand a thorough comparison of Zgoubi results with analytical models as the 'thin lens' approximation, the weak resonance approximation, and the static case. Section 2 details the working hypothesis : AGS lattice data, formulae used for deriving various resonance related quantities from the ray-tracing based 'numerical experiments', etc. Section 3 gives inventories of the intrinsic and imperfection resonances together with, in a number of cases, the strengths derived from the ray-tracing. Section 4 gives the details of the numerical simulations of resonance crossing, including behavior of various quantities (closed orbit, synchrotron motion, etc.) aimed at controlling that the conditions of particle and spin motions are correct. In a similar manner Section 5 gives the details of the numerical simulations of spin motion in the static case: fixed energy in the neighboring of the resonance. In Section 6, weak resonances are explored, Zgoubi results are compared with the Fresnel integrals model. Section 7 shows the computation of the {rvec n} vector in the AGS lattice and tuning considered. Many details on the numerical conditions as data files etc. are given in the

  4. Integrated ray tracing simulation of spectral bio-signatures from full 3D earth model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Dongok; Seong, Sehyun; Lee, Jae-Min; Hong, Jinsuk; Jeong, Soomin; Jeong, Yukyeong; Kim, Sug-Whan

    2009-08-01

    Accurate identification and understanding of spectral bio-signatures from possible extra terrestrial planets have received an ever increasing attention from both astronomy and space science communities in recent years. In pursuance of this subject, one of the most important scientific breakthroughs would be to obtain the detailed understanding on spectral biosignatures of the Earth, as it serves as a reference datum for accurate interpretation of collapsed (in temporal and spatial domains) information from the spectral measurement using TPF instruments. We report a new Integrated Ray Tracing (IRT) model capable of computing various spectral bio-signatures as they are observed from the Earth surface. The model includes the Sun, the full 3-D Earth, and an optical instrument, all combined into single ray tracing environment in real scale. In particular, the full 3-D Earth surface is constructed from high resolution coastal line data and defined with realistic reflectance and BSDF characteristics depending on wavelength, vegetation types and their distributions. We first examined the model validity by confirming the imaging and radiometric performance of the AmonRa visible channel camera, simulating the Earth observation from the L1 halo orbit. We then computed disk averaged spectra, light curves and NDVI indexes, leading to the construction of the observed disk averaged spectra at the AmonRa instrument detector plane. The model, computational procedure and the simulation results are presented. The future plan for the detailed spectral signature simulation runs for various input conditions including seasonal vegetation changes and variable cloud covers is discussed.

  5. MCViNE - An object oriented Monte Carlo neutron ray tracing simulation package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiao Y. Y.; Smith, Hillary L.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Winn, Barry; Aczel, Adam A.; Aivazis, Michael; Fultz, Brent

    2016-02-01

    MCViNE (Monte-Carlo VIrtual Neutron Experiment) is an open-source Monte Carlo (MC) neutron ray-tracing software for performing computer modeling and simulations that mirror real neutron scattering experiments. We exploited the close similarity between how instrument components are designed and operated and how such components can be modeled in software. For example we used object oriented programming concepts for representing neutron scatterers and detector systems, and recursive algorithms for implementing multiple scattering. Combining these features together in MCViNE allows one to handle sophisticated neutron scattering problems in modern instruments, including, for example, neutron detection by complex detector systems, and single and multiple scattering events in a variety of samples and sample environments. In addition, MCViNE can use simulation components from linear-chain-based MC ray tracing packages which facilitates porting instrument models from those codes. Furthermore it allows for components written solely in Python, which expedites prototyping of new components. These developments have enabled detailed simulations of neutron scattering experiments, with non-trivial samples, for time-of-flight inelastic instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source. Examples of such simulations for powder and single-crystal samples with various scattering kernels, including kernels for phonon and magnon scattering, are presented. With simulations that closely reproduce experimental results, scattering mechanisms can be turned on and off to determine how they contribute to the measured scattering intensities, improving our understanding of the underlying physics.

  6. Ray tracing simulation of aero-optical effect using multiple gradient index layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Seul Ki; Seong, Sehyun; Ryu, Dongok; Kim, Sug-Whan; Kwon, Hyeuknam; Jin, Sang-Hun; Jeong, Ho; Kong, Hyun Bae; Lim, Jae Wan; Choi, Jong Hwa

    2016-10-01

    We present a new ray tracing simulation of aero-optical effect through anisotropic inhomogeneous media as supersonic flow field surrounds a projectile. The new method uses multiple gradient-index (GRIN) layers for construction of the anisotropic inhomogeneous media and ray tracing simulation. The cone-shaped projectile studied has 19° semi-vertical angle; a sapphire window is parallel to the cone angle; and an optical system of the projectile was assumed via paraxial optics and infrared image detector. The condition for the steady-state solver conducted through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) included Mach numbers 4 and 6 in speed, 25 km altitude, and 0° angle of attack (AoA). The grid refractive index of the flow field via CFD analysis and Gladstone-Dale relation was discretized into equally spaced layers which are parallel with the projectile's window. Each layer was modeled as a form of 2D polynomial by fitting the refractive index distribution. The light source of ray set generated 3,228 rays for varying line of sight (LOS) from 10° to 40°. Ray tracing simulation adopted the Snell's law in 3D to compute the paths of skew rays in the GRIN layers. The results show that optical path difference (OPD) and boresight error (BSE) decreases exponentially as LOS increases. The variation of refractive index decreases, as the speed of flow field increases the OPD and its rate of decay at Mach number 6 in speed has somewhat larger value than at Mach number 4 in speed. Compared with the ray equation method, at Mach number 4 and 10° LOS, the new method shows good agreement, generated 0.33% of relative root-mean-square (RMS) OPD difference and 0.22% of relative BSE difference. Moreover, the simulation time of the new method was more than 20,000 times faster than the conventional ray equation method. The technical detail of the new method and simulation is presented with results and implication.

  7. Investigation of propagation algorithms for ray-tracing simulation of polarized neutrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergbäck Knudsen, Erik; Tranum-Rømer, A.; Willendrup, Peter Kjær

    2014-01-01

    Ray-tracing of polarized neutrons faces a challenge when the neutron propagates through an inhomogeneous magnetic field. This affects simulations of novel instruments using encoding of energy or angle into the neutron spin. We here present a new implementation of propagation of polarized neutrons...

  8. Ray-tracing simulations of liquid-crystal gradient-index lenses for three-dimensional displays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijter, M.; Herzog, A.; De Boer, D.K.G.; Krijn, M.P.C.M.; Urbach, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    For the first time, to our knowledge, we report ray-tracing simulations of an advanced liquid-crystal gradientindex lens structure for application in switchable two-dimensional/three-dimensional (3D) autostereoscopic displays. We present ray-tracing simulations of the angular-dependent lens action.

  9. RAY-RAMSES: a code for ray tracing on the fly in N-body simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Barreira, Alexandre; Bose, Sownak; Li, Baojiu

    2016-01-01

    We present a ray tracing code to compute integrated cosmological observables on the fly in AMR N-body simulations. Unlike conventional ray tracing techniques, our code takes full advantage of the time and spatial resolution attained by the N-body simulation by computing the integrals along the line of sight on a cell-by-cell basis through the AMR simulation grid. Moroever, since it runs on the fly in the N-body run, our code can produce maps of the desired observables without storing large (or any) amounts of data for post-processing. We implemented our routines in the RAMSES N-body code and tested the implementation using an example of weak lensing simulation. We analyse basic statistics of lensing convergence maps and find good agreement with semi-analytical methods. The ray tracing methodology presented here can be used in several cosmological analysis such as Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect studies as well as modified gravity. Our code can also be used in cross-checks of the more conv...

  10. Effective algorithm for ray-tracing simulations of lobster eye and similar reflective optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichý, Vladimír; Hudec, René; Němcová, Šárka

    2016-06-01

    The algorithm presented is intended mainly for lobster eye optics. This type of optics (and some similar types) allows for a simplification of the classical ray-tracing procedure that requires great many rays to simulate. The method presented performs the simulation of a only few rays; therefore it is extremely effective. Moreover, to simplify the equations, a specific mathematical formalism is used. Only a few simple equations are used, therefore the program code can be simple as well. The paper also outlines how to apply the method to some other reflective optical systems.

  11. Comparing FDTD and Ray-Tracing Models in Numerical Simulation of HgCdTe LWIR Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallone, Marco; Goano, Michele; Bertazzi, Francesco; Ghione, Giovanni; Schirmacher, Wilhelm; Hanna, Stefan; Figgemeier, Heinrich

    2016-09-01

    We present a simulation study of HgCdTe-based long-wavelength infrared detectors, focusing on methodological comparisons between the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and ray-tracing optical models. We performed three-dimensional simulations to determine the absorbed photon density distributions and the corresponding photocurrent and quantum efficiency spectra of isolated n-on- p uniform-composition pixels, systematically comparing the results obtained with FDTD and ray tracing. Since ray tracing is a classical optics approach, unable to describe interference effects, its applicability has been found to be strongly wavelength dependent, especially when reflections from metallic layers are relevant. Interesting cavity effects around the material cutoff wavelength are described, and the cases where ray tracing can be considered a viable approximation are discussed.

  12. Numerical simulation and comparison of nonlinear self-focusing based on iteration and ray tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaotong; Chen, Hao; Wang, Weiwei; Ruan, Wangchao; Zhang, Luwei; Cen, Zhaofeng

    2017-05-01

    Self-focusing is observed in nonlinear materials owing to the interaction between laser and matter when laser beam propagates. Some of numerical simulation strategies such as the beam propagation method (BPM) based on nonlinear Schrödinger equation and ray tracing method based on Fermat's principle have applied to simulate the self-focusing process. In this paper we present an iteration nonlinear ray tracing method in that the nonlinear material is also cut into massive slices just like the existing approaches, but instead of paraxial approximation and split-step Fourier transform, a large quantity of sampled real rays are traced step by step through the system with changing refractive index and laser intensity by iteration. In this process a smooth treatment is employed to generate a laser density distribution at each slice to decrease the error caused by the under-sampling. The characteristics of this method is that the nonlinear refractive indices of the points on current slice are calculated by iteration so as to solve the problem of unknown parameters in the material caused by the causal relationship between laser intensity and nonlinear refractive index. Compared with the beam propagation method, this algorithm is more suitable for engineering application with lower time complexity, and has the calculation capacity for numerical simulation of self-focusing process in the systems including both of linear and nonlinear optical media. If the sampled rays are traced with their complex amplitudes and light paths or phases, it will be possible to simulate the superposition effects of different beam. At the end of the paper, the advantages and disadvantages of this algorithm are discussed.

  13. Atomic detail visualization of photosynthetic membranes with GPU-accelerated ray tracing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, John E.; Sener, Melih; Vandivort, Kirby L.; Barragan, Angela; Singharoy, Abhishek; Teo, Ivan; Ribeiro, João V.; Isralewitz, Barry; Liu, Bo; Goh, Boon Chong; Phillips, James C.; MacGregor-Chatwin, Craig; Johnson, Matthew P.; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Hunter, C. Neil; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    The cellular process responsible for providing energy for most life on Earth, namely, photosynthetic light-harvesting, requires the cooperation of hundreds of proteins across an organelle, involving length and time scales spanning several orders of magnitude over quantum and classical regimes. Simulation and visualization of this fundamental energy conversion process pose many unique methodological and computational challenges. We present, in two accompanying movies, light-harvesting in the photosynthetic apparatus found in purple bacteria, the so-called chromatophore. The movies are the culmination of three decades of modeling efforts, featuring the collaboration of theoretical, experimental, and computational scientists. We describe the techniques that were used to build, simulate, analyze, and visualize the structures shown in the movies, and we highlight cases where scientific needs spurred the development of new parallel algorithms that efficiently harness GPU accelerators and petascale computers.

  14. a Highly-Accurate and Fast Ray Tracing Sysyem for HF and UHF Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. C.; Richards, G. P.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate and fast ray tracing is critical for radiowave propagation tools and applications. A ray tracer needs to be accurate to reduce accumulated errors which come from the myriad of models (ionospheric electron density, magnetic field, ion density, neutral molecule density, absorption, land surface, ocean surface, and potentially others) required for accurate simulation. A ray tracer must also be fast to make the use of applications practical. Here we introduce NINJART Is Not Just Another Ray Tracer (NINJART), a highly accurate and fast ray tracing system. NINJART consists of an embarrassingly parallel algorithm rigorously solving the 3-D Hasselgrove equations with a Runge-Kutta adaptive step quadrature rule to accurately trace high frequency to ultra-high frequency radiowaves. It is capable of a wide range of propagation modes from multi-ground hops to vertical and near vertical incidence rays, chordal modes, and other esoteric paths. It is capable of using a variety of ionospheric models to include operational data assimilative or empirical models depending on the needs of the user. It can forward and backward ray trace, calculate time of flight, find the focus factor for signals near the skip zone and calculate the angle of arrival from a known transmitter to a known receiver location. Additionally NINJART uses magnetic field data from various models including the International Geomagnetic Reference Field to reduce the inaccuracies introduced by the simple dipole model, which is commonly used by other ray tracers, in calculating the effects of magneto-ionic splitting thereby allowing accurate traces of both the ordinary and extraordinary mode rays. The NINJART algorithm is a heterogeneous system utilizing the CUDA programming language to take advantage of the computing power of graphical processing units. This allows tracing of thousands of rays concurrently. NINJART achieves additional processing savings, without sacrificing accuracy, by use of an adaptive

  15. ROBAST: Development of a Non-Sequential Ray-Tracing Simulation Library and its Applications in the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a non-sequential ray-tracing simulation library, ROot-BAsed Simulator for ray Tracing (ROBAST), which is aimed for wide use in optical simulations of cosmic-ray (CR) and gamma-ray telescopes. The library is written in C++ and fully utilizes the geometry library of the ROOT analysis framework. Despite the importance of optics simulations in CR experiments, no open-source software for ray-tracing simulations that can be widely used existed. To reduce the unnecessary effort demanded when different research groups develop multiple ray-tracing simulators, we have successfully used ROBAST for many years to perform optics simulations for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Among the proposed telescope designs for CTA, ROBAST is currently being used for three telescopes: a Schwarzschild--Couder telescope, one of the Schwarzschild--Couder small-sized telescopes, and a large-sized telescope (LST). ROBAST is also used for the simulations and the development of hexagonal light concentrators that has be...

  16. Advanced simulations of x-ray beam propagation through CRL transfocators using ray-tracing and wavefront propagation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baltser, Jana; Bergbäck Knudsen, Erik; Vickery, Anette

    2011-01-01

    of X-ray beamline designs for particular user experiments. In this work we used the newly developed McXtrace ray-tracing package and the SRW wave-optics code to simulate the beam propagation of X-ray undulator radiation through such a "transfocator" as implemented at ID- 11 at ESRF. By applying two...

  17. Monte Carlo ray-tracing simulations of luminescent solar concentrators for building integrated photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, Shin Woei; Corrado, Carley; Osborn, Melissa; Carter, Sue A.

    2013-09-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) have the ability to receive light from a wide range of angles, concentrating the captured light onto small photo active areas. This enables greater incorporation of LSCs into building designs as windows, skylights and wall claddings in addition to rooftop installations of current solar panels. Using relatively cheap luminescent dyes and acrylic waveguides to effect light concentration onto lesser photovoltaic (PV) cells, there is potential for this technology to approach grid price parity. We employ a panel design in which the front facing PV cells collect both direct and concentrated light ensuring a gain factor greater than one. This also allows for flexibility in determining the placement and percentage coverage of PV cells during the design process to balance reabsorption losses against the power output and level of light concentration desired. To aid in design optimization, a Monte-Carlo ray tracing program was developed to study the transport of photons and loss mechanisms in LSC panels. The program imports measured absorption/emission spectra and transmission coefficients as simulation parameters with interactions of photons in the panel determined by comparing calculated probabilities with random number generators. LSC panels with multiple dyes or layers can also be simulated. Analysis of the results reveals optimal panel dimensions and PV cell layouts for maximum power output for a given dye concentration, absorbtion/emission spectrum and quantum efficiency.

  18. Using Stochastic Ray Tracing to Simulate a Dense Time Series of Gross Primary Productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin van Leeuwen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Eddy-covariance carbon dioxide flux measurement is an established method to estimate primary productivity at the forest stand level (typically 10 ha. To validate eddy-covariance estimates, researchers rely on extensive time-series analysis and an assessment of flux contributions made by various ecosystem components at spatial scales much finer than the eddy-covariance footprint. Scaling these contributions to the stand level requires a consideration of the heterogeneity in the canopy radiation field. This paper presents a stochastic ray tracing approach to predict the probabilities of light absorption from over a thousand hemispherical directions by thousands of individual scene elements. Once a look-up table of absorption probabilities is computed, dynamic illumination conditions can be simulated in a computationally realistic time, from which stand-level gross primary productivity can be obtained by integrating photosynthetic assimilation over the scene. We demonstrate the method by inverting a leaf-level photosynthesis model with eddy-covariance and meteorological data. Optimized leaf photosynthesis parameters and canopy structure were able to explain 75% of variation in eddy-covariance gross primary productivity estimates, and commonly used parameters, including photosynthetic capacity and quantum yield, fell within reported ranges. Remaining challenges are discussed including the need to address the distribution of radiation within shoots and needles.

  19. Ray-tracing simulations of spherical Johann diffraction spectrometer for in-beam X-ray experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagodziński, P., E-mail: jagodzin@tu.kielce.pl [Department of Physics, Kielce University of Technology, Tysiaclecia PP 7, 25-314 Kielce (Poland); Pajek, M.; Banaś, D. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, Świȩtokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Beyer, H.F. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Trassinelli, M. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75015 Paris (France); Stoehlker, Th. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz-Insitut Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Institut für Optic und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The results of the Monte-Carlo ray-tracing simulations for a Johann-type Bragg spectrometer with spherically curved-crystal designed to detect the X-rays from a fast-moving source are reported. These calculations were performed to optimize the X-ray spectrometer to be used at the gas-target installed at ion storage ring for high-resolution X-ray experiments. In particular, the two-dimensional distributions of detected photons were studied using the Monte-Carlo method both for the stationary and moving X-ray sources, taking into account a detailed description of X-ray source and X-ray diffraction on the crystal as well as a role of the Doppler effect for in-beam experiments. The origin of the asymmetry of observed X-ray profiles was discussed in detail and the procedure to derive a precise (sub-eV) X-ray transition energy for such asymmetric profiles was proposed. The results are important for the investigations of 1s2p{sup 3}P{sub 2}→1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} intrashell transition in excited He-like uranium ions in in-beam X-ray experiments.

  20. Simulation of Satellite, Airborne and Terrestrial LiDAR with DART (I):Waveform Simulation with Quasi-Monte Carlo Ray Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastellu-Etchegorry, Jean-Philippe; Yin, Tiangang; Lauret, Nicolas; Grau, Eloi; Rubio, Jeremy; Cook, Bruce D.; Morton, Douglas C.; Sun, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) provides unique data on the 3-D structure of atmosphere constituents and the Earth's surface. Simulating LiDAR returns for different laser technologies and Earth scenes is fundamental for evaluating and interpreting signal and noise in LiDAR data. Different types of models are capable of simulating LiDAR waveforms of Earth surfaces. Semi-empirical and geometric models can be imprecise because they rely on simplified simulations of Earth surfaces and light interaction mechanisms. On the other hand, Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) models are potentially accurate but require long computational time. Here, we present a new LiDAR waveform simulation tool that is based on the introduction of a quasi-Monte Carlo ray tracing approach in the Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer (DART) model. Two new approaches, the so-called "box method" and "Ray Carlo method", are implemented to provide robust and accurate simulations of LiDAR waveforms for any landscape, atmosphere and LiDAR sensor configuration (view direction, footprint size, pulse characteristics, etc.). The box method accelerates the selection of the scattering direction of a photon in the presence of scatterers with non-invertible phase function. The Ray Carlo method brings traditional ray-tracking into MCRT simulation, which makes computational time independent of LiDAR field of view (FOV) and reception solid angle. Both methods are fast enough for simulating multi-pulse acquisition. Sensitivity studies with various landscapes and atmosphere constituents are presented, and the simulated LiDAR signals compare favorably with their associated reflectance images and Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) waveforms. The LiDAR module is fully integrated into DART, enabling more detailed simulations of LiDAR sensitivity to specific scene elements (e.g., atmospheric aerosols, leaf area, branches, or topography) and sensor configuration for airborne or satellite LiDAR sensors.

  1. Evaluation of simulation alternatives for the brute-force ray-tracing approach used in backlight design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desnijder, Karel; Hanselaer, Peter; Meuret, Youri

    2016-04-01

    A key requirement to obtain a uniform luminance for a side-lit LED backlight is the optimised spatial pattern of structures on the light guide that extract the light. The generation of such a scatter pattern is usually performed by applying an iterative approach. In each iteration, the luminance distribution of the backlight with a particular scatter pattern is analysed. This is typically performed with a brute-force ray-tracing algorithm, although this approach results in a time-consuming optimisation process. In this study, the Adding-Doubling method is explored as an alternative way for evaluating the luminance of a backlight. Due to the similarities between light propagating in a backlight with extraction structures and light scattering in a cloud of light scatterers, the Adding-Doubling method which is used to model the latter could also be used to model the light distribution in a backlight. The backlight problem is translated to a form upon which the Adding-Doubling method is directly applicable. The calculated luminance for a simple uniform extraction pattern with the Adding-Doubling method matches the luminance generated by a commercial raytracer very well. Although successful, no clear computational advantage over ray tracers is realised. However, the dynamics of light propagation in a light guide as used the Adding-Doubling method, also allow to enhance the efficiency of brute-force ray-tracing algorithms. The performance of this enhanced ray-tracing approach for the simulation of backlights is also evaluated against a typical brute-force ray-tracing approach.

  2. Anisotropic ray trace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wai Sze Tiffany

    Optical components made of anisotropic materials, such as crystal polarizers and crystal waveplates, are widely used in many complex optical system, such as display systems, microlithography, biomedical imaging and many other optical systems, and induce more complex aberrations than optical components made of isotropic materials. The goal of this dissertation is to accurately simulate the performance of optical systems with anisotropic materials using polarization ray trace. This work extends the polarization ray tracing calculus to incorporate ray tracing through anisotropic materials, including uniaxial, biaxial and optically active materials. The 3D polarization ray tracing calculus is an invaluable tool for analyzing polarization properties of an optical system. The 3x3 polarization ray tracing P matrix developed for anisotropic ray trace assists tracking the 3D polarization transformations along a ray path with series of surfaces in an optical system. To better represent the anisotropic light-matter interactions, the definition of the P matrix is generalized to incorporate not only the polarization change at a refraction/reflection interface, but also the induced optical phase accumulation as light propagates through the anisotropic medium. This enables realistic modeling of crystalline polarization elements, such as crystal waveplates and crystal polarizers. The wavefront and polarization aberrations of these anisotropic components are more complex than those of isotropic optical components and can be evaluated from the resultant P matrix for each eigen-wavefront as well as for the overall image. One incident ray refracting or reflecting into an anisotropic medium produces two eigenpolarizations or eigenmodes propagating in different directions. The associated ray parameters of these modes necessary for the anisotropic ray trace are described in Chapter 2. The algorithms to calculate the P matrix from these ray parameters are described in Chapter 3 for

  3. Simulation of radiation damping in rings, using stepwise ray-tracing methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méot, F.

    2015-06-01

    The ray-tracing code Zgoubi computes particle trajectories in arbitrary magnetic and/or electric field maps or analytical field models. It includes a built-in fitting procedure, spin tracking, many Monte Carlo processes. The accuracy of the integration method makes it an efficient tool for multi-turn tracking in periodic machines. Energy loss by synchrotron radiation, based on Monte Carlo techniques, had been introduced in Zgoubi in the early 2000s for studies regarding the linear collider beam delivery system. However, only recently has this Monte Carlo tool been used for systematic beam dynamics and spin diffusion studies in rings, including the eRHIC electron-ion collider project at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Some beam dynamics aspects of this recent use of Zgoubi capabilities, including considerations of accuracy as well as further benchmarking in the presence of synchrotron radiation in rings, are reported here.

  4. Enzo+Moray: Radiation Hydrodynamics Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations with Adaptive Ray Tracing

    CERN Document Server

    Wise, John H

    2010-01-01

    We describe a photon-conserving radiative transfer algorithm, using a spatially-adaptive ray tracing scheme, and its parallel implementation into the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) cosmological hydrodynamics code, Enzo. By coupling the solver with the energy equation and non-equilibrium chemistry network, our radiation hydrodynamics framework can be utilised to study a broad range of astrophysical problems, such as stellar and black hole (BH) feedback. Inaccuracies can arise from large timesteps and poor sampling, therefore we devised an adaptive time-stepping scheme and a fast approximation of the optically-thin radiation field with multiple sources. We test the method with several radiative transfer and radiation hydrodynamics tests that are given in Iliev et al. (2006, 2009). We further test our method with more dynamical situations, for example, the propagation of an ionisation front through a Rayleigh-Taylor instability, time-varying luminosities, and collimated radiation. The test suite also includes an...

  5. ENZO+MORAY: radiation hydrodynamics adaptive mesh refinement simulations with adaptive ray tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, John H.; Abel, Tom

    2011-07-01

    We describe a photon-conserving radiative transfer algorithm, using a spatially-adaptive ray-tracing scheme, and its parallel implementation into the adaptive mesh refinement cosmological hydrodynamics code ENZO. By coupling the solver with the energy equation and non-equilibrium chemistry network, our radiation hydrodynamics framework can be utilized to study a broad range of astrophysical problems, such as stellar and black hole feedback. Inaccuracies can arise from large time-steps and poor sampling; therefore, we devised an adaptive time-stepping scheme and a fast approximation of the optically-thin radiation field with multiple sources. We test the method with several radiative transfer and radiation hydrodynamics tests that are given in Iliev et al. We further test our method with more dynamical situations, for example, the propagation of an ionization front through a Rayleigh-Taylor instability, time-varying luminosities and collimated radiation. The test suite also includes an expanding H II region in a magnetized medium, utilizing the newly implemented magnetohydrodynamics module in ENZO. This method linearly scales with the number of point sources and number of grid cells. Our implementation is scalable to 512 processors on distributed memory machines and can include the radiation pressure and secondary ionizations from X-ray radiation. It is included in the newest public release of ENZO.

  6. Thin Lens Ray Tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatland, Ian R.

    2002-01-01

    Proposes a ray tracing approach to thin lens analysis based on a vector form of Snell's law for paraxial rays as an alternative to the usual approach in introductory physics courses. The ray tracing approach accommodates skew rays and thus provides a complete analysis. (Author/KHR)

  7. Ray-tracing simulations for the ultra-lightweight X-ray optics toward a future jupiter exploration mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuishi, I.; Ezoe, Y.; Ogawa, T.; Sato, M.; Nakamura, K.; Numazawa, M.; Takeuchi, K.; Ohashi, T.; Ishikawa, K.; Mitsuda, K.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate a feasibility for in situ X-ray imaging spectrometer JUXTA (Jupiter X-ray Telescope Array) onboard a Japanese Jupiter exploration mission, we demonstrated the ideal performances, i.e., angular resolution, effective area and grasp, of our original, conically-approximated Wolter type-I MEMS-processed optics, by extending the previous ray-tracing simulator. The novel simulator enables us to study both on- and off-axis responses for our optics with two-stage optical configurations for the first time. The on-axis angular resolution is restricted to ∼ 13 μm corresponding to ∼ 10 arcsec on the detector plane without considering the diffraction effect and dominated by the diffraction effect below ∼ 1 keV (e.g., 13 arcsec at 1 keV). Si optics can achieve effective area of >700 mm2 and grasp of >1600 mm2 deg2 at our interesting energy of 600 eV. Larger effective area and grasp can be attained by employing Ni as a substrate material or Ir as a reflecting surface material. However, other factors produced in the fabrication processes such as the waviness on the mirror surface and the deformation error cause the significant performance degradation. Thus, we concluded that MEMS-processed optics can satisfy all the requirements of JUXTA only if the manufacturing accuracy can be controlled.

  8. Ray-trace simulation of CuInS(Se)₂ quantum dot based luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiangmin; Kang, Ruidan; Zhang, Yongyou; Deng, Luogen; Zhong, Haizheng; Zou, Bingsuo; Shi, Li-Jie

    2015-07-27

    To enhance the performance of luminescent solar concentrator (LSC), there is an increased need to search novel emissive materials with broad absorption and large Stokes shifts. I-III-VI colloidal CuInS2 and CuInSe2 based nanocrystals, which exhibit strong photoluminescence emissions in the visible to near infrared region with large Stokes shifts, are expected to improve performance in luminescent solar concentrator applications. In this work, the performance of CuInS(Se)2 quantum dots in simple planar LSC is evaluated by applying Monte-Carlo ray-trace simulation. A systematic parameters study was conducted to optimize the performance. An optimized photon concentration ratio of 0.34 for CuInS2 nanocrystals and 1.25 for CuInSe2 nanocrystals doping LSC are obtained from the simulation. The results demonstrated that CuInSe2 based nanocrystals are particularly interesting for luminescent solar concentrator applications, especially to combine with low price Si solar cells.

  9. Virtual experiments: the ultimate aim of neutron ray-tracing simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefmann, Kim; Willendrup, Peter Kjær; Udby, Linda

    2008-01-01

    We define a virtual neutron experiment as a complete simulation of an experiment, from source over sample to detector. The virtual experiment (VE) will ideally interface with the instrument control software for the input and with standard data analysis packages for the virtual data output. Virtua...

  10. Modeling Coniferous Canopy Structure over Extensive Areas for Ray Tracing Simulations: Scaling from the Leaf to the Stand Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aardt, J. A.; van Leeuwen, M.; Kelbe, D.; Kampe, T.; Krause, K.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing is widely accepted as a useful technology for characterizing the Earth surface in an objective, reproducible, and economically feasible manner. To date, the calibration and validation of remote sensing data sets and biophysical parameter estimates remain challenging due to the requirements to sample large areas for ground-truth data collection, and restrictions to sample these data within narrow temporal windows centered around flight campaigns or satellite overpasses. The computer graphics community have taken significant steps to ameliorate some of these challenges by providing an ability to generate synthetic images based on geometrically and optically realistic representations of complex targets and imaging instruments. These synthetic data can be used for conceptual and diagnostic tests of instrumentation prior to sensor deployment or to examine linkages between biophysical characteristics of the Earth surface and at-sensor radiance. In the last two decades, the use of image generation techniques for remote sensing of the vegetated environment has evolved from the simulation of simple homogeneous, hypothetical vegetation canopies, to advanced scenes and renderings with a high degree of photo-realism. Reported virtual scenes comprise up to 100M surface facets; however, due to the tighter coupling between hardware and software development, the full potential of image generation techniques for forestry applications yet remains to be fully explored. In this presentation, we examine the potential computer graphics techniques have for the analysis of forest structure-function relationships and demonstrate techniques that provide for the modeling of extremely high-faceted virtual forest canopies, comprising billions of scene elements. We demonstrate the use of ray tracing simulations for the analysis of gap size distributions and characterization of foliage clumping within spatial footprints that allow for a tight matching between characteristics

  11. Capturing sunlight into a photobioreactor: Ray tracing simulations of the propagation of light from capture to distribution into the reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijffers, J.F.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Tramper, J.; Wijffels, R.H.; Salim, S.

    2008-01-01

    The Green Solar Collector (GSC), a photobioreactor designed for area efficient outdoor cultivation of microalgae uses Fresnel lenses and light guides to focus, transport and distribute direct light into the algae suspension. Calculating the path of rays of light, so-called ray tracing, is used to de

  12. Capturing sunlight into a photobioreactor: Ray tracing simulations of the propagation of light from capture to distribution into the reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijffers, J.F.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Tramper, J.; Wijffels, R.H.; Salim, S.

    2008-01-01

    The Green Solar Collector (GSC), a photobioreactor designed for area efficient outdoor cultivation of microalgae uses Fresnel lenses and light guides to focus, transport and distribute direct light into the algae suspension. Calculating the path of rays of light, so-called ray tracing, is used to de

  13. Monte Carlo Ray Tracing Simulation of Polarization Characteristics of Sea Water Which Contains Spherical and Non-Spherical Particles of Suspended Solid and Phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Simulation method of sea water which contains spherical and non-spherical particles of suspended solid and phytoplankton based on Monte Carlo Ray Tracing: MCRT is proposed for identifying non-spherical species of phytoplankton. From the simulation results, it is found that the proposed MCRT model is validated. Also some possibility of identification of spherical and non-spherical shapes of particles which are contained in sea water is shown. Meanwhile, simulations with the different shape of particles, Prolate and Oblate show that Degree of Polarization: DP depends on shapes. Therefore, non-spherical shape of phytoplankton can be identified with polarization characteristics measurements of the ocean.

  14. Comparison Between Linear and Nonlinear Models of Mixed Pixels in Remote Sensing Satellite Images Based on Cierniewski Surface BRDF Model by Means of Monte Carlo Ray Tracing Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Comparative study on linear and nonlinear mixed pixel models of which pixels in remote sensing satellite images is composed with plural ground cover materials mixed together, is conducted for remote sensing satellite image analysis. The mixed pixel models are based on Cierniewski of ground surface reflectance model. The comparative study is conducted by using of Monte Carlo Ray Tracing: MCRT simulations. Through simulation study, the difference between linear and nonlinear mixed pixel models is clarified. Also it is found that the simulation model is validated.

  15. Patient-specific scatter correction in clinical cone beam computed tomography imaging made possible by the combination of Monte Carlo simulations and a ray tracing algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot Thing, Rune; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image quality is limited by scattered photons. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations provide the ability of predicting the patient-specific scatter contamination in clinical CBCT imaging. Lengthy simulations prevent MC-based scatter correction from...... and pelvis scan were simulated within 2% statistical uncertainty in two hours per scan. Within the same time, the ray tracing algorithm provided the primary signal for each of the projections. Thus, all the data needed for MC-based scatter correction in clinical CBCT imaging was obtained within two hours per...

  16. The Alba ray tracing code: ART

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Josep; Barla, Alessandro; Juanhuix, Jordi

    2013-09-01

    The Alba ray tracing code (ART) is a suite of Matlab functions and tools for the ray tracing simulation of x-ray beamlines. The code is structured in different layers, which allow its usage as part of optimization routines as well as an easy control from a graphical user interface. Additional tools for slope error handling and for grating efficiency calculations are also included. Generic characteristics of ART include the accumulation of rays to improve statistics without memory limitations, and still providing normalized values of flux and resolution in physically meaningful units.

  17. Thermal Modeling of the Main Rings of Saturn through random distribution particle arrays and ray-tracing simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandes, Alberto; Spilker, Linda; Déau, Estelle

    2016-10-01

    Saturn's rings are a complex collection of icy particles with diameters from 1 m to few meters. Their natural window of study is the infrared because its temperatures are between 40K and 120K. The main driver of the temperature of these rings is the direct solar radiation as well as the solar radiation reflected off Saturn's atmosphere. The second most important energy source is the infrared radiation coming from Saturn itself. The study of the variations of temperatures of the rings, or, in general, their thermal behavior, may provide important information on their composition, their structure and their dynamics. Models that consider these and other energy sources are able to explain, to a first approximation, the observed temperature variations of the rings. The challenge for these models is to accurately describe the variation of illumination on the rings, i. e., how the illuminated and non-illuminated regions of the ring particles change at the different observation geometries. This shadowing mainly depends on the optical depth, as well as the general structure of the rings.In this work, We show a semi-analytical model that considers the main energy sources of the rings and their average properties (e.g., optical depth, particle size range and vertical distribution). In order to deal with the shadowing at specific geometries, the model uses the ray-tracing technique. The goal is to describe the ring temperatures observed by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer, CIRS, onboard the Cassini spacecraft, which is in orbit around Saturn since 2004. So far, the model is able to reproduce some of the general features of specific regions of the A, B and C rings.

  18. Simulating three-dimensional seismograms in 2.5-dimensional structures by combining two-dimensional finite difference modelling and ray tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksat, J.; Müller, T. M.; Wenzel, F.

    2008-07-01

    Finite difference (FD) simulation of elastic wave propagation is an important tool in geophysical research. As large-scale 3-D simulations are only feasible on supercomputers or clusters, and even then the simulations are limited to long periods compared to the model size, 2-D FD simulations are widespread. Whereas in generally 3-D heterogeneous structures it is not possible to infer the correct amplitude and waveform from 2-D simulations, in 2.5-D heterogeneous structures some inferences are possible. In particular, Vidale & Helmberger developed an approach that simulates 3-D waveforms using 2-D FD experiments only. However, their method requires a special FD source implementation technique that is based on a source definition which is not any longer used in nowadays FD codes. In this paper, we derive a conversion between 2-D and 3-D Green tensors that allows us to simulate 3-D displacement seismograms using 2-D FD simulations and the actual ray path determined in the geometrical optic limit. We give the conversion for a source of a certain seismic moment that is implemented by incrementing the components of the stress tensor. Therefore, we present a hybrid modelling procedure involving 2-D FD and kinematic ray-tracing techniques. The applicability is demonstrated by numerical experiments of elastic wave propagation for models of different complexity.

  19. BENDING RAY-TRACING BASED ON SIMULATED ANNEALING METHOD%基于模拟退火法的弯曲射线追踪

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周竹生; 谢金伟

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a new ray-tracing method based on the concept of simulated annealing. With the new method, not only the problem that the traditional ray-tracing method is over dependent on pre - established initial ray-paths is well solved, but also the quality of desirable ray-paths construction and the associated traveltime calculation between fixed sources and receivers is ensured, even if the model is of much complicated velocity-field. As a result, the ray-paths whose traveltime approach is overall minimum are searched out successfully. Furthermore, the algorithm may calculate ray-paths with local extreme lower traveltime too and restrict them easily by instructing rays to pass through some fixed points. The feasibility and stability of the method have been proved by trial results of theoretical models.%提出了一种新的射线追踪方法——模拟退火法.新方法不仅较好地解决了传统射线追踪方法过分依赖初始模型的问题,而且对于复杂速度场模型也能保证在固定的发射与接收点之间构建令人满意的射线路径及其相应的走时,搜索到满足旅行时全局最小的射线路径.此外,新方法还可计算局部最小旅行时,并可方便地通过指定射线经过固定点来对射线路径进行限制.理论模型的试算结果证明了该方法的可行性和稳健性.

  20. The Search for Efficiency in Arboreal Ray Tracing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, M.; Disney, M.; Chen, J. M.; Gomez-Dans, J.; Kelbe, D.; van Aardt, J. A.; Lewis, P.

    2016-12-01

    Forest structure significantly impacts a range of abiotic conditions, including humidity and the radiation regime, all of which affect the rate of net and gross primary productivity. Current forest productivity models typically consider abstract media to represent the transfer of radiation within the canopy. Examples include the representation forest structure via a layered canopy model, where leaf area and inclination angles are stratified with canopy depth, or as turbid media where leaves are randomly distributed within space or within confined geometric solids such as blocks, spheres or cones. While these abstract models are known to produce accurate estimates of primary productivity at the stand level, their limited geometric resolution restricts applicability at fine spatial scales, such as the cell, leaf or shoot levels, thereby not addressing the full potential of assimilation of data from laboratory and field measurements with that of remote sensing technology. Recent research efforts have explored the use of laser scanning to capture detailed tree morphology at millimeter accuracy. These data can subsequently be used to combine ray tracing with primary productivity models, providing an ability to explore trade-offs among different morphological traits or assimilate data from spatial scales, spanning the leaf- to the stand level. Ray tracing has a major advantage of allowing the most accurate structural description of the canopy, and can directly exploit new 3D structural measurements, e.g., from laser scanning. However, the biggest limitation of ray tracing models is their high computational cost, which currently limits their use for large-scale applications. In this talk, we explore ways to more efficiently exploit ray tracing simulations and capture this information in a readily computable form for future evaluation, thus potentially enabling large-scale first-principles forest growth modelling applications.

  1. Monte-Carlo RAY tracing simulation of a falling particle receiver in connection with a central receiver field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alxneit, I. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The program RAY was developed to perform Monte-Carlo simulations of the flux distribution in solar reactors in connection with an arbitrary heliostat field. The code accounts for the shading of the incoming rays from the sun due to the reactor supporting tower as well as for full blocking and shading of the heliostats among themselves. A simplified falling particle reactor (FPR) was evaluated. A central receiver field was used with a total area of 311 m{sup 2} composed of 176 round, focusing heliostats. No attempt was undertaken to optimise either the geometry of the heliostat field nor the aiming strategy of the heliostats. The FPR was evaluated at two different geographic latitudes (-8.23W/47.542N; PSI and -8.23W/20.0N) and during the course of a day (May 30{sup th}). The incident power passing through the reactor aperture and the flux density distribution within the FPR was calculated. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 3 refs.

  2. Development of ray tracing visualization program by Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Kenji; Otani, Takayuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    1997-09-01

    Ray tracing algorithm is a powerful method to synthesize three dimensional computer graphics. In conventional ray tracing algorithms, a view point is used as a starting point of ray tracing, from which the rays are tracked up to the light sources through center points of pixels on the view screen to calculate the intensities of the pixels. This manner, however, makes it difficult to define the configuration of light source as well as to strictly simulate the reflections of the rays. To resolve these problems, we have developed a new ray tracing means which traces rays from a light source, not from a view point, with use of Monte Carlo method which is widely applied in nuclear fields. Moreover, we adopt the variance reduction techniques to the program with use of the specialized machine (Monte-4) for particle transport Monte Carlo so that the computational time could be successfully reduced. (author)

  3. Development of ray tracing visualization program by Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Kenji; Otani, Takayuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    1997-09-01

    Ray tracing algorithm is a powerful method to synthesize three dimensional computer graphics. In conventional ray tracing algorithms, a view point is used as a starting point of ray tracing, from which the rays are tracked up to the light sources through center points of pixels on the view screen to calculate the intensities of the pixels. This manner, however, makes it difficult to define the configuration of light source as well as to strictly simulate the reflections of the rays. To resolve these problems, we have developed a new ray tracing means which traces rays from a light source, not from a view point, with use of Monte Carlo method which is widely applied in nuclear fields. Moreover, we adopt the variance reduction techniques to the program with use of the specialized machine (Monte-4) for particle transport Monte Carlo so that the computational time could be successfully reduced. (author)

  4. IONORT: IONOsphere Ray-Tracing

    OpenAIRE

    Bianchi, C.; Settimi, A; Azzarone, A.

    2010-01-01

    Il pacchetto applicativo “IONORT” per il calcolo del ray-tracing può essere utilizzato dagli utenti che impiegano il sistema operativo Windows. È un programma la cui interfaccia grafica con l’utente è realizzata in MATLAB. In realtà, il programma lancia un eseguibile che integra il sistema d’equazioni differenziali scritto in linguaggio Fortran e ne importa l’output nel programma MATLAB, il quale genera i grafici e altre informazioni sul raggio. A completamento di questa premessa va detto ...

  5. Solar Proton Transport Within an ICRU Sphere Surrounded by a Complex Shield: Ray-trace Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Wilson, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2015-01-01

    A computationally efficient 3DHZETRN code with enhanced neutron and light ion (Z is less than or equal to 2) propagation was recently developed for complex, inhomogeneous shield geometry described by combinatorial objects. Comparisons were made between 3DHZETRN results and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations at locations within the combinatorial geometry, and it was shown that 3DHZETRN agrees with the MC codes to the extent they agree with each other. In the present report, the 3DHZETRN code is extended to enable analysis in ray-trace geometry. This latest extension enables the code to be used within current engineering design practices utilizing fully detailed vehicle and habitat geometries. Through convergence testing, it is shown that fidelity in an actual shield geometry can be maintained in the discrete ray-trace description by systematically increasing the number of discrete rays used. It is also shown that this fidelity is carried into transport procedures and resulting exposure quantities without sacrificing computational efficiency.

  6. RAY TRACING IMPLEMENTATION IN JAVA PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aybars UĞUR

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper realism in computer graphics and components providing realism are discussed at first. It is mentioned about illumination models, surface rendering methods and light sources for this aim. After that, ray tracing which is a technique for creating two dimensional image of a three-dimensional virtual environment is explained briefly. A simple ray tracing algorithm was given. "SahneIzle" which is a ray tracing program implemented in Java programming language which can be used on the internet is introduced. As a result, importance of network-centric ray tracing software is discussed.

  7. Validation of Ray Tracing Code Refraction Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Stephanie L.; McAninch, Gerry L.; Smith, Charles D.; Conner, David A.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's current predictive capabilities using the ray tracing program (RTP) are validated using helicopter noise data taken at Eglin Air Force Base in 2007. By including refractive propagation effects due to wind and temperature, the ray tracing code is able to explain large variations in the data observed during the flight test.

  8. Reverse ray tracing for transformation optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chia-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2015-06-29

    Ray tracing is an important technique for predicting optical system performance. In the field of transformation optics, the Hamiltonian equations of motion for ray tracing are well known. The numerical solutions to the Hamiltonian equations of motion are affected by the complexities of the inhomogeneous and anisotropic indices of the optical device. Based on our knowledge, no previous work has been conducted on ray tracing for transformation optics with extreme inhomogeneity and anisotropicity. In this study, we present the use of 3D reverse ray tracing in transformation optics. The reverse ray tracing is derived from Fermat's principle based on a sweeping method instead of finding the full solution to ordinary differential equations. The sweeping method is employed to obtain the eikonal function. The wave vectors are then obtained from the gradient of that eikonal function map in the transformed space to acquire the illuminance. Because only the rays in the points of interest have to be traced, the reverse ray tracing provides an efficient approach to investigate the illuminance of a system. This approach is useful in any form of transformation optics where the material property tensor is a symmetric positive definite matrix. The performance and analysis of three transformation optics with inhomogeneous and anisotropic indices are explored. The ray trajectories and illuminances in these demonstration cases are successfully solved by the proposed reverse ray tracing method.

  9. Improved algorithm of ray tracing in ICF cryogenic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Yang, Yongying; Ling, Tong; Jiang, Jiabin

    2016-10-01

    The high precision ray tracing inside inertial confinement fusion (ICF) cryogenic targets plays an important role in the reconstruction of the three-dimensional density distribution by algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) algorithm. The traditional Runge-Kutta methods, which is restricted by the precision of the grid division and the step size of ray tracing, cannot make an accurate calculation in the case of refractive index saltation. In this paper, we propose an improved algorithm of ray tracing based on the Runge-Kutta methods and Snell's law of refraction to achieve high tracing precision. On the boundary of refractive index, we apply Snell's law of refraction and contact point search algorithm to ensure accuracy of the simulation. Inside the cryogenic target, the combination of the Runge-Kutta methods and self-adaptive step algorithm are employed for computation. The original refractive index data, which is used to mesh the target, can be obtained by experimental measurement or priori refractive index distribution function. A finite differential method is performed to calculate the refractive index gradient of mesh nodes, and the distance weighted average interpolation methods is utilized to obtain refractive index and gradient of each point in space. In the simulation, we take ideal ICF target, Luneberg lens and Graded index rod as simulation model to calculate the spot diagram and wavefront map. Compared the simulation results to Zemax, it manifests that the improved algorithm of ray tracing based on the fourth-order Runge-Kutta methods and Snell's law of refraction exhibits high accuracy. The relative error of the spot diagram is 0.2%, and the peak-to-valley (PV) error and the root-mean-square (RMS) error of the wavefront map is less than λ/35 and λ/100, correspondingly.

  10. Tropospheric Refraction Modeling Using Ray-Tracing and Parabolic Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pechac

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Refraction phenomena that occur in the lower atmospheresignificantly influence the performance of wireless communicationsystems. This paper provides an overview of corresponding computationalmethods. Basic properties of the lower atmosphere are mentioned.Practical guidelines for radiowave propagation modeling in the loweratmosphere using ray-tracing and parabolic equation methods are given.In addition, a calculation of angle-of-arrival spectra is introducedfor multipath propagation simulations.

  11. Validation of Three-Dimensional Ray-Tracing Algorithm for Indoor Wireless Propagations

    OpenAIRE

    Majdi Salem; Mahamod Ismail; Norbahiah Misran

    2011-01-01

    A 3D ray tracing simulator has been developed for indoor wireless networks. The simulator uses geometrical optics (GOs) to propagate the electromagnetic waves inside the buildings. The prediction technique takes into account multiple reflections and transmissions of the propagated waves. An interpolation prediction method (IPM) has been proposed to predict the propagated signal and to make the ray-tracing algorithm faster, accurate, and simple. The measurements have been achieved by using a s...

  12. Ray tracing reconstruction investigation for C-arm tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malalla, Nuhad A. Y.; Chen, Ying

    2016-04-01

    C-arm tomosynthesis is a three dimensional imaging technique. Both x-ray source and the detector are mounted on a C-arm wheeled structure to provide wide variety of movement around the object. In this paper, C-arm tomosynthesis was introduced to provide three dimensional information over a limited view angle (less than 180o) to reduce radiation exposure and examination time. Reconstruction algorithms based on ray tracing method such as ray tracing back projection (BP), simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) and maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) were developed for C-arm tomosynthesis. C-arm tomosynthesis projection images of simulated spherical object were simulated with a virtual geometric configuration with a total view angle of 40 degrees. This study demonstrated the sharpness of in-plane reconstructed structure and effectiveness of removing out-of-plane blur for each reconstruction algorithms. Results showed the ability of ray tracing based reconstruction algorithms to provide three dimensional information with limited angle C-arm tomosynthesis.

  13. Ray-tracing optical modeling of negative dysphotopsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xin; Liu, Yueai; Karakelle, Mutlu; Masket, Samuel; Fram, Nicole R.

    2011-12-01

    Negative dysphotopsia is a relatively common photic phenomenon that may occur after implantation of an intraocular lens. The etiology of negative dysphotopsia is not fully understood. In this investigation, optical modeling was developed using nonsequential-component Zemax ray-tracing technology to simulate photic phenomena experienced by the human eye. The simulation investigated the effects of pupil size, capsulorrhexis size, and bag diffusiveness. Results demonstrated the optical basis of negative dysphotopsia. We found that photic structures were mainly influenced by critical factors such as the capsulorrhexis size and the optical diffusiveness of the capsular bag. The simulations suggested the hypothesis that the anterior capsulorrhexis interacting with intraocular lens could induce negative dysphotopsia.

  14. Backward ray tracing for ultrasonic imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breeuwer, R.

    1990-01-01

    Focused ultrasonic beams frequently pass one or more media interfaces, strongly affecting the ultrasonic beamshape and focusing. A computer program, based on backward ray tracing was developed to compute the shape of a corrected focusing mirror. This shape is verified with another program; then the

  15. Backward ray tracing for ultrasonic imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breeuwer, R.

    1990-01-01

    Focused ultrasonic beams frequently pass one or more media interfaces, strongly affecting the ultrasonic beamshape and focusing. A computer program, based on backward ray tracing was developed to compute the shape of a corrected focusing mirror. This shape is verified with another program; then the

  16. KBA-X射线显微镜空间分辨力模拟和Au网格实验测量%Ray-tracing simulation and Au-grids experimental test on spatial resolution of KBA X-ray microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董建军; 杨正华; 曹柱荣; 韦敏习; 詹夏宇; 刘慎业; 丁永坤

    2011-01-01

    The spatial resolution of KBA X-ray microscope is studied with ray-tracing simulation and experimental test. In the experiment, the imaging object is Au grid, backlit by X-rays produced by the 9th laser interaction with Cu target on Shen-guang II laser facility. The spatial resolution of KBA X-ray microscope is found to be asymmetric about the center of its field of view. Moreover, the experimental data show that, the variation of resolution in the reducing direction of grazing incidence angle is smaller than that in the increasing direction, and the resolution asymmetry is about 30% relative to the field center.%通过光线追踪模拟在SGⅡ激光装置上利用第9路激光入射到Cu背光靶面产生X射线,通过Au网格背光照相,利用KBA显微镜对此网格成像,获得了清晰的网格图像.通过对实验网格数据的分析发现:在掠射角减小的方向,空间分辨力随视场的变化比掠射角增大的方向变化小,与光线追踪模拟比较,二者均表明KBA的视场是非对称的,从实验图像数据得出,视场的不对称相对于中心位置约为30%.

  17. The ray-tracing mapping operator in an asymmetric atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In a spherically symmetric atmosphere, the refractive index profile is retrieved from bending angle measurements through Abel integral transform. As horizontal refractivity inhomogeneity becomes significant in the moist low atmosphere, the error in refractivity profile obtained from Abel inversion reaches about 10%. One way to avoid this error is to directly assimilate bending angle profile into numerical weather models. This paper discusses the 2D ray-tracing mapping operator for bending angle in an asymmetric atmosphere. Through simulating computations, the retrieval error of the refractivity in horizontal inhomogeneity is assessed. The step length of 4 rank Runge-Kutta method is also tested.

  18. Microseismic network design assessment based on 3D ray tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näsholm, Sven Peter; Wuestefeld, Andreas; Lubrano-Lavadera, Paul; Lang, Dominik; Kaschwich, Tina; Oye, Volker

    2016-04-01

    There is increasing demand on the versatility of microseismic monitoring networks. In early projects, being able to locate any triggers was considered a success. These early successes led to a better understanding of how to extract value from microseismic results. Today operators, regulators, and service providers work closely together in order to find the optimum network design to meet various requirements. In the current study we demonstrate an integrated and streamlined network capability assessment approach. It is intended for use during the microseismic network design process prior to installation. The assessments are derived from 3D ray tracing between a grid of event points and the sensors. Three aspects are discussed: 1) Magnitude of completeness or detection limit; 2) Event location accuracy; and 3) Ground-motion hazard. The network capability parameters 1) and 2) are estimated at all hypothetic event locations and are presented in the form of maps given a seismic sensor coordinate scenario. In addition, the ray tracing traveltimes permit to estimate the point-spread-functions (PSFs) at the event grid points. PSFs are useful in assessing the resolution and focusing capability of the network for stacking-based event location and imaging methods. We estimate the performance for a hypothetical network case with 11 sensors. We consider the well-documented region around the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) located north of Parkfield, California. The ray tracing is done through a detailed velocity model which covers a 26.2 by 21.2 km wide area around the SAFOD drill site with a resolution of 200 m both for the P-and S-wave velocities. Systematic network capability assessment for different sensor site scenarios prior to installation facilitates finding a final design which meets the survey objectives.

  19. Simplifying numerical ray tracing for characterization of optical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Yakir Luc; Speiser, Daniel I; Johnsen, Sönke

    2014-07-20

    Ray tracing, a computational method for tracing the trajectories of rays of light through matter, is often used to characterize mechanical or biological visual systems with aberrations that are larger than the effect of diffraction inherent in the system. For example, ray tracing may be used to calculate geometric point spread functions (PSFs), which describe the image of a point source after it passes through an optical system. Calculating a geometric PSF is useful because it gives an estimate of the detail and quality of the image formed by a given optical system. However, when using ray tracing to calculate a PSF, the accuracy of the estimated PSF directly depends on the number of discrete rays used in the calculation; higher accuracies may require more computational power. Furthermore, adding optical components to a modeled system will increase its complexity and require critical modifications so that the model will describe the system correctly, sometimes necessitating a completely new model. Here, we address these challenges by developing a method that represents rays of light as a continuous function that depends on the light's initial direction. By utilizing Chebyshev approximations (via the chebfun toolbox in MATLAB) for the implementation of this method, we greatly simplified the calculations for the location and direction of the rays. This method provides high precision and fast calculation speeds that allow the characterization of any symmetrical optical system (with a centered point source) in an analytical-like manner. Next, we demonstrate our methods by showing how they can easily calculate PSFs for complicated optical systems that contain multiple refractive and/or reflective interfaces.

  20. Simulation of Ray Tracing in Misaligned Optical System under Mechanical Vibration%振动失调下光学系统光线追迹仿真计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈东富; 刘顺发; 扈宏毅

    2013-01-01

      运动平台上的光学系统不可避免的产生镜面失调,如何描述失调光学系统的光路传输是一个非常迫切的问题.本文利用Matlab符号运算,通过两次坐标旋转和坐标平移得出了失调镜面方程,随后用矢量形式反射定律求出光线经过失调镜面后的方向矢量,通过光线追迹法,建立了失调光路传输模型.实例计算中,以某仪器的望远镜结构为光学模型,用Patran_Nastran的瞬态求解功能,求得在xyz方向同时加载相应正弦振动时镜面的失调位移,随后利用光路传输模型,得出了过主镜中心的光线(视轴)经主镜、次镜和反射镜反射后的最大抖动角度分别为0.0034°,0.0161°,0.0177°,并且得出了光斑在靶面及空间运动轨迹.%A simulation of light beam propagation in the misaligned optical system under mechanical vibration is deduced by the means of ray tracing method based on coordinate transformation and reflection law. A telescope structure of an apparatus was constructed which was then imported into Patran_Nastran to perform a transient response after sine vibrations was applied in the xyz directions simultaneously so as to obtain the displacement of key points of mirrors. Then, the displacement was used by the simulation program to compute the jitter angles. The amplitude of beam jitter angles were 0.003 4°, 0.016 1°, 0.017 7° respectively after optical beam reflected by primary mirror, secondary mirror and reflection mirror. Moreover, the traces of facula in the target plane and in the space were drawn.

  1. IL RAY-TRACING NELLA IONOSFERA

    OpenAIRE

    Azzarone, A.; Bianchi, C.; Settimi, A

    2010-01-01

    Il pacchetto applicativo “IONORT” per il calcolo del ray-tracing può essere utilizzato dagli utenti che impiegano il sistema operativo Windows. È un programma la cui interfaccia grafica con l’utente è realizzata in MATLAB. In realtà, il programma lancia un eseguibile che integra il sistema d’equazioni differenziali scritto in linguaggio Fortran e ne importa l’output nel programma MATLAB, il quale genera i grafici e altre informazioni sul raggio. A completamento di questa premessa va detto che...

  2. RayTrace: A Simplified Ray Tracing Software for use in AutoCad

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Gregers Peter; Tang, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    A design aid tool for testing and development of daylighting systems was developed. A simplified ray tracing software was programmed in Lisp for AutoCad. Only fully specularly reflective, fully transparent and fully absorbant surfaces can be defined in the software. The software is therefore best...

  3. RayTrace: A Simplified Ray Tracing Software for use in AutoCad

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Gregers Peter; Tang, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    A design aid tool for testing and development of daylighting systems was developed. A simplified ray tracing software was programmed in Lisp for AutoCad. Only fully specularly reflective, fully transparent and fully absorbant surfaces can be defined in the software. The software is therefore best...

  4. Ray-tracing software comparison for linear focusing solar collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osório, Tiago; Horta, Pedro; Larcher, Marco; Pujol-Nadal, Ramón; Hertel, Julian; van Rooyen, De Wet; Heimsath, Anna; Schneider, Simon; Benitez, Daniel; Frein, Antoine; Denarie, Alice

    2016-05-01

    Ray-Tracing software tools have been widely used in the optical design of solar concentrating collectors. In spite of the ability of these tools to assess the geometrical and material aspects impacting the optical performance of concentrators, their use in combination with experimental measurements in the framework of collector testing procedures as not been implemented, to the date, in none of the current solar collector testing standards. In the latest revision of ISO9806 an effort was made to include linear focusing concentrating collectors but some practical and theoretical difficulties emerged. A Ray-Tracing analysis could provide important contributions to overcome these issues, complementing the experimental results obtained through thermal testing and allowing the achievement of more thorough testing outputs with lower experimental requirements. In order to evaluate different available software tools a comparison study was conducted. Taking as representative technologies for line-focus concentrators the Parabolic Trough Collector and the Linear Fresnel Reflector Collector, two exemplary cases with predefined conditions - geometry, sun model and material properties - were simulated with different software tools. This work was carried out within IEA/SHC Task 49 "Solar Heat Integration in Industrial Processes".

  5. Emulating Ray-Tracing Channels in Multi-probe Anechoic Chamber Setups for Virtual Drive Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Wei; Llorente, Ines Carton; Kyösti, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses virtual drive testing (VDT) for multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) capable terminals in multi-probe anechoic chamber (MPAC) setups. We propose to perform VDT, via reproducing ray tracing (RT) simulated channels with the field synthesis technique. Simulation results demonst...

  6. McXtrace: A modern ray-tracing package for X-ray instrumentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergbäck Knudsen, Erik; Prodi, A.; Willendrup, Peter Kjær

    2011-01-01

    we present the developments of the McXtrace project, a free, open source software package based on Monte Carlo ray tracing for simulations and optimisation of complete X-ray instruments. The methodology of building a simulation is presented through an example beamline, namely Beamline 811 at MAX-...

  7. Preliminary Ray Tracing and Experimental Study on the Effect of Mirror Coating on the Optical Efficiency of a Solid Dielectric Compound Parabolic Concentrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ji

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the necessity of applying a mirror coating on the side of a truncated solid dielectric CPC (compound parabolic concentrator since ray tracing analysis has revealed that part of the incoming rays do not undergo total internal reflection, even within the half acceptance angle of the CPC. An experiment was designed and conducted indoors and outdoors to study the effect of mirror coating on the optical performance of a solid dielectric CPC. Ray tracing was also employed for the detailed analysis and its results are compared with the measurements. Based on these, a concept of partial coating is proposed and verified through simulation. The results show that a partly coated solid dielectric CPC may have a better optical efficiency than a solid CPC without coating for a certain range of incidence angles.

  8. Interactive Ray Tracing for Virtual TV Studio Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Slusallek

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, the well known ray tracing algorithm gained new popularity with the introduction of interactive ray tracing methods. The high modularity and the ability to produce highly realistic images make ray tracing an attractive alternative to raster graphics hardware.Interactive ray tracing also proved its potential in the field of Mixed Reality rendering and provides novel methods for seamless integration of real and virtual content. Actor insertion methods, a subdomain of Mixed Reality and closely related to virtual television studio techniques, can use ray tracing for achieving high output quality in conjunction with appropriate visual cues like shadows and reflections at interactive frame rates.In this paper, we show how interactive ray tracing techniques can provide new ways of implementing future virtual studio applications.

  9. Refined ray tracing inside single- and double-curvatured concave surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhury, Balamati

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the ray tracing effects inside different quadric surfaces. Analytical surface modeling is a priori requirement for electromagnetic (EM) analysis over aerospace platforms. Although numerically-specified surfaces and even non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) can be used for modeling such surfaces, for most practical EM applications, it is sufficient to model them as quadric surface patches and the hybrids thereof. It is therefore apparent that a vast majority of aerospace bodies can be conveniently modeled as combinations of simpler quadric surfaces, i.e. hybrid of quadric cylinders and quadric surfaces of revolutions. Hence the analysis of geometric ray tracing inside is prerequisite to analyzing the RF build-up. This book, describes the ray tracing effects inside different quadric surfaces such as right circular cylinder, general paraboloid of revolution (GPOR), GPOR frustum of different shaping parameters and the corresponding visualization of the ray-path details. Finally ray tracin...

  10. RAY TRACING RENDER MENGGUNAKAN FRAGMENT ANTI ALIASING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febriliyan Samopa

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Rendering is generating surface and three-dimensional effects on an object displayed on a monitor screen. Ray tracing as a rendering method that traces ray for each image pixel has a drawback, that is, aliasing (jaggies effect. There are some methods for executing anti aliasing. One of those methods is OGSS (Ordered Grid Super Sampling. OGSS is able to perform aliasing well. However, this method requires more computation time since sampling of all pixels in the image will be increased. Fragment Anti Aliasing (FAA is a new alternative method that can cope with the drawback. FAA will check the image when performing rendering to a scene. Jaggies effect is only happened at curve and gradient object. Therefore, only this part of object that will experience sampling magnification. After this sampling magnification and the pixel values are computed, then downsample is performed to retrieve the original pixel values. Experimental results show that the software can implement ray tracing well in order to form images, and it can implement FAA and OGSS technique to perform anti aliasing. In general, rendering using FAA is faster than using OGSS

  11. Powerful scriptable ray tracing package xrt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klementiev, Konstantin; Chernikov, Roman

    2014-09-01

    We present an open source python based ray tracing tool that offers several useful features in graphical presentation, material properties, advanced calculations of synchrotron sources, implementation of diffractive and refractive elements, complex (also closed) surfaces and multiprocessing. The package has many usage examples which are supplied together with the code and visualized on its web page. We exemplify the present version by modeling (i) a curved crystal analyzer, (ii) a quarter wave plate, (iii) Bragg-Fresnel optics and (iv) multiple reflective and non-sequential optics (polycapillary). The present version implements the use of OpenCL framework that executes calculations on both CPUs and GPUs. Currently, the calculations of an undulator source on a GPU show a gain of about two orders of magnitude in computing time. The development version is successful in modelling the wavefront propagation. Two examples of diffraction on a plane mirror and a plane blazed grating are given for a beam with a finite energy band.

  12. Implementation of Refined Ray Tracing inside a Space Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balamati Choudhury

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Modern space modules are susceptible to EM radiation from both external and internal sources within the space module. Since the EM waves for various operations are frequently in the high-frequency domain, asymptotic raytheoretic methods are often the most optimal choice for deterministic EM field analysis. In this work, surface modeling of a typical manned space module is done by hybridizing a finite segment of right circular cylinder and a general paraboloid of revolution (GPOR frustum. A transmitting source is placed inside the space module and test rays are launched from the transmitter. The rays are allowed to propagate inside the cavity. Unlike the available ray-tracing package, that use numerical search methods, a quasi-analytical ray-propagation model is developed to obtain the ray-path details inside the cavity which involves the ray-launching, ray-bunching, and an adaptive cube for ray-reception.

  13. Ray-Tracing studies in a perturbed atmosphere I- The initial value problem

    CERN Document Server

    Tannous, C

    2001-01-01

    We report the development of a new ray-tracing simulation tool having the potential of the full characterization of a radio link through the accurate study of the propagation path of the signal from the transmitting to the receiving antennas across a perturbed atmosphere. The ray-tracing equations are solved, with controlled accuracy, in three dimensions (3D) and the propagation characteristics are obtained using various refractive index models. The launching of the rays, the atmospheric medium and its disturbances are characterized in 3D. The novelty in the approach stems from the use of special numerical techniques dealing with so called stiff differential equations without which no solution of the ray-tracing equations is possible. Starting with a given launching angle, the solution consists of the ray trajectory, the propagation time information at each point of the path, the beam spreading, the transmitted (resp. received) power taking account of the radiation pattern and orientation of the antennas and ...

  14. IONORT: IONOsphere Ray-Tracing - Ray-tracing program in ionospheric magnetoplasma

    OpenAIRE

    Bianchi, Cesidio; Settimi, Alessandro; Azzarone, Adriano

    2010-01-01

    The application package "IONORT" for the calculation of ray-tracing can be used by customers using the Windows operating system. It is a program whose interface with the user is created in MATLAB. In fact, the program launches an executable that integrates the system of differential equations written in Fortran and importing the output in the MATLAB program, which generates graphics and other information on the ray. This work is inspired mainly by the program of Jones and Stephenson, widespre...

  15. GPU-based ray tracing algorithm for high-speed propagation prediction in typical indoor environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lixin; Guan, Xiaowei; Liu, Zhongyu

    2015-10-01

    A fast 3-D ray tracing propagation prediction model based on virtual source tree is presented in this paper, whose theoretical foundations are geometrical optics(GO) and the uniform theory of diffraction(UTD). In terms of typical single room indoor scene, taking the geometrical and electromagnetic information into account, some acceleration techniques are adopted to raise the efficiency of the ray tracing algorithm. The simulation results indicate that the runtime of the ray tracing algorithm will sharply increase when the number of the objects in the single room is large enough. Therefore, GPU acceleration technology is used to solve that problem. As is known to all, GPU is good at calculation operation rather than logical judgment, so that tens of thousands of threads in CUDA programs are able to calculate at the same time, in order to achieve massively parallel acceleration. Finally, a typical single room with several objects is simulated by using the serial ray tracing algorithm and the parallel one respectively. It can be found easily from the results that compared with the serial algorithm, the GPU-based one can achieve greater efficiency.

  16. Detailed numerical simulations of laser cooling processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Serrano, J.; Kohel, J.; Thompson, R.; Yu, N.

    2001-01-01

    We developed a detailed semiclassical numerical code of the forces applied on atoms in optical and magnetic fields to increase the understanding of the different roles that light, atomic collisions, background pressure, and number of particles play in experiments with laser cooled and trapped atoms.

  17. A sound ray tracing algorithm in three-dimensional heterogeneous media based on wavefront traveltimes interpolation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yueqin; ZHANG Jianzhong

    2008-01-01

    A kind of three-dimensional(3-D) sound ray tracing algorithm in heterogeneous media is studied. This algorithm includes two steps: the first step computes the wavefront traveltimes forward; the second step traces the sound rays backward. In the first step, the computation of wavefront traveltimes at discrete grid points from the sound source, was found on Eikonal equation solutions and carried out by GMM (Group marching method) wavefront marching method based on level set. In the second step, sound ray tracing was proceeded gradually from the receiver to each cell towards the sound source, with wavefront traveltimes computed in the first step. Time values on arbitrary positions in each cuboid cell can be expressed by linear interpolation of wavefront traveltimes at the same cell's grid points. Thus,an algorithm of 3-D sound ray tracing in heterogeneous media is put forward. The simulation results indicate that this method can improve both the accuracy and the efficiency of 3-D sound ray tracing greatly.

  18. Display system analysis with critical polarization elements in a non-sequential ray tracing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlocker, J. A.; Jiang, J.; Garcia, K. J.

    2008-08-01

    Common digital display systems have evolved into sophisticated optical devices. The rapid market growth in liquid crystal displays makes the simulation of full systems attractive, promoting virtual prototyping with decreased development times and improved manufacturability. Realistic simulation using commercial non-sequential ray tracing tools has been instrumental in this process, but the need to accurately model polarization devices has become critical in many designs. As display systems seek more efficient use of light and more accurate color representation, the proper simulation of polarization devices with large acceptance angles is essential. This paper examines non-uniform polarization effects in the simulation of modern display devices using realistic polarizer and retarder models in the ASAP® non-sequential ray-tracing environment.

  19. Mathematic models for a ray tracing method and its applications in wireless optical communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minglun; Zhang, Yangan; Yuan, Xueguang; Zhang, Jinnan

    2010-08-16

    This paper presents a new ray tracing method, which contains a whole set of mathematic models, and its validity is verified by simulations. In addition, both theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the computational complexity of the method is much lower than that of previous ones. Therefore, the method can be used to rapidly calculate the impulse response of wireless optical channels for complicated systems.

  20. Detailed weather data generator for building simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Adelard, L; Garde, F; Gatina, J -C

    2012-01-01

    Thermal buildings simulation softwares need meteorological files in thermal comfort, energetic evaluation studies. Few tools can make significant meteorological data available such as generated typical year, representative days, or artificial meteorological database. This paper deals about the presentation of a new software, RUNEOLE, used to provide weather data in buildings applications with a method adapted to all kind of climates. RUNEOLE associates three modules of description, modelling and generation of weather data. The statistical description of an existing meteorological database makes typical representative days available and leads to the creation of model libraries. The generation module leads to the generation of non existing sequences. This software tends to be usable for the searchers and designers, by means of interactivity, facilitated use and easy communication. The conceptual basis of this tool will be exposed and we'll propose two examples of applications in building physics for tropical hu...

  1. Internal and external stray radiation suppression for LWIR catadioptric telescope using non-sequential ray tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yang; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Tao; Wu, Yanxiong; Shi, Guangwei; Wang, Lingjie

    2015-07-01

    A long wave infrared imaging system operated for space exploration of faint target is highly sensitive to stray radiation. We present an integrative suppression process of internal and external stray radiation. A compact and re-imaging LWIR catadioptric telescope is designed as practical example and internal and external stray radiation is analyzed for this telescope. The detector is cryogenically cooled with 100% cold shield efficiency of Lyot stop. A non-sequential ray tracing technique is applied to investigate how the stray radiation propagates inside optical system. The simulation and optimization during initial design stage are proceeded to avoid subversive defect that the stray radiation disturbs the target single. The quantitative analysis of stray radiation irradiance emitted by lenses and structures inside is presented in detail. The optical elements, which operate at room-temperature due to the limitation of weight and size, turn to be the significant stray radiation sources. We propose a method combined infrared material selection and optical form optimization to reduce the internal stray radiation of lens. We design and optimize mechanical structures to achieve a further attenuation of internal stray radiation power. The point source transmittance (PST) is calculated to assess the external radiation which comes from the source out of view field. The ghost of bright target due to residual reflection of optical coatings is simulated. The results show that the performance of stray radiation suppression is dramatically improved by iterative optimization and modification of optomechanical configurations.

  2. High performance dosimetry calculations using adapted ray-tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotte, Lancelot; Saupin, Guillaume

    2010-11-01

    When preparing interventions on nuclear sites, it is interesting to study different scenarios, to identify the most appropriate one for the operator(s). Using virtual reality tools is a good way to simulate the potential scenarios. Thus, taking advantage of very efficient computation times can help the user studying different complex scenarios, by immediately evaluating the impact of any changes. In the field of radiation protection, people often use computation codes based on the straight line attenuation method with build-up factors. As for other approaches, geometrical computations (finding all the interactions between radiation rays and the scene objects) remain the bottleneck of the simulation. We present in this paper several optimizations used to speed up these geometrical computations, using innovative GPU ray-tracing algorithms. For instance, we manage to compute every intersectionbetween 600 000 rays and a huge 3D industrial scene in a fraction of second. Moreover, our algorithm works the same way for both static and dynamic scenes, allowing easier study of complex intervention scenarios (where everything moves: the operator(s), the shielding objects, the radiation sources).

  3. User and programmers guide to the neutron ray-tracing package McStas, version 1.2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K.; Lefmann, K.

    2000-01-01

    The software package McStas is a tool for writing Monte Carlo ray-tracing simulations of neutron scattering instruments with very high complexity and precision. The simulations can compute all aspects of the performance of instruments and can thus be usedto optimize the use of existing equipment...

  4. Ray Tracing RF Field Prediction: An Unforgiving Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Vitucci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The prediction of RF coverage in urban environments is now commonly considered a solved problem with tens of models proposed in the literature showing good performance against measurements. Among these, ray tracing is regarded as one of the most accurate ones available. In the present work, however, we show that a great deal of work is still needed to make ray tracing really unleash its potential in practical use. A very extensive validation of a state-of-the-art 3D ray tracing model is carried out through comparison with measurements in one of the most challenging environments: the city of San Francisco. Although the comparison is based on RF cellular coverage at 850 and 1900 MHz, a widely studied territory, very relevant sources of error and inaccuracy are identified in several cases along with possible solutions.

  5. Simplification of vector ray tracing by the groove function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongwen; Liu, Zuping; Wang, Qiuping

    2005-01-01

    Tracing rays through arbitrary diffraction gratings (including holographic gratings of the second generation fabricated on a curved substrate) by the vector form is somewhat complicated. Vector ray tracing utilizes the local groove density, the calculation of which highly depends on how the grooves are generated. Characterizing a grating by its groove function, available for almost arbitrary gratings, is much simpler than doing so by its groove density, essentially being a vector. Applying the concept of Riemann geometry, we give an expression of the groove density by the groove function. The groove function description of a grating can thus be incorporated into vector ray tracing, which is beneficial especially at the design stage. A unified explicit grating ray-tracing formalism is given as well.

  6. Three-dimensional polarization ray-tracing calculus II: retardance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Garam; McClain, Stephen C; Chipman, Russell A

    2011-06-20

    The concept of retardance is critically analyzed for ray paths through optical systems described by a three-by-three polarization ray-tracing matrix. Algorithms are presented to separate the effects of retardance from geometric transformations. The geometric transformation described by a "parallel transport matrix" characterizes nonpolarizing propagation through an optical system, and also provides a proper relationship between sets of local coordinates along the ray path. The proper retardance is calculated by removing this geometric transformation from the three-by-three polarization ray-tracing matrix. Two rays with different ray paths through an optical system can have the same polarization ray-tracing matrix but different retardances. The retardance and diattenuation of an aluminum-coated three fold-mirror system are analyzed as an example.

  7. GRay: a Massively Parallel GPU-Based Code for Ray Tracing in Relativistic Spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Chi-kwan; Ozel, Feryal

    2013-01-01

    We introduce GRay, a massively parallel integrator designed to trace the trajectories of billions of photons in a curved spacetime. This GPU-based integrator employs the stream processing paradigm, is implemented in CUDA C/C++, and runs on nVidia graphics cards. The peak performance of GRay using single precision floating-point arithmetic on a single GPU exceeds 300 GFLOP (or 1 nanosecond per photon per time step). For a realistic problem, where the peak performance cannot be reached, GRay is two orders of magnitude faster than existing CPU-based ray tracing codes. This performance enhancement allows more effective searches of large parameter spaces when comparing theoretical predictions of images, spectra, and lightcurves from the vicinities of compact objects to observations. GRay can also perform on-the-fly ray tracing within general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic algorithms that simulate accretion flows around compact objects. Making use of this algorithm, we calculate the properties of the shadows of K...

  8. IONORT: IONOsphere Ray-Tracing - Ray-tracing program in ionospheric magnetoplasma

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Cesidio; Azzarone, Adriano

    2010-01-01

    The application package "IONORT" for the calculation of ray-tracing can be used by customers using the Windows operating system. It is a program whose interface with the user is created in MATLAB. In fact, the program launches an executable that integrates the system of differential equations written in Fortran and imports the output in the MATLAB program, which generates graphics and other information on the ray. This work is inspired mainly by the program of Jones and Stephenson, widespread in the scientific community that is interested in radio propagation via the ionosphere. The program is written in FORTRAN 77, a mainframe CDC-3800. The code itself, as well as being very elegant, is highly efficient and provides the basis for many programs now in use mainly in the Coordinate Registration (CR) of Over The Horizon (OTH) radar. The input and output of this program require devices no longer in use for several decades and there are no compilers that accept instructions written for that type of mainframe. For ...

  9. GPU-based Ray Tracing of Dynamic Scenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Lux

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Interactive ray tracing of non-trivial scenes is just becoming feasible on single graphics processing units (GPU. Recent work in this area focuses on building effective acceleration structures, which work well under the constraints of current GPUs. Most approaches are targeted at static scenes and only allow navigation in the virtual scene. So far support for dynamic scenes has not been considered for GPU implementations. We have developed a GPU-based ray tracing system for dynamic scenes consisting of a set of individual objects. Each object may independently move around, but its geometry and topology are static.

  10. Approximate P-wave ray tracing and dynamic ray tracing in weakly orthorhombic media of varying symmetry orientation

    KAUST Repository

    Masmoudi, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    We present an approximate, but efficient and sufficiently accurate P-wave ray tracing and dynamic ray tracing procedure for 3D inhomogeneous, weakly orthorhombic media with varying orientation of symmetry planes. In contrast to commonly used approaches, the orthorhombic symmetry is preserved at any point of the model. The model is described by six weak-anisotropy parameters and three Euler angles, which may vary arbitrarily, but smoothly, throughout the model. We use the procedure for the calculation of rays and corresponding two-point traveltimes in a VSP experiment in a part of the BP benchmark model generalized to orthorhombic symmetry.

  11. Simulation of flame-vortex interaction using detailed and reduced

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilka, M. [Gaz de France (GDF), 75 - Paris (France); Veynante, D. [Ecole Centrale de Paris, Laboratoire EM2C. CNRS, 92 - Chatenay-Malabry (France); Baum, M. [CERFACS (France); Poinsot, T.J. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France). Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse

    1996-12-31

    The interaction between a pair of counter-rotating vortices and a lean premixed CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} flame ({Phi} = + 0.55) has been studied by direct numerical simulations using detailed and reduced chemical reaction schemes. Results from the complex chemistry simulation are discussed with respect to earlier experiments and differences in the simulations using detailed and reduces chemistry are investigated. Transient evolutions of the flame surface and the total heat release rate are compared and modifications in the evolution of the local flame structure are displayed. (authors) 22 refs.

  12. Real time ray tracing of skeletal implicit surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rouiller, Olivier; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas

    Modeling and rendering in real time is usually done via rasterization of polygonal meshes. We present a method to model with skeletal implicit surfaces and an algorithm to ray trace these surfaces in real time in the GPU. Our skeletal representation of the surfaces allows to create smooth models...

  13. Ray Tracing Modelling of Reflector for Vertical Bifacial Panel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Thorsteinsson, Sune; Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff

    2016-01-01

    Bifacial solar panels have recently become a new attractive building block for PV systems. In this work we propose a reflector system for a vertical bifacial panel, and use ray tracing modelling to model the performance. Particularly, we investigate the impact of the reflector volume being filled...

  14. Ray tracing and refraction in the modified US1976 atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, SY

    2003-01-01

    A new and flexible ray-tracing procedure for calculating astronomical refraction is outlined and applied to the US1976 standard atmosphere. This atmosphere is generalized to allow for a free choice of the temperature and pressure at sea level, and in this form it has been named the modified US1976

  15. Evaluation and optimization of the optical performance of low-concentrating dielectric compound parabolic concentrator using ray-tracing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmah, Nabin; Richards, Bryce S; Mallick, Tapas K

    2011-07-01

    We present a detailed design concept and optical performance evaluation of stationary dielectric asymmetric compound parabolic concentrators (DiACPCs) using ray-tracing methods. Three DiACPC designs, DiACPC-55, DiACPC-66, and DiACPC-77, of acceptance half-angles (0° and 55°), (0° and 66°), and (0° and 77°), respectively, are designed in order to optimize the concentrator for building façade photovoltaic applications in northern latitudes (>55 °N). The dielectric concentrator profiles have been realized via truncation of the complete compound parabolic concentrator profiles to achieve a geometric concentration ratio of 2.82. Ray-tracing simulation results show that all rays entering the designed concentrators within the acceptance half-angle range can be collected without escaping from the parabolic sides and aperture. The maximum optical efficiency of the designed concentrators is found to be 83%, which tends to decrease with the increase in incidence angle. The intensity is found to be distributed at the receiver (solar cell) area in an inhomogeneous pattern for a wide range of incident angles of direct solar irradiance with high-intensity peaks at certain points of the receiver. However, peaks become more intense for the irradiation incident close to the extreme acceptance angles, shifting the peaks to the edge of the receiver. Energy flux distribution at the receiver for diffuse radiation is found to be homogeneous within ±12% with an average intensity of 520 W/m².

  16. 3D ultrasonic ray tracing in AutoCAD®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, D.; Leggat, P.; McNab, A.

    2001-04-01

    To assist with the design and validation of testing procedures for NDT, add-on modules have been developed for AutoCAD® 2000. One of the modules computes and displays ultrasonic 3D ray tracing. Another determines paths between two points, for instance a probe and a target or two probes. The third module displays phased array operational modes and calculates element delays for phased array operation. The modules can be applied to simple or complex solid model components.

  17. Ray Tracing Modelling of Reflector for Vertical Bifacial Panel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Thorsteinsson, Sune; Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff

    2016-01-01

    Bifacial solar panels have recently become a new attractive building block for PV systems. In this work we propose a reflector system for a vertical bifacial panel, and use ray tracing modelling to model the performance. Particularly, we investigate the impact of the reflector volume being filled...... with a refractive medium, and shows the refractive medium improves the reflector performance since it directs almost all the light incident on the incoming plane into the PV panel....

  18. Parallel Ray Tracing Using the Message Passing Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    efficiency of 97.9% and a normalized ray-tracing rate of 6.95 ?106 rays ? surfaces/(s ? processor) in a system with 22 planar surfaces, two paraboloid ...with 22 planar surfaces, two paraboloid reflectors, and one hyperboloid refractor. The need for a load-balancing software was obviated by the use of a...specified for each type of optical surface—planar, spherical, paraboloid , hyperboloid, aspheric—and whether it applies for reflection or refraction. The

  19. Development of Ray Tracing Algorithms for Scanning Plane and Transverse Plane Analysis for Satellite Multibeam Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. Abd Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reflector antennas have been widely used in many areas. In the implementation of parabolic reflector antenna for broadcasting satellite applications, it is essential for the spacecraft antenna to provide precise contoured beam to effectively serve the required region. For this purpose, combinations of more than one beam are required. Therefore, a tool utilizing ray tracing method is developed to calculate precise off-axis beams for multibeam antenna system. In the multibeam system, each beam will be fed from different feed positions to allow the main beam to be radiated at the exact direction on the coverage area. Thus, detailed study on caustics of a parabolic reflector antenna is performed and presented in this paper, which is to investigate the behaviour of the rays and its relation to various antenna parameters. In order to produce accurate data for the analysis, the caustic behaviours are investigated in two distinctive modes: scanning plane and transverse plane. This paper presents the detailed discussions on the derivation of the ray tracing algorithms, the establishment of the equations of caustic loci, and the verification of the method through calculation of radiation pattern.

  20. Coupled optical and thermal detailed simulations for the accurate evaluation and performance improvement of molten salts solar towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Barberena, Javier; Mutuberria, Amaia; Palacin, Luis G.; Sanz, Javier L.; Pereira, Daniel; Bernardos, Ana; Sanchez, Marcelino; Rocha, Alberto R.

    2017-06-01

    The National Renewable Energy Centre of Spain, CENER, and the Technology & Innovation area of ACS Cobra, as a result of their long term expertise in the CSP field, have developed a high-quality and high level of detail optical and thermal simulation software for the accurate evaluation of Molten Salts Solar Towers. The main purpose of this software is to make a step forward in the state-of-the-art of the Solar Towers simulation programs. Generally, these programs deal with the most critical systems of such plants, i.e. the solar field and the receiver, on an independent basis. Therefore, these programs typically neglect relevant aspects in the operation of the plant as heliostat aiming strategies, solar flux shapes onto the receiver, material physical and operational limitations, transient processes as preheating and secure cloud passing operating modes, and more. The modelling approach implemented in the developed program consists on effectively coupling detailed optical simulations of the heliostat field with also detailed and full-transient thermal simulations of the molten salts tube-based external receiver. The optical model is based on an accurate Monte Carlo ray-tracing method which solves the complete solar field by simulating each of the heliostats at once according to their specific layout in the field. In the thermal side, the tube-based cylindrical external receiver of a Molten Salts Solar Tower is modelled assuming one representative tube per panel, and implementing the specific connection layout of the panels as well as the internal receiver pipes. Each tube is longitudinally discretized and the transient energy and mass balances in the temperature dependent molten salts and steel tube models are solved. For this, a one dimensional radial heat transfer model based is used. The thermal model is completed with a detailed control and operation strategy module, able to represent the appropriate operation of the plant. An integration framework has been

  1. A new hybrid algorithm using thermodynamic and backward ray-tracing approaches for modeling luminescent solar concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Ch. K.; Lim, Y. S.; Tan, S. G.; Rahman, F. A. [Faculty of Engineering and Science, University Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Genting Klang, 53300, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2010-12-15

    A Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) is a transparent plate containing luminescent material with photovoltaic (PV) cells attached to its edges. Sunlight entering the plate is absorbed by the luminescent material, which in turn emits light. The emitted light propagates through the plate and arrives at the PV cells through total internal reflection. The ratio of the area of the relatively cheap polymer plate to that of the expensive PV cells is increased, and the cost per unit of solar electricity can be reduced by 75%. To improve the emission performance of LSCs, simulation modeling of LSCs becomes essential. Ray-tracing modeling is a popular approach for simulating LSCs due to its great ability of modeling various LSC structures under direct and diffuse sunlight. However, this approach requires substantial amount of measurement input data. Also, the simulation time is enormous because it is a forward-ray tracing method that traces all the rays propagating from the light source to the concentrator. On the other hand, the thermodynamic approach requires substantially less input parameters and simulation time, but it can only be used to model simple LSC designs with direct sunlight. Therefore, a new hybrid model was developed to perform various simulation studies effectively without facing the issues arisen from the existing ray-tracing and thermodynamic models. The simulation results show that at least 60% of the total output irradiance of a LSC is contributed by the light trapped and channeled by the LSC. The novelty of this hybrid model is the concept of integrating the thermodynamic model with a well-developed Radiance ray-tracing model, hence making this model as a fast, powerful and cost-effective tool for the design of LSCs. (authors)

  2. A New Hybrid Algorithm Using Thermodynamic and Backward Ray-Tracing Approaches for Modeling Luminescent Solar Concentrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Kim Lo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC is a transparent plate containing luminescent material with photovoltaic (PV cells attached to its edges. Sunlight entering the plate is absorbed by the luminescent material, which in turn emits light. The emitted light propagates through the plate and arrives at the PV cells through total internal reflection. The ratio of the area of the relatively cheap polymer plate to that of the expensive PV cells is increased, and the cost per unit of solar electricity can be reduced by 75%. To improve the emission performance of LSCs, simulation modeling of LSCs becomes essential. Ray-tracing modeling is a popular approach for simulating LSCs due to its great ability of modeling various LSC structures under direct and diffuse sunlight. However, this approach requires substantial amount of measurement input data. Also, the simulation time is enormous because it is a forward-ray tracing method that traces all the rays propagating from the light source to the concentrator. On the other hand, the thermodynamic approach requires substantially less input parameters and simulation time, but it can only be used to model simple LSC designs with direct sunlight. Therefore, a new hybrid model was developed to perform various simulation studies effectively without facing the issues arisen from the existing ray-tracing and thermodynamic models. The simulation results show that at least 60% of the total output irradiance of a LSC is contributed by the light trapped and channeled by the LSC. The novelty of this hybrid model is the concept of integrating the thermodynamic model with a well-developed Radiance ray-tracing model, hence making this model as a fast, powerful and cost-effective tool for the design of LSCs.

  3. Trans-Ionospheric High Frequency Signal Ray Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, S.; Gillespie, R. J.

    2012-09-01

    All electromagnetic radiation undergoes refraction as it propagates through the atmosphere. Tropospheric refraction is largely governed by interaction of the radiation with bounded electrons; ionospheric refraction is primarily governed by free electron interactions. The latter phenomenon is important for propagation and refraction of High Frequency (HF) through Extremely High Frequency (EHF) signals. The degree to which HF to EHF signals are bent is dependent upon the integrated refractive effect of the ionosphere: a result of the signal's angle of incidence with the boundaries between adjacent ionospheric regions, the magnitude of change in electron density between two regions, as well as the frequency of the signal. In the case of HF signals, the ionosphere may bend the signal so much that it is directed back down towards the Earth, making over-the-horizon HF radio communication possible. Ionospheric refraction is a major challenge for space-based geolocation applications, where the ionosphere is typically the biggest contributor to geolocation error. Accurate geolocation requires an algorithm that accurately reflects the physical process of a signal transiting the ionosphere, and an accurate specification of the ionosphere at the time of the signal transit. Currently implemented solutions are limited by both the algorithm chosen to perform the ray trace and by the accuracy of the ionospheric data used in the calculations. This paper describes a technique for adapting a ray tracing algorithm to run on a General-Purpose Graphics Processing Unit (GPGPU or GPU), and using a physics-based model specifying the ionosphere at the time of signal transit. This technique allows simultaneous geolocation of significantly more signals than an equivalently priced Central Processing Unit (CPU) based system. Additionally, because this technique makes use of the most widely accepted numeric algorithm for ionospheric ray tracing and a timely physics-based model of the ionosphere

  4. Photorealistic ray tracing to visualize automobile side mirror reflective scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hocheol; Kim, Kyuman; Lee, Gang; Lee, Sungkoo; Kim, Jingu

    2014-10-20

    We describe an interactive visualization procedure for determining the optimal surface of a special automobile side mirror, thereby removing the blind spot, without the need for feedback from the error-prone manufacturing process. If the horizontally progressive curvature distributions are set to the semi-mathematical expression for a free-form surface, the surface point set can then be derived through numerical integration. This is then converted to a NURBS surface while retaining the surface curvature. Then, reflective scenes from the driving environment can be virtually realized using photorealistic ray tracing, in order to evaluate how these reflected images would appear to drivers.

  5. Ray tracing study for non-imaging daylight collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittkopf, Stephen [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore (SERIS), National University of Singapore (NUS), 7 Engineering Drive 1, Block E3A, 06-01, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Solar Energy and Building Physics Laboratory (LESO), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL) (Switzerland); Oliver Grobe, Lars; Geisler-Moroder, David [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore (SERIS), National University of Singapore (NUS), 7 Engineering Drive 1, Block E3A, 06-01, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Compagnon, Raphael [College of Engineering and Architecture of Fribourg (EIA-FR), University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland (HES-SO) (Switzerland); Kaempf, Jerome; Linhart, Friedrich; Scartezzini, Jean-Louis [Solar Energy and Building Physics Laboratory (LESO), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL) (Switzerland)

    2010-06-15

    This paper presents a novel method to study how well non-imaging daylight collectors pipe diffuse daylight into long horizontal funnels for illuminating deep buildings. Forward ray tracing is used to derive luminous intensity distributions curves (LIDC) of such collectors centered in an arc-shaped light source representing daylight. New photometric characteristics such as 2D flux, angular spread and horizontal offset are introduced as a function of such LIDC. They are applied for quantifying and thus comparing different collector contours. (author)

  6. Global Ray Tracing Simulations of the SABER Gravity Wave Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    for the lower strato - sphere [e.g., Wang et al., 2005; Vaughan and Worthington, 2007] and falling sphere data for the mid and upper stratosphere [e.g...12a and 12b. D08126 PREUSSE ET AL.: GRAVITY WAVES BY SATELLITE AND RAYTRACER 19 of 25 D08126 definitively address the relative role of the different...2006JD008126. Dunkerton, T. J. (1997), The role of gravity waves in the quasi-biennial oscillation, J. Geophys. Res., 102, 26,053–26,076. Eckermann, S

  7. Dynamic ray tracing and its application in triangulated media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueger, A.

    1993-07-01

    Hale and Cohen (1991) developed software to generate two-dimensional computer models of complex geology. Their method uses a triangulation technique designed to support efficient and accurate computation of seismic wavefields for models of the earth`s interior. Subsequently, Hale (1991) used this triangulation approach to perform dynamic ray tracing and create synthetic seismograms based on the method of Gaussian beams. Here, I extend this methodology to allow an increased variety of ray-theoretical experiments. Specifically, the developed program GBmod (Gaussian Beam MODeling) can produce arbitrary multiple sequences and incorporate attenuation and density variations. In addition, I have added an option to perform Fresnel-volume ray tracing (Cerveny and Soares, 1992). Corrections for reflection and transmission losses at interfaces, and for two-and-one-half-dimensional (2.5-D) spreading are included. However, despite these enhancements, difficulties remain in attempts to compute accurate synthetic seismograms if strong lateral velocity inhomogeneities are present. Here, these problems are discussed and, to a certain extent, reduced. I provide example computations of high-frequency seismograms based on the method of Gaussian beams to exhibit the advantages and disadvantages of the proposed modeling method and illustrate new features for both surface and vertical seismic profiling (VSP) acquisition geometries.

  8. Ray tracing and ECRH absorption modeling in the HSX stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, G. M.; Likin, K. M.; Marushchenko, N. B.; Turkin, Y.

    2015-09-01

    To increase flexibility in ECRH experiments on the helically symmetric experiment (HSX), a second gyrotron and transmission line have been installed. The second antenna includes a steerable mirror for off-axis heating, and the launched power may be modulated for use in heat pulse propagation experiments. The extraordinary wave at the second harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency or the ordinary wave at the fundamental resonance are used for plasma start-up and heating on HSX. The tracing visualized ray tracing code (Marushchenko et al 2007 Plasma Fusion Res. 2 S1129) is used to estimate single-pass absorption and to model multi-pass wave damping in the three-dimensional HSX geometry. The single-pass absorption of the ordinary wave at the fundamental resonance is calculated to be as high as 30%, while measurements of the total absorption indicate that 45% of the launched power is absorbed. A multi-pass ray tracing model correctly predicts the experimental absorption and indicates that the launched power is absorbed within the plasma core (r/a≤slant 0.2 ).

  9. Construction of Virtual Tuming Scene Based on Local Ray Tracing Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王国锋; 王子良; 王太勇

    2003-01-01

    According to the features of the turning simulation, a simplified Whitted lighting model is proposed based on the analysis of Phong and other local illumination model. Moreover, in order to obtain the natural lighting effects, local ray tracing algorithm is given to calculate the light intensity of every position during the course of the simulation. This method can calculate the refresh area before calculating the intersection line,simulate the machining environment accurately and reduce the calculating time. Finally, an example of the virtual cutting scene is shown to demonstrate the effects of the global illumination model. If the CUP is 1.3 G and the internal memory is 128 M, the refreshing time of virtual turning scene can be reduced by nine times. This study plays an important role in the enrichment of the virtual manufacturing theory and the promotion of the development of the advanced manufacturing technology.

  10. GRay: A Massively Parallel GPU-based Code for Ray Tracing in Relativistic Spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chi-kwan; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal

    2013-11-01

    We introduce GRay, a massively parallel integrator designed to trace the trajectories of billions of photons in a curved spacetime. This graphics-processing-unit (GPU)-based integrator employs the stream processing paradigm, is implemented in CUDA C/C++, and runs on nVidia graphics cards. The peak performance of GRay using single-precision floating-point arithmetic on a single GPU exceeds 300 GFLOP (or 1 ns per photon per time step). For a realistic problem, where the peak performance cannot be reached, GRay is two orders of magnitude faster than existing central-processing-unit-based ray-tracing codes. This performance enhancement allows more effective searches of large parameter spaces when comparing theoretical predictions of images, spectra, and light curves from the vicinities of compact objects to observations. GRay can also perform on-the-fly ray tracing within general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic algorithms that simulate accretion flows around compact objects. Making use of this algorithm, we calculate the properties of the shadows of Kerr black holes and the photon rings that surround them. We also provide accurate fitting formulae of their dependencies on black hole spin and observer inclination, which can be used to interpret upcoming observations of the black holes at the center of the Milky Way, as well as M87, with the Event Horizon Telescope.

  11. Monte Carlo tolerancing tool using nonsequential ray tracing on a computer cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Christopher

    2010-08-01

    The development of a flexible tolerancing tool for illumination systems based on Matlab® and Zemax® is described in this paper. Two computationally intensive techniques are combined, Monte Carlo tolerancing and non-sequential ray tracing. Implementation of the tool on a computer cluster allows for relatively rapid tolerancing. This paper explores the tool structure, describing the splitting the task of tolerancing between Zemax and Matlab. An equation is derived that determines the number of simulated ray traces needed to accurately resolve illumination uniformity. Two examples of tolerancing illuminators are given. The first one is a projection system consisting of a pico-DLP, a light pipe, a TIR prism and the critical illumination relay optics. The second is a wide band, high performance Köhler illuminator, which includes a modified molded LED as the light source. As high performance illumination systems evolve, the practice of applying standard workshop tolerances to these systems may need to be re-examined.

  12. ROBAST: Development of a ROOT-Based Ray-Tracing Library for Cosmic-Ray Telescopes and its Applications in the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Okumura, Akira; Rulten, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a non-sequential ray-tracing simulation library, ROOT-based simulator for ray tracing (ROBAST), which is aimed to be widely used in optical simulations of cosmic-ray (CR) and gamma-ray telescopes. The library is written in C++, and fully utilizes the geometry library of the ROOT framework. Despite the importance of optics simulations in CR experiments, no open-source software for ray-tracing simulations that can be widely used in the community has existed. To reduce the dispensable effort needed to develop multiple ray-tracing simulators by different research groups, we have successfully used ROBAST for many years to perform optics simulations for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Among the six proposed telescope designs for CTA, ROBAST is currently used for three telescopes: a Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) medium-sized telescope, one of SC small-sized telescopes, and a large-sized telescope (LST). ROBAST is also used for the simulation and development of hexagonal light concentrators propose...

  13. The Verification and Validation of the Ray-tracing of Bag of Triangles (BoTs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The Verification and Validation of the Ray-tracing of Bag of Triangles ( BoTs ) by Charith Ranawake ARL-CR-0761 February 2015...Ground, MD 22105 ARL-CR-0761 February 2015 The Verification and Validation of the Ray-tracing of Bag of Triangles ( BoTs ) Charith...and Validation of the Ray-tracing of Bag of Triangles ( BoTs ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  14. Modeling of 3D In—Building Propagation by Ray Tracing Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GongKe; XuRui

    1995-01-01

    The modeling of in-building propagation is of great importance for planning of indoor wireless networks.To model the transmission system comprising of transmitter,receiver and dif-ferent kinds of obstacles,ray tracing technique is used by taking a transmitter as a source launch-ing radio rays in different directions,some of these can reach the receiver through different paths with different path loss and delay,adding them together gives out the field strength at the receiv-ing point.Based on this model,computer simulation is carried out to predict the propagation loss and delay spread,it is shown that the simulation agrees well with the experiments.

  15. Novel applications of the x-ray tracing software package McXtrace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergbäck Knudsen, Erik; Nielsen, Martin Meedom; Haldrup, Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    We will present examples of applying the X-ray tracing software package McXtrace to different kinds of X-ray scattering experiments. In particular we will be focusing on time-resolved type experiments. Simulations of full scale experiments are particularly useful for this kind, especially when...... some of the issues encountered. Generally more than one or all of these effects are present at once. Simulations can in these cases be used to identify distinct footprints of such distortions and thus give the experimenter a means of deconvoluting them from the signal. We will present a study...... of this kind along with the newest developments of the McXtrace software package....

  16. Ray-tracing for coordinate knowledge in the JWST Integrated Science Instrument Module

    CERN Document Server

    Sabatke, Derek; Rohrbach, Scott; Kubalak, David

    2014-01-01

    Optical alignment and testing of the Integrated Science Instrument Module of the James Webb Space Telescope is underway. We describe the Optical Telescope Element Simulator used to feed the science instruments with point images of precisely known location and chief ray pointing, at appropriate wavelengths and flux levels, in vacuum and at operating temperature. The simulator's capabilities include a number of devices for in situ monitoring of source flux, wavefront error, pupil illumination, image position and chief ray angle. Taken together, these functions become a fascinating example of how the first order properties and constructs of an optical design (coordinate systems, image surface and pupil location) acquire measurable meaning in a real system. We illustrate these functions with experimental data, and describe the ray tracing system used to provide both pointing control during operation and analysis support subsequently. Prescription management takes the form of optimization and fitting. Our core too...

  17. OSPRay - A CPU Ray Tracing Framework for Scientific Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, I; Johnson, G P; Amstutz, J; Brownlee, C; Knoll, A; Jeffers, J; Gunther, J; Navratil, P

    2017-01-01

    Scientific data is continually increasing in complexity, variety and size, making efficient visualization and specifically rendering an ongoing challenge. Traditional rasterization-based visualization approaches encounter performance and quality limitations, particularly in HPC environments without dedicated rendering hardware. In this paper, we present OSPRay, a turn-key CPU ray tracing framework oriented towards production-use scientific visualization which can utilize varying SIMD widths and multiple device backends found across diverse HPC resources. This framework provides a high-quality, efficient CPU-based solution for typical visualization workloads, which has already been integrated into several prevalent visualization packages. We show that this system delivers the performance, high-level API simplicity, and modular device support needed to provide a compelling new rendering framework for implementing efficient scientific visualization workflows.

  18. Ionospheric Plasma Drift Analysis Technique Based On Ray Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Gizem; Toker, Cenk

    2016-07-01

    Ionospheric drift measurements provide important information about the variability in the ionosphere, which can be used to quantify ionospheric disturbances caused by natural phenomena such as solar, geomagnetic, gravitational and seismic activities. One of the prominent ways for drift measurement depends on instrumentation based measurements, e.g. using an ionosonde. The drift estimation of an ionosonde depends on measuring the Doppler shift on the received signal, where the main cause of Doppler shift is the change in the length of the propagation path of the signal between the transmitter and the receiver. Unfortunately, ionosondes are expensive devices and their installation and maintenance require special care. Furthermore, the ionosonde network over the world or even Europe is not dense enough to obtain a global or continental drift map. In order to overcome the difficulties related to an ionosonde, we propose a technique to perform ionospheric drift estimation based on ray tracing. First, a two dimensional TEC map is constructed by using the IONOLAB-MAP tool which spatially interpolates the VTEC estimates obtained from the EUREF CORS network. Next, a three dimensional electron density profile is generated by inputting the TEC estimates to the IRI-2015 model. Eventually, a close-to-real situation electron density profile is obtained in which ray tracing can be performed. These profiles can be constructed periodically with a period of as low as 30 seconds. By processing two consequent snapshots together and calculating the propagation paths, we estimate the drift measurements over any coordinate of concern. We test our technique by comparing the results to the drift measurements taken at the DPS ionosonde at Pruhonice, Czech Republic. This study is supported by TUBITAK 115E915 and Joint TUBITAK 114E092 and AS CR14/001 projects.

  19. Heat-Flux Analysis of Solar Furnace Using the Monte Carlo Ray-Tracing Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Jin; Kim, Jong Kyu; Lee, Sang Nam; Kang, Yong Heack [Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    An understanding of the concentrated solar flux is critical for the analysis and design of solar-energy-utilization systems. The current work focuses on the development of an algorithm that uses the Monte Carlo ray-tracing method with excellent flexibility and expandability; this method considers both solar limb darkening and the surface slope error of reflectors, thereby analyzing the solar flux. A comparison of the modeling results with measurements at the solar furnace in Korea Institute of Energy Research (KIER) show good agreement within a measurement uncertainty of 10%. The model evaluates the concentration performance of the KIER solar furnace with a tracking accuracy of 2 mrad and a maximum attainable concentration ratio of 4400 sun. Flux variations according to measurement position and flux distributions depending on acceptance angles provide detailed information for the design of chemical reactors or secondary concentrators.

  20. Ray tracing optical analysis of offset solar collector for Space Station solar dynamic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, Kent S.

    1988-01-01

    OFFSET, a detailed ray tracing computer code, was developed at NASA Lewis Research Center to model the offset solar collector for the Space Station solar dynamic electric power system. This model traces rays from 50 points on the face of the sun to 10 points on each of the 456 collector facets. The triangular facets are modeled with spherical, parabolic, or toroidal reflective surface contour and surface slope errors. The rays are then traced through the receiver aperture to the walls of the receiver. Images of the collector and of the sun within the receiver produced by this code provide insight into the collector receiver interface. Flux distribution on the receiver walls, plotted by this code, is improved by a combination of changes to aperture location and receiver tilt angle. Power loss by spillage at the receiver aperture is computed and is considerably reduced by using toroidal facets.

  1. Light-field camera-based 3D volumetric particle image velocimetry with dense ray tracing reconstruction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shengxian; Ding, Junfei; New, T. H.; Soria, Julio

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a dense ray tracing reconstruction technique for a single light-field camera-based particle image velocimetry. The new approach pre-determines the location of a particle through inverse dense ray tracing and reconstructs the voxel value using multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART). Simulation studies were undertaken to identify the effects of iteration number, relaxation factor, particle density, voxel-pixel ratio and the effect of the velocity gradient on the performance of the proposed dense ray tracing-based MART method (DRT-MART). The results demonstrate that the DRT-MART method achieves higher reconstruction resolution at significantly better computational efficiency than the MART method (4-50 times faster). Both DRT-MART and MART approaches were applied to measure the velocity field of a low speed jet flow which revealed that for the same computational cost, the DRT-MART method accurately resolves the jet velocity field with improved precision, especially for the velocity component along the depth direction.

  2. MC ray-tracing optimization of lobster-eye focusing devices with RESTRAX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saroun, Jan [Nuclear Physics Institute, ASCR, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: saroun@ujf.cas.cz; Kulda, Jiri [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2006-11-15

    The enhanced functionalities of the latest version of the RESTRAX software, providing a high-speed Monte Carlo (MC) ray-tracing code to represent a virtual three-axis neutron spectrometer, include representation of parabolic and elliptic guide profiles and facilities for numerical optimization of parameter values, characterizing the instrument components. As examples, we present simulations of a doubly focusing monochromator in combination with cold neutron guides and lobster-eye supermirror devices, concentrating a monochromatic beam to small sample volumes. A Levenberg-Marquardt minimization algorithm is used to optimize simultaneously several parameters of the monochromator and lobster-eye guides. We compare the performance of optimized configurations in terms of monochromatic neutron flux and energy spread and demonstrate the effect of lobster-eye optics on beam transformations in real and momentum subspaces.

  3. Stress optical path difference analysis of off-axis lens ray trace footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ming-Ying; Chan, Chia-Yen; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Wu, Kun-Huan; Chen, Chih-Wen; Chan, Shenq-Tsong; Huang, Ting-Ming

    2013-06-01

    The mechanical and thermal stress on lens will cause the glass refractive index different, the refractive index of light parallel and light perpendicular to the direction of stress. The refraction index changes will introduce Optical Path Difference (OPD). This study is applying Finite Element Method (FEM) and optical ray tracing; calculate off axis ray stress OPD. The optical system stress distribution result is calculated from finite element simulation, and the stress coordinate need to rotate to optical path direction. Meanwhile, weighting stress to each optical ray path and sum the ray path OPD. The Z-direction stress OPD can be fitted by Zernike polynomial, the separated to sag difference, and rigid body motion. The fitting results can be used to evaluate the stress effect on optical component.

  4. Ray-tracing analysis of crosstalk in multi-core polymer optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berganza, Amaia; Aldabaldetreku, Gotzon; Zubia, Joseba; Durana, Gaizka

    2010-10-11

    The aim of this paper is to present a new ray-tracing model which describes the propagation of light in multi-core polymer optical fibers (MCPOFs), taking into account the crosstalk among their cores. The new model overcomes many of the limitations of previous approaches allowing us to simulate MCPOFs of arbitrary designs. Additionally, it provides us with the output ray distribution at the end of the fiber, making it possible to calculate useful parameters related to the fiber performance such as the Near-Field Pattern, the Far-Field Pattern or the bandwidth. We also present experimental measurements in order to validate the computational model and we analyze the importance of crosstalk in different MCPOF configurations.

  5. A detailed framework to incorporate dust in hydrodynamical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Grassi, T; Haugboelle, T; Schleicher, D R G

    2016-01-01

    Dust plays a key role in the evolution of the ISM and its correct modelling in numerical simulations is therefore fundamental. We present a new and self-consistent model that treats grain thermal coupling with the gas, radiation balance, and surface chemistry for molecular hydrogen. This method can be applied to any dust distribution with an arbitrary number of grain types without affecting the overall computational cost. In this paper we describe in detail the physics and the algorithm behind our approach, and in order to test the methodology, we present some examples of astrophysical interest, namely (i) a one-zone collapse with complete gas chemistry and thermochemical processes, (ii) a 3D model of a low-metallicity collapse of a minihalo starting from cosmological initial conditions, and (iii) a turbulent molecular cloud with H-C-O chemistry (277 reactions), together with self-consistent cooling and heating solved on the fly. Although these examples employ the publicly available code KROME, our approach c...

  6. New ray tracing method to investigate the various effects on wave propagation in medical scenario: an application of wireless body area network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M J; Reza, A W; Kausar, A S M Z; Ramiah, H

    2014-01-01

    The advent of technology with the increasing use of wireless network has led to the development of Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN) to continuously monitor the change of physiological data in a cost efficient manner. As numerous researches on wave propagation characterization have been done in intrabody communication, this study has given emphasis on the wave propagation characterization between the control units (CUs) and wireless access point (AP) in a hospital scenario. Ray tracing is a tool to predict the rays to characterize the wave propagation. It takes huge simulation time, especially when multiple transmitters are involved to transmit physiological data in a realistic hospital environment. Therefore, this study has developed an accelerated ray tracing method based on the nearest neighbor cell and prior knowledge of intersection techniques. Beside this, Red-Black tree is used to store and provide a faster retrieval mechanism of objects in the hospital environment. To prove the superiority, detailed complexity analysis and calculations of reflection and transmission coefficients are also presented in this paper. The results show that the proposed method is about 1.51, 2.1, and 2.9 times faster than the Object Distribution Technique (ODT), Space Volumetric Partitioning (SVP), and Angular Z-Buffer (AZB) methods, respectively. To show the various effects on received power in 60 GHz frequency, few comparisons are made and it is found that on average -9.44 dBm, -8.23 dBm, and -9.27 dBm received power attenuations should be considered when human, AP, and CU move in a given hospital scenario.

  7. New Ray Tracing Method to Investigate the Various Effects on Wave Propagation in Medical Scenario: An Application of Wireless Body Area Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Islam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of technology with the increasing use of wireless network has led to the development of Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN to continuously monitor the change of physiological data in a cost efficient manner. As numerous researches on wave propagation characterization have been done in intrabody communication, this study has given emphasis on the wave propagation characterization between the control units (CUs and wireless access point (AP in a hospital scenario. Ray tracing is a tool to predict the rays to characterize the wave propagation. It takes huge simulation time, especially when multiple transmitters are involved to transmit physiological data in a realistic hospital environment. Therefore, this study has developed an accelerated ray tracing method based on the nearest neighbor cell and prior knowledge of intersection techniques. Beside this, Red-Black tree is used to store and provide a faster retrieval mechanism of objects in the hospital environment. To prove the superiority, detailed complexity analysis and calculations of reflection and transmission coefficients are also presented in this paper. The results show that the proposed method is about 1.51, 2.1, and 2.9 times faster than the Object Distribution Technique (ODT, Space Volumetric Partitioning (SVP, and Angular Z-Buffer (AZB methods, respectively. To show the various effects on received power in 60 GHz frequency, few comparisons are made and it is found that on average −9.44 dBm, −8.23 dBm, and −9.27 dBm received power attenuations should be considered when human, AP, and CU move in a given hospital scenario.

  8. KARAT-LAMBDA - frequency dependent ray-traced troposphere delays for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobiger, Thomas; Baron, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Space-geodetic microwave techniques work under the assumption that the only dispersive, i.e. frequency dependent delay contribution is caused by the ionosphere. In general, the refractivity, even for the troposphere, is a complex quantity which can be denoted as N = N0 + (N'(f) + i N''(f)) where N0 is a frequency independent term, and N'(f) and N''(f) represent the complex frequency dependence. Thereby, the imaginary part can be used to derive the loss of energy (absorption) and the real part can be assigned to the changes in the propagation velocity (refraction) and thus describes the delay of an electromagnetic wave which propagates through that medium. Although the frequency dependent delay contribution appears to be of small order, one has to consider that signals are propagating through few kilometers of troposphere at high elevations to hundredths of kilometers at low elevations. Therefore, the Kashima Ray-Tracing package (Hobiger et al., 2008) has been modified (and named KARAT-LAMBDA) to enable the consideration of a frequency dependent refractivity. By using this tool, it was studied if and to which extent future space geodetic instruments are affected from dispersive troposphere delays. Moreover, a semi-empirical correction model for the microwave link of the Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) has been developed, based on ray-tracing calculations with KARAT-LAMBDA. The proposed model (Hobiger et al., 2013) has been tested with simulated ISS overflights at different potential ACES ground station sites and it could be demonstrated that this model is capable to remove biases and elevation dependent features caused by the dispersive troposphere delay difference between the up-link and down-link. References: T. Hobiger, R. Ichikawa, T. Kondo, and Y. Koyama (2008), Fast and accurate ray-tracing algorithms for real-time space geodetic applications using numerical weather models, Journal of Geophysical Research, vol. 113, iss. D203027, pp. 1-14. T. Hobiger, D

  9. Testing the validity of the ray-tracing code GYOTO

    CERN Document Server

    Grould, Marion; Perrin, Guy

    2016-01-01

    In the next few years, the near-infrared interferometer GRAVITY will be able to observe the Galactic center. Astrometric data will be obtained with an anticipated accuracy of 10 $\\mu$as. To analyze these future data, we have developed a code called GYOTO to compute orbits and images. We want to assess the validity and accuracy of GYOTO in a variety of contexts, in particular for stellar astrometry in the Galactic center. Furthermore, we want to tackle and complete a study made on the astrometric displacements that are due to lensing effects of a star of the central parsec with GYOTO. We first validate GYOTO in the weak-deflection limit (WDL) by studying primary caustics and primary critical curves obtained for a Kerr black hole. We compare GYOTO results to available analytical approximations and estimate GYOTO errors using an intrinsic estimator. In the strong-deflection limit (SDL), we choose to compare null geodesics computed by GYOTO and the ray-tracing code named Geokerr. Finally, we use GYOTO to estimate...

  10. Fast Ray Tracing of Lunar Digital Elevation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClanahan, Timothy P.; Evans, L. G.; Starr, R. D.; Mitrofanov, I.

    2009-01-01

    Ray-tracing (RT) of Lunar Digital Elevation Models (DEM)'s is performed to virtually derive the degree of radiation incident to terrain as a function of time, orbital and ephemeris constraints [I- 4]. This process is an integral modeling process in lunar polar research and exploration due to the present paucity of terrain information at the poles and mission planning activities for the anticipated spring 2009 launch of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). As part of the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) and Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) preparations RI methods are used to estimate the critical conditions presented by the combined effects of high latitude, terrain and the moons low obliquity [5-7]. These factors yield low incident solar illumination and subsequently extreme thermal, and radiation conditions. The presented research uses RT methods both for radiation transport modeling in space and regolith related research as well as to derive permanently shadowed regions (PSR)'s in high latitude topographic minima, e.g craters. These regions are of scientific and human exploration interest due to the near constant low temperatures in PSRs, inferred to be < 100 K. Hydrogen is thought to have accumulated in PSR's through the combined effects of periodic cometary bombardment and/or solar wind processes, and the extreme cold which minimizes hydrogen sublimation [8-9]. RT methods are also of use in surface position optimization for future illumination dependent on surface resources e.g. power and communications equipment.

  11. Distance measurement based on light field geometry and ray tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanqin; Jin, Xin; Dai, Qionghai

    2017-01-09

    In this paper, we propose a geometric optical model to measure the distances of object planes in a light field image. The proposed geometric optical model is composed of two sub-models based on ray tracing: object space model and image space model. The two theoretic sub-models are derived on account of on-axis point light sources. In object space model, light rays propagate into the main lens and refract inside it following the refraction theorem. In image space model, light rays exit from emission positions on the main lens and subsequently impinge on the image sensor with different imaging diameters. The relationships between imaging diameters of objects and their corresponding emission positions on the main lens are investigated through utilizing refocusing and similar triangle principle. By combining the two sub-models together and tracing light rays back to the object space, the relationships between objects' imaging diameters and corresponding distances of object planes are figured out. The performance of the proposed geometric optical model is compared with existing approaches using different configurations of hand-held plenoptic 1.0 cameras and real experiments are conducted using a preliminary imaging system. Results demonstrate that the proposed model can outperform existing approaches in terms of accuracy and exhibits good performance at general imaging range.

  12. Detailed simulation of morphodynamics: 2. Sediment pickup, transport, and deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabi, M.; De Vriend, H.J.; Mosselman, E.; Sloff, C.J.; Shimizu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes a numerical model for simulating sediment transport with eddy-resolving 3-D models. This sediment model consists of four submodels: pickup, transport over the bed, transport in the water column and deposition, all based on a turbulent flow model using large-eddy simulation. The

  13. Detailed simulation of morphodynamics: 2. Sediment pickup, transport, and deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabi, M.; De Vriend, H.J.; Mosselman, E.; Sloff, C.J.; Shimizu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes a numerical model for simulating sediment transport with eddy-resolving 3-D models. This sediment model consists of four submodels: pickup, transport over the bed, transport in the water column and deposition, all based on a turbulent flow model using large-eddy simulation. The s

  14. Application of ray-traced tropospheric slant delays to geodetic VLBI analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Armin; Böhm, Johannes

    2017-02-01

    The correction of tropospheric influences via so-called path delays is critical for the analysis of observations from space geodetic techniques like the very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). In standard VLBI analysis, the a priori slant path delays are determined using the concept of zenith delays, mapping functions and gradients. The a priori use of ray-traced delays, i.e., tropospheric slant path delays determined with the technique of ray-tracing through the meteorological data of numerical weather models (NWM), serves as an alternative way of correcting the influences of the troposphere on the VLBI observations within the analysis. In the presented research, the application of ray-traced delays to the VLBI analysis of sessions in a time span of 16.5 years is investigated. Ray-traced delays have been determined with program RADIATE (see Hofmeister in Ph.D. thesis, Department of Geodesy and Geophysics, Faculty of Mathematics and Geoinformation, Technische Universität Wien. http://resolver.obvsg.at/urn:nbn:at:at-ubtuw:1-3444, 2016) utilizing meteorological data provided by NWM of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). In comparison with a standard VLBI analysis, which includes the tropospheric gradient estimation, the application of the ray-traced delays to an analysis, which uses the same parameterization except for the a priori slant path delay handling and the used wet mapping factors for the zenith wet delay (ZWD) estimation, improves the baseline length repeatability (BLR) at 55.9% of the baselines at sub-mm level. If no tropospheric gradients are estimated within the compared analyses, 90.6% of all baselines benefit from the application of the ray-traced delays, which leads to an average improvement of the BLR of 1 mm. The effects of the ray-traced delays on the terrestrial reference frame are also investigated. A separate assessment of the RADIATE ray-traced delays is carried out by comparison to the ray-traced delays from the

  15. Application of ray-traced tropospheric slant delays to geodetic VLBI analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Armin; Böhm, Johannes

    2017-08-01

    The correction of tropospheric influences via so-called path delays is critical for the analysis of observations from space geodetic techniques like the very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). In standard VLBI analysis, the a priori slant path delays are determined using the concept of zenith delays, mapping functions and gradients. The a priori use of ray-traced delays, i.e., tropospheric slant path delays determined with the technique of ray-tracing through the meteorological data of numerical weather models (NWM), serves as an alternative way of correcting the influences of the troposphere on the VLBI observations within the analysis. In the presented research, the application of ray-traced delays to the VLBI analysis of sessions in a time span of 16.5 years is investigated. Ray-traced delays have been determined with program RADIATE (see Hofmeister in Ph.D. thesis, Department of Geodesy and Geophysics, Faculty of Mathematics and Geoinformation, Technische Universität Wien. http://resolver.obvsg.at/urn:nbn:at:at-ubtuw:1-3444, 2016) utilizing meteorological data provided by NWM of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). In comparison with a standard VLBI analysis, which includes the tropospheric gradient estimation, the application of the ray-traced delays to an analysis, which uses the same parameterization except for the a priori slant path delay handling and the used wet mapping factors for the zenith wet delay (ZWD) estimation, improves the baseline length repeatability (BLR) at 55.9% of the baselines at sub-mm level. If no tropospheric gradients are estimated within the compared analyses, 90.6% of all baselines benefit from the application of the ray-traced delays, which leads to an average improvement of the BLR of 1 mm. The effects of the ray-traced delays on the terrestrial reference frame are also investigated. A separate assessment of the RADIATE ray-traced delays is carried out by comparison to the ray-traced delays from the

  16. MIV project: Simulator detailed design and integration for the EUROSIM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Gøsta; Parisch, Manlio; Jørgensen, John Leif;

    1997-01-01

    Under the ESA contract #11453/95/NL/JG(SC), aiming at assessing the feasibility of Rendez-vous and docking of unmanned spacecrafts, a reference mission scenario was defined. This report describes the detailed code developed for the contract, the code module interface and the interface to the EURO...

  17. ROBAST: Development of a ROOT-based ray-tracing library for cosmic-ray telescopes and its applications in the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akira; Noda, Koji; Rulten, Cameron

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a non-sequential ray-tracing simulation library, ROOT-basedsimulatorforraytracing (ROBAST), which is aimed to be widely used in optical simulations of cosmic-ray (CR) and gamma-ray telescopes. The library is written in C++, and fully utilizes the geometry library of the ROOT framework. Despite the importance of optics simulations in CR experiments, no open-source software for ray-tracing simulations that can be widely used in the community has existed. To reduce the dispensable effort needed to develop multiple ray-tracing simulators by different research groups, we have successfully used ROBAST for many years to perform optics simulations for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Among the six proposed telescope designs for CTA, ROBAST is currently used for three telescopes: a Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) medium-sized telescope, one of SC small-sized telescopes, and a large-sized telescope (LST). ROBAST is also used for the simulation and development of hexagonal light concentrators proposed for the LST focal plane. Making full use of the ROOT geometry library with additional ROBAST classes, we are able to build the complex optics geometries typically used in CR experiments and ground-based gamma-ray telescopes. We introduce ROBAST and its features developed for CR experiments, and show several successful applications for CTA.

  18. Virtual Ray Tracing as a Conceptual Tool for Image Formation in Mirrors and Lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Lasse; Savinainen, Antti; Saarelainen, Markku

    2016-12-01

    The ray tracing method is widely used in teaching geometrical optics at the upper secondary and university levels. However, using simple and straightforward examples may lead to a situation in which students use the model of ray tracing too narrowly. Previous studies show that students seem to use the ray tracing method too concretely instead of as a conceptual model. This suggests that introductory physics students need to understand the nature of the ray model more profoundly. In this paper, we show how a virtual ray tracing model can be used as a tool for image formation in more complex and unconventional cases. We believe that this tool has potential in helping students to better appreciate the nature of the ray model.

  19. Study of improved ray tracing parallel algorithm for CGH of 3D objects on GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Bin; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Yao, Jun; Zhao, Kai

    2014-11-01

    An improved parallel algorithm for holograms of three-dimensional objects was presented. According to the physical characteristics and mathematical properties of the original ray tracing algorithm for computer generated holograms (CGH), using transform approximation and numerical analysis methods, we extract parts of ray tracing algorithm which satisfy parallelization features and implement them on graphics processing unit (GPU). Meanwhile, through proper design of parallel numerical procedure, we did parallel programming to the two-dimensional slices of three-dimensional object with CUDA. According to the experiments, an effective method of dealing with occlusion problem in ray tracing is proposed, as well as generating the holograms of 3D objects with additive property. Our results indicate that the improved algorithm can effectively shorten the computing time. Due to the different sizes of spatial object points and hologram pixels, the speed has increased 20 to 70 times comparing with original ray tracing algorithm.

  20. Fast, Accurate and Detailed NoC Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolkotte, P.T.; Hölzenspies, P.K.F.; Smit, G.J.M.; Kellenberger, P.

    2007-01-01

    Network-on-Chip (NoC) architectures have a wide variety of parameters that can be adapted to the designer's requirements. Fast exploration of this parameter space is only possible at a high-level and several methods have been proposed. Cycle and bit accurate simulation is necessary when the actual r

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of lipid vesicle fusion in atomic detail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knecht, Volker; Marrink, Siewert-Jan

    The fusion of a membrane-bounded vesicle with a target membrane is a key step in intracellular trafficking, exocytosis, and drug delivery. Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study the fusion of small unilamellar vesicles composed of a dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/palmitic

  2. Fast voxel and polygon ray-tracing algorithms in intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christopher; Romeijn, H Edwin; Dempsey, James F

    2006-05-01

    We present work on combining three algorithms to improve ray-tracing efficiency in radiation therapy dose computation. The three algorithms include: An improved point-in-polygon algorithm, incremental voxel ray tracing algorithm, and stereographic projection of beamlets for voxel truncation. The point-in-polygon and incremental voxel ray-tracing algorithms have been used in computer graphics and nuclear medicine applications while the stereographic projection algorithm was developed by our group. These algorithms demonstrate significant improvements over the current standard algorithms in peer reviewed literature, i.e., the polygon and voxel ray-tracing algorithms of Siddon for voxel classification (point-in-polygon testing) and dose computation, respectively, and radius testing for voxel truncation. The presented polygon ray-tracing technique was tested on 10 intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning cases that required the classification of between 0.58 and 2.0 million voxels on a 2.5 mm isotropic dose grid into 1-4 targets and 5-14 structures represented as extruded polygons (a.k.a. Siddon prisms). Incremental voxel ray tracing and voxel truncation employing virtual stereographic projection was tested on the same IMRT treatment planning cases where voxel dose was required for 230-2400 beamlets using a finite-size pencil-beam algorithm. Between a 100 and 360 fold cpu time improvement over Siddon's method was observed for the polygon ray-tracing algorithm to perform classification of voxels for target and structure membership. Between a 2.6 and 3.1 fold reduction in cpu time over current algorithms was found for the implementation of incremental ray tracing. Additionally, voxel truncation via stereographic projection was observed to be 11-25 times faster than the radial-testing beamlet extent approach and was further improved 1.7-2.0 fold through point-classification using the method of translation over the cross product technique.

  3. Three-dimensional polarization ray-tracing calculus I: definition and diattenuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Garam; Crabtree, Karlton; Chipman, Russell A

    2011-06-20

    A three-by-three polarization ray-tracing matrix method for polarization ray tracing in optical systems is presented for calculating the polarization transformations associated with ray paths through optical systems. The method is a three-dimensional generalization of the Jones calculus. Reflection and refraction algorithms are provided. Diattenuation of the optical system is calculated via singular value decomposition. Two numerical examples, a three fold-mirror system and a hollow corner cube, demonstrate the method.

  4. Design of indoor WLANs: Combination of a ray-tracing tool with the BPSO method

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Delgado, José; Domingo Gracia, Marta; Valle López, Luis; Pérez López, Jesús Ramón; Torres Jménez, Rafael Pedro; Basterrechea Verdeja, José

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an approach that combines a ray tracing tool with a binary version of the particle swarm optimization method (BPSO) for the design of infrastructure mode indoor wireless local area networks (WLAN). The approach uses the power levels of a set of candidate access point (AP) locations obtained with the ray tracing tool at a mesh of potential receiver locations or test points to allow the BPSO optimizer to carry out the design of the WLAN. For this purpose, several restriction...

  5. Modelling and Simulation of a River-Crossing Operation via Discrete Event Simulation with Engineering Details

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chungjo Jung

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available From a military standpoint, a river is an area that should be avoided in a potential engagement because of lack of cover and the necessity of dividing the unit while crossing. Thus, a key point of a river-crossing operation is speed. Many efforts have been made to enable faster river crossing by improvement of tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTP. However, improvements in TTP are evaluated by modelling and simulation much less frequently than are the toe-to-toe engagements between two opposing forces, and to our knowledge, this is the first simulation model of brigade-level river crossing with engineering details. This study presents a simulation model of the river-crossing operation, applies real world parameters, and evaluates which tactics are preferable in a particular operational environments. This analysis has led to new operational methods of river crossing that have been suggested by experienced subject-matter experts. For instance, the current Republic of Korea Army Field Manual dictates to rotate river-crossing rafts in all situations, but our experiment suggests that no rotation is preferable when the width of river is less than 400 m based on the statistical analyses, which includes the regression-based meta-modelling and the ANOVA, of our simulation model that embodies the engineering details of river-crossing equipment.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 65, No. 2, March 2015, pp.135-143, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.65.8141

  6. A comprehensive ray tracing study on the impact of solar reflections from glass curtain walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Justin S J

    2016-01-01

    To facilitate the investigation of the impact of solar reflection from the façades of skyscrapers to surrounding environment, a comprehensive ray tracing model has been developed using the International Commerce Centre (ICC) in Hong Kong as an example. Taking into account the actual physical dimensions of buildings and meteorological data, the model simulates and traces the paths of solar reflections from ICC to the surrounding buildings, assessing the impact in terms of hit locations, light intensity and the hit time on each day throughout the year. Our analyses show that various design and architectural features of ICC have amplified the intensity of reflected solar rays and increased the hit rates of surrounding buildings. These factors include the high reflectivity of glass panels, their upward tilting angles, the concave profile of the 'Dragon Tail' (glass panels near the base), the particular location and orientation of ICC, as well as the immense height of ICC with its large reflective surfaces. The simulation results allow us to accurately map the date and time when the ray projections occur on each of the target buildings, rendering important information such as the number of converging (overlapping) projections, and the actual light intensity hitting each of the buildings at any given time. Comparisons with other skyscrapers such as Taipei 101 in Taiwan and 2-IFC (International Finance Centre) Hong Kong are made. Remedial actions for ICC and preventive measures are also discussed.

  7. Three-dimensional ray tracing for refractive correction of human eye ametropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Hernandez, J. A.; Diaz-Gonzalez, G.; Trujillo-Romero, F.; Iturbe-Castillo, M. D.; Juarez-Salazar, R.; Santiago-Alvarado, A.

    2016-09-01

    Ametropies of the human eye, are refractive defects hampering the correct imaging on the retina. The most common ways to correct them is by means of spectacles, contact lenses, and modern methods as laser surgery. However, in any case it is very important to identify the ametropia grade for designing the optimum correction action. In the case of laser surgery, it is necessary to define a new shape of the cornea in order to obtain the wanted refractive correction. Therefore, a computational tool to calculate the focal length of the optical system of the eye versus variations on its geometrical parameters is required. Additionally, a clear and understandable visualization of the evaluation process is desirable. In this work, a model of the human eye based on geometrical optics principles is presented. Simulations of light rays coming from a punctual source at six meter from the cornea are shown. We perform a ray-tracing in three dimensions in order to visualize the focusing regions and estimate the power of the optical system. The common parameters of ametropies can be easily modified and analyzed in the simulation by an intuitive graphic user interface.

  8. Detailed electromagnetic simulation for the structural color of butterfly wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R Todd; Smith, Glenn S

    2009-07-20

    Many species of butterflies exhibit interesting optical phenomena due to structural color. The physical reason for this color is subwavelength features on the surface of a single scale. The exposed surface of a scale is covered with a ridge structure. The fully three-dimensional, periodic, finite-difference time-domain method is used to create a detailed electromagnetic model of a generic ridge. A novel method for presenting the three-dimensional observed color pattern is developed. Using these tools, the change in color that is a result of varying individual features of the scale is explored. Computational models are developed that are similar to three butterflies: Morpho rhetenor, Troides magellanus, and Ancyluris meliboeus.

  9. Ultra-Wideband Indoor Channel Modelling Using Ray-Tracing Software for through-the-Wall Imaging Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Lièbe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new software for design of through-the-wall imaging radars. The first part describes the evolution of a ray tracing simulator, originally designed for propagation of narrowband signals, and then for ultra-wideband signals. This simulator allows to obtain temporal channel response to a wide-band emitter (3 GHz to 10 GHz. An experimental method is also described to identify the propagation paths. Simulation results are compared to propagation experiments under the same conditions. Different configurations are tested and then discussed. Finally, a configuration of through-the-wall imaging radar is proposed, with different antennas patterns and different targets. Simulated images will be helpful for understanding the experiment obtained images.

  10. Comparison of a 3-D GPU-Assisted Maxwell Code and Ray Tracing for Reflectometry on ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gady, Sarah; Kubota, Shigeyuki; Johnson, Irena

    2015-11-01

    Electromagnetic wave propagation and scattering in magnetized plasmas are important diagnostics for high temperature plasmas. 1-D and 2-D full-wave codes are standard tools for measurements of the electron density profile and fluctuations; however, ray tracing results have shown that beam propagation in tokamak plasmas is inherently a 3-D problem. The GPU-Assisted Maxwell Code utilizes the FDTD (Finite-Difference Time-Domain) method for solving the Maxwell equations with the cold plasma approximation in a 3-D geometry. Parallel processing with GPGPU (General-Purpose computing on Graphics Processing Units) is used to accelerate the computation. Previously, we reported on initial comparisons of the code results to 1-D numerical and analytical solutions, where the size of the computational grid was limited by the on-board memory of the GPU. In the current study, this limitation is overcome by using domain decomposition and an additional GPU. As a practical application, this code is used to study the current design of the ITER Low Field Side Reflectometer (LSFR) for the Equatorial Port Plug 11 (EPP11). A detailed examination of Gaussian beam propagation in the ITER edge plasma will be presented, as well as comparisons with ray tracing. This work was made possible by funding from the Department of Energy for the Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No.DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-FG02-99-ER54527.

  11. Exploring Light’s Interactions with Bubbles and Light Absorbers in Photoelectrochemical Devices using Ray Tracing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, John Colby [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2012-12-01

    Ray tracing was used to perform optical optimization of arrays of photovoltaic microrods and explore the interaction between light and bubbles of oxygen gas on the surface of the microrods. The incident angle of light was varied over a wide range. The percent of incident light absorbed by the microrods and reflected by the bubbles was computed over this range. It was found that, for the 10 μm diameter, 100 μm tall SrTiO3 microrods simulated in the model, the optimal center-­to-­center spacing was 14 μm for a square grid. This geometry produced 75% average and 90% maximum absorbance. For a triangular grid using the same microrods, the optimal center-­to-­center spacing was 14 μm. This geometry produced 67% average and 85% maximum absorbance. For a randomly laid out grid of 5 μm diameter, 100 μm tall SrTiO3 microrods with an average center-­to-­center spacing of 20 μm, the average absorption was 23% and the maximum absorption was 43%. For a 50% areal coverage fraction of bubbles on the absorber surface, between 2%-­20% of the incident light energy was reflected away from the rods by the bubbles, depending upon incident angle and bubble morphology.

  12. Analyzing luminescent solar concentrators with front-facing photovoltaic cells using weighted Monte Carlo ray tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woei Leow, Shin; Corrado, Carley; Osborn, Melissa; Isaacson, Michael; Alers, Glenn; Carter, Sue A.

    2013-06-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSC) collect ambient light from a broad range of angles and concentrate the captured light onto photovoltaic (PV) cells. LSCs with front-facing cells collect direct and indirect sunlight ensuring a gain factor greater than one. The flexible placement and percentage coverage of PV cells on the LSC panel allow for layout adjustments to be made in order to balance re-absorption losses and the level of light concentration desired. A weighted Monte Carlo ray tracing program was developed to study the transport of photons and loss mechanisms in the LSC to aid in design optimization. The program imports measured absorption/emission spectra of an organic luminescent dye (LR305), the transmission coefficient, and refractive index of acrylic as parameters that describe the system. Simulations suggest that for LR305, 8-10 cm of luminescent material surrounding the PV cell yields the highest increase in power gain per unit area of LSC added, thereby determining the ideal spacing between PV cells in the panel. For rectangular PV cells, results indicate that for each centimeter of PV cell width, an additional increase of 0.15 mm to the waveguide thickness is required to efficiently transport photon collected by the LSC to the PV cell with minimal loss.

  13. Ray Tracing through the Edge Focusing of Rectangular Benders and an Improved Model for the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolski, Jeffrey S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barlow, David B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macek, Robert J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McCrady, Rodney C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    Particle ray tracing through simulated 3D magnetic fields was executed to investigate the effective quadrupole strength of the edge focusing of the rectangular bending magnets in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). The particle rays receive a kick in the edge field of the rectangular dipole. A focal length may be calculated from the particle tracking and related to the fringe field integral (FINT) model parameter. This tech note introduces the baseline lattice model of the PSR and motivates the need for an improvement in the baseline model's vertical tune prediction, which differs from measurement by .05. An improved model of the PSR is created by modifying the fringe field integral parameter to those suggested by the ray tracing investigation. This improved model is then verified against measurement at the nominal PSR operating set point and at set points far away from the nominal operating conditions. Lastly, Linear Optics from Closed Orbits (LOCO) is employed in an orbit response matrix method for model improvement to verify the quadrupole strengths of the improved model.

  14. Ray-tracing critical-angle transmission gratings for the X-ray Surveyor and Explorer-size missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Hans M.; Bautz, Marshall W.; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Marshall, Herman L.; Nowak, Michael A.; Schulz, Norbert S.

    2016-07-01

    We study a critical angle transmission (CAT) grating spectrograph that delivers a spectral resolution significantly above any X-ray spectrograph ever own. This new technology will allow us to resolve kinematic components in absorption and emission lines of galactic and extragalactic matter down to unprecedented dispersion levels. We perform ray-trace simulations to characterize the performance of the spectrograph in the context of an X-ray Surveyor or Arcus like layout (two mission concepts currently under study). Our newly developed ray-trace code is a tool suite to simulate the performance of X-ray observatories. The simulator code is written in Python, because the use of a high-level scripting language allows modifications of the simulated instrument design in very few lines of code. This is especially important in the early phase of mission development, when the performances of different configurations are contrasted. To reduce the run-time and allow for simulations of a few million photons in a few minutes on a desktop computer, the simulator code uses tabulated input (from theoretical models or laboratory measurements of samples) for grating efficiencies and mirror reflectivities. We find that the grating facet alignment tolerances to maintain at least 90% of resolving power that the spectrometer has with perfect alignment are (i) translation parallel to the optical axis below 0.5 mm, (ii) rotation around the optical axis or the groove direction below a few arcminutes, and (iii) constancy of the grating period to 1:105. Translations along and rotations around the remaining axes can be significantly larger than this without impacting the performance.

  15. Real-time ray tracing of implicit surfaces on the GPU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jag Mohan; Narayanan, P J

    2010-01-01

    Compact representation of geometry using a suitable procedural or mathematical model and a ray-tracing mode of rendering fit the programmable graphics processor units (GPUs) well. Several such representations including parametric and subdivision surfaces have been explored in recent research. The important and widely applicable category of the general implicit surface has received less attention. In this paper, we present a ray-tracing procedure to render general implicit surfaces efficiently on the GPU. Though only the fourth or lower order surfaces can be rendered using analytical roots, our adaptive marching points algorithm can ray trace arbitrary implicit surfaces without multiple roots, by sampling the ray at selected points till a root is found. Adapting the sampling step size based on a proximity measure and a horizon measure delivers high speed. The sign test can handle any surface without multiple roots. The Taylor test that uses ideas from interval analysis can ray trace many surfaces with complex roots. Overall, a simple algorithm that fits the SIMD architecture of the GPU results in high performance. We demonstrate the ray tracing of algebraic surfaces up to order 50 and nonalgebraic surfaces including a Blinn's blobby with 75 spheres at better than interactive frame rates.

  16. Fokker-Planck/Ray Tracing for Electron Bernstein and Fast Wave Modeling in Support of NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, R. W. [CompX, Del Mar, CA (United States)

    2009-11-12

    This DOE grant supported fusion energy research, a potential long-term solution to the world's energy needs. Magnetic fusion, exemplified by confinement of very hot ionized gases, i.e., plasmas, in donut-shaped tokamak vessels is a leading approach for this energy source. Thus far, a mixture of hydrogen isotopes has produced 10's of megawatts of fusion power for seconds in a tokamak reactor at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in New Jersey. The research grant under consideration, ER54684, uses computer models to aid in understanding and projecting efficacy of heating and current drive sources in the National Spherical Torus Experiment, a tokamak variant, at PPPL. The NSTX experiment explores the physics of very tight aspect ratio, almost spherical tokamaks, aiming at producing steady-state fusion plasmas. The current drive is an integral part of the steady-state concept, maintaining the magnetic geometry in the steady-state tokamak. CompX further developed and applied models for radiofrequency (rf) heating and current drive for applications to NSTX. These models build on a 30 year development of rf ray tracing (the all-frequencies GENRAY code) and higher dimensional Fokker-Planck rf-collisional modeling (the 3D collisional-quasilinear CQL3D code) at CompX. Two mainline current-drive rf modes are proposed for injection into NSTX: (1) electron Bernstein wave (EBW), and (2) high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) modes. Both these current drive systems provide a means for the rf to access the especially high density plasma--termed high beta plasma--compared to the strength of the required magnetic fields. The CompX studies entailed detailed modeling of the EBW to calculate the efficiency of the current drive system, and to determine its range of flexibility for driving current at spatial locations in the plasma cross-section. The ray tracing showed penetration into NSTX bulk plasma, relatively efficient current drive, but a limited ability to produce current over

  17. A three-dimensional sound ray tracing method by deploying regular tetrahedrons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Wei; LI Taibao

    2005-01-01

    A sound ray tracing algorithm is presented, which helps to rapidly find the sound ray trajectories in three-dimensional (3-D) space. At each step of ray tracing, a small regular tetrahedron is made in front of a ray, so that the sound speed field inside may be approximately regarded as linear. Since a ray trajectory in the linear sound speed field is always on a plane, it may be obtained by the two-dimensional (2-D) sound ray tracing method by deploying triangles.The theoretical derivation is given and a numerical model is discussed. It shows that the algorithm is fast and precise. It is also more concise and reliable than the traditional 3-D algorithms, and may be used to avoid the damage to the precision by the acoustic refraction in the 3-D ultrasound computerized tomography.

  18. Reflection formulae for ray tracing in uniaxial anisotropic media using Huygens's principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán-Castañeda, Luis A; Rosete-Aguilar, Martha

    2016-11-01

    Ray tracing in uniaxial anisotropic materials is important because they are widely used for instrumentation, liquid-crystal displays, laser cavities, and quantum experiments. There are previous works regarding ray tracing refraction and reflection formulae using the common electromagnetic theory approach, but only the refraction formulae have been deduced using Huygens's principle. In this paper we obtain the reflection expressions using this unconventional approach with a specific coordinate system in which both refraction and reflection formulae are simplified as well as their deduction. We compute some numerical examples to compare them with the common expressions obtained using electromagnetic theory.

  19. A model of the AGS based on stepwise ray-tracing through the measured field maps of the main magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutheil Y.; Meot, F.; Tsoupas, N.

    2012-05-20

    Two-dimensional mid-plane magnetic field maps of two of the main AGS magnets were produced, from Hall probe measurements, for a series of different current settings. The analysis of these data yielded the excitation functions [1] and the harmonic coefficients [2] of the main magnets which have been used so far in all the models of the AGS. The constant increase of the computation power makes it possible today to directly use a stepwise raytracing through these measured field maps with a reasonable computation time. We describe in detail how these field maps have allowed the generation of models of the 6 different types of AGS main magnets, and how they are being handled with the Zgoubi ray-tracing code [3]. We give and discuss a number of results obtained regarding both beam and spin dynamics in the AGS, and we provide comparisons with other numerical and analytical modelling methods.

  20. Three-dimensional polarization aberration functions in optical system based on three-dimensional polarization ray-tracing calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenjun; Fu, Yuegang; Liu, Zhiying; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Jiake; Zheng, Yang; Li, Yahong

    2017-03-01

    The polarization aberrations of a complex optical system with multi-element lens have been investigated using a 3D polarization aberration function. The 3D polarization ray-tracing matrix has been combined with the optical path difference to obtain a 3D polarization aberration function, which avoids the need for a complicated phase unwrapping process. The polarization aberrations of a microscope objective have been analyzed to include, the distributions of 3D polarization aberration functions, diattenuation aberration, retardance aberration, and polarization-dependent intensity on the exit pupil. Further, the aberrations created by the field of view and the coating on the distribution rules of 3D polarization aberration functions are discussed in detail. Finally a novel appropriate field of view and wavelength correction is proposed for a polarization aberration function which optimizes the image quality of a multi-element optical system.

  1. Ray tracing based path-length calculations for polarized light tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2015-09-01

    A ray tracing based path length calculation is investigated for polarized light transport in a pixel space. Tomographic imaging using polarized light transport is promising for applications in optical projection tomography of small animal imaging and turbid media with low scattering. Polarized light transport through a medium can have complex effects due to interactions such as optical rotation of linearly polarized light, birefringence, di-attenuation and interior refraction. Here we investigate the effects of refraction of polarized light in a non-scattering medium. This step is used to obtain the initial absorption estimate. This estimate can be used as prior in Monte Carlo (MC) program that simulates the transport of polarized light through a scattering medium to assist in faster convergence of the final estimate. The reflectance for p-polarized (parallel) and s-polarized (perpendicular) are different and hence there is a difference in the intensities that reach the detector end. The algorithm computes the length of the ray in each pixel along the refracted path and this is used to build the weight matrix. This weight matrix with corrected ray path length and the resultant intensity reaching the detector for each ray is used in the algebraic reconstruction (ART) method. The proposed method is tested with numerical phantoms for various noise levels. The refraction errors due to regions of different refractive index are discussed, the difference in intensities with polarization is considered. The improvements in reconstruction using the correction so applied is presented. This is achieved by tracking the path of the ray as well as the intensity of the ray as it traverses through the medium.

  2. An Energy Conservative Ray-Tracing Method With a Time Interpolation of the Force Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Jin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-02-10

    A new algorithm that constructs a continuous force field interpolated in time is proposed for resolving existing difficulties in numerical methods for ray-tracing. This new method has improved accuracy, but with the same degree of algebraic complexity compared to Kaisers method.

  3. A Ray-tracing Method to Analyzing Modulated Planar Fabry-Perot Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougs, Mikkel Dahl; Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2015-01-01

    A new approach for fast modelling of Fabry-Perot antennas with modulated partially reflective surfaces (PRS) using ray-tracing is proposed. For validation of the method, a configuration is introduced which consists of a cavity with a modulated PRS, fed internally by a magnetic dipole. The PRS con...

  4. The Gaussian Laser Angular Distribution in HYDRA's 3D Laser Ray Trace Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepke, Scott M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-04-10

    In this note, the angular distribution of rays launched by the 3D LZR ray trace package is derived for Gaussian beams (npower==2) with bm model=3±. Beams with bm model=+3 have a nearly at distribution, and beams with bm model=-3 have a nearly linear distribution when the spot size is large compared to the wavelength.

  5. Magnetospheric Whistler Mode Ray Tracing with the Inclusion of Finite Electron and Ion Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxworth, A. S.; Golkowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    Ray tracing is an important technique for the study of whistler mode wave propagation in the Earth's magnetosphere. In numerical ray tracing the trajectory of a wave packet is calculated at each point in space by solving the Haselgrove equations, assuming a smooth, loss-less medium with no mode coupling. Previous work on ray tracing has assumed a cold plasma environment with negligible electron and ion temperatures. In this work we present magnetospheric whistler mode wave ray tracing results with the inclusion of finite ion and electron temperature. The inclusion of finite temperature effects makes the fourth order dispersion relation become sixth order. We compare our results with the work done by previous researchers for cold plasma environments, using two near earth space models (NGO and GCPM). Inclusion of finite temperature closes the otherwise open refractive index surface near the lower hybrid resonance frequency and affects the magnetospheric reflection of whistler waves. We also asses the main changes in the ray trajectory and implications for cyclotron resonance wave particle interactions including energetic particle precipitation.

  6. A Ray-tracing Method to Analyzing Modulated Planar Fabry-Perot Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougs, Mikkel Dahl; Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2015-01-01

    A new approach for fast modelling of Fabry-Perot antennas with modulated partially reflective surfaces (PRS) using ray-tracing is proposed. For validation of the method, a configuration is introduced which consists of a cavity with a modulated PRS, fed internally by a magnetic dipole. The PRS...

  7. A Sub-band Divided Ray Tracing Algorithm Using the DPS Subspace in UWB Indoor Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gan, Mingming; Xu, Zhinan; Hofer, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Sub-band divided ray tracing (SDRT) is one technique that has been extensively used to obtain the channel characteristics for ultra-wideband (UWB) radio wave propagation in realistic indoor environments. However, the computational complexity of SDRT scales directly with the number of sub-bands. A...

  8. Detailed simulations of lighting conditions in office rooms lit by daylight and artificial light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Anne

    In this thesis the effect on the annual artificial lighting demand is investigated by employing detailed simulations of lighting conditions in office rooms lit by daylight and artificial. The simulations of the artificial lighting demand is accomplished through daylight simulations in Radiance....... The detailed simulations includes studies of the resolution of different weather data sets in climate-based daylight modeling. Furthermore, influence of the electrical lighting demand by simulating with dynamic occupancy patterns is studied. Finally the thesis explores the influence of obstructions in an urban...... canyon on the daylight availability within the buildings, and hence on the energy consumption for artificial lights. The results from the thesis demonstrates that the effect on the outcome of the daylight simulations when simulating with typical weather data files for the location of Copenhagen...

  9. Identification of Gravity wave Sources over Tropical Latitudes Using Reverse Ray Tracing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat Ratnam, Madineni; Pramitha, M.

    2016-07-01

    Sources and propagation characteristics of high-frequency gravity waves (GWs) observed in the mesosphere using airglow emissions from Gadanki (13.5oN, 79.2oE) and Hyderabad (17.5oN, 78.5oE) are investigated using reverse ray tracing. Wave amplitudes are also traced back, including both radiative and diffusive damping. For this a climatological model of the background atmosphere for the Gadanki region has been developed using nearly 30 years of observations available from a variety of ground based (MST radar, radiosondes, MF radar) and rocket- and satellite-borne measurements. With the reverse ray-tracing method, the source locations for wave events could be identified to be in the upper troposphere. Uncertainty in locating the terminal points of wave events in the horizontal direction is estimated to be within 50-100 km and 150-300 km for Gadanki and Hyderabad wave events, respectively. This uncertainty arises mainly due to non-consideration of the day-to-day variability in the tidal amplitudes. Interestingly, large (~9ms-1 km-1) vertical shears in the horizontal wind are noticed near the ray terminal points (at 10-12 km altitude) and are thus identified to be the source for generating the observed high phase- speed, high-frequency GWs. We also tried to identify the sources for the GWs which are observed during Indo-French campaign conducted during May 2014. Uniqueness of the present study lies in using near-real time background atmosphere data from simultaneous radiosonde and meteor radar covering both source and propagation/dissipation regions of GWs. When we searched for the sources near the terminal points, deep convection is found to be a source for these events. We also tried to identify the sources of inertia-gravity waves (IGWs) that are observed in the troposphere and lower stratosphere during different seasons using long-term (2006-2014) high resolution radiosonde observations. In general, 50% of the waves observed over this location have convection as

  10. A boundary integral formalism for stochastic ray tracing in billiards

    CERN Document Server

    Chappell, David J

    2014-01-01

    Determining the flow of rays or particles driven by a force or velocity field is fundamental to modelling many physical processes, including weather forecasting and the simulation of molecular dynamics. High frequency wave energy distributions can also be approximated using flow or transport equations. Applications arise in underwater and room acoustics, vibro-acoustics, seismology, electromagnetics, quantum mechanics and in producing computer generated imagery. In many practical applications, the driving field is not known exactly and the dynamics are determined only up to a degree of uncertainty. This paper presents a boundary integral framework for propagating flows including uncertainties, which is shown to systematically interpolate between a deterministic and a completely random description of the trajectory propagation. A simple but efficient discretisation approach is applied to model uncertain billiard dynamics in an integrable rectangular domain.

  11. Quantitative evaluation of ultrasonic wave propagation in inhomogeneous anisotropic austenitic welds using 3D ray tracing method. Numerical and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolkoori, Sanjeevareddy

    2014-07-01

    Austenitic welds and dissimilar welds are extensively used in primary circuit pipes and pressure vessels in nuclear power plants, chemical industries and fossil fuelled power plants because of their high fracture toughness, resistance to corrosion and creep at elevated temperatures. However, cracks may initiate in these weld materials during fabrication process or stress operations in service. Thus, it is very important to evaluate the structural integrity of these materials using highly reliable non-destructive testing (NDT) methods. Ultrasonic non-destructive inspection of austenitic welds and dissimilar weld components is complicated because of anisotropic columnar grain structure leading to beam splitting and beam deflection. Simulation tools play an important role in developing advanced reliable ultrasonic testing (UT) techniques and optimizing experimental parameters for inspection of austenitic welds and dissimilar weld components. The main aim of the thesis is to develop a 3D ray tracing model for quantitative evaluation of ultrasonic wave propagation in an inhomogeneous anisotropic austenitic weld material. Inhomogenity in the anisotropic weld material is represented by discretizing into several homogeneous layers. According to ray tracing model, ultrasonic ray paths are traced during its energy propagation through various discretized layers of the material and at each interface the problem of reflection and transmission is solved. The influence of anisotropy on ultrasonic reflection and transmission behaviour in an anisotropic austenitic weld material are quantitatively analyzed in three dimensions. The ultrasonic beam directivity in columnar grained austenitic steel material is determined three dimensionally using Lamb's reciprocity theorem. The developed ray tracing model evaluates the transducer excited ultrasonic fields accurately by taking into account the directivity of the transducer, divergence of the ray bundle, density of rays and phase

  12. Business Management Simulations – a detailed industry analysis as well as recommendations for the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Batko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Being exposed to serious games showed that some simulations widely vary in quality and learning outcome. In order to get to the bottom of best practices a detailed review of business management simulation literature was conducted. Additionally, an industry analysis was performed, by interviewing 17 simulation companies, testing a range of full and demo games, and conducting secondary research. The findings from both research efforts were then collated and cross-referenced against each other in order to determine three things: firstly, the practices and features used by simulation companies that have not yet been the subject of academic research; secondly, the most effective features, elements and inclusions within simulations that best assist in the achievement of learning outcomes and enhancement the user experience; and finally, ‘best practices’ in teaching a business management course in a university or company with the assistance of a simulation. Identified gaps in the current research were found to include the effectiveness of avatars, transparent pricing and the benefits of competing the simulation against other teams as opposed to the computer. In relation to the second and third objectives of the research, the findings were used to compile a business plan, with detailed recommendations for companies looking to develop a new simulation, and for instructors implementing and coordinating the use of a simulation in a business management context.

  13. Development of a Procedure to Apply Detailed Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms to CFD Simulations as Post Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth-Rasmussen, Martin Skov; Glarborg, Peter; Jensen, Anker

    2003-01-01

    mechanism. It involves post-processing of data extracted from computational fluid dynamics simulations. Application of this approach successfully describes combustion chemistry in a standard swirl burner, the so-called Harwell furnace. Nevertheless, it needs validation against more complex combustion models......It is desired to make detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms applicable to the complex geometries of practical combustion devices simulated with computational fluid dynamics tools. This work presents a novel general approach to combining computational fluid dynamics and a detailed chemical kinetic...

  14. Robust Image Denoising using a Virtual Flash Image for Monte Carlo Ray Tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moon, Bochang; Jun, Jong Yun; Lee, JongHyeob

    2013-01-01

    parameters. To highlight the benefits of our method, we apply our method to two Monte Carlo ray tracing methods, photon mapping and path tracing, with various input scenes. We demonstrate that using virtual flash images and homogeneous pixels with a standard denoising method outperforms state-of-the-art......We propose an efficient and robust image-space denoising method for noisy images generated by Monte Carlo ray tracing methods. Our method is based on two new concepts: virtual flash images and homogeneous pixels. Inspired by recent developments in flash photography, virtual flash images emulate...... values. While denoising each pixel, we consider only homogeneous pixels—pixels that are statistically equivalent to each other. This makes it possible to define a stochastic error bound of our method, and this bound goes to zero as the number of ray samples goes to infinity, irrespective of denoising...

  15. Modeling pyramidal sensors in ray-tracing software by a suitable user-defined surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antichi, Jacopo; Munari, Matteo; Magrin, Demetrio; Riccardi, Armando

    2016-04-01

    Following the unprecedented results in terms of performances delivered by the first light adaptive optics system at the Large Binocular Telescope, there has been a wide-spread and increasing interest on the pyramid wavefront sensor (PWFS), which is the key component, together with the adaptive secondary mirror, of the adaptive optics (AO) module. Currently, there is no straightforward way to model a PWFS in standard sequential ray-tracing software. Common modeling strategies tend to be user-specific and, in general, are unsatisfactory for general applications. To address this problem, we have developed an approach to PWFS modeling based on user-defined surface (UDS), whose properties reside in a specific code written in C language, for the ray-tracing software ZEMAX™. With our approach, the pyramid optical component is implemented as a standard surface in ZEMAX™, exploiting its dynamic link library (DLL) conversion then greatly simplifying ray tracing and analysis. We have utilized the pyramid UDS DLL surface-referred to as pyramidal acronyms may be too risky (PAM2R)-in order to design the current PWFS-based AO system for the Giant Magellan Telescope, evaluating tolerances, with particular attention to the angular sensitivities, by means of sequential ray-tracing tools only, thus verifying PAM2R reliability and robustness. This work indicates that PAM2R makes the design of PWFS as simple as that of other optical standard components. This is particularly suitable with the advent of the extremely large telescopes era for which complexity is definitely one of the main challenges.

  16. Supercontinuum generation in ZBLAN fibers—detailed comparison between measurement and simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Agger, Christian; Petersen, Christian; Dupont, Sune; Steffensen, Henrik; Lyngsø, Jens Kristian; Thomsen, Carsten L.; Thøgersen, Jan; Keiding, Søren Rud; Bang, Ole

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed comparison between modeling and experiments on supercontinuum (SC) generation in a commercial ZBLAN step-index fiber. Special emphasis is put on identifying accurate material parameters by incorporating measurements of the ZBLAN Raman gain, fiber dispersion, and loss. This identification of accurate parameters is of great importance to substantiate numerical simulations of SC generation in soft-glass fibers. Good agreement between measurement and simulation is obtained w...

  17. Statistical Inverse Ray Tracing for Image-Based 3D Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shubao; Cooper, David B

    2014-10-01

    This paper proposes a new formulation and solution to image-based 3D modeling (aka "multi-view stereo") based on generative statistical modeling and inference. The proposed new approach, named statistical inverse ray tracing, models and estimates the occlusion relationship accurately through optimizing a physically sound image generation model based on volumetric ray tracing. Together with geometric priors, they are put together into a Bayesian formulation known as Markov random field (MRF) model. This MRF model is different from typical MRFs used in image analysis in the sense that the ray clique, which models the ray-tracing process, consists of thousands of random variables instead of two to dozens. To handle the computational challenges associated with large clique size, an algorithm with linear computational complexity is developed by exploiting, using dynamic programming, the recursive chain structure of the ray clique. We further demonstrate the benefit of exact modeling and accurate estimation of the occlusion relationship by evaluating the proposed algorithm on several challenging data sets.

  18. A rapid and accurate two-point ray tracing method in horizontally layered velocity model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yue; CHEN Xiao-fei

    2005-01-01

    A rapid and accurate method for two-point ray tracing in horizontally layered velocity model is presented in this paper. Numerical experiments show that this method provides stable and rapid convergence with high accuracies, regardless of various 1-D velocity structures, takeoff angles and epicentral distances. This two-point ray tracing method is compared with the pseudobending technique and the method advanced by Kim and Baag (2002). It turns out that the method in this paper is much more efficient and accurate than the pseudobending technique, but is only applicable to 1-D velocity model. Kim(s method is equivalent to ours for cases without large takeoff angles, but it fails to work when the takeoff angle is close to 90o. On the other hand, the method presented in this paper is applicable to cases with any takeoff angles with rapid and accurate convergence. Therefore, this method is a good choice for two-point ray tracing problems in horizontally layered velocity model and is efficient enough to be applied to a wide range of seismic problems.

  19. Vertex shading of the three-dimensional model based on ray-tracing algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoming; Sang, Xinzhu; Xing, Shujun; Yan, Binbin; Wang, Kuiru; Dou, Wenhua; Xiao, Liquan

    2016-10-01

    Ray Tracing Algorithm is one of the research hotspots in Photorealistic Graphics. It is an important light and shadow technology in many industries with the three-dimensional (3D) structure, such as aerospace, game, video and so on. Unlike the traditional method of pixel shading based on ray tracing, a novel ray tracing algorithm is presented to color and render vertices of the 3D model directly. Rendering results are related to the degree of subdivision of the 3D model. A good light and shade effect is achieved by realizing the quad-tree data structure to get adaptive subdivision of a triangle according to the brightness difference of its vertices. The uniform grid algorithm is adopted to improve the rendering efficiency. Besides, the rendering time is independent of the screen resolution. In theory, as long as the subdivision of a model is adequate, cool effects as the same as the way of pixel shading will be obtained. Our practical application can be compromised between the efficiency and the effectiveness.

  20. Ray-tracing and physical-optics analysis of the aperture efficiency in a radio telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmi, Luca; Bolli, Pietro

    2007-07-01

    The performance of telescope systems working at microwave or visible-IR wavelengths is typically described in terms of different parameters according to the wavelength range. Most commercial ray-tracing packages have been specifically designed for use with visible-IR systems and thus, though very flexible and sophisticated, do not provide the appropriate parameters to fully describe microwave antennas and to compare with specifications. We demonstrate that the Strehl ratio is equal to the phase efficiency when the apodization factor is taken into account. The phase efficiency is the most critical contribution to the aperture efficiency of an antenna and the most difficult parameter to optimize during the telescope design. The equivalence between the Strehl ratio and the phase efficiency gives the designer/user of the telescope the opportunity to use the faster commercial ray-tracing software to optimize the design. We also discuss the results of several tests performed to check the validity of this relationship that we carried out using a ray-tracing software, ZEMAX, and a full Physical Optics software, GRASP9.3, applied to three different telescope designs that span a factor of approximately 10 in terms of D/lambda. The maximum measured discrepancy between phase efficiency and Strehl ratio varies between approximately 0.4% and 1.9% up to an offset angle of >40 beams, depending on the optical configuration, but it is always less than 0.5% where the Strehl ratio is >0.95.

  1. Combining Single and Packet-Ray Tracing for Arbitrary Ray Distributions on the Intel MIC Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benthin, Carsten; Wald, Ingo; Woop, Sven; Ernst, Manfred; Mark, William R

    2012-09-01

    Wide-SIMD hardware is power and area efficient, but it is challenging to efficiently map ray tracing algorithms to such hardware especially when the rays are incoherent. The two most commonly used schemes are either packet tracing, or relying on a separate traversal stack for each SIMD lane. Both work great for coherent rays, but suffer when rays are incoherent: The former experiences a dramatic loss of SIMD utilization once rays diverge; the latter requires a large local storage, and generates multiple incoherent streams of memory accesses that present challenges for the memory system. In this paper, we introduce a single-ray tracing scheme for incoherent rays that uses just one traversal stack on 16-wide SIMD hardware. It uses a bounding-volume hierarchy with a branching factor of four as the acceleration structure, exploits four-wide SIMD in each box and primitive intersection test, and uses 16-wide SIMD by always performing four such node or primitive tests in parallel. We then extend this scheme to a hybrid tracing scheme that automatically adapts to varying ray coherence by starting out with a 16-wide packet scheme and switching to the new single-ray scheme as soon as rays diverge. We show that on the Intel Many Integrated Core architecture this hybrid scheme consistently, and over a wide range of scenes and ray distributions, outperforms both packet and single-ray tracing.

  2. Interactions between Levels of Instructional Detail and Expertise When Learning with Computer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yuling; Gao, Yuan; Liu, Tzu-Chien; Sweller, John

    2015-01-01

    Based on cognitive load theory, the effect of different levels of instructional detail and expertise in a simulation-based environment on learning about concepts of correlation was investigated. Separate versions of the learning environment were designed for the four experimental conditions which differed only with regard to the levels of written…

  3. Interactions between Levels of Instructional Detail and Expertise When Learning with Computer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yuling; Gao, Yuan; Liu, Tzu-Chien; Sweller, John

    2015-01-01

    Based on cognitive load theory, the effect of different levels of instructional detail and expertise in a simulation-based environment on learning about concepts of correlation was investigated. Separate versions of the learning environment were designed for the four experimental conditions which differed only with regard to the levels of written…

  4. Assessing wet snow avalanche activity using detailed physics based snowpack simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wever, N.; Vera Valero, C.; Fierz, C.

    2016-06-01

    Water accumulating on microstructural transitions inside a snowpack is often considered a prerequisite for wet snow avalanches. Recent advances in numerical snowpack modeling allow for an explicit simulation of this process. We analyze detailed snowpack simulations driven by meteorological stations in three different climate regimes (Alps, Central Andes, and Pyrenees), with accompanying wet snow avalanche activity observations. Predicting wet snow avalanche activity based on whether modeled water accumulations inside the snowpack locally exceed 5-6% volumetric liquid water content is providing a higher prediction skill than using thresholds for daily mean air temperature, or the daily sum of the positive snow energy balance. Additionally, the depth of the maximum water accumulation in the simulations showed a significant correlation with observed avalanche size. Direct output from detailed snow cover models thereby is able to provide a better regional assessment of dangerous slope aspects and potential avalanche size than traditional methods.

  5. Correction of ultrasonic array images to improve reflector sizing and location in inhomogeneous materials using a ray-tracing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, G D; Lowe, M J S; Temple, J A G; Rokhlin, S I

    2010-05-01

    The use of ultrasonic arrays has increased dramatically within recent years due to their ability to perform multiple types of inspection and to produce images of the structure through post-processing of received signals. Phased arrays offer many advantages over conventional transducers in the inspection of materials that are inhomogeneous with spatially varying anisotropic properties. In this paper, the arrays are focused on austenitic steel welds as a representative inhomogeneous material. The method of ray-tracing through a previously developed model of an inhomogeneous weld is shown, with particular emphasis on the difficulties presented by material inhomogeneity. The delay laws for the structure are computed and are used to perform synthetic focusing at the post-processing stage of signal data acquired by the array. It is demonstrated for a simulated austenitic weld that by taking material inhomogeneity and anisotropy into account, superior reflector location (and hence, superior sizing) results when compared to cases where these are ignored. The image is thus said to have been corrected. Typical images are produced from both analytical data in the frequency domain and data from finite element simulations in the time domain in a variety of wave modes, including cases with mode conversion and reflections.

  6. TIM, a ray-tracing program for METATOY research and its dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Dean; Hamilton, Alasdair C.; Constable, George; Snehanshu, Harsh; Talati, Sharvil; Courtial, Johannes

    2012-03-01

    TIM (The Interactive METATOY) is a ray-tracing program specifically tailored towards our research in METATOYs, which are optical components that appear to be able to create wave-optically forbidden light-ray fields. For this reason, TIM possesses features not found in other ray-tracing programs. TIM can either be used interactively or by modifying the openly available source code; in both cases, it can easily be run as an applet embedded in a web page. Here we describe the basic structure of TIM's source code and how to extend it, and we give examples of how we have used TIM in our own research. Program summaryProgram title: TIM Catalogue identifier: AEKY_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKY_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 124 478 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4 120 052 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Java Computer: Any computer capable of running the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) 1.6 Operating system: Any; developed under Mac OS X Version 10.6 RAM: Typically 145 MB (interactive version running under Mac OS X Version 10.6) Classification: 14, 18 External routines: JAMA [1] (source code included) Nature of problem: Visualisation of scenes that include scene objects that create wave-optically forbidden light-ray fields. Solution method: Ray tracing. Unusual features: Specifically designed to visualise wave-optically forbidden light-ray fields; can visualise ray trajectories; can visualise geometric optic transformations; can create anaglyphs (for viewing with coloured "3D glasses") and random-dot autostereograms of the scene; integrable into web pages. Running time: Problem-dependent; typically seconds for a simple scene.

  7. OFFSET - RAY TRACING OPTICAL ANALYSIS OF OFFSET SOLAR COLLECTOR FOR SPACE STATION SOLAR DYNAMIC POWER SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, K.

    1994-01-01

    OFFSET is a ray tracing computer code for optical analysis of a solar collector. The code models the flux distributions within the receiver cavity produced by reflections from the solar collector. It was developed to model the offset solar collector of the solar dynamic electric power system being developed for Space Station Freedom. OFFSET has been used to improve the understanding of the collector-receiver interface and to guide the efforts of NASA contractors also researching the optical components of the power system. The collector for Space Station Freedom consists of 19 hexagonal panels each containing 24 triangular, reflective facets. Current research is geared toward optimizing flux distribution inside the receiver via changes in collector design and receiver orientation. OFFSET offers many options for experimenting with the design of the system. The offset parabolic collector model configuration is determined by an input file of facet corner coordinates. The user may choose other configurations by changing this file, but to simulate collectors that have other than 19 groups of 24 triangular facets would require modification of the FORTRAN code. Each of the roughly 500 facets in the assembled collector may be independently aimed to smooth out, or tailor, the flux distribution on the receiver's wall. OFFSET simulates the effects of design changes such as in receiver aperture location, tilt angle, and collector facet contour. Unique features of OFFSET include: 1) equations developed to pseudo-randomly select ray originating sources on the Sun which appear evenly distributed and include solar limb darkening; 2) Cone-optics technique used to add surface specular error to the ray originating sources to determine the apparent ray sources of the reflected sun; 3) choice of facet reflective surface contour -- spherical, ideal parabolic, or toroidal; 4) Gaussian distributions of radial and tangential components of surface slope error added to the surface normals at

  8. Infrasonic ray tracing applied to mesoscale atmospheric structures: refraction by hurricanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Alfred J; Jones, R Michael

    2013-11-01

    A ray-tracing program is used to estimate the refraction of infrasound by the temperature structure of the atmosphere and by hurricanes represented by a Rankine-combined vortex wind plus a temperature perturbation. Refraction by the hurricane winds is significant, giving rise to regions of focusing, defocusing, and virtual sources. The refraction of infrasound by the temperature anomaly associated with a hurricane is small, probably no larger than that from uncertainties in the wind field. The results are pertinent to interpreting ocean wave generated infrasound in the vicinities of tropical cyclones.

  9. Invisibility cloaking via non-smooth transformation optics and ray tracing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosskey, Miles M., E-mail: mmc31@duke.ed [Mathematics Department, Duke University, Box 90320, Durham, NC 27708-0320 (United States); Nixon, Andrew T., E-mail: andrew_nixon@brown.ed [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, 182 George Street, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Schick, Leland M., E-mail: lschick@math.arizona.ed [Department of Mathematics, University of Arizona, 617 N. Santa Rita Ave., P.O. Box 210089, Tucson, AZ 85721-0089 (United States); Kovacic, Gregor, E-mail: kovacg@rpi.ed [Mathematical Sciences Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2011-05-02

    We present examples of theoretically-predicted invisibility cloaks with shapes other than spheres and cylinders, including cones and ellipsoids, as well as shapes spliced from parts of these simpler shapes. In addition, we present an example explicitly displaying the non-uniqueness of invisibility cloaks of the same shape. We depict rays propagating through these example cloaks using ray tracing for geometric optics. - Highlights: Theoretically-predicted conical and ellipsoidal invisibility cloaks. Non-smooth cloaks spliced from parts of simpler shapes. Example displaying non-uniqueness of invisibility cloaks of the same shape. Rays propagating through example cloaks depicted using geometric optics.

  10. Numerical ray-tracing approach with laser intensity distribution for LIDAR signal power function computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guangyuan; Li, Song; Huang, Ke; Li, Zile; Zheng, Guoxing

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a new numerical ray-tracing approach for LIDAR signal power function computation, in which the light round-trip propagation is analyzed by geometrical optics and a simple experiment is employed to acquire the laser intensity distribution. It is relatively more accurate and flexible than previous methods. We emphatically discuss the relationship between the inclined angle and the dynamic range of detector output signal in biaxial LIDAR system. Results indicate that an appropriate negative angle can compress the signal dynamic range. This technique has been successfully proved by comparison with real measurements.

  11. A Fast Ray-Tracing Using Bounding Spheres and Frustum Rays for Dynamic Scene Rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ken-Ichi; Kaeriyama, Yoshiyuki; Komatsu, Kazuhiko; Egawa, Ryusuke; Ohba, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Hiroaki

    Ray tracing is one of the most popular techniques for generating photo-realistic images. Extensive research and development work has made interactive static scene rendering realistic. This paper deals with interactive dynamic scene rendering in which not only the eye point but also the objects in the scene change their 3D locations every frame. In order to realize interactive dynamic scene rendering, RTRPS (Ray Tracing based on Ray Plane and Bounding Sphere), which utilizes the coherency in rays, objects, and grouped-rays, is introduced. RTRPS uses bounding spheres as the spatial data structure which utilizes the coherency in objects. By using bounding spheres, RTRPS can ignore the rotation of moving objects within a sphere, and shorten the update time between frames. RTRPS utilizes the coherency in rays by merging rays into a ray-plane, assuming that the secondary rays and shadow rays are shot through an aligned grid. Since a pair of ray-planes shares an original ray, the intersection for the ray can be completed using the coherency in the ray-planes. Because of the three kinds of coherency, RTRPS can significantly reduce the number of intersection tests for ray tracing. Further acceleration techniques for ray-plane-sphere and ray-triangle intersection are also presented. A parallel projection technique converts a 3D vector inner product operation into a 2D operation and reduces the number of floating point operations. Techniques based on frustum culling and binary-tree structured ray-planes optimize the order of intersection tests between ray-planes and a sphere, resulting in 50% to 90% reduction of intersection tests. Two ray-triangle intersection techniques are also introduced, which are effective when a large number of rays are packed into a ray-plane. Our performance evaluations indicate that RTRPS gives 13 to 392 times speed up in comparison with a ray tracing algorithm without organized rays and spheres. We found out that RTRPS also provides competitive

  12. A Detailed Comparison Between The Observed and Synthesized Properties of a Simulated Type ii Spicule

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Leenaarts, Jorrit; Pereira, Tiago M D; Carlsson, Mats; Hansteen, Viggo; Stern, Julie V; Tian, Hui; McIntosh, Scott W; van der Voort, Luc Rouppe

    2013-01-01

    We performed a 3D radiative MHD simulation of the solar atmosphere. This simulation shows a jet-like feature that shows similarities to the type II spicules observed for the first time with Hinode. Rapid Blueshifted Events (RBEs) on the solar disk are associated with these spicules. Observational results suggest they may contribute significantly in supplying the corona with hot plasma. We perform a detailed comparison of the properties of the simulated jet with those of type II spicules (observed with Hinode) and RBEs (with ground-based instruments). We analyze variety of synthetic emission and absorption lines from the simulations including chromospheric Ca II and Ha to TR and coronal temperatures (10E4 to several 10E6K). We compare their synthetic intensities, line profiles, Doppler shifts, line widths and asymmetries with observations from Hinode/SOT and EIS, SOHO/SUMER, SST and SDO/AIA. Many properties of the synthetic observables resemble the observations, and we describe in detail the physical processes...

  13. Detailed Monte Carlo Simulation of electron transport and electron energy loss spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attarian Shandiz, M; Salvat, F; Gauvin, R

    2016-11-01

    A computer program for detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the transport of electrons with kinetic energies in the range between about 0.1 and about 500 keV in bulk materials and in thin solid films is presented. Elastic scattering is described from differential cross sections calculated by the relativistic (Dirac) partial-wave expansion method with different models of the scattering potential. Inelastic interactions are simulated from an optical-data model based on an empirical optical oscillator strength that combines optical functions of the solid with atomic photoelectric data. The generalized oscillator strength is built from the adopted optical oscillator strength by using an extension algorithm derived from Lindhard's dielectric function for a free-electron gas. It is shown that simulated backscattering fractions of electron beams from bulk (semi-infinite) specimens are in good agreement with experimental data for beam energies from 0.1 keV up to about 100 keV. Simulations also yield transmitted and backscattered fractions of electron beams on thin solid films that agree closely with measurements for different film thicknesses and incidence angles. Simulated most probable deflection angles and depth-dose distributions also agree satisfactorily with measurements. Finally, electron energy loss spectra of several elemental solids are simulated and the effects of the beam energy and the foil thickness on the signal to background and signal to noise ratios are investigated. SCANNING 38:475-491, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Anatomically detailed and large-scale simulations studying synapse loss and synchrony using NeuroBox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eBreit

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The morphology of neurons and networks plays an important role in processing electrical and biochemical signals. Based on neuronal reconstructions, which are becoming abundantly available through databases such as NeuroMorpho.org, numerical simulations of Hodgkin-Huxley-type equations, coupled to biochemical models, can be performed in order to systematically investigate the influence of cellular morphology and the connectivity pattern in networks on the underlying function. Development in the area of synthetic neural network generation and morphology reconstruction from microscopy data has brought forth the software tool NeuGen. Coupling this morphology data (either from databases, synthetic or reconstruction to the simulation platform UG 4 (which harbors a neuroscientific portfolio and VRL-Studio, has brought forth the extendible toolbox NeuroBox. NeuroBox allows users to perform numerical simulations on hybrid-dimensional morphology representations. The code basis is designed in a modular way, such that e.g. new channel or synapse types can be added to the library. Workflows can be specified through scripts or through the VRL-Studio graphical workflow representation. Third-party tools, such as ImageJ, can be added to NeuroBox workflows. In this paper, NeuroBox is used to study the electrical and biochemical effects of synapse loss vs. synchrony in neurons, to investigate large morphology data sets within detailed biophysical simulations, and used to demonstrate the capability of utilizing high-performance computing infrastructure for large scale network simulations. Using new synapse distribution methods and Finite Volume based numerical solvers for compartment-type models, our results demonstrate how an increase in synaptic synchronization can compensate synapse loss at the electrical and calcium level, and how detailed neuronal morphology can be integrated in large-scale network simulations.

  15. Exploring Light's Interactions with Bubbles and Light Absorbers in Photoelectrochemical Devices using Ray Tracing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Ray tracing was used to perform optical optimization of arrays of photovoltaic microrods and explore the interaction between light and bubbles of oxygen gas on the surface of the microrods. The incident angle of light was varied over a wide range. The percent of incident light absorbed by the microrods and reflected by the bubbles was computed over this range. It was found that, for the 10 μm diameter, 100 μm tall SrTiO3 microrods simulated in the model, the optimal center-to-center spacing was 14 μm for a square grid. This geometry produced 75% average and 90% maximum absorbance. For a triangular grid using the same microrods, the optimal center-to-­center spacing was 14 μm. This geometry produced 67% average and 85% maximum absorbance. For a randomly laid out grid of 5 μm diameter, 100 μm tall SrTiO! microrods with an average center-­to-­center spacing of 20 μm, the average absorption was 23% and the maximum absorption was 43%. For a 50% areal coverage fraction of bubbles on the absorber surface, between 2%-20% of the incident light energy was reflected away from the rods by the bubbles, depending upon incident angle and bubble morphology.

  16. Radiation modeling of a photo-reactor using a backward ray-tracing method: an insight into indoor photocatalytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelzers, R S; Yu, Q L; Mangkuto, R A

    2014-10-01

    This article aims to understand the radiation behavior within a photo-reactor, following the ISO 22197-1:2007 standard. The RADIANCE lighting simulation tool, based on the backward ray-tracing modeling method, is employed for a numerical computation of the radiation field. The reflection of the glass cover in the photo-reactor and the test sample influence the amount of irradiance received by the test-sample surface in the photo-reactor setup. The reflection of a white sample limits the irradiance reduction by the glass cover to 1.4 %, but darker samples can lead to an overestimation up to 9.8 % when used in the same setup. This overestimation could introduce considerable error into the interpretation of experiments. Furthermore, this method demonstrates that the kinetics for indoor photocatalytic pollutant degradation can be refined through radiation modeling of the reactor setup. In addition, RADIANCE may aid in future modeling of the more complex indoor environment where radiation affects significantly photocatalytic activity.

  17. Effects of Ice-Crystal Structure on Halo Formation: Cirrus Cloud Experimental and Ray-Tracing Modeling Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Knight, Nancy C.; Takano, Yoshihide; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    1994-01-01

    During the 1986 Project FIRE (First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Regional Experiment) field campaign, four 22 deg halo-producing cirrus clouds were studied jointly from a ground-based polarization lidar and an instrumented aircraft. The lidar data show the vertical cloud structure and the relative position of the aircraft, which collected a total of 84 slides by impaction, preserving the ice crystals for later microscopic examination. Although many particles were too fragile to survive impaction intact, a large fraction of the identifiable crystals were columns and radial bullet rosettes, with both displaying internal cavitations and radial plate-column combinations. Particles that were solid or displayed only a slight amount of internal structure were relatively rare, which shows that the usual model postulated by halo theorists, i.e., the randomly oriented, solid hexagonal crystal, is inappropriate for typical cirrus clouds. With the aid of new ray-tracing simulations for hexagonal hollow-ended column and bullet-rosette models, we evaluate the effects of more realistic ice-crystal structures on halo formation and lidar depolarization and consider why the common halo is not more common in cirrus clouds.

  18. Problems in Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrocarbons and Detailed Simulation of Combustion Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yuxuan

    This dissertation research consists of two parts, with Part I on the kinetics of catalytic oxidation of hydrocarbons and Part II on aspects on the detailed simulation of combustion processes. In Part I, the catalytic oxidation of C1--C3 hydrocarbons, namely methane, ethane, propane and ethylene, was investigated for lean hydrocarbon-air mixtures over an unsupported Pd-based catalyst, from 600 to 800 K and under atmospheric pressure. In Chapter 2, the experimental facility of wire microcalorimetry and simulation configuration were described in details. In Chapter 3 and 4, the oxidation rate of C1--C 3 hydrocarbons is demonstrated to be determined by the dissociative adsorption of hydrocarbons. A detailed surface kinetics model is proposed with deriving the rate coefficient of hydrocarbon dissociative adsorption from the wire microcalorimetry data. In Part II, four fundamental studies were conducted through detailed combustion simulations. In Chapter 5, self-accelerating hydrogen-air flames are studied via two-dimensional detailed numerical simulation (DNS). The increase in the global flame velocity is shown to be caused by the increase of flame surface area, and the fractal structure of the flame front is demonstrated by the box-counting method. In Chapter 6, skeletal reaction models for butane combustion are derived by using directed relation graph (DRG) and DRG-aided sensitivity analysis (DRGASA), and uncertainty minimization by polynomial chaos expansion (MUM-PCE) mothodes. The dependence of model uncertainty is subjected to the completeness of the model. In Chapter 7, a systematic strategy is proposed to reduce the cost of the multicomponent diffusion model by accurately accounting for the species whose diffusivity is important to the global responses of the combustion systems, and approximating those of less importance by the mixture-averaged model. The reduced model is validated in an n-heptane mechanism with 88 species. In Chapter 8, the influence of Soret

  19. Simulating Photon Scattering Effects in Structurally Detailed Ventricular Models Using a Monte Carlo Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J Bishop

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Light scattering during optical imaging of electrical activation within the heart is known to significantlydistort the optically-recorded action potential (AP upstroke, as well as affecting the magnitude of the measured response of ventricular tissue to strong electric shocks. Modelling approaches based on the photondiffusion equation have recently been instrumental in quantifying and helping to understand the origin of the resulting distortion. However, they are unable to faithfully represent regions of non-scattering media, such assmall cavities within the myocardium which are filled with perfusate during experiments. Stochastic Monte Carlo (MC approaches allow simulation and tracking of individual photon `packets' as they propagate through tissuewith differing scattering properties. Here, we present a novel application of the MC method of photon scattering simulation, applied for the first time to the simulation of cardiac optical mapping signals withinunstructured, tetrahedral, finite element computational ventricular models. The method faithfully allows simulation of optical signals over highly-detailed, anatomically-complex MR-based models, includingrepresentations of fine-scale anatomy and intramural cavities. We show that optical action potential upstroke is prolonged close to large subepicardial vessels than further away from vessels, at times having a distinct `humped' morphology.Furthermore, we uncover a novel mechanism by which photon scattering effects around vessels cavities interact with `virtual-electrode' regions of strong de-/hyper-polarised tissue surrounding cavitiesduring shocks, significantly reducing the apparent optically-measured epicardial polarisation. We therefore demonstrate the importance of this novel optical mapping simulation approach along with highly anatomically-detailed models to fully investigate electrophysiological phenomena driven by fine-scale structural heterogeneity.

  20. A Unified Detail-Preserving Liquid Simulation by Two-Phase Lattice Boltzmann Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yulong; Liu, Xiaopei; Xu, Xuemiao

    2016-02-19

    Traditional methods in graphics to simulate liquid-air dynamics under different scenarios usually employ separate approaches with sophisticated interface tracking/reconstruction techniques. In this paper, we propose a novel unified approach which is easy and effective to produce a variety of liquid-air interface phenomena. These phenomena, such as complex surface splashes, bubble interactions, as well as surface tension effects, can co-exist in one single simulation, and are created within the same computational framework. Such a framework is unique in that it is free from any complicated interface tracking/reconstruction procedures. Our approach is developed from the two-phase lattice Boltzmann method with the mean field model, which provides a unified framework for interface dynamics but is numerically unstable under turbulent conditions. Considering the drawbacks of the existing approaches, we propose techniques to suppress oscillation for significant stability enhancement, as well as derive a new subgrid-scale model to further improve stability, faithfully preserving liquid-air interface details without excessive diffusion by taking into account the density variation. The whole framework is highly parallel, enabling very efficient implementation. Comparisons to the related approaches show superiority on stable simulation with detail preservation and multiphase phenomena simultaneously involved. A set of animation results demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.

  1. Accelerating development of metal organic framework membranes using atomically detailed simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Seda

    A new group of nanoporous materials, metal organic frameworks (MOFs), have emerged as a fascinating alternative to more traditional nanoporous materials for membrane based gas separations. Although hundreds of different MOF structures have been synthesized in powder forms, very little is currently known about the potential performance of MOFs as membranes since fabrication and testing of membranes from new materials require a large amount of time and resources. The purpose of this thesis is to predict the macroscopic flux of multi-component gas mixtures through MOF-based membranes with information obtained from detailed atomistic simulations. First, atomically detailed simulations of gas adsorption and diffusion in MOFs combined with a continuum description of a membrane are introduced to predict the performance of MOF membranes. These results are compared with the only available experimental data for a MOF membrane. An efficient approximate method based on limited information from molecular simulations to accelerate the modeling of MOF membranes is then introduced. The accuracy and computational efficiency of different modeling approaches are discussed. A robust screening strategy is proposed to screen numerous MOF materials to identify the ones with the high membrane selectivity and to direct experimental efforts to the most promising of many possible MOF materials. This study provides the first predictions of any kind about the potential of MOFs as membranes and demonstrates that using molecular modeling for this purpose can be a useful means of identifying the phenomena that control the performance of MOFs as membranes.

  2. The Effects of Highly Detailed Urban Roughness Parameters on a Sea-Breeze Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varquez, Alvin Christopher G.; Nakayoshi, Makoto; Kanda, Manabu

    2015-03-01

    We consider the effects of detailed urban roughness parameters on a sea-breeze simulation. An urban roughness database, constructed using a new aerodynamic parametrization derived from large-eddy simulations, was incorporated as a surface boundary condition in the advanced Weather Research and Forecasting model. The zero-plane displacement and aerodynamic roughness length at several densely built-up urban grids were three times larger than conventional values due to the consideration of building-height variability. A comparison between simulations from the modified model and its default version, which uses uniform roughness parameters within a conventional method, was conducted for a 2-month period during summer. Results showed a significant improvement in the simulation of surface wind speed but not with temperature. From the 2-month study period, a day with an evident sea-breeze penetration was selected and simulated at higher temporal resolution. Sea-breeze penetration weakened and was more delayed over urbanized areas. The slow sea-breeze penetration also lessened heat advection downwind allowing stronger turbulent mixing and a deeper boundary layer above urban areas. Horizontal wind-speed reduction due to the increased urban surface drag reached heights of several hundreds of metres due to the strong convection.

  3. Agreement between total corneal astigmatism calculated by vector summation and total corneal astigmatism measured by ray tracing using Galilei double Scheimpflug analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizi, Sepehr; Delfazayebaher, Siamak; Ownagh, Vahid; Sadeghpour, Fatemeh

    2017-08-03

    To evaluate the agreement between total corneal astigmatism calculated by vector summation of anterior and posterior corneal astigmatism (TCAVec) and total corneal astigmatism measured by ray tracing (TCARay). This study enrolled a total of 204 right eyes of 204 normal subjects. The eyes were measured using a Galilei double Scheimpflug analyzer. The measured parameters included simulated keratometric astigmatism using the keratometric index, anterior corneal astigmatism using the corneal refractive index, posterior corneal astigmatism, and TCARay. TCAVec was derived by vector summation of the astigmatism on the anterior and posterior corneal surfaces. The magnitudes and axes of TCAVec and TCARay were compared. The Pearson correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman plots were used to assess the relationship and agreement between TCAVec and TCARay, respectively. The mean TCAVec and TCARay magnitudes were 0.76±0.57D and 1.00±0.78D, respectively (Pvector summation and ray tracing methods cannot be used interchangeably. There was a systematic error between the TCAVec and TCARay magnitudes. Copyright © 2017 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Detailed dynamic solid oxide fuel cell modeling for electrochemical impedance spectra simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Ph. [Laboratory of Steam Boilers and Thermal Plants, School of Mechanical Engineering, Thermal Engineering Section, National Technical University of Athens, Heroon Polytechniou 9, 15780 Athens (Greece); Panopoulos, K.D. [Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, 4th km. Ptolemais-Mpodosakeio Hospital, Region of Kouri, P.O. Box 95, GR 502, 50200 Ptolemais (Greece)

    2010-08-15

    This paper presents a detailed flexible mathematical model for planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), which allows the simulation of steady-state performance characteristics, i.e. voltage-current density (V-j) curves, and dynamic operation behavior, with a special capability of simulating electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The model is based on physico-chemical governing equations coupled with a detailed multi-component gas diffusion mechanism (Dusty-Gas Model (DGM)) and a multi-step heterogeneous reaction mechanism implicitly accounting for the water-gas-shift (WGS), methane reforming and Boudouard reactions. Spatial discretization can be applied for 1D (button-cell approximation) up to quasi-3D (full size anode supported cell in cross-flow configuration) geometries and is resolved with the finite difference method (FDM). The model is built and implemented on the commercially available modeling and simulations platform gPROMS trademark. Different fuels based on hydrogen, methane and syngas with inert diluents are run. The model is applied to demonstrate a detailed analysis of the SOFC inherent losses and their attribution to the EIS. This is achieved by means of a step-by-step analysis of the involved transient processes such as gas conversion in the main gas chambers/channels, gas diffusion through the porous electrodes together with the heterogeneous reactions on the nickel catalyst, and the double-layer current within the electrochemical reaction zone. The model is an important tool for analyzing SOFC performance fundamentals as well as for design and optimization of materials' and operational parameters. (author)

  5. Dynamical Twisted Mass Fermions with Light Quarks: Simulation and Analysis Details

    CERN Document Server

    Boucaud, Ph; Farchioni, F; Frezzotti, R; Giménez, V; Herdoiza, G; Jansen, K; Lubicz, V; Michael, C; Münster, G; Palao, D; Rossi, G C; Scorzato, L; Shindler, A; Simula, S; Sudmann, T; Urbach, C; Wenger, U

    2008-01-01

    In a recent paper [hep-lat/0701012] we presented precise lattice QCD results of our European Twisted Mass Collaboration (ETMC). They were obtained by employing two mass-degenerate flavours of twisted mass fermions at maximal twist. In the present paper we give details on our simulations and the computation of physical observables. In particular, we discuss the problem of tuning to maximal twist, the techniques we have used to compute correlators and error estimates. In addition, we provide more information on the algorithm used, the autocorrelation times and scale determination, the evaluation of disconnected contributions and the description of our data by means of chiral perturbation theory formulae.

  6. Wind Turbine Rotor Simulation via CFD Based Actuator Disc Technique Compared to Detailed Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmail Mahmoodi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a generalized Actuator Disc (AD is used to model the wind turbine rotor of the MEXICO experiment, a collaborative European wind turbine project. The AD model as a combination of CFD technique and User Defined Functions codes (UDF, so-called UDF/AD model is used to simulate loads and performance of the rotor in three different wind speed tests. Distributed force on the blade, thrust and power production of the rotor as important designing parameters of wind turbine rotors are focused to model. A developed Blade Element Momentum (BEM theory as a code based numerical technique as well as a full rotor simulation both from the literature are included into the results to compare and discuss. The output of all techniques is compared to detailed measurements for validation, which led us to final conclusions.

  7. Co-Simulation of Detailed Whole Building with the Power System to Study Smart Grid Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Fuller, Jason C.; Srivastava, Viraj; Ciraci, Selim; Daily, Jeffrey A.

    2014-12-24

    Modernization of the power system in a way that ensures a sustainable energy system is arguably one of the most pressing concerns of our time. Buildings are important components in the power system. First, they are the main consumers of electricity and secondly, they do not have constant energy demand. Conventionally, electricity has been difficult to store and should be consumed as it is generated. Therefore, maintaining the demand and supply is critical in the power system. However, to reduce the complexity of power models, buildings (i.e., end-use loads) are traditionally modeled and represented as aggregated “dumb” nodes in the power system. This means we lack effective detailed whole building energy models that can support requirements and emerging technologies of the smart power grid. To gain greater insight into the relationship between building energy demand and power system performance, it is important to constitute a co-simulation framework to support detailed building energy modeling and simulation within the power system to study capabilities promised by the modern power grid. This paper discusses ongoing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and presents underlying tools and framework needed to enable co-simulation of building, building energy systems and their control in the power system to study applications such as demand response, grid-based HVAC control, and deployment of buildings for ancillary services. The optimal goal is to develop an integrated modeling and simulation platform that is flexible, reusable, and scalable. Results of this work will contribute to future building and power system studies, especially those related to the integrated ‘smart grid’. Results are also expected to advance power resiliency and local (micro) scale grid studies where several building and renewable energy systems transact energy directly. This paper also reviews some applications that can be supported and studied using the framework introduced

  8. Two-fluid electromagnetic simulations of plasma-jet acceleration with detailed equation-of-state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D. R.; Clark, R. E.; Bruner, N. [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I. E. [Prism Computational Sciences, Inc., Madison, Wisconsin 53711 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    We describe a new particle-based two-fluid fully electromagnetic algorithm suitable for modeling high density (n{sub i} {approx} 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) and high Mach number laboratory plasma jets. In this parameter regime, traditional particle-in-cell (PIC) techniques are challenging due to electron timescale and lengthscale constraints. In this new approach, an implicit field solve allows the use of large timesteps while an Eulerian particle remap procedure allows simulations to be run with very few particles per cell. Hall physics and charge separation effects are included self-consistently. A detailed equation of state (EOS) model is used to evolve the ion charge state and introduce non-ideal gas behavior. Electron cooling due to radiation emission is included in the model as well. We demonstrate the use of these new algorithms in 1D and 2D Cartesian simulations of railgun (parallel plate) jet accelerators using He and Ar gases. The inclusion of EOS and radiation physics reduces the electron temperature, resulting in higher calculated jet Mach numbers in the simulations. We also introduce a surface physics model for jet accelerators in which a frictional drag along the walls leads to axial spreading of the emerging jet. The simulations demonstrate that high Mach number jets can be produced by railgun accelerators for a variety of applications, including high energy density physics experiments.

  9. Statistical Analysis of Detailed 3-D CFD LES Simulations with Regard to CCV Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vítek Oldřich

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with statistical analysis of large amount of detailed 3-D CFD data in terms of cycle-to-cycle variations (CCVs. These data were obtained by means of LES calculations of many consecutive cycles. Due to non-linear nature of Navier-Stokes equation set, there is a relatively significant CCV. Hence, every cycle is slightly different – this leads to requirement to perform statistical analysis based on ensemble averaging procedure which enables better understanding of CCV in ICE including its quantification. The data obtained from the averaging procedure provides results on different space resolution levels. The procedure is applied locally, i.e., in every cell of the mesh. Hence there is detailed CCV information on local level – such information can be compared with RANS simulations. Next, volume/mass averaging provides information at specific locations – e.g., gap between electrodes of a spark plug. Finally, volume/mass averaging of the whole combustion chamber leads to global information which can be compared with experimental data or results of system simulation tools (which are based on 0-D/1-D approach.

  10. Detailed high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of OMEGA separated reactants inertial confinement fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, Brian M.; Grim, Gary P.; Fincke, James R.; Shah, Rahul C.; Forrest, Chad J.; Silverstein, Kevin; Marshall, Frederic J.; Boswell, Melissa; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Gore, Robert A.; Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna C.; Jungman, Gerard; Klein, Andreas; Rundberg, Robert S.; Steinkamp, Michael J.; Wilhelmy, Jerry B.

    2016-07-01

    -wavelength asymmetries degrade TT yield more than the DT yield and thus bring DT/TT neutron yield ratios into agreement with experiment. Finally, we present a detailed comparison of the flows in 2D and 3D simulations.

  11. Detailed high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of OMEGA separated reactants inertial confinement fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, Brian M., E-mail: bmhaines@lanl.gov; Fincke, James R.; Shah, Rahul C.; Boswell, Melissa; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Gore, Robert A.; Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna C.; Jungman, Gerard; Klein, Andreas; Rundberg, Robert S.; Steinkamp, Michael J.; Wilhelmy, Jerry B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS T087, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Grim, Gary P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Forrest, Chad J.; Silverstein, Kevin; Marshall, Frederic J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    -wavelength asymmetries degrade TT yield more than the DT yield and thus bring DT/TT neutron yield ratios into agreement with experiment. Finally, we present a detailed comparison of the flows in 2D and 3D simulations.

  12. Detailed high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of OMEGA separated reactants inertial confinement fusion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Brian M.; Grim, Gary P.; Fincke, James R.; Shah, Rahul C.; Forrest, Chad J.; Silverstein, Kevin; Marshall, Frederic J.; Boswell, Melissa; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Gore, Robert A.; Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna C.; Jungman, Gerard; Klein, Andreas; Rundberg, Robert S.; Steinkamp, Michael J.; Wilhelmy, Jerry B.

    2016-07-01

    -wavelength asymmetries degrade TT yield more than the DT yield and thus bring DT/TT neutron yield ratios into agreement with experiment. Finally, we present a detailed comparison of the flows in 2D and 3D simulations.

  13. Polarization property analysis of a periscopic scanner with three-dimensional polarization ray-tracing calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yufei; Yan, Changxiang

    2016-02-20

    The polarization properties of a two-axis periscopic optical scanner constituted by a pair of rotating planar mirrors have been studied by using the three-dimensional polarization ray-tracing matrix method. The separate and cumulative matrices that define the transformation of the polarization state are obtained and expressed in terms of the rotation angles of two mirrors. The variations of diattenuation and retardance are investigated and graphically shown as functions of the rotation angles. On this basis, a further investigation about the cumulative polarization aberrations of three different metal-coated periscopic scanners is accomplished. Finally, the output polarization states of the three metal-coated scanners are calculated with the input beam of the arbitrary polarization states, and the results show that aluminum film is more appropriate than gold film or silver film for the polarization-maintaining periscopic scanner.

  14. Microcellular propagation prediction model based on an improved ray tracing algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z-Y; Guo, L-X; Fan, T-Q

    2013-11-01

    Two-dimensional (2D)/two-and-one-half-dimensional ray tracing (RT) algorithms for the use of the uniform theory of diffraction and geometrical optics are widely used for channel prediction in urban microcellular environments because of their high efficiency and reliable prediction accuracy. In this study, an improved RT algorithm based on the "orientation face set" concept and on the improved 2D polar sweep algorithm is proposed. The goal is to accelerate point-to-point prediction, thereby making RT prediction attractive and convenient. In addition, the use of threshold control of each ray path and the handling of visible grid points for reflection and diffraction sources are adopted, resulting in an improved efficiency of coverage prediction over large areas. Measured results and computed predictions are also compared for urban scenarios. The results indicate that the proposed prediction model works well and is a useful tool for microcellular communication applications.

  15. Refraction in planetary atmospheres: improved analytical expressions and comparison with a new ray-tracing algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Betremieux, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric refraction affects to various degrees exoplanet transit, lunar eclipse, as well as stellar occultation observations. Exoplanet retrieval algorithms often use analytical expressions for the column abundance along a ray traversing the atmosphere as well as for the deflection of that ray, which are first order approximations valid for low densities in a spherically symmetric homogeneous isothermal atmosphere. We derive new analytical formulae for both of these quantities, which are valid for higher densities, and use them to refine and validate a new ray tracing algorithm which can be used for arbitrary atmospheric temperature-pressure profiles. We illustrate with simple isothermal atmospheric profiles the consequences of our model for different planets: temperate Earth-like and Jovian-like planets, as well as HD189733b, and GJ1214b. We find that, for both hot exoplanets, our treatment of refraction does not make much of a difference to pressures as high as 10 atmosphere, but that it is important to ...

  16. Photorealistic ray tracing of free-space invisibility cloaks made of uniaxial dielectrics

    CERN Document Server

    Halimeh, Jad C

    2012-01-01

    The design rules of transformation optics generally lead to spatially inhomogeneous and anisotropic impedance-matched magneto-dielectric material distributions for, e.g., free-space invisibility cloaks. Recently, simplified anisotropic non-magnetic free-space cloaks made of a locally uniaxial dielectric material (calcite) have been realized experimentally. In a two-dimensional setting and for in-plane polarized light propagating in this plane, the cloaking performance can still be perfect for light rays. However, for general views in three dimensions, various imperfections are expected. In this paper, we study two different purely dielectric uniaxial cylindrical free-space cloaks. For one, the optic axis is along the radial direction, for the other one it is along the azimuthal direction. The azimuthal uniaxial cloak has not been suggested previously to the best of our knowledge. We visualize the cloaking performance of both by calculating photorealistic images rendered by ray tracing. Following and complemen...

  17. Ray trace algorithm description for the study of pump power absorption in double clad fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narro, R.; Rodriguez, E.; Ponce, L.; de Posada, E.; Flores, T.; Arronte, M.

    2011-09-01

    An algorithm for the analysis of the double clad fiber design is presented. The algorithm developed in the MATLAB computing language, is based on ray tracing method applied to three-dimensional graphics figures which are composed of a set of plans. The algorithm can evaluate thousands of ray paths in sequence and its corresponding pump absorption in each of the elements of the fiber according to the Lambert-Beer law. The beam path is evaluated in 3 dimensions considering the losses by reflexion and refraction in the faces and within the fiber. Due to its flexibility, the algorithm can be used to study the ray propagation in single mode or multimode fibers, bending effects in fibers, variable geometries of the inner clad and the core, and could also be used to study tappers.

  18. Skew ray tracing in a step-index optical fiber using Geometric Algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Ang, Angeleene; McNamara, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    We used Geometric Algebra to compute the paths of skew rays in a cylindrical, step-index multimode optical fiber. To do this, we used the vector addition form for the law of propagation, the exponential of an imaginary vector form for the law of refraction, and the juxtaposed vector product form for the law of reflection. In particular, the exponential forms of the vector rotations enables us to take advantage of the addition or subtraction of exponential arguments of two rotated vectors in the derivation of the ray tracing invariants in cylindrical and spherical coordinates. We showed that the light rays inside the optical fiber trace a polygonal helical path characterized by three invariants that relate successive reflections inside the fiber: the ray path distance, the difference in axial distances, and the difference in the azimuthal angles. We also rederived the known generalized formula for the numerical aperture for skew rays, which simplifies to the standard form for meridional rays.

  19. New ray-tracing capabilities for the development of silicon pore optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacanti, Giuseppe; Barrière, Nicolas; Chatbi, Abdelhakim; Collon, Maximilien; Günther, Ramses; Yanson, Alexei; Vervest, Mark; Bavdaz, Marcos; Wille, Eric

    2015-09-01

    The Geant4 based ray-tracer used to support the development of Silicon Pore Optics is being extended to take into account more subtle effects that affect the performance of the optics, like thermo-mechanical stresses and detailed surface metrology. Its performance has also been increased to make it possible to simulate rapidly and in detail the optics of Athena so that various possible configurations can be explored and characterized providing important feedback to the development and system teams. In this paper we report on the state of the development.

  20. ACCELERATION RENDERING METHOD ON RAY TRACING WITH ANGLE COMPARISON AND DISTANCE COMPARISON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana liliana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In computer graphics applications, to produce realistic images, a method that is often used is ray tracing. Ray tracing does not only model local illumination but also global illumination. Local illumination count ambient, diffuse and specular effects only, but global illumination also count mirroring and transparency. Local illumination count effects from the lamp(s but global illumination count effects from other object(s too. Objects that are usually modeled are primitive objects and mesh objects. The advantage of mesh modeling is various, interesting and real-like shape. Mesh contains many primitive objects like triangle or square (rare. A problem in mesh object modeling is long rendering time. It is because every ray must be checked with a lot of triangle of the mesh. Added by ray from other objects checking, the number of ray that traced will increase. It causes the increasing of rendering time. To solve this problem, in this research, new methods are developed to make the rendering process of mesh object faster. The new methods are angle comparison and distance comparison. These methods are used to reduce the number of ray checking. The rays predicted will not intersect with the mesh, are not checked weather the ray intersects the mesh. With angle comparison, if using small angle to compare, the rendering process will be fast. This method has disadvantage, if the shape of each triangle is big, some triangles will be corrupted. If the angle to compare is bigger, mesh corruption can be avoided but the rendering time will be longer than without comparison. With distance comparison, the rendering time is less than without comparison, and no triangle will be corrupted.

  1. Nonlinear teleseismic tomography at Long Valley caldera, using three-dimensional minimum travel time ray tracing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiland, C.M. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Steck, L.K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Dawson, P.B. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-10

    The authors explore the impact of three-dimensional minimum travel time ray tracing on nonlinear teleseismic inversion. This problem has particular significance when trying to image strongly contrasting low-velocity bodies, such as magma chambers, because strongly refracted/and/or diffracted rays may precede the direct P wave arrival traditionally used in straight-ray seismic tomography. They use a simplex-based ray tracer to compute the three-dimensional, minimum travel time ray paths and employ an interative technique to cope with nonlinearity. Results from synthetic data show that their algorithm results in better model reconstructions compared with traditional straight-ray inversions. The authors reexamine the teleseismic data collected at Long Valley caldera by the U.S. Geological Survey. The most prominent feature of their result is a 25-30% low-velocity zone centered at 11.5 km depth beneath the northwestern quandrant of the caldera. Beneath this at a depth of 24.5 km is a more diffuse 15% low-velocity zone. In general, the low velocities tend to deepen to the south and east. The authors interpret the shallow feature to be the residual Long Valley caldera magma chamber, while the deeper feature may represent basaltic magmas ponded in the midcrust. The deeper position of the prominent low-velocity region in comparison to earlier tomographic images is a result of using three-dimensional rays rather than straight rays in the ray tracing. The magnitude of the low-velocity anomaly is a factor of {approximately}3 times larger than earlier models from linear arrival time inversions and is consistent with models based on observations of ray bending at sites within the caldera. These results imply the presence of anywhere from 7 to 100% partial melt beneath the caldera. 40 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. Numerical Simulations of the Single-mode, Reacting Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability Using Detailed Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attal, Nitesh; Ramaprabhu, Praveen

    2013-11-01

    The interaction of a shock wave with a chemically reacting front is of importance to the design of supersonic combustors and scramjets where mixing from the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI) could be tapped to increase combustion efficiency. We will describe results of shock-driven, reacting RMI of a sinusoidally perturbed, single-mode interface separating Hydrogen (fuel) and Oxygen at 300 K and 1625 K respectively. The non-premixed interface was accelerated by a Mach 1.2 shock traversing from the light (H2) to heavy (O2) fluid (Atwood number = 0.5) in a numerical shock tube of aspect ratio 12. The 2D simulations were performed using the compressible flow code FLASH, with modifications to handle detailed chemistry and temperature-dependent material properties. The initial thickness of the material interface was systematically varied to study the effect of the diffusion thickness on the flame and instability dynamics. Product formation and heat release as a result of chemical reactions were described according to the 9-species, 19-steps detailed reaction mechanism.

  3. Accounting for spectral albedo, solar light penetration and impurity content in detailed snowpack simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Marie; Lafaysse, Matthieu; Picard, Ghislain; Arnaud, Laurent; Libois, Quentin; Morin, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    The energy balance of the snowpack, driven in particular by its spectral albedo and the penetration depth of solar light, is of primary importance to drive the time evolution of snow on the ground. Here we introduce new developments of the detailed snowpack model SURFEX/ISBA-Crocus (Brun et al., 1992 ; Vionnet et al., 2012) which now includes a spectrally-resolved two-stream calculation of solar light absorption within the snowpack (Libois et al. ,2013) and of the spectral partitioning of the direct and diffuse atmospheric irradiance and a prognostic snow impurity content. The added value of these refined representation of processes is evaluated with respect to field measurements of snow spectral reflectance and snow water equivalent. Simulations were performed at Col de Porte site (Chartreuse, France, 1325 m a.s.l.) using in situ meteorological forcings during winter 2013-2014 and aerosols deposition fluxes from MOCAGE chemistry transport atmospheric model. A major Saharian dust deposition event occurred in February 2014. Using simulations and measurements, we investigate in particular the impact of this event on the physical characteristics of the snowpack with a special focus on metamorphism and on the timing of melt.

  4. Sweet Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) Canopy Photosynthesis Modeling Using 3D Plant Architecture and Light Ray-Tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jee Hoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Ahn, Tae In; Shin, Jong Hwa; Park, Kyung Sub; Son, Jung Eek

    2016-01-01

    Canopy photosynthesis has typically been estimated using mathematical models that have the following assumptions: the light interception inside the canopy exponentially declines with the canopy depth, and the photosynthetic capacity is affected by light interception as a result of acclimation. However, in actual situations, light interception in the canopy is quite heterogenous depending on environmental factors such as the location, microclimate, leaf area index, and canopy architecture. It is important to apply these factors in an analysis. The objective of the current study is to estimate the canopy photosynthesis of paprika (Capsicum annuum L.) with an analysis of by simulating the intercepted irradiation of the canopy using a 3D ray-tracing and photosynthetic capacity in each layer. By inputting the structural data of an actual plant, the 3D architecture of paprika was reconstructed using graphic software (Houdini FX, FX, Canada). The light curves and A/C i curve of each layer were measured to parameterize the Farquhar, von Caemmerer, and Berry (FvCB) model. The difference in photosynthetic capacity within the canopy was observed. With the intercepted irradiation data and photosynthetic parameters of each layer, the values of an entire plant's photosynthesis rate were estimated by integrating the calculated photosynthesis rate at each layer. The estimated photosynthesis rate of an entire plant showed good agreement with the measured plant using a closed chamber for validation. From the results, this method was considered as a reliable tool to predict canopy photosynthesis using light interception, and can be extended to analyze the canopy photosynthesis in actual greenhouse conditions.

  5. Sweet Pepper (Capsicum annuum L. Canopy Photosynthesis Modeling using 3D Plant Architecture and Light Ray-tracing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jee Hoon Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Canopy photosynthesis has typically been estimated using mathematical models that have the following assumptions: the light interception inside the canopy exponentially declines with the canopy depth, and the photosynthetic capacity is affected by light interception as a result of acclimation. However, in actual situations, light interception in the canopy is quite heterogenous depending on environmental factors such as the location, microclimate, leaf area index, and canopy architecture. It is important to apply these factors in an analysis. The objective of the current study is to estimate the canopy photosynthesis of paprika (Capsicum annuum L. with an analysis of by simulating the intercepted irradiation of the canopy using a 3D ray-tracing and photosynthetic capacity in each layer. By inputting the structural data of an actual plant, the 3D architecture of paprika was reconstructed using graphic software (Houdini FX, FX, Canada. The light curves and A/Ci curve of each layer were measured to parameterize the Farquhar, von Caemmerer and Berry (FvCB model. The difference in photosynthetic capacity within the canopy was observed. With the intercepted irradiation data and photosynthetic parameters of each layer, the values of an entire plant’s photosynthesis rate were estimated by integrating the calculated photosynthesis rate at each layer. The estimated photosynthesis rate of an entire plant showed good agreement with the measured plant using a closed chamber for validation. From the results, this method was considered as a reliable tool to predict canopy photosynthesis using light interception, and can be extended to analyze the canopy photosynthesis in actual greenhouse conditions.

  6. Sweet Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) Canopy Photosynthesis Modeling Using 3D Plant Architecture and Light Ray-Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jee Hoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Ahn, Tae In; Shin, Jong Hwa; Park, Kyung Sub; Son, Jung Eek

    2016-01-01

    Canopy photosynthesis has typically been estimated using mathematical models that have the following assumptions: the light interception inside the canopy exponentially declines with the canopy depth, and the photosynthetic capacity is affected by light interception as a result of acclimation. However, in actual situations, light interception in the canopy is quite heterogenous depending on environmental factors such as the location, microclimate, leaf area index, and canopy architecture. It is important to apply these factors in an analysis. The objective of the current study is to estimate the canopy photosynthesis of paprika (Capsicum annuum L.) with an analysis of by simulating the intercepted irradiation of the canopy using a 3D ray-tracing and photosynthetic capacity in each layer. By inputting the structural data of an actual plant, the 3D architecture of paprika was reconstructed using graphic software (Houdini FX, FX, Canada). The light curves and A/Ci curve of each layer were measured to parameterize the Farquhar, von Caemmerer, and Berry (FvCB) model. The difference in photosynthetic capacity within the canopy was observed. With the intercepted irradiation data and photosynthetic parameters of each layer, the values of an entire plant's photosynthesis rate were estimated by integrating the calculated photosynthesis rate at each layer. The estimated photosynthesis rate of an entire plant showed good agreement with the measured plant using a closed chamber for validation. From the results, this method was considered as a reliable tool to predict canopy photosynthesis using light interception, and can be extended to analyze the canopy photosynthesis in actual greenhouse conditions. PMID:27667994

  7. TGF electron avalanches and gamma-ray emission with LEPTRACK - a new detailed simulation software package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Paul

    2014-05-01

    In designing the MXGS coded mask imager of the ASIM mission on the ISS, to detect and locate gamma-rays from Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes, it was necessary to write software to simulate the expansion of gamma-ray photons from 15-20 km altitudes for an initial estimate of TGF spectra and diffuse beam structure likely to be observed at orbital altitudes. From this a new detailed LEPTRACK simulation software package has been developed to track all electron-photon scattering via Bremsstrahlung and ionization, and via any spatial electric-magnetic field geometies which will drive the Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA) process at the heart of TGF origin. LEPTRACK uses the standard physics of keV-MeV photon interactions, Bremsstrahlung scattering, Binary-Electron-Bethe models of electron ionization-scattering, positron Bhabha scattering and annihilation. Unlike simulation packages GEANT4, EGS, etc, the physics of these processes is transferred outside the software and controlled by a standard database of text files of total scattering cross sections, differential energy transfer and deflection angle PDFs - easy to read and plot - but which can also be changed, if the user understands the physics involved and wishes to create their own modified database. It also uses a superparticle spatial mesh system to control particle density and flux fields, electric field evolution, and exponential avalanche growth. Results will be presented of TGF simulations using macro electric field geometries expected in storm clouds and micro field geometries expected around streamer tips - and combinations of both - and will include video displays showing the evolving ionization structure of electron trajectories, the time evolution of photon-electron-positron density and flux fields, local molecular ion densities, the dielectric effect of induced local electric fields - and the important effect of the local earth magnetic field on circular lepton feedback and TGF beam direction

  8. The Super Gaussian Laser Intensity Profile in HYDRA's 3D Laser Ray Trace Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepke, Scott M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-05

    In this note, the laser focal plane intensity pro le for a beam modeled using the 3D ray trace package in HYDRA is determined. First, the analytical model is developed followed by a practical numerical model for evaluating the resulting computationally intensive normalization factor for all possible input parameters.

  9. Forward ray tracing for image projection prediction and surface reconstruction in the evaluation of corneal topography systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snellenburg, J.J.; Braaf, B.; Hermans, E.A.; Heijde, van der R.G.L.; Sicam, V.A.

    2010-01-01

    A forward ray tracing (FRT) model is presented to determine the exact image projection in a general corneal topography system. Consequently, the skew ray error in Placido-based topography is demonstrated. A quantitative analysis comparing FRT-based algorithms and Placido-based algorithms in reconstr

  10. The flux distribution from a 1.25m2 target aligned heliostat: comparison of ray tracing and experimental results

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maliage, M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to validate SolTrace for concentrating solar investigations at CSIR by means of a test case: the comparison of the flux distribution in the focal spot of a 1.25 m2 target aligned heliostat predicted by the ray tracing...

  11. Detailed characteristics of drop-laden mixing layers: Large eddy simulation predictions compared to direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okong'o, Nora; Leboissetier, Anthony; Bellan, Josette

    2008-10-01

    Results are compared from direct numerical simulation (DNS) and large eddy simulation (LES) of a temporal mixing layer laden with evaporating drops to assess the ability of LES to reproduce detailed characteristics of DNS. The LES used computational drops, each of which represented eight physical drops, and a reduced flow field resolution using a grid spacing four times larger than that of the DNS. The LES also used models for the filtered source terms, which express the coupling of the drops with the flow, and for the unresolved subgrid-scale (SGS) fluxes of species mass, momentum, and enthalpy. The LESs were conducted using one of three different SGS-flux models: dynamic-coefficient gradient (GRD), dynamic-coefficient Smagorinsky (SMD), and constant-coefficient scale similarity (SSC). The comparison of the LES with the filtered-and-coarsened (FC) DNS considered detailed aspects of the flow that are of interest in ignition or full combustion. All LESs captured the largest-scale vortex, the global amount of vapor emanating from the drops, and the overall size distribution of the drops. All LESs tended to underpredict the global amount of irreversible entropy production (dissipation). The SMD model was found unable to capture either the global or local vorticity variation and had minimal small-scale activity in dynamic and thermodynamic variables compared to the FC-DNS. The SMD model was also deficient in predicting the spatial distribution of drops and of the dissipation. In contrast, the GRD and SSC models did mimic the small-scale activity of the FC-DNS and the spatial distribution of drops and of the dissipation. Therefore, the GRD and SSC models are recommended, while the SMD model seems inappropriate for combustion or other problems where the local activity must be predicted.

  12. Kashima RAy-Tracing Service (KARATS) for high accurate GNSS positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, R.; Hobiger, T.; Hasegawa, S.; Tsutsumi, M.; Koyama, Y.; Kondo, T.

    2010-12-01

    Radio signal delays associated with the neutral atmosphere are one of the major error sources of space geodesy such as GPS, GLONASS, GALILEO, VLBI, In-SAR measurements. We have developed a state-of-art tool to estimate the atmospheric path delays by ray-tracing through JMA meso-scale analysis (MANAL data) data. The tools, which we have named 'KAshima RAytracing Tools (KARAT)', are capable of calculating total slant delays and ray-bending angles considering real atmospheric phenomena. Numerical weather models such as MANAL data have undergone a significant improvement of accuracy and spatial resolution, which makes it feasible to utilize them for the correction of atmosphere excess path delays. In the previous studies for evaluating KARAT performance, the KARAT solutions are slightly better than the solutions using VMF1 and GMF with linear gradient model for horizontal and height positions. Based on these results we have started the web-based online service, 'KAshima RAytracing Service (KARATS)' for providing the atmospheric delay correction of RINEX files on Jan 27th, 2010. The KARATS receives user's RINEX data via a proper web site (http://vps.nict.go.jp/karats/index.html) and processes user's data files using KARAT for reducing atmospheric slant delays. The reduced RINEX files are archived in the specific directory for each user on the KARATS server. Once the processing is finished the information of data archive is sent privately via email to each user. If user want to process a large amount of data files, user can prepare own server which archives them. The KARATS can get these files from the user's server using GNU ¥emph{wget} and performs ray-traced corrections. We will present a brief status of the KARATS and summarize first experiences gained after this service went operational in December 2009. In addition, we will also demonstrate the newest KARAT performance based on the 5km MANAL data which has been operational from April 7th, 2009 and an outlook on

  13. Magnetospherically reflected chorus waves revealed by ray tracing with CLUSTER data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Parrot

    Full Text Available This paper is related to the propagation characteristics of a chorus emission recorded simultaneously by the 4 satellites of the CLUSTER mission on 29 October 2001 between 01:00 and 05:00 UT. During this day, the spacecraft (SC 1, 2, and 4 are relatively close to each other but SC3 has been delayed by half an hour. We use the data recorded aboard CLUSTER by the STAFF spectrum analyser. This instrument provides the cross spectral matrix of three magnetic and two electric field components. Dedicated software processes this spectral matrix in order to determine the wave normal directions relative to the Earth’s magnetic field. This calculation is done for the 4 satellites at different times and different frequencies and allows us to check the directions of these waves. Measurements around the magnetic equator show that the parallel component of the Poynting vector changes its sign when the satellites cross the equator region. It indicates that the chorus waves propagate away from this region which is considered as the source area of these emissions. This is valid for the most intense waves observed on the magnetic and electric power spectrograms. But it is also observed on SC1, SC2, and SC4 that lower intensity waves propagate toward the equator simultaneously with the SC3 intense chorus waves propagating away from the equator. Both waves are at the same frequency. Using the wave normal directions of these waves, a ray tracing study shows that the waves observed by SC1, SC2, and SC4 cross the equatorial plane at the same location as the waves observed by SC3. SC3 which is 30 minutes late observes the waves that originate first from the equator; meanwhile, SC1, SC2, and SC4 observe the same waves that have suffered a Lower Hybrid Resonance (LHR reflection at low altitudes (based on the ray tracing analysis and now return to the equator at a different location with a lower intensity. Similar phenomenon is observed when all SC are on the other side

  14. Identification of gravity wave sources using reverse ray tracing over Indian region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pramitha

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Reverse ray tracing method is successfully implemented for the first time in the Indian region for identification of the sources and propagation characteristics of the gravity waves observed using airglow emissions from Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E and Hyderabad (17.5° N, 78.5° E. Wave amplitudes are also traced back for these wave events by including both radiative and diffusive damping. Background temperature and wind data obtained from MSISE-90 and HWM-07 models, respectively, are used for the ray tracing. For Gadanki region suitability of these models is tested. Further, a climatological model of background atmosphere for Gadanki region has been developed using a long-term of nearly 30 years of observations available from a variety of ground-based (MST radar, radiosonde, MF radar, rocket-, and satellite-borne measurements. For considering real-time atmospheric inputs, ERA-Interim products are utilized. By this reverse ray method, the source locations for nine wave events could be identified to be in the upper troposphere, whereas, for five other events the waves seem to have been ducted in the mesosphere itself. Uncertainty in locating the terminal points in the horizontal direction is estimated to be within 50–100 and 150–300 km for Gadanki and Hyderabad wave events, respectively. This uncertainty arises mainly due to non-consideration of the day-to-day variability in tidal amplitudes. As no convection in-and-around the terminal points are noticed, it is unlikely to be the source. Interestingly, large (~9 m s−1 km−1 vertical shear in the horizontal wind is noted near the ray terminal points (at 10–12 km altitude and is identified to be the source for generating the nine wave events. Conditions prevailing at the terminal points for each of the 14 events are also provided. These events provide leads to a greater understanding of the tropical lower and upper atmospheric coupling through gravity waves.

  15. GPU-based four-dimensional general-relativistic ray tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchelmeister, Daniel; Müller, Thomas; Ament, Marco; Wunner, Günter; Weiskopf, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a new general-relativistic ray tracer that enables image synthesis on an interactive basis by exploiting the performance of graphics processing units (GPUs). The application is capable of visualizing the distortion of the stellar background as well as trajectories of moving astronomical objects orbiting a compact mass. Its source code includes metric definitions for the Schwarzschild and Kerr spacetimes that can be easily extended to other metric definitions, relying on its object-oriented design. The basic functionality features a scene description interface based on the scripting language Lua, real-time image output, and the ability to edit almost every parameter at runtime. The ray tracing code itself is implemented for parallel execution on the GPU using NVidia's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), which leads to performance improvement of an order of magnitude compared to a single CPU and makes the application competitive with small CPU cluster architectures. Program summary Program title: GpuRay4D Catalog identifier: AEMV_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 73649 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1334251 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, CUDA. Computer: Linux platforms with a NVidia CUDA enabled GPU (Compute Capability 1.3 or higher), C++ compiler, NVCC (The CUDA Compiler Driver). Operating system: Linux. RAM: 2 GB Classification: 1.5. External routines: OpenGL Utility Toolkit development files, NVidia CUDA Toolkit 3.2, Lua5.2 Nature of problem: Ray tracing in four-dimensional Lorentzian spacetimes. Solution method: Numerical integration of light rays, GPU-based parallel programming using CUDA, 3D

  16. CFD Simulation of Propane Cracking Tube Using Detailed Radical Kinetic Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张楠; 邱彤; 陈丙珍

    2013-01-01

    In the radiant section of cracking furnace, the thermal cracking process is highly coupled with turbulent flow, heat transfer and mass transfer. In this paper, a three-dimensional simulation of propane pyrolysis reactor tube is performed based on a detailed kinetic radical cracking scheme, combined with a comprehensive rigorous compu-tational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. The eddy-dissipation-concept (EDC) model is introduced to deal with turbu-lence-chemistry interaction of cracking gas, especially for the multi-step radical kinetics. Considering the high as-pect ratio and severe gradient phenomenon, numerical strategies such as grid resolution and refinement, stepping method and relaxation technique at different levels are employed to accelerate convergence. Large scale of radial nonuniformity in the vicinity of the tube wall is investigated. Spatial distributions of each radical reaction rate are first studied, and made it possible to identify the dominant elementary reactions. Additionally, a series of operating conditions including the feedstock feed rate, wall temperature profile and heat flux profile towards the reactor tubes are investigated. The obtained results can be used as scientific guide for further technical retrofit and operation op-timization aiming at high conversion and selectivity of pyrolysis process.

  17. Isobutane ignition delay time measurements at high pressure and detailed chemical kinetic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healy, D.; Curran, H.J. [Combustion Chemistry Centre, School of Chemistry, NUI Galway (Ireland); Donato, N.S.; Aul, C.J.; Petersen, E.L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Zinner, C.M. [Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Bourque, G. [Rolls-Royce Canada Limited, 9500 Cote de Liesse, Lachine, Quebec (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    Rapid compression machine and shock-tube ignition experiments were performed for real fuel/air isobutane mixtures at equivalence ratios of 0.3, 0.5, 1, and 2. The wide range of experimental conditions included temperatures from 590 to 1567 K at pressures of approximately 1, 10, 20, and 30 atm. These data represent the most comprehensive set of experiments currently available for isobutane oxidation and further accentuate the complementary attributes of the two techniques toward high-pressure oxidation experiments over a wide range of temperatures. The experimental results were used to validate a detailed chemical kinetic model composed of 1328 reactions involving 230 species. This mechanism has been successfully used to simulate previously published ignition delay times as well. A thorough sensitivity analysis was performed to gain further insight to the chemical processes occurring at various conditions. Additionally, useful ignition delay time correlations were developed for temperatures greater than 1025 K. Comparisons are also made with available isobutane data from the literature, as well as with 100% n-butane and 50-50% n-butane-isobutane mixtures in air that were presented by the authors in recent studies. In general, the kinetic model shows excellent agreement with the data over the wide range of conditions of the present study. (author)

  18. Simulation of plasma discharge in liquids: A detailed two-phase fluid approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charchi Aghdam, Ali; Farouk, Tanvir; Reacting Systems; Advanced Energy Research Laboratory Team

    2015-09-01

    Plasma discharge in liquids has gained great attention recently due to its applications in biomedical engineering, fuel processing, and water treatment and so on. Despite the tremendous interest, a comprehensive understanding of the underlying physics still remains limited. In the current work, an attempt is made to present a mathematical multi-physics model to describe the discharge of plasma in liquids. An in-house modeling platform is developed for simulating plasma formation in multiphase fluids. The model resolves a detailed two-phase fluid including viscous effects, surface tension, gravitational forces and electrical body force. All the governing equations are solved for gas and liquid phases. Electric field and charged species equations along with the plasma reaction kinetics are solved to get the charge distribution in the different phases as well as at the gas-liquid interface to obtain the electric body force acting at the interface. By coupling the above sub-models, a comprehensive multi-physics model for plasma discharge in liquids is constructed which is able to capture several physical aspects of the phenomena especially the role of the bubble, its motion and distortion on plasma characteristics.

  19. Eccentric small-zone ray tracing wavefront aberrometry for refraction in keratoconus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, Anneli; Behndig, Anders

    2016-11-01

    To compare objective refraction using small-zone eccentric laser ray tracing (LRT) wavefront aberrometry to standard autorefraction in keratoconus (KC), and whether the visual acuities achieved with these refractions differ from corresponding values in healthy eyes. Twenty-nine eyes of 29 patients with KC and 29 eyes of 29 healthy controls were included in this prospective unmasked case-control study. The uncorrected (UCVA) and spectacle-corrected (SCVA) Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) visual acuities based on refractions derived from LRT in central and four eccentric zones were compared to those achieved with standard autorefraction. The spherical equivalent (M) and two astigmatic power vectors (C0 and C45) were calculated for all refractions. Pentacam HR(®) was used to generate keratometry readings of the corresponding zones. In KC, the refraction from the upper nasal zone rendered a higher SCVA than the standard autorefraction more often than in the controls (p refractions rendered similar SCVA:s in KC. Pentacam HR(®) showed higher keratometry readings infero-temporally, but also lower readings supero-nasally, compared to controls. In KC, eccentric LRT measurements gave better SCVA than standard autorefraction more often than in healthy eyes. Eccentric LRT may become a valuable tool in the demanding task of subjective refraction in KC. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Intraocular lens power estimation by accurate ray tracing for eyes underwent previous refractive surgeries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Que; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Lu; Meng, Qingyu; Zhu, Qiudong

    2015-08-01

    For normal eyes without history of any ocular surgery, traditional equations for calculating intraocular lens (IOL) power, such as SRK-T, Holladay, Higis, SRK-II, et al., all were relativley accurate. However, for eyes underwent refractive surgeries, such as LASIK, or eyes diagnosed as keratoconus, these equations may cause significant postoperative refractive error, which may cause poor satisfaction after cataract surgery. Although some methods have been carried out to solve this problem, such as Hagis-L equation[1], or using preoperative data (data before LASIK) to estimate K value[2], no precise equations were available for these eyes. Here, we introduced a novel intraocular lens power estimation method by accurate ray tracing with optical design software ZEMAX. Instead of using traditional regression formula, we adopted the exact measured corneal elevation distribution, central corneal thickness, anterior chamber depth, axial length, and estimated effective lens plane as the input parameters. The calculation of intraocular lens power for a patient with keratoconus and another LASIK postoperative patient met very well with their visual capacity after cataract surgery.

  1. Investigation of temporal and lateral variations of seismic velocities in south Iceland using ray tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjartansson, Einar; Bjarnason, Ingi Th.

    2017-04-01

    Tools for ray-tracing through one dimensional earth models consisting of layers of constant velocity gradients, and continuous values across layers, have been developed. They are used to investigate stability and robustness of earthquake locations and velocity determinations in the South Iceland Lowlands (SIL) a transform seismic zone. These tools will also be used to invert for velocity functions for different regions and time periods, by inverting simultaneously for micro-earthquake source parameters and P and S velocities. Increase of velocity gradient with depth will cause rays with different take-off angles to cross, which can result in focusing and triplication when velocity is plotted versus time. It is therefore important to constrain the velocity solutions to avoid this. Large changes in gradient between adjacent layers causes variability of ray density and geometrical spreading, particularly for rays that turn just below the boundaries. This may create artificial clustering in the depth distribution of micro-earthquake source solutions. Resampling of the velocity functions using cubic spline interpolation can be used to reduce these effects. The software is open source and can be accessed at https://github.com/4dseismic

  2. Spatial resolution recovery utilizing multi-ray tracing and graphic processing unit in PET image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yicheng; Peng, Hao

    2015-02-07

    Depth-of-interaction (DOI) poses a major challenge for a PET system to achieve uniform spatial resolution across the field-of-view, particularly for small animal and organ-dedicated PET systems. In this work, we implemented an analytical method to model system matrix for resolution recovery, which was then incorporated in PET image reconstruction on a graphical processing unit platform, due to its parallel processing capacity. The method utilizes the concepts of virtual DOI layers and multi-ray tracing to calculate the coincidence detection response function for a given line-of-response. The accuracy of the proposed method was validated for a small-bore PET insert to be used for simultaneous PET/MR breast imaging. In addition, the performance comparisons were studied among the following three cases: 1) no physical DOI and no resolution modeling; 2) two physical DOI layers and no resolution modeling; and 3) no physical DOI design but with a different number of virtual DOI layers. The image quality was quantitatively evaluated in terms of spatial resolution (full-width-half-maximum and position offset), contrast recovery coefficient and noise. The results indicate that the proposed method has the potential to be used as an alternative to other physical DOI designs and achieve comparable imaging performances, while reducing detector/system design cost and complexity.

  3. A model of polarized-beam AGS in the ray-tracing code Zgoubi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ahrens, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brown, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dutheil, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Glenn, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roser, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Shoefer, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tsoupas, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-07-12

    A model of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, based on the AGS snapramps, has been developed in the stepwise ray-tracing code Zgoubi. It has been used over the past 5 years in a number of accelerator studies aimed at enhancing RHIC proton beam polarization. It is also used to study and optimize proton and Helion beam polarization in view of future RHIC and eRHIC programs. The AGS model in Zgoubi is operational on-line via three different applications, ’ZgoubiFromSnaprampCmd’, ’AgsZgoubiModel’ and ’AgsModelViewer’, with the latter two essentially interfaces to the former which is the actual model ’engine’. All three commands are available from the controls system application launcher in the AGS ’StartUp’ menu, or from eponymous commands on shell terminals. Main aspects of the model and of its operation are presented in this technical note, brief excerpts from various studies performed so far are given for illustration, means and methods entering in ZgoubiFromSnaprampCmd are developed further in appendix.

  4. Seismic ray-tracing calculation based on parabolic travel-time interpolation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周竹生; 张赛民; 陈灵君

    2004-01-01

    A new seismic ray-tracing method is put forward based on parabolic travel-time interpolation(PTI) method, which is more accurate than the linear travel-time interpolation (LTI) method. Both PTI method and LTI method are used to compute seismic travel-time and ray-path in a 2-D grid cell model. Firstly, some basic concepts are introduced. The calculations of travel-time and ray-path are carried out only at cell boundaries. So, the ray-path is always straight in the same cells with uniform velocity. Two steps are applied in PTI and LTI method, step 1 computes travel-time and step 2 traces ray-path. Then, the derivation of LTI formulas is described. Because of the presence of refraction wave in shot cell, the formula aiming at shot cell is also derived. Finally, PTI method is presented. The calculation of PTI method is more complex than that of LTI method, but the error is limited. The results of numerical model show that PTI method can trace ray-path more accurately and efficiently than LTI method does.

  5. THE APPLICATION OF MAMMOTH FOR A DETAILED TIGHTLY COUPLED FUEL PIN SIMULATION WITH A STATION BLACKOUT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleicher, Frederick; Ortensi, Javier; DeHart, Mark; Wang, Yaqi; Schunert, Sebastian; Novascone, Stephen; Hales, Jason; Williamson, Rich; Slaughter, Andrew; Permann, Cody; Andrs, David; Martineau, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Accurate calculation of desired quantities to predict fuel behavior requires the solution of interlinked equations representing different physics. Traditional fuels performance codes often rely on internal empirical models for the pin power density and a simplified boundary condition on the cladding edge. These simplifications are performed because of the difficulty of coupling applications or codes on differing domains and mapping the required data. To demonstrate an approach closer to first principles, the neutronics application Rattlesnake and the thermal hydraulics application RELAP-7 were coupled to the fuels performance application BISON under the master application MAMMOTH. A single fuel pin was modeled based on the dimensions of a Westinghouse 17x17 fuel rod. The simulation consisted of a depletion period of 1343 days, roughly equal to three full operating cycles, followed by a station blackout (SBO) event. The fuel rod was depleted for 1343 days for a near constant total power loading of 65.81 kW. After 1343 days the fission power was reduced to zero (simulating a reactor shut-down). Decay heat calculations provided the time-varying energy source after this time. For this problem, Rattlesnake, BISON, and RELAP-7 are coupled under MAMMOTH in a split operator approach. Each system solves its physics on a separate mesh and, for RELAP-7 and BISON, on only a subset of the full problem domain. Rattlesnake solves the neutronics over the whole domain that includes the fuel, cladding, gaps, water, and top and bottom rod holders. Here BISON is applied to the fuel and cladding with a 2D axi-symmetric domain, and RELAP-7 is applied to the flow of the circular outer water channel with a set of 1D flow equations. The mesh on the Rattlesnake side can either be 3D (for low order transport) or 2D (for diffusion). BISON has a matching ring structure mesh for the fuel so both the power density and local burn up are copied accurately from Rattlesnake. At each depletion time

  6. Combustion in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engines: Experiments and Detailed Chemical Kinetic Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flowers, D L

    2002-06-07

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines are being considered as an alternative to diesel engines. The HCCI concept involves premixing fuel and air prior to induction into the cylinder (as is done in current spark-ignition engine) then igniting the fuel-air mixture through the compression process (as is done in current diesel engines). The combustion occurring in an HCCI engine is fundamentally different from a spark-ignition or Diesel engine in that the heat release occurs as a global autoignition process, as opposed to the turbulent flame propagation or mixing controlled combustion used in current engines. The advantage of this global autoignition is that the temperatures within the cylinder are uniformly low, yielding very low emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}, the chief precursors to photochemical smog). The inherent features of HCCI combustion allows for design of engines with efficiency comparable to, or potentially higher than, diesel engines. While HCCI engines have great potential, several technical barriers exist which currently prevent widespread commercialization of this technology. The most significant challenge is that the combustion timing cannot be controlled by typical in-cylinder means. Means of controlling combustion have been demonstrated, but a robust control methodology that is applicable to the entire range of operation has yet to be developed. This research focuses on understanding basic characteristics of controlling and operating HCCI engines. Experiments and detailed chemical kinetic simulations have been applied to the characterize some of the fundamental operational and design characteristics of HCCI engines. Experiments have been conducted on single and multi-cylinder engines to investigate general features of how combustion timing affects the performance and emissions of HCCI engines. Single-zone modeling has been used to characterize and compare the implementation of different control strategies. Multi

  7. Patellar segmentation from 3D magnetic resonance images using guided recursive ray-tracing for edge pattern detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ruida; Jackson, Jennifer N.; McCreedy, Evan S.; Gandler, William; Eijkenboom, J. J. F. A.; van Middelkoop, M.; McAuliffe, Matthew J.; Sheehan, Frances T.

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents an automatic segmentation methodology for the patellar bone, based on 3D gradient recalled echo and gradient recalled echo with fat suppression magnetic resonance images. Constricted search space outlines are incorporated into recursive ray-tracing to segment the outer cortical bone. A statistical analysis based on the dependence of information in adjacent slices is used to limit the search in each image to between an outer and inner search region. A section based recursive ray-tracing mechanism is used to skip inner noise regions and detect the edge boundary. The proposed method achieves higher segmentation accuracy (0.23mm) than the current state-of-the-art methods with the average dice similarity coefficient of 96.0% (SD 1.3%) agreement between the auto-segmentation and ground truth surfaces.

  8. An analysis of options available for developing a common laser ray tracing package for Ares and Kull code frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeratunga, S K

    2008-11-06

    Ares and Kull are mature code frameworks that support ALE hydrodynamics for a variety of HEDP applications at LLNL, using two widely different meshing approaches. While Ares is based on a 2-D/3-D block-structured mesh data base, Kull is designed to support unstructured, arbitrary polygonal/polyhedral meshes. In addition, both frameworks are capable of running applications on large, distributed-memory parallel machines. Currently, both these frameworks separately support assorted collections of physics packages related to HEDP, including one for the energy deposition by laser/ion-beam ray tracing. This study analyzes the options available for developing a common laser/ion-beam ray tracing package that can be easily shared between these two code frameworks and concludes with a set of recommendations for its development.

  9. 3-D TECATE/BREW: Thermal, stress, and birefringent ray-tracing codes for solid-state laser design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelinas, R. J.; Doss, S. K.; Nelson, R. G.

    1994-07-01

    This report describes the physics, code formulations, and numerics that are used in the TECATE (totally Eulerian code for anisotropic thermo-elasticity) and BREW (birefringent ray-tracing of electromagnetic waves) codes for laser design. These codes resolve thermal, stress, and birefringent optical effects in 3-D stationary solid-state systems. This suite of three constituent codes is a package referred to as LASRPAK.

  10. Characterisation and comparison of ophthalmic instrument quality using a model eye with reverse ray-tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheil, Conor; Goncharov, Alexander V.

    2013-05-01

    A physical model eye was constructed to test the quality of ophthalmic instruments. The accuracy and precision of two commercially available instruments were analysed. For these instruments, a particular model eye was obtained which mimicked the physical properties that would be usually measured e.g. corneal topography or optical path within the human eye. The model eye was designed using relatively simple optical components (e.g. plano-convex lenses) separated by appropriate intraocular distances taken from the literature. The dimensions of the model eye were known a priori: The lenses used in the construction of the model eye were characterised ac­ cording to values given in the manufacturers' data sheets and also through measurement using an interferometer. The distances between the lens surfaces were calculated using the interferometric data with reverse ray-tracing. Optical paths were calculated as the product of refractive index and axial distance. The errors inherent in mea­ suring these ocular parameters by different ophthalmic instruments can be considered as producing an erroneous value for the overall refractive power of the eye. The latter is a useful metric for comparing various ophthalmic devices where the direct comparison of quality is not possible or is not practical. For example, a 1% error in anterior corneal radius of curvature will have a more detrimental effect than the same error in posterior corneal radius, due to the relative differences in refractive indices at those surface boundaries. To quantify the error in ocular refractive power, a generic eye model was created in ZEMAX optical design software. The parametric errors were then used to compute the overall error in predicting ocular refractive power, thus highlighting the relative importance of individual errors. This work will help in future determination of acceptable levels of metrological errors in ocular instrumentation.

  11. Accounting for partiality in serial crystallography using ray-tracing principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M J; Schreurs, Antoine M M; Ravelli, Raimond B G; Gros, Piet

    2015-09-01

    Serial crystallography generates `still' diffraction data sets that are composed of single diffraction images obtained from a large number of crystals arbitrarily oriented in the X-ray beam. Estimation of the reflection partialities, which accounts for the expected observed fractions of diffraction intensities, has so far been problematic. In this paper, a method is derived for modelling the partialities by making use of the ray-tracing diffraction-integration method EVAL. The method estimates partialities based on crystal mosaicity, beam divergence, wavelength dispersion, crystal size and the interference function, accounting for crystallite size. It is shown that modelling of each reflection by a distribution of interference-function weighted rays yields a `still' Lorentz factor. Still data are compared with a conventional rotation data set collected from a single lysozyme crystal. Overall, the presented still integration method improves the data quality markedly. The R factor of the still data compared with the rotation data decreases from 26% using a Monte Carlo approach to 12% after applying the Lorentz correction, to 5.3% when estimating partialities by EVAL and finally to 4.7% after post-refinement. The merging R(int) factor of the still data improves from 105 to 56% but remains high. This suggests that the accuracy of the model parameters could be further improved. However, with a multiplicity of around 40 and an R(int) of ∼50% the merged still data approximate the quality of the rotation data. The presented integration method suitably accounts for the partiality of the observed intensities in still diffraction data, which is a critical step to improve data quality in serial crystallography.

  12. A new 3-D ray tracing method based on LTI using successive partitioning of cell interfaces and traveltime gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Yan; Hu, Ying; Qin, Qian-Qing

    2013-05-01

    We present a new method of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic ray tracing, based on an improvement to the linear traveltime interpolation (LTI) ray tracing algorithm. This new technique involves two separate steps. The first involves a forward calculation based on the LTI method and the dynamic successive partitioning scheme, which is applied to calculate traveltimes on cell boundaries and assumes a wavefront that expands from the source to all grid nodes in the computational domain. We locate several dynamic successive partition points on a cell's surface, the traveltimes of which can be calculated by linear interpolation between the vertices of the cell's boundary. The second is a backward step that uses Fermat's principle and the fact that the ray path is always perpendicular to the wavefront and follows the negative traveltime gradient. In this process, the first-arriving ray path can be traced from the receiver to the source along the negative traveltime gradient, which can be calculated by reconstructing the continuous traveltime field with cubic B-spline interpolation. This new 3-D ray tracing method is compared with the LTI method and the shortest path method (SPM) through a number of numerical experiments. These comparisons show obvious improvements to computed traveltimes and ray paths, both in precision and computational efficiency.

  13. Mesospheric gravity waves observed near equatorial and low–middle latitude stations: wave characteristics and reverse ray tracing results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Achmad

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Gravity wave signatures were extracted from OH airglow observations using all-sky CCD imagers at four different stations: Cachoeira Paulista (CP (22.7° S, 45° W and São João do Cariri (7.4° S, 36.5° W, Brazil; Tanjungsari (TJS (6.9° S, 107.9° E, Indonesia and Shigaraki (34.9° N, 136° E, Japan. The gravity wave parameters are used as an input in a reverse ray tracing model to study the gravity wave vertical propagation trajectory and to estimate the wave source region. Gravity waves observed near the equator showed a shorter period and a larger phase velocity than those waves observed at low-middle latitudes. The waves ray traced down into the troposphere showed the largest horizontal wavelength and phase speed. The ray tracing results also showed that at CP, Cariri and Shigaraki the majority of the ray paths stopped in the mesosphere due to the condition of m2m2m|→∞, which suggests the presence of ducting waves and/or waves generated in-situ. In the troposphere, the possible gravity wave sources are related to meteorological front activities and cloud convections at CP, while at Cariri and TJS tropical cloud convections near the equator are the most probable gravity wave sources. The tropospheric jet stream and the orography are thought to be the major responsible sources for the waves observed at Shigaraki.

  14. Calibration and Validation of a Detailed Architectural Canopy Model Reconstruction for the Simulation of Synthetic Hemispherical Images and Airborne LiDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Bremer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Canopy density measures such as the Leaf Area Index (LAI have become standardized mapping products derived from airborne and terrestrial Light Detection And Ranging (aLiDAR and tLiDAR, respectively data. A specific application of LiDAR point clouds is their integration into radiative transfer models (RTM of varying complexity. Using, e.g., ray tracing, this allows flexible simulations of sub-canopy light condition and the simulation of various sensors such as virtual hemispherical images or waveform LiDAR on a virtual forest plot. However, the direct use of LiDAR data in RTMs shows some limitations in the handling of noise, the derivation of surface areas per LiDAR point and the discrimination of solid and porous canopy elements. In order to address these issues, a strategy upgrading tLiDAR and Digital Hemispherical Photographs (DHP into plausible 3D architectural canopy models is suggested. The presented reconstruction workflow creates an almost unbiased virtual 3D representation of branch and leaf surface distributions, minimizing systematic errors due to the object–sensor relationship. The models are calibrated and validated using DHPs. Using the 3D models for simulations, their capabilities for the description of leaf density distributions and the simulation of aLiDAR and DHP signatures are shown. At an experimental test site, the suitability of the models, in order to systematically simulate and evaluate aLiDAR based LAI predictions under various scan settings is proven. This strategy makes it possible to show the importance of laser point sampling density, but also the diversity of scan angles and their quantitative effect onto error margins.

  15. Efficiency calibration of an extended-range Ge detector by a detailed Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyres, V. [Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain)], E-mail: Virginia.peyres@ciemat.es; Garcia-Torano, E. [Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2007-09-21

    A Monte Carlo simulation has been employed for calibrating an extended-range Ge detector in an energy range from 14 to 1800 keV. A set of sources from monoenergetic and multi-gamma emitters point were measured at 15 cm from the detector window and provided 26 experimental values to which the results of the simulations are compared. Discrepancies between simulated and experimental values are within 1 standard deviation, and relative differences are, in most cases, below 1%.

  16. The Use of Pro/Engineer CAD Software and Fishbowl Tool Kit in Ray-tracing Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nounu, Hatem N.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    This document is designed as a manual for a user who wants to operate the Pro/ENGINEER (ProE) Wildfire 3.0 with the NASA Space Radiation Program's (SRP) custom-designed Toolkit, called 'Fishbowl', for the ray tracing of complex spacecraft geometries given by a ProE CAD model. The analysis of spacecraft geometry through ray tracing is a vital part in the calculation of health risks from space radiation. Space radiation poses severe risks of cancer, degenerative diseases and acute radiation sickness during long-term exploration missions, and shielding optimization is an important component in the application of radiation risk models. Ray tracing is a technique in which 3-dimensional (3D) vehicle geometry can be represented as the input for the space radiation transport code and subsequent risk calculations. In ray tracing a certain number of rays (on the order of 1000) are used to calculate the equivalent thickness, say of aluminum, of the spacecraft geometry seen at a point of interest called the dose point. The rays originate at the dose point and terminate at a homogenously distributed set of points lying on a sphere that circumscribes the spacecraft and that has its center at the dose point. The distance a ray traverses in each material is converted to aluminum or other user-selected equivalent thickness. Then all equivalent thicknesses are summed up for each ray. Since each ray points to a direction, the aluminum equivalent of each ray represents the shielding that the geometry provides to the dose point from that particular direction. This manual will first list for the user the contact information for help in installing ProE and Fishbowl in addition to notes on the platform support and system requirements information. Second, the document will show the user how to use the software to ray trace a Pro/E-designed 3-D assembly and will serve later as a reference for troubleshooting. The user is assumed to have previous knowledge of ProE and CAD modeling.

  17. Supercontinuum generation in ZBLAN fibers—detailed comparison between measurement and simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Christian; Petersen, Christian; Dupont, Sune

    2012-01-01

    . This identification of accurate parameters is of great importance to substantiate numerical simulations of SC generation in soft-glass fibers. Good agreement between measurement and simulation is obtained when pumping both in the normal and anomalous dispersion regimes. © 2012 Optical Society of America...

  18. Low VHF Channel Measurements and Simulations in Indoor and Outdoor Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    bands, ray tracing approaches are often used to simulate wave propagation. Ray tracing is relatively straightforward and computationally tractable...4164. 20. Kaya A, Greenstein L, Trappe W. Characterizing indoor wireless channels via ray tracing combined with stochastic modeling. Wireless...GNU Radio project50 and a custom MATLAB -USRP-Library (MUL)51 to control the USRPs and conduct our experiments. GNU Radio enables the implementation of

  19. Component-level test of molded freeform optics for LED beam shaping using experimental ray tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Gustavo; Hilbig, David; Fleischmann, Friedrich; Henning, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Due to the high demand of LED light sources, the need to modify their radiation pattern to meet specific application requirements has also increased. This is mostly achieved by using molded secondary optics, which are composed of a combination of several aspherical and freeform surfaces. Unfortunately, the manufacturers of these secondary optics only provide output information at system level, making impossible to independently characterize the secondary optic in order to determine the sources of erroneous results. For this reason, it is necessary to perform a component-level verification leading to the validation of the correctness of the produced secondary optic independently of the light source. To understand why traditional inspection methods fail, it is necessary to take into account that not only errors due to irregularities on the lens surface like pores, glass indentations or scratches affect the performance of the lens, but also differences in refractive index appear after the compression during fabrication process. These internal alterations are generally produced during the cooling stage and their effect over the performance of the lens are not possible to be measured using tactile techniques. Additionally, the small size of the lens and the freeform characteristics of its surface introduce additional difficulties to perform its validation. In this work, the component-level test is done by obtaining the ray mapping function (RMF) which describes the deflection of the light beam as a function of the input angle. To obtain the RMF, firstly a collimated light source is held fix and the lens is rotated. Thus, a virtual point source is created and subsequently by using experimental ray tracing it is possible to determine the ray slopes, which are used to the retrieve the RMF. Under the assumption that the optical system under analysis is lossless and considering the principle of energy conservation, it is possible under specific conditions to use this new

  20. Dynamic Simulation of an Organic Rankine Cycle—Detailed Model of a Kettle Boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Pili

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Organic Rankine Cycles (ORCs are nowadays a valuable technology to produce electricity from low and medium temperature heat sources, e.g., in geothermal, biomass and waste heat recovery applications. Dynamic simulations can help improve the flexibility and operation of such plants, and guarantee a better economic performance. In this work, a dynamic model for a multi-pass kettle evaporator of a geothermal ORC power plant has been developed and its dynamics have been validated against measured data. The model combines the finite volume approach on the tube side and a two-volume cavity on the shell side. To validate the dynamic model, a positive and a negative step function in heat source flow rate is applied. The simulation model performed well in both cases. The liquid level appeared the most challenging quantity to simulate. A better agreement in temperature was achieved by increasing the volume flow rate of the geothermal brine by 2% over the entire simulation. Measurement errors, discrepancies in working fluid and thermal brine properties and uncertainties in heat transfer correlations can account for this. In the future, the entire geothermal power plant will be simulated, and suggestions to improve its dynamics and control by means of simulations will be provided.

  1. BGPR_Reconstruct: A MATLAB ® ray-tracing program for nonlinear inversion of first arrival travel time data from zero-offset borehole radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Dale F.; Ferré, Ty P. A.

    2004-08-01

    A MATLAB program was developed to invert first arrival travel time picks from zero offset profiling borehole ground penetrating radar traces to obtain the electromagnetic wave propagation velocities in soil. Zero-offset profiling refers to a mode of operation wherein the centers of the bistatic antennae being lowered to the same depth below ground for each measurement. The inversion uses a simulated annealing optimization routine, whereby the model attempts to reduce the root mean square error between the measured and modeled travel time by perturbing the velocity in a ray tracing routine. Measurement uncertainty is incorporated through the presentation of the ensemble mean and standard deviation from the results of a Monte Carlo simulation. The program features a pre-processor to modify or delete travel time information from the profile before inversion and post-processing through presentation of the ensemble statistics of the water contents inferred from the velocity profile. The program includes a novel application of a graphical user interface to animate the velocity fitting routine.

  2. Water flow prediction for Membranes using 3D simulations with detailed morphology

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Meixia

    2015-04-01

    The membrane morphology significantly influences membrane performance. For osmotically driven membrane processes, the morphology strongly affects the internal concentration polarization. Different membrane morphologies were generated by simulation and their influence on membrane performance was studied, using a 3D model. The simulation results were experimentally validated for two classical phase-inversion membrane morphologies: sponge- and finger-like structures. Membrane porosity and scanning electron microscopy image information were used as model input. The permeance results from the simulation fit well the experimentally measured permeances. Water permeances were predicted for different kinds of finger-like cavity membranes with different finger-like cavity lengths and various finger-like cavity sets, as well as for membranes with cylindrical cavities. The results provide realistic information on how to increase water permeance, and also illustrate that membrane’s complete morphology is important for the accurate water permeance evaluation. Evaluations only based on porosity might be misleading, and the new 3D simulation approach gives a more realistic representation.

  3. Detailed Simulation of Complex Hydraulic Problems with Macroscopic and Mesoscopic Mathematical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Biscarini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical simulation of fast-moving fronts originating from dam or levee breaches is a challenging task for small scale engineering projects. In this work, the use of fully three-dimensional Navier-Stokes (NS equations and lattice Boltzmann method (LBM is proposed for testing the validity of, respectively, macroscopic and mesoscopic mathematical models. Macroscopic simulations are performed employing an open-source computational fluid dynamics (CFD code that solves the NS combined with the volume of fluid (VOF multiphase method to represent free-surface flows. The mesoscopic model is a front-tracking experimental variant of the LBM. In the proposed LBM the air-gas interface is represented as a surface with zero thickness that handles the passage of the density field from the light to the dense phase and vice versa. A single set of LBM equations represents the liquid phase, while the free surface is characterized by an additional variable, the liquid volume fraction. Case studies show advantages and disadvantages of the proposed LBM and NS with specific regard to the computational efficiency and accuracy in dealing with the simulation of flows through complex geometries. In particular, the validation of the model application is developed by simulating the flow propagating through a synthetic urban setting and comparing results with analytical and experimental laboratory measurements.

  4. Detailed comparison of simulations, experiments, and theory of sub-cyclotron Alfven eigenmodes in NSTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestz, Jeff; Belova, Elena; Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Tang, Shawn; Crocker, Neal

    2016-10-01

    High frequency compressional (CAE) and global (GAE) Alfvén eigenmodes are often driven unstable by super-Alfvénic beam ions in NSTX, and have been linked to anomalous electron temperature profile flattening at high beam power [D. Stutman, PRL 2009]. A large set of 3D MHD- δf hybrid simulations show that GAE are ubiquitous at beam energies Vb /VA > 2.5 , while CAE are not excited until Vb /VA > 4 . The frequency of the most unstable GAE changes significantly with the normalized beam energy, consistent with trends described by its dispersion and resonance condition. These simulation results are analyzed and compared with a new, extensive experimental survey of NSTX discharges, as well as analytic studies. Interestingly, simulations find no case where counter-propagating CAE are more unstable than co-CAE, whereas experiments routinely observe both co- and counter-CAE. Moreover, simulations find co-GAE to be very unstable for beams peaked around λ <= 0.5 , yet these modes have not yet been thoroughly investigated experimentally. Preliminary predictions are also made for the CAE/GAE instability in ITER-like plasmas, which are expected to operate near similar values of Vb /VA as those studied for NSTX. This work supported by DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-SC0011810.

  5. Detailed simulation of the airbag inflation process using a Coupled CFD/FE Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fairlie, G.E.; Steenbrink, A.C.

    2001-01-01

    There is increasing pressure to reduce injuries and fatalities by effectively using airbags for side impact and out-of-position impact loading conditions. The simulation of these scenarios is particularly difficult as the occupant is interacting with the airbag at early times during the airbag deplo

  6. Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion with Detailed Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Hong G [University of Michigan; Trouve, Arnaud [University of Maryland; Rutland, Christopher J [University of Wisconsin; Chen, Jacqueline H [Sandia National Laboratories

    2012-08-13

    The TSTC project is a multi-university collaborative effort to develop a high-fidelity turbulent reacting flow simulation capability utilizing terascale, massively parallel computer technology. The main paradigm of our approach is direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring highest temporal and spatial accuracy, allowing quantitative observations of the fine-scale physics found in turbulent reacting flows as well as providing a useful tool for development of sub-models needed in device-level simulations. The code named S3D, developed and shared with Chen and coworkers at Sandia National Laboratories, has been enhanced with new numerical algorithms and physical models to provide predictive capabilities for spray dynamics, combustion, and pollutant formation processes in turbulent combustion. Major accomplishments include improved characteristic boundary conditions, fundamental studies of auto-ignition in turbulent stratified reactant mixtures, flame-wall interaction, and turbulent flame extinction by water spray. The overarching scientific issue in our recent investigations is to characterize criticality phenomena (ignition/extinction) in turbulent combustion, thereby developing unified criteria to identify ignition and extinction conditions. The computational development under TSTC has enabled the recent large-scale 3D turbulent combustion simulations conducted at Sandia National Laboratories.

  7. morphforge: a toolbox for simulating small networks of biologically detailed neurons in Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael James Hull

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The broad structure of a modelling study can often be explained over a cup of coffee, butconverting this high-level conceptual idea into graphs of the final simulation results may requiremany weeks of sitting at a computer. Although models themselves can be complex, oftenmany mental resources are wasted working around complexities of the software ecosystemsuch as fighting to manage files, interfacing between tools and data formats, finding mistakesin code or working out the units of variables. morphforge is a high-level, Python toolboxfor building and managing simulations of small populations of multicompartmental biophysicalmodel neurons. An entire in silico experiment, including the definition of neuronal morphologies,channel descriptions, stimuli, visualisation and analysis of results can be written within a singleshort Python script using high-level objects. Multiple independent simulations can be createdand run from a single script, allowing parameter spaces to be investigated. Consideration hasbeen given to the reuse of both algorithmic and parameterisable components to allow bothspecific and stochastic parameter variations. Some other features of the toolbox include: theautomatic generation of human-readable documentation (e. g. PDF-files about a simulation; thetransparent handling of different biophysical units; a novel mechanism for plotting simulationresults based on a system of tags; and an architecture that supports both the use of establishedformats for defining channels and synapses (e. g. MODL files, and the possibility to supportother libraries and standards easily. We hope that this toolbox will allow scientists to quicklybuild simulations of multicompartmental model neurons for research and serve as a platform forfurther tool development.

  8. Chorus wave-normal statistics in the Earth's radiation belts from ray tracing technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Breuillard

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Discrete ELF/VLF (Extremely Low Frequency/Very Low Frequency chorus emissions are one of the most intense electromagnetic plasma waves observed in radiation belts and in the outer terrestrial magnetosphere. These waves play a crucial role in the dynamics of radiation belts, and are responsible for the loss and the acceleration of energetic electrons. The objective of our study is to reconstruct the realistic distribution of chorus wave-normals in radiation belts for all magnetic latitudes. To achieve this aim, the data from the electric and magnetic field measurements onboard Cluster satellite are used to determine the wave-vector distribution of the chorus signal around the equator region. Then the propagation of such a wave packet is modeled using three-dimensional ray tracing technique, which employs K. Rönnmark's WHAMP to solve hot plasma dispersion relation along the wave packet trajectory. The observed chorus wave distributions close to waves source are first fitted to form the initial conditions which then propagate numerically through the inner magnetosphere in the frame of the WKB approximation. Ray tracing technique allows one to reconstruct wave packet properties (electric and magnetic fields, width of the wave packet in k-space, etc. along the propagation path. The calculations show the spatial spreading of the signal energy due to propagation in the inhomogeneous and anisotropic magnetized plasma. Comparison of wave-normal distribution obtained from ray tracing technique with Cluster observations up to 40° latitude demonstrates the reliability of our approach and applied numerical schemes.

  9. Modeling the Reflectance of the Lunar Regolith by a New Method Combining Monte Carlo Ray Tracing and Hapke’s Model with Application to Chang’E-1 IIM Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Un-Hong Wong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we model the reflectance of the lunar regolith by a new method combining Monte Carlo ray tracing and Hapke’s model. The existing modeling methods exploit either a radiative transfer model or a geometric optical model. However, the measured data from an Interference Imaging spectrometer (IIM on an orbiter were affected not only by the composition of minerals but also by the environmental factors. These factors cannot be well addressed by a single model alone. Our method implemented Monte Carlo ray tracing for simulating the large-scale effects such as the reflection of topography of the lunar soil and Hapke’s model for calculating the reflection intensity of the internal scattering effects of particles of the lunar soil. Therefore, both the large-scale and microscale effects are considered in our method, providing a more accurate modeling of the reflectance of the lunar regolith. Simulation results using the Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium (LSCC data and Chang’E-1 elevation map show that our method is effective and useful. We have also applied our method to Chang’E-1 IIM data for removing the influence of lunar topography to the reflectance of the lunar soil and to generate more realistic visualizations of the lunar surface.

  10. A method for detailed simulations of neutron diffraction from imperfect crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alianelli, L. E-mail: lucia.alianelli@ill.fr; Wilson, N.; Andersen, K.H.; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Felici, R

    2004-08-21

    An upgraded version of the McStas Monochromator-curved module is presented. The new component, called Monochromator-reflect, is based on the use of input files for interpolating the neutron reflection and transmission probabilities according to the theoretical reflectivity of the crystal. These probabilities depend on the energy and angle at the crystal surface and also on the crystal mosaicity, geometry, material scattering cross-section, attenuation coefficient, and Bragg planes. We present details of the algorithm and definitions which are essential for a correct use of the module and show the improvements that it offers.

  11. A method for detailed simulations of neutron diffraction from imperfect crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alianelli, L.; Wilson, N.; Andersen, K. H.; Sánchez del Río, M.; Felici, R.

    2004-08-01

    An upgraded version of the McStas Monochromator-curved module is presented. The new component, called Monochromator-reflect, is based on the use of input files for interpolating the neutron reflection and transmission probabilities according to the theoretical reflectivity of the crystal. These probabilities depend on the energy and angle at the crystal surface and also on the crystal mosaicity, geometry, material scattering cross-section, attenuation coefficient, and Bragg planes. We present details of the algorithm and definitions which are essential for a correct use of the module and show the improvements that it offers.

  12. Monte Carlo Ray Tracing Based Sensitivity Analysis of the Atmospheric and the Ocean Parameters on Top of the Atmosphere Radiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo Ray Tracing: MCRT based sensitivity analysis of the geophysical parameters (the atmosphere and the ocean on Top of the Atmosphere: TOA radiance in visible to near infrared wavelength regions is conducted. As the results, it is confirmed that the influence due to the atmosphere is greater than that of the ocean. Scattering and absorption due to aerosol particles and molecules in the atmosphere is major contribution followed by water vapor and ozone while scattering due to suspended solid is dominant contribution for the ocean parameters.

  13. Modeling ionospheric disturbance features in quasi-vertically incident ionograms using 3-D magnetoionic ray tracing and atmospheric gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, M. A.; Harris, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    The Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) has initiated an experimental program, Spatial Ionospheric Correlation Experiment, utilizing state-of-the-art DSTO-designed high frequency digital receivers. This program seeks to understand ionospheric disturbances at scales employ a 3-D magnetoionic Hamiltonian ray tracing engine, developed by DSTO, to (1) model the various disturbance features observed on both the O and X polarization modes in our QVI data and (2) understand how they are produced. The ionospheric disturbances which produce the observed features were modeled by perturbing the ionosphere with atmospheric gravity waves.

  14. Polarization properties of a corner-cube retroreflector with three-dimensional polarization ray-tracing calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenjun; Fu, Yuegang; Zheng, Yang; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Jiake; Liu, Zhiying; Zheng, Jianping

    2013-07-01

    The output polarization states of corner cubes (for both uncoated and metal-coated surfaces) with an input beam of arbitrary polarization state and of arbitrary tilt angle to the cube have been analyzed by using the three-dimensional polarization ray-tracing matrix method. The diattenuation and retardance of the corner-cube retroreflector (CCR) for all six different ray paths are calculated, and the relationships to the tilt angle and the tilt orientation angle are shown. When the tilt angle is large, hollow metal-coated CCR is more appropriate than solid metal-coated CCR for the case that the polarization states of output beam should be controlled.

  15. Optical analysis of a curved-slats fixed-mirror solar concentrator by a forward ray-tracing procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol Nadal, Ramon; Martínez Moll, Víctor

    2013-10-20

    Fixed-mirror solar concentrators (FMSCs) use a static reflector and a moving receiver. They are easily installable on building roofs. However, for high-concentration factors, several flat mirrors would be needed. If curved mirrors are used instead, high-concentration levels can be achieved, and such a solar concentrator is called a curved-slats fixed-mirror solar concentrator (CSFMSC), on which little information is available. Herein, a methodology is proposed to characterize the CSFMSC using 3D ray-tracing tools. The CSFMSC shows better optical characteristics than the FMSC, as it needs fewer reflector segments for achieving the same concentration and optical efficiency.

  16. Numerical simulations of tests masonry walls from ceramic block using a detailed finite element model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Salajka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with an analysis of the behaviour of brick ceramic walls. The behaviour of the walls was analysed experimentally in order to obtain their bearing capacity under static loading and their seismic resistance. Simultaneously, numerical simulations of the experiments were carried out in order to obtain additional information on the behaviour of masonry walls made of ceramic blocks. The results of the geometrically and materially nonlinear computations were compared to the results of the performed tests.

  17. Simulation of biatrial conduction via different pathways during sinus rhythm with a detailed human atrial model*

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Dong-dong; Gong, Ying-lan; Shou, Guo-fa; Jiao, Pei-feng; Zhang, Heng-gui; Ye, Xue-song; Xia, Ling

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand biatrial conduction, investigate various conduction pathways, and compare the differences between isotropic and anisotropic conductions in human atria, we present a simulation study of biatrial conduction with known/assumed conduction pathways using a recently developed human atrial model. In addition to known pathways: (1) Bachmann’s bundle (BB), (2) limbus of fossa ovalis (LFO), and (3) coronary sinus (CS), we also hypothesize that there exist two fast conducti...

  18. A Hybrid Model for Multiscale Laser Plasma Simulations with Detailed Collisional Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-23

    account for all processes of the collisional cascade during the relaxation of a hot plasma. To this end, the focus was in the development of (a) a...Collisional Radiative operator was necessary to accurately account for all processes of the collisional cascade during the relaxation of a hot plasma. To this...important to note that this is a code-to- code comparison and the validation of these simulations is an area of active research in the non-local

  19. Vadose zone transport field study: Detailed test plan for simulated leak tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AL Ward; GW Gee

    2000-06-23

    Hanford to: identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford's waste disposal sites; reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; develop a detailed and accurate database of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. This plan provides details for conducting field tests during FY 2000 to accomplish these objectives. Details of additional testing during FY 2001 and FY 2002 will be developed as part of the work planning process implemented by the Integration Project.

  20. Simulation of biatrial conduction via different pathways during sinus rhythm with a detailed human atrial model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-dong DENG; Ying-lan GONG; Guo-fa SHOU; Pei-feng JIAO; Heng-gui ZHANG; Xue-song YE; Ling XIA

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand biatrial conduction,investigate various conduction pathways,and compare the differences between isotropic and anisotropic conductions in human atria,we present a simulation study of biatrial conduction with known/assumed conduction pathways using a recently developed human atrial model.In addition to known pathways:(1) Bachmann's bundle (BB),(2) limbus of fossa ovalis (LFO),and (3) coronary sinus (CS),we also hypothesize that there exist two fast conduction bundles that connect the crista terminalis (CT),LFO,and CS.Our simulation demonstrates that use of these fast conduction bundles results in a conduction pattern consistent with experimental data.The comparison of isotropic and anisotropoic conductions in the BB case showed that the atrial working muscles had small effect on conduction time and conduction speed,although the conductivities assigned in anisotropic conduction were two to four times higher than the isotropic conduction.In conclusion,we suggest that the hypothesized intercaval bundles play a significant role in the biatrial conduction and that myofiber orientation has larger effects on the conduction system than the atrial working muscles.This study presents readers with new insights into human atrial conduction.

  1. A detailed model for simulation of catchment scale subsurface hydrologic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniconi, Claudio; Wood, Eric F.

    1993-01-01

    A catchment scale numerical model is developed based on the three-dimensional transient Richards equation describing fluid flow in variably saturated porous media. The model is designed to take advantage of digital elevation data bases and of information extracted from these data bases by topographic analysis. The practical application of the model is demonstrated in simulations of a small subcatchment of the Konza Prairie reserve near Manhattan, Kansas. In a preliminary investigation of computational issues related to model resolution, we obtain satisfactory numerical results using large aspect ratios, suggesting that horizontal grid dimensions may not be unreasonably constrained by the typically much smaller vertical length scale of a catchment and by vertical discretization requirements. Additional tests are needed to examine the effects of numerical constraints and parameter heterogeneity in determining acceptable grid aspect ratios. In other simulations we attempt to match the observed streamflow response of the catchment, and we point out the small contribution of the streamflow component to the overall water balance of the catchment.

  2. Computational Flame Diagnostics for Direct Numerical Simulations with Detailed Chemistry of Transportation Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Tianfeng [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2017-02-16

    The goal of the proposed research is to create computational flame diagnostics (CFLD) that are rigorous numerical algorithms for systematic detection of critical flame features, such as ignition, extinction, and premixed and non-premixed flamelets, and to understand the underlying physicochemical processes controlling limit flame phenomena, flame stabilization, turbulence-chemistry interactions and pollutant emissions etc. The goal has been accomplished through an integrated effort on mechanism reduction, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of flames at engine conditions and a variety of turbulent flames with transport fuels, computational diagnostics, turbulence modeling, and DNS data mining and data reduction. The computational diagnostics are primarily based on the chemical explosive mode analysis (CEMA) and a recently developed bifurcation analysis using datasets from first-principle simulations of 0-D reactors, 1-D laminar flames, and 2-D and 3-D DNS (collaboration with J.H. Chen and S. Som at Argonne, and C.S. Yoo at UNIST). Non-stiff reduced mechanisms for transportation fuels amenable for 3-D DNS are developed through graph-based methods and timescale analysis. The flame structures, stabilization mechanisms, local ignition and extinction etc., and the rate controlling chemical processes are unambiguously identified through CFLD. CEMA is further employed to segment complex turbulent flames based on the critical flame features, such as premixed reaction fronts, and to enable zone-adaptive turbulent combustion modeling.

  3. Simulated tempering based on global balance or detailed balance conditions: Suwa-Todo, heat bath, and Metropolis algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yoshiharu; Okumura, Hisashi

    2015-12-01

    Simulated tempering (ST) is a useful method to enhance sampling of molecular simulations. When ST is used, the Metropolis algorithm, which satisfies the detailed balance condition, is usually applied to calculate the transition probability. Recently, an alternative method that satisfies the global balance condition instead of the detailed balance condition has been proposed by Suwa and Todo. In this study, ST method with the Suwa-Todo algorithm is proposed. Molecular dynamics simulations with ST are performed with three algorithms (the Metropolis, heat bath, and Suwa-Todo algorithms) to calculate the transition probability. Among the three algorithms, the Suwa-Todo algorithm yields the highest acceptance ratio and the shortest autocorrelation time. These suggest that sampling by a ST simulation with the Suwa-Todo algorithm is most efficient. In addition, because the acceptance ratio of the Suwa-Todo algorithm is higher than that of the Metropolis algorithm, the number of temperature states can be reduced by 25% for the Suwa-Todo algorithm when compared with the Metropolis algorithm.

  4. Detailed studies of hadronic showers and comparison to GEANT4 simulations with data from highly granular calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    van der Kolk, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    The highly granular calorimeter prototypes of the CALICE collaboration have provided large data samples with precise three-dimensional information on hadronic showers with steel and tungsten absorbers and silicon, scintillator and gas detector readout. From these data sets, detailed measurements of the spatial structure, including longitudinal and lateral shower profiles and of the shower substructure and time structure are extracted. Recent analyses have extended these studies to different particle species in calorimeters with scintillator readout and steel and tungsten absorbers, to energies below 10 GeV in a silicon tungsten calorimeter and have provided first studies of the shower substructure with gaseous readout and unprecedented granularity of $1\\times1$~cm$^{2}$ over a full cubic meter. These results are confronted with Geant4 simulations with different hadronic physics models. They present new challenges to the simulation codes and provide the possibility to validate and improve the simulation of had...

  5. A fast GPU-based Monte Carlo simulation of proton transport with detailed modeling of non-elastic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Tseung, H Wan Chan; Beltran, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Very fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of proton transport have been implemented recently on GPUs. However, these usually use simplified models for non-elastic (NE) proton-nucleus interactions. Our primary goal is to build a GPU-based proton transport MC with detailed modeling of elastic and NE collisions. Methods: Using CUDA, we implemented GPU kernels for these tasks: (1) Simulation of spots from our scanning nozzle configurations, (2) Proton propagation through CT geometry, considering nuclear elastic scattering, multiple scattering, and energy loss straggling, (3) Modeling of the intranuclear cascade stage of NE interactions, (4) Nuclear evaporation simulation, and (5) Statistical error estimates on the dose. To validate our MC, we performed: (1) Secondary particle yield calculations in NE collisions, (2) Dose calculations in homogeneous phantoms, (3) Re-calculations of head and neck plans from a commercial treatment planning system (TPS), and compared with Geant4.9.6p2/TOPAS. Results: Yields, en...

  6. Detailed simulation of structural color generation inspired by the Morpho butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steindorfer, Michael A; Schmidt, Volker; Belegratis, Maria; Stadlober, Barbara; Krenn, Joachim R

    2012-09-10

    The brilliancy and variety of structural colors found in nature has become a major scientific topic in recent years. Rapid-prototyping processes enable the fabrication of according structures, but the technical exploitation requires a profound understanding of structural features and material properties regarding the generation of reflected color. This paper presents an extensive simulation of the reflectance spectra of a simplified 2D Morpho butterfly wing model by utilizing the finite-difference time-domain method. The structural parameters are optimized for reflection in a given spectral range. A comparison to simpler models, such as a plane dielectric layer stack, provides an understanding of the origin of the reflection behavior. We find that the wavelength of the reflection maximum is mainly set by the lateral dimensions of the structures. Furthermore small variations of the vertical dimensions leave the spectral position of the reflectance wavelength unchanged, potentially reducing grating effects.

  7. Detailed analysis of fan-shaped jets in three dimensional numerical simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-Lin Jiang; K. Shibata; H. Isobe; Cheng Fang

    2011-01-01

    We performed three dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations to study the magnetic reconnection using an initially shearing magnetic field configuration (force free field with a current sheet in the middle of the computational box). It is shown that there are two types of reconnection jets: the ordinary reconnection jets and fan-shaped jets, which are formed along the guide magnetic field. The fan-shaped jets are significantly different from the ordinary reconnection jets which are ejected by magnetic tension force. There are two driving forces for accelerating the fan-shaped jets. One is the Lorentz force which initially dominates the motion of fluid elements, and then the gas pressure gradient force accelerates the fluid elements in the later stage. The dependence on magnetic reconnection angle and resistivity value has also been studied. The formation and evolution of these jets provide a new understanding of dynamic magnetohydrodynamicjets.

  8. Detailed Simulation of Transformer Internal Fault in Power System by Diakoptical Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOUHSARI, S. M.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel method for modeling internal faults in a power transformer. This method uses a distributed computing approach for analysis of internal fault in transient stability (T/S studies of electrical networks using Diakoptics and large change sensitivity (LCS concepts. The combination of these concepts by phase frame model of transformer will be used here to develop an internal fault simulation of transformers. This approach leads to a model which is compatible with commercial phasor-based software packages. Consequently, it enables calculation of fault currents in any branch of the network due to a winding fault of a power transformer. The proposed method is implemented successfully and validated by time domain software and GEC group measurement results.

  9. Assessing the detail needed to capture rainfall-runoff dynamics with physics-based hydrologic response simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, B.B.; Ebel, B.A.; Heppner, C.S.; Loague, K.

    2011-01-01

    Concept development simulation with distributed, physics-based models provides a quantitative approach for investigating runoff generation processes across environmental conditions. Disparities within data sets employed to design and parameterize boundary value problems used in heuristic simulation inevitably introduce various levels of bias. The objective was to evaluate the impact of boundary value problem complexity on process representation for different runoff generation mechanisms. The comprehensive physics-based hydrologic response model InHM has been employed to generate base case simulations for four well-characterized catchments. The C3 and CB catchments are located within steep, forested environments dominated by subsurface stormflow; the TW and R5 catchments are located in gently sloping rangeland environments dominated by Dunne and Horton overland flows. Observational details are well captured within all four of the base case simulations, but the characterization of soil depth, permeability, rainfall intensity, and evapotranspiration differs for each. These differences are investigated through the conversion of each base case into a reduced case scenario, all sharing the same level of complexity. Evaluation of how individual boundary value problem characteristics impact simulated runoff generation processes is facilitated by quantitative analysis of integrated and distributed responses at high spatial and temporal resolution. Generally, the base case reduction causes moderate changes in discharge and runoff patterns, with the dominant process remaining unchanged. Moderate differences between the base and reduced cases highlight the importance of detailed field observations for parameterizing and evaluating physics-based models. Overall, similarities between the base and reduced cases indicate that the simpler boundary value problems may be useful for concept development simulation to investigate fundamental controls on the spectrum of runoff generation

  10. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Detailed Test Plan for Simulated Leak Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.

    2000-06-23

    This report describes controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field tests to be conducted during FY 2000 in support of DOE?s Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS). The VZTFS supports the Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Initiative. The field tests will improve understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. These methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing steel-cased boreholes. Specific objectives are to 1) identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford?s waste disposal sites; 2) reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; 3) develop a detailed and accurate data base of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; and 4) identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) manages the VZTFS for DOE.

  11. Impact of baryon physics on dark matter structures: a detailed simulation study of halo density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Duffy, Alan R; Kay, Scott T; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Battye, Richard A; Booth, C M

    2010-01-01

    The back-reaction of baryons on the dark matter halo density profile is of great interest, not least because it is an important systematic uncertainty when attempting to detect the dark matter. Here, we draw on a large suite of high resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, to systematically investigate this process and its dependence on the baryonic physics associated with galaxy formation. The inclusion of baryons results in significantly more concentrated density profiles if radiative cooling is efficient and feedback is weak. The dark matter halo concentration can in that case increase by as much as 30 (10) per cent on galaxy (cluster) scales. The most significant effects occur in galaxies at high redshift, where there is a strong anti-correlation between the baryon fraction in the halo centre and the inner slope of both the total and the dark matter density profiles. If feedback is weak, isothermal inner profiles form, in agreement with observations of massive, early-type galaxies. However, we ...

  12. Detailed Numerical Simulations on the Formation of Pillars around HII-regions

    CERN Document Server

    Gritschneder, Matthias; Naab, Thorsten; Walch, Stefanie

    2010-01-01

    We study the structural evolution of turbulent molecular clouds under the influence of ionizing radiation emitted from a nearby massive star by performing a high resolution parameter study with the iVINE code. The temperature is taken to be 10K or 100K, the mean number density is either 100cm^3 or 300cm^3. Besides, the turbulence is varied between Mach 1.5 and Mach 12.5 and the main driving scale between 1pc and 8pc. We vary the ionizing flux by an order of magnitude. In our simulations the ionizing radiation enhances the initial turbulent density distribution and thus leads to the formation of pillar-like structures observed adjacent to HII regions in a natural way. Gravitational collapse occurs regularly at the tips of the structures. We find a clear correlation between the initial state of the turbulent cold cloud and the final morphology and physical properties of the structures formed. The most favorable regime for the formation of pillars is Mach 4-10. Structures and therefore stars only form if the ini...

  13. A detailed numerical simulation of a liquid-propellant rocket engine ground test experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankford, D. W.; Simmons, M. A.; Heikkinen, B. D.

    1992-07-01

    A computational simulation of a Liquid Rocket Engine (LRE) ground test experiment was performed using two modeling approaches. The results of the models were compared with selected data to assess the validity of state-of-the-art computational tools for predicting the flowfield and radiative transfer in complex flow environments. The data used for comparison consisted of in-band station radiation measurements obtained in the near-field portion of the plume exhaust. The test article was a subscale LRE with an afterbody, resulting in a large base region. The flight conditions were such that afterburning regions were observed in the plume flowfield. A conventional standard modeling approach underpredicted the extent of afterburning and the associated radiation levels. These results were attributed to the absence of the base flow region which is not accounted for in this model. To assess the effects of the base region a Navier-Stokes model was applied. The results of this calculation indicate that the base recirculation effects are dominant features in the immediate expansion region and resulted in a much improved comparison. However, the downstream in-band station radiation data remained underpredicted by this model.

  14. Unravelling the details of vitamin D photosynthesis by non-adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapavicza, Enrico; Meyer, Alexander M; Furche, Filipp

    2011-12-21

    We investigate the photodynamics of vitamin D derivatives by a fully analytical implementation of the linear response time-dependent density functional theory surface hopping method (LR-TDDFT-SH). Our study elucidates the dynamics of the processes involved in vitamin D formation at the molecular level and with femtosecond resolution. We explain the major experimental findings and provide new insights that cannot directly be obtained from experiments: firstly, we investigate the dynamics of the photoinduced ring-opening of provitamin D (Pro) and cyclohexadiene (CHD) and the subsequent rotational isomerization. In agreement with recent experiments and CC2 calculations, only the bright S(1) state is involved in the ring-opening reaction. Our calculations confirm the experimentally reported 5 : 1 ratio between the excited state lifetimes of Pro and CHD. The longer lifetimes of Pro are attributed to steric constraints of the steroid skeleton and to temperature effects, both emerging directly from our simulations. For CHD and Pro, we present an explanation of the biexponential decay recently reported by Sension and coworkers [Tang et al., J. Phys. Chem., 2011, 134, 104503]: our calculations suggest that the fast and slow components arise from a reactive and an unreactive reaction pathway, respectively. Secondly, we assess the wavelength dependent photochemistry of previtamin D (Pre). Using replica exchange molecular dynamics we sample the Pre conformers present at thermal equilibrium. Based on this ensemble we explain the conformation dependent absorption and the essential features of Pre photochemistry. Consistent with the experiments, we find ring-closure to occur mostly after excitation of the cZc conformers and at lower energies, whereas Z/E isomerization of the central double bond preferably occurs after excitation at higher energies. For the isomerization we provide the first theoretical evidence of the proposed hula-twist mechanism. Our results show that LR

  15. Neighbor List Collision-Driven Molecular Dynamics Simulation for Nonspherical Particles. I. Algorithmic Details II. Applications to Ellipses and Ellipsoids

    CERN Document Server

    Donev, A; Stillinger, F H; Donev, Aleksandar; Torquato, Salvatore; Stillinger, Frank H.

    2004-01-01

    In the first part of a series of two papers, we present in considerable detail a collision-driven molecular dynamics algorithm for a system of nonspherical particles, within a parallelepiped simulation domain, under both periodic or hard-wall boundary conditions. The algorithm extends previous event-driven molecular dynamics algorithms for spheres. We present a novel partial-update near-neighbor list (NNL) algorithm that is superior to previous algorithms at high densities, without compromising the correctness of the algorithm. This efficiency of the algorithm is further increased for systems of very aspherical particles by using bounding sphere complexes (BSC). In the second part of this series of papers we apply the algorithm presented in the first part of this series of papers to systems of hard ellipses and ellipsoids. The theoretical machinery needed to treat such particles, including the overlap potentials, is developed in full detail. We describe an algorithm for predicting the time of collision for tw...

  16. A novel Monte Carlo algorithm for simulating crystals with McStas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alianelli, L.; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Felici, R.; Andersen, K.H.; Farhi, E

    2004-07-15

    We developed an original Monte Carlo algorithm for the simulation of Bragg diffraction by mosaic, bent and gradient crystals. It has practical applications, as it can be used for simulating imperfect crystals (monochromators, analyzers and perhaps samples) in neutron ray-tracing packages, like McStas. The code we describe here provides a detailed description of the particle interaction with the microscopic homogeneous regions composing the crystal, therefore it can be used also for the calculation of quantities having a conceptual interest, as multiple scattering, or for the interpretation of experiments aiming at characterizing crystals, like diffraction topographs.

  17. A novel Monte Carlo algorithm for simulating crystals with McStas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alianelli, L.; Sánchez del Río, M.; Felici, R.; Andersen, K. H.; Farhi, E.

    2004-07-01

    We developed an original Monte Carlo algorithm for the simulation of Bragg diffraction by mosaic, bent and gradient crystals. It has practical applications, as it can be used for simulating imperfect crystals (monochromators, analyzers and perhaps samples) in neutron ray-tracing packages, like McStas. The code we describe here provides a detailed description of the particle interaction with the microscopic homogeneous regions composing the crystal, therefore it can be used also for the calculation of quantities having a conceptual interest, as multiple scattering, or for the interpretation of experiments aiming at characterizing crystals, like diffraction topographs.

  18. Simulating x-ray telescopes with McXtrace: a case study of ATHENA's optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Desiree D. M.; Knudsen, Erik B.; Westergaard, Niels J.; Christensen, Finn E.; Massahi, Sonny; Shortt, Brian; Spiga, Daniele; Solstad, Mathias; Lefmann, Kim

    2016-07-01

    We use the X-ray ray-tracing package McXtrace to simulate the performance of X-ray telescopes based on Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) technologies. We use as reference the design of the optics of the planned X-ray mission Advanced Telescope for High ENergy Astrophysics (ATHENA) which is designed as a single X-ray telescope populated with stacked SPO substrates forming mirror modules to focus X-ray photons. We show that is possible to simulate in detail the SPO pores and qualify the use of McXtrace for in-depth analysis of in-orbit performance and laboratory X-ray test results.

  19. Simulation of folding of a small alpha-helical protein in atomistic detail using worldwide-distributed computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrovic, Bojan; Snow, Christopher D; Shirts, Michael R; Pande, Vijay S

    2002-11-08

    By employing thousands of PCs and new worldwide-distributed computing techniques, we have simulated in atomistic detail the folding of a fast-folding 36-residue alpha-helical protein from the villin headpiece. The total simulated time exceeds 300 micros, orders of magnitude more than previous simulations of a molecule of this size. Starting from an extended state, we obtained an ensemble of folded structures, which is on average 1.7A and 1.9A away from the native state in C(alpha) distance-based root-mean-square deviation (dRMS) and C(beta) dRMS sense, respectively. The folding mechanism of villin is most consistent with the hydrophobic collapse view of folding: the molecule collapses non-specifically very quickly ( approximately 20ns), which greatly reduces the size of the conformational space that needs to be explored in search of the native state. The conformational search in the collapsed state appears to be rate-limited by the formation of the aromatic core: in a significant fraction of our simulations, the C-terminal phenylalanine residue packs improperly with the rest of the hydrophobic core. We suggest that the breaking of this interaction may be the rate-determining step in the course of folding. On the basis of our simulations we estimate the folding rate of villin to be approximately 5micros. By analyzing the average features of the folded ensemble obtained by simulation, we see that the mean folded structure is more similar to the native fold than any individual folded structure. This finding highlights the need for simulating ensembles of molecules and averaging the results in an experiment-like fashion if meaningful comparison between simulation and experiment is to be attempted. Moreover, our results demonstrate that (1) the computational methodology exists to simulate the multi-microsecond regime using distributed computing and (2) that potential sets used to describe interatomic interactions may be sufficiently accurate to reach the folded state

  20. Three-dimensional ray tracing through curvilinear interfaces with application to laser Doppler anemometry in a blood analogue fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Allen H; Bertram, Christopher D

    2010-02-01

    Prediction of the effects of refractive index (RI) mismatch on laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) measurements within a curvilinear cavity (an artificial ventricle) was achieved by developing a general technique for modelling the paths of the convergent beams of the LDA system using 3D vector geometry. Validated by ray tracing through CAD drawings, the predicted maximum tolerance in RI between the solid model and the working fluid was +/- 0.0005, equivalent to focusing errors commensurate with the geometric and alignment uncertainties associated with the flow model and the LDA arrangement. This technique supports predictions of the effects of refraction within a complex geometry. Where the RI mismatch is unavoidable but known, it is possible not only to calculate the true position of the measuring volume (using the probe location and model geometry), but also to estimate degradation in signal quality arising from differential displacement and refraction of the laser beams.

  1. The Ray Tracing Analytical Solution within the RAMOD framework. The case of a Gaia-like observer

    CERN Document Server

    Crosta, Mariateresa; de Felice, Fernando; Lattanzi, Mario Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the analytical solution of the inverse ray tracing problem for photons emitted by a star and collected by an observer located in the gravitational field of the Solar System. This solution has been conceived to suit the accuracy achievable by the ESA Gaia satellite (launched on December 19, 2013) consistently with the measurement protocol in General relativity adopted within the RAMOD framework. Aim of this study is to provide a general relativistic tool for the science exploitation of such a revolutionary mission, whose main goal is to trace back star directions from within our local curved space-time, therefore providing a three-dimensional map of our Galaxy. The results are useful for a thorough comparison and cross-checking validation of what already exists in the field of Relativistic Astrometry. Moreover, the analytical solutions presented here can be extended to model other measurements that require the same order of accuracy expected for Gaia.

  2. Development of a curved ray tracing method for modeling of phase paths from GPS radio occultation: A two-dimensional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Tae-Kwon; Kuo, Ying-Hwa; Lee, Dong-Kyou

    2010-12-01

    A two-dimensional curved ray tracer (CRT) is developed to study the propagation path of radio signals across a heterogeneous planetary atmosphere. The method, designed to achieve improvements in both computational efficiency and accuracy over conventional straight-line methods, takes rays' first-order bending into account to better describe curved raypaths in the stratified atmosphere. CRT is then used to simulate the phase path from GPS radio occultation (RO). The merit of the ray tracing approach in GPS RO is explicit consideration of horizontal variation in the atmosphere, which may lead to a sizable error but is disregarded in traditional retrieval schemes. In addition, direct modeling of the phase path takes advantage of simple error characteristics in the measurement. With provision of ionospheric and neutral atmospheric refractive indices, in this effort, rays are traced along the full range of GPS-low Earth orbiting (LEO) radio links just as the measurements are made in real life. Here, ray shooting is employed to realize the observed radio links with controlled accuracy. CRT largely reproduces the very measured characteristics of GPS signals. When compared, the measured and simulated phases show remarkable agreement. The cross validation between CRT and GPS RO has confirmed not only the strength of CRT but also the high accuracy of GPS RO measurements. The primary motivation for this study is enabling effective quality control for GPS RO data, overcoming a complicated error structure in the high-level data. CRT has also shown a great deal of potential for improved utilization of GPS RO data for geophysical research.

  3. 改进的地震模型初值射线追踪方法%Improved Seismic Model Initial Value Ray Tracing Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺中银; 高阳

    2011-01-01

    The initial value ray tracing method is one of major method in modem ray tracing methods. It overcomes time-consuming computing efficiency in two spots ray tracing. Based on eikonal equation, improved initial value ray tracing, that is using square slowness to replace velocity parameters in model, make eikonal equation produces analytic solutions, a step further to derive computing expressions of reflection and transmission slowness vectors when the ray confiont with interface, and reflection and transmission coefficients function expressions. Through ray tracings of simple two layered interface syncline model and complex multiple layered salt-dome model, have shown the improvement of initial value ray tracing by comparison with Runge-Kutta discrete numerical solution, not only improved ray tracing efficiency (about 10 times), but also extended limit for the use of ray tracing method.%初值射线追踪方法是现代射线追踪方法中的一个很重要的理论,它克服了两点法射线追踪方法耗时的计算效率问题.以程函方程为基础,对初值射线追踪方法进行改进,即利用平方慢度来替换模型中的速度参数,使得程函方程产生解析解,从而进一步导出当射线遇到界面时的反射和透射慢度向量的计算表达式,以及反射、透射系数的函数表达式.通过对简单的两层界面向斜模型及复杂的多层盐丘模型的射线追踪,表明该初值射线追踪方法的改进相比于以往的龙格库塔离散数值解法,不但使射线追踪效率得到了大幅度提高(10倍左右),且也扩大了射线法使用范围.

  4. Fast ray-tracing of human eye optics on Graphics Processing Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qi; Patkar, Saket; Pai, Dinesh K

    2014-05-01

    We present a new technique for simulating retinal image formation by tracing a large number of rays from objects in three dimensions as they pass through the optic apparatus of the eye to objects. Simulating human optics is useful for understanding basic questions of vision science and for studying vision defects and their corrections. Because of the complexity of computing such simulations accurately, most previous efforts used simplified analytical models of the normal eye. This makes them less effective in modeling vision disorders associated with abnormal shapes of the ocular structures which are hard to be precisely represented by analytical surfaces. We have developed a computer simulator that can simulate ocular structures of arbitrary shapes, for instance represented by polygon meshes. Topographic and geometric measurements of the cornea, lens, and retina from keratometer or medical imaging data can be integrated for individualized examination. We utilize parallel processing using modern Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) to efficiently compute retinal images by tracing millions of rays. A stable retinal image can be generated within minutes. We simulated depth-of-field, accommodation, chromatic aberrations, as well as astigmatism and correction. We also show application of the technique in patient specific vision correction by incorporating geometric models of the orbit reconstructed from clinical medical images. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 短波射线追踪技术中的电离层混合建模方法%Ionosphere hybrid modeling method for short-wave ray tracing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栗伟珉; 苏东林; 阎照文; 刘焱

    2012-01-01

    在国际参考电离层模型和多层准抛物模型的基础上,提出了一种混合应用两种模型进行电离层建模的新方法.利用射线追踪技术,分别对混合模型和传统国际参考电离层模型下短波射线在电离层中的轨迹进行了仿真,得到了电波群路径.通过与实测电波群路径的对比,结果表明:对中国中纬度地区在电离层混合模型下的射线追踪精度优于传统国际参考电离层模型下的射线追踪精度,同时混合建模方法降低了多层准抛物模型对输入条件的要求,扩展了多层准抛物模型在射线追踪技术中的应用范围.%Based on the international reference ionosphere(IRI) and the quasi-parabolic segments(QPS) model,a new ionosphere hybrid modeling method for short-wave ray tracing was proposed.The group ranges which show the short-wave propagation trace in the ionosphere were obtained separately by simulation in the hybrid model and the IRI model.By comparing the simulated results and the ionospheric oblique incidence sounding experimental data,the hybrid modeling method accuracy at mid-latitude region in China was analyzed.It indicates the ray tracing simulation accuracy in the hybrid model on experimental day better than the one in the IRI model.The limit to the QPS model's input is reduced by the hybrid modeling method and the QPS model's application range is extended in ray tracing technology.

  6. Development and application of a ray-tracing code integrating with 3D equilibrium mapping in LHD ECH experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, T., Ii; Kubo, S.; Takahashi, H.; Makino, R.; Seki, R.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Shimozuma, T.; Ida, K.; Suzuki, C.; Emoto, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Moon, C.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Kobayashi, S.; Ito, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Ejiri, A.; Mutoh, T.

    2015-11-01

    The central electron temperature has successfully reached up to 7.5 keV in large helical device (LHD) plasmas with a central high-ion temperature of 5 keV and a central electron density of 1.3× {{10}19} m-3. This result was obtained by heating with a newly-installed 154 GHz gyrotron and also the optimisation of injection geometry in electron cyclotron heating (ECH). The optimisation was carried out by using the ray-tracing code ‘LHDGauss’, which was upgraded to include the rapid post-processing three-dimensional (3D) equilibrium mapping obtained from experiments. For ray-tracing calculations, LHDGauss can automatically read the relevant data registered in the LHD database after a discharge, such as ECH injection settings (e.g. Gaussian beam parameters, target positions, polarisation and ECH power) and Thomson scattering diagnostic data along with the 3D equilibrium mapping data. The equilibrium map of the electron density and temperature profiles are then extrapolated into the region outside the last closed flux surface. Mode purity, or the ratio between the ordinary mode and the extraordinary mode, is obtained by calculating the 1D full-wave equation along the direction of the rays from the antenna to the absorption target point. Using the virtual magnetic flux surfaces, the effects of the modelled density profiles and the magnetic shear at the peripheral region with a given polarisation are taken into account. Power deposition profiles calculated for each Thomson scattering measurement timing are registered in the LHD database. The adjustment of the injection settings for the desired deposition profile from the feedback provided on a shot-by-shot basis resulted in an effective experimental procedure.

  7. High Altitude Long Endurance Remotely Operated Aircraft - National Airspace System Integration - Simulation IPT: Detailed Airspace Operations Simulation Plan. Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The primary goal of Access 5 is to allow safe, reliable and routine operations of High Altitude-Long Endurance Remotely Operated Aircraft (HALE ROAs) within the National Airspace System (NAS). Step 1 of Access 5 addresses the policies, procedures, technologies and implementation issues of introducing such operations into the NAS above pressure altitude 40,000 ft (Flight Level 400 or FL400). Routine HALE ROA activity within the NAS represents a potentially significant change to the tasks and concerns of NAS users, service providers and other stakeholders. Due to the complexity of the NAS, and the importance of maintaining current high levels of safety in the NAS, any significant changes must be thoroughly evaluated prior to implementation. The Access 5 community has been tasked with performing this detailed evaluation of routine HALE-ROA activities in the NAS, and providing to key NAS stakeholders a set of recommended policies and procedures to achieve this goal. Extensive simulation, in concert with a directed flight demonstration program are intended to provide the required supporting evidence that these recommendations are based on sound methods and offer a clear roadmap to achieving safe, reliable and routine HALE ROA operations in the NAS. Through coordination with NAS service providers and policy makers, and with significant input from HALE-ROA manufacturers, operators and pilots, this document presents the detailed simulation plan for Step 1 of Access 5. A brief background of the Access 5 project will be presented with focus on Steps 1 and 2, concerning HALE-ROA operations above FL400 and FL180 respectively. An overview of project management structure follows with particular emphasis on the role of the Simulation IPT and its relationships to other project entities. This discussion will include a description of work packages assigned to the Simulation IPT, and present the specific goals to be achieved for each simulation work package, along with the associated

  8. Using CAD software to simulate PV energy yield - The case of product integrated photovoltaic operated under indoor solar irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reich, N.H.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Turkenburg, W.C.; Sinke, W.C.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we show that photovoltaic (PV) energy yields can be simulated using standard rendering and ray-tracing features of Computer Aided Design (CAD) software. To this end, three-dimensional (3-D) sceneries are ray-traced in CAD. The PV power output is then modeled by translating irradiance

  9. Using CAD software to simulate PV energy yield - The case of product integrated photovoltaic operated under indoor solar irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reich, N.H.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Turkenburg, W.C.; Sinke, W.C.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we show that photovoltaic (PV) energy yields can be simulated using standard rendering and ray-tracing features of Computer Aided Design (CAD) software. To this end, three-dimensional (3-D) sceneries are ray-traced in CAD. The PV power output is then modeled by translating irradiance

  10. Spin dynamics modeling in the AGS based on a stepwise ray-tracing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutheil, Yann [Univ. of Grenoble (France)

    2006-08-07

    The AGS provides a polarized proton beam to RHIC. The beam is accelerated in the AGS from Gγ= 4.5 to Gγ = 45.5 and the polarization transmission is critical to the RHIC spin program. In the recent years, various systems were implemented to improve the AGS polarization transmission. These upgrades include the double partial snakes configuration and the tune jumps system. However, 100% polarization transmission through the AGS acceleration cycle is not yet reached. The current efficiency of the polarization transmission is estimated to be around 85% in typical running conditions. Understanding the sources of depolarization in the AGS is critical to improve the AGS polarized proton performances. The complexity of beam and spin dynamics, which is in part due to the specialized Siberian snake magnets, drove a strong interest for original methods of simulations. For that, the Zgoubi code, capable of direct particle and spin tracking through field maps, was here used to model the AGS. A model of the AGS using the Zgoubi code was developed and interfaced with the current system through a simple command: the AgsFromSnapRampCmd. Interfacing with the machine control system allows for fast modelization using actual machine parameters. Those developments allowed the model to realistically reproduce the optics of the AGS along the acceleration ramp. Additional developments on the Zgoubi code, as well as on post-processing and pre-processing tools, granted long term multiturn beam tracking capabilities: the tracking of realistic beams along the complete AGS acceleration cycle. Beam multiturn tracking simulations in the AGS, using realistic beam and machine parameters, provided a unique insight into the mechanisms behind the evolution of the beam emittance and polarization during the acceleration cycle. Post-processing softwares were developed to allow the representation of the relevant quantities from the Zgoubi simulations data. The Zgoubi simulations proved particularly

  11. Technical Note : A direct ray-tracing method to compute integral depth dose in pencil beam proton radiography with a multilayer ionization chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Deffet, Sylvain; Meijers, Arturs; Vander Stappen, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To introduce a fast ray-tracing algorithm in pencil proton radiography (PR) with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) for in vivo range error mapping. Methods: Pencil beam PR was obtained by delivering spots uniformly positioned in a square (45x45 mm(2) field-of-view) of 9x9 spots capable

  12. CFD simulation with detailed chemistry of steam reforming of methane for hydrogen production in an integrated micro-reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Xuli; Cheng, Yinhong; Jin, Yong; Cheng, Yi [Department of Chemical Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Reaction Engineering and Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ding, Shi [Department of Chemical Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Reaction Engineering and Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Research Institute of Petroleum Processing, SINOPEC, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2010-06-15

    micro-reactor has drawn more and more attention in recent years due to the process intensification on basic transport phenomena in micro-channels, which would often lead to the improved reactor performance. Steam reforming of methane (SRM) in micro-reactor has great potential to realize a low-cost, compact process for hydrogen production via an evident shortening of reaction time from seconds to milliseconds. This work focuses on the detailed modeling and simulation of a micro-reactor design for SRM reaction with the integration of a micro-channel for Rh-catalyzed endothermic reaction, a micro-channel for Pt-catalyzed exothermic reaction and a wall in between with Rh or Pt-catalyst coated layer. The elementary reaction kinetics for SRM process is adopted in the CFD model, while the combustion channel is described by global reaction kinetics. The model predictions were quantitatively validated by the experimental data in the literature. For the extremely fast reactions in both channels, the simulations indicated the significance of the heat conduction ability of the reactor wall as well as the interplay between the exothermic and endothermic reactions (e.g., the flow rate ratio of fuel gas to reforming gas). The characteristic width of 0.5 mm is considered to be a suitable channel size to balance the trade-off between the heat transfer behavior in micro-channels and the easy fabrication of micro-channels. (author)

  13. Atomic detail brownian dynamics simulations of concentrated protein solutions with a mean field treatment of hydrodynamic interactions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mereghetti, Paolo; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2012-07-26

    High macromolecular concentrations are a distinguishing feature of living organisms. Understanding how the high concentration of solutes affects the dynamic properties of biological macromolecules is fundamental for the comprehension of biological processes in living systems. In this paper, we describe the implementation of mean field models of translational and rotational hydrodynamic interactions into an atomically detailed many-protein brownian dynamics simulation method. Concentrated solutions (30-40% volume fraction) of myoglobin, hemoglobin A, and sickle cell hemoglobin S were simulated, and static structure factors, oligomer formation, and translational and rotational self-diffusion coefficients were computed. Good agreement of computed properties with available experimental data was obtained. The results show the importance of both solvent mediated interactions and weak protein-protein interactions for accurately describing the dynamics and the association properties of concentrated protein solutions. Specifically, they show a qualitative difference in the translational and rotational dynamics of the systems studied. Although the translational diffusion coefficient is controlled by macromolecular shape and hydrodynamic interactions, the rotational diffusion coefficient is affected by macromolecular shape, direct intermolecular interactions, and both translational and rotational hydrodynamic interactions.

  14. Ray-Trace of an Abnormal Radar Echo Using Geographic Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Nan Chen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Weather radar plays a key role in natural disaster mitigation just as surveillance radar does in detecting objects that threaten homeland security. Both together comprise an instrumental part of radar observation. Therefore, quality control of the data gathered through radar detection is extremely important. However, radar waves propagate in the atmosphere, and an anomalous echo can occur if there are significant discontinuities in temperature and humidity in the lower boundary layer. The refractive curvature of the earth makes some errors in observation inevitable. On the night of July 3, 2003, Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD weather radar detected an abnormal echo. The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF model was utilized to simulate the atmospheric conditions. Radar propagation was simulated using the Advanced Refractivity Engineering Prediction System (AREPS as well as the GIS. The results show the feasibility of establishing an abnormal propagation early-warning system and extending the application of the GIS in serving as the foundation of a Common Operation Picture (COP. Furthermore, the parameters of the boundary layer near the sea's surface in the numerical weather forecasting model need remodification.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(1, pp.63-72, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1487

  15. Using Ray Tracing to Evaluate the Performance of Several Methods for Determining the Ground Range and Refractive Index of Ionospheric Scattering Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, R. A.; Frissell, N. A.; de Larquier, S.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the performance of three methods used by HF radars in the SuperDARN network for determining the ground ranges to ionospheric scattering volumes. Each method uses somewhat different approaches, but the same equivalent-path analysis. We also show that Snell's Law can be added to this analysis to determine the refractive index of each scattering volume and thereby correct Doppler velocity measurements for ionospheric refraction. Two of these methods make their predictions using the group range to the scattering volume and a virtual height model, while the third method uses the group range and the elevation angle each backscattered return. The effectiveness of each of these methods is evaluated using ray tracing analyses through the International Reference Ionosphere. Ray tracings analysis provides determinations of the initial elevation angle, group range, group range, and refractive index of each ionospheric volume that backscatters signals to the radar. The initial or final elevation angle and the group range are used as inputs to the geolocation methods and the ground range and refractive index serve as reference data against which the predictions of the geolocation methods can be evaluated. We find that the methods using virtual height models actually change the initial elevation angle determined from ray tracing to a different elevation angle that is consistent with the virtual height model. Due to this change, predictions of the ground range and refractive index of scattering volumes located with virtual-height models are rarely consistent with the predictions obtained from ray tracing. In contrast, the geolocation method that uses the group range and initial or final elevation angle yields predictions that are in good agreement with ray tracing. Modifications to the equivalent-path analysis are required to obtain consistent predictions of the ground range and refractive index of backscatter from the topside F-layer.

  16. Assessment of the Accuracy of the Conventional Ray-Tracing Technique: Implications in Remote Sensing and Radiative Transfer Involving Ice Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Lei; Yang, Ping; Liu, Chao; Yi, Bingqi; Baum, Bryan A.; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Iwabuchi, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental problem in remote sensing and radiative transfer simulations involving ice clouds is the ability to compute accurate optical properties for individual ice particles. While relatively simple and intuitively appealing, the conventional geometric-optics method (CGOM) is used frequently for the solution of light scattering by ice crystals. Due to the approximations in the ray-tracing technique, the CGOM accuracy is not well quantified. The result is that the uncertainties are introduced that can impact many applications. Improvements in the Invariant Imbedding T-matrix method (II-TM) and the Improved Geometric-Optics Method (IGOM) provide a mechanism to assess the aforementioned uncertainties. The results computed by the II-TMþIGOM are considered as a benchmark because the IITM solves Maxwell's equations from first principles and is applicable to particle size parameters ranging into the domain at which the IGOM has reasonable accuracy. To assess the uncertainties with the CGOM in remote sensing and radiative transfer simulations, two independent optical property datasets of hexagonal columns are developed for sensitivity studies by using the CGOM and the II-TMþIGOM, respectively. Ice cloud bulk optical properties obtained from the two datasets are compared and subsequently applied to retrieve the optical thickness and effective diameter from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements. Additionally, the bulk optical properties are tested in broadband radiative transfer (RT) simulations using the general circulation model (GCM) version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG) that is adopted in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model (CAM, version 5.1). For MODIS retrievals, the mean bias of uncertainties of applying the CGOM in shortwave bands (0.86 and 2.13 micrometers) can be up to 5% in the optical thickness and as high as 20% in the effective diameter, depending on cloud optical

  17. A Three-Dimensional Ray Tracing Study on Whistler-Mode Chorus During Geomagnetic Activities%A Three-Dimensional Ray Tracing Study on Whistler-Mode Chorus During Geomagnetic Activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周庆华; 史建魁; 肖伏良

    2011-01-01

    A three-dimensional ray tracing study of a whistler-mode chorus is conducted for different geomagnetic activities by using a global core plasma density model. For the upperband chorus, the initial azimuthal wave angle affects slightly the projection of ray trajectories onto the plane (Z, √(x^2 + y^2)), but controls the longitudinal propagation. The trajectory of the upper-band chorus is strongly associated with the plasmapause and the magnetic local time (MLT) of chorus source region. For the high geomagnetic activity, the chorus trajectory moves inward together with the plasmapause. In the bulge region, the plasmapause extends outward, while the chorus trajectory moves outward together with the plasmapause. For moderately or high geomagnetic activity, the lower-band chorus suffers low hybrid resonance (LHR) reflection before it reaches the plasmapause, leading to a weak correlation with the geomagnetic activity and magnetic local time of the chorus source region. For low geomagnetic activity, the lower-band chorus may be reflected firstly at the plasmapause instead of suffering LHR reflection, exhibiting a propagation characteristic similar to that of the upper-band chorus. The results provide a new insight into the propagation characteristics of the chorus for different geomagnetic activities and contribute to further understanding of the acceleration of energetic electron by a chorus wave.

  18. SolTrace: A Ray-Tracing Code for Complex Solar Optical Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelin, Tim [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dobos, Aron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lewandowski, Allan [Allan Lewandowski Solar Consulting LLC, Evergreen, CO (United States)

    2013-10-01

    SolTrace is an optical simulation tool designed to model optical systems used in concentrating solar power (CSP) applications. The code was first written in early 2003, but has seen significant modifications and changes since its inception, including conversion from a Pascal-based software development platform to C++. SolTrace is unique in that it can model virtually any optical system utilizingthe sun as the source. It has been made available for free and as such is in use worldwide by industry, universities, and research laboratories. The fundamental design of the code is discussed, including enhancements and improvements over the earlier version. Comparisons are made with other optical modeling tools, both non-commercial and commercial in nature. Finally, modeled results are shownfor some typical CSP systems and, in one case, compared to measured optical data.

  19. Exploring parameter space in detailed single neuron models: simulations of the mitral and granule cells of the olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, U S; Bower, J M

    1993-06-01

    1. Detailed compartmental computer simulations of single mitral and granule cells of the vertebrate olfactory bulb were constructed using previously published geometric data. Electrophysiological properties were determined by comparing model output to previously published experimental data, mainly current-clamp recordings. 2. The passive electrical properties of each model were explored by comparing model output with intracellular potential data from hyperpolarizing current injection experiments. The results suggest that membrane resistivity in both cells is nonuniform, with somatas having a substantially lower resistivity than the dendrites. 3. The active properties of these cells were explored by incorporating active ion channels into modeled compartments. On the basis of evidence from the literature, the mitral cell model included six channel types: fast sodium, fast delayed rectifier (Kfast), slow delayed rectifier (K), transient outward potassium current (KA), voltage- and calcium-dependent potassium current (KCa), and L-type calcium current. The granule cell model included four channel types: rat brain sodium, K, KA, and the non-inactivating muscarinic potassium current (KM). Modeled channels were based on the Hodgkin-Huxley formalism. 4. Representative kinetics for each of the channel classes above were obtained from the literature. The experimentally unknown spatial distributions of each included channel were obtained by systematic parameter searches. These were conducted in two ways: large-scale simulation series, in which each parameter was varied in turn, and an adaptation of a multidimensional conjugate gradient method. In each case, the simulated results were compared wtih experimental data using a curve-matching function evaluating mean squared differences of several aspects of the simulated and experimental voltage waveforms. 5. Systematic parameter variations revealed a single distinct region of parameter space in which the mitral cell model best

  20. Evaluation of Diversity Antenna Designs Using Ray Tracing, Measured Radiation Patterns, and MIMO Channel Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Pal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an evaluation of the MIMO performance of three candidate antenna array designs, each embedded within a PDA footprint, using indoor wideband channel measurements at 5.2 GHz alongside channel simulations. A channel model which employs the plane-wave approximation was used to combine the embedded antenna radiation patterns of the candidate devices obtained from far-field pattern measurements and multipath component parameters from an indoor ray-tracer. The 4-element candidate arrays were each constructed using a different type of antenna element, and despite the diverse element directivities, pattern characteristics, and polarization purities, all three devices were constructed to fully exploit diversity in polarization, space, and angle. Thus, low correlation and high information theoretic capacity was observed in each case. A good match between the model and the measurements is also demonstrated, especially for 2×2 MIMO subsets of identically or orthogonally polarized linear slot antennas. The interdependencies between the channel XPD, directional spread and pathloss, and the respective impact on channel capacity are also discussed in this paper.

  1. Evaluation of Diversity Antenna Designs Using Ray Tracing, Measured Radiation Patterns, and MIMO Channel Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal Arindam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an evaluation of the MIMO performance of three candidate antenna array designs, each embedded within a PDA footprint, using indoor wideband channel measurements at 5.2 GHz alongside channel simulations. A channel model which employs the plane-wave approximation was used to combine the embedded antenna radiation patterns of the candidate devices obtained from far-field pattern measurements and multipath component parameters from an indoor ray-tracer. The 4-element candidate arrays were each constructed using a different type of antenna element, and despite the diverse element directivities, pattern characteristics, and polarization purities, all three devices were constructed to fully exploit diversity in polarization, space, and angle. Thus, low correlation and high information theoretic capacity was observed in each case. A good match between the model and the measurements is also demonstrated, especially for MIMO subsets of identically or orthogonally polarized linear slot antennas. The interdependencies between the channel XPD, directional spread and pathloss, and the respective impact on channel capacity are also discussed in this paper.

  2. McStas 1.1: A freeware package for neutron Monte Carlo ray-tracing simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefmann, K.; Nielsen, K.

    1999-01-01

    The key themes of teh 12th ordinary general meeting of the Nordic Society for Radiation Protection were: RADIATION - ENVIRONMENT - INFORMATION. A number of outstanding international experts accepted to contribute on the meetings first day with invited presentations, which focussed on these themes...

  3. Investigating detailed interactions between novel PAR1 antagonist F16357 and the receptor using docking and molecular dynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Readmond, Carolyn; Wu, Chun

    2017-08-24

    Currently, Vorapaxar is the only recently FDA-approved antiplatelet drug targeting Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1). However, a novel antagonist, F16357, has been shown to prevent painful bladder syndrome, also known as interstitial cystitis (IC). Unfortunately, there is no high resolution structure of the F16357-receptor complex, hindering its optimization as a therapeutic agent. In this study, we used docking and molecular dynamic (MD) simulations to investigate the detailed interactions between F16357 and PAR1 at a molecular level. The recently solved crystal structure of human PAR1 complexed with Vorapaxar was used in our docking of F16357 into the binding pocket of the receptor. To enhance binding pose selection, F16357 was docked first without constraints and then with a positional constraint to invert its orientation to become similar to that of Vorapaxar. The three systems, with crystal Vorapaxar, F16357 and an inverted F16357, were subjected to 3.0μs MD simulations. The MM-GBSA binding energy analysis showed that F16357 binds more strongly in a pose obtained from an unrestrained docking than in the inverted pose from a restrained docking; and Vorapaxar binds more strongly than F17357. This ordering is consistent with the experimental pIC50 values. Our structural data showed subtle changes in the binding pose between Vorapaxar and F16357. Transmembrane helices 1, 2, 5, and 7 were most significantly affected; most notably a large kink at F279(5.47) in TM helix 5 of the Vorapaxar complex was completely absent in the F16357 complex. The results of this study facilitate the future development of other therapeutic PAR1 antagonists. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of VTEC from ground-based space geodetic techniques based on ray-traced mapping factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinkelmann, Robert; Alizadeh, M. Mahdi; Schuh, Harald; Deng, Zhiguo; Zus, Florian; Etemadfard, M. Hossein

    2016-07-01

    For the derivation of vertical total electron content (VTEC) from slant total electron content (STEC), usually a standard approach is used based on mapping functions that assume a single-layer model of the ionosphere (e.g. IERS Conventions 2010). In our study we test the standard approach against a recently developed alternative which is based on station specific ray-traced mapping factors. For the evaluation of this new mapping concept, we compute VTEC at selected Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) stations using the dispersive delays and the corresponding formal errors obtained by observing extra-galactic radio sources at two radio frequencies in S- and X-bands by the permanent geodetic/astrometric program organized by the IVS (International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry). Additionally, by applying synchronous sampling and a consistent analysis configuration, we determine VTEC at Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) antennas using GPS (Global Positioning System) and/or GLONASS (Globalnaja nawigazionnaja sputnikowaja Sistema) observations provided by the IGS (International GNSS Service) that are operated in the vicinity of the VLBI antennas. We compare the VTEC time series obtained by the individual techniques over a period of about twenty years and describe their characteristics qualitatively and statistically. The length of the time series allows us to assess the long-term climatology of ionospheric VTEC during the last twenty years.

  5. Ray-tracing traveltime tomography versus wave-equation traveltime inversion for near-surface seismic land data

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Lei

    2017-05-11

    Full-waveform inversion of land seismic data tends to get stuck in a local minimum associated with the waveform misfit function. This problem can be partly mitigated by using an initial velocity model that is close to the true velocity model. This initial starting model can be obtained by inverting traveltimes with ray-tracing traveltime tomography (RT) or wave-equation traveltime (WT) inversion. We have found that WT can provide a more accurate tomogram than RT by inverting the first-arrival traveltimes, and empirical tests suggest that RT is more sensitive to the additive noise in the input data than WT. We present two examples of applying WT and RT to land seismic data acquired in western Saudi Arabia. One of the seismic experiments investigated the water-table depth, and the other one attempted to detect the location of a buried fault. The seismic land data were inverted by WT and RT to generate the P-velocity tomograms, from which we can clearly identify the water table depth along the seismic survey line in the first example and the fault location in the second example.

  6. A Three-Dimensional Ray-Tracing Study of R-X Mode Waves during High Geomagnetic Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Fu-Liang; CHEN Lun-Jin; ZHENG Hui-Nan; WANG Shui; GUO Jun

    2008-01-01

    We further present a three-dimensional(3D)ray-tracing study on the propagation characteristic of the superluminous R-X mode waves during high geomagnetic activity following our recent two-dimensional results [J.Geophys.Res.112(2007)A10214].We perform numerical calculations for this mode which originates at specific altitude r=2.0RE in the souice cavity along a 70°night geomagnetic field line.We demonstrate that the ray path of the R-X mode is essentially governed by the azimuthal angle of the wave vector k.Ray paths starting with azimuthal angle 180°(or in the meridian plane)can reach the lowest latitude,but stay at relatively higher latitudes with the azimuthal anglas other than 180°(or off the meridian plane).The results further supports the previous finding that the R-X mode may be physically present in the radiation belts under appropriate conditions.

  7. Radiative Transfer Modeling of a Large Pool Fire by Discrete Ordinates, Discrete Transfer, Ray Tracing, Monte Carlo and Moment Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, K. A.; Ripoll, J.-F.; Wray, A. A.; Joseph, D.; ElHafi, M.

    2004-01-01

    Five computational methods for solution of the radiative transfer equation in an absorbing-emitting and non-scattering gray medium were compared on a 2 m JP-8 pool fire. The temperature and absorption coefficient fields were taken from a synthetic fire due to the lack of a complete set of experimental data for fires of this size. These quantities were generated by a code that has been shown to agree well with the limited quantity of relevant data in the literature. Reference solutions to the governing equation were determined using the Monte Carlo method and a ray tracing scheme with high angular resolution. Solutions using the discrete transfer method, the discrete ordinate method (DOM) with both S(sub 4) and LC(sub 11) quadratures, and moment model using the M(sub 1) closure were compared to the reference solutions in both isotropic and anisotropic regions of the computational domain. DOM LC(sub 11) is shown to be the more accurate than the commonly used S(sub 4) quadrature technique, especially in anisotropic regions of the fire domain. This represents the first study where the M(sub 1) method was applied to a combustion problem occurring in a complex three-dimensional geometry. The M(sub 1) results agree well with other solution techniques, which is encouraging for future applications to similar problems since it is computationally the least expensive solution technique. Moreover, M(sub 1) results are comparable to DOM S(sub 4).

  8. Ray Tracing Demonstrates the Importance of Focusing in the Practical Operation Near Cutoff of an Electrostatic Filter Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashen, M. T.; Koch, P. M.

    1997-04-01

    In our fast-beam apparatus we have long used( P. Koch and K. van Leeuwen, Phys. Rep. 255), 289 (1995). an electrostatic filter lens (FL) selectively to transmit energy labeled signal ions (e.g., H^+ or He^+) whose energy EB + EL is E_L=40--300 eV above the energy, typically E_B=14.6 keV, of the much more intense primary ion beam. Based on one originally used( H. Zeman, K. Jost, and S. Gilad, Rev. Sci. Inst. 42), 485 (1971). with hundred-eV-energy-range electrons, our 12.8 cm long FL has 21 identical, equally spaced, 0.1 cm thick mumetal disks (11.4 cm OD with 1.91 cm dia. axial hole) electrically biased via resistors so that its near-axis electrostatic field is approximately hyperbolic. We have long noted that the analysis presented in Ref. [3], which ignores focusing effects, fails to explain why our FL has a final cutoff up to five or more times sharper than `theory'. We present ray tracing results obtained with the computer program uc(Simion) to show that strong focusing and higher operating regions (initially parallel rays crossing the axis more than once) play a very important role in the operation of the FL near cutoff and in sharpening its cutoff. Agreement is good.

  9. Photorealistic 3D omni-directional stereo simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiners, Dirk; Cruz-Neira, Carolina; Neumann, Carsten

    2015-03-01

    While a lot of areas in VR have made significant advances, visual rendering in VR is often not quite keeping up with the state of the art. There are many reasons for this, but one way to alleviate some of the issues is by using ray tracing instead of rasterization for image generation. Contrary to popular belief, ray tracing is a realistic, competitive technology nowadays. This paper looks at the pros and cons of using ray tracing and demonstrates the feasibility of employing it using the example of a helicopter flight simulator image generator.

  10. Monte Carlo calculation of beam quality correction factors in proton beams using detailed simulation of ionization chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomà, Carles; Andreo, Pedro; Sempau, Josep

    2016-03-01

    This work calculates beam quality correction factors (k Q ) in monoenergetic proton beams using detailed Monte Carlo simulation of ionization chambers. It uses the Monte Carlo code penh and the electronic stopping powers resulting from the adoption of two different sets of mean excitation energy values for water and graphite: (i) the currently ICRU 37 and ICRU 49 recommended {{I}\\text{w}}=75~\\text{eV} and {{I}\\text{g}}=78~\\text{eV} and (ii) the recently proposed {{I}\\text{w}}=78~\\text{eV} and {{I}\\text{g}}=81.1~\\text{eV} . Twelve different ionization chambers were studied. The k Q factors calculated using the two different sets of I-values were found to agree with each other within 1.6% or better. k Q factors calculated using current ICRU I-values were found to agree within 2.3% or better with the k Q factors tabulated in IAEA TRS-398, and within 1% or better with experimental values published in the literature. k Q factors calculated using the new I-values were also found to agree within 1.1% or better with the experimental values. This work concludes that perturbation correction factors in proton beams—currently assumed to be equal to unity—are in fact significantly different from unity for some of the ionization chambers studied.

  11. Detailed microscopic calculation of stellar electron and positron capture rates on $^{24}$Mg for O+Ne+Mg core simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Nabi, Jameel-Un

    2014-01-01

    Few white dwarfs, located in binary systems, may acquire sufficiently high mass accretion rates resulting in the burning of carbon and oxygen under nondegenerate conditions forming a O+Ne+Mg core. These O+Ne+Mg cores are gravitationally less bound than more massive progenitor stars and can release more energy due to the nuclear burning. They are also amongst the probable candidates for low entropy r-process sites. Recent observations of subluminous Type II-P supernovae (e.g., 2005cs, 2003gd, 1999br, 1997D) were able to rekindle the interest in 8 -- 10 M$_{\\odot}$ which develop O+Ne+Mg cores. Microscopic calculations of capture rates on $^{24}$Mg, which may contribute significantly to the collapse of O+Ne+Mg cores, using shell model and proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory, were performed earlier and comparisons made. Simulators, however, may require these capture rates on a fine scale. For the first time a detailed microscopic calculation of the electron and positron captur...

  12. Fast ray-tracing algorithm for circumstellar structures (FRACS) I. Algorithm description and parameter-space study for mid-IR interferometry of B[e] stars

    CERN Document Server

    Niccolini, Gilles; De Souza, Armando Domiciano

    2010-01-01

    The physical interpretation of spectro-interferometric data is strongly model-dependent. On one hand, models involving elaborate radiative transfer solvers are too time consuming in general to perform an automatic fitting procedure and derive astrophysical quantities and their related errors. On the other hand, using simple geometrical models does not give sufficient insights into the physics of the object. We propose to stand in between these two extreme approaches by using a physical but still simple parameterised model for the object under consideration. Based on this philosophy, we developed a numerical tool optimised for mid-infrared (mid-IR) interferometry, the fast ray-tracing algorithm for circumstellar structures (FRACS) which can be used as a stand-alone model, or as an aid for a more advanced physical description or even for elaborating observation strategies. FRACS is based on the ray-tracing technique without scattering, but supplemented with the use of quadtree meshes and the full symmetries of ...

  13. Parallel Computing of a Variational Data Assimilation Model for GPS/MET Observation Using the Ray-Tracing Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张昕; 刘月巍; 王斌; 季仲贞

    2004-01-01

    The Spectral Statistical Interpolation (SSI) analysis system of NCEP is used to assimilate meteorological data from the Global Positioning Satellite System (GPS/MET) refraction angles with the variational technique. Verified by radiosonde, including GPS/MET observations into the analysis makes an overall improvement to the analysis variables of temperature, winds, and water vapor. However, the variational model with the ray-tracing method is quite expensive for numerical weather prediction and climate research. For example, about 4 000 GPS/MET refraction angles need to be assimilated to produce an ideal global analysis. Just one iteration of minimization will take more than 24 hours CPU time on the NCEP's Gray C90 computer. Although efforts have been taken to reduce the computational cost, it is still prohibitive for operational data assimilation. In this paper, a parallel version of the three-dimensional variational data assimilation model of GPS/MET occultation measurement suitable for massive parallel processors architectures is developed. The divide-and-conquer strategy is used to achieve parallelism and is implemented by message passing. The authors present the principles for the code's design and examine the performance on the state-of-the-art parallel computers in China. The results show that this parallel model scales favorably as the number of processors is increased. With the Memory-IO technique implemented by the author, the wall clock time per iteration used for assimilating 1420 refraction angles is reduced from 45 s to 12 s using 1420 processors. This suggests that the new parallelized code has the potential to be useful in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate studies.

  14. Application of the nudged elastic band method to the point-to-point radio wave ray tracing in IRI modeled ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosikov, I. A.; Klimenko, M. V.; Bessarab, P. F.; Zhbankov, G. A.

    2017-07-01

    Point-to-point ray tracing is an important problem in many fields of science. While direct variational methods where some trajectory is transformed to an optimal one are routinely used in calculations of pathways of seismic waves, chemical reactions, diffusion processes, etc., this approach is not widely known in ionospheric point-to-point ray tracing. We apply the Nudged Elastic Band (NEB) method to a radio wave propagation problem. In the NEB method, a chain of points which gives a discrete representation of the radio wave ray is adjusted iteratively to an optimal configuration satisfying the Fermat's principle, while the endpoints of the trajectory are kept fixed according to the boundary conditions. Transverse displacements define the radio ray trajectory, while springs between the points control their distribution along the ray. The method is applied to a study of point-to-point ionospheric ray tracing, where the propagation medium is obtained with the International Reference Ionosphere model taking into account traveling ionospheric disturbances. A 2-dimensional representation of the optical path functional is developed and used to gain insight into the fundamental difference between high and low rays. We conclude that high and low rays are minima and saddle points of the optical path functional, respectively.

  15. Ion velocity distribution functions in argon and helium discharges: detailed comparison of numerical simulation results and experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huihui; Sukhomlinov, Vladimir S.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Mustafaev, Alexander S.

    2017-02-01

    Using the Monte Carlo collision method, we have performed simulations of ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF) taking into account both elastic collisions and charge exchange collisions of ions with atoms in uniform electric fields for argon and helium background gases. The simulation results are verified by comparison with the experiment data of the ion mobilities and the ion transverse diffusion coefficients in argon and helium. The recently published experimental data for the first seven coefficients of the Legendre polynomial expansion of the ion energy and angular distribution functions are used to validate simulation results for IVDF. Good agreement between measured and simulated IVDFs shows that the developed simulation model can be used for accurate calculations of IVDFs.

  16. A Detailed One Dimensional Finite-Volume Simulation Model of a Tubular SOFC and a Pre-Reformer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Vanoli

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    In this paper, a detailed model of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC tube, equipped with a tube-and-shell pre-reformer unit, is presented. Both SOFC tube and pre-reformer are discretized along their axes. Detailed models of the kinetics of the shift and reforming reactions are introduced. Energy, mole and mass balances are performed for each slice of the components under investigation, allowing the calculation of temperature profiles. Friction factors and heat exchange coefficients are calculated by means of experimental correlations. Detailed models are also introduced in order to evaluate SOFC overvoltages. On the basis of this model, temperatures, pressures, chemical compositions and electrical parameters are evaluated for each slice of the two components under investigation. Finally, the influence of the most important design parameters on the performance of the system is investigated.

    • An initial version of this paper was published in July of
      2006 in the proceedings of ECOS’06, Aghia Pelagia,
      Crete, Greece. 

  17. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Advanced Search > Author Details ... Intra‑Operative Airway Management in Patients with Maxillofacial Trauma having Reduction and ... Clinical Parameters and Challenges of Managing Cervicofacial Necrotizing Fasciitis in a ...

  18. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Advanced Search > Author Details. Log in or ... Difficult airway management in a patient with giant malignant goitre scheduled for thyroidectomy - case report ... Airway Management Dilemma in a Patient with Maxillofacial Injury

  19. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Advanced Search > Author Details ... Sequencing for Batch Production in a Group Flowline Machine Shop ... Sampling Plans for Monitoring Quality Control Process at a Plastic Manufacturing Firm in Nigeria: A Case Study

  20. Micro-Fluidic Dye Ring Laser - Experimental Tuning of the Wavelength and Numerical Simulation of the Cavity Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Morten; Balslev, Søren; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate wavelength tuning of a micro-fluidic dye ring laser. Wavelength tunability is obtained by controlling the liquid dye concentration. The device performance is modelled by FEM simulations supporting a ray-tracing view.......We demonstrate wavelength tuning of a micro-fluidic dye ring laser. Wavelength tunability is obtained by controlling the liquid dye concentration. The device performance is modelled by FEM simulations supporting a ray-tracing view....

  1. Complete protein-protein association kinetics in atomic detail revealed by molecular dynamics simulations and Markov modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, Nuria; Doerr, Stefan; de Fabritiis, Gianni; Noé, Frank

    2017-10-01

    Protein-protein association is fundamental to many life processes. However, a microscopic model describing the structures and kinetics during association and dissociation is lacking on account of the long lifetimes of associated states, which have prevented efficient sampling by direct molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Here we demonstrate protein-protein association and dissociation in atomistic resolution for the ribonuclease barnase and its inhibitor barstar by combining adaptive high-throughput MD simulations and hidden Markov modelling. The model reveals experimentally consistent intermediate structures, energetics and kinetics on timescales from microseconds to hours. A variety of flexibly attached intermediates and misbound states funnel down to a transition state and a native basin consisting of the loosely bound near-native state and the tightly bound crystallographic state. These results offer a deeper level of insight into macromolecular recognition and our approach opens the door for understanding and manipulating a wide range of macromolecular association processes.

  2. Comparison of experiment with Monte Carlo simulations on a reflective gap using a detailed surface properties model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaworski, J.; Welty, J.R. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Palmer, B.J.; Drost, M.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The spatial distribution of light through a rectangular gap bounded by highly reflective, diffuse surfaces was measured and compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations. Incorporating radiant properties for real surfaces into a Monte Carlo code was seen to be a significant problem; a number of techniques for accomplishing this are discussed. Independent results are reported for measured values of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function over incident polar angles from 0 to 90 deg for a semidiffuse surface treatment (Krylon flat white spray paint). The inclusion of this information into a Monte Carlo simulation yielded various levels of agreement with experimental results. The poorest agreement occurred when the incident radiation was at a grazing angle with respect to the surface and the reflectance was nearly specular. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Bertrand `paradox' reloaded (with details on transformations of variables, an introduction to Monte Carlo simulation and an inferential variation of the problem)

    CERN Document Server

    D'Agostini, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    This note is mainly to point out, if needed, that uncertainty about models and their parameters has little to do with a `paradox'. The proposed `solution' is to formulate practical questions instead of seeking refuge into abstract principles. (And, in order to be concrete, some details on how to calculate the probability density functions of the chord lengths are provided, together with some comments on simulations and an appendix on the inferential aspects of the problem.)

  4. Quantitative evaluation of ultrasonic C-scan image in acoustically homogeneous and layered anisotropic materials using three dimensional ray tracing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkoori, Sanjeevareddy; Hoehne, Christian; Prager, Jens; Rethmeier, Michael; Kreutzbruck, Marc

    2014-02-01

    Quantitative evaluation of ultrasonic C-scan images in homogeneous and layered anisotropic austenitic materials is of general importance for understanding the influence of anisotropy on wave fields during ultrasonic non-destructive testing and evaluation of these materials. In this contribution, a three dimensional ray tracing method is presented for evaluating ultrasonic C-scan images quantitatively in general homogeneous and layered anisotropic austenitic materials. The directivity of the ultrasonic ray source in general homogeneous columnar grained anisotropic austenitic steel material (including layback orientation) is obtained in three dimensions based on Lamb's reciprocity theorem. As a prerequisite for ray tracing model, the problem of ultrasonic ray energy reflection and transmission coefficients at an interface between (a) isotropic base material and anisotropic austenitic weld material (including layback orientation), (b) two adjacent anisotropic weld metals and (c) anisotropic weld metal and isotropic base material is solved in three dimensions. The influence of columnar grain orientation and layback orientation on ultrasonic C-scan image is quantitatively analyzed in the context of ultrasonic testing of homogeneous and layered austenitic steel materials. The presented quantitative results provide valuable information during ultrasonic characterization of homogeneous and layered anisotropic austenitic steel materials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of a laboratory-scale container for freezing protein solutions with detailed evaluation of a freezing process simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessl, Ulrich; Jajcevic, Dalibor; Leitgeb, Stefan; Khinast, Johannes G; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2014-02-01

    A 300-mL stainless steel freeze container was constructed to enable QbD (Quality by Design)-compliant investigations and the optimization of freezing and thawing (F/T) processes of protein pharmaceuticals at moderate volumes. A characterization of the freezing performance was conducted with respect to freezing kinetics, temperature profiling, cryoconcentration, and stability of the frozen protein. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of temperature and phase transition were established to facilitate process scaling and process analytics as well as customization of future freeze containers. Protein cryoconcentration was determined from ice-core samples using bovine serum albumin. Activity, aggregation, and structural perturbation were studied in frozen rabbit muscle l-lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) solution. CFD simulations provided good qualitative and quantitative agreement with highly resolved experimental measurements of temperature and phase transition, allowing also the estimation of spatial cryoconcentration patterns. LDH exhibited stability against freezing in the laboratory-scale system, suggesting a protective effect of cryoconcentration at certain conditions. The combination of the laboratory-scale freeze container with accurate CFD modeling will allow deeper investigations of F/T processes at advanced scale and thus represents an important step towards a better process understanding. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  6. Detailed analysis of offshore wakes based on two years data of alpha ventus and comparison with CFD simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerhellweg, A.; Canadillas, B.; Kinder, F.; Neumann, T. [DEWI, Wilhelmshaven (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Wind conditions and power output were evaluated for wake effects in the offshore wind farm 'alpha ventus' and compared to CFD simulations. The evaluation of the wind conditions comprises wind speed reduction and turbulence increase in the wake. Power data were assessed for the power deficit in the wake of a single wind turbine and along a row of wind turbines and for the farm efficiency. The wake of a single wind turbine is described by the maximum power deficit and the expansion width of the wake. The wake effects were evaluated with special emphasis on the influence of thermal stability on the wake effects. The atmospheric stability was assessed from temperature difference of air and water and its impact on the power output was quantified. (orig.)

  7. Electromagnetic Computation and Visualization of Transmission Particle Model and Its Simulation Based on GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingnian Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic calculation plays an important role in both military and civic fields. Some methods and models proposed for calculation of electromagnetic wave propagation in a large range bring heavy burden in CPU computation and also require huge amount of memory. Using the GPU to accelerate computation and visualization can reduce the computational burden on the CPU. Based on forward ray-tracing method, a transmission particle model (TPM for calculating electromagnetic field is presented to combine the particle method. The movement of a particle obeys the principle of the propagation of electromagnetic wave, and then the particle distribution density in space reflects the electromagnetic distribution status. The algorithm with particle transmission, movement, reflection, and diffraction is described in detail. Since the particles in TPM are completely independent, it is very suitable for the parallel computing based on GPU. Deduction verification of TPM with the electric dipole antenna as the transmission source is conducted to prove that the particle movement itself represents the variation of electromagnetic field intensity caused by diffusion. Finally, the simulation comparisons are made against the forward and backward ray-tracing methods. The simulation results verified the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Simulating the detailed chemical composition of secondary organic aerosol formed on a regional scale during the TORCH 2003 campaign in the southern UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Johnson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Following on from the companion study (Johnson et al., 2006, a photochemical trajectory model (PTM has been used to simulate the chemical composition of organic aerosol for selected events during the 2003 TORCH (Tropospheric Organic Chemistry Experiment field campaign. The PTM incorporates the speciated emissions of 124 non-methane anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC and three representative biogenic VOC, a highly-detailed representation of the atmospheric degradation of these VOC, the emission of primary organic aerosol (POA material and the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA material. SOA formation was represented by the transfer of semi- and non-volatile oxidation products from the gas-phase to a condensed organic aerosol-phase, according to estimated thermodynamic equilibrium phase-partitioning characteristics for around 2000 reaction products. After significantly scaling all phase-partitioning coefficients, and assuming a persistent background organic aerosol (both required in order to match the observed organic aerosol loadings, the detailed chemical composition of the simulated SOA has been investigated in terms of intermediate oxygenated species in the Master Chemical Mechanism, version 3.1 (MCM v3.1. For the various case studies considered, 90% of the simulated SOA mass comprises between ca. 70 and 100 multifunctional oxygenated species derived, in varying amounts, from the photooxidation of VOC of anthropogenic and biogenic origin. The anthropogenic contribution is dominated by aromatic hydrocarbons and the biogenic contribution by α- and β-pinene (which also constitute surrogates for other emitted monoterpene species. Sensitivity in the simulated mass of SOA to changes in the emission rates of anthropogenic and biogenic VOC has also been investigated for 11 case study events, and the results have been compared to the detailed chemical composition data. The role of accretion chemistry in SOA formation, and its

  9. Characterization of a 6 kW high-flux solar simulator with an array of xenon arc lamps capable of concentrations of nearly 5000 suns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Robert; Bush, Evan; Loutzenhiser, Peter, E-mail: peter.loutzenhiser@me.gatech.edu [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); Haueter, Philipp [Haueter Engineering Gmbh, Rombach 5022 (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    A systematic methodology for characterizing a novel and newly fabricated high-flux solar simulator is presented. The high-flux solar simulator consists of seven xenon short-arc lamps mounted in truncated ellipsoidal reflectors. Characterization of spatial radiative heat flux distribution was performed using calorimetric measurements of heat flow coupled with CCD camera imaging of a Lambertian target mounted in the focal plane. The calorimetric measurements and images of the Lambertian target were obtained in two separate runs under identical conditions. Detailed modeling in the high-flux solar simulator was accomplished using Monte Carlo ray tracing to capture radiative heat transport. A least-squares regression model was used on the Monte Carlo radiative heat transfer analysis with the experimental data to account for manufacturing defects. The Monte Carlo ray tracing was calibrated by regressing modeled radiative heat flux as a function of specular error and electric power to radiation conversion onto measured radiative heat flux from experimental results. Specular error and electric power to radiation conversion efficiency were 5.92 ± 0.05 mrad and 0.537 ± 0.004, respectively. An average radiative heat flux with 95% errors bounds of 4880 ± 223 kW ⋅ m{sup −2} was measured over a 40 mm diameter with a cavity-type calorimeter with an apparent absorptivity of 0.994. The Monte Carlo ray-tracing resulted in an average radiative heat flux of 893.3 kW ⋅ m{sup −2} for a single lamp, comparable to the measured radiative heat fluxes with 95% error bounds of 892.5 ± 105.3 kW ⋅ m{sup −2} from calorimetry.

  10. Detailed simulation of the airbag inflation process using a coupled CFD/FE method Detaillierte Simulation eines Airbag Aufblasvorganges durch gekoppelte CFD/FE Methoden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbrink, A.C.; Fairlie, G.E.

    2000-01-01

    There is increasing pressure to reduce injuries and fatalities by effectively using airbags for side impact and out-of-position impact loading conditions. The simulation of these scenarios is particularly difficult as the occupant is interacting with the airbag at early times during the airbag deplo

  11. Detailed simulation of the airbag inflation process using a coupled CFD/FE method Detaillierte Simulation eines Airbag Aufblasvorganges durch gekoppelte CFD/FE Methoden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbrink, A.C.; Fairlie, G.E.

    2000-01-01

    There is increasing pressure to reduce injuries and fatalities by effectively using airbags for side impact and out-of-position impact loading conditions. The simulation of these scenarios is particularly difficult as the occupant is interacting with the airbag at early times during the airbag

  12. Numerical Simulation of Effects of Cloud Top Temperatures and Generating Cells on Secondary Ice Production in Stratiform Clouds with a Detailed Microphysical Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines a one-dimensional,heightdependent bin model with detailed microphysical processes in which ice splinters are produced by a riming process.The model is then applied to simulate the shift of particle size distribution effected by the secondary ice production process within clouds with different generating cells and cloud top temperatures.The result of model simulations reveals the general effects of cloud updrafts on increasing ice particle concentration by extending the residence time of ice particles in clouds and providing sufficiently large supercooled water droplets.The rimesplintering mechanism is more effective in clouds with lower ice seeding rates than those with higher rates.Evolutions of hydrometeor size distribution triggered by the rime-splintering mechanism indicate that the interaction between large ice particles and supercooled water drops adds a "second maximum" to the primary ice spectra.

  13. Evaluation of light extraction efficiency for the light-emitting diodes based on the transfer matrix formalism and ray-tracing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingbo, An; Li, Wang; Hongxi, Lu; Zhiguo, Yu; Lei, Liu; Xin, Xi; Lixia, Zhao; Junxi, Wang; Jinmin, Li

    2016-06-01

    The internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of the light-emitting diodes can be calculated by the ratio of the external quantum efficiency (EQE) and the light extraction efficiency (LEE). The EQE can be measured experimentally, but the LEE is difficult to calculate due to the complicated LED structures. In this work, a model was established to calculate the LEE by combining the transfer matrix formalism and an in-plane ray tracing method. With the calculated LEE, the IQE was determined and made a good agreement with that obtained by the ABC model and temperature-dependent photoluminescence method. The proposed method makes the determination of the IQE more practical and conventional. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos.11574306, 61334009), the China International Science and Technology Cooperation Program (No. 2014DFG62280), and the National High Technology Program of China (No. 2015AA03A101).

  14. The extended Beer-Lambert theory for ray tracing modeling of LED chip-scaled packaging application with multiple luminescence materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Cadmus C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Optical ray tracing modeling applied Beer-Lambert method in the single luminescence material system to model the white light pattern from blue LED light source. This paper extends such algorithm to a mixed multiple luminescence material system by introducing the equivalent excitation and emission spectrum of individual luminescence materials. The quantum efficiency numbers of individual material and self-absorption of the multiple luminescence material system are considered as well. By this combination, researchers are able to model the luminescence characteristics of LED chip-scaled packaging (CSP), which provides simple process steps and the freedom of the luminescence material geometrical dimension. The method will be first validated by the experimental results. Afterward, a further parametric investigation has been then conducted.

  15. Introducing CFD in the optical simulation of linear Fresnel collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, M. A.; Rungasamy, A.; Craig, K. J.; Meyer, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    This paper seeks to determine whether the Finite Volume method within a commercially available Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver (ANSYS Fluent) can model radiation with comparable accuracy to a Monte Carlo ray-tracing software package (SolTrace). A detailed investigation was performed into modeling techniques that can be used to significantly reduce the optical errors traditionally associated with CFD modeling of radiation false scattering and ray effect using a simple optical test case. The strategies formulated in the first part of this paper were used to model a variety of Linear Fresnel Collector Concentrating Solar Power Plants. This paper shows that commercial CFD packages yield accurate results for line focusing concentrating solar applications and simple geometries, validating its use in an integrated environment where both optical and thermal performance of these plants can be simulated and optimized.

  16. Modeling and Simulation of Radiative Compressible Flows in Aerodynamic Heating Arc-Jet Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensassi, Khalil; Laguna, Alejandro A.; Lani, Andrea; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations of an arc heated flow inside NASA's 20 [MW] Aerodynamics heating facility (AHF) are performed in order to investigate the three-dimensional swirling flow and the current distribution inside the wind tunnel. The plasma is considered in Local Thermodynamics Equilibrium(LTE) and is composed of Air-Argon gas mixture. The governing equations are the Navier-Stokes equations that include source terms corresponding to Joule heating and radiative cooling. The former is obtained by solving an electric potential equation, while the latter is calculated using an innovative massively parallel ray-tracing algorithm. The fully coupled system is closed by the thermodynamics relations and transport properties which are obtained from Chapman-Enskog method. A novel strategy was developed in order to enable the flow solver and the radiation calculation to be preformed independently and simultaneously using a different number of processors. Drastic reduction in the computational cost was achieved using this strategy. Details on the numerical methods used for space discretization, time integration and ray-tracing algorithm will be presented. The effect of the radiative cooling on the dynamics of the flow will be investigated. The complete set of equations were implemented within the COOLFluiD Framework. Fig. 1 shows the geometry of the Anode and part of the constrictor of the Aerodynamics heating facility (AHF). Fig. 2 shows the velocity field distribution along (x-y) plane and the streamline in (z-y) plane.

  17. Indoor Operations by FMCW Millimeter Wave SAR Onboard Small UAS: A Simulation Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fulvio Scannapieco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A dedicated system simulator is presented in this paper for indoor operations onboard small Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS by a novel millimeter wave radar sensor. The sensor relies on the principle of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR applied to a Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW radar system. Input to the simulator are both design parameters for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR, which should be able to cope with the stringent requirements set by indoor operations, and information about platform navigation and observed scene. The scene generation task is described in detail. This is based on models for point target response on either a completely absorbing background or fluctuating background and ray tracing (RT techniques. Results obtained from scene processing are finally discussed, giving further insights on expected results from high-resolution observation of an assigned control volume by this novel SAR sensor.

  18. Comparison of ocular modulation transfer function determined by a ray-tracing aberrometer and a double-pass system in early cataract patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiao Liya; Wan Xiuhua; Cai Xiaogu; Balamurali Vasudevan; Xiong Ying; Tan Jiaxuan; Guan Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Background The evaluation of retinal image quality in cataract eyes has gained importance and the clinical modulation transfer functions (MTF) can obtained by aberrometer and double pass (DP) system.This study aimed to compare MTF derived from a ray tracing aberrometer and a DP system in eady cataractous and normal eyes.Methods There were 128 subjects with 61 control eyes and 67 eyes with early cataract defined according to the Lens Opacities Classification System Ⅲ.A laser ray-tracing wavefront aberrometer (iTrace) and a double pass (DP) system (OQAS) assessed ocular MTF for 6.0 mm pupil diameters following dilation.Areas under the MTF (AUMTF) and their correlations were analyzed.Stepwise multiple regression analysis assessed factors affecting the differences between iTrace-and OQAS-derived AUMTF for the early cataract group.Results For both early cataract and control groups,iTrace-derived MTFs were higher than OQAS-derived MTFs across a range of spatial frequencies (P <0.01).No significant difference between the two groups occurred for iTrace-derived AUMTF,but the early cataract group had significantly smaller OQAS-derived AUMTF than did the control group (P <0.01).AUMTF determined from both the techniques demonstrated significant correlations with nuclear opacities,higher-order aberrations (HOAs),visual acuity,and contrast sensitivity functions,while the OQAS-derived AUMTF also demonstrated significant correlations with age and cortical opacity grade.The factors significantly affecting the difference between iTrace and OQAS AUMTF were root-mean-squared HOAs (standardized beta coefficient=-0.63,P <0.01) and age (standardized beta coefficient=0.26,P <0.01).Conclusions MTFs determined from a iTrace and a DP system (OQAS) differ significantly in early cataractous and normal subjects.Correlations with visual performance were higher for the DP system.OQAS-derived MTF may be useful as an indicator of visual performance in early cataract eyes.

  19. How molecular should your molecular model be? On the level of molecular detail required to simulate biological networks in systems and synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonze, Didier; Abou-Jaoudé, Wassim; Ouattara, Djomangan Adama; Halloy, José

    2011-01-01

    The recent advance of genetic studies and the rapid accumulation of molecular data, together with the increasing performance of computers, led researchers to design more and more detailed mathematical models of biological systems. Many modeling approaches rely on ordinary differential equations (ODE) which are based on standard enzyme kinetics. Michaelis-Menten and Hill functions are indeed commonly used in dynamical models in systems and synthetic biology because they provide the necessary nonlinearity to make the dynamics nontrivial (i.e., limit-cycle oscillations or multistability). For most of the systems modeled, the actual molecular mechanism is unknown, and the enzyme equations should be regarded as phenomenological. In this chapter, we discuss the validity and accuracy of these approximations. In particular, we focus on the validity of the Michaelis-Menten function for open systems and on the use of Hill kinetics to describe transcription rates of regulated genes. Our discussion is illustrated by numerical simulations of prototype systems, including the Repressilator (a genetic oscillator) and the Toggle Switch model (a bistable system). We systematically compare the results obtained with the compact version (based on Michaelis-Menten and Hill functions) with its corresponding developed versions (based on "elementary" reaction steps and mass action laws). We also discuss the use of compact approaches to perform stochastic simulations (Gillespie algorithm). On the basis of these results, we argue that using compact models is suitable to model qualitatively biological systems.

  20. General relativistic ray-tracing algorithm for the determination of the electron-positron energy deposition rate from neutrino pair annihilation around rotating neutron and quark stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Z.; Harko, T.

    2011-11-01

    We present a full general relativistic numerical code for estimating the energy-momentum deposition rate (EMDR) from neutrino pair annihilation (?). The source of the neutrinos is assumed to be a neutrino-cooled accretion disc around neutron and quark stars. We calculate the neutrino trajectories by using a ray-tracing algorithm with the general relativistic Hamilton's equations for neutrinos and derive the spatial distribution of the EMDR due to the annihilations of neutrinos and antineutrinos around rotating neutron and quark stars. We obtain the EMDR for several classes of rotating neutron stars, described by different equations of state of the neutron matter, and for quark stars, described by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) bag model equation of state and in the colour-flavour-locked (CFL) phase. The distribution of the total annihilation rate of the neutrino-antineutrino pairs around rotating neutron and quark stars is studied for isothermal discs and accretion discs in thermodynamical equilibrium. We demonstrate both the differences in the equations of state for neutron and quark matter and rotation with the general relativistic effects significantly modify the EMDR of the electrons and positrons generated by the neutrino-antineutrino pair annihilation around compact stellar objects, as measured at infinity.

  1. Model and Visualization of Ray Tracing using JavaScript and HTML5 for TIR Measurement System Equipped with Equilateral Right Angle Prism

    CERN Document Server

    Viridi, Sparisoma

    2013-01-01

    Trace of ray deviated by a prism, which is common in a TIR (total internal reflection) measurement system, is sometimes difficult to manage, especially if the prism is an equilateral right angle prism (ERAP). The point where the ray is reflected inside the right-angle prism is also changed as the angle of incident ray changed. In an ATR (attenuated total reflectance) measurement system, range of this point determines size of sample. Using JavaScript and HTML5 model and visualization of ray tracing deviated by an ERAP is perform and reported in this work. Some data are obtained from this visualization and an empirical relations between angle of incident ray source \\theta_S, angle of ray detector hand \\theta_D, and angle of ray detector \\theta'_D are presented for radial position of ray source R_S, radial position of ray detector R_D, height of right-angle prism t, and refractive index of the prism n. Keywords: deviation angle, equilateral right angle prism, total internal reflection, JavaScript, HTML5.

  2. The influence of leaf anatomy on the internal light environment and photosynthetic electron transport rate: exploration with a new leaf ray tracing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yi; Tholen, Danny; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2016-11-01

    Leaf photosynthesis is determined by biochemical properties and anatomical features. Here we developed a three-dimensional leaf model that can be used to evaluate the internal light environment of a leaf and its implications for whole-leaf electron transport rates (J). This model includes (i) the basic components of a leaf, such as the epidermis, palisade and spongy tissues, as well as the physical dimensions and arrangements of cell walls, vacuoles and chloroplasts; and (ii) an efficient forward ray-tracing algorithm, predicting the internal light environment for light of wavelengths between 400 and 2500nm. We studied the influence of leaf anatomy and ambient light on internal light conditions and J The results show that (i) different chloroplasts can experience drastically different light conditions, even when they are located at the same distance from the leaf surface; (ii) bundle sheath extensions, which are strips of parenchyma, collenchyma or sclerenchyma cells connecting the vascular bundles with the epidermis, can influence photosynthetic light-use efficiency of leaves; and (iii) chloroplast positioning can also influence the light-use efficiency of leaves. Mechanisms underlying leaf internal light heterogeneity and implications of the heterogeneity for photoprotection and for the convexity of the light response curves are discussed.

  3. Detailed atomistic simulation of the nano-sorption and nano-diffusivity of water, tyrosol, vanillic acid, and p-coumaric acid in single wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassiou, Alexandros; Karahaliou, Elena K; Alexiadis, Orestis; Mavrantzas, Vlasis G

    2013-10-28

    We report results from a detailed computer simulation study for the nano-sorption and mobility of four different small molecules (water, tyrosol, vanillic acid, and p-coumaric acid) inside smooth single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Most of the results have been obtained with the molecular dynamics (MD) method, but especially for the most narrow of the CNTs considered, the results for one of the molecules addressed here (water) were further confirmed through an additional Grand Canonical (μVT) Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulation using a value for the water chemical potential μ pre-computed with the particle deletion method. Issues addressed include molecular packing and ordering inside the nanotube for the four molecules, average number of sorbed molecules per unit length of the tube, and mean residence time and effective axial diffusivities, all as a function of tube diameter and tube length. In all cases, a strong dependence of the results on tube diameter was observed, especially in the way the different molecules are packed and organized inside the CNT. For water for which predictions of properties such as local structure and packing were computed with both methods (MD and GCMC), the two sets of results were found to be fully self-consistent for all types of SWCNTs considered. Water diffusivity inside the CNT (although, strongly dependent on the CNT diameter) was computed with two different methods, both of which gave identical results. For large enough CNT diameters (larger than about 13 Å), this was found to be higher than the corresponding experimental value in the bulk by about 55%. Surprisingly enough, for the rest of the molecules simulated (phenolic), the simulations revealed no signs of mobility inside nanotubes with a diameter smaller than the (20, 20) tube. This is attributed to strong phenyl-phenyl attractive interactions, also to favorable interactions of these molecules with the CNT walls, which cause them to form highly ordered, very stable

  4. Detailed atomistic simulation of the nano-sorption and nano-diffusivity of water, tyrosol, vanillic acid, and p-coumaric acid in single wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassiou, Alexandros; Karahaliou, Elena K.; Alexiadis, Orestis; Mavrantzas, Vlasis G.

    2013-10-01

    We report results from a detailed computer simulation study for the nano-sorption and mobility of four different small molecules (water, tyrosol, vanillic acid, and p-coumaric acid) inside smooth single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Most of the results have been obtained with the molecular dynamics (MD) method, but especially for the most narrow of the CNTs considered, the results for one of the molecules addressed here (water) were further confirmed through an additional Grand Canonical (μVT) Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulation using a value for the water chemical potential μ pre-computed with the particle deletion method. Issues addressed include molecular packing and ordering inside the nanotube for the four molecules, average number of sorbed molecules per unit length of the tube, and mean residence time and effective axial diffusivities, all as a function of tube diameter and tube length. In all cases, a strong dependence of the results on tube diameter was observed, especially in the way the different molecules are packed and organized inside the CNT. For water for which predictions of properties such as local structure and packing were computed with both methods (MD and GCMC), the two sets of results were found to be fully self-consistent for all types of SWCNTs considered. Water diffusivity inside the CNT (although, strongly dependent on the CNT diameter) was computed with two different methods, both of which gave identical results. For large enough CNT diameters (larger than about 13 Å), this was found to be higher than the corresponding experimental value in the bulk by about 55%. Surprisingly enough, for the rest of the molecules simulated (phenolic), the simulations revealed no signs of mobility inside nanotubes with a diameter smaller than the (20, 20) tube. This is attributed to strong phenyl-phenyl attractive interactions, also to favorable interactions of these molecules with the CNT walls, which cause them to form highly ordered, very stable

  5. Detailed cloud resolving model simulations of the impacts of Saharan air layer dust on tropical deep convection – Part 1: Dust acts as ice nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Gong

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Observational studies suggest that the Saharan Air Layer (SAL, an elevated layer (850–500 hPa of Saharan air and mineral dust, has strong impacts on the microphysical as well as dynamical properties of tropical deep convective cloud systems along its track. In this case study, numerical simulations using a two-dimensional Detailed Cloud Resolving Model (DCRM were carried out to investigate the dust-cloud interactions in the tropical deep convection, focusing on the dust role as Ice Nuclei (IN.

    The simulations showed that mineral dust considerably enhanced heterogeneous nucleation and freezing at temperatures warmer than −40 °C, resulting in more ice hydrometeors number concentration and reduced precipitating size of ice particles. Because of the lower in the saturation over ice as well as more droplet freezing, total latent heating increased, and consequently the updraft velocity was stronger.

    On the other hand, the increased ice deposition consumed more water vapor at middle troposphere, which induces a competition for water vapor between heterogeneous and homogeneous freezing and nucleation. As a result, dust suppressed the homogeneous droplet freezing and nucleation due to the heterogeneous droplet freezing and the weakened transport of water vapor at lower stratosphere, respectively. These effects led to decreased number concentration of ice cloud particles in the upper troposphere, and consequently lowered the cloud top height during the stratus precipitating stage.

    Acting as IN, mineral dust also influenced precipitation in deep convection. It initiated earlier the collection because dust-related heterogeneous nucleation and freezing at middle troposphere occur earlier than homogeneous nucleation at higher altitudes. Nevertheless, the convective precipitation was suppressed by reduced collection of large graupel particles and insufficient fallout related to decreased sizes of precipitating ice hydrometeors

  6. Terahertz/mm wave imaging simulation software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterman, M. R.; Dougherty, J.; Kiser, W. L., Jr.

    2006-10-01

    We have developed a mm wave/terahertz imaging simulation package from COTS graphic software and custom MATLAB code. In this scheme, a commercial ray-tracing package was used to simulate the emission and reflections of radiation from scenes incorporating highly realistic imagery. Accurate material properties were assigned to objects in the scenes, with values obtained from the literature, and from our own terahertz spectroscopy measurements. The images were then post-processed with custom Matlab code to include the blur introduced by the imaging system and noise levels arising from system electronics and detector noise. The Matlab code was also used to simulate the effect of fog, an important aspect for mm wave imaging systems. Several types of image scenes were evaluated, including bar targets, contrast detail targets, a person in a portal screening situation, and a sailboat on the open ocean. The images produced by this simulation are currently being used as guidance for a 94 GHz passive mm wave imaging system, but have broad applicability for frequencies extending into the terahertz region.

  7. Comparison of radiometric scaling laws and detailed wave-optics simulations for designing ground-based laser satellite-illumination and receiver systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Keith A.

    2002-12-01

    Ground-based optical transmitter and receiver systems designed for active imaging, active tracking and laser ranging of satellites in Earth orbit are very sensitive to physical conditions limiting the radiometric returns for achieving these measurements. The initial design of these systems is often based on simple radiometric scaling laws that provide estimates of average radiometric returns and are derived from experimental data or from more complex theoretical calculations. While these laws are quite useful, it is often easy to lose sight of the initial assumptions made in their formulation, and hence, the limits of their accuracy for designing certain systems. The objective of this paper is to review some of the commonly used radiometric scaling laws for active systems and to establish guidelines for their use based on comparisons of their predictions with results from detailed wave-optics simulations for different system design requirements and physical conditions. The combined effects of laser and transmitter beam parameters, wave-front aberrations, atmospheric turbulence, and satellite optical cross-section are considered.

  8. The spectral details of observed and simulated short-term water vapor feedbacks of El Niño-Southern Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, F.; Huang, X.; Chen, X.

    2015-12-01

    Radiative kernel method has been validated and widely used in the study of climate feedbacks. This study uses spectrally resolved longwave radiative kernels to examine the short-term water vapor feedbacks associated with the ENSO cycles. Using a 500-year GFDL CM3 and a 100-year NCAR CCSM4 pre-industry control simulation, we have constructed two sets of longwave spectral radiative kernels. We then composite El Niño, La Niña and ENSO-neutral states and estimate the water vapor feedbacks associated with the El Niño and La Niña phases of ENSO cycles in both simulations. Similar analysis is also applied to 35-year (1979-2014) ECMWF ERA-interim reanalysis data, which is deemed as observational results here. When modeled and observed broadband feedbacks are compared to each other, they show similar geographic patterns but with noticeable discrepancies in the contrast between the tropics and extra-tropics. Especially, in El Niño phase, the feedback estimated from reanalysis is much greater than those from the model simulations. Considering the observational data span, we carry out a sensitivity test to explore the variability of feedback-deriving using 35-year data. To do so, we calculate the water vapor feedback within every 35-year segment of the GFDL CM3 control run by two methods: one is to composite El Nino or La Nina phases as mentioned above and the other is to regressing the TOA flux perturbation caused by water vapor change (δR_H­2O) against the global-mean surface temperature a­­­­nomaly. We find that the short-term feedback strengths derived from composite method can change considerably from one segment to another segment, while the feedbacks by regression method are less sensitive to the choice of segment and their strengths are also much smaller than those from composite analysis. This study suggests that caution is warranted in order to infer long-term feedbacks from a few decades of observations. When spectral details of the global-mean feedbacks

  9. Simulation of Light Propagation within Glass Fiber Filled Thermoplastics for Laser Transmission Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohmann, Martin; Devrient, Martin; Klämpfl, Florian; Roth, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael

    Laser transmission welding is a well-known joining technology for thermoplastics. Because of the needs of lightweight, cost effective and green production nowadays injection molded parts usually have to be welded. These parts are made out of semi-crystalline thermoplastics which are filled to a high amount with glass fibers. This leads to higher absorption and more scattering within the upper joining partner and hasa negative influence onto the welding process. Here a ray tracing model capable of considering every single glass fiber is introduced. Hence spatially not equally distributed glass fibers can be taken into account. Therefore the model is able to calculate in detail the welding laser intensity distribution after transmission through the upper joining partner. Data gained by numerical simulation is compared to data obtained by laser radiation scattering experiments. Thus observed deviation is quantified and discussed.

  10. Simulation of the trans-oceanic tsunami propagation due to the 1883 Krakatau volcanic eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Choi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The 1883 Krakatau volcanic eruption has generated a destructive tsunami higher than 40 m on the Indonesian coast where more than 36 000 lives were lost. Sea level oscillations related with this event have been reported on significant distances from the source in the Indian, Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Evidence of many manifestations of the Krakatau tsunami was a subject of the intense discussion, and it was suggested that some of them are not related with the direct propagation of the tsunami waves from the Krakatau volcanic eruption. Present paper analyzes the hydrodynamic part of the Krakatau event in details. The worldwide propagation of the tsunami waves generated by the Krakatau volcanic eruption is studied numerically using two conventional models: ray tracing method and two-dimensional linear shallow-water model. The results of the numerical simulations are compared with available data of the tsunami registration.

  11. Simulation of the HPMT/VPT Light Collection Ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Britton, David; McLeod, Elaine Mary

    2003-01-01

    The ray tracing Monte Carlo, RAGE, is used to determine the amount of light expected to be collected by 20mm VPTs as used in the 1999 test-beam configuration, compared to the amount collected by HPMTs used in Lab-27 to view unwrapped crystals. This ratio will be used elsewhere to determine the performance of the VPTs and electronics chain during the test beam run. The ray-tracing simulations demonstrate the importance of the beveled crystal edges and show that the illumination of the rear-face of the crystal is uniform. However, it is shown that the amount of light collected does not scale simply with the detector size.

  12. The applicability of physical optics in the millimetre and sub-millimetre spectral region. Part I: The ray tracing with diffraction on facets method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, A. J.; Hesse, Evelyn; Sourdeval, Odran

    2017-03-01

    Future satellite missions, from 2022 onwards, will obtain near-global measurements of cirrus at microwave and sub-millimetre frequencies. To realise the potential of these observations, fast and accurate light-scattering methods are required to calculate scattered millimetre and sub-millimetre intensities from complex ice crystals. Here, the applicability of the ray tracing with diffraction on facets method (RTDF) in predicting the bulk scalar optical properties and phase functions of randomly oriented hexagonal ice columns and hexagonal ice aggregates at millimetre frequencies is investigated. The applicability of RTDF is shown to be acceptable down to size parameters of about 18, between the frequencies of 243 and 874 GHz. It is demonstrated that RTDF is generally well within about 10% of T-matrix solutions obtained for the scalar optical properties assuming hexagonal ice columns. Moreover, on replacing electromagnetic scalar optical property solutions obtained for the hexagonal ice aggregate with the RTDF counterparts at size parameter values of about 18 or greater, the bulk scalar optical properties can be calculated to generally well within ±5% of an electromagnetic-based database. The RTDF-derived bulk scalar optical properties result in brightness temperature errors to generally within about ±4 K at 874 GHz. Differing microphysics assumptions can easily exceed such errors. Similar findings are found for the bulk scattering phase functions. This finding is owing to the scattering solutions being dominated by the processes of diffraction and reflection, both being well described by RTDF. The impact of centimetre-sized complex ice crystals on interpreting cirrus polarisation measurements at sub-millimetre frequencies is discussed.

  13. Exploration of parameters influencing the self-absorption losses in luminescent solar concentrators with an experimentally validated combined ray-tracing/Monte-Carlo model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumer, Zachar; van Sark, Wilfried G. J. H. M.; de Mello Donegá, Celso; Schropp, Ruud E. I.

    2013-09-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are low cost photovoltaic devices, which reduce the amount of necessary semiconductor material per unit area of a photovoltaic solar energy converter by means of concentration. The device is comprised of a thin plastic plate in which luminescent species (fluorophores) have been incorporated.The fluorophores absorb the solar light and radiatively re-emit a part of the energy. Total internal reflection traps most of the emitted light inside the plate and wave-guides it to a narrow side facet with a solar cell attached, where conversion into electricity occurs. The eciency of such devices is as yet rather low, due to several loss mechanisms, of which self-absorption is of high importance. Combined ray-tracing and Monte-Carlosimulations is a widely used tool for efficiency estimations of LSC-devices prior to manufacturing. We have applied this method to a model experiment, in which we analysed the impact of self-absorption onto LSC-efficiency of fluorophores with different absorption/emission-spectral overlap (Stokes-shift): several organic dyes and semiconductor quantum dots (single compound and core/shell of type-II). These results are compared with the ones obtained experimentally demonstrating a good agreement. The validated model is used to investigate systematically the influence of spectral separation and luminescence quantum efficiency on the intensity loss inconsequence of increased self-absorption. The results are used to adopt a quantity called the self-absorption cross-section and establish it as reliable criterion for self-absorption properties of materials that can be obtained from fundamental data and has a more universal scope of application, than the currently used Stokes-shift.

  14. Fast Ray Tracing NURBS Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦开怀; 龚明伦; 等

    1996-01-01

    In this paper,a new algorithm wit extrapolation process for computing the ray/surface intersection is presented.Also,a ray is defined to be the intersection of two planes,which are non-orthogonal in general,in such a way that the number of multiplication operations is reduced.In the preprocessing step,NURBS surfaces are subdivded adaptively into rational Bezier patches.Parallelepipeds are used to enclose the respective patches as tightly as possible Therefore,for each ray that hits the enclosure(i.e.,parallelepiped)of a patch the intersection points with the parallelepiped's faces can be used to yield a good starting point for the following iteration.The improved Newton iteration with extrapolation process saves CPU time by reducing the number of iteration steps.The intersection scheme is facter than previous methods for which published performance data allow reliable comparison.The method may also be used to speed up tracing the intersection of two parametric surfaces and oter operations that need Newton iteration.

  15. Simulation and performance Analysis of a Novel Model for Short Range Underwater Acoustic communication Channel Using Ray Tracing Method in Turbulent Shallow Water Regions of the Persian Gulf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Dargahi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available High data rate acoustic transmission is required for diverse underwater operations such as the retrieval of large amounts of data from bottom packages and real time transmission of signals from underwater sensors. The major obstacle to underwater acoustic communication is the interference of multipath signals due to surface and bottom reflections. High speed acoustic transmission over a shallow water channel characterized by small grazing angles presents formidable difficulties. The reflection losses associated with such small angles are low, causing large amplitudes in multi-path signals. In this paper, based on the results obtained from practical measurements in the Persian Gulf and available data about sound speed variations in different depths, we propose a simple but effective model for shallow water short-range multipath acoustic channel. Based on the Ray theory, mathematical modeling of multipath effects is carried out. Also in channel modeling, the attenuation due to the wave scatterings at the surface and its bottom reflections for deferent grazing angles and bottom types is considered. In addition, we consider the attenuations due to the absorption of different materials and ambient noises such as see-state noise, shipping noise, thermal noise and turbulences. We use a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model (COHERENS in a fully prognostic mode to study the circulation and water mass properties of the Persian Gulf - a large inverse estuary. Maximum sound speed occurs during the summer in the Persian Gulf which decreases gradually moving from the Strait of Hormuz to the north western part of the Gulf. A gradual decrease in sound speed profiles with depth was commonly observed in almost all parts of the Gulf. However, an exception occurred in the Strait of Hormuz during the winter. The results of the model are in very good agreement with our observations.

  16. Relationship of college student characteristics and inquiry-based geometrical optics instruction to knowledge of image formation with light-ray tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Hakan

    This study is premised on the fact that student conceptions of optics appear to be unrelated to student characteristics of gender, age, years since high school graduation, or previous academic experiences. This study investigated the relationships between student characteristics and student performance on image formation test items and the changes in student conceptions of optics after an introductory inquiry-based physics course. Data was collected from 39 college students who were involved in an inquiry-based physics course teaching topics of geometrical optics. Student data concerning characteristics and previous experiences with optics and mathematics were collected. Assessment of student understanding of optics knowledge for pinholes, plane mirrors, refraction, and convex lenses was collected with, the Test of Image Formation with Light-Ray Tracing instrument. Total scale and subscale scores representing the optics instrument content were derived from student pretest and posttest responses. The types of knowledge, needed to answer each optics item correctly, were categorized as situational, conceptual, procedural, and strategic knowledge. These types of knowledge were associated with student correct and incorrect responses to each item to explain the existences and changes in student scientific and naive conceptions. Correlation and stepwise multiple regression analyses were conducted to identify the student characteristics and academic experiences that significantly predicted scores on the subscales of the test. The results showed that student experience with calculus was a significant predictor of student performance on the total scale as well as on the refraction subscale of the Test of Image Formation with Light-Ray Tracing. A combination of student age and previous academic experience with precalculus was a significant predictor of student performance on the pretest pinhole subscale. Student characteristic of years since high school graduation

  17. A Detailed Physiologically Based Model to Simulate the Pharmacokinetics and Hormonal Pharmacodynamics of Enalapril on the Circulating Endocrine Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, Karina; Willmann, Stefan; Eissing, Thomas; Preusser, Tobias; Block, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disorders including hypertension and is one of the most important targets for drugs. A whole body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (wb PBPK) model integrating this hormone circulation system and its inhibition can be used to explore the influence of drugs that interfere with this system, and thus to improve the understanding of interactions between drugs and the target system. In this study, we describe the development of a mechanistic RAAS model and exemplify drug action by a simulation of enalapril administration. Enalapril and its metabolite enalaprilat are potent inhibitors of the angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE). To this end, a coupled dynamic parent-metabolite PBPK model was developed and linked with the RAAS model that consists of seven coupled PBPK models for aldosterone, ACE, angiotensin 1, angiotensin 2, angiotensin 2 receptor type 1, renin, and prorenin. The results indicate that the model represents the interactions in the RAAS in response to the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of enalapril and enalaprilat in an accurate manner. The full set of RAAS-hormone profiles and interactions are consistently described at pre- and post-administration steady state as well as during their dynamic transition and show a good agreement with literature data. The model allows a simultaneous representation of the parent-metabolite conversion to the active form as well as the effect of the drug on the hormone levels, offering a detailed mechanistic insight into the hormone cascade and its inhibition. This model constitutes a first major step to establish a PBPK-PD-model including the PK and the mode of action (MoA) of a drug acting on a dynamic RAAS that can be further used to link to clinical endpoints such as blood pressure. PMID:23404365

  18. Main: Clone Detail [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Clone Detail Mapping Pseudomolecule data detail Detail information Mapping to the TIGR japonica Pseudomolecu...les kome_mapping_pseudomolecule_data_detail.zip kome_mapping_pseudomolecule_data_detail ...

  19. Synthetically Focused Imaging Techniques in Simulated Austenitic Steel Welds Using AN Ultrasonic Phased Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, G. D.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Rokhlin, S. I.; Temple, J. A. G.

    2010-02-01

    In austenitic steel welds employed in safety-critical applications, detection of defects that may propagate during service or may have occurred during welding is particularly important. In this study, synthetically focused imaging techniques are applied to the echoes received by phased arrays in order to reconstruct images of the interior of a simulated austenitic steel weld, with application to sizing and location of simplified defects. Using a ray-tracing approach through a previously developed weld model, we briefly describe and then apply three focusing techniques. Results generated via both ray-tracing theory and finite element simulations will be shown.

  20. Interfacing MCNPX and McStas for simulation of neutron transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkby, Esben Bryndt; Lauritzen, Bent; Nonbøl, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Simulations of target-moderator-reflector system at spallation sources are conventionally carried out using Monte Carlo codes such as MCNPX[1] or FLUKA[2, 3] whereas simulations of neutron transport from the moderator and the instrument response are performed by neutron ray tracing codes such as Mc...

  1. SU-E-T-587: Monte Carlo Versus Ray-Tracing for Treatment Planning Involving CNS Tumors On the MultiPlan System for CyberKnife Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbang, R Teboh [John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: MultiPlan, the treatment planning system for the CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery system offers two approaches to dose computation, namely Ray-Tracing (RT), the default technique and Monte Carlo (MC), an option. RT is deterministic, however it accounts for primary heterogeneity only. MC on the other hand has an uncertainty associated with the calculation results. The advantage is that in addition, it accounts for heterogeneity effects on the scattered dose. Not all sites will benefit from MC. The goal of this work was to focus on central nervous system (CNS) tumors and compare dosimetrically, treatment plans computed with RT versus MC. Methods: Treatment plans were computed using both RT and MC for sites covering (a) the brain (b) C-spine (c) upper T-spine (d) lower T-spine (e) L-spine and (f) sacrum. RT was first used to compute clinically valid treatment plans. Then the same treatment parameters, monitor units, beam weights, etc., were used in the MC algorithm to compute the dose distribution. The plans were then compared for tumor coverage to illustrate the difference if any. All MC calculations were performed at a 1% uncertainty. Results: Using the RT technique, the tumor coverage for the brain, C-spine (C3–C7), upper T-spine (T4–T6), lower T-spine (T10), Lspine (L2) and sacrum were 96.8%, 93.1%, 97.2%, 87.3%, 91.1%, and 95.3%. The corresponding tumor coverage based on the MC approach was 98.2%, 95.3%, 87.55%, 88.2%, 92.5%, and 95.3%. It should be noted that the acceptable planning target coverage for our clinical practice is >95%. The coverage can be compromised for spine tumors to spare normal tissues such as the spinal cord. Conclusion: For treatment planning involving the CNS, RT and MC appear to be similar for most sites but for the T-spine area where most of the beams traverse lung tissue. In this case, MC is highly recommended.

  2. On the numerical simulation of the laser absorption by Eulerian methods; Sur la simulation numerique de l'absorption laser par des methodes Euleriennes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sentis, R. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Dept. de Conception et Simulation des Armes, 91 (France); Golse, F. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Modelisation des Systemes et Structures, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Lafitte, O. [Paris-7 Univ., 75 (France)]|[Ecole Normale Superieure, 75 - Paris (France)

    2001-07-01

    For the simulation of the laser absorption in a plasma hydrodynamic code, one uses generally a ray tracing method. We show here where are the main difficulties related to a numerical solution of the eikonal equation by an alternative method called Eulerian. We indicate also what way are considered to clear up these difficulties. One of the main assets of the Eulerian method is to give a more regular estimation of the energy absorbed in each elementary volume than the ray-tracing method.

  3. Simulation of rear end impact with a full body human model with a detailed neck: role of passive muscle properties and initial seating posture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Happee, R.; Wismans, J.S.H.M.; Horst, M.J. van der; Bovendeerd, P.H.M.; Kingma, H.

    2001-01-01

    To study the mechanics of the neck during rear end impact, in this paper an existing global human body model and an existing detailed submodel of the neck were combined into a new model. The combined model is validated with responses of volunteers and post mortem human subjects (PMHSs) subjected to

  4. Application of a Detailed Emission Model for Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Simulations Application d'un modèle détaillé d'émissions pour la simulation de gros moteurs diesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson I.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A detailed chemical model describing the formation of soot and NO is applied to simulate emission formation in a heavy duty diesel engine. Cylinder flow and spray development is simulated using an engine CFD code - Speedstar. Combustion is described using a simple eddy break-up model. Modeling of the emission-chemistry/turbulent-flow interaction is based on a flamelet approach. Contrary to a typical flamelet concept, transport equations are solved for mass fractions of soot and NO. The reason being that these major emission constituencies are assumed to change slowly in comparison to typical time scales for chemical processes or transport processes important for combustion. Chemical reactions leading to production and destruction of soot and NO are, however, assumed to be fast. Soot and NO source terms are therefore evaluated from a flamelet library using a presumed probability density function and integrating over mixture fraction space. Results from simulations are compared to engine measurements inform of exhaust emission data and cylinder pressure. Un modèle avec chimie détaillée décrivant la formation des suies et du NO est appliqué à la simulation de la formation des polluants dans un gros moteur Diesel. L'écoulement et le spray sont modélisés avec le code de calcul Speedstar. La combustion est représentée par le modèle eddy break-up . La modélisation de l'interaction entre l'écoulement turbulent et la chimie des polluants est basée sur une approche de type flamelet . Cependant, à la différence d'autres travaux, des équations de transport pour les fractions massiques de suies et de NO sont résolues. Cela est justifié par la supposition que les temps caractéristiques de formation de ces composés sont longs comparés à ceux associés aux phénomènes de transport et aux réactions chimiques associées à la combustion. Cependant, les vitesses de réaction se rapportant aux suies et au NO sont supposées rapides. Cela

  5. Detailed magnetic model simulations of the H- injection chicane magnets for the CERN PS Booster Upgrade, including eddy currents and influence on beam dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetto, E; Borburgh, J; Carli, C; Martini, M; Forte, V

    2014-01-01

    The CERN PS Booster will be upgraded with an H- injection system. The chicanemagnets for the injection bump ramp-down in 5 ms and generate eddy currents in the inconel vacuum chamber which perturb the homogeneity of the magnetic field. The multipolar field components are extracted from 3D OPERA simulations and are included in the lattice model. The -beating correction is computed all along the ramp and complete tracking simulations including space-charge are performed to evaluate the impact of these perturbations and correction on beam dynamics.

  6. Ray-tracing for qP waves in media with rotated axis of symmetry%旋转轴对称介质中的qP波射线追踪

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨文军; 孙福利

    2011-01-01

    本文使用qP波一阶射线追踪方程(FORT)计算光滑、非均匀旋转轴对称弱各向异性介质中qP波传播的路径和走时.此FORT方程只依赖于15个弱各向异性参数,而非标准射线方程中的21个弹性参数.通常弹性参数模型是在局部坐标系中给定的,而在实际中需要的是全局坐标系下的弹性参数,因此为了解决两个坐标系下弹,性参数的变换问题,本文从Bond变换方程出发,推导出了旋转轴对称介质中的弹性参数张量变换方程.全局坐标系中的弹性参数是由局部坐标系中弹性参数通过两个坐标系间极角和方位角的正、余弦函数组合给出的,所得到的弹性参数能够完全匹配FORT方程.最后通过对旋转TI模型和正交模型进行数值模拟验证本方法的有效性和适应性,结果表明本方法对于具有不同各向异性类型、各向异性强度和旋转角度的介质都具有很高的计算精度.%We use the first-order ray tracing (FORT) formulas of qP waves to calculate pathes and traveltimes of qP waves propagation in smooth, inhomogeneous and weakly anisotropic medium with arbitrarily symmetric axes. The FORT equations depend only on 15 weak-anisotropy parameters, not on the 21 elastic moduli used in the standard raytracing equations. The elastic modulus of anisotropic media is presented in the local coordinate system, while practical coordinate is in the global system, the Cartesian coordinate system. In order to solve the inconsistency problem between the global coordinate system and the local coordinate system, in this paper, the tensor transformation equations of elastic modulus in media with rotated axis of symmetry are derived from the Bond transformation equations. The weak-anisotropy parameters in the global coordinate system can be explicitly expressed as the combination with the sine and cosine functions of polar angle and azimuth between these different coordinate systems,and the weak

  7. Numerical simulation of space UV spectrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushkin, Maksim; Fatkhullin, Timur; Panchuk, Vladimir; Sachkov, Mikhail; Kanev, Evgeny

    2016-07-01

    Based on the ray tracing method, we developed algorithms for constructing numerical model of spectroscopic instrumentation. The Software is realized in C ++ using nVidia CUDA technology. The software package consists of three separate modules: the ray tracing module, a module for calculating energy efficiency and module of CCD image simulation. The main objective of this work was to obtain images of the spectra for the cross-dispersed spectrographs as well as segmented aperture Long Slit Spectrograph. The software can be potentially used by WSO-UV project. To test our algorithms and the software package we have performed simulations of the ground cross-dispersed Nasmyth Echelle Spectrometer (NES) installed on the platform of the Nasmyth focus of the Russian 6-meter BTA telescope. The comparison of model images of stellar spectra with observations on this device confirms that the software works well. The high degree of agreement between the theoretical and real spectra is shown.

  8. Synthetic Observations of the HI Line in SPH-Simulated Spiral Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douglas, Kevin A.; Acreman, David; Dobbs, Clare; Brunt, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Using the radiative transfer code Torus, we produce spectral-line cubes of the predicted HI profile from global SPH simulations of spiral galaxies. Torus grids the SPH galaxy using Adaptive Mesh Refinement, then applies a ray-tracing method to infer the HI profile along the line(s) of sight. The gri

  9. New developments in the McStas neutron instrument simulation package

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willendrup, Peter Kjær; Bergbäck Knudsen, Erik; Klinkby, Esben Bryndt

    2014-01-01

    The McStas neutron ray-tracing software package is a versatile tool for building accurate simulators of neutron scattering instruments at reactors, short- and long-pulsed spallation sources such as the European Spallation Source. McStas is extensively used for design and optimization of instruments...

  10. Automatic temperature computation for realistic IR simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goff, Alain; Kersaudy, Philippe; Latger, Jean; Cathala, Thierry; Stolte, Nilo; Barillot, Philippe

    2000-07-01

    Polygon temperature computation in 3D virtual scenes is fundamental for IR image simulation. This article describes in detail the temperature calculation software and its current extensions, briefly presented in [1]. This software, called MURET, is used by the simulation workshop CHORALE of the French DGA. MURET is a one-dimensional thermal software, which accurately takes into account the material thermal attributes of three-dimensional scene and the variation of the environment characteristics (atmosphere) as a function of the time. Concerning the environment, absorbed incident fluxes are computed wavelength by wavelength, for each half an hour, druing 24 hours before the time of the simulation. For each polygon, incident fluxes are compsed of: direct solar fluxes, sky illumination (including diffuse solar fluxes). Concerning the materials, classical thermal attributes are associated to several layers, such as conductivity, absorption, spectral emissivity, density, specific heat, thickness and convection coefficients are taken into account. In the future, MURET will be able to simulate permeable natural materials (water influence) and vegetation natural materials (woods). This model of thermal attributes induces a very accurate polygon temperature computation for the complex 3D databases often found in CHORALE simulations. The kernel of MUET consists of an efficient ray tracer allowing to compute the history (over 24 hours) of the shadowed parts of the 3D scene and a library, responsible for the thermal computations. The great originality concerns the way the heating fluxes are computed. Using ray tracing, the flux received in each 3D point of the scene accurately takes into account the masking (hidden surfaces) between objects. By the way, this library supplies other thermal modules such as a thermal shows computation tool.

  11. Comparing the Performance of Three Land Models in Global C Cycle Simulations: A Detailed Structural Analysis: Structural Analysis of Land Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafique, Rashid [Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, University of Oklahoma, Norman OK USA; Joint Global Change Research Institute, Pacific Northwest National Lab, College Park, MD USA; Xia, Jianyang [School of Ecological and Environmental Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai China; Research Center for Global Change and Ecological Forecasting, East China Normal University; Hararuk, Oleksandra [Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, University of Oklahoma, Norman OK USA; Leng, Guoyong [Joint Global Change Research Institute, Pacific Northwest National Lab, College Park, MD USA; Asrar, Ghassem [Joint Global Change Research Institute, Pacific Northwest National Lab, College Park, MD USA; Luo, Yiqi [Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, University of Oklahoma, Norman OK USA

    2016-04-01

    Land models are valuable tools to understand the dynamics of global carbon (C) cycle. Various models have been developed and used for predictions of future C dynamics but uncertainties still exist. Diagnosing the models’ behaviors in terms of structures can help to narrow down the uncertainties in prediction of C dynamics. In this study three widely used land surface models, namely CSIRO’s Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) with 9 C pools, Community Land Model (version 3.5) combined with Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CLM-CASA) with 12 C pools and Community Land Model (version 4) (CLM4) with 26 C pools were driven by the observed meteorological forcing. The simulated C storage and residence time were used for analysis. The C storage and residence time were computed globally for all individual soil and plant pools, as well as net primary productivity (NPP) and its allocation to different plant components’ based on these models. Remotely sensed NPP and statistically derived HWSD, and GLC2000 datasets were used as a reference to evaluate the performance of these models. Results showed that CABLE exhibited better agreement with referenced C storage and residence time for plant and soil pools, as compared with CLM-CASA and CLM4. CABLE had longer bulk residence time for soil C pools and stored more C in roots, whereas, CLM-CASA and CLM4 stored more C in woody pools due to differential NPP allocation. Overall, these results indicate that the differences in C storage and residence times in three models are largely due to the differences in their fundamental structures (number of C pools), NPP allocation and C transfer rates. Our results have implications in model development and provide a general framework to explain the bias/uncertainties in simulation of C storage and residence times from the perspectives of model structures.

  12. Simulation of the dynamics, microstructure and cloud chemistry of a precipitating and a non-precipitating cloud by means of a detailed 2-D cloud model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurzler, S. [Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere, Johannes-Gutenberg-Univ., Mainz (Germany); Respondek, P. [Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere, Johannes-Gutenberg-Univ., Mainz (Germany); Flossmann, A.I. [Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere, Johannes-Gutenberg-Univ., Mainz (Germany); Pruppacher, H.R. [Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere, Johannes-Gutenberg-Univ., Mainz (Germany)

    1994-11-01

    The predictions of our 2-D cloud model with detailed microphysics for June 3, 1992 were compared with observations made on the same day during the field experiment CLEOPATRA on June 3, 1992. Using the observed vertical temperature and humidity distribution and the observed aerosol characteristics as model input, excellent agreement was obtained between the observations and the theoretical predictions for: (a) the cloud base and the cloud top, (b) the liquid water content and drop size distribution and (c) the number concentration of CCN. The chemical composition of cloud- and rain water was in good agreement with the observations. In addition it was for the first time possible to verify by observation our predictions (Flossmann et al.; 1985, Flossmann and Pruppacher, 1988; Ahr et al., 1990; Flossmann, 1991) that the condensation process produces a sharp cut-off in the aerosol particle size distribution, leading to the formation of a cloud interstitial aerosol consisting of particles smaller than the cut-off radius. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Aussagen unseres 2-D Wolkenmodelles mit detaillierter Mikrophysik fuer den 3. Juni 1992 wurden verglichen mit den Beobachtungen, die an einer regnenden und einer nicht regnenden Wolke waehrend des Feldexperimentes CLEOPATRA gemacht wurden. Als Modelleingabe diente die vertikale Verteilung der Temperatur und Feuchte am 3. und 4. Juni 1992 sowie die chemischen und physikalischen Charakteristika des an diesem Tage vorherrschenden Aerosols. Gute Uebereinstimmung zwischen Theorie und Beobachtung wurde gefunden fuer: (a) die Wolkenbasis und Wolkenobergrenze, (b) den Fluessigwassergehalt der Wolke und das Tropfenspektrum, und (c) die Anzahlkonzentration der CCN. Die chemische Zusammensetzung des Wolken- und des Regenwassers fuegte sich zufriedenstellend in die beobachteten Werte ein. Zusaetzlich war es zum ersten Male gelungen, durch ein Feldexperiment unsere theoretische Voraussage zu verifizieren, welche besagt, dass der

  13. Modeling and Simulating Blast Effects on Electric Substations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyle G. Roybal; Robert F. Jeffers; Kent E. McGillivary; Tony D. Paul; Ryan Jacobson

    2009-05-01

    A software simulation tool was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory to estimate the fragility of electric substation components subject to an explosive blast. Damage caused by explosively driven fragments on a generic electric substation was estimated by using a ray-tracing technique to track and tabulate fragment impacts and penetrations of substation components. This technique is based on methods used for assessing vulnerability of military aircraft and ground vehicles to explosive blasts. An open-source rendering and ray-trace engine was used for geometric modeling and interactions between fragments and substation components. Semi-empirical material interactions models were used to calculate blast parameters and simulate high-velocity material interactions between explosively driven fragments and substation components. Finally, a Monte Carlo simulation was added to model the random nature of fragment generation allowing a skilled analyst to predict failure probabilities of substation components.

  14. 基于GPU和均匀栅格法的光线追踪算法研究%Research of ray-tracing algorithm based on GPU and uniform grid method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童星; 袁道华

    2011-01-01

    由于GPU(图形处理器)性能的大幅提高和可编程性的发展,基于GPU的光线追踪算法逐渐成为研究热点,光线追踪算法需要的计算量大,基于此,分析了光线追踪算法的基本原理,在NVIDIA公司的CUDA(计算统一设备体系结构)环境下采用均匀栅格法作为加速结构实现了光线追踪算法.实验结果表明,该计算模式相对于传统基于CPU的光线追踪算法具有更快的整体运算速度,GPU适合处理高密度数据计算.%Ray-tracing is the technique that rendering images from a three dimensional model of a scene by projecting it on to a two dimensional image plane. In the past decades, the development of the computer graphic (especial for raster graphics systems) emphasize on building the high-efficient, low-cost large graphic systems. For the above-mentioned reasons such as the implementation of a large number of mathematical calculation, the large-scale parallel processing technologies play a important role in graphics compose. The principle of ray-tracing algorithm is introduced. A ray-tracing parallel processing model is built through the research on GPU stream processing and MPICH, and it is proved that applying this mode reduces computation time effectively and the quality of the generated graph holds no difference with that by traditional stand-alone computer.

  15. Interfacing MCNPX and McStas for simulation of neutron transport

    OpenAIRE

    Klinkby, Esben Bryndt; Lauritzen, Bent; Nonbøl, Erik; Willendrup, Peter Kjær; Filges, Uwe; Wohlmuther, Michael; Gallmeier, Franz X.

    2013-01-01

    Simulations of target-moderator-reflector system at spallation sources are conventionally carried out using Monte Carlo codes such as MCNPX[1] or FLUKA[2, 3] whereas simulations of neutron transport from the moderator and the instrument response are performed by neutron ray tracing codes such as McStas[4, 5, 6, 7]. The coupling between the two simulation suites typically consists of providing analytical fits of MCNPX neutron spectra to McStas. This method is generally successful but has limit...

  16. Developing an interface between MCNP and McStas for simulation of neutron moderators

    OpenAIRE

    Klinkby, Esben Bryndt; Lauritzen, Bent; Nonbøl, Erik; Willendrup, Peter Kjær

    2012-01-01

    Simulations of target-moderator-reflector system at spallation sources are conventionally carried out using MCNP/X whereas simulations of neutron transport and instrument performance are carried out by neutron ray tracing codes such as McStas. The coupling between the two simulations suites typically consists of providing analytical fits from MCNP/X neutron spectra to McStas. This method is generally successful, but as will be discussed in the this paper, there are limitations and a more dire...

  17. Visual overview, oral detail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    and with the coordinating nurse, who is the main keeper of the whiteboard. On the basis of observations, we find that coordination is accomplished through a highly intertwined process of technologically mediated visual overview combined with orally communicated details. The oral details serve to clarify and elaborate...

  18. LOCKE Detailed Specification Tables

    CERN Document Server

    Menezo, Lucia G; Gregorio, Jose-Angel

    2012-01-01

    This document shows the detailed specification of LOCKE coherence protocol for each cache controller, using a table-based technique. This representation provides clear, concise visual information yet includes sufficient detail (e.g., transient states) arguably lacking in the traditional, graphical form of state diagrams.

  19. Detail and survey radioautographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wainwright, Wm.W.

    1949-04-19

    The much used survey or contact type of radioautograph is indispensible for a study of the gross distribution of radioactive materials. A detail radioautograph is equally indispensible. The radioautograph makes possible the determination of plutonium with respect to cells. Outlines of survey and detail techniques are given.

  20. Detailed Soils 24K

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This data set is a digital soil survey and is the most detailed level of soil geographic data developed by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. The information was...

  1. Simulating multiple diffraction in imaging systems using a path integration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mout, Marco; Wick, Michael; Bociort, Florian; Petschulat, Jörg; Urbach, Paul

    2016-05-10

    We present a method for simulating multiple diffraction in imaging systems based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle. The method accounts for the effects of both aberrations and diffraction and is entirely performed using Monte Carlo ray tracing. We compare the results of this method to those of reference simulations for field propagation through optical systems and for the calculation of point spread functions. The method can accurately model a wide variety of optical systems beyond the exit pupil approximation.

  2. Three Latin Phonological Details

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Birgit Anette

    2006-01-01

    The present paper deals with three minor details of Latin phonology: 1) the development of the initial sequence *u¿l¿-, where it is suggested that an apparent vacillation between ul- and vol-/vul- represents sandhi variants going back to the proto-language, 2) the adjectives ama¯rus ‘bitter' and ...

  3. Real and Simulated Waveform Recording LIDAR Data in Boreal Juvenile Forest Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovi, A.; Korpela, I.

    2013-05-01

    Airborne small-footprint LiDAR is replacing field measurements in regional-level forest inventories, but auxiliary field work is still required for the optimal management of young stands. Waveform (WF) recording sensors can provide a more detailed description of the vegetation compared to discrete return (DR) systems. Furthermore, knowing the shape of the signal facilitates comparisons between real data and those obtained with simulation tools. We performed a quantitative validation of a Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) -based LiDAR simulator against real data and used simulations and empirical data to study the WF recording LiDAR for the classification of boreal juvenile forest vegetation. Geometric-optical models of three common species were used as input for the MCRT model. Simulated radiometric and geometric WF features were in good agreement with the real data, and interspecies differences were preserved. We used the simulator to study the effects of sensor parameters on species classification performance. An increase in footprint size improved the classification accuracy up to a certain footprint size, while the emitted pulse width and the WF sampling rate had minor effects. Analyses on empirical data showed small improvement in performance compared to existing studies, when classifying seedling stand vegetation to four operational classes. The results on simulator validation serve as a basis for the future use of simulation models e.g. in LiDAR survey planning or in the simulation of synthetic training data, while the empirical findings clarify the potential of WF LiDAR data in the inventory chain for the operational forest management planning in Finland.

  4. Detailed numerical simulation of the effect of defects created by electron irradiation on the performance degradation of a p{sup +}-n-n{sup +} GaAs solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meftah, A.F.; Sengouga, N.; Meftah, A.M. [Laboratory of Metallic and Semiconducting Materials, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Mohamed Kheider University, B.P. 145, 07000 Biskra (Algeria); Belghachi, A. [Laboratory of Semiconductor Devices Physics, Physics Department, University of Bechar, P.O. Box 417, Bechar 08000 (Algeria)

    2009-11-15

    Solar cells exposed to irradiation undergo severe degradation in their performance due to induced structural defects. To predict this effect, the current-voltage characteristics under AM0 illumination for a constant dose of electron irradiation are numerically calculated. From these characteristics the following solar cell output parameters: the short circuit current density J{sub sc}, the open circuit voltage V{sub oc}, the fill factor FF and the conversion efficiency {eta} are extracted. The irradiation induced defects introduce in the energy gap either recombination centres or traps. The irradiation induced degradation is widely attributed to the first type of defects. A strategy is adopted to check the truthfulness of this by simulating the effect of each single trap level separately on the output parameters of the cell. The simulation results show that only the shallowest deep electron trap is responsible for the degradation of J{sub sc} while V{sub oc} is mostly affected by other electron and hole traps especially the deepest one. This more detailed study is an extension of another work in which the effect of a group instead of individual levels is investigated. (author)

  5. Cooperative International Simulations with McStas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL; Chen, Meili [ORNL; Cobb, John W [ORNL; Farhi, Emmanuel N [ORNL; Hagen, Mark E [ORNL; Kohl, James Arthur [ORNL; Lefmann, Kim [ORNL; Lin, Jiao [ORNL; Miller, Stephen D [ORNL; Reuter, Michael A [ORNL; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S [ORNL; Willendrup, Peter K [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    McStas is a neutron ray-trace simulation package that simulates neutron scattering instruments. Its developers at Riso National Laboratory in Denmark and the Institute Max von Laue-Paul Langevin in France are collaborating with the SNS instrument scientists, the Neutron Science TeraGrid developers, and the DANSE developers to improve the package and make it available to more researchers. Distributed computing on the TeraGrid, the UK eScience Grid, the Open Science Grid, etc. is a goal of this collaboration as well as improved visualization, standardized NeXus output, improved performance, more sample kernels, event mode and histogram interfaces, and an analysis interface.

  6. Light Curves from an MHD Simulation of a Black Hole Accretion Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Schnittman, J D; Hawley, J F; Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Krolik, Julian H.; Hawley, John F.

    2006-01-01

    We use a relativistic ray-tracing code to calculate the light curves observed from a global general relativistic magneto-hydrodynamic simulation of an accretion flow onto a Schwarzschild black hole. We apply three basic emission models to sample different properties of the time-dependent accretion disk. With one of these models, which assumes thermal blackbody emission and free-free absorption, we can predict qualitative features of the high-frequency power spectrum from stellar-mass black holes in the "Thermal Dominant" state. The simulated power spectrum is characterized by a power law of index Gamma ~ 3 and total rms fractional variance of ~ 1 % near the orbital frequency at the inner-most stable orbit. Initial results indicate the existence of transient QPO peaks with frequency ratios of nearly 2:3 at a 99.9% confidence limit, but they are not generic features because at any given time they are seen only from certain observer directions. Additionally, we present detailed analysis of the azimuthal structur...

  7. Light Curves from an MHD Simulation of a Black Hole Accretion Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Krolik, Julian H.; Hawley, John F.

    2006-11-01

    We use a relativistic ray-tracing code to calculate the light curves observed from a global, general relativistic, magnetohydrodynamic simulation of an accretion flow onto a Schwarzschild black hole. We apply three basic emission models to sample different properties of the time-dependent accretion disk. With one of these models, which assumes thermal blackbody emission and free-free absorption, we can predict qualitative features of the high-frequency power spectrum from stellar-mass black holes in the ``thermal dominant'' state. The simulated power spectrum is characterized by a power law of index Γ~3 and total rms fractional variance of ~1% near the orbital frequency at the innermost stable orbit. Initial results indicate the existence of transient QPO peaks with frequency ratios of nearly 2:3 at a 99.9% confidence limit, but they are not generic features, because at any given time they are seen only from certain observer directions. In addition, we present detailed analysis of the azimuthal structure of the accretion disk and the evolution of density perturbations in the inner disk. These ``hot-spot'' structures appear to be roughly self-similar over a range of disk radii, with a single characteristic size δφ=25deg and δr/r=0.3, and typical lifetimes Tl~0.3Torb.

  8. Acoustic simulation in realistic 3D virtual scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozard, Patrick; Le Goff, Alain; Naz, Pierre; Cathala, Thierry; Latger, Jean

    2003-09-01

    The simulation workshop CHORALE developed in collaboration with OKTAL SE company for the French MoD is used by government services and industrial companies for weapon system validation and qualification trials in the infrared domain. The main operational reference for CHORALE is the assessment of the infrared guidance system of the Storm Shadow missile French version, called Scalp. The use of CHORALE workshop is now extended to the acoustic domain. The main objective is the simulation of the detection of moving vehicles in realistic 3D virtual scenes. This article briefly describes the acoustic model in CHORALE. The 3D scene is described by a set of polygons. Each polygon is characterized by its acoustic resistivity or its complex impedance. Sound sources are associated with moving vehicles and are characterized by their spectra and directivities. A microphone sensor is defined by its position, its frequency band and its sensitivity. The purpose of the acoustic simulation is to calculate the incoming acoustic pressure on microphone sensors. CHORALE is based on a generic ray tracing kernel. This kernel possesses original capabilities: computation time is nearly independent on the scene complexity, especially the number of polygons, databases are enhanced with precise physical data, special mechanisms of antialiasing have been developed that enable to manage very accurate details. The ray tracer takes into account the wave geometrical divergence and the atmospheric transmission. The sound wave refraction is simulated and rays cast in the 3D scene are curved according to air temperature gradient. Finally, sound diffraction by edges (hill, wall,...) is also taken into account.

  9. Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ngada, N M

    2015-01-01

    The complexity and cost of building and running high-power electrical systems make the use of simulations unavoidable. The simulations available today provide great understanding about how systems really operate. This paper helps the reader to gain an insight into simulation in the field of power converters for particle accelerators. Starting with the definition and basic principles of simulation, two simulation types, as well as their leading tools, are presented: analog and numerical simulations. Some practical applications of each simulation type are also considered. The final conclusion then summarizes the main important items to keep in mind before opting for a simulation tool or before performing a simulation.

  10. 基于详细时域仿真的ASVG静态与动态特性分析%ANALYSIS OF THE STATIC AND DYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF ASVG BASED ON DETAILED TIME DOMAIN SIMULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李必涛; 朱一锋; 程时杰

    2001-01-01

    Based on SIMULINK, a simulation tool of MATLAB, a detailed time domain model of the advanced static VAR generator (ASVG) with capacitor as its energy storage device is developed in this paper. The steady state and dynamic characteristics of ASVG are analyzed with the help of this model. The research is mainly focused on the following aspects: ① The relationship between the trigging angle of GTO, the trigging pulse width and the angular difference between the output voltage of the ASVG and the voltage at the point where the ASVG was connected; ② The main factors which affect the active and reactive power outputs of this type of ASVG. At last, a mathematical model representing the transient characteristics of the ASVG is obtained from the simulation results under different disturbance.%基于MATLAB中的SIMULINK仿真工具,建立了电容型静止补偿器(ASVG)的仿真模型,并对其静态特性和动态特性进行了全时域仿真分析。通过对仿真结果的分析,得出了ASVG的输出电压与它和系统接入点电压间的相角差、ASVG晶闸管触发脉冲、触发脉宽之间的关系,这为ASVG的触发脉冲和触发脉宽的设计提供了依据。同时,文中还对影响电容型ASVG静态输出(或吸收)的有功功率和无功功率的因素进行了详细的分析。最后,通过对ASVG受扰后暂态响应曲线的分析,提出了一种ASVG的动态响应模型。

  11. Detailed Debunking of Denial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enting, I. G.; Abraham, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    The disinformation campaign against climate science has been compared to a guerilla war whose tactics undermine the traditional checks and balances of science. One comprehensive approach has to been produce archives of generic responses such as the websites of RealClimate and SkepticalScience. We review our experiences with an alternative approach of detailed responses to a small number of high profile cases. Our particular examples were Professor Ian Plimer and Christopher Monckton, the Third Viscount Monckton of Brenchley, each of whom has been taken seriously by political leaders in our respective countries. We relate our experiences to comparable examples such as John Mashey's analysis of the Wegman report and the formal complaints about Lomborg's "Skeptical Environmentalist" and Durkin's "Great Global Warming Swindle". Our two approaches used contrasting approaches: an on-line video of a lecture vs an evolving compendium of misrepresentations. Additionally our approaches differed in the emphasis. The analysis of Monckton concentrated on the misrepresentation of the science, while the analysis of Plimer concentrated on departures from accepted scientific practice: fabrication of data, misrepresentation of cited sources and unattributed use of the work of others. Benefits of an evolving compendium were the ability to incorporate contributions from members of the public who had identified additional errors and the scope for addressing new aspects as they came to public attention. `Detailed debunking' gives non-specialists a reference point for distinguishing non-science when engaging in public debate.

  12. A detailed coupled-mode-space non-equilibrium Green's function simulation study of source-to-drain tunnelling in gate-all-around Si nanowire metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, N.; Martinez, A.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we present a 3D quantum transport simulation study of source-to-drain tunnelling in gate-all-around Si nanowire transistors by using the non-equilibrium Green's function approach. The impact of the channel length, device cross-section, and drain and gate applied biases on the source-to-drain tunnelling is examined in detail. The overall effect of tunnelling on the ID-VG characteristics is also investigated. Tunnelling in devices with channel lengths of 10 nm or less substantially enhances the off-current. This enhancement is more important at high drain biases and at larger cross-sections where the sub-threshold slope is substantially degraded. A less common effect is the increase in the on-current due to the tunnelling which contributes as much as 30% of the total on-current. This effect is almost independent of the cross-section, and it depends weakly on the studied channel lengths.

  13. Global detailed gravimetric geoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, S.; Marsh, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    A global detailed gravimetric geoid has been computed by combining the Goddard Space Flight Center GEM-4 gravity model derived from satellite and surface gravity data and surface 1 x 1-deg mean free-air gravity anomaly data. The accuracy of the geoid is plus or minus 2 meters on continents, 5 to 7 meters in areas where surface gravity data are sparse, and 10 to 15 meters in areas where no surface gravity data are available. Comparisons have been made with the astrogeodetic data provided by Rice (United States), Bomford (Europe), and Mather (Australia). Comparisons have also been carried out with geoid heights derived from satellite solutions for geocentric station coordinates in North America, the Caribbean, Europe and Australia.

  14. Consider the details

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus; Hertzum, Morten

    2013-01-01

    levels of distance in our study. For revision time, the electronic whiteboard is slower on one subtask but there is no difference on another subtask. Participants prefer the electronic whiteboard. Given the font size of the electronic whiteboard, the inferior reading accuracy is unsurprising......Electronic whiteboards are replacing dry-erase whiteboards in many contexts. In this study we compare electronic and dry-erase whiteboards in emergency departments (EDs) with respect to reading distance and revision time. We find inferior reading accuracy for the electronic whiteboard at all three...... but the reduced possibilities for acquiring information at a glance when clinicians pass the whiteboard may adversely affect their overview. Conversely, the similar revision times for one subtask show that logon may be done quickly. We discuss how details such as font size and logon may impact the high-level...

  15. A General Purpose Ionospheric Ray Tracing Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    PUBUC RELEASE UNCLASSIFIED i IIt ii 11 UNCLASSIFIED DST0O A U S T R A L I A SURVEILLANCE RESEARCH LABORATORY ZDMC QUAIrrY High Frequency Radar ...tol = tolerance (Kms) at each step of raytracing (a value of * * l.d-6 is sufficient in most cases) * * CHARACTER * * cha - ’y’ if magnetic fields...Director, Surveillance Research Laboratory 1 Chief High Frequency Radar Division 1 Research Leader, Jindalee Operational Radar Network 1 Head, Radar

  16. Detailed source term estimation of the atmospheric release for the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident by coupling simulations of atmospheric dispersion model with improved deposition scheme and oceanic dispersion model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Katata

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Temporal variations in the amount of radionuclides released into the atmosphere during the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station (FNPS1 accident and their atmospheric and marine dispersion are essential to evaluate the environmental impacts and resultant radiological doses to the public. In this paper, we estimate a detailed time trend of atmospheric releases during the accident by combining environmental monitoring data with atmospheric model simulations from WSPEEDI-II (Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information, and simulations from the oceanic dispersion model SEA-GEARN-FDM, both developed by the authors. A sophisticated deposition scheme, which deals with dry and fogwater depositions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activation and subsequent wet scavenging due to mixed-phase cloud microphysics (in-cloud scavenging for radioactive iodine gas (I2 and CH3I and other particles (CsI, Cs, and Te, was incorporated into WSPEEDI-II to improve the surface deposition calculations. The fallout to the ocean surface calculated by WSPEEDI-II was used as input data for the SEA-GEARN-FDM calculations. Reverse and inverse source-term estimation methods based on coupling the simulations from both models was adopted using air dose rates and concentrations, and sea surface concentrations. The results revealed that the major releases of radionuclides due to FNPS1 accident occurred in the following periods during March 2011: the afternoon of 12 March due to the wet venting and hydrogen explosion at Unit 1, the morning of 13 March after the venting event at Unit 3, midnight of 14 March when the SRV (Safely Relief Valve at Unit 2 was opened three times, the morning and night of 15 March, and the morning of 16 March. According to the simulation results, the highest radioactive contamination areas around FNPS1 were created from 15 to 16 March by complicated interactions among rainfall, plume movements, and the temporal

  17. Detailed source term estimation of the atmospheric release for the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident by coupling simulations of atmospheric dispersion model with improved deposition scheme and oceanic dispersion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katata, G.; Chino, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Terada, H.; Ota, M.; Nagai, H.; Kajino, M.; Draxler, R.; Hort, M. C.; Malo, A.; Torii, T.; Sanada, Y.

    2014-06-01

    Temporal variations in the amount of radionuclides released into the atmosphere during the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station (FNPS1) accident and their atmospheric and marine dispersion are essential to evaluate the environmental impacts and resultant radiological doses to the public. In this paper, we estimate a detailed time trend of atmospheric releases during the accident by combining environmental monitoring data with atmospheric model simulations from WSPEEDI-II (Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information), and simulations from the oceanic dispersion model SEA-GEARN-FDM, both developed by the authors. A sophisticated deposition scheme, which deals with dry and fogwater depositions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation and subsequent wet scavenging due to mixed-phase cloud microphysics (in-cloud scavenging) for radioactive iodine gas (I2 and CH3I) and other particles (CsI, Cs, and Te), was incorporated into WSPEEDI-II to improve the surface deposition calculations. The fallout to the ocean surface calculated by WSPEEDI-II was used as input data for the SEA-GEARN-FDM calculations. Reverse and inverse source-term estimation methods based on coupling the simulations from both models was adopted using air dose rates and concentrations, and sea surface concentrations. The results revealed that the major releases of radionuclides due to FNPS1 accident occurred in the following periods during March 2011: the afternoon of 12 March due to the wet venting and hydrogen explosion at Unit 1, the morning of 13 March after the venting event at Unit 3, midnight of 14 March when the SRV (Safely Relief Valve) at Unit 2 was opened three times, the morning and night of 15 March, and the morning of 16 March. According to the simulation results, the highest radioactive contamination areas around FNPS1 were created from 15 to 16 March by complicated interactions among rainfall, plume movements, and the temporal variation of

  18. Computing the total atmospheric refraction for real-time optical imaging sensor simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Richard F.

    2015-05-01

    Fast and accurate computation of light path deviation due to atmospheric refraction is an important requirement for real-time simulation of optical imaging sensor systems. A large body of existing literature covers various methods for application of Snell's Law to the light path ray tracing problem. This paper provides a discussion of the adaptation to real time simulation of atmospheric refraction ray tracing techniques used in mid-1980's LOWTRAN releases. The refraction ray trace algorithm published in a LOWTRAN-6 technical report by Kneizys (et. al.) has been coded in MATLAB for development, and in C-language for simulation use. To this published algorithm we have added tuning parameters for variable path segment lengths, and extensions for Earth grazing and exoatmospheric "near Earth" ray paths. Model atmosphere properties used to exercise the refraction algorithm were obtained from tables published in another LOWTRAN-6 related report. The LOWTRAN-6 based refraction model is applicable to atmospheric propagation at wavelengths in the IR and visible bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. It has been used during the past two years by engineers at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) in support of several advanced imaging sensor simulations. Recently, a faster (but sufficiently accurate) method using Gauss-Chebyshev Quadrature integration for evaluating the refraction integral was adopted.

  19. Estimating small angular scale CMB anisotropy with high resolution N-body simulations: weak lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Fullana, M J; Thacker, R J; Couchman, H M P; Sáez, D

    2010-01-01

    We estimate the impact of weak lensing by strongly nonlinear cosmological structures on the cosmic microwave background. Accurate calculation of large $\\ell$ multipoles requires N-body simulations and ray-tracing schemes with both high spatial and temporal resolution. To this end we have developed a new code that combines a gravitational Adaptive Particle-Particle, Particle-Mesh (AP3M) solver with a weak lensing evaluation routine. The lensing deviations are evaluated while structure evolves during the simulation so that all evolution steps--rather than just a few outputs--are used in the lensing computations. The new code also includes a ray-tracing procedure that avoids periodicity effects in a universe that is modeled as a 3-D torus in the standard way. Results from our new simulations are compared with previous ones based on Particle-Mesh simulations. We also systematically investigate the impact of box volume, resolution, and ray-tracing directions on the variance of the computed power spectra. We find t...

  20. Crowdsourcing detailed flood data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walliman, Nicholas; Ogden, Ray; Amouzad*, Shahrzhad

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decade the average annual loss across the European Union due to flooding has been 4.5bn Euros, but increasingly intense rainfall, as well as population growth, urbanisation and the rising costs of asset replacements, may see this rise to 23bn Euros a year by 2050. Equally disturbing are the profound social costs to individuals, families and communities which in addition to loss of lives include: loss of livelihoods, decreased purchasing and production power, relocation and migration, adverse psychosocial effects, and hindrance of economic growth and development. Flood prediction, management and defence strategies rely on the availability of accurate information and flood modelling. Whilst automated data gathering (by measurement and satellite) of the extent of flooding is already advanced it is least reliable in urban and physically complex geographies where often the need for precise estimation is most acute. Crowdsourced data of actual flood events is a potentially critical component of this allowing improved accuracy in situations and identifying the effects of local landscape and topography where the height of a simple kerb, or discontinuity in a boundary wall can have profound importance. Mobile 'App' based data acquisition using crowdsourcing in critical areas can combine camera records with GPS positional data and time, as well as descriptive data relating to the event. This will automatically produce a dataset, managed in ArcView GIS, with the potential for follow up calls to get more information through structured scripts for each strand. Through this local residents can provide highly detailed information that can be reflected in sophisticated flood protection models and be core to framing urban resilience strategies and optimising the effectiveness of investment. This paper will describe this pioneering approach that will develop flood event data in support of systems that will advance existing approaches such as developed in the in the UK

  1. Multi-frequency radiation hydrodynamics simulations of H2 line emission in primordial, star-forming clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Greif, Thomas H

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the collapse of primordial gas in a minihalo with three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations that accurately model the transfer of H2 line emission. For this purpose, we have implemented a multi-line, multi-frequency ray-tracing scheme in the moving-mesh code Arepo that is capable of adaptively refining rays based on the Healpix algorithm, as well as a hybrid equilibrium/non-equilibrium primordial chemistry solver. We find that the chemical and thermal evolution of the central gas cloud is similar to the case where an escape probability formalism with a fit to detailed one-dimensional calculations is used, with the exception that the suppression of density perturbations due to the diffusion of radiation is only present in the full radiation hydrodynamics simulations. A multi-frequency treatment of the individual H2 lines is essential, since for high optical depths the smaller cross section in the wings of the lines greatly increases the amount of energy that can escape. The influence...

  2. Detailed IR aperture measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Roderik; Garcia Morales, Hector; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Hermes, Pascal Dominik; Mirarchi, Daniele; Quaranta, Elena; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Carlo; Skowronski, Piotr Krzysztof; Wretborn, Sven Joel; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    MD 1673 was carried out on October 5 2016, in order to investigate in more detail the available aperture in the LHC high-luminosity insertions at 6.5 TeV and β∗=40 cm. Previous aperture measurements in 2016 during commissioning had shown that the available aperture is at the edge of protection, and that the aperture bottleneck at β∗=40 cm in certain cases is found in the separation plane instead of in the crossing plane. Furthermore, the bottlenecks were consistently found in close to the upstream end of Q3 on the side of the incoming beam, and not in Q2 on the outgoing beam as expected from calculations. Therefore, this MD aimed at measuring IR1 and IR5 separately (at 6.5 TeV and β∗=40 cm, for 185 µrad half crossing angle), to further localize the bottlenecks longitudinally using newly installed BLMs, investigate the difference in aperture between Q2 and Q3, and to see if any aperture can be gained using special orbit bumps.

  3. Splotch: Visualizing Cosmological Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Dolag, K; Gheller, C; Imboden, S

    2008-01-01

    We present a light and fast, public available, ray-tracer {\\tt Splotch} software tool which supports the effective visualization of cosmological simulations data. We describe the algorithm it relies on, which is designed in order to deal with point-like data, optimizing the ray-tracing calculation by ordering the particles as a function of their ``depth'' defined as a function of one of the coordinates or other associated parameter. Realistic three-dimensional impressions are reached through a composition of the final color in each pixel properly calculating emission and absorption of individual volume elements. We describe several scientific as well as public applications realized with {\\tt Splotch}. We emphasize how different datasets and configurations lead to remarkable different results in terms of the images and animations. A few of these results are available online.

  4. Simulation and experiments of ultrasonic propagation in nickel-based alloy weldments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to obtain good understanding of complicated beam propagation behaviors in nickel-based alloy weldments, ray tracing simulation is established to predict the ultrasonic beam path in a special welded structure of dissimilar steels. Also experimental examinations are carried out to measure the ultrasonic beam paths in the weldment. Then comparisons of the modeling predictions with experimental results are presented to reveal the complicated beam propagation behaviors.

  5. Detailed source term estimation of the atmospheric release for the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident by coupling simulations of an atmospheric dispersion model with an improved deposition scheme and oceanic dispersion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katata, G.; Chino, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Terada, H.; Ota, M.; Nagai, H.; Kajino, M.; Draxler, R.; Hort, M. C.; Malo, A.; Torii, T.; Sanada, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal variations in the amount of radionuclides released into the atmosphere during the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FNPS1) accident and their atmospheric and marine dispersion are essential to evaluate the environmental impacts and resultant radiological doses to the public. In this paper, we estimate the detailed atmospheric releases during the accident using a reverse estimation method which calculates the release rates of radionuclides by comparing measurements of air concentration of a radionuclide or its dose rate in the environment with the ones calculated by atmospheric and oceanic transport, dispersion and deposition models. The atmospheric and oceanic models used are WSPEEDI-II (Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information) and SEA-GEARN-FDM (Finite difference oceanic dispersion model), both developed by the authors. A sophisticated deposition scheme, which deals with dry and fog-water depositions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation, and subsequent wet scavenging due to mixed-phase cloud microphysics (in-cloud scavenging) for radioactive iodine gas (I2 and CH3I) and other particles (CsI, Cs, and Te), was incorporated into WSPEEDI-II to improve the surface deposition calculations. The results revealed that the major releases of radionuclides due to the FNPS1 accident occurred in the following periods during March 2011: the afternoon of 12 March due to the wet venting and hydrogen explosion at Unit 1, midnight of 14 March when the SRV (safety relief valve) was opened three times at Unit 2, the morning and night of 15 March, and the morning of 16 March. According to the simulation results, the highest radioactive contamination areas around FNPS1 were created from 15 to 16 March by complicated interactions among rainfall, plume movements, and the temporal variation of release rates. The simulation by WSPEEDI-II using the new source term reproduced the local and regional patterns of cumulative

  6. A temporal three-dimensional simulation of samarium release in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hai-Sheng; Feng, Jie; Xu, Zheng-Wen; Wu, Jian; Wu, Zhen-Sen; Xu, Bin; Xue, Kun; Xu, Tong; Hu, Yan-Li

    2016-10-01

    For understanding plasma processes of the ionosphere and magnetosphere, the alkali and alkaline-earth metals are usually released in space for artificially increasing the electron density. However, it is a limitation that these releases must be in sunlight where the photoionization can take place. In recent years, the lanthanide metals, such as samarium, have been released to produce electrons in reaction with atomic oxygen in the upper space. The reaction could proceed without sunlight so that the restriction on experimental periods is broken. Unfortunately, any sophisticated models even preliminary ones are unavailable yet in the literature. A temporal three-dimensional model is presented for the samarium release in detail with respect to various altitudes and mass. Especially, the plasma diffusion equation is remarkably extended from 2-D to 3-D by importing the influence of geomagnetic declination, which could be also useful for other chemical releases. The field-aligned terms are brought so as to the presented model can describe the diffusion along the geomagnetic field subtly. On the basis of the presented model, behaviors of radio waves propagating through the release area are simulated by using ray tracing. This model could be as the theoretical support for samarium releases, and it also helpful for the research on the generation and evolution of the ionosphere irregularities.

  7. Simulating the Circumgalactic Medium and the Cycle of Baryons in and Out of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madau, Piero

    2014-10-01

    Studies of the ionization, chemical, thermodynamic, and kinematic state of gaseous material in the circumgalactic medium {CGM} hold clues to understanding the exchange of mass, metals, and energy between galaxies and their surroundings. We propose here a detailed comparison of HST-COS data at low redshifts with results from our suite of extreme-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic "zoom-in" simulations of the CGM of massive spiral and sub-L* galaxies. Our state-of-the-art simulations adopt a feedback prescription that produces hundreds of kpc-scale galactic outflows, metal-dependent radiative cooling, and a model for the diffusion of metals and thermal energy. They have been recently shown to generate interstellar absorption line strengths of Lya, CII, CIV, SiII, and SiIV as a function of impact parameter that are in agreement with those observed in the CGM of star-forming massive galaxies, and to reproduce the observed stellar mass and cold gas content, resolved star formation histories, and metallicities of field dwarfs in the Local Volume. During the duration of this program we will: 1} analyze these simulations and trace the formation of the CGM to z=0; 2} add, in post processing, radiative transfer effects using an updated version of the ray-tracing RADAMESH code developed by one of the co-Is; 3} generate synthetic spectra by drawing sightlines through the simulated CGM, and compare the resulting column densities and equivalent widths of key metal ions as a function of impact parameter with data from the Hubble; 4} make the simulated data available online to the community to enhance the value of past, present, and future observational programs with the HST-COS.

  8. Using CAD software to simulate PV energy yield - The case of product integrated photovoltaic operated under indoor solar irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, N.H.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Turkenburg, W.C. [Dept. of Science, Technology and Society, Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS, Utrecht (Netherlands); Sinke, W.C. [Dept. of Science, Technology and Society, Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS, Utrecht (Netherlands); Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)

    2010-08-15

    In this paper, we show that photovoltaic (PV) energy yields can be simulated using standard rendering and ray-tracing features of Computer Aided Design (CAD) software. To this end, three-dimensional (3-D) sceneries are ray-traced in CAD. The PV power output is then modeled by translating irradiance intensity data of rendered images back into numerical data. To ensure accurate results, the solar irradiation data used as input is compared to numerical data obtained from rendered images, showing excellent agreement. As expected, also ray-tracing precision in the CAD software proves to be very high. To demonstrate PV energy yield simulations using this innovative concept, solar radiation time course data of a few days was modeled in 3-D to simulate distributions of irradiance incident on flat, single- and double-bend shapes and a PV powered computer mouse located on a window sill. Comparisons of measured to simulated PV output of the mouse show that also in practice, simulation accuracies can be very high. Theoretically, this concept has great potential, as it can be adapted to suit a wide range of solar energy applications, such as sun-tracking and concentrator systems, Building Integrated PV (BIPV) or Product Integrated PV (PIPV). However, graphical user interfaces of 'CAD-PV' software tools are not yet available. (author)

  9. Realization and simulating computation of ray-tracing program based on the law of Snell%基于Snell定律的射线追踪程序实现及模拟计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐修生; 王五平; 方璟; 张剑

    2004-01-01

    对基于Snell定律的射线追踪方法进行了研究并编程实现.鉴于追踪过程中根的变化范围较大,采用对分法求根克服了迭代法对迭代初始值的依赖性.通过二次射线追踪实现了对介质中存在超低速区的最短路径追踪,并对混凝土介质中常见的几种速度模型进行了模拟计算,结果表明该方法直观,能够追踪到最短路径,更接近于超声波的实际传播路径.

  10. SBR/Image时域射线跟踪法对UWB信号的仿真%Simulation of the UWB Signal Based on Time-Domain SBR/Image Ray Tracing Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧民

    2008-01-01

    超宽带(UWB)通信系统因为其良好的抗多径性,及比较高的传输速率引起越来越多的科研人员的研究兴趣.射线跟踪是一种被广泛应用于移动通信和个人通信环境中预测无线电波传播特性的技术,它同样适用于研究室内UWB无线信道的特征,能够提供精确度较高的预测结果.本文采用SBR/Image这种射线跟踪技术对UWB信号的传播特性进行了研究,利用MATLAB语言实现了上述算法,并结合相关文献对特定的室内视距环境进行仿真及数据分析,计算结果与文献结果吻合良好,表明本文方法是正确有效的.

  11. Simulations and experiments on RITA-2 at PSI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, S.N.; Lefmann, K.; McMorrow, D.F.

    2002-01-01

    The cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometer RITA-2 designed and built at Riso National Laboratory was installed at the neutron source SINQ at Paul Scherrer Institute in April/May 2001. In connection with the installation of RITA-2, computer simulations were performed using the neutron ray-tracing p......The cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometer RITA-2 designed and built at Riso National Laboratory was installed at the neutron source SINQ at Paul Scherrer Institute in April/May 2001. In connection with the installation of RITA-2, computer simulations were performed using the neutron ray...

  12. Virtual experiments: Combining realistic neutron scattering instrument and sample simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhi, E.; Hugouvieux, V.; Johnson, M. R.; Kob, W.

    2009-08-01

    A new sample component is presented for the Monte Carlo, ray-tracing program, McStas, which is widely used to simulate neutron scattering instruments. The new component allows the sample to be described by its material dynamic structure factor, which is separated into coherent and incoherent contributions. The effects of absorption and multiple scattering are treated and results from simulations and previous experiments are compared. The sample component can also be used to treat any scattering material which may be close to the sample and therefore contaminates the total, measured signal.

  13. Simulations and experiments on RITA-2 at PSI

    CERN Document Server

    Klausen, S N; McMorrow, D F; Altorfer, F; Janssen, S; Luethy, M

    2002-01-01

    The cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometer RITA-2 designed and built at Riso National Laboratory was installed at the neutron source SINQ at Paul Scherrer Institute in April/May 2001. In connection with the installation of RITA-2, computer simulations were performed using the neutron ray-tracing package McStas. The simulation results are compared to real experimental results obtained with a powder sample. Especially, the flux at the sample position and the resolution function of the spectrometer are investigated. (orig.)

  14. Simulations and experiments on RITA-2 at PSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausen, S. N.; Lefmann, K.; McMorrow, D. F.; Altorfer, F.; Janssen, S.; Lüthy, M.

    The cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometer RITA-2 designed and built at Riso National Laboratory was installed at the neutron source SINQ at Paul Scherrer Institute in April/May 2001. In connection with the installation of RITA-2, computer simulations were performed using the neutron ray-tracing package McStas. The simulation results are compared to real experimental results obtained with a powder sample. Especially, the flux at the sample position and the resolution function of the spectrometer are investigated.

  15. Experiment vs simulation RT WFNDEC 2014 benchmark: CIVA results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisseur, D.; Costin, M.; Rattoni, B.; Vienne, C.; Vabre, A.; Cattiaux, G.; Sollier, T.

    2015-03-01

    The French Atomic Energy Commission and Alternative Energies (CEA) has developed for years the CIVA software dedicated to simulation of NDE techniques such as Radiographic Testing (RT). RT modelling is achieved in CIVA using combination of a determinist approach based on ray tracing for transmission beam simulation and a Monte Carlo model for the scattered beam computation. Furthermore, CIVA includes various detectors models, in particular common x-ray films and a photostimulable phosphor plates. This communication presents the results obtained with the configurations proposed in the World Federation of NDEC 2014 RT modelling benchmark with the RT models implemented in the CIVA software.

  16. Modeling a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope Focusing Column - Lessons Learned in Electron Optics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, Jody; Gregory, Don; Gaskin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    /Fourier series hybrid approach. The presentation will give background remarks about the MSFC mini Lunar SEM concept and electron optics modeling, followed by a description of the alternate field modeling techniques that were tried, along with their incorporation into a ray-trace simulation. Next, the validation of this simulation against commercially available software will be discussed using an example lens as a test case. Then, the efficacy of aberration assessment using direct ray-tracing will be demonstrated, using this same validation case. The discussion will include practical error checks of the field solution. Finally, the ray-trace assessment of the MSFC mini Lunar SEM concept will be shown and discussed. The authors believe this presentation will be of general interest to practitioners of modeling and simulation, as well as those with a general optics background. Because electron optics and photon optics share many basic concepts (e.g., lenses, images, aberrations, etc.), the appeal of this presentation need not be restricted to just those interested in charged particle optics.

  17. Optical eye simulator for laser dazzle events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, João M P; Freitas, José; Williamson, Craig A

    2016-03-20

    An optical simulator of the human eye and its application to laser dazzle events are presented. The simulator combines optical design software (ZEMAX) with a scientific programming language (MATLAB) and allows the user to implement and analyze a dazzle scenario using practical, real-world parameters. Contrary to conventional analytical glare analysis, this work uses ray tracing and the scattering model and parameters for each optical element of the eye. The theoretical background of each such element is presented in relation to the model. The overall simulator's calibration, validation, and performance analysis are achieved by comparison with a simpler model based uponCIE disability glare data. Results demonstrate that this kind of advanced optical eye simulation can be used to represent laser dazzle and has the potential to extend the range of applicability of analytical models.

  18. Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gould, Derek A; Chalmers, Nicholas; Johnson, Sheena J

    2012-01-01

    Recognition of the many limitations of traditional apprenticeship training is driving new approaches to learning medical procedural skills. Among simulation technologies and methods available today, computer-based systems are topical and bring the benefits of automated, repeatable, and reliable p...... performance assessments. Human factors research is central to simulator model development that is relevant to real-world imaging-guided interventional tasks and to the credentialing programs in which it would be used.......Recognition of the many limitations of traditional apprenticeship training is driving new approaches to learning medical procedural skills. Among simulation technologies and methods available today, computer-based systems are topical and bring the benefits of automated, repeatable, and reliable...

  19. Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Sheldon

    2006-01-01

    Ross's Simulation, Fourth Edition introduces aspiring and practicing actuaries, engineers, computer scientists and others to the practical aspects of constructing computerized simulation studies to analyze and interpret real phenomena. Readers learn to apply results of these analyses to problems in a wide variety of fields to obtain effective, accurate solutions and make predictions about future outcomes. This text explains how a computer can be used to generate random numbers, and how to use these random numbers to generate the behavior of a stochastic model over time. It presents the statist

  20. SAR Automatic Target Recognition Based on Numerical Scattering Simulation and Model-based Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a model-based Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR automatic target recognition algorithm. Scattering is computed offline using the laboratory-developed Bidirectional Analytic Ray Tracing software and the same system parameter settings as the Moving and Stationary Target Acquisition and Recognition (MSTAR datasets. SAR images are then created by simulated electromagnetic scattering data. Shape features are extracted from the measured and simulated images, and then, matches are searched. The algorithm is verified using three types of targets from MSTAR data and simulated SAR images, and it is shown that the proposed approach is fast and easy to implement with high accuracy.

  1. Acceleration of Radiance for Lighting Simulation by Using Parallel Computing with OpenCL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Wangda; McNeil, Andrew; Wetter, Michael; Lee, Eleanor

    2011-09-06

    We report on the acceleration of annual daylighting simulations for fenestration systems in the Radiance ray-tracing program. The algorithm was optimized to reduce both the redundant data input/output operations and the floating-point operations. To further accelerate the simulation speed, the calculation for matrix multiplications was implemented using parallel computing on a graphics processing unit. We used OpenCL, which is a cross-platform parallel programming language. Numerical experiments show that the combination of the above measures can speed up the annual daylighting simulations 101.7 times or 28.6 times when the sky vector has 146 or 2306 elements, respectively.

  2. MASH: a framework for the automation of x-ray optical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondhauss, Peter

    2014-09-01

    MASH stands for "Macros for the Automation of SHadow". It allows to run a set of ray-tracing simulations, for a range of photon energies for example, fully automatically. Undulator gaps, crystal angles etc. are tuned automatically. Important output parameters, such as photon flux, photon irradiance, focal spot size, bandwidth, etc. are then directly provided as function of photon energy. A photon energy scan is probably the most commonly requested one, but any parameter or set of parameters can be scanned through as well. Heat load calculations with finite element analysis providing temperatures, stress and deformations (Comsol) are fully integrated. The deformations can be fed back into the ray-tracing process simply by activating a switch. MASH tries to hide program internals such as le names, calls to pre-processors etc., so that the user (nearly) only needs to provide the optical setup. It comes with a web interface, which allows to run it remotely on a central computation server. Hence, no local installation or licenses are required, just a web browser and access to the local network. Numerous tools are provided to look at the ray-tracing results in the web-browser. The results can be also downloaded for local analysis. All files are human readable text files that can be easily imported into third-party programs for further processing. All set parameters are stored in a single human-readable file in XML format.

  3. Computed tomography:the details.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-07-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a well established technique, particularly in medical imaging, but also applied in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging. Basic CT imaging via back-projection is treated in many texts, but often with insufficient detail to appreciate subtleties such as the role of non-uniform sampling densities. Herein are given some details often neglected in many texts.

  4. Development of steady-state model for MSPT and detailed analyses of receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Minoru; Sonoda, Masanori; Hino, Koichi

    2016-05-01

    Molten salt parabolic trough system (MSPT) uses molten salt as heat transfer fluid (HTF) instead of synthetic oil. The demonstration plant of MSPT was constructed by Chiyoda Corporation and Archimede Solar Energy in Italy in 2013. Chiyoda Corporation developed a steady-state model for predicting the theoretical behavior of the demonstration plant. The model was designed to calculate the concentrated solar power and heat loss using ray tracing of incident solar light and finite element modeling of thermal energy transferred into the medium. This report describes the verification of the model using test data on the demonstration plant, detailed analyses on the relation between flow rate and temperature difference on the metal tube of receiver and the effect of defocus angle on concentrated power rate, for solar collector assembly (SCA) development. The model is accurate to an extent of 2.0% as systematic error and 4.2% as random error. The relationships between flow rate and temperature difference on metal tube and the effect of defocus angle on concentrated power rate are shown.

  5. New simulation capability for gamma ray mirror experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descalle, Marie-Anne [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ruz-Armendariz, Jaime [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Decker, Todd [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brejhnolt, Nicolai [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pivovaroff, Michael [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-28

    This report provides a description of the simulation toolkit developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to support the design of nuclear safeguards experiments using grazing incidence multilayer mirrors in the energy band of uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) emission lines. This effort was motivated by the data analysis of a scoping experiment at the Irradiated Fuels Examination Facility (IFEL) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in FY13 and of a benchmark experiment at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in FY14 that highlighted the need for predictive tools built around a ray-tracing capability. This report presents the simulation toolkit and relevant results such as the simulated spectra for TMI, MOX, and ATM106 fuel rods based on spent fuel models provided by Los Alamos National Laboratory and for a virgin high 240Pu-content fuel plate, as well as models of the IFEL and INL experiments implemented in the ray tracing tool. The beam position and height were validated against the INL ~60 keV americium data. Examples of alternate configurations of the optics or experimental set-up illustrate the future use of the simulation suite to guide the next IFEL experimental campaign.

  6. Coupled Simulations of the Synchrotron Radiation and Induced Desorption Pressure Profiles for the HL-LHC Triplet Area and Interaction Points

    CERN Document Server

    Kersevan, R; Bregliozzi, G

    2014-01-01

    The HiLumi-LHC machine upgrade has officially started as an approved LHC project (see dedicated presentations at this conference on the subject). One important feature of the upgrade is the installation of very high-gradient triplet magnets for focusing the beams at the collision points of the two high-luminosity detectors ATLAS and CMS. Other important topics are new superconducting D1 and D2 magnets, installation of crab cavities and new tertiary collimators, and re-shuffling of the dispersion suppression area. Based on the current magnetic lattice set-up and beam orbits, a detailed study of the emission of synchrotron radiation (SR) and related photon-induced desorption (PID) has been carried out. A significant amount of SR photons are generated by the two off-axis beams in the common vacuum chamber of the triplet area, about 57 m in length. Ray-tracing Montecarlo codes Synrad+ and Molflow+ have been employed in this study. The related PID pressure profiles are shown, together with simulations using the co...

  7. Phonetic Detail in American English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ray Freeze

    1987-01-01

    @@ In the course of teaching general phonetics and phonological analysis in the psat few years,l have found some phonetic detail which some native speakers as well as non-native speakers were unaware of. This subtle detail will be the focus of this presentation. Som e of this detail many of you will already be aware of because of your experience in learning, teaching, and thinking about English. If anything is new to you, I hope you might enjoy hearing about it even if it turns out not to be useful in your work.

  8. HADES, A Code for Simulating a Variety of Radiographic Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufderheide, M B; Henderson, G; von Wittenau, A; Slone, D M; Barty, A; Martz, Jr., H E

    2004-10-28

    It is often useful to simulate radiographic images in order to optimize imaging trade-offs and to test tomographic techniques. HADES is a code that simulates radiography using ray tracing techniques. Although originally developed to simulate X-Ray transmission radiography, HADES has grown to simulate neutron radiography over a wide range of energy, proton radiography in the 1 MeV to 100 GeV range, and recently phase contrast radiography using X-Rays in the keV energy range. HADES can simulate parallel-ray or cone-beam radiography through a variety of mesh types, as well as through collections of geometric objects. HADES was originally developed for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) applications, but could be a useful tool for simulation of portal imaging, proton therapy imaging, and synchrotron studies of tissue. In this paper we describe HADES' current capabilities and discuss plans for a major revision of the code.

  9. Deterministic simulation of thermal neutron radiography and tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal Chowdhury, Rajarshi; Liu, Xin

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, thermal neutron radiography and tomography have gained much attention as one of the nondestructive testing methods. However, the application of thermal neutron radiography and tomography is hindered by their technical complexity, radiation shielding, and time-consuming data collection processes. Monte Carlo simulations have been developed in the past to improve the neutron imaging facility's ability. In this paper, a new deterministic simulation approach has been proposed and demonstrated to simulate neutron radiographs numerically using a ray tracing algorithm. This approach has made the simulation of neutron radiographs much faster than by previously used stochastic methods (i.e., Monte Carlo methods). The major problem with neutron radiography and tomography simulation is finding a suitable scatter model. In this paper, an analytic scatter model has been proposed that is validated by a Monte Carlo simulation.

  10. Atmospheric extinction in simulation tools for solar tower plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrieder, Natalie; Wilbert, Stefan; Schroedter-Homscheidt, Marion; Schnell, Franziska; Guevara, Diana Mancera; Buck, Reiner; Giuliano, Stefano; Pitz-Paal, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Atmospheric extinction causes significant radiation losses between the heliostat field and the receiver in a solar tower plants. These losses vary with site and time. State of the art is that in ray-tracing and plant optimization tools, atmospheric extinction is included by choosing between few constant standard atmospheric conditions. Even though some tools allow the consideration of site and time dependent extinction data, such data sets are nearly never available. This paper summarizes and compares the most common model equations implemented in several ray-tracing tools. There are already several methods developed and published to measure extinction on-site. An overview of the existing methods is also given here. Ray-tracing simulations of one exemplary tower plant at the Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA) are presented to estimate the plant yield deviations between simulations using standard model equations instead of extinction time series. For PSA, the effect of atmospheric extinction accounts for losses between 1.6 and 7 %. This range is caused by considering overload dumping or not. Applying standard clear or hazy model equations instead of extinction time series lead to an underestimation of the annual plant yield at PSA. The discussion of the effect of extinction in tower plants has to include overload dumping. Situations in which overload dumping occurs are mostly connected to high radiation levels and low atmospheric extinction. Therefore it can be recommended that project developers should consider site and time dependent extinction data especially on hazy sites. A reduced uncertainty of the plant yield prediction can significantly reduce costs due to smaller risk margins for financing and EPCs. The generation of extinction data for several locations in form of representative yearly time series or geographical maps should be further elaborated.

  11. Thermal and airflow prediction in buildings by associating models with different levels of details within an object-oriented simulation environment; Prediction des performances thermo-aerauliques des batiments par association de modeles de differents niveaux de finesse au sein d'un environnement oriente objet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora, L.

    2003-09-01

    The design of innovative HVAC systems, as well as the evaluation of the comfort of occupants requires a detailed estimation of airflows and heat transfers within building zones. Zonal and CFD methods can in principal provide such details, but in practice they are difficult to apply to study a whole building over long periods of time. In this study, we propose a new simulation platform based on the object oriented simulation environment SPARK to treat most of building zones using the nodal approach. This modeling method considers each zone as a fully and instantaneously well mixed volume. In this case, each zone can be characterized by a unique computational node where temperature, pressure and concentration are determined. Then, some specific rooms are studied with more details. In order to see the impact of these details on the entire building model, we propose different coupling methods depending on models associations between the nodal approach, and zonal or CFD room models. After a brief presentation of the different modeling methods used in this study, we attempt to demonstrate the interest to use one method instead of another depending on the room characteristics or the modeler's objectives. We then present the developed platform in which we solve both nodal and zonal models, and we couple detailed room models with the first method. Finally, a few applications demonstrate some capabilities of the developed platform to not only adjust the level of detail for each room model, but also propose new ways of research. In fact, the last application shows a new coupling method between zonal and CFD methods. In this approach, the first method acquires the airflow structure from results obtained using a CFD model in the room. Consequently, the developed platform has numerous applications, to study the dynamics of heat and mass transfers in buildings as well as in their immediate surroundings. (author)

  12. A GPU tool for efficient, accurate, and realistic simulation of cone beam CT projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xun; Yan, Hao; Cervino, Laura; Folkerts, Michael; Jiang, Steve B

    2012-12-01

    Simulation of x-ray projection images plays an important role in cone beam CT (CBCT) related research projects, such as the design of reconstruction algorithms or scanners. A projection image contains primary signal, scatter signal, and noise. It is computationally demanding to perform accurate and realistic computations for all of these components. In this work, the authors develop a package on graphics processing unit (GPU), called gDRR, for the accurate and efficient computations of x-ray projection images in CBCT under clinically realistic conditions. The primary signal is computed by a trilinear ray-tracing algorithm. A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is then performed, yielding the primary signal and the scatter signal, both with noise. A denoising process specifically designed for Poisson noise removal is applied to obtain a smooth scatter signal. The noise component is then obtained by combining the difference between the MC primary and the ray-tracing primary signals, and the difference between the MC simulated scatter and the denoised scatter signals. Finally, a calibration step converts the calculated noise signal into a realistic one by scaling its amplitude according to a specified mAs level. The computations of gDRR include a number of realistic features, e.g., a bowtie filter, a polyenergetic spectrum, and detector response. The implementation is fine-tuned for a GPU platform to yield high computational efficiency. For a typical CBCT projection with a polyenergetic spectrum, the calculation time for the primary signal using the ray-tracing algorithms is 1.2-2.3 s, while the MC simulations take 28.1-95.3 s, depending on the voxel size. Computation time for all other steps is negligible. The ray-tracing primary signal matches well with the primary part of the MC simulation result. The MC simulated scatter signal using gDRR is in agreement with EGSnrc results with a relative difference of 3.8%. A noise calibration process is conducted to calibrate g

  13. Gamma ray transport simulations using SGaRD code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humbert Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available SGaRD (Spectroscopy, Gamma rays, Rapid, Deterministic code is used for the fast calculation of the gamma-ray spectrum, produced by a spherical shielded source and measured by a detector. The photon source lines originate from the radioactive decay of the unstable isotopes. The leakage spectrum is separated in two parts: the uncollided component is transported by ray tracing, and the scattered component is calculated using a multigroup discrete ordinates method. The pulse height spectrum is then simulated by folding the leakage spectrum with the detector response function, which is precalculated for each considered detector type. An application to the simulation of the gamma spectrum produced by a natural uranium ball coated with plexiglass and measured using a NaI detector is presented. The SGaRD code is also used to infer the dimensions of a one-dimensional model of a shielded gamma ray source. The method is based on the simulation of the uncollided leakage current of discrete gamma lines that are produced by nuclear decay. The material thicknesses are computed with SGaRD using a fast ray-tracing algorithm embedded in a nonlinear multidimensional iterative optimization procedure that minimizes the error metric between calculated and measured signatures.

  14. Nonsequential modeling of laser diode stacks using Zemax: simulation, optimization, and experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluccelli, Nicola

    2010-08-01

    Modeling a real laser diode stack based on Zemax ray tracing software that operates in a nonsequential mode is reported. The implementation of the model is presented together with the geometric and optical parameters to be adjusted to calibrate the model and to match the simulated intensity irradiance profiles with the experimental profiles. The calibration of the model is based on a near-field and a far-field measurement. The validation of the model has been accomplished by comparing the simulated and experimental transverse irradiance profiles at different positions along the caustic formed by a lens. Spot sizes and waist location are predicted with a maximum error below 6%.

  15. Design of GNSS Performance Analysis and Simulation Tools as a Web Portal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tadic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers design of a web-portal for the validation of behavior of GNSS applications in different environments. The tool provides the positioning performance analysis and a comparison to benchmark devices. Web-portal incorporates a 3D synthetic data generator to compute the propagation and the reception of radio-navigation signals in a 3D virtual environment. This radio propagation simulator uses ray-tracing to calculate interactions between the GNSS signal and the local environment. For faster execution on a GPU platform, the simulator uses BVH optimization. The work is verified in field trials and by using reference software.

  16. Review of Ship Structural Details

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    8 4.3 Knee and Beam Brackets 4-11 4.3.1 Brackets for Girders and Deep Webs 4-11 4.3.2 Brackets Connecting Rolled Sections 4-15 4.4 Tripping...are shell stringers penetrating deep web frames and longitudinal girders penetrating deep transverses. This is not a common detail. If double...34. 3-76 ^"SECTION ’’.’(-K PLAJ iNG * S v *^ 4Fb^:TH»r.KNF.^ SAME AS FLAMGE ► BULKHFADQR DEEP WEB SS- 9 Detail Type: STANCHION END

  17. Detail in architecture: Between arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulencin Juraj

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Architectural detail represents an important part of architecture. Not only can it be used as an identifier of a specific building but at the same time enhances the experience of the realized project. Within it lie the signs of a great architect and clues to understanding his or her way of thinking. It is therefore the central topic of a seminar offered to architecture students at the Brno University of Technology. During the course of the semester-long class the students acquaint themselves with atypical architectural details of domestic and international architects by learning to read them, understand them and subsequently draw them by creating architectural blueprints. In other words, by general analysis of a detail the students learn theoretical thinking of its architect who, depending on the nature of the design, had to incorporate a variety of techniques and crafts. Students apply this analytical part to their own architectural detail design. The methodology of the seminar consists of experiential learning by project management and is complemented by a series of lectures discussing a diversity of details as well as materials and technologies required to implement it. The architectural detail design is also part of students’ bachelors thesis, therefore, the realistic nature of their blueprints can be verified in the production process of its physical counterpart. Based on their own documentation the students choose the most suitable manufacturing process whether it is supplied by a specific technology or a craftsman. Students actively participate in the production and correct their design proposals in real scale with the actual material. A student, as a future architect, stands somewhere between a client and an artisan, materializes his or her idea and adjusts the manufacturing process so that the final detail fulfills aesthetic consistency and is in harmony with its initial concept. One of the very important aspects of the design is its

  18. Transformative Dynamics in Detailed Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quitzau, Maj-Britt; Poulsen, Naja; Gustavsson, Ted

    that the translation process relies heavily on integration of impositions in the detailed plan, although this has clear limitations, since some sustainable strategies are more difficult to impose than others. It also shows how strategic navigation may represent an alternative translation strategy to promote more...... difficult sustainable strategies that address the project design more directly. In conclusion, the paper argues that strategic navigation represents a stronger mediator of change compared to the detailed plan, but that especially timing issues in the coordination between formal planning and design processes...

  19. Influence of Spectral Transfer Processes in Compressible Low Frequency Plasma Turbulence on Scattering and Refraction of Electromagnetic Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Matlab for simplicity. 6.1 Hamilton-Jacobi Ray Tracing approximation The Hamilton-Jacobi ray tracing or geometric optics approximation is valid...SCATTERING SIMULATIONS: RAY TRACING ..................................... 56 6.0 6.1 Hamilton-Jacobi Ray Tracing approximation...58 6.3 Integration of Ray Tracing Algorithm with Vortex Solutions ............................................ 60 6.4 Fokker-Planck

  20. Modeling neutron guides using Monte Carlo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, D Q; Crow, M L; Wang, X L; Lee, W T; Hubbard, C R

    2002-01-01

    Four neutron guide geometries, straight, converging, diverging and curved, were characterized using Monte Carlo ray-tracing simulations. The main areas of interest are the transmission of the guides at various neutron energies and the intrinsic time-of-flight (TOF) peak broadening. Use of a delta-function time pulse from a uniform Lambert neutron source allows one to quantitatively simulate the effect of guides' geometry on the TOF peak broadening. With a converging guide, the intensity and the beam divergence increases while the TOF peak width decreases compared with that of a straight guide. By contrast, use of a diverging guide decreases the intensity and the beam divergence, and broadens the width (in TOF) of the transmitted neutron pulse.

  1. Simulating Complex Window Systems using BSDF Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantoglou, Maria; Jonsson, Jacob; Lee, Eleanor

    2009-06-22

    Nowadays, virtual models are commonly used to evaluate the performance of conventional window systems. Complex fenestration systems can be difficult to simulate accurately not only because of their geometry but also because of their optical properties that scatter light in an unpredictable manner. Bi-directional Scattering Distribution Functions (BSDF) have recently been developed based on a mixture of measurements and modelling to characterize the optics of such systems. This paper describes the workflow needed to create then use these BSDF datasets in the Radiance lighting simulation software. Limited comparisons are made between visualizations produced using the standard ray-tracing method, the BSDF method, and that taken in a full-scale outdoor mockup.

  2. DAGAL: Detailed Anatomy of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapen, Johan H.

    2017-03-01

    The current IAU Symposium is closely connected to the EU-funded network DAGAL (Detailed Anatomy of Galaxies), with the final annual network meeting of DAGAL being at the core of this international symposium. In this short paper, we give an overview of DAGAL, its training activities, and some of the scientific advances that have been made under its umbrella.

  3. DAGAL: Detailed Anatomy of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Knapen, Johan H

    2016-01-01

    The current IAU Symposium is closely connected to the EU-funded network DAGAL (Detailed Anatomy of Galaxies), with the final annual network meeting of DAGAL being at the core of this international symposium. In this short paper, we give an overview of DAGAL, its training activities, and some of the scientific advances that have been made under its umbrella.

  4. On Detailing in Contemporary Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Claus; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2010-01-01

    / tactility can blur the meaning of the architecture and turn it into an empty statement. The present paper will outline detailing in contemporary architecture and discuss the issue with respect to architectural quality. Architectural cases considered as sublime piece of architecture will be presented...

  5. A SPECT system simulator built on the SolidWorks (TM) 3D-Design package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Furenlid, Lars R

    2014-08-17

    We have developed a GPU-accelerated SPECT system simulator that integrates into instrument-design workflow [1]. This simulator includes a gamma-ray tracing module that can rapidly propagate gamma-ray photons through arbitrary apertures modeled by SolidWorks (TM) -created stereolithography (.STL) representations with a full complement of physics cross sections [2, 3]. This software also contains a scintillation detector simulation module that can model a scintillation detector with arbitrary scintillation crystal shape and light-sensor arrangement. The gamma-ray tracing module enables us to efficiently model aperture and detector crystals in SolidWorks (TM) and save them as STL file format, then load the STL-format model into this module to generate list-mode results of interacted gamma-ray photon information (interaction positions and energies) inside the detector crystals. The Monte-Carlo scintillation detector simulation module enables us to simulate how scintillation photons get reflected, refracted and absorbed inside a scintillation detector, which contributes to more accurate simulation of a SPECT system.

  6. Microscopic Dynamics and Topology of Polymer Rings Immersed in a Host Matrix of Longer Linear Polymers: Results from a Detailed Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study and Comparison with Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George D. Papadopoulos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We have performed molecular dynamics (MD simulations of melt systems consisting of a small number of long ring poly(ethylene oxide (PEO probes immersed in a host matrix of linear PEO chains and have studied their microscopic dynamics and topology as a function of the molecular length of the host linear chains. Consistent with a recent neutron spin echo spectroscopy study (Goossen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 2015, 115, 148302, we have observed that the segmental dynamics of the probe ring molecules is controlled by the length of the host linear chains. In matrices of short, unentangled linear chains, the ring probes exhibit a Rouse-like dynamics, and the spectra of their dynamic structure factor resemble those in their own melt. In striking contrast, in matrices of long, entangled linear chains, their dynamics is drastically altered. The corresponding dynamic structure factor spectra exhibit a steep initial decay up to times on the order of the entanglement time τe of linear PEO at the same temperature but then they become practically time-independent approaching plateau values. The plateau values are different for different wavevectors; they also depend on the length of the host linear chains. Our results are supported by a geometric analysis of topological interactions, which reveals significant threading of all ring molecules by the linear chains. In most cases, each ring is simultaneously threaded by several linear chains. As a result, its dynamics at times longer than a few τe should be completely dictated by the release of the topological restrictions imposed by these threadings (interpenetrations. Our topological analysis did not indicate any effect of the few ring probes on the statistical properties of the network of primitive paths of the host linear chains.

  7. A Detailed Modeling Study of Propane Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C K; Jayaweera, T M; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J

    2004-03-19

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been used to simulate ignition delay times recorded by a number of experimental shock tube studies over the temperature range 900 {le} T {le} 1800 K, in the pressure range 0.75-40 atm and in the equivalence ratio range 0.5 {le} {phi} {le} 2.0. Flame speed measurements at 1 atm in the equivalence ratio range 0.4 {le} {phi} {le} 1.8 have also been simulated. Both of these data sets, particularly those recorded at high pressure, are of particular importance in validating a kinetic mechanism, as internal combustion engines operate at elevated pressures and temperatures and rates of fuel oxidation are critical to efficient system operation. Experiments in which reactant, intermediate and product species were quantitatively recorded, versus temperature in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) and versus time in a flow reactor are also simulated. This data provide a stringent test of the kinetic mechanism as it must reproduce accurate quantitative profiles for all reactant, intermediate and product species. The JSR experiments were performed in the temperature range 1000-1110 K, in the equivalence ratio range 0.5 {le} {phi} {le} 4.0, at a pressure of 5 atm. These experiments are complemented by those carried out in a flow reactor in the temperature range 660-820 K, at 10 atm and at an equivalence ratio of 0.4. In addition, burner stabilized flames were simulated, where chemical species profiles were measured at atmospheric pressure for two propane-air flat flames. Overall, reasonably good agreement is observed between the model simulations and the experimental results.

  8. Simulation and modeling of silicon pore optics for the ATHENA x-ray telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, D.; Christensen, F. E.; Bavdaz, M.; Civitani, M. M.; Conconi, P.; Della Monica Ferreira, D.; Knudsen, E. B.; Massahi, S.; Pareschi, G.; Salmaso, B.; Shortt, B.; Tayabaly, K.; Westergaard, N. J.; Wille, E.

    2016-07-01

    The ATHENA X-ray observatory is a large-class ESA approved mission, with launch scheduled in 2028. The technology of silicon pore optics (SPO) was selected as baseline to assemble ATHENA's optic with more than 1000 mirror modules, obtained by stacking wedged and ribbed silicon wafer plates onto silicon mandrels to form the Wolter-I configuration. Even if the current baseline design fulfills the required effective area of 2 m2 at 1 keV on-axis, alternative design solutions, e.g., privileging the field of view or the off-axis angular resolution, are also possible. Moreover, the stringent requirement of a 5 arcsec HEW angular resolution at 1 keV entails very small profile errors and excellent surface smoothness, as well as a precise alignment of the 1000 mirror modules to avoid imaging degradation and effective area loss. Finally, the stray light issue has to be kept under control. In this paper we show the preliminary results of simulations of optical systems based on SPO for the ATHENA X-ray telescope, from pore to telescope level, carried out at INAF/OAB and DTU Space under ESA contract. We show ray-tracing results, including assessment of the misalignments of mirror modules and the impact of stray light. We also deal with a detailed description of diffractive effects expected in an SPO module from UV light, where the aperture diffraction prevails, to X-rays where the surface diffraction plays a major role. Finally, we analyze the results of X-ray tests performed at the BESSY synchrotron, we compare them with surface finishing measurements, and we estimate the expected HEW degradation caused by the X-ray scattering.

  9. Characterization and simulation of soft gamma-ray mirrors for their use with spent fuel rods at reprocessing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruz, J; Descalle, M A; Alameda, J B; Brejnholt, N F; Chichester, D L; Decker, T A; Fernandez-Perea, M; Hill, R M; Kisner, R A; Melin, A M; Patton, B W; Soufli, R; Trellue, H; Watson, S M; Ziock, K P; Pivovaroff, M J

    2016-06-01

    The use of a grazing incidence optic to selectively reflect K-shell fluorescence emission and isotope-specific lines from special nuclear materials is a highly desirable nondestructive analysis method for use in reprocessing fuel environments. Preliminary measurements have been performed, and a simulation suite has been developed to give insight into the design of the x ray optics system as a function of the source emission, multilayer coating characteristics, and general experimental configurations. The experimental results are compared to the predictions from our simulation toolkit to illustrate the ray-tracing capability and explore the effect of modified optics in future measurement campaigns.

  10. Structure Planning and Optimization Solutions of LTE Network Based on Simulation%基于仿真的LTE网络结构规划与优化解决方案

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡厚恩

    2014-01-01

    针对TD-LTE规划组网中受限于网络结构所带来的问题,主要对基于仿真分析的LTE网络结构规划与优化解决方案展开阐述。首先概述基于仿真的TD-LTE网络结构规划与优化解决方案,并介绍CrossWave射线跟踪传播模型以及仿真规划工具Atoll的ACP功能;然后对LTE网络结构规划思路、ACP仿真应用以及特殊场景精准规划效果进行具体描述;最后通过实际应用案例加以分析说明,该方案为城市LTE网络建设提供了一种新的规划与优化思路。%Because of the TD-LTE planning networking which is limited by the network structure, the structure planning and optimization solutions of LTE network are illustrated based on simulation. First the structure planning and optimization solutions of TD-LTE network are outlined based on simulation, and CrossWave ray tracing propagation model and the ACP function of Atoll simulation planning tool are introduced. And then the structure planning ideas of LTE network, ACP simulation applications and the precise planning effects in special scenarios are described in detail. At last, by the analysis of practical application cases, this solution provides a new idea of planning and optimization for urban LTE network construction.

  11. Morphological details in bloodstain particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wael, K; Lepot, L

    2015-01-01

    During the commission of crimes blood can be transferred to the clothing of the offender or on other crime related objects. Bloodstain particles are sub-millimetre sized flakes that are lost from dried bloodstains. The nature of these red particles is easily confirmed using spectroscopic methods. In casework, bloodstain particles showing highly detailed morphological features were observed. These provided a rationale for a series of experiments described in this work. It was found that the "largest" particles are shed from blood deposited on polyester and polyamide woven fabrics. No particles are lost from the stains made on absorbent fabrics and from those made on knitted fabrics. The morphological features observed in bloodstain particles can provide important information on the substrates from which they were lost. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Generalized Detailed Balance Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelle, David

    2016-08-01

    Given a system M in a thermal bath we obtain a generalized detailed balance relation for the ratio r=π _τ (K→ J)/π _τ (J→ K) of the transition probabilities M:J→ K and M:K→ J in time τ . We assume an active bath, containing solute molecules in metastable states. These molecules may react with M and the transition J→ K occurs through different channels α involving different reactions with the bath. We find that r=sum p^α r^α , where p^α is the probability that channel α occurs, and r^α depends on the amount of heat (more precisely enthalpy) released to the bath in channel α.

  13. A generalized detailed balance relation

    CERN Document Server

    Ruelle, David

    2015-01-01

    Given a system $M$ in a thermal bath we obtain a generalized detailed balance relation for the ratio $r=\\pi_\\tau(K\\to J)/\\pi_\\tau(J\\to K)$ of the transition probabilities $M:J\\to K$ and $M:K\\to J$ in time $\\tau$. We assume an active bath, containing solute molecules in metastable states. These molecules may react with $M$ and the transition $J\\to K$ occurs through different channels $\\alpha$ involving different reactions with the bath. We find that $r=\\sum p^\\alpha r^\\alpha$, where $p^\\alpha$ is the probability that channel $\\alpha$ occurs, and $r^\\alpha$ depends on the amount of heat (more precisely enthalpy) released to the bath in channel $\\alpha$.

  14. New developments in the McStas neutron instrument simulation package

    OpenAIRE

    Willendrup, Peter Kjær; Bergbäck Knudsen, Erik; Klinkby, Esben Bryndt; Nielsen, T.; Farhi, E.; Filges, U.; Lefmann, K.

    2014-01-01

    The McStas neutron ray-tracing software package is a versatile tool for building accurate simulators of neutron scattering instruments at reactors, short- and long-pulsed spallation sources such as the European Spallation Source. McStas is extensively used for design and optimization of instruments, virtual experiments, data analysis and user training. McStas was founded as a scienti_c, open-source collaborative code in 1997. This contribution presents the project at its current state and giv...

  15. Detailed modeling of mountain wave PSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fueglistaler

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs play a key role in polar ozone depletion. In the Arctic, PSCs can occur on the mesoscale due to orographically induced gravity waves. Here we present a detailed study of a mountain wave PSC event on 25-27 January 2000 over Scandinavia. The mountain wave PSCs were intensively observed by in-situ and remote-sensing techniques during the second phase of the SOLVE/THESEO-2000 Arctic campaign. We use these excellent data of PSC observations on 3 successive days to analyze the PSCs and to perform a detailed comparison with modeled clouds. We simulated the 3-dimensional PSC structure on all 3 days with a mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP model and a microphysical box model (using best available nucleation rates for ice and nitric acid trihydrate particles. We show that the combined mesoscale/microphysical model is capable of reproducing the PSC measurements within the uncertainty of data interpretation with respect to spatial dimensions, temporal development and microphysical properties, without manipulating temperatures or using other tuning parameters. In contrast, microphysical modeling based upon coarser scale global NWP data, e.g. current ECMWF analysis data, cannot reproduce observations, in particular the occurrence of ice and nitric acid trihydrate clouds. Combined mesoscale/microphysical modeling may be used for detailed a posteriori PSC analysis and for future Arctic campaign flight and mission planning. The fact that remote sensing alone cannot further constrain model results due to uncertainities in the interpretation of measurements, underlines the need for synchronous in-situ PSC observations in campaigns.

  16. Fast weak-lensing simulations with halo model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giocoli, Carlo; Di Meo, Sandra; Meneghetti, Massimo; Jullo, Eric; de la Torre, Sylvain; Moscardini, Lauro; Baldi, Marco; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Metcalf, R. Benton

    2017-09-01

    Full ray-tracing maps of gravitational lensing, constructed from N-body simulations, represent a fundamental tool to interpret present and future weak-lensing data. However, the limitation of computational resources and storage capabilities severely restricts the number of realizations that can be performed in order to accurately sample both the cosmic shear models and covariance matrices. In this paper, we present a halo model formalism for weak gravitational lensing that alleviates these issues by producing weak-lensing mocks at a reduced computational cost. Our model takes as input the halo population within a desired light cone and the linear power spectrum of the underlined cosmological model. We examine the contribution given by the presence of substructures within haloes to the cosmic shear power spectrum and quantify it to the percent level. Our method allows us to reconstruct high-resolution convergence maps, for any desired source redshifts, of light cones that realistically trace the matter density distribution in the universe, account for masked area and sample selections. We compare our analysis on the same large-scale structures constructed using ray-tracing techniques and find very good agreements in both the linear and non-linear regimes up to few percent levels. The accuracy and speed of our method demonstrate the potential of our halo model for weak-lensing statistics and the possibility to generate a large sample of convergence maps for different cosmological models as needed for the analysis of large galaxy redshift surveys.

  17. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Cyclohexane Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silke, E J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Ribaucour, M

    2006-11-10

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of cyclohexane at both low and high temperatures. Reaction rate constant rules are developed for the low temperature combustion of cyclohexane. These rules can be used for in chemical kinetic mechanisms for other cycloalkanes. Since cyclohexane produces only one type of cyclohexyl radical, much of the low temperature chemistry of cyclohexane is described in terms of one potential energy diagram showing the reaction of cyclohexyl radical + O{sub 2} through five, six and seven membered ring transition states. The direct elimination of cyclohexene and HO{sub 2} from RO{sub 2} is included in the treatment using a modified rate constant of Cavallotti et al. Published and unpublished data from the Lille rapid compression machine, as well as jet-stirred reactor data are used to validate the mechanism. The effect of heat loss is included in the simulations, an improvement on previous studies on cyclohexane. Calculations indicated that the production of 1,2-epoxycyclohexane observed in the experiments can not be simulated based on the current understanding of low temperature chemistry. Possible 'alternative' H-atom isomerizations leading to different products from the parent O{sub 2}QOOH radical were included in the low temperature chemical kinetic mechanism and were found to play a significant role.

  18. Detailed modelling of the 21-cm Forest

    CERN Document Server

    Semelin, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The 21-cm forest is a promising probe of the Epoch of Reionization. The local state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) is encoded in the spectrum of a background source (radio-loud quasars or gamma ray burst afterglow) by absorption at the local 21-cm wavelength, resulting in a continuous and fluctuating absorption level. Small-scale structures (filaments and minihaloes) in the IGM are responsible for the strongest absorption features. The absorption can also be modulated on large scales by inhomogeneous heating and Wouthuysen-Field coupling. We present the results from a simulation that attempts to preserve the cosmological environment while resolving some of the small-scale structures (a few kpc resolution in a 50 Mpc/h box). The simulation couples the dynamics and the ionizing radiative transfer and includes X-ray and Lyman lines radiative transfer for a detailed physical modelling. As a result we find that soft X-ray self-shielding, Lyman-alpha self-shielding and shock heating all have an impact on the pre...

  19. Simulation of complex phenomena in optical fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allington-Smith, Jeremy; Murray, Graham; Lemke, Ulrike

    2012-12-01

    Optical fibres are essential for many types of highly multiplexed and precision spectroscopy. The success of the new generation of multifibre instruments under construction to investigate fundamental problems in cosmology, such as the nature of dark energy, requires accurate modellization of the fibre system to achieve their signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) goals. Despite their simple construction, fibres exhibit unexpected behaviour including non-conservation of etendue (focal ratio degradation, FRD) and modal noise. Furthermore, new fibre geometries (non-circular or tapered) have become available to improve the scrambling properties that, together with modal noise, limit the achievable SNR in precision spectroscopy. These issues have often been addressed by extensive tests on candidate fibres and their terminations, but these are difficult and time-consuming. Modelling by ray tracing and wave analysis is possible with commercial software packages, but these do not address the more complex features, in particular FRD. We use a phase-tracking ray-tracing method to provide a practical description of FRD derived from our previous experimental work on circular fibres and apply it to non-standard fibres. This allows the relationship between scrambling and FRD to be quantified for the first time. We find that scrambling primarily affects the shape of the near-field pattern but has negligible effect on the barycentre. FRD helps to homogenize the near-field pattern but does not make it completely uniform. Fibres with polygonal cross-section improve scrambling without amplifying the FRD. Elliptical fibres, in conjunction with tapering, may offer an efficient means of image slicing to improve the product of resolving power and throughput, but the result is sensitive to the details of illumination. We also investigated the performance of fibres close to the limiting numerical aperture since this may affect the uniformity of the SNR for some prime focus fibre instrumentation.

  20. A GPU Tool for Efficient, Accurate, and Realistic Simulation of Cone Beam CT Projections

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Xun; Cervino, Laura; Folkerts, Michael; Jiang, Steve B

    2012-01-01

    Simulation of x-ray projection images plays an important role in cone beam CT (CBCT) related research projects. A projection image contains primary signal, scatter signal, and noise. It is computationally demanding to perform accurate and realistic computations for all of these components. In this work, we develop a package on GPU, called gDRR, for the accurate and efficient computations of x-ray projection images in CBCT under clinically realistic conditions. The primary signal is computed by a tri-linear ray-tracing algorithm. A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is then performed, yielding the primary signal and the scatter signal, both with noise. A denoising process is applied to obtain a smooth scatter signal. The noise component is then obtained by combining the difference between the MC primary and the ray-tracing primary signals, and the difference between the MC simulated scatter and the denoised scatter signals. Finally, a calibration step converts the calculated noise signal into a realistic one by scali...

  1. Based on MDCE to simulate bell-shaped interferograms produced by a capillary tube interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailing, Yang; Mingming, Tang

    2011-02-01

    The vector theory to calculate the optical path length (OPL) of the rays passing through a capillary tube was given and the OPLs including the collimated lens in 3D space were calculated, the interferograms produced by the capillary tube were simulated. A pinhole localized at the focal point of the collimated lens was seen as a point source of light. Based on ray-tracing, the OPL distribution from the point source of light, passing by the collimated lens, a cylindrical lens, the capillary tube and a screen was calculated. Because the huge calculation in the ray-tracing, a distributed calculating net based on MATLAB Distributed Computing Engine (MDCE) was established to save time. In order to get the simulated interferograms from the envelope of the OPLs, Delaunay triangulation algorithm and cubic spline interpolation were used. We record the interferograms of the capillary tube filled with liquids with different refractive indices and compared with the simulated interferograms. The results showed the two coincided well.

  2. Detailed characteristics of drop-laden mixing layers: LES predictions compared to DNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okong'o, N.; Leboissetier, A.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    Results have been compared from Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of a temporal mixing layer laden with evaporating drops, to assess the ability of LES to reproduce detailed characteristics of DNS.

  3. Virtual X-ray imaging techniques in an immersive casting simulation environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ning [Visual Computing and Virtual Reality Laboratory, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Ewha Womans University, 405-1, Ewha-SK Telecom Building, 11-1, Daehyun-dong, Seodaemun-gu, 120-750 Seoul (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: lining@ewha.ac.kr; Kim, Sung-Hee [Visual Computing and Virtual Reality Laboratory, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Ewha Womans University, 405-1, Ewha-SK Telecom Building, 11-1, Daehyun-dong, Seodaemun-gu, 120-750 Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Ji-Hyun [Visual Computing and Virtual Reality Laboratory, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Ewha Womans University, 405-1, Ewha-SK Telecom Building, 11-1, Daehyun-dong, Seodaemun-gu, 120-750 Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sang-Hyun [Center for e-Design, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, 7-47, Songdo-Dong, Yeonsu-Ku, Inchon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jung-Gil [Center for e-Design, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, 7-47, Songdo-Dong, Yeonsu-Ku, Inchon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myoung-Hee [Visual Computing and Virtual Reality Laboratory, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Ewha Womans University, 405-1, Ewha-SK Telecom Building, 11-1, Daehyun-dong, Seodaemun-gu, 120-750 Seoul (Korea, Republic of) and Center for Computer Graphics and Virtual Reality, Ewha Womans University, 400, Ewha-SK Telecom Building, 11-1, Daehyun-dong, Seodaemun-gu, 120-750 Seoul (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: mhkim@ewha.ac.kr

    2007-08-15

    A computer code was developed to simulate radiograph of complex casting products in a CAVE{sup TM}-like environment. The simulation is based on the deterministic algorithms and ray tracing techniques. The aim of this study is to examine CAD/CAE/CAM models at the design stage, to optimize the design and inspect predicted defective regions with fast speed, good accuracy and small numerical expense. The present work discusses the algorithms for the radiography simulation of CAD/CAM model and proposes algorithmic solutions adapted from ray-box intersection algorithm and octree data structure specifically for radiographic simulation of CAE model. The stereoscopic visualization of full-size of product in the immersive casting simulation environment as well as the virtual X-ray images of castings provides an effective tool for design and evaluation of foundry processes by engineers and metallurgists.

  4. Software simulator for design and optimization of the kaleidoscopes for the surface reflectance measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havran, Vlastimil; Bittner, Jiří; Čáp, Jiří; Hošek, Jan; Macúchová, Karolina; Němcová, Šárka

    2015-01-01

    Realistic reproduction of appearance of real-world materials by means of computer graphics requires accurate measurement and reconstruction of surface reflectance properties. We propose an interactive software simulation tool for modeling properties of a kaleidoscopic optical system for surface reflectance measurement. We use ray tracing to obtain fine grain simulation results corresponding to the resolution of a simulated image sensor and computing the reflections inside this system based on planar mirrors. We allow for a simulation of different geometric configurations of a kaleidoscope such as the number of mirrors, the length, and the taper angle. For accelerating the computation and delivering interactivity we use parallel processing of large groups of rays. Apart from the interactive mode our tool also features batch optimization suitable for automatic search for optimized kaleidoscope designs. We discuss the possibilities of the simulation and present some preliminary results obtained by using it in practice.

  5. Radiographic simulations and analysis for ASCI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufderheide, M.; Stone, D.; VonWittenau, A.

    1998-12-18

    In this paper, the authors describe their work on developing quantitatively accurate radiographic simulation and analysis tools for ASCI hydro codes. they have extended the ability of HADES, the code which simulates radiography through a mesh, to treat the complex meshes used in ASCI calculations. The ultimate goal is to allow direct comparison between experimental radiographs and full physics simulated radiographs of ASCI calculations. They describe the ray-tracing algorithm they have developed for fast, accurate simulation of dynamic radiographs with the meshes used in ALE3D, an LLNL ASCI code. Spectral effects and material compositions are included. In addition to the newness of the mesh types, the distributed nature of domain decomposed problems requires special treatment by the radiographic code. Because of the size of such problems, they have parallelized the radiographic simulation, in order to have quick turnaround time. presently, this is done using the domain decomposition from the hydro code. They demonstrate good parallel scaling as the size of the problem is increased. They show a comparison between an experimental radiograph of a high explosive detonation and a simulated radiograph of an ALE3D calculation. They conclude with a discussion of future work.

  6. Simulation and characterization of different setups for gamma ray detection using SiPMs and LYSO scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benetti, M., E-mail: mbenetti@fbk.eu [INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento) and Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive, 14, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); Tarolli, A.; Giacomini, G.; Piemonte, C. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi (FBK-CMM), Via Sommarive, 18, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); Dalla Betta, G.-F. [INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento) and Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive, 14, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2011-12-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) coupled to fast bright scintillators, like cerium doped silicate based crystals, allow the construction of compact gamma ray detectors. In this paper we discuss simulation results obtained from Monte Carlo ray tracing tools applied to SiPM and LYSO systems. We address the importance of three key factors in light propagation: the scintillator wrapping, the coupling medium, and the detector coating. We also propose a simple experiment to verify some of the findings related to the investigation of diffusive wrappings.

  7. Some articulatory details of emotional speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungbok; Yildirim, Serdar; Bulut, Murtaza; Kazemzadeh, Abe; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2005-09-01

    Differences in speech articulation among four emotion types, neutral, anger, sadness, and happiness are investigated by analyzing tongue tip, jaw, and lip movement data collected from one male and one female speaker of American English. The data were collected using an electromagnetic articulography (EMA) system while subjects produce simulated emotional speech. Pitch, root-mean-square (rms) energy and the first three formants were estimated for vowel segments. For both speakers, angry speech exhibited the largest rms energy and largest articulatory activity in terms of displacement range and movement speed. Happy speech is characterized by largest pitch variability. It has higher rms energy than neutral speech but articulatory activity is rather comparable to, or less than, neutral speech. That is, happy speech is more prominent in voicing activity than in articulation. Sad speech exhibits longest sentence duration and lower rms energy. However, its articulatory activity is no less than neutral speech. Interestingly, for the male speaker, articulation for vowels in sad speech is consistently more peripheral (i.e., more forwarded displacements) when compared to other emotions. However, this does not hold for female subject. These and other results will be discussed in detail with associated acoustics and perceived emotional qualities. [Work supported by NIH.

  8. Level of detail technique for plant models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaopeng ZHANG; Qingqiong DENG; Marc JAEGER

    2006-01-01

    Realistic modelling and interactive rendering of forestry and landscape is a challenge in computer graphics and virtual reality. Recent new developments in plant growth modelling and simulation lead to plant models faithful to botanical structure and development, not only representing the complex architecture of a real plant but also its functioning in interaction with its environment. Complex geometry and material of a large group of plants is a big burden even for high performances computers, and they often overwhelm the numerical calculation power and graphic rendering power. Thus, in order to accelerate the rendering speed of a group of plants, software techniques are often developed. In this paper, we focus on plant organs, i.e. leaves, flowers, fruits and inter-nodes. Our approach is a simplification process of all sparse organs at the same time, i. e. , Level of Detail (LOD) , and multi-resolution models for plants. We do explain here the principle and construction of plant simplification. They are used to construct LOD and multi-resolution models of sparse organs and branches of big trees. These approaches take benefit from basic knowledge of plant architecture, clustering tree organs according to biological structures. We illustrate the potential of our approach on several big virtual plants for geometrical compression or LOD model definition. Finally we prove the efficiency of the proposed LOD models for realistic rendering with a virtual scene composed by 184 mature trees.

  9. Monte-Carlo Simulator and Ancillary Response Generator of Suzaku XRT/XIS System for Spatially Extended Source Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ishisaki, Y; Fujimoto, R; Ozaki, M; Ebisawa, K; Takahashi, T; Ueda, Y; Ogasaka, Y; Ptak, A; Mukai, K; Hamaguchi, K; Hirayama, M; Kotani, T; Kubo, H; Shibata, R; Ebara, M; Furuzawa, A; Iizuka, R; Inoue, H; Mori, H; Okada, S; Yokoyama, Y; Matsumoto, H; Nakajima, H; Yamaguchi, H; Anabuki, N; Tawa, N; Nagai, M; Katsuda, S; Hayashida, K; Bamba, A; Miller, E D; Sato, K; Yamasaki, N Y

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a framework for the Monte-Carlo simulation of the X-Ray Telescopes (XRT) and the X-ray Imaging Spectrometers (XIS) onboard Suzaku, mainly for the scientific analysis of spatially and spectroscopically complex celestial sources. A photon-by-photon instrumental simulator is built on the ANL platform, which has been successfully used in ASCA data analysis. The simulator has a modular structure, in which the XRT simulation is based on a ray-tracing library, while the XIS simulation utilizes a spectral "Redistribution Matrix File" (RMF), generated separately by other tools. Instrumental characteristics and calibration results, e.g., XRT geometry, reflectivity, mutual alignments, thermal shield transmission, build-up of the contamination on the XIS optical blocking filters (OBF), are incorporated as completely as possible. Most of this information is available in the form of the FITS (Flexible Image Transport System) files in the standard calibration database (CALDB). This simulator can also be ut...

  10. Simulation Tool for GNSS Ocean Surface Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høeg, Per; von Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Durgonics, Tibor

    2015-04-01

    GNSS coherent and incoherent reflected signals have the potential of deriving large scale parameters of ocean surfaces, as barotropic variability, eddy currents and fronts, Rossby waves, coastal upwelling, mean ocean surface heights, and patterns of the general ocean circulation. In the reflection zone the measurements may derive parameters as sea surface roughness, winds, waves, heights and tilts from the spectral measurements. Previous measurements from the top of mountains and airplanes have shown such results leading. The coming satellite missions, CYGNSS, COSMIC-2, and GEROS on the International Space Station, are focusing on GNSS ocean reflection measurements. Thus, simulation studies highlighting the assumptions for the data retrievals and the precision and the accuracy of such measurements are of interest for assessing the observational method. The theory of propagation of microwaves in the atmosphere is well established, and methods for propagation modeling range from ray tracing to numerical solutions to the wave equation. Besides ray tracing there are propagation methods that use mode theory and a finite difference solution to the parabolic equation. The presented propagator is based on the solution of the parabolic equation. The parabolic equation in our simulator is solved using the split-step sine transformation. The Earth's surface is modeled with the use of an impedance model. The value of the Earth impedance is given as a function of the range along the surface of the Earth. This impedance concept gives an accurate lower boundary condition in the determination of the electromagnetic field, and makes it possible to simulate reflections and the effects of transitions between different mediums. A semi-isotropic Philips spectrum is used to represent the air-sea interaction. Simulated GPS ocean surface reflections will be presented and discussed based on different ocean characteristics. The spectra of the simulated surface reflections will be analyzed

  11. Developing an interface between MCNP and McStas for simulation of neutron moderators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkby, Esben Bryndt; Lauritzen, Bent; Nonbøl, Erik;

    2012-01-01

    Simulations of target-moderator-reflector system at spallation sources are conventionally carried out using MCNP/X whereas simulations of neutron transport and instrument performance are carried out by neutron ray tracing codes such as McStas. The coupling between the two simulations suites...... typically consists of providing analytical fits from MCNP/X neutron spectra to McStas. This method is generally successful, but as will be discussed in the this paper, there are limitations and a more direct coupling between MCNP/X andMcStas could allow for more accurate simulations of e.g. complex...... moderator geometries, interference between beamlines as well as shielding requirements along the neutron guides. In this paper different possible interfaces between McStas and MCNP/X are discussed and first preliminary performance results are shown....

  12. Simulation and Analysis of Spectral Response Function and Bandwidth of Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A simulation method for acquiring spectrometer’s Spectral Response Function (SRF based on Huygens Point Spread Function (PSF is suggested. Taking into account the effects of optical aberrations and diffraction, the method can obtain the fine SRF curve and corresponding spectral bandwidth at any nominal wavelength as early as in the design phase. A prism monochromator is proposed for illustrating the simulation procedure. For comparison, a geometrical ray-tracing method is also provided, with bandwidth deviations varying from 5% at 250 nm to 25% at 2400 nm. Further comparison with reported experiments shows that the areas of the SRF profiles agree to about 1%. However, the weak scattered background light on the level of 10−4 to 10−5 observed by experiment could not be covered by this simulation. This simulation method is a useful tool for forecasting the performance of an underdesigned spectrometer.

  13. Monte Carlo methods beyond detailed balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schram, Raoul D.; Barkema, Gerard T.

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo algorithms are nearly always based on the concept of detailed balance and ergodicity. In this paper we focus on algorithms that do not satisfy detailed balance. We introduce a general method for designing non-detailed balance algorithms, starting from a conventional algorithm satisfying

  14. A detailed BWR recirculation loop model for RELAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araiza-Martínez, Enrique, E-mail: enrique.araiza@inin.gob.mx; Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier, E-mail: javier.ortiz@inin.gob.mx; Castillo-Durán, Rogelio, E-mail: rogelio.castillo@inin.gob.mx

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A new detailed BWR recirculation loop model was developed for RELAP. • All jet pumps, risers, manifold, suction and control valves, and recirculation pump are modeled. • Model is tested against data from partial blockage of two jet pumps. • For practical applications, simulation results showed good agreement with available data. - Abstract: A new detailed geometric model of the whole recirculation loop of a BWR has been developed for the code RELAP. This detailed model includes the 10 jet pumps, 5 risers, manifold, suction and control valves, and the recirculation pump, per recirculation loop. The model is tested against data from an event of partial blockage at the entrance nozzle of one jet pump in both recirculation loops. For practical applications, simulation results showed good agreement with data. Then, values of parameters considered as figure of merit (reactor power, dome pressure, core flow, among others) for this event are compared against those from the common 1 jet pump per loop model. The results show that new detailed model led to a closer prediction of the reported power change. The detailed recirculation loop model can provide more reliable boundary condition data to a CFD models for studies of, for example, flow induced vibration, wear, and crack initiation.

  15. A 5G Hybrid Channel Model Considering Rays and Geometric Stochastic Propagation Graph

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinböck, Gerhard; Karstensen, Anders; Kyösti, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    We consider a ray-tracing tool, in particular the METIS map based model for deterministic simulation of the channel impulse response. The ray-tracing tool is extended by adding a geometric stochastic propagation graph to model additional stochastic paths and the dense multipath components observed...... in measurements. The computational complexity of raytracing typically prohibits the inclusion of the dense multipath component or limits it to the early part of the impulse response. Due to computational reasons and for lack of detailed information is the description of the environment for ray-tracing often very...... simplistic, e.g. plain walls and thus neglecting the structures on the building facades, window frames, window sills, etc. Thus in measurements there are often additional components observed that are not captured by these simplistic ray-tracing implementations. In this contribution we introduce a flexible...

  16. A Comprehensive Propagation Prediction Model Comprising Microfacet Based Scattering and Probability Based Coverage Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. M. Zahid Kausar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although ray tracing based propagation prediction models are popular for indoor radio wave propagation characterization, most of them do not provide an integrated approach for achieving the goal of optimum coverage, which is a key part in designing wireless network. In this paper, an accelerated technique of three-dimensional ray tracing is presented, where rough surface scattering is included for making a more accurate ray tracing technique. Here, the rough surface scattering is represented by microfacets, for which it becomes possible to compute the scattering field in all possible directions. New optimization techniques, like dual quadrant skipping (DQS and closest object finder (COF, are implemented for fast characterization of wireless communications and making the ray tracing technique more efficient. In conjunction with the ray tracing technique, probability based coverage optimization algorithm is accumulated with the ray tracing technique to make a compact solution for indoor propagation prediction. The proposed technique decreases the ray tracing time by omitting the unnecessary objects for ray tracing using the DQS technique and by decreasing the ray-object intersection time using the COF technique. On the other hand, the coverage optimization algorithm is based on probability theory, which finds out the minimum number of transmitters and their corresponding positions in order to achieve optimal indoor wireless coverage. Both of the space and time complexities of the proposed algorithm surpass the existing algorithms. For the verification of the proposed ray tracing technique and coverage algorithm, detailed simulation results for different scattering factors, different antenna types, and different operating frequencies are presented. Furthermore, the proposed technique is verified by the experimental results.

  17. Benefits of detailed models of muscle activation and mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, S. L.; Stark, L.

    1981-01-01

    Recent biophysical and physiological studies identified some of the detailed mechanisms involved in excitation-contraction coupling, muscle contraction, and deactivation. Mathematical models incorporating these mechanisms allow independent estimates of key parameters, direct interplay between basic muscle research and the study of motor control, and realistic model behaviors, some of which are not accessible to previous, simpler, models. The existence of previously unmodeled behaviors has important implications for strategies of motor control and identification of neural signals. New developments in the analysis of differential equations make the more detailed models feasible for simulation in realistic experimental situations.

  18. A boundary integral formalism for stochastic ray tracing in billiards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappell, David J. [School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Campus, Nottingham NG11 8NS (United Kingdom); Tanner, Gregor [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Determining the flow of rays or non-interacting particles driven by a force or velocity field is fundamental to modelling many physical processes. These include particle flows arising in fluid mechanics and ray flows arising in the geometrical optics limit of linear wave equations. In many practical applications, the driving field is not known exactly and the dynamics are determined only up to a degree of uncertainty. This paper presents a boundary integral framework for propagating flows including uncertainties, which is shown to systematically interpolate between a deterministic and a completely random description of the trajectory propagation. A simple but efficient discretisation approach is applied to model uncertain billiard dynamics in an integrable rectangular domain.

  19. Improved Ray-Tracing for advanced radio propagation channel modeling

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The characterization of the wireless propagation channel has always been an important issue in radio communications. However, in recent years, given the dramatic increase of demand in terms of capabilities of wireless systems, e.g. data rate, quality of service etc., the study of propagation has become of crucial importance. As measurements are generally costly and time consuming, channel models are widely used for this purpose. The modeling of propagation may rely on different types of mo...

  20. CUDA-Accelerated Geodesic Ray-Tracing for Fiber Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aart, Evert; Sepasian, Neda; Jalba, Andrei; Vilanova, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) allows to noninvasively measure the diffusion of water in fibrous tissue. By reconstructing the fibers from DTI data using a fiber-tracking algorithm, we can deduce the structure of the tissue. In this paper, we outline an approach to accelerating such a fiber-tracking algorithm using a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). This algorithm, which is based on the calculation of geodesics, has shown promising results for both synthetic and real data, but is limited in its applicability by its high computational requirements. We present a solution which uses the parallelism offered by modern GPUs, in combination with the CUDA platform by NVIDIA, to significantly reduce the execution time of the fiber-tracking algorithm. Compared to a multithreaded CPU implementation of the same algorithm, our GPU mapping achieves a speedup factor of up to 40 times.